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Sample records for aqueous nitric acid

  1. Extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate from aqueous nitric acid solutions with CMPO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, B.B.

    1995-08-01

    DOE sponsored development of the transuranium extraction (TRUEX) process for removing actinides from radioactive wastes. The solvent is a mixture of CMPO and TBP. Since the extraction characteristics of CMPO are not as well understood as those of TBP, the extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate with CMPO (dissolved in n-dodecane) were studied. Results indicate that CMPO extracts nitric acid with a 1:1 stoichiometry; equilibrium constant is 2. 660{plus_minus}0.092 at 25 C, and extraction enthalpy is -5. 46{plus_minus}0.46 kcal/mol. Slope analysis indicates that uranyl nitrate extracts with a mixed equilibria of 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries in nearly equal proportion. Equil. constant of the 2: 1 extraction was 1.213 {times} 10{sup 6}{plus_minus}3.56 {times} 10{sup 4} at 25 C; reaction enthalpy was -9.610{plus_minus}0.594 kcal/mol. Nitration complexation constant is 8.412{plus_minus}0.579, with an enthalpy of -10.72{plus_minus}1.87 kcal/mol. Bismuth nitrate also extracts with a mixed equilibria of (perhaps) 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries. A 2:1 extraction equilibrium and a nitrate complexation adequately model the data. Kinetics and enthalpies were also measured.

  2. Extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate from aqueous nitric acid solutions with CMPO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOE sponsored development of the transuranium extraction (TRUEX) process for removing actinides from radioactive wastes. The solvent is a mixture of CMPO and TBP. Since the extraction characteristics of CMPO are not as well understood as those of TBP, the extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate with CMPO (dissolved in n-dodecane) were studied. Results indicate that CMPO extracts nitric acid with a 1:1 stoichiometry; equilibrium constant is 2. 660±0.092 at 25 C, and extraction enthalpy is -5. 46±0.46 kcal/mol. Slope analysis indicates that uranyl nitrate extracts with a mixed equilibria of 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries in nearly equal proportion. Equil. constant of the 2: 1 extraction was 1.213 x 106±3.56 x 104 at 25 C; reaction enthalpy was -9.610±0.594 kcal/mol. Nitration complexation constant is 8.412±0.579, with an enthalpy of -10.72±1.87 kcal/mol. Bismuth nitrate also extracts with a mixed equilibria of (perhaps) 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries. A 2:1 extraction equilibrium and a nitrate complexation adequately model the data. Kinetics and enthalpies were also measured

  3. Radiation-thermal decomposition of nitric and acetic acids in the aqueous nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinetics of radiation, thermal and radiation-thermal decompositions of nitric and acetic acid mixture was investigated in aqueous sodium nitrate solution in homogeneous conditions as well as by interaction of solid phase as sand rock. Temperature dependences of rate of radiation, thermal and radiation-thermal decompositions of the acids were calculated using experimental data. Resulting solutions make possible the calculation of acid decomposition dynamics accounting conditions of underground radioactive waste disposals

  4. Comparative analysis of the effect of pretreating aspen wood with aqueous and aqueous-organic solutions of sulfuric and nitric acid on its reactivity during enzymatic hydrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dotsenko, Gleb; Osipov, D. O.; Zorov, I. N.;

    2016-01-01

    The effect of aspen wood pretreatment methods with the use of both aqueous solutions of sulfuric and nitric acids and aqueous-organic solutions (ethanol, butanol) of sulfuric acid (organosolv) on the limiting degree of conversion of this type of raw material into simple sugars during enzymatic...... of ground wood by 300–400%, compared to the initial raw material. Pretreatment with a 4.8% aqueous solution of nitric acid (125°C, 1.8 MPa, 10 min) is shown to be most effective, as it increases the reactivity of the ground aspen wood by more than 500%....

  5. The redox chemistry of neptunium in γ-irradiated aqueous nitric acid in the presence of an organic phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiolytic changes in oxidation state for solutions of initially Np(V) and/or Np(VI) were investigated by gamma-irradiation in conjunction with UV/Vis spectroscopy of the aqueous phase. Samples were irradiated in varying concentrations of nitric acid, and with or without the presence of 30 % TBP in dodecane. At short irradiation times Np(V) was oxidized to Np(VI), even in the presence of the organic phase. Upon the radiolytic production of sufficient amounts of nitrous acid, reduction of Np(VI) to Np(V) occurred in both phases. This was accompanied by stripping of the previously extracted Np(VI). Nitric acid concentrations of 6 M mitigated this reduction. (author)

  6. NITRIC ACID PICKLING PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boller, E.R.; Eubank, L.D.

    1958-08-19

    An improved process is described for the treatment of metallic uranium surfaces preparatory to being given hot dip coatings. The process consists in first pickling the uraniunn surInce with aqueous 50% to 70% nitric acid, at 60 to 70 deg C, for about 5 minutes, rinsing the acid solution from the uranium article, promptly drying and then passing it through a molten alkali-metal halide flux consisting of 42% LiCl, 53% KCla and 5% NaCl into a molten metal bath consisting of 85 parts by weight of zinc and 15 parts by weight of aluminum

  7. Determination of Nitric Acid in Aqueous Solution of Uranium and Plutonium Purification Cycle by Near Infrared Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Ding-ming; WANG; Lin; ZHANG; Li-hua; GONG; Yan-ping; MU; Ling; WU; Ji-zong

    2012-01-01

    <正>The concentration of nitric acid interfered with the distribution of uranium and plutonium in nuclear fuel reprocessing process. So, in the reprocessing process control analysis, the determination of the free acid plays an important role. Traditional laboratory analytical method of free acid needs large size sample and is time-consuming. Hence, development of fast analytical method for free acid has important significance for the reprocessing process control analysis. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been proved to be a powerful analytical tool and used in various fields, it’s seldom, however, used in spent

  8. Absorption of nitric oxide into aqueous solutions of ferrous chelates accompanied by instantaneous reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demmink, J.F; vanGils, I.C.F.; Beenackers, A.A C M

    1997-01-01

    The absorption of nitric oxide (NO) into aqueous solutions of ferrous chelates of nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), ethylene diaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), hydroxyethylenediaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA), and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) was studied in a stirred cell reactor. Experimental cond

  9. Improvement of oxygen-containing functional groups on olive stones activated carbon by ozone and nitric acid for heavy metals removal from aqueous phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohli, Thouraya; Ouederni, Abdelmottaleb

    2016-08-01

    Recently, modification of surface structure of activated carbons in order to improve their adsorption performance toward especial pollutants has gained great interest. Oxygen-containing functional groups have been devoted as the main responsible for heavy metal binding on the activated carbon surface; their introduction or enhancement needs specific modification and impregnation methods. In the present work, olive stones activated carbon (COSAC) undergoes surface modifications in gaseous phase using ozone (O3) and in liquid phase using nitric acid (HNO3). The activated carbon samples were characterized using N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm, SEM, pHpzc, FTIR, and Boehm titration. The activated carbon parent (COSAC) has a high surface area of 1194 m(2)/g and shows a predominantly microporous structure. Oxidation treatments with nitric acid and ozone show a decrease in both specific surface area and micropore volumes, whereas these acidic treatments have led to a fixation of high amount of surface oxygen functional groups, thus making the carbon surface more hydrophilic. Activated carbon samples were used as an adsorbent matrix for the removal of Co(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II) heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions. Adsorption isotherms were obtained at 30 °C, and the data are well fitted to the Redlich-Peterson and Langmuir equation. Results show that oxidized COSACs, especially COSAC(HNO3), are capable to remove more Co(II), Cu(II), and Ni(II) from aqueous solution. Nitric acid-oxidized olive stones activated carbon was tested in its ability to remove metal ions from binary systems and results show an important maximum adsorbed amount as compared to single systems.

  10. Effect of ultrasonic frequency on H2O2 sonochemical formation rate in aqueous nitric acid solutions in the presence of oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalodière, Elodie; Virot, Matthieu; Moisy, Philippe; Nikitenko, Sergey I

    2016-03-01

    The influence of the ultrasonic frequency (20 kHz, 207 kHz, and 615 kHz) towards the formation kinetics of H2O2 under Ar and Ar/(20 vol.%)O2 atmospheres was evaluated in pure water and aqueous nitric solutions. Results obtained at low frequency ultrasound demonstrate that hydrogen peroxide formation is enhanced under an Ar/O2 gas mixture whatever the sonicated medium. Nevertheless, H2O2 yields are higher in aqueous nitric solutions whatever the nature of the saturating gas. These observations are consistent at high frequency ultrasound under Ar gas notwithstanding higher yields for H2O2. Surprisingly, an inverse tendency is observed for high frequency sonolysis carried out under an Ar/O2 atmosphere: higher yields of H2O2 are measured in pure water. Further studies in the presence of pure Ar revealed a more important decomposition of nitric acid under high frequency ultrasound leading to higher yields of both HNO2 in the liquid phase and NO in the gas phase. In the presence of Ar/O2 mixture, the intrabubble oxidation of NO causes cavitation bubble depletion in O2 leading to the drop of H2O2 yield. On the other hand, it was found that for Ar/(20 vol.%)O2 mixture there is no influence of oxygen on HNO2 yield whatever the ultrasonic frequency; this is most likely explained by two processes: (i) HNO2 formation results from nitrate-ion thermolysis in the liquid reaction zone surrounding the cavitation bubble, and (ii) effective intrabubble oxidation of NOx species by oxygen to nitrate-ion. PMID:26584999

  11. Predicted reaction rates of H(x)N(y)O(z) intermediates in the oxidation of hydroxylamine by aqueous nitric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashcraft, Robert W; Raman, Sumathy; Green, William H

    2008-08-21

    This work reports computed rate coefficients of 90 reactions important in the autocatalytic oxidation of hydroxylamine in aqueous nitric acid. Rate coefficients were calculated using four approaches: Smoluchowski (Stokes-Einstein) diffusion, a solution-phase incarnation of transition state theory based on quantum chemistry calculations, simple Marcus theory for electron-transfer reactions, and a variational TST approach for dissociative isomerization reactions that occur in the solvent cage. Available experimental data were used to test the accuracy of the computations. There were significant discrepancies between the computed and experimental values for some key parameters, indicating a need for improvements in computational methodology. Nonetheless, the 90-reaction mechanism showed the ability to reproduce many of the trends seen in experimental studies of this very complicated kinetic system. This work highlights reactions that may govern the system evolution and branching behavior critical to the stability of the system. We hope that this analysis will guide experimental investigations to reduce the uncertainties in the critical rate coefficients and thermochemistry, allowing an unambiguous determination of the dominant reaction pathways in the system. Advances in efficient and accurate solvation models that effectively separate entropic and enthalpic contributions will most directly benefit solution-phase modeling efforts. Methods for more accurately estimating activity coefficients, including at infinite dilution in multicomponent mixtures, are needed for modeling high ionic strength aqueous systems. A detailed derivation of the solution-phase equilibrium and transition state theory rate expressions in solution is included in the Supporting Information. PMID:18652432

  12. Nitric Acid Poisoning: Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitric acid (HNO3) is a corrosive fluid that, when in contact with reducing agents, generates nitrogen oxides that are responsible for inhalation poisoning. We present two cases of poisoning from nitric acid gas inhalation resulting from occupational exposure. Imaging findings were similar in both cases, consistent with adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS): bilaterally diffuse alveolar opacities on the chest X-ray and a cobblestone pattern on computed tomography (CT).one of the patients died while the other evolved satisfactorily after treatment with n-acetyl cysteine and mechanical ventilation. The diagnosis of nitric acid poisoning was made on the basis of the history of exposure and the way in which the radiological findings evolved.

  13. Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2016-01-01

    Corrosion is an extensive problem that affects the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and European Space Agency (ESA). The deleterious effects of corrosion result in steep costs, asset downtime affecting mission readiness, and safety risks to personnel. It is vital to reduce corrosion costs and risks in a sustainable manner. The primary objective of this effort is to qualify citric acid as an environmentally-preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys.

  14. Corrosion studies in fuel element reprocessing environments containing nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitric acid is universally used in aqueous fuel element reprocessing plants; however, in the processing scheme being developed by the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program, some of the equipment will be exposed to nitric acid under conditions not previously encountered in fuel element reprocessing plants. A previous report presented corrosion data obtained in hyperazeotropic nitric acid and in concentrated magnesium nitrate solutions used in its preparation. The results presented in this report are concerned with the following: (1) corrosion of titanium in nitric acid; (2) corrosion of nickel-base alloys in a nitric acid-hydrofluoric acid solution; (3) the formation of Cr(VI), which enhances corrosion, in nitric acid solutions; and (4) corrosion of mechanical pipe connectors in nitric acid. The results show that the corrosion rate of titanium increased with the refreshment rate of boiling nitric acid, but the effect diminished rapidly as the temperature decreased. The addition of iodic acid inhibited attack. Also, up to 200 ppM of fluoride in 70% HNO3 had no major effect on the corrosion of either titanium or tantalum. In boiling 8 M HNO3-0.05 M HF, Inconel 671 was more resistant than Inconel 690, but both alloys experienced end-grain attack. In the case of Inconel 671, heat treatment was very important; annealed and quenched material was much more resistant than furnace-cooled material.The rate of oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) increased significantly as the nitric acid concentration increased, and certain forms of ruthenium in the solution seemed to accelerate the rate of formation. Mechanical connectors of T-304L stainless steel experienced end-grain attack on the exposed pipe ends, and seal rings of both stainless steel and a titanium alloy (6% Al-4% V) underwent heavy attack in boiling 8 M HNO3

  15. Decomposition of molybdenite products with nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problems of development abroad of hydrometallurgic methods of opening molybdenum concentrates using nitric acid are considered. Several variants of the process are developed, they are the two-stage decomposition by stoichiometrically necessary amount of nitric acid, single-stage decomposition in the avtoclave using nitric acid and oxigen as oxidizers; decomposition using circulatina nitro-sulfuric solution containing molybdenum. The advantages and disadvantages of new methods are presented

  16. Decomposition of molybdenite products with nitric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikitina, L.S.

    1983-04-01

    The problems of development abroad of hydrometallurgic methods of opening molybdenum concentrates using nitric acid are considered. Several variants of the process are developed, they are the two-stage decomposition by stoichiometrically necessary amount of nitric acid, single-stage decomposition in the autoclave using nitric acid and oxigen as oxidizers; decomposition using circulatina nitro-sulfuric solution containing molybdenum. The advantages and disadvantages of new methods are presented.

  17. Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    The Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) Program at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, has the primary objective of modernizing and transforming the launch and range complex at KSC to benefit current and future NASA programs along with other emerging users. Described as the launch support and infrastructure modernization program in the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, the GSDO Program will develop and implement shared infrastructure and process improvements to provide more flexible, affordable, and responsive capabilities to a multi-user community. In support of NASA and the GSDO Program, the objective of this project is to qualify citric acid as an environmentally-preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys. This project is a direct follow-on to United Space Alliance (USA) work at KSC to optimize the parameters for the use of citric acid and verify effectiveness. This project will build off of the USA study to further evaluate citric acids effectiveness and suitability for corrosion protection of a number of stainless steels alloys used by NASA, the Department of Defense (DoD), and the European Space Agency (ESA).

  18. Citric Acid Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Pattie L. (Compiler)

    2013-01-01

    The Ground Systems Development and Operations GSDO) Program at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has the primary objective of modernizing and transforming the launch and range complex at KSC to benefit current and future NASA programs along with other emerging users. Described as the launch support and infrastructure modernization program in the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, the GSDO Program will develop and implement shared infrastructure and process improvements to provide more flexible, affordable, and responsive capabilities to a multi-user community. In support of the GSDO Program, the purpose of this project is to demonstratevalidate citric acid as a passivation agent for stainless steel. Successful completion of this project will result in citric acid being qualified for use as an environmentally preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys in NASA and DoD applications.

  19. Separation of ruthenium from nitric acid solutions using carbon tetrachloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The noble metal, ruthenium is one of the major fission product elements produced with high fission yield, mainly in for breeder reactors using 239Pu fuels. In the aqueous reprocessing of spent fuels for the recovery of U and Pu by PUREX process ruthenium interferes in the solvent extraction stage. In the treatment of high level liquid waste for its disposal, oxides of Ru are formed, which contaminate the surrounding environment owing to their high vapour pressure. Hence, it is desirable to separate from the waste solution prior to its processing for disposal. A simple and feasible method has been employed in the present work for the separation and recovery of ruthenium from aqueous nitric acid medium using ammonium ceric nitrate (ACN) and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). The efficiency in the separation of Ru was investigated under various experimental conditions such as acidity and ageing effect. Separation efficiency was observed to decrease with increasing nitric acid concentration. Maximum separation was achieved at 1 M nitric acid. Further studies were carried out to investigate the effect of ageing on the separation efficiency ruthenium. With increase in time, separation percentage of ruthenium was decreasing in all concentrations of nitric acid studied. (author)

  20. Research on the Stability of Diethyl Hydroxylamine in Nitric Acid Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    By the means of the comparison of the extraction of PU(Ⅲ,Ⅳ) and plutonium in the aqueous Phasecontaining salting-free agent, the stability of diethyl hydroxylamine in nitric acid medium is investigated.

  1. Electrochemical Behavior of Aluminum in Nitric Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Hui; ZHU; Li-yang; LIN; Ru-shan; TAN; Hong-bin; HE; Hui

    2013-01-01

    Aluminum is one of cladding materials for nuclear fuel,it is important to investigate the electrolytic dissolution of aluminum in nitric acid.The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy,polarization curve and cyclic voltammetry cure of anodic aluminum electrode in nitric acid under various conditions were collected(Fig.1).It turns out,under steady state,the thickness of the passivated film of aluminum

  2. Containment of nitric acid solutions of Plutonium-238

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimus, M. A. H.; Silver, G. L.; Pansoy-Hjelvik, L.; Ramsey, K. B.

    1999-01-01

    The corrosion of various metals that could be used to contain nitric acid solutions of Pu-238 has been studied. Tantalum and tantalum/2.5% tungsten resisted the test solvent better than 304L stainless steel and several INCONEL alloys. The solvent used to imitate nitric acid solutions of Pu-238 contained 70% nitric acid, hydrofluoric acid, and ammonium hexanitratocerate.

  3. Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation Project Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Pattie L.

    2013-01-01

    The standard practice for protection of stainless steel is a process called passivation. This procedure results in the formation of a metal oxide layer to prevent corrosion. Typical passivation procedures call for the use of nitric acid which exhibits excellent corrosion performance; however, there are a number of environmental, worker safety, and operational issues associated with its use. The longtime military specification for the passivation of stainless steel was cancelled in favor of newer specifications which allow for the use of citric acid in place of nitric acid. Citric acid offers a variety of benefits that include increased safety for personnel, reduced environmental impact, and reduced operational costs. There have been few studies, however, to determine whether citric acid is an acceptable alternative for NASA and DoD. This paper details activities to date including development of the joint test plan, on-going and planned testing, and preliminary results.

  4. Containment of nitric acid solutions of Plutonium-238

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The corrosion of various metals that could be used to contain nitric acid solutions of Pu-238 has been studied. Tantalum and tantalum/2.5% tungsten resisted the test solvent better than 304L stainless steel and several INCONEL alloys. The solvent used to imitate nitric acid solutions of Pu-238 contained 70% nitric acid, hydrofluoric acid, and ammonium hexanitratocerate. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  5. Growth of nitric acid hydrates on thin sulfuric acid films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Wilson, Margaret A.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1994-05-01

    Type I polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are thought to nucleate and grow on stratospheric sulfate aerosols (SSAs). To model this system, thin sulfuric acid films were exposed to water and nitric acid vapors (1 - 3 × 10-4 Torr H2O and 1 - 2.5 × 10-6 Torr HNO3) and subjected to cooling and heating cycles. FTIR spectroscopy was used to probe the phase of the sulfuric acid and to identify the HNO3/H2O films that condensed. Nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) was observed to grow on crystalline sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT) films. NAT also condensed in/on supercooled H2SO4 films without causing crystallization of the sulfuric acid. This growth is consistent with NAT nucleation from ternary solutions as the first step in PSC formation.

  6. Contribution to the study of the oxidation reaction of Np(V) by nitric acid catalyzed par nitrous acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oxidation reaction kinetics of Np(V) to Np(VI) by nitric acid catalyzed by nitrous acid was studied. In a first part, a detailed bibliographical survey was made of the oxidation-reduction reactions of U, Np, Pu, Am with nitrous and nitric acids (51 references). It is shown that only when both the organic and aqueous phases are mixed up, the extraction of a reaction product (NpVI) induces an equilibrium displacement. TBP was used as solvent. It is shown that the extraction of nitrous acid from the solvent enables the nitrous acid concentration to be kept constant and in the same order of magnitude than that of Np. This enables to show that Np(V) and nitrous acid have no simple orders. The temperature and nitric acid concentration dependence was studied. It is shown that tetravalent nitrogen must play a major part in the Np(V) oxidation

  7. Metastable Nitric Acid Trihydrate in Ice Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Fabian; Kubel, Frank; Gálvez, Oscar; Hölzel, Markus; Parker, Stewart F.; Baloh, Philipp; Iannarelli, Riccardo; Rossi, Michel J.; Grothe, Hinrich

    2016-04-01

    The composition of high altitude ice clouds is still a matter of intense discussion. The constituents in question are ice and nitric acid hydrates. The identification and formation mechanisms, however, are still unknown but are essential to understand atmospheric processing such as the seasonal ozone depletion in the lower polar stratosphere or the radiation balance of planet Earth. We found conclusive evidence for a long-predicted phase, which has been named alpha nitric acid trihydrate (alpha-NAT). This phase has been proven by combination of X-ray and neutron diffraction experiments allowing a convincing structure solution. Additionally, vibrational spectra (infrared and inelastic neutron scattering) were recorded and compared with theoretical calculations. A strong affinity between water ice and alpha-NAT has been found, which explains the experimental spectra and the phase transition kinetics essential for identification in the atmosphere. On the basis of our results, we propose a new three-step mechanism for NAT-formation in high altitude ice clouds. F. Weiss et al. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2016, accepted, DOI:10.1002/anie.201510841

  8. Studies of molybdenite interaction with nitric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potashnikov, Yu.M.; Lutsik, V.I.; Chursanov, Yu.V. (Kalininskij Politekhnicheskij Inst. (USSR))

    1984-01-01

    Products composition and their effect on the reaction rate of molybdenite with nitric acid are specified. It is shown that alongside with NO, NO/sub 2/ is included in the composition of the products of MoS/sub 2/ and HNO/sub 3/ interaction, and it produces catalytic effect on the process considered. Under the conditions studied, MoS/sub 2/ dissolution proceeds in the mixed regime, conditioned by similar values of molybdenite oxidation rate and reaction product diffusion into solution volume (Esub(act.=28.9 kJ/mol, K/sub 298/=6.3x10/sup -7/, cmxs/sup -1/), and for that to catalytic effect of NO/sub 2/ the dependence V approximately ..cap alpha..sup(-g.37) is observed.

  9. Studies of molybdenite interaction with nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Product composition and their effect on the reaction rate of molybdenite with nitric acid are specified. It is shown that alongside with NO NO2 is included in the composition of the products of MoS2 and HNO3 interaction and it produces catalytic effect on the process considered. Under the conditions studied MoS2 dissolution proceeds in the mixed regime, conditioned by similar values of molybdenite oxidation rate and reaction product diffusion into solution volume (Esub(act.=28.9 kJ/mol, K298=6.3x10-7, cmxs-1), at that due to catalytic effect of NO2 the dependence V approximately αsup(-g.37) is observed

  10. Adverse experiences with nitric acid at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durant, W.S.; Craig, D.K.; Vitacco, M.J.; McCormick, J.A.

    1991-06-01

    Nitric acid is used routinely at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in many processes. However, the site has experienced a number of adverse situations in handling nitric acid. These have ranged from minor injuries to personnel to significant explosions. This document compiles many of these events and includes discussions of process upsets, fires, injuries, and toxic effects of nitric acid and its decomposition products. The purpose of the publication is to apprise those using the acid that it is a potentially dangerous material and can react in many ways as demonstrated by SRS experience. 10 refs.

  11. Aqueous Photochemistry of Glyoxylic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugene, Alexis J; Xia, Sha-Sha; Guzman, Marcelo I

    2016-06-01

    Aerosols affect climate change, the energy balance of the atmosphere, and public health due to their variable chemical composition, size, and shape. While the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) from gas phase precursors is relatively well understood, studying aqueous chemical reactions contributing to the total SOA budget is the current focus of major attention. Field measurements have revealed that mono-, di-, and oxo-carboxylic acids are abundant species present in SOA and atmospheric waters. This work explores the fate of one of these 2-oxocarboxylic acids, glyoxylic acid, which can photogenerate reactive species under solar irradiation. Additionally, the dark thermal aging of photoproducts is studied by UV-visible and fluorescence spectroscopies to reveal that the optical properties are altered by the glyoxal produced. The optical properties display periodicity in the time domain of the UV-visible spectrum of chromophores with absorption enhancement (thermochromism) or loss (photobleaching) during nighttime and daytime cycles, respectively. During irradiation, excited state glyoxylic acid can undergo α-cleavage or participate in hydrogen abstractions. The use of (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) analysis shows that glyoxal is an important intermediate produced during direct photolysis. Glyoxal quickly reaches a quasi-steady state as confirmed by UHPLC-MS analysis of its corresponding (E) and (Z) 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazones. The homolytic cleavage of glyoxylic acid is proposed as a fundamental step for the production of glyoxal. Both carbon oxides, CO2(g) and CO(g) evolving to the gas-phase, are quantified by FTIR spectroscopy. Finally, formic acid, oxalic acid, and tartaric acid photoproducts are identified by ion chromatography (IC) with conductivity and electrospray (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS) detection and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. A reaction mechanism is proposed based on all experimental observations. PMID:27192089

  12. Nitric acid uptake by sulfuric acid solutions under stratospheric conditions - Determination of Henry's Law solubility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reihs, Christa M.; Golden, David M.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1990-01-01

    The uptake of nitric acid by sulfuric acid solutions representative of stratospheric particulate at low temperatures was measured to determine the solubility of nitric acid in sulfuric acid solutions as a function of H2SO4 concentration and solution temperature. Solubilities are reported for sulfuric acid solutions ranging from 58 to 87 wt pct H2SO4 over a temperature range from 188 to 240 K, showing that, in general, the solubility of nitric acid increases with decreasing sulfuric acid concentration and with decreasing temperature. The measured solubilities indicate that nitric acid in the global stratosphere will be found predominantly in the gas phase.

  13. The Iron-Catalyzed Oxidation of Hydrazine by Nitric Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karraker, D.G.

    2001-07-17

    To assess the importance of iron to hydrazine stability, the study of hydrazine oxidation by nitric acid has been extended to investigate the iron-catalyzed oxidation. This report describes those results.

  14. NOx generation method from recovered nitric acid by electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A considerable amount of sodium nitrate solution is generated as low-level liquid waste in a spent-fuel reprocessing plant. If the nitric acid recovered from the low-level liquid waste is decomposed into useful materials, such as NOx gas, the nitric acid can be reused and the volume of low-level liquid waste can be greatly reduced. Studies were conducted on electrolytic reduction as a technology for reducing waste volume and producing NOx gas directly from recovered nitric acid in the reprocessing plant. As a result of fundamental research, it was found that NOx could be produced at high current efficiency if nitric acid of 5 - 6 mol/liter or more is electrolytically reduced with graphite or platinum electrodes. (author)

  15. Removal of Methyl Orange from Aqueous Solution by Nitric Acid-Modified Titanium Ore%硝酸掺杂钛精矿吸附去除甲基橙

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷雪飞; 薛向欣; 杨合

    2012-01-01

    Nitric acid-modified titanium ore (NATO) sorbents were prepared by high energy ball milling process. The adsorption properties of NATO sorbents were evaluated by the decoloration efficiency of methyl orange (MO) under dark-state absorption. In the adsorption stage, L9(34) orthogonal experiments of different factors, for example, doping ratio, calcination temperature, soaking time and heating rate were performed. Based on the orthogonal experiments, the optimal operating parameters, 2.0wt % nitric acid, 300 ℃ calcination temperature, 3 h soaking time, and 10 ℃/min heating rate, are obtained. In this optimal condition, the decoloration efficiency of MO reaches 96.8 %, which is significantly better than the undoped samples. Thus, it is feasible to treat dye wastewater by these NATO sorbents.%采用高能球磨法制备了一系列硝酸掺杂的钛精矿(nitric acid-modified titanium ore,NATO)吸附材料,采用正交表L9(34)安排实验,以甲基橙(MO)溶液的脱色率作为衡量吸附剂优劣的重要判据.以硝酸掺杂比例、煅烧温度、保温时间、升温速率为因素进行正交试验,基于降低能耗和成本的考虑和综合分析的基础上,得到制备NATO吸附剂的最优工艺条件:硝酸掺杂比例为2.0%,煅烧温度为300℃,保温时间为3 h,升温速率为10℃/min.在较优工艺条件下制备的NATO吸附剂对甲基橙的脱色率达到96.8%,明显优于未掺杂样品,且沉降性能较好,易于分离,是一类有应用前景的吸附材料.

  16. Acute chemical pneumonitis caused by nitric acid inhalation: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Hyung Shim; Lee, In Jae; Ko, Eun Young; Lee, Jae Young; Kim, Hyun Beom; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Lee, Kwan Seop; Lee, Yul; Bae, Sang Hoon [Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-06-01

    Chemical pneumonitis induced by nitric acid inhalation is a rare clinical condition. The previously reported radiologic findings of this disease include acute permeability pulmonary edema, delayed bronchiolitis obliterans, and bronchiectasis. In very few published rare radiologic reports has this disease manifested as acute alveolar injury; we report a case of acute chemical pneumonitis induced by nitric acid inhalation which at radiography manifested as bilateral perihilar consolidation and ground-glass attenuation, suggesting acute alveolar injury.

  17. Nitric acid leaching of polymetallic middlings of concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Rogozhnikov, D. A.; Mamyachenkov, S. V.; Karelov, S. V.; Anisimova, O. S.

    2013-01-01

    Investigations into the nitric acid leaching of polymetallic middlings with the purpose of the maximal recovery of copper and zinc into the solution are performed. Using methods of mathematical planning of the experiment, the optimal process parameters are determined: ratio L: S = 5, the consumption of nitric acid is 80 cm3 per 20 g of the charge, and the process duration is 120 min. © 2013 Allerton Press, Inc.

  18. Formation of nitric acid hydrates - A chemical equilibrium approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Roland H.

    1990-01-01

    Published data are used to calculate equilibrium constants for reactions of the formation of nitric acid hydrates over the temperature range 190 to 205 K. Standard enthalpies of formation and standard entropies are calculated for the tri- and mono-hydrates. These are shown to be in reasonable agreement with earlier calorimetric measurements. The formation of nitric acid trihydrate in the polar stratosphere is discussed in terms of these equilibrium constants.

  19. Thermal decomposition studies on tri-iso-amyl phosphate in n-dodecane-nitric acid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tri-iso-amyl Phosphate (TiAP) is a promising alternative solvent to TBP, with near similar extraction behaviour and physical properties but lower aqueous phase solubility and does not form third phase during the extraction of Pu(IV). In addition to the solubilised extractant, inadvertent entrainment of the extractant into the aqueous stream is a concern during the evaporation operation as the extractant comes into contact with higher nitric acid concentrations and metal nitrates. Hence the thermal decomposition behaviour of TiAP-HNO3 systems has been studied using an adiabatic calorimeter in closed air ambience, under heat-wait-search mode (H-W-S)

  20. Acetic acid extraction from aqueous solutions using fatty acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJmker, H.M.; Gramblicka, M.; Kersten, S.R.A.; Ham, van der A.G.J.; Schuur, B.

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge for production of acetic acid via bio-based routes is cost-effective concentration and purification of the acetic acid from the aqueous solutions, for which liquid–liquid extraction is a possible method. A main challenge in extraction of acetic acid from dilute aqueous solutions is

  1. Isothermal heat measurements of TBP-nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Net heats of reaction were measured in an isothermal calorimeter for both single phase (organic) and two phase (organic and aqueous) TBP/HNO3 reacting solutions at temperatures above 100 C. The oxidation rate constant was determined to be 5.4E-4 min-1 at 110 C for an open ''vented'' system as compared to 1.33 E-3 min-1 in the closed system. The heat released per unit material oxidized was also reduced. The oxidation in both phases was found to be first order in nitric acid and pseudo-zero order in butylnitrate and water. The hydrolysis (esterification) rate constant determined by Nichols' (1.33E-3 min-1) fit the experimental data from this work well. Forced evaporation of the volatile components by the product gases from oxidation resulted in a cooling mechanism which more than balanced the heat from the oxidation reaction in the two-phased systems. Rate expressions were derived and rate constants determined for both the single and two phase systems. An approximating mathematical model was developed to fit the experimental data and to extrapolate beyond the experimental conditions. This model shows that one foot of ''reacting'' 14.3M HNO3 aqueous phase solution at 121 C will transport sufficient water to the organic phase to replace evaporative losses, maintaining endothermicity, for organic layers up to 12.2 + 6.0 feet deep. If the pressure in a reacting system is allowed to increase due to insufficient venting the temperature of the organic phase would increase in temperature to reach a new equilibrium. The rate of oxidation would increase not only due to the increase in temperature but also from the increased concentration of dissolved HNO3 reduction products. Another important factor is that the cooling system described in this work becomes less effective as the total pressure increases. These factors probably contributed to the explosion at Tomsk

  2. White Paper on Potential Hazards Associated with Contaminated Cheesecloth Exposed to Nitric Acid Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hypes, Philip A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-20

    This white paper addresses the potential hazards associated with waste cheesecloth that has been exposed to nitric acid solutions. This issue was highlighted by the cleanup of a 100 ml leak of aqueous nitric acid solution containing Heat Source (HS) plutonium on 21 June 2016. Nitration of cellulosic material is a well-understood process due to industrial/military applications of the resulting material. Within the Department of Energy complex, nitric acids have been used extensively, as have cellulosic wipes. If cellulosic materials are nitrated, the cellulosic material can become ignitable and in extreme cases, reactive. We have chemistry knowledge and operating experience to support the conclusion that all current wastes are safe and compliant. There are technical questions worthy of further experimental evaluation. An extent of condition evaluation has been conducted back to 2004. During this time period there have been interruptions in the authorization to use cellulosic wipes in PF-4. Limited use has been authorized since 2007 (for purposes other than spill cleanup), so our extent of condition includes the entire current span of use. Our evaluation shows that there is no indication that process spills involving high molarity nitric acid were cleaned up with cheesecloth since 2007. The materials generated in the 21 June leak will be managed in a safe manner compliant with all applicable requirements.

  3. Extraction behaviour of Am(III) and Eu(III) from nitric acid medium in CMPO-HDEHP impregnated resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saipriya, K.; Kumar, T. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre Facilities (India). Kalpakkam Reproscessing Plants; Kumaresan, R.; Nayak, P.K.; Venkatesan, K.A.; Antony, M.P. [Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Fuel Chemistry Div.

    2016-05-01

    Chromatographic resin containing extractants such as octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) or bis-(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (HDEHP) or mixture of extractants (CMPO + HDEHP) in an acrylic polymer matrix was prepared and studied for the extraction of Am(III) and Eu(III) over a range of nitric acid concentration. The effect of various parameters such as concentration of nitric acid in aqueous phase and the concentration of CMPO and HDEHP in the resin phase was studied. The distribution coefficient of Am(III) and Eu(III) in the impregnated resin increased with increased in the concentration of nitric acid for CMPO-impregnated resin, whereas a reverse trend was observed in HDEHP impregnated resin. In case of resin containing both the extractants, synergism was observed at low nitric acid concentration and antagonism at high nitric acid concentration. The mechanism of extraction was probed by slope analysis method at 0.01 and 2 M nitric acid concentrations. Citrate-buffered DTPA was used for the selective separation of Am(III), and a separation factor of 3-4 was obtained at pH 3.

  4. Nitric acid measurements in connection with corrosion studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferm, Martin; De Santis, Franco; Varotsos, Costas

    Atmospheric nitric acid does not only contribute to acidification and eutrophication but causes also deterioration of many materials. Material belonging to our cultural heritage is irreplaceable and its lifetime can depend on the corrosion rate. Nowadays, only very few long-term measurements of nitric acid concentration in Europe and elsewhere have been published so far. Due to the fact that atmospheric corrosion is a long-term effect, the relevant research does not necessarily require monitoring of nitric acid on a daily basis. Moreover, power supply is often not available at sites where it is of interest to study the corrosion rate of objects belonging to our cultural heritage. Besides, such measurements must not disturb the impression of the objects. In this context, the diffusive sampling technique provides average concentrations over long-term periods at a low cost. In addition, the samplers used are noiseless, comparatively small in size, and thus, their ambient exposure can be made inconspicuously and with discretion. The present paper is focussed on an intensive corrosion study, which was performed at 11 rural and 23 urban sites in Europe and one rural site in Canada during 2002/2003. For the above-mentioned reasons, the diffusive sampler's technique was employed for the nitric acid monitoring, where the diffusive samplers were first tested against the denuder technique and bi-monthly measurements of nitric acid were thus obtained. The bi-monthly concentrations varied from 0.05 to 4.3 μg m -3 and the annual averages from 0.16 to 2.0 μg m -3. The observations collected, depicted a summertime maximum and a wintertime minimum in the nitric acid concentrations, except at the northern rural sites, where a maximum in the winter was observed. Furthermore, the observed nitric acid concentrations in Southern Europe were higher than in Northern Europe. In a few places, close to the sites of urban measurements, rural measurements of nitric acid were also performed

  5. Oxidative desulfurization of askale coal by nitric acid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guru, M. [Gazi University, Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2007-07-01

    Efficient use of fossil fuels is of utmost importance in a world that depends on these for the greatest part of its energy needs. Although lignite is a widely used fossil fuel, its sulfur content limits its consumption. This study aims to capture combustible sulfur in the ash by oxidizing it with solution of nitric acid solution. Thus, the combustible sulfur in the coal was converted to sulfate form in the ash. Parameters affecting the conversion of sulfur were determined to be nitric acid concentration, reaction time and mean particle size at constant (near room) temperature and shaking rate. The maximum desulfurization efficiency reached was 38.7% of the original combustible sulfur with 0.3 M nitric acid solution, 16 h of reaction time and 0.1 mm mean particle size.

  6. Reactivity of the uranium (U(IV)/U(VI)) and the plutonium (Pu(III)/Pu(IV)) in nitric aqueous solution under ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To minimize the volumes of solid waste and industrial effluents generated at the end of cycle, particularly in the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing industry, research is currently under way on so-called innovative processes, designed to induce chemical reactions without adding reagent to the media. Among these processes, the use of ultrasound can prove advantageous, and the purpose of this study is to assess accurately the potential for its application. In the present context, this work shows that the transmission of an ultrasonic wave in aqueous nitric acid solution leads to: the accumulation of nitrous acid in solution, until a steady-sate concentration is reached; the removal of nitrogen monoxide and nitrogen dioxide in the gas stream. The initial kinetics of the formation of HNO2 in solution was quantified as a function of the nitric acid concentration and the ultrasound intensity. It was also shown than an excess of nitrous acid in nitric solution decomposes under the effect of ultrasound. It is also possible to accumulate hydrogen peroxide in solution during the ultrasonic irradiation of aqueous nitric acid solutions in the presence of a chemical species N2H5+, NH2SO3H...) which reacts rapidly with HNO2, preventing the reduction of H2O2 by HNO2. The mechanisms of HNO2 formation and decomposition, and the mechanism of H2O2 formation during the ultrasonic irradiation of aqueous nitric acid solutions, are presented. Control of H2O2 or HNO2 in a nitric acid medium under the effect of an ultrasonic wave can be exploited to control redox reactions of uranium and plutonium ions, particularly with respect to the oxidation of U and Pu (U(IV)→ U(IV) or Pu(III) → Pu(IV)) and the reduction of Pu (Pu(IV)→ Pu(III). The redox behavior of uranium and plutonium ions in aqueous nitric solution subject to an ultrasonic flux is interpreted in term of effects induced on the reaction medium, and reveals the potential for using ultrasound to cause chemical reactions in

  7. Refractory Oxide Coatings on Titanium for Nitric Acid Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi Shankar, A.; Kamachi Mudali, U.

    2014-07-01

    Tantalum and Niobium have good corrosion resistance in nitric acid as well as in molten chloride salt medium encountered in spent fuel nuclear reprocessing plants. Commercially, pure Ti (Cp-Ti) exhibits good corrosion resistance in nitric acid medium; however, in vapor condensates of nitric acid, significant corrosion was observed. In the present study, a thermochemical diffusion method was pursued to coat Ta2O5, Nb2O5, and Ta2O5 + Nb2O5 on Ti to improve the corrosion resistance and enhance the life of critical components in reprocessing plants. The coated samples were characterized by XRD, SEM, EDX, profilometry, micro-scratch test, and ASTM A262 Practice-C test in 65 pct boiling nitric acid. The SEM micrograph of the coated samples showed that uniform dense coating containing Ta2O5 and/or Nb2O5 was formed. XRD patterns indicated the formation of TiO2, Ta2O5/Nb2O5, and mixed oxide/solid solution phase on coated Ti samples. ASTM A262 Practice-C test revealed reproducible outstanding corrosion resistance of Ta2O5-coated sample in comparison to Nb2O5- and Ta2O5 + Nb2O5-coated sample. The hardness of the Ta2O5-coated Cp-Ti sample was found to be twice that of uncoated Cp-Ti. The SEM and XRD results confirmed the presence of protective oxide layer (Ta2O5, rutile TiO2, and mixed phase) on coated sample which improved the corrosion resistance remarkably in boiling liquid phase of nitric acid compared to uncoated Cp-Ti and Ti-5Ta-1.8Nb alloy. Three phase corrosion test conducted on Ta2O5-coated samples in boiling 11.5 M nitric acid showed poor corrosion resistance in vapor and condensate phases of nitric acid due to poor adhesion of the coating. The adhesive strength of the coated samples needs to be optimized in order to improve the corrosion resistance in vapor and condensate phases of nitric acid.

  8. Study of ruthenium complexation by 22' bipyridine in nitric aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Substitution of the NO3-, NO+ ions of RuNO(NO3)x.yH2Osup((3-x)+) complexes by 22'bipyridine (bipy) in nitric aqueous solution was studied by spectrophotometry. In the absence of reducing agent we observe the species RuNO(bipy)(NO3)sub(z)sup((3-z)+) and RuNO(bipy)2NO32+. Most reducing agents give rise to the RuNO(bipy)2NO32+ + e → RuNO(bipy)2NO3+ reaction. The oxydation potential of the reversible couple RuNO(bipy)2NO32+/RuNO(bipy)2NO3+ was measured by cyclic voltamperometry at the platinum electrode. Its value is + 1.02 V/NHE. Substitution of NO+ ions by a (bipy) molecule is only possible in the presence of reducing agents of apparent formal potential below + 0.5 V/NHE, and anti-nitrite agents are also needed; these two functions can be fulfilled by hydrazine and ascorbic acid. The presence of HSO3 NH2 was necessary to obtain the substitution of NO+ and NO3- by bipy during electrochemical reductions. The intermediate complexes RuNO(bipy)2NO32+ and RuNO(bipy)2NO3+ probably include two bipy molecules in the trans position whereas RuNO(bipy)22+ complexes, where the sixth coordination position is occupied by π donors stronger than NO3-, have two bipy molecules in the cis position

  9. Sonochemical redox reactions of Pu(III) and Pu(IV) in aqueous nitric solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virot, Matthieu; Venault, Laurent; Moisy, Philippe; Nikitenko, Sergey I

    2015-02-14

    The behavior of Pu(iv) and Pu(iii) was investigated in aqueous nitric solutions under ultrasound irradiation (Ar, 20 kHz). In the absence of anti-nitrous reagents, ultrasound has no effect on Pu(iv), while Pu(iii) can be rapidly oxidized to Pu(iv) due to the autocatalytic formation of HNO(2) induced by HNO(3) sonolysis. In the presence of anti-nitrous reagents (sulfamic acid or hydrazinium nitrate), Pu(iv) can be sonochemically reduced to Pu(iii). The reduction follows a first order reaction law and leads to a steady state where Pu(iv) and Pu(iii) coexist in solution. The reduction process is attributed to the sonochemical generation of H(2)O(2) in solution. The kinetics attributed to the reduction of Pu(iv) are however higher than those related to the formation of H(2)O(2) which, after several hypotheses, is explained by the sonochemical erosion of the titanium-based sonotrode. Titanium particles thereby generated can be solubilized under ultrasound and generate Ti(iii) as an intermediate species, a strong reducing agent able to react with Pu(iv).

  10. The nitric acid burn trauma of the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolios, L; Striepling, E; Kolios, G; Rudolf, K-D; Dresing, K; Dörges, J; Stürmer, K M; Stürmer, E K

    2010-04-01

    Nitric acid burn traumata often occur in the chemical industry. A few publications addressing this topic can be found in the medical database, and there are no reports about these traumata in children. A total of 24 patients, average 16.6 years of age, suffering from nitric acid traumata were treated. Wound with I degrees burns received open therapy with panthenol-containing creams. Wound of II degrees and higher were initially treated by irrigation with sterile isotonic saline solution and then by covering with silver-sulphadiazine dressing. Treatment was changed on the second day to fluid-absorbent foam bandages for superficial wounds (up to IIa degrees depth) and occlusive, antiseptic moist bandages in combination with enzymatic substances for IIb degrees -III degrees burns. After the delayed demarcation, necrectomy and mesh-graft transplantation were performed. All wounds healed adequately. Chemical burn traumata with nitric acid lead to specific yellow- to brown-stained wounds with slower accumulation of eschar and slower demarcation compared with thermal burns. Remaining wound eschar induced no systemic inflammation reaction. After demarcation, skin transplantation can be performed on the wounds, as is commonly done. The distinguishing feature of nitric-acid-induced chemical burns is the difficulty in differentiation and classification of burn depth. An immediate lavage should be followed by silver sulphadiazine treatment. Thereafter, fluid-absorbent foam bandages or occlusive, antiseptic moist bandages should be used according to the burn depth. Slow demarcation caused a delay in performing surgical treatments. PMID:19875347

  11. Simulated dry deposition of nitric acid near forest edges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeJong, JJM; Klaassen, W; Jong, J.J.M. de

    1997-01-01

    Dry deposition is simulated to understand and generalize observations of enhanced deposition of air pollution near forest edges. Nitric acid is taken as an example as its deposition velocity is often assumed to be determined by turbulent transport only. The simulations are based on the micro-meteoro

  12. Corrosion fatigue behavior of zirconium in boiling nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The corrosion fatigue behavior of zirconium in boiling nitric acid has been studied to evaluate the reliability of zirconium used in nuclear fuel reprocessing equipment. An apparatus designed for corrosion fatigue tests in boiling nitric acid was used. The crack growth rate of zirconium was measured as a function of the stress intensity factor using TDCB type specimens. After the tests, the fracture morphology was examined with a scanning electron microscope. The crack growth rate was influenced with the texture of specimens and the test environments. In air at room temperature, the crack growth rate at the longitudinal direction of specimens was faster than that of the transverse direction. Moreover, the crack growth rate in boiling nitric acid was more faster than that in air at room temperature. According to the fractographic examination, X-ray analysis, and so on, the observed results were interpreted with based on the crystal anisotropy on mechanical properties and the susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking in boiling nitric acid of zirconium. (author)

  13. IN-VITRO EVALUATION OF NITRIC OXIDE SCAVENGING ACTIVITY OF METHANOLIC AND AQUEOUS EXTRACT OF SYZYGIUM CUMINI LINN. BARK (MYRTACEAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuncha Jayachandra et al.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Plants have provided mankind with herbal remedies for many diseases for many centuries and eventody. In India, herbal medicines have been the basis of treatment and cure for various diseases in traditional methods practiced such as Ayurveda, Unani and Sidha. Syzygium cumini Linn. (Myrtaceae commonly known as jambul tree (English, having promising theraputic values with its various phytoconstituents. Preliminary Phytochemical investigation was carried out on the methanolic extract of Syzygium cumini Linn. Bark. It indices presence of Carbohydrates, Amino acids, Tannins, Saponins, phytosterols, Terpenoids, phenols and flavonoids. We are also quantitatively estimated total phenolic content, tannins and favaniods by using spectrophotometer. The total phenolic content was 580.23 ± 3.03 mg/g, tannin content was 534 ± 4.03 mg/ g while the flavonoid content was 315.42 ± 4.52 mg/g. The methanolic and aqueous extracts of bark were screened for antioxidant activity using Nitric oxide scavenging activity method, which showed significant persentage of inhibition in dose dependent manner. As antioxidant therapy is found to be useful in complicated disease status related with free radical activity. This is the first research report regarding Invitro evaluation of Nitric oxide scavenging activity of Methanolic and aqueous extracts of Syzygium cumini bark. The present study might be extended for the formulation and evaluation of different antioxidant herbal dosage forms.

  14. Buffering effects on electrograining of aluminium in nitric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koroleva, E.V. [Corrosion and Protection Centre, UMIST, P.O. Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: e.koroleva@umist.ac.uk; Thompson, G.E. [Corrosion and Protection Centre, UMIST, P.O. Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Skeldon, P. [Corrosion and Protection Centre, UMIST, P.O. Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Hollrigl, G. [Alcan Technology and Management Ltd., Bad. Bahnhofstrasse 16, CH-8212 Neuhausen (Switzerland); Lockwood, S. [Bridgnorth Aluminium Limited, Stourbridge Road, Bridgnorth WV15 6AU (United Kingdom); Smith, G. [Bridgnorth Aluminium Limited, Stourbridge Road, Bridgnorth WV15 6AU (United Kingdom)

    2005-09-01

    Electrograining of a binary Al-Si alloy has been undertaken in nitric acid based electrolytes, with the resultant surfaces examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. Depending on electrograining conditions, the pit appearance varies from hemispherical to large lateral pits, with the latter favoured in relatively acidic electrolytes. The conditions prevailing in the pit have been explored through use of aluminium ion additions to the nitric acid electrolyte as well as additions of species which influence the precipitation and dissolution of aluminium hydroxide. These confirm that control of the pit solution pH, through hydroxide generation, as a result of the selected electrograining conditions and consequent anodic and cathodic polarisation, enables tailoring of the resultant electrograined surface appearance.

  15. Interaction of aqueous caustic with acidic oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiwetelu, C.I.; Hornof, V.; Neale, G.H. (Univ. of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON (Canada))

    High content of native carboxylic acids make heavy oils acidic. It is generally accepted that these acids react with caustic reagents present in floodwater, resulting in the in-situ formation of surface active soap anions. When these adsorb at the oil-water interface, they can drastically lower the interfacial tension to the point where residual oil is mobilized. The most intriguing aspect of these acid/caustic interactions is the dynamic nature of the interfacial tension. Given a sufficiently long time, the dynamic tension would attain an equilibrium state. Measurements were made of the equilibrium interfacial tensions of acidified oleic phases contacted with a wide range of caustic concentrations in the aqueous phase. A novel measurement technique (photomicropendography) was used, and data analysis was carried out by nonlinear regression. The present approach utilizes pre-selected fatty acids in a defined oleic phase, enabling quantification of relevant model parameters and facilitating evaluation of key variables influencing interfacial activity. The acid ionization constant and the equilibrium constant governing the formation of inactive soap species were found to be the most important parameters for systems of oleic and lauric acids dissolved in hexadecane. Regression analysis showed that the acid dissociation constant (pKa) of oleic acid ranged from 6.2 to 6.9 and was dependent on the working acid concentration. For lauric acid, the pKa values were in the range of 9 to 11 depending on the caustic concentration of the aqueous phase. Species aggregation in both the oleic and aqueous phases is mostly responsible for the variations in pKa values. 30 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. UV Photodissociation Dynamics of Nitric Acid: The Hydroxyl Elimination Channel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengyan Wang; Zhichao Chen; Yongwei Zhang; Quan Shuai; Bo Jiang; Dongxu Dai; Xiuyan Wang; Xueming Yang

    2009-01-01

    Sliced velocity mapping ion imaging technique was employed to investigate the dynamics of the hydroxyl elimination channel in the photodissociaiton of nitric acid in the ultraviolet region. The OH product was detected by (2+1) resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization via the D2∑- electronic state. The total kinetic energy spectra of the OH+NO2 channel from the photolysis of HONO2 show that both NO2(X2A1) and NO2 (A2B2) channels are present,suggesting that both 11A" and 21A" excited electronic states of HONO2 are involved in the excitation. The parallel angular distributions suggest that the dissociation of the nitric acid is a fast process in comparison with the rotational period of the HNO3 molecule. The anisotropy parameter β for the hydroxyl elimination channel is found to be dependent on the OH product rotational state as well as the photolysis energy.

  17. Mercury-free dissolution of aluminum-clad fuel in nitric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Jerry D.; Anderson, Philip A.

    1994-01-01

    A mercury-free dissolution process for aluminum involves placing the aluminum in a dissolver vessel in contact with nitric acid-fluoboric acid mixture at an elevated temperature. By maintaining a continuous flow of the acid mixture through the dissolver vessel, an effluent containing aluminum nitrate, nitric acid, fluoboric acid and other dissolved components are removed.

  18. Electrodeposition of ruthenium, rhodium and palladium from nitric acid and ionic liquid media: Recovery and surface morphology of the deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Platinum group metals are man-made noble metals. → Electrochemical recovery of fission platinoids. → Recovery from nitric acid medium. → Recovery from ionic liquid medium. → Platinoids with exotic surface morphologies. - Abstract: Electrodeposition is a promising technique for the recovery of platinum group metals with unique surface morphologies. The electrodeposition of palladium, ruthenium and rhodium from aqueous nitric acid, and non-aqueous 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ionic liquid medium was studied at stainless steel electrode. The surface morphology and elemental composition of the resultant deposit were probed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDS) analysis. Deposits with diverse surface morphologies and metal compositions were obtained by varying the composition of the electrolytic medium and applied potential. The results demonstrate the possibility of tailoring the morphologies of PGMs by controlling the composition and potential needed for electrodeposition.

  19. Stress corrosion cracking of zirconium in nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The susceptibility of zirconium and its common alloys to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in nitric acid was investigated by slow strain-rate and constant deflection techniques. Cracking occurred at 250C over a wide range of acid concentrations and electrochemical potentials. The crack velocity increased slightly with increasing temperature. The failure mode was transgranular and the morphology was similar to SCC failures of zirconium alloys in other environments. The fracture was very orientation-dependent suggesting that it occurs on a single crystallographic plane in the material. The results of the study are not consistent with a hydrogen mechanism for cracking

  20. Alternative to Nitric Acid for Passivation of Stainless Steel Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Pattie L.; Kolody, Mark; Curran, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion is an extensive problem that affects the Department of Defense (DoD) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The deleterious effects of corrosion result in steep costs, asset downtime affecting mission readiness, and safety risks to personnel. Consequently, it is vital to reduce corrosion costs and risks in a sustainable manner. The DoD and NASA have numerous structures and equipment that are fabricated from stainless steel. The standard practice for protection of stainless steel is a process called passivation. Typical passivation procedures call for the use of nitric acid; however, there are a number of environmental, worker safety, and operational issues associated with its use. Citric acid offers a variety of benefits including increased safety for personnel, reduced environmental impact, and reduced operational cost. DoD and NASA agreed to collaborate to validate citric acid as an acceptable passivating agent for stainless steel. This paper details our investigation of prior work developing the citric acid passivation process, development of the test plan, optimization of the process for specific stainless steel alloys, ongoing and planned testing to elucidate the process' resistance to corrosion in comparison to nitric acid, and preliminary results.

  1. Metals for the containment of nitric acid solutions of plutonium-238

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of a study of the corrosion of various transition-metal alloys, tantalum, and tantalum/2.5% tungsten are reported. The solvent contained nitric acid, hydrofluoric acid, and ammonium hexanitratocerate. It was designed to imitate the corrosiveness of the nitric acid, hydrofluoric acid mixture used to dissolve 238-plutonium dioxide. (author)

  2. NIR Spectroscopic Properties of Aqueous Acids Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Zubir MatJafri

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Acid content is one of the important quality attributes in determining the maturity index of agricultural product, particularly fruits. Despite the fact that much research on the measurement of acidity in fruits through non-destructive spectroscopy analysis at NIR wavelengths between 700 to 1,000 nm has been conducted, the same response towards individual acids is not well known. This paper presents NIR spectroscopy analysis on aqueous citric, tartaric, malic and oxalic solutions through quantitative analysis by selecting a set of wavelengths that can best be used to measure the pH of the solutions. The aquaphotomics study of the acid solutions has generated R2 above 0.9 for the measurement of all acids. The most important wavelengths for pH are located at 918–925 nm and 990–996 nm, while at 975 nm for water.

  3. Cyclopiazonic acid degradation by aqueous ozone

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Otniel Freitas; Venâncio, Armando

    2011-01-01

    Ozone is a chemical agent with great potential to reduce mycotoxins, it was effective against to reduce some mycotoxins. In view of this it was aimed of this work study the Cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) degradation by aqueous ozone. The degradation of exogenously CPA introduced in mobile phase was confirmed by High performance liquid Chromatography (HPLC). In parallel it was tested the effect of sodium formate (SF), to evaluate the influence of this chemical to neutralize ...

  4. Reduction Rates for Higher Americium Oxidation States in Nitric Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, Travis Shane [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mincher, Bruce Jay [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schmitt, Nicholas C [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The stability of hexavalent americium was measured using multiple americium concentrations and nitric acid concentrations after contact with the strong oxidant sodium bismuthate. Contrary to our hypotheses Am(VI) was not reduced faster at higher americium concentrations, and the reduction was only zero-order at short time scales. Attempts to model the reduction kinetics using zero order kinetic models showed Am(VI) reduction in nitric acid is more complex than the autoreduction processes reported by others in perchloric acid. The classical zero-order reduction of Am(VI) was found here only for short times on the order of a few hours. We did show that the rate of Am(V) production was less than the rate of Am(VI) reduction, indicating that some Am(VI) undergoes two electron-reduction to Am(IV). We also monitored the Am(VI) reduction in contact with the organic diluent dodecane. A direct comparison of these results with those in the absence of the organic diluent showed the reduction rates for Am(VI) were not statistically different for both systems. Additional americium oxidations conducted in the presence of Ce(IV)/Ce(III) ions showed that Am(VI) is reduced without the typical growth of Am(V) observed in the systems sans Ce ion. This was an interesting result which suggests a potential new reduction/oxidation pathway for Am in the presence of Ce; however, these results were very preliminary, and will require additional experiments to understand the mechanism by which this occurs. Overall, these studies have shown that hexavalent americium is fundamentally stable enough in nitric acid to run a separations process. However, the complicated nature of the reduction pathways based on the system components is far from being rigorously understood.

  5. Nitric acid adsorption on ice at environmental temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Susan Kay

    1998-12-01

    Nitric acid has become an important pollutant in areas which depend on snowpack melt for their water supply. The adsorption of HNO3 on the ice surface was investigated at [-]20oC using artificial snow packed into glass columns and exposed to nitric acid vapor in a flow system. It was observed that, given sufficient acid vapor, HNO3 would adsorb in multilayers on the ice, with the bulk of the acid remaining near the input face. With time, molecules from this high-concentration would slowly diffuse down the column, mainly along the ice surface. The surface diffusion coefficient, D, was calculated from both the average linear migration distance, /langle x/rangle, and Fick's First Law to be 3.5×10-7 cm2/sec. The vapor pressure was calculated from Fick's First Law to be 2.3([/pm]0.3)×10-7 torr. Desorption was found to be of zero order and the energy of desorption at [-]20oC was calculated from an Arrhenius-type equation to be 88.8([/pm]0.1) kJ/mol. This means that the HNO3 will tend to stay on the ice surface in a snowpack.

  6. Experimental study on thermal hazard of tributyl phosphate-nitric acid mixtures using micro calorimeter technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qi; Jiang, Lin; Gong, Liang; Sun, Jin-Hua

    2016-08-15

    During PUREX spent nuclear fuel reprocessing, mixture of tributyl phosphate (TBP) and hydrocarbon solvent are employed as organic solvent to extract uranium in consideration of radiation contaminated safety and resource recycling, meanwhile nitric acid is utilized to dissolve the spent fuel into small pieces. However, once TBP contacts with nitric acid or nitrates above 130°C, a heavy "red oil" layer would occur accompanied by thermal runaway reactions, even caused several nuclear safety accident. Considering nitric acid volatility and weak exothermic detection, C80micro calorimeter technique was used in this study to investigate thermal decomposition of TBP mixed with nitric acid. Results show that the concentration of nitric acid greatly influences thermal hazard of the system by direct reactions. Even with a low heating rate, if the concentration of nitric acid increases due to evaporation of water or improper operations, thermal runaway in the closed system could start at a low temperature. PMID:27136728

  7. Optimization of conditions to produce nitrous gases by electrochemical reduction of nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaseous nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2) involved as oxidizing agents in nuclear fuel reprocessing can be an produced by electrochemical reduction of nitric acid. This could be an interesting alternative to the usual process because no wastes are generated. Voltammetric studies on a platinum electrode show that two reduction potential regions are observed in concentrated nitric acid solutions, between 0.05 VSHE and 0.3 VSHE and O.5 VSHE and 1 VSHE. The highest potential region reduction mechanism was studies by: classical micro-electrolysis methods; macro-electrolysis methods; infra-red spectroscopy couplet to electrochemistry. It was determined that the origin of nitric acid reduction is the electrochemical reduction of nitrous acid in nitric oxide which chemically reduces nitric acid. This reaction produces nitrous acid back which indicate an auto-catalytic behaviour of nitric acid reduction mechanism. Nitrogen dioxide evolution during nitric acid reduction can also be explained by an other chemical reaction. In the potential value of platinum electrode is above 0.8 VSHE, products of the indirect nitric acid reduction are nitrous acid, nitrogen oxide and nitrogen dioxide. Below this value nitric oxide can be reduced in nitrous oxide. Thus the potential value is the most important parameter for the nitrogen oxides production selectivity. However, owing to the auto-catalytic character of the reduction mechanism, potential value can be controlled during intentiostatic industrial electrolysis. (author)

  8. Nitric Acid Dehydration Using Perfluoro Carboxylate and Mixed Sulfonate/Carboxylate Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.L. Ames

    2004-09-01

    Perfluoro ionomer membranes are tetrafluoro ethylene-based materials with microheterogeneous structures consisting of a hydrophobic polymer backbone and a hydrophilic side-chain cluster region. Due to the ionomer cluster morphology, these films exhibit unique transport properties. Recent investigations with perfluoro sulfonate and perfluoro sulfonate/carboxylate composite polymers have demonstrated their value in the dehydration of nitric acid and they show potential as an alternative to conventional, energy intensive unit operations in the concentration of acid feeds. As a result, investigations were conducted to determine the feasibility of using pure perfluoro carboxylate and mixed perfluoro sulfonate/carboxylate films for the dehydration of nitric acid because of the speculation of improved water selectivity of the carboxylate pendant chain. During the first phase of these investigations the effort was focused on generating a thin, solution cast perfluoro carboxylate ionomer film, to evaluate the general, chemical and physical characteristics of the polymer, and to assess the material's aqueous transport performance (flux and nitrate separation efficiencies) in pervaporation and high-pressure environments. Results demonstrated that generating robust solution-cast films was difficult yet a number of membranes survived high trans-membrane pressures up to 700 psig. General characterization of the solution cast product showed reduced ion exchange capacities when compared with thicker, ''as received'' perfluoro carboxylate and similar sulfonate films. Small angle x-ray scattering analysis results suggested that the solution cast carboxylate films contained a small fraction of sulfonate terminated side-chains. Aqueous transport experimentation showed that permeate fluxes for both pure water and nitric acid were approximately two orders of magnitude smaller for the carboxylate solution cast membranes when compared to their sulfonate

  9. Enhanced sidewall functionalization of single-wall carbon nanotubes using nitric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Gerard; Shao, Lidong; Ballesteros, Belin; Green, Malcolm L H

    2009-10-01

    When a sample of as-made single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is treated with nitric acid, oxidation debris are formed due to the functionalization (mainly carboxylation) of the amorphous carbon present in the sample and a continuous coating along the carbon nanotube walls is created preventing the sidewall functionalization of the SWNTs. This oxidation debris can be easily removed by an aqueous base wash leaving behind a sample with a low degree of functionality. After removal of the amorphous carbon (by steam purification) from a sample of as-made SWNTs, the resulting purified SWNTs are readily carboxylated on the walls by nitric acid treatment. The use of steam for the purification of SWNTs samples allows the removal of the amorphous carbon and graphitic layers coating the metal particles present in the sample without altering the tubular structure of the SWNTs. The exposed metal particles can then be easily removed by an acid wash. Comparison between the steam treatment and molten sodium hydroxide treatment is made.

  10. Investigation of products of molybdenite oxidation by nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physicochemical study of products of oxidation by nitric acid of molybdenum concentrate containing 98% MoS2 is carried out. It is shown that appearing molybdenum oxide forms block oxidizer access to the surface of sulfide phase and hinder its complete oxidation. When complexing reagents (H2SO4, H3PO4, HCl) are introduced in the solution the bulk of oxidized molybdenum transfers into solution in the form of a stable complex, at that. The effect of internal diffusion decreases and a considerable increase of MoS2 oxidation rate and completeness is achieved

  11. Optimization of the nitrous vapors experimental conditions production by nitric acid electrochemical reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaseous nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2) involved as oxidizing agents in nuclear fuel reprocessing can be produced by electrochemical reduction of nitric acid. This is an interesting alternative to the existing process because no wastes are generated. voltammetric studies on a platinum electrode show that two reduction potential regions are observed in concentrated nitric acid solutions, between 0,05 VSHE and between 0,5 VSHE and 1 VSHE. The highest potential region reduction mechanism was studied by: classical micro-electrolysis methods, macro-electrolysis methods, infrared spectroscopy coupled to electrochemistry. It was determined that the origin of nitric acid reduction is the electrochemical reduction of nitrous acid in nitric oxide which chemically reduces nitric acid. This reaction produces nitrous acid back which indicate an auto-catalytic behaviour of nitric acid reduction mechanism. Nitrogen dioxide evolution during nitric reduction can also explained by an other chemical reaction. If the potential value of platinum electrode is above 0,8 VSHE, products of the indirect nitric acid reduction are nitrous acid, nitrogen oxide and nitrogen dioxide. Below this value nitric oxide can be reduced in nitrous oxide. Thus the potential value is the most important parameter for the nitrogen oxides production selectivity. However, owing to the auto-catalytic character of the reduction mechanism, potential value can be controlled during intentiostatic industrial electrolysis. (author)

  12. Separation of thorium and uranium in nitric acid solution using silica based anion exchange resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanliang; Wei, Yuezhou; He, Linfeng; Tang, Fangdong

    2016-09-30

    To separate thorium and uranium in nitric acid solution using anion exchange process, a strong base silica-based anion exchange resin (SiPyR-N4) was synthesized. Batch experiments were conducted and the separation factor of thorium and uranium in 9M nitric acid was about 10. Ion exchange chromatography was applied to separate thorium and uranium in different ratios. Uranium could be eluted by 9M nitric acid and thorium was eluted by 0.1M nitric acid. It was proved that thorium and uranium can be separated and recovered successfully by this method.

  13. Uranyl fluoride luminescence in acidic aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luminescence emission spectra and decay rates are reported for uranyl species in acidic aqueous solutions containing HF or added NaF. The longest luminescence lifetime, 0.269 ± 0.006 ms, was observed from uranyl in 1 M HF + 1 M HClO4 at 296 K and decreased with increasing temperature. Based on a luminescence dynamics model that assumes equilibrium among electronically excited uranyl fluoride species and free fluoride ion, this long lived uranyl luminescence in aqueous solution is attributed primarily to UO2F2. Studies on the effect of added LiNO3 or Na2WO4·2H2O showed relatively weak quenching of uranyl fluoride luminescence which suggests that high sensitivity determination of the UF6 content of WF6 gas should be feasible via uranyl luminescence analysis of hydrolyzed gas samples of impure WF6

  14. Nitrosation and nitration of fulvic acid, peat and coal with nitric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Cox, Larry G.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrohumic acids, produced from base extraction of coals and peats oxidized with nitric acid, have received considerable attention as soil ammendments in agriculture. The nitration chemistry however is incompletely understood. Moreover, there is a need to understand the reaction of nitric acid with natural organic matter (NOM) in general, in the context of a variety of environmental and biogeochemical processes. Suwannee River NOM, Suwannee River fulvic acid, and Pahokee Peat fulvic acid were treated with 15N-labeled nitric acid at concentrations ranging from 15% to 22% and analyzed by liquid and solid state 15N NMR spectroscopy. Bulk Pahokee peat and Illinois #6 coal were also treated with nitric acid, at 29% and 40% respectively, and analyzed by solid state 15N NMR spectroscopy. In addition to nitro groups from nitration of aromatic carbon, the 15N NMR spectra of all five samples exhibited peaks attributable to nitrosation reactions. These include nitrosophenol peaks in the peat fulvic acid and Suwannee River samples, from nitrosation of phenolic rings, and N-nitroso groups in the peat samples, from nitrosation of secondary amides or amines, the latter consistent with the peat samples having the highest naturally abundant nitrogen contents. Peaks attributable to Beckmann and secondary reactions of the initially formed oximes were present in all spectra, including primary amide, secondary amide, lactam, and nitrile nitrogens. The degree of secondary reaction product formation resulting from nitrosation reactions appeared to correlate inversely with the 13C aromaticities of the samples. The nitrosation reactions are most plausibly effected by nitrous acid formed from the reduction of nitric acid by oxidizable substrates in the NOM and coal samples.

  15. Effect of sulfur compounds on biological reduction of nitric oxide in aqueous Fe(II)EDTA2- solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manconi, I.; Maas, van der P.M.F.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2006-01-01

    Biological reduction of nitric oxide (NO) in aqueous solutions of EDTA chelated Fe(II) is one of the main steps in the BioDeNOx process, a novel bioprocess for the removal of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from polluted gas streams. Since NOx contaminated gases usually also contain sulfurous pollutants, the

  16. Impact of scaling on the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is considering using glycolic acid as a replacement for formic acid in Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Catalytic decomposition of formic acid is responsible for the generation of hydrogen, a potentially flammable gas, during processing. To prevent the formation of a flammable mixture in the offgas, an air purge is used to dilute the hydrogen concentration below the 60% of the Composite Lower Flammability Limit (CLFL). The offgas is continuously monitored for hydrogen using Gas Chromatographs (GCs). Since formic acid is much more volatile and toxic than glycolic acid, a formic acid spill would lead to the release of much larger quantities to the environment. Switching from formic acid to glycolic acid is expected to eliminate the hydrogen flammability hazard leading to lower air purges, thus downgrading of Safety Significant GCs to Process Support GCs, and minimizing the consequence of a glycolic acid tank leak in DWPF. Overall this leads to a reduction in process operation costs and an increase in safety margin. Experiments were completed at three different scales to demonstrate that the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet scales from the 4-L lab scale to the 22-L bench scale and 220-L engineering scale. Ten process demonstrations of the sludge-only flowsheet for SRAT and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles were performed using Sludge Batch 8 (SB8)-Tank 40 simulant. No Actinide Removal Process (ARP) product or strip effluent was added during the runs. Six experiments were completed at the 4-L scale, two experiments were completed at the 22-L scale, and two experiments were completed at the 220-L scale. Experiments completed at the 4-L scale (100 and 110% acid stoichiometry) were repeated at the 22-L and 220-L scale for scale comparisons.

  17. Safe conditions for contacting nitric acid or nitrates with tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyder, M.L

    1994-01-01

    In response to a request from DOE-SR, the current state of knowledge of the reactions between TBP and aqueous nitrate solutions is critically reviewed, and recommendations are made for the safe operation of SRS separations equipment in which this combination of chemicals may be present. The existing limits for evaporation are validated. Guidelines are presented for cases in which general limits do not apply. The rate of reaction between nitric acid and TBP appears to be controlled by the rate of TBP hydrolysis. The hydrolysis reaction produces dibutyl phosphate and n-butanol. The hydrolysis rate is a strong function of temperature, and becomes very fast at temperatures in the range 130{degrees} to 150{degrees}C. The resulting n-butanol is volatile at high temperatures, boiling at 117.5{degrees}C, but is also subject to exothermic oxidation by nitric acid or nitrates. If oxidation occurs before the n-butanol evaporates, the heat of oxidation may exceed local cooling by convection. The resulting heating will further accelerate the reaction, leading to an energetic runaway and possibly (in confined systems) an explosion. Extensive experiments and practice have shown that in a well-mixed and well-vented aqueous system such as an evaporator, at moderate acidities and temperatures below 130{degrees}C, the heat of reaction is adequately removed by vaporization of steam. In general, the heating will be so slow that natural processes provide adequate cooling at temperatures below 80{degrees}C. Above this temperature, care should be taken to ensure that adequate cooling is available for the amount of TBP that may be present. Experiments suggest that in well-ventilated systems n-butanol evaporation and convective cooling are sufficient to control the reaction at temperatures up to 120{degrees}C.

  18. A method for concentrating organic dyes: colorimetric measurements of nitric oxides and sialic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalezari, Parviz; Lekhraj, Rukmani; Casper, Diana

    2011-09-01

    A new method for extraction and concentration of organic dyes that uses a reagent composed of a nonionic detergent mixed with an alcohol is described. We have observed that water-soluble organic dyes are also soluble in nonionic detergents and can be extracted by adding salt, which separates the dye-detergent component from the aqueous phase. We have also found that mixing nonionic detergents with alcohols markedly reduces their viscosity and produces stable, free-flowing, and effective reagents for color extraction. On the basis of these observations, we used a mixture of Triton X-100 and 1-butanol and observed that water-soluble natural and synthetic chromophores, as well as dyes generated in biochemical reactions, can be extracted, concentrated, and analyzed spectrophotometrically. Trypan blue and phenol red are used as examples of synthetic dyes, and red wine is used as an example of phenolic plant pigments. Applications for quantification of nitric oxides and sialic acids are described in more detail and show that as little as 0.15 nmol of nitric oxide and 0.20 nmol of sialic acid can be detected. A major advantage of this method is its ability to concentrate chromophores from dye-containing solutions that otherwise cannot be measured because of their low concentrations. PMID:21605540

  19. Recovery of Lead from Sulfide Concentrate after Mechanochemical Activation Using Nitric Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.G.Kholmogorov; O.N.Kononova; G.L.Pashkov; L.V.Shashina; V.P.Plekhanov; A.A.Sabetskiy

    2005-01-01

    Decomposition of lead sulfide concentrates in nitric acidic solutions after ferric (Ⅲ) nitrate addition and mechanical preparation has been investigated. It was found out that the decomposition can be achieved in HNO3 solution (>1.5 mol·L-1) at the temperature above 85℃. The leaching rate of lead can be increased by means of mechanochemical activation. The use of [Fe(NO3)3-HNO3-H2O] aqueous salt system allows the decomposition of lead sulfide concentrate at room temperature and in this case the concentration of HNO3 does not exceed 0.05-0.1 mol.L-1, The degree of lead recovery into solution from PbS concentrate reaches 99.3%-99.6c70 with the mechanochemical activation of this concentrate. The insoluble residues after the leaching contain SiO2, S0, FeCO3 and PbSO4.

  20. Delayed effects of inhaled nitric acid aerosols in the rat: preliminary studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rats that inhaled transuranic nitrate aerosols in a toxicology study were simultaneously exposed to aerosols of the suspending solution, nitric acid. Results indicated that exposure to nitric acid was associated with the finding of bone tumors. Other rats, exposed to low levels of inhaled Pu(NO3)4, showed one osteosarcoma in 79 rats examined

  1. 77 FR 48433 - New Source Performance Standards Review for Nitric Acid Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    ... production units (NAPUs). These revisions include a change to the nitrogen oxides (NO X ) emission limit... requirements for new nitric acid production units? IV. Summary of Significant Changes Since Proposal A. How is..., Energy, and Economic Impacts of These Standards A. What are the impacts for Nitric Acid Production...

  2. Transportation impact analysis for the shipment of low specific activity nitric acid. Revisison 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is in support of the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility Low Specific Activity (LSA) Nitric Acid Shipment Environmental Assessment. It analyzes potential toxicological and radiological risks associated with transportation of PUREX Facility LSA Nitric Acid from the Hanford Site to Portsmouth VA, Baltimore MD, and Port Elizabeth NJ

  3. Transportation impact analysis for the shipment of low specific activity nitric acid. Revisison 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, J.R.

    1995-05-16

    This is in support of the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility Low Specific Activity (LSA) Nitric Acid Shipment Environmental Assessment. It analyzes potential toxicological and radiological risks associated with transportation of PUREX Facility LSA Nitric Acid from the Hanford Site to Portsmouth VA, Baltimore MD, and Port Elizabeth NJ.

  4. Research on the Stability of Dimethyl Hydroxylamine-methyl Hydrazinein Nitric Acid Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    By the means of the comparison of the extraction of PU(Ⅲ) and plutonium in nitric acid mediumcontaining dimethyl hydroxylamine-methyl hydrazine and the analysis of the percent content of PU(Ⅳ) inthe system, the stability of dimethyl hydroxylamine-methyl hydrazine in nitric acid medium is

  5. Airborne measurements of the nitric acid partitioning in persistent contrails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Th. Peter

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the first systematic measurements of nitric acid (HNO3 uptake in contrail ice particles at typical aircraft cruise altitudes. During the CIRRUS-III campaign cirrus clouds and almost 40 persistent contrails were probed with in situ instruments over Germany and Northern Europe in November 2006. Besides reactive nitrogen, water vapor, cloud ice water content, ice particle size distributions, and condensation nuclei were measured during 6 flights. Contrails with ages up to 12 h were detected at altitudes 10–11.5 km and temperatures 211–220 K. These contrails had a larger ice phase fraction of total nitric acid (HNO3ice/HNO3tot = 6% than the ambient cirrus layers (3%. On average, the contrails contained twice as much HNO3ice as the cirrus clouds, 14 pmol/mol and 6 pmol/mol, respectively. Young contrails with ages below 1 h had a mean HNO3ice of 21 pmol/mol. The contrails had higher nitric acid to water molar ratios in ice and slightly higher ice water contents than the cirrus clouds under similar meteorological conditions. The differences in ice phase fractions and molar ratios between developing contrails and cirrus are likely caused by high plume concentrations of HNO3 prior to contrail formation. The location of the measurements in the upper region of frontal cirrus layers might account for slight differences in the ice water content between contrails and adjacent cirrus clouds. The observed dependence of molar ratios as a function of the mean ice particle diameter suggests that ice-bound HNO3 concentrations are controlled by uptake of exhaust HNO3 in the freezing plume aerosols in young contrails and subsequent trapping of ambient HNO3 in growing ice particles in older (age > 1 h contrails.

  6. Airborne measurements of the nitric acid partitioning in persistent contrails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Schäuble

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the first systematic measurements of nitric acid (HNO3 uptake in contrail ice particles at typical aircraft cruise altitudes. During the CIRRUS-III campaign cirrus clouds and almost 40 persistent contrails were probed with in situ instruments over Germany and Northern Europe in November 2006. Besides reactive nitrogen, water vapor, cloud ice water content, ice particle size distributions, and condensation nuclei were measured during 6 flights. Contrails with ages up to 8 hours were detected at altitudes 10–11.5 km and temperatures 211–220 K. These contrails had a larger ice phase fraction of total nitric acid (HNO3ice/HNO3tot = 6% than the ambient cirrus layers (3%. On average, the contrails contained twice as much HNO3ice as the cirrus clouds, 14 pmol/mol and 6 pmol/mol, respectively. Young contrails with ages below 1 h had a mean HNO3ice of 21 pmol/mol. The contrails had higher nitric acid to water molar ratios in ice and slightly higher ice water contents than the cirrus clouds under similar meteorological conditions. The differences in ice phase fractions and molar ratios between developing contrails and cirrus are likely caused by high plume concentrations of HNO3 prior to contrail formation. The location of the measurements in the top region of frontal cirrus layers might account for slight differences in the ice water content between contrails and adjacent cirrus clouds. The observed dependence of molar ratios as a function of the mean ice particle diameter suggests that ice-bound HNO3 concentrations are controlled by uptake of exhaust HNO3 in the freezing plume aerosols in young contrails and subsequent trapping of ambient HNO3 in growing ice particles in older (age > 1 h contrails.

  7. The relationship between cytokine level and nitric oxide content in aqueous humor after intraocular lens implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between cytokine level and nitric oxide (NO) content in aqueous humor after intraocular lens implantation. METHODS: All New Zealand rabbits were divided randomly into three groups: (1) control group, (2) extracapsular cataract extraction group (ECCE), (3) extracapsular cataract extraction and posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation group (ECCE+IOL). The inflammation of all experimental rabbit eyes, including cornea edema and anterior chamber exudation were observed via zoom-photo slitlamp microscope 1,3,7,14,30 d postoperation. Meanwhile, aqueous humor was drawn for white blood cell (WBC) counting and classifying, and for NO-2/NO-3 and cytokine assay, including interleukin-2(IL-2), tumour necrosis factor-α(TNF-α). Statistics were taken by SPSS softwear. RESULTS: (1) Total WBC in aqueous humor were higher and anterior chamber exudation were more severe in ECCE+IOL group than that in ECCE group and control group. (2) The level of IL-2 and TNF-α and the content of NO-2/NO-3 in aqueous humor of ECCE+IOL group were higher than that in ECCE group and control group 1-14 d postoperation respectively, and it increased to peak value at 3-7 d postoperation and decreased gradually after two weeks postoperation. (3) The change regularity of IL-2, TNF-α and NO-2/NO-3 in each group were basically similar, i.e. when the level of cytokine (IL-2 and TNF-α) was normal, the content of NO-2/NO-3 was normal too, when the level of cytokine (IL-2 and TNF-α) increased, the content of NO-2/NO-3 increased too. CONCLUSION: The intraocular inflammation after ECCE+IOL was more severe than that after simple ECCE. NO, IL-2 and TNF-α play an important role in intraocular inflammation after intraocular lens implantation. The changes of IL-2 and TNF-α level was closely related with NO content in aqueous humor.

  8. Kinetics of the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with nitric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margitan, J. J.; Watson, R. T.

    1982-01-01

    An extensive study was made of the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with nitric acid in a laser photolysis-resonance fluorescence system. A 266 nm laser was used to photolyze HNO3 in the temperature range 225-415 K at pressures of 20-300 torr. A temperature dependence was detected below room temperature, with a leveling off at 298 K and a wide spread in the rate constants. A pressure dependence was observed over the entire range and was more pronounced at lower temperatures. The results are noted to be in agreement with those of previous investigations. However, the wide range of rate constants are suggested to be a problem for stratospheric HO(x) modeling for anthropogenic effects. No explanation could be given of the varying results obtained by other investigators regarding the kinetics of the reactions.

  9. Acidities of Water and Methanol in Aqueous Solution and DMSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Daqing

    2009-01-01

    The relative acidities of water and methanol have been a nagging issue. In gas phase, methanol is more acidic than water by 36.0 kJ/mol; however, in aqueous solution, the acidities of methanol and water are almost identical. The acidity of an acid in solution is determined by both the intrinsic gas-phase ionization Gibbs energy and the solvent…

  10. Effect of Nitric Acid Concentrations on Synthesis and Stability of Maghemite Nanoparticles Suspension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irwan Nurdin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Maghemite (γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles have been synthesized using a chemical coprecipitation method at different nitric acid concentrations as an oxidizing agent. Characterization of all samples performed by several techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, alternating gradient magnetometry (AGM, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, dynamic light scattering (DLS, and zeta potential. The XRD patterns confirmed that the particles were maghemite. The crystallite size of all samples decreases with the increasing concentration of nitric acid. TEM observation showed that the particles have spherical morphology with narrow particle size distribution. The particles showed superparamagnetic behavior with decreased magnetization values at the increasing concentration of nitric acid. TGA measurement showed that the stability temperature decreases with the increasing concentration of nitric acid. DLS measurement showed that the hydrodynamic particle sizes decrease with the increasing concentration of nitric acid. Zeta potential values show a decrease with the increasing concentration of nitric acid. The increasing concentration of nitric acid in synthesis of maghemite nanoparticles produced smaller size particles, lower magnetization, better thermal stability, and more stable maghemite nanoparticles suspension.

  11. Omega-3 fatty acids improve psychomotor performance via mechanism not related to nitric acid production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwan S. M. Al-Nimer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 fatty acids (ω-3FAs are essential polyunsaturated fats that protect the brain from cognitive impairment. It increases the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthetase (eNOS and thereby increases the nitric acid (NO production. This study aimed to explore the effect of ω-3FAs on psychomotor performance and to relate this effect to the reactive nitrogen species. This study was conducted in Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Al-Mustansiriya University in Baghdad, Iraq. Twenty healthy subjects, allocated randomly from medical college students, were participated in the single blind clinical trial. Participants were divided into two groups, each of ten subjects to receive either placebo or (ω-3FAs (750 mg single oral dose daily for 5 days. They were asked to perform psychomotor performance before and after 5 days of treatment, and venous blood was obtained for determination of serum nitric oxide (NO and peroxynitrite (ONOO. ω-3FAs treated group was significantly different from placebo-treated group in reducing choice and motor reaction times as well as the critical flicker frequency threshold. The serum levels of NO and ONOO in ω-3FAs-treated group did not significantly differ from placebo-treated group. Short term supplementation of ω-3FAs improves the psychomotor performance in young healthy subjects via a mechanism not related to the production of nitric oxide production. Inflorescence is a panicle few flowered and fruit is a capsule. The data of the results obtained were presented and discussed.

  12. Nitric Acid-Treated Carbon Fibers with Enhanced Hydrophilicity for Candida tropicalis Immobilization in Xylitol Fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Le Wang; Na Liu; Zheng Guo; Dapeng Wu; Weiwei Chen; Zheng Chang; Qipeng Yuan; Ming Hui; Jinshui Wang

    2016-01-01

    Nitric acid (HNO3)-treated carbon fiber (CF) rich in hydrophilic groups was applied as a cell-immobilized carrier for xylitol fermentation. Using scanning electron microscopy, we characterized the morphology of the HNO3-treated CF. Additionally, we evaluated the immobilized efficiency (IE) of Candida tropicalis and xylitol fermentation yield by investigating the surface properties of nitric acid treated CF, specifically, the acidic group content, zero charge point, degree of moisture and cont...

  13. Thermal hazard evaluation of lauroyl peroxide mixed with nitric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Lung-Chang; You, Mei-Li; Ding, Mei-Fang; Shu, Chi-Min

    2012-01-01

    Many thermal runaway incidents have been caused by organic peroxides due to the peroxy group, -O-O-, which is essentially unstable and active. Lauroyl peroxide (LPO) is also sensitive to thermal sources and is incompatible with many materials, such as acids, bases, metals, and ions. From the thermal decomposition reaction of various concentrations of nitric acid (HNO3) (from lower to higher concentrations) with LPO, experimental data were obtained as to its exothermic onset temperature (T0), heat of decomposition (ΔHd), isothermal time to maximum rate (TMRiso), and other safety parameters exclusively for loss prevention of runaway reactions and thermal explosions. As a novel finding, LPO mixed with HNO3 can produce the detonation product of 1-nitrododecane. We used differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermal activity monitor III (TAM III), and gas chromatography/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) analyses of the reactivity for LPO and itself mixed with HNO3 to corroborate the decomposition reactions and reaction mechanisms in these investigations. PMID:22763742

  14. Thermal Hazard Evaluation of Lauroyl Peroxide Mixed with Nitric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Min Shu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Many thermal runaway incidents have been caused by organic peroxides due to the peroxy group, –O–O–, which is essentially unstable and active. Lauroyl peroxide (LPO is also sensitive to thermal sources and is incompatible with many materials, such as acids, bases, metals, and ions. From the thermal decomposition reaction of various concentrations of nitric acid (HNO3 (from lower to higher concentrations with LPO, experimental data were obtained as to its exothermic onset temperature (T0, heat of decomposition (ΔHd, isothermal time to maximum rate (TMRiso, and other safety parameters exclusively for loss prevention of runaway reactions and thermal explosions. As a novel finding, LPO mixed with HNO3 can produce the detonation product of 1-nitrododecane. We used differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, thermal activity monitor III (TAM III, and gas chromatography/mass spectrometer (GC/MS analyses of the reactivity for LPO and itself mixed with HNO3 to corroborate the decomposition reactions and reaction mechanisms in these investigations.

  15. Study on reduction and back extraction of Pu(IV) by urea derivatives in nitric acid conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, G.A.; Xiao, S.T.; Yan, T.H.; Lin, R.S.; Zhu, Z.W. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O.Box 275(26), Beijing 102413 (China)

    2013-07-01

    The reduction kinetics of Pu(IV) by hydroxyl-semicarbazide (HSC), hydroxyurea (HU) and di-hydroxyurea (DHU) in nitric acid solutions were investigated separately with adequate kinetic equations. In addition, counter-current cascade experiments were conducted for Pu split from U in nitric acid media using three kinds of reductant, respectively. The results show that urea derivatives as a kind of novel salt-free reductant can reduce Pu(IV) to Pu(III) rapidly in the nitric acid solutions. The stripping experimental results showed that Pu(IV) in the organic phase can be stripped rapidly to the aqueous phase by the urea derivatives, and the separation factors of plutonium /uranium can reach more than 10{sup 4}. This indicates that urea derivatives is a kind of promising salt-free agent for uranium/plutonium separation. In addition, the complexing effect of HSC with Np(IV) was revealed, and Np(IV) can be back-extracted by HSC with a separation factor of about 20.

  16. Heterogeneous catalysis contribution for the denitration of aqueous nuclear radioactive waste with formic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical denitration aims to reduce the nitric acid concentration in nuclear fuel reprocessing aqueous wastes by adding formic acid as a reducing agent. The denitration reaction exhibits an induction period, which duration is related to the time needed by the key intermediate of the reaction, i.e. nitrous acid, to reach a threshold concentration in the reaction medium. The addition of a Pt/SiO2 catalyst in the reaction mixture suppresses the induction period of the chemical denitration. The aim of the present work is to identify the role of Pt/SiO2 in the catalytic denitration mechanism. The experimental work is based on the comparison of catalytic tests performed with various catalysts, in order to identify the intrinsic characteristics of Pt/SiO2 that might influence its activity for the reaction. Catalytic denitration results show that Pt/SiO2 acts only by speeding up the nitrous acid generation in the solution until its concentration reaches the threshold level of 0,01 mol L-1 in the experimental conditions. Catalysts activity is evaluated by quantifying the nitrous acid generated on the platinum surface during the induction period of the homogeneous denitration reaction. The large platinum aggregates reactivity is greater than the one of nano-sized particles. The study of the key step of the catalytic denitration reaction, the catalytic generation of nitrous acid, clarifies the role of Pt/SiO2. The homogeneous denitration is initiated thanks to a redox cycle on the catalyst surface: an initial oxidation of Pt0 by nitric acid, which is reduced into nitrous acid, followed by the reduction of the passivated 'Ptox' by formic acid. Furthermore, a platinum reduction by formic acid prior to the catalytic test prevents any platinum leaching from the catalyst into the nitric solution, being all the more significant as platinum dispersion is high. (author)

  17. A study on the dissolution of uranium compounds(UO2, AUC) in nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dissolution behavior of UO2 and AUC powder in nitric acid solutions was investigated to evaluate the performance of chemical decontamination process applicable to and internal surface of metallic system components such as tanks and piping in the uranium conversion plant. It was revealed that the dissolution of UO2 in nitric acid solutions containing low concentration of H2O2 was more effective than that in nitric acid solution without H2O2 as one of the conventional inorganic acid decontamination processes. AUC powder dissolved easily and continuously in nitric acid solutions before the solution pH attains about 3, but above that solution pH uranium concentration in the solution was lowered drastically by recrystallization. It was convinced that pH range of 2.5 ∼ 3 is desired in the decontamination of surface contaminated with AUC

  18. Nitric acid trihydrate (NAT formation at low NAT supersaturations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Voigt

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A polar stratospheric cloud (PSC was observed on 6 February 2003 in the Arctic stratosphere by in-situ measurements onboard the high-altitude research aircraft Geophysica. Low number densities (~10−4 cm−3 of nitric acid (HNO3 containing particles – probably NAT – with diameters up to 6 µm were measured at altitudes between 18 and 20 km. These particles have the potential to grow further and to remove HNO3 from the stratosphere, thereby enhancing polar ozone loss. Interestingly, the NAT particles formed in less than a day at temperatures T>TNAT−3.5 K, just slightly below the NAT equilibrium temperature TNAT. This unique measurement of PSC formation at extremely low NAT saturation ratios (SNAT≤11 constrains current NAT nucleation theories. In particular, NAT formation on ice can for certain be excluded. Conversely, we suggest that meteoritic particles may be favorable candidates for triggering nucleation of NAT at the observed low number densities.

  19. Isothermal heat measurements of TBP-nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Net heats of reaction were measured in an isothermal calorimeter for TBP/HNO3 solutions at ambient pressure and temperatures above 100 degrees C. Carbon and nitrogen balances were performed giving the reaction stoichiometry. Rate expressions were derived and rate constants determined for both the single and two phase systems which included mass lost from the reacting system by evaporation. This mathematical model was fit to the experimental data (including the measured net heat and off-gas rate) gathered over a wide range of conditions. The oxidation rate constant was determined to be 5.4E-4 min-1 at 110 degrees C for an open open-quotes ventedclose quotes system as compared to >1E-3min-1 in a closed system. The heat released per unit material oxidized was also reduced due to a decrease in dissolved oxidants and an inefficient reduction of HNO3. Oxidation in the organic phase was found to be first order in nitric acid and pseudo-zero order in butylnitrate and water

  20. HIRDLS/Aura Level 3 Nitric Acid (HNO3) Zonal Fourier Coefficients V007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The "HIRDLS/Aura Level 3 Nitric Acid (HNO3) Zonal Fourier Coefficients" version 7 data product (H3ZFCHNO3) contains the entire mission (~3 years) of HIRDLS data...

  1. Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence of UO22+ in nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparison between nitrogen and tripled Nd-YAG laser source for Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence (TRLIF) of uranium in nitric acid solutions in the framework of on-line feasibility has been performed. Hence, for uranium on-line monitoring with fiber optics, nitrogen laser (337 nm), most usual source in TRLIF has several drawback; poor beam quality and non negligible nitric acid absorption at 337 nm. Tripled Nd-YAG laser (355 nm) despite lower uranium absorption coefficient has several advantages: no influence of nitric acid absorption, better beam quality, better fiber transmission and solid state technology. No significant difference for fluorescence spectra and lifetimes are observed for both lasers. Limit of detection for direct determination of uranium in nitric acid by TRLIF is in the μg/l (10-8 M) range for both lasers. (author)

  2. Study of the properties of dialkyl thiophosphoric acids. Application to the extraction of U, in phosphoric and nitric solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study is made of complex formation and liquid-liquid extraction of uranium (VI) by dialkyl-thiophosphoric acids of formula (RO)2POSH and by the synergic mixtures: dialkylthiophosphoric acids-phosphine oxides. The aqueous phases studied consist of concentrated phosphoric acid solutions and nitric acid solutions. Several methods, including distribution coefficient measurements, U.V., visible and infrared absorption spectrophotometries and magnetic resonance, were used to study the extraction mechanisms and the structures of species formed in the organic phase. The influence of different parameters (partition of extraction agent, dimerisation, acid ligand-phosphine oxide association, extraction of inorganic acids...) on the uranium (VI) distribution coefficients enabled the constants of complex formation in the aqueous phase and extraction in the organic phase to be determined. These various properties were compared with those of dialkyl phosphoric and dithiophosphoric acids. The mechanisms established prove that sulfur donors ligands form stable complexes with UO22+ ions although U(VI) is considered as a ''hard class a'' acceptor according to Ahrland's classification

  3. Chemistry of ruthenium in nitric acid solution with special regard to nuclear fuel solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is given concerning the published knowledge about the chemistry of ruthenium in nitric acid solution with special reference to nitric acid nuclear fuel solutions. Possibilities of the spectroscopic description of the different existing ruthenium complexes are discussed and papers are presented dealing with the estimation of the proportions of the different ruthenium compounds in nuclear fuel solutions. Finally, arguments are derived for the preparation of ruthenium-containing model solutions, which adequately simulate the composition of real nuclear fuel solutions. (author)

  4. A bibliographical review on the radiolysis of uranyl nitrate solutions in nitric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bibliographical study on the effects of ionizing radiation on uranyl nitrate solutions in nitric acid medium was performed, and the state of knowledge on this subject is presented. The main experimental and theoretical results on water, nitric acid and uranium solutions radiolysis are reviewed and critically evaluated. This paper provides a collection of references as an aid to the development of practical applications, and to stimulate new research on fundamental processes in these systems. (author)

  5. Thermochemistry of aqueous pyridine-3-carboxylic acid (nicotinic acid)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, Elsa M. [Departamento de Quimica e Bioquimica, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade de Lisboa, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Instituto Politecnico de Setubal, ESTBarreiro, Rua Americo da Silva Marinho, 2839-001 Lavradio (Portugal); Rego, Talita S. [Departamento de Quimica e Bioquimica, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade de Lisboa, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Minas da Piedade, Manuel E., E-mail: memp@fc.ul.p [Departamento de Quimica e Bioquimica, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade de Lisboa, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2011-06-15

    Research highlights: {yields} We determined the {Delta}{sub sol}H{sub m} of solid nicotinic acid (NA) in water by solution calorimetry. {yields} We determined {Delta}{sub dil}H{sub m} of an aqueous nicotinic acid solution by flow calorimetry. {yields} We determined (aq, {infinity}) for the 3 NA species involved in acid/base equilibria. {yields} We determined the enthalpy of formation of NA(aq) under saturation conditions.. - Abstract: The molar enthalpy of solution of solid nicotinic acid (NA) at T = 298.15 K, to give an aqueous solution of molality m = 3.748 . 10{sup -3} mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1}, was determined as {Delta}{sub sol}H{sub m} = (19,927 {+-} 48) J {center_dot} mol{sup -1}, by solution calorimetry. Enthalpies of dilution, {Delta}{sub dil}H{sub m}, of 0.1005 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1} aqueous nicotinic acid to yield final solutions with molality in the approximate range (0.03 to 0.09) mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1} were also measured by flow calorimetry. Combining the two sets of data and the results of pH measurements, with values of proton dissociation enthalpies and {Delta}{sub f}H{sub m}{sup 0}(NA, cr) selected from the literature, it was possible to derive the standard molar enthalpies of formation of the three nicotinic acid species involved in protonation/deprotonation equilibria, at infinite dilution: {Delta}{sub f}H{sub m}{sup 0}(HN{sup +}C{sub 5}H{sub 4}COOH.{infinity}H{sub 2}O,aq) = (328.2 {+-} 1.2) kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}, {Delta}{sub f}H{sub m}{sup 0}(HN{sup +}C{sub 5}H{sub 4}COO{sup -}.{infinity}H{sub 2}O,aq) = (325.0 {+-} 1.2) kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}, and {Delta}{sub f}H{sub m}{sup 0}(NC{sub 5}H{sub 4}COO{sup -}.{infinity}H{sub 2}O,aq) = (313.7 {+-} 1.2) kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}. Finally, the enthalpy of solution of nicotinic acid at T = 298.15 K, under saturation conditions (m = 0.138 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1}), and the standard molar enthalpy of formation of the corresponding solution could also be obtained as {Delta

  6. The Chemistry Study Of Uranium And Transition Elements In Mixture Of Nitric Acid And Sulfuric Acid Were Done

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uranium and transition elements were contained in the waste of technetium-99 generator productions to be formed by irradiated uranium. This waste medium is low concentration of nitric acid and sulfuric acid. The tendency of uranium in this medium to form uranyl sulfate complex, the compound of uranyl sulfate belong to heteropoly compounds and is an acid. The transition elements in mixture of nitric acid and sulfuric acid solutions have tendency to form cation complex compound According to difference of the chemical properties of uranium and transition elements, the base reagent can be used for recovery of uranium from this solution

  7. Nitrones are able to release nitric oxide in aqueous environment under hydroxyl free radical attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croitoru, Mircea Dumitru; Ibolya, Fülöp; Pop, Maria Cristiana; Dergez, Timea; Mitroi, Brânduşa; Dogaru, Maria Titica; Tokés, Béla

    2011-10-30

    Importance of a nitric oxide donor that can act as a spin trap might bring some new therapeutic possibilities regarding the treatment of ischemic diseases by reducing the intensity of free radical produced reperfusion lesions. These substances might be also used as a new type of photo protectors since they can absorb UV radiation, capture free radicals formed by interaction of UV radiation with tissue constituents, and tanning of the skin will be permitted due to nitric oxide release. The purpose of this work was to measure the ability of nitrones to release nitric oxide and how different factors (temperature, nitrone concentration, and free radicals) influence the releasing ability. Mostly, indirect determination of nitric oxide was carried out, by measuring nitrite and nitrate amounts (as decomposition products of nitric oxide), all nitrones proved to release significant amounts of nitric oxide. Nitrite measurements were made based on an HPLC-VIS method that uses pre-column derivatization of nitrite by forming an azo dye (limit of quantification: 5ng/ml). No good correlation was found between the amount of nitric oxide and temperature for most studied nitrones but between the formation of nitric oxide and nitrone concentration an asymptotic correlation was found. Fenton reagent also yielded formation of nitric oxide from nitrones and formed amounts were not different from those recorded for UV irradiation. Most of the nitrones effectively released about 0.5% of the maximum amount of nitric oxide that is chemically possible and estimated concentrations of 0.1μM were present in the solutions during decomposition.

  8. Ionisation constants of inorganic acids and bases in aqueous solution

    CERN Document Server

    Perrin, D D

    2013-01-01

    Ionisation Constants of Inorganic Acids and Bases in Aqueous Solution, Second Edition provides a compilation of tables that summarize relevant data recorded in the literature up to the end of 1980 for the ionization constants of inorganic acids and bases in aqueous solution. This book includes references to acidity functions for strong acids and bases, as well as details about the formation of polynuclear species. This text then explains the details of each column of the tables, wherein column 1 gives the name of the substance and the negative logarithm of the ionization constant and column 2

  9. Disposition and transportation of surplus radioactive low specific activity nitric acid. Volume 1, Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    DOE is deactivating the PUREX plant at Hanford; this will involve the disposition of about 692,000 liters (183,000 gallons) of surplus nitric acid contaminated with low levels of U and other radionuclides. The nitric acid, designated as low specific activity, is stored in 4 storage tanks at PUREX. Five principal alternatives were evaluated: transfer for reuse (sale to BNF plc), no action, continued storage in Hanford upgraded or new facility, consolidation of DOE surplus acid, and processing the LSA nitric acid as waste. The transfer to BNF plc is the preferred alternative. From the analysis, it is concluded that the proposed disposition and transportation of the acid does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA; therefore an environmental impact statement is not required.

  10. Corrosion properties of high silicon iron-based alloys in nitric acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The effect of copper and rare-earth elements on corrosion behavior of ~iigh silicon iron-based alloys in nitric acid was studied by means of static and loading current corrosion experiments. The anodic polarization curve was also made to discuss the corrosion mechanism. The examination on alloy microstructure and SEM corrosion pattern showed that when silicon content reached 14.5%, the Fe3Si phase appeared and the primary structure of the iron-base alloy was ferrite. When adding 4.57% copper in the iron alloy, its corrosion resistance in static diluted sulfuric acid was improved while its corrosion resistance and electrochemical corrosion properties in the nitric acid were decreased. In contrast, the addition of rare earth elements could improve the corrosion properties in all above conditions including in static diluted sulfuric acid and in nitric acid.

  11. Disposition and transportation of surplus radioactive low specific activity nitric acid. Volume 1, Environmental Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOE is deactivating the PUREX plant at Hanford; this will involve the disposition of about 692,000 liters (183,000 gallons) of surplus nitric acid contaminated with low levels of U and other radionuclides. The nitric acid, designated as low specific activity, is stored in 4 storage tanks at PUREX. Five principal alternatives were evaluated: transfer for reuse (sale to BNF plc), no action, continued storage in Hanford upgraded or new facility, consolidation of DOE surplus acid, and processing the LSA nitric acid as waste. The transfer to BNF plc is the preferred alternative. From the analysis, it is concluded that the proposed disposition and transportation of the acid does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA; therefore an environmental impact statement is not required

  12. Proton transfer reactions between nitric acid and acetone, hydroxyacetone, acetaldehyde and benzaldehyde in the solid phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasne, Jérôme; Laffon, Carine; Parent, Philippe

    2012-12-01

    The heterogeneous and homogeneous reactions of acetone, hydroxyacetone, acetaldehyde and benzaldehyde with solid nitric acid (HNO(3)) films have been studied with Reflection-Absorption Infrared Spectroscopy (RAIRS) under Ultra-High Vacuum (UHV) conditions in the 90-170 K temperature range. In the bulk or at the surface of the films, nitric acid transfers its proton to the carbonyl function of the organic molecules, producing protonated acetone-H(+), hydroxyacetone-H(+), acetaldehyde-H(+) and benzaldehyde-H(+), and nitrate anions NO(3)(-), a reaction not observed when nitric acid is previously hydrated [J. Lasne, C. Laffon and Ph. Parent, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2012, 14, 697]. This provides a molecular-scale description of the carbonyl protonation reaction in an acid medium, the first step of the acid-catalyzed condensation of carbonyl compounds, fuelling the growth of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the atmosphere.

  13. Spectrofluorimetric determination of nitric oxide at trace levels with 5,6-diamino-1,3-naphthalene disulfonic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xian; Wang, Hong; Liang, Shu-Cai; Zhang, Hua-Shan

    2002-03-01

    Based on the selective reaction that 5,6-diamino-1,3-naphthalene disulfonic acid (DANDS) traps nitric oxide (NO) in the presence of dioxygen to yield the highly fluorescent form, 1-[H]-naphthotriazole-6,8-disulfonic acid in moderately alkaline medium, a new spectrofluorimetric method for the determination of NO has been reported. The method offered the advantage of specificity, sensitivity and a simple protocol for the direct detection of NO in aqueous solution. The linear calibration range for NO was 0.04-1.44 mumoll(-1) with a 3sigma detection limit of 0.6 nmoll(-1). The proposed method has been used to monitor the release of NO from S-nitrosocysteine, a NO-releasing agent. PMID:18968522

  14. Kinetics of reaction between acetic acid and Ag2+ in nitric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reaction kinetics between acetic acid and Ag2+ in nitric acid medium is studied by spectrophotometry. The effects of concentrations of acetic acid (HAc), H+, NO3- and temperature on the reaction are investigated. The rate equation has been determined to be -dc(Ag2+)/dt=kc(Ag2+)c(HAc)c-1(H+), where k = (610±15) (mol/L)-1·min-1 with an activation energy of about (48.8±3.5) kJ·mol-1 when the temperature is 25degC and the ionic strength is 4.0 mol/L. The reduction rate of Ag2+ increases with the increase of HAc concentration or temperature and the decrease of HNO3 concentration. However, the effect of NO3- concentrations on the reaction rate is negligible. (author)

  15. The bonding of heavy metals on nitric acid-etched coal fly ashes functionalized with 2-mercaptoethanol or thioglycolic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coal fly ash is a waste by-product of the coal fire industry, which generates many environmental problems. Alternative uses of this material would provide efficient solutions for this by-product. In this work, nitric acid-etched coal fly ash labelled with 2-mercaptoethanol or thioglycolic acid was assessed for retention of Al(III), As(III), Cu(II), Cd(II), Fe(III), Mn(II), Hg(II), Ni(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II) ions. The bonding characteristics between the organic compounds with the solid support, as well as with the metal ions, were evaluated using various surface analytical techniques. Visualization of the organically-functionalized coal fly ash particle was possible using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), while the elemental composition of the functionalized material, before and after retention of the metal ions, was obtained by energy dispersive (ED)-X ray spectrometry (XRS) and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometry and Raman spectrometry were used to obtain information about the functional groups. It was found that some metal(oid) ions (As, Ni, Pb, Zn) were coordinated through the mercaptan group, while other metal(oid)s (Al, Cd, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn) were apparently bonded to oxygen atoms. A low-cost and effective solid phase retention system for extraction of heavy metals from aqueous solutions was thus developed. - Graphical abstract: Nitric acid-etched coal fly ash labelled with 2-mercaptoethanol or thioglycolic acid was intended for the retention of heavy metals. The bonding characteristics between the organic compounds with the solid support, as well as with the metal ions, were evaluated using surface analytical techniques. - Highlights: • Coal fly ashes were organically-functionalized. • Organically-functionalized coal fly ashes were spectrometrically characterized. • Organically-functionalized coal fly ashes can be used as an effective solid sorbent for metal(oid)s. • This retention

  16. Nitric oxide secretion in human conjunctival fibroblasts is inhibited by alpha linolenic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Erdinest, Nir; Shohat, Noam; Moallem, Eli; Yahalom, Claudia; Mechoulam, Hadas; Anteby, Irene; Ovadia, Haim; Solomon, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Purpose It is known that both human conjunctival fibroblasts (HCF) and corneal epithelial (HCE) cells contribute to the inflammatory process in the ocular surface by releasing inflammatory cytokines. In addition, nitric oxide (NO) has an important role in inflammatory responses in the ocular surface. In the present study, we aimed to characterize the capacity of these cells to release nitric oxide in response to cytokines and Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and show that Alpha-linoleic acid (ALA) i...

  17. Macro level extraction of U(VI) and Pu(IV) by tri-iso-amyl phosphate and tri-n-butyl phosphate from nitric acid media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batch extraction of Pu(IV) by 1.1 M Tri-iso-amyl phosphate (TiAP) in n-dodecane (DD) from plutonium nitrate solutions in nitric acid media has been investigated as a function of metal loading and equilibrium aqueous phase acidity at 303 K under high solvent loading conditions. Co-extraction behavior of U(VI) and Pu(IV) with 1.1 M solutions of trialkyl phosphates (TBP and TiAP) in n-DD from nitric acid media has also been compared by carrying out the extraction from a U-Pu feed solution (21% Pu to mimic PFBR MOX fuel composition) at 303 K. (author)

  18. Effects of Nitric Acid Concentration on the Stability of Alumina Sols

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Alumina sols with a mlar ratio of 1: 50 between aluminum sec- butoxide ( ASB ) and H2 O werefabricated by adding various amounts of nitric acid.The particle shape, zeta potential, polydispersity and effective particle size of alumina sol were examined by a TEM, a zeta PALS granularity analyzer and a zetaPALS zeta potential analyzer, respectively.By analyzing the change of zeta potential and double- layer thickness with nitric acid concentration, the potential energy curves of colloidal particles were mapped on the basis of DLVO theory, and the effects of nitric acid concentration on the stability of alumina sols were intensively studied.The results show that for the alumina sols with a mol ratio of 1: 50 between ASB and H2 O, the total interaction energy of the colloidal particle is at a maximum when the nitric acid concentration is 0.22 mol/ L.Therefore, the stability of the colloid reaches optimum at the nitric acid concentration of 0.22 mol/L.

  19. Serum uric acid levels and leukocyte nitric oxide production in multiple sclerosis patients outside relapses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mostert, JP; Ramsaransing, GSM; Heerserna, DJ; Heerings, M; Wilczak, N; De Keyser, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: A number of studies found that patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) have low serum levels of uric acid. It is unclear whether this represents a primary deficit or secondary effect. Uric acid is a scavenger of peroxynitrite, which is the product of nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide. Becau

  20. Photolysis of Periodate and Periodic Acid in Aqueous Solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sehested, Knud; Kläning, U. K.

    1978-01-01

    The photochemistry of periodate and periodic acid in aqueous solution was studied (i) by quantum yield measurements at low light intensity (ii) by flash photolysis, and (iii) by photolysis of glassy samples at 77 K. The photochemical studies were supplemented with pulse radiolysis studies...... of aqueous periodate solutions and with kinetic studies using stopped-flow technique. In strongly alkaline solution the photodecomposition of periodate proceeds via formation of O– and IVI. At pH

  1. Preparation of nitric humic acid by catalytic oxidation from Guizhou coal with catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Zhiyuan; Gong Liang; Ran Pan

    2012-01-01

    Nitric humic acid was prepared by catalytic oxidation between nitric acid and Guizhou coal,with added catalysts.We investigated catalytic oxidation processes and the factors that affect the reactions.The effects of different catalysts,including NiSO4 support on active carbon (AC-NiSO4),NiSO4 support on silicon dioxide (SiO2-NiSO4),composites of SO42-/Fe2O3,Zr-iron and vanadium-iron composite were studied.As well.we investigated nitric humic acid yields and the chemical structure of products by element analysis,FT-IR and E4/E6 (an absorbance ratio at wavelengths of 465 and 665 nm of humic acid alkaline extraction solutions).The results show that the catalytic oxidation reaction with added catalysts can increase humic acid yields by 18.7%,16.36%,12.94%,5.61% and 8.59%,respectively.The highest yield of humic acid,i.e.,36.0%,was obtained with AC-NiSO4 as the catalyst.The amounts of C and H decreased with the amount of nitrogen.The increase in the E4/E6 ratio in catalytic oxidation of (Guizhou) coal shows that small molecular weights and high yields of nitric humic acid can be obtained by catalytic oxidation reactions.

  2. Decomposition Studies of Triphenylboron, Diphenylborinic Acid and Phenylboric Acid in Aqueous Alkaline Solutions Containing Copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, C.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Peterson, R. A.

    1997-02-11

    This report documents the copper-catalyzed chemical kinetics of triphenylboron, diphenylborinic acid and phenylboric acid (3PB, 2PB and PBA) in aqueous alkaline solution contained in carbon-steel vessels between 40 and 70 degrees C.

  3. Observation of gaseous nitric acid production at a high-energy proton accelerator facility

    CERN Document Server

    Kanda, Y; Nakajima, H

    2005-01-01

    High-energy protons and neutrons produce a variety of radionuclides as well as noxious and oxidative gases, such as ozone and nitric acid, in the air mainly through the nuclear spallation of atmospheric elements. Samples were collected from the surfaces of magnets, walls, and floors in the neutrino beamline tunnel and the target station of the KEK 12-GeV proton synchrotron facility by wiping surfaces with filter paper. Considerably good correlations were found between the amounts of nitrate and tritium and between those of nitrate and /sup 7/Be. This finding gives evidence that at high-energy proton facilities, nitric acid is produced in the radiolysis of air in beam- loss regions. Also, the nitric acid on the surfaces was found to be desorbed and tended to be more uniform throughout the tunnel due to air circulation. The magnitude of diminishing from the surfaces was in the order of tritium>nitrate>/sup 7/Be1).

  4. Coextraction of uranium(VI) form nitric acid solutions by N,N—diethyldecanamide and TBP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SunGuo-Xin; SunSi-Xiu; 等

    1997-01-01

    The partition of uranium(VI) between nitric acid and N,N-diethydecanamide,C9H19CON(C2H5)2,(DEDEA)in kerosene has been investigated at various concentrations of nitric acid,extractant and slating -out agent LiNO3.The mechanism of extraction is discussed in the light of the results obtained.The effect of TBP on the extraction of uranium(VI) with DEDEA has also been considered.There is apparent synergism between these two extractants at low concentration of TBP;however,at higher concentration,distributioin ratio decreases.

  5. Oxidation of hydroxylamine by nitrous and nitric acids. Model development from first principle SCRF calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Sumathy; Ashcraft, Robert W; Vial, Marc; Klasky, Marc L

    2005-09-29

    Ab initio molecular orbital calculations have been performed to develop an elementary reaction mechanism for the autocatalytic and scavenging reactions of hydroxylamine in an aqueous nitric acid medium. An improved understanding of the titled reactions is needed to determine the "stability boundary of hydroxylamine" for safe operations of the plutonium-uranium reduction extraction (PUREX) process. Under the operating conditions of the PUREX process, namely, 6 M nitric acid, the reactive forms of hydroxylamine are NH2OH, NH3OH+, and the complex NH3OH.NO3, and those of nitrous acid are NO+, H2ONO+, N2O4, N2O3, NO2, and NO. High-level CBSQB3/IEFPCM and CBSQB3/COSMO calculations were performed using GAUSSIAN03 to investigate the energy landscape and to explore a large number of possible ion-ion, ion-radical, ion-molecule, radical-radical, radical-molecule, and molecule-molecule pathways available to the reactive forms of the reactants in solution. It was found that in solution the autocatalytic generation of nitrous acid proceeds through free radical pathways at low-hydroxylamine concentrations from unprotonated NH2OH via hydrogen abstraction. At high [NH3OH+], we suggest a possible involvement of the NH3ONO+ intermediate via the reaction NH2ONO + NO2 --> HNO + HONO + NO. The NH3ONO+ intermediate, in turn, is formed favorably via the ion-ion reactions of NH3OH+ with NO+ and/or the reaction between NO+ and hydroxylammonium nitrate (HAN). The intermediates involved in the scavenging reaction of nitrous acid by hydroxylamine are NH3ONO+, NH2ONO, NH2(NO)O, NH(NO)OH, and HONNOH and the rate-determining step is the 1,2-NO migration in NH2ONO leading to NH2(NO)O. Reactions NH2ONO --> NH2(NO)O and NH2(NO)O --> NH(NO)OH were studied with two explicit water molecules and the results are discussed in the context of the importance of the explicit treatment of solvent in the determination of the energetics and mechanism of these processes. The rate constants for the reactions were

  6. Thermodynamic and kinetic modelling of the reduction of concentrated nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research thesis aimed at determining and quantifying the different stages of the reduction mechanism in the case of concentrated nitric acid. After having reported the results of a bibliographical study on the chemical and electrochemical behaviour of concentrated nitric media (generalities, chemical equilibriums, NOx reactivity, electrochemical reduction of nitric acid), the author reports the development and discusses the results of a thermodynamic simulation of a nitric environment at 25 C. This allowed the main species to be identified in the liquid and gaseous phases of nitric acid solutions. The author reports an experimental electrochemical investigation coupled with analytic techniques (infrared and UV-visible spectroscopy) and shows that the reduction process depends on the cathodic overvoltage, and identifies three potential areas. A kinetic modelling of the stationary state and of the impedance is then developed in order to better determine, discuss and quantify the reduction process. The application of this kinetic model to the preliminary results of an electrochemical study performed on 304 L steel is then discussed

  7. Material compatibility evaluation for DWPF nitric-glycolic acid-literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickalonis, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Skidmore, E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2013-06-01

    Glycolic acid is being evaluated as an alternative for formic and nitric acid in the DWPF flowsheet. Demonstration testing and modeling for this new flowsheet has shown that glycolic acid and glycolate has a potential to remain in certain streams generated during the production of the nuclear waste glass. A literature review was conducted to assess the impact of glycolic acid on the corrosion of the materials of construction for the DWPF facility as well as facilities downstream which may have residual glycolic acid and glycolates present. The literature data was limited to solutions containing principally glycolic acid.

  8. Investigation of the direct and indirect electrochemical oxidation of hydrazine in nitric acid medium on platinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nuclear fuel processing by the PUREX process, the purification of plutonium in nitric acid medium requires the oxidation of Pu(III) to Pu(IV), and of hydrazinium nitrate to nitrogen. The study helped to characterize the electrochemical behavior of the oxidation of hydrazinium nitrate and the reduction of nitric acid to nitrous acid, a compound which can chemically oxidize hydrazinium nitrate and Pu(III). Electro-analytical studies on polycrystalline platinum showed that hydrazine is oxidized in two potential zones, which depend on the surface texture of the platinum anode. Electrolysis in separate compartments, carried out in medium-acid media (2 and 4 mo/l) in the potential zone where these processes take place, showed that, at 0.9 V/ECS, the hydrazine oxidation reactions involved are: a four-electron process (75 %) with nitrogen formation and a one-electron process (25 %) with formation of nitrogen and ammonium ion. By contrast, electrolysis carried out at 0.65 V/ECS (with reactivation of the electrode at - 0.2 V/ECS to remove the poison from the platinum) allowed the selective oxidation of hydrazine to nitrogen by the four-electron reaction. Nitric acid can only be reduced to nitrous acid in the absence of hydrazine. For medium-acid media (≤ 6 mol/l), this reaction takes place at potentials below - 0.2 V/ECS. However, the production rate of nitrous acid (partial order 0 with respect to nitric acid) is very low compared with the values obtained for strongly-acid media (6 to 10 mol/l) at the potential of - 0.1 V/ECS. Note that, in concentrated nitric medium, the selectivity of the reduction reaction is 47 to 85 % for nitrous acid, depending on the nitric acid concentration (6 to 10 mol/l) and the potential imposed (- 0.1 ≤ E ≤ 0.6 V/ECS). A kinetic study helped to determine the hydrazine oxidation rates as a function of the operating conditions. In all cases, the reaction rate is of partial order 0 with respect to hydrazine. These studies accordingly

  9. Raman spectra of amino acids and their aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guangyong; Zhu, Xian; Fan, Qi; Wan, Xueliang

    2011-03-01

    Amino acids are the basic "building blocks" that combine to form proteins and play an important physiological role in all life-forms. Amino acids can be used as models for the examination of the importance of intermolecular bonding in life processes. Raman spectra serve to obtain information regarding molecular conformation, giving valuable insights into the topology of more complex molecules (peptides and proteins). In this paper, amino acids and their aqueous solution have been studied by Raman spectroscopy. Comparisons of certain values for these frequencies in amino acids and their aqueous solutions are given. Spectra of solids when compared to those of the solute in solution are invariably much more complex and almost always sharper. We present a collection of Raman spectra of 18 kinds of amino acids ( L-alanine, L-arginine, L-aspartic acid, cystine, L-glutamic acid, L-glycine, L-histidine, L-isoluecine, L-leucine, L-lysine, L-phenylalanine, L-methionone, L-proline, L-serine, L-threonine, L-tryptophan, L-tyrosine, L-valine) and their aqueous solutions that can serve as references for the interpretation of Raman spectra of proteins and biological materials.

  10. Tropospheric nitric acid columns from the IASI satellite instrument interpreted with a chemical transport model: Implications for parameterizations of nitric oxide production by lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Matthew; Martin, Randall V.; Wespes, Catherine; Coheur, Pierre-Francois; Clerbaux, Cathy; Murray, Lee T.

    2014-08-01

    This paper interprets tropical tropospheric nitric acid columns from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) satellite instrument with a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem). GEOS-Chem and IASI columns generally agree over the tropical ocean to within 10%. However, the GEOS-Chem simulation underestimates IASI nitric acid over Southeast Asia by a factor of 2. The regional nitric acid bias is confirmed by comparing the GEOS-Chem simulation with additional satellite (High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder, Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer) and aircraft (Pacific Exploratory Mission (PEM)-Tropics A and PEM-West B) observations of the middle and upper troposphere. This bias appears to be driven by the lightning NOx parameterization, both in terms of the magnitude of the NOx source and the ozone production efficiency of concentrated lightning NOx plumes. We tested a subgrid lightning plume parameterization and found that an ozone production efficiency of 15 mol/mol in lightning plumes over Southeast Asia in conjunction with an additional 0.5 Tg N would reduce the regional nitric acid bias from 92% to 6% without perturbing the rest of the tropics. Other sensitivity studies such as modified NOx yield per flash, increased altitude of lightning NOx emissions, decreased convective mass flux, or increased scavenging of nitric acid required unrealistic changes to reduce the bias.

  11. Conductivity of Oxalic Acid in Aqueous Solution at Low Concentration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪良; 韩世钧

    2005-01-01

    Oxalic acid is a weak and unsymmetrical bi-basic acid. There exist dissociation and association equilibria among the species in aqueous solution. The molar conductivity of the solution is the sum of the ionic contributions.Based on this idea, a new prediction equation of ionic conductivity was proposed at low concentration. The molar conductivities of the solution and its relevant ions were calculated respectively. The results obtained were in good agreement with those from experiments and the Quint-Viallard equation.

  12. Continuous wet denuder measurements of atmospheric nitric and nitrous acids during the 1999 Atlanta Supersite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genfa, Z.; Slanina, J.; Boring, C.B.; Jongejan, A.C.; Purnendu, K.D.

    2003-01-01

    Two different measurement methods for atmospheric nitric and nitrous acid during the Atlanta Supersite study are described and compared. Both approaches combined wet denuder collection coupled to ion chromatographic analysis. One of these utilized a rotating wet annular denuder maintained indoor wit

  13. Research on the Reaction Between Technetium and Hydrazine in Nitric Acid Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The reaction between technetium and hydrazine in nitric acid medium was studied by the titration ofthe concentration of hydrazine and pursuing the concentration of heptavalent technetium along with time.It is approved that the reaction between technetium and hydrazine includes an inducing period, a fast

  14. ExoMol molecular line lists: XI The spectrum of nitric acid

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlyuchko, Anatoly I; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Nitric acid is a possible biomarker in the atmospheres of exoplanets. An accurate line list of rotational and rotational-vibrational transitions is computed for nitric acid (HNO$_3$). This line list covers wavelengths longer than 1.42 $\\mu$m (0 - 7000 cm$^{-1}$) and temperatures up to 500 K. The line list is computed using a hybrid variational -- perturbation theory and empirically tuned potential energy and dipole surfaces. It comprises almost 7 billion transitions involving rotations up to $J=100$. Comparisons with spectra from the HITRAN and PNNL databases demonstrate the accuracy of our calculations. Synthetic spectra of water - nitric acid mixturessuggest that nitric acid has features at 7.5 and 11.25 $\\mu$m that are capable of providing a clear signature for HNO$_3$; the feature at 11.25 $\\mu$m is particularly promising. Partition functions plus full line lists of transitions are made available in an electronic form as supplementary data to the article and at www.exomol.com.

  15. Brightening of the global cloud field by nitric acid and the associated radiative forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Makkonen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Clouds cool Earth's climate by reflecting 20% of the incoming solar energy, while also trapping part of the outgoing radiation. The effect of human activities on clouds is poorly understood, but the present-day anthropogenic cooling via changes of cloud albedo and lifetime could be of the same order as warming from anthropogenic addition in CO2. Soluble trace gases can increase water condensation to particles, possibly leading to activation of smaller aerosols and more numerous cloud droplets. We have studied the effect of nitric acid on the aerosol indirect effect with the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM5.5-HAM2. Including the nitric acid effect in the model increases cloud droplet number concentrations globally by 7%. The nitric acid contribution to the present-day cloud albedo effect was found to be −0.32 W m−2 and to the total indirect effect −0.46 W m−2. The contribution to the cloud albedo effect is shown to increase to −0.37 W m−2 by the year 2100, if considering only the reductions in available cloud condensation nuclei. Overall, the effect of nitric acid can play a large part in aerosol cooling during the following decades with decreasing SO2 emissions and increasing NOx and greenhouse gases.

  16. Reaction of formaldehyde and nitric acid in a remotely operated thermosiphon evaporator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conditions have been developed for the safe and successful use of a method for reacting formaldehyde with excess nitric acid, while simulataneously concentrating a fissile uranium nitrate solution. This process, which is being conducted in a remotely operated thermosiphon evaporator, has been adapted to plant scale and is being used to process multikilogram batches

  17. Synthesis and bioactivity of novel nitric oxide-releasing ursolic acid derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Chen; Wen Qiu; Jia Tang; Zhi Feng Wang; Shu Ying He

    2011-01-01

    A series of furoxan-based novel nitric oxide-donating ursolic acid (UA) derivatives (7a-f) were synthesized, and their cytotoxic activities against HepG2 cells in vitro were evaluated by MTT method. It was found that 7a-d and 7f showed more potent cytotoxic activities than control 5-fluorouracil and UA.

  18. Method for the manufacture of nitric acid soluble mixed oxide fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the manufacture of nitric acid-soluble mixed oxide fuel pellets with adjustable proportions, the starting powder is ground down to a primary grain size of < 2 μm together with a halogen-free grinding aid and subsequently mixed. The change is then granulated in a rotating chamber, pressed into pellet form and sintered. (orig.)

  19. Susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of zirconium and titanium alloy in nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of zirconium and titanium alloys used in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants was examined by the slow strain rate tensile test (SSRT) in nitric acid solutions by referencing those results obtained in silicone oil. Titanium alloys like Zr-39%Ti, Zr-15%Ti and Zr-5%Ti, Ti-5%Ta were used. Titanium alloys have not the susceptibility to SCC in nitric acid solutions. On the other hand zirconium have the susceptibility to SCC in the same solutions. In comparison with SSRT results of zirconium specimens with a notch in oil, the reduction ratio of time to failure in nitric acid solutions decreased with increasing temperature. The quasi-cleavage type SCC fracture morphology was observed on the fracture surface of specimens tested in nitric acid. In order to evaluate the effect of crystal anisotropy on SCC, L type specimens and C type specimens, which were machined out parallel and perpendicular to the rolling direction respectively were examined. The susceptibility to SCC of C type notched specimens was higher than that of L type notched specimens, because of the preferential texture of quasi-cleavage planes oriented along the cracking path. (author)

  20. The Consistency of Isotopologues of Ambient Atmospheric Nitric Acid in Passively Collected Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, M. D.; Sickman, J. O.; Bytnerowicz, A.; Padgett, P.; Allen, E. B.

    2012-12-01

    Anthropogenic sources of nitrogen oxides have previously been shown to have distinctive isotopic signatures of oxygen and nitrogen. Nylon filters are currently used in passive sampling arrays to measure ambient atmospheric nitric acid concentrations and estimate deposition rates. This experiment measured the ability of nylon filters to consistently collect isotopologues of atmospheric nitric acid in the same ratios as they are present in the atmosphere. Samplers were deployed in continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) and at field sites across a nitrogen deposition gradient in Southern California. Filters were exposed over a four week period with individual filters being subjected to 1-4 week exposure times. Extracted nitric acid were measured for δ18O and δ15N ratios and compared for consistency based on length of exposure and amount of HNO3 collected. Filters within the CSTRs collected HNO3 at a consistent rate in both high and low concentration chambers. After two weeks of exposure, the mean δ18O values were within 0.5‰ of the δ18O of the source HNO3 solution. The mean of all weekly exposures were within 0.5‰ of the δ15N of the source solution, but after three weeks, the mean δ15N of adsorbed HNO3 was within 0.2‰. As the length of the exposure increased, the variability of measured delta values decreased for both elements. The field samplers collected HNO3 consistent with previously measured values along a deposition gradient. The mean δ18O at high deposition sites was 52.2‰ compared to 35.7‰ at the low deposition sites. Mean δ15N values were similar at all sites across the deposition gradient. Due to precipitation events occurring during the exposure period, the δ15N and δ18O of nitric acid were highly variable at all field sites. At single sites, changes in δ15N and δ18O were negatively correlated, consistent with two-sourcing mixing dynamics, but the slope of the regressions differed between high and low deposition sites. Anthropogenic

  1. Nitric acid treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes optimized by Taguchi method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsuddin, Shahidah Arina; Derman, Mohd Nazree; Hashim, Uda; Kashif, Muhammad; Adam, Tijjani; Halim, Nur Hamidah Abdul; Tahir, Muhammad Faheem Mohd

    2016-07-01

    Electron transfer rate (ETR) of CNTs can be enhanced by increasing the amounts of COOH groups to their wall and opened tips. With the aim to achieve the highest production amount of COOH, Taguchi robust design has been used for the first time to optimize the surface modification of MWCNTs by nitric acid oxidation. Three main oxidation parameters which are concentration of acid, treatment temperature and treatment time have been selected as the control factors that will be optimized. The amounts of COOH produced are measured by using FTIR spectroscopy through the absorbance intensity. From the analysis, we found that acid concentration and treatment time had the most important influence on the production of COOH. Meanwhile, the treatment temperature will only give intermediate effect. The optimum amount of COOH can be achieved with the treatment by 8.0 M concentration of nitric acid at 120 °C for 2 hour.

  2. Nitric Acid Revamp and Upgrading of the Alarm & Protection Safety System at Petrokemija, Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoško, I.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Every industrial production, particularly chemical processing, demands special attention in conducting the technological process with regard to the security requirements. For this reason, production processes should be continuously monitored by means of control and alarm safety instrumented systems. In the production of nitric acid at Petrokemija d. d., the original alarm safety system was designed as a combination of an electrical relay safety system and transistorized alarm module system. In order to increase safety requirements and modernize the technological process of nitric acid production, revamping and upgrading of the existing alarm safety system was initiated with a new microprocessor system. The newly derived alarm safety system, Simatic PCS 7, links the function of "classically" distributed control (DCS and logical systems in a common hardware and software platform with integrated engineering tools and operator interface to meet the minimum safety standards with safety integrity level 2 (SIL2 up to level 3 (SIL3, according to IEC 61508 and IEC 61511. This professional paper demonstrates the methodology of upgrading the logic of the alarm safety system in the production of nitric acid in the form of a logical diagram, which was the basis for a further step in its design and construction. Based on the mentioned logical diagram and defined security requirements, the project was implemented in three phases: analysis and testing, installation of the safety equipment and system, and commissioning. Developed also was a verification system of all safety conditions, which could be applied to other facilities for production of nitric acid. With the revamped and upgraded interlock alarm safety system, a new and improved safety boundary in the production of nitric acid was set, which created the foundation for further improvement of the production process in terms of improved analysis.

  3. Bile acid induced colonic irritation stimulates intracolonic nitric oxide release in humans.

    OpenAIRE

    F. Casellas; Mourelle, M; Papo, M; Guarner, F; Antolin, M; Armengol, J R; J. R. Malagelada

    1996-01-01

    AIM--To measure the intracolonic release of nitric oxide end products (nitrates plus nitrites) and eicosanoids in response to intraluminal irritation with deoxycholic acid (DCA). PATIENTS--Seven patients with irritable bowel syndrome. METHODS--The left colon was perfused with a solution with or without 3 mM deoxycholic acid. Aspirates were assayed for eicosanoids by specific radioimmuno-assay, and for nitrates plus nitrites by the Griess reaction. To confirm that stimulated colonic mucosa can...

  4. γ-Irradiation of malic acid in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negron-Mendoza, Alicia; Graff, Rebecca L.; Ponnamperuma, Cyril

    1980-12-01

    The γ-irradiation of malic acid in aqueous solutions was studied under initially oxygenated and oxygen-free conditions in an attempt to determine the possible interconversion of malic acid into other carboxylic acids, specifically those associated with Krebs cycle. The effect of dose on product formation of the system was investigated. Gas-liquid chromatography combined with mass spectrometry was used as the principal means of identification of the non-volatile products. Thin layer chromotography and direct probe mass spectroscopy were also employed. The findings show that a variety of carboxylic acids are formed, with malonic and succinic acids in greatest abundance. These products have all been identified as being formed in the γ-irradiation of acetic acid, suggesting a common intermediary. Since these molecules fit into a metabolic cycle, it is strongly suggestive that prebiotic pathways provided the basis for biological systems.

  5. Gamma-irradiation of malic acid in aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negron-Mendoza, A.; Graff, R.L.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1980-12-01

    The gamma-irradiation of malic acid in aqueous solutions was studied under initially oxygenated and oxygen-free conditions in an attempt to determine the possible interconversion of malic acid into other carboxylic acids, specifically those associated with Krebs cycle. The effect of dose on product formation of the system was investigated. Gas-liquid chromatography combined with mass spectrometry was used as the principal means of identification of the nonvolatile products. Thin layer chromatography and direct probe mass spectroscopy were also employed. The findings show that a variety of carboxylic acids are formed, with malonic and succinic acids in greatest abundance. These products have all been identified as being formed in the gamma-irradiation of acetic acid, suggesting a common intermediary. Since these molecules fit into a metabolic cycle, it is strongly suggestive that prebiotic pathways provided the basis for biological systems.

  6. Solvent extraction of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions with N,N,N‘,N’—tetrabutylsuccinylamide from nitric acid solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王友绍; 孙思修; 等

    1996-01-01

    The solvent extraction of U(VI) and Th(IV) from nitric acid medium by N,N,N',N'-tetrabutylsuccinylamide(TBSA) in a diluent composed of 0.5 volume fraction trimethyl benzene(TMB) and 0.5 volume fraction kerosene(OK) has been studied.The distribution ratios of U(VI) and Th(IV) as a function of aqueous HON3 concentration,extractant concentration and temperature have been measured.From the data,the composition of extracted species,equilibrium constants and enthapies of extraction reaction are also calculated.

  7. Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1993-01-01

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

  8. Influence of Oxide Film to Stress Corrosion Cracking of Zirconium in Boiling Nitric Acid Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel reprocessing process acts an important role of nuclear energy cycle. In Japan, a commercial reprocessing plant has been operating at the Rokkasho reprocessing plant. Purex process that is used nitric acid and dodecane with tributyl phosphate for solvent has been adopted in the plant. Boiling nitric acid is applied to dissolve oxide spent nuclear fuel. In the boiling nitric acid solution, plant material corrodes severely and intergranular corrosion is observed in stainless steels. In order to avoid corrosion in such severe environment, some equipment in the plants has been made of zirconium, which has excellent corrosion resistance in nitric acid solutions. However, it has been known that zirconium has stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility in concentrated HNO3 with nobler corrosion potential. Nobler corrosion potential causes breakdowns of passive film having excellent protective performance and raises SCC susceptibility of zirconium in nitric acid solutions. Therefore, it is important to clarify the relationship among potential, growth and the breakdown of oxide film for the SCC initiation mechanism. In this study, we investigated the oxide film growth of zirconium with various potentials in boiling nitric acid solutions. Electrochemical tests and immersion tests with various applied potentials conducted in boiling 3. 6 and 9 mol.dm-3 HNO3. The potentials in the immersion tests were set at 1.3, 1.4 and 1.5 V vs. sat. KCl-Ag/AgCl electrode (SSE). These were in the region of trans-passive state of zirconium in boiling nitric acid solution. The test durations were 10, 100 and 500 h. After the corrosion tests, cross-sectional observations of oxide films were conducted. From the results of anodic polarization curves of zirconium in boiling nitric acid, passivity region was observed through rest potential to about 1.5 V in boiling 6 mol.dm-3 HNO3. Rapid increase of current density was observed at the potential attributed to transition from passivity

  9. Improvement in electrochemical capacitance of activated carbon from scrap tires by nitric acid treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yan; Zhao, Ping-Ping; Dong, Xiao-Ting; Zhang, Cui; Liu, Shuang-Xi

    2014-12-01

    Activated carbon (AC) obtained from the industrial pyrolytic tire char is treated by concentrated nitric acid (AC-HNO3) and then used as the electrode material for supercapacitors. Surface properties and electrochemical capacitances of AC and ACHNO3 are studied. It is found that the morphology and the porous texture for AC and AC-HNO3 have little difference, while the oxygen content increases and functional groups change after the acid treatment. Electrochemical results demonstrate that the AC-HNO3 electrode displays higher specific capacitance, better stability and cycling performance, and lower equivalent series resistance, indicating that AC obtained from the industrial pyrolytic tire char treated by concentrated nitric acid is applicable for supercapacitors.

  10. Mediated electrochemical oxidation of organic wastes using a Co (III) mediator in a nitric acid based system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An electrochemical cell with a Co(III) mediator and nitric acid electrolyte provides efficient destruction of organic and mixed wastes. The organic waste is concentrated in the anolyte reservoir, where the mediator oxidizes the organics and insoluble transuranic compounds and is regenerated at the anode until the organics are converted to CO2. The nitric acid is an excellent oxidant that facilitates the destruction of the organic components. The anode is not readily attacked by the nitric acid solution, thus the cell can be used for extended continual operation without electrode replacement. 2 figs

  11. Amino Acids Catalyzed Direct Aldol Reactions in Aqueous Micelles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Yi-Yuan; WANG Qi; DING Qiu-Ping; HE Jia-Qi; CHENG Jin-Pei

    2003-01-01

    @@ Since the discovery of its roles as a good small-organic-molecule catalyst in intramolecular aldol reactions, pro line has drawn considerable attention in synthetic chemistry due to its similarity to the type-Ⅰ aldolases. Recently,List and others have reported some new direct asymmetric intermolecular reactions catalyzed by proline, including aldol, Mannich, Michael, and other analogous reactions. Except for two recent examples, [1,2] proline catalyzed aldol reactions in aqueous micelles have not been reported, nor have other amino acids as organocatalysts in directly catalyzing aldol reaction been reported. Herein we wish to present our recent results regarding environmentally be nign direct aldol reactions catalyzed by amino acids including proline, histidine and arginine in aqueous media.

  12. Solvent extraction of nitric acid,uranium(VI) and thorium(IV) by N,N,N',N'-tetrahexylsuccinylamide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    A new kind of diamideN,N,N',N'-tetrahexylsuccinylamide (THSA)wassynthesized,characterized and used for the extraction of HNO3,U(VI) and Th(IV)in a diluent composed of 0.5 volume fraction1,2,4-trimethy benzene(TMB) and 0.5 volume fraction kerosene(OK).Extraction distribution coefficients of U(VI) and Th(IV) as functionsof aqueous nitric acid concentration, extractant concentration,temperature and salting-out agent (LiNO3) have been studied, and it is found that THSA as an extractant is superior to TBP for extraction ofU(VI) and Th(IV).Back extraction was also studied.At low acidity, themain adduct of THSA and HNO3 is HNO3.THSA.THSA.(HNO3)2 and THSA.(HNO3)3 are also found at high acidity.The compositions of extracted species, apparent equilibrium constants and enthalpies ofextraction reactions have also been calculated.

  13. Pulse Radiolysis of Adrenaline in Acid Aqueous Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gohn, M.; Getoff, N.; Bjergbakke, Erling

    1976-01-01

    Pulse radiolysis of adrenaline in acid aqueous solutions (pH 1–3) was carried out. The rate constants for the reactions of adrenaline with H and OH were determined: k(H + adr.) = (0·9±0·1) × 109 dm3 mol−1s−1; k(OH + adr.) = (1·65±0·15) × 1010 dm3 mol−1s−1. The H-adduct of adrenaline has two λmax...

  14. Parallel proton transfer pathways in aqueous acid-base reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, M. J.; Bakker, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    We study the mechanism of proton transfer (PT) between the photoacid 8-hydroxy-1,3, 6-pyrenetrisulfonic acid (HPTS) and the base chloroacetate in aqueous solution. We investigate both proton and deuteron transfer reactions in solutions with base concentrations ranging from 0.25M to 4M. Using femtosecond midinfrared spectroscopy, we probe the vibrational responses of HPTS, its conjugate photobase, the hydrated proton/deuteron, and chloroacetate. The measurement of these four resonances allows ...

  15. A laboratory study of the nucleation kinetics of nitric acid hydrates under stratospheric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Alexander D.; Murray, Benjamin J.; Plane, John M. C.

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of the kinetics of crystallisation of ternary H2O-H2SO4-HNO3 mixtures to produce nitric acid hydrate phases, as occurs in the lower stratosphere, have been a long-standing challenge for investigators in the laboratory. Understanding polar stratospheric chlorine chemistry and thereby ozone depletion is increasingly limited by descriptions of nucleation processes. Meteoric smoke particles have been considered in the past as heterogeneous nuclei, however recent studies suggest that these particles will largely dissolve, leaving mainly silica and alumina as solid inclusions. In this study the nucleation kinetics of nitric acid hydrate phases have been measured in microliter droplets at polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) temperatures, using a droplet freezing assay. A clear heterogeneous effect was observed when silica particles were added. A parameterisation based on the number of droplets activated per nuclei surface area (ns) has been developed and compared to global model data. Nucleation experiments on identical droplets have been performed in an X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD) to determine the nature of the phase which formed. β-Nitric Acid Trihydrate (NAT) was observed alongside a mixture of Nitric Acid Dihydrate (NAD) phases. It is not possible to determine whether NAT nucleates directly or is formed by a phase transition from NAD (likely requiring the presence of a mediating liquid phase). Regardless, these results demonstrate the possibility of forming NAT on laboratory timescales. In the polar stratosphere, sulfuric acid (present at several weight percent of the liquid under equilibrium conditions) could provide such a liquid phase. This study therefor provides insight into previous discrepancies between phases formed in the laboratory and those observed in the atmosphere. It also provides a basis for future studies into atmospheric nucleation of solid PSCs.

  16. Nitric Acid-Treated Carbon Fibers with Enhanced Hydrophilicity for Candida tropicalis Immobilization in Xylitol Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitric acid (HNO3-treated carbon fiber (CF rich in hydrophilic groups was applied as a cell-immobilized carrier for xylitol fermentation. Using scanning electron microscopy, we characterized the morphology of the HNO3-treated CF. Additionally, we evaluated the immobilized efficiency (IE of Candida tropicalis and xylitol fermentation yield by investigating the surface properties of nitric acid treated CF, specifically, the acidic group content, zero charge point, degree of moisture and contact angle. We found that adhesion is the major mechanism for cell immobilization and that it is greatly affected by the hydrophilic–hydrophilic surface properties. In our experiments, we found 3 hto be the optimal time for treating CF with nitric acid, resulting in an improved IE of Candida tropicalis of 0.98 g∙g−1 and the highest xylitol yield and volumetric productivity (70.13% and 1.22 g∙L−1∙h−1, respectively. The HNO3-treated CF represents a promising method for preparing biocompatible biocarriers for multi-batch fermentation.

  17. Reactivity of the uranium (U(IV)/U(VI)) and the plutonium (Pu(III)/Pu(IV)) in nitric aqueous solution under ultrasound; De l'influence des ultrasons sur la reactivite de l'uranium (U(IV)/U(VI)) et du plutonium (PU(III)/PU(IV)) en solution aqueuse nitrique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venault, L

    1998-07-01

    To minimize the volumes of solid waste and industrial effluents generated at the end of cycle, particularly in the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing industry, research is currently under way on so-called innovative processes, designed to induce chemical reactions without adding reagent to the media. Among these processes, the use of ultrasound can prove advantageous, and the purpose of this study is to assess accurately the potential for its application. In the present context, this work shows that the transmission of an ultrasonic wave in aqueous nitric acid solution leads to: the accumulation of nitrous acid in solution, until a steady-sate concentration is reached; the removal of nitrogen monoxide and nitrogen dioxide in the gas stream. The initial kinetics of the formation of HNO{sub 2} in solution was quantified as a function of the nitric acid concentration and the ultrasound intensity. It was also shown than an excess of nitrous acid in nitric solution decomposes under the effect of ultrasound. It is also possible to accumulate hydrogen peroxide in solution during the ultrasonic irradiation of aqueous nitric acid solutions in the presence of a chemical species (N{sub 2}H{sub 5}{sup +}, NH{sub 2}SO{sub 3}H...) which reacts rapidly with HNO{sub 2}, preventing the reduction of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} by HNO{sub 2}. The mechanisms of HNO{sub 2} formation and decomposition, and the mechanism of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} formation during the ultrasonic irradiation of aqueous nitric acid solutions, are presented. Control of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or HNO{sub 2} in a nitric acid medium under the effect of an ultrasonic wave can be exploited to control redox reactions of uranium and plutonium ions, particularly with respect to the oxidation of U and Pu (U(IV){yields} U(IV) or Pu(III) {yields} Pu(IV)) and the reduction of Pu (Pu(IV){yields} Pu(III). The redox behavior of uranium and plutonium ions in aqueous nitric solution subject to an ultrasonic flux is interpreted in term of effects

  18. Oleic acid-dependent modulation of Nitric oxide associated 1 protein levels regulates nitric oxide-mediated defense signaling in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The conserved cellular metabolites nitric oxide (NO) and oleic acid (18:1) are well-known regulators of disease physiologies in diverse organism. We show that NO production in plants is regulated via 18:1. Reduction in 18:1 levels, via a genetic mutation in the 18:1-synthesizing gene SUPPRESSOR OF S...

  19. Evaluation of the Magnesium Hydroxide Treatment Process for Stabilizing PFP Plutonium/Nitric Acid Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, Mark A.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Baker, Aaron B.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2000-09-28

    This document summarizes an evaluation of the magnesium hydroxide [Mg(OH)2] process to be used at the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) for stabilizing plutonium/nitric acid solutions to meet the goal of stabilizing the plutonium in an oxide form suitable for storage under DOE-STD-3013-99. During the treatment process, nitric acid solutions bearing plutonium nitrate are neutralized with Mg(OH)2 in an air sparge reactor. The resulting slurry, containing plutonium hydroxide, is filtered and calcined. The process evaluation included a literature review and extensive laboratory- and bench-scale testing. The testing was conducted using cerium as a surrogate for plutonium to identify and quantify the effects of key processing variables on processing time (primarily neutralization and filtration time) and calcined product properties.

  20. Fractionation of microimpurities during precipitation of basic zirconium sulfate out of nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made on fractionation of microimpurities during precipitation of basic zirconium sulfate out of concentrated with respect to ZrO2 nitric acid solutions. Investigation into fractionation of Sc(3), Cr(3), Mn(2), Fe(3), Co(2), CU(2), Zn(2) and Y(3) microirpurities during hydrolytic precipitation of basic zirconium sulfate out of nitric acid solutions showed that a majority of microimpurities are characterized by high distribution factors and concentrate in mother liquor. Adsorption isotherms were constructed for Cu(2) and Fe(3) microimpurities. The assumption about the effect of microimpurity nature (ionic charge and radius, the electron structure) on precipitation mechanism was made on the base of obtained data

  1. Easy synthesis of graphene sheets from alfalfa plants by treatment of nitric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Jiao, E-mail: qujiao@bhu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Bohai University, Jinzhou 121013 (China); School of Urban and Environmental Sciences, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China); Luo, Chunqiu, E-mail: fplj_lcq@163.com [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Bohai University, Jinzhou 121013 (China); Zhang, Qian; Cong, Qiao [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Bohai University, Jinzhou 121013 (China); Yuan, Xing [School of Urban and Environmental Sciences, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China)

    2013-04-01

    Highlights: ► An easy method for synthesis of graphene sheets using alfalfa plants was introduced. ► An novelty formation mechanism of graphene sheets using alfalfa plants was proposed. ► This method exploits a new carbon source and provides a novel idea to synthesize graphene sheets. -- Abstract: This letter focuses on synthesis of graphene sheets from alfalfa plants by treatment of nitric acid. The transmission electron microscopy image (TEM) demonstrates that the graphene sheets are agglomerated and overlapped, the energy dispersive spectrum (EDS) indicates that the products are pure, and the Raman spectrum shows the graphene sheets are well graphitized. In addition, the formation mechanism of the graphene sheets from alfalfa plants by treatment nitric acid is discussed. These findings inspire the search for a new strategy for synthesis of graphene sheets from renewable natural products, and the lower cost of this new process and carbon source may facilitate industrial production.

  2. Passive Sampler for Measurements of Atmospheric Nitric Acid Vapor (HNO3 Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Bytnerowicz

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric acid (HNO3 vapor is an important nitrogenous air pollutant responsible for increasing saturation of forests with nitrogen and direct injury to plants. The USDA Forest Service and University of California researchers have developed a simple and inexpensive passive sampler for monitoring air concentrations of HNO3. Nitric acid is selectively absorbed on 47-mm Nylasorb nylon filters with no interference from particulate NO3-. Concentrations determined with the passive samplers closely corresponded with those measured with the co-located honeycomb annular denuder systems. The PVC protective caps of standardized dimensions protect nylon filters from rain and wind and allow for reliable measurements of ambient HNO3 concentrations. The described samplers have been successfully used in Sequoia National Park, the San Bernardino Mountains, and on Mammoth Mountain in California.

  3. Investigation on surface structure of potassium permanganate/nitric acid treated poly(tetrafluoroethylene)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Congli; Liu, Shuling; Gong, Tianlong; Gu, Aiqun; Yu, Zili

    2014-10-01

    In the previous articles concerning the treatment of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) with potassium permanganate/nitric acid mixture, the conversion of a hydrophobic to a hydrophilic surface was partially assigned to the defluorination of PTFE and then the introduction of carbonyl and hydroxyl groups into the defluorinated sites. In the present work, PTFE sheets were treated with potassium permanganate/nitric acid, and the surfaces before and after treatment were comparatively characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The surface sediments of the treated PTFE were also determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). The results indicate that the conversion of the hydrophobicity to the hydrophilicity on the modified PTFE surface is mainly due to the deposition of hydrophilic manganese oxides which covered the fluorocarbon surface, and no detectable chemical reactions of PTFE occur in the treating process.

  4. Pb(II) leaching from waste CRT funnel glass in nitric acid solutions

    OpenAIRE

    A. Strzałkowska; M. Wojtala; J. Siwka

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The paper presents experimental results of Pb (II) leaching from waste CRT funnel glass using solution of nitric acid (V) . This work focused on examining the impact of concentration and particle size on the leaching percentage of Pb (II) from funnel glass.Design/methodology/approach: Material for the investigation was crushed and sieved. Leaching was carried out using working solutions pfrom co repared ncentrated HNO3 and mechanical stirrer.Findings: The received results show the po...

  5. Effect of Nitric Acid Concentrations on Synthesis and Stability of Maghemite Nanoparticles Suspension

    OpenAIRE

    Irwan Nurdin; Mohd Rafie Johan; Iskandar Idris Yaacob; Bee Chin Ang

    2014-01-01

    Maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles have been synthesized using a chemical coprecipitation method at different nitric acid concentrations as an oxidizing agent. Characterization of all samples performed by several techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), alternating gradient magnetometry (AGM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and zeta potential. The XRD patterns confirmed that the particles were maghemite. The crysta...

  6. Study on the Reaction Between Methyl Hydrazine and Formaldehyde in Nitric Acid Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Chuan-bo; CAO; Zhi; BIAN; Xiao-yan; XIAN; Liang; YAN; Tai-hong; ZHENG; Wei-fang

    2012-01-01

    <正>To make sure whether the reaction between formaldehyde and methyl hydrazine (MMH) could happen in dilute nitric acid solution, the condensation reaction between the two ones was investigated at 16 ℃. The reaction was slow and it took over 5 hours to reach the balance and the solution turned yellow at last. The maximum absorption peaks of the product existed at 340 nm and 400-450 nm, respectively.

  7. Effects of composite restorations on nitric oxide and uric acid levels in saliva

    OpenAIRE

    Nilgun Akgul; Pinar Gul; Hamit Hakan Alp; Ahmet Kiziltunc

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Dental materials that are used in dentistry should be harmless to oral tissues, and should, therefore, not contain any leachable toxic and diffusible substances capable of causing side effects. This study was intended to investigate the effects on salivary nitric oxide (NO) and uric acid (UA) levels after application of dental composite filling materials to healthy volunteers. Materials and Methods: A total of 52 individuals (32 female and 20 male) participated in the stu...

  8. Heterogeneous formation of polar stratospheric clouds – Part 1: Nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT)

    OpenAIRE

    C. R. Hoyle; I. Engel; Luo, B. P.; Pitts, M.C.; Poole, L. R.; Grooß, J.-U.; Peter, T

    2013-01-01

    Satellite-based observations during the Arctic winter of 2009/2010 provide firm evidence that, in contrast to the current understanding, the nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) in the polar stratosphere does not only occur on preexisting ice particles. In order to explain the NAT clouds observed over the Arctic in mid-December 2009, a heterogeneous nucleation mechanism is required, occurring via immersion freezing on the surface of solid particles, likely of meteoriti...

  9. Heterogeneous formation of polar stratospheric clouds – Part 1: Nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT)

    OpenAIRE

    C. R. Hoyle; I. Engel; Luo, B. P.; Pitts, M.C.; Poole, L. R.; J.-U. Grooß; Peter, T

    2013-01-01

    Satellite based observations during the Arctic winter of 2009/2010 provide firm evidence that, in contrast to the current understanding, the nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) in the polar stratosphere does not only occur on preexisting ice particles. In order to explain the NAT clouds observed over the Arctic in mid December 2009, a heterogeneous nucleation mechanism is required, occurring via immersion freezing on the surface of solid particles, likely of meteoritic origin. For t...

  10. Autoclave leaching of molybdenite concentrates with catalytic additives of nitric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, K. M.; Raspopov, N. A.; Shneerson, Ya. M.; Lapin, A. Yu.; Bitkov, G. A.; Men'shikov, Yu. A.; Paskhin, P. N.; Kirichenko, V. P.

    2010-07-01

    The scientific theoretical prerequisites for the use of small additives of nitric acid for the intensification of the autoclave oxidative leaching (AOL) of sulfide concentrates are checked in order to increase the degree of extraction of the base metal with a simultaneous decrease in the cost of the process. The technological parameters of the AOL conditions applied to molybdenite are also refined, and recommendations for a practical application of the apparatus of the process and for a decrease in its cost are made.

  11. The temperature dependence of the rate constant for the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with nitric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurylo, M. J.; Cornett, K. D.; Murphy, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    The rate constant for the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with nitric acid in the 225-443 K temperature range has been measured by means of the flash photolysis resonance fluorescence technique. Above 300 K, the rate constant levels off in a way that can only be explained by the occurrence of two reaction channels, of which one, operative at low temperatures, proceeds through the formation of an adduct intermediate. The implications of these rate constant values for stratospheric reaction constants is discussed.

  12. Photosynthetic and growth responses of Schima superba seedlings to sulfuric and nitric acid depositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Fang-Fang; Ding, Hui-Ming; Feng, Li-Li; Chen, Jing-Jing; Yang, Song-Yu; Wang, Xi-Hua

    2016-05-01

    A continuing rise in acid deposition can cause forest degradation. In China, acid deposition has converted gradually from sulfuric acid deposition (SAD) to nitric acid deposition (NAD). However, the differing responses of photosynthesis and growth to depositions of sulfuric vs. nitric acid have not been well studied. In this study, 1-year-old seedlings of Schima superba, a dominant species in subtropical forests, were treated with two types of acid deposition SO4 (2-)/NO3 (-) ratios (8:1 and 0.7:1) with two applications (foliar spraying and soil drenching) at two pH levels (pH 3.5 and pH 2.5) over a period of 18 months. The results showed that the intensity, acid deposition type, and spraying method had significant effects on the physiological characteristics and growth performance of seedlings. Acid deposition at pH 2.5 via foliar application reduced photosynthesis and growth of S. superba, especially in the first year. Unlike SAD, NAD with high acidity potentially alleviated the negative effects of acidity on physiological properties and growth, probably due to a fertilization effect that improved foliar nitrogen and chlorophyll contents. Our results suggest that trees were damaged mainly by direct acid stress in the short term, whereas in the long term, soil acidification was also likely to be a major risk to forest ecosystems. Our data suggest that the shift in acid deposition type may complicate the ongoing challenge of anthropogenic acid deposition to ecosystem stability. PMID:26797956

  13. Search for an in-line nitric acid analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallagher, K. Y.; Johnson, C. M.

    1980-10-01

    A literature search was conducted to identify possible techniques for measuring mineral acid normality in the presence of heavy metal salts, undissolved solids, and high radiation fields. Of the techniques noted, eight were identified that could be applicable to the objective. The possibilities were reduced to two methods, which warrant further investigation. These two are refractometry and a modified coulometric-polarographic method. All methods are discussed in detail followed by rationale for including or rejecting each for further investigation.

  14. Radiolysis studies of uranyl nitrate solution in nitric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiolysis of acidic uranyl nitrate solutions was investigated using Co-60 gamma radiation. Hydrogen peroxide was determined as a function of increasing dose. The UV-vis absorption spectra of the irradiated solutions were measured and the spectral changes were analyzed. The increasing dose increases the absorbance intensities, possibly by an increment in nitrate concentration produced by radiolysis, which can originate the formation of different uranyl complexes in solution. (author)

  15. Search for an in-line nitric acid analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A literature search was conducted to identify possible techniques for measuring mineral acid normality in the presence of heavy metal salts, undissolved solids, and high radiation fields. Of the techniques noted, eight were identified that could be applicable to the objective. The possibilities were reduced to two methods, which warrant further investigation. These two are refractometry and a modified coulometric-polarographic method. All methods are discussed in detail followed by rationale for including or rejecting each for further investigation

  16. Kinetics of Reaction Between Tc(Ⅶ) and Monomethylhydrazine or Dimethylhydroxylamine in Nitric Acid Medium Containing Plutonium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>The chemical reaction kinetics research of Tc(Ⅶ) with monomethylhydrazine or dimethylhydroxy-lamine in nitric acid medium demonstrated that Tc(Ⅶ) hardly reacts with the salt-free reagents during the

  17. Quantitative analysis of mixed hydrofluoric and nitric acids using Raman spectroscopy with partial least squares regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Gumin; Lee, Kwangchil; Park, Haesung; Lee, Jinho; Jung, Youngjean; Kim, Kyoungsik; Son, Boongho; Park, Hyoungkuk

    2010-06-15

    Mixed hydrofluoric and nitric acids are widely used as a good etchant for the pickling process of stainless steels. The cost reduction and the procedure optimization in the manufacturing process can be facilitated by optically detecting the concentration of the mixed acids. In this work, we developed a novel method which allows us to obtain the concentrations of hydrofluoric acid (HF) and nitric acid (HNO(3)) mixture samples with high accuracy. The experiments were carried out for the mixed acids which consist of the HF (0.5-3wt%) and the HNO(3) (2-12wt%) at room temperature. Fourier Transform Raman spectroscopy has been utilized to measure the concentration of the mixed acids HF and HNO(3), because the mixture sample has several strong Raman bands caused by the vibrational mode of each acid in this spectrum. The calibration of spectral data has been performed using the partial least squares regression method which is ideal for local range data treatment. Several figures of merit (FOM) were calculated using the concept of net analyte signal (NAS) to evaluate performance of our methodology.

  18. Permeation behavior of yttrium from nitric acid medium with DNPPA in hollow fibre membrane module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High purity yttrium finds applications in superconductors, phosphors, as additives in alloys, in cancer treatment, etc. Monazite mineral contains ∼ 4% yttrium apart from other rare earths. Its separation from the leach solution obtained from processing monazite is primarily done by solvent extraction using di 2-ethyl hexyl phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) and 2-ethyl hexyl 2-ethyl hexyl phosphonic acid (EHEHPA) as extractants. Recently, use of di nonyl phenyl phosphoric acid (DNPPA) in separating metal ions from highly acidic solution has gained importance due to its low pKa value (2.54). It is worth exploring DNPPA for rare earth separation from acidic solutions. Amongst various separation techniques, hollow fibre membrane offer low capital and operating cost, low energy, solvent inventory and high concentration factors. In the present investigation an attempt has been made to study the permeation behavior of Y (III) from nitric acid medium in a hollow fibre supported liquid membrane (HFSLM) module with DNPPA as carrier

  19. Chemical reaction calculation simulation of redox behavior of metal ions and the like in the nitric acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is known that corrosion rate of stainless steel in nitric acid solution is affected by the valence change of oxidizing metallic ions. In this study, we conducted redox reaction analyses using chemical reaction calculation model to clarify the mechanism of valence change. We obtained that the oxidization of metallic ions in the solution is not only caused by nitric acid but also nitrogen oxides. (author)

  20. The solubility of thorium fluoride in nitric acid-hydrofluoric acid solution between 25 and 1000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solubility of thorium fluoride in 4, 8, and 13 M nitric acid solutions was measured as a function of fluoride concentration at 25, 50 and 1000C. The behavior of the solubility is best explained by the existence in solution of the species ThFsub(n)sup((4-n)+), where n has values between 0 and 4. Equilibrium quotients for the stepwise complexation of thorium by fluoride are calculated. (author)

  1. Supercritical fluid extraction of uranium and thorium from nitric acid medium using organophosphorous compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE) technique has been widely used for the extraction of metal ions. In the present study, extraction of uranium from nitric acid medium was investigated using supercritical carbon dioxide (Sc-CO2) containing various organophosphorous compounds such as trialkyl phosphates e.g. tri-iso-amyl phosphate (TiAP), tri-sec-butyl phosphate (TsBP) and tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP), dialkylalkyl phosphonates, e.g. diamylamyl phosphonate (DAAP) and dibutyl butyl phosphonate (DBBP), dialkyl hydrogen phosphonates, e.g. dioctyl hydrogen phosphonate (DOHP), dioctylphosphineoxide (DOPO), trioctyl phosphine oxide (TOPO), n-octylphenyl N,N-diisobutyl carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and di-2-ethyl-hexyl phosphoric acid (HDEHP). Some of these ligands have been investigated for the first time in the supercritical phase for the extraction of uranium. The extraction efficiency of uranium was studied with TiAP, DAAP and DBBP as a function of nitric acid concentration; the kinetics of the equilibration period (static extraction) and transportation of the metal complex (dynamic extraction) was investigated. The influence of pressure and temperature on the extraction behaviour of uranium with DAAP was studied from 4 N HNO3. The extraction efficiency of uranium from 4 N nitric acid medium was found to increase in the order of phosphates < phosphonates < HDEHP < TOPO < CMPO. In the case of phosphates and phosphonates, the maximum extraction of uranium was found to be from 4 N HNO3 medium. The acidic extractants, HDEHP and DOHP showed relatively higher extraction at lower acidities. The relative extraction of uranium and thorium from their mixture was also examined using Sc-CO2 containing phosphates, phosphonates and TOPO. The ligand, TsBP provided better fractionation between uranium and thorium compared to trialkyl phosphates, dialkyl alkyl phosphonates and TOPO.

  2. Novel amino acids: synthesis of furoxan and sydnonimine containing amino acids and peptides as potential nitric oxide releasing motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nortcliffe, Andrew; Botting, Nigel P; O'Hagan, David

    2013-07-28

    The incorporation of furoxan and sydnonimine ring systems into amino acid side chains is demonstrated with the preparation of four novel amino acids which carry these nitric oxide-releasing motifs. N-((4-Nitrophenoxy)carbonyl)-3-phenylsydnonimine 9 and bis(phenylsulfonyl)furoxan 10 are the key intermediates for introducing the heterocycle side chains onto appropriate amine and alcohol functionalities respectively. Furoxan 5 and 7 both displayed NO release based on determination of nitrite production. Orthogonal amino acid protecting group strategies were deployed to demonstrate that the amino acids could be incorporated into peptide frameworks. By way of demonstration the amino acids were placed centrally into several tripeptide motifs. Griess test assays showed that these amino acids released NO in the presence of γ-glutathione (GST). PMID:23753002

  3. Electrochemical behaviour of niobium and niobium passive films in nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrochemical behaviour of bare niobium and phosphoric acid anodized niobium electrodes is investigated in nitric acid solutions. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and polarisation techniques have been used to investigate the open-circuit growth of the passive film. The stability of the anodic oxide film has been studied as a function of the formation voltage, formation current density and concentration of the ambient electrolyte. The results show that the Nb-Nb2O5-1M HNO3 does not behave as a perfect dielectric. The flat band potential and donor concentration of the semiconducting anodic oxide film have been calculated from the Mott-Schottky plots. (author)

  4. Electric dipole moments of nitric acid-water complexes measured by cluster beam deflection

    CERN Document Server

    Moro, Ramiro; Kresin, Vitaly V

    2009-01-01

    Water clusters embedding a nitric acid molecule HNO3(H2O)_{n=1-10} are investigated via electrostatic deflection of a molecular beam. We observe large paraelectric susceptibilities that greatly exceed the electronic polarizability, revealing the contribution of permanent dipole moments. The moments derived from the data are also significantly higher than those of pure water clusters. An enhancement in the susceptibility for n=5,6 and a rise in cluster abundances setting in at n=6 suggest that dissociation of the solvated acid molecule into ions takes place in this size range.

  5. Dephosphorization of Steelmaking Slag by Leaching with Acidic Aqueous Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yong; Diao, Jiang; Liu, Xuan; Li, Xiaosa; Zhang, Tao; Xie, Bing

    2016-09-01

    In the present paper, dephosphorization of steelmaking slag by leaching with acidic aqueous solution composed of citric acid, sodium hydroxide, hydrochloric acid and ion-exchanged water was investigated. The buffer solution of C6H8O7-NaOH-HCl system prevented changes in the pH values. Kinetic parameters including leaching temperature, slag particle size and pH values of the solution were optimized. The results showed that temperature has no obvious effect on the dissolution ratio of phosphorus. However, it has a significant effect on the dissolution ratio of iron. The dephosphorization rate increases with the decrease of slag particle size and the pH value of the solution. Over 90% of the phosphorus can be dissolved in the solution while the corresponding leaching ratio of iron was only 30% below the optimal condition. Leaching kinetics of dephosphorization follow the unreacted shrinking core model with a rate controlled step by the solid diffusion layer, the corresponding apparent activation energy being 1.233 kJ mol-1. A semiempirical kinetic equation was established. After leaching, most of the nC2S-C3P solid solution in the steelmaking slag was selectively dissolved in the aqueous solution and the iron content in the solid residue was correspondingly enriched.

  6. Extraction and stripping behaviour of tri-iso-amyl phosphate and tri-n-butyl phosphate in n-dodecane with U(VI) in nitric acid media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batch extraction of U(VI) by 1.1 M solution of tri-iso-amyl phosphate (TiAP) in n-dodecane (n-DD) from uranyl nitrate solutions in nitric acid media has been investigated as a function of metal loading and equilibrium aqueous phase acidity at 303 K. A method adopted for free acidity determination by using a mixture of potassium oxalate and sodium fluoride for complexing U(VI) has been validated by comparing the data generated in the present study with literature data available for tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) under identical conditions. Extraction and stripping behaviour of 1.1 M TiAP/n-DD-U(VI)/HNO3 and 1.1 M TBP/n-DD-U(VI)/HNO3 systems have been compared by carrying out extraction, scrubbing and a series of stripping in cross-current mode. Stripping behaviour of both the solvents loaded with U(VI) and HNO3 has also been investigated as a function of time to understand the effects of nitric acid induced degradation on stripping.

  7. Fermentation of aqueous plant seed extracts by lactic acid bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schafner, D.W.; Beuchat, R.L.

    1986-05-01

    The effects of lactic acid bacterial fermentation on chemical and physical changes in aqueous extracts of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), peanut (Arachis hypogea), soybean (Glycine max), and sorghum (Sorghum vulgare) were studied. The bacteria investigated were Lactobacillus helveticus, L. delbrueckii, L. casei, L. bulgaricus, L. acidophilus, and Streptococcus thermophilus. Organisms were inoculated individually into all of the seed extracts; L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus were also evaluated together as inocula for fermenting the legume extracts. During fermentation, bacterial population and changes in titratable acidity, pH, viscosity, and color were measured over a 72 h period at 37 degrees C. Maximum bacterial populations, titratable acidity, pH, and viscosity varied depending upon the type of extract and bacterial strain. The maximum population of each organism was influenced by fermentable carbohydrates, which, in turn, influenced acid production and change in pH. Change in viscosity was correlated with the amount of protein and titratable acidity of products. Color was affected by pasteurization treatment and fermentation as well as the source of extract. In the extracts inoculated simultaneously with L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus, a synergistic effect resulted in increased bacterial populations, titratable acidity, and viscosity, and decreased pH in all the legume extracts when compared to the extracts fermented with either of these organisms individually. Fermented extracts offer potential as substitutes for cultured dairy products. 24 references.

  8. FY13 GLYCOLIC-NITRIC ACID FLOWSHEET DEMONSTRATIONS OF THE DWPF CHEMICAL PROCESS CELL WITH SIMULANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, D.; Zamecnik, J.; Best, D.

    2014-03-13

    Savannah River Remediation is evaluating changes to its current Defense Waste Processing Facility flowsheet to replace formic acid with glycolic acid in order to improve processing cycle times and decrease by approximately 100x the production of hydrogen, a potentially flammable gas. Higher throughput is needed in the Chemical Processing Cell since the installation of the bubblers into the melter has increased melt rate. Due to the significant maintenance required for the safety significant gas chromatographs and the potential for production of flammable quantities of hydrogen, eliminating the use of formic acid is highly desirable. Previous testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory has shown that replacing formic acid with glycolic acid allows the reduction and removal of mercury without significant catalytic hydrogen generation. Five back-to-back Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycles and four back-to-back Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles were successful in demonstrating the viability of the nitric/glycolic acid flowsheet. The testing was completed in FY13 to determine the impact of process heels (approximately 25% of the material is left behind after transfers). In addition, back-to-back experiments might identify longer-term processing problems. The testing was designed to be prototypic by including sludge simulant, Actinide Removal Product simulant, nitric acid, glycolic acid, and Strip Effluent simulant containing Next Generation Solvent in the SRAT processing and SRAT product simulant, decontamination frit slurry, and process frit slurry in the SME processing. A heel was produced in the first cycle and each subsequent cycle utilized the remaining heel from the previous cycle. Lower SRAT purges were utilized due to the low hydrogen generation. Design basis addition rates and boilup rates were used so the processing time was shorter than current processing rates.

  9. Trans fatty acids induce vascular inflammation and reduce vascular nitric oxide production in endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi G Iwata

    Full Text Available Intake of trans fatty acids (TFA, which are consumed by eating foods made from partially hydrogenated vegetable oils, is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. This relation can be explained by many factors including TFA's negative effect on endothelial function and reduced nitric oxide (NO bioavailability. In this study we investigated the effects of three different TFA (2 common isomers of C18 found in partially hydrogenated vegetable oil and a C18 isomer found from ruminant-derived-dairy products and meat on endothelial NF-κB activation and nitric oxide (NO production. Human endothelial cells were treated with increasing concentrations of Elaidic (trans-C18:1 (9 trans, Linoelaidic (trans-C18:2 (9 trans, 12 trans, and Transvaccenic (trans-C18:1 (11 trans for 3 h. Both Elaidic and Linoelaidic acids were associated with increasing NF-κB activation as measured by IL-6 levels and phosphorylation of IκBα, and impairment of endothelial insulin signaling and NO production, whereas Transvaccenic acid was not associated with these responses. We also measured superoxide production, which has been hypothesized to be necessary in fatty acid-dependent activation of NF-κB. Both Elaidic acid and Linoelaidic acid are associated with increased superoxide production, whereas Transvaccenic acid (which did not induce inflammatory responses did not increase superoxide production. We observed differential activation of endothelial superoxide production, NF-κB activation, and reduction in NO production by different C18 isomers suggesting that the location and number of trans double bonds effect endothelial NF-κB activation.

  10. Corrosion investigations on zircaloy-4 and titanium dissolver materials for MOX fuel dissolution in concentrated nitric acid containing fluoride ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraj, J.; Krishnaveni, P.; Krishna, D. Nanda Gopala; Mallika, C.; Mudali, U. Kamachi

    2016-05-01

    Aqueous reprocessing of plutonium-rich mixed oxide fuels require fluoride as a dissolution catalyst in boiling nitric acid for an effective dissolution of the spent fuel. High corrosion rates were obtained for the candidate dissolver materials zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) and commercial pure titanium (CP-Ti grade 2) in boiling 11.5 M HNO3 + 0.05 M NaF. Complexing the fluoride ions either with Al(NO3)3 or ZrO(NO3)2 aided in decreasing the corrosion rates of Zr-4 and CP-Ti. From the obtained corrosion rates it is concluded that CP-Ti is a better dissolver material than Zr-4 for extended service life in boiling 11.5 M HNO3 + 0.05 M NaF, when complexed with 0.15 M ZrO(NO3)2. XPS analysis confirmed the presence of TiO2 and absence of fluoride on the surface of CP-Ti samples, indicating that effective complexation had occurred in solution leading to passivation of the metal and imparting high corrosion resistance.

  11. Rocket Performance of Red Fuming Nitric Acid with Blends of Norbornadiene, Carene and Cardanol

    OpenAIRE

    R. Chhibber; C. Prabhakaran; Kulkarni, S. G.; S.P. Panda

    1992-01-01

    The fuel blends of nornornadiene and carene (50:50 by weight) and norbornadiene, carene and cardanol (40:40:20 by weight) exhibit synergistic hypergolic ignition with red fuming nitric acid (RFNA) as oxidiser. These fuel blends have been evaluated by theoretical calculations of performance parameters and subsequently verified by static firing in a 10 kg/sub f/ thruster at a chamber pressure of around 20 atm, using RFNA (with 21 per cent N/sub 2/O/sub 4/ by weight) as oxidiser. The theo...

  12. Evaluation of various Crown ethers for the supercritical fluid extraction of uranium from nitric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various crowns have been evaluated for supercritical fluid extraction of uranium from nitric acid medium employing HPFOA as counter ion. Uranium extraction efficiency was found to be influenced by cavity size of crown ether and nature of substituents. Complexation tendency of UO22+ increases with increasing cavity size of crown ether. Electron withdrawing substituents decreased the extraction efficiency which could be attributed to decrease in the basicity of four oxygen atoms and hence their bonding ability. Whereas electron donating substituents increased the efficiency due to increases in basicity of oxygen atoms and hence in increase in bonding ability. (author)

  13. Hypergolic Burning of Formylidene and Furfurylidene amines with Red Fuming Nitric Acid as Oxidizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Panda

    1977-04-01

    Full Text Available Six p-formylidene and six p-furfurylideneamines were synthesized and their ignition delay with red fuming nitric acid (RFNA were measured by cup test method using a high speed camera. Structure - hypergolicity correlation revealed that a p-methyl group inhibits hypergolicity whereas a p-methoxy group accelerates it. Similarly oxidizable non-conjugated benzene rings increase hypergolicity whereas conjugated benzene rings decrease it. On compacting, the p-formylidene anisidine was found to be hypergolic with an ignition delay less than 100 milliseconds.

  14. Corrosion of high purity Fe-Cr-Ni alloys in 13 N boiling nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrosion in boiling nitric acid was investigated for high purity Fe-18%Cr-12%Ni alloys and type 304L stainless steels (SS). Owing to very low impurity concentration, the solution treated high purity alloys show almost no intergranular corrosion while the type 304L SS show severe intergranular corrosion. Both in the high purity alloys and type 304L SS, aging treatments ranging from 873 K to 1073 K for 1 h enhance intergranular corrosion. During the aging treatments, impurities should be segregated to the grain boundaries. The corrosion behaviors were discussed from a standpoint of impurity segregation to grain boundaries. This study is of importance for purex reprocessing of spent fuels

  15. Direct Synthesis of Phenol from Benzene on an Activated Carbon Catalyst Treated with Nitric Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui-hong Chen; Jia-quan Xu; Ming-ming Jin; Gui-ying Li; Chang-wei Hu

    2011-01-01

    Commercially available coal-based activated carbon was treated by nitric acid with different concentrations and the resultant samples were used as catalysts for the direct hydroxylation of benzene to phenol in acetonitrile. Boehm titration, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy,scanning electron microscope coupled with an energy dispersive X-ray microanalyzer, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method were used to characterize toe samples. The number of carboxyl groups on the surface was found to be the main factor affecting the catalytic activity. An optimum catalytic performance with a yield of 15.7% and a selectivity of 87.2% to phenol was obtained.

  16. Formation of substrate-based gold nanocage chains through dealloying with nitric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziren Yan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Metal nanocages have raised great interest because of their new properties and wide applications. Here, we report on the use of galvanic replacement reactions to synthesize substrate-supported Ag–Au nanocages from silver templates electrodeposited on transparent indium tin oxide (ITO film coated glass. The residual Ag in the composition was dealloyed with 10% nitric acid. It was found that chains of Au nanocages were formed on the substrate surface during dealloying. When the concentration of HNO3 increased to 20%, the structures of nanocages were damaged and formed crescent or semi-circular shapes. The transfer process on the substrate surface was discussed.

  17. The reducibility of sulphuric acid and sulphate in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In connection with the Swedish project for final storage of spent fuel elements it was necessary to assess whether dissolved sulphate can corrode the copper canister. A simple reaction between copper and sulphate is thermodynamically impossible, but copper can react to give copper sulphide if an additional electron donor such as iron(II) is available. The problem was extended to the more general question of the reducibility of sulphur(VI) in dilute aqueous solution. Chemical reduction of sulphate does not take place in dilute solution at temperatures below 100oC. In experiments on the reduction of sulphates under hydrothermal conditions a reaction only takes place at temperatures above 275-300oC. The oxidising action of sulphuric acid on metals becomes perceptible only at acid concentrations over 45-50%. In experiments on the cathodic reduction of 74% sulphuric acid the formation of hydrogen sulphide and elementary sulphur starts, depending on the current density, at 50-130oC, and polarographic measurements suggest that the reducible species is not the hydrogen sulphate ion but molecular sulphuric acid. The resistance of copper to oxygen-free sulphuric acid up to a concentration of 60% is well-known. Numerous processes in industrial electrochemistry take place in sulphuric acid or sulphate electrolytes. The reversible metal/metal-sulphate electrodes of lead and cadmium are unstable relative to the corresponding metal sulphides. Nevertheless the reversible lead sulphate electrode does not fail from sulphide formation. All these facts confirm that sulphur(VI) in dilute solution is completely inert towards chemical reducing agents and also to cathodic reduction. Thus corrosion of copper by sulphate under final-storage conditions and in the absence of sulphate reducing bacteria can be almost certainly be ruled out. (author) 5 figs., 85 refs

  18. Stainless steels with low contents in residual elements for nitric acid environments. Influence of melting processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitric acid solutions, as they are for instance employed in the chemical treatment of nuclear fuels, do not apparently pose any more corrosion problems and the safe use of the several steels is well documented. The most difficult corrosion problems are next those related to ''tunnel'' penetrations, in the hot-rolling direction (longitudinal). This phenomenon can be quite important such as to imperial complex structures. Up to the last few years, the only manner to eliminate such ''tunnel'' corrosions was to carry out special operations of remelting and refining under careful selected slag (Electro Slag Remelting or ESR). It turns out indeed that non metallic inclusions are the prime factors in this type of corrosion. Well adapted ladle refining processes made possible to obtain equivalent results at lower costs, while purity and cleanliness are improved to such a degree that a steel of type Cr 18 - Ni 10 thus produced exhibit a nearly absolute resistance to intergranular corrosion in the 14 N (65%) boiling nitric acid (the Huey test) whatever the ''sensitization'' treatment, between 10000C and 6000C. In view of its very high tolerance to varied thermal cycles and of the near complete disappearance of any ''tunnel'' corrosion, such a steel is of great interest when complex parts are produced, by machining forged or rolled metal, which is then assembled by welding techniques or procedures which would be forbidden in the case of usual Cr 18 -Ni 10 steels. Similar improvements are also obtained on the two other special steels used in nitric environments: Cr 25 - Ni 20 - C <= 0,020 (Nb) and Cr 17 - Ni 14 - Si 4 - C <= 0,015 (Nb)

  19. Procedure of Destructive Chemical Recovery of Precious Metals in Nitric Acid Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubičić, M.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The heart of the nitric acid production process is the chemical reactor containing a platinum-based catalyst pack and an associated catchment system, which allows the ammonia oxidation reaction to take place efficiently. Under the severe operating conditions imposed by the high-pressure ammonia oxidation process, the catalyst gauzes experience progressive deterioration, as shown by the restricted surface of the catalyst wires, the loss of catalytic activity and the loss of catalytic materials. The higher the pressure of gaseous ammonia oxidation, the greater the loss of platinum group metals from the surface of the applied selective heterogeneous catalysts. Total losses for one batch over the whole period of using selective heterogeneous catalysts may account in the range from 20 to 40 % of the total installed quantity of precious metals. An important part of the platinum removed from the platinum-rhodium alloy wires can be recovered at the outlet of the reactor by means of palladium catchment gauzes. However, this catchment process, which is based on the great ability of palladium to alloy with platinum, is not 100 % effective and a fraction of the platinum and practically all of the rhodium lost by the catalyst wires, evades the catchment package and is then deposited in other parts of the plant, especially heat exchangers. From the above mentioned operating equipment, the retained mass of precious metals can be recovered by the technical procedure of non-destructive and destructive chemical solid-liquid extraction.Shown is the technical procedure of destructive chemical recovery of preheater and boiler for preheating and production of steam by applying sulfuric acid (w = 20 % and subsequent procedure of raffination of derived sludge, to the final recovery of precious metals. The technical procedure of destructive chemical recovery of precious metals from preheater and boiler for preheating and production of steam in nitric acid production is

  20. Adsorption of itaconic acid from aqueous solutions onto alumina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JELENA J. GULICOVSKI

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Itaconic acid, IA (C5H6O4, was investigated as a potential flocculant for the aqueous processing of alumina powders. The adsorption of IA, as a function of its concentration and pH value of the solution, onto the alumina surface was studied by the solution depletion method. The stability of the suspensions in the presence of itaconic acid was evaluated in light of the surface charge of the alumina powder used, the degree of dissociation of IA, as well as the sedimentation behavior and rheology of the suspensions. It was found that the adsorption process is extremely pH dependent; the maximum adsorption of IA onto alumina surface occurring at a pH close to the value of the first IA dissociation constant, pKa1. Also, IA does not influence the value of the point of zero charge of alumina. It was shown that IA represents an efficient flocculant for concentrated acidic alumina suspensions.

  1. Single-cycle method for partitioning of trivalent actinides using completely incinerable reagents from nitric acid medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravi, Jammu; Venkatesan, K.A.; Antony, M.P.; Srinivasan, T.G.; Rao, P.R. Vasudeva [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Fuel Chemistry Div.

    2014-10-01

    A new approach, namely 'Single-cycle method for partitioning of Minor Actinides using completely incinerable ReagenTs' (SMART), has been explored for the separation of Am(III) from Eu(III) present in nitric acid medium. The extraction behavior of Am(III) and Eu(III) in a solution of an unsymmetrical diglycolamide, N,N,-didodecyl-N',N'-dioctyl-3-oxapentane-1,5-diamide (D{sup 3}DODGA), and an acidic extractant, N,N-di-2-ethylhexyl diglycolamic acid (HDEHDGA), in n-dodecane was studied. The distribution ratio of both these metal ions in D{sup 3}DODGA-HDEHDGA/n-dodecane initially decreased with increase in the concentration of nitric acid reached a minimum at 0.1 M nitric acid followed by increase. Synergic extraction of Am(III) and Eu(III) was observed at nitric acid concentrations above 0.1 M and antagonism at lower acidities. Contrasting behavior observed at different acidities was probed by the slope analysis of the extraction data. The study revealed the involvement of both D{sup 3}DODGA and HDEHDGA during synergism and increased participation of HDEHDGA during antagonism. The stripping behavior of Am(III) and Eu(III) from the loaded organic phase was studied as a function of nitric acid, DTPA, and citric acid concentrations. The conditions needed for the mutual separation of Am(III) and Eu(III) from the loaded organic phase were optimized. Our studies revealed the possibility of separating trivalent actinides from HLLW using these completely incinerable reagents. (orig.)

  2. The liquid membrane for extraction of Yttrium and Dysprosium from Acid Nitric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of surfactant in liquid membrane has been done. The surfactant is span-80 (sorbitol-monooleate), the liquid membrane phase was the organic phase (O), the internal liquid phase (W) with ratio O/W = 1, and surfactant. The organic phase using D2EHPA in the kerosene and the internal liquid phase using aqua des or acid nitric. The determination of surfactant with variation of span-80 (0,25 - 2%) in the liquid membrane volume. The speed of stirrer was 3500 rpm in 20 minute. The ratio of liquid membrane phase form and external phase (aqua des or acid nitric) was 1, the speed of stirrer was 350 rpm in 10 minute (permeation process). The liquid phase and the liquid membrane phase was separated and then determinated the volume of liquid membrane, the result of percentage of span-80 was 0,25 % volume. The extraction of yttrium and dysprosium in 2 M HNO3 was Kdy = 2.945 and KdDy = 0.019

  3. Homogeneous nucleation rates of nitric acid dihydrate (NAD at simulated stratospheric conditions – Part II: Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Möhler

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation energies ΔGact for the nucleation of nitric acid dihydrate (NAD in supercooled binary HNO3/H2O solution droplets were calculated from volume-based nucleation rate measurements using the AIDA (Aerosol, Interactions, and Dynamics in the Atmosphere aerosol chamber of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. The experimental conditions covered temperatures T between 192 and 197 K, NAD saturation ratios SNAD between 7 and 10, and nitric acid molar fractions of the nucleating sub-micron sized droplets between 0.26 and 0.28. Based on classical nucleation theory, a new parameterisation for ΔGact=A×(T ln SNAD−2+B is fitted to the experimental data with A=2.5×106 kcal K2 mol−1 and B=11.2−0.1(T−192 kcal mol−1. A and B were chosen to also achieve good agreement with literature data of ΔGact. The parameter A implies, for the temperature and composition range of our analysis, a mean interface tension σsl=51 cal mol−1 cm−2 between the growing NAD germ and the supercooled solution. A slight temperature dependence of the diffusion activation energy is represented by the parameter B. Investigations with a detailed microphysical process model showed that literature formulations of volume-based (Salcedo et al., 2001 and surface-based (Tabazadeh et al., 2002 nucleation rates significantly overestimate NAD formation rates when applied to the conditions of our experiments.

  4. Temperature effects on the nitric acid oxidation of industrial grade multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Nadia F., E-mail: nadia@fisica.ufc.br [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil); Martinez, Diego Stefani T., E-mail: diegostefani.br@gmail.com; Paula, Amauri J., E-mail: amaurijp@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Laboratorio de Quimica do Estado Solido (LQES), Instituto de Quimica (Brazil); Silveira, Jose V. [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil); Alves, Oswaldo L., E-mail: oalves@iqm.unicamp.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Laboratorio de Quimica do Estado Solido (LQES), Instituto de Quimica (Brazil); Souza Filho, Antonio G., E-mail: agsf@fisica.ufc.br [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil)

    2013-07-15

    In this study, we report an oxidative treatment of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by using nitric acid at different temperatures (25-175 Degree-Sign C). The analyzed materials have diameters varying from 10 to 40 nm and majority lengths between 3 and 6 {mu}m. The characterization results obtained by different techniques (e.g., field emission scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy, Braunauer, Emmet and Teller method, {zeta}-potential and confocal Raman spectroscopy) allowed us to access the effects of temperature treatment on the relevant physico-chemical properties of the MWCNTs samples studied in view of an integrated perspective to use these samples in a bio-toxicological context. Analytical microbalance measurements were used to access the purity of samples (metallic residue) after thermogravimetric analysis. Confocal Raman spectroscopy measurements were used to evaluate the density of structural defects created on the surface of the tubes due to the oxidation process by using 2D Raman image. Finally, we have demonstrated that temperature is an important parameter in the generation of oxidation debris (a byproduct which has not been properly taken into account in the literature) in the industrial grade MWCNTs studied after nitric acid purification and functionalization.

  5. Surface oxide growth on platinum electrode in aqueous trifluoromethanesulfonic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Yoshihisa; Mashio, Tetsuya; Ohma, Atsushi; Dale, Nilesh; Oshihara, Kenzo; Jerkiewicz, Gregory

    2014-10-01

    Platinum in the form of nanoparticles is the key and most expensive component of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, while trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (CF3SO3H) is the smallest fluorinated sulfonic acid. Nafion, which acts as both electrolyte and separator in fuel cells, contains -CF2SO3H groups. Consequently, research on the electrochemical behaviour of Pt in aqueous CF3SO3H solutions creates important background knowledge that can benefit fuel cell development. In this contribution, Pt electro-oxidation is studied in 0.1 M aqueous CF3SO3H as a function of the polarization potential (Ep, 1.10 ≤ Ep ≤ 1.50 V), polarization time (tp, 100 ≤ tp ≤ 104 s), and temperature (T, 278 ≤ T ≤ 333 K). The critical thicknesses (X1), which determines the applicability of oxide growth theories, is determined and related to the oxide thickness (dox). Because X1 > dox for the entire range of Ep, tp, and T values, the formation of Pt surface oxide follows the interfacial place-exchange or the metal cation escape mechanism. The mechanism of Pt electro-oxidation is revised and expanded by taking into account possible interactions of cations, anions, and water molecules with Pt. A modified kinetic equation for the interfacial place exchange is proposed. The application of the interfacial place-exchange and metal cation escape mechanisms leads to an estimation of the Ptδ+-Oδ- surface dipole (μPtO), and the potential drop (Vox) and electric field (Eox) within the oxide. The Pt-anion interactions affect the oxidation kinetics by indirectly influencing the electric field within the double layer and the surface oxide.

  6. Electrochemical oxidation of 243Am(III) in nitric acid by a terpyridyl-derivatized electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dares, C. J.; Lapides, A. M.; Mincher, B. J.; Meyer, T. J.

    2015-11-05

    A high surface area, tin-doped indium oxide electrode surface-derivatized with a terpyridine ligand has been applied to the oxidation of trivalent americium to Am(V) and Am(VI) in nitric acid. Potentials as low as 1.8 V vs. the saturated calomel electrode are used, 0.7 V lower than the 2.6 V potential for one-electron oxidation of Am(III) to Am(IV) in 1 M acid. This simple electrochemical procedure provides, for the first time, a method for accessing the higher oxidation states of Am in non-complexing media for developing the coordination chemistries of Am(V) and Am(VI) and, more importantly, for separation of americium from nuclear waste streams.

  7. Decomposition of perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) by heterogeneous photocatalysis in acidic aqueous medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchangam, Sri Chandana; Lin, Angela Yu-Chen; Shaik, Khaja Lateef; Lin, Cheng-Fang

    2009-09-01

    Decomposition of perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) is of prime importance since they are recognized as persistent organic pollutants and are widespread in the environment. PFCAs with longer carbon chain length are particularly of interest because of their noted recalcitrance, toxicity, and bioaccumulation. Here in this study, we demonstrate efficient decomposition of three important PFCAs such as perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) and perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA) by heterogeneous photocatalysis with TiO(2) as a photocatalyst in acidic aqueous solutions. The PFCAs were decomposed into shorter carbon chain length PFCAs and fluoride ions. Photoholes of excited TiO(2) generated upon UV-irradiation are found to be the oxidation sites for PFCAs. Therefore, creation and sustenance of these photoholes in the acidic aqueous medium has enhanced the decomposition of PFCAs. Heterogeneous photocatalytic treatment achieved more than 99% decomposition and 38% complete mineralization of PFOA in 7h. The decomposition of other PFCAs was as high as 99% with a defluorination efficiency of 38% for PFDA and 54% for PFNA. The presence of perchloric acid was found to enhance the decomposition by facilitating the ionization of PFCAs. The oxygen present in the medium served both as an oxidant and an electron acceptor. The mechanistic details of PFCA decomposition and their corresponding mineralization are elaborated.

  8. The effect of nitric acid exposure on Galileo spacecraft titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V propellant tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Cheng; O'Donnell, Tim; Yavrouian, Andre

    1990-01-01

    The Ti-6Al-4V-constructed retropropulsion-module tanks of the Galileo spacecraft were purged with nitrogen tetroxide in order to wait out a major launch rescheduling; nitric acid is among the residual products of such an operation. A test program was conducted on representative samples to ascertain the fracture toughness and stress corrosion threshold of the tanks' material, in view of Space Shuttle safety and mission-reliability requirements. It was found that the tanks' structural integrity was not degraded by nitric acid exposure.

  9. Oxidation-reduction reactions of simple hydroxamic acids and plutonium(IV) ions in nitric acid

    OpenAIRE

    Carrott, M. J.; Fox, O. D.; LeGurun, G.; Jones, C J; Mason, C; Taylor, Robin; Andrieux, Fabrice; Boxall, Colin

    2008-01-01

    Simple hydroxamic acids such as formo- and aceto-hydroxamic acids have been proposed as suitable reagents for the separation of either Pu and/or Np from U in modified or single cycle Purex based solvent extraction processes designed to meet the emerging requirements of advanced fuel cycles. The stability of these hydroxamic acids is dominated by their decomposition through acid hydrolysis. Kinetic studies of the acid hydrolysis of formo- and acetohydroxamic acids are reported in the absence a...

  10. Transport of neodymium from nitric acid solution by non-dispersive solvent extraction using a hollow fiber contactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transport behaviour of neodymium from nitric acid medium was investigated using hollow fiber non-dispersive extraction technique employing a mixture of di-nonyl phenyl phosphoric acid (DNPPA) and tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) in petrofin as the solvent. The effect of feed acidity and Nd concentration was studied in counter current mode at a feed as well as organic phase flow rate of 100 mL/min. (author)

  11. Co-extraction and co-stripping of U(VI) and Pu(IV) using tri-iso-amyl phosphate and tri-n-butyl phosphate in n-dodecane from nitric acid media under high loading conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sreenivasulu, Balija; Suresh, Ammath; Sivaraman, Nagarajan; Rao, P.R. Vasudeva [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Chemistry Group

    2016-08-01

    The extraction of Pu(IV) using 1.1 M solution of tri-iso-amyl phosphate (TiAP)/n-dodecane (DD) from plutonium nitrate solutions in nitric acid media was examined as a function of equilibrium aqueous phase metal ion concentration and equilibrium aqueous phase acidity at 303 K. The nitric acid concentration in the organic phase was measured as a function of equilibrium organic phase plutonium concentration. The co-extraction of U(VI) and Pu(IV) was studied using 1.1 M TiAP/DD system as a function of their equilibrium aqueous phase metal ion concentration and compared with 1.1 M tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)/n-DD system under identical conditions. Co-extraction and co-stripping of U(VI) and Pu(IV) were studied using 1.1 M TiAP/DD and 1.1 M TBP/DD systems in cross current mode to evaluate the number of stages required for the extraction and stripping of heavy metal ions (uranium and plutonium). The extraction and stripping efficiencies were calculated for both the systems. The saturation limit of the organic phase was also established in these studies.

  12. Humic acid removal from aqueous solutions by peroxielectrocoagulation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Reza Yazdanbakhsh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Natural organic matter is the cause of many problems associated with water treatment such as the presence of disinfection by-products (DBPs and membrane fouling during water filtration. In this study, the performance of the peroxi-electrocoagulation process (PEP was investigated for the removal of humic acids (HAs from aqueous solutions. Methods: PEP was carried out for the removal of HA using a plexiglas reactor with a volume of 2 L and fitted with iron electrodes and a direct current supply (DC. Samples were taken at various amounts of pH (2-4, current density (1 and 2A/cm2, hydrogen peroxide (50-150 mg/L and reaction time (5-20 minutes and then filtered to remove sludge formed during reaction. Finally, the HA concentration was measured by UV absorbance at 254 nm (UV254. Results: Results indicated that increasing the concentration of H2O2 from 50 to 150 mg/L increased HA removal efficiency from 83% to 94.5%. The highest removal efficiency was observed at pH 3.0; by increasing the pH to the alkaline range, the efficiency of the process was reduced. It was found that HA removal efficiency was high in current density 1A/cm2. Increasing current density up to 1 A cm-2 caused a decrease in removal efficiency. Results of this study showed that under the optimum operating range for the process ([current density] = 1A/cm2, [hydrogen peroxide concentration] = 150 mg/L, [reaction time]= 20 minutes and [pH]= 3.0, HA removal efficiency reached 98%. Conclusion: It can be concluded that PEP has the potential to be utilized for cost-effective removal of HA from aqueous solutions.

  13. Kinetics of reduction of nitric acid by electrochemical method and validation of cell design for plant application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Employing electrochemical method, the concentration of nitric acid had been reduced from 4 to about 0.5 M, under constant current/potential conditions in batch mode, for the purpose of optimizing the process parameters for the destruction of nitric acid in radioactive liquid waste, with good energy efficiency. Based on the rate constants determined from the batch process, a cell assembly in cylindrical configuration was designed for the electro-reduction of nitric acid in continuous mode, in radioactive environment. The steady state concentration of the acid at the outlet was compared with that concentration calculated using model equation and the agreement between the two sets of data was found to be reasonable. Cyclic voltammetric runs were recorded to understand the reduction behavior of nitric acid on platinum electrode. The results revealed the reduction of nitrate ion to be a quasi–reversible process and for the scan rate of 0.1 V s−1, values of 3.3 × 10−6 cm2 s−1 and 1.37 × 10−3 cm s−1 were computed for the diffusion coefficient and heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant, respectively

  14. Nitric oxide metabolism and indole acetic acid biosynthesis cross-talk in Azospirillum brasilense SM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koul, Vatsala; Tripathi, Chandrakant; Adholeya, Alok; Kochar, Mandira

    2015-04-01

    Production of nitric oxide (NO) and the presence of NO metabolism genes, nitrous oxide reductase (nosZ), nitrous oxide reductase regulator (nosR) and nitric oxide reductase (norB) were identified in the plant-associated bacterium (PAB) Azospirillum brasilense SM. NO presence was confirmed in all overexpressing strains, while improvement in the plant growth response of these strains was mediated by increased NO and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) levels in the strains. Electron microscopy showed random distribution to biofilm, with surface colonization of pleiomorphic Azospirilla. Quantitative IAA estimation highlighted a crucial role of nosR and norBC in regulating IAA biosynthesis. The NO quencher and donor reduced/blocked IAA biosynthesis by all strains, indicating their common regulatory role in IAA biosynthesis. Tryptophan (Trp) and l-Arginine (Arg) showed higher expression of NO genes tested, while in the case of ipdC, only Trp and IAA increased expression, while Arg had no significant effect. The highest nosR expression in SMnosR in the presence of IAA and Trp, along with its 2-fold IAA level, confirmed the relationship of nosR overexpression with Trp in increasing IAA. These results indicate a strong correlation between IAA and NO in A. brasilense SM and suggest the existence of cross-talk or shared signaling mechanisms in these two growth regulators.

  15. INTERACTION OF AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS OF CHLORINE WITH MALIC ACID, TARTARIC ACID, AND VARIOUS FRUIT JUICES, A SOURCE OF MUTAGENS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The interactions of aqueous solutions of chlorine with some fruit acids (citric acid, DL-malic acid, and L-tartaric acid) at different pH values were studied. iethyl ether extraction followed by GC/MS analysis indicated that a number of mutagens (certain chlorinated propanones an...

  16. Extraction of lanthanide(III) and uranyl(VI) from nitric acid solution by malonamides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extractive properties of two malonamide extractants, DMDBO3NPDA and DMDBMA were investigated for the extraction of lanthanide(III) and uranyl(VI) ions in benzene-nitric acid systems. It was found that DMDBO3NPDA has a higher extractive capacity than DMDBMA. The difference in their extracting capacities is discussed, based on the enthalpy changes for the extraction reactions and IR data for complexes of metal nitrates with malonamides. In addition, the applicability of a mixed solvent of n-dodecane and some aliphatic alcohols as a diluent for DMDBO3NPDA was examined. the longer the carbon chain and the higher the concentration of the aliphatic alcohol, the more the phase compatibility improves. The distribution ratios of neodymium(III) ion increase with an increase in the carbon chain length of linear aliphatic alcohol and with a decrease in its concentration

  17. Pb(II leaching from waste CRT funnel glass in nitric acid solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Strzałkowska

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The paper presents experimental results of Pb (II leaching from waste CRT funnel glass using solution of nitric acid (V . This work focused on examining the impact of concentration and particle size on the leaching percentage of Pb (II from funnel glass.Design/methodology/approach: Material for the investigation was crushed and sieved. Leaching was carried out using working solutions pfrom co repared ncentrated HNO3 and mechanical stirrer.Findings: The received results show the possibility of find the parameters of leaching that could remove the whole Pb(II from funnel glass.Practical implications: Results after additional research can be applicate by glass industry.Originality/value: Worked out technologies can be used in glass recycling and production.

  18. Electrochemical and XPS studies of Ni-based metallic glasses in boiling nitric acid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin Chunling [WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)], E-mail: clqin@imr.tohoku.ac.jp; Asami, Katsuhiko; Kimura, Hisamichi; Zhang Wei; Inoue, Akihisa [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2009-02-01

    This work systematically reports the electrochemical properties and surface characteristics of Ni-based metallic glasses in boiling nitric acid solutions. The Ni-based glassy alloys demonstrate high corrosion resistance in boiling 6 N HNO{sub 3} solutions with and without Cr{sup 6+} ions, which may be of great potential for nuclear fuel reprocessing applications. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis reveals that the high corrosion resistance of the alloys is due to the formation of the passive film composed exclusively of Nb{sup 5+} and Ta{sup 5+} cations after immersion in the solution without Cr{sup 6+} ions, and Nb{sup 5+}, Ta{sup 5+} and Cr{sup 3+} cations after immersion in the solution with Cr{sup 6+} ions.

  19. Vapor pressures of solid hydrates of nitric acid - Implications for polar stratospheric clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsnop, Douglas R.; Fox, Lewis E.; Zahniser, Mark S.; Wofsy, Steven C.

    1993-01-01

    Thermodynamic data are presented for hydrates of nitric acid: HNO3.H2O, HNO3.2H2O, HNO3.3H2O, and a higher hydrate. Laboratory data indicate that nucleation and persistence of metastable HNO3.2H2O may be favored in polar stratospheric clouds over the slightly more stable HNO3.3H2O. Atmospheric observations indicate that some polar stratospheric clouds may be composed of HNO3.2H2O and HNO3.3H2O. Vapor transfer from HNO3.2H2O to HNO3.3H2O could be a key step in the sedimentation of HNO3, which plays an important role in the depletion of polar ozone.

  20. Vapor pressures of solid hydrates of nitric Acid: implications for polar stratospheric clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsnop, D R; Zahniser, M S; Fox, L E; Wofsy, S C

    1993-01-01

    Thermodynamic data are presented for hydrates of nitric acid: HNO(3).H(2)O, HNO(3).2H(2)O, HNO(3).3H(2)O, and a higher hydrate. Laboratory data indicate that nucleation and persistence of metastable HNO(3).2H(2)O may be favored in polar stratospheric clouds over the slightly more stable HNO(3).3H(2)O. Atmospheric observations indicate that some polar stratospheric clouds may be composed of HNO(3).2H(2)O and HNO(3).3H(2)O. Vapor transfer from HNO(3).2H(2)O to HNO(3).3H(2)O could be a key step in the sedimentation of HNO(3), which plays an important role in the depletion of polar ozone. PMID:17757475

  1. Simultaneous extraction of U and Zr using HDEHP impregnated XAD-7 resin in nitric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feasibility of separating U and Zr from U-Zr alloys using HDEHP impregnated XAD-7 resin was explored in the present study with a view to obtain a sample solution free from matrix elements suitable for carrying out ICP-MS analysis of lanthanides at trace concentrations. Initially, the distributions of U, Zr and lanthanides in the impregnated resin were investigated with different nitric acid concentrations. The separated fractions were analyzed by ICP-MS for trace lanthanides whereas ion chromatography was employed for quantifying U and Zr. It was observed that at 4M HNO3 medium U exhibited high distribution whereas lanthanides showed least distribution in the resin. Zirconium showed significant distribution in 4M HNO3. Hence, 4M HNO3 was found to be optimal in order to extract U and Zr simultaneously. However, heavy rare earths such as Tm, Yb and Lu showed significant Kd values leading to their poor recovery. (author)

  2. Sorption of Pu(IV) from nitric acid by bifunctional anion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anion exchange is attractive for separating plutonium because the Pu(IV) nitrate complex is very strongly sorbed and few other metal ions form competing anionic nitrate complexes. The major disadvantage of this process has been the unusually slow rate at which the Pu(IV) nitrate complex is sorbed by the resin. The paper summarizes the concept of bifunctional anion-exchange resins, proposed mechanism for Pu(IV) sorption, synthesis of the alkylating agent, calculation of Kd values from Pu(IV) sorption results, and conclusions from the study of Pu(IV) sorption from 7M nitric acid by macroporous anion-exchange resins including level of crosslinking, level of alkylation, length of spacer, and bifunctional vs. monofunctional anion-exchange resins

  3. Study on Purification Diatomite with nitric acid by Thermal Closed System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuang Meng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, a purification approach using nitric acid leaching at thermal closed system was developed to improve the porous structure of raw diatomite by removal of impurities from its surface and clogged pores. The feasibility and efficiency of this approach were determined by XRF for chemical constitution of diatomite, SEM for morphology and BET for specific surface area of purified diatomite. The investigations indicated that the content of SiO2 was in order of 85.14% for raw diatomite and 98% for purified diatomite, the content of Fe2O3 decreases after purified; the integrity of the porous structure was confirmed by SEM, and increase in specific surface area from 18m2·g-1 to 36m2·g-1.

  4. Studies of dissolution solutions of ruthenium metal, oxide and mixed compounds in nitric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousset, F.; Eysseric, C.; Bedioui, F

    2004-07-01

    Ruthenium is one of the fission products generated by irradiated nuclear fuel. It is present throughout all the steps of nuclear fuel reprocessing-particularly during extraction-and requires special attention due to its complex chemistry and high {beta}{gamma} activity. An innovative electro-volatilization process is now being developed to take advantage of the volatility of RuO{sub 4} in order to eliminate it at the head end of the Purex process and thus reduce the number of extraction cycles. Although the process operates successfully with synthetic nitrato-RuNO{sup 3+} solutions, difficulties have been encountered in extrapolating it to real-like dissolution solutions. In order to better approximate the chemical forms of ruthenium found in fuel dissolution solutions, kinetic and speciation studies on dissolved species were undertaken with RuO{sub 2},xH{sub 2}O and Ru{sup 0} in nitric acid media. (authors)

  5. Influence of different diluents on thorium extraction and third-phase formation from nitric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced heavy water reactor (AHWR) is being developed in India for the utilization of vast resources of thorium for power generation. The reprocessing of the irradiated AHWR fuel is quite challenging in view of the presence of Th, U and Pu along with fission products in the feed solution. This paper compares thorium extraction/third-phase formation behavior of TBP and DHOA dissolved in different diluents viz. n-dodecane, normal paraffinic hydrocarbon (NPH), Shelsol D 70 (SS D 70, 40 % aromatic), and Solvsso 100 (∼ 95-100 % aromatic) as a function of nitric acid concentration. The work compares the performance of SS D 70 and Solvsso 100 having aromatic components vis-à-vis n-dodecane and NPH towards Th(IV) extraction/third-phase using TBP and DHOA as extractants. It is observed that presence of aromatic component in the diluent helps in increasing the Th(IV)-LOC value

  6. Nitric Acid Deposition following an Astrophysical Ionizing Radiation Event is below Critical Loads for Terrestrial and Freshwater Ecosystems

    CERN Document Server

    Melott, Ben Neuenswander Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Nitric acid rainout is one of the effects of an astrophysical ionizing radiation event. The predicted values of nitrate rainout from previous work for a typical gamma ray burst (GRB) within our galaxy serve as an extreme example and are shown to be below critical loads of eutrophication and acidification for ecoregions in Europe and the US.

  7. PKCa Agonists Enhance the Protective Effect of Hyaluronic Acid on Nitric Oxide-Induced Apoptosis of Articular Chondrocytes in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-lin Zhou

    2013-12-01

    The results may be showed that PKCa regulate the expresion of caspase-3, which contribute to the apoptosis of chondrocytes induced by NO. PKC α agonists enhance the protective effect of hyaluronic acid on nitric oxide-induced articular chondrocytes apoptosis.

  8. Ammonium nitrate evaporation and nitric acid condensation in DMT CCN counters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romakkaniemi, S.; Jaatinen, A.; Laaksonen, A.; Nenes, A.; Raatikainen, T.

    2014-05-01

    The effect of inorganic semivolatile aerosol compounds on the cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) activity of aerosol particles was studied by using a computational model for a DMT-CCN counter, a cloud parcel model for condensation kinetics and experiments to quantify the modelled results. Concentrations of water vapour and semivolatiles as well as aerosol trajectories in the CCN column were calculated by a computational fluid dynamics model. These trajectories and vapour concentrations were then used as an input for the cloud parcel model to simulate mass transfer kinetics of water and semivolatiles between aerosol particles and the gas phase. Two different questions were studied: (1) how big a fraction of semivolatiles is evaporated from particles after entering but before particle activation in the DMT-CCN counter? (2) How much can the CCN activity be increased due to condensation of semivolatiles prior to the maximum water supersaturation in the case of high semivolatile concentration in the gas phase? Both experimental and modelling results show that the evaporation of ammonia and nitric acid from ammonium nitrate particles causes a 10 to 15 nm decrease to the critical particle size in supersaturations between 0.1% and 0.7%. On the other hand, the modelling results also show that condensation of nitric acid or similar vapour can increase the CCN activity of nonvolatile aerosol particles, but a very high gas phase concentration (as compared to typical ambient conditions) would be needed. Overall, it is more likely that the CCN activity of semivolatile aerosol is underestimated than overestimated in the measurements conducted in ambient conditions.

  9. Effect of humidity on nitric acid uptake to mineral dust aerosol particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vlasenko

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the first laboratory observation of HNO3 uptake by airborne mineral dust particles. The model aerosols were generated by dry dispersion of Arizona Test Dust (ATD, SiO2, and by nebulizing a saturated solution of calcium carbonate. The uptake of 13N-labelled gaseous nitric acid was observed in a flow reactor on the 0.2–2 s reaction time scale at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The amount of reacted nitric acid was found to be a linear function of aerosol surface area. SiO2 particles did not show any significant uptake, while the CaCO3 aerosol was found to be more reactive than the ATD. Due to the smaller uncertainty associated with the reactive surface area in the case of suspended particles as compared to bulk powder samples, we believe that we provide an improved estimate of the uptake kinetics of HNO3 to mineral dust. The uptake coefficient averaged over the first 2 s of reaction time at a concentration of 1012 molecules cm−3 was found to increase with increasing relative humidity, from 0.022±0.007 at 12% RH to 0.113±0.017 at 73% RH , scaling along a water adsorption isotherm. The processing of the dust at 85% RH leads to a water soluble coating on the particles and enhances their hygroscopicity.

  10. Effect of humidity on nitric acid uptake to mineral dust aerosol particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vlasenko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the first laboratory observation of HNO3 uptake by airborne mineral dust particles. The model aerosols were generated by dry dispersion of Arizona Test Dust (ATD, SiO2, and by nebulizing a saturated solution of calcium carbonate. The uptake of 13N-labeled gaseous nitric acid was observed in a flow reactor on the 0.2–2 s reaction time scale at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The amount of nitric acid appearing in the aerosol phase at the end of the flow tube was found to be a linear function of the aerosol surface area. SiO2 particles did not show any significant uptake, while the CaCO3 aerosol was found to be more reactive than ATD. Due to the smaller uncertainty associated with the reactive surface area in the case of suspended particles as compared to bulk powder samples, we believe that we provide an improved estimate of the rate of uptake of HNO3 to mineral dust. The fact that the rate of uptake was smaller at a concentration of 1012 than at 1011 was indicative of a complex uptake mechanism. The uptake coefficient averaged over the first 2 s of reaction time at a concentration of 1012 molecules cm-3 was found to increase with increasing relative humidity, from 0.022±0.007 at 12% RH to 0.113±0.017 at 73% RH , which was attributed to an increasing degree of solvation of the more basic minerals. The extended processing of the dust by higher concentrations of HNO3 at 85% RH led to a water soluble coating on the particles and enhanced their hygroscopicity.

  11. Investigation on surface structure of potassium permanganate/nitric acid treated poly(tetrafluoroethylene)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Congli; Liu, Shuling; Gong, Tianlong; Gu, Aiqun; Yu, Zili, E-mail: ziliyu@scu.edu.cn

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • A new transformation (conversion) mechanism of PTFE surface from a hydrophobicity to a hydrophilicity was proposed through the treatment of KMnO{sub 4}/HNO{sub 3}. • Chemical reactions or defluorination of PTFE described in the reported paper was testified to be a misconceived conclusion by the combination of several testing measurements (IR, XPS, XRD and so on) in our present work. • Deposition of manganese oxide and/or manganese hydroxide on PTFE surface contributed to the hydrophilic property of the modified PTFE with KMnO{sub 4}/HNO{sub 3} treated. • The deposition thickness on the modified PTFE surface was about 5 μm, which was significantly helpful in enhancing the adhesive strength of PTFE with other materials. - Abstract: In the previous articles concerning the treatment of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) with potassium permanganate/nitric acid mixture, the conversion of a hydrophobic to a hydrophilic surface was partially assigned to the defluorination of PTFE and then the introduction of carbonyl and hydroxyl groups into the defluorinated sites. In the present work, PTFE sheets were treated with potassium permanganate/nitric acid, and the surfaces before and after treatment were comparatively characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The surface sediments of the treated PTFE were also determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). The results indicate that the conversion of the hydrophobicity to the hydrophilicity on the modified PTFE surface is mainly due to the deposition of hydrophilic manganese oxides which covered the fluorocarbon surface, and no detectable chemical reactions of PTFE occur in the treating process.

  12. Mass transfer studies in miniature Rotating Disc Contactor (RDC) with 30% TBP/nitric acid biphasic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rotating disc contactor is the widely used liquid-liquid extraction equipment for its high throughput and efficiency. In this work mass transfer performance of the miniature RDC column for the 30% TBP/nitric acid biphasic system was studied in terms of the operating variables such as rotor speed and flow rate of the aqueous and organic phase. The RDC column used in the experiments was shown. The column shell is made up of thick glass having diameter of 10.5 cm and height 100 cm. The rotor diameter is 5.3 cm and stator opening diameter is 6.3 cm. Totally 25 number of rotor discs were welded in the rotating shaft. This shaft was aligned in such a way that each rotor was placed in the centre of the compartment formed in between the two stator rings. The experiments were carried out to study the effect of rotor speed and superficial velocity of the dispersed and continuous phase on mass transfer efficiency. The organic solvent was made as the continuous phase and O/A ratio was set as 4 in both the continuous to dispersed phase(c-d) and dispersed to continuous phase (d-c) mass transfer experiments. The Number of Transfer Units (NTU) was estimated based on the solvent phase. The graphical representation of NTU was shown. The NTU value was observed as 4 and 3 respectively for extraction and stripping at the combined through put of 60 L/h and the rotor speed of 1000 rpm. This corresponds to the Height of Transfer Unit (HTU) value of 15 cm and 20 cm respectively for d-c and c-d mass transfer. The estimated overall mass transfer coefficient was increasing with rotor speed and superficial velocity of the liquid phases. The overall mass transfer coefficient also increases with increase in hold up

  13. Optimization of the nitrous vapors experimental conditions production by nitric acid electrochemical reduction; Optimisation des conditions operatoires de production de vapeurs nitreuses par reduction electrochimique d`acide nitrique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemaire, M.

    1996-11-22

    Gaseous nitrogen oxides (NO and NO{sub 2}) involved as oxidizing agents in nuclear fuel reprocessing can be produced by electrochemical reduction of nitric acid. This is an interesting alternative to the existing process because no wastes are generated. voltammetric studies on a platinum electrode show that two reduction potential regions are observed in concentrated nitric acid solutions, between 0,05 V{sub SHE} and between 0,5 V{sub SHE} and 1 V{sub SHE}. The highest potential region reduction mechanism was studied by: classical micro-electrolysis methods, macro-electrolysis methods, infrared spectroscopy coupled to electrochemistry. It was determined that the origin of nitric acid reduction is the electrochemical reduction of nitrous acid in nitric oxide which chemically reduces nitric acid. This reaction produces nitrous acid back which indicate an auto-catalytic behaviour of nitric acid reduction mechanism. Nitrogen dioxide evolution during nitric reduction can also explained by an other chemical reaction. If the potential value of platinum electrode is above 0,8 V{sub SHE}, products of the indirect nitric acid reduction are nitrous acid, nitrogen oxide and nitrogen dioxide. Below this value nitric oxide can be reduced in nitrous oxide. Thus the potential value is the most important parameter for the nitrogen oxides production selectivity. However, owing to the auto-catalytic character of the reduction mechanism, potential value can be controlled during intentiostatic industrial electrolysis. (author). 91 refs.

  14. Optical properties of chitosan in aqueous solution of L- and D-ascorbic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinkina, Olga N.; Shipovskaya, Anna B.; Kazmicheva, Olga F.

    2016-04-01

    The optical properties of aqueous chitosan solutions in L- and D-ascorbic acids were studied by optical rotatory dispersion and spectrophotometry. The specific optical rotation [α] of all chitosan solutions tested was positive, in contrast to aqueous solutions of the ascorbic acid enantiomers, which exhibit an inverse relationship of [α] values. Significant differences in the absolute values of [α] of the chitosan solutions at polymer-acid ratios exceeding the equimolar one were found.

  15. Alpha radiolysis of nitric acid and sodium nitrate with 4He2+ beam of 13.5 MeV energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of aqueous nitric acid solution alpha radiolysis was performed through experiments carried out at a cyclotron facility, where a helion beam with an energy of 13.5 MeV could be delivered into the solution. The effects of nitrate and hydronium ions on the formation yields of hydrogen peroxide and nitrous acid, G(H2O2) and G(HNO2), were studied. The results showed that G(H2O2) decreases linearly with increasing nitrate ion concentration. On the other hand, G(HNO2) increases with the nitrate ion concentration until it reaches a plateau for nitric acid concentrations higher than 2 mol L–1. It was also found that an increase of hydronium ion concentration has a favorable effect on G(H2O2) and G(HNO2). Furthermore, it appears that these effects are additive and that the variations of G(H2O2) and G(HNO2) can be described by two parametric expressions, as a function of the nitrate and hydronium ion concentrations. - Highlights: • G(H2O2) decreases linearly with increasing nitrate ion concentrations. • G(H2O2) increases considerably with increasing acidity (up to [H+]=0.5 mol L−1). • G(HNO2) increases with increasing nitrate and hydronium concentrations until a plateau is reached. • The effects of nitrate and hydronium ions on G(H2O2) and G(HNO2) are additive

  16. N,N-dialkyl-2-hydroxyacetamides for modifier-free separation of trivalent actinides from nitric acid medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prathibha, T.; Kumaresan, R.; Selvan, B. Robert; Venkatesan, K.A.; Antony, M.P.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Fuel Chemistry Div.

    2016-07-01

    The alkyl derivatives of N,N,-dialkyl-2-hydroxyacetamide (DAHyA), namely, N,N,-dihexyl-2-hydroxyacetamide (DHHyA), N,N,-dioctyl-2-hydroxyacetamide (DOHyA), N,N,-didecyl-2-hydroxyacetamide (DDHyA), were synthesized and characterized by FT-IR, and NMR spectroscopy. The extraction behaviour of Am(III) in a solution of DAHyA in n-dodecane was studied as a function of various parameters to evaluate the feasibility of using DAHyA for partitioning of trivalent actinides from high-level liquid waste (HLLW). The distribution ratio of Am(III) (D{sub Am(III)}) in 0.1 M DAHyA/n-DD increased from 10{sup -4} to > 200 with increase in nitric acid concentration from 1 M to 6 M. A D{sub Am(III)} value 10-70 was obtained in a nitric acid concentration range from 3-4 M. The extraction of Am(III) in 0.1 M DAHyA/n-dodecane decreased in the order DHHyA > DOHyA > DDHyA. The third-phase formation behaviour of nitric acid and neodymium (III) in 0.2 M DAHyA/n-dodecane was studied. Near stoichiometric amount of neodymium (III) can be loaded in octyl and decyl derivatives without any third-phase formation from 3-4 M nitric acid medium. Unlike other extractants, the loaded trivalent metal ion in DAHyA can be recovered even with 1 M nitric acid. Therefore, the study revealed that N,N,-dialkyl-2-hydroxyacetamides are promising candidates for partitioning the trivalent actinides from HLLW.

  17. Fatty acid-binding protein 4 impairs the insulin-dependent nitric oxide pathway in vascular endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Aragonès Gemma; Saavedra Paula; Heras Mercedes; Cabré Anna; Girona Josefa; Masana Lluís

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Recent studies have shown that fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4) plasma levels are associated with impaired endothelial function in type 2 diabetes (T2D). In this work, we analysed the effect of FABP4 on the insulin-mediated nitric oxide (NO) production by endothelial cells in vitro. Methods In human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs), we measured the effects of FABP4 on the insulin-mediated endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and activation a...

  18. Study of Removal Nitrous Acid From Nitric Acid Solution Using Packed Column

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAN; Tian; CHANG; Shang-wen; LIU; Jin-ping; ZHOU; Xian-ming; LI; Gao-liang; TANG; Hong-bin; HE; Hui

    2013-01-01

    It is necessary that the adjustment of the Pu(Ⅲ)to Pu(Ⅳ)should be used excess nitride gases befor the cycle of Pu purification in Purex.The mass of nitrous acid were present in solution after adjustment.Ifthe solution contain the mass of nitrous acid arrived at the cycle of Pupurification,the nitrous could react with Pu reducing agent in the processof Pu back-extractionbecause nitrous acid could extracted to organic,

  19. Effect of aqueous extract of Origanum vulgare and Melilotus officinalis onproduction of nitric oxide (NO in cultured vascular endothelial cells (mouse endothelioma F-2 cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Ansari

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: During recent years, nitric oxide (NO has been considered as a molecule involved in migraine headaches. This free radical involves in initiation of migraine headaches via NO/cGMP signaling pathway and vascular relaxation specially big intracranial arteries. Therefore, we studied the effects of aqueous extract of Origanum vulgare and Melilotus officinalis prescribed in migraine treatment in traditional & modern medicine, on NO level in cultured endothelial cells.Materials and Methods: Each crude herb (25g was mixed with 200 ml distilled water. End extract obtained after filtering and drying. Endothelial cells propagated in DMEM medium containing 10% FCS and 1-2% penicillin-streptomycin. The nitrite concentration was measured as an indicator of nitric oxide production according to the Griess reaction and with ELISA in 540 nm.Results: Concentrations of 100, 200 and 400 g/ml of Origanum vulgare, reduced NO levels compared with control to 13.1 % (p<0.05, 25.8% (p<0.01 and 33.9% (p<0.001 respectively. However, despite our expectation melilotus officinalis increased NO level. The concentrations of 100, 200 and 400 g/ml of the herb, increased NO levels to 12.7 (p<0.05, 36.5% (p<0.001 & 72.9% (p<0.001 respectively.Conclusion: We concluded that aqueous extract of Origanum vulgare probably decreases migraine headaches by reducing NO and aqueous extract of Melilotus officinalis does not act through this mechanism.

  20. Synergistic hypergolic ignition of blends of dienes and dienophiles with red fuming nitric acid as oxidizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panda, S.P.; Kulkarni, S.G.; Prabhakaran, C.

    1989-04-01

    Synergistic hypergolic ignition of several fuel blends and mixtures with red fuming nitric acid (RFNA) as oxidizer has been reported previously. The liquid fuels consisted of blends of 3-carene, cyclopentadiene, or norbornadiene with cardanol in the weight ratio 70:30 for the first two and 85:15 for norbornadiene. In all these cases, synergism in ignition was believed to be due to the fast and exothermic oligomerization of 3-carene, cyclopentadiene, and norbornadiene in the presence of acid. The exothermicity of the systems was enhanced by the addition of cardanol to the unsaturation of oligomers, leading to the formation of highly oxidizable phenolic ethers. Two more important reactions at the preignition stage were nitration and oxidation of the ethers leading to the production of gaseous combustibles and heat. In this case, an attempt has been made to extend the range of possible preignition reactions by introducing diene-dienophile Diels-Alder cycloaddition with low activation energy by replacing cardanol with furfuryl alcohol or furfurylideneacetone having a furan ring to behave as acid polymerizable dienes in the above systems.

  1. Hydrogen generation in SRAT with nitric acid and late washing flowsheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melter feed preparation processes, incorporating a final wash of the precipitate slurry feed to Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and a partial substitution of the SRAT formic acid requirement with nitric acid, should not produce peak hydrogen generation rates during Cold Chemical Runs (CCR's) and radioactive operation greater than their current, respective hydrogen design bases of 0.024 lb/hr and 1.5 lb/hr. A single SRAT bench-scale process simulation for CCR-s produced a DWPF equivalent peak hydrogen generation rate of 0.004 lb/hr. During radioactive operation, the peak hydrogen generation rate will be dependent on the extent DWPF deviates from the nominal precipitate hydrolysis and melter feed preparation process operating parameters. Two actual radioactive sludges were treated according to the new flowsheets. The peak hydrogen evolution rates were equivalent to 0.038 and 0.20 lb/hr (DWPF scale) respectively. Compared to the formic acid -- HAN hydrolysis flowsheets, these peak rates were reduced by a factor of 2.5 and 3.4 for Tank 15 and Tank 11 sludges, respectively

  2. Estimation of salivary nitric oxide and uric acid levels in oral squamous cell carcinoma and healthy controls

    OpenAIRE

    Varsha Salian; Farah Demeri; Suchetha Kumari

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) being the most common head and neck cancer, involves the interplay of several free radicals and antioxidant molecules. The potential role of salivary nitric oxide (NO) and uric acid in cancer development needs to be explored as there are a few studies highlighting their association with each other and with oral cancer. Aims: The present study was designed to measure the NO and uric acid levels in the saliva of patients with OSCC as compared with...

  3. Validation Testing of the Nitric Acid Dissolution Step Within the K Basin Sludge Pretreatment Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AJ Schmidt; CH Delegard; KL Silvers; PR Bredt; CD Carlson; EW Hoppe; JC Hayes; DE Rinehart; SR Gano; BM Thornton

    1999-03-24

    The work described in this report involved comprehensive bench-scale testing of nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) dissolution of actual sludge materials from the Hanford K East (KE) Basin to confirm the baseline chemical pretreatment process. In addition, process monitoring and material balance information was collected to support the development and refinement of process flow diagrams. The testing was performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)for the US Department of Energy's Office of Spent Fuel Stabilization (EM-67) and Numatec Hanford Corporation (NHC) to assist in the development of the K Basin Sludge Pretreatment Process. The baseline chemical pretreatment process for K Basin sludge is nitric acid dissolution of all particulate material passing a 1/4-in. screen. The acid-insoluble fraction (residual solids) will be stabilized (possibly by chemical leaching/rinsing and grouting), packaged, and transferred to the Hanford Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The liquid fraction is to be diluted with depleted uranium for uranium criticality safety and iron nitrate for plutonium criticality safety, and neutralized with sodium hydroxide. The liquid fraction and associated precipitates are to be stored in the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) pending vitrification. It is expected that most of the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), associated with some K Basin sludges, will remain with the residual solids for ultimate disposal to ERDF. Filtration and precipitation during the neutralization step will further remove trace quantities of PCBs within the liquid fraction. The purpose of the work discussed in this report was to examine the dissolution behavior of actual KE Basin sludge materials at baseline flowsheet conditions and validate the.dissolution process step through bench-scale testing. The progress of the dissolution was evaluated by measuring the solution electrical conductivity and concentrations of key species in the

  4. Validation Testing of the Nitric Acid Dissolution Step Within the K Basin Sludge Pretreatment Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work described in this report involved comprehensive bench-scale testing of nitric acid (HNO3) dissolution of actual sludge materials from the Hanford K East (KE) Basin to confirm the baseline chemical pretreatment process. In addition, process monitoring and material balance information was collected to support the development and refinement of process flow diagrams. The testing was performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)for the US Department of Energy's Office of Spent Fuel Stabilization (EM-67) and Numatec Hanford Corporation (NHC) to assist in the development of the K Basin Sludge Pretreatment Process. The baseline chemical pretreatment process for K Basin sludge is nitric acid dissolution of all particulate material passing a 1/4-in. screen. The acid-insoluble fraction (residual solids) will be stabilized (possibly by chemical leaching/rinsing and grouting), packaged, and transferred to the Hanford Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The liquid fraction is to be diluted with depleted uranium for uranium criticality safety and iron nitrate for plutonium criticality safety, and neutralized with sodium hydroxide. The liquid fraction and associated precipitates are to be stored in the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) pending vitrification. It is expected that most of the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), associated with some K Basin sludges, will remain with the residual solids for ultimate disposal to ERDF. Filtration and precipitation during the neutralization step will further remove trace quantities of PCBs within the liquid fraction. The purpose of the work discussed in this report was to examine the dissolution behavior of actual KE Basin sludge materials at baseline flowsheet conditions and validate the.dissolution process step through bench-scale testing. The progress of the dissolution was evaluated by measuring the solution electrical conductivity and concentrations of key species in the dissolver

  5. Activation of Carbonyl-Containing Molecules with Solid Lewis Acids in Aqueous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Román-Leshkov, Yuriy [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Chemical Engineering; Davis, Mark E. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States). Chemical Engineering

    2011-09-28

    Current interest in reacting carbonyl-containing molecules in aqueous media is primarily due to the growing emphasis on conversion of biomass to fuels and chemicals. Recently, solid Lewis acids have been shown to perform catalytic reactions with carbonyl-containing molecules such as sugars in aqueous media. Here, catalysis mediated by Lewis acids is briefly discussed, Lewis acid solids that perform catalysis in aqueous media are then described, and the review is concluded with a few comments on the outlook for the future.

  6. Integrating nitric oxide into salicylic acid and jasmonic acid/ethylene plant defense pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mur, Luis A J; Prats, Elena; Pierre, Sandra;

    2013-01-01

    Plant defence against pests and pathogens is known to be conferred by either salicylic acid (SA) or jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET) pathways, depending on infection or herbivore-grazing strategy. It is well attested that SA and JA/ET pathways are mutually antagonistic allowing defence responses...

  7. Isolation of living Algae growing in the shells of Molluscs and Barnacles with EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prud’homme van Reine, W.F.; Hoek, van den C.

    1966-01-01

    Several decalcifying mixtures or aqueous solutions of inorganic or organic acids are generally used for releasing algae growing in the shells of molluscs and barnacles, for instance dilute hydrochloric, nitric, citric, or acetic acid (4), a mixture of nitric acid, chromic acid and alcolhol (1), nitr

  8. 利用硝酸回收机械化学活化后的硫化物浓缩液中的铅%Recovery of Lead from Sulfide Concentrate after Mechanochemical Activation Using Nitric Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.G. Kholmogorov; O.N. Kononova; G.L. Pashkov; L.V. Shashina; V.P. Plekhanov; A.A. Sabetskiy

    2005-01-01

    Decomposition of lead sulfide concentrates in nitric acidic solutions after ferric (Ⅲ) nitrate addition and mechanical preparation has been investigated. It was found out that the decomposition can be achieved in of mechanochemical activation. The use of [Fe(NO3)3-HNO3-H2O] aqueous salt system allows the decomposition of lead sulfide concentrate at room temperature and in this case the concentration of HNO3 does not exceed mechanochemical activation of this concentrate. The insoluble residues after the leaching contain SiO2, S0, FeCO3 and PbSO4.

  9. Transformations of polyols to organic acids and hydrogen in aqueous alkaline media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasterecht, van T.; Deelen, van T.W.; Jong, de K.P.; Bitter, J.H.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we show that carbon nanofiber supported copper and nickel nanoparticles can selectively transform ethylene glycol and glycerol into value added oxygenates (organic acids) under anaerobic aqueous conditions. During aqueous phase oxidation Cu based catalysts showed a nearly quantitative

  10. High pressure Raman spectroscopic study of the effects of n-ethylamines and water on the 2-nitropropane/Nitric acid system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gobin, Cedric; Petitet, Jean Pierre [Laboratoire d' Ingenierie des Materiaux et des Hautes Pressions, CNRS, Institut Galilee, Universite Paris XIII, 99 av. J-B Clement, 93430 Villetaneuse (France)

    2005-12-01

    High pressure Raman spectroscopy measurements in a diamond anvil cell (0-10 GPa) on 2-nitropropane/nitric acid/X (X=triethylamine, diethylamine, and water) ternary systems and 2-nitropropane/nitric acid/water/Y (Y=triethylamine and diethylamine) quaternary systems are reported. The modifications of the chemical behavior of the 2-nitropropane/nitric acid model system, induced by the presence of triethylamine, diethylamine, and/or water, were studied at ambient and high pressure. At ambient pressure, the ionization of the nitric acid has been observed with each of the additives. Moreover, in the case of ethylamines, new peaks have been observed and the hypothesis of a 2-nitropropane/ethylamine complex is advanced. At high pressure, the decomposition of the 2-nitropropane/nitric acid system, with an oxygen balance near zero, has been observed only in presence of triethylamine. The role of each additive to the 2-nitropropane/nitric acid system in the modification of the respective reducing and oxidizing character of the components, and in the reactivity of the system, is discussed. Several hypotheses are advanced concerning the sensitizing effect of the additives on the 2-nitropropane/nitric acid system. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  11. MATERIAL COMPATIBILITY EVALUATION FOR DWPF NITRIC-GLYCOLIC ACID - LITERATURE REVIEW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickalonis, J.; Skidmore, E.

    2013-06-05

    Glycolic acid is being evaluated as an alternative for formic and nitric acid in the DWPF flowsheet. Demonstration testing and modeling for this new flowsheet has shown that glycolic acid and glycolate has a potential to remain in certain streams generated during the production of the nuclear waste glass. A literature review was conducted to assess the impact of glycolic acid on the corrosion of the materials of construction for the DWPF facility as well as facilities downstream which may have residual glycolic acid and glycolates present. The literature data was limited to solutions containing principally glycolic acid. The reported corrosion rates and degradation characteristics have shown the following for the materials of construction.  For C276 alloy, the primary material of construction for the CPC vessels, corrosion rates of either 2 or 20 mpy were reported up to a temperature of 93 C.  For the austenitic stainless steels, 304L and 316L, variable rates were reported over a range of temperatures, varying from 2 mpy up to 200 mpy (at 100 C).  For 690, G30, Allcorr, Ultimet and Stellite alloys no data were available.  For relevant polymers where data are available, the data suggests that exposure to glycolic acid is not detrimental. The literature data had limited application to the DWPF process since only the storage and feed vessels, pumps and piping used to handle the glycolic acid are directly covered by the available data. These components are either 304L or 316L alloys for which the literature data is inconsistent (See Bullet 2 above). Corrosion rates in pure glycolic acid solutions also are not representative of the DWPF process streams. This stream is complex and contains aggressive species, i.e. chlorides, sulfates, mercury, as well as antifoaming agents which cumulatively have an unknown effect on the corrosion rates of the materials of construction. Therefore, testing is recommended to investigate any synergistic effects of the

  12. Material compatibility evaluataion for DWPF nitric-glycolic acid - literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glycolic acid is being evaluated as an alternative for formic and nitric acid in the DWPF flowsheet. Demonstration testing and modeling for this new flowsheet has shown that glycolic acid and glycolate has a potential to remain in certain streams generated during the production of the nuclear waste glass. A literature review was conducted to assess the impact of glycolic acid on the corrosion of the materials of construction for the DWPF facility as well as facilities downstream which may have residual glycolic acid and glycolates present. The literature data was limited to solutions containing principally glycolic acid. The reported corrosion rates and degradation characteristics have shown the following for the materials of construction: For C276 alloy, the primary material of construction for the CPC vessels, corrosion rates of either 2 or 20 mpy were reported up to a temperature of 93 deg C; For the austenitic stainless steels, 304L and 316L, variable rates were reported over a range of temperatures, varying from 2 mpy up to 200 mpy (at 100 deg C); For 690, G30, Allcorr, Ultimet and Stellite alloys no data were available; and, For relevant polymers where data are available, the data suggests that exposure to glycolic acid is not detrimental. The literature data had limited application to the DWPF process since only the storage and feed vessels, pumps and piping used to handle the glycolic acid are directly covered by the available data. These components are either 304L or 316L alloys for which the literature data is inconsistent (See Bullet 2 above). Corrosion rates in pure glycolic acid solutions also are not representative of the DWPF process streams. This stream is complex and contains aggressive species, i.e. chlorides, sulfates, mercury, as well as antifoaming agents which cumulatively have an unknown effect on the corrosion rates of the materials of construction. Therefore, testing is recommended to investigate any synergistic effects of the aggressive

  13. A safer and flexible method for the oxygen functionalization of carbon nanotubes by nitric acid vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santangelo, Saveria, E-mail: saveria.santangelo@unirc.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, dell’Energia, dell’Ambiente e dei Materiali (DICEAM), Università “Mediterranea”, 89122 Reggio Calabria (Italy); Piperopoulos, Elpida [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Eletronica, Chimica ed Ingegneria Industriale (DIECII), Università di Messina, 98166 Messina (Italy); Fazio, Enza [Dipartimento di Fisica e di Scienze della Terra (DFST), Università di Messina, 98166 Messina (Italy); Faggio, Giuliana [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Informazione, delle Infrastrutture e dell’Energia Sostenibile (DIIES), Università “Mediterranea”, 89122 Reggio Calabria (Italy); Ansari, Shabana [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Eletronica, Chimica ed Ingegneria Industriale (DIECII), Università di Messina, 98166 Messina (Italy); Lanza, Maurizio [Istituto per i Processi Chimico Fisici (IPCF) del CNR, 98158 Messina (Italy); Neri, Fortunato [Dipartimento di Fisica e di Scienze della Terra (DFST), Università di Messina, 98166 Messina (Italy); Messina, Giacomo [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Informazione, delle Infrastrutture e dell’Energia Sostenibile (DIIES), Università “Mediterranea”, 89122 Reggio Calabria (Italy); Milone, Candida [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Eletronica, Chimica ed Ingegneria Industriale (DIECII), Università di Messina, 98166 Messina (Italy)

    2014-06-01

    The functionalization by nitric acid vapors at azeotropic concentration has been recently proposed to eliminate drawbacks of the widely utilized liquid phase functionalization method. This work suggests to exploit the so-called “salt effect” to improve the vapor phase oxidation method in terms of safety and flexibility. Increasing the relative volatility of acid, the addition of Mg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} salt to the HNO{sub 3} + H{sub 2}O solution allows (i) obtaining vapors with HNO{sub 3} at the azeotropic concentration from a more diluted liquid solution (i.e. operating under safer conditions), and (ii) varying the concentration of HNO{sub 3} in the vapor phase even above the azeotropic concentration limit (with improved process flexibility). High-resolution transmission electron microscopy, thermo-gravimetry, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy systematic analyses are carried out on pristine and oxidized nanotubes in order to assess their functionalization degree, surface chemistry and structural evolution. The most relevant finding of this preliminary study is that the nanotube functionalization extent increases linearly with the HNO{sub 3} vapor concentration.

  14. Photolysis of Nitric Acid and Nitrate on Natural and Artificial Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chunxiang; Gao, Honglian; Zhang, Ning; Zhou, Xianliang

    2016-04-01

    Photolysis of nitric acid and nitrate (HNO3/nitrate) was investigated on the surfaces of natural and artificial materials, including plant leaves, metal sheets, and construction materials. The surfaces were conditioned in the outdoor air prior to experiments to receive natural depositions of ambient HNO3/nitrate and other atmospheric constituents. The photolysis rate constant (JHNO3(s)) of the surface HNO3/nitrate was measured based on the production rates of nitrous acid (HONO) and nitrogen oxides (NOx). The JHNO3(s) values, from 6.0 × 10(-6) s(-1) to 3.7 × 10(-4) s(-1), are 1 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than that of gaseous HNO3. The HONO was the major product from photolysis of HNO3/nitrate on most plant leaves, whereas NOx was the major product on most artificial surfaces. The JHNO3(s) values decreased with HNO3/nitrate surface density and could be described by a simple analytical equation. Within a typical range of HNO3/nitrate surface density in the low-NOx forested areas, photolysis of HNO3/nitrate on the forest canopy can be a significant source for HONO and NOx for the overlying atmosphere. PMID:26936001

  15. A quantitative test of infrared optical constants for supercooled sulphuric and nitric acid droplet aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Wagner

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In situ Fourier transform infrared (FTIR extinction spectra of supercooled H2SO4/H2O and HNO3/H2O solution droplets were recorded in the large coolable aerosol chamber AIDA (Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe for a range of aerosol compositions and at temperatures extending down to 192 K. The measured spectra were quantitatively analysed in terms of aerosol composition and mass concentration by using Mie theory in combination with published refractive index data as input parameters. Simultaneously, total sulphuric acid and nitric acid mass concentrations from filter analysis and total water concentrations measured with the Lyman-a hygrometer of Forschungszentrum Jülich were used to calculate the aerosol composition at thermodynamic equilibrium inside the aerosol chamber. By comparing these measured aerosol parameters with those retrieved from the analysis of the FTIR spectra, the accuracy of the literature data sets of refractive indices could be assessed. In summary, four data sets were tested in the H2SO4/H2O system as well as two data sets in the HNO3/H2O system, partly revealing significant discrepancies in the retrieved aerosol properties. Potential explanations for these differences are discussed in this paper.

  16. A quantitative test of infrared optical constants for supercooled sulphuric and nitric acid droplet aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Wagner

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available In situ Fourier transform infrared (FTIR extinction spectra of supercooled H2SO4/H2O and HNO3/H2O solution droplets were recorded in the large coolable aerosol chamber AIDA (Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe for a range of aerosol compositions and at temperatures extending down to 192 K. The measured spectra were quantitatively analysed in terms of aerosol composition and mass concentration by using Mie theory in combination with published refractive index data as input parameters. Simultaneously, total sulphuric acid and nitric acid mass concentrations from filter analysis and total water concentrations measured with the Lyman-a hygrometer of Forschungszentrum Jülich were used to calculate the aerosol composition at thermodynamic equilibrium inside the aerosol chamber. By comparing these measured aerosol parameters with those retrieved from the analysis of the FTIR spectra, the accuracy of the literature data sets of refractive indices could be assessed. In summary, four data sets were tested in the H2SO4/H2O system as well as two data sets in the HNO3/H2O system, partly revealing significant discrepancies in the retrieved aerosol properties. Potential explanations for these differences are discussed in this paper.

  17. Oxidative aromatization of Hantzsch 1,4-dihydropyridines by aqueous hydrogen peroxide-acetic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A simple method for the oxidative aromatization of Hantzsch 1,4-dihydropyridines to the corresponding pyridines is achieved by using hydrogen peroxide as green oxidant and acetic acid as catalyst in aqueous solution.

  18. Thermodynamics of the complexation of arabinogalactan with salicylic and p-aminobenzoic acids in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudarisova, R. Kh.; Badykova, L. A.

    2016-03-01

    The thermodynamics of complexation of arabinogalactan with salicylic and p-aminobenzoic acids in aqueous solutions is studied by means spectroscopy. The standard thermodynamic characteristics (Δ H°; Δ G°; Δ S°) of complexation are calculated.

  19. Succinic acid in aqueous solution : connecting microscopic surface composition and macroscopic surface tension

    OpenAIRE

    Werner, Josephina; Julin, Jan; Dalirian, Maryam; Prisle, Nønne; Öhrwall, Gunnar; Persson, Ingmar; Björneholm, Olle; Riipinen, Ilona

    2014-01-01

    The water vapor interface of aqueous solutions of succinic acid, where pH values and bulk concentrations were varied, has been studied using surface sensitive X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. It was found that succinic acid has a considerably higher propensity to reside in the aqueous surface region than its deprotonated form, which is effectively depleted from the surface due to the two strongly hydrated carboxylate groups. From both XPS experim...

  20. Radiation-induced destruction peculiarities of hydroxyl containing amino acids in diluted aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amino acids aqueous solution of alpha-alanine and beta-alanine, serine, threonine (concentration 5*10-4 M) were irradiated with dose rate 0.35 Gy/s in range 100-1100 Gy and analysed. Effectiveness of radiation-induced decomposition process depends on row of factors: concentration of amino acid aqueous solution, pH, oxygen presence and other acceptors

  1. Effect of ascorbic acid supplementation on nitric oxide metabolites and systolic blood pressure in rats exposed to lead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Amani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Extended exposure to low levels of lead causes high blood pressure in human and laboratory animals. The mechanism is not completely recognized, but it is relatively implicated with generation of free radicals, oxidant agents such as ROS, and decrease of available nitric oxide (NO. In this study, we have demonstrated the effect of ascorbic acid as an antioxidant on nitric oxide metabolites and systolic blood pressure in rats exposed to low levels of lead. Materials and Methods: The adult male Wistar rats weighing 200-250 g were divided into four groups: control, lead acetate (receiving 100 ppm lead acetate in drinking water, lead acetate plus ascorbic acid (receiving 100 ppm lead acetate and 1 g/l ascorbic acid in drinking water, and ascorbic acid (receiving 1 g/l ascorbic acid in drinking water groups. The animals were anesthetized with ketamin/xylazine (50 and 7 mg/kg, respectively, ip and systolic blood pressure was then measured from the tail of the animals by a sphygmomanometer. Nitric oxide levels in serum were measured indirectly by evaluation of its stable metabolites (total nitrite and nitrate (NOc. Results: After 8 and 12 weeks, systolic blood pressure in the lead acetate group was significantly elevated compared to the control group. Ascorbic acid supplementation could prevent the systolic blood pressure rise in the lead acetate plus ascorbic acid group and there was no significant difference relative to the control group. The serum NOc levels in lead acetate group significantly decreased in relation to the control group, but this reduction was not significantly different between the lead acetate plus ascorbic acid group and the control group. Conclusion: Results of this study suggest that ascorbic acid as an antioxidant prevents the lead induced hypertension. This effect may be mediated by inhibition of NOc oxidation and thereby increasing availability of NO.

  2. Evaluation of nitric and acetic acid resistance of cement mortars containing high-volume black rice husk ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatveera, B; Lertwattanaruk, P

    2014-01-15

    This paper presents the performance of cement mortar containing black rice husk ash (BRHA) under nitric and acetic acid attacks. The BRHA, collected from an electrical generating power plant that uses rice husk as fuel, was ground using a grinding machine. The compressive strength loss, weight loss, and expansion of mortars under nitric and acetic acid attack were investigated. The test results of BRHA properties in accordance with the ASTM C 618 standard found that the optimal grinding time was 4 h as this achieved a Blaine fineness of 5370 cm(2)/g. For parametric study, BRHA were used as a Portland cement Type 1 replacement at the levels of 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, and 50% by weight of binder. The water-to-binder ratios were 0.55, 0.60, and 0.65. From test results, when the percentage replacements of BRHA in cement increased, it was observed that the strength loss and weight loss of mortars containing BRHA under acetic acid attack were higher than those of the mortars against nitric acid attack. It was found that, of the various BHRA mortars, the strength loss and weight loss due to nitric and acetic acid attacks were the lowest in the mortar with 10% BRHA replacement. For 10%, 20% and 30% BRHA replacements, the rate of expansion of the BRHA mortar decreased when compared with the control mortar. For the mortars with other percentage replacements of BRHA, the rate of expansion increased. Furthermore, the effective water-to-binder ratios of control and BRHA mortars were the primary factor for determining the durability of mortar mixed with BRHA.

  3. Surfactant-Amino Acid and Surfactant-Surfactant Interactions in Aqueous Medium: a Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Nisar Ahmad

    2015-08-01

    An overview of surfactant-amino acid interactions mainly in aqueous medium has been discussed. Main emphasis has been on the solution thermodynamics and solute-solvent interactions. Almost all available data on the topic has been presented in a lucid and simple way. Conventional surfactants have been discussed as amphiphiles forming micelles and amino acids as additives and their effect on the various physicochemical properties of these conventional surfactants. Surfactant-surfactant interactions in aqueous medium, various mixed surfactant models, are also highlighted to assess their interactions in aqueous medium. Finally, their applied part has been taken into consideration to interpret their possible uses.

  4. The effect of gamma irradiation on the nitric acid solution as washing agent used in Ru-U extraction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The continuous extraction of uranium was carried out in a 12 -stage bank of mixer-settlers using a 30% volume Tbp-kerosene mixture solvent. The uranyl nitrate solution of 200 g U/l containing 11 mg/l of ruthenium as impurity was fed to the mixer settlers at 7th stage at 75 ml/h flow rate. The 30% volume Tbp-kerosene solvent was introduced at 1st stage at 150 ml/h flow rate, while the nitric acid washing solution already gamma irradiated at 103, 105, 107, 108 rads respectively was fed at 12th stage at 56 ml/h flow rate. Extraction time was 6 hours, and the stirring was done at 2300 rpm. The experiments showed that gamma irradiation caused the degradation of nitric acid which was shown by the decrease in its acidity. Increasing radiation dose to the nitric acid solution resulted in the decrease of uranium recovery and the FDRu-U. At the lowest radiation dose (i.e. 103 rad) the uranium recovery and FDRu-U obtained respectively were found to be 96.37% and 2.19, while that at the highest radiation dose (i.e. 108 rad) they were 88.20% and 2.01 respectively

  5. Bis(2-ethylhexyl)diglycolamic acid for the mutual separation of Europium (III) and Americium (III) from citric acid - nitric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-level liquid waste arises from fast reactor fuel reprocessing contains significant quantities of lanthanides and trivalent minor actinides. Recently, the partitioning of minor actinides from fast reactor-high active waste (FR-HAW) using a TRUEX solvent, composed of a solution of 0.2 M octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO)-1.2 M tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) in n-dodecane is demonstrated. A new stripping formulation composed of a solution of 0.1 M citric acid in 0.1 M nitric acid was employed for back extraction of trivalents from the loaded TRUEX solvent. Thus the mutual separation lanthanides and actinides requires a suitable extractant for separating them from citric acid medium

  6. Study of the nitric acid influence on the production of Ce O2 with high specific surface area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cerium oxide (Ce O2) main characteristics for use as catalyst in an exhaust gases purification system are: high specific surface area (approximately 30 m2/g after calcination at 800 deg C/ 2 hs), and thermal stability. The Ce O2 powders obtained by conventional route, i.e., precipitation, and submitted high temperature (800 deg C) heat treatments, showed low specific surface area. In this work nitric acid effects on the Ce O2 surface area values were investigated. The variables studied were nitric acid concentration, humidity content in the raw material, re pulp after leaching, addition of hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2) and starting material specific surface area. By this process, it was possible to obtain powders with specific surface area larger than 40 m2/g, after treatment at 800 deg C during two hours. (author)

  7. (U, Th, RE) hydroxide dissolution of Bangka's monazite base decomposition, using nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The (U, Th, RE) hydroxide dissolution experiment on Bangka's monazite base decomposition product using nitric acid (HNO3) reagent has been done. The uses of HNO3 for (U, Th, RE)NO3 solution product can do extraction with TBP-Kerosene to take impurity of Th in the end product of RE. The solution use of HCl gave end product RE with high Th as 1000 - 1500 ppm. The aim of the experiment was to find a good conditions of dissolution with applied parameter were HNO3 normality, amount of redactor, temperature and dissolution time respectively. This experiment used feed (U, Th, RE) hydroxide as product -200 mesh Bangka monazite base decomposition. The amount of feed for a time experiment is 50 gram wet, 36% of water content, the compartment volume of reagent / weight of feed is 1. The results gave a good experiment conditions i.e. HNO3 14 N, amount of redactor 20 ml H2O2, at room temperature and a hour dissolution time respectively. Such conditions gave the recovery of U 53.14 %; Th 88.98 %; RE2O3 70.03% and P2O5 53.89 %

  8. Dissolution of plutonium dioxide in nitric acid media by silver(II) electroreduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxidative dissolution of plutonium dioxide with electrogenerated silver(II) was undertaken first on an analytical scale in order to discover the parameters controlling this dissolution process and to prove the feasibility of the technique for 300 grams of material. The influence on the rate of PuO2 dissolution of the following parameters was studied: mass of PuO2, current density, total concentration of silver ion, nitric acid concentration, temperature, and agitation efficiency. The results demonstrate that: 1. the limiting step of the dissolution process is the electrogeneration of silver(II); 2. the dissolution of PuO2 can be achieved with a good current efficiency; 3. the best temperature range is 30±100C; 4. the optimum [HNO3] is 4 to 6 M; 5. the plutonium(VI) solution up to 500 g l-1 can be prepared. A six litres capacity thermostated glass electrolyser was built which consists of two separated compartments inlcuding: 1. an anodic compartment equipped with a cylindrical platinum grid electrode (area, 1000 cm2) and a tantalum propeller, and 2. a cathodic compartment of 0.2 litre capacity consisting of an aluminium silicate diaphragm with a tantalum rod cathode. Quantitative dissolutions of 300 g of PuO2 in 4 M HNO3 were performed for 2 h at an applied current of 60 A. (orig.)

  9. Involvement of nitric oxide in the signal transduction of salicylic acid regulating stomatal movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The effects and the relationship between salicylic acid (SA) and nitric oxide (NO) on Vicia faba L. stomatal movement were studied. The results here showed that exogenous SA and NO induced stomatal closure, 100 μmol/L SA induced a rapid and striking NO increase in the cytosol of guard cells. This phenomenon was largely pre-vented by 200 μmol/L 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimida-zoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (PTIO), a specific NO scavenger, and 25 μmol/L NG-nitro-L-Arg-methyl eater (L-NAME), an in-hibitor of NO synthase (NOS) in mammalian cells that also inhibits plant NOS. In addition, SA-induced stomatal closure was largely prevented by PTIO and L-NAME. These results provide evidence that guard cells generate NO in response to SA via NOS-like activity, and that such NO production is required for full stomatal closure in response to SA. H-(1,2,4)-oxadiazole-[4,3-α]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase, and nicotinamide, an antago-nist of cADPR production, inhibited the effects of SA- and NO-induced stomatal closure. It suggests that both cGMP and cADPR might mediate the signal transduction of SA and NO-induced stomatal closure.

  10. Electro-Oxidation of Concentrated Ce(Ⅲ) at Carbon Felt Anode in Nitric Acid Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Electro-oxidation of Ce( Ⅲ) to Ce( Ⅳ ) in parallel plate flow type electrolyzer divided with cation exchange membrane was carried out in nitric acid media at carbon felt anode under galvanostatic conditions. Carbon felt was used as an anode for its high specific surface area and high oxygen evolution overpotential. Pt coated Ti plates were used as cathcurrent efficiency (92%) until about 80% of Ce( Ⅲ) was oxidized. Then, oxygen evolution, accompanied by terminal voltage jump, took place, lowering current efficiency. Ce( Ⅲ ) was oxidized up to 90% with current efficiency of 62%. In this mode, strong carbon felt anode oxidation was observed. The wear out of carbon felt was 46% in six consequent runs (6 h of operation). After each run, carbon felt surface had to be renewed with slightly alkaline solution to remove carbon oxidation products and ensure regular operational conditions. When anode surface was blocked, oxygen evolution took place from the beginning of electrolysis due to higher actual current density. The wear out of carbon felt anode could be minimized by means of oxygen evolution prevention. In the case when electrolysis had been stopped before oxygen evolution started (at Ce( Ⅳ ) conversion of about 80% ), the wear out of anode was less than 2% during 6 consequent runs (4 h of operation).

  11. The inhibited effect of some tetrazolic compounds towards the corrosion of brass in nitric acid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihit, M. [Laboratoire de Chimie-Physique, Equipe de Chimie Moleculaire and Corrosion, Faculte des Sciences, Agadir B.P 8106 (Morocco); El Issami, S. [Laboratoire de Chimie-Physique, Equipe de Chimie Moleculaire and Corrosion, Faculte des Sciences, Agadir B.P 8106 (Morocco); Bouklah, M. [Laboratoire de Chimie des Eaux and Corrosion, Faculte des Sciences, Oujda (Morocco); Bazzi, L. [Laboratoire de Chimie-Physique, Equipe de Chimie Moleculaire and Corrosion, Faculte des Sciences, Agadir B.P 8106 (Morocco); Hammouti, B. [Laboratoire de Chimie des Eaux and Corrosion, Faculte des Sciences, Oujda (Morocco)]. E-mail: hammoutib@yahoo.fr; Ait Addi, E. [Laboratoire de Chimie-Physique, Equipe de Chimie Moleculaire and Corrosion, Faculte des Sciences, Agadir B.P 8106 (Morocco); Salghi, R. [Laboratoire de l' Environnement et Science de l' Eau, Ecole Nationale des Sciences Appliquees d' Agadir, B.P. 33/S, Agadir (Morocco); Kertit, S. [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Materiaux, Ecole Normale Superieure-Takaddoum, Rabat (Morocco)

    2006-01-15

    The effect of the addition of some tetrazolic type organic compounds: 1-phenyl-5-mercapto-1,2,3,4-tetrazole (PMT), 1,2,3,4-tetrazole (TTZ), 5-amino-1,2,3,4-tetrazole (AT) and 1-phenyl-1,2,3,4-tetrazole (PT) on the corrosion of brass in nitric acid is studied by weight loss, polarisation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. The explored methods gave almost similar results. Results obtained reveal that PMT is the best inhibitor and the inhibition efficiency (E%) follows the sequence: PMT > PT > AT > TTZ. Polarization measurements also indicated that tetrazoles acted as mixed-type inhibitors without changing the mechanism of the hydrogen evolution reaction. Partial {pi}-charge on atoms has been calculated. Correlation between the highest occupied molecular orbital energy E {sub HOMO} and inhibition efficiencies was sought. The adsorption of PMT on the brass surface followed the Langmuir isotherm. Effect of temperature is also studied in the (25-50 deg. C) range.

  12. Passivity and passivity breakdown of 304L stainless steel in hot and concentrated nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study is to characterize the oxidation behavior of 304L stainless steel (SS) in representative conditions of spent nuclear fuel reprocessing, i.e. in hot and concentrated nitric acid. In these conditions the SS electrochemical potential is in the passive domain and its corrosion rate is low. However when the media becomes more aggressive, the potential may be shifted towards the trans-passive domain characterized with a high corrosion rate. Passivity and passivity breakdown in the trans-passive domain are of a major interest for the industry. So as to characterize these phenomenons, this work was undertaken with the following representative conditions: a 304L SS from an industrial sheet was studied, the media was hot and concentrated HNO3, long term tests were performed. First, the surface of an immersed 304L SS was characterized with several complementary techniques from the micro to the nanometer scale. Then oxidation kinetics was studied in the passive and in the trans-passive domain. The oxidation behavior was studied thanks to weight loss determination and surface analysis. Finally, oxidation evolution as a function of the potential was studied from the passive to the trans-passive domain. In particular, this allowed us to obtain the anodic curve of 304L SS in hot and concentrated and to define precisely the 304L SS limits of in such conditions. (author)

  13. A New Process Study on Comprehensive Utilization of NOx from Nitric Acid Plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Hou-zhen; Liang Hua

    2003-01-01

    Based on studies of controlling NOx from nitric acid exhaust gas domestic and abroad, this paper has developed a new technique on removal of NOx and production of a by-product with high added value-- MnO2. Experiment shows, pyrolusite, whose valid composition is MnO2, of absorbing NOx has the following characteristics: quick, low cost, no secondary pollutant. Moreover, exhaust gas can attain the required standards. If the temperature of the pyrolusite serum is 30℃, pH=4, containing 90 g/L MnO2, the absorptivity for 3 000 mg/m3 NOx is 89.2%. Furthermore,few of the impurities in pyrolusite dissolve in the absorption mother solution. The purification cost of product is very low.The purity of end product MnO2 is more than 99. 995% after purifying. Therefore, it is workable for the new technique on economy and technology. There are also obvious environmental benefits and marked economic returns.

  14. Effects of composite restorations on nitric oxide and uric acid levels in saliva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilgun Akgul

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Dental materials that are used in dentistry should be harmless to oral tissues, and should, therefore, not contain any leachable toxic and diffusible substances capable of causing side effects. This study was intended to investigate the effects on salivary nitric oxide (NO and uric acid (UA levels after application of dental composite filling materials to healthy volunteers. Materials and Methods: A total of 52 individuals (32 female and 20 male participated in the study. Filtek Z250 composite filling material (3M ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA was applied to healthy volunteers. Saliva samples were collected before restoration (baseline and 1 h, 1-day, 7 days, and 30 days after restoration. NO concentrations were measured using the Griess reaction method, and UA was measured using an enzymatic method. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA and the Bonferroni post-hoc test (α =5%. Results: NO values increased statistically significant after 7 days (P 0.05. There was no correlation between NO and UA levels in saliva (P > 0.05. Conclusion: Composite resins activated the antioxidant system in saliva. However, further studies are now needed to confirm our findings and to permit a definitive conclusion.

  15. Heterogeneous formation of polar stratospheric clouds - Part 1: Nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyle, C. R.; Engel, I.; Luo, B. P.; Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.; Grooß, J.-U.; Peter, T.

    2013-09-01

    Satellite-based observations during the Arctic winter of 2009/2010 provide firm evidence that, in contrast to the current understanding, the nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) in the polar stratosphere does not only occur on preexisting ice particles. In order to explain the NAT clouds observed over the Arctic in mid-December 2009, a heterogeneous nucleation mechanism is required, occurring via immersion freezing on the surface of solid particles, likely of meteoritic origin. For the first time, a detailed microphysical modelling of this NAT formation pathway has been carried out. Heterogeneous NAT formation was calculated along more than sixty thousand trajectories, ending at Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) observation points. Comparing the optical properties of the modelled NAT with these observations enabled a thorough validation of a newly developed NAT nucleation parameterisation, which has been built into the Zurich Optical and Microphysical box Model (ZOMM). The parameterisation is based on active site theory, is simple to implement in models and provides substantial advantages over previous approaches which involved a constant rate of NAT nucleation in a given volume of air. It is shown that the new method is capable of reproducing observed polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) very well, despite the varied conditions experienced by air parcels travelling along the different trajectories. In a companion paper, ZOMM is applied to a later period of the winter, when ice PSCs are also present, and it is shown that the observed PSCs are also represented extremely well under these conditions.

  16. Development and performance evaluation of nano platinum coated titanium electrode for application in nitric acid medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmi, K.R.; Vanithakumari, S.C.; George, R.P.; Mallika, C.; Kamachi Mudali, U., E-mail: kamachi@igcar.gov.in

    2015-02-01

    Nano platinum coated titanium (NPCT) electrodes were developed using electrodeposition assisted hydrothermal method for application as electrodes in reprocessing plant under severe corrosive environment. After synthesis, the morphology of the NPCT electrode surface was characterized using Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The phase and chemical state of the modified electrode was investigated using X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) respectively. The enhanced electrochemical activity of NPCT electrode was established by conducting hydrogen adsorption-desorption study and electrochemical oxygen reduction studies. The performance of the electrode was investigated by employing it as anode in cerium oxidation under an applied current of 0.1 A in 11.5 M nitric acid. Post performance analysis reveals the stability of the synthesized electrode. - Highlights: • Nano Pt covered Ti with higher electrochemical activity was synthesized. • Efficiency of nano Pt coated titanium was double than polycrystalline bulk Pt. • The coating was intact post experiment in very aggressive environment of HNO{sub 3}.

  17. Characteristic of wet method of phosphorus recovery from polish sewage sludge ash with nitric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorazda Katarzyna

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sewage Sludge Ash (SSA is a concentrated source of phosphorus and can be successfully recycled via a number of different routes. This paper presents research results on phosphorus recovery from differently combusted sewage sludge with the use of nitric acid extraction. Different SSA forms from Polish thermal utilization stations were compared. It was revealed that sewage treatment technology as well as combustion technology influence many physical and chemical parameters of ashes that are crucial for further phosphorus recovery from such waste according to the proposed method. Presented research defines extraction efficiency, characterized extracts composition and verifies the possibility of using SSA as cheaper and alternative sources of phosphorus compounds. Gdynia, Kielce and Kraków SSA have the best properties for the proposed technology of phosphorus recovery with high extraction efficiency greater than 86%. Unsuitable results were obtained for Bydgoszcz, Szczecin Slag and Warszawa SSA. Extraction process for Łódź and Szczecin Dust SSA need to be improved for a higher phosphorus extraction efficiency greater than 80%.

  18. Plasma Formed in Argon, Acid Nitric and Water Used in Industrial ICP Torches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F. BENDJEBBAR; P. ANDRE; M. BENBAKKAR; D. ROCHETTE; S. FLAZI; D. VACHER

    2012-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) are used in spectrochemical analyses. The introduction of the sample by means of an aerosol are widely used. The introduction and the total evaporation of the aerosol is required in order to obtain a good repeatability and reproducibility of analyses. To check whether the vaporization of the aerosol droplets inside the plasma is completed, a solution could be used to compare the experimental results of the emission spectral lines with theoretical results. An accurate calculation code to obtain monatomic spectral lines intensities is therefore required, which is the purpose of the present paper. The mixtures of argon, water and nitric acid are widely used in spectrochemical analyses with ICPs. With these mixtures, we calculate the composition, thermodynamic functions and monatomic spectral lines intensities of the plasma at thermodynamic equilibrium and at atmospheric pressure. To obtain a self sufficient paper and also to allow other researchers to compare their results, all required data and a robust accurate algorithm, which is simple and easy to compute, are given.

  19. Development and performance evaluation of nano platinum coated titanium electrode for application in nitric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nano platinum coated titanium (NPCT) electrodes were developed using electrodeposition assisted hydrothermal method for application as electrodes in reprocessing plant under severe corrosive environment. After synthesis, the morphology of the NPCT electrode surface was characterized using Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The phase and chemical state of the modified electrode was investigated using X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) respectively. The enhanced electrochemical activity of NPCT electrode was established by conducting hydrogen adsorption-desorption study and electrochemical oxygen reduction studies. The performance of the electrode was investigated by employing it as anode in cerium oxidation under an applied current of 0.1 A in 11.5 M nitric acid. Post performance analysis reveals the stability of the synthesized electrode. - Highlights: • Nano Pt covered Ti with higher electrochemical activity was synthesized. • Efficiency of nano Pt coated titanium was double than polycrystalline bulk Pt. • The coating was intact post experiment in very aggressive environment of HNO3

  20. Heterogeneous formation of polar stratospheric clouds – Part 1: Nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Hoyle

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Satellite-based observations during the Arctic winter of 2009/2010 provide firm evidence that, in contrast to the current understanding, the nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT in the polar stratosphere does not only occur on preexisting ice particles. In order to explain the NAT clouds observed over the Arctic in mid-December 2009, a heterogeneous nucleation mechanism is required, occurring via immersion freezing on the surface of solid particles, likely of meteoritic origin. For the first time, a detailed microphysical modelling of this NAT formation pathway has been carried out. Heterogeneous NAT formation was calculated along more than sixty thousand trajectories, ending at Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP observation points. Comparing the optical properties of the modelled NAT with these observations enabled a thorough validation of a newly developed NAT nucleation parameterisation, which has been built into the Zurich Optical and Microphysical box Model (ZOMM. The parameterisation is based on active site theory, is simple to implement in models and provides substantial advantages over previous approaches which involved a constant rate of NAT nucleation in a given volume of air. It is shown that the new method is capable of reproducing observed polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs very well, despite the varied conditions experienced by air parcels travelling along the different trajectories. In a companion paper, ZOMM is applied to a later period of the winter, when ice PSCs are also present, and it is shown that the observed PSCs are also represented extremely well under these conditions.

  1. Heterogeneous Formation of Polar Stratospheric Clouds- Part 1: Nucleation of Nitric Acid Trihydrate (NAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyle, C. R.; Engel, I.; Luo, B. P.; Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.; Grooss, J.-U.; Peter, T.

    2013-01-01

    Satellite-based observations during the Arctic winter of 2009/2010 provide firm evidence that, in contrast to the current understanding, the nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) in the polar stratosphere does not only occur on preexisting ice particles. In order to explain the NAT clouds observed over the Arctic in mid-December 2009, a heterogeneous nucleation mechanism is required, occurring via immersion freezing on the surface of solid particles, likely of meteoritic origin. For the first time, a detailed microphysical modelling of this NAT formation pathway has been carried out. Heterogeneous NAT formation was calculated along more than sixty thousand trajectories, ending at Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) observation points. Comparing the optical properties of the modelled NAT with these observations enabled a thorough validation of a newly developed NAT nucleation parameterisation, which has been built into the Zurich Optical and Microphysical box Model (ZOMM). The parameterisation is based on active site theory, is simple to implement in models and provides substantial advantages over previous approaches which involved a constant rate of NAT nucleation in a given volume of air. It is shown that the new method is capable of reproducing observed polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) very well, despite the varied conditions experienced by air parcels travelling along the different trajectories. In a companion paper, ZOMM is applied to a later period of the winter, when ice PSCs are also present, and it is shown that the observed PSCs are also represented extremely well under these conditions.

  2. Heterogeneous formation of polar stratospheric clouds – Part 1: Nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Hoyle

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Satellite based observations during the Arctic winter of 2009/2010 provide firm evidence that, in contrast to the current understanding, the nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT in the polar stratosphere does not only occur on preexisting ice particles. In order to explain the NAT clouds observed over the Arctic in mid December 2009, a heterogeneous nucleation mechanism is required, occurring via immersion freezing on the surface of solid particles, likely of meteoritic origin. For the first time, a detailed microphysical modelling of this NAT formation pathway has been carried out. Heterogeneous NAT formation was calculated along more than sixty thousand trajectories, ending at Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarisation (CALIOP observation points. Comparing the optical properties of the modelled NAT with these observations enabled the thorough validation of a newly developed NAT nucleation parameterisation, which has been built into the Zurich Optical and Microphysical box Model (ZOMM. The parameterisation is based on active site theory, is simple to implement in models and provides substantial advantages over previous approaches which involved a constant rate of NAT nucleation in a given volume of air. It is shown that the new method is capable of reproducing observed PSCs very well, despite the varied conditions experienced by air parcels travelling along the different trajectories. In a companion paper, ZOMM is applied to a later period of the winter, when ice PSCs are also present, and it is shown that the observed PSCs are also represented extremely well under these conditions.

  3. Curcumin Derivatives as Green Corrosion Inhibitors for α-Brass in Nitric Acid Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouda, A. S.; Elattar, K. M.

    2012-11-01

    1,7- Bis-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-phenyl)-hepta-1,6-diene-4-arylazo-3,5-dione I-V have been investigated as corrosion inhibitors for α-brass in 2 M nitric acid solution using weight-loss and galvanostatic polarization techniques. The efficiency of the inhibitors increases with the increase in the inhibitor concentration but decreases with a rise in temperature. The conjoint effect of the curcumin derivatives and KSCN has also been studied. The apparent activation energy ( E a*) and other thermodynamic parameters for the corrosion process have also been calculated. The galvanostatic polarization data indicated that the inhibitors were of mixed-type, but the cathode is more polarized than the anode. The slopes of the cathodic and anodic Tafel lines ( b c and b a) are maintained approximately equal for various inhibitor concentrations. However, the value of the Tafel slopes increases together as inhibitor concentration increases. The adsorption of these compounds on α-brass surface has been found to obey the Frumkin's adsorption isotherm. The mechanism of inhibition was discussed in the light of the chemical structure of the undertaken inhibitors.

  4. A New Process Study on Comprehensive Utilization of NOx from Nitric Acid Plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhouHou-zhen; LiangHua

    2003-01-01

    Based on studies of controlling NOx from nitric acid exhaust gas domestic and abroad, this paper has developed a new technique on removal of NOx and production of a by-product with high added value MnO2. Experiment shows, pyrolusite, whose valid composition is MnO2, of absorbing NOx has the following characteristics: quick, low cost, no secondary pollutant. Moreover, exhaust gas can attain the required standards. If the temperature of the pyrolusite serum is 30℃, pH=4, containing 90 g/L MnO2, the absorptivity for 3 000 mg/m3 NOx is 89.2%. Furthermore,few of the impurities in pyrolusite dissolve in the absorption mother solution. The purification cost of product is very low.The purity of end product MnO2 is more than 99. 995% after purifying. Therefore, it is workable for the new technique on economy and technology. There are also obvious environmental benefits and marked economic returns.

  5. Effect of temperature on strontium extraction from nitric acid medium using crown ether - aliphatic alcohol as the organic solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extraction of Sr(II) from 4.0 M nitric acid was carried out employing dicyclohexano 18 crown 6 (DCH18C6) in octanol and its mixtures with butanol at varying temperature. The thermodynamic parameter ΔH was computed from the Van't Hoff plot and ΔS and ΔG values were calculated. An interesting trend was observed in the enthalpy and entropy changes with varying diluent concentration. (author)

  6. AtNOA1 modulates nitric oxide accumulation and stomatal closure induced by salicylic acid in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Li Rong; Hao, Fu Shun; Lu, Bao Shi; Ma, Li Ya

    2010-01-01

    Phytohormone salicylic acid (SA) has been documented to induce nitric oxide (NO) generation and stomatal closure in plants. However, the cellular components mediating these processes are limited. Here, we report that NO synthesis in guard cells and stomatal closure are markedly induced by SA in Arabidopsis wild type plants, whereas these effects caused by SA are suppressed significantly in noa1 T-DNA mutant plants. These results suggest that AtNOA1 regulates SA-triggered NO accumulation and s...

  7. Determination of Copper-Based Fungicides by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Using Digestion Procedure with Sulfuric and Nitric Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Jelena Milinović; Rada Đurović

    2007-01-01

    Copper-based fungicides can be effectively digested by treatment with a mixture of concentrated sulfuric and nitric acid in exactly 15 minutes for the rapid determination via copper using flame atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). Under optimum conditions, the results of copper fungicide analysis were consistent to those obtained by the AOAC’s recommended method. Recovery values ranged from 98.63 to 103.40%. Relative standard deviation values are lower than 2%. The proposed digestion procedu...

  8. Non Dispersive Solvent Extraction (NDSX) for the separation of samarium from nitric acid medium using DNPPA in a hollow fibre membrane module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a growing interest in recent years either to eliminate the use of hazardous organic solvents or to limit their inventory in the separation scheme for the purification of metal ion from different types of aqueous streams. Hollow fibre contractor fits this objective perfectly, which not only minimizes the use of large volume of solvents as often encountered in conventional solvent extraction technique, but also offers the large surface area for fast mass transfer kinetics. In the present work we have used a in-house assembled membrane-contactors modules made of Accurel PP50/280 hydrophobic hollow fibres (MEMBRANA society) in a glass sealed with epoxy resin at both the sides for the non- dispersive solvent extraction of Sm(III) from nitric acid medium with di-nonyl phenyl phosphoric acid (DNPPA) dissolved in dodecane. The module contains 50 polypropylene hollow fibres of an average length of 20 cm. The used polypropylene hollow fibres have internal diameter and thickness of 280 μm and 50 μm respectively. The average pore size and porosity were 0.05 μm and the 50-55% respectively and the average surface area was 0.128Cm2.Cm-3. The NDSX experiments were carried out by pumping Sm (III) solution at varying concentration of HNO3 (0.1 to 2M) through the tube side and organic solvent (0.2M DNPPA) through the shell side of HFM module. The volume of aqueous and organic phases were 200 mL each. Experiments were performed under different hydrodynamic conditions under counter current mode in a closed system. Except for flow rate variation test run, the flow rate of aqueous and organic solution was fixed at 5mL/min. Operation time of 60 min. was found to be optimum for quantitative extraction of Sm(III) from aqueous solution to organic phase. Extraction of Sm (III) decreased with increase in HNO3 concentration following the cation exchange mechanism for acidic extractant DNPPA. Increase in Sm(III) concentration from 0.5g/L to 10 g/L in 1M HNO3 led to decrease in

  9. Accurate quantification and transformation of arsenic compounds during wet ashing with nitric acid and microwave assisted heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goessler, W; Pavkov, M

    2003-06-01

    Arsenous acid, dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), methylarsonic acid (MA), arsenic acid, arsenobetaine bromide (AB), trimethylarsine oxide (TMAO), arsenocholine iodide (AC), and tetramethylarsonium iodide (TETRA) were heated in a microwave autoclave with nitric acid to 100-300 degrees C. The arsenic compounds in the digests were separated with anion- and cation-exchange chromatography and determined with an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer as arsenic-specific detector. Arsenous acid was completely oxidized to arsenic acid at 100 degrees C. For a complete oxidation of MA and DMA to arsenic acid temperatures > 220 degrees C and > 280 degrees C were necessary. AB decomposed to arsenic acid via TMAO. Complete conversion was only obtained after heating the sample for 90 min to 300 degrees C. For a complete conversion of TMAO similar harsh conditions were necessary. AC was already substantially degraded to TMAO, TETRA and two unknown compounds at 100 degrees C. The unknown arsenic compounds were found only in the digests up to 160 degrees C. Quantitative conversion of AC to arsenic acid went also via TMAO. At temperatures above 220 degrees C TETRA started to convert to TMAO, which then was further converted to arsenic acid. To investigate whether the results obtained for the arsenic standards are transferable to real samples, the certified reference material DORM-2 was also heated in nitric acid with variable digestion temperatures and times. For an almost complete conversion of the AB present in DORM-2 90 min at 300 degrees C were necessary. Total organic carbon (TOC) was less or = 260 degrees C for 60 min. UV photo-oxidation of DORM-2 was investigated as an alternative sample decomposition. Only 6% of AB was converted to arsenic acid when DORM-2 was irradiated for 2 h at 1000 W. In contrast to microwave heating substantial amounts of MA were observed as degradation product.

  10. Thermal And Spectroscopic Analyses Of Next Generation Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Solvent Contacted With 3, 8, And 16 Molar Nitric Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F. F.; Fink, S. D.

    2011-12-07

    A new solvent system referred to as Next Generation Solvent or NGS, has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the removal of cesium from alkaline solutions in the Caustic Side Solvent Extraction process. The NGS is proposed for deployment at MCU{sup a} and at the Salt Waste Processing Facility. This work investigated the chemical compatibility between NGS and 16 M, 8 M, and 3 M nitric acid from contact that may occur in handling of analytical samples from MCU or, for 3 M acid, which may occur during contactor cleaning operations at MCU. This work shows that reactions occurred between NGS components and the high molarity nitric acid. Reaction rates are much faster in 8 M and 16 M nitric acid than in 3 M nitric acid. In the case of 16 M and 8 M nitric acid, the nitric acid reacts with the extractant to produce initially organo-nitrate species. The reaction also releases soluble fluorinated alcohols such as tetrafluoropropanol. With longer contact time, the modifier reacts to produce a tarry substance with evolved gases (NO{sub x} and possibly CO). Calorimetric analysis of the reaction product mixtures revealed that the organo-nitrates reaction products are not explosive and will not deflagrate.

  11. A pulse radiolysis study of salicylic acid and 5-sulpho-salicylic acid in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactions of H, OH, eaq- and some one-electron oxidants have been studied with salicylic acid and 5-sulpho-salicylic acid in aqueous solutions. Rate constants for the reaction of eaq- with these compounds were of the order of 109dm3mol-1s-1 and this reaction led to the formation of reducing radicals which could transfer electron to methyl viologen. Other one-electron reductants were not able to reduce these compounds. OH radicals reacted with these compounds by addition pathway with very high rate constants (>1010dm3mol-1s-1) while O- radical anions could oxidize these molecules to give phenoxyl type of radicals. Amongst the one-electron oxidants, only N3 radicals and SO4- radicals could oxidize salicylic acid while 5-sulpho-salicylic acid could be oxidized only by SO4- radicals indicating that while one-electron reduction potential for semi-oxidized SA may beo1 for N3? radical), it is more than 1.33V vs. NHE for semi-oxidized SSA species

  12. The IUPAC aqueous and non-aqueous experimental pKa data repositories of organic acids and bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Anthony Michael

    2014-10-01

    Accurate and well-curated experimental pKa data of organic acids and bases in both aqueous and non-aqueous media are invaluable in many areas of chemical research, including pharmaceutical, agrochemical, specialty chemical and property prediction research. In pharmaceutical research, pKa data are relevant in ligand design, protein binding, absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination as well as solubility and dissolution rate. The pKa data compilations of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry, originally in book form, have been carefully converted into computer-readable form, with value being added in the process, in the form of ionisation assignments and tautomer enumeration. These compilations offer a broad range of chemistry in both aqueous and non-aqueous media and the experimental conditions and original reference for all pKa determinations are supplied. The statistics for these compilations are presented and the utility of the computer-readable form of these compilations is examined in comparison to other pKa compilations. Finally, information is provided about how to access these databases.

  13. Remedial investigation report on the abandoned nitric acid pipeline at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upper East Fork Poplar Creek OU-2 consists of the Abandoned Nitric Acid Pipeline. This pipeline was installed in 1951 to transport liquid wastes ∼ 4,800 ft from Buildings 9212, 9215, and 9206 to the S-3 Ponds. Materials known to have been discharged through the pipeline include nitric acid, depleted and enriched uranium, various metal nitrates, salts, and lead skimmings. A total of nineteen locations were chosen to be investigated along the pipeline for the first phase of this Remedial Investigation. Sampling consisted of drilling down to obtain a soil sample at a depth immediately below the pipeline. Additional samples were obtained deeper in the subsurface depending upon the depth of the pipeline, the depth of the water table, and the point of auger refusal. The nineteen samples collected below the pipeline were analyzed by the Y-12 Plant laboratory for metals, nitrate/nitrite, and isotopic uranium. Samples collected from three boreholes were also analyzed for volatile organic compounds because these samples produced a response with organic vapor monitoring equipment. The results of the baseline human health risk assessment for the Abandoned Nitric Acid Pipeline contaminants of potential concern show no unacceptable risks to human health via incidental ingestion of soil, inhalation of dust, dermal contact with the soil, or external exposure to radionuclides in the ANAP soils, under the construction worker and/or the residential land-use scenarios

  14. Remedial investigation report on the abandoned nitric acid pipeline at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    Upper East Fork Poplar Creek OU-2 consists of the Abandoned Nitric Acid Pipeline. This pipeline was installed in 1951 to transport liquid wastes {approximately} 4,800 ft from Buildings 9212, 9215, and 9206 to the S-3 Ponds. Materials known to have been discharged through the pipeline include nitric acid, depleted and enriched uranium, various metal nitrates, salts, and lead skimmings. A total of nineteen locations were chosen to be investigated along the pipeline for the first phase of this Remedial Investigation. Sampling consisted of drilling down to obtain a soil sample at a depth immediately below the pipeline. Additional samples were obtained deeper in the subsurface depending upon the depth of the pipeline, the depth of the water table, and the point of auger refusal. The nineteen samples collected below the pipeline were analyzed by the Y-12 Plant laboratory for metals, nitrate/nitrite, and isotopic uranium. Samples collected from three boreholes were also analyzed for volatile organic compounds because these samples produced a response with organic vapor monitoring equipment. The results of the baseline human health risk assessment for the Abandoned Nitric Acid Pipeline contaminants of potential concern show no unacceptable risks to human health via incidental ingestion of soil, inhalation of dust, dermal contact with the soil, or external exposure to radionuclides in the ANAP soils, under the construction worker and/or the residential land-use scenarios.

  15. Development of a Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Detector for Ammonia and Nitric Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahniser, Mark S.; Nelson, David D.; McManus, J. Barry; Shorter, Joanne H.; Herndon, Scott C.; Jimenez, Rodrigo

    2005-12-31

    We have developed a compact, robust, atmospheric trace gas detector based on mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy using pulsed quantum cascade (QC) lasers. The spectrometer is suitable for airborne measurements of ammonia, nitric acid, formaldehyde, formic acid, methane, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide and other gases that have line-resolved absorption spectra in the mid-infrared spectral region. The QC laser light source operates near room temperature with thermal electric cooling instead of liquid nitrogen which has been previously required for semiconductor lasers in the mid-infrared spectral region. The QC lasers have sufficient output power so that thermal electric cooled detectors may be used in many applications with lower precision requirements. The instrument developed in this program has been used in several field campaigns from both the Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory and from the NOAA WP3 aircraft. The Phase II program has resulted in more than 10 archival publications describing the technology and its applications. Over 12 instruments based on this design have been sold to research groups in Europe and the United States making the program both a commercial as well as a technological success. Anticipated Benefits The development of a sensitive, cryogen-free, mid-infrared absorption method for atmospheric trace gas detection will have wide benefits for atmospheric and environmental research and broader potential commercial applications in areas such as medical diagnostic and industrial process monitoring of gaseous compounds. Examples include air pollution monitoring, breath analysis, combustion exhaust diagnostics, and plasma diagnostics for semi-conductor fabrication. The substitution of near-room temperature QC lasers for cryogenic lead salt TDLs and the resulting simplifications in instrument design and operation will greatly expand the range of applications.

  16. Ice formation on nitric acid coated dust particles: Laboratory and modeling studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Chun; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Shutthanandan, V.; Liu, Xiaohong; Fast, Jerome D.; Berg, Larry K.

    2015-08-16

    Changes in the ice nucleation characteristics of atmospherically relevant mineral dust particles due to nitric acid coating are not well understood. Further, the atmospheric implications of dust coating on ice-cloud properties under different assumptions of primary ice nucleation mechanisms are unknown. We investigated ice nucleation ability of Arizona test dust, illite, K-feldspar and quartz as a function of temperature (-25 to -30°C) and relative humidity with respect to water (75 to 110%). Particles were size selected at 250 nm and transported (bare or coated) to the ice nucleation chamber to determine the fraction of particles nucleating ice at various temperature and water saturation conditions. All dust nucleated ice at water-subsaturated conditions, but the coated particles showed a reduction in their ice nucleation ability compared to bare particles. However, at water-supersaturated conditions, we observed that bare and coated particles had nearly similar ice nucleation characteristics. X-ray diffraction patterns indicated that structural properties of bare dust particles modified after acid treatment. We found that lattice parameters were slightly different, but crystallite sizes of the coated particles were reduced compared to bare particles. Next, single-column model results show that simulated ice crystal number concentrations mostly depends upon fraction of particles that are coated, primary ice nucleation mechanisms, and the competition between ice nucleation mechanisms to nucleate ice. In general, we observed that coating modify the ice-cloud properties and the picture of ice and mixed-phase cloud evolution is complex when different primary ice nucleation mechanisms are competing for fixed water vapor mass.

  17. Comparing the effects of inorganic nitrate and allopurinol in renovascular complications of metabolic syndrome in rats: role of nitric oxide and uric acid

    OpenAIRE

    Essawy, Soha S.; Abdel-Sater, Khaled A.; Elbaz, Amani A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The epidemic of metabolic syndrome is increasing worldwide and correlates with elevation in serum uric acid and marked increase in total fructose intake. Fructose raises uric acid and the latter inhibits nitric oxide bioavailability. We hypothesized that fructose-induced hyperuricemia may have a pathogenic role in metabolic syndrome and treatment of hyperuricemia or increased nitric oxide may improve it. Material and methods Two experiments were performed. Male Sprague-Dawley rat...

  18. Fast and Simultaneous Determination of Pu(Ⅳ) and Nitric Acid in Spent Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Sample by Near Infrared Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Ding-ming; ZHANG; Li-hua; WANG; Ling; GONG; Yan-ping; FAN; De-jun; YI; Bao-shan; CHEN; Qiang; JI; Yong-chao; WU; Ji-zong

    2013-01-01

    Determination of Pu(Ⅳ)and nitric acid plays significant role in nuclear fuel reprocessing plant to control process accurately and timely.Coupling C-T fixed-type grating with InGaAs detector,a new novel analytical system for simultaneous measurement of nitric acid and Pu(Ⅳ)was developed by our working group.After obtaining near infrared absorptive spectra by the spectroscopic instrument,the spectra data

  19. Neodymium(3) complexing with bischloromethylphosphinic acid in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High resolution spectrography is used to study Nd3+ complexing with (ClCH2)2POOH(HL) in aqueous solution. NdL2+ complex (lg Kstab = 0.44±0.04) with the corresponding absorption band with a maximum at λ=4283 A is formed in a system

  20. Study on the effect of gamma radiolysis on the chromatographic composition profile of tri-isoAmyl-phosphate-n-dodecane-nitric acid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tri-Iso-Amyl phosphate (TiAP), a higher homologue of tri-butyl phosphate (TBP) is the solvent proposed for the reprocessing of the spent nuclear fuel of Fast Breeder Reactors (FBR) origin. TiAP-n-dodecane has extraction behavior comparable to that of TBP-n-dodecane system, without third phase formation and an aqueous solubility ∼ 19mg/L, that is far too less in case as compared to that with TBP(∼400gm/L). We have initiated our study to examine the radiolytic degradation behavior of TiAP-n-dodecane in comparison to that of TBP and explore its full potential for reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels. A 30% mixture of TiAP with n-dodecane equilibrated with nitric acid of concentrations 2M has been subjected to steady state gamma radiolysis using 60Co source. The samples were irradiated for increasing absorbed dose of 6,12 and 18M rad. Each of these samples were subjected to gas chromatographic analysis under optimised condition using thermal conductivity detector. Separately, these samples were also methylated using diazomethane for the determination of acidic phosphate species as their volatile methyl ester

  1. Change in the amino acid composition of calf skin collagen after. gamma. -irradiation in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duzhenkova, N.A.; Savich, A.V. (Institut Biofiziki, Moscow (USSR))

    A study was made of the amino acid composition of calf skin collagen after ..gamma..-irradiation (/sup 60/Co) of 2.5x10/sup -6/ M aerated aqueous protein solution within the dose range from 30 to 2000 Gy. The radiosensitivity of amino acid residues was compared.

  2. Rosmarinic acid content in antidiabetic aqueous extract of Ocimum canum Sims grown in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosmarinic acid (RA) is an important polyphenol that is found in a variety of herbs including Ocimum canum sims (locally called eme or akokobesa in Ghana). Aqueous extracts from the leaves of O.canum are used as an antidiabetic herbal medicine in Ghana. Interestingly, rosmarinic acid content and p...

  3. Self-assembly and foaming properties of fatty acid-lysine aqueous dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novales, Bruno; Riaublanc, Alain; Navailles, Laurence; Houssou, Bérénice Houinsou; Gaillard, Cédric; Nallet, Frédéric; Douliez, Jean-Paul

    2010-04-20

    We report on dispersions of fatty acid-lysine salts in aqueous solutions which are further used to produce foams. The alkyl chain length is varied from dodecyl to stearic. In aqueous solutions, the lysine salt of the dodecyl chain yields an isotropic solution, probably micelles, whereas for longer alkyl chains, vesicles formed but crystallized upon resting at room temperature or when kept at 4 degrees C. Solid-state NMR showed that in vesicles fatty acids are embedded in a lamellar arrangement passing from a gel to a fluid state upon heating; the transition temperature at which it occurs was determined by DSC. Those results are confirmed by small-angle neutron scattering which also give additional information on the bilayer structure. Incredibly stable foams are obtained using the palmitic acid/Lys salt whereas for other alkyl chain length, poor or no foam is formed. We conclude that the foamability is related to the phase behavior in aqueous solution. PMID:20334439

  4. Low Temperature Selective Catalytic Reduction of Nitrogen Oxides in Production of Nitric Acid by the Use of Liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabljanac, Ž.

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the application of low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of nitrous oxides in the tail gas of the dual-pressure process of nitric acid production. The process of selective catalytic reduction is carried out using the TiO2/WO3 heterogeneous catalyst applied on a ceramic honeycomb structure with a high geometric surface area per volume. The process design parameters for nitric acid production by the dual-pressure procedure in a capacity range from 75 to 100 % in comparison with designed capacity for one production line is shown in the Table 1. Shown is the effectiveness of selective catalytic reduction in the temperature range of the tail gas from 180 to 230 °C with direct application of liquid ammonia, without prior evaporation to gaseous state. The results of inlet and outlet concentrations of nitrous oxides in the tail gas of the nitric acid production process are shown in Figures 1 and 2. Figure 3 shows the temperature dependence of the selective catalytic reduction of nitrous oxides expressed as NO2in the tail gas of nitric acid production with the application of a constant mass flow of liquid ammonia of 13,0 kg h-1 and average inlet mass concentration of the nitrous oxides expressed as NO2of 800,0 mgm-3 during 100 % production capacity. The specially designed liquid-ammonia direct-dosing system along with the effective homogenization of the tail gas resulted in emission levels of nitrous oxides expressed as NO2 in tail gas ranging from 100,0 to 185,0 mg m-3. The applied low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of the nitrous oxides in the tail gases by direct use of liquid ammonia is shown in Figure 4. It is shown that low-temperature selective catalytic reduction with direct application of liquid ammonia opens a new opportunity in the reduction of nitrous oxide emissions during nitric acid production without the risk of dangerous ammonium nitrate occurring in the process of subsequent energy utilization of

  5. Improvement in Aqueous Solubility of Retinoic Acid Receptor (RAR) Agonists by Bending the Molecular Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Michiaki; Ichikawa, Yuki; Tomoshige, Shusuke; Makishima, Makoto; Muranaka, Atsuya; Uchiyama, Masanobu; Yamaguchi, Takao; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Ishikawa, Minoru

    2016-08-01

    Aqueous solubility is a key requirement for many functional molecules, e. g., drug candidates. Decrease of the partition coefficient (log P) by chemical modification, i.e., introduction of hydrophilic group(s) into molecules, is a classical strategy for improving aqueous solubility. We have been investigating alternative strategies for improving the aqueous solubility of pharmaceutical compounds by disrupting intermolecular interactions. Here, we show that introducing a bend into the molecular structure of retinoic acid receptor (RAR) agonists by changing the substitution pattern from para to meta or ortho dramatically enhances aqueous solubility by up to 890-fold. We found that meta analogs exhibit similar hydrophobicity to the parent para compound, and have lower melting points, supporting the idea that the increase of aqueous solubility was due to decreased intermolecular interactions in the solid state as a result of the structural changes. PMID:27378357

  6. Macroscopic, thermodynamic, kinetic and microscopic study of nitric acid pickling of Elektron 21 (EV31A) magnesium alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Benjamin Mouls; Laurent Arurault; Pierre-Louis Taberna; Corine Bonningue

    2014-01-01

    International audience; The study of pickling of the EL21T6 substrate in a nitric acid bath firstly provided knowledge of the influence of the different experimental parameters (concentration of acid, temperature and stirring of the solution) in relation to the etching rate. This experimental part led to the choice of standard pickling (Tbath = 25 °C, moderate stirring (250 rpm), [HNO3] = 1.20 mol/L, duration of 2 min) so as to obtain constant removal of material, even after several uses of t...

  7. Selective extraction of plutonium from nitric acid medium by bifunctional polyethersulfone beads for quantification with thermal ionisation mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyethersulfone (PES) magnetic beads were prepared by phase inversion technique. The beads were grafted with two monomers, viz. 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate phosphoric acid (HEMP) and (3-acrylamidopropyl)trimethyl ammonium chloride (AMAC), by photo-induced free radical polymerization. Effect of different HNO3 concentrations on the sorption profiles of Am(III) and Pu(IV) was studied using the grafted PES beads. The beads were found to extract plutonium quantitatively from high nitric acid medium (3-8 M). The effect of presence of competing actinide, e.g. U(VI), on the sorption of Pu(IV) was also studied. (author)

  8. Summary Report on Gamma Radiolysis of TBP/n-dodecane in the Presence of Nitric Acid Using the Radiolysis/Hydrolysis Test Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dean R. Peterman; Bruce J. Mincher; Catherine L. Riddle; Richard D. Tillotson

    2010-08-01

    Design and installation has been completed for a state-of-the-art radiolysis/hydrolysis test loop system. The system is used to evaluate the effects of gamma radiolysis and acid hydrolysis on the stability and performance of solvent extraction process solvents. The test loop is comprised of two main sections; the solvent irradiation and hydrolysis loop and the solvent reconditioning loop. In the solvent irradiation and hydrolysis loop, aqueous and organic phases are mixed and circulated through a gamma irradiator until the desired absorbed dose is achieved. Irradiation of the mixed phases is more representative of actual conditions in a solvent extraction process. Additionally, the contact of the organic phase with the aqueous phase will subject the solvent components to hydrolysis. This hydrolysis can be accelerated by controlling the system at an elevated temperature. At defined intervals, the organic from the irradiation/hydrolysis loop will be transferred to the solvent reconditioning loop where the solvent is contacted with scrub, strip, and solvent wash solutions which simulate process flowsheet conditions. These two processes are repeated until the total desired dose is achieved. Since all viable solvent extraction components in an advanced fuel cycle must exhibit high radiolytic and hydrolytic stability, this test loop is not limited to any one solvent system but is applicable to all systems of interest. Also, the test loop is not limited to testing of process flowsheets. It is also a valuable tool in support of fundamental research on newly identified extractants/modifiers and the impact of gamma radiation on their stability in a dynamic environment. The investigation of the radiolysis of a TBP/n-dodecane process solvent in contact with aqueous nitric acid has been performed. These studies were intended to confirm/optimize the operability of the test loop system. Additionally, these data are directly applicable to numerous other solvent extraction

  9. Dissolution Of Plutonium Metal Using Nitric Acid Solutions Containing Potassium Fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deinventory and deactivation of the Savannah River Site's (SRS's) FB-Line facility required the disposition of approximately 2000 items from the facility's vaults. Plutonium (Pu) scraps and residues which do not meet criteria for conversion to a mixed oxide fuel will be dissolved and the solution stored for subsequent disposition. Some of the items scheduled for dissolution are composite materials containing Pu and tantalum (Ta) metals. The preferred approach for handling this material is to dissolve the Pu metal, rinse the Ta metal with water to remove residual acid, and burn the Ta metal. The use of a 4 M nitric acid (HNO3) solution containing 0.2 M potassium fluoride (KF) was initially recommended for the dissolution of approximately 500 g of Pu metal. However, prior to the use of the flowsheet in the SRS facility, a new processing plan was proposed in which the feed to the dissolver could contain up to 1250 g of Pu metal. To evaluate the use of a larger batch size and subsequent issues associated with the precipitation of plutonium-containing solids from the dissolving solution, scaled experiments were performed using Pu metal and samples of the composite material. In the initial experiment, incomplete dissolution of a Pu metal sample demonstrated that a 1250 g batch size was not feasible in the HB-Line dissolver. Approximately 45% of the Pu was solubilized in 4 h. The remaining Pu metal was converted to plutonium oxide (PuO2). Based on this work, the dissolution of 500 g of Pu metal using a 4-6 h cycle time was recommended for the HB-Line facility. Three dissolution experiments were subsequently performed using samples of the Pu/Ta composite material to demonstrate conditions which reduced the risk of precipitating a double fluoride salt containing Pu and K from the dissolving solution. In these experiments, the KF concentration was reduced from 0.2 M to either 0.15 or 0.175 M. With the use of 4 M HNO3 and a reduction in the KF concentration to 0.175 M

  10. Versatile electrochemical coatings and surface layers from aqueous methanesulfonic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, F. C.; Ponce De Leon, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Ever tightening environmental pressure together with the continued need for coatings able to meet challenging service environments have stimulated advances in coating technology. In the case of electrochemical techniques, the classical techniques of electrodeposition and anodising are being upgraded to meet the need for modern surface engineering coatings (including nanostructured films) on metals. A major challenge is to retain conventional processing, including aqueous solutions, simple pow...

  11. Optimization of conditions to produce nitrous gases by electrochemical reduction of nitric acid; Optimisation des conditions operatoires de production de vapeurs nitreuses par reduction electrochimique d`acide nitrique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemaire, M. [CEA Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 -Gif-sur-Yvette (France)]|[CEA Centre d`Etudes de la Vallee du Rhone, 30 -Marcoule (France). Direction du Cycle du Combustible

    1996-11-22

    Gaseous nitrogen oxides (NO and NO{sub 2}) involved as oxidizing agents in nuclear fuel reprocessing can be an produced by electrochemical reduction of nitric acid. This could be an interesting alternative to the usual process because no wastes are generated. Voltammetric studies on a platinum electrode show that two reduction potential regions are observed in concentrated nitric acid solutions, between 0.05 V{sub S}HE and 0.3 V{sub S}HE and O.5 V{sub S}HE and 1 V{sub S}HE. The highest potential region reduction mechanism was studies by: classical micro-electrolysis methods; macro-electrolysis methods; infra-red spectroscopy couplet to electrochemistry. It was determined that the origin of nitric acid reduction is the electrochemical reduction of nitrous acid in nitric oxide which chemically reduces nitric acid. This reaction produces nitrous acid back which indicate an auto-catalytic behaviour of nitric acid reduction mechanism. Nitrogen dioxide evolution during nitric acid reduction can also be explained by an other chemical reaction. In the potential value of platinum electrode is above 0.8 V{sub S}HE, products of the indirect nitric acid reduction are nitrous acid, nitrogen oxide and nitrogen dioxide. Below this value nitric oxide can be reduced in nitrous oxide. Thus the potential value is the most important parameter for the nitrogen oxides production selectivity. However, owing to the auto-catalytic character of the reduction mechanism, potential value can be controlled during intentiostatic industrial electrolysis. (author). 91 refs.

  12. Inhibitory effects of indole α-lipoic acid derivatives on nitric oxide production in LPS/IFNγ activated RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabay, Arzu Zeynep; Koc, Aslı; Gurkan-Alp, A Selen; Buyukbingol, Zeliha; Buyukbingol, Erdem

    2015-04-01

    Alpha-lipoic acid (α-lipoic acid) is a potent antioxidant compound that has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory effects. RAW 264.7 macrophages produce various inflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-alpha upon activation with LPS (Lipopolysaccharide) and IFNγ (interferon gamma). In this study, the effect of 12 synthetic indole α-lipoic acid derivatives on nitric oxide production and iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase) protein expression in LPS/IFNγ activated RAW 264.7 macrophages was determined. Cell proliferation, nitric oxide levels and iNOS protein expression were examined with thiazolyl blue tetrazolium blue test, griess assay and western blot, respectively. Our results showed that all of the indole α-lipoic acid derivatives showed significant inhibitory effects on nitric oxide production and iNOS protein levels (p < 0.05). The most active compounds were identified as compound I-4b, I-4e and II-3b. In conclusion, these indole α-lipoic acid derivatives may have the potential for treatment of inflammatory conditions related with high nitric oxide production. PMID:25727912

  13. Rocket Performance of Red Fuming Nitric Acid with Blends of Norbornadiene, Carene and Cardanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Chhibber

    1992-07-01

    Full Text Available The fuel blends of nornornadiene and carene (50:50 by weight and norbornadiene, carene and cardanol (40:40:20 by weight exhibit synergistic hypergolic ignition with red fuming nitric acid (RFNA as oxidiser. These fuel blends have been evaluated by theoretical calculations of performance parameters and subsequently verified by static firing in a 10 kg/sub f/ thruster at a chamber pressure of around 20 atm, using RFNA (with 21 per cent N/sub 2/O/sub 4/ by weight as oxidiser. The theoretical calculations show maximum specific impulse and C*values at the O/F, 3 to be 227.8 s and 1598.7 m/s respectively for the norbornadiene-carene blend. The corresponding values for the norbornadiene, carene and cardanol blend were found to be 226.8 s and 1586.0 m/s respectively at the O/F, 4. For theoretical calculations, the chamber pressure (P/sub c and the exit pressure (P/sub e/0 were assumed to be 20 and 1 atm, respectively. The static firing of the propellants in a 10 kg thruster exhibited smooth pressure-time curves with the experimental C* values in close agreement with those calculated and the non-deposition of carbon in the nozzle. This indicated low combustion instability and high combustion efficiency under rocket conditions (> 0.9. The fuel blends with their low cost and toxicity and relatively high density can replace G-fuel used in several Indian missiles without impairing the performance.

  14. Potentiality of uranium biosorption from nitric acid solutions using shrimp shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biosorption has gained important credibility during recent years because of its good performance and low cost. This work is concerned with studying the potentiality of the chitin component of the shrimp shells for uranium biosorption from nitric acid liquid solutions. The structural characteristics of the working chitin have been determined via Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The surface morphology was examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The adsorption capacity of biomass was investigated experimentally. The influence of contact time, pH, metal ion concentration, solution volume to mass ratio and temperature were evaluated and the results were fitted using adsorption isotherm models. The kinetic of uranium biosorption was also investigated as well as biosorption thermodynamic. - Graphical abstract: Physicochemical process of biosorption is known to be promising technique due to the ease of operation and comparable low cost of biosorbant application. Chitin flakes extracted from shrimp shells show potentiality in uranium adsorption reached 7.48 mg uranium at the following conditions: 60 min contact time, pH 3.66, 50:1 V/m ration and at room temperature. The theoretical sorption capacity was 25.31 mg g−1, according to Langmuir isotherm model. The rate of sorption follows pseudo second-order. The nature of biosorption process is spontaneous and exothermic. - Highlights: • This study shows the potentially for shrimp shell beads for uranium adsorption. • The max. biosorption was achieved at pH 3.6, contact time 60 min, S/L ratio 1:50. • Uranium sorption follows Langmuir isotherm with theoretical capacity of 25.31 g/kg. • The nature of sorption process of the sorbents is spontaneous and exothermic. • The rate of sorption follows pseudo second-order

  15. Laboratory evaluation of the effect of nitric acid uptake on frost point hygrometer performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Thornberry

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Chilled mirror hygrometers (CMH are widely used to measure water vapour in the troposphere and lower stratosphere from balloon-borne sondes. Systematic discrepancies among in situ water vapour instruments have been observed at low water vapour mixing ratios (<5 ppm in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS. Understanding the source of the measurement discrepancies is important for a more accurate and reliable determination of water vapour abundance in this region. We have conducted a laboratory study to investigate the potential interference of gas-phase nitric acid (HNO3 with the measurement of frost point temperature, and consequently the water vapour mixing ratio, determined by CMH under conditions representative of operation in the UT/LS. No detectable interference in the measured frost point temperature was found for HNO3 mixing ratios of up to 4 ppb for exposure times up to 150 min. HNO3 was observed to co-condense on the mirror frost, with the adsorbed mass increasing linearly with time at constant exposure levels. Over the duration of a typical balloon sonde ascent (90–120 min, the maximum accumulated HNO3 amounts were comparable to monolayer coverage of the geometric mirror surface area, which corresponds to only a small fraction of the actual frost layer surface area. This small amount of co-condensed HNO3 is consistent with the observed lack of HNO3 interference in the frost point measurement because the CMH utilizes significant reductions (>10% in surface reflectivity by the condensate to determine H2O.

  16. Laboratory evaluation of the effect of nitric acid uptake on frost point hygrometer performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Thornberry

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Chilled mirror hygrometers (CMH are widely used to measure water vapour in the troposphere and lower stratosphere from balloon-borne sondes. Systematic discrepancies among in situ water vapour instruments have been observed at low water vapour mixing ratios (<5 ppm in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS. Understanding the source of the measurement discrepancies is important for a more accurate and reliable determination of water vapour abundance in this region. We have conducted a laboratory study to investigate the potential interference of gas-phase nitric acid (HNO3 with the measurement of frost point temperature, and consequently the water vapour mixing ratio, determined by CMH under conditions representative of operation in the UT/LS. No detectable interference in the measured frost point temperature was found for HNO3 mixing ratios of up to 4 ppb for exposure times up to 150 min. HNO3 was observed to co-condense on the mirror frost, with the adsorbed mass increasing linearly with time at constant exposure levels. Over the duration of a typical balloon sonde ascent (90–120 min, the maximum accumulated HNO3 amounts were comparable to monolayer coverage of the geometric mirror surface area, which corresponds to only a small fraction of the actual frost layer surface area. This small amount of co-condensed HNO3 is consistent with the observed lack of HNO3 interference in the frost point measurement because the CMH utilizes significant reductions (>10% in surface reflectivity by the condensate to determine H2O.

  17. EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE AND CONCENTRATION ON THE VISCOSITY OF AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS OF 3-AMINOPROPANOIC ACID, 4-AMINOBUTANOIC ACID, 5-AMINOPENTANOIC ACID, 6-AMINOHEXANOIC ACID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen María Romero

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present the effect of temperatureon the viscosities of aqueous solutionsof 3-aminopropanoic acid, 4-aminobutanoicacid, 5-aminopentanoic acidand 6-aminohexanoic acid as a functionof concentration. The experimental measurementswere done from 293.15 K to308.15 K. At each temperature the experimentaldata were fi tted to the Tsangaris-Martin equation and the B viscosity coefficient was determined. The dependenceof the B coeffi cients on the number ofcarbon atoms of the amino acids is linear,so the contribution of polar and apolargroups was established. The results areinterpreted in terms of amino acid hydration.

  18. Kinetics of oxidation of ethyldigol by vanadium(V) in aqueous acidic medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of oxidation of ethyldigol by vanadium(V) in aqueous acidic medium has been carried out. The reaction is first order with respect to vanadium(V) and the substrate and is acid catalysed. Hammett acidity function (H0) and Bunnett hypothesis have been applied. The formation of free radicals during the course of the reaction has been indicated. A probable reaction mechansim is proposed. (Author)

  19. Phosphorylation of glyceric acid in aqueous solution using trimetaphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, V; Orgel, L E

    1996-02-01

    The phosphorylation of glyceric acid is an interesting prebiotic reaction because it converts a simple, potentially prebiotic organic molecule into phosphate derivatives that are central to carbohydrate metabolism. We find that 0.05 M glyceric acid in the presence of 0.5 M trimetaphosphate in alkaline solution gives a mixture of 2- and 3-phosphoglyceric acids in combined yields of up to 40%. PMID:11536746

  20. Phosphorylation of Glyceric Acid in Aqueous Solution Using Trimetaphosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Vera; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1996-01-01

    The phosphorylation of glyceric acid is an interesting prebiotic reaction because it converts a simple, potentially prebiotic organic molecule into phosphate derivatives that are central to carbohydrate metabolism. We find that 0.05 M glyceric acid in the presence of 0.5 M trimetaphosphate in alkaline solution gives a mixture of 2- and 3-phosphoglyceric acids in combined yields of up to 40%.

  1. Effects of organic acids, amino acids and ethanol on the radio-degradation of patulin in an aqueous model system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Hyejeong [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Chonbuk, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Food Science and Technology, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Sangyong [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Chonbuk, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Cheorun [Department of Animal Science and Biotechnology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Jinwoo [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Chonbuk, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Soohyun [Glycomics Team, Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Joong-Ho [Department of Food Science and Technology, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dongho [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Chonbuk, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: fungikim@kaeri.re.kr

    2008-06-15

    The effects of organic acids, amino acids, and ethanol on the radio-degradation of patulin by gamma irradiation in an aqueous model system were investigated. The patulin, dissolved in distilled water at a concentration of 50 ppm, was practically degraded by the gamma irradiation at the dose of 1.0 kGy, while 33% of the patulin remained in apple juice. In the aqueous model system, the radio-degradation of patulin was partially inhibited by the addition of organic acids, amino acids, and ethanol. The proportions of remaining patulin after irradiation with the dose of 1.0 kGy in the 1% solution of malic acid, citric acid, lactic acid, acetic acid, ascorbic acid, and ethanol were 31.4%, 2.3%, 31.2%, 6.1%, 50.8%, and 12.5%, respectively. During 30 days of storage, the remaining patulin was reduced gradually in the solution of ascorbic acid and malic acid compared to being stable in other samples. The amino acids, serine, threonine, and histidine, inhibited the radio-degradation of patulin. In conclusion, it was suggested that 1 kGy of gamma irradiation (recommended radiation doses for radicidation and/or quarantine in fruits) is effective for the reduction of patulin, but the nutritional elements should be considered because the radio-degradation effects are environment dependent.

  2. Adsorption of organic acids from dilute aqueous solution onto activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, S.W.

    1980-06-01

    The radioisotope technique was used to study the removal of organic acid contaminants from dilute aqueous solutions onto activated carbon. Acetic acid, propionic acid, n-butyric acid, n-hexanoic acid and n-heptanoic acid were studied at 278, 298, and 313/sup 0/K. Three bi-solute acid mixtures (acetic and propionic acids, acetic and butanoic acids, and propionic and butanoic acids) were studied at 278 and 298/sup 0/K. Isotherms of the single-solute systems were obtained at three different temperatures in the very dilute concentration region (less than 1% by weight). These data are very important in the prediction of bi-solute equilibrium data. A Polanyi-based competitive adsorption potential theory was used to predict the bi-solute equilibrium uptakes. Average errors between calculated and experimental data ranges from 4% to 14%. It was found that the competitive adsorption potential theory gives slightly better results than the ideal adsorbed solution theory.

  3. Electrical conductivity of aqueous solutions of perrhenic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physiocochemical properties of perrhenic acid, HReO4, are studied; its salts form the basis of solutions for electrochemical production of rhenium. Information is presented from which the electrical conductivity of solutions in the temperature range 15-90 degrees can be determined from known concentrations of the acid in water and vice versa

  4. Contribution to the study of the redox couple Np(VI)/Np(V) in the presence of uranium(VI) in solutions of nitric acid and nitrous acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The redox behavior of the Np(VI)/Np(V) couple was the subject of a spectrometric study of the Np(VI) reduction reaction in nitric acid solutions (4 to 5 M) containing variable concentrations (1.5 to 3.5 x 10-3 M) of nitrous acid. A low nitrous acid concentration and a high nitric acid concentration were found to favor the stabilization of Np(VI). The stoichiometric coefficients of nitrous acid and nitric acid in the Np(VI) reduction reaction were determined thermodynamically, although only the reaction order with respect to HNO2 could be calculated from a kinetic analysis. Adding nitrate ions to a HNO3/HNO2 solution enhanced the stability of neptunium at oxidation state +VI, but also increased the reduction rate. When uranium(VI) was added to the HNO3/HNO2 solutions, the total quantity of neptunium at oxidation state +V (either free or as a Np(V)-U(VI) complex) remained practically unchanged, as did the Np(VI) reduction rate. The electrochemical behavior of the Np(VI)/Np(V) couple was investigated in a weak acidic medium by voltammetry with an ultra-micro-electrode (UME). The oxidation wave limiting current variation was a linear function of the Np(V) concentration when a gold UME was used, but not with a platinum UME; the reduction wave limiting current variation versus the Np(V) concentration was linear with either gold or platinum UMEs. The presence of the Np(V)-U(VI) complex in the neptunium solutions was characterized by a shift in the normal apparent potential of the Np(VI)/Np(V) couple toward anodic potentials consistent with the previously determined values of the complexation constants. (author)

  5. Aqueous citric acid as green reaction media for the synthesis of octahydroxanthenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo A. Navarro D.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A simple, convenient and environmentally friendly one-pot procedure for the synthesis of 1,8-dioxo-octahydroxanthenes by the reaction of dimedone and aromatic aldehydes in aqueous citric acid is described. In this green synthetic protocol promoted by the reaction media, the use of any other catalysts and hazardous organic solvents are avoided, making the work up procedure greener and easier. The isolation of the products, obtained in good yields, is readily performed by filtration and crystallization from ethanol when required and the aqueous acidic media can be easily recycled and reused several times without significant loss of catalytic activity.

  6. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes in aqueous phytic acid for enhancing biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The poor dispersion of carbon based nanomaterials without strong acid pretreatment in aqueous solution is a fundamental problem, limiting its applications in biology-related fields. A good dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in water was realized by 50 wt.% phytic acid (PA) solution. As an application case, the PA–MWCNTs dispersion in aqueous solution was used for the immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and its direct electrochemistry was realized. The constructed biosensor has a sound limit of detection, wide linear range, and high affinity for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as well as being free from interference of co-existing electro-active species. (papers)

  7. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes in aqueous phytic acid for enhancing biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaoyu; Miao, Yun; Ye, Pingping; Wen, Ying; Yang, Haifeng

    2014-04-01

    The poor dispersion of carbon based nanomaterials without strong acid pretreatment in aqueous solution is a fundamental problem, limiting its applications in biology-related fields. A good dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in water was realized by 50 wt.% phytic acid (PA) solution. As an application case, the PA-MWCNTs dispersion in aqueous solution was used for the immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and its direct electrochemistry was realized. The constructed biosensor has a sound limit of detection, wide linear range, and high affinity for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as well as being free from interference of co-existing electro-active species.

  8. Kinetics of Acid-Catalyzed Dehydration of Cyclic Hemiacetals in Organic Aerosol Particles in Equilibrium with Nitric Acid Vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranney, April P; Ziemann, Paul J

    2016-04-28

    Previous studies have shown that 1,4-hydroxycarbonyls, which are often major products of the atmospheric oxidation of hydrocarbons, can undergo acid-catalyzed cyclization and dehydration in aerosol particles to form highly reactive unsaturated dihydrofurans. In this study the kinetics of dehydration of cyclic hemiacetals, the rate-limiting step in this process, was investigated in a series of environmental chamber experiments in which secondary organic aerosol (SOA) containing cyclic hemiacetals was formed from the reaction of n-pentadecane with OH radicals in dry air in the presence of HNO3. A particle beam mass spectrometer was used to monitor the formation and dehydration of cyclic hemiacetals in real time, and SOA and HNO3 were quantified in filter samples by gravimetric analysis and ion chromatography. Measured dehydration rate constants increased linearly with increasing concentration of HNO3 in the gas phase and in SOA, corresponding to catalytic rate constants of 0.27 h(-1) ppmv(-1) and 7.0 h(-1) M(-1), respectively. The measured Henry's law constant for partitioning of HNO3 into SOA was 3.7 × 10(4) M atm(-1), ∼25% of the value for dissolution into water, and the acid dissociation constant was estimated to be water. The results indicate that HNO3 was only weakly dissociated in the SOA and that dehydration of cyclic hemiacetals was catalyzed by molecular HNO3 rather than by H(+). The Henry's law constant and kinetics relationships measured here can be used to improve mechanisms and models of SOA formation from the oxidation of hydrocarbons in dry air in the presence of NOx, which are conditions commonly used in laboratory studies. The fate of cyclic hemiacetals in the atmosphere, where the effects of higher relative humidity, organic/aqueous phase separation, and acid catalysis by molecular H2SO4 and/or H(+) are likely to be important, is discussed.

  9. The Significance of Lewis Acid Sites for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of Nitric Oxide on Vanadium-Based Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marberger, Adrian; Ferri, Davide; Elsener, Martin; Kröcher, Oliver

    2016-09-19

    The long debated reaction mechanisms of the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide with ammonia (NH3 ) on vanadium-based catalysts rely on the involvement of Brønsted or Lewis acid sites. This issue has been clearly elucidated using a combination of transient perturbations of the catalyst environment with operando time-resolved spectroscopy to obtain unique molecular level insights. Nitric oxide reacts predominantly with NH3 coordinated to Lewis sites on vanadia on tungsta-titania (V2 O5 -WO3 -TiO2 ), while Brønsted sites are not involved in the catalytic cycle. The Lewis site is a mono-oxo vanadyl group that reduces only in the presence of both nitric oxide and NH3 . We were also able to verify the formation of the nitrosamide (NH2 NO) intermediate, which forms in tandem with vanadium reduction, and thus the entire mechanism of SCR. Our experimental approach, demonstrated in the specific case of SCR, promises to progress the understanding of chemical reactions of technological relevance.

  10. The Significance of Lewis Acid Sites for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of Nitric Oxide on Vanadium-Based Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marberger, Adrian; Ferri, Davide; Elsener, Martin; Kröcher, Oliver

    2016-09-19

    The long debated reaction mechanisms of the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide with ammonia (NH3 ) on vanadium-based catalysts rely on the involvement of Brønsted or Lewis acid sites. This issue has been clearly elucidated using a combination of transient perturbations of the catalyst environment with operando time-resolved spectroscopy to obtain unique molecular level insights. Nitric oxide reacts predominantly with NH3 coordinated to Lewis sites on vanadia on tungsta-titania (V2 O5 -WO3 -TiO2 ), while Brønsted sites are not involved in the catalytic cycle. The Lewis site is a mono-oxo vanadyl group that reduces only in the presence of both nitric oxide and NH3 . We were also able to verify the formation of the nitrosamide (NH2 NO) intermediate, which forms in tandem with vanadium reduction, and thus the entire mechanism of SCR. Our experimental approach, demonstrated in the specific case of SCR, promises to progress the understanding of chemical reactions of technological relevance. PMID:27553251

  11. Dissolution state of cellulose in aqueous systems. 2. Acidic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Luis; Medronho, Bruno; Antunes, Filipe E; Topgaard, Daniel; Lindman, Björn

    2016-10-20

    Cellulose is insoluble in water but can be dissolved in strong acidic or alkaline conditions. How well dissolved cellulose is in solution and how it organizes are key questions often neglected in literature. The typical low pH required for dissolving cellulose in acidic solvents limits the use of typical characterization techniques. In this respect, Polarization Transfer Solid State NMR (PT ssNMR) emerges as a reliable alternative. In this work, combining PT ssNMR, microscopic techniques and X-ray diffraction, a set of different acidic systems (phosphoric acid/water, sulfuric acid/glycerol and zinc chloride/water) is investigated. The studied solvent systems are capable to efficiently dissolve cellulose, although degradation occurs to some extent. PT ssNMR is capable to identify the liquid and solid fractions of cellulose, the degradation products and it is also sensitive to gelation. The materials regenerated from the acidic dopes were found to be highly sensitive to the solvent system and to the presence of amphiphilic additives in solution. PMID:27474617

  12. Aqueous solutions of acidic ionic liquids for enhanced stability of polyoxometalate-carbon supercapacitor electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chenchen; Zhao, Enbo; Nitta, Naoki; Magasinski, Alexandre; Berdichevsky, Gene; Yushin, Gleb

    2016-09-01

    Nanocomposites based on polyoxometalates (POMs) nanoconfined in microporous carbons have been synthesized and used as electrodes for supercapacitors. The addition of the pseudocapacitance from highly reversible redox reaction of POMs to the electric double-layer capacitance of carbon lead to an increase in specific capacitance of ∼90% at 1 mV s-1. However, high solubility of POM in traditional aqueous electrolytes leads to rapid capacity fading. Here we demonstrate that the use of aqueous solutions of protic ionic liquids (P-IL) as electrolyte instead of aqueous sulfuric acid solutions offers an opportunity to significantly improve POM cycling stability. Virtually no degradation in capacitance was observed in POM-based positive electrode after 10,000 cycles in an asymmetric capacitor with P-IL aqueous electrolyte. As such, POM-based carbon composites may now present a viable solution for enhancing energy density of electrical double layer capacitors (EDLC) based on pure carbon electrodes.

  13. Dialkylmethyl-2-(N,N-diisobutyl)acetamidoammonium iodide as a ruthenium selective ligand from nitric acid medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Shikha [Bio-Organic Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Ghosh, Sunil K., E-mail: ghsunil@barc.gov.in [Bio-Organic Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Sharma, Joti N., E-mail: jnsharma@barc.gov.in [Process Development Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • A new class of quart-ammonium based ligands have been designed and synthesized. • Ligand showed high extractability and selectivity for Ru in nitric acid medium. • Results are better compared to other extractants reported so far. • The iodide ion played key role in extraction process. • The composition of the extracted complex was found to be L[Ru(NO)(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}I]. - Abstract: A new class of quaternary ammonium iodide based ligands with 2-(N,N-diisobutyl)acetamide as an alkyl appendage have been designed, synthesized and tested for their ability to extract ruthenium selectively from nitric acid medium. The 2-(N,N-diisobutyl)acetamido ammonium iodide with two propyl and a methyl substituents showed best results for the recovery of ruthenium. The optimized concentration of the solvent was found to be 0.2 M in 30% isodecyl alcohol/n-dodecane. The stoichiometry of the complex was ascertained by slope analysis method and was found to be 1:1 with respect to ligand L{sup +}I{sup −} and Ru(NO)(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}. Ruthenium formed an adduct of structure LRu(NO)(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}I in the extraction medium. Iodide ion played an important role in the formation of the stable and extractable complex of ruthenium. No extraction was observed when iodide was replaced by nitrate anion in the ligand. The ligand also showed good selectivity for ruthenium in the presence of other metal ions commonly found in nitric acid solutions of nuclear waste.

  14. Field test of four methods for gas-phase ambient nitric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, J. R.; Hartsell, Benjamin E.; Luke, Winston T.; Rahmat Ullah, S. M.; Dasgupta, Purnendu K.; Greg Huey, L.; Tate, Paul

    Three semi-continuous methods for detecting nitric acid (HNO 3) were tested against the annular denuder + filter pack (ADS) integrated collection technique at the Tampa Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE) Sydney research station ˜20km downwind of the Tampa, Florida, urban core. The semi-continuous instruments included: two slightly differing implementations of the NOY-NO (total oxides of nitrogen minus that total denuded of HNO 3) denuder difference technique, one from the NOAA Air Resources Lab (ARL), and one from Atmospheric Research and Analysis, Inc. (ARA); the parallel plate wet diffusion scrubber + online ion chromatography technique from Texas Tech University (TTU); and the chemical ionization mass spectrometer from the Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT). Twelve hour ADS samples were collected by the University of South Florida (USF). Results for 10 min samples computed from the various higher sampling frequencies of each semi-continuous instrument showed good agreement (R2>0.7) for afternoon periods of the highest production and accumulation of HNO 3. Further, agreement was within ±30% for these instruments even at HNO 3 concentrations 60% for the nighttime samples; ADS results were below the corporate mean maximum HNO 3 concentration by >30% as well. The four instruments using semi-continuous methods, by contrast, were all within 10% of each other's 12 h mean mixing ratios. While only ARA employed a formal minimum detection limit at 0.050 ppb, error analysis with the other techniques established that at the same level of precision, TTU's effective limit was approximately the same as ARA's and that ARL's limit was 0.030 ppb; analysis for GIT showed no apparent effective limit at the levels of HNO 3 encountered in this field study. The importance of sample inlet height for HNO 3 measurements was indirectly shown through comparison to previous field work at this site when sample inlet heights ranged from 1.5-10 m and produced systematic

  15. Nitric acid in the stratosphere based on Odin observations from 2001 to 2009 – Part 1: A global climatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Urban

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The Sub-Millimetre Radiometer (SMR on board the Odin satellite, launched in February 2001, observes thermal emissions of stratospheric nitric acid (HNO3 originating from the Earth limb in a band centred at 544.6 GHz. Height-resolved measurements of the global distribution of nitric acid in the stratosphere were performed approximately on two observation days per week. An HNO3 climatology based on more than 7 years of observations from August 2001 to April 2009 covering the vertical range between typically ~19 and 45 km (~1.5–60 hPa or ~500–1800 K in terms of potential temperature was created. The study highlights the spatial and seasonal variation of nitric acid in the stratosphere, characterised by a pronounced seasonal cycle at middle and high latitudes with maxima during late fall and minima during spring, strong denitrification in the lower stratosphere of the Antarctic polar vortex during winter (the irreversible removal of NOy by the sedimentation of cloud particles containing HNO3, as well as large quantities of HNO3 formed every winter at high-latitudes in the middle and upper stratosphere. A strong inter-annual variability is observed in particular at high latitudes. A comparison with a stratospheric HNO3 climatology, based on over 7 years of UARS/MLS (Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite/Microwave Limb Sounder measurements from the 1990s, shows good consistency and agreement of the main morphological features in the potential temperature range ~465 to ~960 K, if the different characteristics of the data sets such as the better altitude resolution of Odin/SMR as well as the slightly different altitude ranges are considered. Odin/SMR reaches higher up and UARS/MLS lower down in the stratosphere. An overview from 1991 to 2009 of stratospheric nitric acid is provided (with a short gap between 1998 and 2001, if the global measurements of both experiments are taken together.

  16. Precipitation of pertechnetate ion from nitric acid solutions using complexes of copper(II) with heterocyclic N-donor ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TcO4- precipitation with organic complexes of Cu(II) from nitric acid solutions was studied. Complex Cu(phen)3(NO3)2 was chosen as the optimal precipitant. The conditions for maximum Tc precipitation of 95 ± 3 % were determined. It was shown the possibility to obtain metal-Tc alloys by thermal treatment of the precipitates. As found, the addition of the fusible metal (Sn) to the sediment was required to receive appropriate matrix. Cu-Tc-Sn matrix was tested for Tc leaching. (author)

  17. Reduction of radioactive low-level liquid wastes in a reprocessing plant. Application of electrolysis to nitric acid decomposition -(2)-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NOx gas generation by electrolysis of HNO3 has been extensively examined to drastically reduce the quantity of low-level liquid waste from a PUREX reprocessing plant. In this study, benchmark experiments used an electrolysis cell with 700-cm2 electrodes and auxiliary equipment for oxidation and distillation to concentrate a portion of the cathode loop depleted nitric acid, which contained HNO2. The material balance for the NOx-HNO2-HNO3 chemical equilibrium was clarified by the electrolysis. Further, a basic flow diagram was developed for a total system to effectively produce NOx gas. (authors)

  18. Effect of Nitric Acid on the Low Fluorescing Performance of Drilling Fluid Lubricant Based Animal and Vegetable Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-shan Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available After synthesis of mixed fatty acid triethanolamine ester surfactant based on animal and vegetable mixed oils, the reaction solution was added into 4% (wt/wt liquid nitric acid or 9% (wt/wt solid nitric acid as eliminating fluorescent agent continuing to react from 1 to 2 hours. The low fluorescence lubricant named E167 for drilling fluid was prepared, in which maximum fluorescence intensity (Fmax was less than 10 in three-dimensional fluorescence spectra of excitation wavelength range. When the E167 was added into fresh water based drilling fluid at the dosage of 0.5% (wt/wt, the sticking coefficient reduced rate (ΔKf is 78% and the extreme pressure (E-P friction coefficient reduced rate (Δf is 79%. In the case of 4% brine mud with 0.5% (wt/wt E167 in it, the ΔKf and Δf are 75% and 62%, respectively. After the hot rolling ageing test 180°C × 16 h with the E167 was added into fresh water based drilling fluid at the dosage of 1% (wt/wt, the ΔKf and Δf are greater than 70%, which shows a much better lubrication properties of strong resistance to high temperature. The fresh water based drilling fluid which contains 1% (wt/wt E167 is almost nonfoaming even after hot rolling ageing 120°C × 16 h.

  19. Reaction of formic and nitric acids with Savannah River Site radioactive HLW sludge in the DWPF pretreatment steps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) will combine borosilicate frit with highly radioactive waste sludge to produce glass waste forms for disposal. A key step in the DWPF will be acidification of the sludge with formic and nitric acids prior to vitrification. The reducing properties of formic acid will be used to reduce mercury (II) oxide and salts to elemental mercury. The mercury will then be steam-stripped, recovered, and purified. Another benefit of acidifying the sludge will be to reduce its viscosity so that a sludge-frit mixture can be pumped to the melter. The sludge viscosity decreases with pH as various sludge components dissolve with increasing acidity

  20. Boron removal from aqueous solutions by activated carbon impregnated with salicylic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the removal of boric acid from aqueous solution by activated carbon impregnated with salicylic acid was studied in batch system. pH, adsorbent amount, initial boron concentration, temperature, shaking rate and salicylic acid film thickness were chosen as parameters. Boron removal efficiencies increased with increasing adsorbent amount, temperature and pH, decreasing initial boron concentration. As thickness of salicylic acid film on activated carbon becomes thin up to 0.088 nm, the efficiency increased, and then, the efficiency decreased with becoming thinner than 0.088 nm of salicylic acid film. Shaking rate was no effect on removal efficiency. In result, it was determined that the use of salicylic acid as an impregnant for activated carbon led to the increase of the amount of boron adsorbed. A lactone ring, being the most appropriate conformation, forms between boric acid and -COOH and -OH groups of salicylic acid

  1. Uptake of hypobromous acid (HOBr by aqueous sulfuric acid solutions: low-temperature solubility and reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. T. Iraci

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypobromous acid (HOBr is a key species linking inorganic bromine to the chlorine and odd hydrogen chemical families. We have measured the solubility of HOBr in 45–70 wt% sulfuric acid solutions representative of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosol composition. Over the temperature range 201–252 K, HOBr is quite soluble in sulfuric acid, with an effective Henry's law coefficient, H*=104-107 mol L-1 atm-1. H* is inversely dependent on temperature, with ΔH=-45.0±5.4 kJ mol-1 and ΔS=-101±24 J mol-1 K-1 for 55–70 wt% H2SO4 solutions. Our study includes temperatures which overlap both previous measurements of HOBr solubility. For uptake into 55–70 wt% H2SO4, the solubility is described by log H*=(2349±280/T–(5.27±1.24. At temperatures colder than ~213 K, the solubility of HOBr in 45 wt% H2SO4 is at least a factor of five larger than in 70 wt% H2SO4, with log H*=(3665±270/T–(10.63±1.23. The solubility of HOBr is comparable to that of HBr, indicating that upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols should contain equilibrium concentrations of HOBr which equal or exceed those of HBr. Upon uptake of HOBr into aqueous sulfuric acid in the presence of other brominated gases, particularly for 70 wt% H2SO4 solution, our measurements demonstrate chemical reaction of HOBr followed by evolution of gaseous products including Br2O and Br2.

  2. Chemical modification of amino acids by atmospheric-pressure cold plasma in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, Eisuke; Kitamura, Tsuyoshi; Kuwabara, Junpei; Ikawa, Satoshi; Yoshizawa, Shunsuke; Shiraki, Kentaro; Kawasaki, Hideya; Arakawa, Ryuichi; Kitano, Katsuhisa

    2014-07-01

    Plasma medicine is an attractive new research area, but the principles of plasma modification of biomolecules in aqueous solution remain elusive. In this study, we investigated the chemical effects of atmospheric-pressure cold plasma on 20 naturally occurring amino acids in aqueous solution. High-resolution mass spectrometry revealed that chemical modifications of 14 amino acids were observed after plasma treatment: (i) hydroxylation and nitration of aromatic rings in tyrosine, phenylalanine and tryptophan; (ii) sulfonation and disulfide linkage formation of thiol groups in cysteine; (iii) sulfoxidation of methionine and (iv) amidation and ring-opening of five-membered rings in histidine and proline. A competitive reaction experiment using 20 amino acids demonstrated that sulfur-containing and aromatic amino acids were preferentially decreased by the plasma treatment. These data provide fundamental information for elucidating the mechanism of protein inactivation for biomedical plasma applications.

  3. Interaction between N-Phospho-Amino Acids and Nucleoside in Aqueous Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Nucleosides were phosphorylated with different N- (O, O-diisopropyl) phosphoryl amino acids to give nucleoside mono phosphates in aqueous solution. 2', 3', and 5'-isomers had been confirmed by comparison with authentic samples on the basis of HPLC analysis. The conversion percentage of nucleoside indicated that N- (O, O-diisopropyl) phosphoryl aspartic acid reacted with adenosine and guanosine at a much higher rate than other kinds of N- phosphoryl amino acids, while phosphorylation of cytidine and uridine was relatively easy by using N- (O, O-diisopropyl) phosphoryl threonine. The result could give some clue to the prebiotic code origin of nucleic acid and protein.

  4. Thermal decomposition of dilute aqueous formic acid solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, A.B.; Sørensen, E.

    1992-01-01

    or a decarboxylation. In particular the second one is dependent on the reactor vessel used. It is shown to be catalyzed by a mixture of oxides of stainless steel components. The presence of CH3COOH or CH3CHO promotes the decomposition of HCOOH by way of both decarboxylation and oxidation. In any case formic acid...

  5. Salt dependent stability of stearic acid Langmuir-Blodgett films exposed to aqueous electrolytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, Naveen; Wang, Lei; Siretanu, Igor; Duits, Michel; Mugele, Frieder

    2013-01-01

    We use contact angle goniometry, imaging ellipsometry, and atomic force microscopy to study the stability and wettability of Langmuir–Blodgett (LB) monolayers of stearic acid on silica substrates, upon drying and exposure to aqueous solutions of varying salinity. The influences of Ca2+ and Na+ ions

  6. Diffusion Coefficient and Solubility of Isobutene and trans-2-Butene in Aqueous Sulfuric Acid Solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brilman, Derk W.F.; Swaaij, Wim P.M. van; Versteeg, Geert F.

    2001-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient and the physical solubility of isobutene and trans-2-butene in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions cannot be determined experimentally due to the occurrence of fast chemical reactions. In the present contribution these physicochemical parameters are estimated. For the solubilit

  7. Aqueous-phase hydrogenation of acetic acid over transition metal catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olcay, Hakan [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Xu, Lijun [ORNL; Xu, Ye [ORNL; Huber, George [University of Massachusetts, Amherst

    2010-01-01

    Catalytic hydrogenation of acetic acid to ethanol has been carried out in aqueous phase on several metals, with ruthenium being the most active and selective. DFT calculations suggest that the initial CO bond scission yielding acetyl is the key step and that the intrinsic reactivity of the metals accounts for the observed activity.

  8. Kinetic study of CO2 with various amino acid salts in aqueous solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holst, van J.; Versteeg, G.F.; Brilman, D.W.F.; Hogendoorn, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    A study towards the kinetics of CO2 with several aqueous salts of amino acids was performed at a temperature of 298 K. Absorption rate experiments were carried out in the pseudo-first-order regime, enabling the determination of the kinetic rate constant from the flux. In a preliminary screening at a

  9. Kinetic study of CO2 with various amino acid salts in aqueous solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoist, J.; Versteeg, G. F.; Brilman, D. W. F.; Hogendoorn, J. A.; Holst, J. v

    2009-01-01

    A study towards the kinetics Of CO2 with several aqueous salts of amino acids was performed at a temperature of 298 K. Absorption rate experiments were carried out in the pseudo-first-order regime, enabling the determination of the kinetic rate constant from the flux. In a preliminary screening at a

  10. Rosmarinic acid content in antidiabetic aqueous extract from ocimum canum sims in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosmarinic acid (RA) is an important polyphenol that is found in a variety of herbs including Ocimum canum sims (locally called eme or akokobesa in Ghana). Aqueous extracts from the leaves of O. canum are used as an antidiabetic herbal medicine in Ghana. Analytical TLC was used to examine the compos...

  11. 49 CFR 173.195 - Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized... Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.195 Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution). (a) Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized, must be packed...

  12. Standard enthalpies of formation of α-aminobutyric acid and products of its dissociation in an aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytkin, A. I.; Chernikov, V. V.; Krutova, O. N.

    2016-08-01

    Heats of solution of crystalline α-aminobutyric acid in water and in aqueous solutions of potassium hydroxide at 298.15 K are measured by means of direct calorimetry. Standard enthalpies of formation of the amino acid and products of its dissociation in an aqueous solution are calculated.

  13. FT-RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY FOR MONITORING THE POLYMERIZATION OF ACRYLIC ACID IN AQUEOUS SOLUTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Yu; Hui-zhou Liu; Jia-yong Chen

    1999-01-01

    FT-Raman spectroscopy was used to monitor the polymerization of acrylic acid in aqueous solution. A simple method to avoid the noise in the background during the signal processing via Fourier transformation was used in this work. The effects of the amount of initiator used on the polymerization are studied. When the amount of the initiator in the polymerization was increased, both the rate and extent of polymerization of acrylic acid will be increased.

  14. DISSOLUTION OF PLUTONIUM METAL IN 8-10 M NITRIC ACID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudisill, T.; Pierce, R.

    2012-02-21

    The H-Canyon facility will be used to dissolve Pu metal for subsequent purification and conversion to plutonium dioxide (PuO{sub 2}) using Phase II of HB-Line. To support the new mission, the development of a Pu metal dissolution flowsheet which utilizes concentrated (8-10 M) nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) solutions containing potassium fluoride (KF) is required. Dissolution of Pu metal in concentrated HNO{sub 3} is desired to eliminate the need to adjust the solution acidity prior to purification by anion exchange. The preferred flowsheet would use 8-10 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.015-0.07 M KF, and 0.5-1.0 g/L Gd to dissolve the Pu up to 6.75 g/L. An alternate flowsheet would use 8-10 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.1-0.2 M KF, and 1-2 g/L B to dissolve the Pu. The targeted average Pu metal dissolution rate is 20 mg/min-cm{sup 2}, which is sufficient to dissolve a 'standard' 2250-g Pu metal button in 24 h. Plutonium metal dissolution rate measurements showed that if Gd is used as the nuclear poison, the optimum dissolution conditions occur in 10 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.04-0.05 M KF, and 0.5-1.0 g/L Gd at 112 to 116 C (boiling). These conditions will result in an estimated Pu metal dissolution rate of {approx}11-15 mg/min-cm{sup 2} and will result in dissolution times of 36-48 h for standard buttons. The recommended minimum and maximum KF concentrations are 0.03 M and 0.07 M, respectively. The maximum KF concentration is dictated by a potential room-temperature Pu-Gd-F precipitation issue at low Pu concentrations. The purpose of the experimental work described in this report was two-fold. Initially a series of screening experiments was performed to measure the dissolution rate of Pu metal as functions of the HNO{sub 3}, KF, and Gd or B concentrations. The objective of the screening tests was to propose optimized conditions for subsequent flowsheet demonstration tests. Based on the rate measurements, this study found that optimal dissolution conditions in solutions containing 0.5-1.0 g/L Gd

  15. Removal of Aqueous Boron by Using Complexation of Boric Acid with Polyols: A Raman Spectroscopic Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Ki Heon; Jeong, Hui Cheol; An, Hye Young; Lim, Jun-Heok; Lee, Jea-Keun; Won, Yong Sun [Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Boron is difficult to be removed from seawater by simple RO (reverse osmosis) membrane process, because the size of boric acid (B(OH){sub 3}), the major form of aqueous boron, is as small as the nominal pore size of RO membrane. Thus, the complexation of boric acid with polyols was suggested as an alternative way to increase the size of aqueous boron compounds and the complexation behavior was investigated with Raman spectroscopy. As a reference, the Raman peak for symmetric B-O stretching vibrational mode both in boric acid and borate ion (B(OH){sub 4}{sup -}) was selected. A Raman peak shift (877 cm{sup -1} →730 cm{sup -1}) was observed to confirm that boric acid in water is converted to borate ion as the pH increases, which is also correctly predicted by frequency calculation. Meanwhile, the Raman peak of borate ion (730 cm{sup -1}) did not appear as the pH increased when polyols were applied into aqueous solution of boric acid, suggesting that the boric acid forms complexing compounds by combining with polyols.

  16. Photodegradation of α-naphthaleneacetic acid in aqueous solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Kinetic processes of α-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) photolysis were studied under different conditions. The results showed that the ultraviolet light was more effective than fluorescent light in promoting degradation, and the degradation of NAA under ultraviolet light followed the first order kinetics with the photolysis rate constant of 1.15 x 10-2 min-1 and half-life time (t1/2) of 60 min. Further, it was proved that the photolysis rate was higher in the presence of oxygen, titanium dioxide (TiO2), and low pH ( acidic solution). At last, two photolysis intermediates were identified by GC-MS and possible photolysis pathways were proposed.

  17. Uric acid attenuates nitric oxide production by decreasing the interaction between endothelial nitric oxide synthase and calmodulin in human umbilical vein endothelial cells: a mechanism for uric acid-induced cardiovascular disease development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Hyun; Jin, Yoon Mi; Hwang, Soojin; Cho, Du-Hyong; Kang, Duk-Hee; Jo, Inho

    2013-08-01

    The elevated level of uric acid in the body is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases, which is mediated by endothelial dysfunction. However, its underlying mechanism is not fully understood, although dysregulation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) production is likely to be involved. Using human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC), we explored the molecular mechanism of uric acid on endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) activity and NO production. Although high dose of uric acid (12mg/dl for 24h treatment) significantly decreased eNOS activity and NO production, it did not alter eNOS expression and phosphorylations at eNOS-Ser(1177), eNOS-Thr(495) and eNOS-Ser(114). Under this condition, we also found no alterations in the dimerization and acetylation of eNOS, compared with the control. Furthermore, uric acid did not change the activity of arginase II, an enzyme degrading l-arginine, a substrate of eNOS, and intracellular level of calcium, a cofactor for eNOS activation. We also found that uric acid did not alter xanthine oxidase activity, suggesting no involvement of xanthine oxidase-derived O2(-) production in the observed inhibitory effects. In vitro and in cell coimmunoprecipitation studies, however, revealed that uric acid significantly decreased the interaction between eNOS and calmodulin (CaM), an eNOS activator, although it did not change the intracellular CaM level. Like in HUVEC, uric acid also decreased eNOS-CaM interaction in bovine aortic EC. Finally, uric acid attenuated ionomycin-induced increase in the interaction between eNOS and CaM. This study suggests firstly that uric acid decreased eNOS activity and NO production through reducing the binding between eNOS and CaM in EC. Our result may provide molecular mechanism by which uric acid induces endothelial dysfunction.

  18. Kinetics of Acid-Catalyzed Dehydration of Cyclic Hemiacetals in Organic Aerosol Particles in Equilibrium with Nitric Acid Vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranney, April P; Ziemann, Paul J

    2016-04-28

    Previous studies have shown that 1,4-hydroxycarbonyls, which are often major products of the atmospheric oxidation of hydrocarbons, can undergo acid-catalyzed cyclization and dehydration in aerosol particles to form highly reactive unsaturated dihydrofurans. In this study the kinetics of dehydration of cyclic hemiacetals, the rate-limiting step in this process, was investigated in a series of environmental chamber experiments in which secondary organic aerosol (SOA) containing cyclic hemiacetals was formed from the reaction of n-pentadecane with OH radicals in dry air in the presence of HNO3. A particle beam mass spectrometer was used to monitor the formation and dehydration of cyclic hemiacetals in real time, and SOA and HNO3 were quantified in filter samples by gravimetric analysis and ion chromatography. Measured dehydration rate constants increased linearly with increasing concentration of HNO3 in the gas phase and in SOA, corresponding to catalytic rate constants of 0.27 h(-1) ppmv(-1) and 7.0 h(-1) M(-1), respectively. The measured Henry's law constant for partitioning of HNO3 into SOA was 3.7 × 10(4) M atm(-1), ∼25% of the value for dissolution into water, and the acid dissociation constant was estimated to be <8 × 10(-4), at least a factor of 10(4) less than that for HNO3 in water. The results indicate that HNO3 was only weakly dissociated in the SOA and that dehydration of cyclic hemiacetals was catalyzed by molecular HNO3 rather than by H(+). The Henry's law constant and kinetics relationships measured here can be used to improve mechanisms and models of SOA formation from the oxidation of hydrocarbons in dry air in the presence of NOx, which are conditions commonly used in laboratory studies. The fate of cyclic hemiacetals in the atmosphere, where the effects of higher relative humidity, organic/aqueous phase separation, and acid catalysis by molecular H2SO4 and/or H(+) are likely to be important, is discussed. PMID:27043733

  19. Solvent extraction of uranium(VI) and thorium(IV) in nitric acid solution by N,N,N‘,N’—tetrabutyladipicamide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WangYou-Shao; BaoBo-Rong; 等

    1997-01-01

    N,N,N'N'-tetrabutyladipicamide(TBAA) has been synthesized,and applied to the extraction of U(VI) and Th(IV) from nitric acid solutions in a diluent composed of 0.50 volume fraction 1,2,4-trimethyl benzene (TMA) and 0.50 volume fraction kerosene(OK),The effects of the aueous nitric acid concentration,extractant concentration,slating-out agent (LiNO3) and temperature on extraction ability of TBAA for U(VI) and Th(IV) have been studied.Back Extraction of U(VI) and Th (IV) from organic phases were performed by dilute nitric acid.The compositions of extracted complexes,equilibrium constants and enthalpies of extraction reactions have also been estimated.The IR spectra of extraction of U(VI) and Th(IV) have been studied.

  20. [Effect of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates on nitric oxide system during acute hypoxia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurhaliuk, N M

    2002-01-01

    Effects Crebs Cycle of exogenous intermediates sodium succinate (50 mg/kg) and sodium alpha-ketoglutarate (200 mg/kg) on processes of mitochondrial ADP-stimulated respiration (using as substrates of oxidation 0.35 mM succinate, 1 mM alpha-ketoglutarate), production of nitric oxide under NO2-, NO3-, as well as carbamide, putrescyne content and processes of lipid peroxidation in the rats liver under acute hypoxia (7% O2 in N2, 30 min) have been studied. It was shown, that the exogenous sodium alpha-ketoglutarate increases nitric oxide content, aminotransferase activation, inhibition of succinatedehydrogenase simultaneously more than exogenous sodium succinate. It correlates with decreasing of processes lipid peroxidation in liver. PMID:14964867

  1. Synthesis of high molecular weight polylactic acid from aqueous lactic acid co-catalyzed by tin(II)chloride dihydrate and succinic anhydride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI Ziqiang; BAI Yanbin; WANG Shoufeng

    2005-01-01

    Polylactic acid was synthesized from commercial available cheap aqueous lactic acid (85%―90% w/w) using succinic anhydride and SnCl2·2H2O as catalyst in the absence of organic solvents. As a result, polylactic acid with a molecular weight of 60000 was prepared in 10 h. The new procedure is much simple, cheap and outstanding in that the start material is aqueous lactic acid; the catalytic system is environmentally benign.

  2. New Catalyst for Removal of N2O from Nitric Acid Plant Tail Gases

    OpenAIRE

    Obalová, L.

    2013-01-01

    In the present work, the Co-Mn-Al mixed oxide modified by K was prepared in the pilot plant scale for the first time and tested in real conditions. Result of N2O catalytic decomposition in the pilot plant reactor installed at the bypassed tail gas from the nitric production plant are shown and obtained kinetic datae used for modelling of full scale reactor for N2O emissions abatement.

  3. Mechanisms leading to oligomers and SOA through aqueous photooxidation: insights from OH radical oxidation of acetic acid and methylglyoxal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Tan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous experiments have demonstrated that the aqueous OH radical oxidation of methylglyoxal produces low volatility products including pyruvate, oxalate and oligomers. These products are found predominantly in the particle phase in the atmosphere, suggesting that methylglyoxal is a precursor of secondary organic aerosol (SOA. Acetic acid plays a central role in the aqueous oxidation of methylglyoxal and it is a ubiquitous product of gas phase photochemistry, making it a potential "aqueous" SOA precursor in its own right. However, the fate of acetic acid upon aqueous-phase oxidation is not well understood. In this research, acetic acid (20 μM–10 mM was oxidized by OH radicals, and pyruvic acid and methylglyoxal experimental samples were analyzed using new analytical methods, in order to better understand the formation of SOA from acetic acid and methylglyoxal. Glyoxylic, glycolic, and oxalic acids formed from acetic acid and OH radicals. In contrast to the aqueous OH radical oxidation of methylglyoxal, the aqueous OH radical oxidation of acetic acid did not produce succinic acid and oligomers. This suggests that the methylgloxal-derived oligomers do not form through the acid catalyzed esterification pathway proposed previously. Using results from these experiments, radical mechanisms responsible for oligomer formation from methylglyoxal oxidation in clouds and wet aerosols are proposed. The importance of acetic acid/acetate as an SOA precursor is also discussed. We hypothesize that this and similar chemistry is central to the daytime formation of oligomers in wet aerosols.

  4. Influence of gas-particle partitioning on ammonia and nitric acid fluxes above a deciduous forest in the Midwestern USA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristina; Sørensen, Lise Lotte; Hornsby, Karen E.;

    +. Therefore, the phase partitioning between gas and aerosol phases can have a significant effect on local budgets and atmospheric transport distances (Nemitz et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys., 2004). In this study, fluxes of NH3, HNO3 and carbon dioxide (CO2) along with size-resolved N-aerosol concentrations......Quantifying the atmosphere-biosphere exchange of reactive nitrogen gasses (including ammonia (NH3) and nitric acid (HNO3)) is crucial to assessing the impact of anthropogenic activities on natural and semi-natural ecosystems. However, measuring the deposition of reactive nitrogen is challenging due...... to bi-directionality of the flux, and the dynamics of the chemical gas/aerosol equilibrium of NH3 and HNO3 (or other atmospheric acids) with aerosol-phase ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3-). NH3 and HNO3 are both very reactive and typically exhibit higher deposition velocities than aerosol NH4...

  5. Plasma levels of nitric oxide related amino acids in demented subjects with Down syndrome are related to neopterin concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppus, A M W; Fekkes, D; Verhoeven, W M A; Tuinier, S; van Duijn, C M

    2010-03-01

    Subjects with Down syndrome (DS) have abnormalities in virtually all aspects of the immune system and almost all will be affected with Alzheimer's disease (AD). It is thought that nitric oxide (NO) is involved in the pathophysiology of AD. In the present study, including a total of 401 elderly DS subjects, the spectrum of plasma amino acids and neopterin was investigated and related to development of AD. Concentrations of nearly all amino acids in DS subjects differed significantly from those of healthy controls. Neopterin was increased in DS subjects, especially in dementia. The production of NO as reflected by an increased citrulline/arginine ratio (Cit/Arg ratio) was enhanced during development of clinical dementia. Neopterin concentrations correlated to the Cit/Arg ratio only in the group of prevalent demented subjects (rho = 0.48, P = 0.006). The results of this study are suggestive for an increase in oxidative processes in DS subjects with AD.

  6. Radiolytical oxidation of ascorbic acid in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Ascorbic acid, AsA (vitamin c), has been widely studied as an antioxidant or as an initiator of some technological processes, for example polymerization or nanoparticles formation. AsA can be easily oxidized to ascorbyl radical, in the first stage, and to dehydroascorbic acid, DHA, in the second stage. It has been found that several different ascorbyl radicals are formed during AsA oxidation but the main radical exists as the anion with the unpaired electron delocalized on a highly conjugated tricarbonyl system. Absorption spectrum of ascorbyl radical shows two bands with maxima at 300 and 360 nm, however only that at 360 nm is proportional to the dose and thus this wavelength was chosen for observations. We studied the oxidation of AsA by the following oxidizing radicals generated by the pulse radiolysis method ·OH, (SCN)2-·, Cl2-·, N3· and NO2·. The observed dependence of the yield and the formation rate of the AsA radical on the reduction potential of the oxidizing radical is discussed. The results obtained in water are compared with those obtained with AsA enclosed in the water pools of reverse micelles formed by AOT in n-heptane or by Igepal CO-520 in c-hexane. Somewhat surprising observation of different ascorbyl radical in pulse irradiated reverse micelles containing DHA is also commented.

  7. Estimation of salivary nitric oxide and uric acid levels in oral squamous cell carcinoma and healthy controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha Salian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC being the most common head and neck cancer, involves the interplay of several free radicals and antioxidant molecules. The potential role of salivary nitric oxide (NO and uric acid in cancer development needs to be explored as there are a few studies highlighting their association with each other and with oral cancer. Aims: The present study was designed to measure the NO and uric acid levels in the saliva of patients with OSCC as compared with healthy controls and to highlight any possible correlations between them. Materials and Methods: The present study involved 50 subjects, 25 with OSCC (study and 25 healthy individuals (controls. Saliva samples collected from patients were subjected to NO and uric acid analysis by griess method and uricase method, respectively. Statistical Analysis: The results were analyzed using Student′s t-test and Pearson′s Chi-square test. Results: A significant increase in the salivary levels of NO was seen in study subjects as compared to healthy controls. On the contrary, a significant decrease in salivary uric acid level was observed in the study group as compared to healthy controls. In addition, there exists an inverse correlation between NO and uric acid levels in study and control groups. Conclusion: Salivary levels of NO and uric acid may act as key bimolecular markers in the detection of oral cancer, which could be further confirmed by larger sample size and future studies.

  8. Entrained solvent separation by charcoal adsorption from aqueous streams generated during uranium recovery from phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the two cycle solvent extraction process for the separation of uranium from phosphoric acid, solvents such as D2EHPA, di nonyl phenyl phosphoric acid (DNPPA), tri butyl phosphate (TBP), etc., get dissolved/entrained in the various aqueous phases such as WPA, ammonium carbonate solution, MGA and sulphuric acid. These solvents have to be separated both from process economy point of view and for industrial acceptability. Systematic experiments showed that recovery of solvents by diluent washing is not effective for alkaline solution. Hence studies were undertaken to study the feasibility of activated charcoal adsorption for entrained/dissolved solvent separation. (author)

  9. Spectrophotometric determination of uranium with benzohydroxamic acid in aqueous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A spectrophotometric method has been developed for the determination of uranium with benzohydroxamic acid (BHA). Uranium in the hexavalent state forms a yellowish orange colored chelate with BHA. The absorbance of the complex is maximum at pH 6.0, excluding pH7 and complex is stable for more than 72 hours. The maximum absorbance at 304 nm is considered for quantification of uranium. The present method is validated and good agreement with spectrophotometric determination of uranium with thiocyanate. Uranium in the range 1-10 μg/ml has been determined with good precision. The described method is simple, precised and accurate. It can be applied for the determination of uranium in raffinates of Purex process, without producing the nuclear waste in organic phase

  10. Extraction and characterisation of aqueous organic acids from natural waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humic and fulvic acids were extracted from large volumes of groundwater associated with the Broubster and Needle's Eye natural analogue sites, and the BGS research site at Drigg in Cumbria. Extractions were performed by both batchwise extraction and radial flow chromatography using DEAE-cellulose. Retained humic substances were eluted using NaOH and separated into humic and fulvic components by acidification to pH 1. After separation the humic component was purified by repetitive precipitation and dissolution whilst the fulvic component was purified by absorption chromatography. The resulting humic substances were shown to be of high purity with respect to metallic elements, with less than 1% of available sites being occupied. During elution the association of trace elements with humic substances was monitored and a high degree of association between humic substances, U and the Rare Earth Elements was noted. (author)

  11. Gamma-irradiation of malic acid in aqueous solutions. [prebiotic significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negron-Mendoza, A.; Graff, R. L.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1980-01-01

    The gamma-irradiation of malic acid in aqueous solutions was studied under initially oxygenated and oxygen-free conditions in an attempt to determine the possible interconversion of malic acid into other carboxylic acids, specifically those associated with Krebs cycle. The effect of dose on product formation of the system was investigated. Gas-liquid chromatography combined with mass spectrometry was used as the principal means of identification of the nonvolatile products. Thin layer chromatography and direct probe mass spectroscopy were also employed. The findings show that a variety of carboxylic acids are formed, with malonic and succinic acids in greatest abundance. These products have all been identified as being formed in the gamma-irradiation of acetic acid, suggesting a common intermediary. Since these molecules fit into a metabolic cycle, it is strongly suggestive that prebiotic pathways provided the basis for biological systems.

  12. GLYCOLIC-NITRIC ACID FLOWSHEET DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF CHEMICAL PROCESSING CELL WITH MATRIX SIMULANTS AND SUPERNATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, D.; Stone, M.; Newell, J.; Best, D.

    2012-05-07

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is evaluating changes to its current DWPF flowsheet to improve processing cycle times. This will enable the facility to support higher canister production while maximizing waste loading. Higher throughput is needed in the CPC since the installation of the bubblers into the melter has increased melt rate. Due to the significant maintenance required for the DWPF gas chromatographs (GC) and the potential for production of flammable quantities of hydrogen, reducing or eliminating the amount of formic acid used in the CPC is being developed. Earlier work at Savannah River National Laboratory has shown that replacing formic acid with an 80:20 molar blend of glycolic and formic acids has the potential to remove mercury in the SRAT without any significant catalytic hydrogen generation. This report summarizes the research completed to determine the feasibility of processing without formic acid. In earlier development of the glycolic-formic acid flowsheet, one run (GF8) was completed without formic acid. It is of particular interest that mercury was successfully removed in GF8, no formic acid at 125% stoichiometry. Glycolic acid did not show the ability to reduce mercury to elemental mercury in initial screening studies, which is why previous testing focused on using the formic/glycolic blend. The objective of the testing detailed in this document is to determine the viability of the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet in processing sludge over a wide compositional range as requested by DWPF. This work was performed under the guidance of Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TT and QAP). The details regarding the simulant preparation and analysis have been documented previously.

  13. GLYCOLIC-NITRIC ACID FLOWSHEET DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF CHEMICAL PROCESS CELL WITH SLUDGE AND SUPERNATE SIMULANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, D.; Stone, M.; Newell, J.; Best, D.; Zamecnik, J.

    2012-08-28

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is evaluating changes to its current Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) flowsheet to improve processing cycle times. This will enable the facility to support higher canister production while maximizing waste loading. Higher throughput is needed in the Chemical Process Cell (CPC) since the installation of the bubblers into the melter has increased melt rate. Due to the significant maintenance required for the DWPF gas chromatographs (GC) and the potential for production of flammable quantities of hydrogen, reducing or eliminating the amount of formic acid used in the CPC is being developed. Earlier work at Savannah River National Laboratory has shown that replacing formic acid with an 80:20 molar blend of glycolic and formic acids has the potential to remove mercury in the SRAT without any significant catalytic hydrogen generation. This report summarizes the research completed to determine the feasibility of processing without formic acid. In earlier development of the glycolic-formic acid flowsheet, one run (GF8) was completed without formic acid. It is of particular interest that mercury was successfully removed in GF8, no formic acid at 125% stoichiometry. Glycolic acid did not show the ability to reduce mercury to elemental mercury in initial screening studies, which is why previous testing focused on using the formic/glycolic blend. The objective of the testing detailed in this document is to determine the viability of the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet in processing sludge over a wide compositional range as requested by DWPF. This work was performed under the guidance of Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TT&QAP). The details regarding the simulant preparation and analysis have been documented previously.

  14. Electrochemical examination of the ascorbic acid radical anion in non-aqueous electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshimura, M.; Honda, K.; Kondo, T.; Rao, T.N.; Tryk, D.A.; Fujishima, A

    2002-10-15

    A quasi-reversible redox reaction involving ascorbic acid was observed in non-aqueous electrolytes at conductive diamond electrode. The chemical reversibility of these reactions is consistent with ascorbic acid being reduced to the ascorbic acid radical anion in a one-electron process, with subsequent reoxidation to ascorbic acid. This is the first report on the electrochemical production of the ascorbic acid radical anion in non-aqueous electrolytes. Ascorbyl 6-stearate and 4-hydroxy 2(5H)-furanone, which have somewhat similar structures as ascorbic acid, also showed one-electron transfer reduction reaction producing radicals with a single negative charge, suggesting that these compounds follow the same electrochemical behavior as ascorbic acid. The double bond and hydroxyl substituent on the five-membered ring are shown to be necessary for the stabilization of the radical anions. It was confirmed by the calculation of the total energy using molecular orbital methods that resonance structures involving the double-bond and hydroxyl group provide significant stabilization of the radical anions. Electrochemical preparation may be a useful method for the detailed study of radicals, their molecular structure and reactivity.

  15. Electrochemical examination of the ascorbic acid radical anion in non-aqueous electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A quasi-reversible redox reaction involving ascorbic acid was observed in non-aqueous electrolytes at conductive diamond electrode. The chemical reversibility of these reactions is consistent with ascorbic acid being reduced to the ascorbic acid radical anion in a one-electron process, with subsequent reoxidation to ascorbic acid. This is the first report on the electrochemical production of the ascorbic acid radical anion in non-aqueous electrolytes. Ascorbyl 6-stearate and 4-hydroxy 2(5H)-furanone, which have somewhat similar structures as ascorbic acid, also showed one-electron transfer reduction reaction producing radicals with a single negative charge, suggesting that these compounds follow the same electrochemical behavior as ascorbic acid. The double bond and hydroxyl substituent on the five-membered ring are shown to be necessary for the stabilization of the radical anions. It was confirmed by the calculation of the total energy using molecular orbital methods that resonance structures involving the double-bond and hydroxyl group provide significant stabilization of the radical anions. Electrochemical preparation may be a useful method for the detailed study of radicals, their molecular structure and reactivity

  16. [Catalytic ozonation by ceramic honeycomb for the degradation of oxalic acid in aqueous solution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Sun, Zhi-Zhong; Ma, Jun

    2007-11-01

    Comparative experiments for the degradation of oxalic acid in aqueous solution were carried out in the three processes of ozonation alone, ceramic honeycomb-catalyzed ozonation and ceramic honeycomb adsorption. The results show that the degradation rates of oxalic acid in the ceramic honeycomb-catalyzed ozonation, ozonation alone and ceramic honeycomb adsorption systems are 37.6%, 2.2% and 0.4%, and the presence of ceramic honeycomb catalyst significantly improves the degradation rate of oxalic acid compared to the results from non-catalytic ozonation and adsorption. With the addition of tert-butanol, the degradation rates of oxalic acid in catalytic ozonation system decrease by 24.1%, 29.0% and 30.1%, respectively, at the concentration of 5, 10 and 15 mg x L(-1). This phenomenon indicates that ceramic honeycomb-catalyzed ozonation for the degradation of oxalic acid in aqueous solution follows the mechanism of *OH oxidation, namely the heterogeneous surface of catalyst enhances the initiation of *OH. The results of TOC analysis demonstrate that the process of ceramic honeycomb-catalyzed ozonation can achieve the complete mineralization level without the formation of intermediary degradation products. The experimental results suggest that the reaction temperature has positive relationship with the degradation rate of oxalic acid. The degradation rates of oxalic acid in the ceramic honeycomb-catalyzed ozonation system are 16.4%, 37.6%, 61.3% and 68.2%, at the respective reaction temperature of 10, 20, 30 and 40 degrees C.

  17. Electrochemiluminescence of Tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) with Ascorbic Acid and Dehydroascorbic Acid in Aqueous and Non-aqueous Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Fumiki; Hattori, Kaoru; Matsuoka, Masanori; Jin, Jiye

    2016-01-01

    The electrochemiluminescence (ECL) of tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) (Ru(bpy)3(2+)) is studied in non-aqueous media using dehydroascorbic acid (DHA) as coreactant to validate the evidence for the mechanism of the ascorbic acid (H2A)/Ru(bpy)3(2+) ECL system in an aqueous media. DHA is electrochemically reduced around -1.2 V vs. Ag/Ag(+) in pure acetonitrile to generate the ascorbyl radical anion (A(•-)), which is confirmed by in-situ UV-visible absorption measurements using a thin-layer spectroelectrochemical cell. The ECL of the DHA/Ru(bpy)3(2+) system in non-aqueous media is not observed in the potential range from 0 to +1.4 V in anodic potential sweep mode; however, distinct ECL is detected using double potential step electrolysis from -1.2 to +1.4 V vs. Ag/Ag(+). The ECL may be generated by a homogeneous charge-transfer process between A(•-) produced during the first pulse potential step (-1.2 V) and Ru(bpy)3(3+) generated during the second pulse potential step (+1.4 V). The calculated standard enthalpy (-ΔH°) for the charge-transfer reaction between A(•-) and Ru(bpy)3(3+) is 2.29 eV, which is larger than the lowest excited singlet state energy of Ru(bpy)3(2+) (*Ru(bpy)3(2+); 2.03 eV, 610 nm). It is determined that the generated intermediate A(•-) is crucial in the Ru(bpy)3(2+) ECL reaction. PMID:27063718

  18. Synergistic Action between Jasmonic Acid and Nitric Oxide in Inducing Matrine Accumulation of Sophora flavescens Suspension Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Secondary metabolites not only play important ecological roles in plants but also are important pharmaceutical and source compounds for derivative synthesis. Production of plant secondary metabolites is believed to be controlled by the endogenous signal network of plants. However, the molecular basis is still largely unknown. Here we show that matrine production of Sophora flavescens Ait. cells treated with low levels of jasmonic acid (JA) and nitric oxide (NO) is significantly increased although treatment with low concentrations of JA or NO alone has no effects on matrine production, showing that JA and NO may act synergistically in triggering matrine production. Moreover, treatment with NO triggers lipoxygenase(LOX) activity and enhances JA levels of the cells, showing that NO may activate the endogenous JA biosynthesis of S.flavescens cells. External application of JA induces nitric oxide synthase-like activities and stimulates NO generation of S. flavescens cells, which suggests that JA may trigger NO generation of the cells. Thus, the results reveal a mutually amplifying reaction between JA and NO in S. flavescens cells. Furthermore, JA and NO inhibitors suppress not only the mutually amplifying reaction between JA and NO but also the synergistic effects of NO and JA on matrine production.Therefore, the data demonstrate that the synergistic action of JA and NO in inducing matrine production might be due to the mutually amplifying reaction between JA and NO in the cells.

  19. Triterpenoic Acids from Apple Pomace Enhance the Activity of the Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (eNOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldbauer, Katharina; Seiringer, Günter; Nguyen, Dieu Linh; Winkler, Johannes; Blaschke, Michael; McKinnon, Ruxandra; Urban, Ernst; Ladurner, Angela; Dirsch, Verena M; Zehl, Martin; Kopp, Brigitte

    2016-01-13

    Pomace is an easy-accessible raw material for the isolation of fruit-derived compounds. Fruit consumption is associated with health-promoting effects, such as the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Increased vascular nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, for example, due to an enhanced endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity, could be one molecular mechanism mediating this effect. To identify compounds from apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) pomace that have the potential to amplify NO bioavailability via eNOS activation, a bioassay-guided fractionation of the methanol/water (70:30) extract has been performed using the (14)C-L-arginine to (14)C-L-citrulline conversion assay (ACCA) in the human endothelium-derived cell line EA.hy926. Phytochemical characterization of the active fractions was performed using the spectrophotometric assessment of the total phenolic content, as well as TLC, HPLC-DAD-ELSD, and HPLC-MS analyses. Eleven triterpenoic acids, of which one is a newly discovered compound, were identified as the main constituents in the most active fraction, accompanied by only minor contents of phenolic compounds. When tested individually, none of the tested compounds exhibited significant eNOS activation. Nevertheless, cell stimulation with the reconstituted compound mixture restored eNOS activation, validating the potential of apple pomace as a source of bioactive components.

  20. Measurement of inorganic arsenic species in rice after nitric acid extraction by HPLC-ICPMS: verification using XANES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, W; Foster, S; Krikowa, F; Donner, E; Lombi, E

    2013-06-01

    The measurement of As species in rice is normally accomplished by extraction followed by HPLC-ICPMS analysis. This method, however, has not been comprehensively validated by comparing these speciation results with XANES, which does not require sample extraction, due to the challenge of conducting XANES analysis at very low As concentrations. In this study As speciation data using nitric acid extraction/HPLC-ICPMS and XANES are compared to verify the efficacy of using 2% v/v nitric acid extraction and HPLC-ICPMS to measure inorganic As, DMA, and MA in reference rice materials and common rice varieties obtainable in Australia. Total As and As species (As(III), As(V), DMA, and MA) concentrations measured in 8 reference materials were in agreement with published values. XANES analysis was performed on 5 samples having total As concentrations ranging from 0.198 to 0.335 μg g(-1). XANES results gave similar proportions of total As(III), As(V), and DMA to HPLC-ICPMS. XANES was able to distinguish two forms of As(III): As(III) and As(III)GSH. Total As concentrations in rice samples varied from 0.006 to 0.45 μg g(-1) As (n = 47) with a mean ± std of 0.127 ± 0.112 μg g(-1) As with most As present as inorganic species (63 ± 26%). DMA was found in nearly all the rice samples with the majority of samples containing concentrations below 0.05 μg g(-1) As while MA concentrations were negligible (<0.003 μg g(-1) As). Six rice varieties produced in Australia, China, and Spain all had elevated DMA concentrations (0.170-0.399 μg g(-1) As) that were correlated with total As concentrations (r(2) = 0.7518). In conclusion, comparison of As speciation by HPLC-ICPMS and XANES showed that similar As species were detected indicating the appropriateness of using 2% v/v nitric acid for extraction of rice prior to speciation. Common rice varieties obtainable in Australia generally have low As concentrations with most As present as inorganic As.

  1. Effect of nitric oxide synthase inhibition on the exchange of glucose and fatty acids in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinonen, Ilkka; Saltin, Bengt; Kemppainen, Jukka;

    2013-01-01

    The role of nitric oxide in controlling substrate metabolism in humans is incompletely understood.......The role of nitric oxide in controlling substrate metabolism in humans is incompletely understood....

  2. Highly-acidic aqueous solution as a medium for radiation chemical studies: redox chemistry of phenol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the aqueous medium is a common choice for radiation induced generation of a variety of transients (radicals), typically a non-aqueous solvent (or even a frozen matrix) is employed to study a transient with a labile H+ (TrH.+), mainly to maintain low propensity of its deprotonation reaction TrH.+→Tr. + H+, that otherwise occur promptly in an aqueous type medium. However, in addition to the relative difficulty encountered in routine handling of such specific non-aqueous reaction media, low transient yield (GTrH.+) therein also restrict their use. Furthermore, any comparative study of the two species TrH.+ and Tr. remains unattainable. In this context we have probed the highly acidic aqueous solution as an alternative medium for radiation induced generation and subsequent chemical studies of acidic radical cation, TrH.+ vis-a-vis the de-protonated radical Tr.. This presentation highlights these results in three parts deals with (a) measurement of oxidizing and reducing radical yields for reactions in H2SO4 and HClO4 solutions, with highest acidity maintained at ∼14 M or Hammett acidity constant H0 - 7 in case of former and ∼10 M or H0 -5.2 in case of the latter; (b) measurement of the H-atom (the sole reducing radical) scavenging efficiency of dissolved O2 in such solution for maintaining exclusive oxidizing condition; and (c) employing these results, oxidation of phenol (C6H5OH) in such medium was probed and the reactions of its radical cation C6H5OH.+ against the phenoxyl radical C6H5O. were compared. Consequently, these studies also revealed an error in the previous measurement of the C6H5OH.+ pKa value (-2.0) which was corrected to -2.75. Details of these studies will be presented to show the efficacy of highly-acidic aqueous solutions as a regular medium for radiation chemical studies. (authors)

  3. Crystallization and immersion freezing ability of oxalic and succinic acid in multicomponent aqueous organic aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Robert; Höhler, Kristina; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Schnaiter, Martin

    2015-04-01

    This study reports on heterogeneous ice nucleation efficiency of immersed oxalic and succinic acid crystals in the temperature range from 245 to 215 K, as investigated with expansion cooling experiments using suspended particles. In contrast to previous laboratory work with emulsified solution droplets where the precipitation of solid inclusions required a preceding freezing/evaporation cycle, we show that immersed solids readily form by homogeneous crystallization within aqueous solution droplets of multicomponent organic mixtures, which have noneutonic compositions with an excess of oxalic or succinic acid. Whereas succinic acid crystals did not act as heterogeneous ice nuclei, immersion freezing by oxalic acid dihydrate crystals led to a reduction of the ice saturation ratio at freezing onset by 0.066-0.072 compared to homogeneous freezing, which is by a factor of 2 higher than previously reported laboratory data. These observations emphasize the importance of oxalic acid in heterogeneous ice nucleation.

  4. Acidity and hydrogen exchange dynamics of iron(II)-bound nitroxyl in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yin; Toubaei, Abouzar; Kong, Xianqi; Wu, Gang

    2014-10-20

    Nitroxyl-iron(II) (HNO-Fe(II)) complexes are often unstable in aqueous solution, thus making them very difficult to study. Consequently, many fundamental chemical properties of Fe(II)-bound HNO have remained unknown. Using a comprehensive multinuclear ((1)H, (15)N, (17)O) NMR approach, the acidity of the Fe(II)-bound HNO in [Fe(CN)5(HNO)](3-) was investigated and its pK(a) value was determined to be greater than 11. Additionally, HNO undergoes rapid hydrogen exchange with water in aqueous solution and this exchange process is catalyzed by both acid and base. The hydrogen exchange dynamics for the Fe(II)-bound HNO have been characterized and the obtained benchmark values, when combined with the literature data on proteins, reveal that the rate of hydrogen exchange for the Fe(II)-bound HNO in the interior of globin proteins is reduced by a factor of 10(6). PMID:25205463

  5. Effective Removal of Tetracycline from Aqueous Solution by Organic Acid-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Liang; Liang, Yuyan; Chen, Xuelan; Xu, Wei; Wu, Kesheng; Wei, Hua; Xiong, Yonghua

    2016-03-01

    Self-assembled iron oxide nanocomposites are good magnetic nano-adsorbents that can be prepared using simple methods. Four types of organic acid-functionalised (oleic acid, undecenoic acid, caprylic acid or hexanoic acid) magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were synthesised through a one-pot chemisorption method for the removal of tetracycline (TC) from aqueous solution. The undecenoic acid-coated MNPs (UA-MNPs) exhibited the highest adsorption efficiency and can be easily retrieved with a low-gradient magnetic separator (0.4 Tesla) at pH 5.0 aqueous solution. The TC adsorption process on the UA-MNPs followed the Langmuir isotherm and the maximum adsorption capacities increased from 86.96 mg g(-1) to 222.2 mg g(-1) with the increase in temperature from 288 K to 318 K. The kinetics of adsorption fits pseudo-second-order model perfectly with a rate constant, 5.946 g mg(-1) min(-1) at 298 K. The positive values of the enthalpy (AH) and the negative value of the free energy (AG) indicated an endothermic and spontaneous adsorption process of TC on the UA-MNPs. Moreover, the UA-MNPs possessed excellent ability to adsorb the other three major types of TC antibiotics, including chlortetracycline, oxytetracycline and doxycycline. PMID:27455621

  6. DISSOLUTION OF PLUTONIUM METAL IN 8-10 M NITRIC ACID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudisill, T. S.; Pierce, R. A.

    2012-07-02

    The H-Canyon facility will be used to dissolve Pu metal for subsequent purification and conversion to plutonium dioxide (PuO{sub 2}) using Phase II of HB-Line. To support the new mission, the development of a Pu metal dissolution flowsheet which utilizes concentrated (8-10 M) nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) solutions containing potassium fluoride (KF) is required. Dissolution of Pu metal in concentrated HNO{sub 3} is desired to eliminate the need to adjust the solution acidity prior to purification by anion exchange. The preferred flowsheet would use 8-10 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.015-0.07 M KF, and 0.5-1.0 g/L Gd to dissolve the Pu up to 6.75 g/L. An alternate flowsheet would use 8-10 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.05-0.2 M KF, and 1-2 g/L B to dissolve the Pu. The targeted average Pu metal dissolution rate is 20 mg/min-cm{sup 2}, which is sufficient to dissolve a “standard” 2250-g Pu metal button in 24 h. Plutonium metal dissolution rate measurements showed that if Gd is used as the nuclear poison, the optimum dissolution conditions occur in 10 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.04-0.05 M KF, and 0.5-1.0 g/L Gd at 112 to 116 °C (boiling). These conditions will result in an estimated Pu metal dissolution rate of ~11-15 mg/min-cm{sup 2} and will result in dissolution times of 36-48 h for standard buttons. The recommended minimum and maximum KF concentrations are 0.03 M and 0.07 M, respectively. The data also indicate that lower KF concentrations would yield dissolution rates for B comparable to those observed with Gd at the same HNO{sub 3} concentration and dissolution temperature. To confirm that the optimal conditions identified by the dissolution rate measurements can be used to dissolve Pu metal up to 6.75 g/L in the presence of representative concentrations of Fe and Gd or B, a series of experiments was performed to demonstrate the flowsheets. In three of the five experiments, the offgas generation rate during the dissolution was measured and samples were analyzed for hydrogen gas (H{sub 2}). The use of

  7. Adsorption of and acidic dye from aqueous solution by surfactant modified bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper is to study the adsorption of an acidic dye S. Y. 4 GL (i.e: Supranol yellow 4GL) from aqueous solution on inorgano-organo clay. Bentonite is a kind of natural clay with good exchanging ability. By exchanging its inter lamellar cations with Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and hydroxy aluminic or chromium poly cations, the properties of natural bentonite can be greatly improved. (Author)

  8. Degradation of acid red 14 by silver ion-catalyzed peroxydisulfate oxidation in an aqueous solution

    OpenAIRE

    RASOULIFARD, Mohammad Hossein; MOHAMMADI, Seied Mohammad Mahdi DOUST

    2012-01-01

    Silver ion (Ag1+)-catalyzed peroxydisulfate was studied for the degradation of acid red 14 (AR-14) in an aqueous medium. The effect of different parameters, such as temperature, peroxydisulfate concentration, and dye and Ag1+ concentrations, were investigated. Application of Ag1+-catalyzed peroxydisulfate, as an advanced oxidation process, introduces an effectual method for wastewater treatment. An accelerated reaction using S2O82- to destroy dyes can be achieved via chemical activat...

  9. The stability of the acetic acid dimer in microhydrated environments and in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pašalić, Hasan; Tunega, Daniel; Aquino, Adélia J A; Haberhauer, Georg; Gerzabek, Martin H; Lischka, Hans

    2012-03-28

    The thermodynamic stability of the acetic acid dimer conformers in microhydrated environments and in aqueous solution was studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations using the density functional based tight binding (DFTB) method. To confirm the reliability of this method for the system studied, density functional theory (DFT) and second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) calculations were performed for comparison. Classical optimized potentials for liquid simulations (OPLS) force field dynamics was used as well. One focus of this work was laid on the study of the capabilities of water molecules to break the hydrogen bonds of the acetic acid dimer. The barrier for insertion of one water molecule into the most stable cyclic dimer is found to lie between 3.25 and 4.8 kcal mol(-1) for the quantum mechanical methods, but only at 1.2 kcal mol(-1) for OPLS. Starting from different acetic acid dimer structures optimized in gas phase, DFTB dynamics simulations give a different picture of the stability in the microhydrated environment (4 to 12 water molecules) as compared to aqueous solution. In the former case all conformers are converted to the hydrated cyclic dimer, which remains stable over the entire simulation time of 1 ns. These results demonstrate that the considered microhydrated environment is not sufficient to dissociate the acetic acid dimer. In aqueous solution, however, the DFTB dynamics shows dissociation of all dimer structures (or processes leading thereto) starting after about 50 ps, demonstrating the capability of the water environment to break up the relatively strong hydrogen bridges. The OPLS dynamics in the aqueous environment shows--in contrast to the DFTB results--immediate dissociation, but a similar long-term behavior.

  10. Acceleration of suspending single-walled carbon nanotubes in BSA aqueous solution induced by amino acid molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Haruhisa; Nakamura, Ayako; Horie, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) suspensions in aqueous media were prepared using bovine serum albumin (BSA) and amino acid molecules. It was found that the amino acid molecules clearly decreased the time required for suspending the SWCNTs in BSA aqueous solutions. Dynamic light scattering measurements revealed that the particle sizes of the SWCNTs suspended in aqueous media with and without amino acid molecules were approximately the same and stable for more than one week. The zeta potential values of the BSA molecules in pure water and amino acid aqueous solutions were different, and these values were also reflected in the surface potential of colloidal SWCNT particles in the corresponding aqueous media, thus inducing different dispersibility of SWCNTs in aqueous media. Pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance measurements showed that the interactions between the SWCNTs and the amino acid molecules are weak and comprise chemical exchange interactions and not bonding interactions. Amino acid molecules play a fascinating role in the preparation of SWCNT suspensions in BSA aqueous media by increasing electrostatic repulsive interactions between SWCNT colloidal particles and consequently enhancing the dispersion ability of the BSA molecules.

  11. The Meteorology and Chemistry of High Nitric-Acid Episodes at the South Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, William; Davis, Douglas

    2016-04-01

    Between 1998 and 2007, a series of field experiments carried out at the South Pole and with aircraft over a wider area revealed a very chemically active boundary layer overlying the east Antarctic ice sheet during the Austral summer. An early discovery was unexpectedly high concentrations of nitric acid (NO) at the South Pole. These were argued to be a result of the UV pholoysis of reactive nitrogen in surface and/or near-surface snow followed by subsequent confinement and non-linear HOx/NOx chemistry within a thin stable atmospheric boundary layer. The concentrations of NO also demonstrated daily, intraseasonal, as well as interannual variability as seen in the four field programs. This paper seeks to elucidate the interplay of large-to-small scale meteorology and chemistry at the South Pole that leads to highly variable NO concentrations and to examine boundary layer depth effects on NO in years when no direct measurements were available, in particular during the latest field program in 2006-2007. The importance of the South Pole is that it, unlike other high-latitude sites, has no diurnal cycle to disturb the evolution of the mostly stable boundary layer and its physics and chemistry. In the spring, as the solar elevation angle increases, nitrate photolysis rates increase. At the same time, the stratospheric vortex warms and with its breakup, the total column ozone increases leading to decreased photolysis rates. In addition, following the formation of the thermal tropopause in early spring, the tropospheric circulation over Antarctica changes dramatically, affecting the transport and dominant source regions for warm air and clouds arriving at the South Pole. The timing of the final warming ranged from early-November to mid-December for the four field experiment years. During the 30 days prior to the final increase in column ozone, as the thermal tropopause forms (~100 hPa), the winds at 300 hPa become bimodal, either along the eastern side of the Weddell Sea

  12. Insights Into the Aqueous History of Mars from Acid-Sulfate Weathered Phyllosilicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, P. I.; Ming, D. W.; Rampe, E. B.; Morris, R. V.

    2016-01-01

    Phyllosilicates on Mars are thought to have formed during Mars' earliest Noachian geologic era (approx. 4.1-3.7 Ga). Sulfate formation, on the other hand, requires more acidic conditions which are thought to have occurred later during Mars' Hesperian era (approx. 3.7-3.0 Ga). Therefore, regions on Mars where phyllosilicates and sulfates are found in close proximity to each other provide evidence for the aqueous conditions during this global transition. Both phyllosilicates and sulfates form in the presence of water and thus give clues to the aqueous history of Mars and its potential for habitability. Phyllosilicates that formed during the Noachian era would have been weathered by the prevailing acidic conditions that define the Hesperian. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to characterize the alteration products of acid-sulfate weathered phyllosilicates in laboratory experiments, focusing on the Fe/Mg-smectites commonly identified on Mars. We also compare our results to observations of phyllosilicates and sulfates on Mars in regions such as Endeavour Crater and Mawrth Vallis to understand the formation process of sulfates and constrain the aqueous history of these regions.

  13. Hydrofluoric-nitric-sulphuric-acid surface treatment of tungsten for carbon fibre-reinforced composite hybrids in space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanerva, M.; Johansson, L.-S.; Campbell, J. M.; Revitzer, H.; Sarlin, E.; Brander, T.; Saarela, O.

    2015-02-01

    Hybrid material systems, such as combinations of tungsten foils and carbon fibre-reinforced plastic (CFRP), are replacing metal alloy concepts in spacecraft enclosures. However, a good adhesion between the tungsten oxide scale and the epoxy resin used is required. Here, the effects of a hydrofluoric-nitric-sulphuric-acid (HFNS) treatment on tungsten oxides and subsequent adhesion to CFRP are analysed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and fracture testing. The work shows that HFNS treatment results in decreased oxygen content, over 50% thinner tungsten trioxide (WO3) layer and increased nano-roughness on thin tungsten foils. Fracture testing established a 39% increase in the average critical strain for tungsten-CFRP specimens after HFNS treatment was carried out on tungsten. The effect of the oxide scale modification regarding the critical strain energy release rate was ΔGc≈ 8.4 J/m2.

  14. Microstructure and Corrosion Behavior of Hf-40 Wt Pct Ti Alloy in Nitric Acid Medium for Reprocessing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraj, J.; Ravi, K. R.; Mallika, C.; Kamachi Mudali, U.

    2016-06-01

    The Hf-40 wt pct Ti (Hf-Ti) alloy was developed for neutron poison application in the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. The furnace-cooled Hf-Ti sample exhibited the microstructure comprising equiaxed-α, lamellar-α, and feathery-α. The water-quenched Hf-Ti sample confirmed the presence of lath and internally twinned martensite. In comparison to the furnace-cooled sample, low corrosion current density and passivation current density values obtained for the water-quenched Hf-Ti in 6 M HNO3 at 298 K (25 °C) indicated better passivation ability. The martensitic structure exhibited high hardness (660 HV) and negligible corrosion rate in 6 M nitric acid at 298 K (25 °C). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) analysis confirmed that passivation behavior of this alloy was due to the protective passive film composed of TiO2 and HfO2.

  15. Microstructure and Corrosion Behavior of Hf-40 Wt Pct Ti Alloy in Nitric Acid Medium for Reprocessing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraj, J.; Ravi, K. R.; Mallika, C.; Kamachi Mudali, U.

    2016-09-01

    The Hf-40 wt pct Ti (Hf-Ti) alloy was developed for neutron poison application in the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. The furnace-cooled Hf-Ti sample exhibited the microstructure comprising equiaxed-α, lamellar-α, and feathery-α. The water-quenched Hf-Ti sample confirmed the presence of lath and internally twinned martensite. In comparison to the furnace-cooled sample, low corrosion current density and passivation current density values obtained for the water-quenched Hf-Ti in 6 M HNO3 at 298 K (25 °C) indicated better passivation ability. The martensitic structure exhibited high hardness (660 HV) and negligible corrosion rate in 6 M nitric acid at 298 K (25 °C). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) analysis confirmed that passivation behavior of this alloy was due to the protective passive film composed of TiO2 and HfO2.

  16. RECOVERY OF CARBOXYLIC ACIDS FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS BY LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION WITH A TRIISOOCTYLAMINE DILUENT SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Malmary

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Tertiary alkylamines in solution with organic diluents are attractive extractants for the recovery of carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous phases. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism for extraction of organic acids from water by a long-chain aliphatic tertiary amine. In order to attain this objective, we studied the liquid-liquid equilibria between the triisooctylamine + 1-octanol + n-heptane system as solvent and an aqueous solution of an individual carboxylic acid such as citric, lactic and malic acids. The experiments showed that the partition coefficient for a particular organic acid depends on the kind of solute, notably when the acid concentration in the aqueous phase is low. A mathematical model, where both chemical association and physical distribution are taken into consideration, is proposed. The model suggests that the various complexes obtained between amine and organic acids contribute to the distribution of the solute between the coexisting phases in equilibrium.

  17. Violent explosion after inadvertent mixing of nitric acid and isopropanol – Review 15 years later finds basic accident data corrupted, no evidence of broad learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedlund, Frank Huess; Folmer Nielsen, Merete; Hagen Mikkelsen, Sonja;

    2014-01-01

    to produce isopropyl nitrate (nitric acid 1-methylethyl ester, CAS 1712-64-7), a rocket propellant. It is argued that the accident has broad learning potential because of the widespread usage of the two chemicals across industries, the innocent nature of the human error and the severity of the consequence...

  18. Density, viscosity, and N2O solubility of aqueous amino acid salt and amine amino acid salt solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Density of amino acid salt and amine amino acid salt. ► Viscosity of amino acid salt and amine amino acid salt. ► Henry’s law constant/N2O solubility of amino acid salt and amine amino acid salt. ► Schumpe model. Correlations for density, viscosity, and N2O solubility. - Abstract: Physicochemical properties of aqueous amino acid salt (AAS), potassium salt of sarcosine (KSAR) and aqueous amine amino acid salt (AAAS), 3-(methylamino)propylamine/sarcosine (SARMAPA) have been studied. Densities of KSAR were measured for sarcosine mole fraction 0.02 to 0.25 for temperature range 298.15 K to 353.15 K, the viscosities were measured for 0.02 to 0.10 mole fraction sarcosine (293.15 K to 343.15 K) while the N2O solubilities were measured from 0.02 to 0.10 mole fraction sarcosine solutions (298.15 K to 363.15 K). Densities of SARMAPA were measured for sarcosine mole fraction 0.02 to 0.23 for temperature range (298.15 K to 353.15 K), viscosities were measured for 0.02 to 0.16 mole fraction sarcosine (293.15 K to 343.15 K) while the N2O solubilities were measured from 0.02 to 0.16 mole fraction sarcosine solutions (298.15 K to 343.15 K). Experimental results were correlated well with empirical correlations and N2O solubility results for KSAR were predicted adequately by a Schumpe model. The solubilities of N2O in AAS and AAAS are significantly lower than values for amines. The solubilities vary as: amine > AAAS > AAS.

  19. Response of marine and freshwater algae to nitric acid and elevated carbon dioxide levels simulating environmental effects of bolide impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boston, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    One of the intriguing facets of the Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction is the apparently selective pattern of mortality amongst taxa. Some groups of organisms were severely affected and some remained relatively unscathed as they went through the K/T boundary. While there is argument concerning the exact interpretation of the fossil record, one of the best documented extinctions at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary is that of the calcareous nannoplankton. These organisms include coccolithic algae and foraminiferans. Attempts to explain their decline at the K/T boundary center around chemistry which could affect their calcium carbonate shells while leaving their silica-shelled cousins less affected or unaffected. Two environmental consequences of an extraterrestrial body impact which were suggested are the production of large quantities of nitrogen oxides generated by the shock heating of the atmosphere and the possible rise in CO2 from the dissolution of CaCO3 shells. Both of these phenomena would acidify the upper layers of the oceans and bodies of freshwater not otherwise buffered. The effects of nitric acid, carbon dioxide, or both factors on the growth and reproduction of calcareous marine coccoliths and non-calcareous marine and freshwater species of algae were considered. These experiments demonstrate that nitric acid and carbon dioxide have significant effects on important aspects of the physiology and reproduction of modern algae representative of extinct taxa thought to have suffered significant declines at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary. Furthermore, calcareous species showed more marked effects than siliceous species and marine species tested were more sensitive than freshwater species.

  20. Aldehydes, ketones, and carboxylic acids formed radiolytically in aqueous solutions of cyanides and simple nitriles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic search for aldehydes, ketones, and carboxylic acids was carried out in aqueous solutions of HCN, NH4CN, CH3CN, and C2H4CN, that had received multikilogray doses of 60Co γ radiation. About 30 radiolytic products were identified, among them a large variety of dicarboxylic and tricarboxylic acids. Some of them might be of significant interest in molecular evolution studies of prebiotic processes. They originate in the free-radical-initiated chemical reactions where the additional oligomerization processes are particularly important. Most of the radiolytic products appear in both cyanides and nitriles and point to the importance of reactions involving the carbon-nitrogen triple bond

  1. Application of Polyaniline Nano Composite for the Adsorption of Acid Dye from Aqueous Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Baseri, J.Raffiea; P. N. Palanisamy; P. Sivakumar

    2012-01-01

    In this research, Polyaniline coated sawdust (Polyaniline nano composite) was synthesized via direct chemical polymerization and used as an adsorbent for the removal of acid dye (Acid Violet 49) from aqueous solutions. The effect of some important parameters such as pH, initial concentration of dye, contact time and temperature on the removal efficiency was investigated in batch adsorption system. The adsorption capacity of PAC was high (96.84 %) at a pH of 3-4. The experimental data fitted w...

  2. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase lowers fatty acid oxidation in preeclampsia-like mice at early gestational stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Rui-qiong; SUN Min-na; YANG Zi

    2011-01-01

    Background Preeclampsia is one of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. It is associated with abnormal lipid metabolism, including fatty acid oxidation metabolism. Long chain 3-hydroxyacyI-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD) plays an indispensable role in the oxidation of fatty acids. It has been reported that nitric oxide (NO) is one of the regulatory factors of the fatty acid oxidation pathway. The aim of this research was to investigate whether the nitric oxide synthase (NOS)inhibitor L-NAME may cause down-regulation of LCHAD in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia.Methods Pregnant wild-type (WT) mice were treated with L-NAME or normal saline (NS) during gestation days 7-18 (early group), days 11-18 (mid group) and days 16-18 (late group), and apoE-/- mice served as a control. Systolic blood pressure (SBP), urine protein, feto-placental outcome, plasma lipid levels and NO concentrations were measured, and the expression of mRNA and protein for LCHAD in placental tissue were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting, respectively.Results In WT and apoE-/- mice, SBP and urinary protein increased following L-NAME injection. Fetal and placental weights and NO concentrations were reduced and total cholesterol, triglycerides and free fatty acid levels were increased in early and mid L-NAME groups in WT and apoE-/- mice, compared with the NS group. There was no significant difference between the late L-NAME group and NS group. RT-PCR and Western blotting analysis showed that the mRNA and protein levels of LCHAD expression were significantly down-regulated in the early and mid L-NAME groups but not in the late L-NAME group in the WT and apoE-/- mice compared with the corresponding NS groups.Conclusions Inhibition of NO in early and mid gestation in mice may cause hyperlipidemia and suppression of fatty acid oxidation, whereas preeclampsia-like conditions in late gestation may be a maternal vascular response to inhibition of NO.

  3. Statistical Thermodynamic Model for Surface Tension of Aqueous Organic Acids with Consideration of Partial Dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Hallie C; Dutcher, Cari S

    2016-06-30

    With statistical mechanics, an isotherm-based surface tension model for single solute aqueous solutions was derived previously (Wexler et al. J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2013) for the entire concentration range, from infinite dilution to pure liquid solute, as a function of solute activity. In recent work (Boyer et al. J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2015), empirical model parameters were reduced through physicochemical interpretations of both electrolyte and organic solutes, enabling surface tension predictions for systems where there is little or no data. The prior binary model is extended in the current work for the first time to treat multicomponent systems to predict surface tensions of partially dissociating organic acids (acetic, butyric, citric, formic, glutaric, maleic, malic, malonic, oxalic, propionic, and succinic acids). These organic acids are especially applicable to the study of atmospheric aqueous aerosols, due to their abundance in the atmosphere. In the model developed here, surface tension depends explicitly on activities of both the neutral organic and deprotonated components of the acid. The relative concentrations of the nondissociated and dissociated mole fractions are found using known dissociation constants. Model parameters strongly depend on molecular size, number of functional groups, O:C ratio, and number of carbons. For all organic acids in this study, fully predictive modeling of surface tensions is demonstrated. PMID:27219322

  4. Chemical weathering and the role of sulfuric and nitric acids in carbonate weathering: Isotopes (13C, 15N, 34S, and 18O) and chemical constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cai; Ji, Hongbing

    2016-05-01

    Multiple isotopes (13C-DIC, 34S and 18O-SO42-, 15N and 18O-NO3-) and water chemistry were used to evaluate weathering rates and associated CO2 consumption by carbonic acid and strong acids (H2SO4 and HNO3) in a typical karst watershed (Wujiang River, Southwest China). The dual sulfate isotopes indicate that sulfate is mainly derived from sulfide oxidation in coal stratum and sulfide-containing minerals, and dual nitrate isotopes indicate that nitrate is mainly derived from soil N and nitrification. The correlation between isotopic compositions and water chemistry suggests that sulfuric and nitric acids, in addition to carbonic acid, are involved in carbonate weathering. The silicate and carbonate weathering rates are 7.2 t km-2 yr-1 and 76 t km-2 yr-1, respectively. In comparison with carbonate weathering rates (43 t km-2 yr-1) by carbonic acid alone, the subsequent increase in rates indicates significant enhancement of weathering when combined with sulfuric and nitric acids. Therefore, the role of sulfuric and nitric acids in the rock weathering should be considered in the global carbon cycle.

  5. Aqueous Phase Photo-Oxidation of Succinic Acid: Changes in Hygroscopic Properties and Reaction Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, P. K.; Ninokawa, A.; Hofstra, J.; de Lijser, P.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles have been identified as important factors in understanding climate change. The extent to which aerosols affect climate is determined, in part, by hygroscopic properties which can change as a result of atmospheric processing. Dicarboxylic acids, components of atmospheric aerosol, have a wide range of hygroscopic properties and can undergo oxidation and photolysis reactions in the atmosphere. In this study, the hygroscopic properties of succinic acid aerosol, a non-hygroscopic four carbon dicarboxylic acid, were measured with a humidified tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) and compared to reaction products resulting from the aqueous phase photo-oxidation reaction of hydrogen peroxide and succinic acid. Reaction products were determined and quantified using gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID) and GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) as a function of hydrogen peroxide:succinic acid concentration ratio and photolysis time. Although reaction products include larger non-hygroscopic dicarboxylic acids (e.g. adipic acid) and smaller hygroscopic dicarboxylic acids (e.g. malonic and oxalic acids), comparison of hygroscopic growth curves to Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) predictions suggests that the hygroscopic properties of many of the product mixtures are largely independent of the hygroscopicity of the individual components. This study provides a framework for future investigations to fully understand and predict the role of chemical reactions in altering atmospheric conditions that affect climate.

  6. Radiolysis of aqueous solutions of acetic acid in the presence of Na-montmorillonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Negron-Mendoza, A.; Ramos, S.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1990-01-01

    The gamma-irradiation of 0.8 mol dm-3 aqueous, oxygen-free acetic acid solutions was investigated in the presence or absence of Na-montmorillonite. H2, CH4, CO, CO2, and several polycarboxylic acids were formed in all systems. The primary characteristics observed in the latter system were: (1) Higher yield of the decomposition of acetic acid; (2) Lower yield of the formation of polycarboxylic acids; (3) No effect on the formation of methane; (4) Higher yield of the formation of carbon dioxide; and (5) The reduction of Fe3+ in the octahedral sites of Na-montmorillonite. A possible reaction scheme was proposed to account for the observed changes. The results are important in understanding heterogeneous processes in radiation catalysis and might be significant to prebiotic chemistry.

  7. Recovery of acetic acid from an aqueous pyrolysis oil phase by reactive extraction using tri-n-octylamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rasrendra, C. B.; Girisuta, B.; van de Bovenkamp, H. H.; Winkelman, J. G. M.; Leijenhorst, E. J.; Venderbosch, R. H.; Windt, M.; Meier, D.; Heeres, H. J.

    2011-01-01

    The application of reactive extraction to isolate organic acids, particularly acetic acid, from the aqueous stream of phase splitted pyrolysis oil using a long chain aliphatic tertiary amine is reported. Acetic acid recovery was optimized by selecting the proper amine and diluent combination and adj

  8. Stability of clavulanic acid in PEG/citrate and liquid–liquid extraction in aqueous two-phase system

    OpenAIRE

    Carneiro-da-Cunha, M. N.; Souza, K. P. S.; Mota, A; J.A. Teixeira; Porto, C S; Porto, Tatiana Souza; Porto, Ana L. F.

    2014-01-01

    β-Lactamases are enzymes responsible for the hydrolysis of β-lactam antibiotics, being produced by several pathogenic bacteria. Clavulanic acid is a commercially and clinically important β-lactamase inhibitor, its extraction being possible by the application of aqueous two-phase system. In this study, clavulanic acid stability was investigated at different molar mass PEG (400, 1 000 and 20 000 g mol−1) and at different citrate concentrations (5 and 20%) PEG/citrate aqueous-two phase systems (...

  9. Effects of aqueous saffron extract on nitric oxide production by two human carcinoma cell lines: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) and laryngeal carcinoma (Hep2)

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamad Reza Parizadeh; Fahime Ghafoori Gharib; Ali Reza Abbaspour; Jalil Tavakol Afshar; Majid Ghayour-Mobarhan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: A number of studies have demonstrated the potential antitumor effects of saffron and its constituents on different malignant cells in vitro. It has been reported that a novel glycoconjugate isolated from corms and callus of saffron possesses cytotoxic activity against different tumor cellswith nitric oxide (NO) production. These data suggest that the cytotoxic effect of saffron extract may be related to an effect on nitric oxide production. The aim of the study was to investigate t...

  10. Hydrogen bonding of single acetic acid with water molecules in dilute aqueous solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In separation processes,hydrogen bonding has a very significant effect on the efficiency of isolation of acetic acid (HOAc) from HOAc/H2O mixtures. This intermolecular interaction on aggregates composed of a single HOAc molecule and varying numbers of H2O molecules has been examined by using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations (AIMD) and quantum chemical calculations (QCC). Thermodynamic data in aqueous solution were obtained through the self-consistent reaction field calculations and the polarizable continuum model. The aggregation free energy of the aggregates in gas phase as well as in aqueous system shows that the 6-membered ring is the most favorable structure in both states. The relative stability of the ring structures inferred from the thermodynamic properties of the QCC is consistent with the ring distributions of the AIMD simulation. The study shows that in dilute aqueous solution of HOAc the more favorable molecular interaction is the hydrogen bonding between HOAc and H2O molecules,resulting in the separation of acetic acid from the HOAc/H2O mixtures with more difficulty than usual.

  11. Adsorption and Desorption Behavior of Tannic Acid in Aqueous Solution on Polyaniline Adsorbent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jiahong; JI Yanfen; DING Shaolan; MA Hongrui; HAN Xiaojing

    2013-01-01

    Tannic acid is generally considered as one of polyphenolic pollutants,which may cause severe threats to the environment.In this study,polyaniline adsorbent was synthesized by chemical oxidation to remove tannic acid in aqueous solutions.The adsorption amount of tannic acid varied greatly with pH of solution and strong adsorption was at pH 5.8-6.7.Coexisting cations,such as Na+,K+,and Ca2+,can enhance the adsorption of tannic acid on polyaniline,which may be contributed to the electrostatic interaction between tannic acid and polyaniline.The adsorption process could be well described by Langmuir model and the maximum adsorption capacity was 117.65 mg·g-1 at 35 ℃ and pH 6.0.The thermodynamic parameters calculated from the adsorption isotherms indicate that the adsorption of tannic acid is spontaneous and endothermic process.The polyaniline saturated with tannic acid can be desorbed in alkaline solution and regenerated adsorbent can be used repeatedly with high adsorption capacity,which implies that polyaniline adsorbents have a great potential in water purification for the removal of tannic acid.

  12. Interaction of Atmospheric-Pressure Air Microplasmas with Amino Acids as Fundamental Processes in Aqueous Solution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renwu Zhou

    Full Text Available Plasma medicine is a relatively new field that investigates potential applications of cold atmospheric-pressure plasmas in bioengineering, such as for bacterial inactivation and degradation of organic molecules in water. In order to enunciate mechanisms of bacterial inactivation at molecular or atomic levels, we investigated the interaction of atmospheric-pressure air microplasmas with amino acids in aqueous solution by using high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS. Results show that the oxidation effect of plasma-induced species on the side chains of the amino acids can be categorized into four types, namely hydroxylation, nitration, dehydrogenation and dimerization. In addition, relative activities of amino acids resulting from plasma treatment come in descending order as follows: sulfur-containing carbon-chain amino acids > aromatic amino acids > five-membered ring amino acids > basic carbon-chain amino acids. Since amino acids are building blocks of proteins vital to the growth and reproduction of bacteria, these results provide an insight into the mechanism of bacterial inactivation by plasma.

  13. Separation of Acetic Acid from Aqueous Solution using Various Organic Solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Zaved Hossain Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 800x600 Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 In the study a model has been developed to separate the acetic acid from aqueous solution by liquid-liquid extraction and find out the proper solvent for this separation. Various solvents such as n-butanol, iso butanol, amyl alcohol and ethyl acetate are used for separation of acetic acid from water. The binodal curves (mutual solubility curves for acetic acid distributed between water and an organic solvent were obtained by titrating known mixtures of two components (water and solvents with the third component acetic acid to the point of first appearance of permanent turbidity. In order to determine the tie-lines, the absorbance of the coexisting phases, obtained by the separation of ternary mixtures within the binodal curve are needed to be determined. The absorbance of each point had been determined by a UV spectrophotometer. Distribution diagrams are obtained by plotting weight percent of acetic acid in solvent phase against the weight percent of acetic acid in water phase. Selectivity diagrams are also obtained by plotting (wt. % of acetic acid / (percent of acetic acid + percent of water in solvent phase against the same quantity in the diluent phase. The separation factor is determined numerically from the tie-line data.

  14. Modeling of density of aqueous solutions of amino acids with the statistical associating fluid theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji Peijun [College of Chemical Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Feng Wei [College of Life Science and Technology, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)]. E-mail: fengwei@mail.buct.edu.cn; Tan Tianwei [College of Life Science and Technology, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2007-07-15

    The density of aqueous solutions of amino acids has been modeled with the statistical associating fluid theory (SAFT) equation of state. The modeling is accomplished by extending the previously developed new method to determine the SAFT parameters for amino acids. The modeled systems include {alpha}-alanine/H{sub 2}O, {beta}-alanine/H{sub 2}O, proline/H{sub 2}O, L-asparagine/H{sub 2}O, L-glutamine/H{sub 2}O, L-histidine/H{sub 2}O, serine/H{sub 2}O, glycine/H{sub 2}O, alanine/H{sub 2}O/sucrose, DL-valine/H{sub 2}O/sucrose, arginine/H{sub 2}O/sucrose, serine/H{sub 2}O/ethylene glycol, and glycine/H{sub 2}O/ethylene glycol. The density of binary solutions of amino acids has been correlated or predicted with a high precision. And then the density of multicomponent aqueous solutions of amino acids has been modeled based on the modeling results of binary systems, and a high accuracy of density calculations has been obtained. Finally, the water activities of DL-valine/H{sub 2}O, glycine/H{sub 2}O, and proline/H{sub 2}O have been predicted without using binary interaction parameters, and good results have been obtained.

  15. Determination of hydroxyl radicals with salicylic acid in aqueous nitrate and nitrite solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xi; ZHAN Man-jun; KONG Ling-ren; WANG Lian-sheng

    2004-01-01

    The qualitative and quantitative analyses of reactive oxygen species are essential to determine their steady-state concentration and related reaction mechanisms in environmental aquatic systems. In this study, salicylic acid was employed as an innovative molecular probe of hydroxyl radical(OH) generated in aqueous nitrate and nitrite solutions through photochemical reactions. Kinetic studies showed that the steady-state concentrations of OH in aqueous NO3-(10 mmol/L, pH = 5) and NO2- (10 mmol/L, pH = 5) solutions under ultraviolet irradiation were at a same magnitude, 10-15 mol/L. Apparent quantum yields of OH at 313 nm were measured as 0.011 and 0.07 for NO3- and NO2- respectively, all comparable to the results of previous studies.

  16. Cross-talk between calcium-calmodulin and nitric oxide in abscisic acid signaling in leaves of maize plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianrong Sang; Aying Zhang; Fan Lin; Mingpu Tan; Mingyi Jiang

    2008-01-01

    Using pharmacological and biochemical approaches,the signaling pathways between hydrogen peroxide (H2O2),calcium (Ca2+)-calmodulin (CAM),and nitric oxide (NO) in abscisic acid (ABA)-induced antioxidant defense were investigated in leaves of maize (Zea mays L.) plants.Treatments with ABA,H2O2,and CaCI2 induced increases in the generation of NO in maize mesophyll cells and the activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the cytosolic and microsomal fractions of maize leaves.However,such increases were blocked by the pretreatments with Ca2+ inhibitors and CaM antagonists.Meanwhile,pretreatments with two NOS inhibitors also suppressed the Ca2+-induced increase in the production of NO.On the other hand,treatments with ABA and the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) also led to increases in the concentration of cytosolic Ca2+ in protoplasts of mesophyll cells and in the expression of calmodulin 1 (CaMI) gene and the contents of CaM in leaves of maize plants,and the increases induced by ABA were reduced by the pretreatments with a NO scavenger and a NOS inhibitor.Moreover,SNP-induced increases in the expression of the antioxidant genes superoxide dismutase 4 (SOD4),cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase (cAPX),and glutathione reductase 1 (GRI) and the activities of the chloroplastic and cytosolic antioxidant enzymes were arrested by the pretreatments with Ca2+ inhibitors and CaM antagonists.Our results suggest that Ca2+-CaM functions both upstream and downstream of NO production,which is mainly from NOS,in ABA- and H2O2-induced antioxidant defense in leaves of maize plants.

  17. Nitric Oxide Mediates 5-Aminolevulinic Acid-Induced Antioxidant Defense in Leaves of Elymus nutans Griseb. Exposed to Chilling Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juanjuan Fu

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO and 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA are both extremely important signalling molecules employed by plants to control many aspects of physiology. In the present study, the role of NO in ALA-induced antioxidant defense in leaves of two sources of Elymus nutans Griseb. (Damxung, DX and Zhengdao, ZD was investigated. Chilling stress enhanced electrolyte leakage, accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and superoxide radical in two E. nutans, which were substantially alleviated by exogenous ALA and NO application. Pretreatment with NO scavenger PTIO or NOS inhibitor L-NNA alone and in combination with ALA induced enhancements in electrolyte leakage and the accumulation of MDA, H2O2 and superoxide radical in leaves of DX and ZD exposed to chilling stress, indicating that the inhibition of NO biosynthesis reduced the chilling resistance of E. nutans and the ALA-enhanced chilling resistance. Further analyses showed that ALA and NO enhanced antioxidant defense and activated plasma membrane (PM H+-ATPase and decreased the accumulation of ROS induced by chilling stress. A pronounced increase in nitric oxide synthase (NOS activity and NO release by exogenous ALA treatment was found in chilling-resistant DX plants exposed to chilling stress, while only a little increase was observed in chilling-sensitive ZD. Furthermore, inhibition of NO accumulation by PTIO or L-NNA blocked the protective effect of exogenous ALA, while both exogenous NO treatment and inhibition of endogenous NO accumulation did not induce ALA production. These results suggested that NO might be a downstream signal mediating ALA-induced chilling resistance in E. nutans.

  18. New Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase and Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitors, Nalidixic Acid Linked to Isatin Schiff Bases via Certain l-Amino Acid Bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Naglah

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A series of new Schiff bases were synthesized by condensation of isatins with the nalidixic acid-l-amino acid hydrazides. Prior to hydrazide formation, a peptide linkage has been prepared via coupling of nalidixic acid with appropriate l-amino acid methyl esters to yield 3a–c. The chemical structures of the new Schiff bases (5b and 5d–h were confirmed by means of IR, NMR, mass spectroscopic, and elemental analyses. The anti-inflammatory activity of these Schiff bases was evaluated via measurement of the expressed inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophage cells model. The Schiff bases exhibited significant dual inhibitory effect against the induction of the pro-inflammatory iNOS and COX-2 proteins with variable potencies. However, they strongly down-regulated the iNOS expression to the level of 16.5% ± 7.4%–42.2% ± 19.6% compared to the effect on COX-2 expression (<56.4% ± 3.1% inhibition at the same concentration (10 μM. The higher iNOS inhibition activity of the tested Schiff bases, relative to that of COX-2, seems to be a reflection of the combined suppressive effects exerted by their nalidixic acid, isatins (4a–c, and l-amino acid moieties against iNOS expression. These synthesized nalidixic acid-l-amino acid-isatin conjugates can be regarded as a novel class of anti-inflammatory antibacterial agents.

  19. Toxicity of aqueous C70-gallic acid suspension in Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seda, Brandon C; Ke, Pu-Chun; Mount, Andrew S; Klaine, Stephen J

    2012-01-01

    The present study assessed the toxic effects of stable aqueous colloidal suspensions of gallic-acid-stabilized C(70) fullerene on Daphnia magna. The suspensions were stabilized through noncovalent surface modification with gallic acid. In addition to whole-organism responses, changes in antioxidative processes in D. magna were quantified. Acute toxicity was observed with 96LC50 for C(70) -gallic acid of 0.4 ± 0.1 mg/L C(70) . Daphnia magna fecundity was significantly reduced in 21-d bioassays at C(70) -gallic aqcid concentrations below quantifiable limits. Antioxidant enzyme activities of glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase as well as lipid peroxidation suggested that exposed organisms experienced oxidative stress. Microscopic techniques used to determine cellular toxicity via apoptosis proved unsuccessful.

  20. ADSORPTION OF TANNIN ACID ONTO AN AMINATED MACROPOROUS RESIN FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A macroporous polymeric adsorbent NG-8 was synthesized with divinylbenzene using conventional suspension polymerization technique. Its aminated product NG-9 was prepared by introducing tertiary amino groups into NG-8 for removal of tannin acid from aqueous solutions. NG-9 could be used directly without a wetting process and had higher adsorption capacity than NG-8, which might be attributed to the enhanced adsorbent-adsorbate interaction due to the tertiary amino groups on the polymeric matrix. The Langmuir equation was successfully employed to describe the adsorption process. The adsorption enthalpy change further validated the uptake of tannin acid on NG-9 to be an enhanced physical adsorption because of the Lewis acid-base interaction. In addition, adsorption kinetic studies testified that the tertiary amino groups on the polymer matrix could decrease the adsorption rate maybe for the hindrance of the tertiary amino groups and water clusters built up.

  1. Solution extraction of several lanthanides from nitric acid with isohexyl-BTP in [Cnmim][NTf2] ionic liquid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵龙; 董珍; 马国龙; 袁威津

    2015-01-01

    The extraction behavior of several lanthanides (La3+, Eu3+, Lu3+) from nitric acid (HNO3) solution was studied using a novel extraction system based on 2,6-bis(5,6-dihexyl-1,2,4-triazin-3-yl) pyridine (isohexyl-BTP) as extractant in 1-alkyl-3-me-thylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsufonyl)imide ([Cnmim][NTf2]) ionic liquid. Isohexyl-BTP in ionic liquids exhibited remarkably better extraction performance for lanthanides than that in octanol-dodecane (3:7 v/v) system. Lower HNO3 concentration and short alkyl chain length of [Cnmim]+were more favourable for removal of lanthanides. Besides, it was confirmed that isohexyl-BTP in ILs formed a 1:3 complex [Ln(BTP)3(NO3)n](3–n)+(n=0, 1) by slope analysis. In addition, [C2mim][NTf2] preferred to extract lanthanides via a cation exchange mechanism at lower acidity, which was proved via UV-Vis measurement. It was speculated that extraction mechanism shifted from cation exchange to neutral species extraction with increase in HNO3 concentration and alkyl chain length of [Cnmim]+due to the H+completion, NO3–inhibition and hydrophobicity of IL.

  2. Macroscopic, thermodynamic, kinetic and microscopic study of nitric acid pickling of Elektron 21 (EV31A magnesium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Mouls

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of pickling of the EL21T6 substrate in a nitric acid bath firstly provided knowledge of the influence of the different experimental parameters (concentration of acid, temperature and stirring of the solution in relation to the etching rate. This experimental part led to the choice of standard pickling (Tbath = 25 °C, moderate stirring (250 rpm, [HNO3] = 1.20 mol/L, duration of 2 min so as to obtain constant removal of material, even after several uses of the pickling bath. SEM observations also confirmed that in these operating conditions, pickling concerns both the grains of the matrix and the precipitates of type Mg3(Nd, Gd, leading to uniform removal of material from the surface. Working from a number of assumptions, thermodynamic and chemical kinetic studies then allowed a pickling mechanism to be proposed and led to obtaining values for the corresponding kinetic parameters (order of reaction, constant of mean rate, activation energy to be obtained.

  3. The Arabidopsis aleurone layer responds to nitric oxide, gibberellin, and abscisic acid and is sufficient and necessary for seed dormancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethke, Paul C; Libourel, Igor G L; Aoyama, Natsuyo; Chung, Yong-Yoon; Still, David W; Jones, Russell L

    2007-03-01

    Seed dormancy is a common phase of the plant life cycle, and several parts of the seed can contribute to dormancy. Whole seeds, seeds lacking the testa, embryos, and isolated aleurone layers of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) were used in experiments designed to identify components of the Arabidopsis seed that contribute to seed dormancy and to learn more about how dormancy and germination are regulated in this species. The aleurone layer was found to be the primary determinant of seed dormancy. Embryos from dormant seeds, however, had a lesser growth potential than those from nondormant seeds. Arabidopsis aleurone cells were examined by light and electron microscopy, and cell ultrastructure was similar to that of cereal aleurone cells. Arabidopsis aleurone cells responded to nitric oxide (NO), gibberellin (GA), and abscisic acid, with NO being upstream of GA in a signaling pathway that leads to vacuolation of protein storage vacuoles and abscisic acid inhibiting vacuolation. Molecular changes that occurred in embryos and aleurone layers prior to germination were measured, and these data show that both the aleurone layer and the embryo expressed the NO-associated gene AtNOS1, but only the embryo expressed genes for the GA biosynthetic enzyme GA3 oxidase.

  4. Aqueous extracts of Mozambican plants as alternative and environmentally safe acid-base indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macuvele, Domingos Lusitaneo Pier; Sithole, Gerre Zebedias Samo; Cesca, Karina; Macuvele, Suzana Lília Pinare; Matsinhe, Jonas Valente

    2016-06-01

    Indicators are substances that change color as the pH of the medium. Many of these substances are dyes of synthetic origin. The mulala plant (Euclea natalensis), which roots are commonly used by rural communities for their oral hygiene, and roseira (Hibiscus rosa-sinensis), an ornamental plant, are abundant in Mozambique. Currently, synthetic acid-base indicators are most commonly used but have environmental implications and, on the other hand, are expensive products, so the demand for natural indicators started. This study investigated the applicability of aqueous extracts of H. rosa-sinensis and E. natalensis as acid-base indicators. Ground on this work, the extracts can be used as acid-base indicators. On the basis of the absorption spectroscopy in both the UV-Vis region and previous studies, it was possible to preliminarily pinpoint anthocyanins and naphthoquinones as responsible for the shifting of colors depending on the pH range of aqueous extracts of H. rosa-sinensis and E. natalensis. These natural indicators are easily accessible, inexpensive, easy to extract, environmentally safe, and locally available. PMID:26936478

  5. Inhibition of gastric acid secretion by the aqueous extract and purified extracts of Stachytarpheta cayennensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela, S M; Souccar, C; Lima-Landman, M T; Lapa, A J

    1997-02-01

    Stachytarpheta cayennensis Schauer (Verbenaceae) is used in folk medicine to treat gastric and intestinal disturbances. The freeze-dried aqueous extract of the whole plant tested to rodents up to the dose of 2 g kg-1, p.o., did not produce signs of toxicity. The extract (0.5-2 g kg-1, p.o.) increased the intestinal motility and protected mice against ulcers induced by restraintin-cold, ethanol or indomethacin. Injected into the duodenal lumen the extract inhibited the basal acid secretion as well as that induced by histamine and bethanecol in pylorus-ligated mice. Partition of the aqueous extract in organic solvents yielded semipurified fractions whose antiacid activity guided further chemical purification. All the fractions were chromatographically characterized, the main substances in the active extract being flavonoids and amines; some substances were revealed only under UV light. The most purified active fraction obtained presented a specific activity 5-10 times higher than that detected in the original extract. Data from pharmacological studies indicate that the antiulcer activity of S. cayennensis is related to a specific inhibition of gastric acid secretion. Cholinergic and histaminergic stimulation of acid secretion were similarly reduced by the extracts suggesting inhibition of common steps in both pathways, possibly at the level of histamine release/H2 receptor interaction, or at the proton pump. Whatever the mechanisms involved, the present data confirm the plant effectiveness as antiacid/antiulcer and laxative. PMID:9063095

  6. The effect of electron irradiation on aqueous dispersions of humic acids and lignin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of irradiation by accelerated electrons on optical absorption of diluted aqueous solutions of lignin and humic acids was studied under two different irradiation conditions: when thickness of irradiated solution layer was less than the electrons range in the solution (mode I) and vice versa (mode II). Dominating agglomeration and sedimentation of the compounds has been demonstrated to take place under irradiation in mode I, maximal effect being achieved at absorbed dose 5–15 kGy. Under irradiation in mode II, i.e. when all the incident electrons were being absorbed, the radiation-induced coagulation was depressed. The dependence of radiation effect on irradiation conditions may be caused by stabilizing action of accumulating excess charge of absorbed electrons on negatively charged micelles of lignin and humic acids. - Highlights: • Electron irradiation promotes coagulation in aqueous dispersions of lignin and humic acids. • Maximal effect of coagulation is achieved at absorbed dose 5–15 kGy. • Negative charge accumulating by absorption of incident electrons results in stabilizing negatively charged micelles

  7. An Exact Method to Determine the Conductivity of Aqueous Solutions in Acid-Base Titrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Rodríguez-Laguna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Several works in the literature show that it is possible to establish the analytic equations to estimate the volume V of a strong base or a strong acid (Vb and Va, resp. being added to a solution of a substance or a mix of substances during an acid-base titration, as well as the equations to estimate the first derivative of the titration plot dpH/dV, and algebraic expressions to determine the buffer β capacity with dilution βdil. This treatment allows establishing the conditions of thermodynamic equilibria for all species within a system containing a mix of species from one or from various polyacid systems. The present work shows that it is possible to determine exactly the electric conductivity of aqueous solutions for these Brønsted acid-base titrations, because the functional relation between this property and the composition of the system in equilibrium is well known; this is achieved using the equivalent conductivity λi values of each of the ions present in a given system. The model employed for the present work confirms the experimental outcomes with the H2SO4, B(OH3, CH3COOH, and H3PO4 aqueous solutions’ titration.

  8. Determination of Uranyl Nitrate and Nitric Acid Based on Density and Conductivity Measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>Measurement of the uranium and acidity plays an important role in process control of spent fuel reprocessing. The main chemical compositions including a mount of U solution in spent fuel reprocessing

  9. Temperature effect on adiolysis of deaerated acid aqueous solutions of ferrous sulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the course of γ-radiolysis (60Co, dose rate=3.75 Gr/c, doses=1.575-3.375 kGr) of deaerated acid aqueous solution 3.6x10-3 mol/l of ferrous sulfate in the 20-250 deg C range the hydrogen molecules radiochemical yield per 100 eV of absorbed energy G(H2) decreases from 3.82±0.12 to 2.72±0.26, whereas G(Fe3+) independently of temperature is equal 8.34±0.36

  10. Aqueous phototransformation of bisphenol S: the competitive radical-attack pathway to p-hydroxybenzenesulfonic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaowen; Ma, Jiahai; Wang, Zhenpeng; Guo, Rongrong; Hu, Xuefeng

    2014-01-01

    The kinetics, environmental influencing factors, products and reaction mechanism of aqueous phototransformation of bisphenol S (BPS), as an alternative to bisphenol A, which is of environmental concern, were investigated. p-Hydroxybenzenesulfonic acid, as the major transformation product was confirmed by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry, electrospray ionization, ¹H nuclear magnetic resonance and fluorescence spectrum analysis. A reaction pathway was proposed based on the reactive oxygen species related results by electron paramagnetic resonance and radical traps. The competition of the excited state of BPS between transferring electron to O₂ to •O₂(-) and directly oxidizing H₂O to •OH was revealed.

  11. A Greener, Efficient Approach to Michael Addition of Barbituric Acid to Nitroalkene in Aqueous Diethylamine Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hany J. Al-Najjar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An efficient method for the synthesis of a variety of pyrimidine derivatives 3a–t by reaction of barbituric acids 1a,b as Michael donor with nitroalkenes 2a–k as Michael acceptor using an aqueous medium and diethylamine is described. This 1,4-addition strategy offers several advantages, such as using an economic and environmentally benign reaction media, high yields, versatility, and shorter reaction times. The synthesized compounds were identified by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, CHN, IR, and MS. The structure of compound 3a was further confirmed by single crystal X-ray structure determination.

  12. Growth and shape transformations of giant phospholipid vesicles upon interaction with an aqueous oleic acid suspension

    CERN Document Server

    Peterlin, Primoz; Kogej, Ksenija; Svetina, Sasa; Walde, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The interaction of two types of vesicle systems was investigated: micrometer-sized, giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) formed from 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and submicrometer-sized, large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) formed from oleic acid and oleate, both in a buffered aqueous solution (pH=8.8). Individual POPC GUVs were transferred with a micropipette into a suspension of oleic acid/oleate LUVs, and the shape changes of the GUVs were monitored using optical microscopy. The behavior of POPC GUVs upon transfer into a 0.8 mM suspension of oleic acid, in which oleic acid/oleate forms vesicular bilayer structures, was qualitatively different from the behavior upon transfer into a 0.3 mM suspension of oleic acid/oleate, in which oleic acid/oleate is predominantly present in the form of monomers and possibly non-vesicular aggregates. In both cases, changes in vesicle morphology were observed within tens of seconds after the transfer. Vesicle initially started to evaginate. In 60% of the...

  13. Degradation of hydroxycinnamic acid mixtures in aqueous sucrose solutions by the Fenton process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Danny M T; Zhang, Zhanying; Doherty, William O S

    2015-02-11

    The degradation efficiencies and behaviors of caffeic acid (CaA), p-coumaric acid (pCoA), and ferulic acid (FeA) in aqueous sucrose solutions containing the mixture of these hydroxycinnamic acids (HCAs) were studied by the Fenton oxidation process. Central composite design and multiresponse surface methodology were used to evaluate and optimize the interactive effects of process parameters. Four quadratic polynomial models were developed for the degradation of each individual acid in the mixture and the total HCAs degraded. Sucrose was the most influential parameter that significantly affected the total amount of HCA degraded. Under the conditions studied there was a sucrose in all reactions. The optimal values of the process parameters for a 200 mg/L HCA mixture in water (pH 4.73, 25.15 °C) and sucrose solution (13 mass %, pH 5.39, 35.98 °C) were 77% and 57%, respectively. Regression analysis showed goodness of fit between the experimental results and the predicted values. The degradation behavior of CaA differed from those of pCoA and FeA, where further CaA degradation is observed at increasing sucrose and decreasing solution pH. The differences (established using UV/vis and ATR-FTIR spectroscopy) were because, unlike the other acids, CaA formed a complex with Fe(III) or with Fe(III) hydrogen-bonded to sucrose and coprecipitated with lepidocrocite, an iron oxyhydroxide.

  14. Adsorption of naphthalene from aqueous solution onto fatty acid modified walnut shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mijia; Yao, Jun; Dong, Lifu; Sun, Jingjing

    2016-02-01

    The removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from aqueous solution is challenging to environmental technologists. Agricultural waste is apparently the most attractive materials in removing PAHs because of its abundance, renewability, and economic advantage. The adsorption of PAHs (e.g., naphthalene) onto walnut shell (WNS) and its fatty acid (e.g., capric acid, lauric acid, palmitic acid, and oleic acid)-modified equivalent were investigated in this work to develop low-cost biosorbents for hydrophobic organic compounds. Compared with other modified sorbents, oleic acid graftted walnut shell (OWNS) showed the maximum partition coefficient (4330 ± 8.8 L kg(-1)) because of its lowest polarity and highest aromaticity. The adsorption capacity (7210 μg g(-1)) of OWNS at the temperature of 298 K was observed for an initial naphthalene concentration of 25 mg L(-1) with contact time of 40 h, sorbent dosage of 1 g L(-1), and in neutral condition. Furthermore, the regeneration capability of OWNS implied that it was a promising biosorbent for naphthalene removal. PMID:26517393

  15. Degradation of hydroxycinnamic acid mixtures in aqueous sucrose solutions by the Fenton process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Danny M T; Zhang, Zhanying; Doherty, William O S

    2015-02-11

    The degradation efficiencies and behaviors of caffeic acid (CaA), p-coumaric acid (pCoA), and ferulic acid (FeA) in aqueous sucrose solutions containing the mixture of these hydroxycinnamic acids (HCAs) were studied by the Fenton oxidation process. Central composite design and multiresponse surface methodology were used to evaluate and optimize the interactive effects of process parameters. Four quadratic polynomial models were developed for the degradation of each individual acid in the mixture and the total HCAs degraded. Sucrose was the most influential parameter that significantly affected the total amount of HCA degraded. Under the conditions studied there was a analysis showed goodness of fit between the experimental results and the predicted values. The degradation behavior of CaA differed from those of pCoA and FeA, where further CaA degradation is observed at increasing sucrose and decreasing solution pH. The differences (established using UV/vis and ATR-FTIR spectroscopy) were because, unlike the other acids, CaA formed a complex with Fe(III) or with Fe(III) hydrogen-bonded to sucrose and coprecipitated with lepidocrocite, an iron oxyhydroxide. PMID:25585639

  16. Alginic acid and hyaluronic acid, effective stabilizers of carthamin red colour in aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koshi Saito

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Sodium salts and free forms of two heterosaccharides, alginic and hyaluronic acids were mixed with carthamin in a buffer at pH 5.5 and their preservation effects of carthamin red colour were screened after incubation for 24 h at 3-5oC in the dark. The effects observed were (alginic acid/hyaluronic acid, % on average: 69.3/60.3, for which the values are higher by 40.9 and 29.1%, respectively, compared with those of the control which was conducted with no addition of heterosaccharides. Alginic acid is a more promising stabilizer than haluronic acid, indicating that active groups such as hydroxyls, carboxyls and amino groups on the building units of the macromolecules are associated closely with the carthamin red colour preservation. The empirical outcomes are referred to the practical application of carthamin as a colourant of food products.

  17. Formation of isomers of anionic hemiesters of sugars and carbonic acid in aqueous medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Vagner B; Vidal, Denis T R; Francisco, Kelliton J M; Ducati, Lucas C; do Lago, Claudimir L

    2016-06-16

    Hemiesters of carbonic acid can be freely formed in aqueous media containing HCO3(-)/CO2 and mono- or poly-hydroxy compounds. Herein, (13)C NMR spectroscopy was used to identify isomers formed in aqueous solutions of glycerol (a prototype compound) and seven carbohydrates, as well as to estimate the equilibrium constant of formation (Keq). Although both isomers are formed, glycerol 1-carbonate corresponds to 90% of the product. While fructose and ribose form an indistinct mixture of isomers, the anomers of d-glucopyranose 6-carbonate correspond to 74% of the eight isomers of glucose carbonate that were detected. The values of Keq for the disaccharides sucrose (4.3) and maltose (4.2) are about twice the values for the monosaccharides glucose (2.0) and fructose (2.3). Ribose (Keq = 0.89)-the only sugar without a significant concentration of a species containing a -CH2OH group in an aqueous solution-resulted in the smallest Keq. On the basis of the Keq value and the concentrations of HCO3(-) and glucose in blood, one can anticipate a concentration of 2-4 µmol L(-1) for glucose 6-carbonate, which corresponds to ca. of 10% of its phosphate counterpart (glucose 6-phosphate).

  18. Leaching of lead from zinc leach residue in acidic calcium chloride aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Le; Mu, Wen-ning; Shen, Hong-tao; Liu, Shao-ming; Zhai, Yu-chun

    2015-05-01

    A process with potentially reduced environmental impacts and occupational hazards of lead-bearing zinc plant residue was studied to achieve a higher recovery of lead via a cost-effective and environmentally friendly process. This paper describes an optimization study on the leaching of lead from zinc leach residue using acidic calcium chloride aqueous solution. Six main process conditions, i.e., the solution pH value, stirring rate, concentration of CaCl2 aqueous solution, liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratio, leaching temperature, and leaching time, were investigated. The microstructure and components of the residue and tailing were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). On the basis of experimental results, the optimum reaction conditions were determined to be a solution pH value of 1, a stirring rate of 500 r·min-1, a CaCl2 aqueous solution concentration of 400 g·L-1, a liquid-to-solid mass ratio of 7:1, a leaching temperature of 80°C, and a leaching time of 45 min. The leaching rate of lead under these conditions reached 93.79%, with an iron dissolution rate of 19.28%. Silica did not take part in the chemical reaction during the leaching process and was accumulated in the residue.

  19. Formation of isomers of anionic hemiesters of sugars and carbonic acid in aqueous medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Vagner B; Vidal, Denis T R; Francisco, Kelliton J M; Ducati, Lucas C; do Lago, Claudimir L

    2016-06-16

    Hemiesters of carbonic acid can be freely formed in aqueous media containing HCO3(-)/CO2 and mono- or poly-hydroxy compounds. Herein, (13)C NMR spectroscopy was used to identify isomers formed in aqueous solutions of glycerol (a prototype compound) and seven carbohydrates, as well as to estimate the equilibrium constant of formation (Keq). Although both isomers are formed, glycerol 1-carbonate corresponds to 90% of the product. While fructose and ribose form an indistinct mixture of isomers, the anomers of d-glucopyranose 6-carbonate correspond to 74% of the eight isomers of glucose carbonate that were detected. The values of Keq for the disaccharides sucrose (4.3) and maltose (4.2) are about twice the values for the monosaccharides glucose (2.0) and fructose (2.3). Ribose (Keq = 0.89)-the only sugar without a significant concentration of a species containing a -CH2OH group in an aqueous solution-resulted in the smallest Keq. On the basis of the Keq value and the concentrations of HCO3(-) and glucose in blood, one can anticipate a concentration of 2-4 µmol L(-1) for glucose 6-carbonate, which corresponds to ca. of 10% of its phosphate counterpart (glucose 6-phosphate). PMID:27111726

  20. Adsorption of uranium ions by crosslinked polyester resin functionalized with acrylic acid from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the crosslinked polyester resin containing acrylic acid functional groups was used for the adsorption of uranium ions from aqueous solutions. For this purpose, the crosslinked polyester resin of unsaturated polyester in styrene monomer (Polipol 353, Poliya) and acrylic acid as weight percentage at 80 and 20%, respectively was synthesized by using methyl ethyl ketone peroxide (MEKp, Butanox M60, Azo Nobel)-cobalt octoate initiator system. The adsorption of uranium ions on the sample (0.05 g copolymer and 5 mL of U(VI) solution were mixed) of the crosslinked polyester resin functionalized with acrylic acid was carried out in a batch reactor. The effects of adsorption parameters of the contact time, temperature, pH of solution and initial uranium(VI) concentration for U(VI) adsorption on the crosslinked polyester resin functionalized with acrylic acid were investigated. The adsorption data obtained from experimental results depending on the initial U(VI) concentration were analyzed by the Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) adsorption isotherms. The adsorption capacity and free energy change were determined by using D-R isotherm. The obtained experimental adsorption data depending on temperature were evaluated to calculate the thermodynamic parameters of enthalpy (ΔHo), entropy (ΔSo) and free energy change (ΔGo) for the U(VI) adsorption on the crosslinked polyester resin functionalized with acrylic acid from aqueous solutions. The obtained adsorption data depending on contact time were analyzed by using adsorption models such as the modified Freundlich, Elovich, pseudo-first order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. (author)

  1. Development of a Technology for Treating Wastewater Contaminated with Nitric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liz Mabel Ríos Hidalgo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The production process of nitroaromatic hazardous compounds, with the generation of acidic wastewater, represents a significant danger for the health and safety of the workers and the environment. The present study is focused on the development of an efficient installation to treat acidic wastewater resulting from the synthesis process of nitroaromatic compound, considering workers safety and environmental criteria. In this research, a detailed study of the different alternatives that can be used for effective and safe treatment of acidic wastewater was performed. The analysis of several technological schemes for the acidic wastewaters neutralization and the selection of the most feasible alternative from a technical-economic point of view were carried out. The simulation and mathematical modeling developed in this research represent a significant advance in the knowledge of this process for working in a much more secure form. The technological scheme of the process was defined, and the design of the main and auxiliary equipment as well as the piping system was carried out using different computational programs. Finally, this paper proposes a technological design for the treatment of acidic wastewater generated by the production process of nitroaromatic compound, which represents the basic criteria for the further design, construction, and equipment installation of the plant.

  2. Laboratory photochemical processing of aqueous aerosols: formation and degradation of dicarboxylic acids, oxocarboxylic acids and α-dicarbonyls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Pavuluri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the photochemical processing of dicarboxylic acids and related polar compounds, we conducted batch UV irradiation experiments on two types of aerosol samples collected from India, which represent anthropogenic (AA and biogenic aerosols (BA, for time periods of 0.5 to 120 h. The irradiated samples were analyzed for molecular compositions of diacids, oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls. The results show that photochemical degradation of oxalic (C2 and malonic (C3 and other C8-C12 diacids overwhelmed their production in aqueous aerosols whereas succinic acid (C4 and C5-C7 diacids showed a significant increase (ca. 10 times during the course of irradiation experiments. The photochemical formation of oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls overwhelmed their degradation during the early stages of experiment, except for ω-oxooctanoic acid (ωC8 that showed a similar pattern to that of C4. We also found a gradual decrease in the relative abundance of C2 to total diacids and an increase in the relative abundance of C4 during prolonged experiment. Based on the changes in concentrations and mass ratios of selected species with the irradiation time, we hypothesize that iron-catalyzed photolysis of C2 and C3 diacids dominates their concentrations in Fe-rich atmospheric waters, whereas photochemical formation of C4 diacid (via ωC8 is enhanced with photochemical processing of aqueous aerosols in the atmosphere. This study demonstrates that the ambient aerosols contain abundant precursors that produce diacids, oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls, although some species such as oxalic acid decompose extensively during an early stage of photochemical processing.

  3. Interactions of Gas-Phase Nitric/Nitrous Acids and Primary Organic Aerosol in the Atmosphere of Houston, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, L. D.; Griffin, R. J.; Dibb, J. E.; Anderson, C. H.; Whitlow, S. I.; Lefer, B. L.; Flynn, J.; Rappenglück, B.

    2007-12-01

    Concentrations of aerosol and gas-phase pollutants were measured on the roof of an 18-story building during the Texas Air Quality Study II Radical and Aerosol Measurement Project (TRAMP) from August 15 through September 28, 2006. Aerosol measurements included size-resolved, non-refractory mass concentrations of ammonium, nitrate, sulfate, chloride, and organic aerosol in submicron particles using an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS). Particulate water-soluble organic carbon (PWSOC) was quantified using a mist chamber/total organic carbon analysis system. Concentration data for gas-phase pollutants included those for nitric acid (HNO3), nitrous acid (HONO), and hydrochloric acid (HCl) collected using a mist chamber/ion chromatographic technique, oxides of nitrogen (NOx) collected using a chemiluminescent method, and carbon monoxide (CO) collected using an infrared gas correlation wheel instrument. Coincident increases in nitrate and organic aerosol mass concentrations were observed on many occasions throughout the measurement campaign, most frequently during the morning rush hour. Based on the lack of organic aerosol processing (defined by the ratio of m/z = 44/57 in the Q-AMS spectra), strong correlation with NOx and CO, and a lack of significant increase in PWSOC concentration, the spikes in organic aerosol were likely associated with primary organic aerosol (POA). During these events, gas-phase HNO3 concentration decreases were observed simultaneously with increases in gas-phase HONO concentrations. These data likely indicate uptake of HNO3 and subsequent heterogeneous conversion to HONO involving POA. Preliminary calculations show that HNO3 partitioning could account for the majority of the observed HONO and aerosol nitrate concentrations during these events. Q-AMS chloride and HCl data also indicate uptake of chloride by particles during these events. This phenomenon was also observed during the night, but these nocturnal events were less

  4. Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part I. Regeneration of Amine-Carboxylic Acid Extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poole, L.J.; King, C.J.

    1990-03-01

    Two novel regenerated solvent extraction processes are examined. The first process has the potential to reduce the energy costs inherent in the recovery of low-volatility carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solutions. The second process has the potential for reducing the energy costs required for separate recovery of ammonia and acid gases (e.g. CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) from industrial sour waters. The recovery of carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solution can be achieved by extraction with tertiary amines. An approach for regeneration and product recovery from such extracts is to back-extract the carboxylic acid with a water-soluble, volatile tertiary amine, such as trimethylamine. The resulting trimethylammonium carboxylate solution can be concentrated and thermally decomposed, yielding the product acid and the volatile amine for recycle. Experimental work was performed with lactic acid, succinic acid, and fumaric acid. Equilibrium data show near-stoichiometric recovery of the carboxylic acids from an organic solution of Alamine 336 into aqueous solutions of trimethylamine. For fumaric and succinic acids, partial evaporation of the aqueous back extract decomposes the carboxylate and yields the acid product in crystalline form. The decomposition of aqueous solutions of trimethylammonium lactates was not carried out to completion, due to the high water solubility of lactic acid and the tendency of the acid to self-associate. The separate recovery of ammonia and acid gases from sour waters can be achieved by combining steam-stripping of the acid gases with simultaneous removal of ammonia by extraction with a liquid cation exchanger. The use of di-2,4,4-trimethylpentyl phosphinic acid as the liquid cation exchanger is explored in this work. Batch extraction experiments were carried out to measure the equilibrium distribution ratio of ammonia between an aqueous buffer solution and an organic solution of the phosphinic acid (0.2N) in Norpar 12. The concentration

  5. Selenium dioxide catalysed oxidation of acetic acid hydrazide by bromate in aqueous hydrochloric acid medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R S Yalgudre; G S Gokavi

    2012-07-01

    Selenium dioxide catalysed acetic acid hydrazide oxidation by bromate was studied in hydrochloric acid medium. The order in oxidant concentration, substrate and catalyst were found to be unity. Increasing hydrogen ion concentration increases the rate of the reaction due to protonation equilibria of the oxidant. The mechanism of the reaction involves prior complex formation between the catalyst and substrate, hydrazide, followed by its oxidation by diprotonated bromate in a slow step. Acetic acid was found to be the oxidation product. Other kinetic data like effect of solvent polarity and ionic strength on the reaction support the proposed mechanism.

  6. Kinetics and Mechanism of Oxidation of Glutamic Acid by N-Bromophthalimide in Aqueous Acidic Medium

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of glutamic acid (Glu) with N-bromophthalimide (NBP) was studied in perchloric acid medium at 30 °C by potentiometric method. The reaction is first order each in NBP and glutamic acid and is negative fractional order in [H+]. Addition of KBr or the reaction product, phthalimide had no effect on the rate. Similarly variation of ionic strength of the medium did not affect the rate of the reaction. Also the rate increased with decrease in dielectric constant of the reac...

  7. [Changes in the collagen amino acid composition of calf skin after gamma-irradiation in an aqueous solution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duzhenkova, N A; Savich, A V

    1983-01-01

    A study was made of the amino acid composition of calf skin collagen after gamma-irradiation (60Co) of 2.5 X 10(-6) M aerated aqueous protein solution within the dose range from 30 to 2000 Gy. The radiosensitivity of amino acid residues was compared. PMID:6657935

  8. Standard enthalpies of formation of γ-aminobutyric acid and the products of its dissociation in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytkin, A. I.; Chernikov, V. V.; Krutova, O. N.; Skvortsov, I. A.; Korchagina, A. S.

    2016-09-01

    Heat effects of the dissolution of crystalline γ-aminobutyric acid in water and potassium hydroxide solutions are determined by direct colorimetry at 298.15 K. Standard enthalpies of formation of γ-aminobutyric acid and the products of its dissociation in aqueous solution are calculated.

  9. Investigation of the direct and indirect electrochemical oxidation of hydrazine in nitric acid medium on platinum; Etude de l`oxydation electrochimique directe et indirecte de l`hydrazine en milieu acide nitrique sur platine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cames, B

    1997-12-31

    In nuclear fuel processing by the PUREX process, the purification of plutonium in nitric acid medium requires the oxidation of Pu(III) to Pu(IV), and of hydrazinium nitrate to nitrogen. The study helped to characterize the electrochemical behavior of the oxidation of hydrazinium nitrate and the reduction of nitric acid to nitrous acid, a compound which can chemically oxidize hydrazinium nitrate and Pu(III). Electro-analytical studies on polycrystalline platinum showed that hydrazine is oxidized in two potential zones, which depend on the surface texture of the platinum anode. Electrolysis in separate compartments, carried out in medium-acid media (2 and 4 mo/l) in the potential zone where these processes take place, showed that, at 0.9 V/ECS, the hydrazine oxidation reactions involved are: a four-electron process (75 %) with nitrogen formation and a one-electron process (25 %) with formation of nitrogen and ammonium ion. By contrast, electrolysis carried out at 0.65 V/ECS (with reactivation of the electrode at - 0.2 V/ECS to remove the poison from the platinum) allowed the selective oxidation of hydrazine to nitrogen by the four-electron reaction. Nitric acid can only be reduced to nitrous acid in the absence of hydrazine. For medium-acid media ({<=} 6 mol/l), this reaction takes place at potentials below - 0.2 V/ECS. However, the production rate of nitrous acid (partial order 0 with respect to nitric acid) is very low compared with the values obtained for strongly-acid media (6 to 10 mol/l) at the potential of - 0.1 V/ECS. Note that, in concentrated nitric medium, the selectivity of the reduction reaction is 47 to 85 % for nitrous acid, depending on the nitric acid concentration (6 to 10 mol/l) and the potential imposed (- 0.1 {<=} E {<=} 0.6 V/ECS). A kinetic study helped to determine the hydrazine oxidation rates as a function of the operating conditions. In all cases, the reaction rate is of partial order 0 with respect to hydrazine. These studies accordingly

  10. Photochemical decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid in aqueous periodate with VUV and UV light irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The photochemical decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in aqueous periodate (IO4-) was investigated under two types of low-pressure mercury lamps: one emits at 254 nm light (UV light) and the other emits both 254 nm and 185 nm light (VUV light). PFOA decomposed efficiently under VUV light irradiation while it decomposed poorly under UV light irradiation. The addition of IO4- significantly increased the rate of decomposition and defluorination of PFOA irradiated with UV light whereas it decreased both processes under VUV irradiation. Reactive radical (IO3·) generated by photolysis of IO4- initiated the oxidation of PFOA in UV process. Aquated electrons (eaq-), generated from water homolysis, scavenged IO4- resulting in decrease of reactive radical species production and PFOA decomposition. The shorter-chain perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) formed in a stepwise manner from long-chain PFCAs.

  11. Aldehydes, ketones, and carboxylic acids formed radiolytically in aqueous solutions of cyanides and simple nitriles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negron-Mendoza, A.; Draganic, Z.D.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Graganic, I.G.

    1983-08-01

    A systematic search for aldehydes, ketones, and carboxylic acids was carried out in aqueous solutions of HCN, NH/sub 4/CN, CH/sub 3/CN, and C/sub 2/H/sub 4/CN, that had received multikilogray doses of /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. radiation. About 30 radiolytic products were identified, among them a large variety of dicarboxylic and tricarboxylic acids. Some of them might be of significant interest in molecular evolution studies of prebiotic processes. They originate in the free-radical-initiated chemical reactions where the additional oligomerization processes are particularly important. Most of the radiolytic products appear in both cyanides and nitriles and point to the importance of reactions involving the carbon-nitrogen triple bond.

  12. Separation of glycols from dilute aqueous solutions via complexation with boronic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randel, L.A.; King, C.J.

    1991-07-01

    This work examines methods of separating low molecular weight glycols from dilute aqueous solution. Extraction into conventional solvents is generally not economical, since, in the literature reviewed, distribution ratios for the two- to four-carbon glycols are all less than one. Distribution ratios can be increased, however, by incorporating into the organic phase an extracting agent that will complex with the solute of interest. The extracting agent investigated in this work is 3-nitrophenylboronic acid (NPBA). NPBA, a boric acid derivative, reversibly complexes with many glycols. The literature on complexation of borate and related compounds with glycols, including mechanistic data, measurement techniques, and applications to separation processes, provides information valuable for designing experiments with NPBA and is reviewed herein. 88 refs., 15 figs., 24 tabs.

  13. Solubility and reactivity of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) in dilute aqueous salt solutions and in sulphuric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, A.; Kutsuna, S.; Takeuchi, K.; Ibusuki, T.

    The loss rates of PAN in several dilute aqueous salt solutions (NaBr, Na 2SO 3, KI, NaNO 2, FeCl 3, and FeSO 4) and in sulphuric acid were measured at 279 K with a simple bubbler experiment. They are little different from that in pure water. For 5 M sulphuric acid hydrolysis and solubility were determined in the temperature range of 243-293 K. The hydrolysis rate kh=3.2×10 -4 s -1 at 293 K is close to that in water. The observed temperature dependence of the Henry's Law constant H=10- 6.6±0.6exp((4780±420)/T) M atm -1 leads to enthalpy and entropy of solvation Δ Hsolv=-39.7±3.5 kJ mol -1 and Δ Ssolv=-126±11 J mol -1 K -1, respectively.

  14. Kinetics study on the dissolution of UO2 particles by microwave and conventional heating in 4 mol/L nitric acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The dissolution of UO2 particles in 4 mol·L-1 nitric acid medium at temperatures of 90-110℃ by mi- crowave heating and conventional heating has been investigated, respectively. It is found that the dissolution ratios of UO2 particles by microwave heating were 10%-40% higher than that by conven- tional heating. Kinetics research shows that the dissolution of UO2 particles in 4 mol·L-1 nitric acid is controlled by the diffusion control model for microwave heating and by the surface reaction control model for conventional heating. The diffusion control model for the dissolution of UO2 particles by mi- crowave heating could be explained by the diffuseness on the surface of UO2 particles.

  15. Influence of charge exchange in acidic aqueous and alcoholic titania dispersions on viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenholm, Jarl B; Dahlsten, Per

    2015-12-01

    Charging effects resulting from adsorption of acid, acid anions, and protons on titania (anatase) surfaces in anhydrous or mixed alcohol-water dispersions is summarized. The suddenly enhanced conductivity as compared to titania-free solutions has previously been modeled and explained as surface-induced electrolytic dissociation (SIED) of weak acids. This model and recently published results identifying concurrent surface-induced liquid (solvent) dissociation (SILD) are evaluated with experimentally determined conductivity and pH of solutions, zeta-potential of particles, and viscosity of dispersions. Titania (0-25wt%)-alcohol (methanol, ethanol, and propanol) dispersions mixed with (0-100wt%) water were acidified with oxalic, phosphoric, and sulfuric acids. It was found that the experimental results could in many cases be condensed to master curves representing extensive experimental results. These curves reveal that major properties of the systems appear within three concentration regions were different mechanisms (SILD, surface-induced liquid dissociation; SIAD, surface-induced acid dissociation) and charge rearrangement were found to be simultaneously active. In particular, zeta-potential - pH and viscosity - pH curves are in acidified non-polar solvents mirror images to those dependencies observed in aqueous dispersions to which hydroxyl is added. The results suggest that multiple dispersion and adsorption equilibria should be considered in order to characterize the presented exceptionally extensive and complex experimental results. PMID:26520241

  16. Sunlight-initiated chemistry of aqueous pyruvic acid: building complexity in the origin of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Elizabeth C; Shoemaker, Richard K; Vaida, Veronica

    2013-10-01

    Coupling chemical reactions to an energy source is a necessary step in the origin of life. Here, we utilize UV photons provided by a simulated sun to activate aqueous pyruvic acid and subsequently prompt chemical reactions mimicking some of the functions of modern metabolism. Pyruvic acid is interesting in a prebiotic context due to its prevalence in modern metabolism and its abiotic availability on early Earth. Here, pyruvic acid (CH3COCOOH, a C3 molecule) photochemically reacts to produce more complex molecules containing four or more carbon atoms. Acetoin (CH3CHOHCOCH3), a C4 molecule and a modern bacterial metabolite, is produced in this chemistry as well as lactic acid (CH3CHOHCOOH), a molecule which, when coupled with other abiotic chemical reaction pathways, can provide a regeneration pathway for pyruvic acid. This chemistry is discussed in the context of plausible environments on early Earth such as near the ocean surface and atmospheric aerosol particles. These environments allow for combination and exchange of reactants and products of other reaction environments (such as shallow hydrothermal vents). The result could be a contribution to the steady increase in chemical complexity requisite in the origin of life.

  17. EXAFS study of the speciation of protactinium(V) in aqueous hydrofluoric acid solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sio, Stéphanie M; Wilson, Richard E

    2014-12-01

    The speciation of protactinium(V) in hydrofluoric acid (HF) solutions was studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure measurements were performed on an aqueous solution of 0.05 M protactinium(V) with various HF concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 27 M in order to probe the protactinium coordination sphere with respect to the identity and number of coordinating ligands. The resulting fits to the spectra suggest the presence of an eight-coordinate homoleptic fluoro complex in highly concentrated fluoride solutions (27 M), with equilibrium between seven- and eight-coordinate fluoro complexes at moderate acidities, and in more dilute solutions, results indicate that one water molecule is likely to replace a fluoride in the first coordination sphere, at a distance of 2.54-2.57 Å. Comparisons of this chemistry with group V metals, niobium and tantalum, are presented, and the potential implications for these results on the hydrolytic behavior of protactinium in aqueous systems are discussed.

  18. Process optimization of reaction of acid leaching residue of asbestos tailing and sodium hydroxide aqueous solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Silica is the major component of the acid leaching residue of asbestos tailing. The waterglass solution can be prepared by the reaction of the residue with sodium hydroxide aqueous solution. Compared to the high temperature reaction method, this process is environmental friendly and low cost. In this paper, the reaction process of the residue and the sodium hydroxide aqueous solution is optimized. The optimum reaction process parameters are as follows: the usage of sodium hydroxide is 26.4 g/100 g acid leaching residue, the reaction temperature is 90℃, the reaction time is 1 h, and the ratio of the liquid/solid is 2.0. The significance sequence of the process parameters to the alkali leaching reaction effect is the usage of sodium hydroxide > the ratio of the liquid/solid > the reaction time > the reaction temperature. The significance sequence to the leaching ratio of SiO2 is the ratio of the liquid/solid > the usage of sodium hydroxide > the reaction time > the reaction temperature. The significance sequence to the modulus of the sodium silicate is the ratio of the liquid/solid > the usage of sodium hydroxide > the reaction time > the reaction temperature. Under the optimum conditions, the leaching ratio of the SiO2 is 77.5%, and the modulus of the sodium silicate is 3.15. The XRD analysis result indicates that the major components of the alkali leaching residue are serpentine, talc, quartz and some albite.

  19. Bile acid-surfactant interactions at the liquid crystal/aqueous interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Sihui; Liang, Wenlang; Cheng, Kung-Lung; Fang, Jiyu; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2014-07-14

    The interaction between bile acids and surfactants at interfaces plays an important role in fat digestion. In this paper, we study the competitive adsorption of cholic acid (CA) at the sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-laden liquid crystal (LC)/aqueous interface formed with cyanobiphenyl (nCB, n = 5-8) and the mixture of 5CB with 4-(4-pentylcyclohexyl)benzonitrile (5PCH). We find that the critical concentration of CA required to displace SDS from the interface linearly decreases from 160 μM to 16 μM by reducing the alkyl chain length of nCB from n = 8 to n = 5 and from 16 μM to 1.5 μM by increasing the 5PCH concentration from 0 wt% to 19 wt% in the 5PCH-5CB binary mixture. Our results clearly demonstrate that the sensitivity of 5PCH-5CB mixtures for monitoring the interaction between CA and SDS at the LC/aqueous interface can be increased by one order of magnitude, compared to 5CB.

  20. Adsorption of Crystal violet on raw and acid-treated montmorillonite, K10, in aqueous suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Gautam Kumar; Sen Gupta, Susmita; Bhattacharyya, Krishna G

    2016-04-15

    Crystal violet is used as a dye in cotton and silk textiles, paints and printing ink. The dye is hazardous and exposure to it may cause permanent injury to the cornea and conjunctiva including permanent blindness, and in severe cases, may lead to respiratory and kidney failure. The present work describes removal of Crystal violet from aqueous solution by adsorption on raw and acid-treated montmorillonite, K10. The clay mineral was treated with 0.25 and 0.50 M sulfuric acid and the resulting materials were characterized by XRD, zeta potential, SEM, FTIR, cation exchange capacity, BET surface area and pore volume measurements. The influences of pH, interaction time, adsorbent amount, and temperature on adsorption were monitored and explained on the basis of physico-chemical characteristics of the materials. Basic pH generally favors adsorption but considerable removal was possible even under neutral conditions. Adsorption was very rapid and equilibrium could be attained in 180 min. The kinetics conformed to second order model. Langmuir monolayer adsorption capacity of raw montmorillonite K10 was 370.37 mg g(-1) whereas 0.25 M and 0.50 M acid treated montmorillonite K10 had capacities of 384.62 and 400.0 mg g(-1) respectively at 303 K. Adsorption was exothermic and decreased in the temperature range of 293-323 K. Thermodynamically, the process was spontaneous with Gibbs energy decreasing with rise in temperature. The results suggest that montmorillonite K10 and its acid treated forms would be suitable for removing Crystal violet from aqueous solution. PMID:26866669

  1. Adsorption of Crystal violet on raw and acid-treated montmorillonite, K10, in aqueous suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Gautam Kumar; Sen Gupta, Susmita; Bhattacharyya, Krishna G

    2016-04-15

    Crystal violet is used as a dye in cotton and silk textiles, paints and printing ink. The dye is hazardous and exposure to it may cause permanent injury to the cornea and conjunctiva including permanent blindness, and in severe cases, may lead to respiratory and kidney failure. The present work describes removal of Crystal violet from aqueous solution by adsorption on raw and acid-treated montmorillonite, K10. The clay mineral was treated with 0.25 and 0.50 M sulfuric acid and the resulting materials were characterized by XRD, zeta potential, SEM, FTIR, cation exchange capacity, BET surface area and pore volume measurements. The influences of pH, interaction time, adsorbent amount, and temperature on adsorption were monitored and explained on the basis of physico-chemical characteristics of the materials. Basic pH generally favors adsorption but considerable removal was possible even under neutral conditions. Adsorption was very rapid and equilibrium could be attained in 180 min. The kinetics conformed to second order model. Langmuir monolayer adsorption capacity of raw montmorillonite K10 was 370.37 mg g(-1) whereas 0.25 M and 0.50 M acid treated montmorillonite K10 had capacities of 384.62 and 400.0 mg g(-1) respectively at 303 K. Adsorption was exothermic and decreased in the temperature range of 293-323 K. Thermodynamically, the process was spontaneous with Gibbs energy decreasing with rise in temperature. The results suggest that montmorillonite K10 and its acid treated forms would be suitable for removing Crystal violet from aqueous solution.

  2. Generation of avirulent Leishmania parasites and induction of nitric oxide production in macrophages by using polyacrylic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elcicek, Serhat; Bagirova, Malahat; Allahverdiyev, Adil M

    2013-03-01

    Polyacrylic acid (PAA) is one of the anionic synthetic polyelectrolytes and is used in various immunological and pharmaceutical applications. PAA has been used as adjuvant in veterinary vaccines, in particular. However, to our knowledge, there are no studies that document immunostimulant properties of PAA in Leishmania infection. The main aim of this study was to investigate the interaction of Leishmania parasites with PAA: the possible effects on the infectivity of Leishmania promastigotes; and, induction of nitric oxide (NO) production in macrophages in vitro. The cytotoxicity of PAA on both macrophages and Leishmania infantum promastigotes were determined by MTT assay. NO production in the macrophage culture supernatant was measured by the Griess method. A significant, dose-dependent and time-dependent decrease in the infection index was observed after PAA exposure. The value of this decrease was found to be between 93% and 100% for all concentration and time points. PAA (molecular weight (MW) 30, 100 kDa at 1mg/1h)-exposed parasites stimulate NO production significantly at 48 h post-infection (PI), when compared to the control. This study demonstrates that Leishmania parasites lost their virulence upon interaction with PAA, and this interaction induced NO production in infected macrophages. These results may have important implications in the development of anti-leishmanial vaccines and amelioration of immune response. PMID:23238031

  3. Improvement of microwave-assisted digestion of milk powder with diluted nitric acid using oxygen as auxiliary reagent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzi, Cezar A.; Barin, Juliano S.; Garcia, Edivaldo E.; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.; Dressler, Valderi L.; Flores, Erico M. M.

    2011-05-01

    The feasibility of using diluted HNO 3 solutions under oxygen pressure for decomposition of whole and non-fat milk powders and whey powder samples has been evaluated. Digestion efficiency was evaluated by determining the carbon content in solution (digests) and the determination of Ca, Cd, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Pb and Zn was performed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and Hg by chemical vapor generation coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Samples (up to 500 mg) were digested using HNO 3 solutions (1 to 14 mol L - 1 ) and the effect of oxygen pressure was evaluated between 2.5 and 20 bar. It was possible to perform the digestion of 500 mg of milk powder using 2 mol L - 1 HNO 3 with oxygen pressure ranging from 7.5 to 20 bar with resultant carbon content in digests lower than 1700 mg L - 1 . Using optimized conditions, less than 0.86 mL of concentrated nitric acid (14 mol L - 1 ) was enough to digest 500 mg of sample. The accuracy was evaluated by determination of metal concentrations in certified reference materials, which presented an agreement better than 95% (Student's t test, P < 0.05) for all the analytes.

  4. Tuning the work function of monolayer graphene on 4H-SiC (0001) with nitric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günes, Fethullah; Arezki, Hakim; Pierucci, Debora; Alamarguy, David; Alvarez, José; Kleider, Jean-Paul; Dappe, Yannick J; Ouerghi, Abdelkarim; Boutchich, Mohamed

    2015-11-01

    Chemical doping of graphene is a key process for the modulation of its electronic properties and the design and fabrication of graphene-based nanoelectronic devices. Here, we study the adsorption of diluted concentrations of nitric acid (HNO3) onto monolayer graphene/4H-SiC (0001) to induce a variation of the graphene work function (WF). Raman spectroscopy indicates an increase in the defect density subsequent to the doping. Moreover, ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) was utilized to quantify the WF shift. UPS data show that the WF of the graphene layer decreased from 4.3 eV (pristine) down to 3.8 eV (30% HNO3) and then increased to 4.4 eV at 100% HNO3 concentration. These observations were confirmed using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. This straightforward process allows a large WF modulation, rendering the molecularly modified graphene/4H-SiC(0001) a highly suitable electron or hole injection electrode. PMID:26457876

  5. Interaction between abscisic acid and nitric oxide in PB90-induced catharanthine biosynthesis of catharanthus roseus cell suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Chen, Zunwei; Lu, Li; Jin, Haihong; Sun, Lina; Yu, Qin; Xu, Hongke; Yang, Fengxia; Fu, Mengna; Li, Shengchao; Wang, Huizhong; Xu, Maojun

    2013-01-01

    Elicitations are considered to be an important strategy to improve production of secondary metabolites of plant cell cultures. However, mechanisms responsible for the elicitor-induced production of secondary metabolites of plant cells have not yet been fully elucidated. Here, we report that treatment of Catharanthus roseus cell suspension cultures with PB90, a protein elicitor from Phytophthora boehmeriae, induced rapid increases of abscisic acid (ABA) and nitric oxide (NO), subsequently followed by the enhancement of catharanthine production and up-regulation of Str and Tdc, two important genes in catharanthine biosynthesis. PB90-induced catharanthine production and the gene expression were suppressed by the ABA inhibitor and NO scavenger respectively, showing that ABA and NO are essential for the elicitor-induced catharanthine biosynthesis. The relationship between ABA and NO in mediating catharanthine biosynthesis was further investigated. Treatment of the cells with ABA triggered NO accumulation and induced catharanthine production and up-regulation of Str and Tdc. ABA-induced catharanthine production and gene expressions were suppressed by the NO scavenger. Conversely, exogenous application of NO did not stimulate ABA generation and treatment with ABA inhibitor did not suppress NO-induced catharanthine production and gene expressions. Together, the results showed that both NO and ABA were involved in PB90-induced catharanthine biosynthesis of C. roseus cells. Furthermore, our data demonstrated that ABA acted upstream of NO in the signaling cascade leading to PB90-induced catharanthine biosynthesis of C. roseus cells. PMID:23554409

  6. Recovery of Nickel from Reformer Catalysts of Direct Reduction, Using the Pressurized Dissolving Method in Nitric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Abrar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the process of direct reduction of iron pellet and production of sponge iron, NiO/Al2O3 act as a catalyst for the generation of carbon monoxide and hydrogen by vapor and natural gas. As an expensive material used in MIDREX method for steel units, this type of catalyst has major environmental problems after accumulation. The steel industry in Iran hopes to employ the MIDREX technique for the 80 percent of the 50 million tons of steel. Thus, the problem of spent catalysts will become a serious environmental challenge. Through the hydrometallurgy method, the present study investigates a possible solution to the problem of catalyst depot (due to heavy metals such as nickel via nickel recovery, which may increase the possibility of selling or re-using the precious and expensive metal. The present research studied the Nickel recovery from spent catalysts of NiO/Al2O¬3 used in reduction gas reliefs of the production of sponge iron unit. In this study, the parameters of temperature, concentration, time and Rpm were studied using pressurized dissolving method. 100% efficiency was achieved at 140 °C for 120 minutes, nitric acid concentration of 1.5 mm, Rpm of 600 and 40 s/l 40 grams per liter.

  7. Improvement of microwave-assisted digestion of milk powder with diluted nitric acid using oxygen as auxiliary reagent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizzi, Cezar A. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, 97105-900, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Bioanalitica, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Barin, Juliano S. [Departamento de Tecnologia e Ciencia dos Alimentos, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, 97105-900, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Garcia, Edivaldo E. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Estadual de Maringa, 87100-900, Maringa, PR (Brazil); Nobrega, Joaquim A. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, 13565-905, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Dressler, Valderi L. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, 97105-900, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Bioanalitica, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Flores, Erico M.M., E-mail: ericommf@gmail.com [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, 97105-900, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Bioanalitica, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2011-05-15

    The feasibility of using diluted HNO{sub 3} solutions under oxygen pressure for decomposition of whole and non-fat milk powders and whey powder samples has been evaluated. Digestion efficiency was evaluated by determining the carbon content in solution (digests) and the determination of Ca, Cd, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Pb and Zn was performed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and Hg by chemical vapor generation coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Samples (up to 500 mg) were digested using HNO{sub 3} solutions (1 to 14 mol L{sup -1}) and the effect of oxygen pressure was evaluated between 2.5 and 20 bar. It was possible to perform the digestion of 500 mg of milk powder using 2 mol L{sup -1} HNO{sub 3} with oxygen pressure ranging from 7.5 to 20 bar with resultant carbon content in digests lower than 1700 mg L{sup -1}. Using optimized conditions, less than 0.86 mL of concentrated nitric acid (14 mol L{sup -1}) was enough to digest 500 mg of sample. The accuracy was evaluated by determination of metal concentrations in certified reference materials, which presented an agreement better than 95% (Student's t test, P < 0.05) for all the analytes.

  8. Nitric acid particles in cold thick ice clouds observed at global scale: Link with lightning, temperature, and upper tropospheric water vapor

    OpenAIRE

    Chepfer, H.; Minnis, P.; P. Dubuisson; Chiriaco, Marjolaine; Sun-Mack, S.; Rivière, E.D.

    2007-01-01

    International audience Signatures of nitric acid particles (NAP) in cold thick ice clouds have been derived from satellite observations. Most NAP are detected in the tropics (9 to 20% of clouds with T < 202.5 K). Higher occurrences were found in the rare midlatitudes very cold clouds. NAP occurrence increases as cloud temperature decreases, and NAP are more numerous in January than July. Comparisons of NAP and lightning distributions show that lightning seems to be the main source of the N...

  9. Removal of Basic Dyes from Aqueous Solution by Chloroacetic Acid Modified Ferula Communis Based Adsorbent: Thermodynamic and Kinetic Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Salih, Shameran Jamal

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT: This research aimed to propose an alternative cheap and abundantly available adsorbent (Ferula communis) for the removal of basic dyes from aqueous solutions. Chloroacetic acid modified Ferula communis (MFC) shows a great potential for the removal of basic red 9 dyes (BR9) from aqueous solution with the effects of solution capacity under pH, temperature, contact time, adsorbent dosage, and initial dye concentration condition on BR9 removal were examined. The adsorption equilibrium d...

  10. A stable liquid–liquid extraction system for clavulanic acid using polymer-based aqueous two-phase systems

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Jorge F. B.; Santos, Valéria Carvalho; Johansson, Hans-Olof; J. A. Teixeira; Pessoa Júnior, Adalberto

    2012-01-01

    The partitioning of Clavulanic Acid (CA) in a novel inexpensive and stable aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) composed by poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and sodium polyacrylate (NaPA) has been studied. The aqueous two-phase systems are formed by mixing both polymers with a salt (NaCl or Na2SO4) and an aqueous solution of CA. The stability of CA on the presence of both polymers was investigated and it was observed that these polymers do not degrade the biomolecule. The effect of PEG-molecular ...

  11. Thermodynamic modeling of acidic gas solubility in aqueous solutions of MEA, MDEA and MEA-MDEA blends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrachnos, Ath.; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Voutsas, EC

    2006-01-01

    The thermodynamic framework that was developed in a previous work [Vrachnos et al. Ind. Eng. Chem. Res. 2004, 43, 2798] for the description of chemical and vapor-liquid equilibria of carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, and their mixtures in aqueous methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) solutions is revised...... and extended in this study to the absorption of carbon dioxide into aqueous monoethanolamine (MEA) solutions and aqueous MDEA-MEA blends. The results of the model are compared with experimental data taken from the literature. Very satisfactory predictions of acidic gas vapor-liquid equilibrium over MDEA, MEA...

  12. Mechanisms leading to oligomers and SOA through aqueous photooxidation: insights from OH radical oxidation of acetic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Tan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous experiments have demonstrated that the aqueous OH radical oxidation of methylglyoxal produces low volatility products including oxalate and oligomers. These products are found predominantly in the particle phase in the atmosphere, suggesting that methylglyoxal is a precursor of secondary organic aerosol (SOA. Acetic acid is an important intermediate in aqueous methylglyoxal oxidation and a ubiquitous product of gas phase photochemistry, making it a potential "aqueous" SOA precursor in its own right. Altieri et al. (2008 proposed that acetic acid was the precursor of oligoesters observed in methylglyoxal oxidation. However, the fate of acetic acid upon aqueous-phase oxidation is not well understood. In this research, acetic acid at concentrations relevant to atmospheric waters (20 μM–10 mM was oxidized by OH radical. Products were analyzed by ion chromatography (IC, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS, and IC-ESI-MS. The formation of glyoxylic, glycolic, and oxalic acids were observed. In contrast to methylglyoxal oxidation, succinic acid and oligomers were not detected. Using results from these and methylglyoxal + OH radical experiments, radical mechanisms responsible for oligomer formation from methylglyoxal oxidation in clouds and wet aerosols are proposed. The importance of acetic acid/acetate as an SOA precursor is also discussed. We hypothesize that this and similar chemistry is central to the daytime formation of oligomers in wet aerosols.

  13. Partition of Chiral pharmaceutical intermediate R(-)-Mandelic Acid in Aqueous Two-Phase System of Poly(ethylene glycol)-Ammonium Sulfate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Xiaoping; Li Zhongqin; Chen Jiebo; Huang Xinghua

    2004-01-01

    An aqueous two-phase system of poly (ethylene glycol)-ammonium sulfate was employed to separate R (-)-mandelic acid.The result showed that R (-)-mandelic acid has priority to partition in PEG-rich top phase. This indicated that aqueous two-phase is a very suitable system for separation of R(-)-mandelic acid.

  14. Deprotonation of salicylic acid and 5-nitrosalicylic acid in aqueous solutions of ethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faraji Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The protonation constant values of two hydroxybenzoic acids (salicylic and 5-nitrosalicylic acid were studied in some water-ethanol solutions using spectrophotometric and potentiometric methods at 25°C and in an ionic strength of 0.1 M sodium perchlorate. The results indicated that the pKa values increase with increasing proportion of ethanol in mixed solvent. The dependence of the protonation constants on the variation of the solvent were correlated by the dielectric constants of the media. Furthermore, for a better understanding of the solvent influence, the obtained results were explained in terms of the Kamlet-Taft parameters α (hydrogen-bond donor acidity, π

  15. 六硝基茋在硝酸中的溶解度测定及关联%Solubility Measurement and Correlation of Hexanitrostilbene in Nitric Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许元刚; 李冬雪

    2014-01-01

    The solubility of 2 ,2',4 ,4',6 ,6'-Hexanitrostilbene , varied with concentration of nitric acid under 25℃, was measured using the laser monitor technique.The experimental data were correlated with the ( CNIBS )/Redlich -Kister empirical equation.The results showed that the solubility of HNS in nitric acid increased with concentration of nitric acid, and the predicted data by empirical equation had good agreement with the experiment data.%采用激光监测技术,测定了25℃下六硝基茋在不同浓度硝酸中的溶解度,用( CNIBS)/Redlich-Kister经验方程对实验数据进行了关联。结果表明六硝基茋在硝酸中的溶解度随硝酸浓度的增大而增加,用( CNIBS )/Redlich-Kister方程预测的溶解度值与实验值有较好的吻合。

  16. Pulse electrodeposition of Pt and Pt–Ru methanol-oxidation nanocatalysts onto carbon nanotubes in citric acid aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Huei-Yu [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan, ROC (China); Hsieh, Chien-Kuo [Department of Materials Engineering, Ming Chi University of Technology, New Taipei City 24301, Taiwan, ROC (China); Tsai, Ming-Chi; Wei, Yu-Hsuan; Yeh, Tsung-Kuang [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan, ROC (China); Tsai, Chuen-Horng, E-mail: tsai@aec.gov.tw [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2015-06-01

    In this study, platinum nanoparticle/carbon nanotube (Pt NP/CNT) and platinum–ruthenium nanoparticle (Pt–Ru NP/CNT) hybrid nanocatalysts were prepared by the pulse-electrodeposition method in different aqueous solutions containing citric acid (CA) or sulfuric acid (SA). The electrocatalytic properties of the Pt NP/CNT and Pt–Ru NP/CNT electrodes prepared using different aqueous solutions were investigated for methanol oxidation. The results show that the electrochemical mass activities of these hybrid nanocatalysts prepared in the CA aqueous solution were increased by factors of 1.46 and 2.77 for Pt NPs and Pt–Ru NPs, respectively, compared with those prepared in SA aqueous solutions using the same procedure. These increased mass activities are attributed to the CA playing dual roles as both a stabilizing agent and a particle size reducing agent in the aqueous solutions. The approach developed in this work enables further reductions in the particle sizes of noble-metal nanocatalysts. - Highlights: • Pulse-electrodeposition of Pt or Pt–Ru nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes • Carbon nanotubes used as a catalyst-supporting material • Citric acid used as reducing agent in the aqueous electrodeposition solutions • Electrochemical activity for methanol oxidation improved by a factor of 1.46 to 2.77.

  17. STRUCTURE AND REDOX TRANSFORMATIONS OF IRON(III COMPLEXES WITH SOME BIOLOGICALLY IMPORTANT INDOLE-3-ALKANOIC ACIDS IN AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krisztina Kovács

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Interactions of a series of indole-3-alkanoic acids (with n-alkanoic acid side-chains from C1 to C4 with iron(III in acidic aqueous solutions have been shown to comprise two parallel processes including complexation and redox transformations giving iron(II hexaaquo complexes. The structure and composition of the reaction products are discussed, as analysed using a combination of instrumental techniques including 57Fe Mössbauer, vibrational and HNMR spectroscopies.

  18. Fatty acid composition, antioxidant and antibacterial properties of the microwave aqueous extract of three varieties of Labisia pumila Benth

    OpenAIRE

    Karimi, Ehsan; Jaafar, Hawa ZE; Ghasemzadeh, Ali; Ebrahimi, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Background The present study was conducted in order to evaluate the fatty acid profile, anti-oxidant and anti-bacterial activities from the microwave aqueous extract of the leaves of three different varieties of Labisia pumila Benth. Results The chemical analysis of the extract showed that fatty acids (palmitic, palmitoleic, stearic, oleic, linoleic and α-linolenic) acid as the main components in three varieties of L. pumila leaves. Furthermore, the obtained results of the anti-oxidant reveal...

  19. Removal of fluoride in aqueous solution by adsorption on acid activated water treatment sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinitnantharat, Soydoa; Kositchaiyong, Sriwilai; Chiarakorn, Siriluk

    2010-06-01

    This paper reports the use of a pellet of adsorbent made from water treatment sludge (S) and acid activated water treatment sludge (SH) for removal of fluoride in the batch equilibration technique. The influence of pH, adsorbent dosage, temperature and effect of other ions were employed to find out the feasibility of acid activated adsorbent to remove fluoride to the permissible concentration of 0.7 mg/L. The results from the adsorption isotherm followed both Langmuir and Freundlich models and the highest fluoride removal was found for adsorbent activated with acetic acid at 2.0 mol/L. The optimum adsorbent dosage was found at 40 g/L, 0.01 mol/L acid activated adsorbent which was able to adsorb fluoride from 10 down to 0.11 mg/L. The adsorption capacity was decreased when the temperature increased. This revealed that the adsorption of fluoride on SH was exothermic. In the presence of nitrate and carbonate ions in the aqueous solution, fluoride removal efficiency of SH decreased from 94.4% to 86.6% and 90.8%, respectively. However, there is no significant effect in the presence of sulfate and chloride ions.

  20. Inhibition of ice crystallisation in highly viscous aqueous organic acid droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Murray

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Homogeneous nucleation of ice within aqueous solution droplets and their subsequent crystallisation is thought to play a significant role in upper tropospheric ice cloud formation. It is normally assumed that homogeneous nucleation will take place at a threshold supersaturation, irrespective of the identity of the solute, and that rapid growth of ice particles will follow immediately after nucleation. However, it is shown here through laboratory experiments that droplets may not readily freeze in the very cold tropical tropopause layer (TTL, typical temperatures of 186–200 K. In these experiments ice crystal growth in citric acid solution droplets did not occur when ice nucleated below 197±6 K. Citric acid, 2-hydroxypropane-1,2,3-tricarboxyllic acid, is a molecule with similar functionality to oxygenated organic compounds which are ubiquitous in atmospheric aerosol. It is therefore thought to be a sensible proxy for atmospheric organic material. Evidence is presented that suggests citric acid solution droplets become ultra-viscous and form glassy solids under atmospherically relevant conditions. Diffusion of liquid water molecules to ice nuclei is expected to be very slow in ultra-viscous solution droplets and nucleation is negligible in glassy droplets; this most likely provides an explanation for the experimentally observed inhibition of ice crystallisation. The implications of ultra-viscous and glassy solution droplets for ice cloud formation and supersaturations in the TTL are discussed.

  1. Biosorption of Acid Yellow 17 from aqueous solution by non-living aerobic granular sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batch biosorption experiments were carried out for the removal of Acid Yellow 17 from aqueous solution using non-living aerobic granular sludge as an effective biosorbent. The effects of solution pH value, biosorbent dosage, initial Acid Yellow 17 concentration, NaCl concentration and temperature on the biosorption were investigated. The experimental results indicate that this process was highly dependent on pH value and the pH value of 2.0 was favorable. The Temkin isotherm was more applicable for describing the biosorption equilibrium at the whole concentration range than the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm. The results of kinetics study show that the pseudo-second-order model fitted to the experimental data well. Both intraparticle diffusion and boundary layer diffusion might affect the biosorption rate. Thermodynamic studies demonstrate that the biosorption process was spontaneous and exothermic. The FTIR analysis before and after Acid Yellow 17 binding indicated that functional groups such as amine, hydroxyl, carboxyl and either on the non-living aerobic granular sludge would be the active binding sites for the biosorption of the studied dye. These results show that non-living aerobic granular sludge could be effectively used as a low-cost and alternative biosorbent for the removal of Acid Yellow 17 dye from wastewater.

  2. Inhibition of ice crystallisation in highly viscous aqueous organic acid droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Murray

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Homogeneous nucleation of ice within aqueous solution droplets and their subsequent crystallisation is thought to play a significant role in upper tropospheric ice cloud formation. It is normally assumed that homogeneous nucleation will take place at a threshold supersaturation, irrespective of the identity of the solute, and that rapid growth of ice particles will follow immediately after nucleation. However, it is shown here through laboratory experiments that droplets may not readily freeze in the very cold tropical tropopause layer (TTL, typical temperatures of 186–200 K. In these experiments ice crystal growth in citric acid solution droplets did not occur when ice nucleated below 197±6 K. Citric acid, 2-hydroxypropane-1,2,3-tricarboxyllic acid, is a molecule with similar functionality to oxygenated organic compounds which are ubiquitous to atmospheric aerosol and is therefore thought to be a sensible proxy for atmospheric organic material. Evidence is presented that suggest citric acid solution droplets become ultra-viscous or perhaps even glassy under atmospherically relevant conditions. Diffusion of liquid water molecules to ice nuclei is expected to be very slow in ultra-viscous solution droplets and this most likely provides an explanation for the experimentally observed inhibition of ice crystallisation. The implications of ultra-viscous solution droplets for ice cloud formation and supersaturations in the TTL are discussed.

  3. Reactivity of Alanylalanine Diastereoisomers in Neutral and Acid Aqueous Solutions: a Versatile Stereoselectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasson, Raphaël; Tsuji, Maika; Kamata, Masazumi; Asakura, Kouichi

    2011-10-01

    A good comprehension of the reactivity of peptides in aqueous solution is fundamental in prebiotic chemistry, namely for understanding their stability and behavior in primitive oceans. Relying on the stereoselectivity of the involved reactions, there is a huge interest in amino acid derivatives for explaining the spontaneous emergence of homochirality on primitive Earth. The corresponding kinetic and thermodynamic parameters are however still poorly known in the literature. We studied the reactivity of alanylalanine in acidic to neutral conditions as a model system. The hydrolysis into amino acids, the epimerization of the N-terminal residue, and the cyclization into diketopiperazine could be successfully identified and studied. This kinetic investigation highlighted interesting behaviors. Complex mechanisms were observed in very acidic conditions. The relative kinetic stability of the diastereoisomers of the dipeptide is highly dependent of the pH, with the possibility to dynamically destabilize the thermodynamically more stable diastereoisomers. The existence of the cyclization of dipeptides adds complexity to the system. On one hand it brings additional stereoselectivities; on the other hand fast racemization of heterochiral dipeptides is obtained.

  4. Acidity control of the oxidation reactions induced by non-thermal plasma treatment of aqueous effluents in pollutant abatement processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The acid properties of a non-thermal plasma in humid air (e.g., a gliding arc device) induced in an aqueous solution may deeply affect the efficiency of the matching oxidising properties, especially when the aqueous targets involve organic solutes. Hence, their oxidation rate may be strongly modified. A series of buffers is proposed to control the pH of aqueous target for at least one-hour treatments. The selected acid-base systems were selected for their inertia towards oxidation reaction, to cover a very large range of acidity. The reported results are essential from both fundamental and applied points of view. They first allow the acute controlling of the degradation rate of organic compounds. They also enable estimating the efficiency of the gliding arc treatments in environmental applications. Besides, they allow getting reliable data on the bactericidal effect on the plasma treatments, which are a merging application of the electric discharges. (author)

  5. Kinetics of Formic Acid-autocatalyzed Preparation of Performic Acid in Aqueous Phase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙晓英; 赵雪冰; 杜伟; 刘德华

    2011-01-01

    Performic acid (PFA) is an oxidant used in chemical processing, synthesis and bleaching. The macro kinetic models of synthesis, hydrolysis and decomposition of PFA were investigated via formic acid-autocatalyzed reaction. It was found that the intrinsic activation energies of PFA synthesis and hydrolysis were 75.2 kJ·mol^-1 and 40.4 kJ·mol^-1 respectively. The observed activation energy of PFA decomposition was 95.4 kJ·mol^-1. The experi-mental results indicated that the decomposition of PFA was liable to occur even at the ambient temperature. Both the spontaneous decomposition and the radical-introduced decomposition contributed to the decomposition of PFA.

  6. Roles for nitric oxide and arachidonic acid in the induction of heterosynaptic cerebellar LTD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, T; Hartell, N A

    2001-01-22

    In cerebellar slices conjunctive pairing of parallel fibre (PF) stimulation with depolarization of Purkinje cells (PCs) induces a long-term depression (LTD) of PF synaptic transmission that spreads to unpaired PF inputs to the same cell. Inhibitors of NO synthase (7-nitro-indazole), soluble guanylate cyclase (ODQ) and PKG (KT5823) all prevented depression at each of two independent PF pathways to a single PC. Inhibition of NOS also unmasked a platelet activating factor (PAF)-mediated synaptic potentiation of possible presynaptic origin. LTD was also prevented by the phospholipase A2 inhibitor OBAA but was rescued by co-perfusion with arachidonic acid. We conclude that NO and diffusible products of phospholipase A2 metabolism are potential mediators of the spread of cerebellar plasticity at the single cell level. PMID:11201073

  7. Craig-distribution of rare earth elements in the system tributylphoshate-nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1.6 kg of yttrium earth mixtures (4-6% Er) were concentrated to 60% erbium oxide by repeated Craig-distributions with 4Μ HNO3 lower phase for separation of yttrium, and with 11 Μ for separation of holmium and thulium. During these experiments the optimal conditions were studied with regard to acidity and input. The 60% Er2O3 was further purified by using 4Μ followed by 11Μ HNO3 lower phase several times. There resulted nearly 20g Er2O3 99.9% pure. The concept of the effective distribution coefficients characterising preparative Craig-Distributions was further verified by discussion of the values of selected separations. (Author)

  8. Kinetics of oxidation of pentavalent neptunium by pentavalent vanadium in solutions of nitric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Precek, Martin; Paulenova, Alena

    2010-03-01

    Management of the oxidation state of neptunium in the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel by solvent extraction is very important. The kinetics of the oxidation of neptunium(V) by vanadium(V) in solutions of nitrate acid was investigated at constant ionic strength 4M. The reaction rate is first order with respect to Np(V) and V(V). The effects of proton concentration on the apparent second order rate constant k1" was determined for temperature 25°C as k1" = (0.99±0.03)·[H+]1.21M-1s-1. Activation parameters associated with the overall reaction have been calculated; the standard reaction enthalpy and entropy were 52.6±0.9 kJ/mol and -55.8±0.9 J/K/mol respectively.

  9. Effects of Salviae Miltiorrhizae Radix Hot Aqueous Extract on Nitric Oxide and Prostaglandin E2 Production and on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl Radical Scavenging in Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeo In Ho

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of Salviae Miltiorrhizae Radix hot aqueous extract on nitric oxide (NO and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 production and on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH free-radical scavenging in macrophages. Methods: Salviae Miltiorrhizae Radix (300 g was heated at 100℃ with distilled water (2 L for 4 hours. The extract was filtered and concentrated to 100 mL by using a rotary evaporator, was frozen at -80℃, and was then freeze-dried by using a freezing-drying system. The RAW 264.7 macrophage was subcultured by using 10-㎍/mL lipopolysaccharide (LPS. In order to evaluate cytotoxicity, we performed 3-(4,5-dimrthylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assays and measured the cell viability. The NO production was measured by using Griess assays, and the PGE2 production was measured by using enzyme immunoassays. The antioxidant activity, the DPPH free-radical scavenging capability, was measured by using the DPPH method. Results: Cell viability with the 1-, 5-, 25-, 125- and 625-㎍/mL Salviae Miltiorrhizae Radix hot aqueous extract was not significantly decreased compared to the cell viability without the extract. When 125 and 625 ㎍/mL of Salviae Miltiorrhizae Radix hot aqueous extract were used, NO production in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages was significantly inhibited compared to that in the control group. When 25, 125, and 625 ㎍/mL of Salviae Miltiorrhizae Radix hot aqueous extract were used, PGE2 production in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages was significantly inhibited compared to that in the control group. The 125- and 625-㎍/mL Salviae Miltiorrhizae Radix hot aqueous extracts had high DPPH free-radical scavenging capabilities in RAW 264.7 macrophages. Conclusion: This study indicates that Salviae Miltiorrhizae Radix hot aqueous extract suppresses NO and PGE2 production and improves DPPH free-radical scavenging capability. Thus, it seems that Salviae

  10. Volumetric behaviour of amino acids and their group contributions in aqueous lactose solutions at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, Amalendu, E-mail: palchem@sify.co [Department of Chemistry, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra 136 119 (India); Chauhan, Nalin [Department of Chemistry, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra 136 119 (India)

    2011-02-15

    Densities, {rho}, for glycine, L-alanine, L-valine, and L-leucine [(0.05 to 0.30) m] in aqueous lactose solutions ranging from pure water to 6 mass% lactose were determined at T = (293.15, 298.15, 303.15, and 308.15) K. The density was used to compute apparent molar volume, V{sub {phi}}, partial molar volume at infinite dilution, V{sub {phi}}{sup o}, and experimental slope, S{sub V} were obtained and interpreted in terms of solute-solvent and solute-solute interactions. These data were used to calculate the ({partial_derivative}V{sub {phi}}{sup 0}/{partial_derivative}T){sub P} values. The partial molar volume of transfer, {Delta}V{sub {phi}}{sup 0} from water to aqueous lactose solutions at infinite dilution has also been calculated. In addition to this, the linear correlation of V{sub {phi}}{sup 0} with number of carbon atoms in the alkyl chain of amino acids was utilized to determine the respective contributions of NH{sub 3}{sup +}COO{sup -}, and CH{sub 2} groups to V{sub {phi}}{sup 0}.

  11. Aqueous chlorination of mefenamic acid: kinetics, transformation by-products and ecotoxicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adira Wan Khalit, Wan Nor; Tay, Kheng Soo

    2016-05-18

    Mefenamic acid (Mfe) is one of the most frequently detected nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the environment. This study investigated the kinetics and the transformation by-products of Mfe during aqueous chlorination. The potential ecotoxicity of the transformation by-products was also evaluated. In the kinetic study, the second-order rate constant (kapp) for the reaction between Mfe and free available chlorine (FAC) was determined at 25 ± 0.1 °C. The result indicated that the degradation of Mfe by FAC is highly pH-dependent. When the pH was increased from 6 to 8, it was found that the kapp for the reaction between Mfe and FAC was decreased from 16.44 to 4.4 M(-1) s(-1). Characterization of the transformation by-products formed during the chlorination of Mfe was carried out using liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight accurate mass spectrometry. Four major transformation by-products were identified. These transformation by-products were mainly formed through hydroxylation, chlorination and oxidation reactions. Ecotoxicity assessment revealed that transformation by-products, particularly monohydroxylated Mfe which is more toxic than Mfe, can be formed during aqueous chlorination.

  12. Aqueous Dispersions of Silica Stabilized with Oleic Acid Obtained by Green Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Lavinia Nistor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes for the first time the synthesis of silica nanoparticles starting from sodium silicate and oleic acid (OLA. The interactions between OLA and sodium silicate require an optimal OLA/OLANa molar ratio able to generate vesicles that can stabilize silica particles obtained by the sol-gel process of sodium silicate. The optimal molar ratio of OLA/OLANa can be ensured by a proper selection of OLA and respectively of sodium silicate concentration. The titration of sodium silicate with OLA revealed a stabilization phenomenon of silica/OLA vesicles and the dependence between their average size and reagent’s molar ratio. Dynamic light scattering (DLS and scanning electron microscopy (SEM measurements emphasized the successful synthesis of silica nanoparticles starting from renewable materials, in mild condition of green chemistry. By grafting octadecyltrimethoxysilane on the initial silica particles, an increased interaction between silica particles and the OLA/OLANa complex was achieved. This interaction between the oleyl and octadecyl chains resulted in the formation of stable gel-like aqueous systems. Subsequently, olive oil and an oleophylic red dye were solubilized in these stable aqueous systems. This great dispersing capacity of oleosoluble compounds opens new perspectives for future green chemistry applications. After the removal of water and of the organic chains by thermal treatment, mesoporous silica was obtained.

  13. Molecular interactions of α-amino acids insight into aqueous β-cyclodextrin systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekka, Deepak; Roy, Mahendra Nath

    2013-10-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analysis of molecular interaction prevailing in glycine, L-alanine, L-valine and aqueous solution of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) have been probed by thermophysical properties. Density (ρ), viscosity (η), and ultrasonic speed (u) measurements have been reported at different temperatures. The extent of interaction (solute-solvent interaction) is expressed in terms of the limiting apparent molar volume ([Formula: see text]), viscosity B-coefficient and limiting apparent molar adiabatic compressibility ([Formula: see text]). The changes on the enthalpy ([Formula: see text]) and entropy ([Formula: see text]) of the encapsulation analysis give information about the driving forces governing the inclusion. The temperature dependence behaviour of partial molar quantities and group contributions to partial molar volumes has been determined for the amino acids. The trends in transfer volumes, [Formula: see text], have been interpreted in terms of solute-cosolute interactions based on a cosphere overlap model. The role of the solvent (aqueous solution of β-CD) and the contribution of solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions to the solution complexes have also been analyzed through the derived properties.

  14. Transuranic decontamination of nitric acid solutions by the TRUEX solvent extraction process: preliminary development studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the work that has been performed to date at Argonne National Laboratory on the development of the TRUEX process, a solvent extraction process employing a bifunctional organophosphorous reagent in a PUREX process solvent (tributyl phosphate-normal paraffinic hydrocarbons). The purpose of this extraction process is to separate and concentrate transuranic (TRU) elements from nuclear waste. Assessments were made of the use of two TRUEX solvents: one incorporating the well-studied dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate (DHDECMP) and a second incorporating an extractant with superior properties for a 1M HNO3 acid feed, octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (O/sub phi/D[IB]CMPO). In this report, conceptual flowsheets for the removal of soluble TRUs from high-level nuclear wastes using these two TRUEX proces solvents are presented, and flowsheet features are discussed in detail. The conceptual flowsheet for TRU-element removal from a PUREX waste by the O/sub phi/D[IB]CMPO-TRUEX process solvent was tested in a bench-scale countercurrent experiment, and results of that experiment are presented and discussed. The conclusion of this study is that the TRUEX process is able to separate TRUs from high-level wastes so that the major portion of the solid waste (approx. 99%) can be classified as non-TRU. Areas where more experimentation is needed are listed at the end of the report. 45 references, 17 figures, 56 tables

  15. A-train CALIOP and MLS observations of early winter Antarctic polar stratospheric clouds and nitric acid in 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lambert

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A-train Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS observations are used to investigate the development of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs and the gas-phase nitric acid distribution in the early 2008 Antarctic winter. Observational evidence of gravity-wave activity is provided by Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS radiances and infrared spectroscopic detection of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT in PSCs is obtained from the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS. Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS-5 DAS analyses are used to derive Lagrangian trajectories and to determine temperature-time histories of air parcels. We use CALIOP backscatter and depolarization measurements to classify PSCs and the MLS measurements to determine the corresponding gas-phase HNO3 as a function of temperature. For liquid PSCs the uptake of HNO3 follows the theoretical equilibrium curve for supercooled ternary solutions (STS, but at temperatures about 1 K lower as determined from GEOS-5. In the presence of solid phase PSCs, above the ice frost-point, the HNO3 depletion occurs over a wider range of temperatures (+2 to −7 K distributed about the NAT equilibrium curve. Rapid gas-phase HNO3 depletion is first seen by MLS from from 23–25 May 2008, consisting of a decrease in the volume mixing ratio from 14 ppbv (parts per billion by volume to 7 ppbv on the 46–32 hPa (hectopascal pressure levels and accompanied by a 2–3 ppbv increase by renitrification at the 68 hPa pressure level. The observed region of depleted HNO3 is substantially smaller than the region bounded by the NAT existence temperature threshold. Temperature-time histories of air parcels demonstrate that the depletion is more clearly correlated with prior exposure to temperatures a few kelvin above the frost-point. From the combined data we infer the presence

  16. A-train CALIOP and MLS observations of early winter antarctic polar stratospheric clouds and nitric acid in 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lambert

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A-train Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS observations are used to investigate the development of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs and the gas phase nitric acid distribution in the early 2008 Antarctic winter. Observational evidence of gravity-wave activity is provided by Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS radiances and infrared spectroscopic detection of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT in PSCs is obtained from the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS. Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS-5 DAS analyses are used to derive Lagrangian trajectories and to determine temperature-time histories of air parcels. We use CALIOP backscatter and depolarization measurements to classify PSCs and the MLS measurements to determine the corresponding gas phase HNO3 as a function of temperature. For liquid PSCs the uptake of HNO3 follows the theoretical equilibrium curve for supercooled ternary solutions (STS, but at temperatures about 1 K lower as determined from GEOS-5. In the presence of solid phase PSCs, above the ice frost-point, the HNO3 depletion occurs over a wider range of temperatures (+2 to −7 K distributed about the NAT equilibrium curve. Rapid gas phase HNO3 depletion is first seen by MLS from from 23–25 May 2008, consisting of a decrease in the volume mixing ratio (parts per billion by volume from 14 ppbv to 7 ppbv on the 46–32 hPa (hectopascal pressure levels and accompanied by a 2–3 ppbv increase by renitrification at the 68 hPa pressure level. Temperature-time histories of air parcels demonstrate that the depleted HNO3 region is more clearly correlated with prior low temperature exposure of a few kelvin above the frost-point than with either the region bounded by the NAT existence temperature threshold or the region of minimum temperatures. From the combined data we infer the

  17. Electrochemical oxidation of loop diuretic furosemide in aqueous acid medium and its analytical application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikandar D. Bukkitgar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of oxidative–reductive mechanisms of pharmaceutically important molecules gives us information about the metabolic fact of targeted drug. As compared to recent ongoing, time-consuming and costly techniques, there is an urgent needing for development of a sensitive technique, which can help easy understanding of these pathways. Therefore, in the present work, an effective, low-cost and time-saving technique to investigate the reaction mechanism of furosemide in aqueous acid medium is attempted. Furosemide undergoes two-proton and two-electron transfer reaction. The product obtained was analysed by UV spectra. It was found that the chemical oxidation and electrochemical oxidation of furosemide follows two different pathways. In addition, an effective technique has been developed to determine furosemide in its trace level. Good recoveries and low detection limit accomplished the magnitude of the proposed method. The proposed method was adopted for furosemide determination in human urine and pharmaceutical samples.

  18. Solubility and metastable zone width of DL-tartaric acid in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Wang, Xiaofang; Hao, Lin; Yang, Xiaowu; Dang, Leping; Wei, Hongyuan [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, 300072 Tianjin (China)

    2012-11-15

    Solubility and metastable zone width (MSZW) of DL-tartaric acid (DL-TA) in aqueous solution have been determined. Solubility of DL-TA was measured in the temperature range from 0 to 50 C at atmospheric pressure by means of the conventional polythermal method using Turbidity Monitoring Technique, which was verified by a gravimetric method. The dissolution enthalpy and entropy of DL-TA were then calculated from the solubility data using van't Hoff equation. Two approaches was used to estimate the nucleation kinetics from the measured metastable zone width data, the self-consistent approach and the approach based on 3D nucleation. In addition, the metastable zone width slightly decreases with increasing agitation rate and was independent of working volume. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Removal of Basic Violet 14 from aqueous solution using sulphuric acid activated materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, S

    2016-01-01

    In this study the adsorption of Basic Violet, 14 from aqueous solution onto sulphuric acid activated materials prepared from Calophyllum inophyllum (CS) and Theobroma cacao (TS) shells were investigated. The experimental data were analysed by Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherm models. The results showed that CS has a superior adsorption capacity compared to the TS. The adsorption capacity was found to be 1416.43 mg/g for CS and 980.39 mg/g for TS. The kinetic data results at different concentrations were analysed using pseudo first-order and pseudo-second order model. Boyd plot indicates that the dye adsorption onto CS and TS is controlled by film diffusion. The adsorbents were characterised by scanning electron microscopy. The materials used in this study were economical waste products and hence can be an attractive alternative to costlier adsorbents for dye removal in industrial wastewater treatment processes. PMID:27330899

  20. Interpolymer reactions of nonionic polymers with polyacrylic acid in aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Shaikhutdinov

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Results of fundamental investigations in the intermacromolecular reactions and interpolymer complexes to be performed by authors with co-workes within last 20 years have been intergrated and summarized in the present review. The raw of fundamental regularities in the effect of factors of different nature (pH, ionic strength, temperature, hydrophilic-hydrophobic balance of macrochain, etc. on the complexation of nonionic polymers with polycarboxylic acids in aqueous solutions has been revealed. Critical pH upon complexation (pHcrit. has been used for evaluation of the complexing ability of the polymers. It was shown tha tdepending on pHcrit. all systems can be divided into 2 groups, namely, weak complexing and strongly complexing. The existence of two critical pH upon complexation responsible for formation typical interpolymer complexes and hydrophilic associations has been demonstrated by the method of luminescence spectroscopy.