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Sample records for ar structural evolution

  1. Evolution of the northern Sierra Nevada metamorphic belt: Petrological, structural, and Ar/Ar constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacker, B.R. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1993-05-01

    The Sierra Nevada metamorphic belt constitutes an important record of the growth of continental crust from essentially oceanic materials. In the northern Sierra, the central part of the belt is made up of volcanoplutonic arcs and sediment-dominated units inferred to be accretionary wedges or closed ocean basins. The latter are broken formation and melange composed of radiolarian chert, lava, and volcanogenic and continental turbidites. Sedimentary detritus in the largest of these units can be plausibly linked to sources farther east in the Sierra, suggesting that deposition occurred near the eastern Sierran arc. Isoclinal folds, steeply dipping foliations, and steeply plunging down-dip lineations are characteristics structures. The westernmost unit is only feebly recrystallized, and deformation was accomplished principally by stress solution and local redeposition in veins. More easterly, inboard units are compositionally similar, but they recrystallized at pumpellyite-actinolite-and blueschist-facies conditions and deformed via solution-transfer and dislocation creep. Phengite silica contents, the degree of quartz veining, and the locations of pseudo-isograds support an eastward increase in metamorphic pressure and temperature. Metamorphic conditions during the growth of pumpellyite and actinolite ranged from {approximately}150-350 {degrees}C and 200-400 MPa, compatible with recrystallization and deformation in subduction zones or the deeper levels of magmatic arcs. Ar/Ar ages of volcanisclastic rocks and crosscutting plutons constrain the age of deformation and metamorphism in the western part of the region to 174-165 Ma. Deformation and recrystallization in more easterly units may have been coeval or begun as early as Triassic time. 58 refs., 14 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. K-Ar age determinations from the northern Damara branch and their implications for the structural and metamorphic evolution of the Damara Orogen, South West Africa/Namibia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K-Ar age determination on the fine mineral fractions (< 2 μm) of phyllites and schists were carried out on samples from two separate areas of the north-south-trending coastal branch of the Damara Orogen and additionally from the Tsumeb region. From the northern Damara branch (Sesfontein area), two groups of ages were obtained. One group, around 490 m.y., is interpreted as the cooling age of a regional metamorphism having its peak in this region around 530 m.y. The second, younger group of ages around 460 m.y. seems to be influenced by the mineral composition of the samples taken for determination and as yet is not interpreted in the sence of a second regional metamorphic event. In the southern part of the northern branch (Brandberg West area), the main regional metamorphic event appears to have occurred around 490 m.y. Younger ages in this region may also have been influenced by the mineral composition of the samples or may have been rejuvenated by the intrusion of late to post-tectonic granites. The K-Ar age determinations on the rocks of the Tsumeb area can be related to a main regional metamorphic event dated at about 460 m.y. in this region

  3. Stellar structure and evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book introduces the theory of the internal structure of stars and their evolution in time. It presents the basic physics of stellar interiors, methods for solving the underlying equations, and the most important results necessary for understanding the wide variety of stellar types and phenomena. The evolution of stars is discussed from their birth through normal evolution to possibly spectacular final stages. Chapters on stellar oscillations and rotation are included

  4. Stellar structure and evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kippernhahn, R. (MPI fur Physik und Astrophysik, Garching (DE)); Weigert, A. (Sternwarte, Hamberg (DE))

    1990-01-01

    This book introduces the theory of the internal structure of stars and their evolution in time. It presents the basic physics of stellar interiors, methods for solving the underlying equations, and the most important results necessary for understanding the wide variety of stellar types and phenomena. The evolution of stars is discussed from their birth through normal evolution to possibly spectacular final stages. Chapters on stellar oscillations and rotation are included.

  5. Factor Structure of CIWA-Ar in Alcohol Withdrawal

    OpenAIRE

    Ajay Kumar Bakhla; Khess, Christoday R.J.; Vijay Verma; Mahesh Hembram; Samir Kumar Praharaj; Subhas Soren

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To identify the underlying factor structure of alcohol withdrawal syndrome, as measured with CIWA-Ar. Methods. Exploratory factor analysis was conducted on the items of CIWA-Ar. On 201 alcohol-dependent male patients seeking treatment for alcohol withdrawal at 36 hours of abstinence. Results. A three-factor solution was obtained that accounted for 68.74% of total variance. First factor had loading from four items (34.34% variance), second factor also had four items (24.25% variance...

  6. Factor Structure of CIWA-Ar in Alcohol Withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhla, Ajay Kumar; Khess, Christoday R J; Verma, Vijay; Hembram, Mahesh; Praharaj, Samir Kumar; Soren, Subhas

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To identify the underlying factor structure of alcohol withdrawal syndrome, as measured with CIWA-Ar. Methods. Exploratory factor analysis was conducted on the items of CIWA-Ar. On 201 alcohol-dependent male patients seeking treatment for alcohol withdrawal at 36 hours of abstinence. Results. A three-factor solution was obtained that accounted for 68.74% of total variance. First factor had loading from four items (34.34% variance), second factor also had four items (24.25% variance), and the third had two items (10.04% variance). Conclusions. Factor analysis reveals the existence of multidimensionality of alcohol withdrawal as measured with CIWA-Ar and we found three factors that can be named as delirious, autonomic and nonspecific factors. PMID:24826372

  7. Factor Structure of CIWA-Ar in Alcohol Withdrawal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar Bakhla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To identify the underlying factor structure of alcohol withdrawal syndrome, as measured with CIWA-Ar. Methods. Exploratory factor analysis was conducted on the items of CIWA-Ar. On 201 alcohol-dependent male patients seeking treatment for alcohol withdrawal at 36 hours of abstinence. Results. A three-factor solution was obtained that accounted for 68.74% of total variance. First factor had loading from four items (34.34% variance, second factor also had four items (24.25% variance, and the third had two items (10.04% variance. Conclusions. Factor analysis reveals the existence of multidimensionality of alcohol withdrawal as measured with CIWA-Ar and we found three factors that can be named as delirious, autonomic and nonspecific factors.

  8. The Evolution of Vector Magnetic Field Associated with Major Flares in NOAA AR10656

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shuo Wang; Yuanyong Deng; Rajmal Jain; Vasyl Yurchyshyn; Haimin Wang; Yuanyuan Liu; Zhiliang Yang

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, we study the evolution of vector magnetic field of AR 10656 by using the observations of Huairou Solar Observing Station (HSOS, China) and Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO, USA). The magnetic flux emergence and cancellation, and thus, magnetic non-potential changes, are associated with the major flares in this active region. Compared with some other super-active regions, the evolution of magnetic morphologies and non-potentialities are relatively gradual, and thus the energy transportation and release are relatively slow. This gradual process may result in the recurrent flares of AR 10656.

  9. Multiscale modeling and experiment validation of microstructure evolution induced by Ar+ irradiation in hastelloy C276

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microstructure evolution induced by Ar+ irradiation (room temperature, about 10 dpa) in nickel based alloy Hastelloy C276 was studied using molecular dynamics and cluster dynamics, and a multiscale modeling code Radieff was constructed based on rate theory. The nucleation and growth of interstitial dislocation loops and void were studied by Radieff code. C276 was irradiated by 115 keV Ar+ at room temperature as validation experiment using transmission electron microscope (TEM)-implanter/accelerator interface facility at Wuhan University, and the microstructure evolution was observed by TEM. The size of dislocation loops simulated by Radieff is in good agreement with experiment. (authors)

  10. Behaviour of AR glass fibre for building structural applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miravete, A.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The AR glass reinforcement fibres were designed to resist the alkalis from the concrete. This is the main reason for its utilisation as a short-fibre-reinforcement of mortar and concrete for the last decades. Originally, the AR glass fibre sizing was not compatible with synthetic resins, so that this type of reinforcement was applied exclusively to mortar and concrete matrices. Recently, due to the developments of sizing, which are compatible with synthetic resins, the AR- glass fibres may be used as reinforcement of organic matrix composite materials, broadening the range of structural applications. The mechanical properties of AR glass fibre and organic matrix composite materials will be studied in this paper. First, the behaviour of this material under stress corrosion will be analysed. Their mass loss will be compared to E, C, and boron free glass fibres. Second, an experimental study dealing with 3P test bending and short beam ofAR glass fibre/polyester will de described with the goal of obtaining their Young modulus and tensile and interlaminar shear strengths. Finally, these experimental results will be compared to E glass fibre/polyester and several conclusions about their structural applications will be drawn.

    El vidrio AR y su presentación en forma de fibras de refuerzo, fue diseñado para ser inerte a los álcalis de los cementos. Por este motivo se viene utilizando desde hace varias décadas como refuerzo de morteros y hormigones en forma de fibra corta. El ensimaje que estas fibras de vidrio de refuerzo A R presentaba en su origen no era compatible con resinas de tipo sintéticas, por lo que el refuerzo era exclusivo para cementos y hormigones fuera cual fuera la aplicación, formato o proceso productivo. Recientemente, gracias al desarrollo específico de ensimajes especiales acordes a las fibras de vidrio AR ha aparecido la misma tipología de vidrio AR como refuerzo en forma de fibra continua compatible con resinas sint

  11. Evolution of energy structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of the big inertia and long time constants of energy systems, their long-time behaviour is mainly determined by their present day state and by the trends of their recent evolution. For this reason, it is of prime importance to foresee the evolution of the different energy production sources which may play an important role in the future. A status of the world energy consumption and production is made first using the energy statistics of the IEA. Then, using the trends observed since 1973, the consequences of a simple extrapolation of these trends is examined. Finally, the scenarios of forecasting of energy structures, like those supplied by the International institute for applied systems analysis (IIASA) are discussed. (J.S.)

  12. Transpressional tectonics and Carboniferous magmatism in the Limousin, Massif Central, France:structural and 40Ar/39Ar investigations.

    OpenAIRE

    Gébelin, Aude; Brunel, Maurice; Monié, Patrick; Faure, Michel; Arnaud, Nicolas

    2007-01-01

    New structural, microstructural, and 40Ar/39Ar data from the NW Massif Central (France) provide additional constraints on the timing and tectonic setting of late Variscan granite magmatism. Previous studies had emphasized the role of late orogenic extension in the emplacement of granite plutons in the Limousin region. In contrast, the new data set is consistent with syntectonic emplacement of magma in a dextral simple shear active from 350 to 300 Ma in a transpressional regime. As an alternat...

  13. A Late Mesoproterozoic 40Ar/39Ar age for a melt breccia from the Keurusselkä impact structure, Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmieder, Martin; Jourdan, Fred; Moilanen, Jarmo; Buchner, Elmar; Öhman, Teemu

    2016-02-01

    Field investigations in the eroded central uplift of the ≤30 km Keurusselkä impact structure, Finland, revealed a thin, dark melt vein that intersects the autochthonous shatter cone-bearing target rocks near the homestead of Kirkkoranta, close to the center of the impact structure. The petrographic analysis of quartz in this melt breccia and the wall rock granite indicate weak shock metamorphic overprint not exceeding ~8-10 GPa. The mode of occurrence and composition of the melt breccia suggest its formation as some kind of pseudotachylitic breccia. 40Ar/39Ar dating of dark and clast-poor whole-rock chips yielded five concordant Late Mesoproterozoic miniplateau ages and one plateau age of 1151 ± 10 Ma [± 11 Ma] (2σ; MSWD = 0.11; P = 0.98), considered here as the statistically most robust age for the rock. The new 40Ar/39Ar age is incompatible with ~1.88 Ga Svecofennian tectonism and magmatism in south-central Finland and probably reflects the Keurusselkä impact, followed by impact-induced hydrothermal chloritization of the crater basement. In keeping with the crosscutting relationships in the outcrop and the possible influence of postimpact alteration, the Late Mesoproterozoic 40Ar/39Ar age of ~1150 Ma should be treated as a minimum age for the impact. The new 40Ar/39Ar results are consistent with paleomagnetic results that suggested a similar age for Keurusselkä, which is shown to be one of the oldest impact structures currently known in Europe and worldwide.

  14. Stellar Structure and Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Kippenhahn, Rudolf; Weiss, Achim

    2013-01-01

    This long-awaited second edition of the classical textbook on Stellar Structure and Evolution by Kippenhahn and Weigert is a thoroughly revised version of the original text. Taking into account modern observational constraints as well as additional physical effects such as mass loss and diffusion, Achim Weiss and Rudolf Kippenhahn have succeeded in bringing the book up to the state-of-the-art with respect to both the presentation of stellar physics and the presentation and interpretation of current sophisticated stellar models. The well-received and proven pedagogical approach of the first edition has been retained. The book provides a comprehensive treatment of the physics of the stellar interior and the underlying fundamental processes and parameters. The models developed to explain the stability, dynamics and evolution of the stars are presented and great care is taken to detail the various stages in a star’s life. Just as the first edition, which remained a standard work for more than 20 years after its...

  15. Synthesis, structural characterization, and spectroscopy of the cadmium-cadmium bonded molecular species Ar'CdCdAr' (Ar' = C6H3-2,6-(C6H3-2,6-Pri2)2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhongliang; Fischer, Roland C; Fettinger, James C; Rivard, Eric; Brynda, Marcin; Power, Philip P

    2006-11-29

    The synthesis and first structural characterization of a cadmium-cadmium bonded molecular compound Ar'CdCdAr' (Ar' = C6H3-2,6-(C6H3-2,6-Pri2)2) are reported. The existence of the Cd-Cd bond was established by 113Cd NMR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (Cd-Cd = 2.6257(5) A). Like its group 12 analogue Ar'ZnZnAr', DFT calculations showed that Ar'CdCdAr' had significant p-character in the Cd-Cd sigma-bonding HOMO. PMID:17117840

  16. Microstructural evolution in nickel alloy C-276 after Ar-ion irradiation at elevated temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Shuoxue [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); He, Xinfu [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Li, Tiecheng [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Ma, Shuli; Tang, Rui [Nuclear Power Institute of China, Chengdu 610041 (China); Guo, Liping, E-mail: guolp@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2012-10-15

    In present work, the irradiation damage in nickel-base alloy C-276 irradiated with Ar-ions was studied. Specimens of C-276 alloy were subjected to an irradiation of Ar-ions (with 120 keV) to dose levels of 6 and 10 dpa at 300 and 550 Degree-Sign C, respectively. The size distributions and densities of dislocation loops caused by irradiation were investigated with transmission electron microscopy. Irradiation hardening due to the formation of the loops was calculated using the dispersed barrier-hardening model, showing that irradiation hardening was greatest at 300 Degree-Sign C/6 dpa. The microstructure evolution induced by Ar-ion irradiation (0-10 dpa) in nickel-base alloy C-276 has been studied using a multi-scale modeling code Radieff constructed based on rate theory, and the size of dislocation loops simulated by Radieff was in good agreement with the experiment. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High density of dislocation loops appeared after Ar ions irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Irradiation hardening due to the formation of loops was calculated by the DBH model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Size of loops simulated by Radieff was in good agreement with the experiment.

  17. Southern Brasilia Belt (SE Brazil): tectonic discontinuities, K-Ar data and evolution during the Neoproterozoic Brasiliano orogeny

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper focuses the tectonic evolution of the southern brasilia belt, with emphasis on the Furnas segment, along the 21 deg C S parallel. The uppermost structural unit (Passos Nappe - PN) comprises a highly deformed metasedimentary succession interpreted as a fragment of the Neoproterozoic passive margin of western Sao francisco craton. An inverted metamorphic gradient ranging from greensvhits to lower granulite facies of medium to high-pressure regime characterizes the PN as relict of a subduction zone. The External Domain display a complex imbrication of basement rocks (Archean Piumhi greenstones, a turbiditic gaywacke succession and a calc-alkaline granitoid suite) with undated siliciclast low-grade metasedimentary rocks. The Sao Francisco Craton (SFC) comprises pre-1.8 Ga basement rocks covered by anchimetamorphic Neoproterozoic carbonatic shallow marine platform deposits of the Bambui group. The Brasiliano thrust stacking generated a coarse clastic influx of molassic character on the foreland zone of Sao Francisco Craton, coeval with the exhumation of the External Domain thrust sheets. New K-Ar determinations on mineral separates are presented an interpreted among previous data. The SFC basement rocks display Paleo-to Meesoproterozoic cooling ages. The allochthonous units, in contrast, display K-Ar ages within the 560-675 Ma range. Brasiliano thrust stacking is therefore interpreted to have taken place onto a cold Sao Francisco craton foreland, in a thin-skinned style, as basement rocks were not heated enough to have their-K-ar systems reset during the allochthony. (author)

  18. Behaviour of AR glass fibre for building structural applications

    OpenAIRE

    Miravete, A.; Mieres, J. M.; Calvo, I; Comino, P.; Chiminelli, A.; Cuatrero, J.; Tolosana, N.

    2005-01-01

    The AR glass reinforcement fibres were designed to resist the alkalis from the concrete. This is the main reason for its utilisation as a short-fibre-reinforcement of mortar and concrete for the last decades. Originally, the AR glass fibre sizing was not compatible with synthetic resins, so that this type of reinforcement was applied exclusively to mortar and concrete matrices. Recently, due to the developments of sizing, which are compatible with synthetic resins, the AR- glass fibres may be...

  19. 40Ar/39Ar-Dating of deformation of transform-shear stage in evolution of the Early Caledonides in Western Sangilen (South-Eastern Tuva)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detail structural-metamorphic and isotopic investigations into borders of the Muguro-Chinchilig tectonic block are conducted. 40Ar/39Ar-isotope dating was conducted by the graduated warming-up with biotite for different zones. Carried studies demonstrate that in the boundary of 465 million years intensive shift disturbances entailing fragmentation of the Muguro-Chinchilig tectonic block and disturbances in entirety of its separate parts in borders of the Sangilen plateau (South-Eastern Tuva) were stated

  20. Controlled Evolution of Silicon Nanocone Arrays Induced by Ar+ Sputtering at Room Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qin-Tao; LI Zhi-Gang; XIE Qiao-Ling; GONG Jin-Long; ZHU De-Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Controlled evolution of silicon nanocone arrays induced by Ar+ sputtering at room temperature, using the coating carbon as a mask, is demonstrated. The investigation of scanning electron microscopy indicates that the morphology of silicon nanostructures can be controlled by adjusting the thickness of the coating carbon film.Increasing the thickness of the coating carbon film from 50-6Onm, 250-300nm and 750-800nm to 150Onm, the morphologies of silicon nanostructures are transformed from smooth surface ripple, coarse surface ripple and surface ripple with densely distributed nanocones to nanocone arrays with a high density of about 1 × 109-2 × 109 cm-2.

  1. Nuclear Shell Structure Evolution Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhengda; Wang, Xiaobin; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wang, Xiaochun

    2012-01-01

    The Self-similar-structure shell model (SSM) comes from the evolution of the conventional shell model (SM) and keeps the energy level of SM single particle harmonic oscillation motion. In SM, single particle motion is the positive harmonic oscillation and in SSM, the single particle motion is the negative harmonic oscillation. In this paper a nuclear evolution equation (NEE) is proposed. NEE describes the nuclear evolution process from gas state to liquid state and reveals the relations among...

  2. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, paleomagnetism, and evolution of the Boring volcanic field, Oregon and Washington, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, Robert J.; Hagstrum, Jonathan T.; Calvert, Andrew T.; Evarts, Russell C.; Conrey, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    The 40Ar/39Ar investigations of a large suite of fine-grained basaltic rocks of the Boring volcanic field (BVF), Oregon and Washington (USA), yielded two primary results. (1) Using age control from paleomagnetic polarity, stratigraphy, and available plateau ages, 40Ar/39Ar recoil model ages are defined that provide reliable age results in the absence of an age plateau, even in cases of significant Ar redistribution. (2) Grouping of eruptive ages either by period of activity or by composition defines a broadly northward progression of BVF volcanism during latest Pliocene and Pleistocene time that reflects rates consistent with regional plate movements. Based on the frequency distribution of measured ages, periods of greatest volcanic activity within the BVF occurred 2.7–2.2 Ma, 1.7–0.5 Ma, and 350–50 ka. Grouped by eruptive episode, geographic distributions of samples define a series of northeast-southwest–trending strips whose centers migrate from south-southeast to north-northwest at an average rate of 9.3 ± 1.6 mm/yr. Volcanic activity in the western part of the BVF migrated more rapidly than that to the east, causing trends of eruptive episodes to progress in an irregular, clockwise sense. The K2O and CaO values of dated samples exhibit well-defined temporal trends, decreasing and increasing, respectively, with age of eruption. Divided into two groups by K2O, the centers of these two distributions define a northward migration rate similar to that determined from eruptive age groups. This age and compositional migration rate of Boring volcanism is similar to the clockwise rotation rate of the Oregon Coast Range with respect to North America, and might reflect localized extension on the trailing edge of that rotating crustal block.

  3. Sputtering and surface state evolution of Bi under oblique incidence of 120 keV Ar{sup +} ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mammeri, S. [CRNA, B.P. 399, 02 Bd. Frantz Fanon, Alger-Gare, Algiers (Algeria); Ouichaoui, S., E-mail: souichaoui@usthb.d [Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumediene (USTHB), Faculte de Physique, Laboratoire SNIRM, B.P. 32, El-Alia, 16111 Bab Ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria); Ammi, H.; Hammoudi, H. [CRNA, B.P. 399, 02 Bd. Frantz Fanon, Alger-Gare, Algiers (Algeria); Pineda-Vargas, C.A. [iThemba Labs, MRG, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Cape Town 7129 (South Africa)

    2011-05-01

    The sputtering and surface state evolution of Bi/Si targets under oblique incidence of 120 keV Ar{sup +} ions have been investigated over the range of incidence angles 0{sup o} {<=} {theta}{sub i} {<=} 60{sup o}. Increasing erosion of irradiated samples (whose surface thickness reduced by {approx}3% at normal incidence up to {approx}8% at {theta} = 60{sup o}) and their surface smoothing with reducing grain sizing were pointed out using Rutherford backscattering (RBS), atomic force (AFM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. Measured sputtering yield data versus {theta}{sub i} with fixed ion fluence to {approx}1.5 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} are well described by Yamamura et al. semi-empirical formula and Monte Carlo (MC) simulation using the SRIM-2008 computer code. The observed increase in sputter yield versus incidence angle is closely correlated to Bi surface topography and crystalline structure changes under ion irradiation.

  4. 40Ar/39Ar ages of seamount trachytes from the South China Sea and implications for the evolution of the northwestern sub-basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaohu Li; Jiabiao Li; Xing Yu; Chunsheng Wang; Fred Jourdan

    2015-01-01

    A chronological study of seamount rocks in the South China Sea basin provides a great opportunity to understand the expansion and evolution history of the sea basin. In this paper, we analyzed the 40Ar/39Ar age of trachytic samples collected from the Shuangfeng seamounts in the northwestern sub-basin of the South China Sea. The two samples yielded plateau ages of 23.80 ? 0.18 and 23.29 ? 0.22 Ma, respectively, which indicate magmatic activity in late Oligocene which helpful constraints the expansion time of the northwest sub-basin. Previous studies suggested that the northwestern sub-basin and southwestern sub-basin have experienced a relatively consistent expansion in the NWeSE direction followed by a late expansion of the eastern sub-basin. We concluded that the expansion of the northwestern sub-basin began prior to ca. 24 Ma, which also implicated magmatic events of a late or stop expansion of the northwestern sub-basin combined with our results of 40Ar/39Ar age data and previous geophysical data.

  5. 75 FR 11936 - Unit Structures LLC, Magnolia, AR; Notice of Termination of Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Unit Structures LLC, Magnolia, AR; Notice of Termination of... of workers of Unit Structures LLC, Magnolia, Arkansas. The petitioner has requested that the...

  6. Earth-atmosphere evolution based on new determination of Devonian atmosphere Ar isotopic composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Finlay M.; Mark, Darren F.; Gandanger, Pierre; McConville, Paul

    2016-07-01

    The isotopic composition of the noble gases, in particular Ar, in samples of ancient atmosphere trapped in rocks and minerals provides the strongest constraints on the timing and rate of Earth atmosphere formation by degassing of the Earth's interior. We have re-measured the isotopic composition of argon in the Rhynie chert from northeast Scotland using a high precision mass spectrometer in an effort to provide constraints on the composition of Devonian atmosphere. Irradiated chert samples yield 40Ar/36Ar ratios that are often below the modern atmosphere value. The data define a 40Ar/36Ar value of 289.5 ± 0.4 at K/36Ar = 0. Similarly low 40Ar/36Ar are measured in un-irradiated chert samples. The simplest explanation for the low 40Ar/36Ar is the preservation of Devonian atmosphere-derived Ar in the chert, with the intercept value in 40Ar-39Ar-36Ar space representing an upper limit. In this case the Earth's atmosphere has accumulated only 3% (5.1 ± 0.4 ×1016 mol) of the total 40Ar inventory since the Devonian. The average accumulation rate of 1.27 ± 0.09 ×108 mol40Ar/yr overlaps the rate over the last 800 kyr. This implies that there has been no resolvable temporal change in the outgassing rate of the Earth since the mid-Palaeozoic despite the likely episodicity of Ar degassing from the continental crust. Incorporating the new Devonian atmosphere 40Ar/36Ar into the Earth degassing model of Pujol et al. (2013) provides the most precise constraints on atmosphere formation so far. The atmosphere formed in the first ∼100 Ma after initial accretion during a catastrophic degassing episode. A significant volume of 40Ar did not start to accumulate in the atmosphere until after 4 Ga which implies that stable K-rich continental crust did not develop until this time.

  7. Geochronology (40Ar/39Ar, K-Ar and He-exposure ages of Cenozoic magmatic rocks from Northern Chile (18-22°S: implications for magmatism and tectonic evolution of the central Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Wörner

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available K-Ar and Ar/Ar ages from magmatic rocks of northern Chile (18-22°S describe duration and extent of the Tertiary and Quaternary magmatic evolution and date major tectonic events in northernmost Chile. This paper summarizes new K-Ar and Ar-Ar mineral and whole rock ages for intrusive rocks from the Precordillera, Tertiary ignimbrites and andesitic stratovolcanoes from the Western Andean Escarpment at 18°S (WARP and the volcanic front. Intrusive rocks of the Precordillera (Quebrada Paguana, Quebrada Blanca, Quebrada Choja, Quebrada Guatacondo, Cerro Chandacolla represent the Cretaceous to Eocene magmatic arc system and gave ages between 45 and 35 Ma. Younger ages on intrusive rocks are invariably caused by deuteric alteration. Ignimbrites of the Putani and Oxaya formations gave Ar-Ar sanidine ages around 24.2 to 24.8 Ma and 22.8 to 19.4 Ma, respectively. Andesitic stratovolcanoes, which directly overlie Oxaya ignimbrites east of the Western Cordillera gave ages of 20.3 Ma (Cordon Quevilque to 9.0 Ma (Cerro Margarita. Samples from the Miocene to Pleistocene arc system on the Chilean Altiplano underlying the volcanoes of the active volcanic front have been dated between 10.5 to ~3 Ma. A widespread ignimbrite can be correlated from the Lauca basin to the Pacific coast and to the east to occurrences of near Pérez. Repeated Ar-Ar sanidine dating of the Lauca-Pérez-ignimbrite resulted in highly concordant ages of 2.71±0.25 Ma, 2.72 Ma±0.01 Ma, and 2.73±0.11 Ma. Rocks from the active chain (Volcanic Cordillera gave ages younger than 0.9 Ma (Volcán Irruputuncu, Volcán Olca, Volcán Aucanquilcha, Volcán Ollagüe, Volcán Poruñita. These new data are used to constrain Miocene stratigraphy and tectonic movements as well as the timing of uplift and sedimentary response at the Western Andean Escarpment within the framework of the tectonic evolution of the Central AndesGeocronología (49Ar/39Ar, K-Ar y edades He de exposición de rocas cenozoicas del

  8. Tensor Effect on Proton Bubble Structure of ~(46)Ar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    We have calculated the proton density distribution of 46Ar for different pairing interactions with the Skyrme interactions SLy5 and SLy5+Tw (Tw is the tensor force, which was obtained by the G-matrix calculations and added perturbatively into the SLy5 interaction

  9. Preservation of Sub-Microscopic Scale Structural Relics in Biotite: Implications for 40AR/39AR Geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrando, M.; Di Vincenzo, G.; Ferraris, C.

    2012-12-01

    , characterized by a concordant central segment, with an error-weighted mean age of 44.9 ± 0.3 Ma. Age profiling on separate grains from sample JT1007, analyzed perpendicularly to the cleavage plane, reveal a broad core-to-rim age variation, with a maximum apparent age of ~66 Ma in the core and a minimum age in the rim as low as ~45. Similar age gradients and concave upward spectra from relict minerals that underwent at least one re-heating event are generally ascribed to incomplete diffusive resetting of the original argon reservoir or to the influx of extraneous argon followed by partial diffusive loss. However, major element compositional variations and the preservation of sub-micron scale magmatic biotite relics within largely re-equilibrated crystals suggest that the observed age spread may be explained by the coexistence of two different argon reservoirs related to the two different microstructural sites. This study suggests that, in addition to the well documented influx of externally-derived argon, anomalously old 40Ar/39Ar ages in metamorphic biotite may also be related to the preservation of sub-microscopic scale mineral relics that escaped complete re-equilibration during the subsequent tectono-metamorphic evolution.

  10. Using ICD for structural analysis of clusters: a case study on NeAr clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a method to utilize interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) to retrieve information about the mean geometric structures of heteronuclear clusters. It is based on observation and modelling of competing ICD channels, which involve the same initial vacancy, but energetically different final states with vacancies in different components of the cluster. Using binary rare gas clusters of Ne and Ar as an example, we measure the relative intensity of ICD into (Ne+)2 and Ne+Ar+ final states with spectroscopically well separated ICD peaks. We compare in detail the experimental ratios of the Ne–Ne and Ne–Ar ICD contributions and their positions and widths to values calculated for a diverse set of possible structures. We conclude that NeAr clusters exhibit a core–shell structure with an argon core surrounded by complete neon shells and, possibly, further an incomplete shell of neon atoms for the experimental conditions investigated. Our analysis allows one to differentiate between clusters of similar size and stochiometric Ar content, but different internal structure. We find evidence for ICD of Ne 2s−1, producing Ar+ vacancies in the second coordination shell of the initial site. (paper)

  11. Mesozoic thermal history and timing of structural events for the Yukon-Tanana Upland, east-central Alaska: 40Ar/39Ar data from metamorphic and plutonic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusel-Bacon, C.; Lanphere, M.A.; Sharp, W.D.; Layer, P.W.; Hansen, V.L.

    2002-01-01

    We present new 40Ar/39Ar ages for hornblende, muscovite, and biotite from metamorphic and plutonic rocks from the Yukon-Tanana Upland, Alaska. Integration of our data with published 40Ar/39Ar, kinematic, and metamorphic pressure (P) and temperature (T) data confirms and refines the complex interaction of metamorphism and tectonism proposed for the region. The oldest metamorphic episode(s) postdates Middle Permian magmatism and predates the intrusion of Late Triassic (215-212 Ma) granitoids into the Fortymile River assemblage (Taylor Mountain assemblage of previous papers). In the eastern Eagle quadrangle, rapid and widespread Early Jurassic cooling is indicated by ???188-186 Ma 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages for hornblende from plutons that intrude the Fortymile River assemblage, and for metamorphic minerals from the Fortymile River assemblage and the structurally underlying Nasina assemblage. We interpret these Early Jurassic ages to represent cooling resulting from northwest-directed contraction that emplaced the Fortymile River assemblage onto the Nasina assemblage to the north as well as the Lake George assemblage to the south. This cooling was the final stage of a continuum of subduction-related contraction that produced crustal thickening, intermediate- to high-P metamorphism within both the Fortymile River assemblage and the structurally underlying Lake George assemblage, and Late Triassic and Early Jurassic plutonism in the Fortymile River and Nasina assemblages. Although a few metamorphic samples from the Lake George assemblage yield Jurassic 40Ar/39Ar cooling ages, most yield Early Cretaceous 40Ar/39Ar ages: hornblende ???135-115 Ma, and muscovite and biotite ???110-108 Ma. We interpret the Early Cretaceous metamorphic cooling, in most areas, to have resulted from regional extension and exhumation of the lower plate, previously tectonically thickened during Early Jurassic and older convergence.

  12. Evolution of energy structures; Evolution des structures energetiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nifenecker, H. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    2005-07-01

    Because of the big inertia and long time constants of energy systems, their long-time behaviour is mainly determined by their present day state and by the trends of their recent evolution. For this reason, it is of prime importance to foresee the evolution of the different energy production sources which may play an important role in the future. A status of the world energy consumption and production is made first using the energy statistics of the IEA. Then, using the trends observed since 1973, the consequences of a simple extrapolation of these trends is examined. Finally, the scenarios of forecasting of energy structures, like those supplied by the International institute for applied systems analysis (IIASA) are discussed. (J.S.)

  13. Accessory mineral U-Th-Pb ages and 40Ar/39Ar eruption chronology, and their bearing on rhyolitic magma evolution in the Pleistocene Coso volcanic field, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, J.I.; Vazquez, J.A.; Renne, P.R.; Schmitt, A.K.; Bacon, C.R.; Reid, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    We determined Ar/Ar eruption ages of eight extrusions from the Pleistocene Coso volcanic field, a long-lived series of small volume rhyolitic domes in eastern California. Combined with ion-microprobe dating of crystal ages of zircon and allanite from these lavas and from granophyre geothermal well cuttings, we were able to track the range of magma-production rates over the past 650 ka at Coso. In ??? 230 ka rhyolites we find no evidence of protracted magma residence or recycled zircon (or allanite) from Pleistocene predecessors. A significant subset of zircon in the ???85 ka rhyolites yielded ages between ???100 and 200 Ma, requiring that generation of at least some rhyolites involves material from Mesozoic basement. Similar zircon xenocrysts are found in an ???200 ka granophyre. The new age constraints imply that magma evolution at Coso can occur rapidly as demonstrated by significant changes in rhyolite composition over short time intervals (???10's to 100's ka). In conjunction with radioisotopic age constraints from other young silicic volcanic fields, dating of Coso rhyolites highlights the fact that at least some (and often the more voluminous) rhyolites are produced relatively rapidly, but that many small-volume rhyolites likely represent separation from long-lived mushy magma bodies. ?? The Author(s) 2009.

  14. Time constraints on post-rift evolution of the Southwest Indian passive margin from ^{40}Ar-^{39Ar dating of supergene K-Mn oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Nicolas; Arnaud, Nicolas; Beauvais, Anicet; Chardon, Dominique

    2013-04-01

    The high-elevation passive margin of Southwest India is marked by the Western Ghats escarpment, which separates the coastal domain from the low-relief East-dipping Mysore plateau. The escarpment has evolved from the Seychelles rifting at ~ 63 Ma following the Deccan traps volcanic event at ~ 65-63 Ma. This escarpment results from differential erosion processes across the passive margin, the rate and timing of which depend upon whether the margin has evolved according to a model of downwarped or rising flank topography. We explore the post-rift evolution of the South Indian passive margin through the characterisation of stepped relicts of lateritic paleosurfaces across that margin, and notably by 40Ar-39Ar dating of in-situ formed K-Mn oxides in supergene Mn-ore deposits carried by these paleosurfaces. The genesis and maturation of Mn-ore deposits are generally linked to progressive weathering processes of the paleosurfaces, which expose them. Dating of K-Mn oxides thus document the timing of these processes [1], and potentially the ages of the altered paleosurface. Moreover, the elevation differences between successive lateritic paleosurfaces of different ages may provide denudation rates for the considered time spans. Previous work (e.g., [2]) and our own field investigations, allow identifying three main lateritic paleosurfaces on the plateau at altitude ranges of 1000-900 m (S2), 900-800 m (S3) and 800-700 m (S3d), and a lower paleosurface in the coastal domain at 150-50 m (S4). K-Mn oxides (cryptomelane) were sampled in Mn ore deposits from different paleosurfaces, particularly in the coastal area around Goa on S4 and in Sandur and Shimoga Mn-ore deposits exposed on S2 and S3. The 40Ar-39Ar ages obtained from carefully characterised mineralogical assemblages range from ~ 26 to ~ 36 Ma in the Sandur Mn-ore deposit indicating intense lateritic weathering processes at the Eocene-Oligocene transition underneath paleosurface S2. Similar ages of ~ 24 and ~ 32 Ma are

  15. Southernmost Andes and South Georgia Island, North Scotia Ridge: Zircon U-Pb and muscovite {40Ar }/{39Ar } age constraints on tectonic evolution of Southwestern Gondwanaland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukasa, Samuel B.; Dalziel, Ian W. D.

    1996-11-01

    Zircon U-Pb and muscovite {40Ar }/{39Ar } isotopic ages have been determined on rocks from the southernmost Andes and South Georgia Island, North Scotia Ridge, to provide absolute time constraints on the kinematic evolution of southwestern Gondwanaland, until now known mainly from stratigraphic relations. The U-Pb systematics of four zircon fractions from one sample show that proto-marginal basin magmatism in the northern Scotia arc, creating the peraluminous Darwin granite suite and submarine rhyolite sequences of the Tobifera Formation, had begun by the Middle Jurassic (164.1 ± 1.7 Ma). Seven zircon fractions from two other Darwin granites are discordant with non-linear patterns, suggesting a complex history of inheritances and Pb loss. Reference lines drawn through these points on concordia diagrams give upper intercept ages of ca. 1500 Ma, interpreted as a minimum age for the inherited zircon component. This component is believed to have been derived from sedimentary rocks in the Gondwanaland margin accretionary wedge that forms the basement of the region, or else directly from the cratonic "back stop" of that wedge. Ophiolitic remnants of the Rocas Verdes marginal basin preserved in the Larsen Harbour complex on South Georgia yield the first clear evidence that Gondwanaland fragmentation had resulted in the formation of oceanic crust in the Weddell Sea region by the Late Jurassic (150 ± 1 Ma). The geographic pattern in the observed age range of 8 to 13 million years in these ophiolitic materials, while not definitive, is in keeping with propagation of the marginal basin floor northwestward from South Georgia Island to the Sarmiento Complex in southern Chile. Rocks of the Beagle granite suite, emplaced post-tectonically within the uplifted marginal basin floor, have complex zircon U-Pb systematics with gross discordances dominated by inheritances in some samples and Pb loss in others. Of eleven samples processed, only two had sufficient amounts of zircon for

  16. Modifying the electronic structure of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes by Ar+ ion irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolvanen, A.; Buchs, G.; Ruffieux, P.; Gröning, P.; Gröning, O.; Krasheninnikov, A.V.

    2009-01-01

    Local controllable modification of the electronic structure of carbon nanomaterials is important for the development of carbon-based nanoelectronics. By combining density-functional theory simulations with Ar-ion-irradiation experiments and low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectrosc

  17. The Magnetic Evolution of AR 6555 which led to Two Impulsive, Relatively Compact, X-Type Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenla, J. M.; Ambastha, A.; Kalman, B.; Csepura, Gy.

    1995-01-01

    We study the evolution of the vector magnetic field and the sunspot motions observed in AR 6555 during 1991 March 23-26. This region displays two locations of large magnetic shear that were also sites of flare activity. The first location produced two large (X-class) flares during the period covered by our observations. The second location had larger magnetic shear than the first but produced only small (M- and C-class) flares during our observations. We study the evolution of the photospheric magnetic field in relation to the large flares in the first location. These flares occurred around the same included polarity and have very similar characteristics (soft X-ray light curves, energies, etc,). However, the whole active region has changed substantially in the period between them. We found several characteristics of the region that appear related to the occurrence of these flares: (1) The flares occurred near regions of large magnetic 'shear' but not at the locations of maximum shear or maximum field. (2) Potential field extrapolations of the observed field suggest that the topology changed, prior to the first of the two flares, in such a way that a null appeared in the coarse magnetic field. (3) This null was located close to both X-class flares and remained in that location for a few days while the two flares were observed. (4) The flaring region has a pattern of vector field and sunspot motions in which material is 'squeezed' along the polarity inversion line. This pattern is very different from that usually associated with shearing arcades, but it is similar to that suggested previously by Fontenia and Davis. The vertical electric currents, inferred from the transverse field, are consistent with this pattern. (5) A major reconfiguration of the longitudinal field and the vertical electric currents occurred just prior to the first of the two flares. Both changes imply substantial variations of the magnetic structure of the region. On the basis of the available

  18. The magnetic evolution of AR 6555 which lead to two impulsive, readily compact, X-type flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambastha, A.; Fontenla, J. M.; Kalman, B.; Csepura, GY.

    1995-01-01

    We study the evolution of the vector magnetic field and the sunspot motions observed in AR 6555 during 23-26 Mar. 1991. This region displays two locations of large magnetic shear that were also sites of flare activity. The first location produced two large (X-class) flares during the period covered by our observations. The second location had larger magnetic shear than the first, but produced only small (M- and C-class) flares during our observations. We study the evolution of the photospheric magnetic field in relation to the large flares in the first location. These flares occurred around the same included polarity, and have very similar characteristics (soft X-ray light curves, energies, etc.). However, the whole active region has changed substantially in the period between them. We found several characteristics of the region that appear related to the occurrence of these flares. (1) The flares occurred near regions of large magnetic 'shear,' but not at the locations of maximum shear or maximum field. (2) Potential field extrapolations of the observed field suggest that the topology changed, prior to the first of the two flares, in such a way that a null appeared in the coarse magnetic field. (3) This null was located close to both X-class flares, and remained in that location for a few days while the two flares were observed. (4) The flaring region has a pattern of vector field and sunspot motions in which material is 'squeezed' along the polarity inversion line. This pattern is very different from that usually associated with shearing arcades, but it is similar to that suggested previously by Fontenla and Davis. The vertical electric currents, inferred from the transverse field, are consistent with this pattern. (5) A major reconfiguration of the longitudinal field and the vertical electric currents occurred just prior to the first of the two flares. Both changes imply substantial variations of the magnetic structure of the region. On the basis of the

  19. Protein Evolution within a Structural Space

    OpenAIRE

    Deeds, Eric J.; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2003-01-01

    Understanding of the evolutionary origins of protein structures represents a key component of the understanding of molecular evolution as a whole. Here we seek to elucidate how the features of an underlying protein structural “space” might impact protein structural evolution. We approach this question using lattice polymers as a completely characterized model of this space. We develop a measure of structural comparison of lattice structures that is analogous to the one used to understand stru...

  20. Evolution of Structurally Disordered Proteins Promotes Neostructuralization

    OpenAIRE

    Siltberg-Liberles, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    Protein structure is generally more conserved than sequence, but for regions that can adopt different structures in different environments, does this hold true? Understanding how structurally disordered regions evolve altered secondary structure element propensities as well as conformational flexibility among paralogs are fundamental questions for our understanding of protein structural evolution. We have investigated the evolutionary dynamics of structural disorder in protein families contai...

  1. Modal identification of boiler plant structures on AR spectral analysis of seismic records

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with a modal identification method for large-scale structures such as boiler plants in thermal power station. Practical and accurate modal identification has been carried out by the proposed method, which is composed of two stages; processing frequency transfer functions by autoregressive (AR) spectral analysis, and a curve-fitting technique to extract modal parameters. Seismic records of base acceleration records at various points of the structure are used as multi-output data. This method is examined using time-series data of seismic response simulation. Introduction of the two techniques, namely, decimation of time data and FPE criterion to optimize the order of AR models have realized effective and accurate identification. This method has actually been applied to seismic observation data of boiler plants in operation. As a result of this study, the authors' modal identification has proven to be effective for seismic modeling of large-scale structures

  2. Structure Model of Urban Traffic System Evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Ke-jin; ZHANG Dian-ye

    2008-01-01

    A structure model of urban traffic system evolution is built based on the analysis of the factors influencing the system evolution and the hierarchy between the factors. Then the influencing degrees of the factors are quantificationally analyzed by DEMATE (decision making trial and evaluation laboratory). The analysis results indicate that the traffic mode structure which achieves the highest central degree is the dominant influencing factor of the urban traffic system evolution, and that economy development and the traffic poficy axe the second important factors that also affect the traffic mode structures. Furthermore, physical geography is a basic restriction to the urban traffic system evolution.

  3. Evolution in Stage-Structured Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfield, Michael; Holt, Robert D.; Gomulkiewicz, Richard

    2016-01-01

    For many organisms, stage is a better predictor of demographic rates than age. Yet no general theoretical framework exists for understanding or predicting evolution in stage-structured populations. Here, we provide a general modeling approach that can be used to predict evolution and demography of stage-structured populations. This advances our ability to understand evolution in stage-structured populations to a level previously available only for populations structured by age. We use this framework to provide the first rigorous proof that Lande’s theorem, which relates adaptive evolution to population growth, applies to stage-classified populations, assuming only normality and that evolution is slow relative to population dynamics. We extend this theorem to allow for different means or variances among stages. Our next major result is the formulation of Price’s theorem, a fundamental law of evolution, for stage-structured populations. In addition, we use data from Trillium grandiflorum to demonstrate how our models can be applied to a real-world population and thereby show their practical potential to generate accurate projections of evolutionary and population dynamics. Finally, we use our framework to compare rates of evolution in age- versus stage-structured populations, which shows how our methods can yield biological insights about evolution in stage-structured populations. PMID:21460563

  4. Double-hump resonance structure of the cross sections for electron impact ionization of Ar5+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Configuration-average distorted-wave calculations are carried out for electron-impact ionization of Ar5+. Both direct ionization and the indirect excitation autoionization processes are included in our calculations. Our theoretical values are in quite reasonable agreement with the experimental data. The indirect processes contribute up to 50% to the total ionization cross sections. The possible origin of double-hump resonance structure of the cross sections is demonstrated and the contributions of metastable states are also taken into account.

  5. Structural and Temporal Requirements for Geomagnetic Field Reversal Deduced From 40Ar/39Ar Dated Lava Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, B. S.; Hoffman, K. A.; Coe, R. S.; Brown, L. L.; Jicha, B. R.; Pringle, M. S.; Chauvin, A.

    2004-12-01

    40Ar/39Ar dating of lavas on Tahiti, long thought to record the primary part of the Matuyama-Bruhnes (M-B) reversa1, gives an age of 795+/- 7 ka, indistinguishable from that of transitional lavas in Chile and La Palma, but older than the accepted age for the reversal. Only the transitional lavas on Maui and one from La Palma (dated at 776 +/- 2 ka), agree with the astronomical age for the M-B reversal. Virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs) associated with the Tahitian and Chilean lavas cluster near Australia, as do VGPs recorded on Tahiti during the Big Lost and Punaruu events, two apparently unsuccessful reversals. These findings, suggestive of a recurring, mantle-held flux pattern at the outer core surface during reversal attempts, are also theoretically equivalent to the situation that would arise today if the axial dipole were to continue to weaken and vanish. Hence, we propose that the 795 ka lavas record the onset of a dynamo process--one which only on occasion would result in polarity change. This initial instability, associated with the first of two decreases in field intensity, began 18 kyrs prior to the actual polarity switch. These data may provide the first observational support to the claim that complete reversals require a significant interval of time for magnetic flux to escape from the solid inner core and sufficiently weaken its stabilizing effect.

  6. K-Ar data for the age and evolution of Gettysburg Bank, North Atlantic Ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gettysberg Bank forms the western end of the Gorringe Seamount which is situated in the North Atlantic 110 km west of the tip of the Iberian Peninsula, on the eastern end of the Azores/Gibraltar fracture zone. Gabbros dredged from the Gettysburg bank record a complex history of events. K-Ar ages of separated mineral phases fall into three concordant groups (plus some discordant ages). The oldest ages are from three brown kaersutitic hornblendes and their mean age of 135 +- 3 Ma is taken to be that of their formation. Six plagioclase feldspars yielded concordant ages of 105 +- 3 Ma which is possibly a consequence of a thermal event occurring at that time. Ages from three deformed plagioclases are concordant with a mean of 82 +-3 Ma which is beleived to relate to a phase of shearing, perhaps occurring during transform motion at the plate boundary. (Auth.)

  7. Printing of structures less than 0,3 μm by i-line exposure using resists TDMR-AR80 and TDMR-AR95

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, A.; Dow, T.; Stoeflin, K.

    2007-03-01

    There is increasing interest in high resolution i-line resists which allow the printing of structures smaller than 0.3μm. We have evaluated the resists TDMR-AR80 und TDMR-AR95 from TOK Company in order to check their potential concerning minimum line sizes with sufficient process window in regard to focus/exposure process latitude, with our main focus on trench structures. The Bossung Plots of dense lines and semi-dense lines were determined. The resist and etch profiles were characterised both by inline-SEM measurements and cross-sections. The influence of several stepper illumination modes and Off Axis Illumination (OAI) on the focus/exposure process window was investigated. The resists TDMR-AR80 and TDMR-AR95 enable printing of trench structures less than 0.3μm. For 0.3μm lines, our specification limit of 0.3μm +/- 10% was reached within a focus range from - 0.1 to 1.0 microns. OAI illumination mode enlarged the focus window by 20% in comparison to the standard illumination mode. Structures of 0.28μm and 0.26μm were printed with a focus window of 0.7μm which shows the high potential of this resist generation. The implementation of the resist in production provides large amounts of data which enable the calculation of parameters related to process stability (wafer to wafer and lot to lot CD-standard deviation, Cp-, Cpk-values etc.).

  8. Structural and K/Ar Illite geochronological constraints on the brittle deformation history of the Olkiluoto Region, Southwest Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sveconorwegian orogeny whereas younger extension, almost coaxial with the latter, is interpreted as the result of the late Sveconorwegian orogenic collapse at the Meso- Neoproterozoic boundary. In order to add absolute time constraints to the conceptual model of the structural evolution of the Olkiluoto region, selected fault gouge samples were collected for K/Ar dating of authigenic and synkinematic illite. The new K/Ar ages range in total from 561.3 ± 11.2 Ma (Neoproterozoic-Ediacaran) to 1451.7 ± 29.3 Ma (Mesoproterozoic-Calymmian). Structural analysis of the dated fault cores made it possible to assign tight time constraints to several of the faulting episodes, thus strengthening the structural model produced by the study. (orig.)

  9. Late-stage volcano geomorphic evolution of the Pleistocene San Francisco Mountain, Arizona (USA), based on high-resolution DEM analysis and 40Ar/39Ar chronology

    OpenAIRE

    Karátson, Dávid; Telbisz, Tamás; Singer, Brad

    2010-01-01

    The cone-building volcanic activity and subsequent erosion of San Francisco Mountain, AZ, USA, were studied by using high-resolution digital elevation model (DEM) analysis and new 40Ar/39Ar dating. By defining remnants or planèzes of the volcano flanks in DEM-derived images, the original edifice can be reconstructed. We propose a two-cone model with adjacent summit vents which were active in different times. The reconstructed cones were 4,460 and 4,350 m high a.s.l., corresponding to ∼2,160 a...

  10. New 40Ar/39Ar age constraints on the Late Palaeozoic tectonic evolution of the western Tianshan (Xinjiang, northwestern China), with emphasis on Permian fluid ingress

    OpenAIRE

    De Jong, Koenraad; Wang, Bo; Faure, Michel; Shu, Liangshu S.; Cluzel, Dominique; Charvet, Jacques; Ruffet, Gilles; Yan CHEN

    2009-01-01

    Laser-probe dating of mylonite whole-rock samples from the North Tianshan—Main Tianshan fault zone that cross-cuts the North Tianshan domain's southern margin yielded 40Ar/39Ar spectra with 255–285 Ma ages. Biotite from an undeformed, Early Carboniferous granite, which cuts the steep mylonitic foliation in the Proterozoic basement of the Yili arcs's southern margin, gave a 263.4 ± 0.6 Ma plateau age (1σ). Pre-Carboniferous metasediments overlying this basement yielded plateau ages (1σ) of 253...

  11. K—Ar Geochronology and Evolution of Cenozoic Volcanic Rocks in Eastrn China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王慧芬; 杨学昌; 等

    1989-01-01

    Cenozoic volcanic rocks widespread in eastern China constitute an important part of the circum-Pacific volcanic belt.This paper presents more than 150K-Ar dates and a great deal of petrochemical analysis data from the Cenozoic volcanic rocks distributed in Tengchong,China's southeast coast,Shandong,Hebei,Nei Monggol and Northeast China.An integrated study shows that ubiquitous but uneven volcanic activities prevailed from the Eogene to the Holocene,characterized as being multi-eqisodic and multicycled.For example,in the Paleocene(67-58Ma),Eocene(57-37.5Ma),Miocene(22-18,16-19Ma),Pliocene(8-3Ma),and Early Pleistocene-Middle Pleistocene(1.2-0.5Ma) there were upsurges of volcanism,while in the Oligocene there was a repose period.In space,the older Eogene volcanic rocks are distributed within the region or in the central part of the NE-NNE-striking fault depression,while the younger Neogene and Quaternary volcanic rocks are distributed in the eastern and western parts.Petrologically,they belong essentially to tholeiite-series and alkali-series basalts,with alkalinity in the rocks increasing from old to youg.The above regularities are controlled by both global plate movement and regional inherent tectonic pattern.

  12. Post-flare evolution of AR 10923 with Hinode/XRT

    OpenAIRE

    Parenti, S.; Reale, F.; Reeves, K. K.

    2010-01-01

    Flares are dynamic events which involve rapid changes in coronal magnetic topology end energy release. Even if they may be localized phenomena, the magnetic disturbance at their origin may propagate and be effective in a larger part of the active region. We investigate the temporal evolution of a flaring active region with respect to the loops morphology, the temperature, and emission measure distributions. We consider $Hinode/XRT$ data of a the 2006 November 12th C1.1 flare. We inspect the e...

  13. Structural features and gasification reactivity of coal chars formed in Ar and CO2 atmospheres at elevated pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structural features and gasification reactivity of chars derived from pyrolysis of a bituminous coal under Ar (Ar char) and CO2 atmosphere (CO2 char) have been investigated, respectively. The pyrolysis was performed in a fixed bed reactor at a final temperature of 700 °C and pressures ranging from 0.1 to 1.5 MPa. It was found that CO2 affect the char yield, pore structure and surface area. The N2 surface area of the CO2 char at ambient pressure increased by nearly 42 times compared to the Ar char. The chemical structure features were characterized by using Raman spectroscopy. The recorded spectra between 800 and 1800 cm−1 were curve-fitted with 10 Gaussian bands representing typical structural features of chars to quantitatively compare the char structure difference. The ratio I(Gr+Vl+Vr)/ID between the band intensities of amorphous char structures with small aromatic ring (3–5 rings) systems and condensed aromatic ring systems (>6 rings) is seen to decrease with increasing pyrolysis pressure. The I(Gr+Vl+Vr)/ID of CO2 char is always lower than that of Ar char in the whole pressure range. The non-isothermal CO2 gasification from 700 to 1000 °C in a TGA (thermogravimetric analyzer) indicates that the char prepared under Ar atmosphere was more reactive. - Highlights: • Pressurized coal pyrolysis experiments were run in fixed bed reactor using CO2 or Ar. • Small to large aromatic ring ratio for CO2 chars is always lower than for Ar chars. • Ar derived chars show a slightly enhanced reactivity over CO2 derived chars

  14. Evolution and Analysis of AR500 DOAS%AR500差分光谱仪不确定度分析与评定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏启兵

    2008-01-01

    文章对AR500差分光谱仪的校准过程进行不确定度分析,分析了主要的测量不确定度来源,找出影响不确定度的因素,对不确定度分量进行评估,给出SO2、NO2的合成扩展测量不确定度.

  15. Evolution of dinosaur epidermal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Paul M; Evans, David C; Campione, Nicolás E

    2015-06-01

    Spectacularly preserved non-avian dinosaurs with integumentary filaments/feathers have revolutionized dinosaur studies and fostered the suggestion that the dinosaur common ancestor possessed complex integumentary structures homologous to feathers. This hypothesis has major implications for interpreting dinosaur biology, but has not been tested rigorously. Using a comprehensive database of dinosaur skin traces, we apply maximum-likelihood methods to reconstruct the phylogenetic distribution of epidermal structures and interpret their evolutionary history. Most of these analyses find no compelling evidence for the appearance of protofeathers in the dinosaur common ancestor and scales are usually recovered as the plesiomorphic state, but results are sensitive to the outgroup condition in pterosaurs. Rare occurrences of ornithischian filamentous integument might represent independent acquisitions of novel epidermal structures that are not homologous with theropod feathers. PMID:26041865

  16. The effects of polymer side-chain structure on roughness formation of ArF photoresist in plasma etching processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low etching resistance and roughness formation of ArF photoresist during plasma etching are serious problems. We have previously found that decisive factors affecting the plasma resistance and roughness formation in an ArF photoresist are determined by ultraviolet/vacuum ultraviolet radiation and roughness formation is dominated by chemical reactions. In this paper, on the basis of our previous findings on the interaction between radiation species from plasma and ArF photoresist polymers, we investigated the polymer structural dependence for the degradation mechanism of ArF photoresist in the plasma etching processes. The etching resistance of ArF photoresist was improved by controlling the elemental ratio of oxygen atoms and ring structures in photoresist polymer. Furthermore, lactone C=O bond is found to be a key factor for roughness formation during the etching process. We have revealed the importance of the molecular structure of ArF photoresist for improving the surface roughness and etching resistance during the plasma etching process. (paper)

  17. Formation and evolution of the Cigar Lake uranium deposit based on U-Pb and K-Ar isotope systematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic geochronological study was conducted on the Cigar Lake uranium deposit. U-Pb and Pb-Pb systematics were applied to different types of uranium ore, and various associated sheet silicates were dated by the K-Ar method. These two approaches define a widespread retrograde metamorphic event in the basement, which occurred at about 1780 Ma during the Hudsonian orogeny, and a four-stage evolutionary model for the ore deposit. This model is compatible with the history of other unconformity-type uranium deposits in the Athabasca Basin. The first stage in the evolution of the Cigar Lake uranium deposit is marked by uraninite crystallization at 1341 ± 17 Ma, which, in association with arsenides and sulfarsenides, constitutes the mineralization of economic interest (main orebody). The second stage, characterized by a Fe-kaolinite and Fe-illite paragenesis, occurred locally at about 900 Ma. The third stage involved uranium mobilization at about 325 Ma and is characterized by (i) preferential loss of radiogenic lead from primary uraninite and crystallization of pitchblende at the rims of uraninite grains and (ii) formation of pitchblende associated with Fe sulfides or hematite in the main and perched orebodies. The last stage is characterized by recent alteration and coffinitization which have affected all ore types. 40 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Tectono-thermal evolution of the India-Asia collision zone based on 40Ar-39Ar thermochronology in Ladakh, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajneesh Bhutani; Kanchan Pande; T R Venkatesan

    2004-12-01

    New 40Ar-39Ar thermochronological results from the Ladakh region in the India-Asia collision zone provide a tectono-thermal evolutionary scenario. The characteristic granodiorite of the Ladakh batholith near Leh yielded a plateau age of 46.3 ± 0.6Ma (2 ). Biotite from the same rock yielded a plateau age of 44.6 ± 0.3Ma (2 ). The youngest phase of the Ladakh batholith, the leucogranite near Himya, yielded a cooling pattern with a plateau-like age of ∼36 Ma. The plateau age of muscovite from the same rock is 29.8 ± 0.2Ma (2 ). These ages indicate post-collision tectonothermal activity, which may have been responsible for partial melting within the Ladakh batholith. Two basalt samples from Sumdo Nala have also recorded the post-collision tectono-thermal event, which lasted at least for 8MY in the suture zone since the collision, whereas in the western part of the Indus Suture, pillow lava of Chiktan showed no effect of this event and yielded an age of emplacement of 128.2 ± 2.6Ma (2 ). The available data indicate that post-collision deformation led to the crustal thickening causing an increase in temperature, which may have caused partial melting at the base of the thickened crust. The high thermal regime propagated away from the suture with time.

  19. Structure and Stability of Endohedral Complexes X@(HAlNH)12 (X = He, Ne, Ar, Kr)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Cai-Yun; WU Hai-Shun

    2005-01-01

    The structures of closo-hedral cluster (HAlNH)12 and endohedral complexes X@(HAlNH)12 (X = He, Ne, Ar, Kr) have been studied by using density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level. The geometries, natural bond orbital (NBO), vibrational frequency, energetic parameters, magnetic shielding constants and nucleus independent chemical shifts (NICS) were discussed. The potential surface of guest X shifting from the cage center to a face of six- membered ring was calculated at the same level. The exit transition state was demonstrated with IRC calculations. It is found that X@(HAlNH)12 complexes are dynamically stable, and Ne@(HAlNH)12 is more energetically favorable than the other complexes in thermodynamics.

  20. Nano-structuring of solid surface by extreme ultraviolet Ar8+ laser

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koláček, Karel; Štraus, Jaroslav; Schmidt, Jiří; Frolov, Oleksandr; Prukner, Václav; Shukurov, A.; Holý, V.; Sobota, Jaroslav; Fořt, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 1 (2012), s. 57-63. ISSN 0263-0346. [International Conference on the Frontiers of Plasma Physics and Technology/5./. Singapore, 18.04.2011-22.04.2011] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA08024; GA MŠk(CZ) LC528; GA AV ČR KAN300100702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 ; RVO:61389021 Keywords : Ablation by EUV radiation * application of Ar8+ laser * nano-patterning by EUV radiation * , nano-structuring by EUV radiation Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics; BH - Optics, Masers, Laser s (UPT-D) Impact factor: 2.016, year: 2012

  1. Shaping galaxy evolution with galaxy structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Edmond

    A fundamental pursuit of astronomy is to understand galaxy evolution. The enormous scales and complex physics involved in this endeavor guarantees a never-ending journey that has enamored both astronomers and laymen alike. But despite the difficulty of this task, astronomers have still attempted to further this goal. Among of these astronomers is Edwin Hubble. His work, which includes the famous Hubble sequence, has immeasurably influenced our understanding of galaxy evolution. In this thesis, we present three works that continues Hubble's line of study by using galaxy structure to learn about galaxy evolution. First, we examine the dependence of galaxy quiescence on inner galactic structure with the AEGIS/ DEEP2 survey at 0.5In this thesis, we present three works that continues Hubble's line of study by using galaxy structure to learn about galaxy evolution. First, we examine the dependence of galaxy quiescence on inner galactic structure with the AEGIS/ DEEP2 survey at 0.5Hubble at 0.2

  2. Cross-linked structure of network evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassett, Danielle S., E-mail: dsb@seas.upenn.edu [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Sage Center for the Study of the Mind, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Wymbs, Nicholas F.; Grafton, Scott T. [Department of Psychology and UCSB Brain Imaging Center, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Porter, Mason A. [Oxford Centre for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford OX2 6GG (United Kingdom); CABDyN Complexity Centre, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX1 1HP (United Kingdom); Mucha, Peter J. [Carolina Center for Interdisciplinary Applied Mathematics, Department of Mathematics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Applied Physical Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    We study the temporal co-variation of network co-evolution via the cross-link structure of networks, for which we take advantage of the formalism of hypergraphs to map cross-link structures back to network nodes. We investigate two sets of temporal network data in detail. In a network of coupled nonlinear oscillators, hyperedges that consist of network edges with temporally co-varying weights uncover the driving co-evolution patterns of edge weight dynamics both within and between oscillator communities. In the human brain, networks that represent temporal changes in brain activity during learning exhibit early co-evolution that then settles down with practice. Subsequent decreases in hyperedge size are consistent with emergence of an autonomous subgraph whose dynamics no longer depends on other parts of the network. Our results on real and synthetic networks give a poignant demonstration of the ability of cross-link structure to uncover unexpected co-evolution attributes in both real and synthetic dynamical systems. This, in turn, illustrates the utility of analyzing cross-links for investigating the structure of temporal networks.

  3. Cosmic evolution of Quasar radio structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchings, J. B.; Neff, S. G.

    1991-01-01

    We discuss the results of a survey of Quasar radio structures over redshifts from 0.6 to 3.7. There are clear evolutionary trends in size and luminosity, which suggest that the duty cycle of individual Quasars has increased over cosmic time. This affects source count statistics and gives clues on the evolution of Quasar environments.

  4. Cross-linked structure of network evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the temporal co-variation of network co-evolution via the cross-link structure of networks, for which we take advantage of the formalism of hypergraphs to map cross-link structures back to network nodes. We investigate two sets of temporal network data in detail. In a network of coupled nonlinear oscillators, hyperedges that consist of network edges with temporally co-varying weights uncover the driving co-evolution patterns of edge weight dynamics both within and between oscillator communities. In the human brain, networks that represent temporal changes in brain activity during learning exhibit early co-evolution that then settles down with practice. Subsequent decreases in hyperedge size are consistent with emergence of an autonomous subgraph whose dynamics no longer depends on other parts of the network. Our results on real and synthetic networks give a poignant demonstration of the ability of cross-link structure to uncover unexpected co-evolution attributes in both real and synthetic dynamical systems. This, in turn, illustrates the utility of analyzing cross-links for investigating the structure of temporal networks

  5. Structure and Evolution of the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Freeman, Ken

    2011-01-01

    This review discusses the structure and evolution of the Milky Way, in the context of opportunities provided by asteroseismology of red giants. The review is structured according to the main Galactic components: the thin disk, thick disk, stellar halo, and the Galactic bar/bulge. The review concludes with an overview of Galactic archaeology and chemical tagging, and a brief account of the upcoming HERMES survey with the AAT.

  6. Dynamic Neighborhood Structures in Parallel Evolution Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Mehnen, Jörn; Rudolph, Günter; Weinert, Klaus

    2001-01-01

    Parallelizing is a straightforward approach to reduce the total computation time of evolutionary algorithms. Finding an appropriate communication network within spatially structured populations for improving convergence speed and convergence probability is a difficult task. A new method that uses a dynamic communication scheme in an evolution strategy will be compared with conventional static and dynamic approaches. The communication structure is based on a socalled diffusion model approach. ...

  7. Structural and K/Ar Illite geochronological constraints on the brittle deformation history of the Olkiluoto Region, Southwest Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viola, G. [Geological Survey of Norway - NGU, Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway), Dept. of Geology and Mineral Resources Engineering; Mattila, J. [Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Zwingmann, H.; Todd, A. [CSIRO (Australia), Earth Science and Resource Engineering; Raven, M. [CSIRO (Australia), Land and Water

    2011-07-15

    Mesoproterozoic Sveconorwegian orogeny whereas younger extension, almost coaxial with the latter, is interpreted as the result of the late Sveconorwegian orogenic collapse at the Meso- Neoproterozoic boundary. In order to add absolute time constraints to the conceptual model of the structural evolution of the Olkiluoto region, selected fault gouge samples were collected for K/Ar dating of authigenic and synkinematic illite. The new K/Ar ages range in total from 561.3 {+-} 11.2 Ma (Neoproterozoic-Ediacaran) to 1451.7 {+-} 29.3 Ma (Mesoproterozoic-Calymmian). Structural analysis of the dated fault cores made it possible to assign tight time constraints to several of the faulting episodes, thus strengthening the structural model produced by the study. (orig.)

  8. Volcano Pectusan: composition of rocks, chronology of eruption (K-Ar) and evolution (87Sr/86Sr and δ18O)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paper presents the results of the isotope study of the Pectusan volcano northeast and western slopes located at the North Korea and China boundary. Fresh data on the K-Ar-isotope geochronology, on the rock mass composition enabled to trace the stages and the cycles in the evolution of the mentioned volcano. On the basis of the isotope study (87Sr/86Sr and δ18O) data one analyzed some problems dealing with the genesis of the alkali-sialic rocks

  9. Evolution of reaction mechanisms for the reaction 36Ar + 58Ni studied from 32 to 95 A*MeV with the INDRA multidetector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the context of the multifragmentation study program with the 4π INDRA detector at GANIL, the reaction 36Ar + 58Ni has been studied at seven different energies ranging from 32 to 95 A*MeV. After a brief description of the detector characteristics and of the data treatment, results on the evolution of intermediate mass fragments (IMF) distributions with incident energy and a first outlook about reaction mechanisms are presented. (author). 15 refs., 10 figs

  10. Learning Protein Structure with Peers in an AR-Enhanced Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Chien

    2013-01-01

    Augmented reality (AR) is an interactive system that allows users to interact with virtual objects and the real world at the same time. The purpose of this dissertation was to explore how AR, as a new visualization tool, that can demonstrate spatial relationships by representing three dimensional objects and animations, facilitates students to…

  11. Giant Planet Formation, Evolution, and Internal Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Helled, Ravit; Podolak, Morris; Boley, Aaron; Meru, Farzana; Nayakshin, Sergei; Fortney, Jonathan J; Mayer, Lucio; Alibert, Yann; Boss, Alan P

    2013-01-01

    The large number of detected giant exoplanets offers the opportunity to improve our understanding of the formation mechanism, evolution, and interior structure of gas giant planets. The two main models for giant planet formation are core accretion and disk instability. There are substantial differences between these formation models, including formation timescale, favorable formation location, ideal disk properties for planetary formation, early evolution, planetary composition, etc. First, we summarize the two models including their substantial differences, advantages, and disadvantages, and suggest how theoretical models should be connected to available (and future) data. We next summarize current knowledge of the internal structures of solar- and extrasolar- giant planets. Finally, we suggest the next steps to be taken in giant planet exploration.

  12. Spatial structure of a slot-antenna excited microwave N2-Ar plasma source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spatial structure of a large-scale, slot-antenna excited (2.45 GHz) surface wave plasma source operating in N2-Ar mixtures is investigated. A self-consistent theoretical model is developed in the local approximation to investigate the entire spatial structure of the system, including the discharge zone sustained by the field of the TM140 surface mode and the remote plasma zone. Maxwell's equations and the rate balance equations for the most important excited species--vibrationally and electronically excited states, ions, and N(4S) atoms--and the electron Boltzmann are consistently solved. The pumping of the higher νth levels of N2(X 1Σg+,ν) molecules is shown to be very effective and to strongly influence the remote plasma kinetics. Collisions of N2(X 1Σg+,ν) molecules with N(4S) atoms are responsible for the increase in the number densities of electrons and electronically excited states N2(A 3Σu+,B 3Πg,C 3Πu,a'1Σu-) in the ''far'' remote plasma zone

  13. Evolution on folding landscapes in combinatorial structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, S.M. [Santa Fe Inst., NM (United States); Reidys, C.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-11-01

    In this paper the authors investigate the evolution of molecular structures by random point mutations. They will consider two types of molecular structures: (a) (RNA) secondary structures, and (b) random structures. In both cases structure consists of: (1) a contact graph, and (2) a family of relations imposed on its adjacent vertices. The vertex set of the contact graph is simply the set of all indices of a sequence, and its edges are the bonds. The corresponding relations associated with the edges are viewed as secondary base pairing rules and tertiary interaction rules respectively. Mapping of sequences into secondary and random structures are modeled and analyzed. Here, the set of all sequences that map into a particular structure is modeled as a random graph in the sequence space, the so called neutral network and they study how neutral networks are embedded in sequence space. A basic replication of deletion experiment reveals how effective secondary and random structures can be searched by random point mutations and to what extent the structure effects the dynamics of this optimization process. In particular the authors can report a nonlinear relation between the fraction of tertiary interactions in random structures, and the times taken for a population of sequences to find a high fitness target random structure.

  14. Ars disyecta Ars disyecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Castillo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Bajo la nominación Ars Disyecta se busca exponer el vínculo entre artes visuales, feminismo y metamorfosis. Las prácticas artísticas feministas aquí presentadas se proponen perturbar el espacio metafórico heredado de la diferencia sexual (pensemos, por ejemplo, en las palabras engendramiento, matriz, vida, compenetración o invaginamiento. En este sentido, la nominación Ars disyecta pone en escena un conjunto de prácticas e intervenciones que intentan interrumpir la matriz de la diferencia, desestabilizando lo femenino desde aquellas figuras que se resisten a la lógica de la totalidad y de un tiempo propio. Buscando seguir la huella de un arte disyecto es que interrogaré en este ensayo aquellas autorías feministas que en el arte contemporáneo trafican con las huellas del contagio, la mutación y la alteridad.This article aims to present the relation between visual arts, feminism I and metamorphosis. The feminist artistic practices portrayed in this article attempt to question categories inherited from the metaphor of sexual difference such as engendering, matrix and life. From this perspective, Ars disyecta will establish a set of artistic practices and interventions that intend to interrupt the proper idea of «feminine difference». Following this line of argument, I will discuss in this article a few contemporary feminist works of art that could be defined by words such as contagious, mutation and otherness.

  15. Nano-Structuring of Solid Surface by EUV Ar8+ Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper demonstrates our first attempt for “direct (i.e. ablation) patterning” of PMMA by pulse, high-current, capillary-discharge-pumped Ar8+ ion laser (λ = 46.9 nm). For focusing a long-focal spherical mirror (R = 2100 mm) covered by 14 double-layer Sc-Si coating was used. The ablated focal spots demonstrate not only that the energy of our laser is sufficient for such experiments, but also that the design of focusing optics must be more sophisticated: severe aberrations have been revealed - an irregular spot shape and strong astigmatism with astigmatic deference as large as 16 mm. In some cases, on the bottom of ablated spots a laser-induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) has appeared. Finally, an illumination of the sample through quadratic hole 7.5x7.5 μm, standing in contact with PMMA substrate, has ablated from the surface a strongly developed 2D diffraction pattern (period in the centre ⁓125 nm). (author)

  16. Variation of 3s photoionization resonance structures in a serial atomic number species Ar, K, and Ca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subvalence 3s-shell photoionization resonances of Ca were measured with monochromatized synchrotron radiation and photoion time-of-flight spectroscopy method. Charge resolved photoion yield spectra were obtained. Broad peak structures were found in the Ca+ spectrum and shallow window structures were found in the Ca2+ spectrum. We performed MCDF calculations to assign the resonance structures. The 3s-shell photoionization of Ar and K were also measured for comparison. A systematic increase was observed in Fano-Beutler parameter and in the resonance width along with the increase of atomic number from Z=18(Ar) to 20(Ca). We discuss also the spectral structures that could be of the 3p double-shake-up satellites, which are observed in the 3s photoionization region. (author)

  17. Macrodomains: Structure, Function, Evolution, and Catalytic Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rack, Johannes Gregor Matthias; Perina, Dragutin; Ahel, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    Recent developments indicate that macrodomains, an ancient and diverse protein domain family, are key players in the recognition, interpretation, and turnover of ADP-ribose (ADPr) signaling. Crucial to this is the ability of macrodomains to recognize ADPr either directly, in the form of a metabolic derivative, or as a modification covalently bound to proteins. Thus, macrodomains regulate a wide variety of cellular and organismal processes, including DNA damage repair, signal transduction, and immune response. Their importance is further indicated by the fact that dysregulation or mutation of a macrodomain is associated with several diseases, including cancer, developmental defects, and neurodegeneration. In this review, we summarize the current insights into macrodomain evolution and how this evolution influenced their structural and functional diversification. We highlight some aspects of macrodomain roles in pathobiology as well as their emerging potential as therapeutic targets. PMID:26844395

  18. Evolution of sensory structures in basal metazoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Dave K; Nakanishi, Nagayasu; Yuan, David; Camara, Anthony; Nichols, Scott A; Hartenstein, Volker

    2007-11-01

    Cnidaria have traditionally been viewed as the most basal animals with complex, organ-like multicellular structures dedicated to sensory perception. However, sponges also have a surprising range of the genes required for sensory and neural functions in Bilateria. Here, we: (1) discuss "sense organ" regulatory genes, including; sine oculis, Brain 3, and eyes absent, that are expressed in cnidarian sense organs; (2) assess the sensory features of the planula, polyp, and medusa life-history stages of Cnidaria; and (3) discuss physiological and molecular data that suggest sensory and "neural" processes in sponges. We then develop arguments explaining the shared aspects of developmental regulation across sense organs and between sense organs and other structures. We focus on explanations involving divergent evolution from a common ancestral condition. In Bilateria, distinct sense-organ types share components of developmental-gene regulation. These regulators are also present in basal metazoans, suggesting evolution of multiple bilaterian organs from fewer antecedent sensory structures in a metazoan ancestor. More broadly, we hypothesize that developmental genetic similarities between sense organs and appendages may reflect descent from closely associated structures, or a composite organ, in the common ancestor of Cnidaria and Bilateria, and we argue that such similarities between bilaterian sense organs and kidneys may derive from a multifunctional aggregations of choanocyte-like cells in a metazoan ancestor. We hope these speculative arguments presented here will stimulate further discussion of these and related questions. PMID:21669752

  19. Structural Evolution of Carbon During Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adel F. Sarofim; Angelo Kandas

    1998-10-28

    The examination of the structural evolution of carbon during oxidation has proven to be of scientific interest. Early modeling work of fluidized bed combustion showed that most of the reactions of interest occurs iOn the micropores, and this work has concentrated on these pores. This work has concentrated on evolution of macroporosity and rnicroporosity of carbons during kinetic controlled oxidation using SAXS, C02 and TEM analysis. Simple studies of fluidized bed combustion of coal chars has shown that many of the events considered fragmentation events previously may in fact be "hidden" or nonaccessible porosity. This makes the study of the microporous combustion characteristics of carbon even more important. The generation of a combustion resistant grid, coupled with measurements of the SAXS and C02 surface areas, fractal analysis and TEM studies has confined that soot particles shrink during their oxidation, as previously suspected. However, this shrinkage results in an overall change in structure. This structure becomes, on a radial basis, much more ordered near the edges, while the center itself becomes transparent to the TEM beam, implying a total lack of structure in this region. Although complex, this carbon structure is probably burning as to keep the density of the soot particles nearly the same. The TEM techniques developed for examination of soots has also been applied to Spherocarb. The Spherocarb during oxidation also increases its ordering,. This ordering, by present theories, would imply that the reactivity would go. However, the reactivity goes up, implying that structure of carbon is secondary in importance to catalytic effects.

  20. Relief history and denudation evolution of the northern Tibet margin: Constraints from 40Ar/39Ar and (U-Th)/He dating and implications for far-field effect of rising plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Feng, Huile; Shi, Wenbei; Zhang, Weibin; Wu, Lin; Yang, Liekun; Wang, Yinzhi; Zhang, Zhigang; Zhu, Rixiang

    2016-04-01

    How does the rising Tibetan Plateau affect its peripheral region? The current understanding of the mechanism of orogenic plateau development is incomplete and thus no consensus yet exists in this regard. However, our new 40Ar/39Ar and (U-Th)/He dataset presented in this study may shed some light on this issue. 40Ar/39Ar dating, on two vertical transects from the massif between Nuomuhong and Golmud, indicates that the Eastern Kunlun Range was built-up and exhumated during the later Triassic initially, and a minimum overburden of ~ 11.7-14.0 km has been eroded since ~ 220 Ma. (U-Th)/He age-elevation relationships (AERs) indicate a rapid exhumation event at ~ 40 Ma following a long period of slow exhumation phase from late Mesozoic to early Eocene time. In this study, two scenarios - one assuming a single stage and the other assuming multiple stages of evolution history - are modeled. Modeling of a multiple stage scenario is reasonable and is able to reflect the "actual" situation, which reveals the entire denudation and relief history of the northern Tibet from late Mesozoic to the present time. After prolonged denudation before 50 Ma, a low topography (~ 0.17 times the relief of the present) developed by 50 Ma with an erosion rate of 0.013-0.013+ 0.025 mm/yr. The highest relief (~ 1.82 times the relief of the present) of the Cenozoic time came into being at 40 Ma with an erosion rate of 0.052 ± 0.025 mm/yr, which was possibly a result of the collision between India and Eurasia. Subsequently, the relief steadily decreased to the present level due to continued denudation. This suggests that deformation propagation from the continued convergence boundary between India and Eurasia was insignificant after the construction of the highest relief. This observation is broadly consistent with published accounts on the stratigraphic, cooling, and faulting histories of the northern Tibet margin.

  1. Nano-Structuring of Solid Surface by EUV Ar8+ Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Requirement of increased resolution is at present most loudly pronounced in microelectronics, which, following Moore´s law (doubling every two years the transistorcount that can be placed inexpensively on integrated circuit), commands a continuous upgrade of micro-/nano-lithography. Such upgrade indirectly influences processing speed, memory capacity, number and size of pixels in sensors, etc. The submitted paper demonstrates our first attempt for “direct (i.e. ablation) patterning” of PMMA by pulse, high-current, capillary-discharge-pumped Ar8+ ion laser (λ = 46,9 nm). For focusing a long-focal spherical mirror (R = 2100 mm) covered by 14 double-layer Sc-Si coating was used. The ablated focal spots demonstrate not only that the energy of our laser is sufficient for such experiments, but also that the design of focusing optics must be more sophisticated: severe aberrations have been revealed – an irregular spot shape and strong astigmatism with astigmatic difference as large as 16 mm. Moreover, on the bottom of ablated spots a laserinduced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) has appeared. Finally, a direct patterning of quadratic hole 7,5x7,5 µm, standing in contact with PMMA substrate, has shown a strongly developed 2D diffraction pattern (period in the centre ∼125 nm). In conclusion there will be shown the design of a new (grazing incidence) focusing optics, and a new “nano-patterning” tool – grazing incidence interferometer, which enable to ablate a regular, in advance defined pattern. It is believed that this is the first step to application of this technique not only to nanolithography,but also e.g. to study of electron dynamics in superlattices. (author)

  2. The structure and evolution of story networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsdorp, Folgert; van den Bosch, Antal

    2016-06-01

    With this study, we advance the understanding about the processes through which stories are retold. A collection of story retellings can be considered as a network of stories, in which links between stories represent pre-textual (or ancestral) relationships. This study provides a mechanistic understanding of the structure and evolution of such story networks: we construct a story network for a large diachronic collection of Dutch literary retellings of Red Riding Hood, and compare this network to one derived from a corpus of paper chain letters. In the analysis, we first provide empirical evidence that the formation of these story networks is subject to age-dependent selection processes with a strong lopsidedness towards shorter time-spans between stories and their pre-texts (i.e. 'young' story versions are preferred in producing new versions). Subsequently, we systematically compare these findings with and among predictions of various formal models of network growth to determine more precisely which kinds of attractiveness are also at play or might even be preferred as explicatory models. By carefully studying the structure and evolution of the two story networks, then, we show that existing stories are differentially preferred to function as a new version's pre-text given three types of attractiveness: (i) frequency-based and (ii) model-based attractiveness which (iii) decays in time. PMID:27429767

  3. Assembly and Structural Evolution of Micelleplexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yaming; Sprouse, Dustin; Laaser, Jennifer; Reineke, Theresa; Lodge, Timothy

    Cationic micelles complex with DNA to form micelleplexes, which are attractive vehicles for gene delivery. We investigate the formation and structural evolution of micelleplexes in buffered solutions. The micelles are composed of poly((2-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate)-block-poly(n-butyl methacrylate). The formation of the micelleplexes is monitored via turbidimetric titration. With DNA oligomers, solutions of the complexes are homogeneous until near the charge neutral point, at which point the complexes precipitate. With plasmid DNA, more than a stoichiometric amount of DNA is needed to reach the inhomogeneous region, which suggests that binding is partially inhibited. This inhibition is not fully relieved when the plasmid DNA is linearized, suggesting that the stiffness of the DNA is the main source of the inhibition. With micelles in excess, the micelleplexes formed at low ionic strength exhibit bimodal size distributions and remain stable in solution. With DNA in excess, soluble micelleplexes aggregate over time and precipitate. We explain the structural evolution of the micelleplexes as an interplay between kinetic trapping and thermodynamic equilibrium, and compare the results for DNA with those for a flexible polyanion.

  4. Modification of structure and mechanical properties of Al, Ni, Cu by high energy ions of Ar irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The change of microhardness of pure metals Al, Ni, Cu implanted by Ar ions with 46,3 MeV energy in dose interval 1·1013 - 1·1015 cm-2 has been investigated. It has been founded the strengthen of metals, which dose dependence shows saturation and it correlates with thin structure and with cluster defects in particular. The connection between changes of microhardness and the limit of fluidity of implanted metals has been determined

  5. Structural evolution and metallicity of lead clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, Daniel A.; Shayeghi, Armin; Johnston, Roy L.; Schwerdtfeger, Peter; Schäfer, Rolf

    2016-05-01

    The evolution of the metallic state in lead clusters and its structural implications are subject to ongoing discussions. Here we present molecular beam electric deflection studies of neutral PbN (N = 19-25, 31, 36, 54) clusters. Many of them exhibit dipole moments or anomalies of the polarizability indicating a non-metallic state. In order to resolve their structures, the configurational space is searched using the Pool Birmingham Cluster Genetic algorithm based on density functional theory. Spin-orbit effects on the geometries and dipole moments are taken into account by further relaxing them with two-component density functional theory. Geometries and dielectric properties from quantum chemical calculations are then used to simulate beam deflection profiles. Structures are assigned by the comparison of measured and simulated beam profiles. Energy gaps are calculated using time-dependent density functional theory. They are compared to Kubo gaps, which are an indicator of the metallicity in finite particles. Both, experimental and theoretical data suggest that lead clusters are not metallic up to at least 36 atoms.The evolution of the metallic state in lead clusters and its structural implications are subject to ongoing discussions. Here we present molecular beam electric deflection studies of neutral PbN (N = 19-25, 31, 36, 54) clusters. Many of them exhibit dipole moments or anomalies of the polarizability indicating a non-metallic state. In order to resolve their structures, the configurational space is searched using the Pool Birmingham Cluster Genetic algorithm based on density functional theory. Spin-orbit effects on the geometries and dipole moments are taken into account by further relaxing them with two-component density functional theory. Geometries and dielectric properties from quantum chemical calculations are then used to simulate beam deflection profiles. Structures are assigned by the comparison of measured and simulated beam profiles. Energy gaps

  6. Effectiveness of Land Use Structure Evolution to Industrial Structure Transformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Scarcity of land resources and transformation of industrial structure is a pair of contradictory elements.We derive the characteristics of land use structure and industrial structure transformation in Xining City using Transformation Coefficient(TC):first,in the period 1999-2000,the land use structure coefficient(θ1) declined by 79.55%,but the overall evolution trend is gentle;second,the transformation coefficient of industrial structure(θ2) tended to decline ceaselessly on the whole,a decrease of 36.09%(overall,the transformation coefficient of industrial structure is slightly greater than the land use structure coefficient);third,the inter-annual variation of the two experienced ups and downs(in the period 1999-2007,the inter-annual variation was great and in the period 2008-2010,the inter-annual variation tended to be gentle).On the basis of autocorrelation and co-integration model,we draw the following conclusions through analysis:first,the land use structure in Xining City plays a role in promoting industrial structure transformation;second,there is a long-term equilibrium relationship between the two.Finally,relevant policy recommendations are put forward for the industrial development in Xining City.

  7. Evolution of groups with a hierarchical structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Teruaki

    2012-12-01

    The universal occurrence of a hierarchical structure and its dynamic behavior in various types of group, living or abstract, are discussed. Here the word “group” refers not only to tangible aggregation but also to invisible aggregation of social psychological and of geopolitical meaning. The evolution of these groups is simulated using a model of agents distributed on the lattices of cellular grids. It is assumed that agents, fearing isolation, interact asymmetrically with each other with regard to exchange of “power”. As an indicator of hierarchy, the Gini coefficient is introduced. Example calculations are made for the aggregation, fusion and fission of animal groups, and for the appearance of a powerful empire and the rise and fall of supremacy. It is shown that such abstract objects evolve with time in accordance with the universal rules of groups common to birds and fish.

  8. The structure and evolution of coronal holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timothy, A. F.; Krieger, A. S.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1975-01-01

    Soft X-ray observations of coronal holes are analyzed to determine the structure, temporal evolution, and rotational properties of those features as well as possible mechanisms which may account for their almost rigid rotational characteristics. It is shown that coronal holes are open features with a divergent magnetic-field configuration resulting from a particular large-scale magnetic-field topology. They are apparently formed when the successive emergence and dispersion of active-region fields produce a swath of unipolar field founded by fields of opposite polarity, and they die when large-scale field patterns emerge which significantly distort the original field configuration. Two types of holes are described (compact and elongated), and three possible rotation mechanisms are considered: a rigidly rotating subphotospheric phenomenon, a linking of high and low latitudes by closed field lines, and an interaction between moving coronal material and open field lines.

  9. On the structure of the He(21S) + Ar potential energy curve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Differential cross sections for He(21S) + Ar have been measured for six kinetic energies between 21 and 180 meV with an improved apparatus. The potential which gives the best fit to the data shows again a maximum instead of only a slope maximum as proposed by previous workers. Calculated total elastic and inelastic cross sections are in good agreement with recent experimental results. (author)

  10. Surface structure investigation of C/C composites by Ar ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: C/C composites are an attractive choice for components in nuclear reactors because of their excellent performance in high temperature resistance, corrosion resistance and radiation resistance. However, to the best of our knowledge, the radiation research on their morphology and microstructure are scant. Purpose: The aim is to investigate the morphology and microstructure of C/C composites induced by irradiation. Methods: The C/C composites were irradiated with 0.5 MeV and l MeV Ar ions at room temperature. The samples prepared before and after irradiation have been characterized by Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results: With the increment of irradiation dose, the surface defects in the irradiated samples greatly increase. Moreover, some cracks and holes are found in the matrix surfaces, and the largest ones are even up to the size of one micrometer. Conclusion: The surface defects in the matrix caused by 0.5 MeV Ar ion with dose of 2.4 x 1016 ions·cm-2 are much more than those by 1 MeV Ar ion with dose of 3 x 1016 ions·cm-2. (authors)

  11. The formation, structure, and evolution of plasmoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The configuration and topology of the Earth's magnetotail is radically altered during geomagnetic substorms by the formation and subsequent ejection of large scale magnetic and plasma structures called plasmoids. The formation, structure, evolution and topology of plasmoids are studied by examining the magnetic and plasma data from the 1983 ISEE 3 Geotail Mission. This deep tail data set is combined with observations in the middle tail by IMP 8, at geosynchronous orbit and from ground auroral magnetometer stations to develop a unified flux rope plasmoid model. It is found that plasmoids are highly correlated with geomagnetic substorms, are large (approximately 10-20 R(sub E)), rapidly tailward moving (approximately 500 km s(exp -1)) magnetic flux rope structures, and are very stable (i.e., do not change size, downtail velocity, internal electron plasma energy density, or magnetic field signatures as a function of distance downtail). Evidence for the flux rope topology includes the strong correlation of the direction of the core magnetic field in the interplanetary magnetic field direction, the existence of plasmoids with various orientations with respect to the GSM xy plane, and the apparent mass flux of cool magnetosheath electrons into the structure as the plasmoid propagates downtail. Plasmoids are found to be a ubiquitous feature of the distant magnetotail and are occasionally observed in the relatively near-Earth tail by IMP 8. Due to the apparent large vertical extent of plasmoids, they affect the shape and size of the entire magnetosphere as they propagate downtail. Indirect observations of plasmoids are made in the plasma sheet boundary layer, the lobe, and the magnetosheath adjacent to the magnetopause. Because of their prevalence, size, velocity and magnetic and plasma energy content, plasmoids play an important role in the configuration, morphology, topology, and energy budget of the magnetosphere during geomagnetic substorms

  12. Models of protocellular structures, functions and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; New, Michael H.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The central step in the origin of life was the emergence of organized structures from organic molecules available on the early earth. These predecessors to modern cells, called 'proto-cells,' were simple, membrane bounded structures able to maintain themselves, grow, divide, and evolve. Since there is no fossil record of these earliest of life forms, it is a scientific challenge to discover plausible mechanisms for how these entities formed and functioned. To meet this challenge, it is essential to create laboratory models of protocells that capture the main attributes associated with living systems, while remaining consistent with known, or inferred, protobiological conditions. This report provides an overview of a project which has focused on protocellular metabolism and the coupling of metabolism to energy transduction. We have assumed that the emergence of systems endowed with genomes and capable of Darwinian evolution was preceded by a pre-genomic phase, in which protocells functioned and evolved using mostly proteins, without self-replicating nucleic acids such as RNA.

  13. Modification of stearic acid in Ar and Ar-O2 pulsed DC discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stearic acid (C18H36O2) was treated into Ar and Ar-O2(10%) pulsed DC discharge created by a cathode-anode confined system. The samples were placed at the floating potential. The results show that the mass variation of the stearic acid samples after Ar-O2 plasma exposure is more important than the pure Ar plasma treatments. This comportment demonstrate that the oxygen actives species (O and O2 in all states) strongly enhance the etching process with regards to A* species, regardless of their concentration. After treatment by Ar and Ar-O2 plasma, analyses by X-ray diffraction show a significant structural modification of the samples surface, utilizing Ar-O2 plasma the modification was more pronounced. The chemical composition evolution shows that the acid function is etched preferentially in the beginning of the treatment (about 5 min) and that after 10 min the carbonic chains seems to be functionalized by oxygen. (author)

  14. Fine structure in the beta-delayed proton decay of 33Ar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-energy beta-delayed protons from 33Ar have been measured for the first time. The data reveal states, which, despite unfavourable barrier penetrability values, strongly decay to the first excited 2+ state in 32S. The observation is discussed in terms of the standard shell model. A natural explanation is provided by the large spectroscopic amplitudes, involving s1/2 and d3/2 orbitals, as well as the l=0 barrier penetrability, favouring the decay to the 2+ state. (orig.)

  15. Connectivity of neutral networks and structural conservation in protein evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Bastolla, Ugo; Porto, Markus; Roman, H. Eduardo; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2001-01-01

    Protein structures are much more conserved than sequences during evolution. Based on this observation, we investigate the consequences of structural conservation on protein evolution. We study seven of the most studied protein folds, finding out that an extended neutral network in sequence space is associated to each of them. Within our model, neutral evolution leads to a non-Poissonian substitution process, due to the broad distribution of connectivities in neutral networks. The observation ...

  16. Models of Protocellular Structure, Function and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    New, Michael H.; Pohorille, Andrew; Szostak, Jack W.; Keefe, Tony; Lanyi, Janos K.

    2001-01-01

    In the absence of any record of protocells, the most direct way to test our understanding of the origin of cellular life is to construct laboratory models that capture important features of protocellular systems. Such efforts are currently underway in a collaborative project between NASA-Ames, Harvard Medical School and University of California. They are accompanied by computational studies aimed at explaining self-organization of simple molecules into ordered structures. The centerpiece of this project is a method for the in vitro evolution of protein enzymes toward arbitrary catalytic targets. A similar approach has already been developed for nucleic acids in which a small number of functional molecules are selected from a large, random population of candidates. The selected molecules are next vastly multiplied using the polymerase chain reaction. A mutagenic approach, in which the sequences of selected molecules are randomly altered, can yield further improvements in performance or alterations of specificities. Unfortunately, the catalytic potential of nucleic acids is rather limited. Proteins are more catalytically capable but cannot be directly amplified. In the new technique, this problem is circumvented by covalently linking each protein of the initial, diverse, pool to the RNA sequence that codes for it. Then, selection is performed on the proteins, but the nucleic acids are replicated. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  17. Shell structure evolution in nuclei: new paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shell structure evolution in nuclei situated at the extremes of neutron and proton excess are investigated using in-beam gamma spectroscopy techniques with radioactive beams at GANIL. A selection of results obtained very recently is presented: i) The reduced transition probabilities B(E2;01+ → 2+) of the neutron-rich 74Zn and 70Ni nuclei have been measured using Coulomb excitation at intermediate energy. An unexpected large proton core polarization has been found in 70Ni and interpreted as being due to the monopole interaction between the neutron g9/2 and protons f7/2 and f5/2 spin-orbit partner orbitals. ii) Two proton knock-out reactions has been performed in order to study the most neutron-rich nuclei at the N=28 shell closure. Gamma rays spectra and momentum distribution have been obtained for 42Si and neighboring nuclei. Evidences has been found for a deformed structure for 42Si and for the disappearance of the spherical N=28 shell effect. iii) The in-beam gamma spectroscopy of 36Ca performed using neutron knock-out reactions revealed that N=16 is as large sub-shell closure as large as Z=16 in 36S. The uniquely large excitation energy difference of the first 2+ state in these mirror nuclei turns out to be a consequence of the relatively pure neutron (in 36Ca) or proton (in 36S) 1p(d3/2)-1h(s1/2) nature. (author)

  18. Structural control and K/Ar dating of the Au-Ag epithermal veins in the Shila Cordillera, southern Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Au-Ag epithermal mineralization of the Shila Cordillera is dated at about 10.7 Ma (K/Ar on adularia). The vein system is characterized by the association of a major ≅ east-west vein and N120-135 deg. E secondary fractures. The strike-slip faults controlling the veins indicate an initial NE-SW to ENE-WSW Shortening direction, which is compatible with that generally accepted for this period. These structures were reopened during a second phase and channeled mineralizing fluids, the circulation of which may have began at the end of stage 1. (authors)

  19. Relationship between human evolution and neurally mediated syncope disclosed by the polymorphic sites of the adrenergic receptor gene α2B-AR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyoshi Komiyama

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to clarify the effects of disease on neurally mediated syncope (NMS during an acute stress reaction. We analyzed the mechanism of the molecular interaction and the polymorphisms of the alpha-2 adrenoreceptor (α2B-AR gene as the potential psychiatric cause of incentive stress. We focused on the following three genotypes of the repeat polymorphism site at Glu 301-303 in the α2B-AR gene: Glu12/12, Glu12/9, and Glu9/9. On the basis of our clinical research, NMS is likely to occur in people with the Glu12/9 heterotype. To verify this, we assessed this relationship with the interaction of Gi protein and adenylate cyclase by in silico analysis of the Glu12/9 heterotype. By measuring the difference in the dissociation time of the Gi-α subunit twice, we found that the Glu12/9 heterotype suppressed the action of adenylate cyclase longer than the Glu homotypes. As this difference in the Glu repeat number effect is thought to be one of the causes of NMS, we investigated the evolutionary significance of the Glu repeat number. Glu8 was originally repeated in simians, while the Glu12 repeats occurred over time during the evolution of bipedalism in humans. Taken with the Glu12 numbers, NMS would likely become a defensive measure to prevent significant blood flow to the human brain.

  20. Investigation of porous structure in the PET films irradiated with Ar ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of etching through pores of small radii in polyethylenetherephthalate films irradiated with Ar ions having the energy of 1 MeV/u was studied. The etching process of ion tracks was sensitized by UV illumination and by soaking in the solvent at room temperature. Information about the pore shapes and sizes was obtained with electron microscopy methods both at the film surface and in the bulk of the films depending on etching duration. It was found that with etching in 2 N NaOH solution, through pores may be obtained with diameters from 70 nm to several micrometers. The pores have regular cylindrical shape throughout the entire range of sizes

  1. Investigation of porous structure in the PET films irradiated with Ar ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryk, M.T. [National University, ' Kyiv-Mohyla Academy' (Ukraine); Kobets, A.F. [National Science Center, ' Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology' (Ukraine); Kryshtal, A. [Karazin Kharkov National University, Department of Crystal Physics, Svobody Square 4, 61077 Kharkov (Ukraine); Vorobyova, I.V. [Karazin Kharkov National University, Department of Crystal Physics, Svobody Square 4, 61077 Kharkov (Ukraine)]. E-mail: inessa.v.vorobyova@univer.kharkov.ua; Zajtsev, B.V. [National Science Center, ' Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology' (Ukraine)

    2006-10-15

    The process of etching through pores of small radii in polyethylenetherephthalate films irradiated with Ar ions having the energy of 1 MeV/u was studied. The etching process of ion tracks was sensitized by UV illumination and by soaking in the solvent at room temperature. Information about the pore shapes and sizes was obtained with electron microscopy methods both at the film surface and in the bulk of the films depending on etching duration. It was found that with etching in 2 N NaOH solution, through pores may be obtained with diameters from 70 nm to several micrometers. The pores have regular cylindrical shape throughout the entire range of sizes.

  2. Shaping Galaxy Evolution with Galaxy Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, Edmond

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental pursuit of astronomy is to understand galaxy evolution. The enormous scales and complex physics involved in this endeavor guarantees a never-ending journey that has enamored both astronomers and laymen alike. But despite the difficulty of this task, astronomers have still attempted to further this goal. Among of these astronomers is Edwin Hubble. His work, which includes the famous Hubble sequence, has immeasurably influenced our understanding of galaxy evolution. In this thesis...

  3. Evolution of the reaction 40Ar + Ag from E/A = 7 to 34 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 4π charged-particle multidetector AMPHORA has been used to study the reaction 40Ar + natAg from 270 - 1,356 MeV. Charged-particle multiplicity distributions show a low-multiplicity group associated with peripheral collisions and a high multiplicity group associated with central collisions. Average multiplicities for central collisions increase with increasing projectile energy, indicating ever-increasing collision violence. Angular distributions of emitted protons are essentially isotorpic for θ ≥ 80 degree in a reference frame characterized by the empirical systematics of linear momentum transfer (i.e. ∼ 100% to ∼ 70% from 7-34 MeV/nucleon). Spectra of these protons at side angles are evaporation-like in shape and indicate relative effective temperatures of 3, 6, 8, and 12 MeV for beam energies of 7, 17, 27 and 34 MeV respectively. Azimuthal angular correlations between various pairs are consistent with spin-driven emission from emitter sources of reasonable spin values. In short, these results support a classical picture of extensively thermalized emitter nuclei even for initial excitation energies of ∼ 5 MeV per system nucleon and spins of ≥ 100ℎ

  4. Shell evolution: A paradigm of structure of exotic nuclei?

    OpenAIRE

    Otsuka, Taka

    2003-01-01

    The evolution of shell structure and magic numbers of exotic nuclei are discussed with a rather pedagogical introduction. A major origin of the shell evolution is shown to be the spin-isospin dependent central part of the nucleon-nucleon interaction in nuclei. The importance and robustness of this mechanism ...

  5. Evolution and Structural Analyses of Glossina morsitans (Diptera; Glossinidae) Tetraspanins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murungi, E.K.; Kariithi, H.M.; Adunga, V.; Obonyo, M.; Christoffels, A.

    2014-01-01

    Tetraspanins are important conserved integral membrane proteins expressed in many organisms. Although there is limited knowledge about the full repertoire, evolution and structural characteristics of individual members in various organisms, data obtained so far show that tetraspanins play major role

  6. Experimental study of the structure of rich premixed 1,3-butadiene/CH4/O2/Ar flame

    CERN Document Server

    Gueniche, Hadj-Ali; Fournet, René; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique

    2006-01-01

    The structure of a laminar rich premixed 1,3-C4H6/CH4/O2/Ar flame have been investigated. 1,3-Butadiene, methane, oxygen and argon mole fractions are 0.033; 0.2073; 0.3315, and 0.4280, respectively, for an equivalent ratio of 1.80. The flame has been stabilized on a burner at a pressure of 6.7 kPa (50 Torr). The concentration profiles of stable species were measured by gas chromatography after sampling with a quartz probe. Quantified species included carbon monoxide and dioxide, methane, oxygen, hydrogen, ethane, ethylene, acetylene, propyne, allene, propene, cyclopropane, 1,3-butadiene, butenes, 1-butyne, vinylacetylene, diacetylene, C5 compounds, benzene, and toluene. The temperature was measured thanks to a thermocouple in PtRh (6%)-PtRh (30%) settled inside the enclosure and ranged from 900 K close to the burner up to 2100 K.

  7. Structural Architecture and Evolution of Kumkuli Basin, North Tibet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Bizhu; Xu Zhiqin; Jiao Cunli; Cui Junwen; Wang Shenglang; Wang Gonghuai; Li Zhaoyang; Qiu Zhuli

    2009-01-01

    Utilizing the new data of gravity, magnetic, and magnetotelluric survey, we analyzed the characteristics of the three geophysical attribute (gravity, magnetic, and resistivity) interfaces and the deep architecture and structure of Kumkuli basin. The research results can provide basic data for early basin structural study. From coupled basin and mountain system, analysis of the structure, and evolution of Knmknli basin, we found that there was zoning from north to south and from west to east. Kumkuli basin has three structural architecture layers including metamorphic crystallization basement, fold basement and sedimentary cover. Knmkuli basin can be divided into three structural units, two depressions, and one uplift. Structural evolution of the Kumkuli basin can be divided into five evolution stages, including Kumkuli microcontinent formed in Sinian-Ordovician, suture around Kumkuli basin formed in Eopaleozoic, retroarc foreland basin formed in Neopaleozoic, rejuvenated foreland hasin developed in Mesozoic, and strike slip and compression basin developed in Cenozoic.

  8. Modeling Temporal Evolution and Multiscale Structure in Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlau, Tue; Mørup, Morten; Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard

    Many real-world networks exhibit both temporal evolution and multiscale structure. We propose a model for temporally correlated multifurcating hierarchies in complex networks which jointly capture both effects. We use the Gibbs fragmentation tree as prior over multifurcating trees and a change......-point model to account for the temporal evolution of each vertex. We demonstrate that our model is able to infer time-varying multiscale structure in synthetic as well as three real world time-evolving complex networks. Our modeling of the temporal evolution of hierarchies brings new insights into the...

  9. Spectroanalytical investigations on inductively coupled N2/Ar and Ar/Ar high frequency plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to improve the detection limits of trace elements in corrosion products of metallic materials, the inductively coupled plasma excitation source (ICP) was applied for spectroscopic analysis. Besides optimizing the working conditions for the mentioned materials, the fundamental research clearing the excitation processes in ICP was carried out. Basicly, two plasma systems were investigated: the nitrogen cooled N2/Ar- and pure Ar/Ar-plasma. The computed detection limits for 8 chosen elements are between 0.1 and 50 μg ml-1 in both plasmas. The advantage of ion lines was clearly present; in N2/Ar-plasma it was larger than in Ar/Ar-plasma. The excitation temperatures measured with help of ArI, FeI and ZnI lines rise with increasing power and decreasing distance from the induction coil. The distribution of Zn excitation temperature in N2/Ar-plasma as well as the measured N+2 rotational and CN vibrational temperatures indicate, that the toroidal structure of Ar/Ar-plasma is not analogue to the N2/Ar-plasma. The values of the various excitation temperatures (Ar, Fe, Zn) and the differences between the excitation, vibration, rotation and ionization temperatures (Tsub(i) > Tsub(n) = Tsub(vib) > Tsub(rot)) indicate an absence of thermal equilibrium in the concerned system. (orig.)

  10. Ars Electronica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Thomas Bjørnsten

    2009-01-01

    Anmeldelse af Ars Electronica festivalen 3. - 8. september, 2009 i Linz, Østrig, der fejrede 30 års jubilæum under temaet "Human Nature". Festivalen fokuserer på interaktion mellem menneske, teknologi, kunst og samfund med særlig vægt på udviklingen af computeren og det digitale. Udgivelsesdato: 15.12...

  11. Search for ArGa structures for development of coordinate-sensitive detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GaAs samples have been investigated with the view to estimate the possibilities to use them in the coordinate detectors. As a result of the analysis of β-radiation spectra the samples of the π-ν-n-structure, whose signal spectrum from minimal ionizing particle is reliably singled out from the noise spectrum, have been chosen. The mechanism of signal forming in such structure has been considered. It has been concluded that π-ν-n-structure on the basis of the compensated GaAs is very promising as far as the construction of the coordinate sensitive detectors is concerned. 9 refs.; 15 figs

  12. Structural evolution of small ruthenium cluster anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldt, Eugen [Institut für Nanotechnologie, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Hehn, Anna-Sophia; Ahlrichs, Reinhart [Institute für Physikalische Chemie, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Kaiserstrasse 12, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Kappes, Manfred M.; Schooss, Detlef, E-mail: detlef.schooss@kit.edu [Institut für Nanotechnologie, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute für Physikalische Chemie, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Kaiserstrasse 12, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-01-14

    The structures of ruthenium cluster anions have been investigated using a combination of trapped ion electron diffraction and density functional theory computations in the size range from eight to twenty atoms. In this size range, three different structural motifs are found: Ru{sub 8}{sup −}–Ru{sub 12}{sup −} have simple cubic structures, Ru{sub 13}{sup −}–Ru{sub 16}{sup −} form double layered hexagonal structures, and larger clusters form close packed motifs. For Ru{sub 17}{sup −}, we find hexagonal close packed stacking, whereas octahedral structures occur for Ru{sub 18}{sup −}–Ru{sub 20}{sup −}. Our calculations also predict simple cubic structures for the smaller clusters Ru{sub 4}{sup −}–Ru{sub 7}{sup −}, which were not accessible to electron diffraction measurements.

  13. Evolution of extortion in structured populations

    CERN Document Server

    Szolnoki, Attila

    2014-01-01

    Extortion strategies can dominate any opponent in an iterated prisoner's dilemma game. But if players are able to adopt the strategies performing better, extortion becomes widespread and evolutionary unstable. It may sometimes act as a catalyst for the evolution of cooperation, and it can also emerge in interactions between two populations, yet it is not the evolutionary stable outcome. Here we revisit these results in the realm of spatial games. We find that pairwise imitation and birth-death dynamics return known evolutionary outcomes. Myopic best response strategy updating, on the other hand, reveals new counterintuitive solutions. Defectors and extortioners coarsen spontaneously, which allows cooperators to prevail even at prohibitively high temptations to defect. Here extortion strategies play the role of a Trojan horse. They may emerge among defectors by chance, and once they do, cooperators become viable as well. These results are independent of the interaction topology, and they highlight the importan...

  14. Combined 40Ar/39Ar and Fission-Track study of the Freetown Layered Igneous Complex, Freetown, Sierra Leone, West Africa: Implications for the Initial Break-up of Pangea to form the Central Atlantic Ocean and Insight into the Post-rift Evolution of the Sie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrie, Ibrahim; Wijbrans, Jan; Andriessen, Paul; Beunk, Frank; Strasser-King, Victor; Fode, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    Sierra Leone lies within the south-western part of the West African Craton and comprises two major Archaean structural divisions: a low-grade granite-greenstone terrane characterised by N-S striking structures and a NW-SE striking highly metamorphosed belt of strained rocks that form the coastal margin of the craton. Intruded into the belt is the Freetown Layered Igneous Complex (FLIC), a tholeiitic magamtic body emplaced prior to or during the break-up of Pangea to form the Central Atlantic Ocean and, forming today the high ground of the coastal outline of Sierra Leone which is one of the most distinctive features on the West African coast. The break-up of Pangaea to form the Central Atlantic and its passive margins began in the Early Jurassic. Geo-tectonically, the break-up was particularly characterised by the formation of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP), covering once-contiguous parts of North America, Europe, Africa and South America. The FLIC forming part of the heart of CAMP is the largest single layered igneous intrusive yet known on either side of the Central Atlantic, measuring on surface, 65 x 14 x 7 km. Geophysical investigations indicate that the intrusion extends offshore to a depth of about 20 km. Geologically the Complex is a rhythmically layered elongated ultramafic-mafic lopolith divisible into 4 major zones each comprising repeated sequences of troctolitic, gabbroic and anorthositic rocks. An idealised unit of layering is from base upwards: dunite, troctolite, olivine-gabbro, leuco-gabbro, gabbro-norite and anorthosite cumulates. 40Ar-39Ar age spectra and 40Ar/36Ar versus 39Ar/36Ar isochron plots obtained by stepwise-heating experiments on plagioclases, biotites and amphiboles from troctolites, olivine-gabbros, gabbro-norites and anorthosites of the four zones yield plateau and isochron ages that seem to depict the cooling history of the Complex after emplacement. The biotites and some of the plagioclases and amphiboles give very

  15. Low-energy structure of neutron-rich S, Cl and Ar nuclides through β decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed nuclear structure studies of 20≤N≤28, 14≤Z≤20 nuclides have been limited until recently due to the lack of a good production mechanism. With the advent of projectile fragmentation facilities these nuclides can now be produced, separated, and studied in detail using several different techniques. Two recent experiments conducted at the NSCL have provided information on the β decays of 39,40,41P, 40,41,42,43S, and 42,43,44,45Cl, which will be used to establish level schemes for the daughter nuclides. These will provide a better understanding of the systematic change from spherical to deformed shapes within the proton sd and neutron fp shells. Presented here are preliminary results from these experiments with an emphasis placed on the structure of the deformed nucleus 40S

  16. Low-energy structure of neutron-rich S, Cl and Ar nuclides through [beta] decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winger, J.A.; Yousif, H.H.; Ma, W.C.; Ravikumar, V.; Lui, W.; Phillips, S.K.; Piercey, R.B. (Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States) National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States))

    1998-12-01

    Detailed nuclear structure studies of 20[le]N[le]28, 14[le]Z[le]20 nuclides have been limited until recently due to the lack of a good production mechanism. With the advent of projectile fragmentation facilities these nuclides can now be produced, separated, and studied in detail using several different techniques. Two recent experiments conducted at the NSCL have provided information on the [beta] decays of [sup 39,40,41]P, [sup 40,41,42,43]S, and [sup 42,43,44,45]Cl, which will be used to establish level schemes for the daughter nuclides. These will provide a better understanding of the systematic change from spherical to deformed shapes within the proton sd and neutron fp shells. Presented here are preliminary results from these experiments with an emphasis placed on the structure of the deformed nucleus [sup 40]S. [copyright] [ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.

  17. Low-energy structure of neutron-rich S, Cl and Ar nuclides through {beta} decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winger, J.A.; Yousif, H.H.; Ma, W.C.; Ravikumar, V.; Lui, W.; Phillips, S.K.; Piercey, R.B. [Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)]|[National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    1998-12-01

    Detailed nuclear structure studies of 20{le}N{le}28, 14{le}Z{le}20 nuclides have been limited until recently due to the lack of a good production mechanism. With the advent of projectile fragmentation facilities these nuclides can now be produced, separated, and studied in detail using several different techniques. Two recent experiments conducted at the NSCL have provided information on the {beta} decays of {sup 39,40,41}P, {sup 40,41,42,43}S, and {sup 42,43,44,45}Cl, which will be used to establish level schemes for the daughter nuclides. These will provide a better understanding of the systematic change from spherical to deformed shapes within the proton sd and neutron fp shells. Presented here are preliminary results from these experiments with an emphasis placed on the structure of the deformed nucleus {sup 40}S. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Beneath the surface of giant planets: Evolution, structure, and composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly Miller, Neil L.

    This thesis is focused on utilizing the combination of giant exoplanet mass via radial velocity observations and radius via transit observations to study their structure and evolution. In Chapter 2, Giant planet thermal evolution models are coupled to tidal evolution dynamics, including orbital evolution and planet interior heating. Viable tidal evolution histories are explored to explain inflated radii of hot Jupiters. Tidal evolution is demonstrated to be a viable heating mechanism in some cases, but for other cases it can not explain the large radii. The thesis continues in Chapter 3 by exhibiting cases when the tidal-thermal evolution model, including energy-limited mass loss, can be used to infer interior properties and demonstrate a possible evolution history. Specifically, I utilize the thermal evolution models to examine planets CoRoT-2b, CoRoT-7b, and the Kepler-11 system. In Chapter 4, planets with lower incident irradiation are examined to infer the heavy element composition inside a range of planets. These planets don't appear to be significantly inflated by the unknown radius inflation mechanism, thus the mysterious mechanism can be ignored. It is shown that the heavy element mass inside these planets correlates with the metallicity of the star. The heavy element mass also correlates with the mass of the planet. However, the heavy element enrichment is inversely related to the mass of the planet. In the final chapter, I develop a mixing equation of state code for the MESA stellar evolution project. This code is developed with the intention of studying inhomogeneous thermal evolution of planets.

  19. Melt evolution beneath a rifted craton edge: 40Ar/39Ar geochronology and Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotope systematics of primitive alkaline basalts and lamprophyres from the SW Baltic Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappe, Sebastian; Smart, Katie A.; Stracke, Andreas; Romer, Rolf L.; Prelević, Dejan; van den Bogaard, Paul

    2016-01-01

    A new high-precision 40Ar/39Ar anorthoclase feldspar age of 176.7 ± 0.5 Ma (2-sigma) reveals that small-volume alkaline basaltic magmatism occurred at the rifted SW margin of the Baltic Shield in Scania (southern Sweden), at a time of global plate reorganization associated with the inception of Pangea supercontinent break-up. Our combined elemental and Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotope dataset for representative basanite and nephelinite samples (>8 wt.% MgO) from 16 subvolcanic necks of the 30 by 40 km large Jurassic volcanic field suggests magma derivation from a moderately depleted mantle source (87Sr/86Sri = 0.7034-0.7048; εNdi = +4.4 to +5.2; εHfi = +4.7 to +8.1; 206Pb/204Pbi = 18.8-19.5). The mafic alkaline melts segregated from mixed peridotite-pyroxenite mantle with a potential temperature of ∼1400 °C at 2.7-4.2 GPa (∼90-120 km depths), which places ultimate melt generation within the convecting upper mantle, provided that the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary beneath the southern Baltic Shield margin was at ⩽100 km depth during Mesozoic-Cenozoic rifting. Isotopic shifts and incompatible element enrichment relative to Depleted Mantle reflect involvement of at least 20% recycled oceanic lithosphere component (i.e., pyroxenite) with some minor continent-derived sediment during partial melting of well-stirred convecting upper mantle peridotite. Although pargasitic amphibole-rich metasomatized lithospheric mantle is excluded as the main source of the Jurassic magmas from Scania, hydrous ultramafic veins (i.e., hornblendite) may have caused subtle modifications to the compositions of passing sublithospheric melts. For example, modeling suggests that the more radiogenic Hf (εHfi = +6.3 to +8.1) and Pb (206Pb/204Pbi = 18.9-19.5) isotopic compositions of the more sodic and H2O-rich nephelinites, compared with relatively homogenous basanites (εHfi = +4.7 to +6.1; 206Pb/204Pbi = 18.8-18.9), originate from minor interactions between rising asthenospheric melts and

  20. BAK-SNEPPEN MODELS FOR THE EVOLUTION OF STRUCTURED KNOWLEDGE

    OpenAIRE

    Piccinini, Livio Clemente; Chang, Ting Fa Margherita; Lepellere, Maria Antonietta; Taverna, Mario; Tubaro, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Scientific knowledge is subject to a twin evolution, since its development towards novelty creates disconnections and inconsistencies, while the need of structure requires order and method so that transmission and comprehension can be ensured. Models of biological evolution can help to understand many social and economical phenomena where the search for optimality is hindered by voluntary or random competition. Bak-Sneppen is one of the most significant models because it balances at best expl...

  1. Evolution of Sex-Ratio in Structured Population Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Ripoll i Missé, Jordi

    2005-01-01

    In this Thesis we address the study of some non-linear evolution equations (e.g. pde's) modelling the dynamics of sexually-reproducing structured populations, with special emphasis on biological evolution driven by natural selection. The latter is incorporated into the models through the adaptive dynamics, which is a way of describing how the hereditary characteristics of the population evolve. The sex-ratio, defined as the proportion between females and males, is analyzed from the evolutiona...

  2. Accelerated probabilistic inference of RNA structure evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holmes Ian

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pairwise stochastic context-free grammars (Pair SCFGs are powerful tools for evolutionary analysis of RNA, including simultaneous RNA sequence alignment and secondary structure prediction, but the associated algorithms are intensive in both CPU and memory usage. The same problem is faced by other RNA alignment-and-folding algorithms based on Sankoff's 1985 algorithm. It is therefore desirable to constrain such algorithms, by pre-processing the sequences and using this first pass to limit the range of structures and/or alignments that can be considered. Results We demonstrate how flexible classes of constraint can be imposed, greatly reducing the computational costs while maintaining a high quality of structural homology prediction. Any score-attributed context-free grammar (e.g. energy-based scoring schemes, or conditionally normalized Pair SCFGs is amenable to this treatment. It is now possible to combine independent structural and alignment constraints of unprecedented general flexibility in Pair SCFG alignment algorithms. We outline several applications to the bioinformatics of RNA sequence and structure, including Waterman-Eggert N-best alignments and progressive multiple alignment. We evaluate the performance of the algorithm on test examples from the RFAM database. Conclusion A program, Stemloc, that implements these algorithms for efficient RNA sequence alignment and structure prediction is available under the GNU General Public License.

  3. Geotectonic structural interpretation of the basement complex at the eastern border of the Espinhaco ridge, in Guanhaes and Gouveia region, based on an integration of their U/Pb and K/Ar geochronology united

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basement complex at the eastern border of the Espinhaco ridge is composed of predominantly gneissic rocks which were subjected to migmatization and granitization. Overall the area shows complex tectonic evolution with recurrence of tectonomagmatic and metamorphic events as supported by geological, geochronological and structural studies. The Rb/Sr geochronology carried out on the basement rocks and metavolcanics from the Espinhaco interpreted together with the published U-Pb, Rb-Sr and K-Ar data defines the following scenario for the Precambrian crustal evolution. 1. Primary origin of a sialic crust at 2.97-2.84 Ga. ago as supported by U-Pb zircon ages. 2. Crustal reworking of the Archean crust and subordinate juvenile accretion from upper mantle during the 2.2-2.OGa. period, as suggested by the isochrons. 3. Recurrence of Middle Proterozoic events over the basement rocks (gneisses and charnockites) and metavolcanics of the Espinhaco as showed by isochrons. 4. Development of Late Proterozoic migmatization over the basement rocks (0.75 Ga., R.I.= 0.787) is association with Collisional tectonics and resetting of K-Ar mineral systems. (author)

  4. Constraints on the evolution of the Japan Sea based on 40Ar-39Ar ages and Sr isotopic ratios for volcanic rocks of the Yamato Seamount chain in the Japan Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    40Ar-39Ar and Sr isotope analyses were performed on basalts and andesites dredged from the Yamato Seamount chain in the Japan Sea. The 40Ar-39Ar plateau ages range from about 11 to 17 Ma, though most samples show ages between 10 and 14 Ma. The seamounts seem to have formed within a period of a few million years, although some of them might have formed earlier. Based on the present results together with previously reported radiometric age data, it is thought that the Yamato Basin formed during some period prior to 17 Ma and probably later than around 25 Ma. Taking into account the radiometric age data on rocks from the Japan Basin, it is conjectured that the opening of the Japan Sea might have started almost at this time or a little earlier. The observed 87Sr/86Sr ratios range from 0.70357 to 0.70388, suggesting incorporation of some time-integrated components enriched in incompatible elements such as continental crustal materials. This may indicate that in the Japan Sea area, at least the Yamato Basin had not developed enough to show the characteristics of typical N-type MORB source materials without being affected by pre-existing continental crustal materials. (orig.)

  5. Evolution of atomic structure during nanoparticle formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoffer Tyrsted

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanism of nanoparticle formation during synthesis is a key prerequisite for the rational design and engineering of desirable materials properties, yet remains elusive due to the difficulty of studying structures at the nanoscale under real conditions. Here, the first comprehensive structural description of the formation of a nanoparticle, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ, all the way from its ionic constituents in solution to the final crystal, is presented. The transformation is a complicated multi-step sequence of atomic reorganizations as the material follows the reaction pathway towards the equilibrium product. Prior to nanoparticle nucleation, reagents reorganize into polymeric species whose structure is incompatible with the final product. Instead of direct nucleation of clusters into the final product lattice, a highly disordered intermediate precipitate forms with a local bonding environment similar to the product yet lacking the correct topology. During maturation, bond reforming occurs by nucleation and growth of distinct domains within the amorphous intermediary. The present study moves beyond kinetic modeling by providing detailed real-time structural insight, and it is demonstrated that YSZ nanoparticle formation and growth is a more complex chemical process than accounted for in conventional models. This level of mechanistic understanding of the nanoparticle formation is the first step towards more rational control over nanoparticle synthesis through control of both solution precursors and reaction intermediaries.

  6. Structural Approaches to Sequence Evolution Molecules, Networks, Populations

    CERN Document Server

    Bastolla, Ugo; Roman, H. Eduardo; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2007-01-01

    Structural requirements constrain the evolution of biological entities at all levels, from macromolecules to their networks, right up to populations of biological organisms. Classical models of molecular evolution, however, are focused at the level of the symbols - the biological sequence - rather than that of their resulting structure. Now recent advances in understanding the thermodynamics of macromolecules, the topological properties of gene networks, the organization and mutation capabilities of genomes, and the structure of populations make it possible to incorporate these key elements into a broader and deeply interdisciplinary view of molecular evolution. This book gives an account of such a new approach, through clear tutorial contributions by leading scientists specializing in the different fields involved.

  7. Dynamic structure evolution of time-dependent network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Beibei; Zhou, Yadong; Xu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Dai; Guan, Xiaohong

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we research the long-voided problem of formulating the time-dependent network structure evolution scheme, it focus not only on finding new emerging vertices in evolving communities and new emerging communities over the specified time range but also formulating the complex network structure evolution schematic. Previous approaches basically applied to community detection on time static networks and thus failed to consider the potentially crucial and useful information latently embedded in the dynamic structure evolution process of time-dependent network. To address these problems and to tackle the network non-scalability dilemma, we propose the dynamic hierarchical method for detecting and revealing structure evolution schematic of the time-dependent network. In practice and specificity, we propose an explicit hierarchical network evolution uncovering algorithm framework originated from and widely expanded from time-dependent and dynamic spectral optimization theory. Our method yields preferable results compared with previous approaches on a vast variety of test network data, including both real on-line networks and computer generated complex networks.

  8. Effets de la composition et de la structure de matrices polyosidiques sur la libération des arômes

    OpenAIRE

    Juteau, Alexandre

    2003-01-01

    S'il est admis que l'ajout d'agent texturant à la matrice alimentaire entraîne très souvent une diminution de la perception de l'arôme, les mécanismes des interactions texture / arôme restent peu connus ou controversés. Pour tenter de mieux comprendre les mécanismes mis en jeu, la libération au cours du temps de composés d'arôme a été suivie à partir de matrices de propriétés mécaniques et de degré de structuration préalablement caractérisés. Dans un premier temps, une gamme de matrices de pr...

  9. Crystallography, Evolution, and the Structure of Viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Rossmann, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    My undergraduate education in mathematics and physics was a good grounding for graduate studies in crystallographic studies of small organic molecules. As a postdoctoral fellow in Minnesota, I learned how to program an early electronic computer for crystallographic calculations. I then joined Max Perutz, excited to use my skills in the determination of the first protein structures. The results were even more fascinating than the development of techniques and provided inspiration for starting ...

  10. Structure, dynamics, and evolution of centromeric nucleosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Dalal, Yamini; Furuyama, Takehito; Vermaak, Danielle; Henikoff, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Centromeres are defining features of eukaryotic chromosomes, providing sites of attachment for segregation during mitosis and meiosis. The fundamental unit of centromere structure is the centromeric nucleosome, which differs from the conventional nucleosome by the presence of a centromere-specific histone variant (CenH3) in place of canonical H3. We have shown that the CenH3 nucleosome core found in interphase Drosophila cells is a heterotypic tetramer, a “hemisome” consisting of one molecule...

  11. Modelling the Evolution of Social Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutcliffe, A. G.; Dunbar, R. I. M.; Wang, D.

    2016-01-01

    Although simple social structures are more common in animal societies, some taxa (mainly mammals) have complex, multi-level social systems, in which the levels reflect differential association. We develop a simulation model to explore the conditions under which multi-level social systems of this kind evolve. Our model focuses on the evolutionary trade-offs between foraging and social interaction, and explores the impact of alternative strategies for distributing social interaction, with fitness criteria for wellbeing, alliance formation, risk, stress and access to food resources that reward social strategies differentially. The results suggest that multi-level social structures characterised by a few strong relationships, more medium ties and large numbers of weak ties emerge only in a small part of the overall fitness landscape, namely where there are significant fitness benefits from wellbeing and alliance formation and there are high levels of social interaction. In contrast, ‘favour-the-few’ strategies are more competitive under a wide range of fitness conditions, including those producing homogeneous, single-level societies of the kind found in many birds and mammals. The simulations suggest that the development of complex, multi-level social structures of the kind found in many primates (including humans) depends on a capacity for high investment in social time, preferential social interaction strategies, high mortality risk and/or differential reproduction. These conditions are characteristic of only a few mammalian taxa. PMID:27427758

  12. Modelling the Evolution of Social Structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A G Sutcliffe

    Full Text Available Although simple social structures are more common in animal societies, some taxa (mainly mammals have complex, multi-level social systems, in which the levels reflect differential association. We develop a simulation model to explore the conditions under which multi-level social systems of this kind evolve. Our model focuses on the evolutionary trade-offs between foraging and social interaction, and explores the impact of alternative strategies for distributing social interaction, with fitness criteria for wellbeing, alliance formation, risk, stress and access to food resources that reward social strategies differentially. The results suggest that multi-level social structures characterised by a few strong relationships, more medium ties and large numbers of weak ties emerge only in a small part of the overall fitness landscape, namely where there are significant fitness benefits from wellbeing and alliance formation and there are high levels of social interaction. In contrast, 'favour-the-few' strategies are more competitive under a wide range of fitness conditions, including those producing homogeneous, single-level societies of the kind found in many birds and mammals. The simulations suggest that the development of complex, multi-level social structures of the kind found in many primates (including humans depends on a capacity for high investment in social time, preferential social interaction strategies, high mortality risk and/or differential reproduction. These conditions are characteristic of only a few mammalian taxa.

  13. Model of evolution of surface grain structure under ion bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffusion and chemical reactions in multicomponent systems play an important role in numerous technology applications. For example, surface treatment of materials and coatings by particle beam leads to chemical composition and grain structure change. To investigate the thermal-diffusion and chemical processes affecting the evolution of surface structure, the mathematical modeling is efficient addition to experiment. In this paper two-dimensional model is discussed to describe the evolution of titanium nitride coating on the iron substrate under implantation of boron and carbon. The equation for diffusion fluxes and reaction rate are obtained using Gibbs energy expansion into series with respect to concentration and their gradients

  14. Anisotropic rearrangement of the substrate atoms during Ar bombardment on Pd(0 0 1) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang-Pil [Computational Science Center, Interdisciplinary Fusion Technology Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung-Hyun [Computational Science Center, Interdisciplinary Fusion Technology Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Haeri [Computational Science Center, Interdisciplinary Fusion Technology Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kwang-Ryeol, E-mail: krlee@kist.re.kr [Computational Science Center, Interdisciplinary Fusion Technology Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Yong-Chae [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Jikeun [Department of Ophthalmic Optics, Chodang University, Muan 534-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae-Sung [Department of Physics, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-01

    Using a three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, we investigated the atomic scale rearrangement that occurs on a Pd(0 0 1) surface after energetic bombardment by Ar at room temperature. High energy Ar bombardment provoked the significant rearrangement of Pd atoms in a ballistic manner with a fourfold symmetric lateral distribution aligned along the <1 1 0> direction. The MD simulation of uniform Ar bombardment at normal incidence on a Pd surface reproduced the experimentally observed fourfold symmetric nano-scale surface structure. The present result supports that the ballistic rearrangement of the substrate atoms plays an important role in the ion induced surface structure evolution.

  15. Zirconium nitride films deposited in (Ar + N2 + H2) sputtering atmosphere: Optical, structural, and electrical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zr-N films were grown on glass substrates via radio-frequency magnetron sputtering using an Ar + N2 + H2 mixture. Hydrogen was employed in order to reduce oxygen contamination coming from background pressure, as confirmed by secondary ion mass spectroscopy analysis. The tuned process parameter was the nitrogen flux percentage (RN2) in the mixture. The crystallographic structure of the films was studied using x-ray diffraction. The measurements show that the films deposited at low RN2 (lower than or equal to 50%) crystallize in the rocksalt ZrN structure. As RN2 exceeds 50%, the film exhibits the co-presence of ZrN and Zr3N4 (denoted as o-Zr3N4) phases. When the deposition is performed in only nitrogen atmosphere (RN2 = 100%), a broad peak located at 2θ≅ 32.2 deg. is mainly attributed to the contribution coming from (320) planes of the o-Zr3N4. An envelope method, based on the optical reflection and transmission spectra taken at normal incidence, has been applied for the optical characterization of the nitride films. Such a method allows the determination of the samples' average thickness and optical constants (refractive index n and extinction coefficient k) in the ultraviolet-visible-near infrared regions. The evaluated thickness was about 2500 nm, which is in good agreement with the value obtained from profilometry. The absorption coefficient α was calculated from reflectance and transmittance spectra. The energy bandgap ranges from 2.3 eV to 2.4 eV. Electrical characterization was performed using capacitance-voltage measurements, which showed that the films evolve from insulating to semiconductor behavior when the nitrogen content in the sputtering atmosphere is decreased, confirming structural and optical results.

  16. STRUCTURAL EVOLUTION IN BIORENEWABLE SOY BASED POLYURETHANES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deepa Puthanparambil; Casey Kimball; Shaw Ling Hsu; Zhiyong Ren

    2009-01-01

    Spectroscopic studies have revealed that the amount of polyureas formed and the kinetics of their formation in soy based polyurethane systems are considerably different from traditional systems employing ethylene oxide-propylene oxide (EO-PO) based polyols. The aggregation of polyureas was characterized by the hydrogen bonds formed utilizing FTIR spectroscopy. This study offered the opportunity to assign the previously undefined infrared features. The structural transformation is reflected in the segmental relaxation kinetics characterized by spin-spin diffusion most conveniently measured using low field NMR. The reaction kinetics and the products formed are directly related to the hydrophobic nature of the soy based polyols and its inability to disperse water.

  17. A spectroscopic study of the cycling transition 4s[3/2]_2-4p[5/2]_3 at 811.8 nm in Ar-39: Hyperfine structure and isotope shift

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, W; Rudinger, K; Xu, C -Y; Yokochi, R; Mueller, P

    2010-01-01

    Doppler-free saturated absorption spectroscopy is performed on an enriched radioactive Ar-39 sample. The spectrum of the 3s^2 3p^5 4s [3/2]_2 - 3s^2 3p^5 4p [5/2]_3 cycling transition at 811.8 nm is recorded, and its isotope shift between Ar-39 and Ar-40 is derived. The hyperfine coupling constants A and B for both the 4s [3/2]_2 and 4p [5/2]_3 energy levels in Ar-39 are also determined. The results partially disagree with a recently published measurement of the same transition. Based on earlier measurements as well as the current work, the isotope shift and hyperfine structure of the corresponding transition in Ar-37 are also calculated. These spectroscopic data are essential for the realization of laser trapping and cooling of Ar-37 and Ar-39.

  18. Vibrational Level Structures of the Ground Electronic States of the C_3-Ar and C_3-Ne Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Ren; Hsu, Yen-Chu

    2014-06-01

    The Heidelberg multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree package was used. to calculate the vibrational level structures of the ground electronic states of the C_3-Ar and C_3-Ne complexes. The previously reported 4-D ab initio potentials were converted to 6-D potentials by adding the potential energies of the C-C symmetric and antisymmetric stretching vibrations of C_3. They were subsequently transformed from internal coordinates to Jacobi coordinates. The kinetic-energy operators were taken from Yang and Kühn. Preliminary results show that large amplitude motions occur in five coordinates: C-C-C bond angle, out-of-plane tilt angle, van der Waals stretch, van der Waals bend and one of the C-C bonds. G.A. Worth, M.H. Beck, A. Jäckle, H.-D. Meyer, F. Otto, M. Brill, and O. Vendrell, The MCTDH package, version 8.4, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany, 2011. Y. Yang and O. Kühn, Mol. Phys., 106, 2445 (2008)

  19. Communication: Determining the structure of the N2Ar van der Waals complex with laser-based channel-selected Coulomb explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We experimentally reconstructed the structure of the N2Ar van der Waals complex with the technique of laser-based channel-selected Coulomb explosion imaging. The internuclear distance between the N2 center of mass and the Ar atom, i.e., the length of the van der Waals bond, was determined to be 3.88 Å from the two-body explosion channels. The angle between the van der Waals bond and the N2 principal axis was determined to be 90° from the three-body explosion channels. The reconstructed structure was contrasted with our high level ab initio calculations. The agreement demonstrated the potential application of laser-based Coulomb explosion in imaging transient molecular structure, particularly for floppy van der Waals complexes, whose structures remain difficult to be determined by conventional spectroscopic methods

  20. Time-resolved evolution of coherent structures in turbulent channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Duran, Adrian; Jimenez, Javier

    2012-11-01

    The temporal evolution of vortex clusters and of the structures responsible for the momentum transfer in turbulent channels at Reτ = 950 , 2000 and 4000 are studied using DNS sequences with temporal separations among fields short enough for individual structures to be tracked. From the geometric intersection of structures in consecutive fields we build temporal connection graphs of all the objects and define main and secondary branches in a way that each branch represents the temporal evolution of one coherent structure. A family of evolutions is found with self-similar sizes and lifetimes that can be born at any height with respect to the wall, although the probability increases close to it. Especial attention is paid to the wall-normal displacement of the structures. Sweeps tend to go towards the wall whereas ejections move away from it. In all the cases, the vertical velocity is close to uτ and the wall-normal displacement is proportional to the lifetime of the structures and to their sizes. Finally, direct and inverse physical cascades are defined, associated with the process of splitting and merging among structures. The direct cascade predominates, but both directions are roughly comparable. Funded by ERC, CICYT and Spanish Ministry of Science.

  1. Arc-oblique fault systems: their role in the Cenozoic structural evolution and metallogenesis of the Andes of central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piquer, Jose; Berry, Ron F.; Scott, Robert J.; Cooke, David R.

    2016-08-01

    The evolution of the Main Cordillera of Central Chile is characterized by the formation and subsequent inversion of an intra-arc volcano-tectonic basin. The world's largest porphyry Cu-Mo deposits were emplaced during basin inversion. Statistically, the area is dominated by NE- and NW-striking faults, oblique to the N-striking inverted basin-margin faults and to the axis of Cenozoic magmatism. This structural pattern is interpreted to reflect the architecture of the pre-Andean basement. Stratigraphic correlations, syn-extensional deposits and kinematic criteria on fault surfaces show several arc-oblique structures were active as normal faults at different stages of basin evolution. The geometry of syn-tectonic hydrothermal mineral fibers, in turn, demonstrates that most of these structures were reactivated as strike-slip ± reverse faults during the middle Miocene - early Pliocene. Fault reactivation age is constrained by 40Ar/39Ar dating of hydrothermal minerals deposited during fault slip. The abundance and distribution of these minerals indicates fault-controlled hydrothermal fluid flow was widespread during basin inversion. Fault reactivation occurred under a transpressive regime with E- to ENE-directed shortening, and was concentrated around major plutons and hydrothermal centers. At the margins of the former intra-arc basin, deformation was largely accommodated by reverse faulting, whereas in its central part strike-slip faulting was predominant.

  2. Structure, Function, and Evolution of Rice Centromeres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Jiming

    2010-02-04

    The centromere is the most characteristic landmark of eukaryotic chromosomes. Centromeres function as the site for kinetochore assembly and spindle attachment, allowing for the faithful pairing and segregation of sister chromatids during cell division. Characterization of centromeric DNA is not only essential to understand the structure and organization of plant genomes, but it is also a critical step in the development of plant artificial chromosomes. The centromeres of most model eukaryotic species, consist predominantly of long arrays of satellite DNA. Determining the precise DNA boundary of a centromere has proven to be a difficult task in multicellular eukaryotes. We have successfully cloned and sequenced the centromere of rice chromosome 8 (Cen8), representing the first fully sequenced centromere from any multicellular eukaryotes. The functional core of Cen8 spans ~800 kb of DNA, which was determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) using an antibody against the rice centromere-specific H3 histone. We discovered 16 actively transcribed genes distributed throughout the Cen8 region. In addition to Cen8, we have characterized eight additional rice centromeres using the next generation sequencing technology. We discovered four subfamilies of the CRR retrotransposon that is highly enriched in rice centromeres. CRR elements are constitutively transcribed and different CRR subfamilies are differentially processed by RNAi. These results suggest that different CRR subfamilies may play different roles in the RNAi-mediated pathway for formation and maintenance of centromeric chromatin.

  3. Structural evolution of Colloidal Gels under Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boromand, Arman; Maia, Joao; Jamali, Safa

    Colloidal suspensions are ubiquitous in different industrial applications ranging from cosmetic and food industries to soft robotics and aerospace. Owing to the fact that mechanical properties of colloidal gels are controlled by its microstructure and network topology, we trace the particles in the networks formed under different attraction potentials and try to find a universal behavior in yielding of colloidal gels. Many authors have implemented different simulation techniques such as molecular dynamics (MD) and Brownian dynamics (BD) to capture better picture during phase separation and yielding mechanism in colloidal system with short-ranged attractive force. However, BD neglects multi-body hydrodynamic interactions (HI) which are believed to be responsible for the second yielding of colloidal gels. We envision using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) with modified depletion potential and hydrodynamic interactions, as a coarse-grain model, can provide a robust simulation package to address the gel formation process and yielding in short ranged-attractive colloidal systems. The behavior of colloidal gels with different attraction potentials under flow is examined and structural fingerprints of yielding in these systems will be discussed.

  4. The evolution of the interplanetary sector structure in 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, A.; Erdos, G.; Forsyth, R. J.; Smith, E. J.

    1993-01-01

    The unique vantage point of the Ulysses spacecraft throughout 1992 and the beginning of 1993, at a close to constant heliocentric distance of about 5 AU and a slowly varying heliographic latitude from 5 deg to 30 deg south is used to describe and discuss the evolution of the sector structure of the interplanetary magnetic field during the declining phase of the solar cycle. From the end of 1990 to the beginning of 1992 the sector structure changed from a four sector to a two sector structure, but remained constant in solar longitude. From about June-July 1992, the structure, matching the evolution in the computed coronal magnetic fields, drifted eastwards, with a recurrence period of about 28 days. This result may indicate a slower rotation rate for the dipolar component of the solar magnetic field which becomes dominant about this time in the solar cycle.

  5. EVOLUTION OF APPROACHES TO DEFINITION AND STRUCTURIZATION OF INTELLECTUAL CAPITAL

    OpenAIRE

    V. Virchenko

    2012-01-01

    Article is devoted to analysis of peculiarities of evolution theoretical approaches to analysis of the nature of intellectual capital. The stages of development of the intellectual capital theory and approaches to it's structurization are investigated. Peculiarities of the intellectual capital are considered.

  6. Prolongation Structure of Semi-discrete Nonlinear Evolution Equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Based on noncommutative differential calculus, we present a theory of prolongation structure for semi-discrete nonlinear evolution equations. As an illustrative example, a semi-discrete model of the nonlinear Schr(o)dinger equation is discussed in terms of this theory and the corresponding Lax pairs are also given.

  7. Synthesis,structure and ethylene polymerization behavior of titanium complexes [C3H6(N = CH-Ar-O)2]TiCl2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Yangang; JIN Guoxin

    2004-01-01

    The reaction of C3H-6(N=CH-Ar-OH)2 (Ar =5-tert-butyl-C6H3 (2a), 3-tert-butyl-C6H3 (2b), 3-methyl-Call3(2c)) with 2 equiv, of BuLi followed by 1 equiv TiCh yields the dichloride complexes [C3H6(N=CH-Ar-O)2]TiCI2[Ar =5-tert-butyl-C6H3 (3a), 3-tert-butyl-C6H3 (3b), 3-methyl-C6H3 (3c)]. The structure of compound 3a has been confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analysis. These Ti (IV) dichloride complexes are active catalysts for the polymerization of ethylene with methylaluminoxane (MAO) as a cocatalyst. Activities up to 4.14 × l05 g (mol Ti h)-1 were obtained in dried toluene. And the molecular weights of polyethylene are in the range 1.53 × 104-16.4 × 104. Catalyst activity, polymer yield,and polymer molecular weight can be controlled over a wide range by changing the ligand structure and variation of reaction parameters such as Al-Ti ratio and polymerization reaction temperature.

  8. Hinterland-to-foreland structural evolution of the base of the Himalayan metamorphic core, west Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braden, Z.; Godin, L.; Yakymchuk, C.; Kellett, D.; Cottle, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The base of the Himalayan metamorphic core is a folded reverse-sense shear zone exposed extensively along its transport direction. In west Nepal, along-transport exposures show a transition in structural style from hinterland to foreland, and sampled quartzite and pelite show variations in thermobarometry, quartz crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO), monazite Th-Pb ages and 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology. In the hinterland region, the shear zone yields a deformation temperature gradient from > 700°C at the top of the shear zone down to 400°C at the base. Metamorphic grade also decreases downwards through the shear zone. Muscovite 40Ar/39Ar ages are ca. 6 Ma. In the transition zone separating hinterland and foreland on the north flank of the Karnali klippe, a comparable structural section yields a deformation temperature gradient that similarly decreases down structural level from ~700 to 500°C. Muscovite 40Ar/39Ar dating yield ca. 14-12 Ma cooling ages. In-situ monazite geochronology indicates prograde metamorphism at ca. 43-34 Ma and melt crystallization at ca. 26-18 Ma. In the foreland, deformation is not strictly brittle; CPO analyses on sheared quartzite on the south flank of the Karnali klippe suggest deformation temperatures decreasing from 500 to 400°C downwards through the shear zone. Muscovite from the foreland yields 40Ar/39Ar ages of ca. 17 Ma. Deformation temperatures decrease marginally from hinterland to foreland and structurally downward within the shear zone, and estimates suggest ductile deformation prevails well into the foreland. Hinterland 40Ar/39Ar muscovite ages in west Nepal are anomalously young, and are possibly related to recent exhumation due to the SE-propagating mid-Miocene Gurla Mandhata-Humla system. Alternatively, they could be linked to the activation of a young duplex in the footwall of the Himalayan metamorphic core due to along-strike variation in geometry of the Main Himalayan thrust ramp.

  9. The Evolution of Protein Structures and Structural Ensembles Under Functional Constraint

    OpenAIRE

    Liberles, David A; Grahnen, Johan A.; Jessica Siltberg-Liberles

    2011-01-01

    Protein sequence, structure, and function are inherently linked through evolution and population genetics. Our knowledge of protein structure comes from solved structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), our knowledge of sequence through sequences found in the NCBI sequence databases (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/), and our knowledge of function through a limited set of in-vitro biochemical studies. How these intersect through evolution is described in the first part of the review. In the secon...

  10. The nonsinglet structure function evolution by Laplace method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boroun, G. R., E-mail: grboroun@gmail.com, E-mail: boroun@razi.ac.ir; Zarrin, S. [Razi University, Physics Department (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    We derive a general scheme for the evolution of the nonsinglet structure function at the leadingorder (LO) and next-to-leading-order (NLO) by using the Laplace-transform technique. Results for the nonsinglet structure function are compared with MSTW2008, GRV, and CKMT parameterizations and also EMC experimental data in the LO and NLO analysis. The results are in good agreement with the experimental data and other parameterizations in the low- and large-x regions.

  11. Structural evolution of silica sols modified with formamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenza R.F.S.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we investigated the influence of formamide on the acid-catalyzed sol-gel process by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. Three silica sols were studied: Sol catalyzed with nitric acid without formamide, sol catalyzed with nitric acid containing formamide and sol catalyzed with a mixture of nitric acid and hydrofluoric acid and modified with formamide. Following the time evolution of both the Si-(OH stretching vibration at around 950 cm-1 and the Si-O-(Si vibration between 1040 cm-1 and 1200 cm-1 we were able to describe the structural evolution of each sol. The curve of evolution of Si-(OH stretching vibration corresponding to sol A has a simple asymptotic evolution. In the case of formamide containing sol, we observed a two-step structural evolution indicating that for the system containing formamide the polymerization goes through a temporary stabilization of oligomers, which can explain the non-variation of the Si-O(H bond wavenumber for a certain time. Gelation times were of several days for gels without formamide and few hours for gels containing additive. The presence of additive resulted in a highly interconnected gel.

  12. Structure and Evolution of Hot Gas in 30 Dor

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Q D

    1999-01-01

    We have investigated the structure and evolution of hot gas in the 30 Dor nebula, based on recent X-ray observations. Our deep ROSAT HRI image shows that diffuse X-ray emission arises in blister-shaped regions outlined by loops of HII gas. X-ray spectroscopic data from ASCA confirm the thermal nature of the emission and indicate that hot gas temperature decreases from the core to the halo of the nebula. The structure of the nebula can be understood as outflows of hot and HII gases from the parent giant molecular cloud of the central OB association. The dynamic mixing between the two gas phases is likely responsible for the mass loading to the hot gas, as required to explain the observed thermal structure and X-ray luminosity of the nebula. Such processes should also be important in the formation of similar giant HII regions and in their subsequent evolution into supergiant bubbles or galactic chimneys.

  13. Evolution of dispersion fuel meat structure caused by interface reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In reactor operation, the resultant layers are formed by interdiffusion at the fuel particle-matrix interfaces of U3Si2-Al dispersion fuel. This results in the evolution of meat structure. On the basis of Monte-Carlo method, the author developed simulation method of fuel meat, and simulated the stochastic space locations of spherical fuel particles in the meat. The fuel volume fraction is 43%, and the particles are in definite size distribution. For the 13551 simulated particle samples, the evolution of meat structure is calculated with layer thickness ranging from 0 to 16 μm. The parameters of meat structure include the U3Si2 fuel volume fraction, resultant layer volume fraction, Al matrix volume fraction, particle contact probability and overlap degree as functions of layer thickness

  14. The history of crustal uplift and metamorphic evolution of Panzhihua-Xichang micro-palaeoland, SW China:Constraints on Sm-Nd, 40Ar/39Ar and FT ages of granulites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Shijin; LIU Wenzhong; WANG Rucheng; YU Hangbo; LI Daming; WAN Jinglin; FANG Zhong

    2004-01-01

    Panzhihua-Xichang (Panxi) micro-palaeoland is the oldest terrane on the western margin of the Yangtze Block. Some intermediate-basic granulites are considered to be the crystalline basement of lower crust in the terrane. Granulite-facies metamorphism of the granulites was developed in the period from 1186 Ma to 1128 Ma. The origin of granulites was related to the collision orogenic process occurring when the micro-palaeolands merged to form the Rodinia Supercontinent. Amphibolite-facies retrogressive metamorphism of granulites took place in the period from 877 Ma to 825 Ma. This period was consistent with the breakup time of the Rodinia Supercontinent. 40Ar/39Ar ages and fission track (FT) ages of granulites in the Panxi micro-palaeoland show that the vertical movement history of crustal rocks was a slow uplift process of the rigid terrane in the time from Neoproterozoic to Mesozoic. The subduction of India Plate towards Euroasia Plate resulted in the rapid uplift of the Qinghai-Tibetan Block in Cenozoic.Meanwhile, the Qinghai-Tibetan Block moved towards east. Consequently the Panxi terrane was uplifted rapidly. As a result of the collision orogeny between the Qinghai-Tibetan Block and the Panxi terrane, the granulite-facies crystalline basement in this region was exhumed and exposed to the surface.

  15. Simulated evolution of the dark matter large-scale structure

    CERN Document Server

    Demiański, M; Pilipenko, S; Gottlöber, S

    2011-01-01

    We analyze evolution of the basic properties of simulated large scale structure elements formed by dark matter (DM LSS) and confront it with the observed evolution of the Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest. In three high resolution simulations we selected samples of compact DM clouds of moderate overdensity. Clouds are selected at redshifts $0\\leq z\\leq 3$ with the Minimal Spanning Tree (MST) technique. The main properties of so selected clouds are analyzed in 3D space and with the core sampling approach, what allows us to compare estimates of the DM LSS evolution obtained with two different techniques and to clarify some important aspects of the LSS evolution. In both cases we find that regular redshift variations of the mean characteristics of the DM LSS are accompanied only by small variations of their PDFs, what indicates the self similar character of the DM LSS evolution. The high degree of relaxation of DM particles compressed within the LSS is found along the shortest principal axis of clouds. We see that the inter...

  16. Structural investigation of keV Ar-ion-induced surface ripples in Si by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Chini, T. K.; Okuyama, F.; Tanemura, Masaki; Nordlund, K.; タネムラ, マサキ; 種村, 眞幸

    2003-01-01

    Using cross-section transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) we have studied the surface and subsurface structure of individual ripples having submicron scale wavelength and nanometer scale amplitude, generated by obliquely incident (50?120 keV) Ar ion bombardment of Si. The XTEM results reveal that the front slopes of ion-induced ripples have amorphous layers containing bubbles with sizes ranging from about 3 to 15 nm facing the ion beam direction. A hinner amorphous layer without bubbles, on...

  17. Spectroscopic study of the cycling transition 4s[3/2]2-4p[5/2]3 at 811.8 nm in 39Ar: Hyperfine structure and isotope shift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doppler-free saturated absorption spectroscopy is performed on an enriched radioactive 39Ar sample. The spectrum of the 3s23p54s[3/2]2-3s23p54p[5/2]3 cycling transition at 811.8 nm is recorded, and its isotope shift between 39Ar and 40Ar is derived. The hyperfine coupling constants A and B for both the 4s[3/2]2 and 4p[5/2]3 energy levels in 39Ar are also determined. The results partially disagree with a recently published measurement of the same transition. Based on earlier measurements as well as the current work, the isotope shift and hyperfine structure of the corresponding transition in 37Ar are also calculated. These spectroscopic data are essential for the realization of laser trapping and cooling of 37,39Ar.

  18. 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology, Isotope Geochemistry (Sr, Nd, Pb), and petrology of alkaline lavas near Yampa, Colorado: migration of alkaline volcanism and evolution of the northern Rio Grande rift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosca, Michael A.; Thompson, Ren A.; Lee, John P.; Turner, Kenzie J.; Neymark, Leonid A.; Premo, Wayne R.

    2014-01-01

    Volcanic rocks near Yampa, Colorado (USA), represent one of several small late Miocene to Quaternary alkaline volcanic fields along the northeast margin of the Colorado Plateau. Basanite, trachybasalt, and basalt collected from six sites within the Yampa volcanic field were investigated to assess correlations with late Cenozoic extension and Rio Grande rifting. In this paper we report major and trace element rock and mineral compositions and Ar, Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope data for these volcanic rocks. High-precision 40Ar/39Ar geochronology indicates westward migration of volcanism within the Yampa volcanic field between 6 and 4.5 Ma, and the Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope values are consistent with a primary source in the Proterozoic subcontinental lithospheric mantle. Relict olivine phenocrysts have Mg- and Ni-rich cores, whereas unmelted clinopyroxene cores are Na and Si enriched with finely banded Ca-, Mg-, Al-, and Ti-enriched rims, thus tracing their crystallization history from a lithospheric mantle source region to one in contact with melt prior to eruption. A regional synthesis of Neogene and younger volcanism within the Rio Grande rift corridor, from northern New Mexico to southern Wyoming, supports a systematic overall southwest migration of alkaline volcanism. We interpret this Neogene to Quaternary migration of volcanism toward the northeast margin of the Colorado Plateau to record passage of melt through subvertical zones within the lithosphere weakened by late Cenozoic extension. If the locus of Quaternary alkaline magmatism defines the current location of the Rio Grande rift, it includes the Leucite Hills, Wyoming. We suggest that alkaline volcanism in the incipient northern Rio Grande rift, north of Leadville, Colorado, represents melting of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle in response to transient infiltration of asthenospheric mantle into deep, subvertical zones of dilational crustal weakness developed during late Cenozoic extension that have been

  19. Triadic Conceptual Structure of the Maximum Entropy Approach to Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Herrmann-Pillath, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    Many problems in evolutionary theory are cast in dyadic terms, such as the polar oppositions of organism and environment. We argue that a triadic conceptual structure offers an alternative perspective under which the information generating role of evolution as a physical process can be analyzed, and propose a new diagrammatic approach. Peirce's natural philosophy was deeply influenced by his reception of both Darwin's theory and thermodynamics. Thus, we elaborate on a new synthesis which puts together his theory of signs and modern Maximum Entropy approaches to evolution. Following recent contributions to the naturalization of Peircean semiosis, we show that triadic structures involve the conjunction of three different kinds of causality, efficient, formal and final. We apply this on Ulanowicz's analysis of autocatalytic cycles as primordial patterns of life. This paves the way for a semiotic view of thermodynamics which is built on the idea that Peircean interpretants are systems of physical inference device...

  20. Colloidal structural evolution of asphaltene studied by confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Jannett; Castillo, Jimmy A.; Reyes, A.

    2004-10-01

    In this work, a detail analysis of the flocculation kinetic of asphaltenes colloidal particles has been carried out usng confocal microscopy. The colloidal structural evolution of the asphaltene flocculated has had varies postulated; however, the aggregation process of asphaltene is still not fully understood. In a recent paper, using Confocal microscope (homemade), we reported high-resolution micrographic images of asphaltenes flocculated and the correlation between crude oil stability and flocculation process. This technique permitted visualizes directly the physical nature of asphaltene flocculated. In this work, a detail analysis of the flocculation kinetic of asphaltene colloidal particles has been carried out using confocal microscopy. The physical nature of asphaltene flocculated from different crude oils is showed through of high-resolution image micrographies and its colloidal structural evolution.

  1. Modified structure of graphene oxide by investigation of structure evolution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Nekahi; S P H Marashi; D Haghshenas Fatmesari

    2015-12-01

    The structure of graphite oxide and graphene oxide (GO) has been studied previously using various analyses and computer simulations. Although some oxygen functional groups (OFGs) are accepted as the main functionalities in GO, the structure of GO has remained elusive. In this regard, GO was produced using the modified Hummers method and was investigated using X-ray diffraction pattern, Fourier transform infrared analysis and Boehm titration method. Based on the obtained results, a modified model was proposed for GO based on the model of Lerf-Klinowski. OFGs include highly carboxyl groups and phenols with few epoxides, lactones and ketones agglomerated in some regions due to hydrogen bonding between functional groups. Trapped water molecules were shown between the GO sheets which strongly affected the distribution of OFGs and their aggregation by hydrogen bonding.

  2. Thermotectonic evolution of the Apuseni mountains (Romania) based on structural and geothermochronological data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, M. K.; Fügenschuh, B.; Schuster, R.

    2012-04-01

    The Apuseni Mountains in Romania take a central position in the Alpine Carpathian Dinaride system between the Pannonian basin in the West and the Transylvanian basin in the East. Following the final Mid-Cretaceous obduction of the East Vardar ophiolite a NW-vergent nappe stack formed, which involves from bottom to top: Tisza- (Bihor and Codru) and Dacia-derived (Biharia) units, overlain by the South Apuseni or Transylvanian ophiolite belt (see Schmid et al, 2008). This study tries to provide new and additional information on the complex structural and metamorphic evolution of these units, from the onset of obduction during Jurassic times, to the (final?) exhumation processes observed during the Eocene (according to Merten, 2011). Based on observed stretching lineations, kinematic indicators such as porphyroclasts, shearbands etc. were analyzed to establish a relative chronological order of deformation and tectonic transport. Microstructural studies provided additional data on the relative succession of events and the relevant synkinematic temperatures. A thermochronological study, based on the integration of newly aquired Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, Ar-Ar and fission track ages with existing data allowed the construction of a time-temperature deformation path. Our data indicate three major events, a Late Jurassic-Earliest Cretaceous exhumation event, which cannot be directly constrained by structural data so far. Yet the position of the Transsylvanian ophiolites tectonically overlying the Biharia unit as well as distinct thermochronological data are self-explaining. The second event ("Austrian Phase" in local nomenclature), documented by structural and thermochronological data, is related to the top to the NE thrusting (i.e. in present-day coordinates) of Tisza over Dacia during the Mid-Cretaceous. This penetrative event in the Biharia unit is overprinted at the contact between nappes by a third, top to the NW event during the Turonian, which relates to the NW directed

  3. Structural Evolution of Household Energy Consumption: A China Study

    OpenAIRE

    Qingsong Wang; Ping Liu; Xueliang Yuan; Xingxing Cheng; Rujian Ma; Ruimin Mu; Jian Zuo

    2015-01-01

    Sustainable energy production and consumption is one of the issues for the sustainable development strategy in China. As China’s economic development paradigm shifts, household energy consumption (HEC) has become a focus of achieving national goals of energy efficiency and greenhouse gas reduction. The information entropy model and LMDI model were employed in this study in order to analyse the structural evolution of HEC, as well as its associated critical factors. The results indicate that t...

  4. Downstream Evolution of Longitudinal Embedded Vortices with Helical Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velte, Clara Marika; Okulov, Valery; Hansen, Martin Otto Laver

    2009-01-01

    In the present work the downstream development of device induced vortices with helical symmetry embedded in wall bounded flow on a bump is studied with the aid of Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV). The downstream evolution of characteristic parameters of helical vortices is studied......, displaying a linear variation of the helical parameters up to the trailing edge of the bump where the vortex experiences an abrupt transition in structure....

  5. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology and geochemistry of the Central Saurashtra mafic dyke swarm: insights into magmatic evolution, magma transport, and dyke-flow relationships in the northwestern Deccan Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucciniello, Ciro; Demonterova, Elena I.; Sheth, Hetu; Pande, Kanchan; Vijayan, Anjali

    2015-05-01

    The Central Saurashtra mafic dyke swarm in the northwestern Deccan Traps contains a few picrites, several subalkalic basalts and basaltic andesites, and an andesite. We have obtained precise 40Ar/39Ar ages of 65.6 ± 0.2 Ma, 66.6 ± 0.3, and 62.4 ± 0.3 Ma (2σ errors) for three of the dykes, indicating the emplacement of the swarm over several million years. Mineral chemical and whole-rock major and trace element and Sr-Nd isotopic data show that fractional crystallization and crystal accumulation were important processes. Except for two dykes (with ɛNd t values of -8.2 and -12.3), the magmas were only moderately contaminated by continental crust. The late-emplaced (62.4 Ma) basalt dyke has compositional characteristics (low La/Sm and Th/Nb, high ɛNd t of +4.3) suggesting little or no crustal contamination. Most dykes are low-Ti and a few high-Ti, and these contrasting Ti types cannot be produced by fractional crystallization processes but require distinct parental magmas. Some dykes are compositionally homogeneous over tens of kilometers, whereas others are heterogeneous, partly because they were formed by multiple magma injections. The combined field and geochemical data establish the Sardhar dyke as ≥62 km long and the longest in Saurashtra, but this and the other Central Saurasthra dykes cannot have fed any of the hitherto studied lava-flow sequences in Saurashtra, given their very distinct Sr-Nd isotopic compositions. As observed previously, high-Ti lavas and dykes only outcrop east-northeast of a line joining Rajkot and Palitana, probably because of underlying enriched mantle at ~65 Ma.

  6. Explosive evolution of self-preserving local structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has recently been noticed that certain forms of localized structures can grow explosively in time without change in spatial structure. Explicit forms, which describe their evolution are obtained as solutions of reaction-diffusion equations. It is the purpose of the present investigation to analyze the influence of perturbations on such solutions. The analysis will be generalized to consider the interaction of three variables, e.g. a three-wave system, as described by three coupled reaction-diffusion equations. Equilibria, i.e. time-independent solutions corresponding to the explosive-type reaction-diffusion equations, are also determined and their properties of stability are analyzed. (author)

  7. The evolution of the bank regulatory structure : a reappraisal

    OpenAIRE

    F. Ward McCarthy, Jr.

    1984-01-01

    In his article, “The Evolution of the Bank Regulatory Structure: A Reappraisal,” F. Ward McCarthy Jr. argues that neither of these competing theories provides a sufficient explanation for the major developments in the bank regulatory framework of the United States. He proposes that the structure of bank regulation has been dictated in part by the desire of governments to enhance their abilities to generate revenue. McCarthy traces the history of government intervention in the banking industry...

  8. Structural and magmatic evolution in the Loimaa area, southwestern Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nironen, M.

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Within the Loimaa area there is a junction of the general E-W structural trend of southern Finland and a NW-N-NE curving trend. The structure of the area is dominated by ductile D, and D4 deformations with E-W and N-S axial traces, respectively. The typical semicircular structures in the study area are interpreted as F3-F4 fold interference structures. The predominant plutonic rocks in the Loimaa area are penetratively foliated tonalites and granodiorites which probably intruded during D2 deformation. Peak regional metamorphism at upper amphibolite facies and emplacement of the Pöytyä Granodiorite ca. 1870 Ma ago occurred during D, deformation. The ductile style of D4 deformation in the Loimaa area is probably related to the high-grade metamorphism at 1850-1810 Ma in the late Svecofennian granite-migmatite (LSGM zone immediately south of the study area. The Oripää Granite was emplaced during D4 deformation. The structural evolution in the Loimaa area may be correlated with the evolution further to the northwest (Pori area and north (Tampere-Vammala area whereas correlation to the south and west is problematic. A transpressional model presented for the LSGM zone is not applicable to the Loimaa area.

  9. Ar-Ar_Redux: rigorous error propagation of 40Ar/39Ar data, including covariances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeesch, P.

    2015-12-01

    Rigorous data reduction and error propagation algorithms are needed to realise Earthtime's objective to improve the interlaboratory accuracy of 40Ar/39Ar dating to better than 1% and thereby facilitate the comparison and combination of the K-Ar and U-Pb chronometers. Ar-Ar_Redux is a new data reduction protocol and software program for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology which takes into account two previously underappreciated aspects of the method: 1. 40Ar/39Ar measurements are compositional dataIn its simplest form, the 40Ar/39Ar age equation can be written as: t = log(1+J [40Ar/39Ar-298.5636Ar/39Ar])/λ = log(1 + JR)/λ Where λ is the 40K decay constant and J is the irradiation parameter. The age t does not depend on the absolute abundances of the three argon isotopes but only on their relative ratios. Thus, the 36Ar, 39Ar and 40Ar abundances can be normalised to unity and plotted on a ternary diagram or 'simplex'. Argon isotopic data are therefore subject to the peculiar mathematics of 'compositional data', sensu Aitchison (1986, The Statistical Analysis of Compositional Data, Chapman & Hall). 2. Correlated errors are pervasive throughout the 40Ar/39Ar methodCurrent data reduction protocols for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology propagate the age uncertainty as follows: σ2(t) = [J2 σ2(R) + R2 σ2(J)] / [λ2 (1 + R J)], which implies zero covariance between R and J. In reality, however, significant error correlations are found in every step of the 40Ar/39Ar data acquisition and processing, in both single and multi collector instruments, during blank, interference and decay corrections, age calculation etc. Ar-Ar_Redux revisits every aspect of the 40Ar/39Ar method by casting the raw mass spectrometer data into a contingency table of logratios, which automatically keeps track of all covariances in a compositional context. Application of the method to real data reveals strong correlations (r2 of up to 0.9) between age measurements within a single irradiation batch. Propertly taking

  10. Relativistic fine structure oscillator strengths for Li-like ions: C IV - Si XII, S XIV, Ar XVI, Ca XVIII, Ti XX, Cr XXII, and Ni XXVI

    OpenAIRE

    Nahar, Sultana N.

    2002-01-01

    Ab initio calculations including relativistic effects employing the Breit-Pauli R-matrix (BPRM) method are reported for fine structure energy levels and oscillator strengths upto n = 10 and 0.leq. l .leq.9 for 15 Li-like ions: C IV, N V, O VI, F VII, Ne VIII, Na IX, Mg X, Al XI, Si XII, S XIV, Ar XVI, Ca XIII, Ti XX, Cr XXII, and Ni XXVI. About one hundred bound fine structure energy levels of total angular momenta, 1/2 .leq. J .leq. 17/2 of even and odd parities, total orbital angular moment...

  11. Tatooine Nurseries: Structure and Evolution of Circumbinary Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Vartanyan, David; Rafikov, Roman R

    2015-01-01

    Recent discoveries of circumbinary planets by Kepler mission provide motivation for understanding their birthplaces - protoplanetary disks around stellar binaries with separations <1 AU. We explore properties and evolution of such circumbinary disks focusing on modification of their structure caused by tidal coupling to the binary. We develop a set of analytical scaling relations describing viscous evolution of the disk properties, which are verified and calibrated using 1D numerical calculations with realistic inputs. Injection of angular momentum by the central binary suppresses mass accretion onto the binary and causes radial distribution of the viscous angular momentum flux F_J to be different from that in a standard accretion disk around a single star with no torque at the center. Disks with no mass accretion at the center develop F_J profile which is flat in radius. Radial profiles of temperature and surface density are also quite different from those in disks around single stars. Damping of the dens...

  12. Chemical evolution of InP/InGaAs/InGaAsP microstructures irradiated in air and deionized water with ArF and KrF lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation of quantum semiconductor microstructures with ultraviolet pulsed lasers could induce surface defects and modify chemical composition of the microstructure capping material that during high-temperature annealing leads to selected area bandgap engineering through the process known as quantum well intermixing (QWI). In this work, we investigate the role of both ArF and KrF excimer lasers in the QWI process of InP/InGaAs/InGaAsP microstructures irradiated in air and deionized (DI) water. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy analysis was employed to study the chemical composition of the irradiated surface and investigate the chemical evolution of ArF and KrF laser irradiated microstructures. The results indicate that InPxOy oxides are the dominating surface products of the ArF and KrF lasers interaction with InP. Consistent with this observation is a relatively greater bandgap blue shift of ∼130 nm found in the microstructures irradiated in air, in comparison to a maximum of 60 nm blue shift observed in the microstructures irradiated in a DI water environment.

  13. Near edge X-ray absorption fine structure study for optimization of hard diamond-like carbon film formation with Ar cluster ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) film deposited using C60 vapor with simultaneous irradiation of an Ar cluster ion beam was characterized by a near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS), in order to optimize the hard DLC film deposition conditions. Contents of sp2 orbitals in the films, which were estimated from NEXAFS spectra, are 30% lower than that of a conventional DLC film deposited by a RF plasma method. Those contents were obtained under the flux ratio of the C60 molecules to the Ar cluster ions to range from 1 to 20, at 5keV of Ar cluster ion acceleration energy. Average hardness of the films was 50 GPa under these flux ratios. This hardness was three times higher than that of a conventional DLC film. Furthermore, the lowest sp2 content and above-mentioned high hardness were obtained at room temperature of the substrate when the depositions were performed in the range of the substrate temperature from room temperature to 250degC. (author)

  14. Near edge X-ray absorption fine structure study for optimization of hard diamond-like carbon film formation with Ar cluster ion beam

    CERN Document Server

    Kitagawa, T; Kanda, K; Shimizugawa, Y; Toyoda, N; Matsui, S; Yamada, I; Tsubakino, H; Matsuo, J

    2003-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) film deposited using C sub 6 sub 0 vapor with simultaneous irradiation of an Ar cluster ion beam was characterized by a near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS), in order to optimize the hard DLC film deposition conditions. Contents of sp sup 2 orbitals in the films, which were estimated from NEXAFS spectra, are 30% lower than that of a conventional DLC film deposited by a RF plasma method. Those contents were obtained under the flux ratio of the C sub 6 sub 0 molecules to the Ar cluster ions to range from 1 to 20, at 5keV of Ar cluster ion acceleration energy. Average hardness of the films was 50 GPa under these flux ratios. This hardness was three times higher than that of a conventional DLC film. Furthermore, the lowest sp sup 2 content and above-mentioned high hardness were obtained at room temperature of the substrate when the depositions were performed in the range of the substrate temperature from room temperature to 250degC. (author)

  15. 40Ar/39Ar and U-Pb Ages and Isotopic Data for Oligocene Ignimbrites, Calderas, and Granitic Plutons, Southern Stillwater Range and Clan Alpine Mountains: Insights into the Volcanic-Plutonic Connection and Crustal Evolution in Western Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, D. A.; Watts, K. E.; Henry, C.; Colgan, J. P.; Cousens, B.

    2014-12-01

    Calderas in the southern Stillwater Range (SSR) and Clan Alpine Mountains (CAM) were formed during the mid-Tertiary ignimbrite flareup and subsequently tilted (40->90°) by large-magnitude extension. New geologic mapping, geochemistry, and 40Ar/39Ar and SHRIMP U-Pb zircon dating document 2 periods of magmatism resulting in 4 nested calderas and related granitoid plutons in sections up to 10 km thick. The first period included pre-caldera rhyolite lava domes (30(?) Ma), ~5 km of pre- and post-collapse intermediate lavas and rhyolite tuff that filled the Job Canyon caldera (~29.4 to 28.8 Ma), and the >4-5 km thick, geochemically similar IXL pluton (28.9±0.4 Ma) that intruded the Job Canyon caldera. The second period included pre-caldera rhyolite lava domes and dikes (~25.5 Ma) and 3 ignimbrite units in 3 calderas: tuff of the Louderback Mountains (low-silica rhyolite; ≥600 m thick; ~25.2 Ma); tuff of Poco Canyon (high-silica rhyolite; up to 4.3 km thick; 25.27±0.05 Ma); and ≥2000 km3 tuff of Elevenmile Canyon (trachydacite to rhyolite; up to 4.5 km thick; 25.12±0.01 Ma). The composite Freeman Creek pluton (granite, 24.8±0.4 Ma; granodiorite, 25.0±0.2 Ma) and Chalk Mountain rhyolite porphyry (25.2±0.2 Ma) and granite (24.8±0.3 Ma) plutons intruded the Poco Canyon and Elevenmile Canyon calderas. Early (30 Ma) rhyolites have the least radiogenic compositions (Sri~0.7040), whereas other units are relatively homogeneous (Sri~0.7050, ENd~0.0). Oxygen isotope compositions for SSR and CAM calderas are highly variable (d18Oquartz=5.6-8.2‰, d18Osanidine=5.5-7.0‰, d18Ozircon= 4.1-6.3‰), corresponding to a magmatic range of 5.7-7.9‰. U-Pb dating of zircons indicates homogeneous age populations and few/no xenocrysts and antecrysts. These data show that (1) thick plutons (>2-5 km) underlie compositionally and temporally related caldera-filling ignimbrites, (2) caldera-forming cycles are isotopically variable, requiring divergent magmatic sources in relatively

  16. Structural evolution of carbon during oxidation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarofim, A.F.

    1998-04-01

    The examination of the structural evolution of carbon during oxidation has proven to be of scientific interest. Early modeling work of fluidized bed combustion showed that most of the reactions of interest occurs in the micropores, and this work has concentrated on these pores. This work has concentrated on evolution of macroporosity and microporosity of carbons during kinetic controlled oxidation using SAXS, CO{sub 2} and TEM analysis. Simple studies of fluidized bed combustion of coal chars has shown that many of the events considered fragmentation events previously may in fact be {open_quotes}hidden{close_quotes} or nonaccessible porosity. This makes the study of the microporous combustion characteristics of carbon even more important. The generation of a combustion resistant grid, coupled with measurements of the SAXS and CO{sub 2} surface areas, fractal analysis and TEM. Studies has confirmed that soot particles shrink during their oxidation, as previously suspected. However, this shrinkage results in an overall change in structure. This structure becomes, on a radial basis, much more ordered near the edges, while the center itself becomes transparent to the TEM beam, implying a total lack of structure in this region. Although complex, this carbon structure is probably burning as to keep the density of the soot particles nearly the same. The TEM techniques developed for examination of soots has also been applied to Spherocarb. The Spherocarb during oxidation also increases its ordering. This ordering, by present theories, would imply that the reactivity would go. However, the reactivity goes up, implying that structure of carbon is secondary in importance to catalytic effects.

  17. Analysis of ribosomal protein gene structures: implications for intron evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Many spliceosomal introns exist in the eukaryotic nuclear genome. Despite much research, the evolution of spliceosomal introns remains poorly understood. In this paper, we tried to gain insights into intron evolution from a novel perspective by comparing the gene structures of cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (CRPs and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins (MRPs, which are held to be of archaeal and bacterial origin, respectively. We analyzed 25 homologous pairs of CRP and MRP genes that together had a total of 527 intron positions. We found that all 12 of the intron positions shared by CRP and MRP genes resulted from parallel intron gains and none could be considered to be "conserved," i.e., descendants of the same ancestor. This was supported further by the high frequency of proto-splice sites at these shared positions; proto-splice sites are proposed to be sites for intron insertion. Although we could not definitively disprove that spliceosomal introns were already present in the last universal common ancestor, our results lend more support to the idea that introns were gained late. At least, our results show that MRP genes were intronless at the time of endosymbiosis. The parallel intron gains between CRP and MRP genes accounted for 2.3% of total intron positions, which should provide a reliable estimate for future inferences of intron evolution.

  18. K-Ar ages of hornblende from the granodiorite in the Kuraoka igneous rocks around Mt. Gion-yama in the Kurosegawa structural belt, central Kyushu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palaeozoic Gion-yama facies of Kurosegawa structural belt which distribute in central region of Gokase town near the northern border of Miyazaki prefecture, is known to belong to Silur-Devonian series by coral fossils in limestone. Igneous rocks and metamorphic rocks of Kuraoka-yama which located in its neghborhood, were undergone petrological studies and structural studies previously, but their ages were not determined yet. K-Ar age determination of hornblende in granodiorite of Kuraoka-yama igneous rock series was attempted. This granodiorite is classified into two facies, namely granodiorite, the constituent minerals of which are identfied macroscopically, and leucocratic mylonitized granite, but without remarkable substantial difference between them. Hornblende for age determination was collected from former. K-Ar age was determined by repeated measurements and obtained mean age was 450 Ma. As correlated with isotope ages of Mitaki igneous rocks of Kurosegawa structural belt which were studied previously, the obtained value was the oldest and correlated to Ordovician period. This result means that calc-alkaline igneous activity took place in older age than Gion-yama facies. The obtained result is expected to provide data for explaining the relations between granodiorite and conodont bearing Ordovician facies of Kurosegawa structural belt of Shikoku, petrological correlation of acidic rocks, and for discussing geology of older age. (Ishimitsu, A.)

  19. Structural evolution in the crystallization of rapid cooling silver melt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Z.A., E-mail: ze.tian@gmail.com [School of Physics and Electronics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Laboratory for Simulation and Modelling of Particulate Systems School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Dong, K.J.; Yu, A.B. [Laboratory for Simulation and Modelling of Particulate Systems School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2015-03-15

    The structural evolution in a rapid cooling process of silver melt has been investigated at different scales by adopting several analysis methods. The results testify Ostwald’s rule of stages and Frank conjecture upon icosahedron with many specific details. In particular, the cluster-scale analysis by a recent developed method called LSCA (the Largest Standard Cluster Analysis) clarified the complex structural evolution occurred in crystallization: different kinds of local clusters (such as ico-like (ico is the abbreviation of icosahedron), ico-bcc like (bcc, body-centred cubic), bcc, bcc-like structures) in turn have their maximal numbers as temperature decreases. And in a rather wide temperature range the icosahedral short-range order (ISRO) demonstrates a saturated stage (where the amount of ico-like structures keeps stable) that breeds metastable bcc clusters. As the precursor of crystallization, after reaching the maximal number bcc clusters finally decrease, resulting in the final solid being a mixture mainly composed of fcc/hcp (face-centred cubic and hexagonal-closed packed) clusters and to a less degree, bcc clusters. This detailed geometric picture for crystallization of liquid metal is believed to be useful to improve the fundamental understanding of liquid–solid phase transition. - Highlights: • A comprehensive structural analysis is conducted focusing on crystallization. • The involved atoms in our analysis are more than 90% for all samples concerned. • A series of distinct intermediate states are found in crystallization of silver melt. • A novelty icosahedron-saturated state breeds the metastable bcc state.

  20. Structural evolution in the crystallization of rapid cooling silver melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structural evolution in a rapid cooling process of silver melt has been investigated at different scales by adopting several analysis methods. The results testify Ostwald’s rule of stages and Frank conjecture upon icosahedron with many specific details. In particular, the cluster-scale analysis by a recent developed method called LSCA (the Largest Standard Cluster Analysis) clarified the complex structural evolution occurred in crystallization: different kinds of local clusters (such as ico-like (ico is the abbreviation of icosahedron), ico-bcc like (bcc, body-centred cubic), bcc, bcc-like structures) in turn have their maximal numbers as temperature decreases. And in a rather wide temperature range the icosahedral short-range order (ISRO) demonstrates a saturated stage (where the amount of ico-like structures keeps stable) that breeds metastable bcc clusters. As the precursor of crystallization, after reaching the maximal number bcc clusters finally decrease, resulting in the final solid being a mixture mainly composed of fcc/hcp (face-centred cubic and hexagonal-closed packed) clusters and to a less degree, bcc clusters. This detailed geometric picture for crystallization of liquid metal is believed to be useful to improve the fundamental understanding of liquid–solid phase transition. - Highlights: • A comprehensive structural analysis is conducted focusing on crystallization. • The involved atoms in our analysis are more than 90% for all samples concerned. • A series of distinct intermediate states are found in crystallization of silver melt. • A novelty icosahedron-saturated state breeds the metastable bcc state.

  1. Direct nano-structuring of solid surface by extreme ultraviolet Ar8+ laser (poster P06.6)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koláček, Karel; Štraus, Jaroslav; Schmidt, Jiří; Frolov, Oleksandr; Prukner, Václav; Melich, Radek; Choukourov, A.; Sobota, Jaroslav; Fořt, Tomáš

    Waikoloa, Hawaii: IEEE, 2012. s. 24-24. ISBN N. [International Conference on Electron, Ion and Photon Beam Technology & Nanofabrication/56./. 29.05.2012-01.06.2012, Waikoloa, Hawaii] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA08024 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : nano-patterning by Ar8+ laser * ablation * desorption * direct engraving of 2D diffraction pattern Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics; JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering (UPT-D)

  2. Structure of the ArsI C-As Lyase: Insights into the Mechanism of Degradation of Organoarsenical Herbicides and Growth Promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadar, Venkadesh Sarkarai; Yoshinaga, Masafumi; Pawitwar, Shashank S; Kandavelu, Palani; Sankaran, Banumathi; Rosen, Barry P

    2016-06-01

    Arsenic is a ubiquitous and carcinogenic environmental element that enters the biosphere primarily from geochemical sources, but also through anthropogenic activities. Microorganisms play an important role in the arsenic biogeochemical cycle by biotransformation of inorganic arsenic into organic arsenicals and vice versa. ArsI is a microbial non-heme, ferrous-dependent dioxygenase that transforms toxic methylarsenite [MAs(III)] to less toxic and carcinogenic inorganic arsenite [As(III)] by C-As bond cleavage. An ArsI ortholog, TcArsI, from the thermophilic bacterium Thermomonospora curvata was expressed, purified, and crystallized. The structure was solved in both the apo form and with Ni(II), Co(II), or Fe(III). The MAs(III) binding site is a vicinal cysteine pair in a flexible loop. A structure with the loop occupied with β-mercaptoethanol mimics binding of MAs(III). The structure of a mutant protein (Y100H/V102F) was solved in two different crystal forms with two other orientations of the flexible loop. These results suggest that a loop-gating mechanism controls the catalytic reaction. In the ligand-free open state, the loop is exposed to solvent, where it can bind MAs(III). The loop moves toward the active site, where it forms a closed state that orients the C-As bond for dioxygen addition and cleavage. Elucidation of the enzymatic mechanism of this unprecedented C-As lyase reaction will enhance our understanding of recycling of environmental organoarsenicals. PMID:27107642

  3. 39Ar-40Ar systematics of two millimeter-sized rock fragments from Mare Crisium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two small fragments, L24B, a glass-rich agglutinate (1.9mg) and L24A, a fine-grained lithic fragment (9.4mg), from the Luna 24 landing site have been neutron irradiated for the purpose of 39Ar-40Ar dating. A fairly well-defined 39Ar-40Ar plateau age of 3.65+-0.12 AE was found for the larger fragment. After appropriate corrections the composition of the trapped and spallogenic Ar could be deciphered. The evolution of 38Arsub(sp)/37Ar showed that 660 m.y. and 500 m.y. were the most reliable exposure ages for L24A and L24B, respectively. The Ti contents of <=0.6% determined by gamma-counting prior to the Ar analysis indicate both fragments being associated with the group of low-Ti or even very low-Ti basalts. (Auth.)

  4. The structural and property evolution of cellulose during carbonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhim, Yo-Rhin

    The understanding of the structure and related property evolution during carbonization is imperative in engineering carbon materials for specific functionalities. High purity cellulose was used as a model precursor to help understand the conversion of organic compounds to hard carbons. Several characterization techniques were employed to follow the structural, compositional and property changes during the thermal transformation of microcrystalline cellulose to carbon over the temperature range of 250°C to 2000°C. These studies revealed several stages of composition and microstructure evolution during carbonization supported by the observation of five distinct regions of electrical and thermal properties. In Region I, from 250°C to 400°C, depolymerisation of cellulose molecules caused the evolution of volatile gases and decrease in dipole polarization. This also led to the reduction of overall AC electrical conductivity and specific heat. In Region II, from 450°C to 500°C, the formation and growth of conducting sp 2 carbon clusters resulted in increases in overall AC electrical conductivity and thermal diffusivity with rising temperature. For heat treatment temperatures of 550°C and 600°C, Region III, carbon clusters grew into aggregates of curved carbon layers leading to interfacial polarization and onset of percolation. AC electrical and thermal conductivities are enhanced due to electron hopping and improved phonon transport among carbon clusters. With temperatures rising from 650°C to 1000°C, Region IV, DC conductivity began to emerge and increased sharply along with thermal conductivity with further percolation of carbon clusters as lateral growth of carbon layers continued. Lastly, from 1200°C to 2000°C, Region V, DC electrical conductivity remained constant due to a fully percolated system.

  5. Primary Cell Wall Structure in the Evolution of Land Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Investigation of the primary cell walls of lower plants improves our understanding of the cell biology of these organisms but also has the potential to improve our understanding of cell wall structure and function in angiosperms that evolved from lower plants. Cell walls were prepared from eight species, ranging from a moss to advanced gymnosperms, and subjected to sequential chemical extraction to separate the main polysaccharide fractions. The glycosyl compositions of these fractions were then determined by gas chromatography. The results were compared among the eight plants and among data from related studies reported in the existing published reports to identify structural features that have been either highly conserved or clearly modified during evolution. Among the highly conserved features are the presence of a cellulose framework, the presence of certain hemicelluloses such as xyloglucan, and the presence of rhamnogalacturonan Ⅱ, a domain in pectic polysaccharides. Among the modified features are the abundance of mannosyl-containing hemicelluloses and the presence of methylated sugars.

  6. Structural Evolution of the Protein Kinase-Like Superfamily.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The protein kinase family is large and important, but it is only one family in a larger superfamily of homologous kinases that phosphorylate a variety of substrates and play important roles in all three superkingdoms of life. We used a carefully constructed structural alignment of selected kinases as the basis for a study of the structural evolution of the protein kinase-like superfamily. The comparison of structures revealed a "universal core" domain consisting only of regions required for ATP binding and the phosphotransfer reaction. Remarkably, even within the universal core some kinase structures display notable changes, while still retaining essential activity. Hence, the protein kinase-like superfamily has undergone substantial structural and sequence revision over long evolutionary timescales. We constructed a phylogenetic tree for the superfamily using a novel approach that allowed for the combination of sequence and structure information into a unified quantitative analysis. When considered against the backdrop of species distribution and other metrics, our tree provides a compelling scenario for the development of the various kinase families from a shared common ancestor. We propose that most of the so-called "atypical kinases" are not intermittently derived from protein kinases, but rather diverged early in evolution to form a distinct phyletic group. Within the atypical kinases, the aminoglycoside and choline kinase families appear to share the closest relationship. These two families in turn appear to be the most closely related to the protein kinase family. In addition, our analysis suggests that the actin-fragmin kinase, an atypical protein kinase, is more closely related to the phosphoinositide-3 kinase family than to the protein kinase family. The two most divergent families, alpha-kinases and phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinases (PIPKs, appear to have distinct evolutionary histories. While the PIPKs probably have an

  7. Atomic-scale structures and electronic states of defects on Ar+-ion irradiated MoS2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► MoS2 surfaces bearing defects generated by Ar+ bombardment at a low density were observed by STM. ► STS results revealed that the two types of defects have different spectra. ► The bright feature is assigned to hybridized Mo states beneath the feature. ► The concave defect is monolayer removal of MoS2 with the mid-gap electronic state at the edge. -- Abstract: We observed MoS2 surfaces bearing defects generated by Ar+-ion bombardment at the density of 2.75 × 10−3 ions/nm2 by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and measured local electronic state by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). Two types of concave surface defects, one with a bright feature and one without, were observed in STM images. STS revealed that the two features have different spectra. We elucidated the origins of these defects by comparison of the experimental results with electronic states obtained from density functional theory (DFT) calculation. The dI/dV curve measured at the center of the bright feature has a mid-gap state, which can be assigned to Mo beneath the feature. The bright feature was composed of several S vacancies, leaving a surface with metallic character. The concave defect without the bright feature is interpreted as being formed by layer-by-layer removal of MoS2. The dI/dV curve measured at the center of this type of concave defect showed a semiconducting property similar to that of a clean MoS2 surface, and the edge of the concave region shows a peak at −0.5 V from the Fermi level

  8. Structure and evolution of magnetic fields associated with solar eruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the studies of solar photospheric magnetic field evolution in active regions and its relationship to solar flares. It is divided into two topics, the magnetic structure and evolution leading to solar eruptions and rapid changes in the photospheric magnetic field associated with eruptions. For the first topic, we describe the magnetic complexity, new flux emergence, flux cancelation, shear motions, sunspot rotation and magnetic helicity injection, which may all contribute to the storage and buildup of energy that trigger solar eruptions. For the second topic, we concentrate on the observations of rapid and irreversible changes of the photospheric magnetic field associated with flares, and the implication on the restructuring of the three-dimensional magnetic field. In particular, we emphasize the recent advances in observations of the photospheric magnetic field, as state-of-the-art observing facilities (such as Hinode and Solar Dynamics Observatory) have become available. The linkages between observations, theories and future prospectives in this research area are also discussed. (invited reviews)

  9. The Interior Structure, Composition, and Evolution of Giant Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Fortney, Jonathan J

    2009-01-01

    We discuss our current understanding of the interior structure and thermal evolution of giant planets. This includes the gas giants, such as Jupiter and Saturn, that are primarily composed of hydrogen and helium, as well as the "ice giants," such as Uranus and Neptune, which are primarily composed of elements heavier than H/He. The effect of different hydrogen equations of state (including new first-principles computations) on Jupiter's core mass and heavy element distribution is detailed. This variety of the hydrogen equations of state translate into an uncertainty in Jupiter's core mass of 18 M_Earth. For Uranus and Neptune we find deep envelope metallicities up to 0.95, perhaps indicating the existence of an eroded core, as also supported by their low luminosity. We discuss the results of simple cooling models of our solar system's planets, and show that more complex thermal evolution models may be necessary to understand their cooling history. We review how measurements of the masses and radii of the ~50 ...

  10. The Coevolution of Phycobilisomes: Molecular Structure Adapting to Functional Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Shi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Phycobilisome is the major light-harvesting complex in cyanobacteria and red alga. It consists of phycobiliproteins and their associated linker peptides which play key role in absorption and unidirectional transfer of light energy and the stability of the whole complex system, respectively. Former researches on the evolution among PBPs and linker peptides had mainly focused on the phylogenetic analysis and selective evolution. Coevolution is the change that the conformation of one residue is interrupted by mutation and a compensatory change selected for in its interacting partner. Here, coevolutionary analysis of allophycocyanin, phycocyanin, and phycoerythrin and covariation analysis of linker peptides were performed. Coevolution analyses reveal that these sites are significantly correlated, showing strong evidence of the functional and structural importance of interactions among these residues. According to interprotein coevolution analysis, less interaction was found between PBPs and linker peptides. Our results also revealed the correlations between the coevolution and adaptive selection in PBS were not directly related, but probably demonstrated by the sites coupled under physical-chemical interactions.

  11. Cooling-induced structure formation and evolution in collapsars

    CERN Document Server

    Batta, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    The collapse of massive rotating stellar cores and the associated accretion onto the newborn compact object is thought to power long gamma ray bursts (GRBs). The physical scale and dynamics of the accretion disk are initially set by the angular momentum distribution in the progenitor, and the physical conditions make neutrino emission the main cooling agent in the flow. The formation and evolution of structure in these disks is potentially very relevant for the energy release and its time variability, which ultimately imprint on the observed GRB properties. To begin to characterize these, taking into account the three dimensional nature of the problem, we have carried out an initial set of calculations of the collapse of rotating polytropic cores in three dimensions, making use of a pseudo-relativistic potential and a simplified cooling prescription. We focus on the effects of self gravity and cooling on the overall morphology and evolution of the flow for a given rotation rate in the context of the collapsar...

  12. Diversity, structure and convergent evolution of the global sponge microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Torsten; Moitinho-Silva, Lucas; Lurgi, Miguel; Björk, Johannes R; Easson, Cole; Astudillo-García, Carmen; Olson, Julie B; Erwin, Patrick M; López-Legentil, Susanna; Luter, Heidi; Chaves-Fonnegra, Andia; Costa, Rodrigo; Schupp, Peter J; Steindler, Laura; Erpenbeck, Dirk; Gilbert, Jack; Knight, Rob; Ackermann, Gail; Victor Lopez, Jose; Taylor, Michael W; Thacker, Robert W; Montoya, Jose M; Hentschel, Ute; Webster, Nicole S

    2016-01-01

    Sponges (phylum Porifera) are early-diverging metazoa renowned for establishing complex microbial symbioses. Here we present a global Porifera microbiome survey, set out to establish the ecological and evolutionary drivers of these host-microbe interactions. We show that sponges are a reservoir of exceptional microbial diversity and major contributors to the total microbial diversity of the world's oceans. Little commonality in species composition or structure is evident across the phylum, although symbiont communities are characterized by specialists and generalists rather than opportunists. Core sponge microbiomes are stable and characterized by generalist symbionts exhibiting amensal and/or commensal interactions. Symbionts that are phylogenetically unique to sponges do not disproportionally contribute to the core microbiome, and host phylogeny impacts complexity rather than composition of the symbiont community. Our findings support a model of independent assembly and evolution in symbiont communities across the entire host phylum, with convergent forces resulting in analogous community organization and interactions. PMID:27306690

  13. Structural evolution and diversity of the caterpillar trunk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont, Steen Thorleif

    The thesis explores some major transformation series in the structure of the lepidopteran larval trunk, focusing partly on the initial events in the evolution of the order, partly on one of the more spectacular cases of subsequent biological diversification within ‘typical’/’higher’ Lepidoptera: ......, Harvard-based) is presented at a level where publication-readiness can be achieved, once an ongoing phylogenetic analysis by other Harvard-lab workers is completed, and SD’s findings can be analyzed in the light thereof....... the link between cuticle thickness, the degree of myrmecopily and the underlying mechanism of lycaenid-ant associations (MS4). In two major manuscripts (MS1-2), comparative descriptions are provided of the larval trunk in, respectively the Micropterigidae and the lowest-grade leaf-mining caterpillars...

  14. Evolution of the nucleon structure in light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of the EMC effect as a function of atomic mass A is considered for the first time for the lightest nuclei, D, 3He and , 4He, with an approach based on the Bethe-Salpeter formalism. We show that the pattern of the oscillation of the ratio rA(x)=F2A/F2N(D) with respect to the line rA(x)=1 varies with A, unlike the pattern for nuclei with masses A>4, where only the amplitude of the oscillation changes. It is found that the shape of the structure function distortions, which is typical for metals, is being reached in 3He

  15. Diversity, structure and convergent evolution of the global sponge microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Torsten; Moitinho-Silva, Lucas; Lurgi, Miguel; Björk, Johannes R.; Easson, Cole; Astudillo-García, Carmen; Olson, Julie B.; Erwin, Patrick M.; López-Legentil, Susanna; Luter, Heidi; Chaves-Fonnegra, Andia; Costa, Rodrigo; Schupp, Peter J.; Steindler, Laura; Erpenbeck, Dirk; Gilbert, Jack; Knight, Rob; Ackermann, Gail; Victor Lopez, Jose; Taylor, Michael W.; Thacker, Robert W.; Montoya, Jose M.; Hentschel, Ute; Webster, Nicole S.

    2016-01-01

    Sponges (phylum Porifera) are early-diverging metazoa renowned for establishing complex microbial symbioses. Here we present a global Porifera microbiome survey, set out to establish the ecological and evolutionary drivers of these host–microbe interactions. We show that sponges are a reservoir of exceptional microbial diversity and major contributors to the total microbial diversity of the world's oceans. Little commonality in species composition or structure is evident across the phylum, although symbiont communities are characterized by specialists and generalists rather than opportunists. Core sponge microbiomes are stable and characterized by generalist symbionts exhibiting amensal and/or commensal interactions. Symbionts that are phylogenetically unique to sponges do not disproportionally contribute to the core microbiome, and host phylogeny impacts complexity rather than composition of the symbiont community. Our findings support a model of independent assembly and evolution in symbiont communities across the entire host phylum, with convergent forces resulting in analogous community organization and interactions. PMID:27306690

  16. The structure of the Temsamane fold-and-thrust stack (eastern Rif, Morocco): Evolution of a transpressional orogenic wedge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabaloy-Sánchez, Antonio; Azdimousa, Ali; Booth-Rea, Guillermo; Asebriy, Lahcen; Vázquez-Vílchez, Mercedes; Martínez-Martínez, José Miguel; Gabites, Janet

    2015-11-01

    The structure of the Temsamane fold-and-thrust stack corresponds to four units limited by anastomosing ductile shear zones cutting a trend of south verging recumbent folds. This ductile stack was formed in an inclined left-handed transpressional zone at the North African paleomargin during Chattian to Langhian times producing two main deformational events. The first event (Dp) produced a Sp/Lp planar linear fabric generated in a non-coaxial deformation with a top-to-the-WSW sense of movement and was associated to metamorphic P-T conditions varying from late diagenesis in the southernmost Temsamane outcrops to epizone in the north. According to the 40Ar/39Ar ages, this deformation occurred at Chattian-Aquitanian times. The second deformational event (Dc event) generated ENE-WSW trending folds with SSE vergence and a set of anastomosing shear zones with Sm/Lm planar linear fabric. The latter units were generated at around 15 Ma (Langhian), and indicate a strong localization of the simple shear component of the transpression. Moreover, this orientation is compatible with the kinematics of the Temsamane detachment, which can explain most of the uplift of the Temsamane rocks from the middle to the uppermost crust. The described evolution indicates that collision between the western Mediterranean terranes and the North African paleomargin and the formation of the Rifean orogenic wedge occurred at Chattian to Langhian times.

  17. Biophysical and structural considerations for protein sequence evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grahnen Johan A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein sequence evolution is constrained by the biophysics of folding and function, causing interdependence between interacting sites in the sequence. However, current site-independent models of sequence evolutions do not take this into account. Recent attempts to integrate the influence of structure and biophysics into phylogenetic models via statistical/informational approaches have not resulted in expected improvements in model performance. This suggests that further innovations are needed for progress in this field. Results Here we develop a coarse-grained physics-based model of protein folding and binding function, and compare it to a popular informational model. We find that both models violate the assumption of the native sequence being close to a thermodynamic optimum, causing directional selection away from the native state. Sampling and simulation show that the physics-based model is more specific for fold-defining interactions that vary less among residue type. The informational model diffuses further in sequence space with fewer barriers and tends to provide less support for an invariant sites model, although amino acid substitutions are generally conservative. Both approaches produce sequences with natural features like dN/dS Conclusions Simple coarse-grained models of protein folding can describe some natural features of evolving proteins but are currently not accurate enough to use in evolutionary inference. This is partly due to improper packing of the hydrophobic core. We suggest possible improvements on the representation of structure, folding energy, and binding function, as regards both native and non-native conformations, and describe a large number of possible applications for such a model.

  18. The influence of halo evolution on galaxy structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Simon

    2015-03-01

    If Einstein-Newton gravity holds on galactic and larger scales, then current observations demonstrate that the stars and interstellar gas of a typical bright galaxy account for only a few percent of its total nonlinear mass. Dark matter makes up the rest and cannot be faint stars or any other baryonic form because it was already present and decoupled from the radiation plasma at z = 1000, long before any nonlinear object formed. The weak gravito-sonic waves so precisely measured by CMB observations are detected again at z = 4 as order unity fluctuations in intergalactic matter. These subsequently collapse to form today's galaxy/halo systems, whose mean mass profiles can be accurately determined through gravitational lensing. High-resolution simulations link the observed dark matter structures seen at all these epochs, demonstrating that they are consistent and providing detailed predictions for all aspects of halo structure and growth. Requiring consistency with the abundance and clustering of real galaxies strongly constrains the galaxy-halo relation, both today and at high redshift. This results in detailed predictions for galaxy assembly histories and for the gravitational arena in which galaxies live. Dark halos are not expected to be passive or symmetric but to have a rich and continually evolving structure which will drive evolution in the central galaxy over its full life, exciting warps, spiral patterns and tidal arms, thickening disks, producing rings, bars and bulges. Their growth is closely related to the provision of new gas for galaxy building.

  19. A Dynamic Model for the Evolution of Protein Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, Guy; Boca, Simina Maria; Mittenthal, Jay; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2016-05-01

    Domains are folded structures and evolutionary building blocks of protein molecules. Their three-dimensional atomic conformations, which define biological functions, can be coarse-grained into levels of a hierarchy. Here we build global dynamical models for the evolution of domains at fold and fold superfamily (FSF) levels. We fit the models with data from phylogenomic trees of domain structures and evaluate the distributions of the resulting parameters and their implications. The trees were inferred from a census of domain structures in hundreds of genomes from all three superkingdoms of life. The models used birth-death differential equations with the global abundances of structures as state variables, with one set of equations for folds and another for FSFs. Only the transitions present in the tree are assumed possible. Each fold or FSF diversifies in variants, eventually producing a new fold or FSF. The parameters specify rates of generation of variants and of new folds or FSFs. The equations were solved for the parameters by simplifying the trees to a comb-like topology, treating branches as emerging directly from a trunk. We found that the rate constants for folds and FSFs evolved similarly. These parameters showed a sharp transient change at about 1.5 Gyrs ago. This time coincides with a period in which domains massively combined in proteins and their arrangements distributed in novel lineages during the rise of organismal diversification. Our simulations suggest that exploration of protein structure space occurs through coarse-grained discoveries that undergo fine-grained elaboration. PMID:27146880

  20. Rb, Sr and strontium isotopic composition, K/Ar age and large ion lithophile trace element abundances in rocks and glasses from the Wanapitei Lake impact structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shock metamorphosed rocks and shock-produced melt glasses from the Wanapitei Lake impact structure have been examined petrographically and by electron microprobe. Eleven clasts exhibiting varying degrees of shock metamorphism and eight impact-produced glasses have been analyzed for Rb, Sr and Sr isotopic composition. Five clasts and one glass have also been analyzed for large ion lithophile (LIL) trace element abundances including Li, Rb, Sr, and Ba and the REE's. The impact event forming the Wanapitei Lake structure occurred 37 m.y. ago based on K/Ar dating of glass and glassy whole-rock samples. Rb/Sr isotopic dating failed to provide a meaningful whole-rock or internal isochron. The isotopic composition of the glasses can be explained by impact-produced mixing and melting of metasediments. Large ion lithophile trace element abundance patterns confirm the origin of the glasses by total shock melting of metasediments. (author)

  1. The formation and evolution of vacancy-type defects in Ar-implanted silicon studied by slow-positron annihilation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, B.S. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academic of Sciences, Nan Chang Road, Lanzhou 730000 (China)], E-mail: b.s.li@impcas.ac.cn; Zhang, C.H. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academic of Sciences, Nan Chang Road, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhong, Y.R.; Wang, D.N. [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analysis Techniques, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academic of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Zhou, L.H.; Yang, Y.T.; Zhang, H.H.; Zhang, L.Q. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academic of Sciences, Nan Chang Road, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2009-07-01

    The Doppler broadening spectrum of a silicon wafer was measured using a variable-energy positron beam to investigate the effects of vacancy-type defects induced by 180 keV Ar ion implantation. The S-parameter in the damaged layer decreases with annealing temperature up to 673 K, and then increases with annealing temperature from 673 to 1373 K. At low annealing temperatures ranging from room temperature to 673 K, argon-decorated vacancies are formed by argon atoms combining with open-volume defects at inactive positron sites. With further increase of annealing temperature, argon-decorated vacancies dissociate and subsequently migrate and coalesce, leading to an increase of S-parameter. Furthermore, the buried vacancy-layer becomes narrow with increasing annealing temperature. At 1373 K, the buried vacancy-layer moved towards the sample surface.

  2. Preliminary study of geotectonic evolution of the southern region of Sao Francisco (MG, Brazil) craton: an interpretation based on Rb-Sr, K-Ar, Pb-Pb and fission track data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results obtained from isotopic dating techniques (Rb-Sr, K-Ar, Pb-Pb and fission tracks) applied to samples from the southern region of Sao Francisco craton (Mg, Brazil) are discussed. Rb-Sr and Pb-Pb ages, in total rock, allowed the determination of crust enlargement, with eventual modifications of the pre-existing crust, during the Late Archean period (3000 to 2600 million years) and the Inferior Proterozoic period (2400 to 2100 m.y.). Three main cooling periods of time were determined by K-Ar dating of mica, amphiboles and total rock at the craton border: 2200 to 1700 m.y., 1300 to 1100 m.y. and 900 to 400 m.y. related, respectively, to superposition of three cycles: Transamazonico, Uruacuano and Brasiliano. Cooling below 1100C, detected by the fission track method applied to apatites, pointed out an age of 850 m.y. at the internal parts and 550 m.y. at the craton periphery, thus showing a progressive action of Brazilian marginal movable zones in the studied region. The application of these two techniques together enabled the evaluation of the rocks cooling shape. Cooling of these samples was complex between 2700 and 2200 m.y. and slow from 2000 m.y. onwards. The integrated treatment of data from the various dating techniques is of great importance to know the geotectonic evolution of ancient polycyclic sites. (C.L.B.)

  3. Structure and broadening coefficients (He, Ar and N2) of the ν4 band of CF4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spectra of CF4 in the ν4 fundamental band region have been recorded in pure gas and in mixtures with He, Ar and N2 at resolution up to 0.003 cm-1. Obtained data allowed us to evaluate the integrated band intensity, line intensity distribution and effective broadening coefficients for J-multiplets. The broadening coefficient behavior is similar to that previously registered for linear molecules: they coincide for P and R branches; the J-dependence in the case of argon is more pronounced than that for helium. The broadening coefficients for nitrogen and helium are practically the same but the values for nitrogen are scattered around the general trend. Q-branch broadening is different from that for J-manifolds. The coefficients of branch broadening are noticeably smaller. Nitrogen broadening is very close to result for the case of argon though there is a marked difference between them for J-manifolds. Collisions with argon and nitrogen broaden the Q-branch almost 3 times more effectively than collisions with helium

  4. Structures and Spectroscopic Properties Calculated for C_6H_7^+ and its Complexes with Ne, Ar, N_2, or CO_2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botschwina, P.; Oswald, R.

    2012-06-01

    Explicitly correlated coupled cluster theory at the CCSD(T)-F12x (x = a, b) level in conjunction with the double-hybrid density functional B2PLYP-D has been employed in a study of the benzenium ion (C_6H_7^+) and its complexes with simple ligands (L = Ne, Ar, N_2, or CO_2). The ground-state rotational constants of C_6H_7^+ are predicted to be A_0 = 5445 MHz, B_0 = 5313 MHz, and C_0 = 2731 MHz. For the complexes with L = Ne, Ar or N_2, the energetically most favourable structure is of π-bonded type, but for the most strongly bound complex C_6H_7^+ ... CO_2 a conformer with the CO_2 ligand lying in the ring-plane of the C_6H_7^+ moiety is slightly lower in energy. T. B. Adler, G. Knizia, and H.-J. Werner, J. Chem. Phys. 127, 221106 (2007) G. Knizia, T. B. Adler, and H.-J. Werner, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 054104 (2009). T. Schwabe and S. Grimme, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 9, 3397 (2007). P. Botschwina and R. Oswald, J. Phys. Chem. A 115, 13664 (2011) P. Botschwina and R. Oswald, J. Chem. Phys. submitted.

  5. Effects of total CH4/Ar gas pressure on the structures and field electron emission properties of carbon nanomaterials grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of total CH4/Ar gas pressure on the growth of carbon nanomaterials on Si (1 0 0) substrate covered with CoO nanoparticles, using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), were investigated. The structures of obtained products were correlated with the total gas pressure and changed from pure carbon nanotubes (CNTs) through hybrid CNTs/graphene sheets (GSs), to pure GSs as the total gas pressure changed from 20 to 4 Torr. The total gas pressure influenced the density of hydrogen radicals and Ar ions in chamber, which in turn determined the degree of how CoO nanoparticles were deoxidized and ion bombardment energy that governed the final carbon nanomaterials. Moreover, the obtained hybrid CNTs/GSs exhibited a lower turn-on field (1.4 V/μm) emission, compared to either 2.7 V/μm for pure CNTs or 2.2 V/μm for pure GSs, at current density of 10 μA/cm2.

  6. Structure and Evolution of Kuiper Belt Objects and Dwarf Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, W. B.; Prialnik, D.; Stern, S. A.; Coradini, A.

    Kuiper belt objects (KBOs) accreted from a mélange of volatile ices, carbonaceous matter, and rock of mixed interstellar and solar nebular provenance. The transneptunian region, where this accretion took place, was likely more radially compact than today. This and the influence of gas drag during the solar nebula epoch argue for more rapid KBO accretion than usually considered. Early evolution of KBOs was largely the result of heating due to radioactive decay, the most important potential source being 26Al, whereas long-term evolution of large bodies is controlled by the decay of U, Th, and 40K. Several studies are reviewed dealing with the evolution of KBO models, calculated by means of one-dimensional numerical codes that solve the heat and mass balance equations. It is shown that, depending on parameters (principally rock content and porous conductivity), KBO interiors may have reached relatively high temperatures. The models suggest that KBOs likely lost ices of very volatile species during early evolution, whereas ices of less-volatile species should be retained in cold, less-altered subsurface layers. Initially amorphous ice may have crystallized in KBO interiors, releasing volatiles trapped in the amorphous ice, and some objects may have lost part of these volatiles as well. Generally, the outer layers are far less affected by internal evolution than the inner part, which in the absence of other effects (such as collisions) predicts a stratified composition and altered porosity distribution. Kuiper belt objects are thus unlikely to be "the most pristine objects in the solar system," but they do contain key information as to how the early solar system accreted and dynamically evolved. For large (dwarf planet) KBOs, long-term radiogenic heating alone may lead to differentiated structures -- rock cores, ice mantles, volatile-ice-rich "crusts," and even oceans. Persistence of oceans and (potential) volcanism to the present day depends strongly on body size and

  7. Structural Evolution of Household Energy Consumption: A China Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingsong Wang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable energy production and consumption is one of the issues for the sustainable development strategy in China. As China’s economic development paradigm shifts, household energy consumption (HEC has become a focus of achieving national goals of energy efficiency and greenhouse gas reduction. The information entropy model and LMDI model were employed in this study in order to analyse the structural evolution of HEC, as well as its associated critical factors. The results indicate that the information entropy of HEC increased gradually, and coal will be reduced by clean energies, such as natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas. The information entropy tends to stabilize and converge due to rapid urbanization. Therefore, from the perspective of environmental protection and natural resource conservation, the structure of household energy consumption will be optimized. This study revealed that residents’ income level is one of the most critical factors for the increase of energy consumption, while the energy intensity is the only driving force for the reduction of HEC. The accumulated contribution of these two factors to the HEC is 240.53% and −161.75%, respectively. It is imperative to improve the energy efficiency in the residential sector. Recommendations are provided to improve the energy efficiency-related technologies, as well as the standards for the sustainable energy strategy.

  8. Evolution and Structural Analyses of Glossina morsitans (Diptera; Glossinidae Tetraspanins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin K. Murungi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Tetraspanins are important conserved integral membrane proteins expressed in many organisms. Although there is limited knowledge about the full repertoire, evolution and structural characteristics of individual members in various organisms, data obtained so far show that tetraspanins play major roles in membrane biology, visual processing, memory, olfactory signal processing, and mechanosensory antennal inputs. Thus, these proteins are potential targets for control of insect pests. Here, we report that the genome of the tsetse fly, Glossina morsitans (Diptera: Glossinidae encodes at least seventeen tetraspanins (GmTsps, all containing the signature features found in the tetraspanin superfamily members. Whereas six of the GmTsps have been previously reported, eleven could be classified as novel because their amino acid sequences do not map to characterized tetraspanins in the available protein data bases. We present a model of the GmTsps by using GmTsp42Ed, whose presence and expression has been recently detected by transcriptomics and proteomics analyses of G. morsitans. Phylogenetically, the identified GmTsps segregate into three major clusters. Structurally, the GmTsps are largely similar to vertebrate tetraspanins. In view of the exploitation of tetraspanins by organisms for survival, these proteins could be targeted using specific antibodies, recombinant large extracellular loop (LEL domains, small-molecule mimetics and siRNAs as potential novel and efficacious putative targets to combat African trypanosomiasis by killing the tsetse fly vector.

  9. Functional role, structure, and evolution of the melanocortin-4 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiöth, Helgi B; Lagerström, Malin C; Watanobe, Hajime; Jonsson, Logi; Vergoni, Anna Valeria; Ringholm, Aneta; Skarphedinsson, Jon O; Skuladottir, Gudrun V; Klovins, Janis; Fredriksson, Robert

    2003-06-01

    The melanocortin (MC)-4 receptor participates in regulating body weight homeostasis. We demonstrated early that acute blockage of the MC-4 receptor increases food intake and relieves anorexic conditions in rats. Our recent studies show that 4-week chronic blockage of the MC-4 receptor leads to robust increases in food intake and development of obesity, whereas stimulation of the receptor leads to anorexia. Interestingly, the food conversion ratio was clearly increased by MC-4 receptor blockage, whereas it was decreased in agonist-treated rats in a transient manner. Chronic infusion of an agonist caused a transient increase in oxygen consumption. Our studies also show that the MC-4 receptor plays a role in luteinizing hormone and prolactin surges in female rats. The MC-4 receptor has a role in mediating the effects of leptin on these surges. The phylogenetic relation of the MC-4 receptor to other GPCRs in the human genome was determined. The three-dimensional structure of the protein was studied by construction of a high-affinity zinc binding site between the helices, using two histidine residues facing each other. We also cloned the MC-4 receptor from evolutionary important species and showed by chromosomal mapping a conserved synteny between humans and zebrafish. The MC-4 receptor has been remarkably conserved in structure and pharmacology for more than 400 million years, implying that the receptor participated in vital physiological functions early in vertebrate evolution. PMID:12851300

  10. Shell structure evolution far from stability: experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shell structure evolution in nuclei situated at the extremes of neutron and proton excess are investigated using in-beam gamma spectroscopy techniques with radioactive beams at GANIL. A selection of results obtained very recently is presented: i) The reduced transition probabilities B(E2;0+1 → 2+) of the neutron-rich 74Zn and 70Ni nuclei have been measured using Coulomb excitation at intermediate energy. An unexpected large proton core polarization has been found in 70Ni and interpreted as being due to the monopole interaction between the neutron g9/2 and protons f7/2 and f5/2 spin-orbit partner orbitals. ii) Two proton knock-out reactions has been performed in order to study the most neutron-rich nuclei at the N = 28 shell closure. Gamma rays spectra and momentum distribution have been obtained for 42Si and neighboring nuclei. Evidence has been found for a deformed structure at N = 28 for Silicon, despite a relatively large Z = 14 gap. iii) The in-beam gamma spectroscopy of 36Ca performed using neutron knock-out reactions revealed that N = 16 is as large sub-shell closure as Z = 16 in 36S. The uniquely large excitation energy difference of the first 2+ state in these mirror nuclei turns out to be a consequence of their relatively pure neutron or proton 1p(d3/2)-1h(s1/2) nature

  11. Orchestrated structure evolution: modeling growth-regulated nanomanufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orchestrated structure evolution (OSE) is a scalable manufacturing method that combines the advantages of top-down (tool-directed) and bottom-up (self-propagating) approaches. The method consists of a seed patterning step that defines where material nucleates, followed by a growth step that merges seeded islands into the final patterned thin film. We develop a model to predict the completed pattern based on a computationally efficient approximate Green's function solution of the diffusion equation plus a Voronoi diagram based approach that defines the final grain boundary structure. Experimental results rely on electron beam lithography to pattern the seeds, followed by the mass transfer limited growth of copper via electrodeposition. The seed growth model is compared with experimental results to quantify nearest neighbor seed-to-seed interactions as well as how seeds interact with the pattern boundary to impact the local growth rate. Seed-to-seed and seed-to-pattern interactions are shown to result in overgrowth of seeds on edges and corners of the shape, where seeds have fewer neighbors. We explore how local changes to the seed location can be used to improve the patterning quality without increasing the manufacturing cost. OSE is shown to enable a unique set of trade-offs between the cost, time, and quality of thin film patterning.

  12. Tatooine Nurseries: Structure and Evolution of Circumbinary Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartanyan, David; Garmilla, José A.; Rafikov, Roman R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent discoveries of circumbinary planets by the Kepler mission provide motivation for understanding their birthplaces—protoplanetary disks around stellar binaries with separations ≲ 1 {{AU}}. We explore properties and evolution of such circumbinary disks focusing on modification of their structure caused by tidal coupling to the binary. We develop a set of analytical scaling relations describing viscous evolution of the disk properties, which are verified and calibrated using 1D numerical calculations with realistic inputs. Injection of angular momentum by the central binary suppresses mass accretion onto the binary and causes radial distribution of the viscous angular momentum flux {F}J to be different from that in a standard accretion disk around a single star with no torque at the center. Disks with no mass accretion at the center develop an {F}J profile that is flat in radius. Radial profiles of temperature and surface density are also quite different from those in disks around single stars. Damping of the density waves driven by the binary and viscous dissipation dominates heating of the inner disk (within 1-2 AU), pushing the ice line beyond 3-5 AU, depending on disk mass and age. Irradiation by the binary governs disk thermodynamics beyond ˜10 AU. However, self-shadowing by the hot inner disk may render central illumination irrelevant out to ˜20 AU. Spectral energy distribution of a circumbinary disk exhibits a distinctive bump around 10 μm, which may facilitate identification of such disks around unresolved binaries. Efficient tidal coupling to the disk drives orbital inspiral of the binary and may cause low-mass and relatively compact binaries to merge into a single star within the disk lifetime. We generally find that circumbinary disks present favorable sites for planet formation (despite their wider zone of volatile depletion), in agreement with the statistics of Kepler circumbinary planets.

  13. Instrumentation development for planetary in situ 40Ar/39Ar geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidheiser-Kroll, B.; Morgan, L. E.; Munk, M.; Warner, N. H.; Gupta, S.; Slaybaugh, R.; Harkness, P.; Mark, D. F.

    2015-12-01

    The chronology of the Solar System, particularly the timing of formation of extraterrestrial bodies and their features, is a major outstanding problem in planetary science. Although various chronological methods for in situ geochronology have been proposed (e.g. Rb-Sr, K-Ar), and even applied (K-Ar, Farley et al., 2014), the reliability, accuracy, and applicability of the 40Ar/39Ar method makes it by far the most desirable chronometer for dating extraterrestrial bodies. The method however relies on the neutron irradiation of samples, and thus a neutron source. We will discuss the challenges and feasibility of deploying a passive neutron source to planetary surfaces for the in situ application of the 40Ar/39Ar chronometer. Requirements in generating and shielding neutrons, as well as analyzing samples are discussed, along with an exploration of limitations such as mass, power, and cost. Two potential solutions for the in situ extraterrestrial deployment of the 40Ar/39Ar method will be presented. Although this represents a challenging task, developing the technology to apply the 40Ar/39Ar method on planetary surfaces would represent a major advance towards constraining the timescale of solar system formation and evolution.

  14. The role of Ar flow rates on synthesis of nano-structured zirconium nitride layer growth using plasma enhanced hot filament nitriding (PEHFN) technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zirconium is an important material in nuclear industry and Zirconium nitride is considered as an imperative inert matrix in fast reactor fuels for incineration of minor actinides and plutonium. In this article the effects of nonreactive sputter gas (argon) flow rates on the surface properties of zirconium are investigated in argon-nitrogen admixture (60 sccm - standard cubic centimeters per minute) using direct current thermal plasma (dc plasma) enhanced hot filament nitriding (PEHFN) technique. The nitrided specimens are analyzed using X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and nano hardness tester to study their surface properties. Phase analysis (XRD) confirms the development of o-Zr3N4 phase for all exposure conditions. Crystallite size analysis using XRD and AFM morphology confirms the growth of nano-structured zirconium nitride layers. Considerable enhancement in hardness is found when the sample is treated for 40 sccm argon in the admixture Ar:N2 (60 sccm). (authors)

  15. Predicting the electronic structure and magnetic properties of UO2+, UO2(CO)5+ and UO2(Ar)5+ using wavefunction based methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: This work aims to highlight the utility of concerted theoretical approaches for the investigation of f-element complexes, namely a combination of crystal-field (CF) based models with ab-initio wavefunction calculations. - Abstract: The electronic structure and magnetic properties of UO2+, and two complexes, UO2(CO)5+ and UO2(Ar)5+ in D5h symmetry are studied with a combination of relativistic theoretical methods: ab-initio wavefunction calculations, density functional theory (DFT), and crystal-field (CF) models with parameters extracted from the ab-initio calculations. The model Hamiltonian techniques are employed to describe theoretically the state interaction and the “competition” between Crystal field (CF) and spin–orbit coupling (SO), this is important besides for a correct description of the sign of the g-factors using also a symmetry criteria

  16. Study of evolution of 40Ar+natAg reaction from 7 to 34 MeV/u with a 4π multidetector of charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Properties of hot nuclei have been studied in the reactions of 40Ar with natAg at 7, 17, 27 and 34 MeV with AMPHORA, a 4π multidetector for charged particles. For central collisions, the results support the classical picture of hot (E* as great as 5 MeV/Nucleon), heavy (M ∼ 100-130 amu) nuclear systems, with high spin (Jmax ≥100h/2π) that emit a long chain of particles and fragments. Out-of-plane fragment production increases strongly with incident energy. This suggests that symmetric fission gradually disappears, as three or more body breakup processes become preferred modes of decay. Furthermore, the fragment-fragment correlations seem to indicate that Li fragments are emitted rapidly (τ≤10-21s) and often before the protons and α particles. This implies that thermalization of the composite nucleus is so fast that it clouds a clear signal for the hypothesis of 'instantaneous' multifragmentation

  17. Mutation rates and the evolution of germline structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scally, Aylwyn

    2016-07-19

    Genome sequencing studies of de novo mutations in humans have revealed surprising incongruities in our understanding of human germline mutation. In particular, the mutation rate observed in modern humans is substantially lower than that estimated from calibration against the fossil record, and the paternal age effect in mutations transmitted to offspring is much weaker than expected from our long-standing model of spermatogenesis. I consider possible explanations for these discrepancies, including evolutionary changes in life-history parameters such as generation time and the age of puberty, a possible contribution from undetected post-zygotic mutations early in embryo development, and changes in cellular mutation processes at different stages of the germline. I suggest a revised model of stem-cell state transitions during spermatogenesis, in which 'dark' gonial stem cells play a more active role than hitherto envisaged, with a long cycle time undetected in experimental observations. More generally, I argue that the mutation rate and its evolution depend intimately on the structure of the germline in humans and other primates.This article is part of the themed issue 'Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks'. PMID:27325834

  18. THE STRUCTURE, ORIGIN, AND EVOLUTION OF INTERSTELLAR HYDROCARBON GRAINS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiar, J. E.; Ricca, A. [SETI Institute, Carl Sagan Center, 189 Bernardo Avenue, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Tielens, A. G. G. M. [Leiden Observatory, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Adamson, A. J., E-mail: jchiar@seti.org, E-mail: Alessandra.Ricca@1.nasa.gov, E-mail: tielens@strw.leidenuniv.nl, E-mail: aadamson@gemini.edu [Gemini Observatory, Northern Operations Center, 670 North A' ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96729 (United States)

    2013-06-10

    Many materials have been considered for the carrier of the hydrocarbon absorption bands observed in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). In order to refine the model for ISM hydrocarbon grains, we analyze the observed aromatic (3.28, 6.2 {mu}m) and aliphatic (3.4 {mu}m) hydrocarbon absorption features in the diffuse ISM along the line of sight toward the Galactic center Quintuplet Cluster. Observationally, sp {sup 2} bonds can be measured in astronomical spectra using the 6.2 {mu}m CC aromatic stretch feature, whereas the 3.4 {mu}m aliphatic feature can be used to quantify the fraction of sp {sup 3} bonds. The fractional abundance of these components allows us to place the Galactic diffuse ISM hydrocarbons on a ternary phase diagram. We conclude that the Galactic hydrocarbon dust has, on average, a low H/C ratio and sp {sup 3} content and is highly aromatic. We have placed the results of our analysis within the context of the evolution of carbon dust in the ISM. We argue that interstellar carbon dust consists of a large core of aromatic carbon surrounded by a thin mantle of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H), a structure that is a natural consequence of the processing of stardust grains in the ISM.

  19. The structure and evolution of buyer-supplier networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Takayuki; Souma, Wataru; Watanabe, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the structure and evolution of customer-supplier networks in Japan using a unique dataset that contains information on customer and supplier linkages for more than 500,000 incorporated non-financial firms for the five years from 2008 to 2012. We find, first, that the number of customer links is unequal across firms; the customer link distribution has a power-law tail with an exponent of unity (i.e., it follows Zipf's law). We interpret this as implying that competition among firms to acquire new customers yields winners with a large number of customers, as well as losers with fewer customers. We also show that the shortest path length for any pair of firms is, on average, 4.3 links. Second, we find that link switching is relatively rare. Our estimates indicate that the survival rate per year for customer links is 92 percent and for supplier links 93 percent. Third and finally, we find that firm growth rates tend to be more highly correlated the closer two firms are to each other in a customer-supplier network (i.e., the smaller is the shortest path length for the two firms). This suggests that a non-negligible portion of fluctuations in firm growth stems from the propagation of microeconomic shocks - shocks affecting only a particular firm - through customer-supplier chains. PMID:25000368

  20. The structure and evolution of buyer-supplier networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Mizuno

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate the structure and evolution of customer-supplier networks in Japan using a unique dataset that contains information on customer and supplier linkages for more than 500,000 incorporated non-financial firms for the five years from 2008 to 2012. We find, first, that the number of customer links is unequal across firms; the customer link distribution has a power-law tail with an exponent of unity (i.e., it follows Zipf's law. We interpret this as implying that competition among firms to acquire new customers yields winners with a large number of customers, as well as losers with fewer customers. We also show that the shortest path length for any pair of firms is, on average, 4.3 links. Second, we find that link switching is relatively rare. Our estimates indicate that the survival rate per year for customer links is 92 percent and for supplier links 93 percent. Third and finally, we find that firm growth rates tend to be more highly correlated the closer two firms are to each other in a customer-supplier network (i.e., the smaller is the shortest path length for the two firms. This suggests that a non-negligible portion of fluctuations in firm growth stems from the propagation of microeconomic shocks - shocks affecting only a particular firm - through customer-supplier chains.

  1. A probabilistic model for the evolution of RNA structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holmes Ian

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For the purposes of finding and aligning noncoding RNA gene- and cis-regulatory elements in multiple-genome datasets, it is useful to be able to derive multi-sequence stochastic grammars (and hence multiple alignment algorithms systematically, starting from hypotheses about the various kinds of random mutation event and their rates. Results Here, we consider a highly simplified evolutionary model for RNA, called "The TKF91 Structure Tree" (following Thorne, Kishino and Felsenstein's 1991 model of sequence evolution with indels, which we have implemented for pairwise alignment as proof of principle for such an approach. The model, its strengths and its weaknesses are discussed with reference to four examples of functional ncRNA sequences: a riboswitch (guanine, a zipcode (nanos, a splicing factor (U4 and a ribozyme (RNase P. As shown by our visualisations of posterior probability matrices, the selected examples illustrate three different signatures of natural selection that are highly characteristic of ncRNA: (i co-ordinated basepair substitutions, (ii co-ordinated basepair indels and (iii whole-stem indels. Conclusions Although all three types of mutation "event" are built into our model, events of type (i and (ii are found to be better modeled than events of type (iii. Nevertheless, we hypothesise from the model's performance on pairwise alignments that it would form an adequate basis for a prototype multiple alignment and genefinding tool.

  2. THE STRUCTURE, ORIGIN, AND EVOLUTION OF INTERSTELLAR HYDROCARBON GRAINS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many materials have been considered for the carrier of the hydrocarbon absorption bands observed in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). In order to refine the model for ISM hydrocarbon grains, we analyze the observed aromatic (3.28, 6.2 μm) and aliphatic (3.4 μm) hydrocarbon absorption features in the diffuse ISM along the line of sight toward the Galactic center Quintuplet Cluster. Observationally, sp 2 bonds can be measured in astronomical spectra using the 6.2 μm CC aromatic stretch feature, whereas the 3.4 μm aliphatic feature can be used to quantify the fraction of sp 3 bonds. The fractional abundance of these components allows us to place the Galactic diffuse ISM hydrocarbons on a ternary phase diagram. We conclude that the Galactic hydrocarbon dust has, on average, a low H/C ratio and sp 3 content and is highly aromatic. We have placed the results of our analysis within the context of the evolution of carbon dust in the ISM. We argue that interstellar carbon dust consists of a large core of aromatic carbon surrounded by a thin mantle of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H), a structure that is a natural consequence of the processing of stardust grains in the ISM.

  3. Structure Shape Evolution in Lanthanide and Actinide Nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalaf A. M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available To give the characteristics of the evolution of the collectivity in even-even nuclei, we studied the behavior of the energy ratios R(4 / 2 and R(6 / 4. All chains of lanthanides begins as vibrational with R(4 / 2 near 2.0 and move towards rotational (R(4 / 2 3.33 as neutron number increases. A rabid jump in R(4 / 2 near N = 90 was seen. The plot of R(4 / 2 against Z shows not only the existence of a shape transitions but also the change in curvature in the data for N = 88 and 90, concave to convex. For intermedi- ate structure the slopes in E-GOS ( E over spin plots range between the vibrator and rotor extremes. The abnormal behavior of the two-neutron separation energies of our lanthanide nuclei as a function of neutron number around neutron number 90 is cal- culated. Nonlinear behavior is observed which indicate that shape phase transition is occurred in this region. The calculated reduced B(E2 transition probabilities of the low states of the ground state band in the nuclei 150 Nd / 152 Sm / 154 Gd / 156 Dy are analyzed and compared to the prediction of vibrational U(5 and rotational SU(3 limits of interacting boson model calculations.

  4. Two-cell detonation: losses effects on cellular structure and propagation in rich H2-NO2/N2O4-Ar mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virot, F.; Khasainov, B.; Desbordes, D.; Presles, H.-N.

    2010-12-01

    Detonation experiments in H2-NO2/N2O4-Ar mixtures (Equivalence ratio 1.2 and initial pressure lower than 0.1 MPa) confined in a tube of internal diameter 52 mm reveal two propagation regimes depending on initial pressure: (1) a quasi-CJ regime is observed along with a double cellular structure at high pressures; (2) at lower pressures, a low velocity detonation regime is observed with a single structure. Transition between this two regimes happens when the spinning detonation of the larger cell vanishes. Each detonation regime is characterized by velocity and pressure measurements and cellular structure records. Coherence between all experimental data for each experiment leads in assumption that losses are responsible for the transition between one regime to another. In a second part, we study such behaviour for a two-step mixture through numerical simulations using a global two-step chemical kinetics and a simple losses model. Numerical simulations qualitatively agree with experiments. Both detonation regimes with their own cellular structures are reproduced.

  5. Structure and evolution of the global seafood trade network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gephart, Jessica A.; Pace, Michael L.

    2015-12-01

    The food production system is increasingly global and seafood is among the most highly traded commodities. Global trade can improve food security by providing access to a greater variety of foods, increasing wealth, buffering against local supply shocks, and benefit the environment by increasing overall use efficiency for some resources. However, global trade can also expose countries to external supply shocks and degrade the environment by increasing resource demand and loosening feedbacks between consumers and the impacts of food production. As a result, changes in global food trade can have important implications for both food security and the environmental impacts of production. Measurements of globalization and the environmental impacts of food production require data on both total trade and the origin and destination of traded goods (the network structure). While the global trade network of agricultural and livestock products has previously been studied, seafood products have been excluded. This study describes the structure and evolution of the global seafood trade network, including metrics quantifying the globalization of seafood, shifts in bilateral trade flows, changes in centrality and comparisons of seafood to agricultural and industrial trade networks. From 1994 to 2012 the number of countries trading in the network remained relatively constant, while the number of trade partnerships increased by over 65%. Over this same period, the total quantity of seafood traded increased by 58% and the value increased 85% in real terms. These changes signify the increasing globalization of seafood products. Additionally, the trade patterns in the network indicate: increased influence of Thailand and China, strengthened intraregional trade, and increased exports from South America and Asia. In addition to characterizing these network changes, this study identifies data needs in order to connect seafood trade with environmental impacts and food security outcomes.

  6. Structural evolution and mechanisms of fatigue in polycrystalline brass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vejloe Carstensen, J

    1998-03-01

    The plastic strain controlled fatigue behaviour of polycrystalline Cu-15%Zn and Cu-30%Zn has been investigated with the aim of studying the effect of slip mode modification by the addition of zinc to copper. It has been clearly demonstrated, that true cyclic saturation does not occur in the plastic strain controlled fatigue of brass. This complicates the contstruction of a cyclic stress-strain (CSS) curve and thus the comparison with copper. A method to overcome this complication has been suggested. Surface observations on fatigued brass specimens show that individual grains tend to deform by Sachs type single slip. This behaviour has been described by the self-consistent Sachs-Eshelby model, which provides estimates of the CSS curve for brass polycrystals. Successive stages of primary hardening, softening and secondary hardening has been observed in the plastic strain controlled fatigue of brass. It has been found that the primary hardening is attributed to an increase of intergranular stresses whereas the secondary hardening apparently is attributed to an increase of friction stresses. Investigations of the structural evolution show that the softening behaviour can be explained by the presence of short-range order (SRO). SRO promote the formation of extended dipole arrays which hardens the material. The formation of intense shear bands destroy the dipole arrays, which explains the cyclic softening. The present results reveal that Cu-30%Zn in a pure planar slip alloy, while Cu-15%Zn displays both planar and wavy slip. The mechanical and structural behaviour observed in brass resembles recent observations in 316L austenitic stainless steels, and the present results reveal that Cu-30%Zn and 316L have approximately the same fatigue life curve. This emphasizes brass as being a convenient model system for the industrially important austenitic steels. (au) 9 tabs., 94 ills., 177 refs.; The thesis is also available as DCAMM-R-S80 and as an electronic document on http://www.risoe.dk/rispubl

  7. Structural evolution and mechanisms of fatigue in polycrystalline brass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The plastic strain controlled fatigue behaviour of polycrystalline Cu-15%Zn and Cu-30%Zn has been investigated with the aim of studying the effect of slip mode modification by the addition of zinc to copper. It has been clearly demonstrated, that true cyclic saturation does not occur in the plastic strain controlled fatigue of brass. This complicates the contstruction of a cyclic stress-strain (CSS) curve and thus the comparison with copper. A method to overcome this complication has been suggested. Surface observations on fatigued brass specimens show that individual grains tend to deform by Sachs type single slip. This behaviour has been described by the self-consistent Sachs-Eshelby model, which provides estimates of the CSS curve for brass polycrystals. Successive stages of primary hardening, softening and secondary hardening has been observed in the plastic strain controlled fatigue of brass. It has been found that the primary hardening is attributed to an increase of intergranular stresses whereas the secondary hardening apparently is attributed to an increase of friction stresses. Investigations of the structural evolution show that the softening behaviour can be explained by the presence of short-range order (SRO). SRO promote the formation of extended dipole arrays which hardens the material. The formation of intense shear bands destroy the dipole arrays, which explains the cyclic softening. The present results reveal that Cu-30%Zn in a pure planar slip alloy, while Cu-15%Zn displays both planar and wavy slip. The mechanical and structural behaviour observed in brass resembles recent observations in 316L austenitic stainless steels, and the present results reveal that Cu-30%Zn and 316L have approximately the same fatigue life curve. This emphasizes brass as being a convenient model system for the industrially important austenitic steels. (au)

  8. Structure and evolution of barley powdery mildew effector candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedersen Carsten

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein effectors of pathogenicity are instrumental in modulating host immunity and disease resistance. The powdery mildew pathogen of grasses Blumeria graminis causes one of the most important diseases of cereal crops. B. graminis is an obligate biotrophic pathogen and as such has an absolute requirement to suppress or avoid host immunity if it is to survive and cause disease. Results Here we characterise a superfamily predicted to be the full complement of Candidates for Secreted Effector Proteins (CSEPs in the fungal barley powdery mildew parasite B. graminis f.sp. hordei. The 491 genes encoding these proteins constitute over 7% of this pathogen’s annotated genes and most were grouped into 72 families of up to 59 members. They were predominantly expressed in the intracellular feeding structures called haustoria, and proteins specifically associated with the haustoria were identified by large-scale mass spectrometry-based proteomics. There are two major types of effector families: one comprises shorter proteins (100–150 amino acids, with a high relative expression level in the haustoria and evidence of extensive diversifying selection between paralogs; the second type consists of longer proteins (300–400 amino acids, with lower levels of differential expression and evidence of purifying selection between paralogs. An analysis of the predicted protein structures underscores their overall similarity to known fungal effectors, but also highlights unexpected structural affinities to ribonucleases throughout the entire effector super-family. Candidate effector genes belonging to the same family are loosely clustered in the genome and are associated with repetitive DNA derived from retro-transposons. Conclusions We employed the full complement of genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic analyses as well as structural prediction methods to identify and characterize the members of the CSEPs superfamily in B. graminis f

  9. Contribution for the assessment and simplified calculation of structures taking into account hysteresis evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By defining a scalar function of comparison in general and isolating one-dimensional cyclic hysteresis curves for field elements, the foundation is laid for a unified way of judging systems with chain-type structure taking into account hysteresis evolution. A general description of this evolution leads to certain evolutionary properties, with the 'linear' and 'uniform' evolution covering the usual methods for low-cycle fatigue (Miner's rule, Manson-Coffin, Rainflow, etc.). For the more realistic case of an 'exponential' and 'consistent' evolution, experimentally verifiable typ-functions are given which enable with fair accuracy an approximate time-domain computation of a system regarding hysteresis evolution. (orig.)

  10. Relativistic fine structure oscillator strengths for Li-like ions C IV - Si XII, S XIV, Ar XVI, Ca XVIII, Ti XX, Cr XXII, and Ni XXVI

    CERN Document Server

    Nahar, S N

    2002-01-01

    Ab initio calculations including relativistic effects employing the Breit-Pauli R-matrix (BPRM) method are reported for fine structure energy levels and oscillator strengths upto n = 10 and 0.leq. l .leq.9 for 15 Li-like ions: C IV, N V, O VI, F VII, Ne VIII, Na IX, Mg X, Al XI, Si XII, S XIV, Ar XVI, Ca XIII, Ti XX, Cr XXII, and Ni XXVI. About one hundred bound fine structure energy levels of total angular momenta, 1/2 .leq. J .leq. 17/2 of even and odd parities, total orbital angular momentum, 0 .leq L .leq. 9 and spin multiplicity (2S+1) = 2, 4 are considered for each ion. The levels provide almost 900 dipole allowed and intercombination bound-bound transitions. The BPRM method enables consideration of large set of transitions with uniform accuracy compared to the best available theoretical methods. The CC eigenfunction expansion for each ion includes the lowest 17 fine structure energy levels of the core configurations 1s^2, 1s2s, 1s2p, 1s3s, 1s3p, and 1s3d. The calculated energies of the ions agree with ...

  11. Structure and evolution of high-mass stellar mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Glebbeek, Evert; Zwart, Simon Portegies; Pols, Onno R

    2013-01-01

    In young dense clusters repeated collisions between massive stars may lead to the formation of a very massive star (above 100 Msun). In the past the study of the long-term evolution of merger remnants has mostly focussed on collisions between low-mass stars (up to about 2 Msun) in the context of blue-straggler formation. The evolution of collision products of more massive stars has not been as thoroughly investigated. In this paper we study the long-term evolution of a number of stellar mergers formed by the head-on collision of a primary star with a mass of 5-40 Msun with a lower mass star at three points in its evolution in order to better understand their evolution. We use smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) calculations to model the collision between the stars. The outcome of this calculation is reduced to one dimension and imported into a stellar evolution code. We follow the subsequent evolution of the collision product through the main sequence at least until the onset of helium burning. We find that l...

  12. Gem-bearing basaltic volcanism, Barrington, New South Wales: Cenozoic evolution, based on basalt K-Ar ages and zircon fission track and U-Pb isotope dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on basalt K-Ar and zircon fission track dating, Barrington shield volcano was active for 55 million years. Activity in the northeast, at 59 Ma, preceded more substantial activity between 55 and 51 Ma and more limited activity on western and southern flanks after 45 Ma. Eruptions brought up megacrystic gemstones (ruby, sapphire and zircon) throughout the volcanism, particularly during quieter eruptive periods. Zircon fission track dating (thermal reset ages) indicates gem-bearing eruptions at 57, 43, 38, 28 and 4-5 Ma, while U-Pb isotope SHRIMP dating suggests two main periods of zircon crystallisation between 60 and 50 Ma and 46-45 Ma. Zircons show growth and sector twinning typical of magmatic crystallisation and include low-U, moderate-U and high-U types. The 46 Ma high-U zircons exhibit trace and rare-earth element patterns that approach those of zircon inclusions in sapphires and may mark a sapphire formation time at Barrington. Two Barrington basaltic episodes include primary lavas with trace-element signatures suggesting amphibole/apatite-enriched lithospheric mantle sources. Other basalts less-enriched in Th, Sr, P and light rare-earth elements have trace-element ratios that overlap those of HIMU-related South Tasman basalts. Zircon and sapphire formation is attributed to crystallisation from minor felsic melts derived by incipient melting of amphibole-enriched mantle during lesser thermal activity. Ruby from Barrington volcano is a metamorphic type, and a metamorphic/metasomatic origin associated with basement ultramafic bodies is favoured. Migratory plate/plume paths constructed through Barrington basaltic episodes intersect approximately 80% of dated Palaeogene basaltic activity (65-30 Ma) along the Tasman margin (27-37 deg S) supporting a migratory plume-linked origin. Neogene Barrington activity dwindled to sporadic gem-bearing eruptions, the last possibly marking a minor plume trace. The present subdued thermal profile in northeastern New South

  13. MC carbide structures in M(lc2)ar-M247. M.S. Thesis - Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawro, S. W.

    1982-01-01

    The morphologies and distribution of the MC carbides in Mar-M247 ingot stock and castings were investigated using metallographic, X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis techniques. The MC carbides were found to form script structures during solidification. The script structures were composed of three distinct parts. The central cores and elongated arms of the MC carbide script structures had compositions (Ti, Cr, Hf, Ta, W)C and lattice parameters of 4.39 A. The elongated script arms terminated in enlarged, angular "heads". The heads had compositions (Ti, Hf, Ta, W)C and lattice parameters of approximately 4.50 A. The heads had a higher Hf content than the cores and arms. The size of the script structures, as well as the relative amount of head-type to core and arm-type MC carbide, was found to be determined by solidification conditions. No carryover of the MC carbides from the ingot stock to the remelted and cast material was observed.

  14. Oldest human footprints dated by Ar/Ar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaillet, Stéphane; Vita-Scaillet, Grazia; Guillou, Hervé

    2008-11-01

    Fossilized human trackways are extremely rare in the geologic record. These bear indirect but invaluable testimony of human/hominid locomotion in open air settings and can provide critical information on biomechanical changes relating to bipedalism evolution throughout the primitive human lineage. Among these, the "Devil's footsteps" represent one of the best preserved human footprints suite recovered so far in a Pleistocene volcanic ash of the Roccamonfina volcano (southern Italy). Until recently, the age of these footprints remained speculative and indirectly correlated with a loosely dated caldera-forming eruption that produced the Brown Leucitic Tuff. Despite extensive hydrothermal alteration of the pyroclastic deposit and variable contamination with excess 40Ar, detailed and selective 40Ar/ 39Ar laser probe analysis of single leucite crystals recovered from the ash deposit shows that the pyroclastic layer and the footprints are 345 ± 6 kyr old (1 σ), confirming for the first time that these are the oldest human trackways ever dated, and that they were presumably left by the modern human predecessor, Homo heidelbergensis, close to Climatic Termination IV.

  15. Structure and evolution of the magnetochrome domains: no longer alone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal eArnoux

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB can swim along Earth’s magnetic field lines, thanks to the alignment of dedicated cytoplasmic organelles. These organelles, termed magnetosomes, are proteolipidic vesicles filled by a 35-120 nm crystal of either magnetite or greigite. The formation and alignment of magnetosomes are mediated by a group of specific genes, the mam genes, encoding the magnetosome-associated proteins. The whole process of magnetosome biogenesis can be divided into four sequential steps; (i cytoplasmic membrane invagination, (ii magnetosomes alignment, (iii iron crystal nucleation and (iv species-dependent mineral size and shape control. Since both magnetite and greigite are a mix of iron(III and iron(II, iron redox state management within the magnetosome vesicle is a key issue. Recently, studies have started pointing out the importance of a MTB-specific c-type cytochrome domain found in several magnetosome-associated proteins (MamE, P, T and X. This magnetochrome (MCR domain is almost always found in tandem, and this tandem is either found alone (MamT, in combination with a PDZ domain (MamP, a domain of unknown function (MamX or with a trypsin combined to one or two PDZ domains (MamE. By taking advantage of new genomic data available on MTB and a recent structural study of MamP, which helped define the MCR domain boundaries, we attempt to retrace the evolutionary history within and between the different MCR-containing proteins. We propose that the observed tandem repeat of MCR is the result of a convergent evolution and attempt to explain why this domain is rarely found alone.

  16. Structure and evolution of the magnetochrome domains: no longer alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnoux, Pascal; Siponen, Marina I; Lefèvre, Christopher T; Ginet, Nicolas; Pignol, David

    2014-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) can swim along Earth's magnetic field lines, thanks to the alignment of dedicated cytoplasmic organelles. These organelles, termed magnetosomes, are proteolipidic vesicles filled by a 35-120 nm crystal of either magnetite or greigite. The formation and alignment of magnetosomes are mediated by a group of specific genes, the mam genes, encoding the magnetosome-associated proteins. The whole process of magnetosome biogenesis can be divided into four sequential steps; (i) cytoplasmic membrane invagination, (ii) magnetosomes alignment, (iii) iron crystal nucleation and (iv) species-dependent mineral size and shape control. Since both magnetite and greigite are a mix of iron (III) and iron (II), iron redox state management within the magnetosome vesicle is a key issue. Recently, studies have started pointing out the importance of a MTB-specific c-type cytochrome domain found in several magnetosome-associated proteins (MamE, P, T, and X). This magnetochrome (MCR) domain is almost always found in tandem, and this tandem is either found alone (MamT), in combination with a PDZ domain (MamP), a domain of unknown function (MamX) or with a trypsin combined to one or two PDZ domains (MamE). By taking advantage of new genomic data available on MTB and a recent structural study of MamP, which helped define the MCR domain boundaries, we attempt to retrace the evolutionary history within and between the different MCR-containing proteins. We propose that the observed tandem repeat of MCR is the result of a convergent evolution and attempt to explain why this domain is rarely found alone. PMID:24723915

  17. Understanding the Structure and Evolution of Nearby Disk Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand the structure and evolution of disk galaxies, we studied the stellar and gaseous components as well as the star formation rate in nearby disk galaxies. We used PS1 medium deep survey images to derive five-band (grizy) surface brightness profiles down to 30 ABmag/arcsec^2 for about 700 galaxies. From these stellar mass and mass-to-light ratio radial profiles are derived. The stellar mass radial profiles tend to bend-up at large radii, this often traces an extended old stellar population. The mass-to-light ratio profiles tend to rise outside the r25 radii. We also find a larger fraction of up-bending surface brightness profiles than Polen & Trujillo (2006). This may be because their sample is biased towards low surface brightness galaxies. We used HIPASS data as well as VLA HI 21cm data to study the gas component and dynamics of disk galaxies. We used the GALEX UV images to study the star formation of a HI-selected star-forming sample of about 400 galaxies, compiling a database of FUV and NUV radial profiles and related parameters. We used this to study the star forming efficiency (SFE, star formation rate per unit area divided by gas surface mass density) of the sample galaxies. We found that the UV based SFE has a tighter relationship with HI mass than an H_alpha based SFE as typically used in previous studies and the UV SFE is flat across wide range of stellar mass. We constructed a simple model to predict the distribution of interstellar medium and star formation rate in an equilibrium disk with constant two-fluid Toomre Q. This model can reproduces the SFE relations we derived.

  18. Compact structure and proteins of pasta retard in vitro digestive evolution of branched starch molecular structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Wei; Sissons, Mike; Warren, Frederick J; Gidley, Michael J; Gilbert, Robert G

    2016-11-01

    The roles that the compact structure and proteins in pasta play in retarding evolution of starch molecular structure during in vitro digestion are explored, using four types of cooked samples: whole pasta, pasta powder, semolina (with proteins) and extracted starch without proteins. These were subjected to in vitro digestion with porcine α-amylase, collecting samples at different times and characterizing the weight distribution of branched starch molecules using size-exclusion chromatography. Measurement of α-amylase activity showed that a protein (or proteins) from semolina or pasta powder interacted with α-amylase, causing reduced enzymatic activity and retarding digestion of branched starch molecules with hydrodynamic radius (Rh)protein(s) was susceptible to proteolysis. Thus the compact structure of pasta protects the starch and proteins in the interior of the whole pasta, reducing the enzymatic degradation of starch molecules, especially for molecules with Rh>100nm. PMID:27516291

  19. Archival Studies of The Mslim World in the Medieval Age: An Evaluation Archival Studies and Archival Structure in The Period Of Fatimid Ortaçağ İslam Dünyası'nda Arşivcilik: Fatımi Dönemi Arşivciliğine ve Arşivcilik Uygulamalarına Dair Bir Değerlendirme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammet Hanefi Kutluoğlu

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the subject of archival history in Turkey are mainly concentrated on the bureaucratical structures of the investigated periods. The unexistance of enough archival materials and studies on the archival application of this periods has forced the researchers to undertake this type of studies. In case of availability of archival materials, understanding and evaluation of the creation and the preparation of the documents could be easier. The aim of this article is to present an important book on the bureaucratical tradition and archival structure of Fatimid period to the readers. This book also gives some crucial Information on historical development of archival studies in The Islamic World under theoretical and methodological bases. Ülkemizde arşivcilik tarihim konu alan araştırmalarda daha çok ilgili dönemlerin bürokratik yap darı incelenmektedir. Bunun nedeni, bu dönemlerle alakalı arşiv uygulamalarına yönelik çalışmaların ve arşiv malzemelerinin bulunmamasıdır. Arşiv malzemesinin bulunduğu durumlarda, o dönemde üretilen belgelerin iç düzenlemeleri hakkında yorumlar yapılabilmektedir. Bu çalışmanın asıl konusunu oluşturan Fatımi dönemi ise, bürokratik geleneğin yanı sıra dönemin arşivcilik uygulamaları hakkında önemli bilgiler içeren bir eseri günümüze taşımasıdır. Bu durum, islam dünyası arşivciliğinin hem teorik ve hem de metodik anlamdaki tarihsel sürecinin ortaya konması hususunda önemli bir zemin oluşturmakta; bu tarihsel sürecin öğrenilmesi de mesleki bilincin ve özgüvenin sağlanmasında önemli bir rol oynamaktadır.

  20. The effects of air pollution on cardiovascular diseases: lag structures Efeitos da poluição do ar nas doenças cardiovasculares: estruturas de defasagem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes Conceição Martins

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the lag structure between air pollution exposure and elderly cardiovascular diseases hospital admissions, by gender. METHODS: Health data of people aged 64 years or older was stratified by gender in São Paulo city, Southeastern Brazil, from 1996 to 2001. Daily levels of air pollutants (CO, PM10, O3, NO2, and SO2 , minimum temperature, and relative humidity were also analyzed. It were fitted generalized additive Poisson regressions and used constrained distributed lag models adjusted for long time trend, weekdays, weather and holidays to assess the lagged effects of air pollutants on hospital admissions up to 20 days after exposure. RESULTS: Interquartile range increases in PM10 (26.21 mug/m³ and SO2 (10.73 mug/m³ were associated with 3.17% (95% CI: 2.09-4.25 increase in congestive heart failure and 0.89% (95% CI: 0.18-1.61 increase in total cardiovascular diseases at lag 0, respectively. Effects were higher among female group for most of the analyzed outcomes. Effects of air pollutants for different outcomes and gender groups were predominately acute and some "harvesting" were found. CONLUSIONS: The results show that cardiovascular diseases in São Paulo are strongly affected by air pollution.OBJETIVO: Investigar a estrutura de defasagem entre exposição à poluição do ar e internações hospitalares por doenças cardiovasculares em idosos, separada por gênero. MÉTODOS: Os dados de saúde de pessoas com mais de 64 anos de idade foram estratificados por gênero, na cidade de São Paulo, entre 1996 e 2001. Os níveis diários de poluentes do ar (CO, PM10, O3, NO2, SO2 e os dados de temperatura mínima e umidade relativa do ar foram também foram analisados. Foram utilizados modelos restritos de distribuição polinomial em modelos aditivos generalizados de regressão de Poisson para estimar os efeitos dos poluentes no dia da exposição e até 20 dias após, controlando-se para sazonalidades de longa e curta dura

  1. Real Time Pore Structure Evolution during Olivine Mineral Carbonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W.; Fusseis, F.; Lisabeth, H. P.; Xiao, X.

    2014-12-01

    Aqueous carbonation of ultramafic rocks has been proposed as a promising method for long-term, secure sequestration of carbon dioxide. While chemical kinetics data indicate that carbonation reaction in olivine is one of the fastest among the mg-bearing minerals, in practice, the factors that limit the extent and rate of carbonation in ultramafic rocks are fluid supply and flux. On the one hand, reaction products could produce passivating layer that prohibits further reactions. On the other hand, the increases in solid volume during carbonation could lead to cracking and create new fluid paths. Whether carbonation in ultramafic rocks is self-limiting or self-sustaining has been hotly debated. Experimental evidence of precipitation of reaction products during olivine carbonation was reported. To date, reaction-driven cracking has not been observed. In this paper, we present the first real-time pore structure evolution data using the x-ray synchrotron microtomography. Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) solution was injected into porous olivine aggregates and in-situ pore structure change during olivine carbonation at a constant confining pressure (12 MPa) and a temperature of 200oC was captured at 30 min. interval for ~160 hours. Shortly after the experiment started, filling-in of the existing pores by precipitation of reaction products was visible. The size of the in-fills kept increasing as reactions continued. After ~48 hours, cracking around the in-fill materials became visible. After ~60 hours, these cracks started to show a clear polygonal pattern, similar to the crack patterns usually seen on the surface of drying mud. After ~72 hours, some of the cracks coalesced into large fractures that cut-through the olivine aggregates. New fractures continued to develop and at the end of the experiment, the sample was completely disintegrated by these fractures. We also conducted nanotomography experiments on a sub-volume of the reacted olivine aggregate. Orthogonal sets of

  2. Numerical investigation of NeI for 2p55g configuration and ArI for 3p55g configuration Zeeman structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The behavior of an atom in the magnetic field can be studied numerically based on the parameters of the fine structure (the radial integrals in the energy operator matrix). A set of the fine structure parameters ensuring the correlation with experimentally observed energies was obtained in the previous works of the authors. The authors provide the results of the numerical study of magnetic sublevels behavior for NeI and ArI (of specified configurations) in the magnetic fields up to 150 kOe. Using the free momentums representation and the Clebsch-Gordan coefficients the authors succeeded to obtain the expressions for the diagonal and non-diagonal elements of the atom-field interaction matrices in LSJM-representation as well as to refine the signs of the non-diagonal elements. (γψi|W|γψi) = (((J(J + 1) + L(L + 1) - S (S +1)/2J(J + 1))gl + ((J(J + 1) - L(L + 1) + S (S +1)/2J(J + 1))gs)) μ0H M (ΔJ 0 ΔL = ΔS = 0 ; (γψi|W|γ'ψj) √[((J - L + S + 1)(J + L - S + 1)(J + L + S + 2)(L + S - J))/4(J + 1)2(2J + 1)(2J + 3) x ((J + 1)2 - M2 x (gl - gs)μ0H] (ΔJ 0 ±1, ΔL ΔS = 0, Jmin). The energies of Zeeman's sublevels were calculated by means of the diagonalization of the complete energy operator matrix, which was expressed in LS-representation with additional elements accounting for the atom-field interaction. The diagonalization was carried out for all the values of the magnetic quantum number M. The distinctive details of Zeemann's structure especially points of crossing and anticrossing areas of magnetic sublevels were obtained for 2p55g configuration of NeI and 3p55g configuration of ArI. (author)

  3. The Coevolution of Phycobilisomes: Molecular Structure Adapting to Functional Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Yin-Chu Wang; Song Qin; Fei Shi

    2011-01-01

    Phycobilisome is the major light-harvesting complex in cyanobacteria and red alga. It consists of phycobiliproteins and their associated linker peptides which play key role in absorption and unidirectional transfer of light energy and the stability of the whole complex system, respectively. Former researches on the evolution among PBPs and linker peptides had mainly focused on the phylogenetic analysis and selective evolution. Coevolution is the change that the conformation of one residue is ...

  4. Effect of offshore structures on shoreline evolution, Atlantic Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A distorted scale hydraulic model investigation was performed to determine the potential effect, if any, of a proposed offshore nuclear power plant on shoreline evolution. Model measurements of current patterns and breaking wave characteristics (height, depth and angle to shoreline) were used to calculate longshore transport rates in the potentially affected areas. It was concluded that the proposed construction would have a negligible effect on future shoreline evolution

  5. Effect of N2/Ar on structure and hardness of TaN-Ag thin films deposited by DC cylindrical magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foadi, Farnaz; Darabi, Elham; Reza Hantehzadeh, Mohammad

    2014-05-01

    TaN-Ag thin films were deposited on a 304 stainless steel substrate by cylindrical DC magnetron sputtering using different ratios of nitrogen to argon gas. The N2 percentages were 1.5%, 3%, 4.5%, 7.5%, 10.5% and 15% by volume. The influence of the N2/Ar ratio on the films morphology, structure and hardness was investigated using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Grazing Incidence X-ray Diffraction (GIXRD), and the nanoindentation method. The amounts of Ta and Ag were determined using Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). The thickness of the deposited films was measured by surface step profilometer. The RMS surface roughness increased for N2 percentages up to 7.5% and then decreased. Grazing results showed different TaN phases and Ag crystalline structures. The hardness of all films was much higher than the hardness of bulk silver or tantalum. The highest hardness value was obtained for 1.5% N2 . The EDS results indicated that the Ag/Ta ratio in the deposited films increases with increasing the N2 amount from 1.5% to 15%. The size of Ag islands on the surface was maximized at 7.5% N2 in the gas mixture. The thicknesses of films were in the range of 400-600 nm.

  6. An 40 Ar- 39 Ar study of the Cape Verde hot spot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Paul Martin; Grandvuinet, Tanja; Wilson, James Richard;

    2008-01-01

    The 40Ar-39Ar analyses of 28 groundmass separates from volcanic rocks from the islands of Santiago, Sal, and São Vicente, Cape Verde archipelago, are presented. The new age data record the volcanic evolution for Santiago from 4.6 to 0.7 Ma, for Sal from around 15 to 1.1 Ma, and for São Vicente fr...

  7. Analysis on the Evolution of Agricultural Structure about Pan-Yangtze River Delta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Jiang; LIU Zhi-ying

    2010-01-01

    Starting from the definition of agricultural structure,this paper firstly analyzes the change of industrial and spatial structure of agriculture of Pan-Yangtze River Delta,then inspects the relationship between the development of economics and the evolution of agricultural structure,an the end it provides policy recommendation about the development and adjustment of agricultural structure for the future.

  8. On the equilibrium structures of the complexes H2C3H+ · Ar and c-C3H3(+) · Ar: results of explicitly correlated coupled cluster calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botschwina, Peter; Oswald, Rainer

    2011-01-28

    Explicitly correlated coupled cluster theory at the CCSD(T)-F12x (x = a, b) level [T. B. Adler et al., J. Chem. Phys. 127, 221106 (2007)] has been employed in a study of the potential energy surfaces for the complexes H(2)C(3)H(+) · Ar and c-C(3)H(3)(+) · Ar. For the former complex, a pronounced minimum with C(s) symmetry was found (D(e) ≈ 780 cm(-1)), well below the local "H-bound" minimum with C(2v) symmetry (D(e) ≈ 585 cm(-1)). The absorption at 3238 cm(-1) found in the recent infrared photodissociation spectra [A. M. Ricks et al., J. Chem. Phys. 132, 051101 (2010)] is, thus, interpreted as an essentially free acetylenic CH stretching vibration of the propargyl cation. A global minimum of C(s) symmetry was also obtained for c-C(3)H(3)(+) (D(e) ≈ 580 cm(-1)), but the energy difference with respect to the local C(2v) minimum is only 54 cm(-1). PMID:21280723

  9. Cenozoic structural evolution of the Argentinean Andes at 34°40'S: A close relationship between thick and thin-skinned deformation Evolución estructural Cenozoica de los Andes Argentinos a los 34°40'S: una estrecha relación entre deformación de piel fina y piel gruesa

    OpenAIRE

    Martín Turienzo; Luis Dimieri; Cristina Frisicale; Vanesa Araujo; Natalia Sánchez

    2012-01-01

    In the Argentinean side of the Andes at 34°40'S, the Cenozoic Andean orogeny produced the thick-skinned Malargüe fold-and-thrust belt and the easternmost basement uplift of the Cordillera Frontal. Integrating balanced structural cross-sections with previous studies of Cenozoic synorogenic rocks and 40Ar/39Ar ages of coeval volcanic and subvolcanic rocks, we propose a Miocene to Quaternary sequential structural evolution of this sector of the Andes. Andean deformation in the study area begun a...

  10. Models of the Protocellular Structures, Functions and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; New, Michael; Keefe, Anthony; Szostak, Jack W.; Lanyi, Janos F.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    In the absence of extinct or extant record of protocells, the most direct way to test our understanding of the origin of cellular life is to construct laboratory models that capture important features of protocellular systems. Such efforts are currently underway in a collaborative project between NASA-Ames, Harvard medical School and University of California. They are accompanied by computational studies aimed at explaining self-organization of simple molecules into ordered structures. The centerpiece of this project is a method for the in vitro evolution of protein enzymes toward arbitrary catalytic targets. A similar approach has already been developed for nucleic acids: First, a very large population of candidate molecules is generated using a random synthetic approach. Next, the small numbers of molecules that can accomplish the desired task are selected. These molecules are next vastly multiplied using the polymerase chain reaction. A mutagenic approach, in which the sequences of selected molecules are randomly altered, can yield further improvements in performance or alterations of specificities. Unfortunately, the catalytic potential of nucleic acids is rather limited. Proteins are more catalytically capable but cannot be directly amplified. In the new technique, this problem is circumvented by covalently linking each protein of the initial, diverse, pool to the RNA sequence that codes for it. Then, selection is performed on the proteins, but the nucleic acids are replicated. To date, we have obtained "a proof of concept" by evolving simple, novel proteins capable of selectively binding adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP). Our next goal is to create an enzyme that can phosphorylate amino acids and another to catalyze the formation of peptide bonds in the absence of nucleic acid templates. This latter reaction does not take place in contemporary cells. once developed, these enzymes will be encapsulated in liposomes so that they will function in a simulated cellular

  11. Experimental study of the structure of a lean premixed indane/CH4/O2/Ar flame

    CERN Document Server

    Pousse, Emir; Fournet, René; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique

    2009-01-01

    In order to better understand the chemistry involved during the combustion of components of diesel fuel, the structure of a laminar lean premixed methane flame doped with indane has been investigated. The gases of this flame contains 7.1% (molar) of methane, 36.8% of oxygen and 0.90% of indane corresponding to an equivalence ratio of 0.74 and a ratio C9H10/CH4 of 12.75%. The flame has been stabilized on a burner at a pressure of 6.7 kPa using argon as dilutant, with a gas velocity at the burner of 49.2 cm/s at 333 K. Quantified species included usual methane C0-C2 combustion products, but also 11 C3-C5 hydrocarbons and 3 C1-C3 oxygenated compounds, as well as 17 aromatic products, namely benzene, toluene, phenylacetylene, styrene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, trimethylbenzenes, ethyltoluenes, indene methylindane, methylindene, naphthalene, phenol, benzaldehyde, benzofuran. The temperature was measured thanks to a thermocouple in PtRh (6%)-PtRh (30%) settled inside the enclosure and ranged from 800 K close to the bu...

  12. Structure and evolution of the Y-chromosomal and mitochondrial DNA of cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaar, Edward Louis Christian

    2004-01-01

    The research described in this thesis is focused on the structure and evolution of the bovine Y-chromosome and the use of paternal markers in molecular diagnostics. The Y-chromosome has emerged together with the X-chromosome early during the evolution of the mammals by differentiation of a pair of a

  13. H2/(Ar+H2)流量比对AZO薄膜结构及光电性能的影响%Effect of H2/(Ar+H2)flux ratio on structure and optical-electrical properties of AZO thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱胜君; 王俊; 李念; 李涛涛; 吴隽; 祝柏林

    2012-01-01

    Ar+ H2气氛下,用RF磁控溅射法在室温下制备Al掺杂的ZnO(AZO)薄膜,研究H2/(Ar+H2)流量比对薄膜结构和光电性能的影响.结果表明,在沉积气氛中引入H2可以提高AZO薄膜的结晶质量,降低AZO薄膜的电阻率,提高其霍尔迁移率和载流子浓度;H2/(Ar+ H2)流量比为5%时,AZO薄膜的最小电阻率为1.58×10-3 Ω·cm,最大霍尔迁移率和载流子浓度分别为13.17 cm2·(V· s)-1和3.01×1020 cm-3;AZO薄膜在可见光范围内平均透光率大于85.7%.%Al-doped ZnO thin films (AZO) were deposited in Ar+H2 atmosphere by RF magnetron sputtering at room temperature. The effect of H2/(Ar+H2) flux ratio on structure and optical-electrical properties of AZO films were investigated with XRD, SEM, Hall effect instrument, and UV visible spectrophotometer. The results show that H2 introduction into deposition atmosphere can improve the crystallite quality of the AZO films, greatly reduce the electrical resistivity and improve Hall mobility and carrier concentration of the films. When H2/(Ar+H2) flux ratio is 5%, deposited AZO film has the minimum resistivity of 1. 58× 10-3 Ω · cm with Hall mobility.at 13. 17 cm2 V-1 s-1 and carrier concentration at 3. 01 × 10 20 cm-3, and its average transmittance in the visible light range is over 85. 7%. The results suggest that AZO films deposited in Ar+H2 atmosphere at room temperature are suitable for application in solar cells and organic light emitting diodes as transparent conductive electrode layers.

  14. The Evolution and Internal Structure of Jupiter and Saturn with Compositional Gradients

    CERN Document Server

    Vazan, A; Podolak, M; Kovetz, A

    2016-01-01

    The internal structure of gas giant planets may be more complex than the commonly assumed core-envelope structure with an adiabatic temperature profile. Different primordial internal structures as well as various physical processes can lead to non-homogenous compositional distributions. A non-homogenous internal structure has a significant impact on the thermal evolution and final structure of the planets. In this paper, we present alternative structure and evolution models for Jupiter and Saturn allowing for non-adiabatic primordial structures and the mixing of heavy elements by convection as these planets evolve. We present the evolution of the planets accounting for various initial composition gradients, and in the case of Saturn, include the formation of a helium-rich region as a result of helium rain. We investigate the stability of regions with composition gradients against convection, and find that the helium shell in Saturn remains stable and does not mix with the rest of the envelope. In other cases,...

  15. Properties and evolution of anisotropic structures in collisionless plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Karimov, A R; Stenflo, L

    2016-01-01

    A new class of exact electrostatic solutions of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations based on the Jeans's theorem is proposed for studying the evolution and properties of two-dimensional anisotropic plasmas that are far from thermodynamic equilibrium. In particular, the free expansion of a slab of electron-ion plasma into vacuum is investigated.

  16. Paleozoic accretionary orogenesis in the eastern Beishan orogen: constraints from zircon U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Songjian; Xiao, Wenjiao; Windley, Brian; Mao, Qigui

    2016-04-01

    The continental growth mechanism of the Altaids in Central Asia is still in controversy between models of continuous subduction-accretion versus punctuated accretion by closure of multiple oceanic basins. The Beishan orogenic belt, located in the southern Altaids, is a natural laboratory to address this controversy. Key questions that are heavily debated are: the closure time and subduction polarity of former oceans, the emplacement time of ophiolites, and the styles of accretion and collision. This paper reports new structural data, zircon ages and Ar-Ar dates from the eastern Beishan Orogen that provide information on the accretion process and tectonic affiliation of various terranes. Our geochronological and structural results show that the younging direction of accretion was northwards and the subduction zone dipped southwards under the northern margin of the Shuangyingshan micro-continent. This long-lived and continuous accretion process formed the Hanshan accretionary prism. Our field investigations show that the emplacement of the Xiaohuangshan ophiolite was controlled by oceanic crust subduction beneath the forearc accretionary prism of the Shuangyingshan-Mazongshan composite arc to the south. Moreover, we address the age and terrane affiliation of lithologies in the eastern Beishan orogen through detrital zircon geochronology of meta-sedimentary rocks. We provide new information on the ages, subduction polarities, and affiliation of constituent structural units, as well as a new model of tectonic evolution of the eastern Beishan orogen. The accretionary processes and crustal growth of Central Asia were the result of multiple sequences of accretion and collision of manifold terranes. Reference: Ao, S.J., Xiao, W., Windley, B.F., Mao, Q., Han, C., Zhang, J.e., Yang, L., Geng, J., Paleozoic accretionary orogenesis in the eastern Beishan orogen: Constraints from zircon U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. Gondwana Research, doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j

  17. Generalized Dromion Structures of New (2 + 1)-Dimensional Nonlinear EvolutionEquation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jie-Fang

    2001-01-01

    We derive the generalized dromions of the new (2 + 1)-dimensional nonlinear evolution equation by the arbitrary function presented in the bilinearized linear equations. The rich soliton and dromion structures for this system are released.

  18. The structural evolution process and the electronic properties of armchair silicon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Deng-Hui; Tang, Yu-Chao; Yao, Cheng-Peng; Zhu, Heng-Jiang

    2016-04-01

    The structural evolution process of the capped armchair single- and double-walled SiNTs grown from silicon clusters was investigated using the DFT method. The evolution process was described quantitatively by monitoring change of the geometry structures. The initial structural configuration of the single- and double-walled SiNTs was determined by optimizing structure of the small silicon clusters. The evolution process of the SWSiNTs is through forming tubular clusters with a global reconstruction from structure of the double-rings. Then, it elongates through the layer-by-layer growth process with local reconstructions. Eventually, the infinite SiNTs can be constructed with corresponding repeat unit, designed by the periodic characteristics on the basis of tubular clusters. Eventually, All of the SiNTs have a narrow band gap. From calculation of band structure, the band gap which occurs oscillations and gradually decreases with increase of the diameter, length, and the number of walls.

  19. Influence of the irradiation temperature on the surface structure and physical/chemical properties of Ar ion-irradiated bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Ion irradiation is performed on bulk metallic glasses at 300 K and close to Tg. • Nanocrystallization is observed after high-temperature irradiation. • The mechanical properties are enhanced after the irradiation procedures. • Corrosion resistance is improved after irradiation close to Tg. - Abstract: Surface treatments using multiple Ar ion irradiation processes with a maximum energy and fluence of 200 keV and 1 × 1016 ions/cm2, respectively, have been performed on two different metallic glasses: Zr55Cu28Al10Ni7 and Ti40Zr10Cu38Pd12. Analogous irradiation procedures have been carried out at room temperature (RT) and at T = 620 K (≈0.9 Tg, where Tg denotes the glass transition). The structure, mechanical behavior, wettability and corrosion resistance of the irradiated alloys have been compared with the properties of the as-cast and annealed (T = 620 K) non-irradiated specimens. While ion irradiation at RT does not significantly alter the amorphous structure of the alloys, ion irradiation close to Tg promotes decomposition/nanocrystallization. Consequently, the hardness (H) and reduced Young’s modulus (Er) decrease after irradiation at RT but they both increase after irradiation at 620 K. While annealing close to Tg increases the hydrophobicity of the samples, irradiation induces virtually no changes in the contact angle when comparing with the as-cast state. Concerning the corrosion resistance, although not much effect is found after irradiation at RT, an improvement is observed after irradiation at 620 K, particularly for the Ti-based alloy. These results are of practical interest in order to engineer appropriate surface treatments based on ion irradiation, aimed at specific functional applications of bulk metallic glasses

  20. Emplacement conditions and age of granitoids from the southern external zone of the French central massif: petro-structural and {sup 40}Ar-{sup 39}Ar geochronological study of rocks from their contact aureole and of some magmatic rocks. Geotectonic implications; Conditions et ages de mise en place des granitoides de la zone externe sud du massif central francais: etude petro-structurale et geochronologique {sup 40}Ar-{sup 39}Ar des roches de leurs aureoles de contact et de quelques roches magmatiques. Implications geotectoniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Najoui, K

    1996-12-20

    A comparative petro-structural and geochronological {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar study conducted on three granitoids (Mont-Lozere, Sidobre and Aigoual/St-Guiral/Liron) outcropping in the south of the French Massif Central allows us to specify the conditions of their emplacement in the external area of the Hercynian belt. The local gravimetric study shows that the St-Guiral and the Liron have laccolitic shapes and are asymmetric. The paragenetic analysis of the mineralogical associations which occur in the three contact aureoles, the metamorphic gradients and P-T estimates show that the Aigoual, the St-Guiral, the Liron and the Pont-de-Montvert (Mont-Lozere) granodiorites (T: 650-700 deg C; P: 1-1.5 kb) were emplaced in more superficial levels than the early basic and early granodiorite magmas of the St-Guiral, and the Sidobre granite (T: 550-600 deg C; P: 2-2.5 kb). Besides, the structural observations in the host rocks show that emplacement of the St-Guiral granodiorite is synchronous with the deformation and regional metamorphism whereas the Liron granodiorite emplaced later. The laser-probe dating of single biotites and hornblendes corroborate this fact. The {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar data of the St-Guiral hornfels and granodiorites give ages of 324 Ma. The Liron mafic micro-granular enclaves and lamprophyres give ages of 310 Ma. This suggests that the early granodiorite magmas were emplaced in the late Visean compressive events, followed by granodioritic injections synchronous with the Namuro-Westphalian extension 257 refs.

  1. Deciphering the brittle evolution of SW Norway through a combined structural, mineralogical and geochronological approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiber, Thomas; Viola, Giulio; Fredin, Ola; Zwingmann, Horst; Wilkinson, Camilla Maya; Ganerød, Morgan

    2016-04-01

    SW Norway has experienced a complex brittle history after cessation of the Caledonian orogeny, and the recent discoveries of major hydrocarbon reserves in heavily fractured and weathered basement offshore SW Norway has triggered a renewed interest in understanding this complex tectonic evolution. In this contribution we present results from a multidisciplinary study combining lineament analysis, field work, paleo-stress inversion, mineralogical characterization and radiometric dating in the Bømlo area of SW Norway in order to develop a tectonic model for the brittle evolution of this important region. The study area mainly consists of the Rolvsnes granodiorite (U-Pb zircon age of ca. 466 Ma), which is devoid of penetrative ductile deformation features. The first identified brittle faults are muscovite-bearing top-to-the-NNW thrusts and E-W striking dextral strike-slip faults decorated with stretched biotite. These are mechanically compatible and are assigned to the same NNW-SSE transpressional regime. Ar-Ar muscovite and biotite dates of ca. 450 Ma (Late Ordovician) indicate fault activity in the course of a Taconian-equivalent orogenic event. During the subsequent Silurian Laurentia-Baltica collision variably oriented, lower-grade chlorite and epidote-coated faults formed in response to a ENE-WSW compressional stress regime. A large number of mainly N-S striking normal faults consist of variably thick fault gouge cores with illite, quartz, kaolinite, calcite and epidote mineralizations, accommodating mainly E-W extension. K-Ar dating of illites separated from representative fault gouges and zones of altered granodiorite constrain deformation ranging from the Permian to the Late Jurassic, indicating a long history of crustal extension where faults were repeatedly activated. In addition, a set of ca. SW-NE striking faults associated with alteration zones give Cretaceous dates, either representing a young phase of NW-SE extension or reactivation of previously formed

  2. Polycyclic orogeny in Central Ogcheon metamorphic belt, Korea: evidence from 40Ar/39Ar hornblende ages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    -hornblende schist of the structurally lower Poeun unit. In addition, one sample of the upper Pibanryeong unit gives a plateau date of 263.5±24 Ma with an intercept date of 222±23 Ma. The appearance of the hornblende 40Ar/39Ar dates of 432 - 499 Ma suggests that the timing of major metamorphic event in the OMB is close to ca. 500 Ma. This result substantiates the presence of long-debated Caledonian disturbance in central Ogcheon belt. On the other hand, one sample recording an intercept date of 222+23 Ma is the product of Triassic thermal event that is apparently mild in central part of the OMB. Our results together with the P-T estimates of Min and Cho (1998) suggest that the Ogcheon metamorphic belt is the product of Ordovician Barrovian-type metamorphism, and that this polycyclic belt is not correlated with the Triassic continental collision belt between Sino-Korean and Yangtze cratons in east-central China. Moreover, it is likely that the OMB has a prolonged history of tectono-metamorphic evolution in contrast to the Paleozoic sequences of the Taebaeksan sedimentary zone. Hence, we conclude that the Ogcheon belt represents a collage of at least two separate terranes. Copyright (1999) Geological Society of Australia

  3. Genetic Programs of Structural Evolution of Hybrid Electromechanical Objects

    OpenAIRE

    Shinkarenko V. F.; Gaidaienko Iu; Ahmad N Al-Husban

    2012-01-01

    In this paper the interconnected genetic models defining algorithms of intrageneric synthesis of hybrid electromechanical structures are considered. The authors analyze the space of admissible crossing and define the variety of genetically admissible classes of hybrid structures. The recommendations about the use of models in problems of a structural prediction and innovative synthesis of new versions of hybrid electromechanical objects are given.

  4. Ar/39Ar age spectrum analysis of detrital microclines from the southern San Joaquin Basin, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detrital microcline grains from sedimentary strata preserve a record of thermal evolution in the temperature range approx.= 1000 to 2000C which can be revealed by 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum analysis. Microcline separates from deep drill hole intersections with Eocene to Miocene sediments in the Basin and Tejon Blocks of the southern San Joaquin Valley, California, analysed by the age spectrum approach show radiogenic 40Ar (40Ar*) gradients that record both the slow cooling of the uplifting sediment source approx.= 65 Ma ago, and a recent thermal event. This information, in conjunction with the observation of fission track annealing in the coexisting apatites, allows estimation of the temperature-time conditions of this thermal event at about 1400C for approx.= 200 ka. Present and paleotemperature data is in accord with heating related to several kilometers of Pleistocene sediment deposition. Heat flow calculations suggest that this recent subsidence has depressed the thermal gradient from about 300C km-1 to the present apparent gradient of 240C km-1. 40Ar/39Ar analysis of detrital microcline crystals yields thermochronological information in the temperature-time range of petroleum maturation and provides this technique with potential as both a useful exploration tool and as a means of probing the fundamental geodynamic processes of basin evolution. (orig.)

  5. Brain structure evolution in a basal vertebrate clade: evidence from phylogenetic comparative analysis of cichlid fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolm Niclas

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The vertebrate brain is composed of several interconnected, functionally distinct structures and much debate has surrounded the basic question of how these structures evolve. On the one hand, according to the 'mosaic evolution hypothesis', because of the elevated metabolic cost of brain tissue, selection is expected to target specific structures mediating the cognitive abilities which are being favored. On the other hand, the 'concerted evolution hypothesis' argues that developmental constraints limit such mosaic evolution and instead the size of the entire brain varies in response to selection on any of its constituent parts. To date, analyses of these hypotheses of brain evolution have been limited to mammals and birds; excluding Actinopterygii, the basal and most diverse class of vertebrates. Using a combination of recently developed phylogenetic multivariate allometry analyses and comparative methods that can identify distinct rates of evolution, even in highly correlated traits, we studied brain structure evolution in a highly variable clade of ray-finned fishes; the Tanganyikan cichlids. Results Total brain size explained 86% of the variance in brain structure volume in cichlids, a lower proportion than what has previously been reported for mammals. Brain structures showed variation in pair-wise allometry suggesting some degree of independence in evolutionary changes in size. This result is supported by variation among structures on the strength of their loadings on the principal size axis of the allometric analysis. The rate of evolution analyses generally supported the results of the multivariate allometry analyses, showing variation among several structures in their evolutionary patterns. The olfactory bulbs and hypothalamus were found to evolve faster than other structures while the dorsal medulla presented the slowest evolutionary rate. Conclusion Our results favor a mosaic model of brain evolution, as certain

  6. The structural, metamorphic and magmatic evolution of Mesoproterozoic orogens

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Nick M. W.; Slagstad, Trond; Viola, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    The Mesoproterozoic (1600–1000 Ma) is an Era of Earth history that has been defined in the literature as being quiescent in terms of both tectonics and the evolution of the biosphere and atmosphere (Holland, 2006, Piper, 2013b and Young, 2013). The ‘boring billion’ is an informal term that is given to a time period overlapping the Mesoproterozoic period, extending from 1.85 to 0.85 Ga (Holland, 2006). Orogenesis was not absent from this period however, with various continents featuring active...

  7. Evolution of Tertiary Structure of Viral RNA Dependent Polymerases

    OpenAIRE

    Černý, Jiří; Černá Bolfíková, Barbora; Valdés, James J.; Grubhoffer, Libor; Růžek, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Viral RNA dependent polymerases (vRdPs) are present in all RNA viruses; unfortunately, their sequence similarity is too low for phylogenetic studies. Nevertheless, vRdP protein structures are remarkably conserved. In this study, we used the structural similarity of vRdPs to reconstruct their evolutionary history. The major strength of this work is in unifying sequence and structural data into a single quantitative phylogenetic analysis, using powerful a Bayesian approach. The resulting phylog...

  8. Conservation of mRNA secondary structures may filter out mutations in Escherichia coli evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Chursov, Andrey; Frishman, Dmitrij; Shneider, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Recent reports indicate that mutations in viral genomes tend to preserve RNA secondary structure, and those mutations that disrupt secondary structural elements may reduce gene expression levels, thereby serving as a functional knockout. In this article, we explore the conservation of secondary structures of mRNA coding regions, a previously unknown factor in bacterial evolution, by comparing the structural consequences of mutations in essential and nonessential Escherichia coli genes accumul...

  9. Superhydrophobic hierarchically structured surfaces in biology: evolution, structural principles and biomimetic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthlott, W; Mail, M; Neinhuis, C

    2016-08-01

    A comprehensive survey of the construction principles and occurrences of superhydrophobic surfaces in plants, animals and other organisms is provided and is based on our own scanning electron microscopic examinations of almost 20 000 different species and the existing literature. Properties such as self-cleaning (lotus effect), fluid drag reduction (Salvinia effect) and the introduction of new functions (air layers as sensory systems) are described and biomimetic applications are discussed: self-cleaning is established, drag reduction becomes increasingly important, and novel air-retaining grid technology is introduced. Surprisingly, no evidence for lasting superhydrophobicity in non-biological surfaces exists (except technical materials). Phylogenetic trees indicate that superhydrophobicity evolved as a consequence of the conquest of land about 450 million years ago and may be a key innovation in the evolution of terrestrial life. The approximate 10 million extant species exhibit a stunning diversity of materials and structures, many of which are formed by self-assembly, and are solely based on a limited number of molecules. A short historical survey shows that bionics (today often called biomimetics) dates back more than 100 years. Statistical data illustrate that the interest in biomimetic surfaces is much younger still. Superhydrophobicity caught the attention of scientists only after the extreme superhydrophobicity of lotus leaves was published in 1997. Regrettably, parabionic products play an increasing role in marketing.This article is part of the themed issue 'Bioinspired hierarchically structured surfaces for green science'. PMID:27354736

  10. Tectonic evolution and mantle structure of the Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Benthem, S.; Govers, R.; Spakman, W.; Wortel, R.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate whether predictions of mantle structure from tectonic reconstructions are in agreement with a detailed tomographic image of seismic P wave velocity structure under the Caribbean region. In the upper mantle, positive seismic anomalies are imaged under the Lesser Antilles and Puerto Ric

  11. Evolution of molecular structure in alkoxide-derived lithium niobate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on structural rearrangements during the sol-gel processing of lithium niobate investigated by FTIR and Raman spectroscopic methods. The reaction of lithium ethoxide with niobium ethoxide resulted in the formation of a bimetallic alkoxide, LiNb(OEt)6, which could be crystallized from solution. Single crystals were comprised of helical polymeric units consisting of niobium octahedra linked by lithium in cetrahedral (distorted) coordination. Successive crystallizations from solution allowed for the enhanced purification of the alkoxide precursor. Hydrolysis of the bimetallic alkoxide resulted in the formation of an amorphous network structure, which contained niobium-oxygen octahedral units modified by lithium. Heat-treatment facilitated structural rearrangements for the niobium environment, which allowed for the formation of the lithium niobate crystal structure. Further heat-treatment above 700 degrees C resulted in structural changes associated with lithium oxide volatility

  12. The evolution of the plasmoidal structure in the pinched column in plasma focus discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubes, P.; Paduch, M.; Cikhardt, J.; Klir, D.; Kravarik, J.; Rezac, K.; Cikhardtova, B.; Kortanek, J.; Zielinska, E.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a description is provided of the evolution of the dense spherical-like structures—plasmoids—formed in the pinched column of the dense plasma focus at the current of 1 MA at the final phase of implosion of the deuterium plasma sheath and at the phase of evolution of instabilities both at the time of HXR and neutron production. At the stratification of the plasma column, the plasma injected to the dense structures from the axially neighboring regions forms small turbulences which increase first the toroidal structures, and finally generates a non-chaotic current plasmoidal structure with central maximal density. This spontaneous evolution supports the hypothesis of the spheromak-like model of the plasmoid and its sub-millimeter analogy, high-energy spot. These spots, also called nodules formed in the filamentary structure of the current can be a source of the energy capable of accelerating the fast charged particles.

  13. The structure evolution process and the electronic properties of armchair boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Chengpeng; Tang, Yuchao; Liu, Denghui; Zhu, Hengjiang

    2016-04-01

    We report the results of density functional calculations on the structural evolution and electronic properties of armchair boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs), including SWBNNTs and DWBNNTs. Our results show that the initial structural configuration of the BNNTs was determined by the small boron nitride clusters. The evolution process of the BNNTs is through forming tubular clusters with a global reconstruction from structure of the double-rings. Then, it elongates through the layer-by-layer growth process with local reconstructions. Eventually, the infinite BNNTs can be constructed with corresponding repeat unit, designed by the periodic characteristics on the basis of tubular clusters. From the band structure of armchair BNNTs, it can be found the gap slightly increases with increasing diameter of the tube, decrease with the increasing of the walls. Moreover, the evolution process provides a better way to understand the growth mechanism of armchair BNNTs in atomic-level and guide the production of armchair BNNTs in industrial.

  14. Tabletop imaging of structural evolutions in chemical reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ibrahim, Heide; Beaulieu, Samuel; Schmidt, Bruno E; Thiré, Nicolas; Bisson, Éric; Hebeisen, Christoph T; Wanie, Vincent; Giguére, Mathieu; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Sanderson, Joseph; Schuurman, Michael S; Légaré, François

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of femto-chemistry has made it a primary goal to follow the nuclear and electronic evolution of a molecule in time and space as it undergoes a chemical reaction. Using Coulomb Explosion Imaging we have shot the first high-resolution molecular movie of a to and fro isomerization process in the acetylene cation. So far, this kind of phenomenon could only be observed using VUV light from a Free Electron Laser [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 263002 (2010)]. Here we show that 266 nm ultrashort laser pulses are capable of initiating rich dynamics through multiphoton ionization. With our generally applicable tabletop approach that can be used for other small organic molecules, we have investigated two basic chemical reactions simultaneously: proton migration and C=C bond-breaking, triggered by multiphoton ionization. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with the timescales and relaxation pathways predicted by new and definitively quantitative ab initio trajectory simulations.

  15. Evolution of the Magnetic Field Structure of the Crab Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Lyne, Andrew; Weltevrede, Patrick; Jordan, Christine; Stappers, Ben; Bassa, Cees; Kramer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Pulsars are highly-magnetised rotating neutron stars and are well-known for the stability of their signature pulse shapes, allowing high-precision studies of their rotation. However, during the past 22 years, the radio pulse profile of the Crab pulsar has shown a steady increase in the separation of the main pulse and interpulse components at 0.62$^{\\rm o}\\pm$0.03$^{\\rm o}$ per century. There are also secular changes in the relative strengths of several components of the profile. The changing component separation indicates that the axis of the dipolar magnetic field, embedded in the neutron star, is moving towards the stellar equator. This evolution of the magnetic field could explain why the pulsar does not spin down as expected from simple braking by a rotating dipolar magnetic field.

  16. Structural Evolution of Human Recombinant alfaB-Crystallin under UV Irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sugiyama, Masaaki; Fujii, Noriko; Morimoto, Yukio;

    2008-01-01

    External stresses cause certain proteins to lose their regular structure and aggregate. In order to clarify this abnormal aggregation process, a structural evolution of human recombinant aB-crystallin under UV irradiation was observed with in situ small-angle neutron scattering. The abnormal...

  17. Structure and fluid evolution of Yili basin and their relation to sandstone type uranium mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the summary of strata and structure distribution of Yili basin, the relation of structure and fluid evolution to sandstone type ur alum mineraliation are analyzed. It is found that uranium mineralization in Yili basin experienced ore hosting space forming, pre-alteration of hosting space, hosting space alteration and uranium formation stages. (authors)

  18. Magnetic structure evolution in mechanically milled nanostructured ZnFe2O4 particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Jianzhong; Wynn, P.; Mørup, Steen;

    1999-01-01

    Nanostructured partially-inverted ZnFe2O4 particles have been prepared from bulk ZnFe2O4 by high-energy ball milling in an open container. The grain size reduction, cation site distributions, and the evolution of magnetic structures have been studied by x-ray diffraction with Rietveld structure...

  19. Superdeformation of Ar hypernuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaka, Masahiro; Kimura, Masaaki; Hiyama, Emiko; Sagawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the differences in the Λ separation energies (S_Λ ) of the ground and superdeformed (SD) states in {}^{37}_Λ Ar, ^{39}_Λ Ar, and ^{41}_Λ Ar within the framework of antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD). In this study, we find that the calculated S_Λ values in the SD states are much smaller than those in the ground states, unlike the result using the relativistic mean-field (RMF) calculation [B.-N. Lu et al., Phys. Rev. C, 89, 044307 (2014)]. One of the reasons for this difference between the present work and the RMF calculation is the difference in the density profile of the SD states in the core nuclei. We also find that the property of the Λ N odd-parity interaction affects the S_Λ trend between the ground and SD states.

  20. Competitive Processes and the Evolution of Governance Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Ricketts Martin

    2000-01-01

    Cet article examine la concurrence entre des structures de gouvernance des entreprises. Il y est souligné quune panoplie de structures constitutionnelles peut être observée dans le cadre marchand et que cette variété a servi des objectifs transactionnels importants sur un plan historique. Larticle met en contraste les approches coasienne et autrichienne de lexplication des structures de gouvernance. Nous examinons la tendance récente du déplacement de la propriété des entreprises vers les inv...

  1. Design of structurally distinct proteins using strategies inspired by evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, T M; Williams, B; Williams, T; Xu, X; Eletsky, A; Federizon, J F; Szyperski, T; Kuhlman, B

    2016-05-01

    Natural recombination combines pieces of preexisting proteins to create new tertiary structures and functions. We describe a computational protocol, called SEWING, which is inspired by this process and builds new proteins from connected or disconnected pieces of existing structures. Helical proteins designed with SEWING contain structural features absent from other de novo designed proteins and, in some cases, remain folded at more than 100°C. High-resolution structures of the designed proteins CA01 and DA05R1 were solved by x-ray crystallography (2.2 angstrom resolution) and nuclear magnetic resonance, respectively, and there was excellent agreement with the design models. This method provides a new strategy to rapidly create large numbers of diverse and designable protein scaffolds. PMID:27151863

  2. Evol and ProDy for bridging protein sequence evolution and structural dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Bakan, Ahmet; Dutta, Anindita; Mao, Wenzhi; Liu, Ying; Chennubhotla, Chakra; Lezon, Timothy R.; Bahar, Ivet

    2014-01-01

    Correlations between sequence evolution and structural dynamics are of utmost importance in understanding the molecular mechanisms of function and their evolution. We have integrated Evol, a new package for fast and efficient comparative analysis of evolutionary patterns and conformational dynamics, into ProDy, a computational toolbox designed for inferring protein dynamics from experimental and theoretical data. Using information-theoretic approaches, Evol coanalyzes conservation and coevolu...

  3. Bayesian Network Structure Learning from Limited Datasets through Graph Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Tonda, Alberto; Lutton, Evelyne; Reuillon, Romain; Squillero, Giovanni; Wuillemin, Pierre-Henri

    2012-01-01

    Bayesian networks are stochastic models, widely adopted to encode knowledge in several fields. One of the most interesting features of a Bayesian network is the possibility of learning its structure from a set of data, and subsequently use the resulting model to perform new predictions. Structure learning for such models is a NP-hard problem, for which the scientific community developed two main approaches: score-and-search metaheuristics, often evolutionary-based, and dependency-analysis det...

  4. Kinematic and Structural Evolution of Field and Cluster Spiral Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Ziegler, Bodo L.; Kutdemir, Elif; Da Rocha, Cristiano; Böhm, Asmus; Peletier, Reynier F; Verdugo, Miguel

    2009-01-01

    To understand the processes that build up galaxies we investigate the stellar structure and gas kinematics of spiral and irregular galaxies out to redshift 1. We target 92 galaxies in four cluster (z = 0.3 & 0.5) fields to study the environmental influence. Their stellar masses derived from multiband VLT/FORS photometry are distributed around but mostly below the characteristic Schechter-fit mass. From HST/ACS images we determine morphologies and structural parameters like disk length, positi...

  5. 二芳氧基稀土氯化物(ArO)2YCl(THF)2·MePh的合成、表征及晶体结构(ArO=2,6-二叔丁基-4-甲基酚基)%Synthesis, Characterization and Crystal Structure of Aryloxo Lanthanide Chloride [(ArO)2YCl(THF)2](MePh) (ArO = 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenoxo)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    喻龙宝; 姚英明; 沈琪

    2002-01-01

    无水YCl3与二倍量的ArONa(ArO=2,6-二叔丁基-4-甲基酚基)在四氢呋喃(THF)中反应, 经甲苯溶液重结晶, 高产率地合成了二芳氧基稀土氯化物(ArO)2YCl(THF)2*MePh. 产物经元素分析和核磁共振表征, 并测定了其晶体结构. 配合物属正方晶系, I4(1)/acd空间群, 晶胞参数为a=1.8913(1) nm, b=1.8913(1) nm, c=5.2239(1) nm, V=18.686(1) nm3, Z=16, Dc=1.137 mg*m-3, μ=1.342 mm-1 (Mo Kα), F(000)=6848, R=0.0469, Rw=0.1122. 中心金属钇原子与二个芳氧基中的氧原子、一个氯原子和两个THF分子中的氧原子配位, 形成一个五配位的扭曲的三角双锥几何构型. Y-O(Ar)和Y-Cl的键长分别为0.2101(3) 和0.2517(6) nm.

  6. Subsurface defects structural evolution in nano-cutting of single crystal copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • An innovative analysis method is adopted to analyze nano-cutting process accurately. • A characteristic SFT and stair-rod dislocation are found in subsurface defect layer. • The formation mechanism of stair-rod dislocation is investigated. • The local atomic structure of subsurface defects is introduced. - Abstract: In this work, molecular dynamics simulation is performed to study the subsurface defects structural distribution and its evolution during nano-cutting process of single crystal copper. The formation mechanism of chip and machined surface is interviewed by analyzing the dislocation evolution and atomic migration. The centro-symmetry parameter and spherical harmonics method are adopted to characterize the distribution and evolution of the subsurface defect structures and local atomic structures. The results show that stacking faults, dislocation loops, “V-shaped” dislocation loops, and plenty of point defects are formed during the machined surface being formed in shear-slip zone. In subsurface damage layers, stair-rod dislocation, stacking fault tetrahedra, atomic cluster defect, and vacancy defect are formed. And the formation mechanism of stair-rod dislocation is investigated by atomic-scale structure evolution. The local atomic structures of subsurface defects are icosahedrons, hexagonal close packed, body-centered cubic, and defect face center cubic, and the variations of local atomic structures are investigated

  7. Subsurface defects structural evolution in nano-cutting of single crystal copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Quanlong [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Center for Precision Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Bai, Qingshun [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Chen, Jiaxuan, E-mail: wangquanlong0@hit.edu.cn [Center for Precision Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Sun, Yazhou [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Guo, Yongbo [Center for Precision Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Liang, Yingchun [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2015-07-30

    Highlights: • An innovative analysis method is adopted to analyze nano-cutting process accurately. • A characteristic SFT and stair-rod dislocation are found in subsurface defect layer. • The formation mechanism of stair-rod dislocation is investigated. • The local atomic structure of subsurface defects is introduced. - Abstract: In this work, molecular dynamics simulation is performed to study the subsurface defects structural distribution and its evolution during nano-cutting process of single crystal copper. The formation mechanism of chip and machined surface is interviewed by analyzing the dislocation evolution and atomic migration. The centro-symmetry parameter and spherical harmonics method are adopted to characterize the distribution and evolution of the subsurface defect structures and local atomic structures. The results show that stacking faults, dislocation loops, “V-shaped” dislocation loops, and plenty of point defects are formed during the machined surface being formed in shear-slip zone. In subsurface damage layers, stair-rod dislocation, stacking fault tetrahedra, atomic cluster defect, and vacancy defect are formed. And the formation mechanism of stair-rod dislocation is investigated by atomic-scale structure evolution. The local atomic structures of subsurface defects are icosahedrons, hexagonal close packed, body-centered cubic, and defect face center cubic, and the variations of local atomic structures are investigated.

  8. Total Lightning Characteristics and Electric Structure Evolution in a Hailstorm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Dong; ZHANG Yijun; MENG Qing; LU Weitao; YI Xiaoyuan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, total lightning data observed by SAFIR3000 3-D Lightning Locating System was combined with radar data to analyze characteristics of the lightning activity and electric structure of a hailstorm that occurred in Beijing on 31 May 2005. The results indicated that there were two active periods for the lightning activity during the hailstorm process. The hail shooting was found in the first period. After the end of the hail shooting, lightning frequency decreased suddenly. However, more active lightning activities occurred in the second period with lots of them appearing in the cloud anvil region. The peak of the lightning frequency came about 5 rain prior to the hail shooting. Only 6.16% of the total lightning was cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning, among which 20% had positive polarity. This percentage was higher than that in normal thunderstorms. In addition, heavier positive CG lightning discharge occurred before rather than after the hail shooting. In the stage of the hail shooting, the electric structure of the hailstorm was inverted, with the main negative charge region located around the -40℃ level and the main positive charge region around the -15℃ level. In addition, a weak negative charge region existed below the positive charge region transitorily. After the hail shooting, the electric structure underwent fast and persistent adjustments and became a normal tripole, with positive charge in the upper and lower levels and negative charge in the middle levels. However, the electric structure was tilted under the influence of the westerly wind in the middle and upper levels. The lightning activity and electric structure were closely related to the dynamic and microphysical processes of the hailstorm. It was believed that severe storms with stronger updrafts were more conducive to an inverted tripolar electric structure than normal thunderstorms, and the inverted distribution could then facilitate more positive CG lightning in the severe storms.

  9. Quasar Evolution Driven by Galaxy Encounters in Hierarchical Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Menci, N; Fontana, A; Giallongo, E; Poli, F; Vittorini, V

    2003-01-01

    We link the evolution of the galaxies in the hierarchical clustering scenario with the changing accretion rates of cold gas onto the central massive black holes that power the quasars. We base on galaxy interactions as main triggers of accretion; the related scaling laws are taken up from Cavaliere & Vittorini (2000), and grafted to a semi-analytic code for galaxy formation. As a result, at high $z$ the protogalaxies grow rapidly by hierarchical merging; meanwhile, much fresh gas is imported and also destabilized, so the holes are fueled at their full Eddington rates. At lower $z$ the galactic dynamical events are mostly encounters in hierarchically growing groups; now the refueling peters out, as the residual gas is exhausted while the destabilizing encounters dwindle. So, with no parameter tuning other than needed for stellar observables, our model uniquely produces at $z>3$ a rise, and at $z\\lesssim 2.5 $ a decline of the bright quasar population as steep as observed. In addition, our results closely f...

  10. Spectral properties of the temporal evolution of brain network structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Zhang, Zhen-Zhen; Ma, Jun; Yang, Yong; Lin, Pan; Wu, Ying

    2015-12-01

    The temporal evolution properties of the brain network are crucial for complex brain processes. In this paper, we investigate the differences in the dynamic brain network during resting and visual stimulation states in a task-positive subnetwork, task-negative subnetwork, and whole-brain network. The dynamic brain network is first constructed from human functional magnetic resonance imaging data based on the sliding window method, and then the eigenvalues corresponding to the network are calculated. We use eigenvalue analysis to analyze the global properties of eigenvalues and the random matrix theory (RMT) method to measure the local properties. For global properties, the shifting of the eigenvalue distribution and the decrease in the largest eigenvalue are linked to visual stimulation in all networks. For local properties, the short-range correlation in eigenvalues as measured by the nearest neighbor spacing distribution is not always sensitive to visual stimulation. However, the long-range correlation in eigenvalues as evaluated by spectral rigidity and number variance not only predicts the universal behavior of the dynamic brain network but also suggests non-consistent changes in different networks. These results demonstrate that the dynamic brain network is more random for the task-positive subnetwork and whole-brain network under visual stimulation but is more regular for the task-negative subnetwork. Our findings provide deeper insight into the importance of spectral properties in the functional brain network, especially the incomparable role of RMT in revealing the intrinsic properties of complex systems. PMID:26723151

  11. ARS Biodiesel Research Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel activities within ARS are concerned with the production, quality, and properties of this alternative fuel from agriculturally derived fats and oils. Currently, in the absence of tax incentives, biodiesel production when using refined fats and oils and conventional alkali transesterificati...

  12. ARS Culture Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    The internationally recognized Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Culture Collection will be described to include the microorganisms maintained by the collection, preservation methods and worldwide distribution of cultures. The impact of the germplasm will be described to include discovery of the f...

  13. Structural evolution of ZTA composites during synthesis and processing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Exare, C.; Kiat, J. M.; Guiblin, N.; Porcher, F.; Petříček, Václav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 4 (2015), s. 1273-1283. ISSN 0955-2219 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-03276S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : ceramics * alumina–zirconia composites * structural properties * strain effect * size effect Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.947, year: 2014

  14. Correlation between atomic structure evolution and strength in a bulk metallic glass at cryogenic temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, J; Wang, G; Liu, Z Y; Bednarčík, J; Gao, Y L; Zhai, Q J; Mattern, N; Eckert, J

    2014-01-01

    A model Zr41.25Ti13.75Ni10Cu12.5Be22.5 (at.%) bulk metallic glass (BMG) is selected to explore the structural evolution on the atomic scale with decreasing temperature down to cryogenic level using high energy X-ray synchrotron radiation. We discover a close correlation between the atomic structure evolution and the strength of the BMG and find out that the activation energy increment of the concordantly atomic shifting at lower temperature is the main factor influencing the strength. Our results might provide a fundamental understanding of the atomic-scale structure evolution and may bridge the gap between the atomic-scale physics and the macro-scale fracture strength for BMGs. PMID:24469299

  15. Fluorous 'ponytails' lead to strong gelators showing thermally induced structure evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Harshita; Armitage, Sarah E; Kline, Steven R; Damodaran, Krishna K; Kennedy, Stuart R; Atwood, Jerry L; Steed, Jonathan W

    2015-11-21

    Appending perfluoroalkyl substituents to bis(urea) gelators results in significantly decreased inter-chain interactions with markedly thinner fibres and hence more cross-linked and more transparent gels with potential applications in the crystallisation of fluorinated pharmaceuticals. Gel structure has been probed by detailed SANS measurements which indicate a surprising structure evolution on thermal cycling, not seen for hydrocarbon analogues. The SANS data are complemented by the single crystal X-ray structure of one fluorinated gelator. PMID:26364926

  16. Structural Evolution of the Gold-rich Ashanti Belt, SW Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Perrouty, Stephane

    2012-01-01

    The Paleoproterozoic Ashanti Belt hosts numerous world class gold deposits such as the Obuasi deposit (60 million ounces) and the Tarkwa deposit (40 million ounces). Characterising the regional structural and magmatic evolution provides new insight into the geotectonic context forming these deposits. In this work, we propose (1) a new geologic and structural map of the area using field observations and airborne geophysical data, (2) a structural context of early gold mineralisation in the Was...

  17. Subsurface defects structural evolution in nano-cutting of single crystal copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Quanlong; Bai, Qingshun; Chen, Jiaxuan; Sun, Yazhou; Guo, Yongbo; Liang, Yingchun

    2015-07-01

    In this work, molecular dynamics simulation is performed to study the subsurface defects structural distribution and its evolution during nano-cutting process of single crystal copper. The formation mechanism of chip and machined surface is interviewed by analyzing the dislocation evolution and atomic migration. The centro-symmetry parameter and spherical harmonics method are adopted to characterize the distribution and evolution of the subsurface defect structures and local atomic structures. The results show that stacking faults, dislocation loops, "V-shaped" dislocation loops, and plenty of point defects are formed during the machined surface being formed in shear-slip zone. In subsurface damage layers, stair-rod dislocation, stacking fault tetrahedra, atomic cluster defect, and vacancy defect are formed. And the formation mechanism of stair-rod dislocation is investigated by atomic-scale structure evolution. The local atomic structures of subsurface defects are icosahedrons, hexagonal close packed, body-centered cubic, and defect face center cubic, and the variations of local atomic structures are investigated.

  18. Reactivation episodes of the romeral fault system in the northwestern part of central andes, colombia, through 39ar-40ar and k-ar results

    OpenAIRE

    VINASCO VALLEJO, CESAR JAVIER; Cordani, Umberto

    2013-01-01

    Direct dating of reactivation of the San Jerónimo Fault (SJF), easternmost limit of the Romeral fault system (RFS), is presented through 39Ar-40Ar and K-Ar results in neo-formed micas and mylonitic bands of strongly hidrothermalized gabbros. Published cooling and crystallization ages from sin-tectonic magmatic rocks exposed in the western fl ank of the Central Cordillera have suggest that tectonic evolution of the paleo-fault system began since Triassic and Lower Jurassic before the installat...

  19. Structural evolution of an alkali sulfate activated slag cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobasher, Neda; Bernal, Susan A.; Provis, John L.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the effect of sodium sulfate content and curing duration (from fresh paste up to 18 months) on the binder structure of sodium sulfate activated slag cements was evaluated. Isothermal calorimetry results showed an induction period spanning the first three days after mixing, followed by an acceleration-deceleration peak corresponding to the formation of bulk reaction products. Ettringite, a calcium aluminium silicate hydrate (C-A-S-H) phase, and a hydrotalcite-like Mg-Al layered double hydroxide have been identified as the main reaction products, independent of the Na2SO4 dose. No changes in the phase assemblage were detected in the samples with curing from 1 month up to 18 months, indicating a stable binder structure. The most significant changes upon curing at advanced ages observed were growth of the AFt phase and an increase in silicate chain length in the C-A-S-H, resulting in higher strength.

  20. The evolution of structural changes in ettringite during thermal decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Michael R.; Brady, Steven K.; Berliner, Ronald; Conradi, Mark S.

    2006-04-01

    The thermal decomposition of ettringite, Ca 6[Al(OH) 6] 2(SO 4) 3·˜26H 2O, was studied with pulsed neutron time-of-flight diffraction combined with Rietveld structure refinement. Like prior investigations, transition from a crystalline to amorphous state occurred following the loss of ˜20 water molecules. In contrast to earlier investigations, which relied upon indirect measurements of water and hydroxyl occupancies, the present study inferred the occupancies directly from Rietveld crystal structure refinement of the diffraction data. The decomposition pathway was shown to be more complex than previously envisioned, involving the simultaneous loss of hydroxyl and water molecules. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy studies of the rigid lattice lineshapes of fully and partially hydrated ettringite were performed and confirmed our decomposition model.

  1. The evolution of structural changes in ettringite during thermal decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal decomposition of ettringite, Ca6[Al(OH)6]2(SO4)3.∼26H2O, was studied with pulsed neutron time-of-flight diffraction combined with Rietveld structure refinement. Like prior investigations, transition from a crystalline to amorphous state occurred following the loss of ∼20 water molecules. In contrast to earlier investigations, which relied upon indirect measurements of water and hydroxyl occupancies, the present study inferred the occupancies directly from Rietveld crystal structure refinement of the diffraction data. The decomposition pathway was shown to be more complex than previously envisioned, involving the simultaneous loss of hydroxyl and water molecules. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy studies of the rigid lattice lineshapes of fully and partially hydrated ettringite were performed and confirmed our decomposition model

  2. The structure and evolution of cold dark matter halos

    CERN Document Server

    Diemand, Jürg

    2009-01-01

    In the standard cosmological model a mysterious cold dark matter (CDM) component dominates the formation of structures. Numerical studies of the formation of CDM halos have produced several robust results that allow unique tests of the hierarchical clustering paradigm. Universal properties of halos, including their mass profiles and substructure properties are roughly consistent with observational data from the scales of dwarf galaxies to galaxy clusters. Resolving the fine grained structure of halos has enabled us to make predictions for ongoing and planned direct and indirect dark matter detection experiments. While simulations of pure CDM halos are now very accurate and in good agreement (recently claimed discrepancies are addressed in detail in this review), we are still unable to make robust, quantitative predictions about galaxy formation and about how the dark matter distribution changes in the process. Whilst discrepancies between observations and simulations have been the subject of much debate in th...

  3. Structure evolution of implanted polymers: Buried conductive layer formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The polarization, temperature and frequency dependence of the conductivity of polyethylene and poliamide-6 films implanted with B+ ions at 60-100 keV to various fluences were investigated. The phenomenon of hysteresis was observed in the d.c. current-voltage dependence for the polymers implanted with moderate fluences. This effect was attributed to the aligning of electric dipoles (attributed to the carbon-rich clusters) in the implanted layer by the applied electric field. The possibility of fabrication of a sandwich structure insulator/conductive layer/insulator combining the ion implantation with the electrochemical deposition of dielectric polymer poly-ortho-phenylenediamine from solution was demonstrated. The spatial characteristics of this structure enable the control of the conductance of the concealed carbonaceous layer by applying an external electric field that opens the way for fabrication of a transistor-like electronic switch

  4. Structural evolution during the reduction of chemically derived graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagri, Akbar; Mattevi, Cecilia; Acik, Muge; Chabal, Yves J; Chhowalla, Manish; Shenoy, Vivek B

    2010-07-01

    The excellent electrical, optical and mechanical properties of graphene have driven the search to find methods for its large-scale production, but established procedures (such as mechanical exfoliation or chemical vapour deposition) are not ideal for the manufacture of processable graphene sheets. An alternative method is the reduction of graphene oxide, a material that shares the same atomically thin structural framework as graphene, but bears oxygen-containing functional groups. Here we use molecular dynamics simulations to study the atomistic structure of progressively reduced graphene oxide. The chemical changes of oxygen-containing functional groups on the annealing of graphene oxide are elucidated and the simulations reveal the formation of highly stable carbonyl and ether groups that hinder its complete reduction to graphene. The calculations are supported by infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. Finally, more effective reduction treatments to improve the reduction of graphene oxide are proposed. PMID:20571578

  5. The Geography, Structure and Evolution of Infrastructure Networks in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Vinciguerra, S.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, network science has entered in virtually every scientific discipline. Some even speak of the “new science of networks” causing a scientific revolution across all disciplines. Also in Geography and Urban Studies, interest in network analysis has increased. This interest is understandable since most networks have a geographical structure, with nodes being located in space and links providing connections across space. This study positions itself at the interface of Social Networ...

  6. Evolution of Tertiary Structure of Viral RNA Dependent Polymerases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Černý, Jiří; Černá, B.; Valdés, James J.; Grubhoffer, Libor; Růžek, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 5 (2014), e96070. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP502/11/2116; GA ČR GAP302/12/2490; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Q-BETA replicase * C virus RNA * crystal structure Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2014

  7. Differential human capital and structural evolution in agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, John L.

    1994-01-01

    The growth of market capitalism and the technological advances of the last two centuries underlie the relentless process of structural change in agriculture. Substantial occupational migration out of farming and geographical migration from rural to urban areas is a characteristic of most, if not all, economies in the 20th century. The process of rural-urban migration, and the resulting urban problems have received considerable attention. The fate of the residual farm population has received l...

  8. Merit, Approbation and the Evolution of Social Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Cowan, Robin; Jonard, Nicolas

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we study a society in which individuals gain utility from income and from social approbation. Income is correlated with class. Approbation is given to an unobservable trait, which must be signalled through the agent’s social mobility, i.e. class change. Mobility is driven by a simple mechanism involving inheritance, effort and ability. Thus social structure (class composition) is affected by individuals’ quest for approbation, and we study how that affects the emergence and mult...

  9. The evolution of stellar structures in dwarf galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Bastian, N.; Weisz, D. R.; Skillman, E. D.; McQuinn, K. B. W.; Dolphin, A. E.; Gutermuth, R. A.; Cannon, J. M.; Ercolano, B.; Gieles, M.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Walter, F.

    2010-01-01

    We present a study of the variation of spatial structure of stellar populations within dwarf galaxies as a function of the population age. We use deep Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging of nearby dwarf galaxies in order to resolve individual stars and create composite colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) for each galaxy. Using the obtained CMDs, we select Blue Helium Burning stars (BHeBs), which can be unambiguously age-dated by comparing the absolute magnitude of individu...

  10. Evolution of organizational structure and strategy of the automobile industry

    OpenAIRE

    Heng, S.H.; Wibbelink, R.

    2000-01-01

    This paper is a historically oriented study of the automobile industry. It sets out to understand why have the structure and strategy of the dominant companies in the automobile industry changed in the way they have done. Our findings suggest three factors at work, namely the knowledge of car production and of customers, the capability of the technological system, and the business environment. The knowledge system represents the level of know-how and the availability of information. In a sens...

  11. Structured habitats and the evolution of anticompetitor toxins in bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Chao, L.; Levin, B R

    1981-01-01

    We demonstrate that in liquid cultures, defined in this study as a mass habitat, the outcome of competition between Escherichia coli that produce an antibacterial toxin (colicin) and sensitive E. coli is frequency dependent; the colicinogenic bacteria are at an advantage only when fairly common (frequencies in excess of 2 X 10(-2)). However, we also show that in a soft agar matrix, a structured habitat, the colicinogenic bacteria have an advantage even when initially rare (frequencies as low ...

  12. Nonlinear Evolution of Cosmological Structures in Warm Dark Matter Models

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Aurel; Maccio, Andrea V; Moore, Ben

    2011-01-01

    The dark energy dominated warm dark matter (WDM) model is a promising alternative cosmological scenario. We explore large-scale structure formation in this paradigm. We do this in two different ways: with the halo model approach and with the help of an ensemble of high resolution N-body simulations. Combining these quasi-independent approaches, leads to a physical understanding of the important processes which shape the formation of structures. We take a detailed look at the halo mass function, the concentrations and the linear halo bias of WDM. In all cases we find interesting deviations with respect to CDM. In particular, the concentration-mass relation displays a turnover for group scale dark matter haloes, for the case of WDM particles with masses of the order ~0.25 keV. This may be interpreted as a hint for top-down structure formation on small scales. We implement our results into the halo model and find much better agreement with simulations. On small scales the WDM halo model now performs as well as i...

  13. Effect of Ni on eutectic structural evolution in hypereutectic Al-Mg2Si cast alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → By the injection of rod-like NiAl3 phase in Al-Mg2Si alloys, Al-Mg2Si binary eutectic structure gradually evolves into Al-Mg2Si-NiAl3 ternary eutectic. → The ternary eutectic presents a unique double rod structure that rod-like NiAl3 and Mg2Si uniformly distribute in Al matrix. → The mechanism of structural evolution was analyzed in terms of the detailed microstructural observations. → The high temperature (350 deg. C) tensile strength of the alloy increases by 23% due to the eutectic structural evolution. - Abstract: The aim of this work is to investigate the eutectic structural evolution of hypereutectic Al-20% Mg2Si with Ni addition under a gravity casting process. Three-dimensional morphologies of eutectic phases were observed in detail using field emission scanning electron microscopy, after Al matrix was removed by deep etching or extraction. The results show that Al-Mg2Si binary eutectic gradually evolves into Al-Mg2Si-NiAl3 ternary eutectic with the increase of Ni content, and flake-like eutectic Mg2Si transforms into rods. The ternary eutectic presents a unique double rod structure that rod-like NiAl3 and Mg2Si uniformly distribute in Al matrix. Further, the high temperature (350 deg. C) tensile strength of the alloy increases by 23% due to the eutectic structure evolution, and the mechanism of structural evolution was discussed and analyzed in terms of the detailed microstructural observations.

  14. Thermally Induced Structural Evolution and Performance of Mesoporous Block Copolymer-Directed Alumina Perovskite Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Kwan Wee; Moore, David T.; Saliba, Michael; Sai, Hiroaki; Estroff, Lara A.; Hanrath, Tobias; Snaith, Henry J.; Wiesner, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Structure control in solution-processed hybrid perovskites is crucial to design and fabricate highly efficient solar cells. Here, we utilize in situ grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering and scanning electron microscopy to investigate the structural evolution and film morphologies of methylammonium lead tri-iodide/chloride (CH3NH3PbI3–x Cl x ) in mesoporous block copolymer derived alumina superstructures during thermal annealing. We show the CH3NH3PbI3–x Cl x material evolution to be ...

  15. Correlation between atomic structure evolution and strength in a bulk metallic glass at cryogenic temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, J.; Wang, G.; Z. Y. LIU; Bednarčík, J.; Gao, Yan; Zhai, Q. J.; Mattern, N.; Eckert, J.

    2014-01-01

    A model Zr41.25Ti13.75Ni10Cu12.5Be22.5 (at.%) bulk metallic glass (BMG) is selected to explore the structural evolution on the atomic scale with decreasing temperature down to cryogenic level using high energy X-ray synchrotron radiation. We discover a close correlation between the atomic structure evolution and the strength of the BMG and find out that the activation energy increment of the concordantly atomic shifting at lower temperature is the main factor influencing the strength. Our res...

  16. Chromatin structure and evolution in the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunlop Malcolm G

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolutionary rates are not constant across the human genome but genes in close proximity have been shown to experience similar levels of divergence and selection. The higher-order organisation of chromosomes has often been invoked to explain such phenomena but previously there has been insufficient data on chromosome structure to investigate this rigorously. Using the results of a recent genome-wide analysis of open and closed human chromatin structures we have investigated the global association between divergence, selection and chromatin structure for the first time. Results In this study we have shown that, paradoxically, synonymous site divergence (dS at non-CpG sites is highest in regions of open chromatin, primarily as a result of an increased number of transitions, while the rates of other traditional measures of mutation (intergenic, intronic and ancient repeat divergence as well as SNP density are highest in closed regions of the genome. Analysis of human-chimpanzee divergence across intron-exon boundaries indicates that although genes in relatively open chromatin generally display little selection at their synonymous sites, those in closed regions show markedly lower divergence at their fourfold degenerate sites than in neighbouring introns and intergenic regions. Exclusion of known Exonic Splice Enhancer hexamers has little affect on the divergence observed at fourfold degenerate sites across chromatin categories; however, we show that closed chromatin is enriched with certain classes of ncRNA genes whose RNA secondary structure may be particularly important. Conclusion We conclude that, overall, non-CpG mutation rates are lowest in open regions of the genome and that regions of the genome with a closed chromatin structure have the highest background mutation rate. This might reflect lower rates of DNA damage or enhanced DNA repair processes in regions of open chromatin. Our results also indicate that dS is a poor

  17. Thermal and Structural Evolution of Asteroid (4) Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidsson, Bjorn

    2013-10-01

    Placing the formation and evolution of a large differentiated planetesimal like asteroid (4) Vesta into a broader context of Solar System chronology has important implications for our understanding of planetary formation. Vesta is here assumed to form instantaneously at t=1.0 Myr after CAI by low-velocity contraction of a boulder swarm created by streaming instabilities. A novel computer code tracks the last phase of formation, from a radius R=564 km swarm with 90% porosity, via cold-pressing, to hydrostatic equilibrium at R=314 km, porosity above 42% and bulk density d=2.00 g/cc. The code then calculates temperature versus depth and time for an initially homogeneous mixture of metal and rock which contains radioactive Al-26 and Fe-60. Heat conductivities and specific heat capacities are functions of temperature and porosity. The porosity profile is updated continuously as a result of hot-pressing. When the first sign of metal melting occurs at t=1.68 Myr, the core porosity is 35%, R=310 km and d= 2.20 g/cc. The gradual melting of metal and its flow towards the center is modeled. Initially only void spaces are filled out, but as the liquid fraction reaches a threshold, silicate grains migrate upward, thus finalizing the differentiation. Around this time, efficient hot-pressing of weakened warm rock leads to substantial shrinking. By t=1.9 Myr, R=270 km, d=3.14 g/cc, and a compact solid rock mantle separates a ~110 km liquid metal core from a ~10km porous metal/rock crust. At t=2.1 Myr rock melting is initiated, and is completed 0.8 Myr later. The densities of metal and rock are considered temperature dependent, resulting in swelling or shrinking of the body, as well as density gradients within core and mantle. Efforts are ongoing to allow the resulting buoyancy to drive convection, with the corresponding energy transport accounted for. This will allow for studies of the duration of the magnetic dynamo, and more realistic changes of temperature, radius, and density

  18. Thermally induced structural evolution and performance of mesoporous block copolymer-directed alumina perovskite solar cells.

    KAUST Repository

    Tan, Kwan Wee

    2014-04-11

    Structure control in solution-processed hybrid perovskites is crucial to design and fabricate highly efficient solar cells. Here, we utilize in situ grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering and scanning electron microscopy to investigate the structural evolution and film morphologies of methylammonium lead tri-iodide/chloride (CH3NH3PbI(3-x)Cl(x)) in mesoporous block copolymer derived alumina superstructures during thermal annealing. We show the CH3NH3PbI(3-x)Cl(x) material evolution to be characterized by three distinct structures: a crystalline precursor structure not described previously, a 3D perovskite structure, and a mixture of compounds resulting from degradation. Finally, we demonstrate how understanding the processing parameters provides the foundation needed for optimal perovskite film morphology and coverage, leading to enhanced block copolymer-directed perovskite solar cell performance.

  19. Review: Evolution of GnIH structure and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro eOsugi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Discovery of gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH in the Japanese quail in 2000 was the first to demonstrate the existence of a hypothalamic neuropeptide inhibiting gonadotropin release. We now know that GnIH regulates reproduction by inhibiting gonadotropin synthesis and release via action on the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH system and the gonadotrope in various vertebrates. GnIH peptides identified in birds and mammals have a common LPXRF-amide (X = L or Q motif at the C-terminus and inhibits pituitary gonadotropin secretion. However, the function and structure of GnIH peptides were diverse in fish. Goldfish GnIHs possessing a C-terminal LPXRF-amide motif had both stimulatory and inhibitory effects on gonadotropin synthesis or release. The C-terminal sequence of grass puffer and medaka GnIHs were MPQRF-amide. To investigate the evolutionary origin of GnIH and its ancestral structure and function, we searched for GnIH in agnathans, the most ancient lineage of vertebrates. We identified GnIH precursor gene and mature GnIH peptides with C-terminal QPQRF-amide or RPQRF-amide from the brain of sea lamprey. Lamprey GnIH fibers were in close proximity to GnRH-III neurons. Further, one of lamprey GnIHs stimulated the expression of lamprey GnRH-III peptide in the hypothalamus and gonadotropic hormone β mRNA expression in the pituitary. We further identified the ancestral form of GnIH, which had a C-terminal RPQRF-amide, and its receptors in amphioxus, the most basal chordate species. The amphioxus GnIH inhibited cAMP signaling in vitro. In sum, the original forms of GnIH may date back to the time of the emergence of early chordates. GnIH peptides may have had various C-terminal structures slightly different from LPXRF-amide in basal chordates, which had stimulatory and/or inhibitory functions on reproduction. The C-terminal LPXRF-amide structure and its inhibitory function on reproduction may be selected in later-evolved vertebrates, such as

  20. Structure evolution of AZ61 magnesium alloy in SIMA process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Hong; ZHANG Fa-yun; JIE Xiao-ping

    2005-01-01

    The effect of prior compressive deformation, isothermal temperature and holding time on the structure of AZ61 magnesium alloy fabricated by strain-induced melt activation(SIMA) processing was investigated. The specimens were subjected under deformation ratios of 0%, 22% and 40% and various heat treatment time and temperature regions. The results indicate that the ideal technological parameters of semi-solid AZ61 alloy produced with non-dendrites are recommended as 22% (prior compressive deformation), 595 ℃ (heat treatment temperature) and 40 min(time). The as-cast AZ61 magnesium alloy isn't fit for semi-solid forming.

  1. The evolution of field-induced structure of confined ferrofluid emulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors report a real-time study of the evolution of the structure of confined ferrofluid emulsions during the ''liquid-solid'' phase transition. A monodisperse oil-in-water ferrofluid emulsion is used. The structure evolution of the emulsion after rapidly applying a magnetic field is probed by the static light scattering. The scattering pattern exhibits pronounced rings reflecting the formation of chains and their coalescence to columns or even ''worm'' structures. The scattering ring is found to decrease in size and brighten in intensity with time. To monitor the structure evolution in time, both the ring peak position in scattering wave vector, qmax, and the peak intensity, Imax, are measured as a function of time. Both qmax and Imax saturate in less than 0.5 seconds after applying a magnetic field. At a constant cell thickness of 25 μm, the evolution of structure is essentially independent of volume fraction ranging from 0.015 to 0.13. In addition, a very good scaling is found in the scattered light intensity as a function of the scattering wave vector

  2. The evolution of field-induced structure of confined ferrofluid emulsions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mou, T.; Flores, G.A.; Liu, J. (California State Univ., Long Beach, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Bibette, J. (Centre de Recherche Paul Pascal, Pessac (France)); Richard, J. (Rhone-Poulenc Recherches, Aubervilliers (France))

    1994-09-01

    The authors report a real-time study of the evolution of the structure of confined ferrofluid emulsions during the ''liquid-solid'' phase transition. A monodisperse oil-in-water ferrofluid emulsion is used. The structure evolution of the emulsion after rapidly applying a magnetic field is probed by the static light scattering. The scattering pattern exhibits pronounced rings reflecting the formation of chains and their coalescence to columns or even ''worm'' structures. The scattering ring is found to decrease in size and brighten in intensity with time. To monitor the structure evolution in time, both the ring peak position in scattering wave vector, q[sub max], and the peak intensity, I[sub max], are measured as a function of time. Both q[sub max] and I[sub max] saturate in less than 0.5 seconds after applying a magnetic field. At a constant cell thickness of 25 [mu]m, the evolution of structure is essentially independent of volume fraction ranging from 0.015 to 0.13. In addition, a very good scaling is found in the scattered light intensity as a function of the scattering wave vector.

  3. Comparative Structural Models of Similarities and Differences between "Vehicle" and "Target" in Order to Teach Darwinian "Evolution"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelos, Maria Fatima; Nagem, Ronaldo L.

    2010-01-01

    Our objective is to contribute to the teaching of Classical Darwinian "Evolution" by means of a study of analogies and metaphors. Throughout the history of knowledge about "Evolution" and in Science teaching, tree structures have been used an analogs to refer to "Evolution," such as by Darwin in the "Tree of Life" passage contained in "On The…

  4. Kinematic and Structural Evolution of Field and Cluster Spiral Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ziegler, Bodo L; Da Rocha, Cristiano; Böhm, Asmus; Peletier, Reynier F; Verdugo, Miguel

    2009-01-01

    To understand the processes that build up galaxies we investigate the stellar structure and gas kinematics of spiral and irregular galaxies out to redshift 1. We target 92 galaxies in four cluster (z = 0.3 & 0.5) fields to study the environmental influence. Their stellar masses derived from multiband VLT/FORS photometry are distributed around but mostly below the characteristic Schechter-fit mass. From HST/ACS images we determine morphologies and structural parameters like disk length, position angle and ellipticity. Combining the spectra of three slit positions per galaxy using the MXU mode of VLT/FORS2 we construct the two-dimensional velocity field from gas emission lines for 16 cluster members and 33 field galaxies. The kinematic position angle and flatness are derived by a Fourier expansion of elliptical velocity profiles. To trace possible interaction processes, we define three irregularity indicators based on an identical analysis of local galaxies from the SINGS project. Our distant sample display...

  5. Impact origin of the Sudbury structure: Evolution of a theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowman, Paul D., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews the origin, development, and present status of the widely accepted theory, proposed by Robert S. Dietz in 1962, that the Sudbury structure was formed by meteoritic or asteroidal impact. The impact theory for the origin of the Sudbury structure seems supported by a nearly conclusive body of evidence. However, even assuming an impact origin to be correct, at least three major questions require further study: (1) the original size and shape of the crater, before tectonic deformation and erosion; (2) the source of the melt now forming the Sudbury Igneous Complex; and (3) the degree, if any, to which the Ni-Cu-platinum group elements are meteoritic. The history of the impact theory illustrates several under-appreciated aspects of scientific research: (1) the importance of cross-fertilization between space research and terrestrial geology; (2) the role of the outsider in stimulating thinking by insiders; (3) the value of small science, at least in the initial stages of an investigation, Dietz's first field work having been at his own expense; and (4) the value of analogies (here, between the Sudbury Igneous Complex and the maria), which although incorrect in major aspects, may trigger research on totally new lines. Finally, the Sudbury story illustrates the totally unpredictable and, by implication, unplannable nature of basic research, in that insight to the origin of the world's then-greatest Ni deposit came from the study of tektites and the Moon.

  6. Structure and Function Evolution of Thiolate Monolayers on Gold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant Alvin Edwards

    2006-05-01

    The use of n-alkanethiolate self-assembled monolayers on gold has blossomed in the past few years. These systems have functioned as models for common interfaces. Thiolate monolayers are ideal because they are easily modified before or after deposition. The works contained within this dissertation include interfacial characterization (inbred reflection absorption spectroscopy, ellipsometry, contact angle, scanning probe microscopy, and heterogeneous electron-transfer kinetics) and various modeling scenarios. The results of these characterizations present ground-breaking insights into the structure, function, and reproducible preparation of these monolayers. Surprisingly, three interfacial properties (electron-transfer, contact angle, and ellipsometry) were discovered to depend directly on the odd-even character of the monolayer components. Molecular modeling was utilized to investigate adlayer orientation, and suggests that these effects are adlayer structure specific. Finally, the electric force microscopy and theoretical modeling investigations of monolayer samples are presented, which show that the film dielectric constant, thickness, and dipole moment directly affect image contrast. In addition, the prospects for utilization of this emerging technique are outlined.

  7. Compositional, structural and optical properties of Si-rich a-SiC:H thin films deposited by ArF-LCVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, E. [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Vigo, Campus Lagoas-Marcosende, 36310 Vigo (Spain)]. E-mail: fani@uvigo.es; Chiussi, S. [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Vigo, Campus Lagoas-Marcosende, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Kosch, U. [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Vigo, Campus Lagoas-Marcosende, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Gonzalez, P. [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Vigo, Campus Lagoas-Marcosende, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Serra, J. [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Vigo, Campus Lagoas-Marcosende, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Serra, C. [CACTI, Universidad de Vigo, Campus Lagoas-Marcosende, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Leon, B. [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Vigo, Campus Lagoas-Marcosende, 36310 Vigo (Spain)

    2005-07-30

    Silicon-rich amorphous hydrogenated silicon carbon (a-SiC:H) films with C content up to 23% have been grown on Si and Corning glass substrates using ArF laser induced chemical vapor deposition (ArF-LCVD). This technique allows tailoring film composition by controlling deposition parameters such as precursor gas mixture (disilane and ethylene diluted in helium) and substrate temperature (180-400 deg. C). The influence of both parameters on composition and bonding were studied by Fourier transform infrarred (FTIR) and X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The optical gap of these semiconductors deposited at 250 deg. C varied from 1.6 to 2.4 eV and was determined by UV-vis spectroscopy. An additional analysis by profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been done for determining the deposition rate and the roughness (rms < 6 nm) of the films as well as their surface morphology.

  8. Structure, Stability, and Evolution of Magnetic Flux Ropes from the Perspective of Magnetic Twist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Kliem, Bernhard; Titov, Viacheslav S.; Chen, Jun; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Haimin; Liu, Chang; Xu, Yan; Wiegelmann, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the evolution of NOAA Active Region (AR) 11817 during 2013 August 10-12, when it developed a complex field configuration and produced four confined, followed by two eruptive, flares. These C-and-above flares are all associated with a magnetic flux rope (MFR) located along the major polarity inversion line, where shearing and converging photospheric flows are present. Aided by the nonlinear force-free field modeling, we identify the MFR through mapping magnetic connectivities and computing the twist number {{ T }}w for each individual field line. The MFR is moderately twisted (| {{ T }}w| \\lt 2) and has a well-defined boundary of high squashing factor Q. We found that the field line with the extremum | {{ T }}w| is a reliable proxy of the rope axis, and that the MFR's peak | {{ T }}w| temporarily increases within half an hour before each flare while it decreases after the flare peak for both confined and eruptive flares. This pre-flare increase in | {{ T }}w| has little effect on the AR's free magnetic energy or any other parameters derived for the whole region, due to its moderate amount and the MFR's relatively small volume, while its decrease after flares is clearly associated with the stepwise decrease in the whole region's free magnetic energy due to the flare. We suggest that {{ T }}w may serve as a useful parameter in forewarning the onset of eruption, and therefore, the consequent space weather effects. The helical kink instability is identified as the prime candidate onset mechanism for the considered flares.

  9. Tectonic evolution and mantle structure of the Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benthem, Steven; Govers, Rob; Spakman, Wim; Wortel, Rinus

    2013-06-01

    investigate whether predictions of mantle structure from tectonic reconstructions are in agreement with a detailed tomographic image of seismic P wave velocity structure under the Caribbean region. In the upper mantle, positive seismic anomalies are imaged under the Lesser Antilles and Puerto Rico. These anomalies are interpreted as remnants of Atlantic lithosphere subduction and confirm tectonic reconstructions that suggest at least 1100 km of convergence at the Lesser Antilles island arc during the past ~45 Myr. The imaged Lesser Antilles slab consists of a northern and southern anomaly, separated by a low-velocity anomaly across most of the upper mantle, which we interpret as the subducted North America-South America plate boundary. The southern edge of the imaged Lesser Antilles slab agrees with vertical tearing of South America lithosphere. The northern Lesser Antilles slab is continuous with the Puerto Rico slab along the northeastern plate boundary. This results in an amphitheater-shaped slab, and it is interpreted as westward subducting North America lithosphere that remained attached to the surface along the northeastern boundary of the Caribbean plate. At the Muertos Trough, however, material is imaged until a depth of only 100 km, suggesting a small amount of subduction. The location and length of the imaged South Caribbean slab agrees with proposed subduction of Caribbean lithosphere under the northern South America plate. An anomaly related to proposed Oligocene subduction at the Nicaragua rise is absent in the tomographic model. Beneath Panama, a subduction window exists across the upper mantle, which is related to the cessation of subduction of the Nazca plate under Panama since 9.5 Ma and possibly the preceding subduction of the extinct Cocos-Nazca spreading center. In the lower mantle, two large anomaly patterns are imaged. The westernmost anomaly agrees with the subduction of Farallon lithosphere. The second lower mantle anomaly is found east of

  10. Aluminum polyphosphate gels structural evolution probed by NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work was to investigate how the structure of aluminum polyphosphate gels change upon aging and drying. This is essential if one is interested in using a gel as a matrix to synthesize organic-inorganic hybrid materials. The liquid and solid samples were characterized by 27Al and 31P NMR spectroscopy. Larger polyphosphate chains make the main contribution to gel formation and the smaller units are expelled into the supernatant solution. Polyphosphate chains undergo hydrolysis and chain scission upon gelation. Samples aged in a moisture-rich environment turn into viscous liquids as a consequence of water uptake, followed by extensive hydrolysis. Samples exposed to low relative humidity environments dry yielding brittle samples in which larger chains are stable. Vacuum-dried samples still contain ca. 30%-weight water. (author)

  11. Further Evidence for Cosmological Evolution of the Fine Structure Constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the results of a search for time variability of the fine structure constant α using absorption systems in the spectra of distant quasars. Three large optical data sets and two 21 cm and mm absorption systems provide four independent samples, spanning ∼23% to 87% of the age of the universe. Each sample yields a smaller α in the past and the optical sample shows a 4σ deviation: Δα/α=-0.72±0.18 x 10-5 over the redshift range 0.5< z<3.5 . We find no systematic effects which can explain our results. The only potentially significant systematic effects push Δα/α towards positive values; i.e., our results would become more significant were we to correct for them

  12. Patterning and evolution of floral structures - marking time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKim, Sarah; Hay, Angela

    2010-08-01

    The diversity of flowering structures dazzles the eye, dominates the landscape, and invites evolutionary questions regarding the development of such variety. Comparative work in a number of genetically tractable plant species has addressed how diverse floral architectures develop, and started to reveal the balance between conservation and divergence of the patterning mechanisms responsible for when and where flowers form on a plant. We highlight findings from Petunia where conserved LFY/UFO function is under species-specific regulation, and a novel mechanism involving WOX homeodomain proteins for modulating cyme development in diverse nightshades. We also draw attention to recent findings in Arabidopsis of miRNA and chromatin-based timing mechanisms controlling floral development, and illustrate how genetic studies in Arabidopsis relatives can reveal how evolutionary changes in such mechanisms generate diversity in form. PMID:20452201

  13. Structural Evolution of a Granular Pack under Manual Tapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iikawa, Naoki; Bandi, Mahesh M.; Katsuragi, Hiroaki

    2015-09-01

    We experimentally study a two-dimensional (2D) granular pack of photoelastic disks subject to vertical manual tapping. Using bright- and dark-field images, we employ gradient-based image analysis methods to analyze various structural quantities. These include the packing fraction (ϕ), force per disk (Fd), and force chain segment length (l) as functions of the tapping number (τ). The increase in the packing fraction with the tapping number is found to exponentially approach an asymptotic value. An exponential distribution is observed for the cumulative numbers of both the force per disk Fd:Ncum(Fd) = AFexp ( - Fd/F0), and the force chain segment length l:Ncum(l) = Alexp ( - l/l0). Whereas the coefficient AF varies with τ for Fd, l shows no dependence on τ. The τ dependences of Fd and ϕ allow us to posit a linear relationship between the total force of the granular pack Ftot*(τ ) and ϕ(τ).

  14. Alpha-synuclein gene structure,evolution,and protein aggregation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lili Xiong; Peng Zhao; Zhiyun Guo; Jianhua Zhang; Diqiang Li; Canquan Mao

    2010-01-01

    α-synuclein,a member of the synuclein family,is predominately expressed in brain tissues,where it is the major component of Lewy bodies,the major hallmark of Parkinson's disease.We analyzed the phylogenetics,gene structure,and effects of different forms of α-synuclein on in vitro protein aggregation.The synuclein phylogenetic tree showed that sequences could be classified into α,β,and γ protein groups.The orthologous gene α-,β-and γ-synuclein showed similar evolutionary distance to the paralogous gene α-,β-and γ-synuclein.Bioinformatics analysis suggests that the amino-acid sequence of human α-synuclein can be divided into three regions: N-terminal amphipathic region(1-60),central hydrophobic non-amyloid beta component segment(61-95),and the C-terminal acidic part(96-140).The mutant site of A30P is at the second exon of α-synuclein,whereas E46K is located at the third exon of α-synuclein.α-synuclein alternative splicing results in four isomers,and five exons,all of which participate in protein coding,comprising 140 amino acids to produce the major α-synuclein in vivo.The threeα-synuclein isoforms are products of alternative splicing,α-synuclein 126,112 and 98.We also review the genetic and cellular factors that affect the aggregation of α-synuclein and compounds that inhibit aggregation.A better understanding of α-synuclein sequences,structure,and function may allow better targeted therapy and diagnosis of α-synuclein in Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. A numerical model for the evolution of internal structure of cavitation cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Tezhuan; Wang, Yiwei; Liao, Lijuan; Huang, Chenguang

    2016-07-01

    Bubble size distributions in cloud cavitation are important in cavitating flows. In this study, a numerical model was developed to study the evolution of the internal structure of cloud cavitation. The model includes (1) an evolution equation of bubble number density, which considers the bubble breakup effect and (2) the multiphase Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with a modified cavitation model for background cavitating flows. The proposed model was validated with a flow over a projectile. Results show that the numerical model can predict the evolution of the internal structure of cloud cavitation. Comparisons of the proposed model and Singhal model were discussed. The effects of re-entrant jet and bubble number density on cavitating flows were also investigated.

  16. Kinematic Morphology of Large-scale Structure: Evolution from Potential to Rotational Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xin; Aragon-Calvo, Miguel A; Neyrinck, Mark C; Eyink, Gregory L

    2013-01-01

    As an alternative way of describing the cosmological velocity field, we discuss the evolution of rotational invariants constructed from the velocity gradient tensor. Compared with the traditional divergence-vorticity decomposition, these invariants, defined as coefficients of characteristic equation of the velocity gradient tensor, enable a complete classification of all possible flow patterns in the dark-matter comoving frame, including both potential and vortical flows. Before shell-crossing, different categories of potential flow are highly associated with cosmic web structure, because of the coherent evolution of density and velocity. This correspondence is even preserved at some level when vorticity is generated after shell-crossing. The evolution from the potential to vortical flow can be traced continuously by these invariants. With the help of this tool, we show that the vorticity is generated in a particular way that is highly correlated with the large-scale structure. This includes a distinct spatia...

  17. Ars Electronica tulekul / Rael Artel

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Artel, Rael, 1980-

    2003-01-01

    6.-11. IX toimub Austrias Linzis "Ars Electronica" festival, mille teema on "Code - The Language of Our Time". Festivali kavast, osalejatest, ava-performance'ist "Europe - A Symphonic Vision", näitusest "Cyberarts 2003. Prix Ars Electronica"

  18. ARABIC LIGHT STEMMER (ARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ASMA AL-OMARI

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Stemming is a main step used to process textual data. It is usually used in several types of applications such as: text mining, information retrieval (IR, and natural language processing (NLP. A major task in stemming is to standardize words; which can be achieved by reducing each word to its base (root or stem. Arabic stemming is not an easy task. Unlike other languages, Arabic language is a highly inflected language, since it uses many inflectional forms. Researchers are divided on the benefit of using stemming in fields of IR, NLP...etc., since in Arabic the morphological variants of a certain word are not always semantically related. The aim of this paper is to design and implement a new Arabic light stemmer (ARS which is not based on Arabic root patterns. Instead, it depends on well defined mathematical rules and several relations between letters. A series of tests were conducted on ARS stemmer to compare its effectiveness with the effectiveness of two other Arabic stemmers. Test shows clearly the effectiveness superiority of ARS compared to effectiveness of these two Arabic stemmers.

  19. FINE STRUCTURE OF FLARE RIBBONS AND EVOLUTION OF ELECTRIC CURRENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emission of solar flares across the electromagnetic spectrum is often observed in the form of two expanding ribbons. The standard flare model explains flare ribbons as footpoints of magnetic arcades, emitting due to interaction of energetic particles with the chromospheric plasma. However, the physics of this interaction and properties of the accelerated particles are still unknown. We present results of multiwavelength observations of the C2.1 flare of 2013 August 15, observed with the New Solar Telescope of the Big Bear Solar Observatory, and the Solar Dynamics Observatory, GOES, and Fermi spacecraft. The observations reveal previously unresolved sub-arcsecond structure of flare ribbons in regions of strong magnetic field consisting from numerous small-scale bright knots. We observe a red-blue asymmetry of Hα flare ribbons with a width as small as ∼100 km. We discuss the relationship between the ribbons and vertical electric currents estimated from vector magnetograms, and show that Joule heating can be responsible for energization of Hα knots in the ribbons

  20. Surnames and dialects in France: population structure and cultural evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scapoli, C; Goebl, H; Sobota, S; Mamolini, E; Rodriguez-Larralde, A; Barrai, I

    2005-11-01

    To study the isonymy structure of France as related to local language variations, the surname distributions of 6.03 million telephone users registered for the year 2002 were analysed in the 21 conterminous regions, their 94 departments and in 809 towns of the Country. For regions and departments the differences among local dialects were quantified according to the dialecto-metrization of the Atlas Linguistique Français. We found that Lasker's distance between regions was correlated with geographic distance with r=0.692+/-0.040, while Euclidean (r=0.546+/-0.058) and Nei's (r=0.610+/-0.048) distances were less correlated. Slightly lower correlations were observed for departments. Also, dialectometric distance was correlated with geography (r=0.582+/-0.069 for regions and r=0.617+/-0.015 for departments). The correlations between Lasker and dialectometric matrix distances for regions and departments are r=0.625+/-0.046 and 0.544+/-0.014, respectively, indicating that the common cause generating surname and language diversity accounts for about 35% of the differentiation. Both Lasker and dialectometric distances identify very similar boundaries between Poitou, Centre, Bourgogne and Franche Comptée at the North, and Aquitaine, Limousin, Auvergne, Rhône-Alpes in the South. Average Fisher's alpha for France was 7877 the highest value observed for the European countries studied to date. The size of alpha in most French towns indicates considerable recent immigration. PMID:15935393

  1. Rheological, structural and chemical evolution of bitumen under gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitumen derived from crude oil by fractional distillation has been used in the nuclear industry as a radioactive waste encapsulation matrix. When subjected to α, β and γ self-irradiation, this organic matrix undergoes radiolysis, generating hydrogen bubbles and modifying the physical and chemical properties of the material. In this paper, the effects of irradiation on bitumen materials, especially in terms of its physical, chemical, structural and rheological properties, were characterized at radiation doses ranging from 1 to 7 MGy. An increase in the shear viscosity and melt yield stress was observed with increasing doses. Similarly, the elastic and viscous moduli (G' and G'') increase with the dose, with a more pronounced increase for G' that reflects enhanced elasticity arising from radiation-induced cross-linking. In addition, a low-frequency plateau is observed for G', reflecting pseudo-solid behavior and leading to an increase of the complex viscosity. This behavior is due to increased interactions between asphaltene particles, and to aromatization of the bitumen by γ-radiations. Cross-linking of bitumen enhances its strength, as confirmed by various techniques (modulated DSC, DTA/TGA, SEC, FTIR and XRD). (authors)

  2. The evolution of stellar structures in dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Bastian, N; Skillman, E D; McQuinn, K B W; Dolphin, A E; Gutermuth, R A; Cannon, J M; Ercolano, B; Gieles, M; Kennicutt, R C; Walter, F

    2010-01-01

    We present a study of the variation of spatial structure of stellar populations within dwarf galaxies as a function of the population age. We use deep Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging of nearby dwarf galaxies in order to resolve individual stars and create composite colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) for each galaxy. Using the obtained CMDs, we select Blue Helium Burning stars (BHeBs), which can be unambiguously age-dated by comparing the absolute magnitude of individual stars with stellar isochrones. Additionally, we select a very young (<10 Myr) population of OB stars for a subset of the galaxies based on the tip of the young main-sequence. By selecting stars in different age ranges we can then study how the spatial distribution of these stars evolves with time. We find, in agreement with previous studies, that stars are born within galaxies with a high degree of substructure which is made up of a continuous distribution of clusters, groups and associations from parsec to hundreds...

  3. Diverse Structural Evolution at z > 1 in Cosmologically Simulated Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Snyder, Gregory F; Moody, Christopher; Peth, Michael; Freeman, Peter; Ceverino, Daniel; Primack, Joel; Dekel, Avishai

    2014-01-01

    From mock Hubble Space Telescope images, we quantify non-parametric statistics of galaxy morphology, thereby predicting the emergence of relationships among stellar mass, star formation, and observed rest-frame optical structure at 1 10^10 M_sun contain relatively more disc-dominated light profiles than those with lower mass, reflecting significant disc brightening in some haloes at 1 10^10 M_sun. We analyze a cosmological major merger at z~1.5 and find that the newly proposed MID morphology diagnostics trace later stages while G-M20 trace earlier ones. MID is sensitive also to clumpy star-forming discs. The observability time of typical MID-enhanced events in our simulation sample is less than 100 Myr. A larger sample of cosmological assembly histories may be required to calibrate such diagnostics in the face of their sensitivity to viewing angle, segmentation algorithm, and various phenomena such as clumpy star formation and minor mergers.

  4. Fine-structure constant variability surprises for laboratory atomic spectroscopy and cosmological evolution of quasar spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Bekenstein, J D

    2003-01-01

    Calculation of the Dirac hydrogen atom spectrum in the framework of dynamical fine structure constant (alpha) variability discloses a small departure in the laboratory from Sommerfeld's formula for the fine structure shifts, possibly measurable today. And for a distant object in the universe, the wavelength shift of a spectral line specifically ascribable to cosmological alpha variation is found to depend differently on the quantum numbers than in the conventional view. This last result clashes with the conventional wisdom that an atom's spectrum can change with cosmological time only through evolution of the alpha parameter in the energy eigenvalue formula, and thus impacts on the Webb group's analysis of fine structure intervals in quasar absorption lines (which has been claimed to disclose cosmological alpha evolution). In particular, analyzing together a mix of quasar absorption lines from different fine structure multiplets can bias estimates of cosmological alpha variability.

  5. Star counts as an indicator of galactic structure and quasar evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahcall, J. N.; Soneira, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    A detailed model of the stellar content of the Galaxy is described briefly. Illustrative applications of the model are made, using existing data, to indicate how star counts can be used to determine some parameters of galactic structure, to detect a massive (stellar) halo, and to constrain models of quasar evolution.

  6. In Situ Observation of the Dislocation Structure Evolution During a Strain Path Change in Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wejdemann, Christian; Poulsen, Henning Friis; Lienert, Ulrich;

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of deformation structures in individual grains embedded in polycrystalline copper specimens during strain path changes is observed in situ by high-resolution reciprocal space mapping with high-energy synchrotron radiation. A large number of individual subgrains is resolved; their...

  7. Structural Evolution of Colloidal Crystal Films in the Process of Melting Revealed by Bragg Peak Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sulyanova, Elena A.; Shabalin, Anatoly; Zozulya, Alexey V.; Meijer, Janne-Mieke; Dzhigaev, Dmitry; Gorobtsov, Oleg; Kurta, Ruslan P.; Lazarev, Sergey; Lorenz, Ulf; Singer, Andrej; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Zaluzhnyy, Ivan; Besedin, Ilya; Sprung, Michael; Petukhov, A. V.; Vartanyants, Ivan A.

    2015-01-01

    In situ X-ray diffraction studies of structural evolution of colloidal crystal films formed by polystyrene spherical particles upon incremental heating are reported. The Bragg peak parameters, such as peak position, integrated intensity, and radial and azimuthal widths were analyzed as a function of

  8. Novel Phase at High Density and Their Role in the Structure and Evolution of Neutron Stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a pedagogic discussion on the role of novel phases of dense baryonic matter in ''neutron'' stars. Qualitative aspects of the physics that drives phase transitions and some of its astrophysical consequences are discussed. Observable aspects of neutron star structure and early evolution of the newly born neutron star are discussed in some detail. (author)

  9. Novel Phases at High Density and their Roles in the Structure and Evolution of Neutron Stars

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, Sanjay

    2002-01-01

    We present a pedagogic discussion on the role of novel phases of dense baryonic matter in ``neutron'' stars. Qualitative aspects of the physics that drives phase transitions and some of its astrophysical consequences are discussed. Observable aspects of neutron star structure and early evolution of the newly born neutron star are discussed in some detail.

  10. Structural Evolution in Photoactive Yellow Protein Studied by Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshizawa M.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast structural evolution in photoactive yellow protein (PYP is studied by femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy. A comparison between wild-type PYP and E46Q mutant reveals that the hydrogen-bonding network surrounding the chromophore of PYP is immediately rearranged in the electronic excited state.

  11. Kinematic morphology of large-scale structure: evolution from potential to rotational flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin; Szalay, Alex; Aragón-Calvo, Miguel A.; Neyrinck, Mark C.; Eyink, Gregory L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2014-09-20

    As an alternative way to describe the cosmological velocity field, we discuss the evolution of rotational invariants constructed from the velocity gradient tensor. Compared with the traditional divergence-vorticity decomposition, these invariants, defined as coefficients of the characteristic equation of the velocity gradient tensor, enable a complete classification of all possible flow patterns in the dark-matter comoving frame, including both potential and vortical flows. We show that this tool, first introduced in turbulence two decades ago, is very useful for understanding the evolution of the cosmic web structure, and in classifying its morphology. Before shell crossing, different categories of potential flow are highly associated with the cosmic web structure because of the coherent evolution of density and velocity. This correspondence is even preserved at some level when vorticity is generated after shell crossing. The evolution from the potential to vortical flow can be traced continuously by these invariants. With the help of this tool, we show that the vorticity is generated in a particular way that is highly correlated with the large-scale structure. This includes a distinct spatial distribution and different types of alignment between the cosmic web and vorticity direction for various vortical flows. Incorporating shell crossing into closed dynamical systems is highly non-trivial, but we propose a possible statistical explanation for some of the phenomena relating to the internal structure of the three-dimensional invariant space.

  12. Ion-induced electron emission monitoring of the structure and morphology evolution in HOPG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temperature dependences of the ion-induced electron emission yield γ of highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) under high-fluence (1018-1019 ions/cm2) 30 keV Ar+ ion irradiation at ion incidence angles from θ = 0 deg. (normal incidence) to 80 deg. have been measured to trace both the structure and morphology changes in the basal oriented samples. The target temperature has been varied during continuous irradiation from T = -180 to 400 deg. C. The surface analysis has been performed by the RHEED and SEM techniques. The surface microgeometry was studied using laser goniophotometry (LGF). The dependences of γ(T) were found to be strongly non-monotonic and essentially different from the ones for Ar+ and N2+ ion irradiation of the polygranular graphites. A sharp peak at irradiation temperature Tp ∼ 150 deg. C was found. A strong influence of electron transport anisotropy has been observed, and ion-induced microgeometry is discussed.

  13. Ion-induced electron emission monitoring of the structure and morphology evolution in HOPG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrianova, N.N.; Borisov, A.M. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, Leninsky Gori, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Mashkova, E.S. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, Leninsky Gori, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)], E-mail: es_mashkova@mail.ru; Parilis, E.S. [California Institute of Technology, 200-36, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Virgiliev, Yu.S. [NIIgraphite, 111141 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2009-08-15

    The temperature dependences of the ion-induced electron emission yield {gamma} of highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) under high-fluence (10{sup 18}-10{sup 19} ions/cm{sup 2}) 30 keV Ar{sup +} ion irradiation at ion incidence angles from {theta} = 0 deg. (normal incidence) to 80 deg. have been measured to trace both the structure and morphology changes in the basal oriented samples. The target temperature has been varied during continuous irradiation from T = -180 to 400 deg. C. The surface analysis has been performed by the RHEED and SEM techniques. The surface microgeometry was studied using laser goniophotometry (LGF). The dependences of {gamma}(T) were found to be strongly non-monotonic and essentially different from the ones for Ar{sup +} and N{sub 2}{sup +} ion irradiation of the polygranular graphites. A sharp peak at irradiation temperature T{sub p} {approx} 150 deg. C was found. A strong influence of electron transport anisotropy has been observed, and ion-induced microgeometry is discussed.

  14. Cluster Structure in Cosmological Simulations I: Correlation to Observables, Mass Estimates, and Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Jeltema, Tesla E.; Hallman, Eric J.; Burns, Jack O.; Motl, Patrick M

    2007-01-01

    We use Enzo, a hybrid Eulerian AMR/N-body code including non-gravitational heating and cooling, to explore the morphology of the X-ray gas in clusters of galaxies and its evolution in current generation cosmological simulations. We employ and compare two observationally motivated structure measures: power ratios and centroid shift. Overall, the structure of our simulated clusters compares remarkably well to low-redshift observations, although some differences remain that may point to incomple...

  15. Fluorous ‘ponytails’ lead to strong gelators showing thermally induced structure evolution.

    OpenAIRE

    Kumari, Harshita; Armitage, Sarah E.; Kline, Steven R.; Damodaran, Krishna K.; Kennedy, Stuart R.; Atwood, Jerry L.; Steed, Jonathan W

    2015-01-01

    Appending perfluoroalkyl substituents to bis(urea) gelators results in significantly decreased inter-chain interactions with markedly thinner fibres and hence more cross-linked and more transparent gels with potential applications in the crystallisation of fluorinated pharmaceuticals. Gel structure has been probed by detailed SANS measurements which indicate a surprising structure evolution on thermal cycling, not seen for hydrocarbon analogues. The SANS data are complemented by the single cr...

  16. Structural similarity of loops in protein families: toward the understanding of protein evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Madej Thomas; Panchenko Anna R

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Protein evolution and protein classification are usually inferred by comparing protein cores in their conserved aligned parts. Structurally aligned protein regions are separated by less conserved loop regions, where sequence and structure locally deviate from each other and do not superimpose well. Results Our results indicate that even longer protein loops can not be viewed as "random coils" and for the majority of protein families in our test set there exists a linear co...

  17. Amplitude and phase evolution of optical fields inside periodic photonic structures

    OpenAIRE

    Flück, E.; Hammer, M; Otter, A.M.; Korterik, J P; Kuipers, L.; Hulst, van der, R.W.M.

    2003-01-01

    Optical amplitude distributions of light inside periodic photonic structures are visualized with subwavelength resolution. In addition, using a phase-sensitive photon scanning tunneling microscope, we simultaneously map the phase evolution of light. Two different structures, which consist of a ridge wave-guide containing periodic arrays of nanometer scale features, are investigated. We determine the wavelength dependence of the exponential decay rate inside the periodic arrays. Furthermore, v...

  18. Dislocation structure evolution and its effects on cyclic deformation response of AISI 316L stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → The cyclic deformation response of AISI 316L steel is investigated at 20 deg. C. → The corresponding microstructure evolution is characterised by electron microscopy. → A 3D representation of dislocation evolution is proposed based on the observation. → The 3D representation gives a good explanation of the microstructure complexity. → The cyclic deformation response is discussed based on the microstructure evolution. - Abstract: The cyclic deformation response of an austenitic stainless steel is characterised in terms of its cyclic peak tensile stress properties by three stages of behaviour: a hardening stage followed by a softening stage, and finally a stable stress response stage. A series of tests have been performed and interrupted at selected numbers of cycles in the different stages of mechanical response. At each interruption point, specimens have been examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with different beam directions by means of the tilting function in order to investigate the formation and the development of dislocation structures from the as-received condition until the end of fatigue life. A new 3D representation of dislocation structure evolution during cyclic loading is proposed on the basis of the microstructural observations. The 3D representation provides a deeper insight into the development of dislocation structures in AISI 316L during low cycle fatigue loading at room temperature. By investigating the dislocation evolution, the study shows that the hardening response is mainly associated with an increase of total dislocation density, whereas the softening stage is a result of the formation of dislocation-free regions. Further development of the dislocation structure into a cellular structure is responsible for the stable stress response stage.

  19. Evol and ProDy for bridging protein sequence evolution and structural dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Wenzhi; Liu, Ying; Chennubhotla, Chakra; Lezon, Timothy R.; Bahar, Ivet

    2014-01-01

    Correlations between sequence evolution and structural dynamics are of utmost importance in understanding the molecular mechanisms of function and their evolution. We have integrated Evol, a new package for fast and efficient comparative analysis of evolutionary patterns and conformational dynamics, into ProDy, a computational toolbox designed for inferring protein dynamics from experimental and theoretical data. Using information-theoretic approaches, Evol coanalyzes conservation and coevolution profiles extracted from multiple sequence alignments of protein families with their inferred dynamics. Availability and implementation: ProDy and Evol are open-source and freely available under MIT License from http://prody.csb.pitt.edu/. Contact: bahar@pitt.edu PMID:24849577

  20. Impact damage evolution under fatigue loading by InfraRed Thermography on composite structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pastor M.-L.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with cumulative damage and its evolution in already impact damage composite structure. In order to follow the growing damage and to compare it with cumulative model, tests are monitored with an InfraRed thermography system. A carbon-epoxy composite is first low-energy impacted and then fatigued under tensioncompression loading. This study also enables a very fast analysis of predicting the damage evolution coupling InfraRed Thermography as NDT method and InfraRed thermography as a following system.

  1. Morphological diversity and evolution of egg and clutch structure in amphibians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altig, R.; McDiarmid, R.W.

    2007-01-01

    The first part of this synthesis summarizes the morphology of the jelly layers surrounding an amphibian ovum. We propose a standard terminology and discuss the evolution of jelly layers. The second part reviews the morphological diversity and arrangement of deposited eggs?the ovipositional mode; we recognize 5 morphological classes including 14 modes. We discuss some of the oviductal, ovipositional, and postovipositional events that contribute to these morphologies. We have incorporated data from taxa from throughout the world but recognize that other types will be discovered that may modify understanding of these modes. Finally, we discuss the evolutionary context of the diversity of clutch structure and present a first estimate of its evolution.

  2. A study on structural evolution of 142-164Nd isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constrained Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov theory with SLy5 Skyrme force has been applied for even-even 142-164Nd isotopes to investigate the structural evolution of Nd isotopic chain. In this work, ground-state energies and charge radii of Nd isotopes have been carried out as in good agreement with the experimental data. The systematic investigation of ground-state shape evolution between spherical U(5) and axially deformed SU(3) for 142-164Nd has been studied by using potential energy curves

  3. Evolution of the structure of the VT6 alloy subjected to equal-channel angular pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigation results are reported on the evolution of microstructure and mechanical properties of a two-phase titanium alloy of VT6 (Ti-6Al-4V) with initial globular structure subjected to equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) at 700 Deg C with 1-12 passes. Experimental results permit studying the evolution of mean grain size, phase morphology, microhardness, mechanical behavior depending on the quantity of ECAP passes. The possibility is found to refine intensively the microstructure in VT6 alloy billets using ECAP

  4. Structure and evolution of irradiated accretion disks. I - Static thermal equilibrium structure. II - Dynamical evolution of a thermally unstable torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuchman, Y.; Mineshige, S.; Wheeler, J. C.

    1990-01-01

    The thermal equilibrum structure and dynamical behavior of externally irradiated accretion disks are investigated. For radiative disks only the surface layer is heated, while for convective disks the heat penetrates deeply into the disk. For sufficiently strong radiation and given irradiation flux F(irr), the disk is completely stabilized against thermal instabilities of the sort invoked to explain dwarf novae. For moderately strong irradiation there is still an unstable branch in the thermal equilibrium curve. In typical soft X-ray transients, the disk is unstable against the dwarf-nova type instability. Fixed F(irr) on accretion disk annuli reduces the amplitude and the quiescent times and increases the outburst duration of the resultant light curves. Varying F(irr) in proportion to the mass accretion rate at the disks's inner edge results in light curves with a plateau in the decay from outbursts. In the case when irradiation is suddenly switched on, a temperature inversion results which leads to the formation of an accretion corona.

  5. Quantitative tracking of grain structure evolution in a nanocrystalline metal during cyclic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular dynamics simulations were used to quantify mechanically induced structural evolution in nanocrystalline Al with an average grain size of 5 nm. A polycrystalline sample was cyclically strained at different temperatures, while a recently developed grain tracking algorithm was used to measure the relative contributions of novel deformation mechanisms such as grain rotation and grain sliding. Sample texture and grain size were also tracked during cycling, to show how nanocrystalline plasticity rearranges overall grain structure and alters the grain boundary network. While no obvious texture is developing during cycling, the processes responsible for plasticity act collectively to alter the interfacial network. Cyclic loading led to the formation of many twin boundaries throughout the sample as well as the occasional coalescence of neighboring grains, with higher temperatures causing more evolution. A temperature-dependent cyclic strengthening effect was observed, demonstrating that both the structure and properties of nanocrystalline metals can be dynamic during loading. (paper)

  6. Topography and Tropical Cyclone Structure Influence on Eyewall Evolution in Typhoon Sinlaku (2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Hsiang Chih

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Typhoon Sinlaku (2008 was a tropical system that affected many countries in East Asia. Besides the loss of life and economic damage, many scientific questions are associated with this system that need to be addressed. A series of numerical simulations were conducted in this study using V3.2 of the advanced research version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARW model to examine the impacts of different terrain conditions and vortex structures on the eyewall evolution when Sinlaku was crossing Taiwan. The sensitivity experiments using different vortex structures show that a storm of the same intensity with a larger eyewall radius tends to induce stronger wind and rainfall at the outer part of the storm during the terrain-crossing period. This result suggests that the vortex contained with larger angular momentum is more favorable to reform a new eyewall from the contraction of the outer rainband after being affected by terrain. Based on these sensitivity experiments it is suggested that the topography and the tropical cyclone (TC structure play important roles in regulating the outer tangential wind speed and modulating the unique eyewall evolutions for TCs passing Taiwan. A stronger vortex structure could lead to more precipitation at the outer part of the storm during the terrain influenced period, implying that the forecasters should pay attention to the storm intensity and also the storm structure which is an important dynamic feature that modulates the eyewall evolution and rainfall distribution of a landfalling storm.

  7. Convergent evolution of modularity in metabolic networks through different community structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Wanding

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been reported that the modularity of metabolic networks of bacteria is closely related to the variability of their living habitats. However, given the dependency of the modularity score on the community structure, it remains unknown whether organisms achieve certain modularity via similar or different community structures. Results In this work, we studied the relationship between similarities in modularity scores and similarities in community structures of the metabolic networks of 1021 species. Both similarities are then compared against the genetic distances. We revisited the association between modularity and variability of the microbial living environments and extended the analysis to other aspects of their life style such as temperature and oxygen requirements. We also tested both topological and biological intuition of the community structures identified and investigated the extent of their conservation with respect to the taxomony. Conclusions We find that similar modularities are realized by different community structures. We find that such convergent evolution of modularity is closely associated with the number of (distinct enzymes in the organism’s metabolome, a consequence of different life styles of the species. We find that the order of modularity is the same as the order of the number of the enzymes under the classification based on the temperature preference but not on the oxygen requirement. Besides, inspection of modularity-based communities reveals that these communities are graph-theoretically meaningful yet not reflective of specific biological functions. From an evolutionary perspective, we find that the community structures are conserved only at the level of kingdoms. Our results call for more investigation into the interplay between evolution and modularity: how evolution shapes modularity, and how modularity affects evolution (mainly in terms of fitness and evolvability. Further, our results

  8. The unusual morphology, structure, and magnetic property evolution of glassy carbon upon high pressure treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, C.Q.; Wang, X.; Liu, Z.X.; Zhang, Y.L.; Li, F.Y.; Yu, R.C. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Inst. of Physics. Beijing High Pressure Research Center

    2003-12-01

    Glassy carbon (GC) has been high-pressure high-temperature treated. An interesting morphology evolution from the pristine sample to the high pressure products was observed. It is found that GC can be graphitized under pressure at a temperature much lower than that at ambient condition. Furthermore the in-situ structure and electrical measurements of GC and graphitized glassy carbon (GGC) under high temperature and high pressure have been investigated up to 30 GPa. We particularly emphasize the unusual magnetic properties of GC treated under high pressures and high temperatures. A paramagnetic to ferromagnetic-like, and then to superconducting (a diamagnetic signal with hysteresis magnetic response) -like behavior, which can be observed at temperatures as high as 80 K, appears as a successive evolution from the initial GC to GGC in accordance with three regions distinguished by the graphitization temperature. This interesting evolution of magnetic properties probably evokes the new understanding of carbon element. (author)

  9. 40Ar/39Ar ages in deformed potassium feldspar: evidence of microstructural control on Ar isotope systematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Steven M.; Potts, Graham J.; Kelley, Simon P.

    2001-05-01

    Detailed field and microstructural studies have been combined with high spatial resolution ultraviolet laser 40Ar/39Ar dating of naturally deformed K-feldspar to investigate the direct relationship between deformation-related microstructure and Ar isotope systematics. The sample studied is a ~1,000 Ma Torridonian arkose from Skye, Scotland, that contains detrital feldspars previously metamorphosed at amphibolite-facies conditions ~1,700 Ma. The sample was subsequently deformed ~430 Ma ago during Caledonian orogenesis. The form and distribution of deformation-induced microstructures within three different feldspar clasts has been mapped using atomic number contrast and orientation contrast imaging, at a range of scales, to identify intragrain variations in composition and lattice orientation. These variations have been related to thin section and regional structural data to provide a well-constrained deformation history for the feldspar clasts. One hundred and forty-three in-situ 40Ar/39Ar analyses measured using ultraviolet laser ablation record a range of apparent ages (317-1030 Ma). The K-feldspar showing the least strain records the greatest range of apparent ages from 420-1,030 Ma, with the oldest apparent ages being found close to the centre of the feldspar away from fractures and the detrital grain boundary. The most deformed K-feldspar yields the youngest apparent ages (317-453 Ma) but there is no spatial relationship between apparent age and the detrital grain boundary. Within this feldspar, the oldest apparent ages are recorded from orientation domain boundaries and fracture surfaces where an excess or trapped 40Ar component resides. Orientation contrast images at a similar scale to the Ar analyses illustrate a significant deformation-related microstructural difference between the feldspars and we conclude that deformation plays a significant role in controlling Ar systematics of feldspars at both the inter- and intragrain scales even at relatively low

  10. Formation and evolution of tweed structures on high-purity aluminum polycrystalline foils under cyclic tension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peculiarities of formation and evolution of tweed structures on the surface of high-purity aluminum polycrystalline foils under cyclic tension were studied using an atom force microscope and a white light interferometer. Tweed structures of micron and submicron sizes were found on the foils at different number of cycles. In the range of 42,000 < N < 95,000 cycles destruction of tweed patterns is observed, which leads to their disappearance from the surface of the foils. Formation of tweed structures of various scales is discussed in terms of the Grinfeld instability

  11. Formation and evolution of tweed structures on high-purity aluminum polycrystalline foils under cyclic tension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, P. V., E-mail: kpv@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Vlasov, I. V. [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Sklyarova, E. A.; Smekalina, T. V. [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    Peculiarities of formation and evolution of tweed structures on the surface of high-purity aluminum polycrystalline foils under cyclic tension were studied using an atom force microscope and a white light interferometer. Tweed structures of micron and submicron sizes were found on the foils at different number of cycles. In the range of 42,000 < N < 95,000 cycles destruction of tweed patterns is observed, which leads to their disappearance from the surface of the foils. Formation of tweed structures of various scales is discussed in terms of the Grinfeld instability.

  12. Tunable far infrared laser spectroscopy of van der Waals bonds: Ar-NH3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyperfine resolved vibration-rotation-tunneling spectra of Ar--NH3 and (NH3)2, generated in a planar supersonic jet, have been measured with the Berkeley tunable far infrared laser spectrometer. Among the seven rotationally assigned bands, one band belongs to Ar--NH3, and the other six belong to (NH3)2. To facilitate the intermolecular vibrational assignment for Ar--NH3, a dynamics study aided by a permutation-inversion group theoretical treatment is performed on the rovibrational levels. The rovibrational quantum number correlation between the free internal rotor limit and the semi-rigid limit is established to provide a basic physical picture of the evolution of intermolecular vibrational component states. An anomalous vibronically allowed unique Q branch vibrational band structure is predicted to exist for a near prolate binary complex containing an inverting subunit. According to the model developed in this work, the observed band of Ar--NH3 centered at 26.470633(17) cm-1 can correlate only to either the fundamental dimeric stretching band for the A2 states with the NH3 inversional quantum number vi = 1, or the Ka = 0 left-arrow 0 subband of the lowest internal-rotation-inversion difference band. Although the estimated nuclear quadrupole coupling constant favors a tentative assignment in terms of the first possibility, a definitive assignment will require far infrared data and a dynamical model incorporating a potential surface

  13. Structure and evolution of low-mass W UMa type systems -- II. with angular momentum loss

    CERN Document Server

    Li, L; Zhang, F

    2004-01-01

    In a preceding paper, using Eggleton's evolution code we have discussed the structure and evolution of low-mass W UMa type contact binaries without angular momentum loss (AML). The models exhibit cyclic behavior about a state of marginal contact on a thermal time-scale. Part of the time of each cycle is spent in contact and part in a semi-detached state. According to observations, W UMa systems suffer AML. We present the models of low-mass contact binaries with AML due to gravitational wave radiation (GR) or magnetic stellar wind (MSW) are presented. We find that gravitational radiation cannot prevent the cyclic evolution of W UMa systems, and the effect of gravitational radiation on the cyclic behavior of contact binary evolution is almost negligible. We also find that the most likely AML mechanism for W UMa systems is magnetic braking, and that magnetic braking effects can increase the period of the cyclic evolution, and shorten the fraction of the time spent in the poor thermal contact state. If W UMa star...

  14. K/Ar dating of diagenetic illite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ascertaining the potassium/argon (K/Ar) age of diagenetic illite yields important information for hydrocarbon exploration since the growth of this mineral in the pores of sandstone reservoir and oil migration are inter linked events in the diagenetic evolution of rocks. Illite was mechanically separated by repeating a series of ultrasonic baths and ultrasonic probes followed by high-speed centrifuging. Resultant fractions were analyzed by X-ray diffractometry to measure the illite content of each sample. The separated illite material was found to be composed of illite and ordered mixed layer illite-smectite with 80% illite layers. Separated fractions were dated radiometrically by the K/Ar method. Preliminary results indicate an average age of some 200 m.y., which marks the end of the diagenetic development of the illite of this area. (author)

  15. Cenozoic structures and the tectonic evolution of the eastern North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, O.R.; Nielsen, S.B.; Egholm, D.L.;

    2011-01-01

    or cover tectonism took place. Our objectives are thus 1) to analyze the interaction between basement and cover structures, and if possible 2) to relate the structures to the regional tectonic evolution. The Zechstein evaporites pinch out onto the Ringkøbing-Fyn High, which in the eastern North Sea...... including decompaction in the Central Graben along the Arne-Elin trend shows that two phases of basement related inversion took place duringthe Paleocene-Eocene and the Oligocene. Halokinetics and differential compaction across the Paleogene inversion structure explain later tectonic signals...... detachment surfaces withinthe sedimentary succession and basement structures. Here we define basement structures by offsets in the pre Zechstein succession. Cover structures are confined to the post Zechstein succession, or part hereof, and detach internally along surfaces in the post Zechstein succession...

  16. Differential evolution: Global search problem in LEED-IV surface structural analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, V.B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Center for Computation and Technology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Plummer, E.W., E-mail: wplummer@phys.lsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    The search process associated with the quantitative theory–experiment comparison in Low Energy Electron Diffraction surface structural analysis can be very time consuming, especially in the case of complex materials with many atoms in the unit cell. Global search algorithms need to be employed to locate the global minimum of the reliability factor in the multi-dimensional structural parameter space. In this study we investigate the use of the Differential Evolution algorithm in Low Energy Electron Diffraction structural analysis. Despite the simplicity of its mechanism the Differential Evolution algorithm presents an impressive performance when applied to ultra-thin films of BaTiO{sub 3}(001) in a theory–theory comparison. A scaling relation of N{sup (1.47} {sup ±} {sup 0.08)} was obtained, where N is the total number of parameters to be optimized. - Highlights: • We investigated the use of the Differential Evolution algorithm (DE) for the LEED search problem. • The DE method was applied to the optimization of the surface structure of the BaTiO{sub 3}(001) ultra-thin films. • A very favorable scaling relation of N{sup 1.47} was obtained, where N is the total number of parameters to be optimized.

  17. Differential evolution: Global search problem in LEED-IV surface structural analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The search process associated with the quantitative theory–experiment comparison in Low Energy Electron Diffraction surface structural analysis can be very time consuming, especially in the case of complex materials with many atoms in the unit cell. Global search algorithms need to be employed to locate the global minimum of the reliability factor in the multi-dimensional structural parameter space. In this study we investigate the use of the Differential Evolution algorithm in Low Energy Electron Diffraction structural analysis. Despite the simplicity of its mechanism the Differential Evolution algorithm presents an impressive performance when applied to ultra-thin films of BaTiO3(001) in a theory–theory comparison. A scaling relation of N(1.47 ± 0.08) was obtained, where N is the total number of parameters to be optimized. - Highlights: • We investigated the use of the Differential Evolution algorithm (DE) for the LEED search problem. • The DE method was applied to the optimization of the surface structure of the BaTiO3(001) ultra-thin films. • A very favorable scaling relation of N1.47 was obtained, where N is the total number of parameters to be optimized

  18. A conceptual approach to model co-evolution of urban structures

    CERN Document Server

    Schweitzer, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Urban structures encompass settlements, characterized by the spatial distribution of built-up areas, but also transportation structures, to connect these built-up areas. These two structures are very different in their origin and function, fulfilling complementary needs: (i) to access space, and (ii) to occupy space. Their evolution cannot be understood by looking at the dynamics of urban aggregations and transportation systems separately. Instead, existing built-up areas feed back on the further development of transportation structures, and the availability of the latter feeds back on the future growth of urban aggregations. To model this co-evolution, we propose an agent-based approach that builds on existing agent-based models for the evolution of trail systems and of urban settlements. The key element in these separate approaches is a generalized communication of agents by means of an adaptive landscape. This landscape is only generated by the agents, but once it exists, it feeds back on their further act...

  19. Transverse zones controlling the structural evolution of the Zipaquira Anticline (Eastern Cordillera, Colombia): Regional implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Helbert; Jiménez, Giovanny

    2016-08-01

    We report paleomagnetic, magnetic fabric and structural results from 21 sites collected in Cretaceous marine mudstones and Paleogene continental sandstones from the limbs, hinge and transverse zones of the Zipaquira Anticline (ZA). The ZA is an asymmetrical fold with one limb completely overturned by processes like gravity and salt tectonics, and marked by several axis curvatures. The ZA is controlled by at least two (2) transverse zones known as the Neusa and Zipaquira Transverse Zones (NTZ and ZTZ, respectively). Magnetic mineralogy methods were applied at different sites and the main carriers of the magnetic properties are paramagnetic components with some sites being controlled by hematite and magnetite. Magnetic fabric analysis shows rigid-body rotation for the back-limb in the ZA, while the forelimb is subjected to internal deformation. Structural and paleomagnetic data shows the influence of the NTZ and ZTZ in the evolution of the different structures like the ZA and the Zipaquira, Carupa, Rio Guandoque, Las Margaritas and Neusa faults, controlling several factors as vergence, extension, fold axis curvature and stratigraphic detatchment. Clockwise rotations unraveled a block segmentation following a discontinuos model caused by transverse zones and one site reported a counter clockwise rotation associated with a left-lateral strike slip component for transverse faults (e.g. the Neusa Fault). We propose that diverse transverse zones have been active since Paleogene times, playing an important role in the tectonic evolution of the Cundinamarca sub-basin and controlling the structural evolution of folds and faults with block segmentation and rotations.

  20. Structure evolution and optimization in the fabrication of PVA-based activated carbon fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu-Juan; Feng, Hui-Min; Wang, Jian-Ping; Yu, Han-Qing

    2008-05-01

    The structure and composition evolution of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibers during the fabrication of activated carbon fibers (ACF) by a newly developed method were systematically elucidated. The pore structure of the fibers was significantly influenced by the carbonization and activation conditions. The elemental composition and chemical structure evolution of the fibers during the heat treatment processes were evaluated by elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry (FTIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Crystal structure evolution of the fibers during the heat treatment processes was elucidated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Based on these understandings, the process conditions were optimized using an L(9)(3)(4) orthogonal array design matrix. Appropriate process parameters for the fabrication of PVA-ACFs were established as carbonizing the dehydrated fiber at 300 degrees C for 60 min, and then lifting the temperature to 900 degrees C with a heating speed of 10 degrees C/min in an inert atmosphere, thereafter keeping the fiber at 900 degrees C for 60 min in an oxidizing atmosphere. PMID:18261741

  1. Frequency Analysis of Acoustic Emission Signal to Monitor Damage Evolution in Masonry Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A crucial aspect in damage evaluation of masonry structures is the analysis of long-term behaviour and for this reason fatigue analysis has a great influence on safety assessment of this structures. Acoustic Emission (AE) are very effective non-destructive techniques applied to identify micro and macro-defects and their temporal evolution in several materials. This technique permits to estimate the velocity of ultrasound waves propagation and the amount of energy released during fracture propagation to obtain information on the criticality of the ongoing process. By means of AE monitoring, an experimental analysis on a set of reinforced and unreinforced masonry walls under variable amplitude and static loading has been carried out. During these tests, the AE signals were recorded. The AE signals were analysed using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) to examine the frequency distribution of the micro and macro cracking. It possible to evaluate the evolution of the wavelength of the AE signal through the two characteristic peak in the AE spectrum signals and the wave speed of the P or S waves. This wavelength evolution can be represent the microcrak and macrocrack evolution in masonry walls. This procedure permits to estimate the fracture dimension characteristic in several loading condition and for several masonry reinforced condition.

  2. Planar defects as Ar traps in trioctahedral micas: A mechanism for increased Ar retentivity in phlogopite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, A.; Lee, J. K. W.; Fitz Gerald, J. D.; Zhao, J.; Abdu, Y. A.; Jenkins, D. M.; Hawthorne, F. C.; Kyser, T. K.; Creaser, R. A.; Armstrong, R.; Heaman, L. W.

    2012-08-01

    propose that these defect structures, which are enclosed entirely within the mineral grain may serve as Ar traps and effectively increase the Ar retentivity of the mineral. As this phenomenon has not been previously documented in micas, this may have significant implications for the interpretation of 40Ar/39Ar ages of minerals which have similar defect structures.

  3. Micro-structural evolution of rubber/clay nanocomposites with vulcanization process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Brominated isobutyl-isoprene rubber/clay nanocomposite (BIIRCN and ethylene-propylene-diene-monomer rubber/clay nanocomposite (EPDMCN were prepared by melt blending. The micro-structural evolution of these two kinds of rubber/clay nanocomposites (RCNs with vulcanization process was investigated using wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD and transmission electron microscope (TEM. The WAXD results revealed that the intercalated structure of organically modified clay (OMC changed throughout the whole curing process. The intercalated structure kept on changing beyond the vulcanization stage of T90. The interlayer space of intercalated silicate in uncured BIIRCN is larger than that in uncured EPDMCN. However, the intercalated structure for EPDMCN changed by a larger extent than that for BIIRCN during the vulcanization process, and the interlayer space of the intercalated structure is larger in the cured EPDMCN than that in the cured BIIRCN. It was found that the intercalant (i.e., octadecylamine, ODA for OMC could shorten the scorch time of the curing reaction, and increase the curing rate, which was attributed to the further intercalation during vulcanization. TEM results indicated that the spatial distribution of OMC is much better in BIIR (a polar rubber matrix than that in EPDM (a non-polar rubber matrix. The changes in spatial dispersion structure during vulcanization for EPDMCN and BIIRCN show different trends. In conclusion, the polarity of the rubber is the determining factor influencing the evolution of both the intercalated structure and the spatial dispersion of clay during vulcanization.

  4. 40 Ar/ 39 Ar radiometric dating to constrain the volcanic stratigraphy: The Mt. Etna methodological case.

    OpenAIRE

    De Beni, E.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Catania, Catania, Italia; Groppelli, G.; Istituto per la Dinamica dei Processi Ambientali–Sezione di Milano, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Mangiagalli 34, 20133 Milano, Italy

    2010-01-01

    Although ~50 radiometric age analyses have been performed on Etna, and there are many historical references, these are not enough to temporally constrain the geo- logical evolution of the volcano. In particular, a new stratigraphic framework based on lithostratigraphic and unconformity-bounded units has pointed out the presence of some stratigraphic uncertainty that can be resolved only with radiometric dating. For this reason, a dating project applying the 40 Ar/ ...

  5. NF-kB overexpression and decreased immunoexpression of AR in the muscular layer is related to structural damages and apoptosis in cimetidine-treated rat vas deferens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Cimetidine, histamine H2 receptors antagonist, has caused adverse effects on the male hormones and reproductive tract due to its antiandrogenic effect. In the testes, peritubular myoid cells and muscle vascular cells death has been associated to seminiferous tubules and testicular microvascularization damages, respectively. Either androgen or histamine H2 receptors have been detected in the mucosa and smooth muscular layer of vas deferens. Thus, the effect of cimetidine on this androgen and histamine-dependent muscular duct was morphologically evaluated. Methods The animals from cimetidine group (CMTG; n=5) received intraperitoneal injections of 100 mg/kg b.w. of cimetidine for 50 days; the control group (CG) received saline solution. The distal portions of vas deferens were fixed in formaldehyde and embedded in paraffin. Masson´s trichrome-stained sections were subjected to morphological and the following morphometrical analyzes: epithelial perimeter and area of the smooth muscular layer. TUNEL (Terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase mediated dUTP Nick End Labeling) method, NF-kB (nuclear factor kappa B) and AR (androgen receptors) immunohistochemical detection were also carried out. The birefringent collagen of the muscular layer was quantified in picrosirius red-stained sections under polarized light. The muscular layer was also evaluated under Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Results In CMTG, the mucosa of vas deferens was intensely folded; the epithelial cells showed numerous pyknotic nuclei and the epithelial perimeter and the area of the muscular layer decreased significantly. Numerous TUNEL-labeled nuclei were found either in the epithelial cells, mainly basal cells, or in the smooth muscle cells which also showed typical features of apoptosis under TEM. While an enhanced NF-kB immunoexpression was found in the cytoplasm of muscle cells, a weak AR immunolabeling was detected in these cells. In CMTG, no significant difference was observed

  6. Geochronology and thermochronology by the 40Ar/39Ar method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is a response to the authors' belief that there is a need for a monograph on 40Ar/39Ar dating to provide concise knowledge concerning the application of this method to geological studies. They aim to provide a reasonably comprehensive but by no means exhaustive coverage of the principles and practices of 40Ar/39Ar dating, with emphasis on interpretation of results. In attempting to provide an overview of the current state of knowledge, they commonly cite examples from the available literature. They draw rather heavily upon their own work, because they feel comfortable with their own examples. (author)

  7. Structural classification of proteins and structural genomics: new insights into protein folding and evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review article surveys the protein structures determined by Joint Center for Structural Genomics and published in this special issue of Acta Crystallographica Section F. During the past decade, the Protein Structure Initiative (PSI) centres have become major contributors of new families, superfamilies and folds to the Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) database. The PSI results have increased the diversity of protein structural space and accelerated our understanding of it. This review article surveys a selection of protein structures determined by the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG). It presents previously undescribed β-sheet architectures such as the double barrel and spiral β-roll and discusses new examples of unusual topologies and peculiar structural features observed in proteins characterized by the JCSG and other Structural Genomics centres

  8. SANS study of the structural evolution in NIPA/SA gel on dehydration

    CERN Document Server

    Sugiyama, M; Maeda, Y; Hara, K

    2002-01-01

    Mesoscopic structures of N-isopropylacryl-amide/sodium acrylate (NIPA/SA) gels with several water contents were investigated with a small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) method in order to make clear their structural evolution on dehydration. The evolution of the SANS profile with a decrease in the water content in the gel could be classified into three stages. In the beginning, there was no peak in the SANS profile except for the central part, which steadily intensified. With the further water dissipation, a side peak appeared at around 0.02 A sup - sup 1 , the intensity of which increased up to a certain water content and then decreased. These results indicate that the water dissipation in the NIPA/SA gel occurs inhomogeneously. (orig.)

  9. INTERPRETING ERUPTIVE BEHAVIOR IN NOAA AR 11158 VIA THE REGION'S MAGNETIC ENERGY AND RELATIVE-HELICITY BUDGETS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In previous works, we introduced a nonlinear force-free method that self-consistently calculates the instantaneous budgets of free magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity in solar active regions (ARs). Calculation is expedient and practical, using only a single vector magnetogram per computation. We apply this method to a time series of 600 high-cadence vector magnetograms of the eruptive NOAA AR 11158 acquired by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory over a five-day observing interval. Besides testing our method extensively, we use it to interpret the dynamical evolution in the AR, including eruptions. We find that the AR builds large budgets of both free magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity, sufficient to power many more eruptions than the ones it gave within the interval of interest. For each of these major eruptions, we find eruption-related decreases and subsequent free-energy and helicity budgets that are consistent with the observed eruption (flare and coronal mass ejection (CME)) sizes. In addition, we find that (1) evolution in the AR is consistent with the recently proposed (free) energy-(relative) helicity diagram of solar ARs, (2) eruption-related decreases occur before the flare and the projected CME-launch times, suggesting that CME progenitors precede flares, and (3) self terms of free energy and relative helicity most likely originate from respective mutual terms, following a progressive mutual-to-self conversion pattern that most likely stems from magnetic reconnection. This results in the non-ideal formation of increasingly helical pre-eruption structures and instigates further research on the triggering of solar eruptions with magnetic helicity firmly placed in the eruption cadre

  10. Structure of technology evolution: The way on which ICT industry emerged in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kibae; Jung, Sungdo; Lee, Changjun; Hwang, Junseok

    2013-01-01

    The role of ICT in the economic growth in Korea is a great attraction to the telecommunication society interested in the relationship among ICT, innovation policy and economic growth. However, prior research concentrates on investigating the effect of policy on innovation and economic growth, but misses the mechanism how a policy affects the technological system which interacts with public institutes, universities and private firms. In this paper, we analyze the structure of technology evolut...

  11. Vertical Moist Thermodynamic Structure and Spatial–Temporal Evolution of the MJO in AIRS Observations

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Baijun; Waliser, Duane E.; Fetzer, Eric J.; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn H.; Yung, Yuk L.; Wang, Bin

    2006-01-01

    The atmospheric moisture and temperature profiles from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)/Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit on the NASA Aqua mission, in combination with the precipitation from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), are employed to study the vertical moist thermodynamic structure and spatial–temporal evolution of the Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO). The AIRS data indicate that, in the Indian Ocean and western Pacific, the temperature anomaly exhibits a trimodal ve...

  12. Internal Structure of Elementary Particle and Possible Deterministic Mechanism of Biological Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Melkikh, Alexei V.

    2004-01-01

    The possibility of a complicated internal structure of an elementary particle was analyzed. In this case a particle may represent a quantum computer with many degrees of freedom. It was shown that the probability of new species formation by means of random mutations is negligibly small. Deterministic model of evolution is considered. According to this model DNA nucleotides can change their state under the control of elementary particle internal degrees of freedom.

  13. Community structure and the evolution of interdisciplinarity in Slovenia's scientific collaboration network

    OpenAIRE

    Lužar, Borut; Levnajić, Zoran; Povh, Janez; Perc, Matjaž

    2014-01-01

    Interaction among the scientific disciplines is of vital importance in modern science. Focusing on the case of Slovenia, we study the dynamics of interdisciplinary sciences from 1960 to 2010. Our approach relies on quantifying the interdisciplinarity of research communities detected in the coauthorship network of Slovenian scientists over time. Examining the evolution of the community structure, we find that the frequency of interdisciplinary research is only proportional with the overall gro...

  14. Structural Evolution of Colloidal Crystal Films in the Process of Melting Revealed by Bragg Peak Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sulyanova, Elena; Shabalin, Anatoly; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Zaluzhnyy, Ivan; Besedin, Ilya; Sprung, Michael; Petukhov, Andrei; Vartaniants, Ivan; Zozulya, Alexey; Meijer, Janne-Mieke; Dzhigaev, Dmitry; Gorobtsov, Oleg; Kurta, Ruslan; Lazarev, Sergey; Lorenz, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    In situ X-ray diffraction studies of structural evolution of colloidal crystal films formed by polystyrene spherical particles upon incremental heating are reported. The Bragg peak parameters, such as peak position, integrated intensity, and radial and azimuthal widths were analyzed as a function of temperature. A quantitative study of colloidal crystal lattice distortions and mosaic spread as a function of temperature was carried out using Williamson–Hall plots based on mosaic block model. T...

  15. Independent Effects of Protein Core Size and Expression on Residue-Level Structure-Evolution Relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Franzosa, Eric A.; Yu Xia

    2012-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that yeast protein evolutionary rate at the level of individual amino acid residues scales linearly with degree of solvent accessibility. This residue-level structure-evolution relationship is sensitive to protein core size: surface residues from large-core proteins evolve much faster than those from small-core proteins, while buried residues are equally constrained independent of protein core size. In this work, we investigate the joint effects of protein core size ...

  16. Numerical Model of Beach Topography Evolution due to Waves and Currents: Special Emphasis on Coastal Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Pham, Thanh Nam

    2010-01-01

    The beach topography change in the nearshore zone may be induced by natural phenomena such as wind, wave, storm, tsunami, and sea level rise. However, it can also be caused by man-made structures and activities, for example, groins, detached breakwaters, seawalls, dredging, and beach nourishment. Therefore, understanding the beach topography evolution in this zone is necessary and important for coastal engineering projects, e.g., constructing harbors, maintaining navigation channels, and prot...

  17. Structure and dynamics of a primordial catalytic fold generated by in vitro evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Chao, Fa-An; Morelli, Aleardo; Haugner, John C.; Churchfield, Lewis; Hagmann, Leonardo N.; Shi, Lei; Masterson, Larry R.; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Veglia, Gianluigi; Seelig, Burckhard

    2012-01-01

    Engineering functional protein scaffolds capable of carrying out chemical catalysis is a major challenge in enzyme design. Starting from a non-catalytic protein scaffold, we recently generated a novel RNA ligase by in vitro directed evolution. This artificial enzyme lost its original fold and adopted an entirely novel structure with dramatically enhanced conformational dynamics, demonstrating that a primordial fold with suitable flexibility is sufficient to carry out enzymatic function.

  18. Simultaneous optimization of enzyme activity and quaternary structure by directed evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Vamvaca, Katherina; Butz, Maren; Walter, Kai U.; Taylor, Sean V.; Hilvert, Donald

    2005-01-01

    Natural evolution has produced efficient enzymes of enormous structural diversity. We imitated this natural process in the laboratory to augment the efficiency of an engineered chorismate mutase with low activity and an unusual hexameric topology. By applying two rounds of DNA shuffling and genetic selection, we obtained a 400-fold more efficient enzyme, containing three non-active-site mutations. Detailed biophysical characterization of the evolved variant suggests that it exists predominant...

  19. Measurement of reaction rates of interest in stellar structure and evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrasi, F.; D`Onofrio, A. [Dipt. di Scienze Ambientali, Seconda Univ. di Napoli, Caserta (Italy)]|[INFN, Napoli (Italy); Campajola, L.; Imbriani, G. [INFN, Napoli (Italy)]|[Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Gialanella, L. [INFN, Napoli (Italy)]|[Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. Federico II, Napoli (Italy)]|[Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik III, Ruhr-Univ. Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Greife, U.; Rolfs, C.; Strieder, F.; Trautvetter, H.P. [Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik III, Ruhr-Univ. Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Roca, V.; Romano, M. [INFN, Napoli (Italy)]|[Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Straniero, O. [Osservatorio Astronomico di Collurania, Teramo (Italy)

    1998-06-01

    Accurate determinations of reaction rates at astrophysical energies are very important in stellar structure and evolution studies. The cases of two key reactions, namely {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B and {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O are discussed, both from the point of view of their astrophysical interest and of the experimental difficulties in the measurement of their cross section. (orig.)

  20. Evolution of fine structure populations as a test of solid target effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of fine structure components of Balmer α transition following electron capture by fully stripped 33 MeV/u Kr36+ ions in carbon targets has been studied in the target thicknesses range 10 - 200 μg/cm2. Our results cannot be explained by a rate-equations model (binary collisions including l-changing process), but constitute a first indication of a possible wake-field induced Stark mixing of the substates. (orig.)

  1. Structure and evolution of the large scale solar and heliospheric magnetic fields. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeksema, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    Structure and evolution of large scale photospheric and coronal magnetic fields in the interval 1976-1983 were studied using observations from the Stanford Solar Observatory and a potential field model. The solar wind in the heliosphere is organized into large regions in which the magnetic field has a componenet either toward or away from the sun. The model predicts the location of the current sheet separating these regions. Near solar minimum, in 1976, the current sheet lay within a few degrees of the solar equator having two extensions north and south of the equator. Soon after minimum the latitudinal extent began to increase. The sheet reached to at least 50 deg from 1978 through 1983. The complex structure near maximum occasionally included multiple current sheets. Large scale structures persist for up to two years during the entire interval. To minimize errors in determining the structure of the heliospheric field particular attention was paid to decreasing the distorting effects of rapid field evolution, finding the optimum source surface radius, determining the correction to the sun's polar field, and handling missing data. The predicted structure agrees with direct interplanetary field measurements taken near the ecliptic and with coronameter and interplanetary scintillation measurements which infer the three dimensional interplanetary magnetic structure. During most of the solar cycle the heliospheric field cannot be adequately described as a dipole.

  2. Small-angle neutron scattering study of structural evolution of different phases in protein solution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V K Aswal; S Chodankar; J Kohlbrecher; R Vavrin; A G Wagh

    2008-10-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study the structural evolution of different phases in protein solution leading to crystallization, denaturation and gelation. The protein solution under crystallization mostly consists of monomers and dimers, and higher-mers are not observed as they are perhaps formed in very small numbers. The onset and the rate of crystallization strongly depend on the salt concentration. Protein denaturation on addition of surfactant occurs due to the formation of micelle-like clusters along the unfolded polypeptide chains of the protein. The structure of such protein{surfactant complex is found to be independent of the size of the micelles in their pure surfactant solutions. The structure of temperature-induced protein gels shows a fractal structure. Rheology of these gels shows a strong dependence on varying pH or protein concentration, whereas the structure of such gels is found to be similar.

  3. Small-angle neutron scattering study of structural evolution of different phases in protein solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study the structural evolution of different phases in protein solution leading to crystallization, denaturation and gelation. The protein solution under crystallization mostly consists of monomers and dimmers, and higher-mers are not observed as they are perhaps formed in very small numbers. The onset and the rate of crystallization strongly depend on the salt concentration. Protein denaturation on addition of surfactant occurs due to the formation of micelle-like clusters along the unfolded polypeptide chains of the protein. The structure of such protein-surfactant complex is found to be independent of the size of the micelles in their pure surfactant solutions. The structure of temperature-induced protein gels shows a fractal structure. Rheology of these gels shows a strong dependence on varying pH or protein concentration, whereas the structure of such gels is found to be similar. (author)

  4. The suitability of concentration addition for predicting the effects of multi-component mixtures of up to 17 anti-androgens with varied structural features in an in vitro AR antagonist assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermler, Sibylle; Scholze, Martin; Kortenkamp, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.kortenkamp@brunel.ac.uk

    2011-12-15

    The risks associated with human exposures to chemicals capable of antagonising the effects of endogenous androgens have attracted considerable recent interest. Exposure is typically to large numbers of chemicals with androgen receptor (AR) antagonist activity, yet there is limited evidence of the combined effects of multi-component mixtures of these chemicals. A few in vitro studies with mixtures of up to six AR antagonists suggest that the concept of concentration addition (CA) provides good approximations of experimentally observed mixture effects, but studies with larger numbers of anti-androgens, and with more varied structural features, are missing. Here we show that the mixture effects of up to 17 AR antagonists, comprising compounds as diverse as UV-filter substances, parabens, perfluorinated compounds, bisphenol-A, benzo({alpha})pyrene, synthetic musks, antioxidants and polybrominated biphenyls, can be predicted well on the basis of the anti-androgenicity of the single components using the concept of CA. We tested these mixtures in an in vitro AR-dependent luciferase reporter gene assay, based on MDA-kb2 cells. The effects of further mixtures, composed of four and six anti-androgens, could be predicted accurately by CA. However, there was a shortfall from expected additivity with a ten-component mixture at two different mixture ratios, but attempts to attribute these deviations to differential expression of hormone-metabolising CYP isoforms did not produce conclusive results. CA provides good approximations of in vitro mixture effects of anti-androgens with varying structural features. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Humans are exposed to a large number of androgen receptor antagonists. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There is limited evidence of the combined effects of anti-androgenic chemicals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We modelled the predictability of combined effects of up to 17 anti-androgens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested the

  5. Geological Dating by 40 Ar - 39 Ar method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isotope 40 K is radioactive, it decays to 40 Ar stable. The number of 40 Ar atoms produced from 40 K, permits to calculate the date of rocks and minerals. This dating technique is named 'Conventional K-Ar Dating Method'. The 40 Ar - 39 Ar dating method permits to calculate the age of rocks and minerals eliminating the limitation of the K-Ar method by calculating potassium and argon concentrations in a single measurement of the ratio of argon isotopes. In this work, the irradiation of the sample with fast neutrons in the nuclear reactor was established. 39 Ar is obtained from the induced reaction 39 K (n,p) 39 Ar. Thus the ration of 40 Ar -39 Ar allows to obtain the date of rocks and minerals. This ratio was measured in a mass spectrometer. If the measurement of argon concentration in the sample is carried out at different increasing temperature values, it is possible to get information of paleotemperatures. The number of atoms 39 Ar is a function of the number 39 K atoms, irradiation time, neutrons flux, its energy E and the capture cross section σ of 39 K. These parameters are calculate indirectly by obtaining the so called 'J value ' by using a standard mineral with known age (HD-BI y Biot-133), this mineral is irradiated together with the unknown age sample. The values of 'J' obtained are in the interval of 2.85 a 3.03 (x 10-3)J/h. Rocks from 'Tres Virgenes' were dated by the method described in this work, showing an agreement with previous values of different authors. The age of this rocks are from Cenozoico era, mainly in the miocene period. (Author)

  6. Evolution of structure with Fe layer thickness in low dimensional Fe/Tb multilayered structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the atomic structure of a series of low-dimensional Fe/Tb multilayered structures which has been explored using a conversion-electron, extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) technique. A structural transition from a close-packed amorphous structure to a body-centered crystalline structure is detected to occur over an Fe layer thickness range of 12.5 Angstrom to 15.0 Angstrom (Tb thickness is held constant at 4.5 Angstrom). Magnetic properties, specifically, magnetization, anisotropy field, and Kerr rotation angle, are measured and found to change significantly in response to this transition. Exploitation of the polarization properties of synchrotron radiation allowed for the description of the atomic structure both perpendicular and parallel to the sample plane

  7. Structural Characteristics and Evolution of Jurassic Basins in the East of Middle Qilian Block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑孟林; 李明杰; 曹春潮; 张勇军; 徐世陆

    2003-01-01

    Structural characteristics of the Jurassic basins of Xining, Minhe, and Xiji in the east of middle Qilian were researched based on the data obtained by gravitational, magnetic, and seismic methods. The result shows that each of these three basins is an independent structural unit with a NW strike and being separated by upheavals. Two groups of faults with NW and NE directions are developed in the basin, which controls the formation and evolution of the (Jurassic basins). The NW faults are the main ones while the NE faults are the secondary for controlling the sedimentation. Of the three basins, the Minhe basin is the favorable prospecting area.

  8. Temperature evolution of magnetic structure of HoFeO$_3$ by single crystal neutron diffraction

    OpenAIRE

    Chatterji, T.; Meven, M.; Brown, P.J.

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the temperature evolution of the magnetic structures of HoFeO$_3$ by single crystal neutron diffraction. The three different magnetic structures found as a function of temperature for \\hfo\\ are described by the magnetic groups Pb$'$n$'2_1$, Pbn$2_1$ and Pbn$'2_1'$ and are stable in the temperature ranges $\\approx$ 600-55~K, 55-37~K and 35$>T>2$~K respectively. In all three the fundamental coupling between the Fe sub-lattices remains the same and only their orientation and...

  9. Regional evolution of geological structure in south China and U mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper states the development laws of regional geological structure of South China and its controlling effect on uranium deposit evolution, and the characteristics of rich uranium formation in different periods of geology-history are analysed. It also discusses the relationship between the distribution of time and space and tectonic structure and environmental vicissitudes. The rock-magma activities-the strong formation of the Diwa Era is of great significance to the formation of uranium deposits within the region, especially to the formation of a series of multi-genesis polygene uranium deposits which are a potential direction in which to look for minerals within the region

  10. Regional evolution of geological structure in south China and U mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper states the development laws of regional geological structure of South China and its controlling effect on uranium deposit evolution, and the characteristics of rich uranium formation in different periods of geo-history are analysed. It also discusses the relationship between the distribution of time and space and tectonic structure and environmental vicissitudes. The rock-magma activities-the strong formation of the Diwa Era is of great significance to the formation of uranium deposits within the region, especially to the formation of a series of multi-genesis polygene uranium deposits which are a potential direction in which to look for minerals within the region

  11. The relationship between uranium-polymetallic metallogenesis and structure-magmatic evolution in western Sichuan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tectonic movement in western Sichuan, frequent magmatic activity, with multistage, multistage on the characteristics of the Caledonian-Himalayan magmatism have to Indosinian most strongly, more widely distributed, rock type complex. From the structure evolution point of view, the Jurassic-Cretaceous granitic magmatism and collision-related melting of silver, tin, lead, zinc mining, mainly along the Chola Mountain-Genie structure with a distribution of igneous rocks, of which uranium is also Related to this magmatic belt, and from the known deposits, mineralization, outliers (belts) and radioactive hot springs point of view, Chola Mountain-Genie tectonic magmatic belt also has a certain look for uranium prospects. (authors)

  12. Evolution of the electronic and ionic structure of Mg clusters with increase in cluster size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyalin, Andrey G.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.;

    2003-01-01

    The optimized structure and electronic properties of neutral and singly charged magnesium clusters have been investigated using ab initio theoretical methods based on density-functional theory and systematic post–Hartree-Fock many-body perturbation theory accounting for all electrons in the system....... We have investigated the appearance of the elements of the hcp structure and metallic evolution of the magnesium clusters, as well as the stability of linear chains and rings of magnesium atoms. The results obtained are compared with the available experimental data and the results of other...

  13. STRUCTURE EVOLUTION OF THE CYLINDRICAL PHASE OF DIBLOCK COPOLYMERS IN FILMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-ge Tan; Zi-yu Wang; Wen-fang Zhu; Qing-gong Song; Hui Li; Cui-qin Bai

    2008-01-01

    In the weak segregation limit,the structure evolution of the hexagonal cylindrical phase of diblock copolymers in films was investigated.Employing the Landau-Brazovskii mean field theory,we obtained three amplitude parameters as functions of temperature,surface field strength and film thickness.By controlling confinement size and surface field strength,lamellae and undulated lamellae appear in the cylindrical bulk phase of diblock copolymers."Phase diagrams" of confinement-induced structures are constructed at different surface field strengths.The obtained theoretical results are in agreement with relevant theoretical and experimental results.

  14. Vaporization of the Ar+Ni system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the 4π multidetector INDRA, collisions between 36Ar and 58Ni have been investigated over a broad bombarding energy range, from 32 to 95 AMeV. The onset for complete vaporization of the system into neutrons, H and He isotopes as well as the evolution with energy of the isotopic composition of the vaporization events were determined. Binary dissipative collisions are found to be the dominant mechanism producing the vaporization events. A statistical sequential decay of the two partners is a possible explanation for the vaporization events observed. (author) 18 refs.; 3 figs

  15. 40Ar/39Ar age calibration against counted annuallayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storey, Michael; Stecher, Ole

    2008-01-01

    The 40Ar/39Ar method, based on the decay of the naturally occurring radioactive isotope 40K, is capable of producing ages with precision better than ± 0.1 %. However, accuracy is limited to no better than 1 % mainly due to the relatively large uncertainty in the 40K decay constants. One approach...

  16. Structural evolution mechanisms of amorphous and liquid As2Se3 at high pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Properzi, L.; Santoro, M.; Minicucci, M.; Iesari, F.; Ciambezi, M.; Nataf, L.; Le Godec, Y.; Irifune, T.; Baudelet, F.; Di Cicco, A.

    2016-06-01

    The elusive structure of compressed, melt-quenched As2Se3 was studied in both its liquid and amorphous form up to 4.4 and 30 GPa, respectively, by means of x-ray absorption spectroscopy and diffraction. The evolution of the short-range structure is studied by As and Se multiple K -edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) refinement, while changes in intermediate-range ordering are revealed by x-ray diffraction and near-edge structures. In the liquid, at the nearest-neighbor length scales, a gradual disordering and slight elongation of the As-Se average distances is observed, preserving the local coordination upon increasing pressure, whereas substantial compression and disordering are observed at intermediate distances. Similarly, in the amorphous form we found a progressive slight elongation and disordering of the first-neighbor As-Se average distance R (from ˜2.42 to 2.44 Å) and bond variance σ2 (from ˜0.004 to 0.008 Å2) upon increasing pressures up to 30 GPa. On the other hand, gradual shortening of the second and farther neighbor distances, more evident below 15 GPa, are compatible with data analysis. No sign of crystallization and gradual metallization are observed for amorphous a-As2Se3 up to 30 GPa. The emerging picture for the structure evolution under high pressures is a compaction mechanism involving mainly changes at intermediate distances, weakly affecting the first-neighbor bonding character.

  17. Structural evolutions of an obsidian and its fused glass by shock-wave compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoda, K.; Okuno, M.; Syono, Y.; Kikuchi, M.; Fukuoka, K.; Koyano, M.; Katayama, S.

    2004-10-01

    Shock-recovery experiments for obsidian and its fused glass have been carried out with pressure up to 35 GPa. Structural evolution accompanying the shock compression was investigated using X-ray diffraction technique, Raman and infrared spectroscopy. The densities of obsidian and its fused glass increased with applied shock pressure up to ˜25 GPa. Densification reached a maximum of 4.7 and 3.6% for obsidian and its fused glass, respectively. The densification mechanism is attributed to reduction of the T O T angle, and changes in ring statistics in the structure. Density reduction observed at greater than 25 GPa of applied shock pressure is due to partial annealing of the high-density glass structures brought by high post-shock residual temperature. The density of fused glass is almost equal to its original value at 35 GPa while the shocked obsidian has a slightly lower value than its original value. Amorphization of crystallites present in the obsidian due to shock compression is probably the cause of the density decrease. The structural evolution observed in shock-compressed obsidian and its fused glass can be explained by densification resulting from average T O T angle reduction and increase of small rings, and subsequent structural relaxation by high post-shock temperature at applied shock compression above ˜25 GPa.

  18. Dislocation structure evolution and characterization in the compression deformed Mn-Cu alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dislocation densities and dislocation structure arrangements in cold compressed polycrystalline commercial M2052 (Mn-20Cu-5Ni-2Fe) high damping alloy with various strains were determined in scanning mode by X-ray peak profile analysis and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The results indicate that the Mn-Cu-Ni-Fe alloy has an evolution behavior quite similar to the dislocation structure in copper. The dislocation arrangement parameter shows a local minimum in the transition range between stages III and IV that can be related to the transformation of the dislocation arrangement in the cell walls from a polarized dipole wall (PDW) into a polarized tile wall (PTW) structure. This evolution is further confirmed by the results of local misorientation determined by EBSD. In addition, during deformation, the multiplication of dislocation densities in the MnCu alloy is significantly slower than that in copper, and the transition of the dislocation structure is strongly retarded in the MnCu alloy compared with copper. These results can be explained by the mechanism of elastic anisotropy on the dislocation dynamics, as the elastic anisotropy in the MnCu alloy is larger than that in copper, which can strongly retard the multiplication of the dislocation population and the transformation of the dislocation structure. These results are important for research into the plastic working behavior of Mn-Cu-Ni-Fe high damping alloy

  19. Mineral matter effects on char structural evolution and oxidation kinetics during coal char combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunden, M.; Yang, N.; Headley, T.; Shaddix, C.; Hardesty, D.

    1997-10-01

    The authors report on recent investigations of the evolution of char structure during carbon burnout and the role of mineral matter in determining this structure. Char samples collected in a carefully controlled laminar, flame-supported entrained flow reactor have been characterized using a number of microscopy tools. Observations of the inorganic structure of chars produced at a variety of combustion conditions are coupled with in-situ optical measurements of the char particle population with an eye towards identifying the mechanism of mineral interaction and its effects on carbon burnout kinetics during pulverized coal char combustion. Preliminary results show a surprising amount of inorganic mineral in solid solution with the carbonaceous matrix. This intimate mixing of organic and inorganic constituents may affect reactivity by both blocking oxygen access to active carbon sites and influencing the microscopic carbon structure that evolves during combustion.

  20. On modeling micro-structural evolution using a higher order strain gradient continuum theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Naaman, S. A.; Nielsen, K. L.; Niordson, C. F.

    2016-01-01

    Published experimental measurements on deformed metal crystals show distinct pattern formation, in which dislocations are arranged in wall and cell structures. The distribution of dislocations is highly non-uniform, which produces discontinuities in the lattice rotations. Modeling the experimenta......Published experimental measurements on deformed metal crystals show distinct pattern formation, in which dislocations are arranged in wall and cell structures. The distribution of dislocations is highly non-uniform, which produces discontinuities in the lattice rotations. Modeling the...... experimentally observed micro-structural behavior, within a framework based on continuous field quantities, poses obvious challenges, since the evolution of dislocation structures is inherently a discrete and discontinuous process. This challenge, in particular, motivates the present study, and the aim is to...

  1. Cluster Structure in Cosmological Simulations. I. Correlation to Observables, Mass Estimates, and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeltema, Tesla E.; Hallman, Eric J.; Burns, Jack O.; Motl, Patrick M.

    2008-07-01

    We use Enzo, a hybrid Eulerian adaptive mesh refinement/N-body code including nongravitational heating and cooling, to explore the morphology of the X-ray gas in clusters of galaxies and its evolution in current-generation cosmological simulations. We employ and compare two observationally motivated structure measures: power ratios and centroid shift. Overall, the structure of our simulated clusters compares remarkably well to low-redshift observations, although some differences remain that may point to incomplete gas physics. We find no dependence on cluster structure in the mass-observable scaling relations, TX-M and YX-M, when using the true cluster masses. However, estimates of the total mass based on the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium, as assumed in observational studies, are systematically low. We show that the hydrostatic mass bias strongly correlates with cluster structure and, more weakly, with cluster mass. When the hydrostatic masses are used, the mass-observable scaling relations and gas mass fractions depend significantly on cluster morphology, and the true relations are not recovered even if the most relaxed clusters are used. We show that cluster structure, via the power ratios, can be used to effectively correct the hydrostatic mass estimates and mass scaling relations, suggesting that we can calibrate for this systematic effect in cosmological studies. Similar to observational studies, we find that cluster structure, particularly centroid shift, evolves with redshift. This evolution is mild but will lead to additional errors at high redshift. Projection along the line of sight leads to significant uncertainty in the structure of individual clusters: less than 50% of clusters which appear relaxed in projection based on our structure measures are truly relaxed.

  2. Evolution of Protein Quaternary Structure in Response to Selective Pressure for Increased Thermostability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Nicholas J; Liu, Jian-Wei; Mabbitt, Peter D; Correy, Galen J; Coppin, Chris W; Lethier, Mathilde; Perugini, Matthew A; Murphy, James M; Oakeshott, John G; Weik, Martin; Jackson, Colin J

    2016-06-01

    Oligomerization has been suggested to be an important mechanism for increasing or maintaining the thermostability of proteins. Although it is evident that protein-protein contacts can result in substantial stabilization in many extant proteins, evidence for evolutionary selection for oligomerization is largely indirect and little is understood of the early steps in the evolution of oligomers. A laboratory-directed evolution experiment that selected for increased thermostability in the αE7 carboxylesterase from the Australian sheep blowfly, Lucilia cuprina, resulted in a thermostable variant, LcαE7-4a, that displayed increased levels of dimeric and tetrameric quaternary structure. A trade-off between activity and thermostability was made during the evolution of thermostability, with the higher-order oligomeric species displaying the greatest thermostability and lowest catalytic activity. Analysis of monomeric and dimeric LcαE7-4a crystal structures revealed that only one of the oligomerization-inducing mutations was located at a potential protein-protein interface. This work demonstrates that by imposing a selective pressure demanding greater thermostability, mutations can lead to increased oligomerization and stabilization, providing support for the hypothesis that oligomerization is a viable evolutionary strategy for protein stabilization. PMID:27016206

  3. Thermal evolution of the crystal structure of the orthorhombic perovskite LaFeO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal evolution of the crystal structure of the prototypical orthorhombic perovskite LaFeO3 has been studied in detail by powder neutron diffraction in the temperature range 25evolution of lattice metrics in the perovskite LaFeO3 is rationalized from a detailed powder neutron diffraction study. - Highlights: • Crystal structure of the perovskite LaFeO3 studied in detail by powder neutron diffraction. • Unusual thermal evolution of lattice metrics rationalized. • Contrasting behavior to Bi-doped LaFeO3. • Octahedral distortion/tilt parameters explain unusual a and c lattice parameter behavior

  4. Coda Wave Interferometry Method Applied in Structural Monitoring to Assess Damage Evolution in Masonry and Concrete Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this experimental program the main goal is to monitor the damage evolution in masonry and concrete structures by Acoustic Emission (AE) signal analysis applying a well-know seismic method. For this reason the concept of the coda wave interferometry is applied to AE signal recorded during the tests. Acoustic Emission (AE) are very effective non-destructive techniques applied to identify micro and macro-defects and their temporal evolution in several materials. This technique permits to estimate the velocity of ultrasound waves propagation and the amount of energy released during fracture propagation to obtain information on the criticality of the ongoing process. By means of AE monitoring, an experimental analysis on a set of reinforced masonry walls under variable amplitude loading and strengthening reinforced concrete (RC) beams under monotonic static load has been carried out. In the reinforced masonry wall, cyclic fatigue stress has been applied to accelerate the static creep and to forecast the corresponding creep behaviour of masonry under static long-time loading. During the tests, the evaluation of fracture growth is monitored by coda wave interferometry which represents a novel approach in structural monitoring based on AE relative change velocity of coda signal. In general, the sensitivity of coda waves has been used to estimate velocity changes in fault zones, in volcanoes, in a mining environment, and in ultrasound experiments. This method uses multiple scattered waves, which travelled through the material along numerous paths, to infer tiny temporal changes in the wave velocity. The applied method has the potential to be used as a 'damage-gauge' for monitoring velocity changes as a sign of damage evolution into masonry and concrete structures.

  5. Coda Wave Interferometry Method Applied in Structural Monitoring to Assess Damage Evolution in Masonry and Concrete Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masera, D; Bocca, P; Grazzini, A, E-mail: davide.masera@polito.it [Department of Structural and Geotechnical Engineering - Politecnico di Torino, corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy)

    2011-07-19

    In this experimental program the main goal is to monitor the damage evolution in masonry and concrete structures by Acoustic Emission (AE) signal analysis applying a well-know seismic method. For this reason the concept of the coda wave interferometry is applied to AE signal recorded during the tests. Acoustic Emission (AE) are very effective non-destructive techniques applied to identify micro and macro-defects and their temporal evolution in several materials. This technique permits to estimate the velocity of ultrasound waves propagation and the amount of energy released during fracture propagation to obtain information on the criticality of the ongoing process. By means of AE monitoring, an experimental analysis on a set of reinforced masonry walls under variable amplitude loading and strengthening reinforced concrete (RC) beams under monotonic static load has been carried out. In the reinforced masonry wall, cyclic fatigue stress has been applied to accelerate the static creep and to forecast the corresponding creep behaviour of masonry under static long-time loading. During the tests, the evaluation of fracture growth is monitored by coda wave interferometry which represents a novel approach in structural monitoring based on AE relative change velocity of coda signal. In general, the sensitivity of coda waves has been used to estimate velocity changes in fault zones, in volcanoes, in a mining environment, and in ultrasound experiments. This method uses multiple scattered waves, which travelled through the material along numerous paths, to infer tiny temporal changes in the wave velocity. The applied method has the potential to be used as a 'damage-gauge' for monitoring velocity changes as a sign of damage evolution into masonry and concrete structures.

  6. Coda Wave Interferometry Method Applied in Structural Monitoring to Assess Damage Evolution in Masonry and Concrete Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masera, D.; Bocca, P.; Grazzini, A.

    2011-07-01

    In this experimental program the main goal is to monitor the damage evolution in masonry and concrete structures by Acoustic Emission (AE) signal analysis applying a well-know seismic method. For this reason the concept of the coda wave interferometry is applied to AE signal recorded during the tests. Acoustic Emission (AE) are very effective non-destructive techniques applied to identify micro and macro-defects and their temporal evolution in several materials. This technique permits to estimate the velocity of ultrasound waves propagation and the amount of energy released during fracture propagation to obtain information on the criticality of the ongoing process. By means of AE monitoring, an experimental analysis on a set of reinforced masonry walls under variable amplitude loading and strengthening reinforced concrete (RC) beams under monotonic static load has been carried out. In the reinforced masonry wall, cyclic fatigue stress has been applied to accelerate the static creep and to forecast the corresponding creep behaviour of masonry under static long-time loading. During the tests, the evaluation of fracture growth is monitored by coda wave interferometry which represents a novel approach in structural monitoring based on AE relative change velocity of coda signal. In general, the sensitivity of coda waves has been used to estimate velocity changes in fault zones, in volcanoes, in a mining environment, and in ultrasound experiments. This method uses multiple scattered waves, which travelled through the material along numerous paths, to infer tiny temporal changes in the wave velocity. The applied method has the potential to be used as a "damage-gauge" for monitoring velocity changes as a sign of damage evolution into masonry and concrete structures.

  7. Mineralogy and Ar-Ar Age of the Tarahumara IIE Iron, with Reference to the Origin of Alkali-Rich Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Hiroshi; Bogard, Donald D.; Otsuki, Mayumi; Ishii, Teruaki

    2003-01-01

    Silicate inclusions in nine known IIE irons show diversity in mineralogy, and Colomera, Kodaikanal, Elga and Miles contain alkali-rich silicate inclusions. Bogard et al. showed evidence of a complex parent body evolution for IIE irons based on Ar-39-Ar-40 ages. Colomera contained a sanidine-rich surface inclusion and the K-enrichment trends in the Na-rich inclusions are different from those of other IIEs. To elucidate the origin of K-rich materials, we studied the mineralogy and Ar-Ar age of silicate inclusions from the Tarahumara IIE iron meteorite.

  8. Evolution of the solar nebula. I. Nonaxisymmetric structure during nebula formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerical solutions of the equations of hydrodynamics, gravitation, and radiative transfer in three spatial dimensions are used to model the formation and time evolution of the early solar nebula in order to learn whether or not gravitational torques between nonaxisymmetric structures in the solar nebula can transport angular momentum rapidly enough to produce nebula clearing on astronomically indicated (10 to the 5 to 10 to the 7 yr) time scales. The models involve solutions for the collapse of spherical clouds with assumed initial density and rotation profiles onto protosuns of variable mass. Most of the models assume uniform initial density and rotation, and have variations in the initial parameters of cloud mass, cloud rotation rate, and protosun mass which are chosen to simulate a range of possible phases of early solar nebula evolution. The models show little tendency for directly forming small numbers of giant gaseous protoplanets through gaseous gravitational instability. 69 refs

  9. Structural and functional evolution of 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myllykoski, Matti; Seidel, Leonie; Muruganandam, Gopinath; Raasakka, Arne; Torda, Andrew E; Kursula, Petri

    2016-06-15

    2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase) is an abundant membrane-associated enzyme within the vertebrate myelin sheath. While the physiological function of CNPase still remains to be characterized in detail, it is known - in addition to its in vitro enzymatic activity - to interact with other proteins, small molecules, and membrane surfaces. From an evolutionary point of view, it can be deduced that CNPase is not restricted to myelin-forming cells or vertebrate tissues. Its evolution has involved gene fusion, addition of other small segments with distinct functions, such as membrane attachment, and possibly loss of function at the polynucleotide kinase-like domain. Currently, it is unclear whether the enzymatic function of the conserved phosphodiesterase domain in vertebrate myelin has a physiological role, or if CNPase could actually function - like many other classical myelin proteins - in a more structural role. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Myelin Evolution. PMID:26367445

  10. Scale covariant gravitation. V - Kinetic theory. VI - Stellar structure and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, S.-H.; Canuto, V. M.

    1981-01-01

    A scale covariant kinetic theory for particles and photons is developed. The mathematical framework of the theory is given by the tangent bundle of a Weyl manifold. The Liouville equation is derived, and solutions to corresponding equilibrium distributions are presented and shown to yield thermodynamic results identical to the ones obtained previously. The scale covariant theory is then used to derive results of interest to stellar structure and evolution. A radiative transfer equation is derived that can be used to study stellar evolution with a variable gravitational constant. In addition, it is shown that the sun's absolute luminosity scales as L approximately equal to GM/kappa, where kappa is the stellar opacity. Finally, a formula is derived for the age of globular clusters as a function of the gravitational constant using a previously derived expression for the absolute luminosity.

  11. On the origin of the eukaryotic chromosome: the role of noncanonical DNA structures in telomere evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garavís, Miguel; González, Carlos; Villasante, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    The transition of an ancestral circular genome to multiple linear chromosomes was crucial for eukaryogenesis because it allowed rapid adaptive evolution through aneuploidy. Here, we propose that the ends of nascent linear chromosomes should have had a dual function in chromosome end protection (capping) and chromosome segregation to give rise to the "proto-telomeres." Later on, proper centromeres evolved at subtelomeric regions. We also propose that both noncanonical structures based on guanine-guanine interactions and the end-protection proteins recruited by the emergent telomeric heterochromatin have been required for telomere maintenance through evolution. We further suggest that the origin of Drosophila telomeres may be reminiscent of how the first telomeres arose. PMID:23699225

  12. Structure and Evolution of Magnetic Fields Associated with Solar Eruptions (Invited Review)

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Haimin

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the studies of solar photospheric magnetic field evolution in active regions and its relationship to solar flares. It is divided into two topics, the magnetic structure and evolution leading to solar eruptions and the rapid changes of photospheric magnetic field associated with eruptions. For the first topic, we describe the magnetic complexity, new flux emergence, flux cancellation, shear motions, sunspot rotation, and magnetic helicity injection, which may all contribute to the storage and buildup of energy and triggering of solar eruptions. For the second topic, we concentrate on the observations of rapid and irreversible changes of photospheric magnetic field associated with flares, and the implication on the restructuring of three-dimensional magnetic field. In particular, we emphasize the recent advances in observations of photospheric magnetic field, as state-of-the-art observing facilities (such as Hinode and Solar Dynamic Observatory) become available. The linkage between observati...

  13. Evolution and mechanism of the periodical structures formed on Ti plate under femtosecond laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Chen, Chuansong; Man, Baoyuan; Meng, Xue; Sun, Yanna; Li, Feifei

    2016-08-01

    This work investigates the femtosencond laser (fs-laser) induced periodical surface structures (FLIPSS) on titanium plate including the concentric rings, microgrooves and subwavelength ripples. The evolution of the three types of the structures at different laser fluence and shot number is investigated experimentally in detail. The competition mechanisms exist among the different FLIPSS. A processing window for each resulting FLIPSS is obtained. In order to give an overall understanding of the FLIPSS, the formation mechanisms of each type of FLIPSS are discussed. The formation of the ripples is well explained by the propagating of the surface plasma wave (SPW) on the air/Ti interface. The evolutions of the ripple distribution are well understood according to this model as well. It is concluded that the interaction of the scattered wave of the laser light with the surface wave is concluded to give rise to the microgroove structure. According to our observation, the shape of the concentric rings does not change with the variation of the laser fluence and pulse number. The structure could be originated from the optical interference between the transmitted and reflected laser beams by the two surfaces of the biconvex lens. This investigation could not only make a further understanding of the formations of FLIPSS but also provide the possibility to control the surface morphologies in laser processing.

  14. Population genomics of dengue virus serotype 4: insights into genetic structure and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waman, Vaishali P; Kasibhatla, Sunitha Manjari; Kale, Mohan M; Kulkarni-Kale, Urmila

    2016-08-01

    The spread of dengue disease has become a global public health concern. Dengue is caused by dengue virus, which is a mosquito-borne arbovirus of the genus Flavivirus, family Flaviviridae. There are four dengue virus serotypes (1-4), each of which is known to trigger mild to severe disease. Dengue virus serotype 4 (DENV-4) has four genotypes and is increasingly being reported to be re-emerging in various parts of the world. Therefore, the population structure and factors shaping the evolution of DENV-4 strains across the world were studied using genome-based population genetic, phylogenetic and selection pressure analysis methods. The population genomics study helped to reveal the spatiotemporal structure of the DENV-4 population and its primary division into two spatially distinct clusters: American and Asian. These spatial clusters show further time-dependent subdivisions within genotypes I and II. Thus, the DENV-4 population is observed to be stratified into eight genetically distinct lineages, two of which are formed by American strains and six of which are formed by Asian strains. Episodic positive selection was observed in the structural (E) and non-structural (NS2A and NS3) genes, which appears to be responsible for diversification of Asian lineages in general and that of modern lineages of genotype I and II in particular. In summary, the global DENV-4 population is stratified into eight genetically distinct lineages, in a spatiotemporal manner with limited recombination. The significant role of adaptive evolution in causing diversification of DENV-4 lineages is discussed. The evolution of DENV-4 appears to be governed by interplay between spatiotemporal distribution, episodic positive selection and intra/inter-genotype recombination. PMID:27169727

  15. High-resolution Auger spectroscopy on 79 MeV Ar5+, 89 MeV Ar6+, and 136 MeV Ar7+ ions after excitation by helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis the atomic structure of highly excited Ar6+ and Ar7+ ions was studied. For this 79 MeV Ar5+, 89 MeV Ar6+, and 136 MeV Ar7+ ions of a heavy ion accelerator were excited by a He gas target to autoionizing states and the Auger electrons emitted in the decay were measured in highly-resolving state. The spectra were taken under an observational angle of zero degree relative to the beam axis in order to minimize the kinematical broadening of the Auger lines. (orig./HSI)

  16. Structural and metamorphic evolution of western part of the Tauern Window, Eastern Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukovská, Z.; Jerabek, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Tauern Window in the Eastern Alps represent a tectonic window, where Penninic continental units and overlying Piemontais oceanic units crop out from below the Austroalpine crystalline nappes. The window is formed by Subpenninic nappe system composed of Variscan basement (Zentralgneiss) with Mesozoic cover sequences overlain by Penninic nappes. The studied nappes were previously recognized as Lower and Upper Schieferhülle and their P-T conditions of up to blueschist facies were determined by Selverstone (1988, 1993).Our detailed structural and petrological study focused mainly on tectono-metamorphic evolution of different nappes. The Zentralgneiss cover sequences consist mainly of schists, amphibolites and quartzites with originally subhorizontal - gently westward dipping fabric. Dominant fabric was later deformed during deformation stages D2 and D3 that are preserved in the form of folds and cleavages. The later one mainly in the W part of studied area. The Penninic nappes are composed of deformed greenschists, micaschists and marbles, which are together folded by large-scale open folds during D2. The metamorphic PT conditions were reconstructed by using the phase equilibrium modelling and chemical composition/zoning of garnets, which are mostly synkinematic to the formation of the main deformation fabric. The compositional zoning in garnets revealed an overall prograde PT evolution with PT increase up to 3.5 kbar and 100°C associated with the main deformation event. The structural and petrological record show the relation of nappe evolution and unroofing of the complex such as described in Jeřábek et al. (2012) from West Carpathians. The E-W stretching and prograde metamorphic evolution is associated with burial, while exhumation is associated with formation of subhorizontal cleavage and dip-slip kinematics towards W contrary to previously published studies.

  17. SPATIAL STRUCTURE EVOLUTION OF SYSTEM OF RECREATION BUSINESS DISTRICT--A Case of Suzhou City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Li-mei; TAO Wei

    2003-01-01

    The growing attention on urban tourism was very widespread. There are two angles to study urban tourism: supply-side and demand-side. And the supply-side of the tourism remains very important. The RBD (Recreation Business District) is a useful framework to understand the components of urban tourism and how they fit together. The paper begins with a review on the RBD and the spatial structure of tourism in urban areas and then attempts to develop a more general understanding of the spatial structure evolution of RBDs in a tourist-historic citySuzhou. The spatial structures and functions of the RBDs in Suzhou are examined, based on field observations, interviews with city officials and industry leaders, and a review of available documents. The urban tourism of Suzhou has developed in a range of contexts, that various types of RBDs have emerged as a result of different urban development strategies. The spatial structure has evolved from the past "Single-cored Structure" to "Double-cored Structure"at present, and then to "Chain Structure" in the future. The spatial form and evolution of RBD in Suzhou are closely relative with its urban spatial expansion. Urban area dispersal is the prerequisite of the emergence of the RBD. Planning and constructing the RBD becomes a new impetus to urban growth or renewal. Finally, a number of strategies for planning and developing the RBD in Suzhou are suggested. The different RBDs should adopt different strategies.Intensification can be the possible strategy for the RBDs in the ancient city. Accreting with the urban theme park or engrafting on the Jinji Lake is suggested respectively for the RBD in the Suzhou New District and the Suzhou Industrial Park.

  18. Evolution of Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Green, Lucie May

    2015-09-01

    The evolution of active regions (AR) from their emergence through their long decay process is of fundamental importance in solar physics. Since large-scale flux is generated by the deep-seated dynamo, the observed characteristics of flux emergence and that of the subsequent decay provide vital clues as well as boundary conditions for dynamo models. Throughout their evolution, ARs are centres of magnetic activity, with the level and type of activity phenomena being dependent on the evolutionary stage of the AR. As new flux emerges into a pre-existing magnetic environment, its evolution leads to re-configuration of small-and large-scale magnetic connectivities. The decay process of ARs spreads the once-concentrated magnetic flux over an ever-increasing area. Though most of the flux disappears through small-scale cancellation processes, it is the remnant of large-scale AR fields that is able to reverse the polarity of the poles and build up new polar fields. In this Living Review the emphasis is put on what we have learned from observations, which is put in the context of modelling and simulation efforts when interpreting them. For another, modelling-focused Living Review on the sub-surface evolution and emergence of magnetic flux see Fan (2009). In this first version we focus on the evolution of dominantly bipolar ARs.

  19. Magnetic Structure of Continental Crust:Implications for Crustal Structure and Evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic structure of the continental crust is one of the important geophysical aspects of continental lithosphere. This paper reviews the achievements in the research into the magnetic structure and its significance for crustal tectonics, composition, metamorphic facies, crust-mantle interaction and magnetization of deep crust. Further studies are suggested according to the basic principles of rock and mineral magnetism in terms of petrology, geochemistry and structural geol ogy. Emphasis is placed on new geological ideas and synthetic studies of the relationship between deep geological processes and interpretation of gravity, magnetic, electrical and seismic data. The relationships between magnetic, density, electricity, velocity, geothermal structures and deep geodynamic processes are taken as a system for the research into the deep geology.

  20. Recent Advances on the Understanding of Structural and Composition Evolution of LMR Cathodes for Li-ion Batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Pengfei; Zheng, Jianming; Xiao, Jie; Wang, Chong-Min; Zhang, Ji-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-and-manganese-rich (LMR) cathode materials have been regarded as very promising for lithium (Li)-ion battery applications. However, their practical application is still limited by several barriers such as their limited electrochemical stability and rate capability. In this work, we present recent progress on the understanding of structural and compositional evolution of LMR cathode materials, with an emphasis being placed on the correlation between structural/chemical evolution and el...

  1. The 38Ar(p,d)37Ar reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 38Ar(p,d)37Ar reaction has been used to study the properties of the high-lying positive parity states in 37Ar. Angular distributions in the region thetasub(c.m.)=160-1320 have been analyzed using the DWBA code DWUCK to determine the spectroscopic properties of these states. The two lowest T=3/2 states have been identified at 4.98MeV (3/2+) and 6.65MeV (1/2+). The results are compared to recent shell-model calculations; their significance for the solar neutrino experiment is also discussed. (Auth.)

  2. Structural evolution and strength change of a metallic glass at different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, X.; Wang, G.; Stachurski, Z. H.; Bednarčík, J.; Mattern, N.; Zhai, Q. J.; Eckert, J.

    2016-08-01

    The structural evolution of a Zr64.13Cu15.75Ni10.12Al10 metallic glass is investigated in-situ by high-energy synchrotron X-ray radiation upon heating up to crystallization. The structural rearrangements on the atomic scale during the heating process are analysed as a function of temperature, focusing on shift of the peaks of the structure factor in reciprocal space and the pair distribution function and radial distribution function in real space which are correlated with atomic rearrangements and progressing nanocrystallization. Thermal expansion and contraction of the coordination shells is measured and correlated with the bulk coefficient of thermal expansion. The characteristics of the microstructure and the yield strength of the metallic glass at high temperature are discussed aiming to elucidate the correlation between the atomic arrangement and the mechanical properties.

  3. Structural evolution of Ni-20Cr alloy during ball milling of elemental powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez B, I.; Trapaga M, L. G. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Unidad Queretaro, Libramiento Norponiente No. 2000, Juriquilla, 76230 Queretaro (Mexico); Martinez F, E. [Centro de Investigacion e Innovacion Tecnologica, Cerrada de Cecati s/n, Col. Santa Catarina Azcapotzalco, 02250 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Zoz, H., E-mail: israelbaez@gmail.co [Zoz GmbH, D-57482, Wenden (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The ball milling (B M) of blended Ni and Cr elemental powders was carried out in a Simoloyer performing on high-energy scale mode at maximum production to obtain a nano structured Ni-20Cr alloy. The phase transformations and structural changes occurring during mechanical alloying were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and optical microscopy (Om). A gradual solid solubility of Cr and the subsequent formation of crystalline metastable solid solutions described in terms of the Avrami-Ero fe ev kinetics model were calculated. The XRD analysis of the structure indicates that cumulative lattice strain contributes to the driving force for solid solution between Ni and Cr during B M. Microstructure evolution has shown, additionally to the lamellar length refinement commonly observed, the folding of lamellae in the final processing stage. Om observations revealed that the lamellar spacing of Ni rich zones reaches a steady value near 500 nm and almost disappears after 30 h of milling. (Author)

  4. ON THE EVOLUTION OF LARGE SCALE STRUCTURES IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL MIXING LAYERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗纪生; H.E, Fiedler

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, several mathematical models for the large scale structures in some special kinds of mixing layers, which might be practically useful for enhancing the mixing, are proposed. First, the linear growth rate of the large scale structures in the mixing layers was calculated. Then, using the much improved weakly non-linear theory, combined with the energy method, the non-linear evolution of large scale structures in two special mixing layer configurations is calculated. One of the mixing layers has equal magnitudes of the upstream velocity vectors, while the angles between the velocity vectors and the trailing edge were π/2 - and π/2 + ,respectively. The other mixing layer was generated by a splitter-plate with a 45-degree-sweep trailing edge.

  5. Evolution of self-organization in nano-structured PVD coatings under extreme tribological conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The evolution of self-organization under extreme frictional conditions has been studied. • Comprehensive characterization of the tribo-films was made using various surface analytical techniques. • During the running-in stage, mullite tribo-ceramics predominate on the surface of the nano-multilayer coating, establishing a functional hierarchy within the layer of tribo-films. • It is possible to control tribo-film evolution during self-organization by means of an increase in structural complexity and the non-equilibrium state of the surface engineered layer. - Abstract: The evolution of the self-organization process where dissipative structures are formed under the extreme frictional conditions associated with high performance dry machining of hardened steels has been studied in detail. The emphasis was on the progressive studies of surface transformations within multilayer and monolayer TiAlCrSiYN-based PVD coatings during the running-in stage of wear when self-organization process occurs. The coating layer was characterized by high resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS). It is shown that the nano-multilayer coating possesses higher non-equilibrium structure in comparison to the monolayer. Comprehensive studies of the tribo-films (dissipative structures) formed on the friction surface were made using a number of advanced surface characterization techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES). The data obtained for the tribo-films was combined with the detailed TEM studies of the structural and phase transformations within the underlying coating layer. This data was related to the micro-mechanical characteristics of the coating layer and its wear resistance. It was demonstrated that the evolution of the self-organization process is strongly controlled by the characteristics of the tribo-films formed at different stages of the wear process. Within running-in stage (after

  6. Evolution of self-organization in nano-structured PVD coatings under extreme tribological conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox-Rabinovich, G., E-mail: gfox@mcmaster.ca [Department of Mechanical Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L7 (Canada); Kovalev, A. [Surface Phenomena Researches Group, CNIICHERMET, 9/23, 2-nd Baumanskaya Street, Moscow 105005 (Russian Federation); Aguirre, M.H. [Laboratory of Advanced Microscopy, Institute of Nanoscience of Aragón, University of Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Yamamoto, K. [Materials Research Laboratory, Kobe Steel Ltd, 1-5-5 Takatsuda-dai, Nishi-ku, Kobe 651-2271, Hyogo (Japan); Veldhuis, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L7 (Canada); Gershman, I. [All-Russian Railway Research Institute, 10 Third Mytishchinskaya Street, Moscow 29851 (Russian Federation); Rashkovskiy, A. [Surface Phenomena Researches Group, CNIICHERMET, 9/23, 2-nd Baumanskaya Street, Moscow 105005 (Russian Federation); Endrino, J.L. [Albengoa Research, Energia Solar 1, Palmas Altas, Seville 41014 (Spain); Beake, B. [Micro Materials Limited, Willow House, Yale Business Village, Ellice Way, Wrexham LL13 7YL (United Kingdom); Dosbaeva, G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L7 (Canada); Wainstein, D. [Surface Phenomena Researches Group, CNIICHERMET, 9/23, 2-nd Baumanskaya Street, Moscow 105005 (Russian Federation); Yuan, Junifeng; Bunting, J.W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L7 (Canada)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • The evolution of self-organization under extreme frictional conditions has been studied. • Comprehensive characterization of the tribo-films was made using various surface analytical techniques. • During the running-in stage, mullite tribo-ceramics predominate on the surface of the nano-multilayer coating, establishing a functional hierarchy within the layer of tribo-films. • It is possible to control tribo-film evolution during self-organization by means of an increase in structural complexity and the non-equilibrium state of the surface engineered layer. - Abstract: The evolution of the self-organization process where dissipative structures are formed under the extreme frictional conditions associated with high performance dry machining of hardened steels has been studied in detail. The emphasis was on the progressive studies of surface transformations within multilayer and monolayer TiAlCrSiYN-based PVD coatings during the running-in stage of wear when self-organization process occurs. The coating layer was characterized by high resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS). It is shown that the nano-multilayer coating possesses higher non-equilibrium structure in comparison to the monolayer. Comprehensive studies of the tribo-films (dissipative structures) formed on the friction surface were made using a number of advanced surface characterization techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES). The data obtained for the tribo-films was combined with the detailed TEM studies of the structural and phase transformations within the underlying coating layer. This data was related to the micro-mechanical characteristics of the coating layer and its wear resistance. It was demonstrated that the evolution of the self-organization process is strongly controlled by the characteristics of the tribo-films formed at different stages of the wear process. Within running-in stage (after

  7. Structural evolution of epitaxial SrCoO{sub x} films near topotactic phase transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeen, Hyoungjeen [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Physics, Pusan National University, Busan, 609735 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ho Nyung, E-mail: hnlee@ornl.gov [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Control of oxygen stoichiometry in complex oxides via topotactic phase transition is an interesting avenue to not only modifying the physical properties, but utilizing in many energy technologies, such as energy storage and catalysts. However, detailed structural evolution in the close proximity of the topotactic phase transition in multivalent oxides has not been much studied. In this work, we used strontium cobaltites (SrCoO{sub x}) epitaxially grown by pulsed laser epitaxy (PLE) as a model system to study the oxidation-driven evolution of the structure, electronic, and magnetic properties. We grew coherently strained SrCoO{sub 2.5} thin films and performed post-annealing at various temperatures for topotactic conversion into the perovskite phase (SrCoO{sub 3-δ}). We clearly observed significant changes in electronic transport, magnetism, and microstructure near the critical temperature for the topotactic transformation from the brownmillerite to the perovskite phase. Nevertheless, the overall crystallinity was well maintained without much structural degradation, indicating that topotactic phase control can be a useful tool to control the physical properties repeatedly via redox reactions.

  8. Structural evolution of epitaxial SrCoOx films near topotactic phase transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyoungjeen Jeen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Control of oxygen stoichiometry in complex oxides via topotactic phase transition is an interesting avenue to not only modifying the physical properties, but utilizing in many energy technologies, such as energy storage and catalysts. However, detailed structural evolution in the close proximity of the topotactic phase transition in multivalent oxides has not been much studied. In this work, we used strontium cobaltites (SrCoOx epitaxially grown by pulsed laser epitaxy (PLE as a model system to study the oxidation-driven evolution of the structure, electronic, and magnetic properties. We grew coherently strained SrCoO2.5 thin films and performed post-annealing at various temperatures for topotactic conversion into the perovskite phase (SrCoO3-δ. We clearly observed significant changes in electronic transport, magnetism, and microstructure near the critical temperature for the topotactic transformation from the brownmillerite to the perovskite phase. Nevertheless, the overall crystallinity was well maintained without much structural degradation, indicating that topotactic phase control can be a useful tool to control the physical properties repeatedly via redox reactions.

  9. A highly active and stable hydrogen evolution catalyst based on pyrite-structured cobalt phosphosulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen; Hu, Enyuan; Jiang, Hong; Xiang, Yingjie; Weng, Zhe; Li, Min; Fan, Qi; Yu, Xiqian; Altman, Eric I; Wang, Hailiang

    2016-01-01

    Rational design and controlled synthesis of hybrid structures comprising multiple components with distinctive functionalities are an intriguing and challenging approach to materials development for important energy applications like electrocatalytic hydrogen production, where there is a great need for cost effective, active and durable catalyst materials to replace the precious platinum. Here we report a structure design and sequential synthesis of a highly active and stable hydrogen evolution electrocatalyst material based on pyrite-structured cobalt phosphosulfide nanoparticles grown on carbon nanotubes. The three synthetic steps in turn render electrical conductivity, catalytic activity and stability to the material. The hybrid material exhibits superior activity for hydrogen evolution, achieving current densities of 10 mA cm(-2) and 100 mA cm(-2) at overpotentials of 48 mV and 109 mV, respectively. Phosphorus substitution is crucial for the chemical stability and catalytic durability of the material, the molecular origins of which are uncovered by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and computational simulation. PMID:26892437

  10. The molecular clock of neutral evolution can be accelerated or slowed by asymmetric spatial structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Allen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Over time, a population acquires neutral genetic substitutions as a consequence of random drift. A famous result in population genetics asserts that the rate, K, at which these substitutions accumulate in the population coincides with the mutation rate, u, at which they arise in individuals: K = u. This identity enables genetic sequence data to be used as a "molecular clock" to estimate the timing of evolutionary events. While the molecular clock is known to be perturbed by selection, it is thought that K = u holds very generally for neutral evolution. Here we show that asymmetric spatial population structure can alter the molecular clock rate for neutral mutations, leading to either Ku. Our results apply to a general class of haploid, asexually reproducing, spatially structured populations. Deviations from K = u occur because mutations arise unequally at different sites and have different probabilities of fixation depending on where they arise. If birth rates are uniform across sites, then K ≤ u. In general, K can take any value between 0 and Nu. Our model can be applied to a variety of population structures. In one example, we investigate the accumulation of genetic mutations in the small intestine. In another application, we analyze over 900 Twitter networks to study the effect of network topology on the fixation of neutral innovations in social evolution.

  11. Structural evolution of epitaxial SrCoOx films near topotactic phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Control of oxygen stoichiometry in complex oxides via topotactic phase transition is an interesting avenue to not only modifying the physical properties, but utilizing in many energy technologies, such as energy storage and catalysts. However, detailed structural evolution in the close proximity of the topotactic phase transition in multivalent oxides has not been much studied. In this work, we used strontium cobaltites (SrCoOx) epitaxially grown by pulsed laser epitaxy (PLE) as a model system to study the oxidation-driven evolution of the structure, electronic, and magnetic properties. We grew coherently strained SrCoO2.5 thin films and performed post-annealing at various temperatures for topotactic conversion into the perovskite phase (SrCoO3-δ). We clearly observed significant changes in electronic transport, magnetism, and microstructure near the critical temperature for the topotactic transformation from the brownmillerite to the perovskite phase. Nevertheless, the overall crystallinity was well maintained without much structural degradation, indicating that topotactic phase control can be a useful tool to control the physical properties repeatedly via redox reactions

  12. A highly active and stable hydrogen evolution catalyst based on pyrite-structured cobalt phosphosulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen; Hu, Enyuan; Jiang, Hong; Xiang, Yingjie; Weng, Zhe; Li, Min; Fan, Qi; Yu, Xiqian; Altman, Eric I.; Wang, Hailiang

    2016-02-01

    Rational design and controlled synthesis of hybrid structures comprising multiple components with distinctive functionalities are an intriguing and challenging approach to materials development for important energy applications like electrocatalytic hydrogen production, where there is a great need for cost effective, active and durable catalyst materials to replace the precious platinum. Here we report a structure design and sequential synthesis of a highly active and stable hydrogen evolution electrocatalyst material based on pyrite-structured cobalt phosphosulfide nanoparticles grown on carbon nanotubes. The three synthetic steps in turn render electrical conductivity, catalytic activity and stability to the material. The hybrid material exhibits superior activity for hydrogen evolution, achieving current densities of 10 mA cm-2 and 100 mA cm-2 at overpotentials of 48 mV and 109 mV, respectively. Phosphorus substitution is crucial for the chemical stability and catalytic durability of the material, the molecular origins of which are uncovered by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and computational simulation.

  13. Effect of spatial structure on the evolution of cooperation based on game models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available To elucidate the mechanisms for the evolution of cooperation has been a core problem in biology, economics and sociology. Evolutionary game theory has proven to be an efficient approach to investigate the problem by using models based on so-called social dilemmas. Spatial structure is indicated to have an important effect on the evolution of cooperation and has been intensively studied during recent years. From this perspective, we review our studies in evolutionary dynamics based on a repeated game with three strategies, 'always defect' (ALLD, 'tit-for-tat' (TFT, and 'always cooperate' (ALLC. With mathematical analysis and numerical simulations, the results show that cooperation can be promoted in spatially-structured populations. Cooperators prevail against defectors by forming stable clusters, which is called the `spatial selection'. Meanwhile, lattice structure also inhibits cooperation due to the advantage of being spiteful. Furthermore, simulations demonstrate that a slight enforcement of ALLC can only promote cooperation when there is weak network reciprocity, while the catalyst effect of TFT on cooperation is verified.

  14. Structure and functions of water-membrane interfaces and their role in proto-biological evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, A.; Wilson, M.; Macelroy, R. D.

    1991-01-01

    Among the most important developments in proto-biological evolution was the emergence of membrane-like structures. These are formed by spontaneous association of relatively simple amphiphilic molecules that would have been readily available in the primordial environment. The resulting interfacial regions between water and nonpolar interior of the membrane have several properties which made them uniquely suitable for promoting subsequent evolution. They can (1) selectively attract organic material and mediate its transport, (2) serve as simple catalysts for chemical reactions, and (3) promote the formation of trans-membrane electrical and chemical gradients which could provide energy sources for proto-cells. Understanding the structure of interfaces, their interactions with organic molecules and molecular mechanisms of their functions is an essential step to understanding proto-biological evolution. In our computer simulation studies, we showed that the structure of water at interfaces with nonpolar media is significantly different from that in the bulk. In particular, the average surface dipole density points from the vapor to the liquid. As a result, negative ions can approach the interface more easily than positive ions. Amphiphilic molecules composed of hydrocarbon conjugated rings and polar substituents (e.g., phenol) assume at the interface rigid orientations in which polar groups are buried in water while hydrocarbon parts are located in the nonpolar environment. These orientational differences are of special interest in connection with the ability of some of these molecules to efficiently absorb photons. Flexible molecules with polar substituents often adopt at interfaces conformations different from those in the bulk aquaeous solution and in the gas phase. As a result, in many instances both specificity and kinetics of chemical reactions in which these molecules can participate is modified by the presence of surfaces. Of special interest is the mechanism by

  15. Efficient coding in speech sounds: Cultural evolution and the emergence of structure in artificial languages

    OpenAIRE

    Verhoef, T.

    2013-01-01

    No species on this planet other than mankind uses a system for communication as intricate as human language. What is the origin of this unique form of communication? This is a question that has fascinated researchers since long ago and the work presented in this thesis belongs to the scientific field in which it is studied. The specific area addressed in this thesis is cultural evolution and the emergence of structure in sound systems used for speech. Speech sounds are organised: a limited nu...

  16. Miocene-Quaternary structural evolution of the Uyuni-Atacama region, Andes of Chile and Bolivia

    OpenAIRE

    Tibaldi, A.; Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca; Corazzato, C.; Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca; Rovida, A.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Milano-Pavia, Milano, Italia

    2008-01-01

    We describe the Miocene-Quaternary geological-structural evolution of the region between the Salar de Uyuni and de Atacama, Andes of Chile and Bolivia. We recognised four main tectonic events based on fold geometry, fault kinematics and stratigraphic data. The oldest event, of Miocene age, is characterized by folding and reverse faulting of the sedimentary successions with an E-W direction of shortening in the northern part of the studied area and a WNW-ESE shortening in the southern part. Th...

  17. Surface structure evolution of cathode materials for Li-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yingchun, Lyu; Yali, Liu; Lin, Gu

    2016-01-01

    Lithium ion batteries are important electrochemical energy storage devices for consumer electronics and the most promising candidates for electrical/hybrid vehicles. The surface chemistry influences the performance of the batteries significantly. In this short review, the evolution of the surface structure of the cathode materials at different states of the pristine, storage and electrochemical reactions are summarized. The main methods for the surface modification are also introduced. Project supported by the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB07030200) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2014CB921002 and 2012CB921702).

  18. Evolution of a defect structure of Pd-Ag alloys during tritium exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tebus, V. E-mail: tebus@bochvar.ru; Rivkis, L.; Dmitrievskaia, E.; Arutunova, G.; Golikov, I.; Ryazantseva, N.; Filin, V.; Kapychev, V.; Bulkin, V

    2002-12-01

    Pd-Ag alloys, a material for palladium diffuser of the ITER fuel clean-up system, were investigated after long-term usage exposition in tritium. Nucleation and evolution of the alloy structure defects as a result of a radiogenic helium-3 accumulation have been examined using electron microscopy, positron annihilation and X-ray analysis. The types of helium containing defects and their characteristics were determined. The early stage of helium bubbles forming was observed. It was shown that the simple defect concentration decreased slowly and helium-3 bubble sizes and concentration increased during the tritium exposure.

  19. Evolution of the electronic structures of NixSiy ordered systems: Experimental and theoretical investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the change of the electronic structures of nickel silicides, Ni3Si and NiSi2, as well as nickel and silicon through the evolution of their valence band X-ray photoelectron spectra (v-XPS) both experimentally and theoretically. The experimental spectra are compared to the total and partial densities of states using the tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbital method (TB-LMTO) in the atomic sphere approximation (ASA). Good agreement is found between theory and experiment. (author)

  20. Hilbert space structures on the solution space of Klein-Gordon-type evolution equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We use the theory of pseudo-Hermitian operators to address the problem of the construction and classification of positive-definite invariant inner-products on the space of solutions of a Klein-Gordon-type evolution equation. This involves dealing with the peculiarities of formulating a unitary quantum dynamics in a Hilbert space with a time-dependent inner product. We apply our general results to obtain possible Hilbert space structures on the solution space of the equation of motion for a classical simple harmonic oscillator, a free Klein-Gordon equation and the Wheeler-DeWitt equation for the FRW-massive-real-scalar-field models

  1. The Structure and Evolution of Protoplanetary Disks: an Infrared and Submillimeter View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieza, Lucas A.

    2016-01-01

    Circumstellar disks are the sites of planet formation, and the very high incidence of extrasolar planets implies that most of them actually form planetary systems. Studying the structure and evolution of protoplanetary disks can thus place important constraints on the conditions, timescales, and mechanisms associated with the planet formation process. In this review, we discuss observational results from infrared and submillimeter wavelength studies. We review disk lifetimes, transition objects, disk demographics, and highlight a few remarkable results from ALMA Early Science observations. We finish with a brief discussion of ALMA's potential to transform the field in near future.

  2. Evolution of the fine-structure constant in runaway dilaton models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.J.A.P. Martins

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We study the detailed evolution of the fine-structure constant α in the string-inspired runaway dilaton class of models of Damour, Piazza and Veneziano. We provide constraints on this scenario using the most recent α measurements and discuss ways to distinguish it from alternative models for varying α. For model parameters which saturate bounds from current observations, the redshift drift signal can differ considerably from that of the canonical ΛCDM paradigm at high redshifts. Measurements of this signal by the forthcoming European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT, together with more sensitive α measurements, will thus dramatically constrain these scenarios.

  3. The Structure and Evolution of Protoplanetary Disks: an infrared and submillimeter view

    CERN Document Server

    Cieza, Lucas A

    2015-01-01

    Circumstellar disks are the sites of planet formation, and the very high incidence of extrasolar planets implies that most of them actually form planetary systems. Studying the structure and evolution of protoplanetary disks can thus place important constraints on the conditions, timescales, and mechanisms associated with the planet formation process. In this review, we discuss observational results from infrared and submillimeter wavelength studies. We review disk lifetimes, transition objects, disk demographics, and highlight a few remarkable results from ALMA Early Science observations. We finish with a brief discussion of ALMA's potential to transform the field in near future.

  4. Investigation of thermal evolution of nanodomain structures in nonlinear barium sodium niobate crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.V.Ivanova

    2008-01-01

    By the 90°elastic light scattering investigation and far field observation in the range of 20-800℃,the relation between behavior of light scattering anomalies and evolution of nanodomain structures in lattice of barium sodium niobate(Ba2NaNb5O15,BSN)crystal was clarified.The correlation between anomalies on the temperature curves of the elastic light scattering intensity and temperature transformations of nanodomains was studied by X-ray and electron microscope methods.Phase transition near 500℃ and movement in field of scattering light could be explained by appearance of a new incommensurate phase.

  5. Social dilemmas in an online social network: The structure and evolution of cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate two paradigms for studying the evolution of cooperation-Prisoner's Dilemma and Snowdrift game in an online friendship network, obtained from a social networking site. By structural analysis, it is revealed that the empirical social network has small-world and scale-free properties. Besides, it exhibits assortative mixing pattern. Then, we study the evolutionary version of the two types of games on it. It is found that cooperation is substantially promoted with small values of game matrix parameters in both games. Whereas the competent cooperators induced by the underlying network of contacts will be dramatically inhibited with increasing values of the game parameters. Further, we explore the role of assortativity in evolution of cooperation by random edge rewiring. We find that increasing amount of assortativity will to a certain extent diminish the cooperation level. We also show that connected large hubs are capable of maintaining cooperation. The evolution of cooperation on empirical networks is influenced by various network effects in a combined manner, compared with that on model networks. Our results can help understand the cooperative behaviors in human groups and society

  6. Influence of diffusive transport on the structural evolution of W/O/W emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sameh, Herzi; Wafa, Essafi; Sihem, Bellagha; Fernando, Leal-Calderon

    2012-12-21

    Double emulsions of the W/O/W type are compartmented materials suitable for encapsulation and sustained release of hydrophilic compounds. Initially, the inner aqueous droplets contain an encapsulated compound (EC), and the external phase comprises an osmotic regulator (OR). Over time, water and the solutes dissolved in it tend to be transferred from one aqueous compartment to the other across the oil phase. Water transfer being by far the fastest process, osmotic equilibration of two compartments is permanently ensured. Since the transport of the EC and OR generally occurs at dissimilar rates, the osmotic regulation process provokes a continuous flux of water that modifies the inner and outer volumes. We fabricated W/O/W emulsions stabilized by a couple of amphiphilic polymers, and we measured the inward and outward diffusion kinetics of the solutes. The phenomenology was explored by varying the chemical nature of the OR while keeping the same EC or vice versa. Microscope observations revealed different evolution scenarios, depending on the relative rates of transfer of the EC and OR. Structural evolution was mainly determined by the permeation ratio between the EC and the OR, irrespective of their chemical nature. In particular, a regime leading to droplet emptying was identified. In all cases, evolution was due to diffusion/permeation phenomena and coalescence was marginal. Results were discussed within the frame of a simple mean-field model taking into account the diffusive transfer of the solutes. PMID:23176152

  7. Evolution of grain and subgrain structure during cold rolling of commercial-purity titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → EBSD analysis of cold-rolled titanium revealed three stages of structure evolution. → These stages are defined by plots of the boundaries density as a function of strain. → The first stage is associated with twinning. → Dislocation density increases and substructure forms at the second stage. → The third stage is related to the formation of high-angle boundaries. - Abstract: The evolution of microstructure in commercial-purity titanium during cold rolling to a thickness strain of 2.6 was quantified using electron backscatter diffraction. The measurements were analyzed in terms of the mean grain size and the density of boundaries (the ratio of total boundary length to the scanned area). The density of high-angle boundaries as a function of thickness strain had three distinct stages, each of which was associated with a different mechanism of microstructure formation, i.e., (i) twinning, (ii) an increase in dislocation density and the formation of substructure, and (iii) the formation of deformation-induced high-angle boundaries. The influence of twinning on the kinetics of microstructure evolution was also interpreted.

  8. Predicting the electronic structure and magnetic properties of UO{sub 2}{sup +}, UO{sub 2}(CO){sub 5}{sup +} and UO{sub 2}(Ar){sub 5}{sup +} using wavefunction based methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Páez-Hernández, Dayán, E-mail: dayan.paez@unab.cl

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: This work aims to highlight the utility of concerted theoretical approaches for the investigation of f-element complexes, namely a combination of crystal-field (CF) based models with ab-initio wavefunction calculations. - Abstract: The electronic structure and magnetic properties of UO{sub 2}{sup +}, and two complexes, UO{sub 2}(CO){sub 5}{sup +} and UO{sub 2}(Ar){sub 5}{sup +} in D{sub 5h} symmetry are studied with a combination of relativistic theoretical methods: ab-initio wavefunction calculations, density functional theory (DFT), and crystal-field (CF) models with parameters extracted from the ab-initio calculations. The model Hamiltonian techniques are employed to describe theoretically the state interaction and the “competition” between Crystal field (CF) and spin–orbit coupling (SO), this is important besides for a correct description of the sign of the g-factors using also a symmetry criteria.

  9. Drosophila ARSs contain the yeast ARS consensus sequence and a replication enhancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Mills, J S; Kingsman, A J; Kingsman, S M

    1986-01-01

    A number of restriction fragments that function as autonomously replicating sequences (ARSs) in yeast have been isolated from Drosophila melanogaster DNA. The behaviour in yeast of plasmids containing Drosophila ARS elements was studied and compared to that exhibited by the archetypal yeast ARS-1 plasmid. ARS functions were localised by subcloning and BAL-31 deletion analysis. These studies demonstrated the structural and functional complexity of Drosophila ARSs. Each Drosophila ARS element h...

  10. 40Ar-39Ar geochronology and thermochronology: principles and potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geochronology based on radiogenic isotopes has become an invaluable tool in earth sciences. Several radioactive parent-daughter systems of varying half-lives such as Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, K-Ar have been traditionally used by researchers for determining the timing of geological and planetary processes. 40Ar-39Ar dating, a variant of the K-Ar system, is a well-established and versatile method of determining the eruptive ages of volcanic rocks and the ∼150-500 deg C thermal histories of a variety of more slowly cooled igneous and metamorphic rocks. This technique has been the most popular tool for dating felsic and intermediate volcanic rocks. Recently several new areas of research have been explored, including total-fusion dating of mineral grains from volcanic and sedimentary samples, mapping of argon isotopic gradients in crystals, and selective dating of fabric-defining minerals in poly deformed specimens

  11. Structure and evolution of Apetala3, a sex-linked gene in Silene latifolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cegan Radim

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evolution of sex chromosomes is often accompanied by gene or chromosome rearrangements. Recently, the gene AP3 was characterized in the dioecious plant species Silene latifolia. It was suggested that this gene had been transferred from an autosome to the Y chromosome. Results In the present study we provide evidence for the existence of an X linked copy of the AP3 gene. We further show that the Y copy is probably located in a chromosomal region where recombination restriction occurred during the first steps of sex chromosome evolution. A comparison of X and Y copies did not reveal any clear signs of degenerative processes in exon regions. Instead, both X and Y copies show evidence for relaxed selection compared to the autosomal orthologues in S. vulgaris and S. conica. We further found that promoter sequences differ significantly. Comparison of the genic region of AP3 between the X and Y alleles and the corresponding autosomal copies in the gynodioecious species S. vulgaris revealed a massive accumulation of retrotransposons within one intron of the Y copy of AP3. Analysis of the genomic distribution of these repetitive elements does not indicate that these elements played an important role in the size increase characteristic of the Y chromosome. However, in silico expression analysis shows biased expression of individual domains of the identified retroelements in male plants. Conclusions We characterized the structure and evolution of AP3, a sex linked gene with copies on the X and Y chromosomes in the dioecious plant S. latifolia. These copies showed complementary expression patterns and relaxed evolution at protein level compared to autosomal orthologues, which suggests subfunctionalization. One intron of the Y-linked allele was invaded by retrotransposons that display sex-specific expression patterns that are similar to the expression pattern of the corresponding allele, which suggests that these transposable elements

  12. Gradual Magnetic Evolution of Sunspot Structure and Filament-Corona Dynamics Associated with the X1.8 Flare in AR 11283

    CERN Document Server

    Ruan, Guiping; Wang, Haimin

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a study on persistent and gradual penumbral decay and correlated decline of the photospheric transverse field component during 10-20 hours before a major flare (X1.8) eruption on 2011 September 7. This long-term pre-eruption behavior is corroborated with the well-imaged pre-flare filament rising, the consistent expansion of coronal arcades overlying the filament, as well as the NLFFF modelling results in the literature. We suggest that both the long-term pre-flare penumbral decay and the transverse field decline are the photospheric manifestation of the gradual rise of the coronal filament-flux rope system. We also suggest that a C3 flare and subsequent reconnection process preceding the X1.8 flare play an important role in triggering the later major eruption.

  13. Electron scattering from 36Ar and 40Ar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The argon isotopes, 36Ar and 40Ar, have been investigated using electron scattering at the high-resolution Linac facilities of the National Bureau of Standards. Both elastic scattering and scattering to low-lying states have been observed. A high-pressure, low-volume gas target cell was designed and developed for this experiment. The cell features a transmission geometry and has resolution comparable to solid targets. Spectra were obtained at incident beam energies ranging from 65 to 115 MeV at scattering angles of 92.50 and 1100. Values obtained for the rms charge radii are 3.327 +- 0.015 and 3.393 +- 0.015 fm for 36Ar and 40Ar respectively. A sensitive measurement was made of the difference in the two radii yielding a value of Δ r = 0.079 +- 0.006 fm. The inelastic levels observed are the 1.97 (2+) and 4.18 MeV (3-) levels in 36Ar, and the 1.46 (2+), 2.52 (2+), 3.21 (2+), and 3.68 MeV (3-) levels in 40Ar. A Tassie model analysis was made of the inelastic transitions in the DWBA approximation and transition strengths of these levels were extracted

  14. Modification of the structure and composition of Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 ceramic coatings by changing the deposition conditions in O2 and Ar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydroxyapatite Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 (HAp) is a material considered to be used to form structural matrices in the mineral phase of bone, dentin and enamel. HAp ceramic materials and coatings are widely applied in medicine and dentistry because of their ability to increase the tissue response to the implant surface and promote bone ingrowth and osseoconduction processes. The deposition conditions affect considerably the structure and bio-functionality of the HAp coatings. We focused our research on developing deposition methods allowing a precise control of the structure and stoichiometric composition of HAp thin films. We found that the use of O2 as a reactive gas improves the quality of the sputtered hydroxyapatite coatings by resulting in the formation of films of better stoichiometry with a fine crystalline structure.

  15. Ars Poetica : [luuletused] / Mats Traat

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Traat, Mats, 1936-

    2008-01-01

    Sisu: Ars poetica ; Veepeegel ; Kontrollõed ; Mandariiniriik ; Nikolai Siamashvili (1888-1911) ; Kolmekümne kolmas aasta ; Kiri linast 1966 ; Italmaz Nuriyev ; Rudolf Rimmelile mõeldes ; Gennadi Aigi

  16. Unified QCD evolution equations and the dominant behaviour of structure functions at low x

    CERN Document Server

    Peschanski, R; Peschanski, R; Wallon, S

    1994-01-01

    We consider a system of evolution equations for quark and gluon structure functions satisfying the leading-logarithmic behaviour due to both QCD collinear \\left(LLQ^2 \\right) and infrared (LL1/x) singularities. We show that these equations leave undetermined an arbitrary regular function of j in the Mellin-transformed weights. We consider the constraints resulting from energy-momentum conservation and from the decoupling of quark loops in the leading j -plane singularity. These constraints can be fulfilled without influencing the leading-log terms. As a particular consequence of the second constraint, the location of the leading singularity is determined in terms of the (LL1/x) and \\left(LLQ^2 \\right) kernels. It leads to a value significantly lower than the LL1/x evaluation, while remaining at j > 1, and compatible with the behaviour of structure functions observed at HERA.

  17. Processes of lithosphere evolution: New evidence on the structure of the continental crust and uppermost mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemieva, I.M.; Mooney, W.D.; Perchuc, E.; Thybo, H.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the structure of the continental lithosphere, its physical properties, and the mechanisms that formed and modified it since the early Archean. The structure of the upper mantle and the crust is derived primarily from global and regional seismic tomography studies of Eurasia and from global and regional data on seismic anisotropy. These data as documented in the papers of this special issue of Tectonophysics are used to illustrate the role of different tectonic processes in the lithospheric evolution since Archean to present. These include, but are not limited to, cratonization, terrane accretion and collision, continental rifting (both passive and active), subduction, and lithospheric basal erosion due to a relative motion of cratonic keels and the convective mantle. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. MnFe(PGe) compounds: Preparation, structural evolution, and magnetocaloric effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interdependences of preparation conditions, magnetic and crystal structures, and magnetocaloric effects (MCE) of the MnFePGe-based compounds are reviewed. Based upon those findings, a new method for the evaluation of the MCE in these compounds, based on differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), is proposed. The MnFePGe-based compounds are a group of magnetic refrigerants with giant magnetocaloric effect (GMCE), and as such, have drawn tremendous attention, especially due to their many advantages for practical applications. Structural evolution and phase transformation in the compounds as functions of temperature, pressure, and magnetic field are reported. Influences of preparation conditions upon the homogeneity of the compounds’ chemical composition and microstructure, both of which play a key role in the MCE and thermal hysteresis of the compounds, are introduced. Lastly, the origin of the “virgin effect” in the MnFePGe-based compounds is discussed. (paper)

  19. A modified differential evolution algorithm for damage identification in submerged shell structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, H. M.; Nichols, J. M.; Earls, C. J.

    2013-08-01

    Obtaining good estimates of structural parameters from observed data is a particularly challenging task owing to the complex (often multi-modal) likelihood functions that often accompany such problems. As a result, sophisticated optimization routines are typically required to produce maximum likelihood estimates of the desired parameters. Evolutionary algorithms comprise one such approach, whereby nature-inspired mutation and crossover operations allow the sensible exploration of even multi-modal functions, in search of a global maximum. The challenge, of course, is to balance broad coverage in parameter space with the speed required to obtain such estimates. This work focuses directly on this problem by proposing a modified version of the Differential Evolution algorithm. The idea is to adjust both mutation and cross-over rates, during the optimization, in a manner that increases the convergence rate to the desired solution. Performance is demonstrated on the challenging problem of identifying imperfections in submerged shell structures.

  20. Structural Evolution of SiC Films During Plasma-Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evolution of chemical bonding configurations for the films deposited from hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) diluted with H2 during plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition is investigated. In the experiment a small amount of CH4 was added to adjust the plasma environment and modify the structure of the deposited films. The measurements of Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed the production of 6H-SiC embedded in the amorphous matrix without the input of CH4. As CH4 was introduced into the deposition reaction, the transition of 6H-SiC to cubic SiC in the films took place, and also the film surfaces changed from a structure of ellipsoids to cauliflower-like shapes. With a further increase of CH4 in the flow ratio, the obtained films varied from Si-C bonding dominant to a sp2/sp3 carbon-rich composition. (low temperature plasma)

  1. Structure and evolution of solar supergranulation using SDO/HMI data

    CERN Document Server

    Roudier, Th; Rieutord, M; Malherbe, J M; Burston, R; Gizon, L

    2014-01-01

    Context: Studying the motions on the solar surface is fundamental for understanding how turbulent convection transports energy and how magnetic fields are distributed across the solar surface. Aims: From horizontal velocity measurements all over the visible disc of the Sun and using data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (SDO/HMI), we investigate the structure and evolution of solar supergranulation. Methods: Horizontal velocity fields were measured by following the proper motions of solar granules using a newly developed version of the coherent structure tracking (CST) code. With this tool, maps of horizontal divergence were computed. We then segmented and identified supergranular cells and followed their histories by using spatio-temporal labelling. With this dataset we derived the fundamental properties of supergranulation, including their motion. Results: We find values of the fundamental parameters of supergranulation similar to previous studies: a mean lifetime of 1.5 ...

  2. Structural evolution of biomass char and its effect on the gasification rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fatehi, Hesameddin; Bai, Xue Song

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of char porous structure can affect the conversion rate of the char by affecting the intra-particle transport, especially in the zone II conversion regime. A multi-pore model based on the capillary pore theory is developed to take into account different conversion rates for pores with...... different radii. The model is valid for biomass chars produced under relatively low heating rates, when the original beehive structure of the biomass is not destroyed during the pyrolysis stage. The contribution of different pores with different radius is taken into account using an effectiveness factor...... presented for each pore radius with respect to different reactions. As the char conversion proceeds, the pore enlargement increases the contribution of micro-pores; consequently the effective surface area will increase. The increase in the effective surface area leads to an increased reactivity of char...

  3. Phase structure and surface morphology evolution of Al–Ti–O films irradiated by electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al–Ti–O films were prepared on Si substrates by reactive magnetron sputtering technology. Then the as-deposited and annealed films were treated by electron beam irradiation. The phase structure and surface morphology of the films were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Especially, height–height correlation function measurement was introduced to quantitatively characterize the film surface evolution. The results show that both electron irradiation and annealing induce well-crystallization of as-deposited films, while the irradiation leads to the phase change of annealed films. In contrast to those of as-deposited films, the surface morphologies of annealed films exhibits roughening characteristic and steep local surface slope due to the formation of new phases and the preferred grain growth. The electron irradiation can result in a rougher surface due to the irradiation-induced structural damage

  4. Structure and evolution of a European Parliament via a network and correlation analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Puccio, Elena; Piilo, Jyrki; Tumminello, Michele

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of the network of relationships among elected members of the Finnish parliament, based on a quantitative analysis of initiative co-signatures, and its evolution over 16 years. To understand the structure of the parliament, we constructed a statistically validated network of members, based on the similarity between the patterns of initiatives they signed. We looked for communities within the network and characterized them in terms of members' attributes, such as electoral district and party. To gain insight on the nested structure of communities, we constructed a hierarchical tree of members from the correlation matrix. Afterwards, we studied parliament dynamics yearly, with a focus on correlations within and between parties, by also distinguishing between government and opposition. Finally, we investigated the role played by specific individuals, at a local level. In particular, whether they act as proponents who gather consensus, or as signers. Our results provide a quantitative background...

  5. Evolution of integrated panel structural design and interfaces for PV power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, J. C.; Anderson, A. J.; Robertson, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    The evolution of integrated photovoltaic (PV) panel design at ARCO Solar is discussed. Historically, framed PV modules of about 1 x 4-ft size were individually mounted in the field on fixed support structures and interconnected electrically with cables to build higher-power arrays. When ARCO Solar saw the opportunity in 1982 to marry its PV modules with state-of-the-art heliostat trackers developed by ARCO Power Systems, it became obvious that mounting individual modules was impractical. For this project, the framed modules were factory-assembled into panels and interconnected with cables before being mounted on the trackers. Since then, ARCO Solar made considerable progress and gained substantial experience in the design and fabrication of large PV panels. Constraints and criteria considered in these design activities included static and dynamic loads; assembly and transportation equipment and logistics, structural and electrical interfaces, and safety and grounding concerns.

  6. Structure and Evolution of Insect Sperm: New Interpretations in the Age of Phylogenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallai, Romano; Gottardo, Marco; Beutel, Rolf Georg

    2016-01-01

    This comprehensive review of the structure of sperm in all orders of insects evaluates phylogenetic implications, with the background of a phylogeny based on transcriptomes. Sperm characters strongly support several major branches of the phylogeny of insects-for instance, Cercophora, Dicondylia, and Psocodea-and also different infraordinal groups. Some closely related taxa, such as Trichoptera and Lepidoptera (Amphiesmenoptera), differ greatly in sperm structure. Sperm characters are very conservative in some groups (Heteroptera, Odonata) but highly variable in others, including Zoraptera, a small and morphologically uniform group with a tremendously accelerated rate of sperm evolution. Unusual patterns such as sperm dimorphism, the formation of bundles, or aflagellate and immotile sperm have evolved independently in several groups. PMID:26982436

  7. Large-scale trends in the evolution of gene structures within 11 animal genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Yandell

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available We have used the annotations of six animal genomes (Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Ciona intestinalis, Drosophila melanogaster, Anopheles gambiae, and Caenorhabditis elegans together with the sequences of five unannotated Drosophila genomes to survey changes in protein sequence and gene structure over a variety of timescales--from the less than 5 million years since the divergence of D. simulans and D. melanogaster to the more than 500 million years that have elapsed since the Cambrian explosion. To do so, we have developed a new open-source software library called CGL (for "Comparative Genomics Library". Our results demonstrate that change in intron-exon structure is gradual, clock-like, and largely independent of coding-sequence evolution. This means that genome annotations can be used in new ways to inform, corroborate, and test conclusions drawn from comparative genomics analyses that are based upon protein and nucleotide sequence similarities.

  8. Three-dimensional computer simulation of time-dependent skeletal structure evolution during liquid phase sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolic, Zoran S [University of Nish, Faculty of Electronic Engineering, Department of Microelectronics, 18000 Nish, PO Box 73 (Serbia); Ristic, Momcilo M [Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Shinagawa, Kazunari, E-mail: zoran.nikolic@elfak.ni.ac.rs [Faculty of Engineering, Department of Advanced Materials Science, Kagawa University (Japan)

    2011-03-15

    In this paper we will investigate numerically gravity induced skeletal structure evolution during liquid phase sintering. Applying three-dimensional domain methodology, skeleton structure will be defined by skeleton units determined by equilibrium dihedral angle and arranged in long chain of connected domains. The settling will be simulated by Free-settling model in which isolated domains fall under gravity over already settled domains, and Extended-settling model in which settled domains continue their motion till they reach position of their local equilibrium. It will be assumed that under gravity condition Stokes's law settling usually dominates microstructure formation, so that settling can be simulated by computation of settling time and average migration distance during defined time interval.

  9. Structural evolution of the southern transfer zone of the Gulf of Suez rift, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Allah, Ali M. A.; Abdel Aal, Mohamed H.; El-Said, Mohamed M.; Abd El-Naby, Ahmed

    2014-08-01

    We present a detailed study about the initiation and reactivations of Zeit-El Tor transfer zone, south Gulf of Suez rift, and its structural setting and tectonic evolution with respect to the Cretaceous-Cenozoic tectonic movements in North Egyptian margin. NE trending zone of opposed-dipping faults (22 km wide) has transferred the NE and SW rotations of the sub-basins in central and south Gulf of Suez rift, respectively. The evolution of this zone started by reactivation of the NE oriented late Neoproterozoic fractures that controlled the occurrence of Dokhan Volcanics in the rift shoulders. Later, the Syrian Arc contraction reactivated these fractures by a sinistral transpression during the Late Cretaceous-Eocene time. N64°E extension of the Oligo-Miocene rift reactivated the NE fractures by a sinistral transtension. During this rifting, the NE trending faults forming the transfer zone were more active than the rift-bounding faults; the Upper Cretaceous reverse faults in the blocks lying between these NE trending faults were rotated; and drape-related reverse faults and the positive flower structures were formed. Tectonic inversion from contraction to extension controlled the distribution and thickness of the Upper Cretaceous-Miocene rocks.

  10. Temporal evolution of the chemical structure during the pattern transfer by ion-beam sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, N.-B.; Jeong, S.; Yu, S.; Ihm, H.-I.; Kim, J.-S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Chemical analyses of the individual nano structures simultaneously with the investigation of their morphological evolution were performed. • Degradation of the transferred pattern starts before the overlayer is fully removed. • The chemical analysis reveals the severe reduction of the sputter yield of the material forming the overlayer near the interface due to the compound formation, requesting caution in the practice of the pattern transfer. - Abstract: Ru films patterned by ion-beam sputtering (IBS) serve as sacrificial masks for the transfer of the patterns to Si(1 0 0) and metallic glass substrates by continued IBS. Under the same sputter condition, however, both bare substrates remain featureless. Chemical analyses of the individual nano structures simultaneously with the investigation of their morphological evolution reveal that the pattern transfer, despite its apparent success, suffers from premature degradation before the mask is fully removed by IBS. Moreover, the residue of the mask or Ru atoms stubbornly remains near the surface, resulting in unintended doping or alloying of both patterned substrates.

  11. Temporal evolution of the chemical structure during the pattern transfer by ion-beam sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Chemical analyses of the individual nano structures simultaneously with the investigation of their morphological evolution were performed. • Degradation of the transferred pattern starts before the overlayer is fully removed. • The chemical analysis reveals the severe reduction of the sputter yield of the material forming the overlayer near the interface due to the compound formation, requesting caution in the practice of the pattern transfer. - Abstract: Ru films patterned by ion-beam sputtering (IBS) serve as sacrificial masks for the transfer of the patterns to Si(1 0 0) and metallic glass substrates by continued IBS. Under the same sputter condition, however, both bare substrates remain featureless. Chemical analyses of the individual nano structures simultaneously with the investigation of their morphological evolution reveal that the pattern transfer, despite its apparent success, suffers from premature degradation before the mask is fully removed by IBS. Moreover, the residue of the mask or Ru atoms stubbornly remains near the surface, resulting in unintended doping or alloying of both patterned substrates

  12. Hidden structures in time evolution of Bloch vector under thermal Jaynes-Cummings model

    CERN Document Server

    Azuma, Hiroo

    2012-01-01

    We reveal hidden structures of time evolution of the Bloch vector, whose dynamics is governed by the thermal Jaynes-Cummings model (JCM). Putting the two-level atom into a certain pure state and the cavity field into a mixed state in thermal equilibrium at initial time, we let the whole system evolve according to the JCM Hamiltonian. During this time evolution, the Bloch vector seems to be in complete disorder and confusion. Because of the thermal photon distribution, both its norm and direction change hard at random, so that the Bloch vector shows a quasichaotic behaviour. However, if we take a different viewpoint compared with ones that we have been used to, we can find some novel structures in the Bloch vector's trajectories plotted at constant time intervals. In this paper, at first, we try to give an explanation of emergence of the quasichaotic behaviour by drawing an analogy between the dynamics of the Bloch vector and that of a compressible fluid. Next, we discuss the following two facts: (1) If we adj...

  13. Ultrafast colorimetric determination of predominant protein structure evolution with gold nanoplasmonic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Young; Choi, Inhee

    2016-01-01

    The intracellular and extracellular accumulation of disordered proteins and aggregated proteins occurs in many protein conformational diseases, such as aging-related neurodegeneration and alcoholic liver diseases. However, the conventional methods to study protein structural changes are limited for the rapid detection and monitoring of protein aggregation because of long incubation times (i.e., usually several days), complicated sample pretreatment steps, and expensive instrumentation. Here, we describe an ultrafast colorimetric method for the real-time monitoring of protein structure evolution and the determination of predominant structures via nanoparticle-assisted protein aggregation. During the aggregation process, nanoparticles act as nucleation cores, which form networks depending on the structures of the protein aggregates, and accelerate the kinetics of the protein aggregation. Simultaneously, these nanoparticles exhibit colorimetric responses according to their embedded shapes (e.g., fibrillar and amorphous) on the protein aggregates. We observed distinct spectral shifts and concomitant colorimetric responses of concentration- and type-dependent protein aggregation with the naked eye within a few minutes (anti-aggregation drugs for protein conformational diseases.The intracellular and extracellular accumulation of disordered proteins and aggregated proteins occurs in many protein conformational diseases, such as aging-related neurodegeneration and alcoholic liver diseases. However, the conventional methods to study protein structural changes are limited for the rapid detection and monitoring of protein aggregation because of long incubation times (i.e., usually several days), complicated sample pretreatment steps, and expensive instrumentation. Here, we describe an ultrafast colorimetric method for the real-time monitoring of protein structure evolution and the determination of predominant structures via nanoparticle-assisted protein aggregation. During

  14. Structural characteristics of Pavonis Mons, Mars, and implications for its volcano-tectonic evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwinner, Klaus; Head, James W.; Wilson, Lionel

    2010-05-01

    Pavonis Mons is the smallest of the three large Tharsis Montes volcanic edifices on Mars. While Viking-based studies have already revealed main structural features of these shields and have provided a framework on their evolution, detailed information on major aspects of their volcano-tectonic structure and evolution is still incomplete. In particular this is the case for the nature of asymmetries that develop along a NE direction, roughly coincident with the crest line of the Tharsis rise, as well as the evolution of the magma reservoir as the shields were built above the ground, and the related consequences for caldera formation and edifice stability. In addition, different morpho-structural features of the Martian shields have been discussed controversially, such as flank "terraces", rillelike channels, and evidence of flank instabilities. We have analyzed recently available high-resolution data, in particular DTMs with up to 50 m grid spacing derived from HRSC data, as well as high-resolution imagery (HRSC, CTX, HIRISE) and regional-scale MOLA DTMs for obtaining new constraints on the volcano-tectonic structure and evolution of Pavonis. We mapped tectonic elements (faults and fractures, wrinkle ridges, collapse pits), main volcanic elements (vent locations, limits of shield, apron and caldera floor units), and elements of flank morphology. Analysis of edifice morphometry is based on slope maps and slope statistics. We were able to identify several major fault systems affecting flanks and base of the edifice. Widespread occurrence of normal faulting from 2-3 km below the summit plateau to the base shows that the middle and lower flanks are characterized by extension. While the summit plateau and uppermost flanks show evidence for compressional deformation, including wrinkle ridges and downslope-convex flank facets interpreted as surface expression of flank thrusts, the system of intersecting flank facets that have been denoted as compressional "terraces" instead

  15. Influence of impurity oxygen on the structure and composition of films obtained by sputtering of Nb in Ar-N2 medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An influence has been studied of the impurity oxygen gas on the structure and the composition of sputtered Nb-N-O films. An increase of the oxygen content in the films takes place at an increase of the partial pressure of N2 reactive gas and a decrease of the ion current onto the target. As a result the films exhibit the transition from the fine-disperse polycrystalline phase δ-NbNO to amorphous Nb2O5 via the two-phase structure (δ-NbNO crystallites in the N2O5 amorphous matrix). It is found that the structure alteration from δNbNO to Nb2O5 is determined by the ratio of Nb-atom fluxes and oxygen onto the substrate and is independent of the presence of N2. The effect of the substrate temperature on the structural state of the phases formed in thin Nb-N-O films is discussed

  16. Structural and metamorphic evolution of the Turku migmatite complex, southwestern Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Väisänen, M.

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The Turku migmatite complex in southwestern Finland is a representative area for the type of tectonic and metamorphic evolution seen within the Palaeoproterozoic Svecofennian Orogen in southern Finland. The orogeny can be divided into early, late and postorogenic stages. The early orogenic structural evolution of the crust is expressed by a D1/D2 deformation recorded as bedding-parallel S1 mica foliation deformed by tight to isoclinal D2 folds with subhorizontal axial planes and a penetrative S2 axial plane foliation. Syntectonic ca. 1890-1870 Ma tonalites were emplaced during D2 as sheet intrusions. This deformation is attributed to thrust tectonics and thickening of the crust. The late orogenic structural evolution produced the main D3 folding, which transposed previous structures into a NE-SW trend. The doubly plunging fold axis produced dome-and-basin structures. The attitude of the F3 folds varies from upright or slightly overturned to locally recumbent towards the NW. Granite dikes were intruded along S3 axial planes. Large D3 fold limbs are often strongly deformed, intensively migmatized and intruded by garnet- and cordierite-bearing granites. These observations suggest that these potassium-rich granites, dated at 1840-1830 Ma, were emplaced during D3. This late orogenic NW-SE crustal shortening further contributed to crustal thickening. Subvertical D4 shear zones that cut all previous rock types possibly controlled the emplacement of postorogenic granitoids. Steeply plunging lineations on D4 shear planes suggest vertical displacements during a regional uplift stage. Metamorphic grade increases from cordierite-sillimanite-K-feldspar gneisses in the northwest and from muscovite-quartz±andalusite rocks in the southeast to high-temperature granulite facies migmatites in the middle of the study area. Block movements during D4 caused the observed differences in metamorphic grade. Garnet and cordierite are mostly breakdown products of biotite

  17. Ar-39-Ar-40 Ages of Two Nakhlites, MIL03346 and Y000593: A Detailed Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jisun; Garrison, Daniel; Bogard, Donald

    2007-01-01

    Radiometric dating of martian nakhlites by several techniques have given similar ages of approx.1.2-1.4 Ga [e.g. 1, 2]. Unlike the case with shergottites, where the presence of martian atmosphere and inherited radiogenic Ar-40 produce apparent Ar-39-Ar-40 ages older than other radiometric ages, Ar-Ar ages of nakhlites are similar to ages derived by other techniques. However, even in some nakhlites the presence of trapped martian Ar produces some uncertainty in the Ar-Ar age. We present here an analysis of such Ar-Ar ages from the MIL03346 and Y000593 nakhlites.

  18. The structural evolution and diffusion during the chemical transformation from cobalt to cobalt phosphide nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Ha, Don-Hyung

    2011-01-01

    We report the structural evolution and the diffusion processes which occur during the phase transformation of nanoparticles (NPs), ε-Co to Co 2P to CoP, from a reaction with tri-n-octylphosphine (TOP). Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) investigations were used to elucidate the changes in the local structure of cobalt atoms which occur as the chemical transformation progresses. The lack of long-range order, spread in interatomic distances, and overall increase in mean-square disorder compared with bulk structure reveal the decrease in the NP\\'s structural order compared with bulk structure, which contributes to their deviation from bulk-like behavior. Results from EXAFS show both the Co2P and CoP phases contain excess Co. Results from EXAFS, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and density functional theory calculations reveal that the inward diffusion of phosphorus is more favorable at the beginning of the transformation from ε-Co to Co2P by forming an amorphous Co-P shell, while retaining a crystalline cobalt core. When the major phase of the sample turns to Co 2P, the diffusion processes reverse and cobalt atom out-diffusion is favored, leaving a hollow void, characteristic of the nanoscale Kirkendall effect. For the transformation from Co2P to CoP theory predicts an outward diffusion of cobalt while the anion lattice remains intact. In real samples, however, the Co-rich nanoparticles continue Kirkendall hollowing. Knowledge about the transformation method and structural properties provides a means to tailor the synthesis and composition of the NPs to facilitate their use in applications. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  19. Thermoplastics Reinforced with Self-Welded Short Carbon Fibers: Nanoparticle-Promoted Structural Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongge; Liu, Yaohua; Lin, Yu; Wu, Guozhang

    2016-07-27

    The large volume of currently available fiber-reinforced polymer composites critically limits the intrinsic versatility of fibers such as high mechanical strength, heat resistance, and excellent thermal/electrical conductivity. We proposed a facile and widely applicable strategy to promote self-organization of randomly dispersed short carbon fibers (CFs) into a three-dimensionally continuous scaffold. The morphological evolution and structural reinforcement of the self-welded CF-polyamide 6 (PA6) scaffold in polystyrene (PS) matrix were investigated, with carbon black (CB) or titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) selectively localized in the PA6 domains. Surprisingly, all of the PA6 droplets once dispersed in the PS matrix can migrate and evenly encapsulate onto the CF surface when 5.8 wt % CB is incorporated, whereas in the TiO2-filled system, the PA6 droplets preferentially segregate at the junction point of CFs to fasten the self-welded CF structure. In addition, a remarkable increase in the interfacial adhesive work between PA6 and CF was observed only when TiO2 is added, and a loading of even less than 0.8 wt % can effectively abruptly strengthen the self-welded CF scaffold. We clarified that the structural evolution is promoted by the nature of self-agglomeration of NPs. CB is highly capable of self-networking in the PA6 domain, resulting in high encapsulation of PA6, although the capillary force for preferential segregation of PA6 at the junction point of CFs is reduced. By contrast, the TiO2 particles tend to form compact aggregates. Such an agglomeration pattern, together with enhanced interfacial affinity, must contribute to a strong capillary force for the preferential segregation of PA6. PMID:27391703

  20. The diverse crustal structure and magmatic evolution of the Manihiki Plateau, central Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hochmuth

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The Manihiki Plateau is a Large Igneous Province (LIP in the central Pacific. It was emplaced as part of the "Super-LIP" Ontong Java Nui and experienced fragmentation into three sub-plateaus, possibly during the break-up of Ontong Java Nui. The Manihiki Plateau is presumably the centerpiece of this "Super-LIP" and its investigation can therefore decipher the break-up mechanisms as well as the evolution of the plateau after its initial emplacement. By analyzing two seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection profiles crossing the two largest sub-plateaus of the Manihiki Plateau, the High Plateau and the Western Plateaus, we give new insights into their crustal structure and magmatic evolution. The High Plateau shows a crustal structure of 20 km thickness and a seismic P wave velocity distribution, which is comparable to other LIPs. The High Plateau experienced a strong secondary volcanism, which can be seen in relicts of seamount chain volcanism. The Western Plateaus on the other hand show no extensive secondary volcanism and are mainly structured by fault systems and sedimentary basins. A constant decrease in Moho depth (9–17 km is a further indicator of crustal stretching on the Western Plateaus. Those findings lead to the conclusion, that the two sub-plateaus of the Manihiki Plateau experienced a different magmatic and tectonic history. Whereas the High Plateau experienced a secondary volcanism, the Western Plateaus underwent crustal stretching during and after the break-up of Ontong Java Nui. This indicates, that the sub-plateaus of the Manihiki Plateau play an individual part in the break-up history of Ontong Java Nui.