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Sample records for aqueuous uranium complexes

  1. Quantum mechanical calculation of aqueuous uranium complexes: carbonate, phosphate, organic and biomolecular species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jha Prashant

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantum mechanical calculations were performed on a variety of uranium species representing U(VI, U(V, U(IV, U-carbonates, U-phosphates, U-oxalates, U-catecholates, U-phosphodiesters, U-phosphorylated N-acetyl-glucosamine (NAG, and U-2-Keto-3-doxyoctanoate (KDO with explicit solvation by H2O molecules. These models represent major U species in natural waters and complexes on bacterial surfaces. The model results are compared to observed EXAFS, IR, Raman and NMR spectra. Results Agreement between experiment and theory is acceptable in most cases, and the reasons for discrepancies are discussed. Calculated Gibbs free energies are used to constrain which configurations are most likely to be stable under circumneutral pH conditions. Reduction of U(VI to U(IV is examined for the U-carbonate and U-catechol complexes. Conclusion Results on the potential energy differences between U(V- and U(IV-carbonate complexes suggest that the cause of slower disproportionation in this system is electrostatic repulsion between UO2 [CO3]35- ions that must approach one another to form U(VI and U(IV rather than a change in thermodynamic stability. Calculations on U-catechol species are consistent with the observation that UO22+ can oxidize catechol and form quinone-like species. In addition, outer-sphere complexation is predicted to be the most stable for U-catechol interactions based on calculated energies and comparison to 13C NMR spectra. Outer-sphere complexes (i.e., ion pairs bridged by water molecules are predicted to be comparable in Gibbs free energy to inner-sphere complexes for a model carboxylic acid. Complexation of uranyl to phosphorus-containing groups in extracellular polymeric substances is predicted to favor phosphonate groups, such as that found in phosphorylated NAG, rather than phosphodiesters, such as those in nucleic acids.

  2. Phospholyl-uranium complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After having reported a bibliographical study on penta-methylcyclopentadienyl uranium complexes, and a description of the synthesis and radioactivity of uranium (III) and (IV) boron hydrides compounds, this research thesis reports the study of mono and bis-tetramethyl-phospholyl uranium complexes comprising chloride, boron hydride, alkyl and alkoxide ligands. The third part reports the comparison of structures, stabilities and reactions of homologue complexes in penta-methylcyclopentadienyl and tetramethyl-phospholyl series. The last part addresses the synthesis of tris-phospholyl uranium (III) and (IV) complexes.

  3. Uranium nucleophilic carbene complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The only stable f-metal carbene complexes (excluding NHC) metals f present R2C2- groups having one or two phosphorus atoms in the central carbon in alpha position. The objective of this work was to develop the chemistry of carbenes for uranium (metal 5f) with the di-anion C{Ph2P(=S)}22- (SCS2-) to extend the organometallic chemistry of this element in its various oxidation states (+3-+6), and to reveal the influence of the 5f orbitals on the nature and reactivity of the double bond C=U. We first isolated the reactants M(SCHS) (M = Li and K) and demonstrated the role of the cation M+ on the evolution of the di-anion M2SCS (M = Li, K, Tl) which is transformed into LiSCHS in THF or into product of intramolecular cyclization K2[C(PhPS)2(C6H4)]. We have developed the necessary conditions mono-, bis- and tris-carbene directly from the di-anion SCS2- and UCl4, as the precursor used in uranium chemistry. The protonolysis reactions of amides compounds (U-NEt2) by the neutral ligand SCH2S were also studied. The compounds [Li(THF)]2[U(SCS)Cl3] and [U(SCS)Cl2(THF)2] were then used to prepare a variety of cyclopentadienyl and mono-cyclo-octa-tetra-enyliques uranium(IV) carbene compounds of the DFT analysis of compounds [M(SCS)Cl2(py)2] and [M(Cp)2(SCS)] (M = U, Zr) reveals the strong polarization of the M=C double bond, provides information on the nature of the σ and π interactions in this binding, and shows the important role of f orbitals. The influence of ancillary ligands on the M=C bond is revealed by examining the effects of replacing Cl- ligands and pyridine by C5H5- groups. Mulliken and NBO analyzes show that U=C bond, unlike the Zr=C bond, is not affected by the change in environment of the metal center. While the oxidation tests of carbene complexes of U(IV) were disappointing, the first carbene complex of uranium (VI), [UO2(SCS)(THF)2], was isolated with the uranyl ion UO22+. The reactions of compounds UO2X2 (X = I, OTf) with anions SCS2- and SCHS- provide the

  4. Uranium extraction by complexation with siderophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahamonde Castro, Cristina

    One of the major concerns of energy production is the environmental impact associated with the extraction of natural resources. Nuclear energy fuel is obtained from uranium, an abundant and naturally occurring element in the environment, but the currently used techniques for uranium extraction leave either a significant fingerprint (open pit mines) or a chemical residue that alters the pH of the environment (acid or alkali leaching). It is therefore clear that a new and greener approach to uranium extraction is needed. Bioleaching is one potential alternative. In bioleaching, complexants naturally produced from fungi or bacteria may be used to extract the uranium. In the following research, the siderophore enterobactin, which is naturally produced by bacteria to extract and solubilize iron from the environment, is evaluated to determine its potential for complexing with uranium. To determine whether enterobactin could be used for uranium extraction, its acid dissociation and its binding strength with the metal of interest must be determined. Due to the complexity of working with radioactive materials, lanthanides were used as analogs for uranium. In addition, polyprotic acids were used as structural and chemical analogs for the siderophore during method development. To evaluate the acid dissociation of enterobactin and the subsequent binding constants with lanthanides, three different analytical techniques were studied including: potentiometric titration, UltraViolet Visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometry and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC). After evaluation of three techniques, a combination of ITC and potentiometric titrations was deemed to be the most viable way for studying the siderophore of interest. The results obtained from these studies corroborate the ideal pH range for enterobactin complexation to the lanthanide of interest and pave the way for determining the strength of complexation relative to other naturally occurring metals. Ultimately, this

  5. Chapter 6. Uranium extraction possibilities from natural uranium-bearing waters of complex salt composition. 6.1. Some uranium extraction methods from natural uranium-bearing waters of complex salt composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present article is devoted to various uranium extraction methods from natural uranium-bearing waters of complex salt composition. Various uranium extraction methods from natural uranium-bearing waters of complex salt composition were described.

  6. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article includes a historical preface about uranium, discovery of portability of sequential fission of uranium, uranium existence, basic raw materials, secondary raw materials, uranium's physical and chemical properties, uranium extraction, nuclear fuel cycle, logistics and estimation of the amount of uranium reserves, producing countries of concentrated uranium oxides and percentage of the world's total production, civilian and military uses of uranium. The use of depleted uranium in the Gulf War, the Balkans and Iraq has caused political and environmental effects which are complex, raising problems and questions about the effects that nuclear compounds left on human health and environment.

  7. Macrocyclic ligands for uranium complexation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A highly preorganized 24-macrocycle containing biuret, thiobiuret and pyridine subunits has been prepared by high dilution ring-closure procedures. Intermediate products to this macrocycle have been utilized to extend this synthetic route to include further representatives where solubility and stability will be influenced by substituent variation. A 1:1 complex has been formed from uranyl acetate and a quinquepyridine derivative, this representing a new type of ligand for the uranyl ion. A very convenient synthetic procedure that will allow the incorporation of these macrocycles into polymeric systems has been developed for the introduction of a vinyl substituent into the 4-position of the pyridine ring. Using triflate, vinyltributyltin and Pd0 chemistry, this procedure should make a variety of substituted 4-vinylpyridines available for the first time. 3 refs

  8. Dicationic halo complexes of uranium(IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation of the interaction of the UX2(C104)2 (X = Cl- and Br-) systems, with selected neutral oxygen donor ligands was undertaken. The study involved the preparation and characterization of the solid state complexes obtained on the reaction of UX2(Cl04)2 with the chosen ligands. Higher coordinated complexes with bidentate phosphine oxide and sulphoxide ligands were also isolated. The reaction of UX2(Cl04)4 with the chosen ligands was also studied in non-aqueous solution spectrophotometrically and conductometrically. Attempts were made to identify reactions that take place in solution in titrations of these ligands with the UX2(Cl04)2 system. This proved to be successful since a large number of species formed in solution in these titrations were identified by a comparison of their electronic spectra in solution with that of the corresponding spectra in the solid state. Complexes of the type U(Cl04)4.nL (n = 4 and 5) were isolated and studied. Interesting data obtained were the significant coordination of perchlorate to uranium (IV) in one of these complexes. This proved to be important since perchlorate coordination towards uranium (IV) were not reported previously

  9. Speciation and Precipitation of Uranium Complexes in Hydrothermal Solutions Related to Granite—type Uranium Deposits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈培荣; 章邦桐; 等

    1992-01-01

    Uranium-bearing hydrothermal solutions during the stage of ore deposition are weakly alkaline and of the Ca2+ -Na+/HCO3- -F- type.UO2(CO3)22- and UO2F4-, are dominant in the hydrothermal solutions with respect to their activity.Wall-rock hydrothermal alterations ,temperature and pressure drop and the reducing capability of rock assemblage (Δeh) led to a decrease in Eh of the hydrothermal solutions and an increase in Eh at which uranium began precipitating.Therefore,the mechanism of uranium precipitation is essentially the reduction of uranium complexes.The granite-type uranium deposits are the most important type of uranium resources in China.Discussions will be made in this paper concerning the hydrothermal speciation and precipitation mech-anisms of uranium complexes in the light of fluid inclusion and geological data from some major de-posits of this type in South China.

  10. Synthesis and reactivity of triscyclopentadienyl uranium (III) and (IV) complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactions of (RC5H4)3U with R=trimethylsilylcyclopentadienyl or tertiobutylcyclopentadienyl are studied for the synthesis of new uranium organometallic compounds. Reactions with sodium hydride are first described uranium (III) anionic hydrides obtained are oxidized for synthesis of stable uranium (IV) organometallic hydrides. Stability of these compounds is discussed. Reactivity of these uranium (III) and (IV) hydrides are studied. Formation of new binuclear compounds with strong U-O and U-N bonds is examined and crystal structure are presented. Monocyclooctatetraenylic uranium complexes are also investigated

  11. Phthalocyaninato complexes of thorium, protactinium and uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the preparation of Bis(phthalocyaninato)-actinoid(IV) complexes, AnPc2, a new optimizing synthesis procedure was developed, with which it was possible to prepare spectrally pure, that is, H2Pc-free, ThPc2, UPc2 and the isostructurally similar 231PaPc2.PaPc2. This was verified with the help of electron spectra, which were compared to preparations which were synthesized in another manner. The corresponding perfluorinated compounds were also produced for thorium and uranium by use of tetrafluorophthalic acid nitrile instead of phthalic acid nitrile as initial product. Electron and infrared spectra show the typical bands of the non-substituted complexes. By the attempt to produce a mono(phthalocyaninato)-thorium complex with the use of ThI4 as initial material a pyridine-extracted pure ThPcI2(py)2 was obtained with a typical mono(phthalocyaninato) complex electron spectrum, an extremely moisture sensitive compound which in water or acids decomposes and produces H2Pc. (orig./RB)

  12. The chemical state of complex uranium oxides

    OpenAIRE

    Kvashnina, K. O.; Butorin, S. M.; Martin, P.; P. Glatzel

    2013-01-01

    We report here the first direct observation of U(V) in uranium binary oxides and analyze the gradual conversion of the U oxidation state in the mixed uranium systems. Our finding clarifies previous contradicting results and provides important input for the geological disposal of spent fuel, recycling applications and chemistry of uranium species.

  13. Complex Doping of Uranium under Centrifugal Casting in Zirconium Mold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the results of the investigation on the structure and distribution pattern of the doping elements in uranium casting, produced by the centrifugal casting in a sealed zirconium mold. It is investigated the possibility of complex zirconium and iron doping of uranium. The values of the zirconium mold dissolution rate against the centrifugal casting time are provided. The mechanism is suggested for doping uranium with the elements included in the mold material during the fuel rod fabrication by the centrifugal casting

  14. RECOVERY OF URANIUM BY CYCLOALKYLDITHIO-CARBAMATE COMPLEXING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, O.K.

    1959-06-30

    The separation of uranium-233 from an aqueous nitric acid solution of neutron irradiated thorium by selectively complexing the uranium is described. The separation is carried out by contacting the thorium solution with a non- aromatic organic dithiocarbamate selected from the group which consists of alkali and alkaline earth cycloalkyldithiocarbamates and recovering the resulting uranyl cycloalkyldithiocarbamate complex by organic solvent extraction such as with methyl ethyl ketone. The complexed uranium may be stripped from the separated organic phase by scrubbing with one normal nitric acid solution.

  15. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    concentration in peat bogs, deposits combined with marine phosphates, with coal and lignite, with black shales, with carbonate rocks, deposits in Precambrian quartz pebble conglomerates, basal-type deposits, deposits in sandstones (tabular, roll-type and tectono-lithologic deposits), breccia chimney filling deposits, deposits in metamorphic rocks, metasomatic deposits, deposits in intrusive rocks, deposits associated with hematite breccia complexes, deposits in granitic rocks, deposits in volcanic rocks, deposits in proterozoic discordances (Athabasca basin, Pine Creek geo-syncline); 4 - French uranium bearing areas and deposits: history of the French uranium mining industry, geological characteristics of French deposits (black shales, sandstones, granites), abroad success of French mining companies (Africa, North America, South America, Australia, Asia); 5 - exploration and exploitation; 6 - uranium economy: perspectives of uranium demand, present day production status, secondary resources, possible resources, market balances, prices and trends, future availability and nuclear perspectives. (J.S.)

  16. Unique advantages of organometallic supporting ligands for uranium complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaconescu, Paula L. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Garcia, Evan [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-05-31

    The objective of our research project was to study the reactivity of uranium complexes supported by ferrocene-based ligands. In addition, this research provides training of graduate students as the next generation of actinide scientists.

  17. Installation for supercritical fluid extraction of uranium complexes from technogenic deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An installation of supercritical fluid extraction of uranium complexes in the carbon dioxide environment developed in the NSC KIPT is presented. The efficiency of uranium complexes extraction was assessed on granite material used in the tests to simulate the uranium-bearing medium. The tests have demonstrated that high extraction rates can be achieved for uranium complexes recovery from technogenic deposits.

  18. Six-coordinate uranium complexes featuring a bidentate anilide ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, A.R.; Silvia, J.S.; Townsend, E.M.; Cummins, Ch.C. [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2010-06-15

    The synthesis of a new bidentate anilide ligand and four uranium amide complexes utilizing the ligand are reported. The secondary aniline HN[R]Ar{sub Met} (R = C(CD{sub 3}){sub 2}CH{sub 3}, Ar{sub Met} = 2-NMe{sub 2}-5-MeC{sub 6}H{sub 3}) is prepared by condensation of H{sub 2}NAr{sub Met} and acetone-d6 followed by alkylation of the resulting imine with MeLi. The ligand precursors (Et{sub 2}O)Li(N[R]Ar{sub Met}) and K(N[R]Ar{sub Met}) are prepared through deprotonation of HN[R]Ar{sub Met} with n-BuLi and KH, respectively. Treatment of UI{sub 3}(THF){sub 4} with (Et{sub 2}O)Li(N[R]Ar{sub Met}) (2 equiv) provides the uranium(III) -ate complex Li[I{sub 2}U(N[R]Ar{sub Met}){sub 2}] (Li[1]), while treatment of UI{sub 3} with three equiv. of K(N[R]Ar{sub Met}) provides the neutral uranium(III) complex U(N[R]Ar{sub Met}){sub 3} (2). Both uranium(III) complexes are susceptible to 1e oxidation, as is demonstrated by the syntheses of the uranium(IV) derivatives I{sub 2}U(N[R]Ar{sub Met}){sub 2} (1) and [U(N[R]Ar{sub Met}){sub 3}][OTf] ([2][OTf]; OTf=CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}). The spectroscopic and X-ray structural characterization of all four uranium complexes is described. The structures of 2 and [2][OTf] exhibit a large degree of steric pressure about the uranium center, effectively preventing the [2]{sup +} ion from achieving a seven-coordinate structure. (authors)

  19. The uranium potential of the Bushveld igneous complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of published literature supported by field observations on the uranium potential of the Bushveld Complex indicates that this geological region may host deposits with reserves in the range of a few thousand tons U3O8. The possibility that the Bushveld Complex or its cover rocks hosts, or has ever hosted in the past, giant uranium deposits such as those of Olympic Dam, Key Lake, Jabiluka or Rossing is considered to be unlikely. The potential for volcanogenic, caldera-type deposits in the Rooiberg Felsites remains at present untested. Recommendations for research currently sponsored by the AEC at the University of Pretoria are presented

  20. Treatment of uranium contaminated waste by complexation and ultrafiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study is an attempt to remove uranium by complexing with some complexing agents and passing the effluent through ultrafilter of 1000 molecular weight cut off hollow fibre membrane made of polysulphone to retain uranium along with complexing agent. Polyethylenimine, polyacrylamide and EDTA have been used as complexing agents whereas Ca3(PO4)2 and Fe(OH)3 as precipitating agents for this purpose. Results indicate that 800 mg/L of EDTA and 200 mg/L of polyethylenimine at a pH of 8 to 9 are most effective. The final activity was brought down to 10-7 mCi/L being the maximum permissible concentration for alpha activity in the effluent to be discharged in the sea. (author). 4 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  1. Uranium complexes with macrosyclic polyethers. Synthesis and structural chemical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This dissertation reports about studies on the chemical coordination behaviour of uranium of oxidation stages IV and VI with regard to twelve different macrocyclic ligands. For the preparation of the complexes, for every system a different method has been developed. The elementary analysis of the various complexes including the uranium had been done by X-ray fluorescence analysis, and the structural characterization proceeded via vibrational, uv-vis and emission spectroscopy as well as 1H-NMR and 13C-spin-lattice relaxation time studies. Conformational analysis of the polyethers used allowed the structural changes in the complexes to be observed. The structural analysis of the hydrous uranium VI crown ether complexes yielded information of characteristic features of these types of complexes. The first coordination sphere of the uranyl ion with covalently bonded anion remains unchanged. As to the water content, there is a certain range. Depending upon the solvent used, the complexes have two or four H2O molecules per formula unit. (orig./EF)

  2. Nitrato complexes of thorium and uranium(IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interactions of nitrate with uranium (1V) and thorium (1V) in the presence of a neutron oxygen donor ligand and in a non-aqueous medium were investigated. Hexamethylphosphoramide and trimethylphosphine oxide were used as neutraldonor ligands. Various simultaneous equlibria were indicated in solution and conditions were established under which solid nitrato complexes, which differ in stoichiometry, could be isolated. The donor action of nitrate towards uranium (1V) was compared to that of chloride, bromide, iodide and the neutral donor ligands. The solid nitrato complexes were characterized by means of their visible and infrared spectra, non-aqueous conductivity and magnetic susceptibility. The coordination modes of the nitrato groups were identified using infrared spectrophotometry. The thermal decomposition kinetics of some of the solid nitrato complexes were studied in vacuum by isothermal thermogravimetric analyses. Energy parameters such as activation energies and enthalpies for similar decomposition reactors were compared and discussed

  3. Study of new complexes of uranium and comba radical. I.- Complexes defective in sodium carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some complexes formed in presence of defect of sodium carbonate with respect to the stoichiometric ratio (U): (C03) = 1:3 are studied. This ratio corresponds to the main complex which is responsible for the uranium extraction with CDMBAC organic solutions and from U(VI) aqueous solutions with an excess of sodium carbonate. (Author) 10 refs

  4. Preparation, spectroscopic and structural analysis of uranium-arabinose complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reaction between L-arabinose and hydrated uranyl salts has been investigated in aqueous solution and the solid complexes of the type UO2(L-arabinose)X2·2H2O, where X=Cl-, Br-, and NO3-, have been isolated and characterized. Due to the marked similarities with those of the structurally known Ca(L-arabinose)X2·4H2O and Mg(L-arabinose)X2·4H2O (X=Cl- or Br-) compounds, the UO22+ ion binds obviously to two L-arabinose moieties, through O1, O5 of the first and O3, O4 of the second molecule resulting into a six-coordinated geometry around the uranium ion with no direct U-X (X=Cl-, Br- or NO3-) interaction. The intermolecular hydrogen bonding network of the free L-arabinose is rearranged upon uranium interaction. The β-anomer configuration is predominant in the free L-arabinose, whereas the α-anomer conformation is preferred in the uranium complexes. (Author)

  5. Homoleptic 2-mercapto benzothiazolate uranium and lanthanide complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment of [Ln(BH4)3(THF)3] (Ln = Ce, Nd) with 3 and 4 mol equiv of KSBT in tetrahydrofuran (THF) led to the formation of [Ln(SBT)3(THF)] and [K(THF)Ln(SBT)4], respectively. The uranium(IV) compound [U(SBT)4(THF)2] was obtained from U(BH4)4 and was reversibly reduced by sodium amalgam into the corresponding anionic uranium(III) complex. The crystal structures of [Ln(SBT)3(THF)2] (Ln = Ce, Nd), [K(15-crown-5)2][Nd(SBT)4], [U(SBT)4(THF)], and [K(15-crown-5)2][U(SBT)4(py)] show the bidentate coordination mode and the thionate character of the SBT ligand. (authors)

  6. Interactions of quercetin-uranium complexes with biomembranes and DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium decontamination gains a great importance with the spread of nuclear waste in both soil and water systems across the planet. All known remediation methods of uranium can be exclusively based either on synthetic materials with high adsorbent power and known physical chemistry or life organisms by which the uranium eventually accumulated inside their tissues. In the present thesis, it was attempted to design a rational approach for uranyl removal primarily from waters using the reducing potential of quercetin, which is a plant-derived small organic molecules, along with its photochemical activities. Such approach, which is neither a fully synthetic nor an organism-based approach, was chosen here to avoid disadvantages with both traditional strategies. Here, complexation experiments were designed to assess the use of uranyl-quercetin complexes for the photoreduction of water-soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) by comparing absorption properties of uranyl-quercetin complexes in acetone, water, and hydrophobic bilayer lipid vesicles. The UV-vis data show that uranyl quercetin complex can form in both hydrophobic and hydrophilic environments. In both cases the B-ring band in quercetin structure becomes reduced, red shifted and a pronounced absorption arises in the 400-500 nm range. Such data suggests that U(VI) binds at the 3-OH and 4-carbonyl of ring C of quercetin. Interestingly, the results of UV-Vis spectroscopy part hint at a crucial role of a stable or transiently ionized hydroxyl for the efficient uranyl-dependent photodegradation of quercetin. FTIR spectroscopy absorption changes further demonstrates that the UV-vis-spectroscopic changes are indeed accompanied by changes in the chemical structure of the complex as expected for a uranyl-dependent photodegradation. IR data thus suggest that U(VI) becomes reduced by the photoreaction, rather than merely changing its coordination shell. The frequency shifts in the C=C and C=O absorption range on the other hand

  7. Determination of the stability constants of uranium-tetracycline complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stability constants of complexes formed with tetracycline (TC) and uranium have been determined by solvent extraction technique. The site on the tetracycline molecule at which uranyl ion may be bound has been studied by means of potentiometric titration and spectrophotometric techniques. The complex species with 1:1 and 1:2 for UO2: TC ratio have been identified by conductometric titration. Solvent extraction studies have also shown that the complexes are mononuclear of the type UO2 (TC) sub (n) (n=1,2) and that no hidroxocomplexes or negatively charged complexes have been formed. Stability constant values have been calculated by numerical weighted least square method and by graphical methods of two parameters, of the average number of ligands and of the limiting value. (Author)

  8. Uranium hetero-bimetallic complexes: synthesis, structure and magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this thesis is to synthesize molecular complexes with uranium and transition metal ions in close proximity, to determine the nature of the magnetic interaction between them. We decided to use Schiff bases as assembling ligands, which are unusual for uranium (IV). Although the simplest Schiff bases, such as H2Salen, lead to ligand exchange reactions, the bi-compartmental Schiff base H4L6 (bis(3-hydroxy-salicylidene) - 2,2-dimethyl-propylene) allows the crystal structure determination of the complex [L6Cu(pyr)]U[L6Cu].2pyr, obtained by reaction of the metallo-ligand H2L6Cu with U(acac)4. In this manner, the complexes [L6Co(pyr)]2U and [L6Ni(pyr)]2U.pyr were also isolated, as well as the compounds in which the paramagnetic ions have been exchanged by the diamagnetic ions ZnII, ZrIV and ThIV': [L6Zn(pyr)]2U, [L6Cu]2Zr and [L6Cu(pyr)]Th[L6Cu].2pyr. These complexes are the first which involve three metallic centres assembling by the means of a hexa-dentate Schiff base. The crystalline structures show, for all these complexes, the outstanding orthogonal arrangement of the two fragments L6M around the central atom which is in a dodecahedral environment of eight oxygen atoms of two Schiff bases. The syntheses of the isostructural complexes Cu2II and Zn2U in which the uranium (IV) ion is close, in the first one, to the paramagnetic ion CuII and, in the second one, to the diamagnetic ion ZnII, has allowed the use of the empiric method to determine the nature of the magnetic interaction between an f element and a transition metal. The comparison of the magnetic behaviour of two complexes Cu2U and Zn2U, expressed by the variation of χT vs T, reveals the ferromagnetic interaction in the heart of the triad Cu-U-Cu. The magnetic behaviour of the complexes Cu2Th et Cu2Zr which does not show any coupling between the two copper (II) ions and the weak antiferromagnetic interaction in the Ni2U compound, favour the hypothesis of ferromagnetic coupling between UIV and Cu

  9. Liquid chromatography of uranium complexes of tetradentate Schiff bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuhawar, M Y; Lanjwani, S N; Jehangir, T M

    2004-08-01

    Dioxouranium together with copper(II), nickel(II) and iron(II) were extracted in chloroform as complexes of bis(salicylaldehyde)-dl-stilbenediimine (dl-H2SA2S) or bis(salicylaldehyde)-meso-stilbenediimine (meso-H2SA2S), and separated by liquid chromatography with UV detection. The linear calibration range and detection limits were 40 - 200 ng and 10 ng/injection for each metal ion. The method was applied to the determination of uranium from mineral ore samples at concentrations of 30 - 700 microg/g with coefficients of variation from 3.6 to 5.5%. The relative elution of dioxouranium complexes of different Schiff bases was examined from reversed-phase HPLC; the substitution of methyl and phenyl groups at the bridge position enhanced the column retention of uranyl complexes. PMID:15352510

  10. Interactions of quercetin-uranium complexes with biomembranes and DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attia, Enas Mohammed Hassan

    2014-07-21

    Uranium decontamination gains a great importance with the spread of nuclear waste in both soil and water systems across the planet. All known remediation methods of uranium can be exclusively based either on synthetic materials with high adsorbent power and known physical chemistry or life organisms by which the uranium eventually accumulated inside their tissues. In the present thesis, it was attempted to design a rational approach for uranyl removal primarily from waters using the reducing potential of quercetin, which is a plant-derived small organic molecules, along with its photochemical activities. Such approach, which is neither a fully synthetic nor an organism-based approach, was chosen here to avoid disadvantages with both traditional strategies. Here, complexation experiments were designed to assess the use of uranyl-quercetin complexes for the photoreduction of water-soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) by comparing absorption properties of uranyl-quercetin complexes in acetone, water, and hydrophobic bilayer lipid vesicles. The UV-vis data show that uranyl quercetin complex can form in both hydrophobic and hydrophilic environments. In both cases the B-ring band in quercetin structure becomes reduced, red shifted and a pronounced absorption arises in the 400-500 nm range. Such data suggests that U(VI) binds at the 3-OH and 4-carbonyl of ring C of quercetin. Interestingly, the results of UV-Vis spectroscopy part hint at a crucial role of a stable or transiently ionized hydroxyl for the efficient uranyl-dependent photodegradation of quercetin. FTIR spectroscopy absorption changes further demonstrates that the UV-vis-spectroscopic changes are indeed accompanied by changes in the chemical structure of the complex as expected for a uranyl-dependent photodegradation. IR data thus suggest that U(VI) becomes reduced by the photoreaction, rather than merely changing its coordination shell. The frequency shifts in the C=C and C=O absorption range on the other hand

  11. Investigating the thermodynamic stability of Bacillus subtilis spore-uranium(VI) adsorption though surface complexation modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrold, Z.; Hertel, M.; Gorman-Lewis, D.

    2012-12-01

    Dissolved uranium speciation, mobility, and remediation are increasingly important topics given continued and potential uranium (U) release from mining operations and nuclear waste. Vegetative bacterial cell surfaces are known to adsorb uranium and may influence uranium speciation in the environment. Previous investigations regarding U(VI) adsorption to bacterial spores, a differentiated and dormant cell type with a tough proteinaceous coat, include U adsorption affinity and XAFS data. We investigated the thermodynamic stability of aerobic, pH dependent uranium adsorption to bacterial spore surfaces using purified Bacillus subtilis spores in solution with 5ppm uranium. Adsorption reversibility and kinetic experiments indicate that uranium does not precipitate over the duration of the experiments and equilibrium is reached within 20 minutes. Uranium-spore adsorption edges exhibited adsorption at all pH measured between 2 and 10. Maximum adsorption was achieved around pH 7 and decreased as pH increased above 7. We used surface complexation modeling (SCM) to quantify uranium adsorption based on balanced chemical equations and derive thermodynamic stability constants for discrete uranium-spore adsorption reactions. Site specific thermodynamic stability constants provide insight on interactions occurring between aqueous uranium species and spore surface ligands. The uranium adsorption data and SCM parameters described herein, also provide a basis for predicting the influence of bacterial spores on uranium speciation in natural systems and investigating their potential as biosorption agents in engineered systems.

  12. EXAFS investigation of uranium(VI) complexes formed at Bacillus cereus and Bacillus sphaericus surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium(VI) complex formation at vegetative cells and spores of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus sphaericus was studied using uranium LII-edge and LIII-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. A comparison of the measured equatorial U-O distances and other EXAFS structural parameters of uranyl species formed at the Bacillus strains with those of the uranyl structure family indicates that the uranium is predominantly bound as uranyl complexes with phosphoryl residues. (orig.)

  13. Uranium mill tailings neutralization: contaminant complexation and tailings leaching studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laboratory experiments were performed to compare the effectiveness of limestone (CaCO3) and hydrated lime [Ca(OH)2] for improving waste water quality through the neutralization of acidic uranium mill tailings liquor. The experiments were designed to also assess the effects of three proposed mechanisms - carbonate complexation, elevated pH, and colloidal particle adsorption - on the solubility of toxic contaminants found in a typical uranium mill waste solution. Of special interest were the effects each of these possible mechanisms had on the solution concentrations of trace metals such as Cd, Co, Mo, Zn, and U after neutralization. Results indicated that the neutralization of acidic tailings to a pH of 7.3 using hydrated lime provided the highest overall waste water quality. Both the presence of a carbonate source or elevating solution pH beyond pH = 7.3 resulted in a lowering of previously achieved water quality, while adsorption of contaminants onto colloidal particles was not found to affect the solution concentration of any constituent investigated. 24 refs., 8 figs., 19 tabs

  14. Metal-Metal Bonding in Uranium-Group 10 Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlina, Johann A; Pankhurst, James R; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Arnold, Polly L

    2016-03-16

    Heterobimetallic complexes containing short uranium-group 10 metal bonds have been prepared from monometallic IU(IV)(OAr(P)-κ(2)O,P)3 (2) {[Ar(P)O](-) = 2-tert-butyl-4-methyl-6-(diphenylphosphino)phenolate}. The U-M bond in IU(IV)(μ-OAr(P)-1κ(1)O,2κ(1)P)3M(0), M = Ni (3-Ni), Pd (3-Pd), and Pt (3-Pt), has been investigated by experimental and DFT computational methods. Comparisons of 3-Ni with two further U-Ni complexes XU(IV)(μ-OAr(P)-1κ(1)O,2κ(1)P)3Ni(0), X = Me3SiO (4) and F (5), was also possible via iodide substitution. All complexes were characterized by variable-temperature NMR spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The U-M bonds are significantly shorter than any other crystallographically characterized d-f-block bimetallic, even though the ligand flexes to allow a variable U-M separation. Excellent agreement is found between the experimental and computed structures for 3-Ni and 3-Pd. Natural population analysis and natural localized molecular orbital (NLMO) compositions indicate that U employs both 5f and 6d orbitals in covalent bonding to a significant extent. Quantum theory of atoms-in-molecules analysis reveals U-M bond critical point properties typical of metallic bonding and a larger delocalization index (bond order) for the less polar U-Ni bond than U-Pd. Electrochemical studies agree with the computational analyses and the X-ray structural data for the U-X adducts 3-Ni, 4, and 5. The data show a trend in uranium-metal bond strength that decreases from 3-Ni down to 3-Pt and suggest that exchanging the iodide for a fluoride strengthens the metal-metal bond. Despite short U-TM (transition metal) distances, four other computational approaches also suggest low U-TM bond orders, reflecting highly transition metal localized valence NLMOs. These are more so for 3-Pd than 3-Ni, consistent with slightly larger U-TM bond orders in the latter. Computational studies of the model systems (PH3)3MU(OH)3I (M = Ni, Pd) reveal

  15. Toxicity of depleted uranium complexes is independent of p53 activity

    OpenAIRE

    Heintze, Ellie; Aguilera, Camille; Davis, Malia; Fricker, Avery; Li, Qiang; Martinez, Jesse; Matthew J. Gage

    2010-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein is one of the key checkpoints in cellular response to a variety of stress mechanisms, including exposure to various toxic metal complexes. Previous studies have demonstrated that arsenic and chromium complexes are able to activate p53, but there is a dearth of data investigating whether uranium complexes exhibit similar effects. The use of depleted uranium (DU) has increased in recent years, raising concern about DU’s potential carcinogenic effects. Previous s...

  16. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author discusses the contribution made by various energy sources in the production of electricity. Estimates are made of the future nuclear contribution, the future demand for uranium and future sales of Australian uranium. Nuclear power growth in the United States, Japan and Western Europe is discussed. The present status of the six major Australian uranium deposits (Ranger, Jabiluka, Nabarlek, Koongarra, Yeelerrie and Beverley) is given. Australian legislation relevant to the uranium mining industry is also outlined

  17. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development, prospecting, research, processing and marketing of South Africa's uranium industry and the national policies surrounding this industry form the headlines of this work. The geology of South Africa's uranium occurences and their positions, the processes used in the extraction of South Africa's uranium and the utilisation of uranium for power production as represented by the Koeberg nuclear power station near Cape Town are included in this publication

  18. Trivalent metallocene chemistry of some uranium, titanium, and zirconium complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dicyclopentadienyluranium halide dimers have been prepared and their solution behavior examined. These molecules exist as dimers in solution, and the halide ligands undergo rapid site exchange on the NMR timescale above 50 C. Analogous dicyclopentadienyluranium hydroxide dimers have also been prepared; they oxidatively eliminate hydrogen to give the corresponding oxide dimers. Mechanism of this reaction is consistent with αmigration of one of the hydroxide hydrogen atoms to a uranium center followed by elimination of hydrogen. Ground state of [(Me3Si)2C5H3]3M M = Nd, U and their base adducts has been examined by variable temperature magnetic susceptibility and EPR spectroscopy. The ground state is found to be 4I9/2 with a crystal field state consisting largely of Jz = 1/2 lowest, in agreement with previous studies on tris-cyclopentadienylneodymium complexes. The zirconium metallocene Cp3Zr has been prepared, characterized crystallographically, and its reactivity studied. Its chemical behavior is controlled by presence of an electron in the non-bonding, dz2 orbital which prevents formation of base adducts Of Cp3Zr, but allows Cp3Zr to abstract atoms from other molecules. Electonic and EPR spectra of Cp*2TiX complexes, where Cp* is Me5C5 and X is a monodentate, anionic ligand such as halide, have been studied. A π-bonding spectrochemical series is developed, and trends in π-bonding ability are found similar to those in other inorganic complexes. The β-agostic interactions in Cp*2TiN(Me)Ph have been examined using variable temperature EPR spectroscopy, and the enthalpy/entropy of the interaction determined. In Cp*2TiEt, enthalpy of the β-agostic interaction is -1.9 kcal/mol. The titanocene anion, Cp*2TiLi(TMEDA) (TMEDA is N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine), has been prepared and its structure determined

  19. Distribution of naturally occurring radionuclides uranium and 226Ra in groundwater adjoining uranium complex of Turamdih, Jharkhand, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimation of radionuclide content is essential for assessment of individual exposure in areas where groundwater is the principal source of drinking water. Elevated levels can be expected in areas known for radioactive mineral deposits and anthropogenic activities like mining and ore processing industry. The aim of this study is to determine the uranium and 226Ra in groundwater sources adjoining and away from uranium mining and ore processing industry at Turamdih, Jharkhand. The concentration of uranium in well/tubewell samples analysed nearby and away from the tailings ponds ranged from 0.1 to 8.4 μgI-1 and 226Ra varied from 4 to 269 mBqI-1. The wide variation of activity concentration is due to regions of uranium deposits with elevated level of radium in the earth's crust and geological faults, when compared to lower concentration profile of radium in earth crust. The ingestion of uranium and 226Ra in the adult population residing around Turamdih mining complex through drinking water sources ranged from 0.81 μSv year-1 to 3.8 μSv year-1 respectively. This is much lower than 100 μSv year-1, that is recommended by WHO for ingestion from intake of a single radionuclide. The groundwater monitoring carried out over four years around Turamdih mining complex indicates that there has been no observable impact on groundwater sources due to mining and ore processing activities in this region. (author)

  20. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A discussion is given of uranium as an energy source in The Australian economy. Figures and predictions are presented on the world supply-demand position and also figures are given on the added value that can be achieved by the processing of uranium. Conclusions are drawn about Australia's future policy with regard to uranium (R.L.)

  1. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The geological setting of uranium resources in the world can be divided in two basic categories of resources and are defined as reasonably assured resources, estimated additional resources and speculative resources. Tables are given to illustrate these definitions. The increasing world production of uranium despite the cutback in the nuclear industry and the uranium requirements of the future concluded these lecture notes

  2. Catalytic properties and dynamic behaviour of uranium complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The catalytic properties of organometallic uranium III and IV compounds in solution as well as reaction mechanisms are studied. The structure in solution of CpUCl3L2 (L=THF, HMPA, OPPh3, OP(OR)3) is investigated. When L=HMPA, the complex exists in two isomers in equilibrium with the L ligands either in trans or mer-cis configuration. The isomerization (Ea=92 kJ mol-1) as well as the bimolecular exchange with an outer sphere ligand L are observable in 1H and 31P NMR, and quantified with the spin saturation transfer technique in several solvents and at different temperatures between 230 and 330 K. This property is extended to other ligands. The compound U(AlH4)3 is synthetized. This compound catalyses the hydroalumination of olefins by LiAlH4 with a very good anti-Markovnikov regioselectivity. A simple mechanism for this reaction is suggested. The reactions of the organoaluminates products with several reactants (D2O, I2, CH2O, Allyl-Br...) has been shown to be a powerful synthetic tool. Some specific alkenes and alkynes exhibit an interesting behaviour as dimerization or β-alkyl elimination which is easily interpreted by our mechanism

  3. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Portsmouth Uranium Enrichment Complex, Piketon, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Uranium Enrichment Complex (PUEC), conducted August 4 through August 15, 1986. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Team specialists are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations performed at PUEC, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by Argonne National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the PUEC Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the PUEC Survey. 55 refs., 22 figs., 21 tabs

  4. EXAFS investigation of uranium(6) complexes formed at Acidithiobacillus ferro oxidans types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mining activities have brought excessive amounts of uranium into the environment. In uranium deposits a number of acidophilic chemo-litho-autotrophic bacteria have been identified which are able to oxidize sulphide minerals, elemental sulphur, ferrous iron and also (in the presence of uranium mineral) U(IV). In particular, the interaction of one representative of the group Acidithiobacillus ferro oxidans (new designation of Thiobacillus ferro oxidans) with uranium has been investigated. Uranium(VI) complex formations at the surfaces of Acidithiobacillus ferro oxidans were studied using uranium LIII-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. In all samples uranium is co-ordinated by two axial oxygen atoms (Oax) at a distance of 1.77-1.78 angstrom. The average distance between uranium and the equatorial oxygen atoms (Oeq) is 2.35 angstrom. The co-ordination number for Oeq is 5-6. In comparison to the uranium crystal structure data, the U-Oeq distance indicates a co-ordination number of the equatorial oxygen of 5. Within the experimental error, there are no differences in the U-O bond distances between samples from the three types of A. ferro oxidans investigated. The fit to the EXAFS data of samples measured as wet pastes gave the same results as for dried samples. No significant structural differences were observed for the uranium complexes formed by the eco-types of A. ferro oxidans. However, the EXAFS spectra do indicate a formation of uranium complexes which are different from those formed by Bacilli where the bond length of 2.28 angstrom indicates a co-ordination number of 4 for the equatorial oxygen atoms. (authors)

  5. MICROBIAL TRANSFORMATIONS OF URANIUM COMPLEXED WITH ORGANIC AND INORGANIC LIGANDS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FRANCIS,A.J.

    2002-09-15

    Biotransformation of various chemical forms of uranium present in wastes, contaminated soils and materials by microorganisms under different process conditions such as aerobic and anaerobic (denitrifying, iron-reducing, fermentative, and sulfate-reducing) conditions will affect the solubility, bioavailability, and mobility of uranium in the natural environment. Fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of microbial transformations of uranium under a variety of environmental conditions will be useful in developing appropriate remediation and waste management strategies as well as predicting the microbial impacts on the long-term stewardship of contaminated sites.

  6. Electrochemistry, Spectroscopy, and Reactivity of Uranium Complexes Supported by Ferrocene Diamide Ligands

    OpenAIRE

    Duhovic, Selma

    2012-01-01

    This work culminates a systematic study of various uranium complexes supported by ferrocene diamide ligands. Chapter 1 reports the synthesis of 1,1'-ferrocene diamines and describes their electronic and steric properties in both neutral and oxidized forms. Chapter 2 describes an efficient synthesis of uranium dialkyl complexes supported by a single 1,1'- ferrocene diamide ligand, while Chapter 3 explores their reactivity with several aromatic heterocycles. Chapter 4 focuses on the electrochem...

  7. Trivalent metallocene chemistry of some uranium, titanium, and zirconium complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukens, W.W. Jr.

    1995-05-01

    Dicyclopentadienyluranium halide dimers have been prepared and their solution behavior examined. These molecules exist as dimers in solution, and the halide ligands undergo rapid site exchange on the NMR timescale above 50 C. Analogous dicyclopentadienyluranium hydroxide dimers have also been prepared; they oxidatively eliminate hydrogen to give the corresponding oxide dimers. Mechanism of this reaction is consistent with {alpha}migration of one of the hydroxide hydrogen atoms to a uranium center followed by elimination of hydrogen. Ground state of [(Me{sub 3}Si){sub 2}C{sub 5}H{sub 3}]{sub 3}M M = Nd, U and their base adducts has been examined by variable temperature magnetic susceptibility and EPR spectroscopy. The ground state is found to be {sup 4}I{sub 9/2} with a crystal field state consisting largely of J{sub z} = 1/2 lowest, in agreement with previous studies on tris-cyclopentadienylneodymium complexes. The zirconium metallocene Cp{sub 3}Zr has been prepared, characterized crystallographically, and its reactivity studied. Its chemical behavior is controlled by presence of an electron in the non-bonding, d{sub z}2 orbital which prevents formation of base adducts Of Cp{sub 3}Zr, but allows Cp{sub 3}Zr to abstract atoms from other molecules. Electonic and EPR spectra of Cp*{sub 2}TiX complexes, where Cp* is Me{sub 5}C{sub 5} and X is a monodentate, anionic ligand such as halide, have been studied. A {pi}-bonding spectrochemical series is developed, and trends in {pi}-bonding ability are found similar to those in other inorganic complexes. The {beta}-agostic interactions in Cp*{sub 2}TiN(Me)Ph have been examined using variable temperature EPR spectroscopy, and the enthalpy/entropy of the interaction determined. In Cp*{sub 2}TiEt, enthalpy of the {beta}-agostic interaction is {minus}1.9 kcal/mol. The titanocene anion, Cp*{sub 2}TiLi(TMEDA) (TMEDA is N,N,N`,N`-tetramethylethylenediamine), has been prepared and its structure determined.

  8. Ligand influences on properties of uranium coordination complexes. Structure, reactivity, and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis several different aspects of uranium chemistry are presented. It was shown that terminal uranium(V) oxo and imido complexes [((RArO)3tacn)UV(O)] and [((RArO)3tacn)UV(NSiMe3)] (R = t Bu, Ad) can be oxidized by silver(I) hexafluoro-antimonate to the uranium(VI) oxo and imido complexes [((RArO)3tacn)UVI(O)]SbF6 and [((RArO)3tacn)UVI(NSiMe3)]SbF6. While for the t Bu-derivative of the oxo complex an equatorial coordination is observed due to stabilization by the inverse trans-influence, normal axial coordination is observed for the Ad-derivative and both imido complexes. The inverse trans-influence was thus proven to be a key factor for the coordination mode of a terminal ligand on high valent uranium complexes. LIII XANES was shown to be a great tool for the determination of oxidation states of uranium complexes. Therefore, a series of uranium complexes in all stable oxidation states for uranium, +III to +VI was prepared, and their spectra analyzed. All compounds bear only O-donor ligands in addition to the chlating trisaryloxide-tacn-ligand. A separation of 1.5 to 3 eV in the white line energy is observed between the different oxidation states. This series can be used as reference for compounds, where oxidation state assignment is not obvious, such as a ketyl radical complex [((t-BuAr)O3tacn)U(O-C(t-BuPh)2.-)]. For this complex, the oxidation state of +IV could be assigned. Moreover, a series of isostructural uranium(IV) complexes was prepared. The influence of different ligands according to the spectrochemical series on the electronic and magnetic properties could be shown using UV/vis/NIR spectroscopy and variable temperature SQUID measurements. Calculations of uranium LIII XANES spectra show a variation in the shape of the spectra and thus high resolution PFY-XANES would be a great tool to determine the electronic influence of these different axial ligands. Using the single N-anchored ligand system, the first example of a uranium(IV)

  9. Ligand influences on properties of uranium coordination complexes. Structure, reactivity, and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosog, Boris

    2012-11-02

    In this thesis several different aspects of uranium chemistry are presented. It was shown that terminal uranium(V) oxo and imido complexes [(({sup R}ArO){sub 3}tacn)U{sup V}(O)] and [(({sup R}ArO){sub 3}tacn)U{sup V}(NSiMe{sub 3})] (R = t Bu, Ad) can be oxidized by silver(I) hexafluoro-antimonate to the uranium(VI) oxo and imido complexes [(({sup R}ArO){sub 3}tacn)U{sup VI}(O)]SbF{sub 6} and [(({sup R}ArO){sub 3}tacn)U{sup VI}(NSiMe{sub 3})]SbF{sub 6}. While for the t Bu-derivative of the oxo complex an equatorial coordination is observed due to stabilization by the inverse trans-influence, normal axial coordination is observed for the Ad-derivative and both imido complexes. The inverse trans-influence was thus proven to be a key factor for the coordination mode of a terminal ligand on high valent uranium complexes. L{sub III} XANES was shown to be a great tool for the determination of oxidation states of uranium complexes. Therefore, a series of uranium complexes in all stable oxidation states for uranium, +III to +VI was prepared, and their spectra analyzed. All compounds bear only O-donor ligands in addition to the chlating trisaryloxide-tacn-ligand. A separation of 1.5 to 3 eV in the white line energy is observed between the different oxidation states. This series can be used as reference for compounds, where oxidation state assignment is not obvious, such as a ketyl radical complex [(({sup t-Bu}Ar)O{sub 3}tacn)U(O-C({sup t-Bu}Ph){sub 2}{sup .-})]. For this complex, the oxidation state of +IV could be assigned. Moreover, a series of isostructural uranium(IV) complexes was prepared. The influence of different ligands according to the spectrochemical series on the electronic and magnetic properties could be shown using UV/vis/NIR spectroscopy and variable temperature SQUID measurements. Calculations of uranium L{sub III} XANES spectra show a variation in the shape of the spectra and thus high resolution PFY-XANES would be a great tool to determine the electronic

  10. Evaluation of the uranium potential of the Bushveld Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The poor quality of the airborne radiometric surveys and the lack of exploration geochemical data in the public domain prevent a satisfactory assessment of the uranium potential of the Bushveld area. Undue reliance must be placed upon fitting models of uranium ore deposits to the geology of the Bushveld area. Although the Bushveld granites have an unusually high background of uranium (20 to 40 ppm), they probably only host small vein-type deposits. The vein at the Albert Silver mine should be investigated as a type example to determine if it is only economic in the narrow interval of supergene enrichment. The Rooiberg Group has considerable potential for caldera-related deposits and for uranium-bearing sulphide deposits (including Olympic Dam-type deposits) in sedimentary interbeds. The Loskop Formation appears to be correlative with the Glentig and lower Swaershoek Formations of the Waterberg area. The Waterberg Group is the logical host to investigate for giant uncomformity/vein-type uranium deposits like those in Canada and Australia. Because the Waterberg consists of four uncomformity-bounded sequences, it is rarely more than 3 km thick; all of the sequences could be younger than 1770 Ma

  11. Triamidoamine uranium(IV)-arsenic complexes containing one-, two- and threefold U-As bonding interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Gardner, B. M.; Balazs, G; Scheer, M; Tuna, F.; McInnes, EJL; McMaster, J.; Lewis, W; Blake, A. J.; Liddle, S T

    2015-01-01

    To further our fundamental understanding of the nature and extent of covalency in uranium–ligand bonding, and the benefits that this may have for the design of new ligands for nuclear waste separation, there is burgeoning interest in the nature of uranium complexes with soft- and multiple-bond-donor ligands. Despite this, there have so far been no examples of structurally authenticated molecular uranium–arsenic bonds under ambient conditions. Here, we report molecular uranium(IV)–arsenic comp...

  12. Determination of uranium and thorium complexes of 5-chloro-7-amino-8-hydroxyquinoline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    5-Chloro-7-amino-8-hydroxyquinoline which is a 8-hydroxyquinoline derivative was synthesized and its thorium and uranium complexes have been determined. 5-Chloro-7-nitro-8-hydroxyquinoline was prepared by nitration reaction of 5-chloro-8-hydroxyquinoline in aqueous solution of nitric acid. Then 5-chloro-7-amino-8-hydroxyquinoline was synthesized by reduction with sodium dithionite. Proton-ligand stability constants of 5-chloro-7-amino-8-hydroxuquinoline and stability constants of thorium and uranium complexes forming this ligand were determined by using the Irving-Rossotti method computing the Calvin-Bjerrum pH-titration data. As a results, thorium complexes were found more stable than uranium complexes. (author). 14 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs

  13. Radiological risk assessment of U(nat) in the ground water around Jaduguda uranium mining complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium is present naturally in earth crust and hence at trace level in ground water, sea water, building materials etc. Naturally occurring radionuclide originating from industrial activities, metal mining and waste depository may contribute to the nearby ground water by radionuclide migration. Ground water ecosystem surrounding the uranium processing facility at Jaduguda has been studied for natural uranium distribution. In the present study, the drinking water sources at various distance zone (with in 1.6 km, 1.6-5 km and > 5km) covering all directions around the waste depository (tailings pond) have been investigated for uranium content. Evaluation of intake, ingestion dose and subsequent risk for population residing around the tailings pond has been carried out. Annual intake of uranium through drinking water for members of public residing around the uranium complex is found to be in the range of 41.8 - 44.4 Bq.y-1. The intake and ingestion dose is appreciably low (-1) which is far below the WHO recommended level of 100 Sv.y-1. The life time radiological risk due to uranium natural in drinking water is insignificant and found to be of the order of 10-6. (author)

  14. Structure studies of uranium complexes with macrocycles in solid phase and in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molecular structure of uranium complexes is determined by X-ray diffraction for monocrystals, paramagnetic NMR for solutions and EXAFS for both. The last method can be applied for any oxidation degree of uranium. Solubilization of uranyl and uranium IV hydroxides by cyclodextrins is evidenced and complexation is shown by NMR and polarography. The [222] cryptand diamine-N-oxide was synthesized and the structure of various compounds of this macrocycle is studied. Insertion of uranium III in 18-crown-16 is studied by EXAFS in the complex U3 (BH4)9 (18-crown-6)2. The structure of the uranium complex U(BH4)2 dicyclohexyl-(18-crown-6)B)2+UCl5BH4)2- is determined by X-ray diffraction. NMR shows that 18-crown-6 and B isomer of dicyclohexyl 18-crown-6 stabilize the cation U(BH4)2+ in dichloromethane and [222] cryptand stabilizes U(BH4)3 in nitromethane

  15. Ligand Influences on Properties of Uranium Coordination Complexes - Structure, Reactivity, and Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Kosog, Boris

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis several different aspects of uranium chemistry are presented. It was shown that terminal uranium(V) oxo and imido complexes [((RArO)3tacn)UV(O)] and [((RArO)3tacn)UV(NSiMe3)] (R = t Bu, Ad) can be oxidized by silver(I) hexafluoro-antimonate to the uranium(VI) oxo and imido complexes [((RArO)3tacn)UVI(O)]SbF6 and [((RArO)3tacn)UVI(NSiMe3)]SbF6. While for the t Bu-derivative of the oxo complex an equatorial coordination is observed due to stabilization by the inverse trans-influe...

  16. Scientific background, technology and equipment for hydrometallurgical processing of uranium and complex ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major results of research performed by All-Russian Research Institute of Chemical Technology in the period from 1953 to 2001, which was aimed at the development of scientific fundamentals, technology and equipment for hydrometallurgical processing of uranium and complex ores, are presented. Special attention was paid to leaching as one of the main operations in uranium hydrometallurgy dictating the degree of uranium extraction along with other valuable components. Study of uranium oxidation kinetics during leaching of ores permitted development and putting into service of highly efficient processes of carbonate and acid leaching in pulp agitators under atmospheric pressure, as well as in autoclaves with horizontal mechanical agitators and vertical pneumatically operated mixing of the pulp

  17. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canada produced one-third of the Western World's uranium production in 1989, twice as much from Saskatchewan as from Ontario, where mine closures have led to the loss of over 2,000 jobs. Canadian production in 1990 was about 8.8 Gg U. In 1990, Canada's primary producers were Denison Mines, Rio Algom, Cluff Mining, and Cameco. In Saskatchewan, there are three operations: Key Lake, Rabbit Lake/Collins Bay, and Cluff Lake. Canada stands fourth in uranium resources, but because of favourable geology remains the focus of much exploration activity, which cost about C$60 in 1989. Large stockpiles overhang the market, so new sources of uranium will not be needed before the mid 1990's, but long-term prospects seem good

  18. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uranium production industry is well into its third recession during the nuclear era (since 1945). Exploration is drastically curtailed, and many staffs are being reduced. Historical market price production trends are discussed. A total of 3.07 million acres of land was acquired for exploration; drastic decrease. Surface drilling footage was reduced sharply; an estimated 250 drill rigs were used by the uranium industry during 1980. Land acquisition costs increased 8%. The domestic reserve changes are detailed by cause: exploration, re-evaluation, or production. Two significant discoveries of deposits were made in Mohave County, Arizona. Uranium production during 1980 was 21,850 short tons U3O8; an increase of 17% from 1979. Domestic and foreign exploration highlights were given. Major producing areas for the US are San Juan basin, Wyoming basins, Texas coastal plain, Paradox basin, northeastern Washington, Henry Mountains, Utah, central Colorado, and the McDermitt caldera in Nevada and Oregon. 3 figures, 8 tables

  19. Mineralogical, radiographic and uranium leaching studies on the uranium ore from Kvanefjeld, Ilimaussaq Complex, South Greenland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    102 samples of low-grade uranium ore from 70 drill holes at Kvanefjeld, Ilimaussaq alkaline intrusion, South Greenland were studied by means of autoradiography, fission-track investigations, microscopy, microprobe analyses and uraniumleaching experiments. The principal U-Th bearing mineral, steenstrupine, and several less common uranium minerals are disseminated in lujavrite (nepheline syenite) and altered volcanic rocks. Steenstrupine has average composition Nasub(6.7)Hsub(x)Casub(1.0) (REE+Y)sub(5.8)(Th,U)sub(0.5)(Mnsub(1.6)Fesub(1.8)Zrsub(0.3)Tisub(0.1)Alsub(o.2))Sisub(12)Osub(36)(Psub(4.3)Sisub(1.7))Osub(24)(F,OH) x nHsub(2)O; n and x are variable. It either is of magnetic origin (type A) or connected with metasomatic processes (type B), or occurs in late veins (type C). Preponderance of grains are metamict (usually 2000-5000 ppm U3O8) or altered (usually above 5000 ppm U3O8), sometimes zoned with both components present. Occasionally they are extremely altered with U content falling to 500-5000 ppm U3O8 and local accumulations of high-U minerals formed. Replacement by crystalline monazite (+- metamict uranothorite and other components) is locally important. Uranium recovery by carbonate leaching (NaHCO3+Na2CO3+O20) depends both on alteration of steenstrupine and on hydration of parent rocks. Yield is between 98 and 50%, the average U concentration in the examined rock around 350 ppm U. (author)

  20. Thermochemistry of complex oxides of uranium(6), arsenic and alkali metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standard reaction enthalpies for stoichiometric mixtures of mono-potassium orthoarsenate, uranium(6) and alkali metal nitrate oxides as well as mixtures of complex oxides of the M1AsUO6 (M1 = Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs) general formulas and potassium nitrate with hydrofluoric acid are determined in adiabatic calorimeter at the temperature of 298.15 K. Standard enthalpies for formation of complex oxides of uranium(6), arsenic and alkali metals at the temperature of 298.15 K are calculated by the obtained results. 8 refs., 1 tab

  1. Spectrophotometric determination of uranium using chromotrope 2R complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple, fast and reliable spectrophotometric method for the determination and microextraction of trace amounts of uranium using chromotrope 2R as a chelating agent and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ionic liquid (IL) was used as an extractant solvent. Influence variables such as pH, volume of ligand and IL were inspected by full factorial design. In the view of Pareto chart a contour plot was studied to examine the significant variables and their interactions. The detection limit and the preconcentration factor were found to be 0.87 and 50 μg L-1, respectively. The developed method was successfully applied to ore samples. (author)

  2. Complex measurement of risk factors at uranium mine workplaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement reported was oriented to monitoring the concentrations of dust aerosol and nitrogen oxides during individual operations and the impact of diesel machinery. Other data on the measurement point included the air flow volume, temperature, relative humidity, activity of radon and its daughters. Thanks to the fact that in uranium mines a high value of fresh air flow is prescribed in view of radon and radon daughters contamination, the concentrations of dust aerosol and nitrogen oxides was found not to even reach permissible values. (Ha)

  3. Environmental significance of copper, lead, manganese, uranium and zinc speciation in the event of contaminated waters release from the Ranger Uranium Mining Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The likely impact of the accidental release of tailings dam water during the dry season at the Ranger Uranium Mining Complex was examined. A speciation scheme utilising sizing by filtration and ion-exchange with Chelex 100 has given an insight into the likely partitioning of zinc, copper, lead, manganese and uranium following the addition of tailings dam water to samples from waterbodies in the vicinity of the uranium mining/milling complex. The speciation findings are discussed in terms of likely toxic effects on fish

  4. Radiological safety aspects of uranium fuel fabrication facilities at Nuclear Fuel Complex, Hyderabad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Health Physics Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre is operating a Health Physics Unit at Nuclear Fuel Complex, Hyderabad which carried out radiological, industrial hygiene and environmental surveillances. Nuclear Fuel Complex has two batteries of plants - one for natural UO2 fuel bundles for Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) and the other for enriched UO2 fuel assemblies for Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) in the country. For natural UO2 fuel the Uranium Oxide Plant (UOP) converts magnesium diuranate to UO2 powder. The Ceramic Fuel Fabrication Plant (CFFP) processes the UO2 powder to dense sintered UO2 pellets and further to fuel assemblies for PHWR. The Enriched Uranium Oxide Plant (EUOP) starts with uranium hexa-fluoride and converts to UO2 powder and Enriched Fuel Fabrication Plant (EFFP) processes the UO2 powder to sintered pellets and fuel assemblies for BWR

  5. Synthesis of uranium and thorium dioxides by Complex Sol-Gel Processes (CSGP). Synthesis of uranium oxides by Complex Sol-Gel Processes (CSGP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (INCT), a new method of synthesis of uranium and thorium dioxides by original variant of sol-gel method - Complex Sol-Gel Process (CSGP), has been elaborated. The main modification step is the formation of nitrate-ascorbate sols from components alkalized by aqueous ammonia. Those sols were gelled into: - irregularly agglomerates by evaporation of water; - medium sized microspheres (diameter <150) by IChTJ variant of sol-gel processes by water extraction from drops of emulsion sols in 2-ethylhexanol-1 by this solvent. Uranium dioxide was obtained by a reduction of gels with hydrogen at temperatures >700 deg. C, while thorium dioxide by a simple calcination in the air atmosphere. (authors)

  6. Heavy metal complexes with organic ligands from surface waters of the uranium mining area in Ronneburg, Thuringia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study focussed on nickel and uranium. A method based on size exclusion chromatography was developed to isolate heavy metals complexed with organic ligands. The compounds and complexes present in the surface waters were characterized. (P.A.)

  7. Effect of anion nature of extraction of uranium(6) cationic complexes with diantipyrylmethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extraction of uranium(6) from trifluoro-, trichloro-, sodium tribromoacetate- and sodium naphthalane sulfonate solutions by diantipyrylmethane in chloroform is studied. Conditions for element quantitative extraction are found. Composition of extracted complexes -UO2LX2 is determined. The process chemical nature is discussed. 9 refs.; 2 figs

  8. Public communication on times of environmental crisis. The opening of San Rafael 's uranium complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Argentina has had a lot of cultural changes in the last few years. An environmental movement has gathered and is trying to stop the opening of the Sierra Pintada uranium complex, near the city of San Rafael, in the south of Mendoza province. Since 2005, several 'groundless information' have been published in the local media about the dangers of this re-opening. These news exaggerate the properties of radon gas, claiming that it will reach San Rafael city (20 miles from the complex), rising radiological risk among the population, etc. This scene shows a 'non-real' picture of the regulatory activities that the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN), a government agency that regulates nuclear facilities in Argentina, is really and systematically accomplishing. In this situation, the board of Directors of ARN decided to entrust a full analysis of the environmental issue in the area. The Office of Press and Communication implemented a local communication plan, using a Strategic and Systemic tool kit. The period to be analyzed is from second semester 2005 to February 2007. A little bit of history: the San Rafael Complex started in September 20 of 1979. It belongs to the National Commission of Atomic Energy (CNEA), a government agency. Until its temporary suspension in 1995 for international market reasons (uranium price was U$S 10 / pound), almost 2 million tons of uranium were processed. Besides its temporary suspension, the ARN has been constantly monitoring this particular former complex. In the year 2001, CNEA notices that the uranium price starts to rise and entrust National Technology University, Avellaneda Branch, to accomplish an Environmental Impact Report, according to the argentine law 25.585. Due especially to the rising of uranium price, (actually, the uranium price is approximately U$S 200) the national government determined to restart the extraction of the mineral again. By the year 2004, with the results of the Environmental Impact report, CNEA

  9. Dissolution of uranium and plutonium oxide using TBP-HNO3 complex. Research document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current technology for the selective separation of plutonium and uranium from spent nuclear fuel (MOX) using TBP-HNO3 complex is being developed (Powdered fuel extraction process). It is promising to simplify the reprocessing process for the selective separation because of its potential to unite the chemical processes, dissolution process using nitric acid and co-extraction process using TBP solvent, and to operate under the ambient pressure and at relatively 'mild' temperature. Plutonium oxide has reported to provide slower dissolution than uranium oxide in nitric acid. In this work dissolution behaviors of plutonium into TBP-HNO3 complex from powdered plutonium and uranium mixed oxide were examined. The powdered MOX fuel (average particles size 10 μm) was prepared from PuO2-UO2 pellets by heating for 4 hours at 400degC. The prepared powder was dissolved into TBP-4.74mol/L HNO3 complex and was stirred for 300 minutes. In the test with 6 grams of powdered MOX fuel and 20 mL of the TBP-HNO3 complex, the concentration of plutonium reached 0.17 mol/L and about 90 percent of plutonium was dissolved. It is experimentally confirmed plutonium was dissolved into the TBP-HNO3 complex from plutonium and uranium mixed oxide. The early dissolution rate was almost the same as that obtained with nitric acid solution. It is likely to predict the dissolution rate from the rate for nitric acid solution. Americium that was contained in the MOX fuel was also dissolved into the TBP-HNO3 complex, but was slower than plutonium. (author)

  10. Reactions of ketones with uranium tetraborohydride, mechanism and stereoselectivity, synthesis and structure of uranium (IV) tetrahydroborato alkoxide complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mono- and bisalkoxide uranium complexes U(BH4)3(OCHR1R2)(THF)2 1 and U(BH4)2(OCHR1R2)2(THF)2 2 were prepared successively in tetrahydrofuran (THF) by treatment of U(BH4)4 with the corresponding ketone R1R2C = O (acetone, benzophenone, cyclohexanone, 2-methylcyclohexanone, 4-tert-butylcyclohexanone, and norcamphor). The borane BH3.THF was liberated during the formation of 1 and 2, and reacted with the ketone to give the alkoxyborane species B(OCHR1R2)nH3-n. Formation of 1 also resulted from: a) reaction of U-BH4)4 with the alkoxyborane species; b) reaction of U(BH4)4 with 2; and c) reaction of 2 with BH3.THF. The alkoxide groups of 1 and 2 rapidly exchange with those of the alkoxyborane species. The uranium complexes 1 and alkoxyborane species resulting from the reaction of U(BH4)4 with the substituted cyclohexanones or norcamphor have been separated and their hydrolysis afforded the corresponding epimeric alcohols in different proportions. The monoalkoxide compounds 1 were alternatively prepared by reaction of the ketones R1R2C = O with UCl4 in the presence of LiBH4 or by treatment of U(BH4)4 with the alcohols R1R2CHOH. The octahedral crystal structures of U(BH4)3(OCHPh2)(THF)2 1b and U(BH4)2(OCHPh2)2(THF)2 2b show that in 1b, the two equatorial THF ligands (and the two equatorial BH4 groups) are in relative cis positions whereas they are trans in 2b

  11. Complex formation of U(VI) with Bacillus-isolates from a uranium mining waste pile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accumulation studies with vegetative cells and spores of three Bacillus isolates (JG-A 30, JG-A 12, JG-A 22, classified as Bacillus cereus, Bacillus sphaericus, Bacillus megaterium) from a uranium mining waste pile (Johanngeorgenstadt, Saxony) and their corresponding reference strains have shown that Bacilli accumulate high amounts of U(VI) in the concentration range examined (11-214 mg/L). Information on the binding strength and the reversibility were obtained from extraction studies with different extractants. With 0.01 M EDTA solution the uranium bound to the biomass was released almost quantitatively. The characterization of the bacterial-UO22+-complexes by time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) showed the formation of inner-sphere complexes with phosphate groups of the biomass. The results lead to the conclusion that the cell wall components with phosphate residues e.g., polysaccharides, teichoic and teichuroic acids or phospholipide layers of the membranes are responsible for the uranium binding. The spectroscopic studies of the U(VI)-complexes with isolated bacterial cell walls and isolated surface-layer proteins of the strain Bacillus sphaericus NCTC 9602 after cell fractionation have shown that the complexation of U(VI) with intact cells (vegetative cells or spores) is different from the coordination with isolated cell wall components, especially with the S-layer proteins. For all Bacillus strains studied in this work, a significant contribution of the S-layer proteins to the binding of uranyl to living cells can be excluded. (orig.)

  12. Average charge of uranium complexes on ion-exchange resin and standard reduction potential strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed study on the adsorbability of uranium complexes on ion-exchanger, especially on the average charge ν and standard reduction potential strength Δμ0 of adsorbed uranium complexes, has been carried out. The new equations of chemical equilibria have been derived by which ν and Δμ0 can be calculated from experimental results. The distributions of uranium complexes in solutions at high ionic strengths and high temperatures were estimated and the standard reduction potentials calculated with the distributions were compared with ones obtained experimentally. On the basis of the above predictive analysis and observed values of ν and Δμ0, it was revealed that ν increased with increasing Cl- concentration or with an elevation of temperature and that ν had a great effect on Δμ0. The Δμ0 was also found to be varied to a small extent in the range of ν more than 2.5 of absolute value. The combined condition of the value of ν around 2.0 and a rather high temperature was favorable in order to strongly adsorb U(VI) complexes. (author)

  13. Synthesis and characterization of uranium(VI) complex with amine phenol ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium(VI) complex, with amine phenol ligand, was synthesized and characterized by FTIR, TG-DTA, XRD and elemental analysis. The present paper highlights the thermal stability aspects of the complex. TG study under air flow conditions has predicted a continuous weight loss up to a temperature ∼540 degC and thereafter a constant weight was recorded. DTA thermogram has shown two exothermic and one endothermic peaks suggesting the formation of different phases during heating. XRD analysis of the residue (after 600 degC) suggests that the structure of the complex was reduced to U3O8. (author)

  14. Foreign research reactor uranium supply program: The Y-12 national security complex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Foreign Research Reactor (FRR) Uranium Supply Program at the Y-12 National Security Complex supports the nonproliferation objectives of the HEU Disposition Program, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program, and the United States FRR Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Acceptance Program. The Y-12 National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Y-12 Site Office maintains the prime contracts with foreign governments for the supply of Low-Enriched Uranium (LEU) for their research reactors. The LEU is produced by down blending Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) that has been declared surplus to the U.S. national defense needs. The down blending and sale of the LEU supports the Surplus HEU Disposition Program Record of Decision to make the HEU non-weapons usable and to recover the economic value of the uranium to the extent feasible. This program supports the important U.S. government and nuclear nonproliferation commitment to serve as a reliable and cost-effective uranium supplier for those foreign research reactors that are converting or have converted to LEU fuel under the guidance of the NNSA RERTR Program. In conjunction with the FRR SNF Acceptance Program which supports the global nonproliferation efforts to disposition U.S.-origin HEU, the Y-12 FRR Uranium Supply Program can provide the LEU for the replacement fuel fabrication. In addition to feedstock for fuel fabrication, Y-12 supplies LEU for target fabrication for medical isotope production. The Y-12 process uses supply forecasting tools, production improvements and efficient delivery preparations to successfully support the global research reactor community

  15. Effects of solution pH and complexing reagents on uranium and thorium desorption under saturated equilibrium conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three contaminated bulk surface soils were used for investigating the effect of solution pH and complexing reagents on uranium and thorium desorption. At a low solution pH, the major chemical species of uranium and thorium, uranyl UO2+2, thorium dihydroxide Th(OH)2+2, and thorium hydroxide Th(OH)+3, tend to form complexes with acetates in the solution phase, which increases the fractions of uranium and thorium desorbed into this phase. At a high solution pH, important uranium and thorium species such as uranyl tricarbonate complex UO2(CO)33-4 and thorium tetrahydroxide complex Th(OH)4 tend to resist complexation with acetates. The presence of complexing reagents in solution can release radionuclides such as uranium and/or thorium from the soil to the solution by forming soluble complexes. Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) are strong complex formers that released 38% to 62% of total uranium activity and 78% to 86% of total thorium activity, respectively, from the soil samples investigated. Solutions of 0.1 molar sodium nitrate (NaNO3) and 0.1 molar sodium sulfate (Na2SO4) were not effective complex formers with uranium and thorium under the experimental conditions. Fractions of uranium and thorium desorbed by 0.15g/200ml humic acid ranged from 4.62% to 6.17% and 1.59% to 7.09%, respectively. This work demonstrates the importance of a knowledge of solution chemistry in investigating the desorption of radionuclides

  16. Antiferromagnetic exchange in a bis(imido) uranium (V) dimeric complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, Liam P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schelter, Eric J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boncella, James M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yang, Ping [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gdula, Robyn L [NON LANL; Scott, Brian L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thompson, Joe D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kiplinger, Jacqueline L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batista, Enrique R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic coupling between two or more metal centers is an important facet of d- and f-block transition metal chemistry due to its implications in chemical bonding. With respect to actinide metals, magnetic coupling between polymetallic actinide centers is less well-known. Of the few documented examples, only one bimetallic uranium(V) complex, [(MeC{sub 5}H{sub 4}){sub 2}U]{sub 2}[{mu}-1,4-N{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}] (1), has unequivocally demonstrated antiferromagnetic coupling. This complex employs a {pi}-conjugated 1,4-phenylenedimide ligand system which bridges the two f{sup 1}-metal centers and enables antiferromagentic coupling between unpaired f-e1ectrons residing in a {pi}-symmetry orbital. In this communication, we report the synthesis of a dimeric bis(imido) uranium(V) iodide complex and demonstrate with magnetic susceptibility measurements and density functional theory (DFT) calculations that the f{sup 1}-uranium centers display antiferromagnetic coupling at low temperatures.

  17. Reliable modeling of the electronic spectra of realistic uranium complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecmer, Paweł; Govind, Niranjan; Kowalski, Karol; de Jong, Wibe A.; Visscher, Lucas

    2013-07-01

    We present an EOMCCSD (equation of motion coupled cluster with singles and doubles) study of excited states of the small [UO2]2+ and [UO2]+ model systems as well as the larger UVIO2(saldien) complex. In addition, the triples contribution within the EOMCCSDT and CR-EOMCCSD(T) (completely renormalized EOMCCSD with non-iterative triples) approaches for the [UO2]2+ and [UO2]+ systems as well as the active-space variant of the CR-EOMCCSD(T) method—CR-EOMCCSd(t)—for the UVIO2(saldien) molecule are investigated. The coupled cluster data were employed as benchmark to choose the "best" appropriate exchange-correlation functional for subsequent time-dependent density functional (TD-DFT) studies on the transition energies for closed-shell species. Furthermore, the influence of the saldien ligands on the electronic structure and excitation energies of the [UO2]+ molecule is discussed. The electronic excitations as well as their oscillator dipole strengths modeled with TD-DFT approach using the CAM-B3LYP exchange-correlation functional for the [UVO2(saldien)]- with explicit inclusion of two dimethyl sulfoxide molecules are in good agreement with the experimental data of Takao et al. [Inorg. Chem. 49, 2349 (2010), 10.1021/ic902225f].

  18. Uranium hetero-bimetallic complexes: synthesis, structure and magnetic properties; Complexes heterobimetalliques de l'uranium: synthese, structure et proprietes magnetiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Borgne, Th

    2000-10-04

    The aim of this thesis is to synthesize molecular complexes with uranium and transition metal ions in close proximity, to determine the nature of the magnetic interaction between them. We decided to use Schiff bases as assembling ligands, which are unusual for uranium (IV). Although the simplest Schiff bases, such as H{sub 2}Salen, lead to ligand exchange reactions, the bi-compartmental Schiff base H{sub 4}L{sup 6} (bis(3-hydroxy-salicylidene) - 2,2-dimethyl-propylene) allows the crystal structure determination of the complex [L{sup 6}Cu(pyr)]U[L{sup 6}Cu].2pyr, obtained by reaction of the metallo-ligand H{sub 2}L{sup 6}Cu with U(acac){sub 4}. In this manner, the complexes [L{sup 6}Co(pyr)]{sub 2}U and [L{sup 6}Ni(pyr)]{sub 2}U.pyr were also isolated, as well as the compounds in which the paramagnetic ions have been exchanged by the diamagnetic ions Zn{sup II}, Zr{sup IV} and Th{sup IV}': [L{sup 6}Zn(pyr)]{sub 2}U, [L{sup 6}Cu]{sub 2}Zr and [L{sup 6}Cu(pyr)]Th[L{sup 6}Cu].2pyr. These complexes are the first which involve three metallic centres assembling by the means of a hexa-dentate Schiff base. The crystalline structures show, for all these complexes, the outstanding orthogonal arrangement of the two fragments L{sup 6}M around the central atom which is in a dodecahedral environment of eight oxygen atoms of two Schiff bases. The syntheses of the isostructural complexes Cu2{sup II} and Zn{sub 2}U in which the uranium (IV) ion is close, in the first one, to the paramagnetic ion Cu{sup II} and, in the second one, to the diamagnetic ion Zn{sup II}, has allowed the use of the empiric method to determine the nature of the magnetic interaction between an f element and a transition metal. The comparison of the magnetic behaviour of two complexes Cu{sub 2}U and Zn{sub 2}U, expressed by the variation of {chi}T vs T, reveals the ferromagnetic interaction in the heart of the triad Cu-U-Cu. The magnetic behaviour of the complexes Cu{sub 2}Th et Cu{sub 2}Zr which does not

  19. Interest of uranium complexes for the mechanism study of the McMurry reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reducing coupling reactions of ketones in diols and olefins are generally carried out with titanium or samarium compounds. In this work uranium complexes have been used. They have allowed to study the chemical reaction mechanism. This thesis is divided into three parts: 1) the reduction mechanism of uranium tetrachloride by cyclic voltametry has been studied at first. It has been shown that this reduction is followed by a transfer reaction of chlorides between the reduced specie of the higher electronic density and UCl . 2) In the second part is described: the synthesis, the crystal structure, the reactivity of the chemical agents, the stereochemistry of diols and alkenes formation and the pinacolisation reaction catalysis. 3) In the last part, the limits of the McMurry reaction are given by the study of the aromatic ketones pinacolisation reaction by-products. The obtained results show that the complexes of the metals which present a high reducing and oxo-philic (Ti, Sm, U..) character react in a similar way with the carbonyl compounds. If the uranium compounds are less used than those of the titanium in the field of the organic synthesis applications, they are precious auxiliaries and excellent models for reactions mechanisms study and for the synthesis methods optimization. (O.M.)

  20. Uranium (VI) complexing by macrocyclic or chelating ligands in aqueous solutions stability, formation kinetics, polarographic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stability of chelates (with EDTA,N,N ethylenediamine diacetic acid EDDA nitrilotriacetic acid NTA and iminodiacetic acid) of UO22+ and UO4 species of uranium VI is studied in aqueous solution (NaClO4 3M at 25 deg celcius). Structure in solution are proposed and discussed for mononuclear species. Only complexing kinetics (formation and acid hydrolysis) of UO4 with EDDA and NTA are studied by spectrophotometry (other reactions are too fast). Besides UO22+ complexes are formed with crown ethers I5C5 and I8C6 in aqueous solution (TEA ClO4 M/10 at 25 deg celcius. Complexes are probably stabilized by solvation. Results are confirmed by voltametry and reduction mechanisms of UO22+ and its complexes on mercury drop are proposed. 143 refs

  1. The U=C Double Bond: Synthesis and Study of Uranium Nucleophilic Carbene Complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment of U(BH4)4 with 1 or 3 equiv of Li2(SCS). 1.5Et2O, 1, afforded the actinide carbene complexes U(μ-SCS)3[U(BH4)3]2 (4) and U(μ-SCS)3[Li(Et2O)]2 (6), respectively [SCS = (Ph2P = S)2C]. In THF, complex 4 was transformed into the mononuclear derivative (SCS)U(BH4)2(THF)2 (5). The multiple bond character of the uranium-carbon bond was first revealed by the X-ray crystal structures of the three complexes. The U=C bond in these complexes present a nucleophilic character, as shown by their reaction with a carbonyl derivative. Finally, DFT calculations prove the involvement of both 5f and 6d orbitals in both the σ and the π U-C bonds. (authors)

  2. Extraction of uranium from simulated ore by the supercritical carbon dioxide fluid extraction method with nitric acid-TBP complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) method using CO2 as a medium with an extractant of HNO3-tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) complex was applied to extract uranium from several uranyl phosphate compounds and simulated uranium ores. An extraction method consisting of a static extraction process and a dynamic one was established, and the effects of the experimental conditions, such as pressure, temperature, and extraction time, on the extraction of uranium were ascertained. It was found that uranium could be efficiently extracted from both the uranyl phosphates and simulated ores by the SFE method using CO2. It was thus demonstrated that the SFE method using CO2 is useful as a pretreatment method for the analysis of uranium in ores. (author)

  3. Uranium (VI)Bis(imido) chalcogenate complexes:synthesis and density functional theory analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bis(imido) uranium(VI) trans- and cis-dichalcogenate complexes with the general formula U(NtBu)2(EAr)2(OPPh3)2 (EAr = O-2-tBuC6H4, SPh, SePh, TePh) and U(NtBu)2(EAr)2(R2bpy) (EAr = SPh, SePh, TePh) (R2bpy = 4,4'-disubstituted-2,2'-bipyridyl, R = Me, tBu) have been prepared. This family of complexes includes the first reported monodentate selenolate and tellurolate complexes of uranium(VI). Density functional theory calculations show that covalent interactions in the U-E bond increase in the trans-dichalcogenate series U(NtBu)2(EAr)2(OPPh3)2 as the size of the chalcogenate donor increases and that both 5f and 6d orbital participation is important in the M-E bonds of U-S, U-Se, and U-Te complexes.

  4. Uranium (VI)Bis(imido) chalcogenate complexes:synthesis and density functional theory analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, Liam P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batista, Enrique R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boncella, James M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yang, Ping [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scott, Brian L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Bis(imido) uranium(VI) trans- and cis-dichalcogenate complexes with the general formula U(NtBu)2(EAr)2(OPPh3)2 (EAr = O-2-tBuC6H4, SPh, SePh, TePh) and U(NtBu)2(EAr)2(R2bpy) (EAr = SPh, SePh, TePh) (R2bpy = 4,4'-disubstituted-2,2'-bipyridyl, R = Me, tBu) have been prepared. This family of complexes includes the first reported monodentate selenolate and tellurolate complexes of uranium(VI). Density functional theory calculations show that covalent interactions in the U-E bond increase in the trans-dichalcogenate series U(NtBu)2(EAr)2(OPPh3)2 as the size of the chalcogenate donor increases and that both 5f and 6d orbital participation is important in the M-E bonds of U-S, U-Se, and U-Te complexes.

  5. Strongly coupled binuclear uranium-oxo complexes from uranyl oxo rearrangement and reductive silylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Polly L.; Jones, Guy M.; Odoh, Samuel O.; Schreckenbach, Georg; Magnani, Nicola; Love, Jason B.

    2012-03-01

    The most common motif in uranium chemistry is the d0f0 uranyl ion [UO2]2+ in which the oxo groups are rigorously linear and inert. Alternative geometries, such as the cis-uranyl, have been identified theoretically and implicated in oxo-atom transfer reactions that are relevant to environmental speciation and nuclear waste remediation. Single electron reduction is now known to impart greater oxo-group reactivity, but with retention of the linear OUO motif, and reactions of the oxo groups to form new covalent bonds remain rare. Here, we describe the synthesis, structure, reactivity and magnetic properties of a binuclear uranium-oxo complex. Formed through a combination of reduction and oxo-silylation and migration from a trans to a cis position, the new butterfly-shaped Si-OUO2UO-Si molecule shows remarkably strong UV-UV coupling and chemical inertness, suggesting that this rearranged uranium oxo motif might exist for other actinide species in the environment, and have relevance to the aggregation of actinide oxide clusters.

  6. Exploration of Bernabe Montano complex of uranium deposits, New Mexico, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Bernabe Montano discovery is a significant eastern extension of the Grants Mineral Belt, consisting of two nearly parallel mineralized trends with a combined strike length of about 14.5 km. One deposit with approximately 106 lb of uranium oxide has been blocked out and several km of mineralized trend require additional delineation drilling. The mineralization exhibits many similarities to Westwater Canyon Member ore deposits in other parts of the Grants Mineral Belt; one of the most significant is the continuation of the south-easterly trend that has persisted, with some breaks, for a length of over 175 km. As with other Grants Mineral Belt deposits, the mineralization is associated with multilevel humate masses that are roughly parallel to the bedding of the Westwater Canyon Member host sandstone beds. These humate masses and the associated uranium deposits show a marked preference for the margins of the thicker, more laterally continuous, channelways. The discovery of the Bernabe Montano complex of deposits is significant for several reasons. First, it opened up exploration in the distal fan facies where many geologists thought the uranium potential was relatively low. The discovery is potentially more significant in that it demonstrates the ability of detailed subsurface geologic mapping to suggest the location of high potential geologic trends in partially explored but favourable regions where the more traditional surface geologic and radiometric techniques are no longer effective in finding new deposits. (author)

  7. Complexation of uranium(VI) with protocatechuic acid - application of iterative transformation factor analysis to EXAFS spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The speciation of 1 mM uranium(VI) in carbonate-free aqueous solutions of 50 mM protocatechuic acid (PCA, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid) was studied in the pH range of 4.0 to 6.8 using EXAFS spectroscopy. The uranium LIII-edge EXAFS spectra were analyzed using a newly developed computer algorithm for iterative transformation factor analysis (FA). Two structural different uranium(VI) complexes were observed. The speciation in the pH range of 4.0 to 4.8 is dominated by a 1:2 or 1:3 uranium(VI)/PCA complex with bidentate coordination of the carboxyl group to the uranium(VI) moiety. Already at pH 4.6 significant amounts of a second species are formed. This uranium(VI) species contains two PCA ligands that are bound to the uranium via their neighboring phenolic hydroxyl groups under formation of five-member rings. (orig.)

  8. Indoor radon related to uranium in granitoids of the Central Bohemian plutonic complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study is based on the indoor radon data (one year measurements, Kodak LR 115 track etch detectors), vectorized geological maps 1:50000, vectorized coordinates of dwellings and uranium data for granitoid types of the Central Bohemian Plutonic Complex (CBPC). Using ArcGis 8.2 programme, the position of 16145 dwellings was linked to a geological database covering the CBPC (approx. 3200 km2), and the type of underlying rock type was specified for each house. The resulting databases enabled us to calculate the mean EEC indoor Rn data for particular granitoid types and to study the relationship between the indoor Rn and the U concentrations. The petrogenetically variable CBPC was emplaced during Variscan orogenesis (330-350 Ma) and is among the most radioactive rock types within the Bohemian Massif. A long-term process of CBPC genesis resulted in more than 20 granitoid types, differing by their petrogenetic characteristics as well as mineralogical and chemical composition, including uranium concentration. The relation between the mean indoor radon values and uranium concentrations in particular rock types was examined. A positive regression between indoor Rn and uranium as the source of Rn soil gas clearly demonstrates how regional geology influences the indoor radon activity concentration in dwellings. The highest indoor Rn concentrations were observed in the Sedlcany granodiorite and Certovo bremeno syenite, where also the highest gamma dose rates (150-210 nGy.h-1) within all granitoid types in the Czech Republic were observed. The two rock types differ from other granitoids by a relatively high zircon concentration, which is the main source of U and subsequently of soil gas Rn being released from the bedrock. The lower indoor Rn values of Certovo bremeno syenite which do not correspond with the high U concentrations can be explained by a relatively low permeability of its clayey weathering crust. This feature was also observed for soil gas radon concentration

  9. Southern complex: geology, geochemistry, mineralogy, and mineral chemistry of selected uranium- and thorium-rich granites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four major rock groups are defined in the Southern Complex: the Bell Creek Granite (BCG), the Clotted Granitoids (CGR), the Albite Granite (AGR), and the Migmatite Complex. Metatexites of the Migmatite Complex are the oldest rocks and include paleosome of a metasedimentary and metavolcanic protolith represented by Banded Iron Formation, Banded Amphibolite, and Banded Gneisses, and interlayered or crosscutting leucogranites. The CGR span the range from metatexite to diatexite and represent in-situ partial melting of metapelitic layers in the protolith during intrusion of the BCG. The BCG cuts the migmatites, is locally cut by the CGR, and was derived by partial melting of a dominantly metasedimentary protolith at some depth below the presently exposed migmatites during a regional tectonothermal event. The Albite Granite is a 2km diameter, muscovite-fluorite-columbite-bearing intrusive stock that cuts all other major units. The thorium history of the BCG is a function of the history of monazite. The thorium history of the CGR is also dominated by monazite but the thorium content of this unit cannot be entirely accounted for by original restite monazite. The uranium history of the BCG and CGR was dominated by magmatic differentiation and post magmatic, metamorphic and supergene redistributions and is largely independent of the thorium history. The thorium and uranium history of the AGR was dominated by magmatic/deuteric processes unlike the BCG and CGR

  10. Complex formation of uranium(VI) with fructose and glucose phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uptake of heavy metals into plants is commonly quantified by the soil-plant transfer factor. Up to now little is known about the chemical speciation of actinides in plants. To compare the obtained spectroscopic data of uranium complexes in plants with model compounds, we investigate the complexation of uranium with relevant bioligands of various functionalities. A very important class of ligands consists of phosphate esters, which serve as phosphate group and energy transmitters as well as energy storage media in biological systems. Heavy metal ions bound to the phosphate esters can be transported into living cells and then deposited. Therefore, in our study we present the results of uranium complexation with glucose-6-phosphate (G6P), and fructose-6-phosphate (F6P) obtained by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). The experiments were performed at a fixed uranyl concentration (10-5 M) as a function of the ligand concentrations (10-5 to 10-3 M) in a pH range from 2 to 4.5. For the glucose phosphate system we observed, using increasing ligand concentrations, a decrease in the fluorescence intensity and a small red shift of the emission bands. From this we conclude that the complexed uranyl glucose phosphate species show only minor or no fluorescence properties. The TRLFS spectra of the glucose phosphate samples indicated the presence of a single species with fluorescence properties. This species has a lifetime of approximately 1.5 μs and was identified as the free uranyl ion. An opposite phenomenon was observed for the fructose phosphate system: there was no decrease in fluorescence intensity. However, a strong red shift of the spectra was observed, illustrating the fluorescence properties of the uranyl fructose phosphate complex. The TRLFS spectra of the fructose phosphate system showed a second lifetime (22+ UO2(lig)x(2-y)+ + y H+ (lig = sugar phosphate). Applying the mass action law and transformation to the logarithmic scale, we

  11. Effects of aqueous complexation on reductive precipitation of uranium by Shewanella putrefaciens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Northup Abraham

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available We have examined the effects of aqueous complexation on rates of dissimilatory reductive precipitation of uranium by Shewanella putrefaciens. Uranium(VI was supplied as sole terminal electron acceptor to Shewanella putrefaciens (strain 200R in defined laboratory media under strictly anaerobic conditions. Media were amended with different multidentate organic acids, and experiments were performed at different U(VI and ligand concentrations. Organic acids used as complexing agents were oxalic, malonic, succinic, glutaric, adipic, pimelic, maleic, citric, and nitrilotriacetic acids, tiron, EDTA, and Aldrich humic acid. Reductive precipitation of U(VI, resulting in removal of insoluble amorphous UO2 from solution, was measured as a function of time by determination of total dissolved U. Reductive precipitation was measured, rather than net U(VI reduction to U(IV, to assess overall U removal rates from solution, which may be used to gauge the influence of chelation on microbial U mineralization. Initial linear rates of U reductive precipitation were found to correlate with stability constants of 1:1 aqueous U(VI:ligand and U(IV:ligand complexes. In the presence of strongly complexing ligands (e.g., NTA, Tiron, EDTA, UO2 precipitation did not occur. Our results are consistent with ligand-retarded precipitation of UO2, which is analogous to ligand-assisted solid phase dissolution but in reverse: ligand exchange with the U4+ aquo cation acts as a rate-limiting reaction moderating coordination of water molecules with U4+, which is a necessary step in UO2 precipitation. Ligand exchange kinetics governing dissociation rates of ligands from U(VI-organic complexes may also influence overall UO2 production rates, although the magnitude of this effect is unclear relative to the effects of U(IV-organic complexation. Our results indicate that natural microbial-aqueous systems containing abundant organic matter can inhibit the formation of biogenic amorphous UO2.

  12. Osmium, ruthenium, iridium and uranium in silicates and chromite from the eastern Bushveld Complex, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gijbels, R.h.; Millard, H.T., Jr.; Desborough, G.A.; Bartel, A.J.

    1974-01-01

    Osmium, ruthenium, iridium and uranium contents were determined in eight ortho pyroxene, seven plagioclase, and three chromite mineral separates from the eastern Bushveld Complex. Neutron activation analysis was used to measure the platinum metals, and uranium was determined by a fission track technique. The platinum metals were found to be present within each mine??ral in the proportions Os:Ru:Ir = 1:7:1, while the concentrations of these metals in the minerals are in the ratios orthopyroxene:plagioclase:chromite = 1:16:700. The concentration of uranium was found to range from 11 to 66 ppb (parts per billion) and not to vary significantly from mineral to mineral. The data for the platinum metals are consistent with a model in which the eastern Bushveld Complex was formed by the fractional crystallization of two separately injected magmas. A computer fit of this model to these data indicates that the initial concentrations of Os, Ru and Ir in the first magma were 0.24, 2.0 and 0.21 ppb and in the second magma were 0.16, 1.1 and 0.18 ppb, respectively. The fit also yields the distribution coefficients for the partitioning between the liquid and cumulus orthopyroxene, cumulus plagioclase and cumulus chromite. These coefficients (mineral/liquid) for osmium are 4.5, 66 and 2700; for ruthenium, they are 5, 65 and 2700; and for iridium, they are 4, 60 and 1600. To make this fit, it was necessary to hypothesize the existence of two types of chromite: one type with a large distribution coefficient, presumably formed as a cumulus phase at high temperature, and another, more prevalent type with a smaller distribution coefficient, which may have been formed by postcumulus growth at a lower temperature. This hypothesis is supported by data for coexisting chromite-silicate pairs, which indicate that the chromite grains expelled these platinum metals as they cooled. ?? 1974.

  13. 1. Mono([8]annulene)Uranium(4) half-sandwich complexes, 2. Novel syntheses of symmetrically substituted cyclooctatetetraenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reproducible, high-yield synthesis of mono([8]annulene)uranium(4)dichloride (1) is reported, along with the X-ray crystal structural of the bis(pyridine) adduct. Metathesis reactions of the half-sandwich complex 1 with a variety of simple alkyl and alkoxy reagents failed to generate any isolable mono-ring complexes. Reactions of 1 with polydentate, delocalized anions did produce stable derivatives, including mono([8]annulene)uranium(4)bis(acetylacetonate) (4). An X-ray crystal structure of 4 is reported

  14. 1. Mono([8]annulene)Uranium(4) half-sandwich complexes, 2. Novel syntheses of symmetrically substituted cyclooctatetetraenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boussie, T.R.

    1991-10-01

    A reproducible, high-yield synthesis of mono([8]annulene)uranium(4)dichloride (1) is reported, along with the X-ray crystal structural of the bis(pyridine) adduct. Metathesis reactions of the half-sandwich complex 1 with a variety of simple alkyl and alkoxy reagents failed to generate any isolable mono-ring complexes. Reactions of 1 with polydentate, delocalized anions did produce stable derivatives, including mono([8]annulene)uranium(4)bis(acetylacetonate) (4). An X-ray crystal structure of 4 is reported.

  15. 1. Mono((8)annulene)Uranium(4) half-sandwich complexes, 2. Novel syntheses of symmetrically substituted cyclooctatetetraenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boussie, T.R.

    1991-10-01

    A reproducible, high-yield synthesis of mono((8)annulene)uranium(4)dichloride (1) is reported, along with the X-ray crystal structural of the bis(pyridine) adduct. Metathesis reactions of the half-sandwich complex 1 with a variety of simple alkyl and alkoxy reagents failed to generate any isolable mono-ring complexes. Reactions of 1 with polydentate, delocalized anions did produce stable derivatives, including mono((8)annulene)uranium(4)bis(acetylacetonate) (4). An X-ray crystal structure of 4 is reported.

  16. Removal of Uranium (VI from aqueous solution by Uranium Benzamide Complex using AC_Fe3O4 Nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Akbari Jonoush

    2014-07-01

    Conclusion: The removal of U(VI on AC_Fe3O4 nanocomposite with the aid of benzamide is a rapid and highly pH depended process. The maximum sorption capacity (15/87 mg/g of AC_Fe3O4 nanocomposite shows that this method is a suitable method for Uranium removal.

  17. Thermodynamics of the Complexation of Uranium(VI) by oxalate in aqueous solution at 10-70oC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Bernardo, Plinio; Zanonato, Pier Luigi; Tian, Guoxin; Tolazzi, Marilena; Rao, Linfeng

    2009-03-31

    The protonation reactions of oxalate (ox) and the complex formation of uranium(VI) with oxalate in 1.05 mol kg{sup -1} NaClO{sub 4} were studied at variable temperatures (10-70 C). Three U(VI)/ox complexes (UO{sub 2}ox{sub j}{sup (2-2j){sup +}} with j = 1, 2, 3) were identified in this temperature range. The formation constants and the molar enthalpies of complexation were determined by spectrophotometry and calorimetry. The complexation of uranium(VI) with oxalate ion is exothermic at lower temperatures (10-40 C) and becomes endothermic at higher temperatures (55-70 C). In spite of this, the free energy of complexation becomes more negative at higher temperatures due to increasingly more positive entropy of complexation that exceeds the increase of the enthalpy of complexation. The thermodynamic parameters at different temperatures, in conjunction with the literature data for other dicarboxylic acids, provide insight into the relative strength of U(VI) complexes with a series of dicarboxylic acids (oxalic, malonic and oxydiacetic) and rationalization for the highest stability of U(VI)/oxalate complexes in the series. The data reported in this study are of importance in predicting the migration of uranium(VI) in geological environments in the case of failure of the engineering barriers which protect waste repositories.

  18. Extraction of uranium and lead from mixed waste debris using a variety of metal/ligand complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To ensure the safety of our Nation's nuclear stockpile, Los Alamos National Laboratory is in the process of constructing the DARHT (Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test) facility. DARHT will examine the effects of aging and the stability of our stockpile. Contained testing will be phased in to reduce the impact of these tests, which contain depleted uranium, on our environment. The main focus of this research is to develop a treatment scheme for the recovery of depleted uranium and lead from shot debris that will result from these tests. The goals of this research are to optimize the conditions on a bench scale using a commercially available water soluble polymer to bind the lead and a variety of metal/ligand complexes such as 4,5-dihydroxy-1,3-benzene-disulfonic acid, dithionite, sodium carbonate/bicarbonate, and sodium hypochlorite to bind the uranium. Studies were conducted on a mixture of debris, such as wood, cable, paper towels, and tubing that contained both uranium and lead ranging in concentration from 10-1000's of ppm of contaminants. Experiments were done varying combinations and successions of extractant solutions as well as a number of sequential extractions. Studies show that a mixture of sodium hypochlorite and carbonate removed 90+% of both uranium and lead. We then focused on a separation scheme for the lead and uranium

  19. Solvent extraction of the lanthanide elements, scandium, uranium and thorium using tetracycline as complexing agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scope of the work is to extend the study of the solvent extraction behaviour to all the 15 lanthanide elements as well as to uranium and thorium and to study the application of the system tetracycline-benzyl alcohol for the separation of the mentioned elements. pH dependence of the extraction have been determined. The effect of the presence of a supporting electrolyte (NaCl) on the extraction as well as the effect of ageing of the extractant solution on its extractant properties were studied. The variation of distribution ratio with metal concentration was examined in order to verify whether or not polynuclear complexes were present in the conditions under which the work was performed. In the first case discontinuous counter-current technique was used. In the second case a single step solvent extraction procedure was applied. (T.G.)

  20. Stability constants of uranium(VI) and thorium(IV) complexes formed with 8-hydroxyquinoline and its 5-sulfonic acid derivative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stability constants of uranium(VI) and thorium(IV) complexes formed with 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HOQ) and its 5-sulfonic acid (8-HOQ-5-SO3H) derivative have been determined using the Irving-Rossotti method, computing the Calvin-Bjerrum pH-titration data. As a result, it is determined that the thorium(IV) complexes are considerably more stable than the corresponding uranium(VI) complexes. On the other hand, the complexes formed between 8-HOQ-5-SO3H and uranium(VI) or thorium(IV) are less stable than the corresponding 8-HOQ complexes. (author) 18 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 tab

  1. Complexation of uranium with 1, 3, 5-trimethoxy 2, 4, 6-tricarboxymethoxy-P-tert-butyl calix(6) arene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complexation behaviour of UO22+ with 1,3,5-trimethoxy 2,4,6-tricarboxymethoxy-p-tert-butyl calix[6]arene under varying conditions of pH and acetate ion concentration has been studied. These studies indicate that extraction mechanism of uranium is influenced by the presence of Na+ ion. (author)

  2. Synthesis, characterization, thermogravimetry, and structural study of uranium complexes derived from dibasic S-alkylated thiosemicarbazone ligands

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fasihizad, A.; Barak, T.; Ahmadi, M.; Dušek, Michal; Pojarová, Michaela

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 67, č. 12 (2014), s. 2160-2170. ISSN 0095-8972 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-03276S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : uranium complex * isothiosemicarbazone * crystallography * spectra * thermal stability Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.012, year: 2014

  3. Detection and characterization of uranium-humic complexes during 1D transport studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesher, Emily K. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Civil and Environmental Engineering; Honeyman, Bruce D. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Civil and Environmental Engineering; Ranville, James F. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Geochemistry

    2013-05-01

    The speciation and transport of uranium (VI) through porous media is highly dependent on solution conditions, the presence of complexing ligands, and the nature of the porous media. The dependency on many variables makes prediction of U transport in bench-scale experiments and in the field difficult. In particular, the identification of colloidal U phases poses a technical challenge. Transport of U in the presence and absence of natural organic matter (Suwannee River humic acid, SRHA) through silica sand and hematite coated silica sand was tested at pH 4 and 5 using static columns, where flow is controlled by gravity and residence time between advective pore volume exchanges can be strictly controlled. The column effluents were characterized by traditional techniques including ICPMS quantification of total [U] and [Fe], TOC analysis of [DOC], and pH analysis, and also by non-traditional techniques: flow field flow fractionation with online ICPMS detection (FlFFF-ICPMS) and specific UV absorbance (SUVA) characterization of effluent fractions. Key results include that the transport of U through the columns was enhanced by pre-equilibration with SRHA, and previously deposited U was remobilized by the addition of SRHA. The advanced techniques yielded important insights on the mechanisms of transport: FlFFF-ICPMS identified a U-SRHA complex as the mobile U species and directly quantified relative amounts of the complex, while specific UV absorbance (SUVA) measurements indicated a composition-based fractionation onto the porous media.

  4. Synthesis and structure determination of a stable organometallic uranium(V) imine complex and its isolobal anionic U(IV)-ate complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, M.; Botoshanskii, M.; Eisen, M.S. [Schulich Faculty of Chemistry, and Institute of Catalysis Science and Technology, Technion Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel); Bannenberg, Th.; Tamm, M. [Institut fur Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Technische Universitat Braunschweig (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    The reaction of one equivalent of Cp*{sub 2}UCl{sub 2} with 2-(trimethylsilyl-imino)-1,3-di-tert-butyl-imidazoline in boiling toluene afforded a one electron oxidation of the uranium metal and the opening of the N-heterocyclic ring, resulting in the formation of an organometallic uranium(V) imine complex. This complex crystallized with one molecule of toluene in the unit cell, and its solid-state structure was determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. When the same reaction was performed in perdeuterated toluene, a myriad of organometallic complexes were obtained, however, when equimolar amounts of water were used in toluene, the same complex was obtained, and its solid state characterization shows two independent molecules in the unit cell with an additional water molecule. For comparison of the geometric parameters, the corresponding isolobal anionic uranium(IV) complex [Cp*{sub 2}UCl{sub 3}]{sup -} was synthesized by the reaction of Cp*{sub 2}UCl{sub 2} with 1,3-di-tert-butyl-imidazolium chloride, and the resulting U(IV)-ate complex was characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis. (authors)

  5. Synthesis and structure determination of a stable organometallic uranium(V) imine complex and its isolobal anionic U(IV)-ate complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reaction of one equivalent of Cp*2UCl2 with 2-(trimethylsilyl-imino)-1,3-di-tert-butyl-imidazoline in boiling toluene afforded a one electron oxidation of the uranium metal and the opening of the N-heterocyclic ring, resulting in the formation of an organometallic uranium(V) imine complex. This complex crystallized with one molecule of toluene in the unit cell, and its solid-state structure was determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. When the same reaction was performed in perdeuterated toluene, a myriad of organometallic complexes were obtained, however, when equimolar amounts of water were used in toluene, the same complex was obtained, and its solid state characterization shows two independent molecules in the unit cell with an additional water molecule. For comparison of the geometric parameters, the corresponding isolobal anionic uranium(IV) complex [Cp*2UCl3]- was synthesized by the reaction of Cp*2UCl2 with 1,3-di-tert-butyl-imidazolium chloride, and the resulting U(IV)-ate complex was characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis. (authors)

  6. Activation of the C-H bond: catalytic hydroxylation of hydrocarbons by new cobaltic alkylperoxydic complexes; selective and catalytic cycloalkane dehydrogenation in presence of uranium for hydrogen transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the thesis is to improve efficiency and selectivity of chemical reactions for alkane transformations. In the first part decomposition of hydroperoxides and hydrocarbon hydroxylation by cobalt complexes is studied. In the second part cycloalkanes are dehydrogenated into aromatics with a Pt catalyst, trapping hydrogen by uranium. Uranium hydride UH3 can yield very pure hydrogen at reasonable temperature

  7. Complexing with tetracycline in the separation of some elements interfering with the activation analysys of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, an analytical method for uranium separation from Th, Zn, Na, Ta, Fe, W, Mo, Ag and lanthanides was studied. These elements form interfering radioisotopes in the gamma ray spectrum of 239 Np and some fission products formed by uranium activation with thermal neutrons. The adequate conditions for separation were studied using solvent extraction technique and tetracycline as an extracting agent. Separation of uranium from Na, Ag and Zn was achieved by controlling pH. Diethlenetriaminepentaacetic acid was used as masking agent for the uranium separation from Fe, Th and lanthanides. For other elements the separation was partial, meaning that about 11% of W, 32% of Mo and 5% of T a were extracted together with uranium into the organic phase. Chemical separation uranium by means of extraction with tetracycline prior to irradiation presented a recovery of 97% for uranium. The method was applied to the determination of uranium and the ratio235 U/238U in ores of monazite, pechblende S-7, provided by the International Atomic Energy Agency and an ore denominated 'goianite' natural of the state of Goias. (Author)

  8. High-performance liquid chromatographic determination of uranium using solvent extraction and bis(salicylaldehyde) tetramethylethylenediimine as complexing reagent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuhawar, M Y; Lanjwani, S N

    1995-12-01

    The reagent bis(salicylaldehyde)tetramethylethylenediimine has been used for the determination of dioxouranium(VI), based on complexation in aqueous solution at pH 6, followed by extraction in chloroform and HPLC determination on a Hypersil ODS (3 mum) column. The complex was eluted with the ternary mixture methanol-acetonitrile-water (40:30:30, v/v/v), with UV detection at 260 nm. Oxovanadium(IV), iron(III), copper(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II) and palladium(II) were completely separated and did not interfere in the determination of uranium. The linear calibration range and detection limits have been obtained. The method has been applied to the determination of uranium together with copper, iron and nickel in mineral ore samples. PMID:18966433

  9. Environmental management plan of the mining and industrial uranium complex in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Mining and Industrial Complex of the Pocos de Caldas Plateau (CIPC) is located at Caldas, county in the southwest of Minas Gerais state. It is a plant of the Industrias Nucleares do Brazil S.A. -INB, the only installation in Brazil for the production of uranium concentrate (yellow-cake) as ammonium diuranate (Adu). The Environmental protection and control program in practice assures the environmental management plan, in operation, maintaining the Complex within technology standards required by updated environmental concepts. The mine is an open pit operation with a surface diameter of 1000 m and an actual average depth of 120 m. Some 44 x 106 m3 of the overburden material were used in embankments structures to civil engineering works in the implantation of several installations in CIPC, and the other portion of the removed material was deposited in two pre-selected areas having both an upper area of about 2,0 x 106 m2. The annual average volume of waters transported to chemical treatment is about 9,0 x 105 m3. The mill, in its full operation, processes 2500 t of ore per day and the solid and liquid tailings are directed to a waste pond system where are contained approximately 2,0 x 106 m3 (2,2 x 106 t) of solid wastes with an estimation of further 70 x 105 m3 to be disposed. The upper surface of tailings pond is about 2,0 x 105 m2. Nowadays, the environmental protection and control program aims to the development of potential pollutant areas stabilization reintegrating them into their original features or adjusting them to other forms of laudable restoration. (authors). 1 fig

  10. Uranium exploration target selection for proterozoic iron oxide/breccia complex type deposits in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multimetal iron oxide/breccia complex (IOBC) type deposits exemplified by Olympic Dam in Australia, fall under low grade, large tonnage deposits. A multidisciplinary integrated exploration programme consisting of airborne surveys, ground geological surveys, geophysical and geochemical investigations and exploratory drilling, supported adequately by the state of the art analytical facilities, data processing using various software and digital image processing has shown moderate success in the identification of target areas for this type of deposits in the Proterozoic terrains of India. Intracratonic, anorogenic, continental rift to continental margin environment have been identified in a very wide spectrum of rock associations. The genesis and evolution of such associations during the Middle Proterozoic period have been reviewed and applied for target selection in the (i) Son-Narmada rift valley zone; (ii) areas covered by Dongargarh Supergroup of rocks in Madhya Pradesh; (iii) areas exposing ferruginous breccia in the western part of the Singhbhum Shear Zone (SSZ) around Lotapahar; (iv) Siang Group of rocks in Arunachal Pradesh; (v) Crystalline rocks of Garo Hills around Anek; and (vi) Chhotanagpur Gneissic complex in the Bahia-Ulatutoli tract of Ranchi Plateau. Of theses six areas, the Son-Narmada rift area appears to be the most promising area for IOBC type deposits. Considering occurrences of the uranium anomalies near Meraraich, Kundabhati, Naktu and Kudar and positive favourability criteria observed in a wide variety of rocks spatially related to the rifts and shears, certain sectors in Son-Narmada rift zone have been identified as promising for intense subsurface exploration. 20 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  11. The genesis of migmatite complexes and the relationship between migmatite and uranium mineralization, area 505 of Datian, Panzhihua city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Presinian metamorphic-migmatitic complexes distributed along 505 area of Datian. According to the results of the migmatite and residue of lithological characteristics, chemical characteristics of rocks, REE and regional data. It is supposed that migmatite formed in situ partial melting-the recrystallization. Mineralized rock are consistent with regional migmatite in the REE patterns, The migmatization that is advantage for uranium activation, migration, enrichment. (authors)

  12. Interest of uranium complexes for the mechanism study of the McMurry reaction; Interet des complexes de l`uranium pour l`etude du mecanisme de la reaction de McMurry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maury, O

    1997-07-04

    The reducing coupling reactions of ketones in diols and olefins are generally carried out with titanium or samarium compounds. In this work uranium complexes have been used. They have allowed to study the chemical reaction mechanism. This thesis is divided into three parts: 1) the reduction mechanism of uranium tetrachloride by cyclic voltametry has been studied at first. It has been shown that this reduction is followed by a transfer reaction of chlorides between the reduced specie of the higher electronic density and UCl . 2) In the second part is described: the synthesis, the crystal structure, the reactivity of the chemical agents, the stereochemistry of diols and alkenes formation and the pinacolisation reaction catalysis. 3) In the last part, the limits of the McMurry reaction are given by the study of the aromatic ketones pinacolisation reaction by-products. The obtained results show that the complexes of the metals which present a high reducing and oxo-philic (Ti, Sm, U..) character react in a similar way with the carbonyl compounds. If the uranium compounds are less used than those of the titanium in the field of the organic synthesis applications, they are precious auxiliaries and excellent models for reactions mechanisms study and for the synthesis methods optimization. (O.M.). 284 refs.

  13. The Extraction of Uranium as Uranyl Nitrate Complex in The Nitrate Acid Solution by Liquid Membrane Emulsion Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extraction of uranium as uranyl nitrate complex in the nitrate acid solution has been carried out using a liquid membrane emulsion technique. The liquid membrane phase is in form of emulsion that consists of kerosene as the solvent, sorbitan monooleat (span-80) as the surfactant, di-2 ethyl phosphoric acids (D2EHPA) as the carrier agent, and phosphoric acids as the internal phase. The optimum conditions for the extraction of uranium as uranyl nitrate complex have been obtained as the following: the organic phase (O) and the water or internal liquid phase (W) ratio in the liquid membrane phase (O/W) was 1, the concentration of nitric acid in the external phase was 3M, the D2EHPH concentration was 10% (v/v), the extraction time was 5 minutes and the agitation speed to achieve a membrane emulsion was 7500 rpm. At this condition the extraction efficiency obtained was 94.24%. The experiments also showed that the amount of extracted uranium by the liquid. membrane emulsion was limited

  14. Differential pulse polarographic determination of uranium(VI) in complex materials after adsorption of its trifluoroethylxanthate cetyltrimethylammonium ion-associated complex on naphthalene adsorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium(VI) is adsorbed as a uranium trifluoroethylxanthate (TFEX)-cetyltrimethylammonium (CTMA) ion-pair complex on microcrystalline naphthalene quantitatively in the pH range 4.2 - 7.0. Without cetyltrimethylammonium as the counter ion, the adsorption is hardly 70%. The metal has been desorbed with HCl and determined with a differential pulse polarograph. Uranium can alternatively be quantitatively adsorbed on TFEX-CTMA-naphthalene adsorbent packed in a column at a flow rate of 1 - 5 ml/min and determined similarly. A well-defined peak has been obtained in this medium at -0.20 V versus a saturated calomel electrode. Cyclic voltammetry, differential pulse polarography and D.C. polarography studies indicate that uranium has been reduced irreversibly under these conditions. The detection limit is 0.30 μg/ml at the minimum instrumental settings (signal-to-noise ratio of 2) (with a preconcentration factor of 10, the detection limit would be 30 ng/ml for uranium when the volume in the cell is 15 ml). However if the volume in the cell is 5 ml, it would have been 10 ng/ml with a preconcentration factor of 30. Linearity is maintained in a concentration range of 0.5 - 19.0 μg/ml (2.1 - 79.83 x 10-9 M) with a correlation factor of 0.9994 and a relative standard deviation of ±1.1% (in this case 7.5 μg may be concentrated from 150 ml of the aqueous sample where its concentration is as low as 50 ng/ml). Various parameters, such as the effect of the pH, volume of the aqueous phase, flow rate and the interference of a large number of metal ions and anions on the determination of uranium, have been studied in detail to optimize the conditions for its trace determination in various complex materials, like alloys, coal fly ash, biological, synthetic, and waste-water samples. (author)

  15. Dissolved organic carbon reduces uranium bioavailability and toxicity. 1. Characterization of an aquatic fulvic acid and its complexation with uranium[VI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenfield, Melanie A; McDonald, Suzanne; Kovacs, Krisztina; Lesher, Emily K; Pringle, Jennifer M; Markich, Scott J; Ng, Jack C; Noller, Barry; Brown, Paul L; van Dam, Rick A

    2011-04-01

    Fulvic acid (FA) from a tropical Australian billabong (lagoon) was isolated with XAD-8 resin and characterized using size exclusion chromatography, solid state cross-polarization magic angle spinning, 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and potentiometric acid-base titration. Physicochemical characteristics of the billabong FA were comparable with those of the Suwannee River Fulvic Acid (SRFA) standard. The greater negative charge density of the billabong FA suggested it contained protons that were more weakly bound than those of SRFA, with the potential for billabong water to complex less metal contaminants, such as uranium (U). This may subsequently influence the toxicity of metal contaminants to resident freshwater organisms. The complexation of U with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) (10 mg L(-1)) in billabong water was calculated using the HARPHRQ geochemical speciation model and also measured using flow field-flow fractionation combined with inductively coupled plasma mass-spectroscopy. Agreement between both methods was very good (within 4% as U-DOC). The results suggest that in billabong water at pH 6.0, containing an average DOC of 10 mg L(-1) and a U concentration of 90 μg L(-1), around 10% of U is complexed with DOC. PMID:21351802

  16. Uranium management activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the missions of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Office (ORO) has been the management of the Department's uranium materials. This mission has been accomplished through successful integration of ORO's uranium activities with the rest of the DOE complex. Beginning in the 1980's, several of the facilities in that complex have been shut down and are in the decommissioning process. With the end of the Cold War, the shutdown of many other facilities is planned. As a result, inventories of uranium need to be removed from the Department facilities. These inventories include highly enriched uranium (HEU), low enriched uranium (LEU), normal uranium (NU), and depleted uranium (DU). The uranium materials exist in different chemical forms, including metals, oxides, solutions, and gases. Much of the uranium in these inventories is not needed to support national priorities and programs. (author)

  17. Synthesis, Characterization, and Density Functional Theory Analysis of Uranium and Thorium Complexes Containing Nitrogen-Rich 5-Methyltetrazolate Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Kevin P; Maerzke, Katie A; Travia, Nicholas E; Morris, David E; Scott, Brian L; Henson, Neil J; Yang, Ping; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L; Veauthier, Jacqueline M

    2016-05-16

    Two nitrogen-rich, isostructural complexes of uranium and thorium, (C5Me5)2U[η(2)-(N,N')-tetrazolate]2 (7) and (C5Me5)2Th[η(2)-(N,N')-tetrazolate]2 (8), containing 5-methyltetrazolate, have been synthesized and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, electrochemical methods, UV-visible-near-IR spectroscopy, and variable-temperature (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations yield favorable free energies of formation (approximately -375 kJ/mol) and optimized structures in good agreement with the experimental crystal structures. Additionally, calculated NMR chemical shifts of 7 and 8 are in good agreement with the variable-temperature (1)H NMR experiments. Time-dependent DFT calculations of both complexes yield UV-visible spectroscopic features that are consistent with experiment and provide assignments of the corresponding electronic transitions. The electronic transitions in the UV-visible spectroscopic region are attributed to C5Me5 ligand-to-metal charge transfer. The low-lying molecular orbitals of the tetrazolate ligands (∼2 eV below the HOMO) do not contribute appreciably to experimentally observed electronic transitions. The combined experimental and theoretical analysis of these new nitrogen-rich uranium and thorium complexes indicates the tetrazolate ligand behaves primarily as a σ-donor. PMID:27110650

  18. Project development for mining-metallurgical complexes for production of uranium concentrates - an analysis and a methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activities comprising the development of a project for a mining-metallurgical complex for production of uranium concentrates, from sampling and evaluation of an orebody until plant start-up, are analyzed. The analysis of the orebody, characterization of the ore, bench scale and pilot plant metallurgical studies, environmental studies and economic analyses of the project are described. The mining project and mine preparation and engineering and construction of the plant are reviewed in less detail. The estimated time lapse for the development of a typical project under ideal conditions is 66 months. A bar diagram is included showing an approximate timetable for each activity. (author)

  19. Study of uranium +4 stabilization by the formation of a complex with a heteropolyanion ligand, for its off-lines analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of the behaviour of uranium in oxidation state +4, during uranium/plutonium separation step of the PUREX process for reprocessing nuclear fuels, requires the availability of an efficient analytical method allowing the stabilization and off-line analysis of sample of aqueous and organic solutions containing this reagent. It was accordingly decided to develop a stabilization method using the heteropolyanion P2W17O6110-(PWO') as a selective ligand. Besides the stabilization effect, the complexation of uranium +4 results in the appearance of an intense and specific band on the visible absorption spectrum of the formed U(PWO)216-complex. This property made it possible to consider the sensitive spectrophotometric analysis of the sample. The work presented first helped to determine, in the presence of PWO, the characteristic thermodynamic data of the reaction involving uranium +4 and +6, plutonium +3 and +4, nitrous and nitric acids, and hydrazine. In the light of these results, it was possible to plan the development of the stabilisation method. The use of PWO thus helped (1) to design a method capable of stopping any reaction involving the uranium +4 / uranium +6 pair, and (2) to perform the simple analysis of uranium +4. The study presented in the second part uses the example of the U4+ cation to understand the reasons for the selectivity of the complexation of actinides +4 by PWO. Owing to the remarkable spectroscopic and magnetic properties of this cation, ti was possible to acquire data concerning the structure of the U(PWO)216- complex, both in solution and in the solid state. It was thus demonstrated that the geometry of the environment of U4+ (eight oxygen forming a cubic anti-prism), which is perfectly complementary to that of the 5f electron wave functions of the actinide, helps to explain the selectivity of the complexation of actinides +4. (author). refs., 46 figs., 40 tabs

  20. Analysis of complex seepage problems with the disposal of uranium tailings: selected case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluations of seepage effects from existing uranium tailings impoundments, as well as those planned for the future operations, form the subject matter of this paper. The method of evaluation is not restricted to uranium tailings alone, but may be applied to the disposal of other kinds of tailings and slurry wastes as well. The application of an integrated program involving field measurements, laboratory measurements, and mathematical modeling is reported. The paper deals with saturated and unsaturated fluid flows in subsurface media as well as with the associated geochemical interactions. The influence of impoundment liners, native soil, and rock types, as well as groundwater are discussed. Selected case studies of applications are reported and discussed

  1. Chemical analysis of uranium-niobium alloys by wavelength dispersive spectroscopy at the sigma complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papin, Pallas A.

    2012-06-01

    Uranium-niobium alloys play an important role in the nation's nuclear stockpile. It is possible to chemically quantify this alloy at a micron scale by using a technique know as wavelength dispersive spectroscopy. This report documents how this technique was used and how it is possible to reproduce measurements of this type. Discussion regarding the accuracy and precision of the measurements, the development of standards, and the comparison of different ways to model the matrices are all presented.

  2. Seismic reflections outline complex structural setting of the uranium in the Athabasca Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-resolution and regional multi-channel seismic reflection profiling was conducted in different localities in the Athabasca Basin, supported by various sponsors. The two overall goals of the seismic program were to test the effectiveness of seismic techniques as tools for uranium exploration, and to contribute to the four-dimensional geoscience framework for uranium exploration within the deeper recesses of the Athabasca Basin. More specifically, objectives of the high-resolution 2D and 3D surveys were: 1) to define the basement structures underlying the basin; 2) to map the stratigraphic architecture of the Athabasca Group Sandstone; 3) to image the sandstone/basement unconformity; 4) to locate faults controlling the uranium deposits; 5) establish possible relationships between sedimentation and deformation and 6) determine the seismic signature of a known uranium deposit. The high-resolution 2D and 3D survey successfully met most of the initial objectives. Despite the difficulties of the acquisition environment, limitations in the survey geometry and elevated noise levels, the final processed data successfully imaged the intricate and subtle stratigraphic and structural features associated with the P2 productive trend. Further efforts will concentrate on the full 3D interpretation, and study of seismic attributes associated with the ore bodies. The present study demonstrates that the seismic method is an extremely valuable exploration tool in the deeper parts of the Athabasca Basin. Following regional to subregional potential geophysical surveys, delineating potential exploration areas, later seismic surveying can offer the opportunity to accurately define small-scale structures and assist the development of a more efficient drilling program

  3. Using complex resistivity imaging to infer biogeochemical processes associated with bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments at the Department of Energy's Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site near Rifle, Colorado (USA) have demonstrated the ability to remove uranium from groundwater by stimulating the growth and activity of Geobacter species through acetate amendment. Prolonging the activity of these strains in order to optimize uranium bioremediation has prompted the development of minimally-invasive and spatially-extensive monitoring methods diagnostic of their in situ activity and the end products of their metabolism. Here we demonstrate the use of complex resistivity imaging for monitoring biogeochemical changes accompanying stimulation of indigenous aquifer microorganisms during and after a prolonged period (100+ days) of acetate injection. A thorough raw-data statistical analysis of discrepancies between normal and reciprocal measurements and incorporation of a new power-law phase-error model in the inversion were used to significantly improve the quality of the resistivity phase images over those obtained during previous monitoring experiments at the Rifle IRFC site. The imaging results reveal spatiotemporal changes in the phase response of aquifer sediments, which correlate with increases in Fe(II) and precipitation of metal sulfides (e.g., FeS) following the iterative stimulation of iron and sulfate reducing microorganism. Only modest changes in resistivity magnitude were observed over the monitoring period. The largest phase anomalies (>40 mrad) were observed hundreds of days after halting acetate injection, in conjunction with accumulation of Fe(II) in the presence of residual FeS minerals, reflecting preservation of geochemically reduced conditions in the aquifer - a prerequisite for ensuring the long-term stability of immobilized, redox-sensitive contaminants, such as uranium.

  4. Using complex resistivity imaging to infer biogeochemical processes associated with bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orozco, A. Flores; Williams, K.H.; Long, P.E.; Hubbard, S.S.; Kemna, A.

    2011-04-01

    Experiments at the Department of Energy's Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site near Rifle, Colorado (USA) have demonstrated the ability to remove uranium from groundwater by stimulating the growth and activity of Geobacter species through acetate amendment. Prolonging the activity of these strains in order to optimize uranium bioremediation has prompted the development of minimally-invasive and spatially-extensive monitoring methods diagnostic of their in situ activity and the end products of their metabolism. Here we demonstrate the use of complex resistivity imaging for monitoring biogeochemical changes accompanying stimulation of indigenous aquifer microorganisms during and after a prolonged period (100+ days) of acetate injection. A thorough raw-data statistical analysis of discrepancies between normal and reciprocal measurements and incorporation of a new power-law phase-error model in the inversion were used to significantly improve the quality of the resistivity phase images over those obtained during previous monitoring experiments at the Rifle IRFC site. The imaging results reveal spatiotemporal changes in the phase response of aquifer sediments, which correlate with increases in Fe(II) and precipitation of metal sulfides (e.g., FeS) following the iterative stimulation of iron and sulfate reducing microorganism. Only modest changes in resistivity magnitude were observed over the monitoring period. The largest phase anomalies (>40 mrad) were observed hundreds of days after halting acetate injection, in conjunction with accumulation of Fe(II) in the presence of residual FeS minerals, reflecting preservation of geochemically reduced conditions in the aquifer - a prerequisite for ensuring the long-term stability of immobilized, redox-sensitive contaminants, such as uranium.

  5. Strongly coupled binuclear uranium-oxo complexes from uranyl oxo rearrangement and reductive silylation

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold, Polly L.; Jones, Guy M.; Odoh, Samuel O.; Schreckenbach, Georg; Magnani, Nicola; Love, Jason B.

    2012-01-01

    The most common motif in uranium chemistry is the d(0)f(0) uranyl ion [UO(2)](2+) in which the oxo groups are rigorously linear and inert. Alternative geometries, such as the cis-uranyl, have been identified theoretically and implicated in oxo-atom transfer reactions that are relevant to environmental speciation and nuclear waste remediation. Single electron reduction is now known to impart greater oxo-group reactivity, but with retention of the linear OUO motif, and reactions of the oxo grou...

  6. Study of new complexes of uranium and comba radical. II-Complexes formed in the presence of OH-, CO3H, CH3-COO-, and B4O7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several complexes extracted with CDMBAC organic solutions from uranium aqueous solutions, in presence of sodium and ammonium hydroxides, are studied. These complexes fit to the general formula: U02(OH)n(C[DMBA)n-2 . The uranium extraction in presence of an excess of sodium bicarbonate is also studied. From aqueous solutions of uranyl acetate we have isolated the complex U02(CH3-C00)n (CDMBA)n-2. In presence of boric acid and sodium tetraborate an U-CDMBA compound containing boron in its molecule has being obtained by precipitation and liquid-liquid extraction. (Author) 5 refs

  7. Studies on the kinetics and mechanism of complex formation in the reactions of ferron with iron (III) and uranium (VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The equilibria and kinetics of the reactions of ferron (7-iodo-8-hydroxyquindine-5-sulphonic acid) with iron(III) and uranium(VI) have been followed by stopped flow spectrophotometry under the conditions of mono-complex formation. The equilibrium constants obtained spectrophotmetrically have been compared with those obtained from kinetic studies. In the case of iron(III), in the acidity range, [H+]=(2.8-10.0)x10-2 mol dm-3, among the different possible reaction path-ways, the reaction has been found to proceed mainly through the interaction of Fe(OH)(aq)2+ and partially deprotonated form (LH-) of the ligand. In the case of uranium(VI), in the acidity range, [H+]=(2.5-25.0)x10-5 mol dm-3, a dual path mechanism involving UO2(aq)2+ and UO2(OH)(aq)- and the partially deprotonated (LH-) form of the ligand is consistent with the observations. The results in each case are in agreement with the Eigen mechanism and the characteristic water exchange rates have been obtained in each case, as a rough estimate, from the experimental data. Activation parameters (ΔHsup(≠) and ΔSsup(≠) for each path have been determined and compared. (author). 23 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Extraction of Uranium (VI) Nitrate Complexes By Adogen 464. Vol. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-chain amines are frequently used for the extraction of actinides and offer several advantages for their use in the reprocessing of high burn-up nuclear fuels. The present investigation was undertaken to obtain some information on the extraction of Uranium (VI)by adogen 464 from nitrate medium. Extraction parameters studied include: acidity, salting agent, metal and extractant concentrations, diluent type, and temperature. Extraction mechanism was proposed on the basis of results obtained. Best results were attained at 6 M H N O3 and sodium nitrate was found to increase appreciably the extraction. It was infrared that extraction was dominated by solvation, and ion exchange reaction mechanisms at lower (<6 M) and higher acidities, respectively. As far as diluents are concerned, the dielectric constant, solvation power and donor characteristics were used to explain the variation in the extraction efficiency of the diluents. Kerosene, the most economic particularly when used on industrial scale, was recommended as optimal diluent. Extractability decreases markedly with rise of temperature, suggesting that the extraction behaviour is exothermic; the thermodynamic functions were also calculated and discussed. A method for the separation of uranium (VI) from some fission products existing in high liquid waste was outlined. 3 figs., 2 tabs

  9. [U(TpMe2)2(bipy)]+: A cationic uranium(III) complex with single molecule magnet behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The addition of 2,2'-bipyridine to [U(TpMe2)2I] (1) results in the displacement of the iodide and the formation of the cationic uranium(III) complex [U(TpMe2)2(bipy)]I (2). This compound was isolated as a dark-green solid in good yield and characterized by IR and NMR spectroscopies, and its molecular structure was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Studies of its magnetic properties revealed a frequency dependence of magnetization with a blocking temperature of 4.5 K and, at lower temperatures, a slow relaxation of magnetization with an energy barrier of 18.2 cm-1, characteristic of single-molecule-magnet behavior. (authors)

  10. Reduced uranium complexes: synthetic and DFT study of the role of pi ligation in the stabilization of uranium species in a formal low-valent state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobkov, Ilia; Gorelsky, Serge; Gambarotta, Sandro

    2009-08-01

    Reaction of UCl(4)(THF)(4) with 1,3-[2,5-(i-Pr)(2)PhNC( horizontal lineCH(2))](2)C(6)H(4)Li(2) produced a complex formulated as [{1,3-[2,5-(i-Pr)(2)PhNC( horizontal lineCH(2))](2)C(6)H(4)}UCl(3)][Li(THF)(4)] (1) that exhibits a nonagostic interaction between one of the carbon atoms of the central phenyl ring and the U metal center. This interaction leads to significant weakening of the corresponding C-H bond, thereby facilitating proton removal in consecutive transformations. Attempts to form trivalent uranium derivatives were carried out by reacting the same ligand dianion with in situ-prepared "UCl(3)". The reaction indeed afforded a trivalent species formulated as {1,3-[2,5-(i-Pr)(2)PhNC( horizontal lineCH(2))](2)C(6)H(4)}U(mu-Cl)(3)[Li(THF)(2)](2) (2). The configuration of the ligand system in this complex is similar to that in 1, with the same type of arrangement of the central phenyl ring. Further reduction chemistry with a variety of reagents and conditions was examined. Reaction of 1 with 1 equiv of lithium naphthalenide at 0 degrees C did not afford 2 but instead gave a closely related U(III) complex formulated as {1,3-[2,5-(i-Pr)(2)PhNC( horizontal lineCH(2))](2)C(6)H(4)}U(THF)(mu-Cl)(2)[Li(Et(2)O)(2)] (3). Both of the trivalent complexes 2 and 3 reacted thermally in boiling THF, undergoing oxidation of the metal center to afford a new tetravalent compound {1,3-[2,5-(i-Pr)(2)PhNC( horizontal lineCH(2))](2)C(6)H(3)}U(THF)(mu-Cl)(2)[Li(THF)(2)] (4) in which the oxidation of the trivalent center occurred at the expense of the central phenyl ring C-H bond. Reaction of 1 with 3 equiv of lithium naphthalenide at room temperature afforded {{1,3-[2,5-(i-Pr)(2)PhNC( horizontal lineCH(2))](2)C(6)H(3)}U(mu-Cl)(mu-[O(CH(2))(3)CH(2)])[Li(DME)]}[Li(DME)(3)] (5). In this species, the tetravalent metal center forms a six-membered metallacycle ring with a moiety arising from THF ring opening. Reaction in DME afforded reductive cleavage of the solvent accompanied by

  11. Uranium: A Dentist's perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Toor, R. S. S.; Brar, G S

    2012-01-01

    Uranium is a naturally occurring radionuclide found in granite and other mineral deposits. In its natural state, it consists of three isotopes (U-234, U-235 and U-238). On an average, 1% – 2% of ingested uranium is absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract in adults. The absorbed uranium rapidly enters the bloodstream and forms a diffusible ionic uranyl hydrogen carbonate complex (UO2HCO3+) which is in equilibrium with a nondiffusible uranyl albumin complex. In the skeleton, the uranyl ion repla...

  12. Effect of denaturants on the speciation of dicarboxylic acids: uranium(VI) complexes of oxalic acid in micellar media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer assisted pH-metric investigation has been carried out on the effect of micelles on the complexes of uranium(VI) with oxalic acid. Approximate formation constants have been calculated with the computer program SCPHD utilizing the experimental data obtained by monitoring H+ ion concentration. The formation constants thus obtained are refined with the computer program MINIQUAD75. Selection of the best-fit chemical model is based on the statistical parameters and residual analysis. The major complexes formed are [UO2(C2O4)2]2-, UO2(C2O4) and [UO2(C2O4)2OH]3-. The distribution patterns of the different species with pH show that [UO2(C2O4)2]2- is the predominant species. Influence of the micelles on the speciation is discussed based on the distribution of the various species in the Stern layer and in bulk solvent. The probable structures of the complexes are also given. (author)

  13. The uranium in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uranium is a natural element omnipresent in the environment, with a complex chemistry more and more understood. Many studies are always today devoted to this element to better improve the uranium behavior in the environment. To illustrate this knowledge and for the public information the CEA published this paper. It gathers in four chapters: historical aspects and properties of the uranium, the uranium in the environment and the impacts, the metrology of the uranium and its migration. (A.L.B.)

  14. Multielectron redox reactions involving C-C coupling and cleavage in uranium Schiff base complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reaction of U(III) with Schiff base ligands and the reduction of U(IV) Schiff base complexes both promote C-C bond formation to afford dinuclear or mononuclear U(IV) amido complexes, which can release up to four electrons to substrates through the oxidative cleavage of the C-C bond. (authors)

  15. Interaction between uranium and humic acid (II): complexation, precipitation and migration behavior of U(VI) in the presence of humic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complexation, precipitation, and migration behavior of uranium in the presence of humic acid (HA) or fulvic acid (FA) were investigated by cation exchange, ultrafiltration and dynamic experiment, respectively. The results showed that (i) complex equilibrium between the uranium and humic substances was achieved at approximately 72 h, (ii) the coordination number varied from 1:1 to 1:2 (U(VI): humic acid) as pH increased from 3 to 6; and (iii), while the complex stability constant decreased when temperature increased, but increased with pH value. We found that the precipitation of uranyl could only be observed in presence of HA, and the precipitation was influenced by conditions, such as pH, uranium concentration, temperature, and the HA concentration. The maximum precipitation proportion up to 60% could be achieved in the condition of 40 mg/L HA solution at pH 6. We further observed that the migration behavior of uranium in soil in the presence of humic acid (HA) or fulvic acid (FA) was different from that in the presence of inorganic colloid, and the effect of humic substances (HS) was limited. (authors)

  16. Spectroscopic investigations on sorption of uranium onto suspended bentonite. Effects of pH, ionic strength and complexing anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Parveen Kumar; Pathak, Priyanath; Mohapatra, Manoj; Mohapatra, Prasanta Kumar [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Radiochemistry Div.; Yadav, Ashok Kumar; Jha, Sambhunath; Bhattacharyya, Dibyendu [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Atomic and Molecular Physics Div.

    2015-06-01

    Batch sorption experiments were carried out under aerobic conditions to understand the sorption behavior of U(VI) onto bentonite clay under varying pH (2-8) and ionic strength (I = 0.01 - 1 M (NaClO{sub 4})) conditions. The influences of different complexing anions (1 x 10{sup -4} M) such as oxalic acid (ox), carbonate (CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}), citric acid (cit), and humic acid (HA, 10 mg/L) on the sorption behavior were also investigated. The sorption of U(VI) increased with increasing pH up to pH 6 beyond which a decrease was attributed to the formation of anionic carbonate species. Marginal influence of the change in the ionic strength of the medium on the sorption profile of uranium suggested inner-sphere complexation onto the bentonite surface. The presence of humic acid showed interesting sorption profile with varying pH. Initially, there was an enhancement in the sorption with increased pH followed by a plateau and finally a decrease thereafter due to the formation of aqueous U(VI)-humate complexes. Spectroscopic studies such as UV spectrophotometry, luminescence and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements were also performed to understand the changes in aqueous speciation of U(VI) ion. The luminescence yields of different aqueous U(VI) species followed the order: U(VI){sub Hydroxy} > U(VI){sub HumicAcid} > U(VI){sub carbonate} > U(VI){sub citrate}. The lower luminescence yield of U(VI)carbonate complex can be attributed to the strong dynamic quenching by carbonate at room temperature. The U(VI) samples shows two distinct life-time suggesting the presence of the different luminescent U(VI) species. Similar trend was observed for U(VI)-bentonite suspension in presence/absence of the complexing ligands. There was luminescence quenching for the sorbed U(VI) due to surface complexation. These observations were further supported by spectrophotometric measurements. EXAFS spectra of U(VI) samples were recorded in luminescence mode at the U L{sub 3

  17. Spectroscopic investigations on sorption of uranium onto suspended bentonite. Effects of pH, ionic strength and complexing anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batch sorption experiments were carried out under aerobic conditions to understand the sorption behavior of U(VI) onto bentonite clay under varying pH (2-8) and ionic strength (I = 0.01 - 1 M (NaClO4)) conditions. The influences of different complexing anions (1 x 10-4 M) such as oxalic acid (ox), carbonate (CO32-), citric acid (cit), and humic acid (HA, 10 mg/L) on the sorption behavior were also investigated. The sorption of U(VI) increased with increasing pH up to pH 6 beyond which a decrease was attributed to the formation of anionic carbonate species. Marginal influence of the change in the ionic strength of the medium on the sorption profile of uranium suggested inner-sphere complexation onto the bentonite surface. The presence of humic acid showed interesting sorption profile with varying pH. Initially, there was an enhancement in the sorption with increased pH followed by a plateau and finally a decrease thereafter due to the formation of aqueous U(VI)-humate complexes. Spectroscopic studies such as UV spectrophotometry, luminescence and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements were also performed to understand the changes in aqueous speciation of U(VI) ion. The luminescence yields of different aqueous U(VI) species followed the order: U(VI)Hydroxy > U(VI)HumicAcid > U(VI)carbonate > U(VI)citrate. The lower luminescence yield of U(VI)carbonate complex can be attributed to the strong dynamic quenching by carbonate at room temperature. The U(VI) samples shows two distinct life-time suggesting the presence of the different luminescent U(VI) species. Similar trend was observed for U(VI)-bentonite suspension in presence/absence of the complexing ligands. There was luminescence quenching for the sorbed U(VI) due to surface complexation. These observations were further supported by spectrophotometric measurements. EXAFS spectra of U(VI) samples were recorded in luminescence mode at the U L3 edge. There was shift in the absorbance edge which

  18. Chapter 6. Uranium extraction possibilities from natural uranium-bearing waters of complex salt composition. 6.2. Technology for uranium extraction from brine with a high content of ion-chlorine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present article is devoted to technology for uranium extraction from brine with a high content of ion-chlorine. The content of basic anions and cations in lake waters of Sasik-Kul deposit was defined. Results of X-ray spectral analysis of salt residual after water evaporation from Sasik-Kul lake was discussed. Investigations revealed that uranium extraction from brines containing ion-chlorine is possible. The developed basic process flow diagram of uranium extraction from Sasik-Kul Lake' brine consists of the following basic stages: evaporation, leaching, catching of formed gases (HCl), sorption, desorption, deposition, drying and tempering.

  19. The uranium behaviour during rock-water interaction in the granites from the Itu complex (Sao Paulo, Brazil): a laboratory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Helen S.B. da; Marques, Leila S.; Kawauchi, Roberto K., E-mail: leila@iag.usp.br, E-mail: keiji@iag.usp.br [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas. Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    In order to elucidate the mechanisms involved in the process of uranium leaching due to the rock-water interaction in the granitic rocks from Itu Complex (Sao Paulo, Brazil), an experimental arrangement was developed and built. About 2.5kg of crushed rock fragments from Cabreuva and Indaiatuba Intrusions were maintained at room temperature within a glass flask filled with circulating water. The percolating water was removed periodically (from 10 to 30 days) for uranium analysis and then replaced by an equal volume of fresh water. Alpha spectrometry was used to determine the activity concentrations of {sup 234}U and {sup 238}U, and {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios, of the waters as well as of the granites. The results for both samples showed that most of the uranium is leached in the first days after the contact between rock and water. The {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios were significantly greater than unity, indicating radioactive disequilibrium between those isotopes, probably due to alpha recoil. Although the uranium activity concentrations in the water samples diminished with the increasing of time, it was not observed considerable variations of the {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios. It was also noticed that, the amount of leached uranium as well as the {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios are characteristics of each sample submitted to leaching, reflecting the differences of the granite facies mineralogy.(author)

  20. Uranium analysis. Fluorine ionometric determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorine determination in uranium, applicable for fluorine content between 10 to 2000 ppm, by dissolution in nitric acid, uranium (VI) citric complex formation, ionometry, potential is compared with a calibration curve

  1. Complexation of three uranium(IV) ions at two α-B-[SbW9O33]9- trilacunary Keggin units. A spectroscopic investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sandwich-type uranium(IV)-polyoxometalate Na6[U3(SbW9O33)2] x 22H2O was prepared and investigated by FT-IR and UV-VIS methods. The uranium(IV) coordination at the trilacunary Keggin units shifts the vas(W-Ob,c-W), vas(W=Od), vas(W-Oa) antisymmetric stretching vibration bands in the 700/950 cm-1 region of the FT-IR spectrum of U(IV)-complex. The visible electronic absorption spectrum of the complex indicates a 3H4 electronic ground state of uranium ions and a quasicubic local symmetry around them. The UV electronic spectra of the U(IV)-POM complex and of the ligand present the broad bands assigned to pπ-dπ electronic transitions in the W=O bonds (at 46640 cm-1 for the ligand and 47280 cm-1 for the complex) and dπ-pπ-dπ transitions in tricentric W-O-W bonds (at 40880 cm-1 for the ligand and 39920 cm-1 for the complex). (author)

  2. Variation of stability constants of thorium and uranium oxalate complexes with ionic strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erten, H.N; Mohammed, A.K.; Choppin, G.R. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1993-12-31

    Extraction of Th(IV) and UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} by a solution of TTA and HDEHP, respectively, in toluene was used to obtain stability constants of their oxalate complexes in 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 M ionic strength (NaClO{sub 2}) solutions. The complexes formed were the MOx, MHOx, MOx{sub 2} and M(HOx){sub 2} (M = Th, UO{sub 2}) species. The values were analyzed by the Specific Interaction Theory and agreed to I {le} 3 M but required an additional term for fitting at I > 3 M.

  3. Isolation and structural characterization of uranium and other f block complexes with tridentate Schiff bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two Schiff base ligands, isatin semicarbazone(ISC) and o-vanillin salicyloylhydrazone(o-VSH) have been prepared and their complexes with U, La, Ce, Pr are synthesized and characterized by IR spectra, diffuse reflectance spectra, elemental analysis and other physico-chemical techniques. (author). 4 refs

  4. Some mixed ligands complexes of zirconium (IV), thorium (IV) and uranium (VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New thiocyanato complexes of Zr(IV), Th(IV), Th(IV) and U(VI) containing polydentate Schiff's base ligands derived from the condensation of salicylaldehyde with triethylene tetramine or 1,3-diamino propane have been synthesized and characterized. The complexes have compositions, [Zr(SCN)/sub 2/ L'], [Th (SCN)/sub 2/ L], [U(O) (SCN)/sub 2/ L'], and [U (O) (SCN)/sub 2/ L], [Schiff's base ligands, L' = N/sub 4/C/sub 8/H/sub 16/ (C/sub 6/H/sub 4/OH)/sub 2/ ; L = N/sub 2/C/sub 5/H/sub 8/ (C/sub 6/H/sub 4/OH)/sub 2/]. As per IR spectral data, the am bidentate thiocyanato ligand is N-coordinated suggesting that the metal centres behave as class a acceptors. Thiocyanato complexes of transition metals containing Schiff's base ligands but reports on thiocyanato complex of heavier metal ions are lacking. Reagent grade chemicals were used as supplied by BDH or Merck. (Orig./A.B.)

  5. Complexation of Gluconate with Uranium(VI) in Acidic Solutions: Thermodynamic Study with Structural Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhicheng; Helms, G.; Clark, S. B.; Tian, Guoxin; Zanonato, PierLuigi; Rao, Linfeng

    2009-01-05

    Within the pC{sub H} range of 2.5 to 4.2, gluconate forms three uranyl complexes UO{sub 2}(GH{sub 4}){sup +}, UO{sub 2}(GH{sub 3})(aq), and UO{sub 2}(GH{sub 3})(GH{sub 4}){sup -}, through the following reactions: (1) UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} + GH{sub 4}{sup -} = UO{sub 2}(GH{sub 4}){sup +}, (2) UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} + GH{sub 4}{sup -} = UO{sub 2}(GH{sub 3})(aq) + H{sup +}, and (3) UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} + 2GH{sub 4}{sup -} = UO{sub 2}(GH{sub 3})(GH{sub 4}){sup -} + H{sup +}. Complexes were inferred from potentiometric, calorimetric, NMR, and EXAFS studies. Correspondingly, the stability constants and enthalpies were determined to be log {Beta}{sub 1} = 2.2 {+-} 0.3 and {Delta}H{sub 1} = 7.5 {+-} 1.3 kJ mol{sup -1} for reaction (1), log {Beta}{sub 2} = -(0.38 {+-} 0.05) and {Delta}H{sub 2} = 15.4 {+-} 0.3 kJ mol{sup -1} for reaction (2), and log {Beta}{sub 3} = 1.3 {+-} 0.2 and {Delta}H{sub 3} = 14.6 {+-} 0.3 kJ mol{sup -1} for reaction (3), at I = 1.0 M NaClO{sub 4} and t = 25 C. The UO{sub 2}(GH{sub 4}){sup +} complex forms through the bidentate carboxylate binding to U(VI). In the UO{sub 2}(GH{sub 3})(aq) complex, hydroxyl-deprotonated gluconate (GH{sub 3}{sup 2-}) coordinates to U(VI) through the five-membered ring chelation. For the UO{sub 2}(GH{sub 3})(GH{sub 4}){sup -} complex, multiple coordination modes are suggested. These results are discussed in the context of trivalent and pentavalent actinide complexation by gluconate.

  6. Effect of some organic solvents on complexing of uranium(6), zinc(2) and manganese(2) with azo derivation of 8-hydroxyquinoline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study has been made of azo derivatives of 8-hydroxyquinoline, namely, 7-(2-thiazolylazo)-8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfoacid, 7-(4-bromo-2-thiazolylazo)-8-hydroquinoline-5-sulfoacid and 7-(6-bromo-2-benzothiazolylazo)-8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfoacid, as analytical reagents with uranium (6), zinc (2) and manganese (2). The possibility is shown of using aqueous-organic mixtures containing dioxan, ethanol, acetone or dimethyl formamide to change the properties of the reagents and resulting complexes. The stability of complexes with a component ratio of 1:1 increases gradually as the polarity of the medium decreases. In the case of a uranium complex in dioxan and dimethyl formamide media, with further decrease in the medium polarity and higher pH values, a complex is formed with a component ratio of 1:2. With a slight variation in the medium polarity, in transition from compound (1:1) to compound (1:2), the stability increases stepwise at the same pH value which has been selected for compound (1:1) (uranium in acetone and ethanol media). The most sensitive reagent is 7-(2-thiazolylazo)-8-hydroxyquinone-5-sulfoacid. Aqueous-acetone and aqueous-dioxan media have been found promising for enhancing the reagent sensitivity

  7. Surface complexation modeling of uranium(VI) sorbed onto lanthanum monophosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordoñez-Regil, E; Drot, R; Simoni, E

    2003-07-15

    Sorption/desorption are basic processes in the field of contaminant transport. In order to develop mechanistically accurate thermodynamic sorption models, the simulation of retention data has to take into account molecular scale informations provided by structural investigations. In this way, the uranyl sorption constants onto lanthanum monophosphate (LaPO(4)) were determined on the basis of a previously published structural investigation. The surface complexation modeling of U(VI) retention onto LaPO(4) has been performed using the constant capacitance model included in the FITEQLv3.2 program. The electrical behavior of the solid surface was investigated using electrophoretic measurements and potentiometric titration experiments. The point of zero charge was found to be 3.5 and surface complexation modeling has made it possible to calculate the surface acidity constants. The fitting procedure was done with respect to the spectroscopic results, which have shown that LaPO(4) presents two kinds of reactive surface sites (lanthanum atoms and phosphate groups). The uranyl sorption edges were determined for two surface coverages: 40 and 20% of the surface sites that are occupied, assuming complete sorption. The modeling of these experimental data was realized by considering two uranyl species ("free" uranyl and uranyl nitrate complex) sorbed only onto phosphate surface groups according to the previously published structural investigation. The obtained sorption constants present similar values for both surface complexes and make it possible to fit both sorption edges: logK(U)=9.4 for z.tbnd;P(OH)(2)+UO(2)(2+)z.tbnd;P(OH)(2)UO(2)(2+) and logK(UN)=9.7 for z.tbnd;P(OH)(2)+UO(2)NO(3)(+)z.tbnd;P(OH)(2)UO(2)NO(3)(+). PMID:12909028

  8. Gas phase uranyl activation: formation of a uranium nitrosyl complex from uranyl azide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yu; de Jong, Wibe A; Gibson, John K

    2015-05-13

    Activation of the oxo bond of uranyl, UO2(2+), was achieved by collision induced dissociation (CID) of UO2(N3)Cl2(-) in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The gas phase complex UO2(N3)Cl2(-) was produced by electrospray ionization of solutions of UO2Cl2 and NaN3. CID of UO2(N3)Cl2(-) resulted in the loss of N2 to form UO(NO)Cl2(-), in which the "inert" uranyl oxo bond has been activated. Formation of UO2Cl2(-) via N3 loss was also observed. Density functional theory computations predict that the UO(NO)Cl2(-) complex has nonplanar Cs symmetry and a singlet ground state. Analysis of the bonding of the UO(NO)Cl2(-) complex shows that the side-on bonded NO moiety can be considered as NO(3-), suggesting a formal oxidation state of U(VI). Activation of the uranyl oxo bond in UO2(N3)Cl2(-) to form UO(NO)Cl2(-) and N2 was computed to be endothermic by 169 kJ/mol, which is energetically more favorable than formation of NUOCl2(-) and UO2Cl2(-). The observation of UO2Cl2(-) during CID is most likely due to the absence of an energy barrier for neutral ligand loss. PMID:25906363

  9. Gas Phase Uranyl Activation: Formation of a Uranium Nitrosyl Complex from Uranyl Azide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Yu; De Jong, Wibe A.; Gibson, John K.

    2015-05-13

    Activation of the oxo bond of uranyl, UO22+, was achieved by collision induced dissociation (CID) of UO2(N3)Cl2– in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The gas phase complex UO2(N3)Cl2– was produced by electrospray ionization of solutions of UO2Cl2 and NaN3. CID of UO2(N3)Cl2– resulted in the loss of N2 to form UO(NO)Cl2–, in which the “inert” uranyl oxo bond has been activated. Formation of UO2Cl2– via N3 loss was also observed. Density functional theory computations predict that the UO(NO)Cl2– complex has nonplanar Cs symmetry and a singlet ground state. Analysis of the bonding of the UO(NO)Cl2– complex shows that the side-on bonded NO moiety can be considered as NO3–, suggesting a formal oxidation state of U(VI). Activation of the uranyl oxo bond in UO2(N3)Cl2– to form UO(NO)Cl2– and N2 was computed to be endothermic by 169 kJ/mol, which is energetically more favorable than formation of NUOCl2– and UO2Cl2–. The observation of UO2Cl2– during CID is most likely due to the absence of an energy barrier for neutral ligand loss.

  10. Determination of Background Uranium Concentration in the Snake River Plain Aquifer under the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's Radioactive Waste Management Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molly K. Leecaster; L. Don Koeppen; Gail L. Olson

    2003-06-01

    Uranium occurs naturally in the environment and is also a contaminant that is disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. To determine whether uranium concentrations in the Snake River Plain Aquifer, which underlies the laboratory, are elevated as a result of migration of anthropogenic uranium from the Subsurface Disposal Area in the RWMC, uranium background concentrations are necessary. Guideline values are calculated for total uranium, 234U, 235U, and 238U from analytical results from up to five datasets. Three of the datasets include results of samples analyzed using isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS) and two of the datasets include results obtained using alpha spectrometry. All samples included in the statistical testing were collected from aquifer monitoring wells located within 10 miles of the RWMC. Results from ID-TIMS and alpha spectrometry are combined when the data are not statistically different. Guideline values for total uranium were calculated using four of the datasets, while guideline values for 234U were calculated using only the alpha spectrometry results (2 datasets). Data from all five datasets were used to calculate 238U guideline values. No limit is calculated for 235U because the ID-TIMS results are not useful for comparison with routine monitoring data, and the alpha spectrometry results are too close to the detection limit to be deemed accurate or reliable for calculating a 235U guideline value. All guideline values presented represent the upper 95% coverage 95% confidence tolerance limits for background concentration. If a future monitoring result is above this guideline, then the exceedance will be noted in the quarterly monitoring report and assessed with respect to other aquifer information. The guidelines (tolerance limits) for total U, 234U, and 238U are 2.75 pCi/L, 1.92 pCi/L, and 0.90 pCi/L, respectively.

  11. Uranium speciation in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed knowledge of the nature of uranium complexes formed after the uptake by plants is an essential prerequisite to describe the migration behavior of uranium in the environment. This study focuses on the determination of uranium speciation after uptake of uranium by lupine plants. For the first time, time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy were used to determine the chemical speciation of uranium in plants. Differences were detected between the uranium speciation in the initial solution (hydroponic solution and pore water of soil) and inside the lupine plants. The oxidation state of uranium did not change and remained hexavalent after it was taken up by the lupine plants. The chemical speciation of uranium was identical in the roots, shoot axis, and leaves and was independent of the uranium speciation in the uptake solution. The results indicate that the uranium is predominantly bound as uranyl(VI) phosphate to the phosphoryl groups. Dandelions and lamb's lettuce showed uranium speciation identical to lupine plants. (orig.)

  12. Mono-, di- and trinuclear dioxo complexes of uranium containing hydrazonato and azomethine ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mono-, di or trinuclear dioxouranium complexes with benzoylhydrazonato or azomethine ligands were prepared by reactions of common dioxouranium precursors such as UO2(NO3)2 . 6 H2O or [NBu4]2[UO2Cl4] with vanillin benzoylhydrazone (H2L4), salicylaldehyde benzoylhydrazone (H2L5), 2-hydroxyacetylbenzene salicylhydrazone (H3L6) or N-(2-ethoxycarbonyl-3-oxo-but-1-en(1)yl)-2-aminophenol (H2L7). Spectroscopic and X-ray crystallographic studies on the complexes [NBu4]2[UO2Cl4] . 2 H2L4, [UO2(HL5)(H2L5)2](NO3), [HNEt3]2[{UO2(L6)}2] and [HNEt3]2[{UO2(L7} 3O)] confirm that the individual donor atom constellation, the size of the potential chelate rings and the acidity of the OH and NH functionalities of the proligands have a strong influence on the structure of the products. (Abstract Copyright [2004], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  13. Complexation modelling of uranium and other actinides by organic compounds of natural or synthetic origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The future of nuclear wastes raises a lot of questions. Their resolution require an accurate knowledge of the physical, chemical and biological processes which affect the properties of radioelements constituting the wastes. 3 research themes have been approached. The experimental methods used are: neutronic activation analysis, UV-visible spectrophotometry and time-resolved induced laser spectro-fluorimetry. A part of the phenomena has been modelled by ionic strength correction models (as Davies or MSA). The main results have revealed: 1)the bio-sorption capacities of the microorganism (Mycobacterium phlei) for UO22+ and NpO2+ (in conditions where the specific adsorption capacities Qe(UO22+)=60 and Qe(NpO2+)=444 moles cations/g dry biomass 2)the retention capacities, in various leaching conditions, by this bacteria of the ions initially adsorbed 3)the complexation properties of 2 siderophores for the cations UO22+, U4+ and Th4+. The thermodynamical equilibrium constants were determined for one of the siderophore: the pyoverdine A; they were such that KUO22+≤KU4+≤KTh4+ 4)in very acidic media (HCl and HClO4 until 12 M), the behaviour of the acylisoxazolone HPBI (1-phenyl-4-benzoyl-5-isoxazolone) and the value of its acidity thermodynamical constant is such that 0.13≤KATh≤0.32 at 25 degrees Celsius 5)the variations of the fluorescence properties of the uranyl cation in terms of the acidity of the concentrated media (HClO4 and CF3SO3H) in which they are in solution; it seems that a complexation between the uranyl ion and the counter-ions present in solution occur. (O.M.)

  14. Surface Complexation Modeling of Uranium(Vi) Sorbed Onto Zirconium Oxophosphate Versus Temperature: Thermodynamic And Structural Approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almazan-Torres, M.G.; Drot, R.; Mercier-Bion, F.; Catalette, H.; Auwer, C.Den; Simoni, E.

    2009-05-11

    This work presents an investigation of the interaction mechanisms between uranyl ions and a solid phosphate, the zirconium oxophosphate: Zr{sub 2}O(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}. Both thermodynamic and structural points of view are developed. Indeed, prior to any simulation of the retention data, it is necessary to precisely characterize the system under study in order to gain information at a molecular scale. First, the intrinsic surface properties of this synthetic compound have been investigated for different temperatures ranging from 25 to 90 C. Mass and potentiometric titrations show that the surface site density remains constant between 25 and 90 C, while the experimental point of zero charge slightly decreases from 4.8 to 4.5 with an increasing temperature. The potentiometric titration data are simulated, for each temperature, using the constant capacitance model and taking into account two surface sites ({triple_bond}Zr{_}O and {triple_bond}P{_}O) with a total surface site density equal to 7.0 sites nm{sup -2}. For both reactive sites, the intrinsic protonation constants do not change with the temperature, while the deprotonation ones increase. These results led to the determination of the associated enthalpy and entropy changes according to the van't Hoff relation. Second, the speciation of U(VI) at the solid/solution interface has been studied using two complementary spectroscopic techniques probing the sorbed uranyl ions: time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS). The substrate presents two different reactive surface sites against uranium retention, which are constituted by the oxygen atoms of the surface PO{sub 4} groups and the oxygen atoms linked to the zirconium atoms. Two inner-sphere complexes are thus present on the substrate, their relative proportion depending on the pH value of the suspension. The effects of the temperature (25-90 C) on the surrounding uranium were checked using the TRLFS

  15. Surface complexation modeling of uranium(VI) sorbed onto zirconium oxophosphate versus temperature: thermodynamic and structural approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almazan-Torres, M G; Drot, R; Mercier-Bion, F; Catalette, H; Den Auwer, C; Simoni, E

    2008-07-01

    This work presents an investigation of the interaction mechanisms between uranyl ions and a solid phosphate, the zirconium oxophosphate: Zr2O(PO4)2. Both thermodynamic and structural points of view are developed. Indeed, prior to any simulation of the retention data, it is necessary to precisely characterize the system under study in order to gain information at a molecular scale. First, the intrinsic surface properties of this synthetic compound have been investigated for different temperatures ranging from 25 to 90 degrees C. Mass and potentiometric titrations show that the surface site density remains constant between 25 and 90 degrees C, while the experimental point of zero charge slightly decreases from 4.8 to 4.5 with an increasing temperature. The potentiometric titration data are simulated, for each temperature, using the constant capacitance model and taking into account two surface sites ([TRIPLE BOND]ZrO and [TRIPLE BOND]PO) with a total surface site density equal to 7.0 sites nm(-2). For both reactive sites, the intrinsic protonation constants do not change with the temperature, while the deprotonation ones increase. These results led to the determination of the associated enthalpy and entropy changes according to the van't Hoff relation. Second, the speciation of U(VI) at the solid/solution interface has been studied using two complementary spectroscopic techniques probing the sorbed uranyl ions: time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS). The substrate presents two different reactive surface sites against uranium retention, which are constituted by the oxygen atoms of the surface PO4 groups and the oxygen atoms linked to the zirconium atoms. Two inner-sphere complexes are thus present on the substrate, their relative proportion depending on the pH value of the suspension. The effects of the temperature (25-90 degrees C) on the surrounding uranium were checked using the TRLFS technique. The

  16. Surface complexation modeling of uranium (Vi) retained onto zirconium diphosphate in presence of organic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the field of nuclear waste disposal, predictions regarding radionuclide migration through the geosphere, have to take account the effects of natural organic matter. This work presents an investigation of interaction mechanisms between U (Vi) and zirconium diphosphate (ZrP2O7) in presence of organic acids (citric acid and oxalic acid). The retention reactions were previously examined using a batch equilibrium method. Previous results showed that U (Vi) retention was more efficient when citric acid or oxalic acid was present in solid surface at lower ph values. In order to determine the retention equilibria for both systems studied, a phosphorescence spectroscopy study was carried out. The experimental data were then fitted using the Constant Capacitance Model included in the FITEQL4.0 code. Previous results concerning surface characterization of ZrP2O7 (surface sites density and surface acidity constants) were used to constraint the modeling. The best fit for U (Vi)/citric acid/ZrP2O7 and U (Vi)/oxalic acid/ZrP2O7 systems considered the formation of a ternary surface complex. (Author)

  17. Thiocyanate complexes of uranium in multiple oxidation states: a combined structural, magnetic, spectroscopic, spectroelectrochemical, and theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashem, Emtithal; Platts, James A; Hartl, František; Lorusso, Giulia; Evangelisti, Marco; Schulzke, Carola; Baker, Robert J

    2014-08-18

    A comprehensive study of the complexes A4[U(NCS)8] (A = Cs, Et4N, (n)Bu4N) and A3[UO2(NCS)5] (A = Cs, Et4N) is described, with the crystal structures of [(n)Bu4N]4[U(NCS)8]·2MeCN and Cs3[UO2(NCS)5]·O0.5 reported. The magnetic properties of square antiprismatic Cs4[U(NCS)8] and cubic [Et4N]4[U(NCS)8] have been probed by SQUID magnetometry. The geometry has an important impact on the low-temperature magnetic moments: at 2 K, μeff = 1.21 μB and 0.53 μB, respectively. Electronic absorption and photoluminescence spectra of the uranium(IV) compounds have been measured. The redox chemistry of [Et4N]4[U(NCS)8] has been explored using IR and UV-vis spectroelectrochemical methods. Reversible 1-electron oxidation of one of the coordinated thiocyanate ligands occurs at +0.22 V vs Fc/Fc(+), followed by an irreversible oxidation to form dithiocyanogen (NCS)2 which upon back reduction regenerates thiocyanate anions coordinating to UO2(2+). NBO calculations agree with the experimental spectra, suggesting that the initial electron loss of [U(NCS)8](4-) is delocalized over all NCS(-) ligands. Reduction of the uranyl(VI) complex [Et4N]3[UO2(NCS)5] to uranyl(V) is accompanied by immediate disproportionation and has only been studied by DFT methods. The bonding in [An(NCS)8](4-) (An = Th, U) and [UO2(NCS)5](3-) has been explored by a combination of DFT and QTAIM analysis, and the U-N bonds are predominantly ionic, with the uranyl(V) species more ionic that the uranyl(VI) ion. Additionally, the U(IV)-NCS ion is more ionic than what was found for U(IV)-Cl complexes. PMID:25072532

  18. Dithio- and Diselenophosphinate Thorium(IV) and Uranium(IV) Complexes: Molecular and Electronic Structures, Spectroscopy, and Transmetalation Reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrle, Andrew C; Kerridge, Andrew; Walensky, Justin R

    2015-12-21

    We report a comparison of the molecular and electronic structures of dithio- and diselenophosphinate, (E2PR2)(1-) (E = S, Se; R = (i)Pr, (t)Bu), with thorium(IV) and uranium(IV) complexes. For the thorium dithiophosphinate complexes, reaction of ThCl4(DME)2 with 4 equiv of KS2PR2 (R = (i)Pr, (t)Bu) produced the homoleptic complexes, Th(S2P(i)Pr2)4 (1S-Th-(i)Pr) and Th(S2P(t)Bu2)4 (2S-Th-(t)Bu). The diselenophosphinate complexes were synthesized in a similar manner using KSe2PR2 to produce Th(Se2P(i)Pr2)4 (1Se-Th-(i)Pr) and Th(Se2P(t)Bu2)4 (2Se-Th-(t)Bu). U(S2P(i)Pr2)4, 1S-U-(i)Pr, could be made directly from UCl4 and 4 equiv of KS2P(i)Pr2. With (Se2P(i)Pr2)(1-), using UCl4 and 3 or 4 equiv of KSe2P(i)Pr2 yielded the monochloride product U(Se2P(i)Pr2)3Cl (3Se-U(iPr)-Cl), but using UI4(1,4-dioxane)2 produced the homoleptic U(Se2P(i)Pr2)4 (1Se-U-(i)Pr). Similarly, the reaction of UCl4 with 4 equiv of KS2P(t)Bu2 yielded U(S2P(t)Bu2)4 (2S-U-(t)Bu), whereas the reaction with KSe2P(t)Bu2 resulted in the formation of U(Se2P(t)Bu2)3Cl (4Se-U(tBu)-Cl). Using UI4(1,4-dioxane)2 and 4 equiv of KSe2P(t)Bu2 with UCl4 in acetonitrile yielded U(Se2P(t)Bu2)4 (2Se-U-(t)Bu). Transmetalation reactions were investigated with complex 2Se-U-(t)Bu and various CuX (X = Br, I) salts to yield U(Se2P(t)Bu2)3X (6Se-U(tBu)-Br and 7Se-U(tBu)-I) and 0.25 equiv of [Cu(Se2P(t)Bu2)]4 (8Se-Cu-(t)Bu). Additionally, 2Se-U-(t)Bu underwent transmetalation reactions with Hg2F2 and ZnCl2 to yield U(Se2P(t)Bu2)3F (6) and U(Se2P(t)Bu2)3Cl (4Se-U(tBu)-Cl), respectively. The molecular structures were analyzed using (1)H, (13)C, (31)P, and (77)Se NMR and IR spectroscopy and structurally characterized using X-ray crystallography. Using the QTAIM approach, the electronic structure of all homoleptic complexes was probed, showing slightly more covalent bonding character in actinide-selenium bonds over actinide-sulfur bonds. PMID:26636609

  19. The impact of uranium mining and milling operations over hydric bodies water quality: a case study of Pocos de Caldas Plateau Minero-industrial Complex area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study introduces an impact assessment of uranium mining and milling over river water quality in Pocos de Caldas Plateau Minero-Industrial Complex (CIPC) area. The pH and stable and radioactive elements concentration values of surface water and liquid effluent samples, obtained during 1982 to 1992 period, are used as data base, and the assessment methodology includes the application of statistical analysis techniques in order to obtain a higher information degree from monitoring programs. The environmental impact from mining and milling activities, additional aspects related to uranium concentrate production, and general description of Pocos de Caldas Plateau region, facility and radiological environmental impact from CIPC operation are also presented. (author). 100 refs, 43 figs, 44 tabs

  20. 300 AREA URANIUM CONTAMINATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    (smbullet) Uranium fuel production (smbullet) Test reactor and separations experiments (smbullet) Animal and radiobiology experiments conducted at the. 331 Laboratory Complex (smbullet) .Deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning,. and demolition of 300 Area facilities

  1. Uranium determination in zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method used for the spectrometric uranium determination with 2-(2-thiolase)-5-diethylaminophenol was modified for its application in the zirconium samples analysis with an uranium content of the 0.1% order. The samples, previously dissolved in nitric acid, were submitted to a separative stage of liquid-liquid extraction, with a trioctylphosphine (TOPO) oxide diluted in cyclohexane. A sodium fluoride aqueous solution was necessary to be aggregated in the spectrometric determination so as to complex the zirconium vestiges, which could be present, originated by the Zr/U high relation of the initial sample. Under the established working conditions, different spectrometric assays, dyes absorption spectra and its uranium complex, complex stability, PH influence determination of the dyes-uranium relation, calculation of the complex's apparent formation constant and its molar absorption, were performed. (Author)

  2. Photochemical route to actinide-transition metal bonds: synthesis, characterization and reactivity of a series of thorium and uranium heterobimetallic complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Ashleigh; Lukens, Wayne; Lu, Connie; Arnold, John

    2014-04-01

    A series of actinide-transition metal heterobimetallics has been prepared, featuring thorium, uranium and cobalt. Complexes incorporating the binucleating ligand N[-(NHCH2PiPr2)C6H4]3 and Th(IV) (4) or U(IV) (5) with a carbonyl bridged [Co(CO)4]- unit were synthesized from the corresponding actinide chlorides (Th: 2; U: 3) and Na[Co(CO)4]. Irradiation of the isocarbonyls with ultraviolet light resulted in the formation of new species containing actinide-metal bonds in good yields (Th: 6; U: 7); this photolysis method provides a new approach to a relatively rare class of complexes. Characterization by single-crystal X-ray diffraction revealed that elimination of the bridging carbonyl is accompanied by coordination of a phosphine arm from the N4P3 ligand to the cobalt center. Additionally, actinide-cobalt bonds of 3.0771(5) and 3.0319(7) for the thorium and uranium complexes, respectively, were observed. The solution state behavior of the thorium complexes was evaluated using 1H, 1H-1H COSY, 31P and variable-temperature NMR spectroscopy. IR, UV-Vis/NIR, and variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements are also reported.

  3. Supercritical fluid extraction of uranium from materials of technogenic deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method and installation of supercritical fluid extraction of uranium complexes in the carbon dioxide environment developed at the NSC KIPT are presented. The efficiency of extraction of uranium complexes from granites, which simulated uranium-bearing materials of technogenic deposits, is investigated. It is shown that high rates of removal of uranium complexes from raw materials are achieved under certain conditions

  4. Surface complexation modeling of uranium(VI) sorbed onto zirconium oxo-phosphate versus temperature: Thermodynamic and structural approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almazan-Torres, M. G.; Drot, R.; Mercier-Bion, F.; Simoni, E. [Univ Paris 11, CNRS/IN2P3/UMR8608, Inst Phys Nucl, F-91406 Orsay, (France); Catalette, H. [EDF R et D, Dept Mat et Mecan Composants, F-77818 Moret Sur Loing, (France); Den Auwer, C. [CEA Marcoule DEN/DRCP/SCPS, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze, (France)

    2008-07-01

    This work presents an investigation of the interaction mechanisms between uranyl ions and a solid phosphate, the zirconium oxo-phosphate: Zr{sub 2}O(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}. Both thermodynamic and structural points of view are developed. Indeed, prior to any simulation of the retention data, it is necessary to precisely characterize the system under study in order to gain information at a molecular scale. First, the intrinsic surface properties of this synthetic compound have been investigated for different temperatures ranging from 25 to 90 degrees C. Mass and potentiometric titrations show that the surface site density remains constant between 25 and 90 degrees C, while the experimental point of zero charge slightly decreases from 4.8 to 4.5 with an increasing temperature. The potentiometric titration data are simulated, for each temperature, using the constant capacitance model and taking into account two surface sites ( (triple bond)Zr-O and (triple bond)P-O) with a total surface site density equal to 7.0 sites nm{sup -2}. For both reactive sites, the intrinsic protonation constants do not change with the temperature, while the deprotonation ones increase. These results led to the determination of the associated enthalpy and entropy changes according to the Van't Hoff relation. Second, the speciation of U(VI) at the solid/solution interface has been studied using two complementary spectroscopic techniques probing the sorbed uranyl ions: time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRUS) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS). The substrate presents two different reactive surface sites against titanium retention, which are constituted by the oxygen atoms of the surface PO{sub 4} groups and the oxygen atoms linked to the zirconium atoms. Two inner-sphere complexes are thus present on the substrate, their relative proportion depending on the pH value of the suspension. The effects of the temperature (25-90 degrees C) on the surrounding uranium were

  5. Surface complexation modeling of uranium(VI) sorbed onto zirconium oxo-phosphate versus temperature: Thermodynamic and structural approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents an investigation of the interaction mechanisms between uranyl ions and a solid phosphate, the zirconium oxo-phosphate: Zr2O(PO4)2. Both thermodynamic and structural points of view are developed. Indeed, prior to any simulation of the retention data, it is necessary to precisely characterize the system under study in order to gain information at a molecular scale. First, the intrinsic surface properties of this synthetic compound have been investigated for different temperatures ranging from 25 to 90 degrees C. Mass and potentiometric titrations show that the surface site density remains constant between 25 and 90 degrees C, while the experimental point of zero charge slightly decreases from 4.8 to 4.5 with an increasing temperature. The potentiometric titration data are simulated, for each temperature, using the constant capacitance model and taking into account two surface sites ( (triple bond)Zr-O and (triple bond)P-O) with a total surface site density equal to 7.0 sites nm-2. For both reactive sites, the intrinsic protonation constants do not change with the temperature, while the deprotonation ones increase. These results led to the determination of the associated enthalpy and entropy changes according to the Van't Hoff relation. Second, the speciation of U(VI) at the solid/solution interface has been studied using two complementary spectroscopic techniques probing the sorbed uranyl ions: time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRUS) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS). The substrate presents two different reactive surface sites against titanium retention, which are constituted by the oxygen atoms of the surface PO4 groups and the oxygen atoms linked to the zirconium atoms. Two inner-sphere complexes are thus present on the substrate, their relative proportion depending on the pH value of the suspension. The effects of the temperature (25-90 degrees C) on the surrounding uranium were checked using the TRUS technique. The

  6. Determination of the compositions of oxalate complexes of uranium(VI) and aluminum(III) by ion flotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion flotation of fourteen metals in oxalate solutions over the pH range of 0.5 -- 6.7 with cationic surfactant, cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), was investigated. From 12.00 ml of 0.1 M oxalate solution containing metal ion of 5.0 x 10-4M and CPC of 3.3 x 10-3M, uranium(VI) and aluminum(III) were removed completely at pH values > 3.5 and > 5.0, respectively, and 90% of zirconium(IV) at pH 1.0 or more, 95% of antimony(III) at pH 4.7, 78% of gallium(III) at pH 3.5 or more and 68% of indium(III) at pH 3.5 were removed by bubbling nitrogen through a 2.7 (dia) x 20 cm cell for 20 to 30 min. The reaction between oxalatouranate(VI) ions and the surfactant can be considered as follows: 2(anti n - 1)R+Cl- + UO2(C2O4)sub(n)sup(-2(anti n - 1)-) reversible R sub(2(anti n - 1))[UO2(C2O4)sub(anti n) + 2(anti n - 1)Cl- where R+ denotes the surfactant cation and anti n represents the mean number of C2O42- coordinated in the complex anions. The molar ratio of R+ to Al(C2O4)sub(anti n)sup((2 anti n - 3)-) can also be assumed to be (2 anti n - 3):1 for the reaction of aluminum(III). The relation between the mean number of the ligand oxalate anion and the concentration of oxalate anion was obtained by the mole ratio method as well as the continuous variation method. The existence of the species such as UO2(C2O4)34- and UO2(C2O4)46- in (0.3 -- 5.0) x 10-3 M oxalate solutions (pH 6.5), and Al(C2O4)2- and Al(C2O4)33- in (0.15 -- 2.98) x 10-2 M oxalate solutions (pH 6.5) was ascertained. (auth.)

  7. Vaal Reefs South uranium plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Vaal Reefs mining complex, part of the Anglo American Corporation, is the largest gold and uranium producing complex in the world, being South Africa's principal producer, accounting for about a quarter of the country's uranium production. Vaal Reefs South uranium plant in the Orkney district was recently officially opened by Dr AJA Roux, the retiring president of the Atomic Energy Board and chairman of the Uranium Enrichment Corporation and will increase the country's uranium production. In the field of technology, and particularly processing technology, South Africa has shown the world unprecedented technology achievement in the field of uranium extraction from low grade ores and the development of the unique uranium enrichment process. New technical innovations that have been incorporated in this new plant are discussed

  8. Selective separation of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process for the selective separation of uranium from elements accompanying it in a uranium-containing ore is claimed. It comprises preparing a uranium-containing solution; adding hydrochloric acid in an amount sufficient to form complex anions of the type (UO2Clsub(n))sup(2-n) where n is 3 or 4, or sulfuric acid in an amount sufficient to form complex anions of the type UO2(SO4)sub(m)sup(2-2m) where m is 2 or 3; adding a cationic surface active agent which forms a difficultly soluble precipitate with the complex anion; subjecting the solution to a gas flotation step to produce a foam fraction containing the pecipitate and a liquid fraction; separating the two fractions; and recovering uranium from the foam fraction

  9. Uranium conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FOI, has performed a study on uranium conversion processes that are of importance in the production of different uranium compounds in the nuclear industry. The same conversion processes are of interest both when production of nuclear fuel and production of fissile material for nuclear weapons are considered. Countries that have nuclear weapons ambitions, with the intention to produce highly enriched uranium for weapons purposes, need some degree of uranium conversion capability depending on the uranium feed material available. This report describes the processes that are needed from uranium mining and milling to the different conversion processes for converting uranium ore concentrate to uranium hexafluoride. Uranium hexafluoride is the uranium compound used in most enrichment facilities. The processes needed to produce uranium dioxide for use in nuclear fuel and the processes needed to convert different uranium compounds to uranium metal - the form of uranium that is used in a nuclear weapon - are also presented. The production of uranium ore concentrate from uranium ore is included since uranium ore concentrate is the feed material required for a uranium conversion facility. Both the chemistry and principles or the different uranium conversion processes and the equipment needed in the processes are described. Since most of the equipment that is used in a uranium conversion facility is similar to that used in conventional chemical industry, it is difficult to determine if certain equipment is considered for uranium conversion or not. However, the chemical conversion processes where UF6 and UF4 are present require equipment that is made of corrosion resistant material

  10. A contribution to the study of the structure and lability of uranium IV complexes in solution by nuclear magnetic resonance and relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complexation of the paramagnetic ion U4+ by various bases (β-diketones, hexamethylphosphorotriamide, H2O, ...) is studied by NMR spectroscopy in the present work. The 13C and 1H NMR spectra of uranium IV (or thorium IV) dipivaloylmethanate and dibenzoylmethanate chelates were recorded in order to throw some light on the geometry of eight-coordinated uranium complexes in CS2 solution. An analysis of the room temperature NMR paramagnetic shifts leads us to propose an average structure of the chelate between a square antiprism and a trigonal dodecahedron. Values for the contact shifts are deduced from the measurements and are interpreted in terms of electronic structure. An 1H NMR study of U(dpm)4 in CS2 solution as a function of temperature shows an intramolecular rearrangement taking place between conformers of D2 symmetry. From the 1H rotating frame relaxation, the kinetics of the intramolecular motion and the susceptibility parameters of the complex are separately deduced. The results show that a ninth coordination site is necessarily involved. There is evidence of a first firmly bound nine coordinence hydration sphere and of a second more labile sphere

  11. Determination of uranium, iron, copper, and nickel from ore samples by MEKC using N,N'-ethylene bis(salicylaldimine) as complexing reagent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Muhammed Aslam; Khuhawar, Muhammad Yar; Arain, Rafee

    2008-02-01

    An analytical procedure has been developed for the separation of dioxouranium(VI), iron(III), copper(II), nickel(II), cobalt(II), cobalt(III), palladium(II), and thorium(IV) by MEKC using N,N'-ethylene bis(salicylaldimine) (H(2)SA(2)en) as a complexing reagent with total runtime uranium ore samples indicating its presence within 103-1789 microg/g with RSD within 0.79-1.87%. Likewise copper, nickel, and iron in their combined matrix were also simultaneously determined with RSD 0.4-1.6% (n = 6). PMID:18186535

  12. Discovery of uranium mineralizations in the rhyolite-granite complex in the Jabal Eghei area of southern Libya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovačević Jovan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available During investigation of the Jabal Eghei area in southern Libya and the production of geological maps at a scale of 1:250 000 (Tibesti sector, sheet Wadi Eghei NF 34-1 and NF 34-2, regional prospecting for mineral raw materials was performed. Radiometric survey of observed targets at the sites indicated two significant uranium mineralizations in rhyolites, and some smaller ones in granites that are in close contact with rhyolites. Rhyolites are located in the central part of the investigated region. They cut through granite rocks. The first mineralization is in the central part of the rhyolite region, which is mostly composed of silificated rhyolites. The second one was discovered near the granite-rhyolite contact zone, characterized by the presence of silicified breccia rocks. These findings were confirmed by laboratory measurements of more than seventy samples collected in the area, using high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. The concentrations of uranium in these mineralizations were found to range from approx. 50 mg kg-1 to more than 600 mg kg-1. The latter value is about 240 times above the Earth’s average. Besides uranium, these measurements have also given concentrations of thorium and potassium. Additional geochemical analysis was performed on samples taken from locations where uranium anomalies were discovered using ICP-MS technique, in which concentrations of more than forty elements were determined. Uranium mineralizations are accompained by increased contents of silver (up to 17 times, arsenic (up to 8 times, molybdenum (up to 50 times, mercury (up to 9 times, and lead (up to 14 times, in regard to the Clark’s values. These results warrant a continued investigation of this region because of potential interest in the discovery of nuclear mineral raw materials.

  13. The effect of surfactants, cations and complexing agents on the spectrophotometric determination of microgram amounts of uranium in waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cationic, anionic and non-ionic detergents, phosphate, soap, citric acid, Alamine-336 and mineral oil at concentrations of 100mg/l do not interfere in the bromo-PADAP method for uranium. Iron(III), nickel(II), copper(II), chromium(III) and vanadium(V) give additive errors, but do not interfere when present at the concentrations usual in waters. Vanadium(V) interference can be minimized by reducing vanadium(V) to (IV). Sodium tripolyphosphate (100mg/l) and sodium pyrophosphate (20mg/l) interfere badly, but the addition of 2 mg of thorium restores recovery to 97-98%. NTA and EDTA interfere slightly, giving recoveries of 96-97%. Provided that the water is not grossly contaminated by metals, uranium can be determined in fresh water at concentrations of 20 μg/l and in saline waters at 60μg/l. (auth.)

  14. Update on uranium-molybdenum fuel foil fabrication development activities at the Y-12 National Security Complex in 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In support of the RERTR Program, efforts are underway at Y-12 to develop and validate a production oriented, monolithic uranium molybdenum (U-Mo) foil fabrication process adaptable for potential implementation in a manufacturing environment. These efforts include providing full-scale prototype depleted and enriched U-Mo foils in support of fuel qualification testing. The work has three areas of focus; develop and demonstrate a feasible foil fabrication process utilizing depleted uranium-molybdenum (DU-Mo) source material, transition these production techniques to enriched uranium (EU-Mo) source material, and evaluate full-scale implementation of the developed production techniques. In 2006, Y-12 demonstrated successful fabrication of full-size DU-10Mo foils. In 2007, Y-12 activities were expanded to include continued DU-Mo foil fabrication with a focus on process refinement, source material impurity effects (specifically carbon), and the feasibility of physical vapor deposition (PVD) on DU-10Mo mini-foils. FY2007 activities also included a transition to EU-Mo and fabrication of full-size enriched foils. The purpose of this report is to update the RERTR audience on Y-12 efforts in 2007 that support the overall RERTR Program goals. (author)

  15. Impact of uranyl-calcium-carbonato complexes on uranium(VI) adsorption to synthetic and natural sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Brandy D; Mayes, Melanie A; Fendorf, Scott

    2010-02-01

    Adsorption on soil and sediment solids may decrease aqueous uranium concentrations and limit its propensity for migration in natural and contaminated settings. Uranium adsorption will be controlled in large part by its aqueous speciation, with a particular dependence on the presence of dissolved calcium and carbonate. Here we quantify the impact of uranyl speciation on adsorption to both goethite and sediments from the Hanford Clastic Dike and Oak Ridge Melton Branch Ridgetop formations. Hanford sediments were preconditioned with sodium acetate and acetic acid to remove carbonate grains, and Ca and carbonate were reintroduced at defined levels to provide a range of aqueous uranyl species. U(VI) adsorption is directly linked to UO(2)(2+) speciation, with the extent of retention decreasing with formation of ternary uranyl-calcium-carbonato species. Adsorption isotherms under the conditions studied are linear, and K(d) values decrease from 48 to 17 L kg(-1) for goethite, from 64 to 29 L kg (-1) for Hanford sediments, and from 95 to 51 L kg(-1) for Melton Branch sediments as the Ca concentration increases from 0 to 1 mM at pH 7. Our observations reveal that, in carbonate-bearing waters, neutral to slightly acidic pH values ( approximately 5) and limited dissolved calcium are optimal for uranium adsorption. PMID:20058915

  16. Study on supercritical fluid extraction of uranium and transuranium complexes with β-diketones and other complexones as applied to decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technologies for supercritical fluid extraction (SCFE) of radionuclides extraction and SCFE decontamination technology have been studied. The studies have shown the salts of heavy metals, uranium and rare-earth elements can be extracted from solutions and from solids surfaces (filter paper, steel and quartz sand) by β-diketones, dialkyldithiocarbamates, organophosphorous compounds or crown-ethers. The solubility of different actinide complexes in supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) were determined. It was found that only fluorine-containing β-diketones, in particular TFA and HFA are promising supercritical fluid decontamination. Adducts of actinides complexes and fluorine-containing β-diketones with water, pyridine and TBP are readily soluble in SC-CO2 and can be used in the technology of supercritical fluid decontamination. (H.Katsuta)

  17. A Heterobimetallic Complex With an Unsupported Uranium(III)-Aluminum(I) Bond: (CpSiMe3)3U-AlCp* (Cp* = C5Me5)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minasian, Stefan; Krinsky Ph.D., Jamin; Williams, Valerie; Arnold Ph.D., John

    2008-07-23

    The discovery of molecular metal-metal bonds has been of fundamental importance to the understanding of chemical bonding. For the actinides, examples of unsupported metal-metal bonds are relatively uncommon, consisting of Cp{sub 3}U-SnPh{sub 3}, and several actinide-transition metal complexes. Traditionally, bonding in the f-elements has been described as electrostatic; however, elucidating the degree of covalency is a subject of recent research. In carbon monoxide complexes of the trivalent uranium metallocenes, decreased {nu}{sub CO} values relative to free CO suggest that the U(III) atom acts as a {pi}-donor. Ephritikhine and coworkers have demonstrated that {pi}-accepting ligands can differentiate trivalent lanthanide and actinide ions, an effect that renders this chemistry of interest in the context of nuclear waste separation technology.

  18. The application of iterative transformation factor analysis to resolve multi-component EXAFS spectra of uranium(6) complexes with acetic acid as a function of pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron-based EXAFS spectroscopy is a powerful technique to obtain structural information on radionuclide complexes in solution. Depending on the chemical conditions of the samples several radionuclide species can coexist in the solution as is often the case for environmentally related samples. All radionuclide species, which may have different near-neighbour environments, contribute to the measured EXAFS signal. In order to isolate the EXAFS spectra of the individual species (pure spectral components), it is necessary, in a first step, to measure a series of samples where their composition is changed by variation of one physico-chemical parameter (e.g. pH, concentration, etc.). For the spectral decomposition it is necessary that the EXAFS signal change as a function of the chosen physico-chemical parameter. In a second step, the series of EXAFS spectra is analysed with Eigen analysis and Iterative Transformation Factor Analysis (ITFA). As a result of the ITFA one obtains: a) for each sample the relative concentration of the structural distinguishable species and b) their corresponding pure spectral components. From the information obtained in a), one can construct a speciation diagram. The pure spectral components contain the structural information of the individual species, which can be extracted by conventional EXAFS analysis. To evaluate our ITFA algorithm for EXAFS analysis of mixtures, we prepared a series of eight solution samples of 0.05 M uranium(VI) and 1 M acetate (Ac) in the pH range of 0.1 to 4.5. From thermodynamic constants it is known that under these conditions up to four species can occur: uranyl hydrate, and the 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3 complexes of uranyl acetate. The uranium LIII-edge EXAFS spectra were measured at room temperature in transmission mode at the Rossendorf Beamline (ROBL) at the ESRF. The average bond length between uranium and the equatorial oxygen atoms (Oeq) increases from 2.40 to 2.46 angstrom with increasing pH. This increase of

  19. Separation and determination of thorium, uranium and mixed rare-earth elements as their UV/Vis absorbing complexes by capillary zone electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separation and determination of thorium, uranium and mixed rare-earth elements (RE) as their 2-(2-arsenophenylazo)-1,8-dihydroxyl-7- (4-chloro-2,6-dibromophenylazo)-naphthalene-3,6-disulfonic acid (DBC-As) complexes by capillary electrophoresis is presented in this paper. The pre-column derivitization conditions are discussed. Some separation parameters such as pH value, type of carrier electrolyte, applied voltage, the concentration of ligand in buffer and the sample size are also optimized. Under the selected conditions, the complete separation of thorium and uranium from mixed RE was accomplished in 10 min. Quantitative analyses exhibited an excellent linear dynamic relationship in the range of over two orders of magnitude. Detection limits of 4.81x10-8, 7.23x10-8, and 59.4x10-8 mol l-1 for RE, Th and U were obtained, respectively. This method was applied to the determination of these metal ions in ore samples

  20. Matrix effects during magnetic sector-field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry Uranium isotope ratio measurements in complex environmental/biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sample matrix effects on mass discrimination during inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) isotope ratio measurements are rarely reported. However, they can lead to errors larger than the uncertainty claimed on the ratio results when not properly taken into account or corrected for. For instance, up to 1% matrix specific effects were experienced during an isotope dilution mass spectrometry campaign we carried out for the certification of the Cd amount content in some food digest samples (7% acidity and salt content around 450μg g-1). Specific nuclear safeguards programs were designed for the monitoring of declared and non-declared nuclear activities and important efforts are currently deployed to better understand the consequences on human health of the dispersion of depleted uranium in the environment. The interest in developing and/or improving measurement capabilities for uranium isotope ratios and uranium content in environmental and biological samples has therefore considerably increased in the last decade. However, procedure validation is rarely addressed with these developments even though, for instance, non-disputable uncertainty statements are absolutely crucial to underpin correctly the important decisions of political, economical, military or medical nature that can arise from these results. This is why we produced simulated urine samples (complex matrix made of organic and inorganic components) with certified n(234U)/n(238U), n(235U)/n(238U) and n(236U)/n(238U) ratios. These, which will eventually be commercially available for validation purposes, will first be used as test materials for an international interlaboratory comparison organised by IRMM and this exercise, named NUSIMEP-4 and open for participation to anyone]. This presentation will introduce magnetic sector-field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) uranium isotope ratio measurements on real human urine samples and in the NUSIMEP-4 test materials. These were

  1. Influence of binary/ternary complex of imprint ion on the preconcentration of uranium(VI) using ion imprinted polymer materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion imprinted polymer (IIP) materials were prepared for uranyl ion (imprint ion) by forming binary (5,7-dichloroquinoline-8-ol (DCQ) or 4-vinylpyridine (VP)) or ternary (5,7-dichloroquinoline-8-ol and 4-vinylpyridine) complexes in 2-methoxy ethanol (porogen) and copolymerizing in the presence of styrene and divinyl benzene as functional and crosslinking monomers, respectively and 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile as initiator. IIP particles were obtained by leaching the imprint ion in these polymer materials with 50% (v/v) hydrochloric acid, filtering, drying in an oven at 50 degree sign C and grinding. Control polymer particles were also prepared under identical conditions. The above synthesized polymer particles were characterized by IR, CHN, X-ray diffraction, and pore size analyses. These leached polymer particles can now pick up uranyl ions from dilute aqueous solutions. The IIP particles obtained with ternary complex of uranyl ion alone gave quantitative enrichment of traces of uranyl ions from dilute aqueous solutions. The optimal pH for quantitative enrichment is 4.5-7.5 and eluted completely with 10 ml of 1.0 M HCl. The retention capacity of uranyl IIP particles was found to be 34.05 mg of uranyl ion per gram of polymer. Further, the percent extraction, distribution ratio, and selectivity coefficients of uranium and other selected inorganic ions were also evaluated. Five replicate determinations of 25 μg of uranium present in 1.0 l of aqueous solution gave a mean absorbance of 0.036 with a relative standard deviation of 2.50%. The detection limit corresponding to three times the standard deviation of the blank was found to be 5 μg l-1

  2. Peroxo complexes of uranium(VI) with N-benzoyl urea and related ligands: synthesis, characterization and antifungal activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The peroxouranium(VI) complexes containing N-benzoyl urea and related ligands having composition (UO(O2)L-L(NO3)2).H2O (where L-L=N-benzoyl urea (NBU), N-benzoyl thiourea (NBT). N-benzoyl hydrazine (NBHz) and N-benzoyl hydroxylamine (NBHA)) are reported. The synthesized complexes have been characterized by various physico-chemical techniques, viz, elemental analysis, molar conductivity, magnetic susceptibility measurements, infra red, electronic, mass spectral and TGA/DTA studies. These studies revealed that the synthesized complexes are non-electrolytic and diamagnetic in nature. The ligands are bound to metal in a bidentate mode. Thermal analysis results provide conclusive evidence for the presence of water molecule in the complexes. Mass spectra confirm the molecular mass of the complexes. Antifungal activity of complexes revealed enhanced activity of complexes as compared to corresponding ligands. (author)

  3. Uranium-series ages of corals and coexisting phosphate deposits on Pelsaert Reef Complex, Houtman-Abrolhos Islands, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeh, H. Herbert; France, Roy E.

    1988-09-01

    An unusually well-defined association between guano-derived phosphate rock (apatite) and coral carbonates on Pelsaert Island has provided an opportunity to test uranium-series dating methods as applied to insular phosphorites. The phosphate deposit, which is bracketed by late Pleistocene and Holocene corals with {230Th}/{234U} ages of 120,000 and 4700 yr B.P., respectively, has {230Th}/{234U} ages ranging from 85,000 to 112,000 yr B.P. The mutually consistent results suggest that phosphate deposition commenced soon after the peak of the last interglaciation and has been largely controlled by sea-level fluctuations and probably other factors associated with late Quaternary climate in this area.

  4. The Lagoa Real subalkaline granitic complex (south Bahia, Brazil): a source for uranium mineralizations associated with Na-Ca metasomatism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the central zone of the Sao Francisco Craton (South Bahia), the lower Proterozoic Lagoa Real granites and orthogneisses overthrust to the West the younger Urandi and Espinhaco metamorphic series, probably a late Brazilian event. This thrust is related to the regional metamorphism (amphibolite facies) of the Lagoa Real granites and induces a reverse HP metamorphism in the over thrusted series. Undeformed granites (sao Timoeto type) present two feldspars, perthitic orthoclase largely predominant over plagioclase (oligoclase ≥ albite), blue quartz, Fe-rich amphibole and biotite ± clinopyroxene assemblages, ilmenite ≥ magnetite, zircon, apatite, allanite and Nb ± Ti-REE oxides and silicates. The crystallization of the granites begins at high temperature and under low fO2 and PH2O conditions. Fractional crystallization of pyroxene and plagioclase leads to silica enrichment during magmatic differentiation. Increasing fO2 and PH2O are observed during this evolution. Orthogneisses show strongly recrystallized paragenesis: equal abundance of non-perthitic microcline and plagioclase (oligoclase ≤ albite), quartz, more Al-rich amphibole and biotite, magnetite, sphene, zircon, allanite, Nb ± Ti-REE oxides and silicates, and ± apatite. HT Na and Ca metasomatism occurs 330 Ma later than granite emplacement and is synchronous with important uranium mineralizations. Major elements and trace-elements geochemistry of the granites and orthogneisses indicate subalkaline to alkaline typology. Incompatible behaviour of Th, REE, Y, Zr, Nb, and F points out a convergence with alkaline magmatism. CI, F, Th, Y, REE, NB enrichments and Ba, Sr depletions are also related to a late magmatic stage. U-Th-rich and metamict accessory minerals of the granites represent a favorabl source for the Lagoa Real uranium ore-deposits

  5. Mineralogy and the mobility of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various types of uranium deposits occur in Southern Africa, such as pegmatite deposits at Rossing, ancient placer deposits in the Witwatersrand, sratabound deposits in the Karoo and deposits associated with alkaline complexes such as Phalaborwa and Pilanesberg. This paper shortly deals with the mineralogy of uranium minerals and the behaviour of uranium during oxidation and transport

  6. Czechoslovak uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data and knowledge related to the prospecting, mining, processing and export of uranium ores in Czechoslovakia are presented. In the years between 1945 and January 1, 1991, 98,461.1 t of uranium were extracted. In the period 1965-1990 the uranium industry was subsidized from the state budget to a total of 38.5 billion CSK. The subsidies were put into extraction, investments and geologic prospecting; the latter was at first, ie. till 1960 financed by the former USSR, later on the two parties shared costs on a 1:1 basis. Since 1981 the prospecting has been entirely financed from the Czechoslovak state budget. On Czechoslovak territory uranium has been extracted from deposits which may be classified as vein-type deposits, deposits in uranium-bearing sandstones and deposits connected with weathering processes. The future of mining, however, is almost exclusively being connected with deposits in uranium-bearing sandstones. A brief description and characteristic is given of all uranium deposits on Czechoslovak territory, and the organization of uranium mining in Czechoslovakia is described as is the approach used in the world to evaluate uranium deposits; uranium prices and actual resources are also given. (Z.S.) 3 figs

  7. Uranium recovery from mine water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In many plant trials it has been proven that very small amounts (10 to 20 ppm) of uranium dissolved in mine water can be effectively recovered by the use of ion exchange resins and this uranium recovery has many advantages. In this paper an economic analysis at different levels of uranium contamination and at different market prices of uranium are described. For this study an operating mine-mill complex with a sulphuric acid leach circuit, followed by solvent extraction (SX) process, is considered, where contaminated mine water is available in excess of process requirements. It is further assumed that the sulphuric acid eluant containing uranium would be mixed with the mill pregnant liquor stream that proceeds to the SX plant for final uranium recovery

  8. Stability constants of mercury(II), copper(II), lead(II) and uranium(II)dioxide complexes with pyruvate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potentiometric titration technique is applied to study the complexes of CuII, HgII, PbII and UIIO2 with pyruvate at different ionic strengths and temperatures. 1:1 metal to ligand complexes are formed with the bivalent copper, mercury and lead ions whereas uranyl ion forms 1:1 and 1:2 metal to ligand complexes. The thermodynamic functions, ΔG*, ΔH* and ΔS* are determined. (author)

  9. A new diamantane functionalized tris(aryloxide) ligand system for small molecule activation chemistry at reactive uranium complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, O.P.; Heinemann, F.W.; Meyer, K. [Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, Inorganic Chemistry, University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); Lam, O.P. [University of California, San Diego, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2010-06-15

    The diamantane functionalized triazacyclononane ligand ({sup Dia}ArOH){sub 3}tacn (L{sub 3}) has been synthesized and the reactivity of its U(III) metallated product [(({sup Dia}ArO){sub 3}tacn)U] (1) has been explored. Complex 1 promotes dichloromethane and azido-trimethyl-silane activation to generate U(IV) complex [(({sup Dia}ArO){sub 3}tacn)U(Cl)] (2) and U(V) complex [(({sup Dia}ArO){sub 3}tacn)U(NTMS)] (3), respectively. Spectroscopic investigations of complexes 1, 2, and 3 will be discussed, along with molecular structures where possible. (authors)

  10. A new diamantane functionalized tris(aryloxide) ligand system for small molecule activation chemistry at reactive uranium complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diamantane functionalized triazacyclononane ligand (DiaArOH)3tacn (L3) has been synthesized and the reactivity of its U(III) metallated product [((DiaArO)3tacn)U] (1) has been explored. Complex 1 promotes dichloromethane and azido-trimethyl-silane activation to generate U(IV) complex [((DiaArO)3tacn)U(Cl)] (2) and U(V) complex [((DiaArO)3tacn)U(NTMS)] (3), respectively. Spectroscopic investigations of complexes 1, 2, and 3 will be discussed, along with molecular structures where possible. (authors)

  11. Study of equilibrium complexing reactions of 3d-elements with uranium-molybdenum heteropolyanions in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of mathematical simulation was used for quantitative description of equilibria in systems H+-M2+-(UMo12O42)8- (M=Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn) studied by pH-metric titration. It is shown that the system studied is described best of all by the model containing complexes (M2UMA)4- (1) and (MHUMA)5-(2) (UMA-uranomolybdenum anion). Distribution diagram of complex forms depending on pH are presented and it is shown that with an increase in the ratio of components M:UMa ≥ 2 the equilibrium shifts to the side of direct reactions of metal ion substitution for heteropolyacid protons. Stability of complexes 1 is practically similar for all metals and exceeds stability of protonated complexes 2. Conditions of isolation of the complexes studied in solid form are described

  12. Complex approach to modelling of evolution of multi-recycled uranium isotope composition in closed fuel cycle of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiated uranium fuel contains more then 90% of uranium, but at the present time the level of nuclear science and technology makes us mostly to postpone the using of recycling uranium up to far future or not at all. Only small number of states has the experience in using of recycling uranium and this experience is limited to one recycle. At the same time multiple recycling decreases the need in uranium mining and improves the utilization of uranium resources. Calculations result that in VVER-1000 irradiated fuel residual 235U concentration remains more than in natural uranium up to burnup level ∝ 60 MW.day/kg of heavy metals (h.m.). Utilization of reprocessed uranium as a source is more complicated due to 232U and 236U isotopes presenting in irradiated fuel. Some other uranium isotopes effect on the fuel reprocessing and fabrication is significantly less. 232U effect on neutron physical parameters is negligible due to very small concentration in reprocessed uranium. However introduction of this isotope may lead to an increase radiation dose rate to personnel because the hard gamma rays from its decay daughters. To limit this dose rate at the fuel fabrication plant 232U concentration in reprocessed uranium was restricted at the level 2.10-7 wt. %. Taking into account the enhanced technologies of fuel pin fabrication this restriction can become softer. 236U is a parasitic neutron absorber and to compensate this effect fuel with recycled uranium must be enriched more than that free from 236U. 234U concentration in reprocessed uranium is relatively small in comparison with 236U and need not compensation, but in the future this option can become necessary. (orig.)

  13. Complexes of uranium and thorium tetrachlorides and uranyl nitrate with N-methyl-N-ethyl O-ethylcarbamate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The N-methyl-N-ethyl O-ethylcarbamate ligand (L) has been synthesized and its UCl4 x L, UO2(NO3)2 x L and ThCl4 x L complexes isolated. In addition, the UCl4 x L' complex (where L' = N,N-diethyl O-ethylcarbamate) is described. From the i.r. spectra, it is clear that the ligands bind to the metal through the carbonyl oxygen atom. The 1H n.m.r. spectra of ligands and complexes are reported and discussed. (orig.)

  14. Uranium-lead ages of zircon megacrysts and zircon included in corundum from Peixe Alcaline complex (Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Peixe Alkaline Complex, Brazil, contains unusual mineral occurrences. Among them are zircon megacrysts (there are centimetric zircons) that have been subject of economic exploitation since the 1970's. But these crystals have not been studied in detail, in particular with respect to their isotope composition and U-Pb age. Pegmatites bearing corundum megacrysts also occur inside this complex. These corundum megacrysts also contain millimetric-sized zircon inclusions, which have never been studied before. The geochronological study of these zircons are important both for the understanding of the complex and the pegmatitic corundum, as well for an improved understanding of the regional geological evolution (au)

  15. Uranium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alltime high for uranium concentrate production is expected to be reached in 1980. The average grade of ore fed to process will be up about 10% from last year. Some curtailments in uranium processing were announced, but three new processing plants began production in 1980. The prospects for 1981 are not as encouraging. The continuation of low prices and slow demand for U3O8 are expected to be reflected in a significant reduction in overall production and in the postponement of some plans for expansion and construction of uranium processing facilities. Increases in production capacity will occur when Plateau Resource's 750 TPD mill at Ticaboo, Utah, starts up early next year, and additional production of byproduct uranium is expected from western phosphate operations and from the southern states. These increases in capacity, however, will not offset the cutbacks in uranium processing already in force together with the additional curtailments anticipated during the course of 1981

  16. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GAO was asked to address several questions concerning a number of proposed uranium enrichment bills introduced during the 100th Congress. The bill would have restructured the Department of Energy's uranium enrichment program as a government corporation to allow it to compete more effectively in the domestic and international markets. Some of GAO's findings discussed are: uranium market experts believe and existing market models show that the proposed DOE purchase of a $750 million of uranium from domestic producers may not significantly increase production because of large producer-held inventories; excess uranium enrichment production capacity exists throughout the world; therefore, foreign producers are expected to compete heavily in the United States throughout the 1990s as utilities' contracts with DOE expire; and according to a 1988 agreement between DOE's Offices of Nuclear Energy and Defense Programs, enrichment decommissioning costs, estimated to total $3.6 billion for planning purposes, will be shared by the commercial enrichment program and the government

  17. Coordination chemistry of actinide elements: preparation of new uranium complexes with schiff bases and their characterization (Preprint No. CT-31)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Schiff bases, o-vanillin semicarbazone (oVSC) and 2-pyridine carboxaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (PCINH) have been prepared and their novel complexes with dioxouranium(VI) have been synthesized and characterized by IR spectra, elemental analysis and other physico-chemical techniques. (author)

  18. Estimation of the Pitzer equation parameters for aqueous complexes. A case study for uranium at 298.15 K and 1 atm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A procedure to estimate the Pitzer parameters for complexes or complex formation reactions from a small number of equilibrium constants (log K vs. I) obtained in 'constant ionic media' is discussed in some detail. It is then often impossible to determine both log K deg., the equilibrium constant at I=0, and all Pitzer parameters, hence some estimations or other simplifications are necessary. Solution coordination chemists have therefore preferred to use the less parametrized Broensted-Guggenheim-Scatchard (SIT) model. By comparison of analytical statements for the mean activity coefficients and equilibrium constants, for the SIT and Pitzer models we have shown that they are equivalent for ionic strengths less than 4 mol kg-1, and have also established relationships between the Pitzer parameter β(1) and the charge type of the interacting ions, and between Δβ(1) for a complex formation reaction and ΔZETA2 for the reaction, where ΔZETA2 is the sum of the squared charges of the reactants/products with the proper stoichiometric coefficients. The first relationship is based on data in single electrolyte systems and the second on equilibrium-constant data determined in ionic media. For reactions involving species of charges one and two in 1-1 electrolyte ionic media we recommend the use of Δβ(1)/ΔZETA2 = 0.337±0.014 kg mol-1 for the estimation of the Δβ(1) at 298.15 K and 1 atm. In this way we have used concentration equilibrium constant data to estimate log K deg. and Pitzer parameters β(0) and β(1) for more than 30 uranium complexes with other ions at 298.15 K and 1 atm. The procedure makes it possible to use the information on complex formation, acid/base and redox equilibria obtained in ionic media together with the Pitzer parameters for strong electrolytes for the modeling of complex equilibrium systems oer a broad range of ionic strength/ionic medium compositions, up to at least 4 mol kg-1. (au)

  19. Anticorrosion protection of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium in atmospheric conditions is non-stable. Sloughing products are being generated on its surface during storage or use. These corrosion products make many difficulties because of necessity to provide personnel safety. Besides, uranium corrosion may cause damage in parts. The first works devoted to uranium corrosion were performed in the framework of the USA Manhattan Project in the early forties of last century. Various methods of uranium protection were investigated, among them the galvanic one was the most studied. Later on the galvanic technology was patented. The works on this problem remains urgent up to the present time. In Russia, many methods of uranium corrosion protection, mainly against atmospheric corrosion, were tried on. In particular, such methods as diffusion zinc and paint coating were investigated. In the first case, a complex intermetallic U-Zn compound was formed but its protection was not reliable enough, this protection system was inconvenient and uncertain and that is why an additional paint coating was necessary. In the case of paint coatings another problem appeared. It was necessary to find such a coating where gas-permeability would prevail over water-permeability. Otherwise significant uranium corrosion occurs. This circumstance together with low mechanical resistance of paint coatings does not allow to use paint coating for long-term protection of uranium. Currently, there are following methods of uranium protection: ion-plasma, galvanic and thermo-vacuum annealing. These are described in this paper. In the end the issue of corrosion protection in reactor core zones is addressed. Here the greatest difficulties are caused when enriched uranium heated up to 500 deg. C needs anticorrosion protection. In this case various metal coatings are not reliable because of brittle inter-metallide formation. The reliable protection may be provided only up to the temperature plus 400 - 500 deg. C with the help of galvanic copper coating since

  20. 77 FR 51579 - Application for a License To Export High-Enriched Uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-24

    ... COMMISSION Application for a License To Export High-Enriched Uranium Pursuant to 10 CFR 110.70 (b) ``Public... kilograms For the export of Canada. Complex, July 30, 2012, August Uranium (93.35%). uranium-235 high-enriched 1, 2012, XSNM3726, 11006037. contained in 7.5 uranium in the kilograms uranium. form of...

  1. Tramp uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many utilities have implemented a no leaker philosophy for fuel performance and actively pursue removing leaking fuel assemblies from their reactor cores whenever a leaking fuel assembly is detected. Therefore, the only source for fission product activity in the RCS when there are no leaking fuel assemblies is tramp uranium. A technique has been developed that strips uranium impurities from ZrCl4. Unless efforts are made to remove natural uranium impurities from reactor materials, the utilities will not be able to reduce the RCS specific 131I activity in PWRs to below the lower limit of ∼1.0 x 10-4 μCi/g

  2. Effect of successive alkylation of N,N-dialkyl amides on the complexation behavior of uranium and thorium: solvent extraction, small angle neutron scattering, and computational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Parveen Kumar; Pathak, Priyanath N; Kumari, Neelam; Sadhu, Biswajit; Sundararajan, Mahesh; Aswal, Vinod Kumar; Mohapatra, Prasanta Kumar

    2014-12-11

    The effect of successive alkylation of the Cα atom adjacent to the carbonyl group in N,N-dialkyl amides (i.e., di(2-ethylhexyl)acetamide (D2EHAA), di(2-ethylhexyl)propionamide (D2EHPRA), di(2-ethylhexyl)isobutyramide (D2EHIBA), and di(2-ethylhexyl)pivalamide (D2EHPVA)) on the extraction behavior of hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) and tetravalent thorium (Th(IV)) ions has been investigated. These studies show that the extraction of Th(IV) is significantly suppressed compared to that of U(VI) with increased branching at the Cα atom adjacent to the carbonyl group. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) studies showed an increased aggregation tendency in the presence of nitric acid and metal ions. D2EHAA showed more aggregation compared to its branched homologues, which explains its capacity for higher extraction of metal ions. These experimental observations were further supported by density function theory calculations, which provided structural evidence of differential binding affinities of these extractants for uranyl cations. The complexation process is primarily controlled by steric and electronic effects. Quantum chemical calculations showed that local hardness and polarizability can be extremely useful inputs for designing novel extractants relevant to a nuclear fuel cycle. PMID:25422857

  3. Kinetics of Uranium Extraction from Uranium Tailings by Oxidative Leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Biao; Li, Mi; Zhang, Xiaowen; Huang, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Extraction of uranium from uranium tailings by oxidative leaching with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was studied. The effects of various extraction factors were investigated to optimize the dissolution conditions, as well as to determine the leaching kinetic parameters. The behavior of H2O2 in the leaching process was determined through scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) and x-ray diffraction analysis of leaching residues. Results suggest that H2O2 can significantly improve uranium extraction by decomposing the complex gangue structures in uranium tailings and by enhancing the reaction rate between uranium phases and the leaching agent. The extraction kinetics expression was changed from 1 - 3(1 - α)2/3 + 2(1 - α) = K 0(H2SO4)-0.14903(S/L)-1.80435( R o)0.20023 e -1670.93/T t ( t ≥ 5) to 1 - 3(1 - α)2/3 + 2(1 - α) = K 0(H2SO4)0.01382(S/L)-1.83275( R o)0.25763 e -1654.59/T t ( t ≥ 5) by the addition of H2O2 in the leaching process. The use of H2O2 in uranium leaching may help in extracting uranium more efficiently and rapidly from low-uranium-containing ores or tailings.

  4. Kinetics of Uranium Extraction from Uranium Tailings by Oxidative Leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Biao; Li, Mi; Zhang, Xiaowen; Huang, Jing

    2016-05-01

    Extraction of uranium from uranium tailings by oxidative leaching with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was studied. The effects of various extraction factors were investigated to optimize the dissolution conditions, as well as to determine the leaching kinetic parameters. The behavior of H2O2 in the leaching process was determined through scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) and x-ray diffraction analysis of leaching residues. Results suggest that H2O2 can significantly improve uranium extraction by decomposing the complex gangue structures in uranium tailings and by enhancing the reaction rate between uranium phases and the leaching agent. The extraction kinetics expression was changed from 1 - 3(1 - α)2/3 + 2(1 - α) = K 0(H2SO4)-0.14903(S/L)-1.80435(R o)0.20023 e -1670.93/T t (t ≥ 5) to 1 - 3(1 - α)2/3 + 2(1 - α) = K 0(H2SO4)0.01382(S/L)-1.83275(R o)0.25763 e -1654.59/T t (t ≥ 5) by the addition of H2O2 in the leaching process. The use of H2O2 in uranium leaching may help in extracting uranium more efficiently and rapidly from low-uranium-containing ores or tailings.

  5. Uranium Market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main fuel component for commercial nuclear power reactors is Uranium. When compared to fossil fuels, it has a competitive edge due to factors such as economics and environmental conditions and in particular due to its international market availability. Uranium world demand reached to 67 320 tU in 2004, which was covered with additional sources. To project the uranium markets behavior requires to know and to accept some conditions tied to the demand, such as the electrical world consumption, the greenhouse effect; water desalination, production of hydrogen, industrial heat, the innovative development of nuclear reactors, and the average time of 10 years between the beginning of exploration programs and definition of deposits, which it owes mainly to the difficulty of achieving the legal, environmental and local community authorizations, to open new mining centers. Uranium market future projections, made by IAEA experts in 2001, that considered middle and high demand scenarios, concluded that cumulatively to year 2050, with regard to demand it will be required 5.4 and 7.6 million tons of uranium respectively, and with regard to the uranium price, it should present a sustained increase. In the last years the situation of the uranium market has changed dramatically. In August 2006 the price of uranium reached to USD 106/kgU in the spot market, surpassing all the made projections. The increase in price that has stayed in rise in the last five years is reactivating the prospection and exploration efforts anywhere in the world, and competition between prospective areas of potential resources mainly in less explored territories

  6. Uranium, depleted uranium, biological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physicists, chemists and biologists at the CEA are developing scientific programs on the properties and uses of ionizing radiation. Since the CEA was created in 1945, a great deal of research has been carried out on the properties of natural, enriched and depleted uranium in cooperation with university laboratories and CNRS. There is a great deal of available data about uranium; thousands of analyses have been published in international reviews over more than 40 years. This presentation on uranium is a very brief summary of all these studies. (author)

  7. Uranium loans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When NUEXCO was organized in 1968, its founders conceived of a business based on uranium loans. The concept was relatively straightforward; those who found themselves with excess supplies of uranium would deposit those excesses in NUEXCO's open-quotes bank,close quotes and those who found themselves temporarily short of uranium could borrow from the bank. The borrower would pay interest based on the quantity of uranium borrowed and the duration of the loan, and the bank would collect the interest, deduct its service fee for arranging the loan, and pay the balance to those whose deposits were borrowed. In fact, the original plan was to call the firm Nuclear Bank Corporation, until it was discovered that using the word open-quotes Bankclose quotes in the name would subject the firm to various US banking regulations. Thus, Nuclear Bank Corporation became Nuclear Exchange Corporation, which was later shortened to NUEXCO. Neither the nuclear fuel market nor NUEXCO's business developed quite as its founders had anticipated. From almost the very beginning, the brokerage of uranium purchases and sales became a more significant activity for NUEXCO than arranging uranium loans. Nevertheless, loan transactions have played an important role in the international nuclear fuel market, requiring the development of special knowledge and commercial techniques

  8. Tetrapositive plutonium, neptunium, uranium, and thorium coordination complexes: chemistry revealed by electron transfer and collision induced dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yu; Tian, Guoxin; Rao, Linfeng; Gibson, John K

    2014-04-17

    The Pu(4+), Np(4+), and U(4+) ions, which have large electron affinities of ∼34.6, ∼33.6, and ∼32.6 eV, respectively, were stabilized from solution to the gas phase upon coordination by three neutral tetramethyl-3-oxa-glutaramide ligands (TMOGA). Both collision induced dissociation (CID) and electron transfer dissociation (ETD) of Pu(TMOGA)3(4+) reveal the propensity for reduction of Pu(IV) to Pu(III), by loss of TMOGA(+) in CID and by simple electron transfer in ETD. The reduction of Pu(IV) is in distinct contrast to retention of Th(IV) in both CID and ETD of Th(TMOGA)3(4+), where only the C-Oether bond cleavage product was observed. U(TMOGA)3(4+) behaves similarly to Th(TMOGA)3(4+) upon CID and ETD, while the fragmentation patterns of Np(TMOGA)3(4+) lie between those of Pu(TMOGA)3(4+) and U(TMOGA)3(4+). It is notable that the gas-phase fragmentation behaviors of these exceptional tetrapositive complexes parallel fundamental differences in condensed phase chemistry within the actinide series, specifically the tendency for reduction from the IV to III oxidation states. PMID:24660979

  9. Solubility measurement of uranium in uranium-contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short-term equilibration study involving two uranium-contaminated soils at the Fernald site was conducted as part of the In Situ Remediation Integrated Program. The goal of this study is to predict the behavior of uranium during on-site remediation of these soils. Geochemical modeling was performed on the aqueous species dissolved from these soils following the equilibration study to predict the on-site uranium leaching and transport processes. The soluble levels of total uranium, calcium, magnesium, and carbonate increased continually for the first four weeks. After the first four weeks, these components either reached a steady-state equilibrium or continued linearity throughout the study. Aluminum, potassium, and iron, reached a steady-state concentration within three days. Silica levels approximated the predicted solubility of quartz throughout the study. A much higher level of dissolved uranium was observed in the soil contaminated from spillage of uranium-laden solvents and process effluents than in the soil contaminated from settling of airborne uranium particles ejected from the nearby incinerator. The high levels observed for soluble calcium, magnesium, and bicarbonate are probably the result of magnesium and/or calcium carbonate minerals dissolving in these soils. Geochemical modeling confirms that the uranyl-carbonate complexes are the most stable and dominant in these solutions. The use of carbonate minerals on these soils for erosion control and road construction activities contributes to the leaching of uranium from contaminated soil particles. Dissolved carbonates promote uranium solubility, forming highly mobile anionic species. Mobile uranium species are contaminating the groundwater underlying these soils. The development of a site-specific remediation technology is urgently needed for the FEMP site

  10. Uranium resources and uranium supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The availability of natural uranium is currently considered unproblematic. Out of concern about the sufficient availability of uranium, an international working group of OECD-NEA, in which the Federal Office for Geosciences and Resources (BGR) participates as a German partner, has conducted analyses of uranium availability since 1965. Its findings are published biannually in the so-called 'Red Book', 'Uranium, Resources, Production, and Demand'. Changes in the political situation worldwide have profoundly influenced the military importance of uranium and thus also greatly improved its accessibility. As a consequence, there was a decline in production in the nineties from approx. 57,000 t of U in 1989 to, at present (2001), approx. 35,000 t annually. Estimates of the worldwide requirement of natural uranium in 2015 range between approx. 55,000 t and 80,000 t of U, because of the unforeseeable extent of the use of nuclear power, as against approx. 63,000 t of U in 2001. The most recent statistics published in the 1999 Red Bock show low-cost reserves (up to Dollar 40 per kg of U) of 1325 million t, and 2234 t of uranium at extraction costs of up to t Dollar 80 per kg. This indicates a statistical range of reserves of approx. 35 years. It should be noted that these figures are snapshots of a dynamic system. A resumption of extensive exploration and technical developments could greatly influence the resource situation. In the nineties, for instance, there is a net increase in uranium reserves of approx. 700,000 t of U as a consequence of exploration activities. (orig.)

  11. Uranium-lead dating of perovskite from the Afrikanda plutonic complex (Kola Peninsula, Russia) using LA-ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reguir, E.; Camacho, A.; Yang, P.; Chakhmouradian, A. R.; Halden, N. M.

    2009-04-01

    Perovskite (CaTiO3) is a common early crystallizing accessory phase in a variety of alkaline rocks, and has been shown to contain enough U and Th for U-Pb dating. U and Pb analysis of perovskite has been primarily carried out using the SHRIMP or ID-TIMS techniques, and the resulting U-Pb dates commonly yield the emplacement age of the host rock. To our knowledge, only one U-Pb study of perovskite has been done using the LA-ICP-MS (Cox and Wilton, 2006). Some of the advantages of this method over the SHRIMP and ID-TIMS techniques include greater speed and lower cost of analysis. In this work, the U-Pb ages of perovskite from the Afrikanda plutonic complex (Russia) were obtained in situ using the LA-ICP-MS. The measured 238U/206Pb and 207Pb/206Pb ratios were corrected for time-dependent mass-bias using the well-calibrated zircon standard GJ-1 (608.5 ± 0.4 Ma; Jackson et al., 2004). On a Tera-Wasserburg diagram (Tera and Wasserburg, 1972) the analyses of perovskite from two magmatic phases (clinopyroxenite and carbonatite) plot in separate clusters. Although the variations in the 238U/206Pb and 207Pb/206Pb ratios within each group are small, there is enough dispersion between the two clusters to obtain a reasonably precise age of 375 ± 13 Ma (2; MSWD = 0.23), which strongly suggests that the carbonatitic rocks are broadly coeval with the clinopyroxenite. The only other isotopic study on the Afrikanda Complex was done on a clinopyroxenite using the Rb-Sr method and yielded a whole rock-mineral (perovskite, biotite, augite and apatite) isochron age of 364.0 ± 3.1 Ma (2; MSWD = 0.72). This age is within error of our U-Pb date, which demonstrates that LA-ICP-MS-based U-Pb dating of perovskite can serve as a reliable geochronological tool. References Cox, R.A. and Wilton, D.H.C. (2006) U-Pb dating of perovskite by LA-ICP-MS: An example from the Oka carbonatite, Quebec, Canada. Chem. Geol., 235, 21-32. Jackson, S.E., Pearson, N.J., Griffin, W.L. and Belousova, E.A. (2004

  12. Uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The economic and environmental sustainability of uranium mining has been analysed by Monash University researcher Dr Gavin Mudd in a paper that challenges the perception that uranium mining is an 'infinite quality source' that provides solutions to the world's demand for energy. Dr Mudd says information on the uranium industry touted by politicians and mining companies is not necessarily inaccurate, but it does not tell the whole story, being often just an average snapshot of the costs of uranium mining today without reflecting the escalating costs associated with the process in years to come. 'From a sustainability perspective, it is critical to evaluate accurately the true lifecycle costs of all forms of electricity production, especially with respect to greenhouse emissions, ' he says. 'For nuclear power, a significant proportion of greenhouse emissions are derived from the fuel supply, including uranium mining, milling, enrichment and fuel manufacture.' Dr Mudd found that financial and environmental costs escalate dramatically as the uranium ore is used. The deeper the mining process required to extract the ore, the higher the cost for mining companies, the greater the impact on the environment and the more resources needed to obtain the product. It is clear that there is a strong sensitivity of energy and water consumption and greenhouse emissions to ore grade, and that ore grades are likely to continue to decline gradually in the medium to long term. These issues are critical to the current debate over nuclear power and greenhouse emissions, especially with respect to ascribing sustainability to such activities as uranium mining and milling. For example, mining at Roxby Downs is responsible for the emission of over one million tonnes of greenhouse gases per year and this could increase to four million tonnes if the mine is expanded.'

  13. Uranium(Ⅵ) Complex Based on a Fluoroquinolone Ligand with Green Fluorescent Emission%具有绿色荧光发射效应的氟喹诺酮-铀(Ⅵ)配合物

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    瞿志荣

    2008-01-01

    A uranium(Ⅵ) complex [UO2(1-ethyl-6,8-difluoro-7-(3-methyl-piperazinium-1-yl)-4-oxo-1,4-dihydro-quinwater at 80 ℃ in Pyrex tube. The crystal belongs to monoclinic system, space group P21/c, with a=1.430(3) nm, b=1.032 1(18) nm, c=1.729(3) nm,β=106.67(3)° V=2.458(6) nm3, Z=4. This complex is a good green fluorescent material in solid state at room temperature. CCDC: 660959.

  14. A method for purifying uranium solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Description is given of a method for separating uranium from an aqueous liquor containing uranyl ions and contaminating cations. This method is characterized in that the aqueous solution is admixed with a re-cycled uranium complex; the aqueous solution is extracted by means of an inert organic solvent non-miscible with water, containing a reagent adapted to react with uranyl ions so as to generate a complex which is soluble in the solvent; the organic solvent is separated from the aqueous solution containing at least a sufficient amount of ammonium ions and carbonate ions for precipitating the uranium-complex; a portion of the precipitated uranium complex is re-cycled in the above step. The invention makes it possible to separate all cations, the overall extraction coefficient is lower than that of uranium

  15. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canada is the world's largest producer and exporter of uranium, most of which is enriched elsewhere for use as fuel in LWRs. The feasibility of a Canadian uranium-enrichment enterprise is therefore a perennial question. Recent developments in uranium-enrichment technology, and their likely impacts on separative work supply and demand, suggest an opportunity window for Canadian entry into this international market. The Canadian opportunity results from three particular impacts of the new technologies: 1) the bulk of the world's uranium-enrichment capacity is in gaseous diffusion plants which, because of their large requirements for electricity (more than 2000 kW·h per SWU), are vulnerable to competition from the new processes; 2) the decline in enrichment costs increases the economic incentive for the use of slightly-enriched uranium (SEU) fuel in CANDU reactors, thus creating a potential Canadian market; and 3) the new processes allow economic operation on a much smaller scale, which drastically reduces the investment required for market entry and is comparable with the potential Canadian SEU requirement. The opportunity is not open-ended. By the end of the century the enrichment supply industry will have adapted to the new processes and long-term customer/supplier relationships will have been established. In order to seize the opportunity, Canada must become a credible supplier during this century

  16. Investigations on the molecular structure of water dissolved and hematite-sorbed uranium(VI) complexes with aliphatic (hydroxo-) carboxylic acids. Combination of several spectroscopic techniques with factor analysis and quantum chemical calculations; Untersuchungen zur Struktur von wassergeloesten und an Haematit sorbierten Uran(VI)-Komplexen mit aliphatischen (Hydroxy-) Carbonsaeuren. Kombination verschiedener spektroskopischer Methoden mit Faktorenanalyse und quantenchemischen Berechnungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucks, Christian

    2013-04-23

    This study is focussed on throwing light on the structures of uranium(VI) complexes with aliphatic (hydroxy-) carboxylic acids and on the structures of the sorption complexes on the iron mineral hematite in presence and absence of organic acids. The ternary system of hematite, uranium(VI), and organic ligand is very complicated, thus it is necessary to decompose it in binary systems. The results within these binary systems are used to better understand the complicated ternary system. Based on the comprehensive investigations on the aqueous uranium(VI) complexes, it is now possible to draw inferences from the structure of the carboxylic acid about the structure of the formed uranium(VI) complex in dependence of the pH. At first it has to be mentioned that uranium(VI) commonly gives pentagonal bipyramidal complexes. The pentaaquauranylion is formed by two axial oxygen atoms (O{sub ax}) at a distance of 1.76 Aa and five equatorial oxygen atoms (O{sub eq}) at 2.40 Aa stemming from coordinated water molecules. Due to complexation with organic ligands water is replaced by the ligand, thus the interatomic distances change. The results gained during all these investigations can help to better understand the interaction of uranium(VI) and carboxylic acids, and beyond that the sorption of uranium(VI) on hematite in the presence of carboxylic acids. Structures of the aqueous and sorption complexes are proposed. All these findings support the ongoing research on the transport behaviour of radioactive matter and may lead to more reliable risk assessment in connection with the permanent disposal of nuclear waste and the residues of uranium mining.

  17. Synthesis and crystal structure of a new uranium complex [Usub(IV)(SCN)4, 4H2O]1 [18-crown-6]sub(1,5), 3H2O, 1 methyl isobutyl ketone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synthesis and crystal structure of the title compound are reported. This uranium complex crystallizes in the P bar 1 triclinic space group with: a = 10.63A; b = 14.60A; c = 15.95A; α = 75030; β = 88040; γ =82.20. The structure was solved by Patterson and successive Fourier difference syntheses methods to a final R value: 0.047. The uranium atom is eight-coordinated to four N-C-S groups and four oxygen atoms from water molecules, in a distorted square antiprism polyhedron. The crown-ether molecules have not the same configuration as uncomplexed ether molecules. They are connected to neutral [U(SCN)4, 4H2O] units by hydrogen bonding via water molecules. The cohesion of the structure is given by hydrogen bonds. (author)

  18. Electrical impedance studies of uranium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thesis presents data on the electrical properties of uranium oxide at temperatures from 1700K to 4.2K, and pressures between 25 K bar and 70 K bar. The impedance data were analysed using the technique of complex plane representation to establish the conductivity and dielectric constant of uranium dioxide. The thermophysical data were compared with previously reported experimental and theoretical work on uranium dioxide and other fluorite structured oxides. (U.K.)

  19. Uranium bombs

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGroot, Gerard

    2009-11-01

    Enrico Fermi was a brilliant physicist, but he did occasionally get things wrong. In 1934 he famously bombarded a sample of uranium with neutrons. The result was astounding: the experiment had, Fermi concluded, produced element 93, later called neptunium. The German physicist Ida Noddack, however, came to an even more spectacular conclusion, namely that Fermi had split the uranium nucleus to produce lighter elements. Noddack's friend Otto Hahn judged that idea preposterous and advised her to keep quiet, since ridicule could ruin a female physicist. She ignored that advice, and was, indeed, scorned.

  20. The chemistry of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparative study has been made between various arsine oxide and phosphine oxide complexes of uranium tetrahalides both in acetone solution and in the solid state. Conductimetric, potentiometric, and spectrophotometric methods have been used in solution, spectroscopic and structural methods on solids. The significantly greater ionising power of arsine oxide ligands is indicated and is discussed together with the structural differences between arsine oxide and phosphine oxide complexes of the type UCl4.2L and UX4.6L[X = Cl and Br; L = AsR3O, PR3O, or P(NMe2)3O; R = Me, Et, or Ph]. (author)

  1. Complexation of uranyl ions. III. Investigation of the sorption of uranium of the VP-1Ap anion exchanger from carbonate media by x-ray spectrometric microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spatial distribution of uranium in granules of the VP-1Ap anion exchanger during heightened sorption from carbonate media has been investigated by x-ray spectroscopic microanalysis. Variation of the form of the concentration profile as a function of the extent of sorption from a uniform profile across the diameter, then to a meniscus-shaped profile, and finally to a smoothed profile with an increase in the coefficient of nonuniformity of the distribution of uranium in the granules from 0.026 to 0.045 has been established

  2. The peraluminous leucogranitic complex of St Sylvestre (France, Massif Central NW). Evolution of the crystallochemistry of mineral phases and of the geochemistry of major and trace elements. Polygenetism characterization in peraluminous granites. Implication on uranium metallogeny

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main purpose of this study is to improve the knowledge of the behaviour of uranium during magmatic and late magmatic processes. In France and other part of the world the close association of uranium (Sn-W) deposits and showings with this type of granite justifies the metallogenic interest of this study. At the scale of the whole granitic complex two distinct petrological groups are redefined: the facies of Brame and St Sylvestre. Mineral paragenesis closely follow the geochemical differentiation. Abundance of uraninite and scarcity of monazite and zircon, are additional features of these samples. The opposite behaviour of monazite (typical of the less evolved facies) and uraninite (whose abundance is directly related to the degree of differentiation) suggests two conclusions. Abundance in uranium is directly related to the magmatic differentiation processes. The early crystallization of monazite and zircon and their high abundance in poorly evolved facies imply a compatible behaviour for Th, Zr and light rare earths. More detailed geochemical studies evidence heterogeneities at on hectometric and locally at a metric scale. Differentiation processes, which appear to be continuous at a kilometric scale in the St Sylvestre facies, are discontinuous at the hectometric and metric scale. Such petrogeochemical discontinuities, implying petrogenitic heterogeneities are expressed in the concept of polygenetism

  3. Electrokinetic removal of uranium from contaminated, unsaturated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrokinetic remediation of uranium-contaminated soil was studied in a series of laboratory-scale experiments in test cells with identical geometry using quartz sand at approximately 10 percent moisture content. Uranium, when present in the soil system as an anionic complex, could be migrated through unsaturated soil using electrokinetics. The distance that the uranium migrated in the test cell was dependent upon the initial molar ratio of citrate to uranium used. Over 50 percent of the uranium was recovered from the test cells using the citrate and carbonate complexing agents over of period of 15 days. Soil analyses showed that the uranium remaining in the test cells had been mobilized and ultimately would have been extracted. Uranium extraction exceeded 90 percent in an experiment that was operated for 37 days. Over 70 percent of the uranium was removed from a Hanford waste sample over a 55 day operating period. Citrate and carbonate ligand utilization ratios required for removing 50 percent of the uranium from the uranium-contaminated sand systems were approximately 230 moles ligand per mole uranium and 1320 moles ligand per mole uranium for the waste. Modifying the operating conditions to increasing the residence time of the complexants is expected to improved the utilization efficiency of the complexing agent

  4. Evaluation of the uranium immobilization potential of vetiver plants grown on processed solid waste of uranium industry of Jaduguda, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remediation of contaminated sites using specific plant or plant groups may offer a cheap, renewable and promising technique to minimize the long-term ecological adverse impact of the waste disposal. The major components of process waste of uranium industry are uranium series radionuclides, heavy metals inherently present in the ore, chemical additives and residual uranium. Among the radionuclides quantitative content of residual uranium is highest in the disposed process waste of uranium mill. In view of this fact experiments were conducted to study the uranium immobilization potential of a phytoremediator that can grow and survive in the complex tailings (fine solid process waste) environment. Vetiver grass (Chrysopogon zizanioides (L.) Nash) was selected for translocation and immobilization studies of uranium. The grass was planted in uranium mill tailing ponds at Jaduguda, Jharkhand, India and periodic sampling was carried out to investigate the extent of uranium uptake. The acid aliquot of dry or wet ash samples of plant and soil were subjected to solvent extraction followed by UV-Fluorimetry for uranium estimation. It has been observed that the grass could immobilize up to 8 ppm uranium within 6 months after planting. Uranium is preferably immobilized at the root and translocation of uranium to upper plant parts (shoot) is low compared to roots. The uranium uptake got saturated after a particular concentration range. The increased level of uranium in the soil covering of tailings needs further investigation. (author)

  5. Uranium industry annual 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  6. Uranium industry annual 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry's activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs

  7. Study of new complexes of uranium and comba radical. II-Complexes formed in the presence of OH{sup -}, CO{sub 3}H{sup -}, CH{sub 3}-COO{sup -}, and B{sub 4}={sub 7}; Estudio de nuevos complejos entre uranio y el radical CADMBA. II. Complejos formados en presencia de OH{sup -}, CO{sub 3}H, CH{sub 3}-COO{sup -} y B{sub 4}O{sub 7}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vera Palomino, V.; Galiano Sedano, J. A.; Parellada Bellod, R.; Bellido Gonzalez, A.

    1975-07-01

    Several complexes extracted with CDMBAC organic solutions from uranium aqueous solutions, in presence of sodium and ammonium hydroxides, are studied. These complexes fit to the general formula: U0{sub 2}(OH){sub n}(CDMBA){sub n}-2 . The uranium extraction in presence of an excess of sodium bicarbonate is also studied. From aqueous solutions of uranyl acetate we have isolated the complex U0{sub 2}(CH{sub 3}-C00){sub n} (CDMBA){sub n}-2. In presence of boric acid and sodium tetraborate an U-CDMBA compound containing boron in its molecule has being obtained by precipitation and liquid-liquid extraction. (Author) 5 refs.

  8. Uranium industry annual, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Uranium Industry Annual 1991, data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2. A feature article entitled ''The Uranium Industry of the Commonwealth of Independent States'' is included in this report

  9. Uranium recovery and uranium remove from acid mine waters by ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion exchange using resins is one of few processes capable of reducing contaminants in effluents to very low levels according to environmental legislation. In this study the process was used to remove and recovery uranium from acid mine waters at Pocos de Caldas-MG Uranium Mining and Milling Plant. The presence of pyrite in the waste rock piles, resulting acid drainage with several pollutants. Including uranium ranging from 6 to 14 mg/l, as sulfate complex, that can be removed by an anionic exchanger. Studies of uranium sorption without treatment, and with lime pretreatment of water to precipitate the iron and recovery uranium as commercial product, are presented. Uranium elution was done with NaCl solutions. Saline concentration and retention time were the parameters studied. the uranium decontaminations level in the effluents from acid mine water was 94%. (author)

  10. Uranium mineralization in the Lower Proterozoic Moeda Formation, Brazil: a mineralogical-scale study of the uranium budget

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metamorphosed medium- and coarse-grained siliciclastics of the Moeda Formation, Moeda-Gandarela, Brazil, are host to variable amounts of uranium mineralization. Host rock petrography identifies three generations of quartz: recognition of these multiple generations of quartz is essential to the understanding of the uranium budget. Uranium titanates, uraninite and uranium-thorium-phosphate minerals are the main carriers of uranium: subordinate carriers include uranothorite, coffinite and crandallite-group minerals. Textural and geochemical studies indicate a complex history, during which, uranium, along with titanium, thorium and rare-earth-elements, has been mobilised and extensively redistributed. (author)

  11. Improved mathematical model for uranium metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved mathematical model for uranium metabolism in the primate was developed. Animal and human literature data were the basis for building the model consisting of six compartments: plasma, red cells, short-term bone component, long-term bone component, kidney, and urine. In this model, there is a feedback from the red cells and bone compartments to plasma, and the model is applicable to uranium only from the time it is absorbed into blood. An analytical mathematical solution is proposed that will permit estimation of the distribution of uranium among the various compartments. To verify the model and determine the required time constants, single non-toxic doses of uranium were administered to baboons and plasma, red cells, and urine samples subsequently analyzed. Samples of human skeleton were also measured for normal levels of uranium. These measurements will be used to test whether the model accurately predicts long-term bond concentration. Uranium exists in the mammalian body as the hexavalent uranyl ion which tends to complex with plasma proteins or bicarbonates. Animal experiments indicate that after an iv injection, uranium leaves the bloodstream very rapidly; at 40 min after injection, 50% has been excreted in the urine, with little uranium in tissue other than kidney and bone. The distribution of uranium in humans is similar to that in animals. There was no significant concentration of uranium in any of 21 human tissues and organs, apart from bone and kidney, examined at autopsy

  12. Uranium anomalies in deep-water sediments of Lake Baikal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the base of data of the element analysis of the Lake Baikal water and deep-water sediments are investigated the causes of uranium anomalous content in terrigenous pelitic silts. It is established that the anomaly cause is uranium accumulation by silt diatom aches component due to its complexation with humic acids. An attempt is made to carry out the uranium material balance with account for uranium coming with river water and sedimentation with diatom aceous slits

  13. Studies of Uranium Recovery from Tunisian Wet Process Phosphoric Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Naima Khleifia; Ahmed Hannachi; Noureddine Abbes

    2013-01-01

    The growing worldwide energy demand associated with several inter related complex environmental as well as economical issues are driving the increase of the share of uranium in energy mix. Subsequently, over the last few years, the interest for uranium extraction and recovery from unconventional resources has gained considerable importance. Phosphate rock has been the most suitable alternative source for the uranium recovery because of its uranium content. Solvent extraction has been found to...

  14. Extractive Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Uranium Chemistry Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Huanwen; Luo, Mingbiao; Xiao, Saijin; OUYANG Yongzhong; Zhou, Yafei; Zhang, Xinglei

    2013-01-01

    Uranium chemistry is of sustainable interest. Breakthroughs in uranium studies make serious impacts in many fields including chemistry, physics, energy and biology, because uranium plays fundamentally important roles in these fields. Substantial progress in uranium studies normally requires development of novel analytical tools. Extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EESI-MS) is a sensitive technique for trace detection of various analytes in complex matrices without sample pre...

  15. Uranium market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuxco's estimates of uranium output from operating US centers plus facilities under construction are tabulated through 1990. Buyer inventories will continue to grow through the end of 1982 and will fall off thereafter. The relative inventory level will remain at two years or above through 1984, and will consistently drop thereafter. This is an indication of the market available for imports and for new US production. 1 table

  16. Depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Mohamed ElBaradei, issued today the following statement: The IAEA has been involved in United Nations efforts relating to the impact of the use of depleted uranium (DU) ammunition in Kosovo. It has supported the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) in the assessment which it is making, at the request of the Secretary-General, of that impact. In this connection, in November 2000, Agency experts participated in a UNEP-led fact-finding mission in Kosovo. DU is only slightly radioactive, being about 40% as radioactive as natural uranium. Chemically and physically, DU behaves in the same way as natural uranium. The chemical toxicity is normally the dominant factor for human health. However, it is necessary to carefully assess the impact of DU in the special circumstances in which it was used, e.g. to determine whether it was inhaled or ingested or whether fragments came into close contact with individuals. It is therefore essential, before an authoritative conclusion can be reached, that a detailed survey of the territory in which DU was used and of the people who came in contact with the depleted uranium in any form be carried out. In the meantime it would be prudent, as recommended by the leader of the November UNEP mission, to adopt precautionary measures. Depending on the results of the survey further measures may be necessary. The Agency, within its statutory responsibilities and on the basis of internationally accepted radiation safety standards, will continue to co-operate with other organizations, in particular WHO and UNEP, with a view to carrying out a comprehensive assessment. Co-operation by and additional information from NATO will be prerequisites. The experience gained from such an assessment could be useful for similar studies that may be carried out elsewhere in the Balkans or in the Gulf. (author)

  17. Uranium raw material base of the Republic of Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is composed of three sections: 1) development history of the uranium raw material base in Kazakhstan; 2) commercial genetic types of uranium deposits of Kazakhstan; and 3) general uranium reserves and resources of the Republic of Kazakhstan. Section 1 gives a survey of stage-by-stage implementation of prospecting and exploration works on the territory of Kazakhstan as well as of forming of uranium ore provinces and formation of uranium raw material base. Section 2 gives a summary of commercial types of uranium deposits from genetic positions. The uranium deposits of Kazakhstan are divided into two major series: endogenous deposits in pre-Mesozoic formations and exogenous deposits in Mesozoic and Cainozoic formations. The endogenous series contains vein-stockwork deposits in Proterozoic and Paleozoic complexes with the Kohshetav uranium ore province and vein-stockwork deposits in land volcanogenous complexes of the Probalkhash uranium ore provinces. The exogenous series contains -phosphate uranium ore formation (deposits of Pricaspian province), epigenetic uranium ore formation of regional zones of stratum oxidation (deposits of Chu-Saryssu and Syr Darya provinces) and epigenetic uranium ore formation of zones of ground-stratum oxidation (deposits of Ily province). Section 3 is dedicated to uranium reserves and resources distribution on the basis of provinces, degree of exploration and cost. (author). 5 figs, 2 tabs

  18. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that in 1990 the Department of Energy began a two-year project to illustrate the technical and economic feasibility of a new uranium enrichment technology-the atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) process. GAO believes that completing the AVLIS demonstration project will provide valuable information about the technical viability and cost of building an AVLIS plant and will keep future plant construction options open. However, Congress should be aware that DOE still needs to adequately demonstrate AVLIS with full-scale equipment and develop convincing cost projects. Program activities, such as the plant-licensing process, that must be completed before a plant is built, could take many years. Further, an updated and expanded uranium enrichment analysis will be needed before any decision is made about building an AVLIS plant. GAO, which has long supported legislation that would restructure DOE's uranium enrichment program as a government corporation, encourages DOE's goal of transferring AVLIS to the corporation. This could reduce the government's financial risk and help ensure that the decision to build an AVLIS plant is based on commercial concerns. DOE, however, has no alternative plans should the government corporation not be formed. Further, by curtailing a planned public access program, which would have given private firms an opportunity to learn about the technology during the demonstration project, DOE may limit its ability to transfer AVLIS to the private sector

  19. Brazilian uranium exploration program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    General information on Brazilian Uranium Exploration Program, are presented. The mineralization processes of uranium depoits are described and the economic power of Brazil uranium reserves is evaluated. (M.C.K.)

  20. Flotation separation of uranium from carbonate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presented are the results of experiments on finding the main peculiarities of flotation separation of uranium from diluted carbonate solutions of means of alkyl amides of nicotine acid, containing in the alkyl chain from 8 to 18 of carbon atoms. Interaction of the collectors with complex uranium containing anions, present in the solution, passes rapidly, and it is followed by formation of sublate colloid solutions. Flotation separation of uranium by means of alkyl amides is the best when pH constitutes 6-9. Suggested is a mechanism of the collector interaction with uranium containing complex anions. It is shown, that practically full separation of uranium takes place at 70-80% excess of the collector as compared with stoichiometrically necessary one for the formation of [UO2(CO3)3](RN2C6H7O)4 compound

  1. 76 FR 72984 - Revised Application for a License To Export High-Enriched Uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    ... COMMISSION Revised Application for a License To Export High-Enriched Uranium The application for a license to export high-enriched Uranium has been revised as noted below. Notice of this application was previously... kilograms To fabricate fuel France. Security Complex; October 18, Uranium (93.35%). uranium (174.0...

  2. 78 FR 33448 - Application for a License To Export High-Enriched Uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    ... COMMISSION Application for a License To Export High-Enriched Uranium Pursuant to 10 CFR 110.70 (b) ``Public... targets Canada. Security Complex, May 13, Uranium (93.35%). uranium-235 at the National 2013, May 21, 2013, XSNM3745, contained in 7.5 Research Universal 11006098. kilograms reactor in Canada for uranium....

  3. 77 FR 73055 - Application for a License To Export High-Enriched Uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-07

    ... COMMISSION Application for a License To Export High-Enriched Uranium Pursuant to 10 CFR 110.70 (b) ``Public... kilograms To fabricate targets The Netherlands. Security Complex. Uranium uranium-235 at CERCA AREVA October... XSNM3730 uranium. targets at the HFR 11006054 Research Reactor in the Netherlands, the BR-2 Reactor...

  4. 77 FR 73056 - Application for a License To Export High-Enriched Uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-07

    ... COMMISSION Application for a License To Export High-Enriched Uranium Pursuant to 10 CFR 110.70 (b) ``Public... targets Belgium. Security Complex. Uranium (93.2%). uranium-235 at CERCA AREVA Romans October 10, 2012 contained in 6.2 in France and to October 12, 2012 kilograms irradiate targets at XSNM3729 uranium. the...

  5. Uranium industry annual, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium industry data collected in the EIA-858 survey provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of annual activities of the industry and include some information about industry plans over the next several years. This report consists of two major sections. The first addresses uranium raw materials activities and covers the following topics: exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment. The second major section is concerned with the following uranium marketing activities: uranium purchase commitments, uranium prices, procurement arrangements, uranium imports and exports, enrichment services, inventories, secondary market activities utility market requirements and related topics

  6. Complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Gershenson, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    The term complexity derives etymologically from the Latin plexus, which means interwoven. Intuitively, this implies that something complex is composed by elements that are difficult to separate. This difficulty arises from the relevant interactions that take place between components. This lack of separability is at odds with the classical scientific method - which has been used since the times of Galileo, Newton, Descartes, and Laplace - and has also influenced philosophy and engineering. In recent decades, the scientific study of complexity and complex systems has proposed a paradigm shift in science and philosophy, proposing novel methods that take into account relevant interactions.

  7. Uranium Industry Annual, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ''Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,'' is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2

  8. Uranium Industry Annual, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-28

    The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ``Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,`` is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2.

  9. Uranium-contaminated soil pilot treatment study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pilot treatment study is proving to be effective for the remediation of uranium-contaminated soil from a site at the Los Alamos National Laboratory by use of a two-step, zero-discharge, 100% recycle system. Candidate uranium-contaminated soils were characterized for uranium content, uranium speciation, organic content, size fractionization, and pH. Geochemical computer codes were used to forecast possible uranium leach scenarios. Uranium contamination was not homogenous throughout the soil. In the first step, following excavation, the soil was sorted by use of the ThemoNuclean Services segmented gate system. Following the sorting, uranium-contaminated soil was remediated in a containerized vat leach process by use of sodium-bicarbonate leach solution. Leach solution containing uranium-carbonate complexes is to be treated by use of ion-exchange media and then recycled. Following the treatment process the ion exchange media will be disposed of in an approved low-level radioactive landfill. It is anticipated that treated soils will meet Department of Energy site closure guidelines, and will be given open-quotes no further actionclose quotes status. Treated soils are to be returned to the excavation site. A volume reduction of contaminated soils will successfully be achieved by the treatment process. Cost of the treatment (per cubic meter) is comparable or less than other current popular methods of uranium-contamination remediation

  10. Bioremediation of uranium contaminated soils and wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contamination of soils, water, and sediments by radionuclides and toxic metals from uranium mill tailings, nuclear fuel manufacturing and nuclear weapons production is a major concern. Studies of the mechanisms of biotransformation of uranium and toxic metals under various microbial process conditions has resulted in the development of two treatment processes: (1) stabilization of uranium and toxic metals with reduction in waste volume and (2) removal and recovery of uranium and toxic metals from wastes and contaminated soils. Stabilization of uranium and toxic metals in wastes is accomplished by exploiting the unique metabolic capabilities of the anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium sp. The radionuclides and toxic metals are solubilized by the bacteria directly by enzymatic reductive dissolution, or indirectly due to the production of organic acid metabolites. The radionuclides and toxic metals released into solution are immobilized by enzymatic reductive precipitation, biosorption and redistribution with stable mineral phases in the waste. Non-hazardous bulk components of the waste volume. In the second process uranium and toxic metals are removed from wastes or contaminated soils by extracting with the complexing agent citric acid. The citric-acid extract is subjected to biodegradation to recover the toxic metals, followed by photochemical degradation of the uranium citrate complex which is recalcitrant to biodegradation. The toxic metals and uranium are recovered in separate fractions for recycling or for disposal. The use of combined chemical and microbiological treatment process is more efficient than present methods and should result in considerable savings in clean-up and disposal costs

  11. Uranium recovery from slags of metallic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Center of the Nuclear Fuel of the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research - IPEN finished the program of attainment of fuel development for research reactors the base of Uranium Scilicet (U3 Si2) from Hexafluoride of Uranium (UF6) with enrichment 20% in weight of 235U. In the process of attainment of the league of U 3 Si 2 we have as Uranium intermediate product the metallic one whose attainment generates a slag contend Uranium. The present work shows the results gotten in the process of recovery of Uranium in slags of calcined slags of Uranium metallic. Uranium the metallic one is unstable, pyrophoricity and extremely reactive, whereas the U3O8 is a steady oxide of low chemical reactivity, what it justifies the process of calcination of slags of Uranium metallic. The calcination of the Uranium slag of the metallic one in oxygen presence reduces Uranium metallic the U3O8. Experiments had been developed varying it of acid for Uranium control and excess, nitric molar concentration gram with regard to the stoichiometric leaching reaction of temperature of the leaching process. The 96,0% income proves the viability of the recovery process of slags of Uranium metallic, adopting it previous calcination of these slags in nitric way with low acid concentration and low temperature of leaching. (author)

  12. Australian uranium and the election

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The international and national complexities of the situation in Australia over the question of mining of the country's large and rich uranium deposits are explored with especial reference to the pending general election. The present position is ironical since access to low cost uranium would give a welcome boost to the nuclear industry which is enthusiastically supported by the Australian prime minister and his colleagues yet the Australian government is unable to promote mining as rapidly as it would like because of the international commitments it has made to provide a justification for its policy. (U.K.)

  13. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter discusses the development of uranium enrichment processes. In the introduction there is a brief history of uranium enrichment, followed by a summary of the criteria used for the assessment of an isotope separation process, e.g. the separation factor, separative power, and the power consumption of a separating element. This is followed by a discussion of the two main processes used, i.e. gaseous diffusion and centrifugation. The reason for the change from diffusion to centrifugation in the UK, mainly on power costs, is discussed. The development potential of centrifuges is also assessed. Other processes which have been developed up to pilot stage are described, e.g. the Becker jet nozzle and the South African process. This is followed by a description of some plasma-based methods. The next topic is concerned with chemical exchange methods and an attempt is made to assess their potential in the enrichment scene from published information. This chapter concludes with a discussion of the advanced laser isotope-separation methods. The two approaches, i.e. the atomic and the molecular routes are discussed again using published information. This information is insufficient to give a complete assessment of the methods, especially the molecular route, but is enough to give indications of their potential

  14. Treatment of uranium bearing waste arising from solvent recovery unit of uranium processing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the regeneration of tributyl phosphate in uranium plant, a sizable volume of liquid waste containing about 70 mg/l of uranium, along with high concentrations of nitrates and carbonates, is generated. Laboratory studies revealed that the waste was not amenable to conventional treatment methods, including co-precipitation, owing to high concentration of carbonates, with which uranium forms a stable carbonato complex. Various commmercially available strongly basic anion exchangers were evaluated for the uptake of uranium from the waste under static conditions. Column studies, employing the anion-exchange resin which has shown the highest uptake, were carried out. These studies reveal the application potential of ion-exchange process not only in the treatment of uranium bearing wastes but also in the recovery of uranium. (author). 8 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs

  15. Uranium processing and properties

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Covers a broad spectrum of topics and applications that deal with uranium processing and the properties of uranium Offers extensive coverage of both new and established practices for dealing with uranium supplies in nuclear engineering Promotes the documentation of the state-of-the-art processing techniques utilized for uranium and other specialty metals

  16. Irradiated uranium reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Task concerned with reprocessing of irradiated uranium covered the following activities: implementing the method and constructing the cell for uranium dissolving; implementing the procedure for extraction of uranium, plutonium and fission products from radioactive uranium solutions; studying the possibilities for using inorganic ion exchangers and adsorbers for separation of U, Pu and fission products

  17. Issues in uranium availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this publication is to show the process by which information about uranium reserves and resources is developed, evaluated and used. The following three papers in this volume have been abstracted and indexed for the Energy Data Base: (1) uranium reserve and resource assessment; (2) exploration for uranium in the United States; (3) nuclear power, the uranium industry, and resource development

  18. Uranium industry annual 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report consists of two major sections. The first addresses uranium raw materials activities and covers the following topics: exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment. The second major section is concerned with the following uranium marketing activities: uranium purchase commitments, uranium prices, procurement arrangements, uranium imports and exports, enrichment services, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and related topics. A glossary and appendices are included to assist the reader in interpreting the substantial array of statistical data in this report and to provide background information about the survey

  19. Redox reactivity and coordination chemistry of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study and the understanding of actinides chemistry have important implications in the nuclear field both for the development of new actinides materials and the retreatment of the nuclear wastes. One of the major issues in that chemistry is that the actinides elements are known to undergo redox reaction and to form assemblies of different size and different topologies. In that context uranium can be a good model of the heavier radioelement because it is much less radioactive. So, this work concerns the synthesis and the study of the spectroscopy and the magnetic properties of several uranium based polymetallic assemblies synthesized by taking advantage of the redox properties and the coordination chemistry of uranium. The hydrolysis reactivity of trivalent uranium has been studied in absence of sterically hindered ligands and led to the synthesis of oxo/hydroxo uranium assemblies with different sizes by changing the starting complex or the reaction conditions. By following the same strategy, the controlled oxidation of trivalent uranium complexes led to an original azido/nitrido uranium complex. The coordination chemistry of the pentavalent uranyl polymer {[UO2py5][KI2py3]}n has also been studied with different ligand and in different conditions and led to several cation-cation complexes for which the stability is sufficient for studying there dismutation by proton NMR. By changing the ancillary ligands stable monomeric complexes of pentavalent uranyl complexes were also obtained. The magnetic properties of all the complexes, monomers and polymetallic complexes were studied and an antiferromagnetic coupling was observed for the cation-cation pentavalent uranyl dimer [UO2(dbm)2(K18C6)]2. (author)

  20. Depleted Uranium Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper considers radiological and toxic impact of the depleted uranium on the human health. Radiological influence of depleted uranium is less for 60 % than natural uranium due to the decreasing of short-lived isotopes uranium-234 and uranium-235 after enrichment. The formation of radioactive aerosols and their impact on the human are mentioned. Use of the depleted uranium weapons has also a chemical effect on intake due to possible carcinogenic influence on kidney. Uranium-236 in the substance of the depleted uranium is determined. The fact of beta-radiation formation in the uranium-238 decay is regarded. This effect practically is the same for both depleted and natural uranium. Importance of toxicity of depleted uranium, as the heavier chemical substance, has a considerable contribution to the population health. The paper analyzes risks regarding the use of the depleted uranium weapons. There is international opposition against using weapons with depleted uranium. Resolution on effects of the use of armaments and ammunitions containing depleted uranium was five times supported by the United Nations (USA, United Kingdom, France and Israel did not support). The decision for banning of depleted uranium weapons was supported by the European Parliament

  1. URANIUM DECONTAMINATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham, J.S.; Carroll, J.L.

    1959-12-22

    A process is described for reducing the extractability of ruthenium, zirconium, and niobium values into hexone contained in an aqueous nitric acid uranium-containing solution. The solution is made acid-deficient, heated to between 55 and 70 deg C, and at that temperature a water-soluble inorganic thiosulfate is added. By this, a precipitate is formed which carries the bulk of the ruthenium, and the remainder of the ruthenium as well as the zirconium and niobium are converted to a hexone-nonextractable form. The rutheniumcontaining precipitate can either be removed from the solu tion or it can be dissolved as a hexone-non-extractable compound by the addition of sodium dichromate prior to hexone extraction.

  2. Natural uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This sheet belongs to a collection which relates to the use of radionuclides essentially in unsealed sources. Its goal is to gather on a single document the most relevant information as well as the best prevention practices to be implemented. These sheets are made for the persons in charge of radiation protection: users, radioprotection-skill persons, labor physicians. Each sheet treats of: 1 - the radio-physical and biological properties; 2 - the main uses; 3 - the dosimetric parameters; 4 - the measurement; 5 - the protection means; 6 - the areas delimitation and monitoring; 7 - the personnel classification, training and monitoring; 8 - the effluents and wastes; 9 - the authorization and declaration administrative procedures; 10 - the transport; and 11 - the right conduct to adopt in case of incident or accident. This sheet deals specifically with natural uranium

  3. Uranium resources, production and fuel fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almost all the known disseminated and vein-type uranium deposits in India are located in the Precambrian igneous and metamorphic complexes in the Peninsular Shield; the most significant reserves occur in the Singhbhum Thrust Belt of Bihar. Adequate resources of uranium to meet the country's fuel requirements for the nuclear power programme have been established. The Uranium Corporation of India has been operating commercially an underground uranium mine and a mill at Jaduguda (Bihar) since 1968. The uranium ore body is mined by the cut-and-fill method. The present mine workings, 530 m below ground level, comprise many innovative features, namely, a tower-mounted Koepe winder system, skip-loading with an underground crushing system, concrete headframe, etc. Surveillance, control and monitoring systems, especially required in the mining of low grade uranium ores, have been successfully introduced. The uranium mill adjacent to the mine uses the acid leach and ion-exchange processes of recovery. The effluents are suitably treated in a specially designed tailings pond. Other accessory economic minerals, namely chalcopyrite, molybdenite and magnetite, are profitably recovered as by-products. Fuel fabrication commenced in India with the manufacture of aluminium-clad metallic uranium fuel for the CIR reactor. Power reactor oxide fuel manufacture has been carried out initially at Trombay for the Rajasthan Power Reactor I (RAPP-I). For transferring the technology developed, industrial-scale plants have been set up in the Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC) at Hyderabad for the manufacture of zirconium-clad natural uranium fuel for PHWRs and low enrichment uranium fuel for the BWR Tarapur Power Station

  4. Morphology Characterization of Uranium Particles From Laser Ablated Uranium Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    In the study, metallic uranium and uranium dioxide material were ablated by laser beam in order to simulate the process of forming the uranium particles in pyrochemical process. The morphology characteristic of uranium particles and the surface of

  5. Variations in the uranium isotopic compositions of uranium ores from different types of uranium deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uvarova, Yulia A.; Kyser, T. Kurt; Geagea, Majdi Lahd; Chipley, Don

    2014-12-01

    Variations in 238U/235U and 234U/238U ratios were measured in uranium minerals from a spectrum of uranium deposit types, as well as diagenetic phosphates in uranium-rich basins and peraluminous rhyolites and associated autunite mineralisation from Macusani Meseta, Peru. Mean δ238U values of uranium minerals relative to NBL CRM 112-A are 0.02‰ for metasomatic deposits, 0.16‰ for intrusive, 0.18‰ for calcrete, 0.18‰ for volcanic, 0.29‰ for quartz-pebble conglomerate, 0.29‰ for sandstone-hosted, 0.44‰ for unconformity-type, and 0.56‰ for vein, with a total range in δ238U values from -0.30‰ to 1.52‰. Uranium mineralisation associated with igneous systems, including low-temperature calcretes that are sourced from U-rich minerals in igneous systems, have low δ238U values of ca. 0.1‰, near those of their igneous sources, whereas uranium minerals in basin-hosted deposits have higher and more variable values. High-grade unconformity-related deposits have δ238U values around 0.2‰, whereas lower grade unconformity-type deposits in the Athabasca, Kombolgie and Otish basins have higher δ238U values. The δ234U values for most samples are around 0‰, in secular equilibrium, but some samples have δ234U values much lower or higher than 0‰ associated with addition or removal of 234U during the past 2.5 Ma. These δ238U and δ234U values suggest that there are at least two different mechanisms responsible for 238U/235U and 234U/238U variations. The 234U/238U disequilibria ratios indicate recent fluid interaction with the uranium minerals and preferential migration of 234U. Fractionation between 235U and 238U is a result of nuclear-field effects with enrichment of 238U in the reduced insoluble species (mostly UO2) and 235U in oxidised mobile species as uranyl ion, UO22+, and its complexes. Therefore, isotopic fractionation effects should be reflected in 238U/235U ratios in uranium ore minerals formed either by reduction of uranium to UO2 or chemical

  6. Uranium Provinces in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Three uranium provinces are recognized in China, the Southeast China uranium province, the Northeast China-lnner Mongolia uranium province and the Northwest China (Xinjiang) uranium province. The latter two promise good potential for uranium resources and are major exploration target areas in recent years. There are two major types of uranium deposits: the Phanerozoic hydrothermal type (vein type) and the Meso-Cenozoic sandstone type in different proportions in the three uranium provinces. The most important reason or prerequisite for the formation of these uranium provinces is that Precambrian uranium-enriched old basement or its broken parts (median massifs) exists or once existed in these regions, and underwent strong tectonomagmatic activation during Phanerozoic time. Uranium was mobilized from the old basement and migrated upwards to the upper structural level together with the acidic magma originating from anatexis and the primary fluids, which were then mixed with meteoric water and resulted in the formation of Phanerozoic hydrothermal uranium deposits under extensional tectonic environments. Erosion of uraniferous rocks and pre-existing uranium deposits during the Meso-Cenozoic brought about the removal of uranium into young sedimentary basins. When those basins were uplifted and slightly deformed by later tectonic activity, roll-type uranium deposits were formed as a result of redox in permeable sandstone strata.

  7. Uranium industry annual 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-04-22

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. The Form EIA-858 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is shown in Appendix D. For the readers convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix E along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  8. Uranium industry annual 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry's activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey.'' Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry's activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry's plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' is provided in Appendix C. The Form EIA-858 ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' is shown in Appendix D. For the readers convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix E along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 24 figs., 56 tabs

  9. Uranium industry annual 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry's activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey.'' Data collected on the ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry's activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry's plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ''Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,'' is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2

  10. Process for the selective separation of uranium from other metals and for obtaining uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This addition to main patent 2817029 includes the separation and obtaining of uranium from an aquaeous sulphuric acid solution instead of a nitric acid solution. The uranium forms complex sulphate anions, which cannot be foamed with cation tenside in a flotation cell. The relatively high stability of complex uranyl sulphates makes it possible to separate the uranium from nearly all metals found with it in nature. The process is more economic and has fewer waste problems. The process and associated device are described in detail. (UWI)

  11. Bioremediation of uranium contaminated Fernald soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated the use of microbial bioleaching for removal of uranium from contaminated soils. The ability of bacteria to assist in oxidation and solubilization of uranium was compared to the ability of fungi to produce complexing compounds which have the same effect. Biosorption of uranium by fungi was also measured. Soil samples were examined for changes in mineralogical properties due to these processes. On the basis of these laboratory scale studies a generalized flow sheet is proposed for bioremediation of contaminated Fernald soils

  12. Spectroscopy and chemistry of uranium IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different fundamental research papers on uranium IV are presented, some were never edited. Molecular spectroscopy was used for identification and structural study of uranium IV in aqueous or organic solutions. The fields studied are: coordination, stereochemistry, electronic structure and chemical properties. For interpretation of results some studies were made with solid compounds or with thorium compounds or thorium complexes. Knowledge of actinides chemistry is improved, uranium and thorium being models for 5 f ions, extractive chemistry is better understood and new applications are possible

  13. Uranium: one utility's outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The perspective of the Arizona Public Service Company (APS) on the uncertainty of uranium as a fuel supply is discussed. After summarizing the history of nuclear power and the uranium industries, a projection is made for the future uranium market. An uncrtain uranium market is attributed to various determining factors that include international politics, production costs, non-commercial government regulation, production-company stability, and questionable levels of uranium sales. APS offers its solutions regarding type of contract, choice of uranium producers, pricing mechanisms, and aids to the industry as a whole. 5 references, 10 figures, 1 table

  14. Uranium: a basic evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All energy sources and technologies, including uranium and the nuclear industry, are needed to provide power. Public misunderstanding of the nature of uranium and how it works as a fuel may jeopardize nuclear energy as a major option. Basic chemical facts about uranium ore and uranium fuel technology are presented. Some of the major policy decisions that must be made include the enrichment, stockpiling, and pricing of uranium. Investigations and lawsuits pertaining to uranium markets are reviewed, and the point is made that oil companies will probably have to divest their non-oil energy activities. Recommendations for nuclear policies that have been made by the General Accounting Office are discussed briefly

  15. Enriching recycled uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper reviews the progress of the use of recycled uranium during the period 1985-8. This article was originally presented as a paper at the 1988 Uranium Institute symposium (which was held in London). A description is given of the differences between natural and recycled uranium, and the presence of U236 in recycled uranium. The concept of equivalent reactivity is described, as well as the cost benefit of using recycled uranium. A summary of Urenco tests and trials with reprocessed uranium is given. Enrichment, UF6 conversion and fuel fabrication are also discussed. (U.K.)

  16. Uranium health physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the papers delivered at the Summer School on Uranium Health Physics held in Pretoria on the 14 and 15 April 1980. The following topics were discussed: uranium producton in South Africa; radiation physics; internal dosimetry and radiotoxicity of long-lived uranium isotopes; uranium monitoring; operational experience on uranium monitoring; dosimetry and radiotoxicity of inhaled radon daughters; occupational limits for inhalation of radon-222, radon-220 and their short-lived daughters; radon monitoring techniques; radon daughter dosimeters; operational experience on radon monitoring; and uranium mill tailings management

  17. Separation and spectrophotometric determination of uranium(VI) by extraction with arsenazo III and zephiramine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microgram quantitites of uranium(VI) can be determined at 655 nm after separation by chloroform extraction of its Arsenazo III complex with Zephiramine. The extracted uranium can be back-extracted with an aqueous solution of ammonium carbonate. Uranium can be separated from aluminium, iron(II), and some other elements. Probably the same species, i.e., the ion association compounds between the uranium(VI)-Arsenazo III complex and Zephiramine are involved during the extraction and the froth flotation. (author)

  18. Uranium: myths and realities the depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium is an element whose name causes worry. The uranium properties are very unknown for people. However the element plays an important roll in the Earth as responsible of numerous natural phenomena, which are vital for life evolution. An example of the low knowledge about uranium has been the Balkan syndrome. A relation between cancers and the use of depleted uranium in ammunition in the Balkan War has been pretended to be established. From the beginning, this hypothesis could have been discarded as it has been confirmed and stated in recent reports of UNEP Commissions who have studied this matter. (Author)

  19. Uranium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The domestic uranium industry is in a state of stagflation. Costs continue to rise while the market for the product remains stagnant. During the last 12 months, curtailments and closures of mines and mills have eliminated over 5000 jobs in the industry, plus many more in those industries that furnish supplies and services. By January 1982, operations at four mills and the mines that furnish them ore will have been terminated. Other closures may follow, depending on cost trends, duration of current contracts, the degree to which mills have been amortized, the feasibility of placing mines on standby, the grade of the ore, and many other factors. Open-pit mines can be placed on standby without much difficulty, other than the possible cost of restoration before all the ore has been removed. There are a few small, dry, underground mines that could be mothballed; however, the major underground producers are wet sandstone mines that in most cases could not be reopened after a prolonged shutdown; mills can be mothballed for several years. Figure 8 shows the location of all the production centers in operation, as well as those that have operated or are on standby. Table 1 lists the same production centers plus those that have been deferred, showing nominal capacity of conventional mills in tons of ore per calendar day, and the industry production rate for those mills as of October 1, 1981

  20. Geology and exploration of the Rum Jungle Uranium Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Rum Jungle Uranium Field was discovered by a private prospector in 1949. A total of 3530 tonnes of uranium oxide was mined and treated from four ore-bodies by Territory Enterprises Pty. Limited who managed the Rum Jungle Project on behalf of the Australian Atomic Energy Commission until the closure of operations in 1971. One small low grade uranium orebody remains to be developed. Lead, zinc, copper, cobalt and nickel were found zoned sub vertically with uranium at one deposit. One medium sized lead, zinc, copper, cobalt and nickel deposit remains to be developed and one small copper deposit with minor uranium was mined. The basemetal deposits show a regional zoning relationship with the known uranium mineralization. Uranium and basemetal mineralization is hosted by graphitic or chloritic, pyritic shales at the contact with a magnesite. These rocks are in the lower part of a sequence of Lower Proterozoic sediments which unconformably overlie Archaean basement complexes. The sediments and complexes are displaced by Giants Reef Fault and sub-parallel shears and linears may further control mineralization. Nearly 50km of the prospective shale/magnesite contact was tested by total count radiometric surveys, various electrical methods, auger, rotary percussion and diamond drilling. The source for the uranium mineralization was probably the Archaean basement complexes from which uranium was initially deposited as protore by either chemical precipitation or clay adsorption in the shale units or as detrital placers in quartz pebble conglomerates immediately overlying the basement complexes. (author)

  1. Spectrophotometric determination of uranium with benzohydroxamic acid in aqueous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A spectrophotometric method has been developed for the determination of uranium with benzohydroxamic acid (BHA). Uranium in the hexavalent state forms a yellowish orange colored chelate with BHA. The absorbance of the complex is maximum at pH 6.0, excluding pH7 and complex is stable for more than 72 hours. The maximum absorbance at 304 nm is considered for quantification of uranium. The present method is validated and good agreement with spectrophotometric determination of uranium with thiocyanate. Uranium in the range 1-10 μg/ml has been determined with good precision. The described method is simple, precised and accurate. It can be applied for the determination of uranium in raffinates of Purex process, without producing the nuclear waste in organic phase

  2. Uranium from phosphate ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following topics are described briefly: the way phosphate fertilizers are made; how uranium is recovered in the phosphate industry; and how to detect covert uranium recovery operations in a phsophate plant

  3. Uranium exploration in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Australia has more low-cost uranium in deposits than any other country, but finding it is not easy. While the price for uranium has been low, little was found but now exploration is starting to increase.

  4. DEPLETED URANIUM TECHNICAL WORK

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Depleted Uranium Technical Work is designed to convey available information and knowledge about depleted uranium to EPA Remedial Project Managers, On-Scene Coordinators, contractors, and other Agency managers involved with the remediation of sites contaminated with this mater...

  5. Uranium mining in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mining of uranium in Australia is criticised in relation to it's environmental impact, economics and effects on mine workers and Aborigines. A brief report is given on each of the operating and proposed uranium mines in Australia

  6. International trade in uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is discussed under the following headings: need for security of uranium supply; pressures on international trade; mechanism of international trade; non-proliferation and uranium trade; means of increasing security of supply. (U.K.)

  7. Brazilian uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimatives of uranium reserves carried out in Figueira, Itataia, Lagoa Real and Espinharas, in Brazil are presented. The samples testing allowed to know geological structures, and the characteristics of uranium mineralization. (M.C.F.)

  8. Uranium in Niger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents government policy in the enhancement of uranium resources, existing mining companies and their productions, exploitation projects and economical outcome related to the uranium mining and auxiliary activities

  9. Spectrophotometric determination of uranium using quercetin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A spectrophotometric method for quantitative determination of uranium, using a flavone (quercetin) as complexing agent, is described. The method is based on the reaction between uranyl ion and alcoholic solution of quercetin with a complex formation of intense yellow color. (M.C.L.)

  10. Radiation damage of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Study of radiation damage covered the following: Kinetics of electric resistance of uranium and uranium alloy with 1% of molybdenum dependent on the second phase and burnup rate; Study of gas precipitation and diffusion of bubbles by transmission electron microscopy; Numerical analysis of the influence of defects distribution and concentration on the rare gas precipitation in uranium; study of thermal sedimentation of uranium alloy with molybdenum; diffusion of rare gas in metal by gas chromatography method

  11. Governing uranium in China

    OpenAIRE

    Patton Schell, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear power is playing an increasingly prominent role in China's long-term strategic energy calculus. In response, China is responding by producing more uranium domestically, buying more uranium on the international market, and investing heavily in overseas uranium properties. At the same time, China has been updating its nuclear regulations over the last three decades, resulting in a myriad of regulatory agencies with widely varying responsibilities related to implementing uranium regulati...

  12. Uranium in fossil bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An attempt has been made to determine the uranium content and thus the age of certain fossil bones Haritalyangarh (Himachal Pradesh), India. The results indicate that bones rich in apatite are also rich in uranium, and that the radioactivity is due to radionuclides in the uranium series. The larger animals apparently have a higher concentration of uranium than the small. The dating of a fossil jaw (elephant) places it in the Pleistocene. (Auth.)

  13. Bicarbonate leaching of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alkaline leach process for extracting uranium from uranium ores is reviewed. This process is dependent on the chemistry of uranium and so is independent on the type of mining system (conventional, heap or in-situ) used. Particular reference is made to the geochemical conditions at Crownpoint. Some supporting data from studies using alkaline leach for remediation of uranium-contaminated sites is presented

  14. Uranium mining: Saskatchewan status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper gives the status of uranium mining by Areva in Saskatchewan. Uranium production now meets 85% of world demand for power generation. 80% of world production of uranium comes from top 5 countries: Kazakhstan, Canada, Australia, Niger and Namibia. Saskatchewan is currently the only Canadian province with active uranium mines and mills and the largest exploration programs. Several mine projects are going through the environmental assessment process. Public opinion is in favour of mining activities in Saskatchewan.

  15. Uranium resources, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The specific character of uranium as energy resources, the history of development of uranium resources, the production and reserve of uranium in the world, the prospect regarding the demand and supply of uranium, Japanese activity of exploring uranium resources in foreign countries and the state of development of uranium resources in various countries are reported. The formation of uranium deposits, the classification of uranium deposits and the reserve quantity of each type are described. As the geological environment of uranium deposits, there are six types, that is, quartz medium gravel conglomerate deposit, the deposit related to the unconformity in Proterozoic era, the dissemination type magma deposit, pegmatite deposit and contact deposit in igneaus rocks and metamorphic rocks, vein deposit, sandstone type deposit and the other types of deposit. The main features of respective types are explained. The most important uranium resources in Japan are those in the Tertiary formations, and most of the found reserve belongs to this type. The geological features, the state of yield and the scale of the deposits in Ningyotoge, Tono and Kanmon Mesozoic formation are reported. Uranium minerals, the promising districts in the world, and the matters related to the exploration and mining of uranium are described. (Kako, I.)

  16. Uranium and thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present article is devoted to uranium and thorium content in fluorite. In order to obtain the comprehensive view on uranium and thorium distribution in fluorite 100 fluorite samples of various geologic deposits and ores of Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan and some geologic deposits of Russia were studied. The uranium and thorium content in fluorite of geologic deposits of various mineralogical and genetic type was defined.

  17. Uranium production in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The history of uranium mining and milling in Australia is briefly outlined, particular attention being given to the development of Australia's only two operating mills, Nabarlek and Ranger, and its only operating mine, Ranger. The latter project is used to illustrate the prerequisites for development of the industry and the complex roles of the various parties involved in establishing a new mine: equity holders, customers, financiers, the securities industry, trade unions, and the public. The moves currently being taken to resolve the future of the industry in Australia, particularly the examination of issues relating to Australia's role in the nuclear fuel cycle being conducted by the Australian Science and Technology Council, preclude any firm conclusions being drawn, but the various options open to the government are reviewed and the record of Australian governments and unions and the attitude of the Australian public are described. (Author) (3 tabs., fig.)

  18. Uranium(3) solutions in hexamethyl-phosphorotriamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A stable solution of uranium (3) has been prepared by reduction of uranium (4) with a solUtion of metallic sodium in hexamethylphosphorotriamide (GMPA). Studies are carried on absorption electron spectra of this solution, as well as of the solution prepared by dissolving the uranium (3) complex, Rb2UCl5, in GMPA. The extinction coefficients of uranium (3) in GMPA, oscillator strengths and some energetic parameters of absorption spectra are determined. An attempt is made to interpret the spectra of f-d transitions of uranium (3) in GMPA solutions. To a first approximation, the scheme of Jsub(1)γsub(n) interaction can be assumed for uranium (3), where J1 is a quantum number of the 5f2 configuration in the Russel-Saunders approximation, and Jsub(1)γsub(n) the state of d-electron in the crystalline field. Also determined are the parameters of splitting by the crystalline field and the electostatic energy of the first non-split level of the 5f26d1 configuration of uranium (3)

  19. Interactions of uranium (VI) with biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study a detailed investigation was made of natural biofilms from two uranium-contaminated sites, namely the former uranium mine in Koenigstein (Saxony) and the ground surface of the former Grassenhalde tailing heap in Thuringia. A predominance of uranyl sulphate (UO2SO4), a highly mobile, solute uranium species, was found in the mine waters of both sites. In this study an investigation was made of the capacity of Euglena mutabilis cells for bioaccumulation of uranium in a pH range of 3 to 6 using living cells and sodium perchlorate (9 g/l) or sodium sulphate (3.48 g/l) as background media. At acidic pH values in the range from 3 to 4 it was possible to remove more than 90% of the original uranium content from the test solution regardless of the medium being used. The speciation of the uranium accumulated in the Euglena cells was investigated by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS). It was found that a new uranium species of low variability forms on the cells independent of the background medium, state of life of the cells and pH value. By comparing the data from the LIFS measurements with reference values it was possible to narrow down the identity of the uranium species to one bonded to (organo) phosphate and/or carboxylic functional groups. Using time-resolved FT-IR spectroscopy it was possible to demonstrate carboxylic bonding of uranium to dead cells. However it was not possible to exclude (organo) complexation with this method. An investigation of the specific location of the uranium on or in the cells using combined CLSM/LIFS technology yielded first indications of intracellular accumulation of uranium in the living cells. Supplementary TEM/EDX measurements confirmed the intracellular uptake, showing it to occur in round to oval cell organelles which are thought to be vacuoles or vacuole-like vesicles. It was not possible to detect uranium on dead cells using these methods. This points to passive, homogeneously distributed biosorption of

  20. Speciation of uranium in environmental relevant compartments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past, the chemistry of uranium was focused on its mining and milling for production of high pure uranium compounds as initial matter of reactor fuel elements for energy production and breeding of plutonium for weapons production. In this sense, the recovery of uranium and plutonium from the used reactor fuel elements was also technical realized. The increasing input of uranium into bio-sphere by mining and milling and industrial processes like production of cement, fossil fuels, and fertilizers has led to the realization of the importance of uranium environmental chemistry. For a better assessment of radiotoxicity and transport along the food chain knowledge about the chemistry of uranium is needed in all involved compartments. Starting from uranium content in geo- and bio-systems, about the determination of chemical behavior - the speciation of uranium - is reported in selected environmental compartments like seepage waters coming from mine tailings, different kinds of bacteria living in uranium contaminated soils, and relevant forage plants growing on these soils. For uranium speciation determination direct non-invasive methods are used like various laser spectroscopic methods, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation source, The results obtained by spectroscopic methods showed that the speciation of uranium is dominated in surface waters by uranyl-carbonate complexes in opposite to the speciation in bacteria and plants. In these compartments the speciation is dominated by binding of uranium on carboxylic and phosphorous containing functional groups. It was shown, that in the investigated systems the speciation strongly depends on different physical chemical parameters like ionic strength, kind and amount of ligands, pH, Eh e.g. In experiments with living organisms it is necessary to characterize the state of the bio-system in dependence of the used parameters to compare the obtained results (ratio of dead or living cells of bacteria

  1. Biogeochemistry of uranium minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cyclic behaviour in the earth's crust is probably easier to demonstrate for uranium than for most elements. The chenmical basis of that behaviour is described with the roles which organisms can play during their life and as organic residues - after their death. The way in which this behaviour has led to the redistribution of uranium in rocks (to form ore bodies in favourable cases) is considered together with the related topic of biogeochemical prospecting for uranium. Many of the same considerations are relevant to the recovery of uranium by leaching from broken rock and to the way in which the cycling of uranium may affect the environment. (Auth.)

  2. A spectrophotometric method for uranium determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A very sensitive extraction spectrophotometric method for the analysis of uranium based on the extraction of a uranium-benzoate-crystal violet complex by a mixture of xylene and benzene is described. The absorbance maximum is at 606 nm and molar absorptivity is 4.28x104 lxmol-1xcm-1. The interference due to a number of anions and cations studied without any pre-extraction was found to be within permissible limits. The method has been used for determining uranium in a synthetic solution, i.e., uranium in the presence of various other ions. The interference due to some cations was eliminated by the use of a masking agent (boric acid). (author)

  3. Investigations on uranium sorption on bentonite and montmorillonite, respectively, and uranium in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The geotechnical barrier is an important component of a geological repository and consists of compacted bentonite surrounding radioactive waste containers. Its most important functions are, to retard the radionuclide migration into the biosphere and to prevent groundwater contact with containers. lt is therefore of central importance to investigate the bentonite material on its capacity to sorb radionuclides under near-natural chemical and physical conditions. The purpose of this work was to study the adsorption of uranium(VI) on bentonit and on montmorillonite-standards at high uranium concentrations. Thereby, a special account was given to the calcium-uranyl-carbonate complexation, which leads to the formation of very stable and mobile uncharged Ca2UO2(CO3)3 complex. Results of batch experiments showed that the dicalcium-uranyl-tricarbonate complexation lowers the uranium(VI) sorption on natural clay (bentonite) by a factor of up to 3. After 21 days of contact time, about 40 % and 20 % of the initial uranium(VI)concentration were sorbed on Na-bentonite and ea-bentonite, respectively, from a solution with Ca2UO2(CO3)3 dominating the uranium(VI) speciation. On the contrary, about 55 % of the initial uranium(VI)-concentration were sorbed on thes clays from the solution, in which (UO2)2CO3(OH)3- complex dominated the uranium(VI) speciation. Thus uranium(VI) sorption is more strongly influenced by the solution composition than by bentonite type. Na-bentonite should be used instead of ea-bentonite as a geotechnical barrier, since calcium-uranyl-carbonate complexation may be a realistic scenario. Further SEM-EDX and HREM-EDX studies showed that uranium(VI) sorption occurred predominantly on montmorillonite, which is the main component of bentonite. Uranium(VI) sorption on bentonite's accessory Minerals (pyrite, calcite, mica, and feldspar) was not observed. Investigation of uranium(VI) sorption on four montmorillonite-standard, which are distinguished by the cationic

  4. Technical Basis for Assessing Uranium Bioremediation Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PE Long; SB Yabusaki; PD Meyer; CJ Murray; AL N’Guessan

    2008-04-01

    In situ bioremediation of uranium holds significant promise for effective stabilization of U(VI) from groundwater at reduced cost compared to conventional pump and treat. This promise is unlikely to be realized unless researchers and practitioners successfully predict and demonstrate the long-term effectiveness of uranium bioremediation protocols. Field research to date has focused on both proof of principle and a mechanistic level of understanding. Current practice typically involves an engineering approach using proprietary amendments that focuses mainly on monitoring U(VI) concentration for a limited time period. Given the complexity of uranium biogeochemistry and uranium secondary minerals, and the lack of documented case studies, a systematic monitoring approach using multiple performance indicators is needed. This document provides an overview of uranium bioremediation, summarizes design considerations, and identifies and prioritizes field performance indicators for the application of uranium bioremediation. The performance indicators provided as part of this document are based on current biogeochemical understanding of uranium and will enable practitioners to monitor the performance of their system and make a strong case to clients, regulators, and the public that the future performance of the system can be assured and changes in performance addressed as needed. The performance indicators established by this document and the information gained by using these indicators do add to the cost of uranium bioremediation. However, they are vital to the long-term success of the application of uranium bioremediation and provide a significant assurance that regulatory goals will be met. The document also emphasizes the need for systematic development of key information from bench scale tests and pilot scales tests prior to full-scale implementation.

  5. Technical Basis for Assessing Uranium Bioremediation Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In situ bioremediation of uranium holds significant promise for effective stabilization of U(VI) from groundwater at reduced cost compared to conventional pump and treat. This promise is unlikely to be realized unless researchers and practitioners successfully predict and demonstrate the long-term effectiveness of uranium bioremediation protocols. Field research to date has focused on both proof of principle and a mechanistic level of understanding. Current practice typically involves an engineering approach using proprietary amendments that focuses mainly on monitoring U(VI) concentration for a limited time period. Given the complexity of uranium biogeochemistry and uranium secondary minerals, and the lack of documented case studies, a systematic monitoring approach using multiple performance indicators is needed. This document provides an overview of uranium bioremediation, summarizes design considerations, and identifies and prioritizes field performance indicators for the application of uranium bioremediation. The performance indicators provided as part of this document are based on current biogeochemical understanding of uranium and will enable practitioners to monitor the performance of their system and make a strong case to clients, regulators, and the public that the future performance of the system can be assured and changes in performance addressed as needed. The performance indicators established by this document and the information gained by using these indicators do add to the cost of uranium bioremediation. However, they are vital to the long-term success of the application of uranium bioremediation and provide a significant assurance that regulatory goals will be met. The document also emphasizes the need for systematic development of key information from bench scale tests and pilot scales tests prior to full-scale implementation

  6. A new type of uranium deposit of zirconium-uranium type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    631 deposit exists an granite-complex body of multiterm and multi-level, and on contact zone of compound granite and medium-coarse grained prophyritic bioxite granite. Ore body exists on alkalic-replace rock body which is mainly composed of sodium. Its occurrence fit in with alkalic-replace lithofacies. The principal mineralization type of 631 deposits is alkalic-replace type. The principal industrial uranium which exists in ore is zirconolite. In zirconolite, uranium content is 2.1% and zirconium content is 28.8%. Whereas the distribution of zircon and uranium is in line with zirconolite

  7. 31 CFR 540.317 - Uranium feed; natural uranium feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Uranium feed; natural uranium feed... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.317 Uranium feed; natural uranium feed....

  8. On the reasons for bombarding uranium with slow neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Form the concepts of slow neutrons, the binding energy and the excitation energy of complex nuclei, and the activation energy in nuclear fission, the four reasons for bombarding uranium with slow neutrons are summed up. Not only the reasons for uranium fission are brought in light, but also the micromechanism is dealt with

  9. Recovery of uranium values from ammonium diuranate filtrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the conversion of uranium hexafluoride (UF6) to UO2 or U metal powder, ammonium diuranate filtrate (ADUF) is generated by precipitation of uranyl fluoride solution (UO2F2) with ammonium hydroxide solution (NH4OH). This filtrate contains uranium in the range of 150-200 mg/l and fluoride ions in the range of 10-15 g/l. Uranium is present in the filtrate in hexavalent state as mixed fluoride complex particularly, UO2F2.3NH4F, which is quite soluble in aqueous medium and leads to loss of precious uranium in the effluent stream and also poses disposal issues

  10. Solvent extraction of uranium and molybdenum in sulfuric media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Solvent extraction process for recovering the uranium and molibdenum from the sulfuric acid solution produced from Figueira ores was developed. The leach solution contains molibdenum with a mean ratio Mo/U = 35%. THe solvent used was a terciary amine-Alamine 336, modified with tridecanol in querosine. An investigation was made to evaluate the variables affecting the extraction and stripping of uranium and molibdenum. The Alamine 336 showed a significant extraction power for uranium and molibdenum. In the stripping step of uranium using acidified sodium cloride it was observed the presence of an insoluble amine-molibdenum-arsenic complex. (author)

  11. Acid chloride leaching of Midwest Lake uranium ore (northern Saskatchewan, Canada)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of acid chloride leaching (i.e. alternative leaching process) of high-grade complex uranium ore was studied on Midwest Lake uranium ore, one of the main objectives of the work being to produce effluents and tailings almost free from radioisotopes and other toxic materials. Irrespective of leachants, uranium extractions were always high (∼99%). 32 refs.; 5 tabs

  12. 75 FR 6223 - Application For a License To Export High-Enriched Uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-08

    ... COMMISSION Application For a License To Export High-Enriched Uranium Pursuant to 10 CFR 110.70(c) ``Public... fabricate Canada. Complex December 21, 2009, Uranium (93.35%). uranium (16.3 targets for December 28, 2009... FR 49139 (Aug. 28, 2007). Information about filing electronically is available on timely...

  13. 75 FR 7525 - Application for a License To Export High-Enriched Uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Application for a License To Export High-Enriched Uranium Pursuant to 10 CFR 110.70(c) ``Public... fuel France; Belgium. Security Complex, February 2, Uranium (93.35%). uranium (87.3 elements in...

  14. 75 FR 15743 - Application for a License To Export High-Enriched Uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-30

    ... COMMISSION Application for a License To Export High-Enriched Uranium Pursuant to 10 CFR 110.70(c) ``Public... fabricate fuel France. Complex, March 3, 2010. Uranium (93.35%). uranium (149.36 elements in March 9, 2010... FR 49139 (Aug. 28, 2007). Information about filing electronically is available on the NRC's...

  15. 77 FR 1956 - Application for a License To Export High-Enriched Uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-12

    ... COMMISSION Application for a License To Export High-Enriched Uranium Pursuant to 10 CFR 110.70(b) ``Public... Netherlands. Security Complex. Uranium uranium (9.3 targets at December 21, 2011 (93.35%). kilograms U- CERCA... August 2007, 72 FR 49139 (Aug. 28, 2007). Information about filing electronically is available on the...

  16. Depleted uranium disposal options evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, has chartered a study to evaluate alternative management strategies for depleted uranium (DU) currently stored throughout the DOE complex. Historically, DU has been maintained as a strategic resource because of uses for DU metal and potential uses for further enrichment or for uranium oxide as breeder reactor blanket fuel. This study has focused on evaluating the disposal options for DU if it were considered a waste. This report is in no way declaring these DU reserves a ''waste,'' but is intended to provide baseline data for comparison with other management options for use of DU. To PICS considered in this report include: Retrievable disposal; permanent disposal; health hazards; radiation toxicity and chemical toxicity

  17. Selective Extraction of Uranium from Liquid or Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farawila, Anne F.; O' Hara, Matthew J.; Wai, Chien M.; Taylor, Harry Z.; Liao, Yu-Jung

    2012-07-31

    Current liquid-liquid extraction processes used in recycling irradiated nuclear fuel rely on (1) strong nitric acid to dissolve uranium oxide fuel, and (2) the use of aliphatic hydrocarbons as a diluent in formulating the solvent used to extract uranium. The nitric acid dissolution process is not selective. It dissolves virtually the entire fuel meat which complicates the uranium extraction process. In addition, a solvent washing process is used to remove TBP degradation products, which adds complexity to the recycling plant and increases the overall plant footprint and cost. A liquid or supercritical carbon dioxide (l/sc -CO2) system was designed to mitigate these problems. Indeed, TBP nitric acid complexes are highly soluble in l/sc -CO2 and are capable of extracting uranium directly from UO2, UO3 and U3O8 powders. This eliminates the need for total acid dissolution of the irradiated fuel. Furthermore, since CO2 is easily recycled by evaporation at room temperature and pressure, it eliminates the complex solvent washing process. In this report, we demonstrate: (1) A reprocessing scheme starting with the selective extraction of uranium from solid uranium oxides into a TBP-HNO3 loaded Sc-CO2 phase, (2) Back extraction of uranium into an aqueous phase, and (3) Conversion of recovered purified uranium into uranium oxide. The purified uranium product from step 3 can be disposed of as low level waste, or mixed with enriched uranium for use in a reactor for another fuel cycle. After an introduction on the concept and properties of supercritical fluids, we first report the characterization of the different oxides used for this project. Our extraction system and our online monitoring capability using UV-Vis absorbance spectroscopy directly in sc-CO2 is then presented. Next, the uranium extraction efficiencies and kinetics is demonstrated for different oxides and under different physical and chemical conditions: l/sc -CO2 pressure and temperature, TBP/HNO3 complex used

  18. Assessing the environmental availability of uranium in soils and sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soils and sediments contaminated with uranium pose certain environmental and ecological risks. At low to moderate levels of contamination, the magnitude of these risks depends not only on the absolute concentrations of uranium in the material but also on the availability of the uranium to drinking water supplies, plants, or higher organisms. Rational approaches for regulating the clean-up of sites contaminated with uranium, therefore, should consider the value of assessing the environmental availability of uranium at the site before making decisions regarding remediation. The purpose of this work is to review existing approaches and procedures to determine their potential applicability for assessing the environmental availability of uranium in bulk soils or sediments. In addition to making the recommendations regarding methodology, the authors have tabulated data from the literature on the aqueous complexes of uranium and major uranium minerals, examined the possibility of predicting environmental availability of uranium based on thermodynamic solubility data, and compiled a representative list of analytical laboratories capable of performing environmental analyses of uranium in soils and sediments

  19. Assessing the environmental availability of uranium in soils and sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amonette, J.E.; Holdren, G.R. Jr.; Krupa, K.M.; Lindenmeier, C.W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-06-01

    Soils and sediments contaminated with uranium pose certain environmental and ecological risks. At low to moderate levels of contamination, the magnitude of these risks depends not only on the absolute concentrations of uranium in the material but also on the availability of the uranium to drinking water supplies, plants, or higher organisms. Rational approaches for regulating the clean-up of sites contaminated with uranium, therefore, should consider the value of assessing the environmental availability of uranium at the site before making decisions regarding remediation. The purpose of this work is to review existing approaches and procedures to determine their potential applicability for assessing the environmental availability of uranium in bulk soils or sediments. In addition to making the recommendations regarding methodology, the authors have tabulated data from the literature on the aqueous complexes of uranium and major uranium minerals, examined the possibility of predicting environmental availability of uranium based on thermodynamic solubility data, and compiled a representative list of analytical laboratories capable of performing environmental analyses of uranium in soils and sediments.

  20. Uranium hexafluoride public risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, D.R.; Hui, T.E.; Yurconic, M.; Johnson, J.R.

    1994-08-01

    The limiting value for uranium toxicity in a human being should be based on the concentration of uranium (U) in the kidneys. The threshold for nephrotoxicity appears to lie very near 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney tissue. There does not appear to be strong scientific support for any other improved estimate, either higher or lower than this, of the threshold for uranium nephrotoxicity in a human being. The value 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney is the concentration that results from a single intake of about 30 mg soluble uranium by inhalation (assuming the metabolism of a standard person). The concentration of uranium continues to increase in the kidneys after long-term, continuous (or chronic) exposure. After chronic intakes of soluble uranium by workers at the rate of 10 mg U per week, the concentration of uranium in the kidneys approaches and may even exceed the nephrotoxic limit of 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney tissue. Precise values of the kidney concentration depend on the biokinetic model and model parameters assumed for such a calculation. Since it is possible for the concentration of uranium in the kidneys to exceed 3 {mu}g per gram tissue at an intake rate of 10 mg U per week over long periods of time, we believe that the kidneys are protected from injury when intakes of soluble uranium at the rate of 10 mg U per week do not continue for more than two consecutive weeks. For long-term, continuous occupational exposure to low-level, soluble uranium, we recommend a reduced weekly intake limit of 5 mg uranium to prevent nephrotoxicity in workers. Our analysis shows that the nephrotoxic limit of 3 {mu}g U per gram kidney tissues is not exceeded after long-term, continuous uranium intake at the intake rate of 5 mg soluble uranium per week.

  1. Speciation of uranium with respect to hydrogeological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Until 1991, eastern Germany has been third largest uranium producer in the world. After the cease of uranium production, larger areas remained contaminated by uranium mining debris, mill-tailings and mining areas. Since 1991 these areas are in the process of remediation by intervention. In Germany, legal stipulations require the prognosis of the likely mid-term impact of an intervention. The benefit of a planned remediation procedure must be evident against the Zero option (doing nothing) and alternative actions. Thermodynamic data of geochemically relevant reactions for uranium under conditions of natural aqueous solution serve as important input data into geochemical reactive transport codes. Especially hydrolysis and carbonato complexation of hexavalent uranium influence the geochemical behaviour of uranium. The first part of the report report summarizes the fundamental chemical facts on mineralogy, electronic structure, UV-Vis and emission spectroscopy of hexavalent uranium. A second part reports in depth the experimental and numerical procedures to study the hydrolytic and carbonate complexation behaviour of hexavalent uranium. The evaluation of single component spectra of the relevant uranium species is discussed. Spectral curves are quantitatively deconcoluted into single components. In all cases the associated uncertainties are given. Thermodynamic data on hydrolysis and carbonato species derived from these experiments are compared to existing data in the literature. (orig.)

  2. Progress in study on microbe-metallogenesis of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of experimental studies for microbial uranium accumulation by anaerobic and aerobic bacteria, as well as mechanisms and developing tendency of microbial uranium accumulation are discussed in the present paper. Up to now, the study on microbe-metallogenesis of uranium has been at an experimental stage in laboratory. Mechanisms of microbial uranium accumulation are divided into two types: those that are metabolism-dependent and those that are metabolism-independent. Metabolism-dependent uranium accumulation consists of extracellular precipitation with metabolically produced ligands, complexation arising from excreted metabolites, or precipitation due to enzyme-mediated changes in reduction state. Metabolism-dependent accumulation can also involve active pumping of metals, leading to intracellular accumulation. Metabolism-independent accumulation involves a physio-chemical interaction between cationic uranium species and negatively charged sites in microorganisms, and can occur whether cells are living or non-living (even in cell wall fragments)

  3. Reductive dissolution approaches to removal of uranium from contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traditional approaches to uranium recovery from ores have employed oxidation of U(IV) minerals to form the uranyl cation which is subsequently complexed by carbonate or maintained in solution by strong acids. Reductive approaches for uranium decontamination have been limited to removing soluble uranium from solutions by formation of U4+ which readily hydrolyses and precipitates. As part of the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration, we have developed a reductive approach to solubilization of uranium from contaminated soils which employs reduction to destabilize U(VI) solid and sorbed species, and strong chelators for U(IV) to prevent hydrolysis and solubilize the reduced from. This strategy has particular application to sites where the uranium is present primarily as intractable U(VI) phases and where high fractions of the contamination must be removed to meet regulatory requirements

  4. Adsorption and thermodynamic behavior of uranium on natural zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adsorptive behavior of natural clinoptilolite-rich zeolite from Balikesir deposites in Turkey was assessed for the removal of uranium from aqueous solutions. The uranium uptake and cation exchange capacities of zeolite were determined. The effect of initial uranium concentrations in solution was studied in detail at the optimum conditions determined before (pH 2.0, contact time: 60 minutes, temperature: 20 deg C). The uptake equilibrium is best described by Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Some thermodynamic parameters (ΔH deg, ΔS deg, ΔG deg) of the adsorption system were also determined. Application to fixation of uranium to zeolite was performed. The uptake of uranium complex on zeolite followed Langmuir adsorption isotherm for the initial concentration (25 to 100 μg/ml). Thermodynamic values of ΔG deg, ΔS deg and ΔH deg found show the spontaneous and exothermic nature of the process of uranium ions uptake by natural zeolite. (author)

  5. A spectroscopic study of the effect of ligand complexation on the reduction of uranium(VI) by anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AH2DS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the reduction rate of uranyl complexes with hydroxide, carbonate, EDTA, and desferriferrioxamine B (DFB) by anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AH2DS) is studied by stopped-flow kinetic technique under anoxic atmosphere. The apparent reaction rates varied with ligand type, solution pH, and U(VI) concentration. For each ligand, a single largest pseudo-1st order reaction rate constant, kobs, within the studied pH range was observed, suggesting the influence of pH-dependent speciation on the U(VI) reduction rate. The maximum reaction rate found in each case followed the order of OH- > CO32- > EDTA > DFB, in reverse order of the trend of the thermodynamic stability of the uranyl complexes and ionic sizes of the ligands. The pH-dependent rates were modeled using a second-order rate expression that was assumed to be dependent on a single U(VI) complex and an AH2DS species. By quantitatively comparing the calculated and measured apparent rate constants as a function of pH, species AHDS3- was suggested as the primary reductant in all cases examined. Species UO2CO3(aq), UO2HEDTA-, and (UO2)2(OH)22+ were suggested as the principal electron acceptors among the U(VI) species mixture in each of the carbonate, EDTA, and hydroxyl systems, respectively. (orig.)

  6. Subsidies to the decommissioning of the first uranium mining and processing plant in Brazil - the case of the mineral industrial complex in Pocos de Caldas, Minas Gerais State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The closure of an uranium mining and milling facility has the potential to cause risks (radiological and non-radiological) to the human health and to the environment as a whole; these risks may be incurred in the short as well in the long terms. The present work took the mining and milling facility of Pocos de Caldas, Minas Gerais - as a study case. The following aspects were covered by the work: analysis of the impacts associated to the facility operation; assessment of the geological processes involved in the mobilization of radioactive and non-radioactive pollutants from the main sources of these pollutants in the environment - the waste rock piles and the tailings dam; quantification of the resulting impacts associated to the emission of pollutants into the environment in future scenarios and establishment of remedial actions taking into account the risk reduction and the association costs. The main aspects arising from the study were: the wastes in the tailings dam are stratified in relation to metal and radionuclide concentrations, with the exception of 210 Pb and 226 Ra. The stratification is caused by the oxidation of the residual pyrite in the tailings, and is also related to metal and radionuclide concentrations in seepage water being higher in the upper zone and lower in the deeper zones. Sulfate anion was the only pollutant present in the seepage water to be detected in the groundwater below the tailings dam. Mathematical simulations taking into account the rest of the potential pollutants indicated the probability of groundwater contamination after 800 years. Direct liquid effluent releases into superficial waters are associated with a dose of about 8.0 mSv/y (conservative scenario) and less than 0.62 mSv/y (non-conservative scenario). If houses are built over the tailings, doses as high as 40 mSv/y and 8.0 mSv/y are to expected due to the Rn exhalation and external gamma respectively. Finally, covering the tailings dam with a clay layer 1.0 m thick

  7. Microbial interactions with uranium: implications for uranium bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accidental release of uranium into the environment has the potential of inducing chemical and radiological toxicity. In situ bioremediation of uranium by microbial processes has been shown to be effective for immobilizing uranium in contaminated sites. Such microbial processes are important components of biogeochemical cycles and regulate the mobility and fate of uranium in the environment. This talk focuses on the spectrum of mechanisms displayed by various microorganisms in order to alleviate uranium toxicity which forms the basis of uranium bioremediation. (author)

  8. Uranium enrichment. Principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium enrichment industry is a more than 60 years old history and has developed without practically no cost, efficiency or profit constraints. However, remarkable improvements have been accomplished since the Second World War and have led to the development of various competing processes which reflect the diversity of uranium compositions and of uranium needs. Content: 1 - general considerations: uranium isotopes, problem of uranium enrichment, first realizations (USA, Russia, Europe, Asia, other countries), present day situation, future needs and market evolution; 2 - principles of isotopic separation: processes classification (high or low enrichment), low elementary enrichment processes, equilibrium time, cascade star-up and monitoring, multi-isotopes case, uranium reprocessing; 3 - enrichment and proliferation. (J.S.)

  9. Uranium Newsletter. No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new Uranium Newsletter is presented as an IAEA annual newsletter. The organization of the IAEA and its involvement with uranium since its founding in 1957 is described. The ''Red Book'' (Uranium Resources, Production and Demand) is mentioned. The Technical Assistance Programme of the IAEA in this field is also briefly mentioned. The contents also include information on the following meetings: The Technical Committee Meeting on Uranium Deposits in Magmatic and Metamorphic Rocks, Advisory Group Meeting on the Use of Airborne Radiometric Data, and the Technical Committee Meeting on Metallogenesis. Recent publications are listed. Current research contracts in uranium exploration are mentioned. IAEA publications on uranium (in press) are listed also. Country reports from the following countries are included: Australia, Brazil, Canada, China (People's Republic of), Denmark, Finland, Germany (Federal Republic of), Malaysia, Philippines, Portugal, South Africa (Republic of), Spain, Syrian Arab Republic, United Kingdom, United States of America, Zambia, and Greece. There is also a report from the Commission of European Communities

  10. Uses of depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The depleted uranium is that in which percentage of uranium-235 fission executable is less than 0.2% or 0.3%. It is usually caused by the process of reprocessing the nuclear fuel burning, and also mixed with some other radioactive elements such as uranium 236, 238 and plutonium 239. The good features of the depleted uranium are its high density, low price and easily mined. So, the specifications for depleted uranium make it one of the best materials in case you need to have objects small in size, but quite heavy regarding its size. Uses of deplet ed uranium were relatively increased in domestic industrial uses as well as some uses in nuclear industry in the last few years. So it has increased uses in many areas of military and peaceful means such as: in balancing the giant air crafts, ships and missiles and in the manufacture of some types of concrete with severe hardness. (author)

  11. Uranium purchases report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data reported by domestic nuclear utility companies in their responses to the 1991 and 1992 ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey,'' Form EIA-858, Schedule B ''Uranium Marketing Activities,are provided in response to the requirements in the Energy Policy Act 1992. Data on utility uranium purchases and imports are shown on Table 1. Utility enrichment feed deliveries and secondary market acquisitions of uranium equivalent of US DOE separative work units are shown on Table 2. Appendix A contains a listing of firms that sold uranium to US utilities during 1992 under new domestic purchase contracts. Appendix B contains a similar listing of firms that sold uranium to US utilities during 1992 under new import purchase contracts. Appendix C contains an explanation of Form EIA-858 survey methodologies with emphasis on the processing of Schedule B data

  12. Geochemical exploration for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Technical Report is designed mainly to introduce the methods and techniques of uranium geochemical exploration to exploration geologists who may not have had experience with geochemical exploration methods in their uranium programmes. The methods presented have been widely used in the uranium exploration industry for more than two decades. The intention has not been to produce an exhaustive, detailed manual, although detailed instructions are given for a field and laboratory data recording scheme and a satisfactory analytical method for the geochemical determination of uranium. Rather, the intention has been to introduce the concepts and methods of uranium exploration geochemistry in sufficient detail to guide the user in their effective use. Readers are advised to consult general references on geochemical exploration to increase their understanding of geochemical techniques for uranium

  13. Precise determination of uranium by extraction spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the conventional method of potentiometric titration, the concentration of potassium dichromate solution was optimized with selection of different concentrations of the solution. The electrode responded slowly during the titration procedure, thus affected the precision and accuracy of the results. An extraction spectrophotometric method for accurate and precise determination of uranium was presented. The method was based on the extraction of Cr (VI)-diphenylcarbazide purple complex using iso-amyl alcohol as the extractant. The purple complex was directly measured at 546 nm so that the uranium-chromate equivalence point can be determined. A method for precise determining uranium by extraction spectrophotometry was developed. The China national reference material of U3O8 (GBW04205) was determined according to the optimized experimental conditions. The relative standard deviation is 0.025% and accuracy of the method is verified by the value of China national reference material of U3O8. (authors)

  14. Determination of uranium in the molybdenum concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minerals are dissolved by acid solution and ammonia is added to the solution,then molybdenum will form(NH4)2MoO4,copper will form complex ion: [Cu(NH4)4]2+ remains in solution. Molybdenum and copper are removed by filtering. The residue is dissolved by 2% hydrochloric acid, lead and residues will leave in the filter paper, iron and other metals and uranium exist in the filtrate in the form of ion. Adding EDTA to the filtrate and adjust the acidity with ammonia to pH=7±0.5, the uranium will precipitate in the form of (NH4)2U2O7, iron will form Fe(OH)Y complex ion. By filtering and separating, uranium will be obtained. Recovery of the method is 98.8%-101.4%. (authors)

  15. Adsorption of uranium from carbonate media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adsorption of uranium onto Wyoming bentonite was measured in carbonate media over the range pH 8-11. Uranium was removed from solution onto the solids by a rapid reaction, proposed to be adsorption of the anionic uranyl tricarbonato complex onto edges of the clay platelets, and a slow reaction which may be precipitation of a hydroxide. The changes in uranium content of the aqueous and solid phases of a uranium ore carbonate leach slurry were also measured as the slurry was progressively diluted. There was an increase in the uranium content of the solids as the pH of the suspension was lowered, as was observed with the Wyoming bentonite. The results indicate the conditions that should be met with respect to pH control in order to prevent the problem of excessive uranium adsorption in the counter-current decantation washing circuit of a conventional leaching process, as well as in the leaching and restoration phases of carbonate solution mining

  16. Uranium in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1974 the Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources (EMR) established a Uranium Resource Appraisal Group (URAG) within EMR to audit annually Canada's uranium resources for the purpose of implementing the federal government's uranium export policy. A major objective of this policy was to ensure that Canadian uranium supplies would be sufficient to meet the needs of Canada's nuclear power program. As projections of installed nuclear power growth in Canada over the long term have been successively revised downwards (the concern about domestic security of supply is less relevant now than it was 10 years ago) and as Canadian uranium supply capabilities have expanded significantly. Canada has maintained its status as the western world's leading exporter of uranium and has become the world's leading producer. Domestic uranium resource estimates have increased to 551 000 tonnes U recoverable from mineable ore since URAG completed its last formal assessment (1982). In 1984, Canada's five primary uranium producers employed some 5800 people at their mining and milling operations, and produced concentrates containing some 11 170 tU. It is evident from URAG's 1984 assessment that Canada's known uranium resources, recoverable at uranium prices of $150/kg U or less, are more than sufficient to meet the 30-year fuelling requirements of those reactors that are either in opertaion now or committed or expected to be in-service by 1995. A substantial portion of Canada's identified uranium resources, recoverable within the same price range, is thus surplus to Canadian needs and available for export. Sales worth close to $1 billion annually are assured. Uranium exploration expenditures in Canada in 1983 and 1984 were an estimated $41 million and $35 million, respectively, down markedly from the $128 million reported for 1980. Exploration drilling and surface development drilling in 1983 and 1984 were reported to be 153 000 m and 197 000 m, respectively, some 85% of which was in

  17. Uranium industry annual, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents data on US uranium raw materials and marketing activities of the domestic uranium industry. It contains aggregated data reported by US companies on the ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' (1988), Form EIA-858, and historical data from prior data collections and other pertinent sources. The report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), the independent agency for data collection and analysis with the US Department of Energy

  18. Biogeochemistry of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possible receipt of uranium from poor ores with application of biotechnology and use of microorganisms is presented. A particular attention is paid to mechanisms of bacterium leaching of uranium and to factors that influence the efficiency of this process and also, to tolerance of microorganisms to toxic metals. Processes of uranium biosorption from a sea water by algae, mushrooms and bacteria are also described. 36 refs. (author)

  19. Simulating distinguish enriched uranium from depleted uranium by activation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detecting uranium material is an important work in arms control Active detection is an efficient method for uranium material. The paper focuses on the feasibility that can distinguish the enriched uranium and the depleted uranium by MCNP program. It can distinguish the enriched uranium and the depleted uranium by the curve of relationship between fission rate of uranium material and thickness of moderator.Advantages of 252Cf and 14 MeV neutron sources are discussed in detecting uranium material through calculation. The results show that 252Cf neutron source is better than 14 MeV one. Delayed neutrons are more easily detected than delayed gamma ray at measurement aspect. (authors)

  20. CHEMICAL TOXICITY OF URANIUM

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Uranium, occurs naturally in the earth’s crust, is an alpha emitter radioactive element from the actinide group. For this reason, U-235 and U-238, are uranium isotopes with long half lives, have got radiological toxicity. But, for natural-isotopic-composition uranium (NatU), there is greater risk from chemical toxicity than radiological toxicity. When uranium is get into the body with anyway, also its chemical toxicity must be thought. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(3.000): 215-220

  1. Uranium and drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium is provoking public anxiety based on the radioactivity of several isotopes and the connection to nuclear technology. Drinking water contains at the most geogenic uranium in low concentrations that might be interesting in the frame of chemical of toxicology, but not due to radiological impact. The contribution gives an overview on the uranium content in drinking water and health effects for the human population based on animal tests. These experiments indicate a daily tolerable intake of 0.2 microgram per kg body mass. The actual limiting value for uranium in drinking water is 0.3 microgram per kg body mass water (drinking water regulation from 2001).

  2. CHEMICAL TOXICITY OF URANIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sermin Cam

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Uranium, occurs naturally in the earth’s crust, is an alpha emitter radioactive element from the actinide group. For this reason, U-235 and U-238, are uranium isotopes with long half lives, have got radiological toxicity. But, for natural-isotopic-composition uranium (NatU, there is greater risk from chemical toxicity than radiological toxicity. When uranium is get into the body with anyway, also its chemical toxicity must be thought. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(3.000: 215-220

  3. International trade in uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two reports are presented; one has been prepared by the Uranium Institute and is submitted by the United Kingdom delegation, the other by the United States delegation. The report of the Uranium Institute deals with the influence of the government on international trade in uranium. This influence becomes apparent predominantly by export and import restrictions, as well as by price controls. The contribution submitted by the United States is a uranium market trend analysis, with pricing methods and contracting modes as well as the effect of government policies being investigated in the light of recent developments

  4. Uranium production from phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to estimates of the world's uranium consumption, exploitation of most rich sources is expected by the 1980's. Forecasts show that the rate of uranium consumption will increase towards the end of the century. It is therefore desirable to exploit poor sources not yet in use. In the near future, the most reasonable source for developing uranium is phosphate rock. Uranium reserves in phosphates are estimated at a few million tons. Production of uranium from phosphates is as a by-product of phosphate rock processing and phosphoric acid production; it will then be possible to save the costs incurred in crushing and dissolving the rock when calculating uranium production costs. Estimates show that the U.S. wastes about 3,000 tons of uranium per annum in phosphoric acid based fertilisers. Studies have also been carried out in France, Yugoslavia and India. In Israel, during the 1950's, a small plant was operated in Haifa by 'Chemical and Phosphates'. Uranium processes have also been developed by linking with the extraction processes at Arad. Currently there is almost no activity on this subject because there are no large phosphoric acid plants which would enable production to take place on a reasonable scale. Discussions are taking place about the installation of a plant for phosphoric acid production utilising the 'wet process', producing 200 to 250,000 tons P2O5 per annum. It is necessary to combine these facilities with uranium production plant. (author)

  5. Heating uranium alloy billets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data were obtained for the surface heat transfer coefficient of uranium and the alloys of uranium-0.75 wt percent titanium, uranium-6 wt percent niobium, and uranium-7.5 wt percent niobium-2.5 wt percent zirconium. Samples were heated to 8500C in both a molten salt bath and an argon-purged air furnace, then the samples were cooled in air. Surface heat transfer coefficients were calculated from the experimental data for both heating and cooling of the metals. 4 fig, 4 tables

  6. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements of uranium and thorium powders and uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used to analyze depleted uranium and thorium oxide powders and uranium ore as a potential rapid in situ analysis technique in nuclear production facilities, environmental sampling, and in-field forensic applications. Material such as pressed pellets and metals, has been extensively studied using LIBS due to the high density of the material and more stable laser-induced plasma formation. Powders, on the other hand, are difficult to analyze using LIBS since ejection and removal of the powder occur in the laser interaction region. The capability of analyzing powders is important in allowing for rapid analysis of suspicious materials, environmental samples, or trace contamination on surfaces since it most closely represents field samples (soil, small particles, debris etc.). The rapid, in situ analysis of samples, including nuclear materials, also reduces costs in sample collection, transportation, sample preparation, and analysis time. Here we demonstrate the detection of actinides in oxide powders and within a uranium ore sample as both pressed pellets and powders on carbon adhesive discs for spectral comparison. The acquired LIBS spectra for both forms of the samples differ in overall intensity but yield a similar distribution of atomic emission spectral lines. - Highlights: • LIBS analysis of mixed actinide samples: depleted uranium oxide and thorium oxide • LIBS analysis of actinide samples in powder form on carbon adhesive discs • Detection of uranium in a complex matrix (uranium ore) as a precursor to analyzing uranium in environmental samples

  7. Sorption of uranium(VI) onto schwertmannite - EXAFS investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In acid mine drainage conditions uranium(VI) adsorbs on goethite and schwertmannite, forming surface complexes with the ferric iron polyhedra and sulfate, respectively. The structure of these surface species was identified by EXAFS. (orig.)

  8. Uranium industry annual 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium production in the United States has declined dramatically from a peak of 43.7 million pounds U3O8 (16.8 thousand metric tons uranium (U)) in 1980 to 3.1 million pounds U3O8 (1.2 thousand metric tons U) in 1993. This decline is attributed to the world uranium market experiencing oversupply and intense competition. Large inventories of uranium accumulated when optimistic forecasts for growth in nuclear power generation were not realized. The other factor which is affecting U.S. uranium production is that some other countries, notably Australia and Canada, possess higher quality uranium reserves that can be mined at lower costs than those of the United States. Realizing its competitive advantage, Canada was the world's largest producer in 1993 with an output of 23.9 million pounds U3O8 (9.2 thousand metric tons U). The U.S. uranium industry, responding to over a decade of declining market prices, has downsized and adopted less costly and more efficient production methods. The main result has been a suspension of production from conventional mines and mills. Since mid-1992, only nonconventional production facilities, chiefly in situ leach (ISL) mining and byproduct recovery, have operated in the United States. In contrast, nonconventional sources provided only 13 percent of the uranium produced in 1980. ISL mining has developed into the most cost efficient and environmentally acceptable method for producing uranium in the United States. The process, also known as solution mining, differs from conventional mining in that solutions are used to recover uranium from the ground without excavating the ore and generating associated solid waste. This article describes the current ISL Yang technology and its regulatory approval process, and provides an analysis of the factors favoring ISL mining over conventional methods in a declining uranium market

  9. Uranium industry annual 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    Uranium production in the United States has declined dramatically from a peak of 43.7 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (16.8 thousand metric tons uranium (U)) in 1980 to 3.1 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (1.2 thousand metric tons U) in 1993. This decline is attributed to the world uranium market experiencing oversupply and intense competition. Large inventories of uranium accumulated when optimistic forecasts for growth in nuclear power generation were not realized. The other factor which is affecting U.S. uranium production is that some other countries, notably Australia and Canada, possess higher quality uranium reserves that can be mined at lower costs than those of the United States. Realizing its competitive advantage, Canada was the world`s largest producer in 1993 with an output of 23.9 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (9.2 thousand metric tons U). The U.S. uranium industry, responding to over a decade of declining market prices, has downsized and adopted less costly and more efficient production methods. The main result has been a suspension of production from conventional mines and mills. Since mid-1992, only nonconventional production facilities, chiefly in situ leach (ISL) mining and byproduct recovery, have operated in the United States. In contrast, nonconventional sources provided only 13 percent of the uranium produced in 1980. ISL mining has developed into the most cost efficient and environmentally acceptable method for producing uranium in the United States. The process, also known as solution mining, differs from conventional mining in that solutions are used to recover uranium from the ground without excavating the ore and generating associated solid waste. This article describes the current ISL Yang technology and its regulatory approval process, and provides an analysis of the factors favoring ISL mining over conventional methods in a declining uranium market.

  10. Uranium-mediated activation of small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Polly L

    2011-08-28

    Molecular complexes of uranium are capable of activating a range of industrially and economically important small molecules such as CO, CO(2), and N(2); new and often unexpected reactions provide insight into an element that needs to be well-understood if future clean-energy solutions are to involve nuclear power. PMID:21614341

  11. Translocation of uranium from water to foodstuff while cooking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Rice can efficiently uptake uranium from water contaminated with uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UO2(NO3) 2.6 H2O), while cooking. • Unusual uranium uptake to the extent of about 1000 ppm is observed when rice is cooked in highly concentrated uranium contaminated water (1240 ppm). • Nature of interaction of uranium with carbohydrates is probed using small monosaccharides like glucose and mannose. • Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry showed UO22+ to be the most stable species in water in such solutions which can form complexes with sugars. • The species (UO22+) is also observed in the case of water exposed to the common mineral, uranium oxide (UO2) and similar type of complexation is observed with sugars. - Abstract: The present work report the unusual uranium uptake by foodstuff, especially those rich in carbohydrates like rice when they are cooked in water, contaminated with uranium. The major staple diet in South Asia, rice, was chosen to study its interaction with UO22+, the active uranium species in water, using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Highest uptake limit was checked by cooking rice at very high uranium concentration and it was found to be good scavenger of uranium. To gain insight into the mechanism of uptake, direct interaction of UO22+ with monosaccharides was also studied, using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry taking mannose as a model. The studies have been done with dissolved uranium salt, uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UO2(NO3)2·6H2O), as well as the leachate of a stable oxide of uranium, UO2(s), both of which exist as UO22+ in water. Among the eight different rice varieties investigated, Karnataka Ponni showed the maximum uranium uptake whereas unpolished Basmati rice showed the minimum. Interaction with other foodstuffs (potato, carrot, peas, kidney beans and lentils) with and without NaCl affected the extent of chemical interaction but was not consistent with the carbohydrate content. Uranium

  12. Extractive spectrophotometric determination of uranium with malachite green

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sensitive spectrophotometric method based on the extraction of a uranium-benzoate-Malachite Green complex by chlorobenzene is described. The absorption maximum is at 635 nm and the molar absorptivity is 8.3 x 1041. mole -1 cm-1. A preliminary separation of uranium by extraction with methyl isobutyl ketone from acid-deficient aluminium nitrate solution is used to avoid interferences. An aliquot of the extract in then diluted with chlorobenzene and shaken with benzoate buffer containing Malachite Green (MG). The method has been applied for the determination of uranium in a synthetic leach solution. The complex extracted is probably [U02(C6H5C003-][MG+]. (author)

  13. Uranium from phosphate ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphate rock, the major raw material for phosphate fertilizers, contains uranium that can be recovered when the rock is processed. This makes it possible to produce uranium in a country that has no uranium ore deposits. The author briefly describes the way that phosphate fertilizers are made, how uranium is recovered in the phosphate industry, and how to detect uranium recovery operations in a phosphate plant. Uranium recovery from the wet-process phosphoric acid involves three unit operations: (1) pretreatment to prepare the acid; (2) solvent extraction to concentrate the uranium; (3) post treatment to insure that the acid returning to the acid plant will not be harmful downstream. There are 3 extractants that are capable of extracting uranium from phosphoric acid. The pyro or OPPA process uses a pyrophosphoric acid that is prepared on site by reacting an organic alcohol (usually capryl alcohol) with phosphorous pentoxide. The DEPA-TOPO process uses a mixture of di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (DEPA) and trioctyl phosphine oxide (TOPO). The components can be bought separately or as a mixture. The OPAP process uses octylphenyl acid phosphate, a commercially available mixture of mono- and dioctylphenyl phosphoric acids. All three extractants are dissolved in kerosene-type diluents for process use

  14. Uranium and Thorium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Warren I.

    1978-01-01

    The results of President Carter's policy on non-proliferation of nuclear weapons are expected to slow the growth rate in energy consumption, put the development of the breeder reactor in question, halt plans to reprocess and recycle uranium and plutonium, and expand facilities to supply enriched uranium. (Author/MA)

  15. Depleted uranium in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan, depleted uranium ammunition is regarded as nuclear weapons and meets with fierce opposition. The fact that US Marines mistakenly fired bullets containing depleted uranium on an island off Okinawa during training exercises in December 1995 and January 1996, also contributes. The overall situation in this area in Japan is outlined. (P.A.)

  16. Uranium Measurements and Attributes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It may be necessary to find the means to determine unclassified attributes of uranium in nuclear weapons or their components for future transparency initiatives. We briefly describe the desired characteristics of attribute measurement systems for transparency. The determination of uranium attributes; in particular, by passive gamma-ray detection is a formidable challenge

  17. Australia and uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief justification of the Australian Government's decision to mine and export Australian Uranium is presented along with a description of the Alligator River Region in the Northern Territory where the major mines are to be located. Aboriginal interests and welfare in the region, the proposed Kakadu National Park and the economic benefits resulting from uranium development are also briefly covered. (J.R.)

  18. Rheinbraun's Australian uranium business

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The leaflet argues against the mining activities of the Rheinische Braunkohlenwerke AG in Germany and especially against uranium mining in Australia. The ethno-ecological impact on flora and fauna, aborigines and miners are pointed out. Uranium mining and lignite mining are compared. (HSCH)

  19. World uranium production outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An outlook on the uranium trade (concentrate and hexafluoride) between the Western world and the the former Comecon countries. The flow from East to West is increased. Up to 1998 existing lower-cost reserves appear to supply enough uranium. Later, the supply gap will require greater output from development of known reserves at costs higher than $30/lb. 4 figs., 1 ref

  20. Uranium: biokinetics and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report was achieved as a part of a collaboration with the Fuel Cycle Direction. Its aim was to give the state of the art about: the behaviour of uranium in the human organism (biokinetics) after ingestion, its toxicity (mainly renal) and the current regulation about its incorporation. Both in the upstream and in the downstream of the fuel cycle, uranium remains, quantitatively, the first element in the cycle which is, at the present time, temporarily disposed or recycled. Such a considerable quantity of uranium sets the problem of its risk on the health. In the long term, the biosphere may be affected and consequently the public may ingest water or food contaminated with uranium. In this way, radiological and chemical toxicity risk may be activated. This report emphasizes: the necessity of confirming some experimental and epidemiological biokinetic data used or not in the ICRP models. Unsolved questions remain about the gastrointestinal absorption according to chemical form (valency state, mixtures...), mass and individual variations (age, disease) further a chronic ingestion of uranium. It is well established that uranium is mainly deposited in the skeleton and the kidney. But the skeleton kinetics following a chronic ingestion and especially in some diseases has to be more elucidated; the necessity of taking into account uranium at first as a chemical toxic, essentially in the kidney and determining the threshold of functional lesion. In this way, it is important to look for some specific markers; the problem of not considering chemical toxicity of uranium in the texts regulating its incorporation

  1. The South Greenland uranium exploration programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the final report of the reconnaissance phase of the SYDURAN Project which was initiated in 1st. December 1978 to outline areas of increased uranium potential where more detailed prospection would be warranted. Districts and smaller zones in South Greenland which have the potential for containing economically exploitable uranium occurrences were defined using airborne gamma-spectroscopic, reconnaissance geochemical and geological methods. Other districts and areas have been shown to have no uranium potential and can be eliminated. The three promising districts are: 1. a 2000 square kilometre sub-circular district surrounding Ilimaussaq complex in which there are small high grade pitchblende occurences in faults and fractures in the surrounding granite. 2. the eastern area of the Motzfeldt Centre where large parts of the centre is mineralised and may give rise to exploitable, large tonnage, low grade uranium ore with associated niobium and rare earth elements in extractable quantities. 3. uraniferous rich districts or zones associated with the migmatitic supracrustal units in the area between Kap Farvel and Lindenows Fjord. The areas which were eliminated from having any uranium potential include: the Ketilidian supracrustal unit. the Nunarssuit alkaline complex. The uranium mineralisation in South Greenland is confined to two Proterozoic episodes: a) a late phase of granitisation and migmatisation with the formation of disseminated uraninite in the Migmatite Complex in the south of the project area between 1700-1800 m.y. and, b) hydrothermal activity associated with Gardar magmatic events between 1090-1170 m.y. in the central Granite Zone. Future work should be directed towards the definition and location of drilling targets. (EG)

  2. EPR of uranium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the electron paramagnetic resonance data on the uranium ions is given. After a general account of the electronic structure of the uranium free atoms and ions, the influence of the external fields (magnetic field, crystal fields) is discussed. The main information obtained from EPR studies on the uranium ions in crystals are emphasized: identification of the valence and of the ground electronic state, determination of the structure of the centers, crystal field effects, role of the intermediate coupling and of the J-mixing, role of the covalency, determination of the nuclear spin, maqnetic dipole moment and electric quadrupole moment of the odd isotopes of uranium. These data emphasize the fact that the actinide group has its own identity and this is accutely manifested at the beginning of the 5fsup(n) series encompassed by the uranium ions. (authors)

  3. Foreign uranium supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Known foreign uranium resources are concentrated in a few countries. The resources of many countries are largely unassessed, but the known uranium countries appear to have the best potential for future expansion. Availability of supply from known resources will depend on resolution of national policies regarding uranium production, ownership and export, and actions of the mining industry. Foreign uranium demand projections have decreased markedly in the last few years, and currently planned and attainable production should be adequate through the 1980's. Longer term resources and supply outlook are still a major concern to both those planning electric supply systems based on converter reactors and those considering reprocessing and recycle of uranium and plutonium and development of breeder reactors. Work continues to clarify long-term supply in several countries and internationally, but more effort, and time, will be needed to clarify these issues

  4. Management of depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large stocks of depleted uranium have arisen as a result of enrichment operations, especially in the United States and the Russian Federation. Countries with depleted uranium stocks are interested in assessing strategies for the use and management of depleted uranium. The choice of strategy depends on several factors, including government and business policy, alternative uses available, the economic value of the material, regulatory aspects and disposal options, and international market developments in the nuclear fuel cycle. This report presents the results of a depleted uranium study conducted by an expert group organised jointly by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency. It contains information on current inventories of depleted uranium, potential future arisings, long term management alternatives, peaceful use options and country programmes. In addition, it explores ideas for international collaboration and identifies key issues for governments and policy makers to consider. (authors)

  5. Method of recovering uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium is recovered from a carbonate leach solution containing a dissolved uranium salt and a monovalent ion. The pH of the leach solution is adjusted to about 5 to about 7.5, and preferably to about 6 to about 7. Phosphate ion is then added to typical in-situ leach solutions in an amount from about 10 to about 30 mole % in excess of the amount needed to stoichiometrically react with the uranium in said solution. This results in the precipitation of a compound made up of the monovalent ion, uranium, and the phosphate ion, which is insoluble in the solution. The precipitate is then separated from the solution preferably by means of a centrifuge or a vortex clarifier. It can then be dissolved in acid, and the uranium extracted into an organic solvent such as DEHPA-TOPA in kerosene

  6. Uranium deposit research, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research on uranium deposits in Canada, conducted as a prerequisite for assessment of the Estimated Additional Resources of uranium, revealed that (a) the uranium-gold association in rudites of the Huronian Supergroup preferably occurs in the carbon layers; (b) chloritized ore at the Panel mine, Elliot Lake, Ontario, occurs locally in tectonically disturbed areas in the vicinity of diabase dykes; (c) mineralization in the Black Sturgeon Lake area, Ontario, formed from solutions in structural and lithological traps; (d) the Cigar Lake deposit, Saskatchewan, has two phases of mineralization: monomineralic and polymetallic; (e) mineralization of the JEB (Canoxy Ltd.) deposit is similar to that at McClean Lake; (f) the uranium-carbon assemblage was identified in the Claude deposit, Carswell Structure; and (g) the Otish Mountains area, Quebec, should be considered as a significant uranium-polymetallic metallogenic province

  7. Jabiluka uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Jabiluka uranium and gold deposit located in the Northern Territory of Australia is the world's largest known primary uranium deposits and as such has the potential to become one of the most important uranium projects in the world. Despite the financial and structural challenges facing the major owner Pancontinental Mining Limited and the changing political policies in Australia, Jabiluka is well situated for development during the 1990's. With the availability of numerous financial and development alternatives, Jabiluka could, by the turn of the century, take its rightful place among the first rank of world uranium producers. The paper discusses ownership, location, property rights, licensing, environmental concerns, marketing and development, capital costs, royalties, uranium policy considerations, geologic exploration history, regional and site geology, and mining and milling operations

  8. Migration of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium migration is treated as a process leading to mobilization and concentration of uranium in ore deposits. During the formation of global zonation, uranium migration contributed to the enrichment of this radioactive metal in the Earth's crust. The process of upper mantle and crust fractionation and differentiation is the first cycle of the mobilization process which led to uranium enrichment in rocks in some areas of the upper Earth's crust that could be considered as the primordial uranium provinces. Uranium migration is related to the structural history of sial Earth's crust and sial magmatism. During orogeny conditions could be created for development of progressive metamorphism and for magma generation. The latter is the best process for uranium mobilization. The effectiveness of this process depends on the composition of the primordial rocks and the intensity of the process. The importance of the magmatism for uranium mobilization is due to the magmatic differentiation. Selectively mobilized felsitic parts of the rocks migrate and form felsitic magmatic portions, which mobilize uranium. Solutions are the best uranium mobilization agents. Their generation starts with water separation from local permeable reservoirs and finishes with water dissociation from minerals during their dehydration. Such solutions could be endogenous or exogenous, depending on the igneous or sedimentary rocks which have been deformed. Some of the solutions can have mixed origin, if deformed magmatic rocks contain exogenous water in pores and cracks and endogenous water in minerals. The mobilizing ability of the solutions depends on their energy, which could derive from their chemical compositions and from physical conditions of the geological environment. The movement of the mineralized solutions can be due to steam pressure and the pressure difference between the starting and the final point of the juvenile solutions, gravity for meteoric waters, convection in geoconvection cells

  9. Method of converting uranium fluoride to intermediate product for uranium oxide manufacture with recycling or reusing valuable materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium fluoride is acted upon by water with nitrate containing a cation capable of binding fluoride ions. The uranium is extracted, for instance, with tributyl phosphate with the generated organic phase containing the prevalent proportion of uranium and representing the required intermediate product and the aqueous phase from which is isolated the fluorine component which may be used within the fuel cycle. The nitrate component of the aqueous phase is recycled following treatment. It is also possible to act on uranium fluoride directly with an aqueous solution. Here the cations of nitrate form with the fluorides soluble nondissociated complexes and reduce the concentration of free fluoride ions. The nitrate +s mostly used in an amount corresponding to its solubility in the system prior to the introduction of UF6. The uranium from the solution with the reduced concentration of free fluoride ions is extracted into the reaction system under such conditions as to make the prevalent majority of fluorides and an amount of uranium smaller than 5x10-2 mol/l remain in the aqueous phase and that such an amount of fluorides should remain in the organic phase which is smaller than corresponds to the fluorine/uranium molar ratio in the organic phase. Uranium contained in the organic phase is processed into uranium oxide, with advantage into UO2. From the isolated compounds of fluorine and the cation of the nitrate gaseous HF is released which is used either inside or outside of the fuel cycle. (J.P.)

  10. Geochemistry and deposit exploration of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of genetically simplified earth crust profiles and a mining synoptic table the broad outlines of the enrichment processes are shown, from geochemical dilution to workable deposits for the major uranium ore deposits. Characteristics are offered of the physical-chemical data of different genetic environments, the tectonic preconditions for ready mobilisation of uranium in the form of uranyl complexes with U6+ and the preferred fixing of U4+ minerals in reducing facies; these cover both intracrustal deposit formations, surface circulation and metamorphesis. (orig.)

  11. The uranium determination in commercial iodinated salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This method extends a classical determination of uranium and thorium in natural waters to a new series of solid inorganic and / or organic samples. A technique based on chemical separations using cation / anion exchange columns was used. The UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy was employed for the determination of cations. The limit of detection using characteristic band absorptions of colored complexes of Arsenazo III with these cations is in the 0.25 - 0.50 ppb range. These values are usually expected for natural samples. Finally, an improved correlation on absorption spectra of uranium, iron and thorium concentrations has been done. An iodinated sodium salt was taken into account as example. (authors)

  12. Iodide, azide, and cyanide complexes of (N,C), (N,N), and (N,O) metallacycles of tetra- and pentavalent uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In contrast to the neutral macrocycle [UN*2(N,C)] (1) [N* = N(SiMe3)3; N,C = CH2SiMe2N-(SiMe3)] which was quite inert toward I2, the anionic bismetallacycle [NaUN*(N,C)2] (2) was readily transformed into the enlarged monometallacycle [UN*(N,N)I] (4) [N,N = (Me3Si)NSiMe2CH2CH2SiMe2N(SiMe3)] resulting from C-C coupling of the two CH2 groups, and [NaUN*(N,O)2] (3) [N,O = OC(=CH2)SiMe2N(SiMe3)], which is devoid of any U-C bond, was oxidized into the UV bismetallacycle [Na{UN*(N,O)2}2(μ-I)] (5). Sodium amalgam reduction of 4 gave the U(III) compound [UN*(N,N)] (6). Addition of MN3 or MCN to the (N,C), (N,N), and (N,O) metallacycles 1, 4, and 5 led to the formation of the anionic azide or cyanide derivatives M[UN*2(N,C)(N3)] [M = Na, 7a or Na(15-crown-5), 7b], M[UN*2(N,C)(CN)] [M = NEt4, 8a or Na(15-crown-5), 8b or K(18-crown-6), 8c], M[UN*(N,N)(N3)2] [M = Na, 9a or Na(THF)4, 9b], [NEt4][UN*(N,N)(CN)2] (10), M[UN*(N,O)2(N3)] [M = Na, 11a or Na(15-crown-5), 11b], M[UN*(N,O)2(CN)] [M = NEt4, 12a or Na(15-crown-5), 12b]. In the presence of excess iodine in THF, the cyanide 12a was converted back into the iodide 5, while the azide 11a was transformed into the neutral UV complex [U(N{SiMe3}-SiMe2C{CHI}O)2I(THF)] (13). The X-ray crystal structures of 4, 7b, 8a-c, 9b, 10, 12b, and 13 were determined. (authors)

  13. Iodide, azide, and cyanide complexes of (N,C), (N,N), and (N,O) metallacycles of tetra- and pentavalent uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bénaud, Olivier; Berthet, Jean-Claude; Thuéry, Pierre; Ephritikhine, Michel

    2011-12-01

    In contrast to the neutral macrocycle [UN*(2)(N,C)] (1) [N* = N(SiMe(3))(3); N,C = CH(2)SiMe(2)N(SiMe(3))] which was quite inert toward I(2), the anionic bismetallacycle [NaUN*(N,C)(2)] (2) was readily transformed into the enlarged monometallacycle [UN*(N,N)I] (4) [N,N = (Me(3)Si)NSiMe(2)CH(2)CH(2)SiMe(2)N(SiMe(3))] resulting from C-C coupling of the two CH(2) groups, and [NaUN*(N,O)(2)] (3) [N,O = OC(═CH(2))SiMe(2)N(SiMe(3))], which is devoid of any U-C bond, was oxidized into the U(V) bismetallacycle [Na{UN*(N,O)(2)}(2)(μ-I)] (5). Sodium amalgam reduction of 4 gave the U(III) compound [UN*(N,N)] (6). Addition of MN(3) or MCN to the (N,C), (N,N), and (N,O) metallacycles 1, 4, and 5 led to the formation of the anionic azide or cyanide derivatives M[UN*(2)(N,C)(N(3))] [M = Na, 7a or Na(15-crown-5), 7b], M[UN*(2)(N,C)(CN)] [M = NEt(4), 8a or Na(15-crown-5), 8b or K(18-crown-6), 8c], M[UN*(N,N)(N(3))(2)] [M = Na, 9a or Na(THF)(4), 9b], [NEt(4)][UN*(N,N)(CN)(2)] (10), M[UN*(N,O)(2)(N(3))] [M = Na, 11a or Na(15-crown-5), 11b], M[UN*(N,O)(2)(CN)] [M = NEt(4), 12a or Na(15-crown-5), 12b]. In the presence of excess iodine in THF, the cyanide 12a was converted back into the iodide 5, while the azide 11a was transformed into the neutral U(V) complex [U(N{SiMe(3)}SiMe(2)C{CHI}O)(2)I(THF)] (13). The X-ray crystal structures of 4, 7b, 8a-c, 9b, 10, 12b, and 13 were determined. PMID:22050237

  14. Development and demonstration of biosorbents for clean-up of uranium in water. CRADA final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain CSU, a nongenetically engineered bacterial strain known to bind dissolved hexavalent uranium, shows particular promise as the basis of an immobilized-cell process for removal of dissolved uranium from contaminated wastewaters. It was characterized with respect to its sorptive active. Living, heat-killed, permeabilized, and unreconstituted lyophilized cells were all capable of binding uranium. The uranium biosorption equilibrium could be described by the Langmuir isotherm. The rate of uranium adsorption increased following permeabilization of the outer and/or cytoplasmic membrane by organic solvents such as acetone. P. aeruginosa CSU biomass was significantly more sorptive toward uranium than certain novel, patented biosorbents derived from algal or fungal biomass sources. P. aeruginosa CSU biomass was also competitive with commercial cation-exchange resins, particularly in the presence of dissolved transition metals. Uranium binding by P. aeruginosa was clearly pH dependent. Uranium loading capacity increased with increasing pH under acidic conditions, presumably as a function of uranium speciation and due to the H+ competition at some binding sites. Nevertheless, preliminary evidence suggests that this microorganism is also capable of binding anionic hexavalent uranium complexes. Ferric iron was a strong inhibitor of uranium binding to P. aeruginosa CSU biomass, and the presence of uranium also decreased the Fe3+ loading when the biomass was not saturated with Fe3+, suggesting that Fe3+ and uranium may share the same binding sites on biomass

  15. Recovery of uranium by tannin immobilized on matrices which have amino group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannin, which contains polyhydroxy groups, has a high affinity for uranium. Various tannin-protein complexes were prepared to develop new adsorbents for uranium recovery from seawater. Albumin tannate has a high ability to adsorb uranium from seawater. Tannin was immobilized on matrices which have multiple active amino groups, such as aminopolystyrene and poly(vinyl-4,6-diamino-s-triazine)-poly VT. Of these complexes, tannin immobilized on poly VT adsorbed uranium most efficiently from seawater and highly selectively from a solution containing various heavy metals: the uranium adsorption was very rapid and was pH dependent. This adsorbent therefore appears to have potential for use in a commercial process for uranium recovery from seawater or from uranium-containing waste water. (author)

  16. In vitro studies of interactions between uranium and kidney cells; Etudes in vitro des interactions entre l'uranium et les cellules renales (doctorat: toxicologie cellulaire)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirto, H

    1999-07-01

    A best knowledge of uranium compounds toxic effects is essential due to of the risk of occupational internal contamination. The aim of this work is to describe, by the original use of cell culture models for uranium, the mechanisms of interactions between uranium and its renal targets. Two renal models are studied: in the one hand the tubular proximal one (LLC-PK{sub 1} cells) and on the other hand, the glomerular model (isolated glomeruli and primary culture of mesangial cells). The chemical conditions permitting the observation of uranium (VI) cytotoxicity on LLC-PK{sub 1} cells were determined. They show that merely solutions prepared with bicarbonate and citrate ligands concentrations 10 fold higher than the metal are soluble in the culture medium Cytotoxicity experiments reveal that only uranium-bicarbonate complexes induce a dose-related cytotoxicity response. Electron microscopy studies conducted with uranium-bicarbonate solutions show that uranium precipitate in the intracellular compartment. In contrast, no toxicity and no intracellular intake are noticed with uranium-citrate complexes. Theoretical speciation diagrams let us to determine that the UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup 2-} complex is responsible for the uranium toxic effects. These results allow us to propose a new model whereby uranium intake by tubular proximal cells would take place in two stages: firstly by attachment of UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup 2-} complexes to the proteins of cell membrane and secondly by an endocytosis process. The monitoring of the variations of morphometric parameters of glomerular structures permit to put in evidence the uranium-induced vaso-reactivity for sub-lethal concentrations. The protective effect of a calcium channels blocker demonstrate the main role played by calcium ions in the uranium-induced glomerular contraction. These studies show that uranium induces glomerular effects for sub-lethal concentrations. (author)

  17. Pressure oxidation processing for sulphide-bearing carbonate type uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the possibility of pressure oxidation processing for the sulphide-bearing carbonate type complex uranium ore is expounded proceeding from the chemical behaviours of pyrite sulphide and carbonate minerals in leaching process and through analysis of orthogonal array test results. The consumption of leaching reagent was decreased and the extraction rate of uranium was increased after pressure oxidation treatment of the complex uranium ore

  18. Uranium rich granite and uranium productive granite in south China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper briefly introduces the differences between uranium rich granite and uranium productive granite in the 5 provinces of South China, and discusses their main characteristics in 4 aspects, the uranium productive granite is highly developed in fracture, very strong in alteration, often occurred as two-mica granite and regularly developed with intermediate-basic and acid dikes. The above characteristics distinguish the uranium productive granite from the uranium rich granite. (authors)

  19. International training course on uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: As part of its Technical Assistance Programme for developing countries, the IAEA has conducted a series of training courses in prospecting for nuclear raw materials for example, in 1974 a regional course on uranium and thorium prospecting was held in India, and an interregional training course on uranium geochemical prospecting methods was held in Austria in 1975. In September 1977, another interregional training course on uranium geochemical prospecting methods was held at Skofja Loka, Slovenia, Yugoslavia. Twenty-four delegates from Afghanistan, Algeria, Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Czechoslovakia, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Portugal, Sri Lanka, Turkey, Venezuela and Yugoslavia participated in the four-week training course. The Federal Republic of Yugoslavia acted as host for the course. The Skofja Loka area was selected because it contains sedimentary rocks with known uranium mineralization, and presented ideal conditions (soil, drainage and topography) for Uranium geochemical surveys. In addition, the participants could benefit from a technical visit to a very interesting type of uranium mineralization near the town of Gorenje Vaz. Several well-known geologists, such as Dr. A. Grimbert (France) and Prof. Ian Nichol (Canada) were present as guest lecturers. In the first week the lectures dealt with the basic concepts of geochemical exploration for uranium, as well as preparing the participants for the field work. In addition to specific topics on geochemistry and uranium behaviour in the natural environment, the lectures also covered other topics of interest, such as world uranium resources and demand, types of uranium deposits and technical advances in exploration equipment. A visit to the Zirovski Vrh uranium mine was made, where the participants saw different techniques for mining ore bodies with complex structure and rapid change in grade concentration. At the end of the mine tour, there was a lengthy discussion of

  20. Microbial Uranium Immobilization Independent of Nitrate Reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At many uranium processing and handling facilities, including sites in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex, high levels of nitrate are present as co-contamination with uranium in groundwater. The daunting prospect of complete nitrate removal prior to the reduction of uranium provides a strong incentive to explore bioremediation strategies that allow for uranium bioreduction and stabilization in the presence of nitrate. Typical in-situ strategies involving the stimulation of metal-reducing bacteria are hindered by low pH environments at this study site and require that the persistent nitrate must first and continuously be removed or transformed prior to uranium being a preferred electron acceptor. This project investigates the possibility of stimulating nitrate-indifferent, pH-tolerant microorganisms to achieve bioreduction of U(VI) despite nitrate persistence. Successful enrichments from U-contaminated sediments demonstrated nearly complete reduction of uranium with very little loss of nitrate from pH 4.9-5.6 using methanol or glycerol as a carbon source. Higher pH enrichments also demonstrated similar U reduction capacity with 5-30% nitrate loss within one week. Bacterial 16S rRNA genes were amplified from uranium-reducing enrichments (pH 5.7-6.7) and sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses classified the clone sequences into four distinct clusters. Data from sequencing and T-RFLP profiles indicated that the majority of the microorganisms stimulated by these enrichment conditions consisted of low G+C Gram-positive bacteria most closely related to Clostridium and Clostridium-like organisms. This research demonstrates that the stimulation of a natural microbial community to immobilize U through bioreduction is possible without the removal of nitrate.

  1. Uranium deposits in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Africa is not only known for its spectacular diamond, gold, copper, chromium, platinum and phosphorus deposits but also for its uranium deposits. At least two uranium provinces can be distinguished - the southern, with the equatorial sub-province; and the south Saharan province. Uranium deposits are distributed either in cratons or in mobile belts, the first of sandstone and quartz-pebble conglomerate type, while those located in mobile belts are predominantly of vein and similar (disseminated) type. Uranium deposits occur within Precambrian rocks or in younger platform sediments, but close to the exposed Precambrian basement. The Proterozoic host rocks consist of sediments, metamorphics or granitoids. In contrast to Phanerozoic continental uranium-bearing sediments, those in the Precambrian are in marginal marine facies but they do contain organic material. The geology of Africa is briefly reviewed with the emphasis on those features which might control the distribution of uranium. The evolution of the African Platform is considered as a progressive reduction of its craton area which has been affected by three major Precambrian tectonic events. A short survey on the geology of known uranium deposits is made. However, some deposits and occurrences for which little published material is available are treated in more detail. (author)

  2. Uranium resource assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this investigation is to examine what is generally known about uranium resources, what is subject to conjecture, how well do the explorers themselves understand the occurrence of uranium, and who are the various participants in the exploration process. From this we hope to reach a better understanding of the quality of uranium resource estimates as well as the nature of the exploration process. The underlying questions will remain unanswered. But given an inability to estimate precisely our uranium resources, how much do we really need to know. To answer this latter question, the various Department of Energy needs for uranium resource estimates are examined. This allows consideration of whether or not given the absence of more complete long-term supply data and the associated problems of uranium deliverability for the electric utility industry, we are now threatened with nuclear power plants eventually standing idle due to an unanticipated lack of fuel for their reactors. Obviously this is of some consequence to the government and energy consuming public. The report is organized into four parts. Section I evaluates the uranium resource data base and the various methodologies of resource assessment. Part II describes the manner in which a private company goes about exploring for uranium and the nature of its internal need for resource information. Part III examines the structure of the industry for the purpose of determining the character of the industry with respect to resource development. Part IV arrives at conclusions about the emerging pattern of industrial behavior with respect to uranium supply and the implications this has for coping with national energy issues

  3. Regulatory impacts on the Canadian uranium industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of environmental and safety regulation in Canada is described and the impacts of these developments on various phases of the uranium industry are examined. In the past 25 years, seven new uranium mining projects, major expansions to four projects, and five uranium refining/conversion projects have undergone environmental assessment in Canada. As regulations and the processes for applying them have developed, the size, complexity and cost of obtaining operating approvals for uranium projects have increased exponentially. Uranium projects are subject to a level of scrutiny that goes far beyond what can be justified by their potential for environmental damage, based primarily on a perceived degree of public concern, rather than any objective measure of environmental risk. The author believes that it is time to re-examine our priorities, to establish some balance between the risks of a project and the assessment effort required. Otherwise, we shall soon find ourselves in the position where smaller projects will never be developed because they cannot cover the regulatory costs. (author)

  4. Low temperature sintering of hyperstoichiometric uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the lattice of uranium dioxide with hyperstoichiometric oxygen content (UO2+x), each additional oxygen atoms is introduced by shifting two anions from normal sites to interstitial ones, thereby creating two oxygen vacancies. The point defects then combine to form complex defects comprising several interstitials and vacancies. The group of anions (3x) in the interstitial position participate in equilibria promoting the creation of uranium vacancies thereby considerably increasing uranium self-diffusion. However, uranium grain boundaries diffusion governs densification during the first two stages of sintering of uranium dioxide with hyperstoichiometric oxygen content, i.e., up to 93% of the theoretical density. Surface diffusion and evaporation-condensation, which are considerably accentuated by the hyperstoichiometric deviation, play an active role during sintering by promoting crystalline growth during the second and third stages of sintering. U8O8 can be added to adjust the stoichiometry and to form a finely porous structure and thus increase the pore area subjected to surface phenomena. The composition with an O/U ratio equal to 2.25 is found to densify the best, despite a linear growth in sintering activation energy with hyperstoichiometric oxygen content, increasing from 300 kj.mol-1 for UO2.10 to 440 kJ.mol-1 for UO2.25. Seeds can be introduced to obtain original microstructures, for example the presence of large grains in small-grain matrix

  5. Risk evaluation of uranium mining: a new kinetic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Release of uranium and associated heavy metals is the main environmental concern regarding exploitation and processing of U-ore. Increasing uranium mining activities potentially increase the risks linked to radiation exposure. As a tool to evaluate these risks, a geochemical inverse modeling approach was developed to estimate the water-mineral interaction in the presence of uranium. Our methodology is based on the estimation of dissolution rate and reactive surface area of the different minerals participating in the reaction by reconstructing the chemical evolution of the interacting fluids. We found that the reactive surface area of parent-rock minerals changes over several orders of magnitude during the investigated reaction time. We propose that the formation of coatings on dissolving mineral surfaces significantly reduces reactivity. Our results show that negatively charged uranium complexes decrease when alkalinity and rock buffer capacity is similarly lower, indicating that the dissolved carbonate is an important parameter impacting uranium mobility. (authors)

  6. Process of zirconium decontamination for recovering uranium and molybdenum contained in sulphuric mineral lixivia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process of zirconium decontamination for recovering uranium and molybdenum contained in sulphuric mineral lixivia, is presented. The process consists in uranium and molybdenum joint extraction using an aqueous solution of long chain alkyl amine in inert diluent, under controlled flow conditions, doing selective washing of rich uranium and molybdenum solvent with sulfuric solution containing zirconium complexant agent. The selective reextraction of uranium using sodium chloride sulfuric solution, and the molybdenum final reextraction using sodium carbonate aqueous solution are done, obtaining uranium and molybdenum final concentrates by precipitation. The final concentrates are obtained with purity grades adjusted to commercial specifications. (M.C.K.)

  7. Production of uranium peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention provides a process for recovering uranium values as uranium peroxide from an aqueous uranyl solution containing dissolved vanadium and sodium impurities. It consists of treating the uranyl solution with hydrogen peroxide in an amount equal to at least 0.5 part H2O2 per part of vanadium (V2O5) in solution in excess of the stoichiometric (1.26 parts/part U3O8) amount required to form the uranium peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide treatment is carried out in three phases. (auth)

  8. Uranium assay in milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powder milk, and fresh milk from buffalo and dairy cattle in North India, were irradiated with a thermal neutron flux of 1017 n cm-2. Neutron dose was calculated by counting tracks on an etched K-43 glass dosimeter. The uranium concentration in milk is low when compared with concentrations in other food stuffs, and its radiotoxicity to humans is considerably lower than chemical toxicity. If a human consumes 1 litre of milk/day, containing .1 μg uranium/litre, for 60 yrs, total intake of uranium would be only 2 mg compared to a maximum permissible intake of 40mg. (U.K.)

  9. Depleted uranium management alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report evaluates two management alternatives for Department of Energy depleted uranium: continued storage as uranium hexafluoride, and conversion to uranium metal and fabrication to shielding for spent nuclear fuel containers. The results will be used to compare the costs with other alternatives, such as disposal. Cost estimates for the continued storage alternative are based on a life-cycle of 27 years through the year 2020. Cost estimates for the recycle alternative are based on existing conversion process costs and Capital costs for fabricating the containers. Additionally, the recycle alternative accounts for costs associated with intermediate product resale and secondary waste disposal for materials generated during the conversion process

  10. Uranium mining and milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report uranium mining and milling are reviewed. The fuel cycle, different types of uranium geological deposits, blending of ores, open cast and underground mining, the mining cost and radiation protection in mines are treated in the first part of this report. In the second part, the milling of uranium ores is treated, including process technology, acid and alkaline leaching, process design for physical and chemical treatment of the ores, and the cost. Each chapter is clarified by added figures, diagrams, tables, and flowsheets. (HK)

  11. Origin and Superposition Metallogenic Model of the Sandstone-type Uranium Deposit in the Northeastern Ordos Basin, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ziying; CHEN Anping; FANG Xiheng; OU Guangxi; XIA Yuliang; SUN Ye

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with the metallogenic model of the sandstone type uranium deposit in thenortheastern Ordos Basin from aspects of uranium source, migration and deposition. A superpositionmetallogenie model has been established due to complex uranium mineralization processes withsuperposition of oil-gas reduction and thermal reformation.

  12. Uranium infiltration from a river to shallow groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The infiltration of uranium from the polluted River Glatt (Switzerland) into a hydraulically connected saturated aquifer was investigated during a period of almost five years. The uranium concentrations and the 234U/238U activity ratios (ARs) were analysed monthly in the water of the river and of four groundwater sampling wells. The speciation of uranium and its relation to other aqueous and solid components were investigated experimentally and in model calculations. The uranium concentration and the ARs in the river varied seasonally with a maximum and a minimum, respectively, in summer. Processes, such as photo-reductive dissolution of iron-oxyhydroxides or the enhanced decomposition of organic matter and calcite in the upstream, eutrophic Lake Greifen may have caused these variations. Laboratory experiments confirmed a possible release of uranium by photochemical reactions. The concentration maximum of uranium was also detected in the shallow groundwater, but with a delay of about six months to the maximum in the river. Under the assumption that the maxima in the river and the groundwater were related, an in situ distribution coefficient (KD) for uranium of ∼7 mL g-1 can be calculated for this Quaternary gravel aquifer. Uranium was present predominantly as UO2-carbonate complexes, whereas the formation of phosphate and organic complexes (e.g., UO2-humates/EDTA/NTA) was negligible. Particles and colloids played a minor role for the transport of uranium in this aquifer. In the course of this study, we observed an ongoing general decrease of the uranium concentrations and a disappearance of its summerly maxima in the River Glatt. We relate this unexpected effect to a better control of the phosphate concentration in surface waters, which diminished the growth of aquatic biota. This, in turn, led to changes in the redox conditions of lake and river sediments, and herewith to a reduced release of heavy metals

  13. Laser fluorimetric determination of uranium in potable waters of Punjab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium enters local water, air and food supplies in varying concentrations through leaching from natural deposits, its release in mill tailings, emissions from nuclear industry, dissolution in phosphate fertilizers and combustion of coal and other fuels. Injested uranium can cause both chemical and radiological toxicity. Uranyl compounds have a high affinity for phosphate, carboxyl and hydroxyl groups and readily combine with proteins and nucleotides to form stable complexes. Hence, permissible concentration of uranium in drinking water is calculated on the basis of chemical and not on radiological toxicity which is 30 μgL-1. Various environmental and clinical research organizations have initiated the studies on the impact of uranium in potable waters and to access associated health hazards. In addition, steps are undertaken for the removal of uranium from drinking water. Removal of uranium from drinking-water is generally achieved by (i) coagulation using ferric sulfate or aluminium sulfate at optimal pH and coagulant dosages, (ii) lime softening process, (iii) ion exchange separation and (iv) reverse osmosis. Quantitative determination of uranium is essential in order to adopt suitable technologies as well as for toxic assessment. Uranium in trace levels is most commonly measured by solid fluorimetry with either ultra violet or laser excitation following fusion of the sample with a pellet of carbonate and sodium fluoride (detection limit 0.1 μg L-1). Sample preparation for this method is tedious and interference from other metal ions is significant. Uranium can also be determined by ICPMS, which has the same detection limit in relatively pure solutions, and a precision of less than 6%. Alpha-spectrometry has been used for the determination of uranium in bottled waters and environmental matrices, although the recovery is often highly variable owing to the low specific activity of natural uranium

  14. Uranium(VI) speciation: modelling, uncertainty and relevance to bioavailability models. Application to uranium uptake by the gills of a freshwater bivalve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of varying solution composition on the interactions between uranium(VI) and excised gills of the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea have been investigated in well defined solution media. A significant reduction in the uptake of uranium was observed on increasing the concentrations of the uranium complexing ligands citrate and carbonate. Saturation kinetics as a function of uranium concentration at a pH value of 5.0 were observed, indicating that the uptake of uranium is a facilitated process, probably involving one or several trans-membrane transport systems. A relatively small change in the uptake of uranium was found as a function of pH (factor of ca. 2), despite the extremely large changes to the solution speciation of uranium within the range of pH investigated (5.0 - 7.5). A comprehensive review of the thermodynamic data relevant to the solution composition domain employed for this study was performed. Estimates of the uncertainties for the formation constants of aqueous uranium(VI) species were integrated into a thermodynamic database. A computer program was written to predict the equilibrium distribution of uranium(VI) in simple aqueous systems, using thermodynamic parameter mean-values. The program was extended to perform Monte Carlo and Quasi Monte Carlo uncertainty analyses, incorporating the thermodynamic database uncertainty estimates, to quantitatively predict the uncertainties inherent in predicting the solution speciation of uranium. The use of thermodynamic equilibrium modelling as a tool for interpreting the bioavailability of uranium(VI) was investigated. Observed uranium(VI) uptake behaviour was interpreted as a function of the predicted changes to the solution speciation of uranium. Different steady-state or pre-equilibrium approaches to modelling uranium uptake were tested. Alternative modelling approaches were also tested, considering the potential changes to membrane transport system activity or sorption characteristics on

  15. Uranium in granites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent research activities of the Canadian Uranium in Granites Study are presented in 18 papers and 3 abstracts. 'Granites' is used as a generic term for granitoids, granitic rocks, and plutonic rocks

  16. Uranium purchases report 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data reported by domestic nuclear utility companies in their responses to the 1991 through 1993 ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey,'' Form EIA-858, Schedule B,'' Uranium Marketing Activities,'' are provided in response to the requirements in the Energy Policy Act 1992. Appendix A contains an explanation of Form EIA-858 survey methodologies with emphasis on the processing of Schedule B data. Additional information published in this report not included in Uranium Purchases Report 1992, includes a new data table. Presented in Table 1 are US utility purchases of uranium and enrichment services by origin country. Also, this report contains additional purchase information covering average price and contract duration. Table 2 is an update of Table 1 and Table 3 is an update of Table 2 from the previous year's report. The report contains a glossary of terms

  17. Uranium hydrothermal deposits

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    René, Miloš

    New York : Nova Science Publishers, 2012 - (Vasiliev, A.; Sidorov, M.), s. 211-244 ISBN 978-1-62081-207-5 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : uranium * hydrothermal deposits * uraninite Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  18. Uranium Location Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A GIS compiled locational database in Microsoft Access of ~15,000 mines with uranium occurrence or production, primarily in the western United States. The metadata...

  19. Uranium in alkaline rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, M.; Wollenberg, H.; Strisower, B.; Bowman, H.; Flexser, S.; Carmichael, I.

    1978-04-01

    Geologic and geochemical criteria were developed for the occurrence of economic uranium deposits in alkaline igneous rocks. A literature search, a limited chemical analytical program, and visits to three prominent alkaline-rock localities (Ilimaussaq, Greenland; Pocos de Caldas, Brazil; and Powderhorn, Colorado) were made to establish criteria to determine if a site had some uranium resource potential. From the literature, four alkaline-intrusive occurrences of differing character were identified as type-localities for uranium mineralization, and the important aspects of these localities were described. These characteristics were used to categorize and evaluate U.S. occurrences. The literature search disclosed 69 U.S. sites, encompassing nepheline syenite, alkaline granite, and carbonatite. It was possible to compare two-thirds of these sites to the type localities. A ranking system identified ten of the sites as most likely to have uranium resource potential.

  20. Ontario's uranium mining industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report traces the Ontario uranium mining industry from the first discovery of uranium north of Sault Ste. Marie through the uranium boom of the 1950's when Elliot Lake and Bancroft were developed, the cutbacks of the 1960s, the renewed enthusiasm in exploration and development of the 1970s to the current position when continued production for the domestic market is assured. Ontario, with developed mines and operational expertise, will be in a position to compete for export markets as they reopen. The low level of expenditures for uranium exploration and the lack of new discoveries are noted. The report also reviews and places in perspective the development of policies and regulations governing the industry and the jurisdictional relationships of the Federal and Provincial governments

  1. The uranium market prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A historical analysis of the uranium market points out the cyclical nature of the market and suggests that the spot price, exploration levels, and mill capacity utilization rate are dependent on economic factors. An examination of the current uranium market suggests that the effects of the forecasted surplus supply, the diminishing returns in exploration and the long lead times and high costs of development may mean that future production levels are uncertain. The general prospects for the uranium industry are also uncertain because of barriers to trade, environmental regulations and public opinion. The paper concludes that by the use of long term contracts, appropriate inventory policy and greater discussion between producers and consumers the prospects for the uranium market can be made more certain and further imbalances in demand and supply can be avoided. (author)

  2. Uranium in alkaline rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geologic and geochemical criteria were developed for the occurrence of economic uranium deposits in alkaline igneous rocks. A literature search, a limited chemical analytical program, and visits to three prominent alkaline-rock localities (Ilimaussaq, Greenland; Pocos de Caldas, Brazil; and Powderhorn, Colorado) were made to establish criteria to determine if a site had some uranium resource potential. From the literature, four alkaline-intrusive occurrences of differing character were identified as type-localities for uranium mineralization, and the important aspects of these localities were described. These characteristics were used to categorize and evaluate U.S. occurrences. The literature search disclosed 69 U.S. sites, encompassing nepheline syenite, alkaline granite, and carbonatite. It was possible to compare two-thirds of these sites to the type localities. A ranking system identified ten of the sites as most likely to have uranium resource potential

  3. Uranium hexafluoride purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium hexafluoride might contain a large amount of impurities after manufacturing or handling. Three usual methods of purification of uranium hexafluoride were presented: selective sorption, sublimation, and distillation. Since uranium hexafluoride usually is contaminated with hydrogen fluoride, a theoretical study of the phase equilibrium properties was performed for the binary system UF6-HF. A large deviation from the ideal solution behaviour was observed. A purification unity based on a constant reflux batch distillation process was developed. A procedure was established in order to design the re boiler, condenser and packed columns for the UF6-HF mixture separation. A bench scale facility for fractional distillation of uranium hexafluoride was described. Basic operations for that facility and results extracted from several batches were discussed. (author)

  4. Uranium conversion and enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description is given of the Atomic Energy Corporation's uranium conversion and enrichment plants at Valinda ba, including a brief discussion of problems encountered and plans for future developments. (author)

  5. Uranium in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1988 Canada's five uranium producers reported output of concentrate containing a record 12,470 metric tons of uranium (tU), or about one third of total Western world production. Shipments exceeded 13,200 tU, valued at $Cdn 1.1 billion. Most of Canada's uranium output is available for export for peaceful purposes, as domestic requirements represent about 15 percent of production. The six uranium marketers signed new sales contracts for over 11,000 tU, mostly destined for the United States. Annual exports peaked in 1987 at 12,790 tU, falling back to 10,430 tU in 1988. Forward domestic and export contract commitments were more than 70,000 tU and 60,000 tU, respectively, as of early 1989. The uranium industry in Canada was restructured and consolidated by merger and acquisition, including the formation of Cameco. Three uranium projects were also advanced. The Athabasca Basin is the primary target for the discovery of high-grade low-cost uranium deposits. Discovery of new reserves in 1987 and 1988 did not fully replace the record output over the two-year period. The estimate of overall resources as of January 1989 was down by 4 percent from January 1987 to a total (measured, indicated and inferred) of 544,000 tU. Exploration expenditures reached $Cdn 37 million in 1987 and $59 million in 1988, due largely to the test mining programs at the Cigar Lake and Midwest projects in Saskatchewan. Spot market prices fell to all-time lows from 1987 to mid-1989, and there is little sign of relief. Canadian uranium production capability could fall below 12,000 tU before the late 1990s; however, should market conditions warrant output could be increased beyond 15,000 tU. Canada's known uranium resources are more than sufficient to meet the 30-year fuel requirements of those reactors in Canada that are now or are expected to be in service by the late 1990s. There is significant potential for discovering additional uranium resources. Canada's uranium production is equivalent, in

  6. Ranger uranium environmental enquiry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The submission is divided into three sections. Section A considers the international implications of the development of uranium resources including economic and resource aspects and environmental and social aspects. Section B outlines the government's position on export controls over uranium and its effect on the introduction of nuclear power in Australia. Section C describes the licensing and regulatory functions that would be needed to monitor the environmental and health aspects of the Ranger project. (R.L.)

  7. Uranium purchases report 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    US utilities are required to report to the Secretary of Energy annually the country of origin and the seller of any uranium or enriched uranium purchased or imported into the US, as well as the country of origin and seller of any enrichment services purchased by the utility. This report compiles these data and also contains a glossary of terms and additional purchase information covering average price and contract duration. 3 tabs

  8. Recovery of uranium values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process is provided for the recovery of uranium from an organic extractant phase containing an amine. The extractant phase is contacted in a number of mixing stages with an acidic aqueous stripping phase containing sulphate ions, and the phases are passed together through a series of mixing stages while maintaining a dispersion of droplets of one phase in the other. Uranium is precipitated from the final stage by raising the pH. An apparatus having several mixing chambers is described

  9. Uranium project. Geochemistry prospection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geochemistry studies the distribution of the chemicals elements in the terrestrial crust and its ways to migrate. The terminology used in this report is the following one: 1) Principles of the prospection geochemistry 2) Stages of the prospection geochemistry 3)utility of the prospection geochemistry 4) geochemistry of uranium 5) procedures used within the framework of uranium project 6) Average available 7) Selection of the zones of prospection geochemistry 8) Stages of the prospection, Sample preparation and analisis 9) Presentation of the results

  10. Uranium tailings bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bibliography containing 1,212 references is presented with its focus on the general problem of reducing human exposure to the radionuclides contained in the tailings from the milling of uranium ore. The references are divided into seven broad categories: uranium tailings pile (problems and perspectives), standards and philosophy, etiology of radiation effects, internal dosimetry and metabolism, environmental transport, background sources of tailings radionuclides, and large-area decontamination

  11. Separation of uranium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention provides a method for separating uranium isotopes comprising the steps of selectively irradiating a photochemically-reactive uranyl source material at a wavelength selective to a desired isotope of uranium at an effective temperature for isotope spectral line splitting below about 77 K, further irradiating the source material within the fluorescent lifetime of the selectively irradiated source material to selectively photochemically reduce the selectively excited isotopic species, and chemically separating the reduced isotope species from the remaining uranyl salt compound

  12. Automated uranium assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precise, timely inventories of enriched uranium stocks are vital to help prevent the loss, theft, or diversion of this material for illicit use. A wet-chemistry analyzer has been developed at LLL to assist in these inventories by performing automated analyses of uranium samples from different stages in the nuclear fuel cycle. These assays offer improved accuracy, reduced costs, significant savings in manpower, and lower radiation exposure for personnel compared with present techniques

  13. Uranium determination in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In our laboratory, a procedure has been assessed to determine uranium content of water in normal situations. The method proposed without sample pre-treatment, is simple and rapid. Uranium mass is measured by fluorimetry. For calculation of detection limit (Ld) and quantification level (Lq) we used blank samples and the results were analyzed for different statistical test. The calculation of total propagated uncertainty and sources contribution on real samples are presented. (author)

  14. Uranium leads political stakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Until the announcement by the federal Environment Minister Peter Garrett that the government would permit uranium mining at Beverly Four Mile, South Australia, there had been little news flow from the sector over the past year. Uranium was the first to turn down, even before the United States sub-prime mortgage crisis began to cause shock waves through the global economy, a report by BGF Equities analyst Warwick Grigor shows.

  15. Extraction of uranium from soil using selective chelators with secondary concentration using water soluble polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies have investigated the extraction and recovery of uranium from contaminated soil containing both sorbed and metallic uranium. Our goal was to selectively bind and recover uranium from this soil and minimize secondary waste generation. Our approach was to determine optimal chelators for uranium extraction using contaminated soil taken from an area at LANL where open air testing of explosives containing depleted uranium was conducted. Uranium concentrations range in the soil from 1000-5000ppm. We have found that equimolar carbonate/bicarbonate solution in conjunction with an oxidant, sodium hypochlorite, is an excellent extractant for uranium from this soil, removing 90+% of the uranium. Our present focus is on the recovery and concentration of uranium from the extractant solution using a large water soluble polymer (>10,000 MW) as a secondary chelator for complexing the extracted uranium:carbonate complex. Using ultrafiltration, the volume of waste can be reduced 100+ fold. These commercially available polymers can then be regenerated and re-used. Using this approach, we are able to recover 90+% of the uranium in a minimal volume

  16. Production of sized particles of uranium oxides and uranium oxyfluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process for converting uranium hexafluoride to uranium dioxide of a relatively large particle size in a fluidized bed reactor by mixing uranium hexafluoride with a mixture of steam and hydrogen to form a mixture of uranium oxide and uranium oxyfluoride seed particles of varying sizes, separating the larger particles from the smaller particles in a cyclone separator, recycling the smaller seed particles through the ejector to increase their size, and introducing the larger seed particles from the cyclone separator into a fluidized bed reactor where the seed particles serve as nuclei on which coarser particles of uranium dioxide are formed. (Patent Office Record)

  17. Determination of leachable uranium in airborne particulates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uranium content of airborne particulates collected on cellulose filters was investigated. As a case study, filter samples from the large area of Thessaloniki, Greece, were used. For the uranium determination instrumental neutron activation analysis was used. To obtain equal counting conditions for all samples after irradiation, independent from the initial matrix, uranium was leached from the filter by using a 0.1M NH4HCO3 solution, forming a stable uranyl complex [UO2(CO3)3]. This complex was absorbed in a batch process on a small amount of chelating ion exchanger Srafion NMRR, which was directly irradiated in the reactor of the NCSR Demokritos. Over the investigated time period in 1997 the mean concentration was found to be 0.047 ng U/m3. In relation to the collected amount of airborne particulates having a mean concentration of 0.52 μg/gU. It can be assumed as a natural uranium level in the environment. (author)

  18. Uranium biomineralization by a metal resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated from contaminated mine waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium biomineralization by a metal-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated from uranium mine waste was characterized for its potential in bioremediation. Uranium resistance, its cellular localization and chemical nature of uranium-bacteria interaction were elucidated. Survival and uranium biomineralization from mine water were investigated using microcosm experiments. The selected bacterium showed U resistance and accumulation (maximum of 275 mg U g-1 cell dry wt.) following incubation in 100 mg U L-1, pH 4.0, for 6 h. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that bioaccumulated uranium was deposited within the cell envelope as needle shaped U-phosphate compounds that attain crystallinity only at pH 4.0. A synergistic involvement of deprotonated phosphate and carboxyl moieties in facilitating bioprecipitation of uranium was evident from FTIR analysis. Based on these findings we attribute the localized U sequestration by this bacterium as innocuous complex to its possible mechanism of uranium resistance. Microcosm data confirmed that the strain can remove soluble uranium (99%) and sequester it as U oxide and phosphate minerals while maintaining its viability. The study showed that indigenous bacteria from contaminated site that can survive uranium and other heavy metal toxicity and sequester soluble uranium as biominerals could play important role in uranium bioremediation.

  19. Production of uranium peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of recovering uranium values as uranium peroxide from an aqueous uranyl solution containing dissolved vanadium and sodium impurities, characterized by treating the uranyl solution with hydrogen peroxide in an amount sufficient to have an excess of at least 0.5 parts H2O2 per part vanadium (V2O5) above the stoichio-metric amount required to form the uranium peroxide, the hydrogen peroxide treatment being carried out in three sequential phases consisting of: 1) a precipitation phase in which the hydrogen peroxide is added to the uranyl solution to precipitate the uranium peroxide and the pH of the reaction media maintained in the range of 3.0 to 7.0 for a period of 5 to 180 60 minutes after the hydrogen peroxide addition; 2) a digestion phase in which the pH of the reaction medium is maintained in the range of 3.0 to 7.0 for a period of 5 to 180 minutes and 3) a final phase in which the pH of the reaction media is maintained in the range of 4.0 to 7.0 for a period of 1 to 60 minutes during which time the uranium peroxide is separated from the reaction solution containing the dissolved vanadium and sodium impurities, the excess hydrogen peroxide aforesaid being maintained until the uranium peroxide is separated from the reaction mixture

  20. Kvanefjeld uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Kvanefjeld uranium project is to evaluate the possibility of a uranium production from the deposit at Narssaq, South Greenland. The project comprises investigations in the fields of geology, mining, process chemistry and technology, economy and environment protection. The predominant uraniferous rock is a nepheline syenite called lujavrite in which the main uranium mineral is steenstrupine. The deposit can be mined in an open pit. Calculations have shown a resource of 56 million tonnes of ore with an average grade of 365 ppm corresponding to 20,400 tonnes of uranium. The uranium is extracted by a sodium carbonate solution at 260degC in an autoclave. A pilot plant has been established including ball mill, continuous pipe autoclave and a belt filter for separation of leach liquor and residue. The uranium is finally precipitated as UO2 by reduction in an autoclave at 260degC. With the existing ore sample, recoveries of more than 80% have been obtained. The carbonate leaching causes a low solubility of most contaminants in the tailings. A draft project has been prepared for an industrial plant in Greenland. The total investments have been calculated at 3 x 109 Dkr. Electrical energy is assumed to be supplied by a hydropower plant at Johan Dahl Land. The mine and mill are expected to employ 500-600 persons. (author)

  1. Electrochemical investigation of uranium β-diketonates for all-uranium redox flow battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The redox flow battery using uranium as the negative and the positive active materials in polar aprotic solvents was proposed. In order to establish the guiding principle for the uranium compounds as the active materials, the investigation of uranium β-diketonate complexes was conducted on (i) the solubility of active materials, (ii) the electrode reaction of U(VI) and U(IV) β-diketonate complexes and (iii) the estimation of the open circuit voltage of the battery. The solubilities of higher than 0.8 mol dm-3 of U(VI) complexes and higher than 0.4 mol dm-3 of a U(IV) complex were obtained in the solvents. The electrode reactions of U(pta)4, UO2(dpm)2, UO2(fod)2 and UO2(pta)2 were first studied and the redox potentials of uranium β-diketonates were thermodynamically discussed. The open circuit voltage is estimated more than 1 V by using Hacac or Hdpm. The larger open circuit voltage is expected when a ligand with the larger basicity is used

  2. Geology of the Alligator Rivers Uranium Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uranium deposits of Ranger 1, Koongarra, Jabiluka One and Two, and Nabarlek are in the Alligator Rivers Uranium Field, the northeastern part of the Pine Creek Geosyncline. Lower Proterozoic metasediments, which were metamorphosed mainly to amphibolite-grade and multiply isoclinally folded at about 1800 Ma, host much of the uranium and overlie or grade into the Archaean to Lower Proterozoic granitoid Nanambu Complex. In the northeast of the Field the metasediments grade into schist and gneiss forming the outer parts of the Lower Proterozoic Nimbuwah Complex; the inner parts of this Complex contain granodioritic and tonalitic migmatite and granitoid rocks which were emplaced before the 1800 Ma event. The metasediments are intruded by pre-orogenic and post-orogenic tholeiitic dolerite, by synorogenic granite, and by later minor phonolite and dolerite dykes. All but the minor dykes are overlain with marked unconformity by Carpentarian (Middle Proterozoic) sandstone with basalt flows, which conceals older rocks over most of the southeastern half of the area. The pre-Carpentarian (pre-Middle Proterozoic) rocks are deeply weathered and lateritised and are covered extensively by Mesozoic and Cainozoic sediment. The uranium is mainly contained in the lower member of the Cahill Formation, comprising mica quartz schist, magnesite and carbonaceous schist, which is chloritised around the uranium occurrences and along faults, shears and some stratigraphic breaks. The ore zones are located in breccia. The stratabound nature of the ore suggests that it has formed partly syngenetically; however, epigenetic processes appear essential for the development of such high-grade deposits. (author)

  3. The South Greenland regional uranium exploration programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the work and results of the last two field seasons (1080 and 1982) of the Syduran Project. The field work was concentrated in the Motzfeldt Centre and the Granite zone with a short reconnaissance of five uranium anomalies in the Migmatite Complex. The results from the Motzfeldt Centre show that it is composed of at least 6 syenite units which can be divided into two major phases of igneous activity. The radioactive mineralisation has been mapped by gamma-spectrometer and has proved to be very extensive. Uranium mineral occurrences found in the Granite Zone occur in the many faults and fractures, which dissect the area. A study of the fractures and fault movements in the zone makes it possible to suggest an overall structural framework in which to place the uranium occurrences in the zone. Field work on the Igaliko peninsula was confined to a small area known as Puissagtag where four pitchblende veins have been discovered. Numerous uraniferous showings, associated with fractures, have been located in the Vatnaverfi peninsula south of the Igaliko Fjord. Mineralogical studies have shown that 12 of these showings contain pitchblende, that 7 of them contain coffinite and that most of them contain brannerite. The most interesting find during the 1982 field season was in the Migmatite Complex. Five anomalously high uranium areas in the complex were explored briefly with the helicopter-borne scintillometer. Near a place called Igdlorssuit, where a particlarly high gamma-spectrometer anomaly was found during the reconnaissance gamma-spectrometer survey, a large raft of meta-sediments in rapakivi granite was found, in which radioactive mineralisation occurred. This proved to be due to fine disseminated uraninite which occurs over some 150 m of strike length with a width of 1-2 m. The results confirm that there is a good possibility of finding exploitable uranium mineral occurrences in South Greenland. (author)

  4. The Chemistry Study Of Uranium And Transition Elements In Mixture Of Nitric Acid And Sulfuric Acid Were Done

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uranium and transition elements were contained in the waste of technetium-99 generator productions to be formed by irradiated uranium. This waste medium is low concentration of nitric acid and sulfuric acid. The tendency of uranium in this medium to form uranyl sulfate complex, the compound of uranyl sulfate belong to heteropoly compounds and is an acid. The transition elements in mixture of nitric acid and sulfuric acid solutions have tendency to form cation complex compound According to difference of the chemical properties of uranium and transition elements, the base reagent can be used for recovery of uranium from this solution

  5. I. Synthesis and characterization of volatile uranium(V) and uranium(VI) alkoxides. II. Isotope selective infrared photochemistry of uranium(VI) hexamethoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I. A number of uranium(V) and uranium(VI) alkoxides were prepared and characterized, with particular attention to volatility and vibrational spectroscopy. Volatility data and x-ray crystallography implied the uranium(V) complexes to be associated as dimers or higher polymers. The uranium(VI) alkoxides were determined to be monomeric through similar considerations. A detailed discussion of uranium hexamethoxide vibrational data is given, with regard to its suitability for infrared laser photolysis with a CO2-TEA laser. II. Infrared laser photolysis of uranium hexamethoxide was shown to selectively dissociate the 238U containing species, when irradiated with a CO2-TEA laser. Wavelength and fluence dependencies were measured, yielding an optimum 235U enrichment factor (for the unreacted material) of 1.0335 on the P(38)/10.6 μ laser transition at 3.2 J/cm2. A selectivity of 1.5 was calculated from dissociation yield experiments. The photolysis products were analyzed, and the initial reaction was determined to be methoxy radical elimination. Secondary reaction products, in the form of polymethoxy ethers, appear to be the result of intramolecuar reactions (on the uranium substrate) initiated by collisional processes. Several mechanisms are proposed

  6. Study of uranium plating measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In neutron physics experiments, the measurement for plate-thickness of uranium can directly affect uncertainties of experiment results. To measure the plate-thickness of transform target (enriched uranium plating and depleted uranium plating), the back to back ionization chamber, small solid angle device and Au-Si surface barrier semi-conductor, were used in the experiment study. Also, the uncertainties in the experiment were analyzed. Because the inhomo-geneous of uranium lay of plate can quantitively affect the result, the homogeneity of uranium lay is checked, the experiment result reflects the homogeneity of uranium lay is good. (authors)

  7. Uranium. Suppl. Vol. A3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This supplement volume 'Uranium' deals with uranium technology, from winning to the fabrication of nuclear fuels containing uranium and their use in various reactor types. Alternative reprocessing methods for ores are described e.g. winning from phosphate ores and sea water, production of uranium compounds (oxide, carbide, nitride etc., hexafluoride for isotope separation) and of uranium-metals and -alloys as well as the utilization of metallic and other compounds of uranium - single or embedded - as nuclear fuels and their fabrication. The behaviour of the nuclear fuel and the way it modifies during reactor operation are described in an extra volume (supplement volume A4). (RB)

  8. Uranium currently selling very badly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surplus offers and declining revenue have caused exploratory and uranium mining activities to slow down. The same applies to research activities on the profitability of leading uranium-carrying rock or recovering uranium from seawater, which have been cut off worldwide. Prices for natural uranium are plunging deep as a consequence of surplus offers. There is little hope among uranium producers that the situation might change in the near future. For the projected Wackersdorf fuel reprocessing facility, this means that one argument of supporters, - lack of uranium for fuel fabrication - has lost its basis. (DG)

  9. Alkaline rocks and the occurrence of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many alkaline complexes contain uranium and other minerals in low concentrations and are regarded as constituting valuable potential reserves. Certain complex metallurgical problems, however, remain to be solved. Alkaline rocks occur in a number of forms and environments and it is noted that they are generated during periods of geological quiescence emplaced mainly in stable aseismic areas. Many occur along the extensions of oceanic transform faults beneath the continental crust and the application of this concept to areas not currently known to host alkaline complexes may prove useful in identifying potential target areas for prospecting operations

  10. Uranium coordination chemistry in Mg-rich systems

    OpenAIRE

    van Veelen, Arjen

    2014-01-01

    In the UK, large quantities of intermediate level waste pose complex radiological remediation challenges. Chemical understanding of uranium in these Mg-rich sludges is vital. Previous studies have examined uranium uptake by calcium carbonate minerals (calcite and aragonite) under conditions pertinent to both natural and anthropogenically perturbed systems. However, research on uranyl uptake by magnesium-rich minerals such as magnesite [MgCO3], brucite [Mg(OH)2], nesquehonite [MgCO3·3H2O] and ...

  11. Nuclear fuel cycle based on thorium and uranium-233

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis of activities carried out in this country and abroad on a complex solution of principal problems of nuclear power advance. Demonstration of the potentiality of the above problems solution on the basis of conventional reactor plant development (light water cooled reactors and BN-type fast reactors) within the framework of nuclear fuel cycle using uranium-235, plutonium and uranium-233. 28 refs.; 1 fig.; 8 tabs

  12. Ligand assisted cleavage of uranium oxo-clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nocton, Gregory; Pecaut, Jacques; Mazzanti, Marinella [Laboratoire de Reconnaissance Ionique et Chimie de Coordination, Service de Chimie Inorganique et Biologique, UMR-E 3 CEA-UJF, CEA/DSM/INAC, CEA-Grenoble, 38054 Grenoble, Cedex 09 (France); Filinchuk, Yaroslav [Swiss Norwegian Beam Lines (SNBL) at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), rue Jules Horowitz, 38043 Grenoble (France)

    2010-07-01

    Dibenzoylmethanate replaces the bridging triflate ligands in uranium triflate poly-oxo-clusters and cleaves the U{sub 12}O{sub 20} core yielding the new [U{sub 6}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 4}({eta}-dbm){sub 12}] dibenzoylmethanate (dbm{sup -}) cluster which slowly dissociates into a monomeric complex. This reactivity demonstrates the importance of bridging ligands in stabilizing uranium poly-oxo-clusters. (authors)

  13. Uranium chemistry in blood and aqueous media. Techniques of studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The object of this report in a first step, is to understand the chemistry of uranium in aqueous phase by specifying the behavior of this element in function of several parameters such PH, concentration of present species, temperature, ionic force. In a second step, investigation techniques are reviewed: X rays diffraction, potentiometric titrations, polarography, spectrophotometry, NMR of 13C, 31P, 17O, capillary electrophoresis, laser detection. The third part brings elements to understand the uranium complexation in blood medium

  14. Uranium-mediated electrocatalytic dihydrogen production from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halter, Dominik P.; Heinemann, Frank W.; Bachmann, Julien; Meyer, Karsten

    2016-02-01

    Depleted uranium is a mildly radioactive waste product that is stockpiled worldwide. The chemical reactivity of uranium complexes is well documented, including the stoichiometric activation of small molecules of biological and industrial interest such as H2O, CO2, CO, or N2 (refs 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11), but catalytic transformations with actinides remain underexplored in comparison to transition-metal catalysis. For reduction of water to H2, complexes of low-valent uranium show the highest potential, but are known to react violently and uncontrollably forming stable bridging oxo or uranyl species. As a result, only a few oxidations of uranium with water have been reported so far; all stoichiometric. Catalytic H2 production, however, requires the reductive recovery of the catalyst via a challenging cleavage of the uranium-bound oxygen-containing ligand. Here we report the electrocatalytic water reduction observed with a trisaryloxide U(III) complex [((Ad,MeArO)3mes)U] (refs 18 and 19)—the first homogeneous uranium catalyst for H2 production from H2O. The catalytic cycle involves rare terminal U(IV)-OH and U(V)=O complexes, which have been isolated, characterized, and proven to be integral parts of the catalytic mechanism. The recognition of uranium compounds as potentially useful catalysts suggests new applications for such light actinides. The development of uranium-based catalysts provides new perspectives on nuclear waste management strategies, by suggesting that mildly radioactive depleted uranium—an abundant waste product of the nuclear power industry—could be a valuable resource.

  15. Improved fluorimetric measurement of uranium uptake and distribution in spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borcia, Catalin [' ' Alexandru Ioan Cuza' ' Univ., Iasi (Romania). Dept. of Physics; Popa, Karin; Cecal, Alexandru [' ' Alexandru Ioan Cuza' ' Univ., Iasi (Romania). Dept. of Chemistry; Murariu, Manuela [' ' Petru Poni' ' Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Iasi (Romania)

    2016-08-01

    Uranium uptake and (radio)toxicity was tested on spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in a laboratory study using differently concentrated uranium nitrate solutions. Within these experiments, two analytical assays of uranium were comparatively tested: a fast and improved fluorimetric assay and the classical colorimetric (U(IV)-arsenazo(III) complexation) one. During the germination, the wheat seeds and plantlets supported well the uranium solutions of treatment within the entire concentration range (1 x 10{sup -4} -5 x 10{sup -3} M). Uranium proved to be non (radio)toxic to wheat as compared with other natural and anthropogenic radiocations, probably because its uptake by spring wheat during the germination is low. Indeed, only a small fraction of uranium administered was located within the roots, whereas the uranium content of the stems was negligible. A high correlation between the results obtained by two analytical methods was found. However, the fluorimetric assay proved to be more reliable and fast, and accurate.

  16. Determination of low concentration of uranium in uranium amalgam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of the strong interference in the determination of low concentrations of uranium in uranium amalgam by spectrophotometry, a new and rapid method has been developed for the removal of the interference of mercury(II) ion in the range of low uranium concentration by reducing Hg(II) to Hg in the sample dissolved in nitric acid with ascorbic acid. The separated uranium in the solution is determined by spectrophotometry in the concentration range of 0.25 approximately 5 mg/g uranium amalgam. The average error is about 2%. Very low concentrations of uranium (approximately 0.25 mg/g) in the uranium amalgam can be determined directly by fluorometric method. No interference effect has been observed at the mercury to uranium ratio up to 105; the average error is about 10%. (author)

  17. Australia's uranium export potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the period 1954-71 in Australia approximately 9000 MT of U3O8 was produced from five separate localities. Of this, 7000 MT was exported to the United Kingdom and United States and the balance stockpiled by the Australian Atomic Energy Commission (AAEC). Australia's uranium ore reserves occur in eight deposits in three states and the Northern Territory. However, 83% of Australia's reserves are contained in four deposits in lower Proterozoic rocks in the East Alligator River region of the Northern Territory. The AAEC has calculated Australia's recoverable uranium reserves by eliminating estimated losses during the mining and milling of the ores. AAEC has estimated reasonably assured resources of 289,000 MT of uranium at a recovery cost of less than US$80 per kilogram uranium. The companies have collectively announced a larger ore reserve than the Australian Atomic Energy Commission. This difference is a result of the companies adopting different ore reserve categories. On August 25, 1977, the federal government announced that Australia would develop its uranium resources subject to stringent environmental controls, recognition of Aboriginal Land Rights, and international safeguards. Australian uranium production should gradually increase from 1981 onward, growing to 10,000 to 15,000 MT by 1985-86. Further increases in capacity may emerge during the second half of the 1980s when expansion plans are implemented. Exploration for uranium has not been intensive due to delays in developing the existing deposits. It is likely that present reserves can be substantially upgraded if more exploration is carried out. 6 figures, 3 tables

  18. Influence of uranium hydride oxidation on uranium metal behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work addresses concerns that the rapid, exothermic oxidation of active uranium hydride in air could stimulate an exothermic reaction (burning) involving any adjacent uranium metal, so as to increase the potential hazard arising from a hydride reaction. The effect of the thermal reaction of active uranium hydride, especially in contact with uranium metal, does not increase in proportion with hydride mass, particularly when considering large quantities of hydride. Whether uranium metal continues to burn in the long term is a function of the uranium metal and its surroundings. The source of the initial heat input to the uranium, if sufficient to cause ignition, is not important. Sustained burning of uranium requires the rate of heat generation to be sufficient to offset the total rate of heat loss so as to maintain an elevated temperature. For dense uranium, this is very difficult to achieve in naturally occurring circumstances. Areas of the uranium surface can lose heat but not generate heat. Heat can be lost by conduction, through contact with other materials, and by convection and radiation, e.g. from areas where the uranium surface is covered with a layer of oxidised material, such as burned-out hydride or from fuel cladding. These rates of heat loss are highly significant in relation to the rate of heat generation by sustained oxidation of uranium in air. Finite volume modelling has been used to examine the behaviour of a magnesium-clad uranium metal fuel element within a bottle surrounded by other un-bottled fuel elements. In the event that the bottle is breached, suddenly, in air, it can be concluded that the bulk uranium metal oxidation reaction will not reach a self-sustaining level and the mass of uranium oxidised will likely to be small in relation to mass of uranium hydride oxidised. (authors)

  19. Evaluation of hydroxamic acid in uranium extraction process : literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Uranium Extraction (UREX) process is being developed for the spent oxide fuel from light water reactors as part of the Accelerator Transmutation of Waste Project. The UREX process is similar to the Plutonium and Uranium Extraction (PUREX) process in that it involves solvent extraction based on a tributyl phosphate extractant. To assure that actinide reduction and complexation are effective, the reductant/complexant aceto-hydroxamic acid is being considered for use in the UREX process. The following literature review describes the solvent extraction, kinetics, oxidation-reduction, and complexation properties of aceto-hydroxamic acid and its derivatives

  20. The uranium deposits of Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principal types of uranium deposits in Ontario are carbonatites and fenites, alkalic volcanic rocks, pegiatites, calc-silicate rocks, pyritic quartz-pebble conglomerates, polymictic conglomerates and some pelitic rocks, and various 'pitchblende' deposits including late Precambrian unconformities, possibly late Precambrian diabase dikes, and other unconformities: carbonates, sandstones, lignites, and semi-pelitic rocks of middle and upper Precambrian age. Only red unzoned pegmatite and the pyritic quartz-pebble conglomerate have supported production. Ontario reasonably assured and estimated resources in the economic and subeconomic categories in 1977 amounted to 553 000 tonnes U, and 1977 production was 4000 tonnes U. Measured, indicated, and inferred resources in the Elliot Lake - Agnew Lake area are at least 400 000 tonnes U. The latter deposits are also a significant thorium resource. Geological features reflecting major changes in physics and chemistry are prime controls on distribution of uranium deposits. Geological province and subprovince boundaries, major faults, higher metamorphic grades, domain boundaries related to quartz monzonite batholiths, alkalic complexes, and the distribution of carbonate rocks are examples of such geological features

  1. Innovative Elution Processes for Recovering Uranium from Seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wai, Chien [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Tian, Guoxin [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Janke, Christopher [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-05-29

    Utilizing amidoxime-based polymer sorbents for extraction of uranium from seawater has attracted considerable interest in recent years. Uranium collected in the sorbent is recovered typically by elution with an acid. One drawback of acid elution is deterioration of the sorbent which is a significant factor that limits the economic competitiveness of the amidoxime-based sorbent systems for sequestering uranium from seawater. Developing innovative elution processes to improve efficiency and to minimize loss of sorbent capacity become essential in order to make this technology economically feasible for large-scale industrial applications. This project has evaluated several elution processes including acid elution, carbonate elution, and supercritical fluid elution for recovering uranium from amidoxime-based polymer sorbents. The elution efficiency, durability and sorbent regeneration for repeated uranium adsorption- desorption cycles in simulated seawater have been studied. Spectroscopic techniques are used to evaluate chemical nature of the sorbent before and after elution. A sodium carbonate-hydrogen peroxide elution process for effective removal of uranium from amidoxime-based sorbent is developed. The cause of this sodium carbonate and hydrogen peroxide synergistic leaching of uranium from amidoxime-based sorbent is attributed to the formation of an extremely stable uranyl peroxo-carbonato complex. The efficiency of uranium elution by the carbonate-hydrogen peroxide method is comparable to that of the hydrochloric acid elution but damage to the sorbent material is much less for the former. The carbonate- hydrogen peroxide elution also does not need any elaborate step to regenerate the sorbent as those required for hydrochloric acid leaching. Several CO2-soluble ligands have been tested for extraction of uranium from the sorbent in supercritical fluid carbon dioxide. A mixture of hexafluoroacetylacetone and tri-n-butylphosphate shows the best result but uranium

  2. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Belgium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium occurrences and resources - To date the uranium identified in Belgium is limited to a number of occurrences and none of these have as yet proved significant from a reserve or resource viewpoint. The main uranium occurrences ares (1) In the Upper Cambrian graphite schists corresponding to the culm of Sweden small zones are found (30 - 50 cm thick) with an average of 20 ppm uranium. (2) Near Vise at the base of the Carboniferous the Visean formation is discordantly superimposed on the Permian (Frasnian) and overlain by shales and phyllites. Solution pockets at the boundary contain phosphatic lenses that contain uranium values of up to 200 ppm. Autunite and Torbernite are the main uranium minerals associated with a number of complex phosphatic minerals. Within the Chalk (Maestrichtien) of the Mons basin, that is mainly in the Ciply - St. Symphorien and Baudow district. Here is found enrichment of uranium up to 140 ppm over large areas related to phosphatic chalk. The thickness of the zone varies from a few to 20 metres. However, as the P2O5 content is not high enough for the deposits to be exploited at present for phosphate there is little possibility of the uranium being concentrated at high enough levels to be exploited for itself alone. (4) Near to Vielsalm (in the Stavelot Massif) are some thin quartz veins containing small amounts of copper and uranium minerals (Torbornite). Values of up to 70 ppm are recorded. (5) A number of low uranium values are recorded associated with phosphatic nodules and zones in the Lower Pleistocene and Tertiary

  3. Innovative Elution Processes for Recovering Uranium from Seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utilizing amidoxime-based polymer sorbents for extraction of uranium from seawater has attracted considerable interest in recent years. Uranium collected in the sorbent is recovered typically by elution with an acid. One drawback of acid elution is deterioration of the sorbent which is a significant factor that limits the economic competitiveness of the amidoxime-based sorbent systems for sequestering uranium from seawater. Developing innovative elution processes to improve efficiency and to minimize loss of sorbent capacity become essential in order to make this technology economically feasible for large-scale industrial applications. This project has evaluated several elution processes including acid elution, carbonate elution, and supercritical fluid elution for recovering uranium from amidoxime-based polymer sorbents. The elution efficiency, durability and sorbent regeneration for repeated uranium adsorption- desorption cycles in simulated seawater have been studied. Spectroscopic techniques are used to evaluate chemical nature of the sorbent before and after elution. A sodium carbonate-hydrogen peroxide elution process for effective removal of uranium from amidoxime-based sorbent is developed. The cause of this sodium carbonate and hydrogen peroxide synergistic leaching of uranium from amidoxime-based sorbent is attributed to the formation of an extremely stable uranyl peroxo-carbonato complex. The efficiency of uranium elution by the carbonate-hydrogen peroxide method is comparable to that of the hydrochloric acid elution but damage to the sorbent material is much less for the former. The carbonate- hydrogen peroxide elution also does not need any elaborate step to regenerate the sorbent as those required for hydrochloric acid leaching. Several CO2-soluble ligands have been tested for extraction of uranium from the sorbent in supercritical fluid carbon dioxide. A mixture of hexafluoroacetylacetone and tri-n-butylphosphate shows the best result but uranium

  4. Uranium mineral base of the Republic of Uzbekistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main uranium estimated and inferred resources making up the mineral base of Republic of Uzbekistan are located in the Central Kyzylkum uranium ore province. Uranium deposits of the province belong to two types: sandstone and black-shale ones. Twenty-two deposits of the sandstone type have been identified in the Central Kyzylkum province and 5 deposits of the black-shale type have been discovered in the province. 114.7 Kt of uranium of the sandstone type from 138.8 Kt can be extracted by underground leaching with operation costs not more than $40/kg of uranium, 24.2 Kt will cost up to $130/kg due to complex geo-technical conditions. 36.0 Kt of uranium from 47.0 Kt of the black-shale type are open pittable with subsequent heap leaching with operation cost not more than $40/kg of uranium. 11.0 Kt located deeper can be mined out with operation costs up to $130/kg. As for 1 January 1999, inferred traditional resources (EAR-II+SP or P1+P2) are 242.7 Kt of uranium, including 188.8 Kt of the sandstone type and 53.9 Kt of black-shale type. Small, 3%, reduction of the inferred resources compared with 1 January 1997 occurred because part of these resources was provided up to EAR-I category after further exploration. Navoi Hydro-Metallurgical Plant (NHMP) deals with uranium operation on the territory of Uzbekistan since 1956. The NHMP comprises following mining operations: Severnoe operation in Uchkuduk, operation in Zafarabad and Yuzhnoe operation in Nurabad. Five modern towns with total population about 500 000 have been constructed on the base of the uranium mining industry. Background radioactivity of territory of Uzbekistan is defined by radionuclides (mainly uranium and thorium) dispersed in rocks and soils. Technogenic radionuclide pollution of territory of Uzbekistan occurs due to mining operation activity in general. Environmental conditions in underground waters on areas of mineral deposits are unfavorable even before mining. The underground waters are highly

  5. Investigating the structural changes of uranium dioxide dependent on additives, Phase I - Uranium-oxide system from structural-phase aspect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Having in mind the complex structure of the system uranium-oxygen, and that experimental studies of this system lead to controversial conclusions, an extensive review and analysis of the papers published on this subject were needed. This review wold be very useful for interpreting the expected structural changes of the uranium dioxide dependent on the additives

  6. Uranium hexafluoride handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Field Office, and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., are co-sponsoring this Second International Conference on Uranium Hexafluoride Handling. The conference is offered as a forum for the exchange of information and concepts regarding the technical and regulatory issues and the safety aspects which relate to the handling of uranium hexafluoride. Through the papers presented here, we attempt not only to share technological advances and lessons learned, but also to demonstrate that we are concerned about the health and safety of our workers and the public, and are good stewards of the environment in which we all work and live. These proceedings are a compilation of the work of many experts in that phase of world-wide industry which comprises the nuclear fuel cycle. Their experience spans the entire range over which uranium hexafluoride is involved in the fuel cycle, from the production of UF6 from the naturally-occurring oxide to its re-conversion to oxide for reactor fuels. The papers furnish insights into the chemical, physical, and nuclear properties of uranium hexafluoride as they influence its transport, storage, and the design and operation of plant-scale facilities for production, processing, and conversion to oxide. The papers demonstrate, in an industry often cited for its excellent safety record, continuing efforts to further improve safety in all areas of handling uranium hexafluoride

  7. Uranium deposits of Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazil is a country of vast natural resources, including numerous uranium deposits. In support of the country's nuclear power program, Brazil has developed the most active uranium industry in South America. Brazil has one operating reactor (Angra 1, a 626-MWe PWR), and two under construction. The country's economic challenges have slowed the progress of its nuclear program. At present, the Pocos de Caldas district is the only active uranium production. In 1990, the Cercado open-pit mine produced approximately 45 metric tons (MT) U3O8 (100 thousand pounds). Brazil's state-owned uranium production and processing company, Uranio do Brasil, announced it has decided to begin shifting its production from the high-cost and nearly depleted deposits at Pocos de Caldas, to lower-cost reserves at Lagoa Real. Production at Lagoa Real is schedules to begin by 1993. In addition to these two districts, Brazil has many other known uranium deposits, and as a whole, it is estimated that Brazil has over 275,000 MT U3O8 (600 million pounds U3O8) in reserves

  8. Microbial reduction of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reduction of the soluble, oxidized form of uranium, U(VI), to insoluble U(IV) is an important mechanism for the immobilization of uranium in aquatic sediments and for the formation of some uranium ores. U(VI) reduction had generally been regarded as an abiologial reaction in which sulphide, molecular hydrogen or organic compounds function as the reductant. Microbial involvement in U(VI) reduction has been considered to be limited to indirect effects, such as microbial metabolism providing the reduced compounds for abiological U(VI) reduction and microbial cell walls providing a surface to stimulate abiological U(VI) reduction. We report here, however, that dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can obtain energy for growth by electron transport to U(VI). This novel form of microbial metabolism can be much faster than commonly cited abiological mechanisms for U(VI) reduction. Not only do these findings expand the known potential terminal electron acceptors for microbial energy transduction, they offer a likely explanation for the deposition of uranium in aquatic sediments and aquifers, and suggest a method for biological remediation of environments contaminated with uranium. (author)

  9. Uranium hexafluoride handling. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    The United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Field Office, and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., are co-sponsoring this Second International Conference on Uranium Hexafluoride Handling. The conference is offered as a forum for the exchange of information and concepts regarding the technical and regulatory issues and the safety aspects which relate to the handling of uranium hexafluoride. Through the papers presented here, we attempt not only to share technological advances and lessons learned, but also to demonstrate that we are concerned about the health and safety of our workers and the public, and are good stewards of the environment in which we all work and live. These proceedings are a compilation of the work of many experts in that phase of world-wide industry which comprises the nuclear fuel cycle. Their experience spans the entire range over which uranium hexafluoride is involved in the fuel cycle, from the production of UF{sub 6} from the naturally-occurring oxide to its re-conversion to oxide for reactor fuels. The papers furnish insights into the chemical, physical, and nuclear properties of uranium hexafluoride as they influence its transport, storage, and the design and operation of plant-scale facilities for production, processing, and conversion to oxide. The papers demonstrate, in an industry often cited for its excellent safety record, continuing efforts to further improve safety in all areas of handling uranium hexafluoride. Selected papers were processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  10. Uranium tailings sampling manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this manual is to describe the requisite sampling procedures for the application of uniform high-quality standards to detailed geotechnical, hydrogeological, geochemical and air quality measurements at Canadian uranium tailings disposal sites. The selection and implementation of applicable sampling procedures for such measurements at uranium tailings disposal sites are complicated by two primary factors. Firstly, the physical and chemical nature of uranium mine tailings and effluent is considerably different from natural soil materials and natural waters. Consequently, many conventional methods for the collection and analysis of natural soils and waters are not directly applicable to tailings. Secondly, there is a wide range in the physical and chemical nature of uranium tailings. The composition of the ore, the milling process, the nature of tailings depositon, and effluent treatment vary considerably and are highly site-specific. Therefore, the definition and implementation of sampling programs for uranium tailings disposal sites require considerable evaluation, and often innovation, to ensure that appropriate sampling and analysis methods are used which provide the flexibility to take into account site-specific considerations. The following chapters describe the objective and scope of a sampling program, preliminary data collection, and the procedures for sampling of tailings solids, surface water and seepage, tailings pore-water, and wind-blown dust and radon

  11. Uranium markets after the hangover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, H. (Hugh Douglas and Co. Ltd., San Francisco, CA (USA))

    1982-07-01

    A report is given on the current depressed state of the world's uranium markets and on the prospects for recovery. The impact on the uranium industry of low prices and reduced demand are outlined.

  12. The Toxicity of Depleted Uranium

    OpenAIRE

    Wayne Briner

    2010-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is an emerging environmental pollutant that is introduced into the environment primarily by military activity. While depleted uranium is less radioactive than natural uranium, it still retains all the chemical toxicity associated with the original element. In large doses the kidney is the target organ for the acute chemical toxicity of this metal, producing potentially lethal tubular necrosis. In contrast, chronic low dose exposure to depleted uranium may not produce a c...

  13. Uranium resources, production and demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power-generating capacity will continue to expand, albeit at a slower pace than during the past fifteen years. This expansion must be matched by an adequately increasing supply of uranium. This report compares uranium supply and demand data in free market countries with the nuclear industry's natural uranium requirements up to the year 2000. It also reviews the status of uranium exploration, resources and production in 46 countries

  14. Radiation damage of metal uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is concerned with the role of dispersion second phase in uranium and burnup rate. The role of dispersion phases in radiation stability of metal uranium was studies by three methods: variation of electric conductivity dependent on the neutron flux and temperature of pure uranium for different states of dispersion second phase; influence of dispersion phase on the radiation creep; transmission electron microscopy of fresh and irradiated uranium

  15. Uranium extraction technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1983 the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD/NEA) and the IAEA jointly published a book on Uranium Extraction Technology. A primary objective of this report was to document the significant technological developments that took place during the 1970s. The purpose of this present publication is to update and expand the original book. It includes background information about the principle of the unit operations used in uranium ore processing and summarizes the current state of the art. The publication also seeks to preserve the technology and the operating 'know-how' developed over the past ten years. This publication is one of a series of Technical Reports on uranium ore processing that have been prepared by the Division of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management at the IAEA. A complete list of these reports is included as an addendum. Refs, figs and tabs

  16. Therapy of uranium contaminations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renal risks associated with the use of chelating agent as a treatment for acute uranium contamination were investigated. Rats were given a single intramuscular injection of uranyl nitrate solution. The percentage of renal uptake of uranyl nitrate as a function of the quantity injected was measured. Then the effect of a single DTPA intraperitoneal injection and the effect of a single bicarbonate injection on renal uptake of uranyl nitrate were studied. The preliminary results were as follows: constancy of renal uptake of uranyl nitrate (13 to 20% of the quantity injected); harmlessness of DTPA as a treatment for uranium contamination (DTPA does not increase uranium renal burden); inefficacy of bicarbonates on uranyl renal uptake

  17. The Kintyre uranium project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, B. [Canning Resources Pty. Ltd., Perth, WA (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    The Kintyre Uranium Project is being developed by Canning Resources Pty Ltd, a subsidiary of Rio Tinto (formerly CRA). The work on the project includes the planning and management of a number of background environmental studies. The company has also commissioned studies by external consultants into process technologies, mining strategies and techniques for extracting the uranium ore from the waste rock. In addition, Canning Resources has made a detailed assessment of the worldwide market potential for Australian uranium in the late 1990s and into the 21st century. The most significant factor affecting the future of this project is the current product price. This price is insufficient to justify the necessary investment to bring this project into production. 8 figs.

  18. The Kintyre uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Kintyre Uranium Project is being developed by Canning Resources Pty Ltd, a subsidiary of Rio Tinto (formerly CRA). The work on the project includes the planning and management of a number of background environmental studies. The company has also commissioned studies by external consultants into process technologies, mining strategies and techniques for extracting the uranium ore from the waste rock. In addition, Canning Resources has made a detailed assessment of the worldwide market potential for Australian uranium in the late 1990s and into the 21st century. The most significant factor affecting the future of this project is the current product price. This price is insufficient to justify the necessary investment to bring this project into production

  19. Early uranium politics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An account is given of early uranium politics, including personal reminiscences. The discovery of and early work on uranium is sketched, leading to the price war over the sale of radium. Details are given of the situation as it developed from the discovery of fission and the outbreak of war, when large quantities of ore were secured for use in the United States atomic bomb project. Negotiations with the Belgians for Belgian Congo ores are described. The post-war period is covered, with a near monopoly for the US-UK-Canada purchasing agency changing to an open market for uranium. The attempts to get agreement on safeguards, to avoid proliferation of atomic weapons, and the particular situation of the French government, are also covered. (U.K.)

  20. Uranium exploration in Ecuador

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 600-km segment of the Andean Cordillera in Ecuador includes zones that can be correlated, geologically, with uranium districts elsewhere in the Andes. It is believed that these essentially unexplored zones have the potential for economic uranium mineralization. Exploration activity to date has been limited, although it has involved both geochemical and radiometric techniques to evaluate geological concepts. Minor uranium occurrences (with chemical analyses up to 100 ppm) have been encountered, which provide further incentive to commence large-scale systematic exploration. It is recognized that a very large exploration budget and considerable technical expertise will be required to ensure exploration success. Consequently, participation by groups of proven capability from other countries will be sought for Ecuador's national exploration programme. (author)

  1. Uranium Enrichment, an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This general presentation on uranium enrichment will be followed by lectures on more specific topics including descriptions of enrichment processes and assessments of the prevailing commercial and industrial situations. I shall therefore avoid as much as possible duplications with these other lectures, and rather dwell on: some theoretical aspects of enrichment in general, underlying the differences between statistical and selective processes, a review and comparison between enrichment processes, remarks of general order regarding applications, the proliferation potential of enrichment. It is noteworthy that enrichment: may occur twice in the LWR fuel cycle: first by enriching natural uranium, second by reenriching uranium recovered from reprocessing, must meet LWR requirements, and in particular higher assays required by high burn up fuel elements, bears on the structure of the entire front part of the fuel cycle, namely in the conversion/reconversion steps only involving UF6 for the moment. (author). tabs., figs., 4 refs

  2. Uranium extraction from seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After an introduction to the physics and chemistry of the sea and an estimation of the chances for the absorption of uranium from rivers, the material-sepecific characteristics of the adsorber technology are decribed in detail. Then, the methods used for gaining uranium form seawater are described with special regard to the tidal and the so-called serial (sequency) method. Whether all methods described can be realised is an economic problem since very high quantitics of water are necessary because of the low contents of uranium. A positive energy balance (gained energy/lost energy) is not definitely ensured yet for the production methods used. The development measures to be taken to obtain a positive energy balance are briefly described, and the research programme of the UEBG is mentioned. (UA)

  3. Uranium - surplus or scarcity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new joint report of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency will help to remove some of the prevailing confusion about the world's actual and potential resources of uranium. The Agencies confirm that the danger of a worldwide uranium shortage has receded and that, over the new few years, there could actually develop an over-supply situation, with a consequent drop in prices. They emphasise, however, that this will be a temporary phenomenon and that inadequate uranium supplies may set limits, in the longer run, to the rapid build-up of nuclear power installations. The report is the latest in a series of similar studies which now normally appear at two-yearly intervals. (author)

  4. Uranium immobilization and nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considerable information useful in nuclear waste storage can be gained by studying the conditions of uranium ore deposit formation. Further information can be gained by comparing the chemistry of uranium to nuclear fission products and other radionuclides of concern to nuclear waste disposal. Redox state appears to be the most important variable in controlling uranium solubility, especially at near neutral pH, which is characteristic of most ground water. This is probably also true of neptunium, plutonium, and technetium. Further, redox conditions that immobilize uranium should immobilize these elements. The mechanisms that have produced uranium ore bodies in the Earth's crust are somewhat less clear. At the temperatures of hydrothermal uranium deposits, equilibrium models are probably adequate, aqueous uranium (VI) being reduced and precipitated by interaction with ferrous-iron-bearing oxides and silicates. In lower temperature roll-type uranium deposits, overall equilibrium may not have been achieved. The involvement of sulfate-reducing bacteria in ore-body formation has been postulated, but is uncertain. Reduced sulfur species do, however, appear to be involved in much of the low temperature uranium precipitation. Assessment of the possibility of uranium transport in natural ground water is complicated because the system is generally not in overall equilibrium. For this reason, Eh measurements are of limited value. If a ground water is to be capable of reducing uranium, it must contain ions capable of reducing uranium both thermodynamically and kinetically. At present, the best candidates are reduced sulfur species

  5. Uranium resources, demand and production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimations of the demand and production of principal uranium resource categories are presented. The estimations based on data analysis made by a joint 'NEA/IAEA Working Party on Uranium Resources' and the corresponding results are published by the OECD (Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development) in the 'Uranium Resources, Production and Demand' Known as 'Red Book'. (M.C.K.)

  6. Uranium hazards stressed by Ham

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ham report, from the Ontario Royal Commission on the Health and Safety of Workers in Mines, is summarized. An unprecedented postwar uranium mining boom strained regulatory resources, causing a disproportionate number of uranium miners to succumb to silicosis. Ventilation, not job rotation, is the answer to radiation protection in uranium mining. (E.C.B.)

  7. Uranium. Resources, production and demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The events characterising the world uranium market in the last several years illustrate the persistent uncertainly faced by uranium producers and consumers worldwide. With world nuclear capacity expanding and uranium production satisfying only about 60 per cent of demand, uranium stockpiles continue to be depleted at a high rate. The uncertainty related to the remaining levels of world uranium stockpiles and to the amount of surplus defence material that will be entering the market makes it difficult to determine when a closer balance between uranium supply and demand will be reached. Information in this report provides insights into changes expected in uranium supply and demand until well into the next century. The 'Red Book', jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, is the foremost reference on uranium. This world report is based on official information from 59 countries and includes compilations of statistics on resources, exploration, production and demand as of 1 January 1997. It provides substantial new information from all of the major uranium producing centres in Africa, Australia, Eastern Europe, North America and the New Independent States, including the first-ever official reports on uranium production in Estonia, Mongolia, the Russian Federation and Uzbekistan. It also contains an international expert analysis of industry statistics and worldwide projections of nuclear energy growth, uranium requirements and uranium supply

  8. Sandstone-type uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    World-class sandstone-type uranium deposits are defined as epigenetic concentrations of uranium minerals occurring as uneven impregnations and minor massive replacements primarily in fluvial, lacustrine, and deltaic sandstone formations. The main purpose of this introductory paper is to define, classify, and introduce to the general geologic setting for sandstone-type uranium deposits

  9. Atomic-scale studies of uranium oxidation and corrosion by water vapour

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, TL; Coe, C.; Bagot, PAJ; Morrall, P; Smith, GDW; Scott, T.; Moody, MP

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the corrosion of uranium is important for its safe, long-term storage. Uranium metal corrodes rapidly in air, but the exact mechanism remains subject to debate. Atom Probe Tomography was used to investigate the surface microstructure of metallic depleted uranium specimens following polishing and exposure to moist air. A complex, corrugated metal-oxide interface was observed, with approximately 60 at.% oxygen content within the oxide. Interestingly, a very thin (~5 nm) interfacia...

  10. Determination of traces of uranium in sea water after separation by froth flotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium in sea water is separated by froth flotation of the uranium (VI)-Arsenazo III-Zephiramine ion-adduct and then determined by neutron activation or spectrophotometric method using the uranium(IV)-Arsenazo III complex. Results of the analysis of Pacific coastal samples by the two methods are in good agreement; an average value of 3.0μg U/per liter was obtained. (author)

  11. The uranium International trade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this thesis is the understanding of how the present dynamic of uranium International trade is developed, the variables which fall into, the factors that are affecting and conditioning it, in order to clarify which are going to be the outlook in the future of this important resource in front of the present ecological situation and the energetic panorama of XXI Century. For this purpose, as starting point, the uranium is considered as a strategic material which importance take root in its energetic potential as alternate energy source, and for this reason in Chapter I, the general problem of raw materials, its classification and present situation in the global market is presented. In Chapter II, by means of a historical review, is explain what uranium is, how it was discovered, and how since the end of the past Century and during the last three decades of present, uranium pass of practically unknown element, to the position of a strategic raw material, which by degrees, generate an International market, owing to its utilization as a basic resource in the generation of energy. Chapter III, introduce us in the roll played by uranium, since its warlike applications until its utilization in nuclear reactors for the generation of electricity. Also is explain the reason for this change in the perception at global level. Finally, in Chapter IV we enter upon specifically in the present conditions of the International market of this mineral throughout the trends of supply and demand, the main producers, users, price dynamics, and the correlation among these economical variables and other factors of political, social and ecological nature. All of these with the purpose to found out, if there exist, a meaning of the puzzle that seems to be the uranium International trade

  12. Uranium occurence in California near Bucaramanga (Columbia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mining district of California, Bucaramanga, is on the west side of the Cordillera Oriental in the Santander massif region. The oldest rocks of the area form a complex of metamorphites and migmatites of the predevonic age. Amphibolite various types of paragneiss and orthogneiss are represented. Several stages of metamorphism can be documented in some rocks, as well as double anatexis. Triassic to jurassic quarz diorites and leukogranites show wide distribution. Porphyric rocks of granodioritic to granitic composition, to which the uranium mineralization is mainly bonded, intruded into the sediments of the lower cretaceous. Atomic absorption spectral analyses were carried out for the elements Cu, Zn and Li, as well as the uranium contents of some samples using fluorimetry. Uranium is primarily bonded to pitch blende and coffinite. The latter mostly occur in fine distribution grown in quarz and belong to the most recent mineralization phase. Autunite, meta-autunite, torbernite, meta-torbernite, zeunerite, meta-zeunerite and meta uranocircite detected as secondary uranium minerals. (orig./HP)

  13. 300 Area Uranium Stabilization Through Polyphosphate Injection: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermeul, Vincent R.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Fritz, Brad G.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Mackley, Rob D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Williams, Mark D.

    2009-06-30

    amendment arrival response data indicate some degree of overlap between the reactive species and thus potential for the formation of calcium-phosphate mineral phases (i.e., apatite formation), the efficiency of this treatment approach was relatively poor. In general, uranium performance monitoring results support the hypothesis that limited long-term treatment capacity (i.e., apatite formation) was established during the injection test. Two separate overarching issues affect the efficacy of apatite remediation for uranium sequestration within the 300 Area: 1) the efficacy of apatite for sequestering uranium under the present geochemical and hydrodynamic conditions, and 2) the formation and emplacement of apatite via polyphosphate technology. In addition, the long-term stability of uranium sequestered via apatite is dependent on the chemical speciation of uranium, surface speciation of apatite, and the mechanism of retention, which is highly susceptible to dynamic geochemical conditions. It was expected that uranium sequestration in the presence of hydroxyapatite would occur by sorption and/or surface complexation until all surface sites have been depleted, but that the high carbonate concentrations in the 300 Area would act to inhibit the transformation of sorbed uranium to chernikovite and/or autunite. Adsorption of uranium by apatite was never considered a viable approach for in situ uranium sequestration in and of itself, because by definition, this is a reversible reaction. The efficacy of uranium sequestration by apatite assumes that the adsorbed uranium would subsequently convert to autunite, or other stable uranium phases. Because this appears to not be the case in the 300 Area aquifer, even in locations near the river, apatite may have limited efficacy for the retention and long-term immobilization of uranium at the 300 Area site..

  14. Uranium release from boom clay in bicarbonate media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The release of natural uranium from Boom Clay was studied to better understand the mechanisms governing the solid-liquid partitioning of uranium. Batch leaching experiments suggested that the portion of natural uranium released from clay is associated with colloids at a low bicarbonate concentration prevailing in Boom Clay. At increased bicarbonate concentrations, uranium was present predominantly as dissolved species indicating a formation of uranium carbonate complexes. The in situ aqueous uranium concentration, i.e., the concentration in the pore waters collected by piezometers was found to be 2 to 3 orders of magnitudes lower than the one measured by the batch techniques. These results illustrated that the batch techniques may cause a remobilization of uranium containing colloids from clay surfaces into solution when clay is suspended, agitated, and mechanically perturbed. These colloids are attributed to artefacts and are not considered to exist in situ because of the high compaction of Boom Clay. Due to the presence of colloids, a laboratory derived solid-liquid partitioning coefficient is not equivalent to and cannot simply be converted to the distribution coefficient Kd currently used in performance assessment calculations. (orig.)

  15. Current status of uranium exploration in Sri Lanka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apart from the few occurrences of Gondwana (Jurassic), Miocene and later sediments, most of Sri Lanka consists of Precambrian rocks of Archaean age. These rocks underwent metamorphism under amphibolite and granulite facies conditions about 200 Ma ago. Nine anomalous areas for uranium mineralization were identified after a preliminary geochemical survey of the whole island, except for the northwestern Miocene belt. Consistent low contents of uranium in stream sediment samples suggested that solution or hydromorphic dispersion of uranium is not a prominent mechanism and that most of the uranium dispersion is rather mechanical in nature in most of the country. Six of the above areas lie either within or close to the boundary between the Highland Series and the Vijayan Complex. The latter mainly consists of granitic gneisses, hornblende biotite gneisses, granitoids and migmatites formed under amphibolite facies conditions. Denser sampling (one sample per 1 km2) in Phase II of the programme in two areas, namely Maha Cya and Mala Oya, indicated that further exploration work would be worthwhile. A number of samples from these areas had uranium values greater than 500 ppm. Further, the composition of the amphiboles and pyroxenes from rocks of the Maha Cya area are comparable to those in rocks from known areas of uranium mineralization such as the Mary Kathleen uranium deposit in Australia. (author). 6 refs, 6 figs

  16. Chemwes Uranium Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chemwes Uranium Plant is located in an area which is underlain to a major extent by pinnacled dolomite. It was decided to adopt a replacement fill for support of light structures in preference to alternatives such as the installation of piles or 'bridging' between pinnacles. The 3 m thick soil 'raft' resulting from the fill replacement technique made it possible to support all but a very small number of foundations upon shallow spread footings or raft slabs. This article describes a replacement fill for support of light structures at the Chemwes Uranium Plant

  17. Uranium - Australia's decision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ministerial statements by the Prime Minister, Deputy Prime Minister, Acting Minister for Foreign Affairs, Minister for Aboriginal Affairs, Minister for Environmental, Housing and Community Development and the Minister for Health, concerning Australia's decision to mine and export uranium are presented. Background information setting out the factors which guided the Government in reaching its decision is included. Reference to the findings and recommendations of the Ranger Uranium Environmental Inquiry, nuclear safeguards, health and safety aspects of nuclear power generation, mining and milling safety and the impact of mining on Aboriginal society is also made. (J.R.)

  18. Uranium ore deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main uranium deposits and occurrences in the Argentine Republic are described, considering, in principle, their geologic setting, the kind of 'model' of the mineralization and its possible origin, and describing the ore species present in each case. The main uraniferous accumulations of the country include the models of 'sandstong type', veintype and impregnation type. There are also other kinds of accumulations, as in calcrete, etc. The main uranium production has been registered in the provinces of Mendoza, Salta, La Rioja, Chubut, Cordoba and San Luis. In each case, the minerals present are mentioned, having been recognized 37 different species all over the country (M.E.L.)

  19. Uranium conversion wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A set of mathematical equations was developed and used to estimate the radiological significance of each radionuclide potentially present in the uranium refining industry effluents. The equations described the evolution in time of the radionuclides activities in the uranium fuel cycle, from mining and milling, through the yellowcake, till the conversion effluents. Some radionuclides that are not usually monitored in conversion effluents (e.g. Pa-231 and Ac-227) were found to be potentially relevant from the radiological point of view in conversion facilities, and are certainly relevant in mining and milling industry, at least in a few waste streams. (author)

  20. Uranium exploration techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is discussed under the headings: introduction (genetic description of some uranium deposits; typical concentrations of uranium in the natural environment); sedimentary host rocks (sandstones; tabular deposits; roll-front deposits; black shales); metamorphic host rocks (exploration techniques); geologic techniques (alteration features in sandstones; favourable features in metamorphic rocks); geophysical techniques (radiometric surveys; surface vehicle methods; airborne methods; input surveys); geochemical techniques (hydrogeochemistry; petrogeochemistry; stream sediment geochemistry; pedogeochemistry; emanometry; biogeochemistry); geochemical model for roll-front deposits; geologic model for vein-like deposits. (U.K.)

  1. Production of sized particles of uranium oxides and uranium oxyfluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process is claimed for converting uranium hexafluoride (UF6) to uranium dioxide (UO2) of a relatively large particle size in a fluidized bed reactor by mixing uranium hexafluoride with a mixture of steam and hydrogen and by preliminary reacting in an ejector gaseous uranium hexafluoride with steam and hydrogen to form a mixture of uranium and oxide and uranium oxyfluoride seed particles of varying sizes, separating the larger particles from the smaller particles in a cyclone separator, recycling the smaller seed particles through the ejector to increase their size, and introducing the larger seed particles from the cyclone separator into a fluidized bed reactor where the seed particles serve as nuclei on which coarser particles of uranium dioxide are formed. 9 claims, 2 drawing figures

  2. Reactivity of ceramic coating materials with uranium and uranium trichlorid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Ho; Cho, Choon Ho; Lee, Yoon Sang; Lee, Han Soo; Kim, Jeong Guk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    Uranium and uranium alloys are typically induction melted in graphite crucibles under a vacuum. The graphite crucible is used for the manufacturing of uranium ingots in the casting equipment. But, due to the chemical reactivity of uranium and most alloying elements with carbon, a protective ceramic coating is generally applied to the crucibles. In this study, to investigate the most suitable ceramic coating material applied to graphite melting crucibles and ingot moldsused in the melting and casting of uranium in the casting equipment, firstly, the thermodynamic analysis was performed by using HSC software to investigate the reactivity between uranium and several ceramic materials and the experiments on the reaction of ceramic coated crucibles in molten uranium were carried out at 1300 .deg. C

  3. Reactivity of ceramic coating materials with uranium and uranium trichlorid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium and uranium alloys are typically induction melted in graphite crucibles under a vacuum. The graphite crucible is used for the manufacturing of uranium ingots in the casting equipment. But, due to the chemical reactivity of uranium and most alloying elements with carbon, a protective ceramic coating is generally applied to the crucibles. In this study, to investigate the most suitable ceramic coating material applied to graphite melting crucibles and ingot moldsused in the melting and casting of uranium in the casting equipment, firstly, the thermodynamic analysis was performed by using HSC software to investigate the reactivity between uranium and several ceramic materials and the experiments on the reaction of ceramic coated crucibles in molten uranium were carried out at 1300 .deg. C

  4. Ecological problems related to uranium mining and uranium reprocessing industry in Ukraine and restoration strategy concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    waste disposal sites located in Dnieprodzerzhinsk town and also from the mining water to the rivers near Zhevti Wody town. The actual Radiological Risks for individual estimated for population leaving in the vicinity of theses areas are low. However potential Radiological Risks for Population due to extra-ordinary situation and extreme hydrometeorological condition can be expected as significant. For instance, the former Pridneprovskiy Chemical Plant (PCP) is located alongside the Dnieper river on a large industrial complex with other industries such as coke and other metallurgical plants. During operation of the PCP nine tailings dumps were created containing about 42 million tones of radioactive wastes with a total activity of about 4 x 1015 Bq (≅100,000 Ci). The impact of tailing 'D' observes at the distance about 100 km from the release points. In particular relatively high Uranium concentration observes in the bottom sediment and in the aquatic biota of Dnieprovskoe reservoir. The high concentration of uranium in the water (up to 1,0-2,5 Bq l-1 ) time to time occurring in the Zheltaya River downstream of waste water released from Mines in Zhevti Wody. Some conclusions on Dose Assessment derived from prior studies by authors are the following: - The highest levels of human exposure are received by inhabitants of settlements located on the banks of Zheltaya and Konoplyanka rivers. - The annual dose estimates are about at the level (0.1 mSv per year) recommended by WHO (2003) as the maximum permissible for drinking water. - However, these streams are relatively small and known to be highly polluted with various contaminants; therefore, this water use are not for drinking, food preparation or other domestic needs. - For uranium, the chemical toxicity needs also to be considered. In the addendum to the WHO Guidelines (1998), a health-based guideline concentration of 0.002 mg U/litre was established, which is well below the limit based on radiological considerations

  5. Uranium sorption by tannin resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sorption of uranium by immobilised Eucalyptus Saligna Sm. and Lysiloma latisiliqua L tannins was investigated. Immobilization condition were analyzed. These resins resulted suitable adsorbent for the concentration of uranium from aqueous systems. The sorption of uranium is pH dependent. At pH 5.5 maximum in sorption capacity is registered. The presence of appreciable amount of sodium chloride do not have any effect on uranium removal. Carbonate and calcium ions in concentrations similar to these that could be found in sea water and other natural water do not decrease the uranium uptake. Tannin resins can be used several times without an appreciable decay of their sorption capacity

  6. Uranium mineralization in fluviatile facies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over half the world's known uranium reserves occur in fluviatile rocks. These deposits include Archean quartz-pebble conglomerates of alluvial fan facies and arkosic braided and meandering fluviatile sandstone facies. Uranium-bearing quartz-pebble conglomerates are described. Approximately 40% of the world's uranium reserves have been found in epigenetic sandstone deposits. Deposits of uranium in braided or meandering fluviatile sandstones can be grouped into peneconcordant and roll-front types. Uranium deposits are widely distributed through central, northern and western Australia but only a very small proportion of the reserves occur in fluviatile sequences

  7. Eldorado plans second uranium refinery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eldorado Nuclear Ltd. intends to open a new uranium refinery at Port Granby, Ont., by 1980, thereby tripling output of uranium hexafluoride. In the 1980's, the company plans to build a third refinery in Saskatchewan. The process of producing uranium hexafluoride from crude yellowcake is explained, and improvements introduced by Eldorado are discussed. They include a continuous denitrator for producing uranium trioxide, and 'pillow block' briquetting rollers for briquetting it before it is reduced with hydrogen to uranium dioxide. (N.D.H.)

  8. Uranium and nuclear energy: 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fourteenth symposium of the Uranium Institute marked the bicentenary of the discovery of uranium, with papers on the history of uranium and its mining, nuclear energy's peaceful applications and its future place. Symposium papers also dealt with the background to the 1990 Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference, the evidence for global warming, environmental regulations affecting energy supply in the USA, radiation effects, nuclear safety in the USSR, the Indian and Brazilian nuclear programmes, the enrichment fuel fabrication and MOX fuel industries, uranium supply and demand and uranium resources, the implications for nuclear energy of deregulation of electricity supply in the USA, EC and UK, fusion and new fission reactors. (author)

  9. Uranium enriched granites in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granites with uranium contents higher than normal occur in a variety of geological settings in the Swedish Precambrian, and represent a variety of granite types and ages. They may have been generated by (1) the anatexis of continental crust (2) processes occurring at a much greater depth. They commonly show enrichement in F, Sn, W and/or Mo. Only in one case is an important uranium mineralization thought to be directly related to a uranium-enriched granite, while the majority of epigenetic uranium mineralizations with economic potential are related to hydrothermal processes in areas where the bedrock is regionally uranium-enhanced. (Authors)

  10. Sandstone-type uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three overall factors are necessary for formation of uranium deposits in sandstone: a source of uranium, host rocks capable of transmitting uranium-bearing solutions, and a precipitant. Possible sources of uranium in sandstone-type deposits include groundwaters emanating from granitic highlands, arkosic sediments, tuffaceous material within or overlying the host rocks, connate fluids, and overlying black shales. The first three sources are considered the most likely. Host rocks are generally immature sandstones deposited in alluvial-fan, intermontane-basin or marginal-marine environments, but uranium deposits do occur in well-winnowed barrier-bar or eolian sands. Host rocks for uranium deposits generally show coefficients of permeability on the order of 1 to 100 gal/day/ft2. Precipitants are normally agents capable of reducing uranium from the uranyl to the uranous state. The association of uranium with organic matter is unequivocal; H2S, a powerful reductant, may have been present at the time of formation of some deposits but may go unnoticed today. Vanadium can serve to preserve the tabular characteristics of some deposits in the near-surface environment, but is considered an unlikely primary precipitant for uranium. Uranium deposits in sandstone are divided into two overall types: peneconcordant deposits, which occur in locally reducing environments in otherwise oxidized sandstones; and roll-type deposits, which occur at the margin of an area where an oxidized groundwater has permeated an otherwise reduced sandstone. Uranium deposits are further broken down into four subclasses; these are described

  11. Hydrolysis of uranium hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A literature survey is presented of uranium hexafluoride hydrolysis methods as the first step in UF6 conversion to UO2. Reviewed are early methods of hydrolysis, the hydrolysis by dry water vapour, the fluidized-bed method, and the liquid phase hydrolysis of UF6 gas. (J.P.)

  12. Geophysics in uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are no revolutionary new methods of uranium exploration on the horizon. Continuing improvements in existing methods and types of instrumentation are to be expected, but the main scope of improvement will hinge upon using the best of the available methods more meticulously and systematically, and paying more attention to the analysis of data. (author)

  13. Uranium prospection in Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The worldwide increase of energy consumption and high fossil fuels costs generates the necessity of alternative energy sources. At present, nuclear energy is substituting the use of hydrocarbons, due to its high performance and contribution to environmental preservation, since it avoids the emission of greenhouse gases. Uranium consumer countries will continue to increase its demand, and even, is expected the incorporation of new reactors in countries with emerging economies. Base in the statement considered above, investment in new mineral deposit is justified. At present, some countries are motivated to start or continue the uranium exploration because of the evolution of the nuclear energy industry. Venezuela started exploration in the mid of 1970s, and stopped at 1980s. Our purpose is to evaluate uranium resources potential in the country, both for own use or export. In order to locate potential areas for exploration, in this initial phase all data from previous period is being compiled, incorporating information from oil exploration (seismic data, wells profiles, etc.). This information is been digitalized to generate a database into a geographical information system. Preliminary results show three areas of interest, where new geological, geochemical and geophysical surveys are propose. At this time, we do not have specific information about ore reserves, but we have anomalous areas that have been established as starting points to continue the uranium exploration in the country. (author)

  14. Uranium: The recalcitrant commodity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uranium is analysed as a special market commodity and compared with other metals like copper. The supply-demand balance, production costs and the special form of pricing are discussed. The likely evaluation of inventories and the future capacity utilization are also discussed and commented. (author). 2 refs, 8 figs

  15. Uranium recovery process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process of recovering uranium from an aqueous medium containing both it and sulfuric acid which comprises contacting the medium with an anion exchange resin having tertiary amine groups, said resin being the product of (a) the reaction of polyethyleneimine and a dihaloalkane and (b) the subsequent reductive alkylation of the product of (a)

  16. Uranium and nuclear issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This seminar focussed on the major issues affecting the future of the entire nuclear fuel cycle. In particular it covered issues bearing on the formation of public policy in relation to the use of uranium as an energy source: economic risk, industrial risks, health effects, site selection, environmental issues, and public acceptance

  17. Diffusion of uranium hexafluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, J.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Gases in Gases, Liquids and their Mixtures' of Volume 15 `Diffusion in Gases, Liquids and Electrolytes' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. It is part of the chapter of the chapter `Diffusion in Pure Gases' and contains data on diffusion of uranium hexafluoride

  18. Radon in Uranium Mining. Proceedings of a Panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    main effect of radiological and waste management legislative controls is on prices and reserves, there are many important contributory factors which require study, such as the future impact on uranium exploration activity, uranium demand, present sales contracts, future sales contracts and the sociological effects on mining communities. An examination was made of what limit of severity the industry could tolerate in regard to further tightening of radiation exposure standards without severe consequences to uranium supplies, with the resulting serious implications for future nuclear power planning. It is probable that in future much of the new uranium supplies will have to come from new mines opened not only in the existing uranium-producing countries but also extensively in developing countries over the next decades. The Agency wishes to be able to advise future uranium producers, particularly in developing countries, of the requisite radiation exposure standards necessary to avoid harm to workers in the industry and of what the effect of these standards will be on economics, mine planning and production. One particularly useful and practical aspect of such assistance will be to provide advice on the design and engineering of good ventilation systems in new mines. Ventilation was, therefore, the theme of the second session of the Panel; it covered technical problems of mine ventilation specifically related to the elimination of radon gas from underground and deep open-pit uranium mines. The subject of the third session of the Panel was the phenomenon of radon emanation and the mode of radon release, which is a complex function of U3O8 content, type of uranium mineralogy, host rock character, porosity, etc. This study is obviously basic and fundamental to the main subject.

  19. Uranium in South Africa: 1983 assessment of resources and production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NUCOR assesses South Africa's uranium resource and production capabilities on an ongoing basis. Assessments are carried out in close co-operation with the mining companies and the Government Mining Engineer. In carrying out this evaluation, the classification recommended by the NEA/IAEA Working Party on Uranium Resources is followed. In order to preserve company confidentiality, the details of the findings are released in summary form only. Within South Africa, uranium occurrences are found in Precambrian quartz-pebble conglomerates, Precambrian alkaline complexes, Cambrian to Precambrian granite gneisses, Permo-Triassic sandstones and coal, and Recent to Tertiary surficial formations. South Africa's uranium resources were reassessed during 1983 and the total recoverable resources in the Reasonably Assured and Estimated Additional Resource categories recoverable at less than $130/kg U were estimated to be 460 000 t U. This represents a decrease of 13,4% when compared with the 1981 assessment. South Africa's uranium production for 1983 amounted to 6 060 t U, a 4,21 % increase over the 1982 production of 5 816 t U. Ninety-seven percent of the production is derived from the Witwatersrand quartz-pebble conglomerates, the rest being produced as a by-product of copper mining at Palabora. South Africa maintained its position as a major low-cost uranium producer, holding 14% of the WOCA uranium resources, and during 1982 it produced 14% of WOCA's uranium. In making future production capability projections it may be safely concluded that South Africa would be able to produce uranium at substantial levels well into the next century

  20. Swelling of Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An understanding of the mechanism of swelling in irradiated uranium has been handicapped by lack of data from experiments in which the parameters are accurately known. The present- concepts of swelling are based largely on data of this nature. In this study, uranium specimens with less than 0,01% impurity were irradiated below 300°C, and the swelling was induced by subsequent heat treatment outside the reactor where careful control of the temperature was possible. The results obtained by this technique were self'consistent but in considerable disagreement with rhe results of the in-pile investigations. The density and porosity of irradiated uranium specimens were determined following pulse annealing in the alpha, beta and gamma phases« Both the light microscope and the electron microscope were used to study porosity. The results may be summarized as follows: (1) Uranium specimens irradiated to 0.30%bum-up and heat-treated 75 h at temperatures less than 550°C in the α-phase swelled less than 1%. (2) Uranium specimens (0.30% bum-up) heat-treated 75 h at temperatures between 550°C and 650°C in the α- phase swelled up to 18%. This swelling was due to bubbles with diameters up to 15/μm. These results were diametrically opposed to recent data. (3) Uranium specimens (0.30% bum-up) heat-treated 75 h at temperatures in the ß-phase decreased their density by 4- 5%. This decrease in density is apparently the result of grain-boundary cracking rather than bubble formation, as there is evidence to suggest that fission gas is retained in the matrix of the γ-phase. These results suggest that a modification of the role of pressure and surface tension is required in the current theories of swelling. (4) A uranium specimen (0.30% bum- up) heat-treated for 15 h in the γ-phase at 820°C swelled 20%. In this case the swelling was primarily due to the formation of bubbles in the vicinity of and on grain boundaries. The explanation of these experimental results requires