WorldWideScience

Sample records for aqueous effluent decontamination

  1. Partial alpha decontamination proceeding of an aqueous effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention concerns a partial alpha decontamination proceeding of an aqueous effluent having, at least one polluting element chosen among copper, zinc, tantalum, gold, actinides or lanthanides. This proceeding consists on putting in contact the aqueous effluent with a silica gel and to separate the contaminated effluent from the silica gel having fixed one of these polluting elements already mentioned; the effluent to treat has a ph value higher or equal to 3. This proceeding can be applied to the treatment of effluents coming from spent fuels reprocessing plants and technological effluents coming from nuclear power plants. (N.C.). 6 refs

  2. The potentialities of the complexation ultrafiltration technique for the decontamination of fission product contaminated aqueous effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many nuclear researchers and industrial operators lay emphasis on improving the back end of the fuel cycle. A major problem concerns the liquid wastes generated by the reprocessing plant at La Hague, discharged into the sea after treatment in the Effluent Treatment Station (STE) 3), and which have become crucial matter. The activity of these wastes is well below the current legal limits, and is constantly decreasing these last years. To bring it close to zero, and ambitious goal, entails innovative new reprocessing techniques. We accordingly investigated the possibilities of complexation-ultrafiltration, a technique that uses water-soluble macromolecules to complex the target elements to be separated. We first achieved the strontium (II) separation with poly-acrylic and poly-sulfonic acids. The effects of pH and NaNO3 concentration influence on Sr (II) complexation were studied. The Sr (II) complexation and concentration phases, followed by cation de-complexation to recover the polymer, were also taken into account. This research, combined with a potentiometric study of the polymers, offered a close understanding of the chemical systems involved, and of the operating conditions and limits of complexation-ultrafiltration. The laboratory results were also validated on a tangential ultrafiltration pilot plant. We then used complexation-ultrafiltration to treat a real effluent generated bu La Hague's STE 3 plant. This experiment demonstrated minimum 90 % decontamination of Sr (II) (with polyacrylate complexing agent), and also for 134-137Cs (with simple ultrafiltration). The use of two polyamides allowed partial decontamination of the effluent for 60Co and 106Ru. This work therefore offers a global approach to complexation-ultrafiltration, from laboratory to pilot scale, on real and simulated effluents. The future of this technique relies chiefly on the ability to solve the problem of polymer recovery. In other respect, complexation-ultrafiltration clearly offers a

  3. Introduction of a cation in aqueous solution by electrolytic dissolution of metal. Applications to the decontamination of radioactive effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research thesis aims at comparing results obtained in chemical decontamination of radioactive effluents with a metallic cation introduced by metal electro-dissolution or by dose addition. After an overview of methods used for the purification of radioactive effluents and a more precise presentation of chemical co-precipitation, the author reports preliminary tests of the application of chemical co-precipitation to the decontamination of radioactive effluents, reports the analysis of iron, zinc and copper behaviour in aqueous environment by means of thermodynamic diagrams and current-voltage curves. He reports the design and use of two electro-dissolution sets, and the application of copper electrolytic dissolution to the elimination of ruthenium in radioactive effluents. He finally addresses the purification treatment of effluents of nuclear reactors

  4. Contribution to immersed arc plasma study: applications to organic aqueous effluent decontamination and gasification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is concerned with decontamination and gasification of aqueous organic liquid waste by immersed thermal plasma technology. In this concept, the organic compounds are decomposed into gas by high temperature plasma. A quench of about 107-108 K/s, is obtained by immersion into a given effluent. Two kinds of arc plasma are studied. The first one is an immersed electrical arc stricken between two graphite electrodes. The second one is a plasma jet generated by a non-transferred plasma torch. For dilute liquid waste (1 g/L) containing molecules incompatible with conventional biological processes, the hydroxyl radicals (OH0) are continuously produced by the plasma jet directly into the solution allowing complete molecule mineralization into carbon dioxide and water. The hetero-atoms, if present, are converted into solvated ions. The decomposition of the molecules, such as chloro-phenols and aniline, are studied. Considering the identified intermediate products, a reaction mechanism is proposed. For each tested molecules, their concentration decreased at least of 90 percent. Based on the 'gasosiphon' phenomenon, the experimental reactor insures the simultaneous recirculation of both gas and liquid phases. The hydrodynamic was studied using in situ high frequency imaging technology. A CFD code was applied for numerical simulation of the observed recirculation phenomena. The results were compared with obtained experimental data. In the case of concentrated liquid waste (≥ 100 g/L), syngas was produced by thermal cracking of organic molecules. The best measured composition of the gas is about 45% v/v of H2 and 45 % v/v of CO when an electrical arc is used. The usability of both studied plasma types were investigated in this field. The experimental study was carried on using fructose and glucose solution (several hundreds g/L) as surrogated effluent. With a specific injection method, gasification rate is about 30 % with one way. Optical Emission Spectroscopy and

  5. Recent studies on advanced methods for the decontamination of aqueous effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Harwell Laboratory has for many years been engaged in the design and development of processes to reduce the level of radioactivity present in low and intermediate level aqueous radioactive wastes to a very low level. A number of the radionuclides included in this work are those of toxic metals such as chromium, zinc, manganese, cobalt and nickel and therefore the processes that have been developed are also applicable to some of the wastes being generated in the non-nuclear industries. Work in Chemistry Division at Harwell has shown that precipitation processes and the use of inorganic ion-exchange materials in combination with ultrafiltration can achieve very effective decontamination. This paper presents some recent results from studies on decontamination processes and describes how the computer program is being amended to take account of sorption processes

  6. Study of potentialities of micellar enhanced ultrafiltration for the decontamination of aqueous effluents containing heavy metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals with the extraction of thorium, ruthenium and uranium by ultrafiltration using different micellar systems. These extractions are carried out in media which are strongly charged in salts (nitrates and carbonates). In the first part of this work has been studied the behaviour of micellar solutions. The type of used ultrafiltration (frontal or tangential), the pH, the initial concentration of surfactant, the salt type, the pressure, the recirculation rate, the surfactant type, the nature of the membrane (organic or mineral), the membrane support (aluminium oxide or carbon), the membrane cut threshold are factors able to affect the behaviour of micellar solutions, so their influences have been studied. This preliminary study has allowed to determine the ultrafiltration experimental conditions required to obtain the best possible flux for a minimal loss of surfactant in the permeate. The second part of this work deals with the metals extraction. The presence of strong salts concentrations is prejudicial to the process for the extractions carried out with SDC, CPC, or CTAB alone. The author has then studied micellar systems solubilizing an extractant agent (systems: Triton-X-100/Kelex-100, Triton-X-100/HS-21 and Brij 35/HS-21). The study of the different parameters affecting the extraction yields has allowed in this case to improve the results for reaching yields sometimes superior to 99.9% as well as for some metals taken separately than for the three metals treated simultaneously. The results of this work have shown the evident potentialities of the use of a surfactant/extractant system for the decontamination of effluents containing heavy metals and metals strongly charged in nitrates. (O.M.)

  7. Coir pith of the green coconut in the decontamination of radioactive aqueous effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Industrial segments as plant of mining, hospitals and university generate considerable volumes of radioactive wastewater containing uranium. The increasing development of the use of the nuclear energy to lead away to an expansion of the sectors of the nuclear fuel cycle, but it leads to security problems and it appears the necessity of control of the removing of uranium and radioactive effluent treatments. Researches evaluate if the technique of the biosorption would promote an alternative process with attractive characteristics of cost-benefit. The residual biomass from agricultural activities has been studied and used as adsorbent of metals and organic composts by low cost, abundance and for being biodegradable. In this work, it is presented the efficiency of the coir pith for the adsorption of ions UO22+. The coir pith is a by-product of the harvest of the coconut, a renewable natural source. The study was accomplished using the batch techniques. The influence from pH 2 to 5, the dose of the coir pith, equilibrium time and the models of kinetic reaction were investigated. It was verified that the adsorption increased with the increase of pH and of the dose. The equilibrium time was of 30 min and the best correspondence with the model of pseudo second-order was observed. The results obtained has been promising, so use as adsorbent of metallic ions represents an economic alternative in relation to the conventional treatment of effluent. (author)

  8. The potentialities of the complexation ultrafiltration technique for the decontamination of fission product contaminated aqueous effluents; Potentialites de la complexation - ultrafiltration a la decontamination d`effluents radioactifs en produits de fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thibert, V.

    1995-07-01

    Many nuclear researchers and industrial operators lay emphasis on improving the back end of the fuel cycle. A major problem concerns the liquid wastes generated by the reprocessing plant at La Hague, discharged into the sea after treatment in the Effluent Treatment Station (STE) (3), and which have become crucial matter. The activity of these wastes is well below the current legal limits, and is constantly decreasing these last years. To bring it close to zero, and ambitious goal, entails innovative new reprocessing techniques. We accordingly investigated the possibilities of complexation-ultrafiltration, a technique that uses water-soluble macromolecules to complex the target elements to be separated. We first achieved the strontium (II) separation with poly-acrylic and poly-sulfonic acids. The effects of pH and NaNO{sub 3} concentration influence on Sr (II) complexation were studied. The Sr (II) complexation and concentration phases, followed by cation de-complexation to recover the polymer, were also taken into account. This research, combined with a potentiometric study of the polymers, offered a close understanding of the chemical systems involved, and of the operating conditions and limits of complexation-ultrafiltration. The laboratory results were also validated on a tangential ultrafiltration pilot plant. We then used complexation-ultrafiltration to treat a real effluent generated bu La Hague`s STE 3 plant. This experiment demonstrated minimum 90 % decontamination of Sr (II) (with polyacrylate complexing agent), and also for {sup 134-137}Cs (with simple ultrafiltration). The use of two polyamides allowed partial decontamination of the effluent for {sup 60}Co and {sup 106}Ru. This work therefore offers a global approach to complexation-ultrafiltration, from laboratory to pilot scale, on real and simulated effluents. The future of this technique relies chiefly on the ability to solve the problem of polymer recovery. (Abstract Truncated)

  9. New decontamination techniques generating a low volume of effluent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This document presents some decontamination techniques, their principles, characteristics and advantages and provides references on the subject. Techniques as foam and spray foam decontamination, dry steam decontamination, electro-decontamination and gel decontamination are presented. A presentation of TRIADE, cleanup dismantling servicing, is also provided. (A.L.B.)

  10. New decontamination techniques generating a low volume of effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents some decontamination techniques, their principles, characteristics and advantages and provides references on the subject. Techniques as foam and spray foam decontamination, dry steam decontamination, electro-decontamination and gel decontamination are presented. A presentation of TRIADE, cleanup dismantling servicing, is also provided. (A.L.B.)

  11. Biosafety and containment plan & design for direct sampling of operating effluent decontamination tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currently, Southeast Poultry Research Laboratory (SEPRL) uses an effluent decontamination system (EDS) that serves as an enhancement, or extra barrier for biocontainment. Wastewater effluent from (A)BSL-3E and (A)BSL-2E laboratories is collected in tanks for thermal inactivation (180°F for 30 minut...

  12. IMPROVED DECONTAMINATION: INTERFACIAL, TRANSPORT, AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF AQUEOUS SURFACTANT CLEANERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This investigation is focused on decontamination using environmentally benign aqueous solutions, specifically the removal of organics and associated radionuclide and heavy metal contaminants by synthetic surfactants. Aqueous-based solutions promise several advantages for deconta...

  13. The use of magnetite for decontaminating alpha containing effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of retention of precipitated magnetite by magnetic filtration followed by direct cementation offered an attractive alternative to conventional ferric hydroxide treatment of radioactive liquid effluents. The magnetically-assisted dewatering of laboratory-prepared magnetite was examined in a number of ways, none of which achieved the desired optimum solids content for cementation. Attempts to prepare magnetite in situ from typical effluents containing iron were unsuccessful owing to the presence of interfering ions. Preformed magnetite was reasonably effective at absorbing actinides from solution but did not appear to offer any significant advantage over ferric hydroxide. (author)

  14. Continuous environmental monitoring for aqueous effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitt, Jr., W. W.; Jones, G. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    An aquatic environmental monitor has been developed that will continuously monitor aqueous waste streams from coal processing plants. The monitor contains three different instruments: a continuous chemical oxygen demand monitor and two continuous-flow fluorometers with different excitation-emission characteristics. A prototype instrument was fabricated and evaluated for several different applications. The details of the instrument design and results of its evaluation are presented in this report.

  15. Separation of tritium from aqueous effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the further development of the so-called ELEX process, carried out from 1 July 1980 until 31 December 1982. The ELEX process is the combination of electrolysis with the catalytic tritium exchange between hydrogen and water in order to accumulate the tritium in the liquid phase. The experimental study of the catalytic tritium exchange between hydrogen and liquid water was continued and the overall exchange rate could be substantially increased. An alternative process based on bithermal exchange of tritium has been evaluated. In the 10 mol h-1 mini-pilot bench scale detritiation unit the ELEX process was successfully demonstrated by detritiating up to now more than 1m3 of water containing up to 100 mCi tritium per dm3, which is the feed concentration to be expected for application of the process in a reprocessing plant. A 280 mol h-1 pilot detritiation installation now being constructed is described. This installation will realize a volume reduction factor of 100 and a process decontamination factor of 100. The maximum total tritium inventory will be about 1000 Ci. The plant consists mainly of a 80 kW electrolyser and a 10 cm diameter exchange column and can be considered as the ultimate step before industrial application of the ELEX process

  16. Adsorption behavior of rice husk for the decontamination of chromium from industrial effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice husk, an agricultural waste product, was studied as a potential decontaminant for chromium in the effluents of leather tanning industries. Physico-chemical parameters such as selection of appropriate electrolyte, shaking time, concentration of absorbent and absorbate were studied to optimize the best conditions in which this material can be utilized on commercial scale for the decontamination of effluents. The radiotracer technique was used to determine the distribution of chromium. In certain cases atomic absorption spectrophotometry was also employed. Maximum adsorption was observed at 0.01 mol x dm-3 acid solutions (HNO3, HCl, H2SO4 and HClO4) using 3.0 g of absorbent for 2.73 x 10-3 mol x dm-3 chromium concentration in five minutes equilibration time. Studies show that the adsorption decreases with the increase in the concentrations of all acids. The adsorption data follows the Freundlich isotherm over the range of 2.73 x 10-3 to 2.73 x 10-2 mol x dm-3 chromium concentration. The characteristic Freundlich constants, i.e., 1/n = 0.86 ± 0.06 and A = 2.35 ± 0.06 mmol x g-1 have been computed for the sorption system. Thermodynamic parameters, i.e., ΔG deg, ΔS deg and ΔH deg have also been calculated for the system. Application of the method to a test case of a medium size industry showed that 21 kg of rice husk was sufficient to maintain the NEQS limits of chromium for industrial effluents. (author)

  17. Application of inorganic ion exchangers for low and medium activity radioactive effluent decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study proposes an alternative pretreatment or treatment for low and medium activity liquid wastes, allowing to improve the quality of containment and decrease the cost of storage. Inorganic ion exchangers are used to remove alpha emitters and long lived fission products and concentrate them in a small volume; these exchangers can be converted into a stable matrix by thermal treatment. This treatment, at least for some liquid wastes, don't exclude a complementary decontamination by chemical precipitation. Sludges, arising from precipitation, exempt from alpha emitters and long lived fission products can be stored in a shallow land burial. This study includes two parts: - Measurements of distribution coefficients for the main nuclides in order to choose, for each liquid wastes, the most suitable ion exchanger. - Estimation of performances of selected inorganic ion exchangers, from tests of percolation of genuine effluents

  18. Bioassay analysis of efficacy of phytoremediation in decontamination of coal mine effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Sandhya; Banerjee, Tarun Kumar

    2013-06-01

    Phytoremediation efficacy of Lemna minor and Azolla pinnata in decontaminating metals from coal mine effluent (CME) was analyzed using bioassays. Catfish Heteropneustes fossilis were exposed to both the phytoremediated CMEs for the metal bioaccumulation analysis and biochemical alteration in seven vital tissues. Gross concentration of metals accumulated in liver, kidneys, air breathing organs (ABO), skin and muscle were greater in fish exposed to A. pinnata remediated CME (AP-CME) than those exposed to L. minor remediated CME (LP-CME). Total protein concentrations of all the tissues were greater in fish exposed to LP-CME than to AP-CME. Glycogen concentrations were greater in muscle, brain, ABO and skin of LP-CME exposed fish. In remaining tissues (liver, kidneys and gills) concentrations of glycogen were more in AP-CME exposed ones. Total lipid and total DNA concentrations were greater in most of the tissues of fish exposed to LP-CME than to AP-CME. The total RNA concentrations were elevated only in muscle, liver, kidneys and brain of LP-CME exposed fish; in rest of the tissues (gills, ABO and skin) it was greater in AP-CME exposed fish. The values of condition factor (K) and organosomatic index (OSI) of fish exposed to LP-CME and AP-CME were insignificant to those of wild fish. However, the improvements in the biomolecules concentration of tissues of fish exposed to either of the phytoremediated effluent were not equivalent to their concentration in the wild fish. Thus, decontamination of CME by either of these macrophytes was not complete and prolonged exposure of even phytoremediated CMEs exerts deleterious effects on the fish. PMID:23566881

  19. A process to separate the sodium from radioactive aqueous effluents resulting from spent fuels reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention concerns the separation of sodium from radioactive aqueous effluents resulting from spent fuels reprocessing. The sodium separation is carried out with the use of charged porous membranes methods and of nano-filtration. Membranes are formed by a polymer layer as poly-aramids, sulfonated poly-sulfone or ionomer containing fluorine. The tangential filtration technology limits the accumulation phenomenon of the retained species at the membrane surface and is then used preferentially. In order to obtain the wished retention rates, the pH value of the aqueous effluent, the temperature, the pressure and the flow rates have to be adjusted. The membrane retention rate for the radioactive elements can be improved by the complexation with the use of chelating agents of one or several elements present in the effluent. Radioactive effluents without sodium can be then stored in vitreous matrices. (O.M.). 4 refs., 26 figs., 4 tabs

  20. Aqueous media treatment and decontamination of hazardous chemical and biological substances by contact plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usage of non-equilibrium contact plasma for processes of decontamination and neutralization in conditions of manifestation of chemical, biological and radiation terrorism takes on special significance due to portability of equipment and its mobility in places where toxic liquid media hazardous for people's health are located. Processes of decontamination of aqueous media, seminated with pathogenic microorganisms and viruses, treatment of water containing toxic heavy metals, cyanides, surface-active substances, and heavy radioactive elements, are investigated. Examples of activation processes in infected water and toxic aqueous solutions present convincing evidence of the way, how new quality technological approach for achievement of high enough degree of the said media treatment is used in each specific case. Among new properties of water activated as a result of action of non-equilibrium contact plasma, it is necessary to mention presence of cluster structure, confirmed by well-known spectral and physical-chemical methods, presence of peroxide compounds, active particles and radicals. Anti-microbial activity which is displayed under action of plasma in aqueous media (chemically pure water, drinking water, aqueous solutions of sodium chloride, potassium iodide, as well as other inorganic compounds) towards wide range of pathogenic and conventionally pathogenic microorganisms allows use them as reliable, accessible and low-cost preparations for increasing the degree of safety of food products. Combination of such processes with known methods of filtration and ultra-filtration gives an efficient and available complex capable of withstanding any threats, which may arise for population and living organisms. Present-day level of machine-building, electrical engineering, and electronics allows predict creation of industrial plasma installations, adapted to conditions of various terrorist threats, with minimized power consumption and optimized technological parameters

  1. REMOVAL OF REMAZOL ROSSO RB DYE FROM AQUEOUS EFFLUENTS BY HOMOGENOUS FENTON OXIDATION PROCESSES

    OpenAIRE

    Carmen Zaharia; Victoria Fedorcea; Adrian Beda; Victor Amarandei; Augustin Muresan

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents some data from our laboratory-setup experiments of homogenous oxidative processes with hydrogen peroxide (i.e. advanced Fenton oxidation processes) applied for Remazol Rosso RB dye-containing aqueous systems, especially textile effluents. Therefore, some different operating parameters (including pH, concentration of dye, H2O2 and ferrous ions, oxidation time, temperature, stirring regime, among its) were tested for determination of the best performance in effluent decolorat...

  2. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 2724-W Protective Equipment Decontamination Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1* for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. A facility effluent monitoring plan determination was performed during Calendar Year 1991 and the evaluation requires the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438**. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements

  3. Ni(II) removal from aqueous effluents by silylated clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Wagner A; Vignado, Carolina; Fontana, Juliane

    2008-05-30

    Industrial effluents discharged in water bodies without proper treatment contribute to water pollution by potentially toxic metal ions. Considering that the legislation for discarding of such effluents is getting more and more rigorous, the development of efficient processes for the treatment of industrial effluents is of great interest. A study on the capacity of metal retention by silylated-modified clays was carried out with the aim to evaluate the efficiency of this application. K10 clay was modified with 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) and tested in batch removal processes. We investigated the sorption process, obtaining isotherms and kinetics of adsorption and the influence of pH, the desorption process and the metal recovery. It was observed that the modified clay presents fast retention and good capacity of both adsorption and desorption. The use of K10/MPS as adsorbent shows to be more adequate in effluent final polishment, after a conventional treatment, or when Ni(II) initial concentration in the effluent is low enough to permit its adequate removal by conventional methods. PMID:17980481

  4. Screening of natural adsorbents for removal of radio-contaminants from aqueous effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper is a summary of studies carried out to examine the uptake potential of some of the bio/natural adsorbents for removal of radiocontaminants from aqueous effluents. Three different bio/natural materials namely coconut coir pith, sugarcane bagasse and saw dust were selected as adsorbents. Preliminary characterisations of the above adsorbents were carried out and percentage of removal of 239Pu and 241Am from aqueous solutions were checked using batch equilibration method. (author)

  5. The application of inorganic ion exchangers to the decontamination of radioactive liquid effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A generic programme of work at Harwell has been investigating the potential application of inorganic exchangers in effluent treatment. Hydrous titanium oxide, manganese dioxide titanium and zirconium phosphates, polyantimonic acid and copper hexacyanoferrate were selected for experimental investigation. An extensive experimental programme has examined the performance of these six materials for the removal of a variety of radionuclides from a wide range of different simulated waste effluents. (author)

  6. Radiation induced decontamination of Cr(Ⅵ), Cu(Ⅱ) and phenol in some tannery effluents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hasan M.KHAN; Abdul MAHMOOD

    2007-01-01

    Industrialization has led to a number of environmental problems, such as release of toxic metals and other toxic organic and inorganic compounds to the environment. Among all, the rapid expansion of leather related industries in Pakistan have resulted in considerable environmental problems and effluents from processing of both domestic and imported hides and skins have increased pollution to alarming levels. Some tannery effluents of Peshawar area investigated in the present study showed high concentrations of Cr(Ⅵ) (2.7-12.6 mg/L), Cu(Ⅱ) (2.6-11.4 mg/L) and phenol (0.1-4.2 mg/L). These contaminants are very toxic and must be removed from effluents before releasing into water bodies. A new technique of gamma irradiation has been investigated to decrease the load of COD and concentrations of Cr(Ⅵ), Cu(Ⅱ) and phenol associated with tannery effluents to the permitted values. It was observed that concentration of Cr(Ⅵ) in the effluents can be brought to the permitted level by applying radiation dose of 3 kGy. A radiation dose of 2.5 kGy was required to remove more than 95% of Cu(Ⅱ) and 100 % degradation of phenol in tannery effluents could be achieved by only one kGy of radiation dose.

  7. Radiation induced decontamination of Cr(VI), Cu(II) and phenol in some tannery effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Industrialization has led to a number of environmental problems, such as release of toxic metals and other toxic organic and inorganic compounds to the environment. Among all, the rapid expansion of leather related industries in Pakistan have resulted in considerable environmental problems and effluents from processing of both domestic and imported hides and skins have increased pollution to alarming levels. Some tannery effluents of Peshawar area investigated in the present study showed high concentrations of Cr(VI) (2.7-12.6 mg/L), Cu(II) (2.6-11.4 mg/L) and phenol (0.1-4.2 mg/L). These contaminants are very toxic and must be removed from effluents before releasing into water bodies. A new technique of gamma irradiation has been investigated to decrease the load of COD and concentrations of Cr(VI), Cu(II) and phenol associated with tannery effluents to the permitted values. It was observed that concentration of Cr(VI) in the effluents can be brought to the permitted level by applying radiation dose of 3 kGy. A radiation dose of 2.5 kGy was required to remove more than 95% of Cu(II) and 100 % degradation of phenol in tannery effluents could be achieved by only one kGy of radiation dose. (authors)

  8. Electrolytic treatment of liquid effluents: decontamination by electro coagulation of release water of a petroleum platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The water releases of petroleum platforms present lots of pollutants; Usually, these waters are reinjected in ground water when it is possible. In the other cases they are released at the surface and need then a treatment. The electro-coagulation is a suitable method often used. The authors propose to study the optimum conditions of decontamination by this method, by a parametric evaluation (water flow, charge density, ph). Experiments used iron and aluminium electrodes. (A.L.B.)

  9. Aqueous stability of gadolinium in surface waters receiving sewage treatment plant effluent Boulder Creek, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verplanck, P.L.; Taylor, H.E.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Barber, L.B.

    2005-01-01

    In many surface waters, sewage treatment plant (STP) effluent is a substantial source of both regulated and unregulated contaminants, including a suite of complex organic compounds derived from household chemicals, pharmaceutical, and industrial and medical byproducts. In addition, STP effluents in some urban areas have also been shown to have a positive gadolinium (Gd) anomaly in the rare earth element (REE) pattern, with the Gd derived from its use in medical facilities. REE concentrations are relatively easy to measure compared to many organic wastewater compounds and may provide a more widely utilized tracer of STP effluents. To evaluate whether sewage treatment plant-associated Gd is a useful tracer of treatment plant effluent, an investigation of the occurrence, fate, and transport of rare earth elements was undertaken. The rare earth element patterns of four of five STP effluents sampled display positive Gd anomalies. The one site that did not have a Gd anomaly serves a small community, population 1200, with no medical facilities. Biosolids from a large metropolitan STP are not enriched in Gd even though the effluent is, suggesting that a substantial fraction of Gd remains in the aqueous phase through routine treatment plant operation. To evaluate whether STP-derived Gd persists in the fluvial environment, a 14-km study reach downstream of an STP was sampled. Gadolinium anomalies were present at all five downstream sites, but the magnitude of the anomaly decreased. Effluent from STPs is a complex mixture of organic and inorganic constituents, and to better understand the chemical interactions and their effect on REEs, the aqueous speciation was modeled using comprehensive chemical analyses of water samples collected downstream of STP input. These calculations suggest that the REEs will likely remain dissolved because phosphate and carbonate complexes dominate over free REE ions. This study supports the application of Gd anomalies as a useful tracer of urban

  10. REMOVAL OF REMAZOL ROSSO RB DYE FROM AQUEOUS EFFLUENTS BY HOMOGENOUS FENTON OXIDATION PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Zaharia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some data from our laboratory-setup experiments of homogenous oxidative processes with hydrogen peroxide (i.e. advanced Fenton oxidation processes applied for Remazol Rosso RB dye-containing aqueous systems, especially textile effluents. Therefore, some different operating parameters (including pH, concentration of dye, H2O2 and ferrous ions, oxidation time, temperature, stirring regime, among its were tested for determination of the best performance in effluent decoloration and dye removal, meaning the optimal values of each studied parameters for highest decoloration or dye removal.

  11. Decontamination of cesium, strontium, and cobalt from aqueous solutions by bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, M.A. [Univ. of the Punjab, Lahore (Pakistan); Khan, S.A. [Government F.C. College, Lahore (Pakistan)

    1996-12-31

    Sorption studies of cesium, strontium, and cobalt (Cs, Sr, and Co) on bentonite under various experimental conditions, such as contact time, pH, sorbent and sorbate concentration, and temperature, have been performed. The sorption data for all these metals have been interpreted in terms of Freundlich, Langmuir, and Dubinin-Radushkevich equations. Thermodynamics parameters, such as heat of sorption {Delta}H{degrees}, free energy change {Delta}G{degrees}, and entropy change {Delta}S{degrees}, for the sorption of these metals on bentonite have been calculated. The value of {Delta}H{degrees} shows that the sorption of Cs was exothermic, while the sorption of Sr and Co on bentonite were endothermic in nature. The value of {Delta}G{degrees} for their sorption was negative, showing the spontaneity of the process. The maximum loading capacity of Cs, Sr, and Co were 75.5, 22, and 27.5 meq, respectively, for 100 g of bentonite. The mean free energy E of Cs, Sr, and Co sorption on bentonite was 14.5, 9, and 7.7 kJ/mol, respectively. The value of E indicates that ion exchange may be the predominant mode of sorption for these radionuclides. The desorption studies with 0.01 M CaCl{sub 2} and groundwater at low-metal loading on bentonite showed that about 95% of Cs, 85-90% of Sr, and 97% of Co were irreversibly sorbed. Bentonite could be effectively used for the decontamination of wastewater effluent containing low concentrations of radioactive nuclides of Cs, Sr, and Co. 16 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Treatment plan for aqueous/organic/decontamination wastes under the Oak Ridge Reservation FFCA Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backus, P.M.; Benson, C.E.; Gilbert, V.P.

    1994-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-Region IV have entered into a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA) which seeks to facilitate the treatment of low-level mixed wastes currently stored at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in violation of the Resource, Conservation and Recovery Act Land Disposal Restrictions. The FFCA establishes schedules for DOE to identify treatment for wastes, referred to as Appendix B wastes, that current have no identified or existing capacity for treatment. A development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation (DDT&E) program was established to provide the support necessary to identify treatment methods for mixed was meeting the Appendix B criteria. The Program has assembled project teams to address treatment development needs for major categories of the Appendix B wastes based on the waste characteristics and possible treatment technologies. The Aqueous, Organic, and Decontamination (A/O/D) project team was established to identify pretreatment options for aqueous and organic wastes which will render the waste acceptable for treatment in existing waste treatment facilities and to identify the processes to decontaminate heterogeneous debris waste. In addition, the project must also address the treatment of secondary waste generated by other DDT&E projects. This report details the activities to be performed under the A/O/D Project in support of the identification, selection, and evaluation of treatment processes. The goals of this plan are (1) to determine the major aqueous and organic waste streams requiring treatment, (2) to determine the treatment steps necessary to make the aqueous and organic waste acceptable for treatment in existing treatment facilities on the ORR or off-site, and (3) to determine the processes necessary to decontaminate heterogeneous wastes that are considered debris.

  13. Treatment plan for aqueous/organic/decontamination wastes under the Oak Ridge Reservation FFCA Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-Region IV have entered into a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA) which seeks to facilitate the treatment of low-level mixed wastes currently stored at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in violation of the Resource, Conservation and Recovery Act Land Disposal Restrictions. The FFCA establishes schedules for DOE to identify treatment for wastes, referred to as Appendix B wastes, that current have no identified or existing capacity for treatment. A development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation (DDT ampersand E) program was established to provide the support necessary to identify treatment methods for mixed was meeting the Appendix B criteria. The Program has assembled project teams to address treatment development needs for major categories of the Appendix B wastes based on the waste characteristics and possible treatment technologies. The Aqueous, Organic, and Decontamination (A OE D) project team was established to identify pretreatment options for aqueous and organic wastes which will render the waste acceptable for treatment in existing waste treatment facilities and to identify the processes to decontaminate heterogeneous debris waste. In addition, the project must also address the treatment of secondary waste generated by other DDT ampersand E projects. This report details the activities to be performed under the A OE D Project in support of the identification, selection, and evaluation of treatment processes. The goals of this plan are (1) to determine the major aqueous and organic waste streams requiring treatment, (2) to determine the treatment steps necessary to make the aqueous and organic waste acceptable for treatment in existing treatment facilities on the ORR or off-site, and (3) to determine the processes necessary to decontaminate heterogeneous wastes that are considered debris

  14. An approach for arsenic in a contaminated soil: Speciation, fractionation, extraction and effluent decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giacomino, A.; Malandrino, M. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 5, 10125 Torino (Italy); Abollino, O., E-mail: ornella.abollino@unito.i [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 5, 10125 Torino (Italy); Velayutham, M.; Chinnathangavel, T. [Anna University, Chennai 600 025 (India); Mentasti, E. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 5, 10125 Torino (Italy)

    2010-02-15

    The fractionation and speciation of As in a contaminated soil were investigated, and a remediation strategy was tested. Regarding speciation, we found that As(V) prevails over As(III) whereas more than 40% of total arsenic is in organic form. The fractionation of As was investigated with two sequential extraction methods: a low mobility was found. Then we tested the possibility of using phosphoric acid to extract As from the soil and cleaning the washing effluents by sorption onto montmorillonite. The efficiency of the extraction and of the adsorption onto the clay were also investigated for Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn, whose total concentrations and fractionation in the soil are reported here. The extraction percentages for As and metals ranged from 30 to 65%; the residual proportions in the soil are presumably in very unreactive forms. Montmorillonite showed a good uptake capacity towards the investigated pollutants. - Arsenic in a contaminated soil was present in different forms and it was extracted by soil washing followed by effluent treatment by sorption onto a natural clay.

  15. The decontamination of bleaching effluent by pilot-scale solar Fenton process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaojiang; Chen, Kefu; Li, Jun; Mo, Lihuan

    2011-01-01

    A solar Fenton process was applied as post-treatment to selectively eliminate organic pollutants and toxicants in bleaching effluents of kraft pulp mills. Experiments were conducted to study the effect of system parameters (pH, initial concentration of H2O2, molar ratio of Fe2+/H2O2 and solar-UV irradiance) on the removals of chemical oxygen demand and colour. The results showed 92.8% of COD and 99.6% of colour were removed at pH 3.5, H2O2 30 mM/ L, Fe2+/H2O2 1:100, solar-UV irradiance 11070 mW/m2, reaction time 120 min. The first-order kinetic model was used to study the dependence of the reaction rate on solar-UV irradiance: a linear relationship was shown to exist between reaction rate constants and solar-UV irradiance. The results of gas chromatography mass spectrometry analysis showed that the toxicity of the bleaching effluents was mainly derived from the presence of mononuclear aromatics, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and organochlorides, which were all degraded into harmless organic acids under the attack of hydroxyl radicals generated from the solar Fenton reaction. PMID:21879547

  16. Results of Hg speciation testing on MCU strip effluent hold tank (SEHT) and decontaminated salt solution hold tank (DSSHT) materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannochie, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-17

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with preparing and shipping samples for Hg speciation by Eurofins Frontier Global Sciences, Inc. in Seattle, WA on behalf of the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Mercury Task Team.i,ii The tenth shipment of samples was designated to include Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT) and MCU Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT) materials from processing Salt Batch 7b. The MCU SEHT (MCU-15-722) and DSSHT (MCU-15-709) samples were pulled on June 15, 2015. All MCU samples were received at SRNL on June 16, 2015. The DSSHT sample was moved the same day to refrigeration, while the SEHT sample was placed in the Shielded Cells. On July 9, 2015 it was opened and an aliquot diluted 1:100 with Eurofins deionized water and a portion of the diluted sample transferred to a Teflon® bottle prior to moving it to refrigeration that same day. All samples were kept in the dark and refrigerated until final dilutions were prepared for shipment to Eurofins.

  17. The Luffa Cynlidrica fibre as discoloration medium of the aqueous effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text.The vegetal fibres of Luffa Cylindrica sponge are characterized in this work with electronic scanning microscopy. Having alveolar mico-porous structure, the material prepared under various treatments is then used for the removal of dissolved dyes from industrial effluents. The obtained results reveal that basic dyes of the triarylcarbonium structure type such as the Crystal violet present non negligible affinity toward the vegetal material on which substantial adsorption is observed within few hours contact time. The adsorption equilibria are fitted at 25 celsius degree according to the Van Vliet-Weber and the hybrid Langmuir-Freundlich correlations. Furthermore, quantitative elution of the sorbed dye is achieved with aqueous solutions of acetone or ethanol at 50%, v/v, which indicates to doubly advantageous use of the sorbent in the recovery and recycling of the dye as well as in the discoloration of the effluents

  18. Pilot scale study of a chemical treatment process for decontamination of aqueous radioactive waste of pakistan research reactor-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical treatment process for the low level liquid radioactive waste generated at PINSTECH was previously optimized on lab-scale making use of coprecipitation of hydrous oxides of iron in basic medium. Ferrous sulfate was used as coagulant. Batch wise application of this procedure on pilot scale has been tested on a 1200 L batch volume of typical PINSTECH liquid waste. Different parameters and unit operations have been evaluated. The required data for the construction of a small size treatment plant envisioned can be used for demonstration/teaching purpose as well as for the decontamination of the waste effluents of the Institute. The lab-scale process parameters were verified valid on pilot scale. It was observed that reagent doses can further be economized with out any deterioration of the Decontamination Factors (DF) achieved or of any other aspect of the process. This simple, cost- effective, DF-efficient and time-smart batch wise process could be coupled with an assortment of other treatment operations thus affording universal application. Observations recorded during this study are presented. (author)

  19. Poster 25. Inorganic seed materials for the decontamination of PWR aqueous wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of several inorganic sorbents, used in combination with crossflow membrane filtration, has been studied for the reduction of Cr-51 and Sb-125 levels in a pressurised water reactor waste stream. A mixture of titanium oxide, zirconium phosphate and sodium nickel hexacyanoferrate (II) gave an overall decontamination factor of 20 at a solution pH of 4.5. (author)

  20. Radioactive contamination of protective clothes made of textile and their decontamination in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This dissertation deals with the radioactive contamination, its prevention, control and decontamination, related to protective clothing made of textile and usually weared in normal working conditions, within the installations where radioactive materials are handled or processed, especially as unsealed sources. The features of textile materials and contaminants, contamination mechanisms, risks related to contaminated clothes, planning of working areas, monitoring and surface contamination limits are described. Concerning to decontamination, the reagents, their action mechanisms and methods of efficiency evaluation are emphasized. The selected reagents were experimentally tested and their efficiencies in decontaminating cotton cloth samples, contaminated with uranyl nitrate solution, were evaluated by means of counting rate determined with a Geiger-Muller provided counting system. In this way, complexing agents, surfactants and commercial cleanning products were tested. The results were analysed and interpreted considering statistical, radiochemical and Radiation Protection aspects. Both, the radiactive contamination and decontamination of protective clothes are extensive matters and they still could be developed and improved; thus, many suggestions were presented as further studies. (author)

  1. Advanced biological treatment of aqueous effluent from the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many of the processing steps in the nuclear fuel cycle generate aqueous effluent streams bearing contaminants that can, because of their chemical or radiological properties, pose an environmental hazard. Concentration of such contaminants must be reduced to acceptable levels before the streams can be discharged to the environment. Two classes of contaminants, nitrates and heavy metals, are addressed in this study. Specific techniques aimed at the removal of nitrates and radioactive heavy metals by biological processes are being developed, tested, and demonstrated. Although cost comparisons between biological processes and current treatment methods will be presented, these comparisons may be misleading because biological processes yield environmentally better end results which are difficult to price. The fluidized-bed biological denitrification process is an environmentally acceptable and economically sound method for the disposal of nonreusable sources of nitrate effluents. A very high denitrification rate can be obtained in a FBR as the result of a high concentration of denitrification bacteria in the bioreactor and the stagewise operation resulting from plug flow in the reactor. The overall denitrification rate in an FBR ranges from 20- to 100-fold greater than that observed for an STR bioreactor. It has been shown that the system can be operated using Ca2+, Na+, or NH4+ cations at nitrate concentrations up to 1 g/liter without inhibition. Biological sorption of uranium and other radionuclides (particularly the actinides) from dilute aqueous waste streams shows considerable promise as a means of recovering these valuable resources and reducing the environmental impact, however, further development efforts are required

  2. Combined decontamination processes for wastes containing PCBs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project has focused on the development of a complex assembly of mutually corresponding technological units:-a low temperature thermal process for the desorption of PCBs and other organics from soils and other contaminated solid wastes;-the extraction of PCBs from soils by an ecological friendly aqueous solution of selected surfactants;-the chemical decontamination of PCBs in oils and in oil-in-water emulsions by metallic sodium and potassium in polyethylene glycols in the presence of aluminum powder;-the modified alkaline catalyzed chemical decontamination of PCBs in oils and in oil-in-water dispersions in a solid-state reactor (in a film of reacting emulsion on solid carriers); and-the breakdown of PCBs in aqueous emulsions with activated hydroxyl radicals enhanced by UV radiation The processes operate in a closed loop configuration with effluents circulating among the process unit. These technologies have been verified at laboratory and pilot-plant scales

  3. The treatment of effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For several years the French Atomic Energy Commission has been studying with interest problems presented by radio-active effluents. Since high activities have not yet received a definite solution we will deal only, in this paper, with the achievements and research concerning low and medium activity effluents. In the field of the achievements, we may mention the various effluent treatment stations which have been built in France; a brief list will be given together with an outline of their main new features. Thus in particular the latest treatment stations put into operation (Grenoble, Fontenay-aux-Roses, Cadarache) will be presented. From all these recent achievements three subjects will be dealt with in more detail. 1 - The workshop for treating with bitumen the sludge obtained after concentration of radionuclides. 2 - The workshop for treating radioactive solid waste by incineration. 3 - A unit for concentrating radio-active liquid effluents by evaporation. In the field of research, several topics have been undertaken, a list will be given. In most cases the research concerns the concentration of radionuclides with a view to a practical and low cost storage, a concentration involving an efficient decontamination of the aqueous liquids in the best possible economic conditions. For improving the treatments leading to the concentration of nuclides, our research has naturally been concerned with perfecting the treatments used in France: coprecipitation and evaporation. In our work we have taken into account in particular two conditions laid down in the French Centres. 1 - A very strict sorting out of the effluents at their source in order to limit in each category the volume of liquid to be dealt with. 2 - The necessity for a very complete decontamination due to the high population density in our country. In the last past we present two original methods for treating liquid effluents. 1 - The use of ion-exchange resins for liquids containing relatively many salts. The

  4. Decontamination of Cr(VI), Cu(II) and phenol in some tannery effluents by gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Industrialization has led to a number of environmental problems, such as release of toxic metals and other toxic organic and inorganic compounds to the environment. Among all, the rapid expansion of leather related industries in Pakistan have resulted in considerable environmental problems and effluents from processing of both domestic and imported hides and skins have increased pollution to alarming levels. Some tannery effluents of Peshawar area investigated in the present study showed high load of COD (537-1068 mg/L), Cr(VI) (2.7-12.6 mg/L), Cu(II) (2.6-11.4 mg/L) and phenol (0.1-4.2 mg/L). These contaminants are very toxic and must be removed from effluents before releasing into water bodies. A novel technique of gamma irradiation has been investigated to decrease the load of COD and concentrations of Cr(VI), Cu(II) and phenol associated with tannery effluents to the permitted values. It was observed that COD in the effluents can be brought to the permitted level by applying radiation dose of 3 kGy and the same dose was also sufficient to remove more than 96% of Cr(VI). A radiation dose of 2.5 kGy was required to remove more than 95 % of Cu(II) and 100 % degradation of phenol in tannery effluents could be achieved by only one kGy of radiation dose. (authors)

  5. Electrolytic treatment of liquid effluents: decontamination by electro coagulation of release water of a petroleum platform; Traitement electrolytique des effluents liquides: decontamination par electrocoagulation des eaux de rejet d'une plate forme petroliere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanseu-Njiki, Ch.P.; Ngameni, E.; Poumiba, S. [Yaounde Univ., Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique, Dept. de Chimie Inorganique, Faculte des Sciences (Cameroon); Darchen, A. [Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Rennes, Laboratoire d' Electrochimie, 35 - Rennes (France)

    2005-07-01

    The water releases of petroleum platforms present lots of pollutants; Usually, these waters are reinjected in ground water when it is possible. In the other cases they are released at the surface and need then a treatment. The electro-coagulation is a suitable method often used. The authors propose to study the optimum conditions of decontamination by this method, by a parametric evaluation (water flow, charge density, ph). Experiments used iron and aluminium electrodes. (A.L.B.)

  6. Removal of toxic metals from aqueous effluents by electrodeposition in a spouted bed electrochemical reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Rosimeire; Britto-Costa, Pedro H; Ruotolo, Luís Augusto M

    2012-06-01

    This work investigates the removal of metal ions from synthetic aqueous effluents using a spouted bed electrochemical reactor whose cathode was composed of 1.0 mm copper particles. Using a Box-Behnken factorial design, the effects of current (I), electrode thickness (L), draught distance (d) and support electrolyte concentration (C(s)) on current efficiency (CE), space-time yield (Y) and energy consumption (EC) were analysed. The results were statistically analysed and the effect of each variable was evaluated using the surface response methodology. The results showed that C(s) is the most important variable to consider in the process optimization. A current of 8.0 A can be applied in order to obtain high Y and CE with an acceptable EC. Electrode thicknesses greater than 1.3 cm are not recommended because the irregular potential distribution leads to a Y drop owing to the low CE observed for this condition. The draught distance does not have statistical significance; therefore, the particle circulation rate is not important in this kind of electrochemical reactor. PMID:22856281

  7. Study of Thorium Phosphate Diphosphate (TPD) formation in nitric medium for the decontamination of high activity actinides bearing effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considering several activities in the nuclear industry and research, several low-level liquids wastes (LLLW) containing actinides in nitric medium must be decontaminated before being released in the environment. These liquid wastes mainly contain significant amounts of uranium(VI), neptunium(V) and plutonium(IV). In this work, two chemical ways were studied to decontaminate LLLW then to incorporate simultaneously uranium, neptunium and plutonium in the Thorium Phosphate Diphosphate (TPD). Both ways started from a nitric solution containing thorium and the actinides considered, present at their lower stable oxidation state. The first way consisted in the initial precipitation of actinide and thorium mixed oxalate. After drying the mixture containing the powder and phosphoric acid under dried argon, a poly-phase system was obtained. It was mainly composed by a thorium-actinide oxalate-phosphate. This mixture was transformed into a TPDAn solid solution (An = U, Np and/or Pu) by heating treatment at 1200 deg. C under inert atmosphere. The second way consisted in the precipitation of a precursor of TPD, identified as the Thorium Phosphate Hydrogen Phosphate loaded with the actinides considered. The gel initially formed by mixing concentrated phosphoric acid solution with the nitric actinide solution was heated at 90 - 160 deg. C in a closed PTFE container for several weeks. It led to the TPDAn solid solutions after heating at 1100 deg. C in air or under inert argon. The efficiency of both processes was evaluated through the determination of the decontamination for each actinide considered. Considering the encouraging results obtained for both kinds of processes, some complementary studies are now required before performing the effective decontamination of real Low-Level Liquid Waste using one of the methods proposed. (author)

  8. Evaluation of thin-film evaporation for decontamination and immobilization of aqueous nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the early 1980's, AECL, at the Chalk River Laboratory (CRL) site, built a Waste Treatment Centre (WTC) for managing low level solid and aqueous liquid wastes. The objective was to demonstrate processes for converting Canadian Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) waste to a form suitable for disposal while meeting or exceeding current environmental regulations. At present, two liquid waste streams are being treated at the Waste Treatment Centre. The liquid waste streams are volume reduced by a combination of continuous crossflow microfiltration (MF), spiral wound reverse osmosis (SWRO), and tubular reverse osmosis (TRO) membrane technologies [1]. The solutions are evaporated while simultaneously adding bitumen in a thin-film evaporator. A water-free product of chemical and radiochemical salts and bitumen is removed in 200 L galvanized steel drums for storage and eventual disposal in the CRL Waste Management Area. The feed stream to the thin-film evaporator typically has a β/γ activity of about 1 - 3 μCi/mL. This intermediate-level radioactive stream is concentrated by a factor of about 10, while simultaneously being immobilized. The radiation field of product drums on contact typically has a value of 0.5 to 3 R/h depending upon the feed concentration of radioactivity to the evaporator. The total solids content in the 200 L drum ranges from 25% to 35%. Encapsulated in the bitumen matrix are a variety of non-radiochemical salts (including sodium phosphate, sodium sulphate, and sodium carbonate) which comprise the bulk of the total solids in the product drum. The drum contains less than 1% of free water. The paper will discuss the volume reduction capability of the plant, with an emphasis on the immobilization of the aqueous waste with bitumen in a thin-film evaporator. Operations experience gained from over 200 campaigns is documented in the paper. (author)

  9. Desempenho de biomassas na adsorção de hidrocarbonetos leves em efluentes aquosos Performance of biomasses in the adsorption of simple hydrocarbons in aqueous effluents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elba Gomes dos Santos

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Removal of hydrocarbons from aqueous effluents using biosorbents was investigated. The effluent was simulated by a dispersion of gasoline (simple hydrocarbons in water. Corn-cob, wood powder, coconut mesocarp and sugar-cane bagasse were used as adsorbents and their performance verified by means of batch experiments performed in an agitated vessel. The influence of input variables such as hydrocarbon concentration, mass of biomass and agitation level on the adsorbents' capacity was studied by means of factorial design. The results indicated that, among the materials studied, coconut mesocarp and sugar-cane bagasse can be considered promising biomasses for treating aqueous effluents contaminated by hydrocarbons.

  10. Bioprospecting of gum kondagogu (Cochlospermum gossypium) for bioremediation of uranium (VI) from aqueous solution and synthetic nuclear power reactor effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ecofriendly green chemistry method using a natural biopolymer, Gum Kondagogu (GK) for the removal of U (VI) from aqueous, simulated nuclear effluents was studied. The adsorption characteristic of GK towards U (VI) from aqueous solution was studied at varied pH, contact time, adsorbent dose, initial U (VI) concentration and temperature using UV–Visible spectroscopy and ICP-MS. Maximum adsorption was seen at pH 4, 0.1% GK with 60 min contact time at room temperature. The GK- U (VI) composite was characterized by FT-IR, zeta potential, TEM and SEM-EDAX. The Langmuir isotherm was found to be 487 mg of U (VI) g−1 of GK. The adsorption capacity and (%) of U (VI) was found to be 490 ± 5.4 mg g−1 and 98.5%. Moreover adsorption of U (VI) by GK was not influenced by other cations present in the simulated effluents. The adsorbed U (VI) was efficiently stripped from composite using 1 M HCl. - Highlights: • An eco-friendly method for removal of U (VI) from simulated nuclear effluents by Gum Kondagogu. • The Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm indicated favourable adsorption. • The adsorption (%) of U (VI) by GK was found to be 98.5%. • Desorption studies on biosorbed metal ions showed that HCl was a good eluent

  11. Radioactive decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Code of Practice covers: (a) the decontamination of plant items, buildings and associated equipment; (b) decontamination of protective clothing; (c) simple personal decontamination; and (d) the basic mechanisms of contamination and their influence on decontaminability. (author)

  12. A study on triple-membrane-separator (TMS) process to treat aqueous effluents containing uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An effective process incorporated with the novel membrane separation technology was developed to recover uranium from the filtrate effluent of uranium dioxide conversion processes. The prominent feature of the process is that it utilizes separation characteristics of three different types of membranes as follow: separation of uranium species from effluent of high fluoride content by ultrafiltration membrane, separation of uranium species from effluent of low fluoride content by reverse osmosis membrane, precipitation of uranium species with hydrogen peroxide, and filtration of uranium bearing precipitates by microfiltration membrane. The process is simple and feasible for treatment of liquid waste containing both soluble and suspended uranium species. The recovery of uranium can be as high as 95% and the treated effluents meet the current environmental standards. 4 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  13. Desempenho de biomassas na adsorção de hidrocarbonetos leves em efluentes aquosos Performance of biomasses in the adsorption of simple hydrocarbons in aqueous effluents

    OpenAIRE

    Elba Gomes dos Santos; Odelsia Leonor Sanchez de Alsina; Flávio Luiz Honorato da Silva

    2007-01-01

    Removal of hydrocarbons from aqueous effluents using biosorbents was investigated. The effluent was simulated by a dispersion of gasoline (simple hydrocarbons) in water. Corn-cob, wood powder, coconut mesocarp and sugar-cane bagasse were used as adsorbents and their performance verified by means of batch experiments performed in an agitated vessel. The influence of input variables such as hydrocarbon concentration, mass of biomass and agitation level on the adsorbents' capacity was studied by...

  14. Environmental decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The record of the proceedings of the workshop on environmental decontamination contains twenty-seven presentations. Emphasis is placed upon soil and surface decontamination, the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, and assessments of instrumentation and equipment used in decontamination

  15. Environmental decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristy, G.A.; Jernigan, H.C. (eds.)

    1981-02-01

    The record of the proceedings of the workshop on environmental decontamination contains twenty-seven presentations. Emphasis is placed upon soil and surface decontamination, the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, and assessments of instrumentation and equipment used in decontamination. (DLS)

  16. Fully automated measuring equipment for aqueous boron and its application to online monitoring of industrial process effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, Seiichi; Abe, Keiko; Ohsumi, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Miyazaki, Naotsugu; Miyadera, Koji; Akasaka, Kin-ichi

    2009-06-01

    Fully automated measuring equipment for aqueous boron (referred to as the online boron monitor) was developed on the basis of a rapid potentiometric determination method using a commercial BF4(-) ion-selective electrode (ISE). The equipment can measure boron compounds with concentration ranging from a few to several hundred mg/L, and the measurement is completed in less than 20 min without any pretreatment of the sample. In the monitor, a series of operations for the measurement, i.e., sampling and dispensing of the sample, addition of the chemicals, acquisition and processing of potentiometric data, rinsing of the measurement cell, and calibration of the BF4(-) ISE, is automated. To demonstrate the performance, we installed the monitor in full-scale coal-fired power plants and measured the effluent from a flue gas desulfurization unit. The boron concentration in the wastewater varied significantly depending on the type of coal and the load of power generation. An excellent correlation (R2 = 0.987) was obtained in the measurements between the online boron monitor and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry, which proved that the developed monitor can serve as a useful tool for managing boron emission in industrial process effluent. PMID:19569339

  17. Development and use of thin film composite based positively charged nanofiltration membranes in separation of aqueous streams and nuclear effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new, positively charged, thin film composite (TFC) type nanofiltration membrane has been developed and studied for its use in various aqueous stream separations. The membrane, containing fixed quaternary ammonium moieties, was developed by insitu interfacial polymerization of a functionalized amine (polyethyleneimine) and terephthaloyl chloride on a suitable base membrane. The nature of the charge on the membrane was established by ATR FT IR spectroscopy and was estimated by determination of its ion exchange capacity. The membrane was tested for its performance in single solute feed systems containing salts of various combinations of univalent and bivalent ions (NaCl, Na2SO4, CaCl2 and MgSO4) in test cell as well as in 2512 spiral modules. The membrane gave differential separation profile for these solutes with high rejection for CaCl2 and low rejection for Na2SO4 due to positive charge on the membrane and the type of charge constituting the salts. The membrane was also used for separation of simulated effluent solution containing uranyl nitrate in combination with ammonium nitrate which is a common effluent generated in nuclear industry. Here also the membrane gave differential separation profile for uranyl nitrate and ammonium nitrate in their mixture by concentrating the former salt and passing the later. This helped separation of these two solutes in the mixture into two different streams. (author)

  18. Study of the synthesis of TiO2 layers on macroporous ceramic supports in supercritical (SC) CO2 for processing radioactive aqueous effluents in dynamic mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Public and military nuclear industry generates a significant amount of radioactive liquid waste which must be treated before being released into the environment. Decontamination methods alternative to the industrial techniques (evaporation, chemical treatment) are being developed, such as column treatments or coupled filtration/sorption processes. Current researches mainly focus on the development and shaping of specific sorbents. In this context, the objectives of this thesis were first to study the synthesis of TiO2 layers on macroporous ceramic supports in supercritical (SC) CO2 and then to evaluate their potential for radionuclide extraction in these alternative processes. A robust synthesis method has been developed, based on the thermal decomposition of titanium isopropoxide in SC CO2 in the temperature range between 150 C and 350 C. Nano-structured TiO2 films were formed on the macroporous supports (ceramic foams, tubular α-alumina supports) with good adhesion, already at 150 C. The effect of the synthesis temperature on sorbents physico-chemical characteristics and sorption properties has been studied with TiO2 powders prepared under the same conditions as the supported films. The best sorption performance were observed for the powder prepared at 150 C, owing to its higher density of surface sites in comparison with powders prepared at either 250 C or 350 C. Consequently, this synthesis temperature (150 C) was selected for a detailed study of the composite sorbents (TiO2/support), in order to assess their sorption performance in continuous treatment processes. The sorption experiments have shown that a column of alumina macroporous foam (Φpore = 400μm) coated with TiO2 was suitable for processing effluents in dynamic mode with high throughputs. Both macro-pore sizes and column height were revealed as important parameters to be controlled. For the coupled filtration/sorption treatment, TiO2 membranes exhibit good mechanical strength and are able to

  19. Decontamination operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paper presents the chronological description of the undertaken measures with decontamination in case of the elimination of the Chernobyl accident consequences. Attention is focused on decontamination of the NPP site and of Pripyat river, on decontamination of the habitations, of equipment, clothes, shoes, sanitary treatment of people, as well as, on the decontamination of roads and dust suppression. 4 figs.; 2 tabs

  20. Microwave-assisted activated carbon from cocoa shell as adsorbent for removal of sodium diclofenac and nimesulide from aqueous effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Microwave-assisted cocoa shell activated carbon was prepared and characterized. • The anti-inflammatories, diclofenac and nimesulide, were adsorbed onto MWCS-1.0. • Adsorption maximum values are 63.47 (diclofenac) and 74.81 mg g−1 (nimesulide). • General order kinetic model suitably explained the adsorption process. • MWCS-1.0 was effectively used for treatment of simulated hospital effluents. - Abstract: Microwave-induced chemical activation process was used to prepare an activated carbon from cocoa shell for efficient removal of two anti-inflammatories, sodium diclofenac (DFC) and nimesulide (NM), from aqueous solutions. A paste was obtained from a mixture of cocoa shell and inorganic components; with a ratio of inorganic: organic of 1 (CSC-1.0). The mixture was pyrolyzed in a microwave oven in less than 10 min. The CSC-1.0 was acidified with a 6 mol L−1 HCl under reflux to produce MWCS-1.0. The CSC-1.0 and MWCS-1.0 were characterized using FTIR, SEM, N2 adsorption/desorption curves, X-ray diffraction, and point of zero charge (pHpzc). Experimental variables such as initial pH of the adsorbate solutions and contact time were optimized for adsorptive characteristics of MWCS-1.0. The optimum pH for removal of anti-inflammatories ranged between 7.0 and 8.0. The kinetic of adsorption was investigated using general order, pseudo first-order and pseu do-second order kinetic models. The maximum amounts of DCF and NM adsorbed onto MWCS-1.0 at 25 °C are 63.47 and 74.81 mg g−1, respectively. The adsorbent was tested on two simulated hospital effluents. MWCS-1.0 is capable of efficient removal of DCF and NM from a medium that contains high sugar and salt concentrations

  1. Rapid assessment of the latent hazard posed by dissolved mercaptans within aqueous effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of mercaptans (RSH) can usually be detected by their inherent noxious odour but there is a need to quantify the concentration within effluent and hence allow an assessment of the latent hazard to be made prior to disposal. The versatility of using naphthoquinone as a rapid derivatising agent through which to trap such species has been evaluated. The quinone moiety provides a label that can be quantified using colorimetric, electrochemical and chromatographic means and offers a significant advantage over conventional thiol labelling agents. The analytical characteristics of each approach have been investigated and the selectivity, sensitivity and applicability of the reaction system critically assessed for a range of model compounds. The naphthoquinone system has a detection limit in the low micromolar range with little interference from other components common to discharge water with 96% recovery of mercaptopropionate. The reaction to sulfide (HS-) has also been assessed and a disparity in response between the detection methods observed and a possible reaction pathway outlined

  2. Investigations of photochemical transformations of aqueous mercury: implications for water effluent treatment technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Heather E; Borello, Amy; Bonzongo, Jean-Claude; Mazyck, David W

    2009-09-01

    Photochemical transformations of mercury were studied to determine its potential as a treatment mechanism to reduce mercury laden waters to trace concentrations. In this study, aqueous solutions of mercury nitrate in deionized water were exposed to UV irradiation and a gas purge. The impacts of purge gas (including rate and bubble size), UV irradiation wavelength, initial mercury concentration and time on mercury removal have been studied. Nitrogen purge with 254 nm UV irradiation resulted in the greatest net production of elemental mercury for all initial concentrations. These conditions followed pseudo first order kinetics and achieved the highest rate constant of 0.18s(-1). As oxygen was introduced into the solution, the quantity of elemental mercury volatilized decreased but still resulted in significant mercury losses through volatilization up to 90% in 60 min. Overriding, the loss of elemental mercury from the solution is dependent upon the gas purge rate and bubble size. PMID:19595425

  3. Development of a suppression method for deposition of radioactive cobalt after chemical decontamination. (2) Consideration of Fe3O4 plating mechanism on stainless steel in aqueous solution at 363 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, chemical decontamination at the beginning of periodical inspection has been applied to many Japanese boiling water reactors in order to reduce radiation exposure. However, following the chemical decontamination, a dose rate increase can be seen in some plants after just a few operation cycles. The Hitachi ferrite coating (Hi-F Coat) process has been developed to reduce the recontamination by radioactive cobalt after the chemical decontamination. In this process, a fine Fe3O4 coating film is formed on the stainless steel base metal of the piping following the chemical decontamination in aqueous solution at 363 K. In this study, we investigated a Fe3O4 plating mechanism on the base metal in aqueous solution at 363 K by measurements using a quartz crystal microbalance. We found that the Fe3O4 film grew in three steps. First, the Fe3O4 particles were produced on a stainless steel surface. Second, the Fe3O4 particles grew as dome shapes and the converged domes became filmlike. Third, the film grew and became a closely packed Fe3O4 film. Furthermore, we determined the equation of the time dependence of the Fe3O4 film amount using crystal growth theory. The equation predicted the film amount at 10,000 s within a margin of error of 5%. (author)

  4. Radiation protection at the RA Reactor in 1993, Part II, Decontamination and actions, collection of liquid effluents and solid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Certain amount of solid waste results from RA reactor operation, the mean quantity of which depends on the duration of reactor operation and related activities. During repair, when reactor is not operated as well under accidental conditions, the quantity of waste is higher, dependent on the type of repair and comprehensiveness of decontamination of the working surface, contaminated tools and components. The waste is sorted and packed on the spot where they appeared according to the existing regulations and principles of radiation protection with aim to minimize unnecessary exposure of the radiation protection personnel who deals with control, transport, radioactive waste treatment and decontamination. During exceptional operations (decontamination, repair, bigger volume of contaminated material, etc.) professional staff of the Radiation protection department gives recommendations and helps in planning the actions related to repair, sorting and packaging of radioactive waste in special containers, identification of the contaminants, etc.

  5. g-C3N4 Modified biochar as an adsorptive and photocatalytic material for decontamination of aqueous organic pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Liu; Jiang, Rui; Zhou, Wangchi; Zhu, Hua; Xiao, Wei; Wang, Dihua; Mao, Xuhui

    2015-12-01

    Converting the waste biomasses with high-carbon content into value-added materials is an environmental-friendly way for their utilization. In this study, a leaf-derived biochar is modified with graphitic C3N4 to fulfill an affordable composite material capable of removing organic pollutants via adsorptive and photocatalytic processes simultaneously. The preparation process includes a carbonization process of chestnut leaf biomass and a followed condensation reaction of melamine at 520 °C. The characterization shows that biochar and C3N4 existed in the composites in their pristine status, and the effective connection of C3N4 and biochar was established. The adsorptive performance of the composites is governed by the biochar content in the composite, thus showing favorable performance for the removal of cationic dye methylene blue (MB). The condensation reaction of the melamine precursor has a coalescing effect on the dispersed biochar, resulting in the growth of particle size of composite. The composites prepared at different biochar/melamine ratios all show a photocatalytic activity on decolorization of MB. In terms of the specific photocatalytic activity of C3N4 in the composite, biochar/melamine ratio of 0.5:1 is the best. Unlike the conventional adsorptive carbon materials which have saturated adsorption capacity, the composite in this study retain a sustaining decontamination capability due to the photocatalytic degradation of adsorbed organic pollutants under irradiation.

  6. Methods of removal of tritium from aqueous effluent: a review of international research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium is formed in thermal nuclear reactors both by neutron activation of elements such as deuterium and lithium and by ternary fission in the fuel. It is a weak beta-emitter with a short half-life, 12.3 years, and its radiological significance in reactor discharges is very low. In heavy-water-cooled and -moderated reactors, such as the CANDU stations, the tritium concentration in the moderator is sufficiently high to cause a potential hazard to operators, and so a major research and development programme has been carried out on processes to remove the tritium. Detritiation of light water has also been the subject of major R and D effort world-wide, because reprocessing operations can generate significant quantities of tritium in liquid waste, and high concentrations of tritium may arise in some aqueous streams in fusion reactors. This Report presents a review of the methods that have been proposed, studied and developed for removal of tritium from light and heavy water: the principles of individual methods are discussed, and the current status of their development is reviewed. (author)

  7. Microwave-assisted activated carbon from cocoa shell as adsorbent for removal of sodium diclofenac and nimesulide from aqueous effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saucier, Caroline [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, P.O. Box 15003, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Adebayo, Matthew A. [Department of Chemical Sciences, Ajayi Crowther University, Oyo, Oyo State (Nigeria); Lima, Eder C., E-mail: eder.lima@ufrgs.br [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, P.O. Box 15003, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Cataluña, Renato [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, P.O. Box 15003, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Thue, Pascal S. [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, P.O. Box 15003, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Ngaoundere, P.O. Box 455, Ngaoundere (Cameroon); Prola, Lizie D.T.; Puchana-Rosero, M.J. [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, P.O. Box 15003, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Machado, Fernando M. [Technology Development Center, Federal University of Pelotas (UFPEL), Pelotas (Brazil); Pavan, Flavio A. [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Pampa (UNIPAMPA), Bagé, RS (Brazil); Dotto, G.L. [Chemical Engineering Department, Federal University of Santa Maria (UFSM), Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)

    2015-05-30

    Highlights: • Microwave-assisted cocoa shell activated carbon was prepared and characterized. • The anti-inflammatories, diclofenac and nimesulide, were adsorbed onto MWCS-1.0. • Adsorption maximum values are 63.47 (diclofenac) and 74.81 mg g{sup −1} (nimesulide). • General order kinetic model suitably explained the adsorption process. • MWCS-1.0 was effectively used for treatment of simulated hospital effluents. - Abstract: Microwave-induced chemical activation process was used to prepare an activated carbon from cocoa shell for efficient removal of two anti-inflammatories, sodium diclofenac (DFC) and nimesulide (NM), from aqueous solutions. A paste was obtained from a mixture of cocoa shell and inorganic components; with a ratio of inorganic: organic of 1 (CSC-1.0). The mixture was pyrolyzed in a microwave oven in less than 10 min. The CSC-1.0 was acidified with a 6 mol L{sup −1} HCl under reflux to produce MWCS-1.0. The CSC-1.0 and MWCS-1.0 were characterized using FTIR, SEM, N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption curves, X-ray diffraction, and point of zero charge (pH{sub pzc}). Experimental variables such as initial pH of the adsorbate solutions and contact time were optimized for adsorptive characteristics of MWCS-1.0. The optimum pH for removal of anti-inflammatories ranged between 7.0 and 8.0. The kinetic of adsorption was investigated using general order, pseudo first-order and pseu do-second order kinetic models. The maximum amounts of DCF and NM adsorbed onto MWCS-1.0 at 25 °C are 63.47 and 74.81 mg g{sup −1}, respectively. The adsorbent was tested on two simulated hospital effluents. MWCS-1.0 is capable of efficient removal of DCF and NM from a medium that contains high sugar and salt concentrations.

  8. Development of a surfactant liquid membrane extraction process for the cleansing of industrial aqueous effluents containing metallic cation traces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work was to develop a process of surfactant liquid membrane extraction to purify industrial waste solution containing Cu(II), Fe(III), and Zn(II) (about 0,1 g/L). The extractant is the ammonium salt of Cyanex 306 and Aliquat 336. The first part of this work deals with the study of the liquid-liquid extraction of the metals. The efficiency of the extractant has been shown for the extraction of each metal alone and for Cu(II) and Zn(II) in the case of a mixture of the three metals. During this study we have observed that Fe(III) is reduced to Fe(II) (which is not extracted by the salt of Cyanex 301) in presence of Cu(II) and the quaternary ammonium salt (Aliquat 336). The optimisation of the experimental conditions for the discontinuous surfactant liquid membrane process led us to choose the following composition of the emulsion: 1,5 % of Cyanex 301 salt, 2,5 % of ECA 4360, dodecan. The internal phase is an aqueous solution containing 3,5 mol/L of NaOH and 0,5 mol/L tri-ethanolamin The residual concentration of Cu(II) and Zn(II) in the external phase is very low. In the case of iron, only 60 % are extracted because of the reduction phenomenon (10 % in liquid-liquid extraction). The realisation of the continuous process in pulsed column, after optimisation of hydrodynamics conditions, leads to similar results. In stationary conditions, we obtain a raffinate containing less than 0,5 mg/L of Cu(II) and Zn(II) and 36 mg/L of iron. The internal phase contains about 2 g/L of Cu(II) an Zn(II). We tried and minimize the reduction of Fe(III) in surfactant liquid membrane process. Less than 16 % of iron cannot be reduced. This leads to a purification of only 84 % In the basis of these results, processes of purification have been proposed for effluents of various composition. They enable to purify the effluent and besides to concentrate the pollutants about twenty times. (author)

  9. Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank, Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank, Caustic Wash Tank And Caustic Storage Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 6 Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, T. B.

    2013-10-01

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) and Caustic Storage Tank (CST) samples from several of the ''microbatches'' of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (''Macrobatch'') 6 have been analyzed for {sup 238}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES). The results from the current microbatch samples are similar to those from comparable samples in Macrobatch 5. From a bulk chemical point of view, the ICPES results do not vary considerably between this and the previous macrobatch. The titanium results in the DSSHT samples continue to indicate the presence of Ti, when the feed material does not have detectable levels. This most likely indicates that leaching of Ti from MST in ARP continues to occur. Both the CST and CWT samples indicate that the target Free OH value of 0.03 has been surpassed. While at this time there is no indication that this has caused an operational problem, the CST should be adjusted into specification. The {sup 137}Cs results from the SRNL as well as F/H lab data indicate a potential decline in cesium decontamination factor. Further samples will be carefully monitored to investigate this.

  10. Radioactive decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It discusses radioactive decontamination from the practical point of view with aim of contributions to safety control of radioisotopes. As general knowledges, contamination forms are explained from physical states of solid materials' surfaces and classification of contaminative mechanism are conducted in each contamination form. Furthermore, the decontaminants selcted for each classified contaminative mechanism are indicated from pH-effect and concentration effect. Decontamination on laboratory, using wet method generally as a decontamination technic includes irrigation method by decontaminant solution and scrubbing method. Decontamination of machinery and tools includes scrubbing method and the methods using ultrasonic decontamination equipment and semiautomatic decontamination equipment of which flow-diagram is illustrated. The methods of decontamination of clothing include its disposal or the use of tightly-closed full automatic washing machine. The general irrigation method are indicated as decontamination of skin. Furthermore, neutral cleaning material method for elimination of short-term elapsed contamination and Titanium oxide paste method for elimination of long-term elapsed contamination are explained. (Kanao, N.)

  11. Processing of radioactive effluents in Cadarache research centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French Atomic Energy Commission (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique - CEA) is studying the design of a new plant for processing liquid aqueous radioactive effluents produced on Cadarache Research Centre. Effluents to be processed are low and medium activity effluents, with, for some of them, important concentrations of actinides, and which lead to the production of A and B category solid wastes, according to the French legislation, and suitable for final disposal. The objectives in terms of minimization of discharge's activity level and solid waste production have guided a selection of processes and their arrangement, in order to optimise decontamination and volume concentration factors. Seeded-ultrafiltration and vitrification with cold crucible melter are part of the selected processes for which developments are in progress in CEA for application to the characteristics of the project. (authors)

  12. Surface decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general methods of surface decontamination used in laboratory and others nuclear installations areas, as well as the procedures for handling radioactive materials and surfaces of work are presented. Some methods for decontamination of body external parts are mentioned. The medical supervision and assistance are required for internal or external contamination involving or not lesion in persons. From this medical radiation protection decontamination procedures are determined. (M.C.K.)

  13. Implementation of Chitosan Inductively Modified by GAMMA Rays Copolymerization With Acrylamide in the Decontamination of Aqueous Basic Dye Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modification induced by gamma rays for the natural polymer chitosan was established using the monomer acrylamide. The hydrogel obtained was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and the thermal properties were investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The effect of absorbed dose (kGy) and chitosan: acrylamide ratio on the gel % was studied. The impact of the polymerization variables was observed on the swelling % of the prepared hydrogel with water. The highest equilibrium degree of swelling of the prepared chitosan-AAm hydrogel (380 g/g) was predicted at 75 % AAm and absorbed dose of 10 kGy for 97.7% gel as a gel fraction yield percent. The removal of the basic blue dye (Astrazone blue BG-200%) from aqueous solutions was discussed. The adsorption capacity of basic dye onto chitosan-AAm was increased from 24.5 mg/g to 47.2 mg/g by increasing ph from 4 to 9. Factors affecting the adsorption process as well as ph and the concentration of the basic blue dye solutions, absorbed dose of gamma radiation for optimum gel fraction yield percent and its AAm monomer content were studied

  14. Specific decontamination methods: water nozzle, cavitation erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The erosion and decontamination tests carried out in the framework of this study, allowed to specify the fields favourable to the use of the high pressure jet taking into account the determinant parameters that are the pressure and the target-nozzle distance. The previous spraying of gels with chemical reagents (sulfuric acid anf hydrazine) allows to get better decontamination factors. Then, the feasibility study of a decontamination method by cavitation erosion is presented. Gelled compounds for decontamination have been developed; their decontamination quality has been evaluated by comparative contamination tests in laboratory and decontamination tests of samples of materials used in nuclear industry; this last method is adapted to remote handling devices and produces a low quantity of secondary effluents, so it allows to clean high contaminated installation on the site without additional exposure of the personnel

  15. Decontamination efficiency of selected locally produced detergents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efficiency was tested of 32 different detergents in the decontamination of PVC floorings and plastic concretes. Radionuclides 85Sr, 137Cs separately and in mixtures were used for contamination. The samples were contaminated with aqueous soulutions of radionuclides and then decontaminated using 1% solutions of the individual detergents. All studied detergents reduce the initial level of contamination by 50 to 90%, this also in decontamination under static conditions. (M.D.)

  16. Application of biomass in oil and fat reduction content in aqueous effluent; Aplicacao de biomassa na reducao do teor de oleos e graxas presentes em efluentes aquosos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boni, Hevelin Tabata; Souza, Antonio Augusto Ulson de; Souza, Selene Maria de Arruda Guelli Ulson de [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), SC (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    In this work, we have studied the bagasse from sugarcane as an alternative bioadsorbent in the treatment to oils and greases contaminated waters. The synthetic effluent was simulated by a distilled water and decahydronaphthalene dispersion, with initial concentration of 8900 mg . L {sup -1}. Gas chromatography was the analytical operation chosen to quantify the oil residual after the adsorption. The biomass was characterized by moisture analysis, CHNS and SEM. The experiments were carried out in batch process with agitation of 120 rpm, evaluating the equilibrium time of adsorptive process and the influence of pH of aqueous level. Results showed that the adsorption process achieved equilibrium quickly, in just 5 minutes of contact between the dispersion and biomass. No significant influence was noticed in the removal of hydrocarbon with the change in pH. The adsorption isotherm was developed changing by the mass of bioadsorbent, at 25 deg C, pH 6 and 120 rpm of agitation. The experimental results were fitted by Langmuir and Langmuir- Freundlich models. The best fit was obtained with Langmuir-Freundlich, providing a maximum adsorption capacity of 6,65 g hydrocarbon / g biomass. The experiments showed the great potential of the sugarcane bagasse to be used as bioadsorbent in reducing the oil and grease levels in industrial effluents. This alternative presents itself as a sustainable route due to the abundance of sugar cane bagasse in the sugar and alcohol industry, avoided the impact of aqueous sources contamination coming from oil and petrochemical industry. (author)

  17. Decontamination method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujimura, Hiroshi; Ono, Shigeki; Tada, Nobuo; Tamai, Yasumasa; Okada, Masaya; Kurihara, Masayuki [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Onuki, Toyomitsu; Toyota, Seiichi

    1998-10-27

    Before contamination of materials to be decontaminated, a surface of a region where a strippable paint is to be coated is smoothed by an epoxy resin previously. Then, a waterproof sheet is extended to the material to be decontaminated, and the strippable paint is applied to the periphery or the entire surface of the sheet. In order to facilitate peeling, the strippable paint is not applied to a portion of the outer circumference of the sheet. Even if the contaminating circumstance is an air atmosphere or a liquid such as reactor water, since the sheet itself has waterproofness and the strippable paint excellent in gas and water tightness is applied to the periphery, contamination is eliminated. When decontaminating the material to be decontaminated having contaminated surfaces, if the sheet for the start of peeling is picked up and the sheet is peeled, the strippable paint at the periphery thereof can be peeled off together with the sheet. (N.H.)

  18. Comparison of Spirulina platensis microalgae and commercial activated carbon as adsorbents for the removal of Reactive Red 120 dye from aqueous effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, Natali F. [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS, AV. Bento Goncalves 9500, 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Lima, Eder C., E-mail: profederlima@gmail.com [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS, AV. Bento Goncalves 9500, 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Royer, Betina; Bach, Marta V. [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS, AV. Bento Goncalves 9500, 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Dotto, Guilherme L.; Pinto, Luiz A.A. [Unit Operation Laboratory, School of Chemistry and Food, Federal University of Rio Grande, FURG, R. Engenheiro Alfredo Huch 475, 96201-900, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil); Calvete, Tatiana [Universitary Center La Salle (UNILASALLE), Av. Victor Barreto 2288, 92010-000, Canoas, RS (Brazil)

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spirulina platensis (SP) and activated carbon (AC) were used to remove RR-120 dye. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The maximum adsorption capacities were found at pH 2 and 298 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The values were 482.2 and 267.2 mg g{sup -1} for SP and AC, respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adsorption was exothermic, spontaneous and favorable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SP and AC were effective to treat a simulated dye-house effluent. - Abstract: Spirulina platensis microalgae (SP) and commercial activated carbon (AC) were compared as adsorbents to remove Reactive Red 120 (RR-120) textile dye from aqueous effluents. The batch adsorption system was evaluated in relation to the initial pH, contact time, initial dye concentration and temperature. An alternative kinetic model (general order kinetic model) was compared with the traditional pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order kinetic models. The equilibrium data were fitted to the Langmuir, Freundlich and Liu isotherm models, and the thermodynamic parameters were also estimated. Finally, the adsorbents were employed to treat a simulated dye-house effluent. The general order kinetic model was more appropriate to explain RR-120 adsorption by SP and AC. The equilibrium data were best fitted to the Liu isotherm model. The maximum adsorption capacities of RR-120 dye were found at pH 2 and 298 K, and the values were 482.2 and 267.2 mg g{sup -1} for the SP and AC adsorbents, respectively. The thermodynamic study showed that the adsorption was exothermic, spontaneous and favourable. The SP and AC adsorbents presented good performance for the treatment of simulated industrial textile effluents, removing 94.4-99.0% and 93.6-97.7%, respectively, of the dye mixtures containing high saline concentrations.

  19. Comparison of Spirulina platensis microalgae and commercial activated carbon as adsorbents for the removal of Reactive Red 120 dye from aqueous effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Spirulina platensis (SP) and activated carbon (AC) were used to remove RR-120 dye. ► The maximum adsorption capacities were found at pH 2 and 298 K. ► The values were 482.2 and 267.2 mg g−1 for SP and AC, respectively. ► Adsorption was exothermic, spontaneous and favorable. ► SP and AC were effective to treat a simulated dye-house effluent. - Abstract: Spirulina platensis microalgae (SP) and commercial activated carbon (AC) were compared as adsorbents to remove Reactive Red 120 (RR-120) textile dye from aqueous effluents. The batch adsorption system was evaluated in relation to the initial pH, contact time, initial dye concentration and temperature. An alternative kinetic model (general order kinetic model) was compared with the traditional pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order kinetic models. The equilibrium data were fitted to the Langmuir, Freundlich and Liu isotherm models, and the thermodynamic parameters were also estimated. Finally, the adsorbents were employed to treat a simulated dye-house effluent. The general order kinetic model was more appropriate to explain RR-120 adsorption by SP and AC. The equilibrium data were best fitted to the Liu isotherm model. The maximum adsorption capacities of RR-120 dye were found at pH 2 and 298 K, and the values were 482.2 and 267.2 mg g−1 for the SP and AC adsorbents, respectively. The thermodynamic study showed that the adsorption was exothermic, spontaneous and favourable. The SP and AC adsorbents presented good performance for the treatment of simulated industrial textile effluents, removing 94.4–99.0% and 93.6–97.7%, respectively, of the dye mixtures containing high saline concentrations.

  20. Removal of uranium (VI) from aqueous solutions and nuclear industry effluents using humic acid-immobilized zirconium pillared clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Removal of uranium U(VI) from water and nuclear industrial effluent with humic acid immobilized zirconium-pillared clay (HA-Zr-PILC) was investigated using batch adsorption technique. The adsorbent was characterized using FTIR, XRD, SEM, surface area analyzer and potentiometric titration. The effects of pH, contact time, initial concentration, adsorbent dose, and adsorption isotherm on removal process were evaluated. The monolayer adsorption capacity for U(VI) removal was found to be 134.65 mg/g. Adsorption efficiency was tested using a simulated nuclear industry effluent sample. Repeated adsorption/desorption cycles show the feasibility of the adsorbent for the removal of U(VI) from water and nuclear industry effluents. (author)

  1. Degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls in aqueous solutions after UV-peroxide treatment: focus on toxicity of effluent to primary producers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dennis N; Macawile, Maria Cristina A; Abella, Leonila C; Gallardo, Susan M

    2011-09-01

    The combination of UV irradiation and hydrogen peroxide (UV-H(2)O(2)) was shown to be effective in treating water spiked with 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobipheny (PCB 153), reducing its concentration by as much as 98%. To test the toxicity of the effluent, bioassays involving three species of primary producers were performed. Results showed the effluent exerting an adverse effect on the algae Scenedesmus bijugatus and the duckweed Lemna paucicostata. On the other hand, exposure of the mungbean Vigna radiata to the effluent revealed mostly no statistically significant adverse effect or growth stimulation. This suggested that on an exposure period of 96 h, higher forms of chlorophyll-bearing species such as plants are relatively unaffected by trace concentrations of PCBs and degradation products, while less differentiated species like algae and duckweeds are vulnerable. PMID:21531462

  2. Decontamination of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty-seven papers were presented at this conference in five sessions. Topics covered include regulation, control and consequences of decontamination; decontamination of components and facilities; chemical and non-chemical methods of decontamination; and TMI decontamination experience

  3. Invention of Hollow Zirconium Tungesto-Vanadate at Nanotube Morphological Structure for Radionuclides and Heavy Metal Pollutants Decontamination from Aqueous Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkady, M. F.; Hassan, H. Shokry

    2015-12-01

    Zirconium tungesto-vanadate cation exchange material was successfully architectured at open ended nanotubes morphological structure in the presence of polyvinyl alcohol as a stabilizing agent using microwave route. The ion exchange capacity (IEC) of the material was recorded as 4.8 meq/g of about 640 m2/g for a specific surface area. The x-ray diffraction pattern of the material implies its crystallinity. Both scanning and transmission electron microscopes identified the average aspect ratio of the architectured nanotubes as 6.5 and its hollow structure. The material posed 96.4 % cadmium ion decontamination within 90 min compared with 84 % strontium decontamination at the same time.

  4. Decontaminating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To enable to decontaminate an object having a complicate surface and also remove hard cruds by a simple device. Method: An object to be decontaminated is placed in a water vessel and steams jetted out from a steam nozzle are condensated at the surface of the object to be decontaminated and decontamination is conducted by impact shocks upon elimination of bubbles. The inside of the water vessel is filled with liquid and steams jetted out from the steam nozzle are cooled by the liquid and condensated. The steams are supplied with a steam supply device by way of steam supply pipeways to the steam nozzle. Since the temperature of the liquid in the water vessel is elevated upon condensation of the jetted steams, the liquids are cooled by the cooling device. Further, since the steams condensated at the surface of the decontaminated object forms water of condensation to increase the water level in the water vessel, the water corresponding to the elevated level is discharged from an overflow pipe. (Kawakami, Y.)

  5. Decontaminating method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, Mikio; Hayashi, Tsutomu; Izumi, Masayuki; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Sato, Toru; Owada, Kazuo.

    1987-11-21

    Purpose: To enable to decontaminate an object having a complicate surface and also remove hard cruds by a simple device. Method: An object to be decontaminated is placed in a water vessel and steams jetted out from a steam nozzle are condensated at the surface of the object to be decontaminated and decontamination is conducted by impact shocks upon elimination of bubbles. The inside of the water vessel is filled with liquid and steams jetted out from the steam nozzle are cooled by the liquid and condensated. The steams are supplied with a steam supply device by way of steam supply pipeways to the steam nozzle. Since the temperature of the liquid in the water vessel is elevated upon condensation of the jetted steams, the liquids are cooled by the cooling device. Further, since the steams condensated at the surface of the decontaminated object forms water of condensation to increase the water level in the water vessel, the water corresponding to the elevated level is discharged from an overflow pipe. (Kawakami, Y.).

  6. Decontamination and modification of liquid scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new technique for decontaminating and recyling used liquid scintillator (LS) is discussed. A modification of hydrophobic scintillator for use with aqueous samples is also described. Both aliphatic and aromatic based LS (Dioxane and Tritol) are effectively decontaminated by extraction with NaOH. A single extraction gives a decontamination factor (DF) of about 90%. Thus 3-4 such extractions decontaminate the LS to background level. Toluene scintillator is unsuitable for aqueous samples because it does not hold water. However, it can be solubilised by alcohol. This LS is decontaminated by separating two phases with excess of water. Recovered LS after proper dilutions gives about 96% efficiency with respect to fresh LS. In all the systems studied generation of active waste ranges from 12-47% depending upon the activity present in the sample. (H.K.)

  7. Decontamination apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The apparatus for decontaminating radioactive components consists of an attachment mechanism for completely suspending the apparatus from the tube sheet of a nuclear steam generator, a first drive mechanism for moving the apparatus in a first direction, a second drive mechanism for pivoting the apparatus in a second direction, and a third drive mechanism for moving the apparatus in a third independent direction. The apparatus also has a dual nozzle arrangement attached to the third drive mechanism for directing a water-grit mixture toward the component to be decontaminated. The apparatus provides a mechanism for remotely decontaminating the channel head of a nuclear steam generator so as to allow working personnel to enter therein. It is likely that less than 0.001 inches of metal surface will be removed from the steam generator using alumina or magnetite grit

  8. Decontamination glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass for the decontamination of the furnace for vitrification of radioactive wastes contains 50 to 60 wt.% of waste glass, 15 to 30 wt.% of calcium oxide, 1 to 6 wt.% sodium oxide, 1 to 5 wt.% phosphorus pentoxide and 5 to 20 wt.% boron oxide. The melting furnace is flushed with the glass such that it melts in the furnace for at least 60 mins and is then poured out of the furnace. After the furnace has cooled down the settled glass spontaneously cracks and peels off the walls leaving a clean surface. The glass may be used not only for decontamination of the furnace but also for decontamination of melting crucibles and other devices contaminated with radioactive glass. (J.B.)

  9. Acidity control of the oxidation reactions induced by non-thermal plasma treatment of aqueous effluents in pollutant abatement processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The acid properties of a non-thermal plasma in humid air (e.g., a gliding arc device) induced in an aqueous solution may deeply affect the efficiency of the matching oxidising properties, especially when the aqueous targets involve organic solutes. Hence, their oxidation rate may be strongly modified. A series of buffers is proposed to control the pH of aqueous target for at least one-hour treatments. The selected acid-base systems were selected for their inertia towards oxidation reaction, to cover a very large range of acidity. The reported results are essential from both fundamental and applied points of view. They first allow the acute controlling of the degradation rate of organic compounds. They also enable estimating the efficiency of the gliding arc treatments in environmental applications. Besides, they allow getting reliable data on the bactericidal effect on the plasma treatments, which are a merging application of the electric discharges. (author)

  10. The effect of operational parameters on electrocoagulation-flotation process followed by photocatalysis applied to the decontamination of water effluents from cellulose and paper factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellulose and paper pulp factories utilize a large amount of water generating several undesirable contaminants. The present work is a preliminary investigation that associates the electrocoagulation-flotation (EC) method followed by photocatalysis to treat such wastewater. For EC, the experiment with aluminium and iron electrodes showed similar efficiency. Iron electrodes (anode and cathode) were chosen. By applying 30 min of EC/Fe0, 153 A m-2 and pH 6.0, the COD values, UV-vis absorbance and turbidity underwent an intense decrease. For the subsequent UV photocatalysis (mercury lamps) TiO2 was employed and the favourable operational conditions found were 0.25 g L-1 of the catalyst and solution pH 3.0. The addition of hydrogen peroxide (50 mmol L-1) highly increased the photo-process performance. By employing the UV/TiO2/H2O2 system, the COD reduction was 88% compared to pre-treated effluents and complete sample photobleaching was verified. The salt concentration on EC (iron electrodes) showed that the electrolysis duration can be reduced from 30 to 10 min by the addition of 5.0 g L-1 of NaCl. The biodegradability index (BOD/COD) increased from 0.15 (pre-treated) to 0.48 (after EC) and to 0.89 (after EC/photocatalysis irradiated for 6 h), showing that the employed sequence is very helpful to improve the water quality. This result was confirmed by biotoxicity tests performed with microcrustaceous Artemia salina

  11. The effect of operational parameters on electrocoagulation-flotation process followed by photocatalysis applied to the decontamination of water effluents from cellulose and paper factories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boroski, Marcela; Rodrigues, Angela Claudia; Garcia, Juliana Carla; Passarella Gerola, Adriana; Nozaki, Jorge [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Estadual de Maringa, Avenida Colombo, 5790, CEP 87020-900, Maringa, PR (Brazil); Hioka, Noboru [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Estadual de Maringa, Avenida Colombo, 5790, CEP 87020-900, Maringa, PR (Brazil)], E-mail: nhioka@uem.br

    2008-12-15

    Cellulose and paper pulp factories utilize a large amount of water generating several undesirable contaminants. The present work is a preliminary investigation that associates the electrocoagulation-flotation (EC) method followed by photocatalysis to treat such wastewater. For EC, the experiment with aluminium and iron electrodes showed similar efficiency. Iron electrodes (anode and cathode) were chosen. By applying 30 min of EC/Fe{sup 0}, 153 A m{sup -2} and pH 6.0, the COD values, UV-vis absorbance and turbidity underwent an intense decrease. For the subsequent UV photocatalysis (mercury lamps) TiO{sub 2} was employed and the favourable operational conditions found were 0.25 g L{sup -1} of the catalyst and solution pH 3.0. The addition of hydrogen peroxide (50 mmol L{sup -1}) highly increased the photo-process performance. By employing the UV/TiO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} system, the COD reduction was 88% compared to pre-treated effluents and complete sample photobleaching was verified. The salt concentration on EC (iron electrodes) showed that the electrolysis duration can be reduced from 30 to 10 min by the addition of 5.0 g L{sup -1} of NaCl. The biodegradability index (BOD/COD) increased from 0.15 (pre-treated) to 0.48 (after EC) and to 0.89 (after EC/photocatalysis irradiated for 6 h), showing that the employed sequence is very helpful to improve the water quality. This result was confirmed by biotoxicity tests performed with microcrustaceous Artemia salina.

  12. Resistance and uptake of cadmium by yeast, Pichia hampshirensis 4Aer, isolated from industrial effluent and its potential use in decontamination of wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Zaman; Rehman, Abdul; Hussain, Syed Z

    2016-09-01

    Pichia hampshirensis 4Aer is first ever used yeast for the bioremediation of environmental cadmium (Cd(+2)) which could maximally remove 22 mM/g and 28 mM/g Cd(+2) from aqueous medium at lab and large scales, respectively. The biosorption was found to be the function of temperature, pH of solution, initial Cd(+2) concentration and biomass dosage. Competitive biosorption was investigated in binary and multi-metal system which indicated the decrease in Cd(+2) biosorption with increasing the competitive metal ions attributed to their higher electronegativity and larger radius. FTIR analysis revealed the active participation of amide and carbonyl moieties in Cd(+2) adsorption confirmed by EDX analysis. Electron micrographs summoned further surface adsorption and increased cell size due to intracellular Cd(+2) accumulation. Cd(+2) was the causative agent of some metal binding proteins as well as prodigious increase in glutathione and other non-protein thiols levels which is the crucial for the yeast to thrive oxidative stress generated by Cd(+2). Our experimental data were consistent with Langmuir as well as Freundlich isotherm models. The yeast obeyed pseudo second order kinetic model which makes it an effective biosorbent for Cd(+2). High bioremediation potential and spontaneity and feasibility of the process make P. hampshirensis 4Aer an impending foundation for green chemistry to exterminate environmental Cd(+2). PMID:27268792

  13. Voltametric study of formic and dihydroxy malonic acids on platinum for the definition of a process for the electrolytic destruction of carboxylic acids in radioactive aqueous effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To limit the amount of nuclear glasses generated by the treatment of the degraded solvent from the PUREX process for reprocessing of nuclear fuels, by solutions of sodium carbonate and caustic soda, it is planned to exploit the complexing power of certain carboxylic acids to return the metallic cations to the aqueous phase. The concept of this new treatment of the solvent by 'substitution' reagents demands a process for the decomposition of these reagents, especially to CO2. The investigation of the electrochemical behaviour, on platinum, of a substance selected as a model for understanding the interfacial mechanisms (HCOOH), and of dihydroxy malonic acid, revealed two distinct electro-poisoning processes: one is due to the adsorption of CO on the surface sites of platinum, and the second to the formation of a passivating layer of P†O. The application of 20 kHz ultrasonic flux in the neighbourhood of the platinum / aqueous formic acid solution interface also appears to cause a change in the superficial structure of the electrode used, in a direction that favours the decomposition of this compound. To overcome problems of poisoning of the platinum surface, aqueous solutions of formic, dihydroxy malonic and oxalic acids were electrolysed, in a cell without diaphragm, by applying voltage and current ranges, at levels adapted to each of the species. It is necessary to bring the working electrode to a higher potential than the oxidation potential for formic acid, and to a lower potential for dihydroxy malonic and oxalic acids. The frequent modifications of the electrode potentials helped to achieve quantitative destruction of these species, to CO2 (and to water) with an electrochemical efficiency approaching 100 %. This wet oxidation process also offers the advantage of not raising the energy potential of the effluents to be treated, because it takes place in mild conditions (ambient temperature and pressure). (author). 131 refs., 90 figs., 48 tabs

  14. Preliminary findings of the effect of surface finish and coatings on PuO2 contamination hold-up and ease of decontamination in aqueous and non-aqueous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of temporary and permanent coatings for the reduction of α-activity hold-up and increased ease of decontamination has been reviewed and a variety of surface treatments and coatings identified as being worthy of investigation. A range of specimens have been prepared with hard coatings and smooth surfaces. A number of adhesive films, paints and lacquers have been applied to mild and stainless steel substrates. In order to compare the different surfaces, a standard contamination technique using a mechanical wiper has been developed to reproducibly contaminate the materials with PuO2. A standard decontamination test using water/Decon 75 or Arklone X is being used to compare the ease of decontamination. Preliminary experiments have shown that the smoothest surface finishes have the lowest activity hold-up and are more easily cleaned. Due to the superior level of micro-smoothness attainable on metals, these showed a significantly lower activity retention than the organic coatings examined to date. A comparison of the relative efficiency of cleaning in Decon 75 and Arklone X showed that generally speaking metal surfaces were cleaned equally well by both media, while the unaged organic surfaces were decontaminated more thoroughly in Arklone X, though the differences were somewhat marginal. (author)

  15. Adsorption of lead and copper ions from aqueous effluents on rice husk ash in a dynamic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. A. Vieira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the kinetic adsorption of Pb and Cu ions using rice husk ash as adsorbent in a fixed bed. The maximum adsorption capacities obtained for lead and copper ions in the fixed bed were 0.0561 and 0.0682 mmol/g (at 20 ºC, respectively. The thermodynamic studies indicated that the lead adsorption process was exothermic and spontaneous, while the copper adsorption process was endothermic and spontaneous. Characterization results indicated the presence of several functional groups, amorphous silica and a fibrous and longitudinal structure of rice husks. Rice husk ash (RHA from northern Brazil can be used as a bioadsorbent for the individual removal of Pb(II and Cu(II ions from metal-containing effluents.

  16. Effects of aqueous effluents from in situ fossil fuel processing technologies on aquatic systems. Annual progress report, January 1-December 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergman, H.L.

    1980-01-04

    This is the third annual progress report for a continuing EPA-DOE jointly funded project to evaluate the effects of aqueous effluents from in situ fossil-fuel processing technologies on aquatic biota. The project is organized into four project tasks: (1) literature review; (2) process water screening; (3) methods development; and (4) recommendations. Our Bibliography of aquatic ecosystem effects, analytical methods and treatment technologies for organic compounds in advanced fossil-fuel processing effluents was submitted to the EPA for publication. The bibliography contains 1314 citations indexed by chemicals, keywords, taxa and authors. We estimate that the second bibliography volume will contain approximately 1500 citations and be completed in February. We compiled results from several laboratories of inorganic characterizations of 19 process waters: 55 simulated in situ oil-shale retort waters; and Hanna-3, Hanna-4B 01W and Lawrence Livermore Hoe Creek underground coal gasification condenser waters. These process waters were then compared to a published summary of the analyses from 18 simulated in situ oil-shale retort waters. We completed this year 96-h flow-through toxicity bioassays with fathead minnows and rainbow trout and 48-h flow-through bioassays with Daphnia pulicaria exposed to 5 oil-shale process waters, 1 tar-sand process water, 2 underground coal gasification condenser waters, 1 post-gasification backflood condenser water, as well as 2 bioassays with fossil-fuel process water constituents. The LC/sub 50/ toxicity values for these respective species when exposed to these waters are given in detail. (LTN)

  17. Decontamination Data - Blister Agents

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Decontamination efficacy data for blister agents on various building materials using various decontamination solutions This dataset is associated with the following...

  18. Decontamination of radioactive cesium in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agricultural soil containing radioactive cesium was decontaminated using an extraction method involving aqueous potassium solutions. Results demonstrated that the potassium solution could extract radioactive cesium from soil artificially contaminated with 137Cs, although extraction rate decreased as time after contamination increased. However, visual examination of radioactivity distribution in soil samples significantly contaminated by the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant showed that radioactive cesium also existed as insoluble particles. Therefore, reducing the volume of radioactive wastes generated from soil decontamination requires a physical decontamination method combined with chemical treatment. (author)

  19. A study of low-cost adsorbent materials for removing Cr(VI from aqueous waste effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Vargas-Niño

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available  The present paper shows very high potential for two types of solid (a commercial alumina and material obtained by composting, i.e. matured compost on Cr(VI adsorption/elimination in aqueous solution using a concentration range close to those previously detected in waste-water from Colombian industries. Both had important properties for eliminating Cr(VI, the compost being more important as it represents low-cost material. Optimal conditions for chromium adsorption on alumina and compost were established. Initial Cr(VI alumina concentration was 10 mgL-1, with 100 mL/g volume of solution per adsorbent mass, pH=2.0, 1 hour equilibrium time and 150 rpm stirring. For compost, initial Cr(VI concentration was = 3 mg L-1, 50 mL/g volume of solution per adsorbent mass, pH=2.5, 3 hour equilibrium time and 150 rpm stirring. The experiments showed that compost adsorption properties could be enhanced by adding small quantities of alumina. Compost could thus be chosen as a promising material for use in bioremediation chromium-containing waste water in a management programme for using solid waste in for minimising environmental impact.  

  20. Visible Light Induced Enhanced Photocatalytic Degradation of Industrial Effluents (Rhodamine B in Aqueous Media Using TiO2 Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. O. Carneiro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, new textile materials have been developed through the use of nanotechnology-based tools. The development of textile surfaces with self-cleaning properties has a large combined potential to reduce the environmental impact related to pollution. In this research work, three types of textiles substrates (cotton, Entretela, and polylactic acid (PLA were functionalized with titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 using chemical and mechanical processes (padding. During the functionalization process, two different methods were used, both of which allowed a good fixation of nanoparticles of TiO2 on textile substrates. The samples were examined for morphology and for photocatalytic properties under visible light irradiation. A study aimed at evaluating the effect of pH of the aqueous solution of TiO2 nanoparticles was performed in order to promote interaction between TiO2 and the dye solution rhodamine B (Rh-B. The TiO2 nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD. The measurement of the zeta potential of the TiO2 nanoparticle solution proved to be always positive and have low colloidal stability. Chromatography (HPLC and GC-MS analyses confirm that oxalic acid is the intermediate compound formed during the photodegradation process.

  1. Efficacy of chlorine, acidic electrolyzed water and aqueous chlorine dioxide solutions to decontaminate Escherichia coli O157:H7 from lettuce leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study compared the efficacy of chlorine (20 – 200 ppm), acidic electrolyzed water (50 ppm chlorine, pH 2.6), acidified sodium chlorite (20 – 200 ppm chlorite ion concentration, Sanova), and aqueous chlorine dioxide (20 – 200 ppm chlorite ion concentration, TriNova) washes in reducing population...

  2. Enhanced toxic cloud knockdown spray system for decontamination applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betty, Rita G.; Tucker, Mark D.; Brockmann, John E.; Lucero, Daniel A.; Levin, Bruce L.; Leonard, Jonathan

    2011-09-06

    Methods and systems for knockdown and neutralization of toxic clouds of aerosolized chemical or biological warfare (CBW) agents and toxic industrial chemicals using a non-toxic, non-corrosive aqueous decontamination formulation.

  3. Decontamination method for radioactive metal waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upon processing of contaminated materials, dusts containing radioactive materials are deposited to portions such as which are considered not to have been contaminated during use, and cause secondary wastes. Then, as a means for reducing the secondary wastes as less as possible, paints are coated to the portions of the decontaminated materials which are considered not to have been contaminated during use and, then chemical decontamination is applied to suppress dissolution of metals in the portions and then the paints are removed. Any of paints may be used optionally except for aqueous paints having an affinity with decontaminating liquids. This can prevent unnecessary dissolution of metals and, accordingly, the volume of secondary wastes can be reduced as less as possible, to extend the life time of the decontaminating liquids as long as possible. (T.M.)

  4. Development of a lab-scale contaminated organic effluents treatment process using evaporation and supercritical water oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The organic liquid waste produced in the ATALANTE facility have to be treated in order to reduce the fire and contamination risks. Therefore, the Mini-DELOS process has been developed, which combines a low pressure evaporator in a shielded enclosure and a continuous supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) reactor in a glovebox. Evaporation makes it possible to evacuate the main organic stream as decontaminated distillates to an industrial incinerator. The remaining residue, concentrating the radioactivity can be converted through SCWO into a contaminated aqueous effluent, fully compatible with the existing outlets of the facility. The preliminary results of the first year of active operation of the Mini- DELOS process are here presented. (authors)

  5. Surface decontamination by photo-catalysis - 16068

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently in the nuclear industry, surface contamination in the form of radioactive metal or metal oxide deposits is most commonly removed by chemical decontamination, electrochemical decontamination or physical attrition. Physical attrition techniques are generally used on structural materials (concrete, plaster), with (electro)chemical methods being used to decontaminate metallic or painted surfaces. The most common types of (electro)chemical decontamination are the use of simple mineral acids such as nitric acid or cerium (IV) oxidation (MEDOC). Use of both of these reagents frequently results in the dissolution of a layer of the substrate surface increasing the percentage of secondary waste which leads to burdens on downstream effluent treatment and waste management plants. In this context, both mineral acids and MEDOC can be indiscriminate in the surfaces attacked during deployment, e.g. attacking in transit through a pipe system to the site of contamination resulting in both diminished effect of the decontaminating reagent upon arrival at its target site and an increased secondary waste management requirement. This provides two main requirements for a more ideal decontamination reagent: Improved area specificity and a dissolution power equal to or greater than the previously mentioned current decontaminants. Photochemically promoted processes may provide such a decontamination technique. Photochemical reduction of metal ion valence states to aid in heavy metal deposition has already been extensively studied [1], with reductive manipulation also being achieved with uranium and plutonium simulants (Ce) [2]. Importantly photooxidation of a variety of metals, including neptunium [3], has also been achieved. Here we report on the potential application of this technology to metal dissolution. (authors)

  6. Reaction-diffusion models of decontamination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.

    A contaminant, which also contains a polymer is in the form of droplets on a solid surface. It is to be removed by the action of a decontaminant, which is applied in aqueous solution. The contaminant is only sparingly soluble in water, so the reaction mechanism is that it slowly dissolves in the...

  7. URANIUM DECONTAMINATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham, J.S.; Carroll, J.L.

    1959-12-22

    A process is described for reducing the extractability of ruthenium, zirconium, and niobium values into hexone contained in an aqueous nitric acid uranium-containing solution. The solution is made acid-deficient, heated to between 55 and 70 deg C, and at that temperature a water-soluble inorganic thiosulfate is added. By this, a precipitate is formed which carries the bulk of the ruthenium, and the remainder of the ruthenium as well as the zirconium and niobium are converted to a hexone-nonextractable form. The rutheniumcontaining precipitate can either be removed from the solu tion or it can be dissolved as a hexone-non-extractable compound by the addition of sodium dichromate prior to hexone extraction.

  8. Researches on skin decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Living 4∼6 week-aged San Yuan white pigs (Suzhou, China) were used in skin decontamination experiments. Following a standard procedure, SM series of decontamination agents were used for decontamination of liquid nuclides. The results of immediate decontamination were as follows: K(decontamination efficiency) = 97.7% (decontamination factor DF = 43.5) for 131I; K>99% (DF>100) for 90Sr/90Y, MFP and U + TRU; K = 99.9% (DF 1000) for 137Cs. In 3 h-delayed decontamination, DF = 27∼67 (K 96.3%∼98.5) for the nuclides mentioned above. When the initiatory MFP contamination increased from 20 to 300 s-1·cm-2, the value of DF by immediate decontamination increased from 20 to 173 with the remaining activity not higher than 10 Bq·cm-2, and no additional decontamination was needed. For radioactive ash contamination of skin, DF 57∼1000 (K = 98.2%∼99.9%) in 4 h-delayed decontamination. SM series of decontamination agents are neutral liquid or cream without any irritative effect on skin. They are effective and easy to use in skin decontamination. (5 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.)

  9. Modelling of the hydrodynamic behaviour of a decontamination foam; Modelisation du comportement hydrodynamique d'une mousse de decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faury, M.; Fournel, B. [CEA Cadarache, Dept. d' Entreposage et de Stockage des Dechets, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2001-07-01

    Decontamination of large components of nuclear power plants (refrigerants, vapor generators, effluents storage tanks...) produces an important volume of secondary effluents. The use of decontamination foams is an alternative allowing a significant diminution of this volume (about of a factor ten). The aim of this work is to propose models which could be applied by an industrialist in order to anticipate the behaviour of a foam flowing out in a component of any geometry and simplifying then the pre-study steps. (O.M.)

  10. Decontamination technologies for release from bioprocessing facilities. Part I. Introduction. Part II. Decontamination of wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genetically engineered microorganisms are widely used in biotechnology. Wastewater from bioprocessing facilities will require treatment to ensure that effluents discharged into surface water or other waste streams are not a source of viable organisms or transmittable genetic material. The application of treatment technologies used in other industries to decontaminate the releases from biotechnology processing facilities was evaluated. Since published literature on the inactivation of recombinant-DNA organisms is very limited, information for bacteria, viruses, fungi and subcellular components was obtained. The data indicated that ozone, chlorine, chlorine dioxide, heat, ultraviolet light and ionizing radiation offer good performance potential for decontamination of rDNA processing wastewater. 180 refs., 7 figs., 26 tabs

  11. Ontario Hydro decontamination experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ontario Hydro currently operates 18 nuclear electric generating units of the CANDU design with a net capacity of 12,402 MW(e). An additional 1,762 MW(e) is under construction. The operation of these facilities has underlined the need to have decontamination capability both to reduce radiation fields, as well as to control and reduce contamination during component maintenance. This paper presents Ontario Hydro decontamination experience in two key areas - full heat transport decontamination to reduce system radiation fields, and component decontamination to reduce loose contamination particularly as practised in maintenance and decontamination centres. (author)

  12. Pickering emulsions for skin decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Alicia; Bolzinger, Marie-Alexandrine; Rolland, Pauline; Chevalier, Yves; Josse, Denis; Briançon, Stéphanie

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed at developing innovative systems for skin decontamination. Pickering emulsions, i.e. solid-stabilized emulsions, containing silica (S-PE) or Fuller's earth (FE-PE) were formulated. Their efficiency for skin decontamination was evaluated, in vitro, 45min after an exposure to VX, one of the most highly toxic chemical warfare agents. Pickering emulsions were compared to FE (FE-W) and silica (S-W) aqueous suspensions. PE containing an oil with a similar hydrophobicity to VX should promote its extraction. All the formulations reduced significantly the amount of VX quantified on and into the skin compared to the control. Wiping the skin surface with a pad already allowed removing more than half of VX. FE-W was the less efficient (85% of VX removed). The other formulations (FE-PE, S-PE and S-W) resulted in more than 90% of the quantity of VX removed. The charge of particles was the most influential factor. The low pH of formulations containing silica favored electrostatic interactions of VX with particles explaining the better elimination from the skin surface. Formulations containing FE had basic pH, and weak interactions with VX did not improve the skin decontamination. However, these low interactions between VX and FE promote the transfer of VX into the oil droplets in the FE-PE. PMID:27021875

  13. Study on skin decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinese San-Yuan white pigs 4∼6 weeks old were used in skin decontamination experiments. The decontamination agents used were the SM series of decontamination agents. In immediate decontamination test, K 97.7% (DF = 43.5) was obtained for 131I, K>99%(DF>100) for 90Sr/90Y, MFP and U + TRU, K = 99.9%(DF = 1000) for 137Cs. DF = 27∼67 (K 96.3%∼98.5%) was obtained for the nuclides mentioned above in 3 h delayed decontamination test. When the initial contamination level of MFP increased from 200 to 3000 cps/10 cm2, the remained activity was still lower than 10 Bq/cm2 after decontamination, and no additional decontamination is needed. For radioactive ashes contamination, DF = 57∼1000 (K 98.2%∼99.9%) was reached in 4 h-delayed decontamination. The SM series of decontamination agents are neutral liquid or cream having no stimulating effect to skin. It is effective and easy to use in skin decontamination

  14. Gross decontamination experiment report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, R.; Kinney, K.; Dettorre, J.; Gilbert, V.

    1983-07-01

    A Gross Decontamination Experiment was conducted on various levels and surfaces of the TMI - Unit 2 reactor building in March 1982. The polar crane, D-rings, missile shields, refueling canals, refueling bridges, equipment, and elevations 305' and 347'-6'' were flushed with low pressure water. Additionally, floor surfaces on elevation 305' and floor surfaces and major pieces of equipment on elevation 347'-6'' were sprayed with high pressure water. Selective surfaces were decontaminated with a mechanical scrubber and chemicals. Strippable coating was tested and evaluated on equipment and floor surfaces. The effectiveness, efficiency, and safety of several decontamination techniques were established for the large, complex decontamination effort. Various decontamination equipment was evaluated and its effectiveness was documented. Decontamination training and procedures were documented and evaluated, as were the support system and organization for the experiment.

  15. Gross decontamination experiment report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Gross Decontamination Experiment was conducted on various levels and surfaces of the TMI - Unit 2 reactor building in March 1982. The polar crane, D-rings, missile shields, refueling canals, refueling bridges, equipment, and elevations 305' and 347'-6'' were flushed with low pressure water. Additionally, floor surfaces on elevation 305' and floor surfaces and major pieces of equipment on elevation 347'-6'' were sprayed with high pressure water. Selective surfaces were decontaminated with a mechanical scrubber and chemicals. Strippable coating was tested and evaluated on equipment and floor surfaces. The effectiveness, efficiency, and safety of several decontamination techniques were established for the large, complex decontamination effort. Various decontamination equipment was evaluated and its effectiveness was documented. Decontamination training and procedures were documented and evaluated, as were the support system and organization for the experiment

  16. Pickering NGS decontaminations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In early 1984, decontaminations of the Pickering NGS Units 1 and 2 heat transport systems were carried out. These decontaminations reduced radiation fields in front of the reactor face by up to a factor of 10, and resulted in radiation fields of 50 to 140 mR/h. These decontaminations were carried out using an improved version of the CAN-DECON process. This paper describes the development of the process and its successful applications at Pickering NGS

  17. Foam Decontamination of Metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The foam decontamination is quite promising method for purifying radioactive contaminated surfaces. Foam decontamination solutions allow creating the necessary volume of deactivating medium and forming a relatively small amount of secondary liquid waste so that this method may be applicable to bulky objects. Also it should be noted that foam compositions can be effective for objects with a complex geometry. Despite the numerous advantages the well known foam decontamination methods are unpopular today due to their low efficiency and difficulties of recycling waste decontamination solutions. We have made some attempts to improve the attractiveness of foam decontamination process. Currently two compositions (acidic and alkaline) for foam decontamination have been tested. The main advantage of both tested compositions is that they are based on easily degradable surfactants. At the same time the acidic composition has a very low salt content. The preliminary results of tests carried out in real production conditions showed that such approach for metal decontamination was very promising. Metal decontamination factors over 2500 were achieved for consequent treating of metal surfaces with acidic and alkali foam solutions in industrial conditions. The total flow rate of foam generating solutions was 1 L/m2 and processing time was 1 hour. Presently we are trying to modify the foam physical properties to improve the process of decontamination of vertical, inclined and inverted surfaces. Also methods and scheme of spent foam generating solutions treatment are under development. (authors)

  18. Decontamination of body surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are two important points for an effective application of decontamination procedures. One is the organizing method of responsible decontamination teams. The team should be directed by medical doctor with the knowledge of decontamination of radionuclides. The other point is the place of application of the decontamination. Hospitals and clinics, especially with a department of nuclear medicine, or specialized units such as an emergency medical center are preferable. Before decontamination procedures are initiated, adequate monitoring of the body surface should be undertaken by a competent person in order to demarcate the areas which are contaminated. There are fundamental principles which are applicable to all decontamination procedures. (1) Precautions must always be taken to prevent further spread of contamination during decontamination operations. (2) Mild decontamination methods should be tried before resorting to treatment which can damage the body surface. The specific feature of each contamination varies widely in radionuclides involved, place and area of the contamination, condition of the contaminated skin such as whether the skin is wounded or not, and others. Soap and water are usually good detergents in most cases. If they fail, orange oil cream (SUPERDECONCREAM, available from Tokyo Engineering Co.) specially prepared for decontamination of radionuclides of most fission and corrosion products may be used. Contaminated hair should be washed several times with an efficient shampoo. (author)

  19. Cleaning and decontamination: Experimental feedback from PHENIX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the first few years of operation of PHENIX, it proved necessary to clean, then decontaminate sodium-polluted components, particularly large components such as the intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) and the primary pumps (PP). Ibis document presents the evolution of the cleaning and decontamination processes used, and specifies the reasons for this evolution. As regards the cleaning, experimental feedback and a greater rigour with respect to the hydrogen hazard have resulted in a modification of the process. The new cleaning process used at present (since 1994) is described in greater detail in this document. The main steps are: cold CO2 bubbling in water, followed by hot CO2 bubbling, spraying phase, then drying for inspection before immersion. In order to optimize and validate the process, the cleaning and decontamination plant has been highly instrumented, which, in particular, has allowed confirmation of the contention that the major part of the sodium is eliminated during the bubbling phases. With respect to decontamination, the objective is to perfect an efficient process that allows both human intervention with no particular biological shield for repair or maintenance of the components, and requalification of the materials after the decontamination operation. Owing to the high operating temperature of Fast Breeder Reactor components (400 to 550 deg. C), the activated corrosion products deposited on the components melt into the metal. The decontamination process therefore consists in either dissolving the deposits on the surface, or dissolving a thickness of about less than ten micrometers of the base metal. The reference process for austenitic-type steels is the SPm process, which consists in immersing the component in a sulphuric-phosphoric bath (sulphuric acid and phosphoric acid) at a temperature of 60 deg. C for 6 hours. The problem linked to this process is the treatment of the effluents that are produced, particularly phosphate releases. A series

  20. Cladding hull decontamination process: preliminary development studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griggs, B.; Bryan, G.H.

    1979-12-01

    An investigation of the chemical and radioactive properties of fuel hulls was conducted to assist in a decontamination process development effort. The removal of zirconium oxide layers from zirconium was accomplished by a treatment in 600/sup 0/C HF followed by a dilute aqueous reagent. Similar treatment in fused alkali-zirconium fluoride salt baths was examined. A remotely operated small batch facility was developed and process parameters determined. 16 figures, 9 tables.

  1. Influence of Decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the influence of several decontamination techniques on the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. There are different kinds of decontamination methods like mechanical and chemical processes. The techniques specified, and their potential to change measured characteristics like the isotope vector of the contamination is demonstrated. It is common for all these processes, that the contamination is removed from the surface. Slightly adhered nuclides can be removed more effectively than strongly sticking nuclides. Usually a mixture of these nuclides forms the contamination. Problematically any kind of decontamination will influence the nuclide distribution and the isotope vector. On the one hand it is helpful to know the nuclide distribution and the isotope vector for the radiological characterization of the nuclear facility and on the other hand this information will be changed in the decontamination process. This is important especially for free release procedures, radiation protection and waste management. Some questions on the need of decontamination have been discussed. (authors)

  2. Planning guidance for nuclear-power-plant decontamination. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munson, L.F.; Divine, J.R.; Martin, J.B.

    1983-06-01

    Direct and indirect costs of decontamination are considered in the benefit-cost analysis. A generic form of the benefit-cost ratio is evaluated in monetary and nonmonetary terms, and values of dollar per man-rem are cited. Federal and state agencies that may have jurisiction over various aspects of decontamination and waste disposal activities are identified. Methods of decontamination, their general effectiveness, and the advantages and disadvantages of each are outlined. Dilute or concentrated chemical solutions are usually used in-situ to dissolve the contamination layer and a thin layer of the underlying substrate. Electrochemical techniques are generally limited to components but show high decontamination effectiveness with uniform corrosion. Mechanical agents are particularly appropriate for certain out-of-system surfaces and disassembled parts. These processes are catagorized and specific concerns are discussed. The treatment, storage, and disposal or discharge or discharge of liquid, gaseous, and solid wastes generated during the decontamination process are discussed. Radioactive and other hazardous chemical wastes are considered. The monitoring, treatment, and control of radioactive and nonradioactive effluents, from both routine operations and possible accidents, are discussed. Protecting the health and safety of personnel onsite during decontamination is of prime importance and should be considered in each facet of the decontamination process. The radiation protection philosophy of reducing exposure to levels as low as reasonably achievable should be stressed. These issues are discussed.

  3. PWR decontamination feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decontamination work which has been accomplished is reviewed and it is concluded that it is worthwhile to investigate further four methods for decontamination for future demonstration. These are: dilute chemical; single stage strong chemical; redox processes; and redox/chemical in combination. Laboratory work is recommended to define the agents and processes for demonstration and to determine the effect of the solvents on PWR materials. The feasibility of Indian Point 1 for decontamination demonstrations is discussed, and it is shown that the system components of Indian Point 1 are well suited for use in demonstrations

  4. Long lasting decontamination foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmer, Ricky L.; Peterman, Dean R.; Tripp, Julia L.; Cooper, David C.; Wright, Karen E.

    2010-12-07

    Compositions and methods for decontaminating surfaces are disclosed. More specifically, compositions and methods for decontamination using a composition capable of generating a long lasting foam are disclosed. Compositions may include a surfactant and gelatin and have a pH of less than about 6. Such compositions may further include affinity-shifting chemicals. Methods may include decontaminating a contaminated surface with a composition or a foam that may include a surfactant and gelatin and have a pH of less than about 6.

  5. Concrete decontamination scoping tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report details the research efforts and scoping tests performed at the Idaho Chemical Process Plant using scabbling, chemical, and electro-osmotic decontamination techniques on radiologically contaminated concrete

  6. Food decontamination using nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    The research indicates that nanomaterials including nanoemulsions are promising decontamination media for the reduction of food contaminating pathogens. The inhibitory effect of nanoparticles for pathogens could be due to deactivate cellular enzymes and DNA; disrupting of membrane permeability; and/...

  7. Facility decontamination technology workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-10-01

    Purpose of the meeting was to provide a record of experience at nuclear facilities, other than TMI-2, of events and incidents which have required decontamination and dose reduction activities, and to furnish GPU and others involved in the TMI-2 cleanup with the results of that decontamination and dose reduction technology. Separate abstracts were prepared for 24 of the 25 papers; the remaining paper had been previously abstracted. (DLC)

  8. Decommissioning and Decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's decommissioning and decontamination programme are (1) to develop, test and optimise the technologies and procedures for decommissioning and decontamination of nuclear installations in order to minimise the waste arising and the distributed dose; (2) to optimise the environmental impact; (3) to reduce the cost of the end-of-life of the installation; (4) to make these new techniques available to the industry; (5) to share skills and competences. The programme and achievements in 1999 are summarised

  9. Tritium contamination and decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Establishment of tritium safe handling technology is required with the development of fusion reactor research. Tritium is contained by multiple-barriers containment due to the difficulty in perfect containment of hydrogen isotopes. Tritium contamination of materials and subsequent desorption are one of the critical issues in tritium containment. And the development of tritium decontamination technology is also a critical issue in tritium safe handling. The status of tritium contamination study and tritium decontamination technology are reviewed. (author)

  10. FINAL REPORT. "GREEN" BIOPOLYMERS FOR IMPROVED DECONTAMINATION OF METALS FROM SURFACES: SORPTIVE CHARACTERIZATION AND COATING PROPERTIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The proposed research aimed to develop a fundamental understanding of important biological and physical chemical parameters for effective decontamination of metal surfaces using environmentally benign aqueous-based biopolymer solutions. Understanding how heavy metal-chelating bio...

  11. "GREEN" BIOPOLYMERS FOR IMPROVED DECONTAMINATION OF METALS FROM SURFACES: SORPTIVE CHARACTERIZATION AND COATING PROPERTIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The proposed research aims to develop a fundamental understanding of important biological and physical chemical parameters for effective decontamination of metal surfaces using environmentally benign aqueous-based biopolymer solutions. Understanding how heavy metal- chelating bio...

  12. Lessons Learned from Decontamination Experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, JH

    2000-11-16

    This interim report describes a DOE project currently underway to establish what is known about decontamination of buildings and people and the procedures and protocols used to determine when and how people or buildings are considered ''clean'' following decontamination. To fulfill this objective, the study systematically examined reported decontamination experiences to determine what procedures and protocols are currently employed for decontamination, the timeframe involved to initiate and complete the decontamination process, how the contaminants were identified, the problems encountered during the decontamination process, how response efforts of agencies were coordinated, and the perceived social psychological effects on people who were decontaminated or who participated in the decontamination process. Findings and recommendations from the study are intended to aid decision-making and to improve the basis for determining appropriate decontamination protocols for recovery planners and policy makers for responding to chemical and biological events.

  13. Performances and microbial features of an aerobic packed-bed biofilm reactor developed to post-treat an olive mill effluent from an anaerobic GAC reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchetti Leonardo

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Olive mill wastewater (OMW is the aqueous effluent of olive oil producing processes. Given its high COD and content of phenols, it has to be decontaminated before being discharged. Anaerobic digestion is one of the most promising treatment process for such an effluent, as it combines high decontamination efficiency with methane production. The large scale anaerobic digestion of OMWs is normally conducted in dispersed-growth reactors, where however are generally achieved unsatisfactory COD removal and methane production yields. The possibility of intensifying the performance of the process using a packed bed biofilm reactor, as anaerobic treatment alternative, was demonstrated. Even in this case, however, a post-treatment step is required to further reduce the COD. In this work, a biological post-treatment, consisting of an aerobic biological "Manville" silica bead-packed bed aerobic reactor, was developed, tested for its ability to complete COD removal from the anaerobic digestion effluents, and characterized biologically through molecular tools. Results The aerobic post-treatment was assessed through a 2 month-continuous feeding with the digested effluent at 50.42 and 2.04 gl-1day-1 of COD and phenol loading rates, respectively. It was found to be a stable process, able to remove 24 and 39% of such organic loads, respectively, and to account for 1/4 of the overall decontamination efficiency displayed by the anaerobic-aerobic integrated system when fed with an amended OMW at 31.74 and 1.70 gl-1day-1 of COD and phenol loading rates, respectively. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences of biomass samples from the aerobic reactor biofilm revealed that it was colonized by Rhodobacterales, Bacteroidales, Pseudomonadales, Enterobacteriales, Rhodocyclales and genera incertae sedis TM7. Some taxons occurring in the influent were not detected in the biofilm, whereas others, such as Paracoccus, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter and Enterobacter

  14. Synthesis of novel complexing macromolecular surfactants and study of their interactions with cobalt for the development of a decontamination process of textiles in dense CO2 medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is about textile decontamination in dense CO2 (liquid CO2 or supercritical CO2). The study is carried out in the framework of decontamination of textile used in the nuclear industry. The dense CO2 offers an alternative to aqueous medium used in the current process which generates a huge quantity of contaminated aqueous effluent requiring a post-treatment. Cobalt is the targeted contamination and can be found as ionic species or particles. The cobalt extraction in dense CO2 is achieved with an additive: a complexing CO2-philic/CO2-phobic macromolecular surfactant. Several types of additives were synthesized by controlled free radical polymerization: gradient copolymers made with CO2-philic groups (silicone-based or fluorinated moieties) and CO2-phobic complexing groups (aceto acetoxy, di-ethylphosphonate or phosphonic acid moieties). The copolymer behavior in dense CO2 was determined by phase diagram measurements (cloud point method) and their self-assembly in dense CO2 was investigated by small angle neutron scattering. The fluorinated copolymers were found advantageous in terms of solubility. Nevertheless, the silicone-based copolymers showed solubilities which are compatible with the process, therefore they are a good alternative to avoid fluorinated compounds which are unwanted in the conditioning of nuclear wastes. The study of cobalt complexation by the copolymers (UV-vis spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy) established relations between the type of complexing group and the affinity with the cobalt. The solubility of copolymer-cobalt complexes in dense CO2 is similar to those of copolymers. Moreover, the self-assembly study of the complex revealed a low aggregation. Finally, the synthesized copolymers were used in particle or ionic decontamination processes. In the case of ionic decontamination process, a rate of 70% of decontamination was reached with the use of gradient copolymer poly(1,1,2,2-tetrahydroperfluoro

  15. Voltametric study of formic and dihydroxy malonic acids on platinum for the definition of a process for the electrolytic destruction of carboxylic acids in radioactive aqueous effluents; Etude voltamperometrique des acides formiques et dihydroxymalonique sur platine en vue de la definition d`un procede de destruction electrolytique d`acides carboxyliques d`effluents aqueux radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Naour, C.

    1994-05-01

    To limit the amount of nuclear glasses generated by the treatment of the degraded solvent from the PUREX process for reprocessing of nuclear fuels, by solutions of sodium carbonate and caustic soda, it is planned to exploit the complexing power of certain carboxylic acids to return the metallic cations to the aqueous phase. The concept of this new treatment of the solvent by `substitution` reagents demands a process for the decomposition of these reagents, especially to CO{sub 2}. The investigation of the electrochemical behaviour, on platinum, of a substance selected as a model for understanding the interfacial mechanisms (HCOOH), and of dihydroxy malonic acid, revealed two distinct electro-poisoning processes: one is due to the adsorption of CO on the surface sites of platinum, and the second to the formation of a passivating layer of P{dagger}O. The application of 20 kHz ultrasonic flux in the neighbourhood of the platinum / aqueous formic acid solution interface also appears to cause a change in the superficial structure of the electrode used, in a direction that favours the decomposition of this compound. To overcome problems of poisoning of the platinum surface, aqueous solutions of formic, dihydroxy malonic and oxalic acids were electrolysed, in a cell without diaphragm, by applying voltage and current ranges, at levels adapted to each of the species. It is necessary to bring the working electrode to a higher potential than the oxidation potential for formic acid, and to a lower potential for dihydroxy malonic and oxalic acids. The frequent modifications of the electrode potentials helped to achieve quantitative destruction of these species, to CO{sub 2} (and to water) with an electrochemical efficiency approaching 100 %. This wet oxidation process also offers the advantage of not raising the energy potential of the effluents to be treated, because it takes place in mild conditions (ambient temperature and pressure). (author). 131 refs., 90 figs., 48 tabs.

  16. Modification of the Decontamination Facility at the Kruemmel NPP - 13451

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    walls are welded gap-free and all rough edges are rounded off. All wetted parts are steel grade 1.4301 or higher. In an extension to the high pressure water decontamination box, 2 ultrasonic ponds and one washing station for small components as provide by new construction. A long pond with 3.25 m length for the decontamination of large components (e.g. turbine blades, pump rotors, driving rods) was installed. For the handling heavy components, a 2 t crane was installed. New construction of a mechanical effluent treatment facility including oil separator was connected to the existing effluent storage tank provided by the customer. One exhaust air filtration system is provided for each decontamination box, with the following requirements. The exhaust air is sent back to the room (recirculated air system). Dry blasting box including raw separator with dust collection in 200 l drum, filter for suspended particles; High pressure water decontamination box and wet area with water separator, pre-separator, filter for suspended particles. Installation of a steel platform at building height +12.85 above the decontamination boxes + 8.50 m for the erection of the high pressure water facilities, the recirculating air filter system, the air compressor and the respiratory air supply unit. The aforementioned components are placed on the steel platform and have been encased in a sound-lowering and accessible manner. New construction of the entire E and C technology for the TU system including modification of the supply lines from the switch gear. All devices are to be operated automatically. Dry blasting box, high pressure water decontamination box and wet area are designed to guarantee a unitary 'exterior view' of the decontamination facility. (authors)

  17. Low level radioactive liquid waste decontamination by electrochemical way

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the work on decontamination treatments for low level radioactive aqueous liquid wastes, the study of an electro-chemical process has been chosen by the C.E.A. at the Cadarache research centre. The first part of this report describes the main methods used for the decontamination of aqueous solutions. Then an electro-deposition process and an electro-dissolution process are compared on the basis of the decontamination results using genuine radioactive aqueous liquid waste. For ruthenium decontamination, the former process led to very high yields (99.9 percent eliminated). But the elimination of all the other radionuclides (antimony, strontium, cesium, alpha emitters) was only favoured by the latter process (90 percent eliminated). In order to decrease the total radioactivity level of the waste to be treated, we have optimized the electro-dissolution process. That is why the chemical composition of the dissolved anode has been investigated by a mixture experimental design. The radionuclides have been adsorbed on the precipitating products. The separation of the precipitates from the aqueous liquid enabled us to remove the major part of the initial activity. On the overall process some operations have been investigated to minimize waste embedding. Finally, a pilot device (laboratory scale) has been built and tested with genuine radioactive liquid waste. (author). 77 refs., 41 tabs., 55 figs., 4 appendixes

  18. Decontamination and decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project scope of work included the complete decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the Westinghouse ARD Fuel Laboratories at the Cheswick Site in the shortest possible time. This has been accomplished in the following four phases: (1) preparation of documents and necessary paperwork; packaging and shipping of all special nuclear materials in an acceptable form to a reprocessing agency; (2) decontamination of all facilities, glove boxes and equipment; loading of generated waste into bins, barrels and strong wooden boxes; (3) shipping of all bins, barrels and boxes containing waste to the designated burial site; removal of all utility services from the laboratories; and (4) final survey of remaining facilities and certification for nonrestricted use; preparation of final report. These four phases of work were conducted in accordance with applicable regulations for D and D of research facilities and applicable regulations for packaging, transportation, and burial and storage of radioactive materials. The final result is that the Advanced Fuel Laboratories now meet requirements of ANSI 13.12 and can be released for unrestricted use. The four principal documents utilized in the D and D of the Cheswick Site were: (1) Plan for Fully Decontaminating and Decommissioning, Revision 3; (2) Environmental Assessment for Decontaminating and Decommissioning the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Plutonium Fuel Laboratories, Cheswick, Pa.; (3) WARD-386, Quality Assurance Program Description for Decontaminating and Decommissioning Activities; and (4) Health Physics, Fire Control, and Site Emergency Manual. These documents are provided as Attachments 1, 2, 3 and 4

  19. Decontamination method for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metallic radioactive wastes are immersed in a liquid nitrogen vessel above a freezing crusher and they are frozen to about -196degC. Then, impact shocks are applied to crush the radioactive wastes frozen by a rotary shearing shock crusher disposed below the freezing crusher. The thus obtained crushed materials are sent to a decontamination device and decontaminated. In this case, since the objective materials are crushed, any of a blast decontamination method, an electrolytic polishing decontamination method, a redox decontamination method and a chemical agent immersion decontamination method can be applied. Thereafter, the dose of remaining radioactivity of the decontaminated crushed materials is measured. With such procedures, the decontamination and the subsequent measurement for the radiation contamination dose can easily and certainly be conducted for metallic radioactive wastes such as pipes of a small diameter and complicated structures. (I.N.)

  20. Environmental and occupational hazards associated with decontamination solutions (a)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some of the reagents employed in the decontamination of reactor coolant systems are potentially hazardous. Potential exposure to decontamination agents by operating personnel, or members of the general population, could occur during use, processing, transportation to, or disposal at a low-level waste site. Federal and state agencies have promulgated regulations relevant to the disposal of decontamination solution waste to prevent acute or chronic exposures. In particular, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Department of Transportation (DOT), Department of Labor - Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), State of South Carolina, State of Nevada, and the State of Washington have such regulations. These regulations may impact on the choice of decontamination solutions, operations procedures, processing methods, or disposal methods. Laws and regulations relate to both chemically hazardous, or toxic materials and to radioactive hazards. Laws which regulate the exposure of workers and the general public to effluents and emissions during processing, disposal and transport have been abstracted. As a result of these regulations, utilities are required to obtain permits to perform monitoring and sampling of personnel and the on-site and off-site environment, provide proper protective clothing and ventilation, make certain the solutions are properly contained during use, storage and processing, and destroy and/or properly immobilize the residues for disposal. Waste treatment processes such as neutralization, ion exchange, evaporation, incineration, etc., must not produce, nor result in hazardous emissions, effluents, residues, or hazards to workers. The laws also stipulate record keeping and documentation

  1. Monitoring of effluent discharged from MINT's premise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Active laboratories at the MINT's main complex are equipped with active sinks for discharging of radioactively contaminated aqueous liquid. Subsequently, the effluent is collected in tasks prior to transferring to the Collection Tanks at the Low Level Effluent Treatment Plant, Waste Management Centre. The need to treat or vice-versa of the effluent depends on the analysis carried out on the effluent. Generally, treated effluent is discharged to the environment once they meet the criteria / requirements as set by the laws. This paper discusses the criteria used in the analysis of the effluent and the readings obtained in a certain period of time. In addition, it has been observed in the drop of application of radioactive materials in recent years. (Author)

  2. Health physics and industrial hygiene aspects of decontamination as a precursor to decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory is conducting a comprehensive study of the impacts, benefits and effects of decontamination as a precursor to decommissioning for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. A major section of this study defines the health physics and industrial hygiene and safety concerns during decontamination operations. Health physics concerns include providing adequate protection for workers from radiation sources which are transported by the decontamination processes, estimating and limiting radioactive effluents to the environment, and maintaining operations in accordance with the ALARA philosophy. Locating and identifying the areas of contamination and measuring the radiation exposure rates throughout the reactor primary system are fundamental to implementing these goals. The principal industrial hygiene and safety concerns stem from the fact that a nuclear power plant is being converted for a time to a chemical plant. The resulting industrial hazards include dangerous obstructions caused by insufficient storage space for decontamination equipment and chemicals, problems created because workers employed for the decontamination are not familiar with the plant layout and equipment, and the problems associated with handling toxic and highly reactive decontamination chemicals. The operation of decontamination equipment also involves risks to the decontamination worker from electrical shock, noise, airborne particulates and toxic gases. Careful planning of operations, training of the crew, and familiarization with the reactor systems significantly reduce the risks of decontamination prior to decommissioning

  3. Radiation decontamination of spices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report radiation decontamination was initiated to investigate the red pepper, which is widely consumed in all parts of Pakistan. The samples were collected from local market and prepared for gamma radiation at dose level of 0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, and 10.0 kGy. The measurement of total fungal count was carried out immediately after irradiation and the at two months storage interval. It was reported that radiation dose 10.0 kGy is suitable for complete decontamination of red pepper. (A.B.)

  4. Electrokinetic decontamination of concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomasney, H. [ISOTRON Corp., New Orleans, LA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has assigned a priority to the advancement of technology for decontaminating concrete surfaces which have become contaminated with radionuclides, heavy metals, and toxic organics. This agency is responsible for decontamination and decommissioning of thousands of buildings. Electrokinetic extraction is one of the several innovative technologies which emerged in response to this initiative. This technique utilizes an electropotential gradient and the subsequent electrical transport mechanism to cause the controlled movement of ionics species, whereby the contaminants exit the recesses deep within the concrete. This report discusses the technology and use at the Oak Ridge k-25 plant.

  5. A chemical decontamination process for decontaminating and decommissioning nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five chemical decontamination processes have been developed for nuclear reactor applications. One of these processes is the cerium decontamination process (CDP). This method uses a cerium acid reagent to rapidly decontaminate surfaces, obtaining decontamination factors in excess of 300 in 6 h on pressurized water reactor specimens. Sound volume reduction and waste management techniques have been demonstrated, and solidified waste volume fractions as low as 9% experimentally obtained. The CDP method represents the hybrid decontamination technique often sought for component replacement and decommissioning operations: high effectiveness, rapid kinetics, simple waste treatment, and a low solidified waste volume

  6. Decontamination formulations for disinfection and sterilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Mark D.; Engler, Daniel E.

    2007-09-18

    Aqueous decontamination formulations that neutralize biological pathogens for disinfection and sterilization applications. Examples of suitable applications include disinfection of food processing equipment, disinfection of areas containing livestock, mold remediation, sterilization of medical instruments and direct disinfection of food surfaces, such as beef carcasses. The formulations include at least one reactive compound, bleaching activator, inorganic base, and water. The formulations can be packaged as a two-part kit system, and can have a pH value in the range of 7-8.

  7. Floating decontamination apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apparatus is disclosed for decontaminating a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. It comprises a buoyant annular frame which descends into the vessel as the water level within it is lowered. Spray nozzles move around the frame on trolleys in a reciprocating fashion and spray water under high pressure on the inner surface of the vessel wall, resulting in automatic washdown of the reactor vessel

  8. A survey of decontamination processes applicable to DOE nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, L.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Conner, C.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1997-05-01

    The objective of this survey was to select an appropriate technology for in situ decontamination of equipment interiors as part of the decommissioning of U.S. Department of Energy nuclear facilities. This selection depends on knowledge of existing chemical decontamination methods. This report provides an up-to-date review of chemical decontamination methods. According to available information, aqueous systems are probably the most universally used method for decontaminating and cleaning metal surfaces. We have subdivided the technologies, on the basis of the types of chemical solvents, into acid, alkaline permanganate, highly oxidizing, peroxide, and miscellaneous systems. Two miscellaneous chemical decontamination methods (electrochemical processes and foam and gel systems) are also described. A concise technical description of various processes is given, and the report also outlines technical considerations in the choice of technologies, including decontamination effectiveness, waste handing, fields of application, and the advantages and limitations in application. On the basis of this survey, six processes were identified for further evaluation. 144 refs., 2 tabs.

  9. A survey of decontamination processes applicable to DOE nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this survey was to select an appropriate technology for in situ decontamination of equipment interiors as part of the decommissioning of U.S. Department of Energy nuclear facilities. This selection depends on knowledge of existing chemical decontamination methods. This report provides an up-to-date review of chemical decontamination methods. According to available information, aqueous systems are probably the most universally used method for decontaminating and cleaning metal surfaces. We have subdivided the technologies, on the basis of the types of chemical solvents, into acid, alkaline permanganate, highly oxidizing, peroxide, and miscellaneous systems. Two miscellaneous chemical decontamination methods (electrochemical processes and foam and gel systems) are also described. A concise technical description of various processes is given, and the report also outlines technical considerations in the choice of technologies, including decontamination effectiveness, waste handing, fields of application, and the advantages and limitations in application. On the basis of this survey, six processes were identified for further evaluation. 144 refs., 2 tabs

  10. Foam decontamination containing silica nanoparticles of various structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process is needed to decrease the amounts of chemical reagents and secondary waste produced during the decontamination process. Decontamination foam is a non-stable, two-phase fluid with aqueous and gas phases representing not more than 10% and 90% of the total volume, respectively. The application of foam allows for remote decontamination processing using only an injection nozzle and the equipment to generate the decontamination foam, which reduces operator exposure to high radioactivity. Solid colloidal particles increase the foam stability in the foam formulation. These particles can be specifically hydrophobized for optimal adsorption at the liquid/gas interface, which creates armor for the bubbles and prevents coalescence by reducing the internal gas transfer. Conversely, hydrophilic particles remain confined in the liquid phase, and to enhance the foam stability. In addition, the silica nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized with various structures and used for the stabilizer of decontamination foam. In this study, we aimed to synthesize silica nanoparticles (NPs) with various structures such as porous, core-shell, and non-porous using methods proposed in previous literatures. We also investigated the effect of silica NPs with various structures for the foam stability and oxide dissolution rate with chemical reagents. This study showed the effect of the silica NPs with various structures on the decontamination foam. The result indicates that porous NPs have a significant effect on the foam stability and oxide dissolution rate because of lower density and smaller size owing to high specific surface area, large pore volume, and porosity

  11. Foam decontamination containing silica nanoparticles of various structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Inho; Kim, Chorong; Jung, Chonghun; Yang, Hanbeom; Park, Sang Yoon; Moon, Jeikwon; Choi, Wangkyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Suk Bon [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    A process is needed to decrease the amounts of chemical reagents and secondary waste produced during the decontamination process. Decontamination foam is a non-stable, two-phase fluid with aqueous and gas phases representing not more than 10% and 90% of the total volume, respectively. The application of foam allows for remote decontamination processing using only an injection nozzle and the equipment to generate the decontamination foam, which reduces operator exposure to high radioactivity. Solid colloidal particles increase the foam stability in the foam formulation. These particles can be specifically hydrophobized for optimal adsorption at the liquid/gas interface, which creates armor for the bubbles and prevents coalescence by reducing the internal gas transfer. Conversely, hydrophilic particles remain confined in the liquid phase, and to enhance the foam stability. In addition, the silica nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized with various structures and used for the stabilizer of decontamination foam. In this study, we aimed to synthesize silica nanoparticles (NPs) with various structures such as porous, core-shell, and non-porous using methods proposed in previous literatures. We also investigated the effect of silica NPs with various structures for the foam stability and oxide dissolution rate with chemical reagents. This study showed the effect of the silica NPs with various structures on the decontamination foam. The result indicates that porous NPs have a significant effect on the foam stability and oxide dissolution rate because of lower density and smaller size owing to high specific surface area, large pore volume, and porosity.

  12. Decontamination of radioactive contaminated protective wear using dry cleaning solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquid waste generated by conventional decontamination of radioactive contaminated cotton protective wear using detergent affects the chemical treatment of the plant. To reduce the generation of aqueous detergent waste, dry cleaning of cotton protective wear, highly soiled with oil and grease towards decontamination was tried with organic solvents. Mineral turpentine oil (MTO) among various other organic solvents was identified as a suitable organic solvent. As MTO leaves characteristic odour on the cloth, various commercial fragrances for the removal of the odour were tried. Application of the optimised dry cleaning solvent and commercial fragrance was adopted in plant scale operation. (author)

  13. Handling and treatment of radioactive aqueous wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report aims to provide essential guidance to developing Member States without a nuclear power programme regarding selection, design and operation of cost effective treatment processes for radioactive aqueous liquids arising as effluents from small research institutions, hospitals and industries. The restricted quantities and low activity associated with the relevant wastes will generally permit contact-handling and avoid the need for shielding requirements. The selection of liquid waste treatment involves: Characterization of arising with the possibility of segregation; Discharge requirements for decontaminated liquors, both radioactive and non-radioactive; Available technologies and costs; Conditioning of the concentrates resulting from the treatment; Storage and disposal of the conditioned concentrates. The report will serve as a technical manual providing reference material and direct step-by-step know-how to staff in radioisotope user establishments and research centres in the developing Member States without nuclear power generation. Therefore, emphasis is limited to the simpler treatment facilities, which will be included with only the robust, well-established waste management processes carefully chosen as appropriate to developing countries. 20 refs, 12 figs, 7 tabs

  14. Sunflowers to decontaminate water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunflowers offer a new method of decontamination. 55 kilograms (dry weight) of sunflowers are able to decontaminate all the cesium 137 and the strontium 90 polluting a pond situated at one kilometer from Tchernobyl. These flowers are able to decrease 95% in 24 hours the uranium concentration in the american site of Ashtabula in Ohio getting this water from 350 parts by milliards to less than 5 parts by milliards. The radioactivity should stocked in the roots at concentrations 5 000 to 10 000 times higher than water concentration. The cost is cheaper than micro filtration and precipitation (2-6 dollars for 4 000 liters of water against 80 dollars for others technologies). when sunflowers are radioactive they can be reduced in dust and vitrified and stocked as solid radioactive wastes. (N.C.)

  15. Soil decontamination with Extraksol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Extraksol process is a mobile decontamination technology which treats unconsolidated materials by solvent extraction. Treatment with Extraksol involves material washing, drying and solvent regeneration. Contaminant removal is achieved through desorption/dissolution mechanisms. The treated material is dry and acceptable to be reinstalled in its original location. The process provides a fast, efficient and versatile alternative for decontamination of soil and sludge. The organic contaminants extracted from the matrix are transferred to the extraction fluids. These are thereafter concentrated in the residues of distillation after solvent regeneration. Removal and concentration of the contaminants ensures an important waste volume reduction. This paper presents the process is operational principles and the steps involved in Extraksol's development with results of the pilot tests and full-scale demonstrations

  16. Ultrasonic decontamination robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is described of removing radioactive contamination from a primary fluid header of a steam generator between periods of active operation thereof, the header having a sealable access manway therein to permit access to interior surfaces of the header. The method consists of: inserting through the header manway into the interior thereof a robotic arm having a base portion sized to fit sealably in the manway, an ultrasonic decontamination head disposed to be movable at an end of the robotic arm, a solvent supply tube connected to the decontamination head, and a fluid removal conduit disposed at a low point in the interior of the header; sealing the base portion in the header manway

  17. Decontamination and protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloney, J.C.; Dhein, E.H.; Morgenthau, M.

    1954-01-01

    Test panels, four ft square, of 14 building materials were mounted on the weather surfaces of two remotely controlled liberty ships and on a stationary barge. One of the ships was protected by a washdown system. All surfaces were contaminated significantly with tenacious fallout. Vertical surfaces facing upwind became equally or more highly contaminated than horizontal or pitched surfaces, probably due to wind currents impacting the tenacious contaminant onto surfaces normal to it. A sequence of hosing and vigorous scrubbing operations resulted in contamination reductions of 40 to 70%, but with reductions on most surfaces being less than 50%. The most effective decontamination method was scrubbing. Under the conditions of this test, painting and joint sealing had little effect while the washdown countermeasure reduced the initial contamination over 90%. It is concluded that contamination from fallout encountered in these tests presents a serious decontamination problem on buildings and paved areas and further development of effective countermeasures is necessary.

  18. Decontamination for free release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many countries are seeking to treat radioactive waste in ways which meet the local regulatory requirements, but yet are cost effective when all contributing factors are assessed. In some countries there are increasing amounts of waste, arising from nuclear plant decommissioning, which are categorized as low level waste: however with suitable treatment a large part of such wastes might become beyond regulatory control and be able to be released as non-radioactive. The benefits and disadvantages of additional treatment before disposal need to be considered. Several processes falling within the overall description of decontamination for free release have been developed and applied, and these are outlined. In one instance the process seeks to take advantage of techniques and equipment used for decontaminating water reactor circuits intermittently through reactor life. (author). 9 refs, 1 fig., 3 tabs

  19. Decontaminating radioactive lead solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lead has been and continues to be used extensively at nuclear facilities and DOE/DOD sites to shield workers from ionizing radiation. Because it is often used in highly contaminated areas, the lead itself often becomes radioactively contaminated, thus creating a Mixed Waste. If the lead is contaminated above specified limits, it must be decontaminated prior to release for unrestricted use. In most cases, where the lead cannot be decontaminated using conventional methods, the lead is stored until a viable decontamination method and/or disposal alternative is determined. At many facilities, large quantities of stored lead are creating a significant problem. The U.S. EPA treatment standard for radioactive lead is, 'Macroencapsulafion with surface coating materials such as polymeric organics (e.g. resins and plastics) or with a jacket of inert inorganic materials to substantially reduce surface exposure to potential leaching media'. Since the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) requires size reduction to less than 9.5 mm particles for solid waste, macroencapsulation is not a practical or economically feasible option for processing lead. The U.S. EPA originally proposed 'Surface Deactivation' as the treatment standard. Because there exists no demonstrated available technology, this method was dropped from the final treatment standard. (author)

  20. Local strategies for decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efficiencies of a great number of techniques for decontamination or dose reduction in contaminated areas have been investigated by several teams of E.C. and CIS scientists (ECP4 project). Modelling, laboratory and field experiments, t and return from experience allowed to assess radiological efficiencies (e.g. 'decontamination factor') and requirements for the operation of numerous practical solutions. Then, those data were supplemented with data on cost and waste generation in order to elaborate all the information for the optimization of decontamination strategies. Results will be presented for about 70 techniques. However, a technique cannot be compared to another from a generic point of view. Rather it is designed for a specific target and the best technology depends on the objectives. It has been decided to implement decision analyses on case studies, and the local conditions and objectives have been investigated. Individual doses ranged from 1 to 5 mSv, with contrasted contributions of internal and external doses. The desire to restore a normal activity in a partially depopulated settlement, and concerns about the recent increase in internal doses were typical incentives for action. The decision aiding analysis illustrated that actions can be usually recommended. Results are outlined here

  1. Results of 'decontamination model project' and application to decontamination operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes 'Decontamination Model Project,' which aims to collect the data related to decontamination and to arrange them for providing the results, for the purpose of judgment on how to implement radioactive decontamination in wide areas as the first experience in Japan. This was the project that Japan Atomic Energy Agency was entrusted by the government, and it was completed in June 2012. This project arranged the following items as information. (1) Various decontamination technologies and methods including applicability / effects, cost, necessary manpower, required time, and technological detail such as the treatment method of waste generated from decontamination and storage method of the waste, (2) Radiation control such as exposure control for workers and securement of general work safety, and (3) Communication with related local governments and local residents. This project is a pilot-trial work in order to measure to what extent decontamination is possible for what substances by what method, but numerical target such as the goal depletion ratio of air dose rate is not specified. However, this project comparatively arranged the results on how much extents the individual item affected surface decontamination. As the conclusion, this paper picks out the points that should be considered in the future full-scale decontamination work, from the results obtained by the experience of this project. (1) preliminary monitoring, (2) safety and operation / maintenance of temporary storage sites, and (3) radiation control involved in decontamination work. (O.A.)

  2. The Decontamination of Low-Level Radioactive Waste Water at Risö Research Establishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of the low rate of water renewal in the recipient, Roskilde Fiord, an efficient decontamination plant incorporating an evaporator has been constructed at the Risö research establishment. It is intended that the activity of the fiord-water at a distance of ten metres from the discharge point shall be less than one-tenth of the drinking-water tolerance. This will correspond to ca. 1 millicurie per month contained in ca. 5000 m3 of effluent. A description of the control and collection of laboratory effluents, of the decontamination plant and of the residue storage building will be given. The results of current experiments dealing with the decontamination factor and the economic aspects of the problem will also be given. (author)

  3. Decontamination of radioisotope production facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The strippable coating method use phosphoric glycerol and irradiated latex as supporting agents have been investigated. The investigation used some decontaminating agents: EDTA, citric acid, oxalic acid and potassium permanganate were combined with phosphoric glycerol supporting agent, then EDTA Na2, sodium citric, sodium oxalic and potassium permanganate were combined with irradiated latex supporting agent. The study was needed to obtain the representative operating data, will be implemented to decontamination the Hot Cell for radioisotope production. The experiment used 50x50x1 mm stainless steel samples and contaminated by Cs-137 about 1.1x10-3 μCi/cm2. This samples according to inner cover of Hot Cell material, and Hot Cell activities. The decontamination factor results of the investigation were: phosphoric glycerol as supporting agent, about 20 (EDTA as decontaminating agent) to 47 (oxalic acid as decontaminating agent), and irradiated latex as supporting agent, about 11.5 (without decontamination agent) to 27 (KMnO4 as decontaminating agent). All composition of the investigation have been obtained the good results, and can be implemented for decontamination of Hot Cell for radioisotope production. The irradiated latex could be recommended as supporting agent without decontaminating agent, because it is very easy to operate and very cheap cost. (author)

  4. Manual on decontamination of surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The manual is intended for those who are responsible for the organization and implementation of decontamination programmes for facilities where radioactive materials are handled mainly on a laboratory scale. It contains information and guidelines on practical methods for decontaminating working spaces, equipment, laboratory benches and protective clothing. Useful information is also provided on the removal of loose skin contamination from personnel by mild, non-medical processes. Methods of removing skin contamination needing medical supervision, or of internal decontamination, which is entirely a medical process, are not covered in this manual. Large-scale decontamination of big nuclear facilities is also considered as outside its scope

  5. Radioactivity decontamination device and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention provides a method of decontaminating floors and walls of large-scaled equipments and buildings (large-sized members to be decontaminated) in a radioactive material handling facility. Namely, supersonic vibrations are applied to a low pressure running water to form water vibrating at fine frequency of supersonic waves. It is jetted to the large-scaled members to be decontaminated to remove radiation-contaminated materials from the surface of the large-scaled members to be decontaminated by friction of the vibrations. Specifically, when the decontaminating water is jetted out from a nozzle at a hydraulic pressure of from 0.02 to 0.1kg/cm2G, supersonic waves at a variable oscillation frequency of from 100 to 800kHz and an output of from 5 to 15W/cm2 per a unit area of vibrator are applied to the water stream. Fine decontamination for large-scaled members can be conducted by the decontamination method of the present invention. Since decontamination of radioactivity does not occur, and unevenness and remaining of contamination are eliminated, the decontamination operation can be made efficient. (I.S.)

  6. Study on LOMI decontamination technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of decontamination technique of Low-Oxidation-State Metal-Ion (LOMI) reagents developed from 1986 to 1991 in the laboratory are introduced. The experiments included preparation of LOMI reagents, de-filming efficiency, corrosion behavior of typical alloys, decontamination factors of reagents for contaminated materials and components have proved that the NP/LOMI decontamination method and treatment technique of waste water are feasible and have some advantages. The preparation of LOMI reagent with low concentration of formic acid by reduced pressure distilling technique and the utilization ratio of vanadium reached to 95% by second electrolysis are the main contributions of the study to the decontamination technique

  7. Unit for air decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To fulfill the applicable requirements of safety to the ventilation systems in nuclear facilities, it is necessary to make a cleaning of the air that hurtles to the atmosphere. For that which was designed and it manufactured an unit for decontamination of the air for the Pilot plant of production of Nuclear Fuel that this built one with national parts, uses Hepa national filters and the design can adapt for different dimensions of filters, also can be added a lodging for a prefilter or to adopt two Hepa filters. (Author)

  8. Decontamination of latex gloves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Initially the latex gloves used in controlled zones were processed after use as radioactive waste. In view of the continually increasing number used, however, the persons in charge of the SPRAR have considered the possibility of decontaminating the gloves and using them again after control. The recovery installations which have been developed were initially designed rather crudely and operated irregularly; they have been progressively improved as a result of the experience acquired; today they are more really an industrial concern, equipped with automatic machinery. In 1967 it has been possible with this set-up to recover 247000 pairs of gloves, representing nearly 70 per cent of the number treated. (author)

  9. Decontaminating pesticide protective clothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, J

    1993-01-01

    The review of recent work on the mechanisms of soil removal from textiles assists in understanding decontamination of pesticide protective clothing. The current work provides explanatory conclusions about residue retention as a basis of making recommendations for the most effective decontamination procedures. A caution about generalizations: Some pesticides produce very idiosyncratic responses to decontamination. An example is the paraquat/salt response. Other pesticides exhibit noticeable and unique responses to a highly alkaline medium (carbaryl), or to bleach (chlorpyrifos), or are quickly volatilized (methyl parathion). Responses such as these do not apply to other pesticides undergoing decontamination. Given this caution, there are soil, substrate, and solvent responses that do maximize residue removal. Residue removal is less complete as the concentration of pesticide increases. The concentration of pesticide in fabric builds with successive exposures, and the more concentrated the pesticide, the more difficult the removal. Use a prewash product and/or presoak. The surfactant and/or solvent in a prewash product is a booster in residue removal. Residues transfer from contaminated clothing to other clothing during the washing cycle. Use a full washer of water for a limited number of garments to increase residue removal. The hotter the washing temperature, the better. Generally, this means a water temperature of at least 49 degrees C, and preferably 60 degrees C. Select the detergent shown to be more effective for the formulation: heavy-duty liquid detergents for emulsifiable concentrate formulations and powdered phosphate detergents for wettable powder formulations. If the fabric has a soil-repellent finish, use 1.25 times the amount recommended on the detergent label. For water hardness above 300 ppm, an additional amount of powdered phosphate detergent is needed to obtain the same level of residue removal as obtained with the heavy-duty liquid detergent when

  10. Decontamination of radioactive corrosion products by KAERI decontamination process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Chong-Hun; Park, Sang-Yoon; Ahn, Byung-Gil; Lee, Byung-Jik; Oh, Won-Zin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-10-31

    A study was performed to develop the chemical decontamination process, which is effective in removing the radioactive corrosion products with large amounts of Ni and Cr. The dissolution characteristics of decontamination agents and the material integrity of disk arm holder with Type 304 stainless steel were examined in high temperature conditions and the results have been compared with low temperature decontamination process. Dissolution tests revealed that oxides on disk arm holder had a spinel-type structure in the form of Fe{sub 1.7}Ni{sub 0.5}Cr{sub 0.8}O{sub 4}. In the dissolution steps, component metals were dissolved fast from the oxide in the early stage, while were dissolved very slowly in the later stage. This might be caused by reduction in metal concentration in the near surface of the oxide and by precipitation of reaction by product, MnO{sub 2}, which prevents reactants in solution from diffusion to the oxide surface. The average DF(Decontamination Factor) after a chemical decontamination, consisting of 3 oxidation-reduction steps, was 75 and an improved DF, of 150, was observed when a ultrasonic treatment was applied after a chemical decontamination, since the corrosion oxide become soft by the dissolution of grain boundary and crack of the oxide during chemical decontamination process. High temperature decontamination process showed remarkable improvement in decontamination effectiveness compared with traditional low temperature process. An examination of corrosion rates monitored during the decontamination, using corrosion coupons, showed that all process reagents caused minimal corrosion(Type 304 stainless steel: 1.7 x 10{sup -3} mil, Inconel 600: 6.6 x 10{sup -3} mil, Stellite-6: 1.2 x 10{sup -2} mil). (author). 19 refs., 4 tabs., 9 figs.

  11. Chemical Decontamination of Metallic Waste from Uranium Conversion Plant Dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) started a decommissioning program of the uranium conversion plant. Pre-work was carried as follows; installation of the access control facility, installation of a changing room and shower room, designation of an emergency exit way and indicating signs, installation of a radiation management facility, preparation of a storage area for tools and equipments, inspection and load test of crane, distribution and packaging of existing waste, and pre-decontamination of the equipment surface and the interior. First, decommissioning work was performed in kiln room, which will be used for temporary radioactive waste storage room. Kiln room housed hydro fluorination rotary kiln for production of uranium tetra-fluoride. The kiln is about 0.8 m in diameter and 5.5 m long. The total dismantled waste was 6,690 kg, 73 % of which was metallic waste and 27 % the others such as cable, asbestos, concrete, secondary waste, etc. And effluent treatment room and filtration room were dismantled for installation of decontamination equipment and lagoon sludge treatment equipment. There were tanks and square mixer in these rooms. The total dismantled waste was 17,250 kg, 67% of which was metallic waste and 33% the others. These dismantled metallic wastes consist of stainless and carbon steel. In this paper, the stainless steel plate and pipe were decontaminated by the chemical decontamination with ultrasonic

  12. Recontamination following dilute chemical decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decontamination is beneficial in reducing radiation fields before inspection, maintenance, or repair work has to be performed on reactor systems. If the fields remain low at subsequent shutdowns, further benefit is attributable to the decontamination. Conversely, if fields rapidly become as high as before the decontamination, no residual benefit derives. In the case where the field rapidly becomes higher than before the decontamination, a detriment from the decontamination is experienced at subsequent shutdowns. In this paper the recontamination data following six separate dilute chemical decontaminations are reported for surveillance periods of up to two years. Surfaces operating at low temperature hardly recontaminated at all over the two-year period; surfaces exposed to high temperatures recontaminated to about 95% of their predecontamination level over a two-year period. A rapid recontamination rate for about three months following the decontamination was followed by recontamination at a rate which is significantly below the published rates for most BWRs in the USA, and for these two plants in particular. In all six cases studied, residual benefit from the decontamination was experienced at subsequent shutdowns. (author)

  13. RUTHENIUM DECONTAMINATION METHOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresky, A.T.

    1960-07-19

    A liquid-liquid extraction method of separating uranium from fission products is given. A small amount of a low molecular weight ketone is added to an acidic aqueous solution containing neutron-irradiated uranium and its associated fission products. The resulting solution is digested and then contacted with an organic liquid that extracts uranium values. The purpose of the step of digesting the aqueous solution in the presence of the ketone is to suppress the extractability of ruthenium.

  14. Laser-based characterization and decontamination of contaminated facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study examines the application of laser ablation to the characterization and decontamination of painted and unpainted concrete and metal surfaces that are typical of many facilities within the US Department of Energy complex. The utility of this promising technology is reviewed and the essential requirements for efficient ablation extracted. Recent data obtained on the ablation of painted steel surfaces and concrete are presented. The affects of beam irradiance, ablation speed and efficiency, and characteristics of the aerosol effluent are discussed. Characterization of the ablated components of the surface offers the ability of concurrent determination of the level of contamination. This concept can be applied online where the ablation endpoint can be determined. A conceptual system for the characterization and decontamination of surfaces is proposed

  15. Solution of decontamination of tissues contaminated by silver 110m and proceeding of decontamination of a such tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here is described a proceeding to decontaminate clothes contaminated by silver Ag110m. The aim is reached with an aqueous solution of ammonia whom concentration is between 2.63 and 52.5 g/l and in which are solubilized silver nitrate AgNO3, at a concentration between 12 and 18 mg/l and a tensio-active agent at a concentration between 12 and 24 g/l

  16. Liquids, gels, foams and supercritical fluids: four states of matter for radioactive decontamination of solids - 59158

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: To face the future challenges in the nuclear industry as dismantling and decommissioning, the Advanced Decontamination Processes Laboratory (Laboratoire des Procedes Avances de Decontamination - LPAD) from the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) is developing new radioactive decontamination of solids processes to protect workers and to reduce strongly the quantity of secondary wastes produced. We have focused in the last past years on the use of four states of matter to develop new patented nuclear decontamination processes: micellar aqueous solutions, gels, foams and supercritical fluids. The conference gives an overview of these four ways to decontaminate a solid surface. The major applications and results obtained on real decontamination operations will be presented for each process. First, micellar solutions based on copolymers blocks surfactants are presented for radioactive degreasing. The advantage to formulate self-drying and cracking gels films sprayed on metallic surfaces is then detailed. For decontamination foams, an approach using new additives polymers or particles- is defended to obtain high life time foams that are able to treat huge and complex shape materials such as fission products tanks or steam generator. At the end, original works to treat textiles or gloves boxes using surfactants in CO2 supercritical fluid are given. Finally, the major challenges to develop more secure processes and to reach a better decontamination efficiency are given. (authors)

  17. Process and device to decontaminate a nuclear reactor steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electropolishing technique is used to decontaminate the microtubes of the tube-plate of a steam generator. The present invention proposes and describes a tool; this tool is adapted to a spider type support or another one, and, with the aid of four controled heads with mobile hollow electrode and associated pipes, allow to insert and position an electrode per head inside each of the four microtubes then to inject and extract the electrolyte, the rinsing solution and the contaminated effluents. The tool can be adapted on any handling equipment to treat the surface of any tube

  18. Cladding hull decontamination and densification process. Part 1. The prototype cladding hull decontamination system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prototype system for decontaminating Zircaloy-4 cladding hulls has been assembled and tested at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The decontamination process consists of treatment with a gaseous mixture of hydrogen fluoride (HF) and argon (Ar) followed by a dilute aqueous etch of ammonium oxalate, ammonium citrate, ammonium fluoride, and hydrogen peroxide. The continuous cleaning process described in this report successfully descaled small portions of most charges, but was unable to handle the original design capacity of 4 kg/hr because of problems in the following areas: control of HF reactor temperatures, regulation of HF and argon mixtures and flows, isolation of the HF reactor atmosphere from the aqueous washer/rinser atmosphere, regulation of undesirable side reactions, and control over hull transport through the system. Due to the limited time available to solve these problems, the system did not attain fully operational status. The work was performed with unirradiated hulls that simulated irradiated hulls. The system was not built to be remotely operable. The process chemistry and system equipment are described in this report with particular emphasis on critical operating areas. Recommendations for improved system operation are included

  19. Ultrasonic decontamination robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ultrasonic decontamination robot removes radioactive contamination from the internal surface of the inlet and outlet headers, divider plate, tube sheet, and lower portions of tubes of a nuclear power plant steam generator. A programmable microprocessor controller guides the movement of a robotic arm mounted in the header manway. An ultrasonic transducer having a solvent delivery subsystem through which ultrasonic action is achieved is moved by the arm over the surfaces. A solvent recovery suction tube is positioned within the header to remove solvent therefrom while avoiding interference with the main robotic arm. The solvent composition, temperature, pressure, viscosity, and purity are controlled to optimize the ultrasonic scrubbing action. The ultrasonic transducer is controlled at a power density, frequency, and on-off mode cycle such as to optimize scrubbing action within the range of transducer-to-surface distance and solvent layer thickness selected for the particular conditions encountered. Both solvent and transducer control actions are optimized by the programmable microprocessor. (author)

  20. Electrokinetic decontamination of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concrete structures which have been contaminated with uranium and other radioisotopes may be decontaminated using in-situ electrokinetic remediation. By placing an electrode cell on the concrete surface and using the concrete's rebar, a ground rod, or another surface cell as the counter electrode, the radioisotopes may be migrated from the concrete into this cell. The process is highly dependent upon the chemical parameters of the species involved; namely, the concrete, the contaminants, and the solubilizers used to mobilize the contaminants. In a preliminary study conducted at the K-25 Site of the Oak Ridge National Labs, an estimated removal of >40 percent of uranium has been observed for a short duration run. This removal occurred using traditional uranium solubilizers in contact with the contaminated surface

  1. Granulated decontamination formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Mark D.

    2007-10-02

    A decontamination formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents, and toxic industrial chemicals. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack, and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The formulation includes at least one solubilizing agent, a reactive compound, a sorbent additive, and water. A highly adsorbent sorbent additive (e.g., amorphous silica, sorbitol, mannitol, etc.) is used to "dry out" one or more liquid ingredients into a dry, free-flowing powder that has an extended shelf life, and is more convenient to handle and mix in the field.

  2. Decontamination & decommissioning focus area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

  3. Decontamination of HEPA filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mound Facility, during many years of plutonium-238 experience, has recovered over 150 kg of plutonium-238. Much of this material was recovered from HEPA filters or from solid wastes such as sludge and slag. The objective of this task was to modify and improve the existing nitric acid leaching process used at Mound so that filters from the nuclear fuel cycle could be decontaminated effectively. Various leaching agents were tested to determine their capability for dissolving PuO2, UO2, U3O8, AmO2, NpO2, CmO2, and ThO2 in mixtures of the following: HNO3-HF; HNO3-HF-H2SO4; and HNO3-(NH4)2Ce(NO3)6. Adsorption isotherms were obtained for two leaching systems. In some tests simulated contaminated HEPA filter material was used, while in others actual spent glovebox filters were used. The maximum decontamination factor of 833 was achieved in the recovery of plutonium-238 from actual filters. The dissolution was accomplished by using a six-stage process with 4N HNO3-0.23M (NH4)2Ce(NO3)6 as the leaching agent. Thorium oxide was also effectively dissolved from filter media using a mixture of nitric acid and ceric ammonium nitrate. Sodium carbonate and Na2CO3-KNO3 fusion tests were performed using simulated PuO2-contaminated filter media at various temperatures. Approximately 70 wt% of the PuO2 was soluble in a mixture composed of 70 wt% Na2CO3-30 wt% KNO3 (heated for 1 h at 9500C). 23 figs., 14 tables

  4. Decontamination and coating of lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technology is being developed to decontaminate lead used in shielding applications in contaminated environments for recycle as shieldings. Technology is also being developed to coat either decontaminated lead or new lead before it is used in contaminated environments. The surface of the coating is expected to be much easier to decontaminate than the original lead surface. If contamination becomes severely embedded in the coating and cannot be removed, it can be easily cut with a knife and removed from the lead. The used coating can be disposed of as radioactive (hot hazardous) waste. The lead can then be recoated for further use as a shielding material

  5. Nova target chamber decontamination study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An engineering study was performed to determine the most effective method for decontamination of the Nova target chamber. Manual and remote decontamination methods currently being used were surveyed. In addition, a concept that may not require in-situ decontamination was investigated. Based on the presently available information concerning material and system compatibility and particle penetration, it is recommended that a system of removable aluminum shields be considered. It is also recommended that a series of tests be performed to more precisely determine the vacuum compatibility and penetrability of other materials discussed in this report

  6. Cleaning of liquid LLW from decontamination processes using semipermeable membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of the three processes, which have been used extensively for liquid radioactive waste purification, evaporation and ion exchange are costly and flocculation gives a low degree of purification. By comparison to that, reverse osmosis offers intermediate purification at reasonable cost. Present research is examining the potential of using a membrane filtration system for the removal of dissolved radionuclides, but chemical treatment showed as necessary to convert soluble radionuclides, organic traces and metals to insoluble, filterable species. Liquid wastes within a CANDU station are segregated into normal and low-activity waste streams. The normal-activity waste includes wastes from the laboratories, laundries, some service-building drains, upgrade drains, and decontamination center. The drains from the reactor building, the heavy-water area, the spent-fuel pool, and the resin storage area are also directed to this normal activity wastes from showers and building drains in areas of the service building that would not normally be contaminated. The aqueous liquid wastes from the decontamination center and the other collected wastes from the chemical drain system are currently treated by the membrane plant. Generally, the liquid waste streams are effectively volume-reduced by a combination of continuous crossflow microfiltration (MF), spiral wound reverse osmosis (SWRO) and tubular reverse osmosis membrane technologies. Backwash chemical cleaning wastes from the membrane plant are further volume-reduced by evaporation. The concentrate from the membrane plant is ultimately immobilized with bitumen. The ability of the MF/SWRO technology to remove impurities non-selectively makes it suitable for the treatment of radioactive effluents from operating nuclear plants, with proper membrane selection, feed characterization, system configuration and system chemistry control. The choice of polysulfonate material for membrane was based on the high flow rates achievable with this

  7. Laryngoscope decontamination techniques: A survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Rajiv; Gupta, Akhilesh; Gupta, Anshu; Kumar, Mritunjay

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: India is a vast country with variable, nonuniform healthcare practices. A laryngoscope is an important tool during general anesthesia and resuscitation. The study aimed to determine the current practices of laryngoscope decontamination in India. Material and Methods: An online survey was conducted amongst 100 anesthesiologists to determine the common methods of laryngoscope decontamination adopted in their settings. The survey was done over 6 months after validating the questionnaire. Results: A total of 73 responses were received out of 100. The result of the survey revealed that there is no uniform technique of laryngoscope decontamination. There is marked variability in techniques followed not only among different institutions, but also within the same institution. Conclusion: There are no fixed protocols adopted for laryngoscope decontamination. Thus, there is a need to develop definitive guidelines on this subject, which can be implemented in India. PMID:27006551

  8. Laryngoscope decontamination techniques: A survey

    OpenAIRE

    Rajiv Chawla; Akhilesh Gupta; Anshu Gupta; Mritunjay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: India is a vast country with variable, nonuniform healthcare practices. A laryngoscope is an important tool during general anesthesia and resuscitation. The study aimed to determine the current practices of laryngoscope decontamination in India. Material and Methods: An online survey was conducted amongst 100 anesthesiologists to determine the common methods of laryngoscope decontamination adopted in their settings. The survey was done over 6 months after validating t...

  9. Large-bore pipe decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of 1200 buildings within the US Department of Energy-Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Complex will require the disposition of miles of pipe. The disposition of large-bore pipe, in particular, presents difficulties in the area of decontamination and characterization. The pipe is potentially contaminated internally as well as externally. This situation requires a system capable of decontaminating and characterizing both the inside and outside of the pipe. Current decontamination and characterization systems are not designed for application to this geometry, making the direct disposal of piping systems necessary in many cases. The pipe often creates voids in the disposal cell, which requires the pipe to be cut in half or filled with a grout material. These methods are labor intensive and costly to perform on large volumes of pipe. Direct disposal does not take advantage of recycling, which could provide monetary dividends. To facilitate the decontamination and characterization of large-bore piping and thereby reduce the volume of piping required for disposal, a detailed analysis will be conducted to document the pipe remediation problem set; determine potential technologies to solve this remediation problem set; design and laboratory test potential decontamination and characterization technologies; fabricate a prototype system; provide a cost-benefit analysis of the proposed system; and transfer the technology to industry. This report summarizes the activities performed during fiscal year 1997 and describes the planned activities for fiscal year 1998. Accomplishments for FY97 include the development of the applicable and relevant and appropriate regulations, the screening of decontamination and characterization technologies, and the selection and initial design of the decontamination system

  10. Large-bore pipe decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebadian, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    The decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of 1200 buildings within the US Department of Energy-Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Complex will require the disposition of miles of pipe. The disposition of large-bore pipe, in particular, presents difficulties in the area of decontamination and characterization. The pipe is potentially contaminated internally as well as externally. This situation requires a system capable of decontaminating and characterizing both the inside and outside of the pipe. Current decontamination and characterization systems are not designed for application to this geometry, making the direct disposal of piping systems necessary in many cases. The pipe often creates voids in the disposal cell, which requires the pipe to be cut in half or filled with a grout material. These methods are labor intensive and costly to perform on large volumes of pipe. Direct disposal does not take advantage of recycling, which could provide monetary dividends. To facilitate the decontamination and characterization of large-bore piping and thereby reduce the volume of piping required for disposal, a detailed analysis will be conducted to document the pipe remediation problem set; determine potential technologies to solve this remediation problem set; design and laboratory test potential decontamination and characterization technologies; fabricate a prototype system; provide a cost-benefit analysis of the proposed system; and transfer the technology to industry. This report summarizes the activities performed during fiscal year 1997 and describes the planned activities for fiscal year 1998. Accomplishments for FY97 include the development of the applicable and relevant and appropriate regulations, the screening of decontamination and characterization technologies, and the selection and initial design of the decontamination system.

  11. Presolidification treatment of decontamination wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unsatisfactory leaching performance of several solidified decontamination solutions indicated a need for presolidification treatments to reduce the water sensitivity of the active chemicals. Chemical treatments examined in this work include pH adjustment, precipitation and oxidation-reduction reactions. The reactions involved in these treatments are discussed. The most suitable presolidification treatment for each decontamination solution has been identified. Further research is needed to test the effectivenss of these treatments

  12. Chemical Gel for Surface Decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many chemical decontamination processes operate by immersing components in aggressive chemical solutions. In these applications chemical decontamination technique produce large amounts of radioactive liquid waste. Therefore it is necessary to develop processes using chemical gels instead of chemical solutions, to avoid the well-known disadvantages of chemical decontamination techniques while retaining their high efficiency. Chemical gels decontamination process consists of applying the gel by spraying it onto the surface of large area components (floors, walls, etc) to be decontaminated. The gel adheres to any vertical or complex surface due to their thixotropic properties and operates by dissolving the radioactive deposit, along with a thin layer of the gel support, so that the radioactivity trapped at the surface can be removed. Important aspects of the gels are that small quantities can be used and they show thixitropic properties : liquid during spraying, and solid when stationary, allowing for strong adherence to surfaces. This work investigates the decontamination behaviors of organic-based chemical gel for SS 304 metallic surfaces contaminated with radioactive materials

  13. Development of economical decontamination processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activity inventary of the Nuclear Power Plant Gundremmingen (BWR, 250 MWel) had been investigated. In the turbine hall, reactor annulus and auxiliary building two years after shut down a remaining activity of 3.5 E10 Bq was found. The main nuclide was Cobalt 60 which is accounting for more than 70 % of the total activity. The different decontamination methods were proved by laboratory tests on originally contaminated pipe samples. With respect to high efficiency, minimizing secondary waste and easy handling, the electrochemical decontamination proved to be the most economical decontamination method. This decontamination procedure had been tested on primary steam valves and the feedwater pumps. 10-20 manhours were needed for the decontamination of each ton of material. The specific secondary waste amount was 95 kg per ton of steel. Those figures were evaluated for the dismantling of a 250 MWel Boiling Water Reactor (except of the containment). After the decontamination of 3400 tons of metal about 260 tons of secondary waste will remain. The dismantling will need 5.9 years. The same evaluation has been performed too for a 1300 MWel Boiling Water Reactor

  14. Cleanup Verification Package for the 116-K-2 Effluent Trench

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. M. Capron

    2006-04-04

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 116-K-2 effluent trench, also referred to as the 116-K-2 mile-long trench and the 116-K-2 site. During its period of operation, the 116-K-2 site was used to dispose of cooling water effluent from the 105-KE and 105-KW Reactors by percolation into the soil. This site also received mixed liquid wastes from the 105-KW and 105-KE fuel storage basins, reactor floor drains, and miscellaneous decontamination activities.

  15. Decontamination of HEPA filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenst, J.W. Jr.; Lewis, E.L.; Luthy, D.F.

    1978-01-01

    Mound Facility, during many years of plutonium-238 experience, has recovered over 150 kg of plutonium-238. Much of this material was recovered from HEPA filters or from solid wastes such as sludge and slag. The objective of this task was to modify and improve the existing nitric acid leaching process used at Mound so that filters from the nuclear fuel cycle could be decontaminated effectively. Various leaching agents were tested to determine their capability for dissolving PuO/sub 2/, UO/sub 2/, U/sub 3/O/sub 8/, AmO/sub 2/, NpO/sub 2/, CmO/sub 2/, and ThO/sub 2/ in mixtures of the following: HNO/sub 3/-HF; HNO/sub 3/-HF-H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/; and HNO/sub 3/-(NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/Ce(NO/sub 3/)/sub 6/. Adsorption isotherms were obtained for two leaching systems. In some tests simulated contaminated HEPA filter material was used, while in others actual spent glovebox filters were used. The maximum decontamination factor of 833 was achieved in the recovery of plutonium-238 from actual filters. The dissolution was accomplished by using a six-stage process with 4N HNO/sub 3/-0.23M (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/Ce(NO/sub 3/)/sub 6/ as the leaching agent. Thorium oxide was also effectively dissolved from filter media using a mixture of nitric acid and ceric ammonium nitrate. Sodium carbonate and Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-KNO/sub 3/ fusion tests were performed using simulated PuO/sub 2/-contaminated filter media at various temperatures. Approximately 70 wt% of the PuO/sub 2/ was soluble in a mixture composed of 70 wt% Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-30 wt% KNO/sub 3/ (heated for 1 h at 950/sup 0/C). 23 figs., 14 tables.

  16. Decontamination of surfaces, contaminated with radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A classification is given of processes taking place during decontamination. The effect of surfaces of various geometry and materials on the rate of decontamination is discussed. The factors influencing the choice of the decontamination method and the main requirements laid to decontaminating agents are reviewed. The decontaminating processes of synthetic washing igredients, detergents, complex-making compounds, caustic solutions, acids, and other compounds, their advantageous and detrimental properties at decontaminating are summarized. The indices of suspectibility to contamination and decontaminability are given. Various measuring methods for decontamination of stains produced by dropping 0.1 ml of isotope solutions on plates of 4x4 cm made of several materials gave different results of the same tendency. It was the heaviest to decontaminate iron plates. According to the investigations a satisfactory combination of surface and agents can be found for each isotope. (K.A.)

  17. Decontamination technology assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to identify and technically assess foreign decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) technology developments that may represent significant improvements over D and D technology currently available or under development in the United States. Technology need areas for nuclear power reactor decommissioning operations were identified and prioritized using the results of past light water rector (LWR) decommissioning studies to quantitatively evaluate the potential for reducing cost and decommissioning worker radiation dose for each major decommissioning activity. Based on these identified needs, current foreign D and D technologies of potential interest to the U.S. were identified through personal contacts and the collection and review of an extensive body of D and D literature. These technologies were then assessed qualitatively to evaluate their uniqueness, potential for a significant reduction in D and D costs and/or worker radiation dose, development status, and other factors affecting their value and applicability to U.S. needs

  18. Problem of waste effluents in wood industry - the possibilities of biological treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Muck, Tadeja

    2015-01-01

    Wood industry does not pollute waters to a great extend, nevertheless we must be aware that the problem still exists. Waste effluents in wood industry contain very high portion of dangerous and toxic substance - formaldehyde. That is why it is inevitably vital to start with detailed analysis of waste effluents and with studies of possibilities of decontamination. Statistical analysis are showing that wood industry are not well aware of the fact how quickly the ecological balance can be destro...

  19. F/H effluent treatment facility. Technical data summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, J P; Stimson, R E

    1984-12-01

    This document provides the technical basis for the design of the facility. Some of the sections are described with options to permit simplification of the process, depending on the effluent quality criteria that the facility will have to meet. Each part of the F/HETF process is reviewed with respect to decontamination and concentration efficiency, operability, additional waste generation, energy efficiency, and compatability with the rest of the process.

  20. F/H effluent treatment facility. Technical data summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides the technical basis for the design of the facility. Some of the sections are described with options to permit simplification of the process, depending on the effluent quality criteria that the facility will have to meet. Each part of the F/HETF process is reviewed with respect to decontamination and concentration efficiency, operability, additional waste generation, energy efficiency, and compatability with the rest of the process

  1. New decontamination technologies for environmental applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technologies discussed represent a versatile collection of tools and approaches for environmental decontamination applications. The fixatives provide a means for gaining and maintaining control of large contaminated areas, for decontaminating large surface areas, and for protecting equipment and supplies used in decontamination operations. The other decontamination techniques together provide a method for removing loose surface contamination from almost all classes of materials and surfaces. These techniques should have wide application both as direct decontamination processes and for the cleaning of tools and equipment used in the decontamination operations

  2. Decontamination of radioruthenium from TRUEX Solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A procedure has been developed for the decontamination of radioruthenium from the lean organic phase composed of a solution 0.2 M n-octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylyphosphineoxide (CMPO) and 1.2 M tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) in n-dodecane (n-DD), which was used for the partitioning of minor actinides from actual high active waste solution (155 GWd/Te). For this purpose, the stripping behavior of radioruthenium from 0.2 M CMPO-1.2 M TBP in n-DD was studied at 298 K by using various aqueous reagents and adsorbents. Among the different reagents investigated, the aqueous solution of sodium hydroxide and sodium carbonate and adsorbents such as neutral alumina and anion exchange resin (OH- form) were identified as the promising candidates. Nearly 90-95% of radioruthenium was removed from the lean organic phase in seven contacts using sodium carbonate or sodium hydroxide solution. The residual radioactivity in the organic phase was removed by treatment with neutral alumina or anion exchange resin. The quality of the organic phase was ascertained by 241Am(III) retention test. (orig.)

  3. Decontamination of radioruthenium from TRUEX Solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumaresan, R.; Nayak, Prasant; Venkatesan, K.A.; Antony, M.P.; Rao, P.R. Vasudeva [Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Fuel Chemistry Div.

    2012-07-01

    A procedure has been developed for the decontamination of radioruthenium from the lean organic phase composed of a solution 0.2 M n-octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylyphosphineoxide (CMPO) and 1.2 M tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) in n-dodecane (n-DD), which was used for the partitioning of minor actinides from actual high active waste solution (155 GWd/Te). For this purpose, the stripping behavior of radioruthenium from 0.2 M CMPO-1.2 M TBP in n-DD was studied at 298 K by using various aqueous reagents and adsorbents. Among the different reagents investigated, the aqueous solution of sodium hydroxide and sodium carbonate and adsorbents such as neutral alumina and anion exchange resin (OH{sup -} form) were identified as the promising candidates. Nearly 90-95% of radioruthenium was removed from the lean organic phase in seven contacts using sodium carbonate or sodium hydroxide solution. The residual radioactivity in the organic phase was removed by treatment with neutral alumina or anion exchange resin. The quality of the organic phase was ascertained by {sup 241}Am(III) retention test. (orig.)

  4. Decontamination of chemical and biological warfare (CBW) agents using an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) [A. Schuetze et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 26, 1685 (1998)] is a nonthermal, high pressure, uniform glow plasma discharge that produces a high velocity effluent stream of highly reactive chemical species. The discharge operates on a feedstock gas (e.g., He/O2/H2O), which flows between an outer, grounded, cylindrical electrode and an inner, coaxial electrode powered at 13.56 MHz rf. While passing through the plasma, the feedgas becomes excited, dissociated or ionized by electron impact. Once the gas exits the discharge volume, ions and electrons are rapidly lost by recombination, but the fast-flowing effluent still contains neutral metastable species (e.g., O2*, He*) and radicals (e.g., O, OH). This reactive effluent has been shown to be an effective neutralizer of surrogates for anthrax spores and mustard blister agent. Unlike conventional wet decontamination methods, the plasma effluent does not cause corrosion and it does not destroy wiring, electronics, or most plastics, making it highly suitable for decontamination of sensitive equipment and interior spaces. Furthermore, the reactive species in the effluent rapidly degrade into harmless products leaving no lingering residue or harmful by-products. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  5. Irradiation technologies used for combustion gases and diluted sulfurous gases decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief description of irradiation technology used for ambient decontamination is presented here. The system is adequate fort gas and liquid effluents and solid wastes. In particular, the characteristics and applications of the irradiation done with an electron beam to gas effluent is described, mainly to clean combustion gases and other industrial gases containing sulfur and nitrogen oxides, S Ox and N Ox, respectively. This technology permits the remove of these contaminants and the acquisition of a solid byproduct, an ammonia sulfate-nitrate, apt for fertilizer applications. (author)

  6. Foam and gel methods for the decontamination of metallic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, Luis; Kaminski, Michael Donald

    2007-01-23

    Decontamination of nuclear facilities is necessary to reduce the radiation field during normal operations and decommissioning of complex equipment. In this invention, we discuss gel and foam based diphosphonic acid (HEDPA) chemical solutions that are unique in that these solutions can be applied at room temperature; provide protection to the base metal for continued applications of the equipment; and reduce the final waste form production to one step. The HEDPA gels and foams are formulated with benign chemicals, including various solvents, such as ionic liquids and reducing and complexing agents such as hydroxamic acids, and formaldehyde sulfoxylate. Gel and foam based HEDPA processes allow for decontamination of difficult to reach surfaces that are unmanageable with traditional aqueous process methods. Also, the gel and foam components are optimized to maximize the dissolution rate and assist in the chemical transformation of the gel and foam to a stable waste form.

  7. Decontaminating products for routine decontamination in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Routine decontamination work that has to be carried out in practical operation includes the cleaning of all kinds of surfaces such as floors, walls and apparatus, the decontamination of professional clothes and of the personnel. In order to ensure a trouble-free functioning of plants for the treatment of waste water and concentrate in nuclear power plants, radioactive liquid wastes appearing in the controlled area should be compatible with the treatment methods in practice. Radioactive concentrates and resides obtained from the treatment methods are mixed with matrix materials like cement or bitumen or treated by roller frame drying and thus are conditioned for intermediate or final storage. Several requirements should be made on decontaminating agents used in the controlled area. Some of these physical-chemical criteria will be described in detail. (R.P.)

  8. Toshiba's decontamination technologies for the decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the decommissioning, two types of decontamination process are necessary, 1) system decontamination before dismantling and 2) decontamination of dismantling waste. Toshiba has been developing the decontamination technologies for the both purposes from the viewpoint of minimizing the secondary waste. For the system decontamination before dismantling, chemical decontamination process, such as T-OZON, can be applicable for stainless steel or carbon steel piping. For the decontamination of dismantling waste, several types of process have been developed to apply variety of shapes and materials. For the simple shape materials, physical decontamination process, such as blast decontamination, is effective. We have developed new blast decontamination process with highly durable zirconia particle. It can be used repeatedly and secondary waste can be reduced compared with conventional blast particle. For the complex shape materials, chemical decontamination process can be applied that formic acid decontamination process for carbon steel and electrolytic reduction decontamination process with organic acid for stainless steel. These chemicals can be decomposed to carbon dioxide and water and amount of secondary waste can be small. (author)

  9. Radioactive Decontamination by Strippable Paint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The strippable paint, one of the adhesion method, is to decontaminate solid surface of materials or/and a large area. Two kinds of specimen planchet, SUS 304 stainless steel and polycarbonate plastic, contaminated with radioactive 137Cs were studied under various conditions. It included surface bottom types, the flat and convex concentric circle type, normal condition at room temperature and overheat condition (∼80 degree celsius). This method used coating paints which contains some elements to have a reaction with radioactive materials selectively. ALARA-Decon clear, Rempack-X200 clear, JD-P5-Mrs.Coat and Pro-Blue-color guard were selected to use as the coating paints. The contaminated surface was coated by the strippable paint under the optimum time, followed by peeling the paint seal. The Rempack-X200 showed the best result, the highest decontamination efficiency which are about 99-100% for all conditions of specimens. The JD-P5 and ALARA-Decon showed good results, which are 98-99% decontamination efficiency for the normal condition set of specimens and about 94-97% for the overheat set of specimens. They can decontaminate polycarbonate specimens better than stainless steel specimens. The Pro-Blue-color guard showed the lowest decontamination efficiency of which 60% for polycarbonate specimens at normal condition and 40%, 30% for stainless steel specimens at normal and overheat conditions respectively. There was no effects of surface bottom types significantly

  10. DECONTAMINATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR FACILITY REUSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossart, Steven J.; Blair, Danielle M.

    2003-02-27

    As nuclear research and production facilities across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons complex are slated for deactivation and decommissioning (D&D), there is a need to decontaminate some facilities for reuse for another mission or continued use for the same mission. Improved technologies available in the commercial sector and tested by the DOE can help solve the DOE's decontamination problems. Decontamination technologies include mechanical methods, such as shaving, scabbling, and blasting; application of chemicals; biological methods; and electrochemical techniques. Materials to be decontaminated are primarily concrete or metal. Concrete materials include walls, floors, ceilings, bio-shields, and fuel pools. Metallic materials include structural steel, valves, pipes, gloveboxes, reactors, and other equipment. Porous materials such as concrete can be contaminated throughout their structure, although contamination in concrete normally resides in the top quarter-inch below the surface. Metals are normally only contaminated on the surface. Contamination includes a variety of alpha, beta, and gamma-emitting radionuclides and can sometimes include heavy metals and organic contamination regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This paper describes several advanced mechanical, chemical, and other methods to decontaminate structures, equipment, and materials.

  11. Decontaminating lead bricks and shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lead used for shielding is often surface contaminated with radionuclides and is therefore a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) D008 mixed waste. The technology-based standard for treatment is macroencapsulation. However, decontaminating and recycling the clean lead is a more attractive solution. Los Alamos National Lab. decontaminates material and equipment contaminated with radioisotopes. Decontaminating lead poses special problems because of the RCRA hazard classification and the size of the inventory, now about 100 metric tons and likely to grow substantially because of planned decommissioning operations. This lead, in the form of bricks and other shield shapes, is surface contaminated with fission products. One of the best methods for decontaminating lead is removing the thin superficial layer of contamination with an abrasive medium under pressure. For lead, a mixture of alumina with water and air at about 280 kPa (40 psig) rapidly and effectively decontaminates the lead. The abrasive medium is sprayed onto the lead in a sealed-off area. The slurry of abrasive and particles of lead falls through a floor grating and is collected in a pump. A pump sends the slurry mixture back to the spray gun, creating a continuous process

  12. Cr(VI) reduction in aqueous solutions by siderite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Mehmet; Gür, Faruk; Tümen, Fikret

    2004-09-10

    Hexavalent chromium is a common and toxic pollutant in soils and wastewaters. Reduction of the mobile Cr(VI) to less mobile and less toxic Cr(III) is a solution for decontamination of industrial effluents. In this study, the reduction of hexavalent chromium in aqueous solutions by siderite was investigated. The influences of amount of acid, contact time, siderite dosage, initial Cr(VI) concentration, temperature and particle size of siderite have been tested in batch runs. The process was found to be acid, temperature and concentration dependent. The amount of acid is the most effective parameter affecting the Cr(VI) reduction since carbonaceous gangue minerals consume acid by side reactions. The highest Cr(VI) reduction efficiency (100%) occurred in the 50 mg/l Cr(VI) solution containing two times acid with respect to stoichiometric amount of Cr(VI) and at the conditions of siderite dosage 20 g/l, contact time 120 min and temperature 25 degrees C. Reduction efficiency increased with increase in temperature and decrease in particle size. The reduction capacity of siderite was found to be 17 mg-Cr(VI)/g. PMID:15363534

  13. Facility effluent monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleckler, B.P.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the facility effluent monitoring programs and provides an evaluation of effluent monitoring data. These evaluations are useful in assessing the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control systems, as well as management practices.

  14. EDF guide book for decontamination at power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper addresses EDF quality organization in the decontamination field: policy includes: decontamination activities, how to reach quality, who is doing what, qualification of decontamination personnel, and acceptance and qualification of a decontamination process. Implementation includes: why planning a decontamination? Responsibility of the initiator, responsibility of the planner, and responsibility of the decontamination crew leader

  15. Tritium permeation, contamination and decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of the grant-in-aid for scientific research on priority areas entitled 'frontiers of tritium researches toward fusion reactors', coordinated three research programs on the tritium permeation, contamination and decontamination have been conducted by the CO2 team. The results are summarized as follows: (1) Study for the development of the tritium permeation barrier was carried out. A ZrO2 film with a magnesium phosphate layer sintered on a SUS 430 steel plate showed excellent reduction in the hydrogen permeation. (2) The non-destructive method using an imaging plate was proposed to monitor tritium release from contaminated materials. The method was applied to SUS 316 steel and revealed that the tritium release from SUS 316 steel was diffusion-limited. (3) As for contamination-protection and decontamination techniques, improvement in the decontamination rate from SUS 316 steel was obtained by providing CrO2 coating. (J.P.N.)

  16. Handbook of radioactive contamination and decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this book the fundamentals of radioactive contamination and the general principles of decontamination are set out. Topics covered include the evaluation of risk after human exposure and the decontamination of persons and their clothing and food and the decontamination of reactor components. The assessment of contamination after possible reactor accidents or nuclear explosions is discussed. The various methods of decontamination appropriate to specific incidents are discussed. (UK)

  17. Contamination and decontamination of fabrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis is made of the problems of contamination and decontamination of clothes and underwear. Possible ways are described of contamination of fabrics (dry, wet) and in this connection the contaminant-fabric binding is underlined (in dry state, at different relative air humidity, in wet conditions in an environment of polar solvents). A survey is presented of decontamination methods and their importance. Dry methods include beatino., brushing and vacuum cleaning, wet methods include soaking and washing, dry cleaning in non-polar solvents, and the Intensol and Dual methods which combine dry cleaning and washing in one process. (B.S.)

  18. Optimization of electrochemical soil decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemec, M. [Czech Technical Univ., Prague (Czech Republic). Dept. of Nuclear Chemistry; John, J. [Czech Technical Univ., Prague (Czech Republic). Centre for Radiochemistry and Radiation Chemistry

    2004-07-01

    At the Czech Technical University in Prague, soil decontamination techniques have been studied for several years. The leaching procedures (batch or 'sorption' leaching) did not allow to achieve more than 30% caesium desorption. Caesium thermodesorption was demonstrated not to be very efficient either; quantitative caesium separation could be achieved only from solutions resulting from fusion of the soil with special fluxes. The most promising results were achieved by electrolytic decontamination. In preliminary experiments, more than 97% of caesium was released from soils contaminated long time ago. The aim of this study was to perform optimisation of the parameters of this method. (orig.)

  19. Decontamination in a Russian settlement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogh, C.L.; Andersson, Kasper Grann; Barkovsky, A.N.; Mishine, A.S.; Ponamarjov, A.V.; Ramzaev, V.P.; Roed, Jørn

    1999-01-01

    Decontamination was carried out in an area with three houses in Novo Bobovichi, Bryansk region, Russia, in the autumn of 1995. It was demonstrated that significant reductions in the dose rate both indoor (DRF = 0.34) and outdoor (DRF = 0.20) can be achieved when a controlled cleaning is undertaken....... This paper describes the decontamination work carried out and the results obtained, The roofs of the houses were swept and cleaned by special roof cleaning equipment. The soil around the houses was removed by hand while carefully monitoring the ground for residual contamination, By monitoring the...

  20. NOVEL LASER ABLATION TECHNOLOGY FOR SURFACE DECONTAMINATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this project is to develop a novel Laser Ablation Decontamination in Liquid (LADIL) technology for surface decontamination and safe removal of radioactive and/or toxic contaminants. It aims to achieve more efficient surface decontamination without secondary conta...

  1. 46 CFR 154.1410 - Decontamination shower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Decontamination shower. 154.1410 Section 154.1410... Equipment § 154.1410 Decontamination shower. When Table 4 references this section, a vessel carrying the listed cargo must have a decontamination shower and an eye wash that: (a) Are on the weatherdeck; and...

  2. 40 CFR 170.250 - Decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Decontamination. 170.250 Section 170... PROTECTION STANDARD Standard for Pesticide Handlers § 170.250 Decontamination. (a) Requirement. During any..., decontamination supplies for washing off pesticides and pesticide residues. (b) General conditions. (1)...

  3. 40 CFR 170.150 - Decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Decontamination. 170.150 Section 170... PROTECTION STANDARD Standard for Workers § 170.150 Decontamination. (a)(1) Requirement. The agricultural employer must provide decontamination supplies for workers in accordance with this section whenever:...

  4. Nuclear and radiological emergency preparedness: decontamination issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are varieties of radiological decontamination methods available. Extensive research efforts are made in this direction for development of effective multi-purpose decontamination formulations and tremendous progress has been made in this field. It is pertinent to develop effective, easily available, cheap decontamination alternatives which can be usable directly by community itself during any radiological terrorism activity

  5. Separation of radionuclides from chemical and electrochemical decontamination wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multistage process combining photocatalytic degradation of organic complexes and complexants followed by separation of the radionuclides by ion exchange was developed and tested for the treatment of aqueous waste from chemical or electrochemical decontamination of NPP primary circuit internals. In these solutions, both the oxalic and citric acids could be quantitatively degraded within 10-12 hours of irradiation by 254 nm UV radiation in the presence of TiO2 photocatalyst. For the group radionuclides separation, a standard cation exchanger was found to be preferable to any of the set of the tested inorganic-organic composite absorbers. (author)

  6. ORNL decontamination and decommissioning program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A program has been initiated at ORNL to decontaminate and decommission surplus or abandoned nuclear facilities. Program planning and technical studies have been performed by UCC-ND Engineering. A feasibility study for decommissioning the Metal Recovery Facility, a fuel reprocessing pilot plant, has been completed

  7. Decontamination in a Russian settlement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogh, C.L.; Andersson, Kasper Grann; Barkovsky, A.N.;

    1999-01-01

    . This paper describes the decontamination work carried out and the results obtained, The roofs of the houses were swept and cleaned by special roof cleaning equipment. The soil around the houses was removed by hand while carefully monitoring the ground for residual contamination, By monitoring the...

  8. Methods of decontaminating metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decontamination methods are discussed for internal and external surfaces of facilities and spaces in nuclear power plants. The problem area is divided into mechanical, chemical, electrochemical, steam emulsion and dry methods. For each group of methods the principle, most suitable application and effectiveness are given. (B.S.)

  9. Decontaminating reagents for radioactive systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A decontaminating reagent composition has been developed comprising EDTA, citric acid, oxalic acid, and formic acid. Formic acid inhibits the decomposition of both EDTA and citric acid, and yields oxalic acid as a result of its own radiolysis. The invention includes the improvement of initially incorporating formic acid in the mixture and maintaining the presence of formic acid by at least one further addition

  10. Advances in PCB decontamination technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1985 several million kilograms of PCB equipment and millions of litres of PCB contaminated oil have been processed in Canada for reduction of PCB concentrations below government guidelines. Advances in extraction and metal recovery from electrical equipment, chemical dechlorination and distillation of PCB-contaminated oils were the significant technological options utilized. For example, using the Decontaksolv technology owners of PCB equipment in Canada have decontaminated three million kilograms of electrical equipment, which resulted in the reintegration of 2.7 million kilograms of useful metals (steel, copper, aluminium) into the economic circuit. The equipment decontaminated included transformers, electromagnets, relays, radiators, circuit breakers, tanks, pipes, valves, and drums. The most recent advances in this technology include improvements that makes the economical processing of capacitors, possible. Chemical dechlorination has virtually eliminated PCB-contaminated oils which are normally present in large transformers, to the point where some service companies have curtailed or discontinued their oil decontamination activities in Canada. Recent advances in this technology center around techniques for the decontamination of waste hydrocarbons, and to a lesser extent, dielectric fluids. Two example projects to illustrate recent advances have been briefly described

  11. Radiation decontamination of poultry viscera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamdar, S. N.; Harikumar, P.

    2008-04-01

    Application of gamma radiation for decontamination of poultry viscera was examined. Exposure to a dose of 20 kGy rendered the viscera sterile (proteolytic enzymes, except acid protease, did not show any significant change during post-irradiation storage at either temperature.

  12. Concentration by evaporation of low and medium activity radioactive effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaporation is one of the radioactive effluent treatments used, enabling a purified distillate to be obtained and giving excellent decontamination factors for all the radionuclides present, if the pH conditions are correctly chosen and in the absence of volatile solvents. SGN has acquired a wide experience in the concentration of radioactive effluents and possesses a specific know-how in the field of droplet abatement and demisting for this application. The report describes the evaporation system optimized for the treatment of low and medium activity effluents, developed by SGN, which includes a special highly performant scrubbing column and, if necessary an additional lamella separator for droplet abatement. It also presents the ACEREN evaporator offered by SGN under CEA licence and based on the principle of a thin film natural evaporation at low temperature, without condensation of vapors

  13. Concentration by evaporation of low and medium activity radioactive effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaporation is one of the radioactive effluent treatments used, enabling a purified distillate to be obtained and giving excellent decontamination factors for all the radionuclides present, if the pH conditions are correctly chosen and in the absence of volatile solvents. SGN has acquired a wide experience in the concentration of radioactive effluents and possesses a specific know-how in the field of droplet abatement and demisting for this application. The report describes the evaporation system optimized for the treatment of low and medium activity effluents, developed by SGN, which includes the combination of a special highly performant scrubbing column and a lamella separator for droplet abatement. It also present the ACEREN evaporator offered by SGN under CEA licence and based on the principle of a thin film natural evaporation at low temperature, without condensation of vapours

  14. Remote decontamination system for contaminated water tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the experience of decontamination works and achievements of construction with remote- handling/unmanned technologies, Obayashi Corporation has developed technologies for the decontamination of contaminated water tanks at the Fukushima Daiichi NPS as an entity to implement with subsidies the 'Validation of technologies for contaminated water management' project in the FY2013 Supplementary Budget. Our remote decontamination system requires no manned operation inside tanks during decontamination work and contributes to exposure reduction. The decontamination performance and system practicality have been confirmed by full-scale demonstration test. This report describes the technology outline of present system and its demonstration test results. (author)

  15. Development of decontaminating agents to their present status or detergents for decontamination work in the nuclear field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Commercial detergents were not sufficient for removing contamination in nuclear facilities. Products were therefore developed for use in small quantities with high decomtamination effects, which caused no problems in the treatment of radioactive waste solutions. Radioactivity removal was achieved by aqueous decontaminants applied to loosely adhering contamination on surfaces such as floors, textiles, persons, etc., and by pastes, molten salt solutions, and mixed acid vapors applied to firmly adhering contamination and to oxide layer deposits. The results is a considerable reduction of solidified waste for final storage. (orig.)

  16. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the T Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan is the first annual report. It shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. Although World War II-era plutonium extraction equipment has been removed, there are still chemicals and radioactive substances in the buildings because of experiments, the decontamination process, or chemical storage. T Plant has a system of monitoring devices and sampling programs to meet applicable regulations and DOE orders. These regulations and orders have been established to protect the health and safety of employees, the general public, and the environment

  17. Decontamination Planning and Approach to its Methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Geun-young; Kim, Chang-Lak [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The research of the approach to the decontamination is required since Korea doesn't have the NPP decommissioning experience. In this paper, the process flow of decontamination is described throughout the foreign case study. And, factors needed to be considered to progress decontamination smoothly are introduced. For the planning of the decontamination, there are several important decisions to be made as follows : - whether the large components are included in the decontamination items or not - whether there are a delay factors like the fuel failure - what items applied to before/after decontamination - applied technologies - using what equipment. The decontamination plan is not fixed. It can be changed by the circumstances of progress. The schedule can be shortened by the good efficiency.

  18. Decontamination Planning and Approach to its Methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research of the approach to the decontamination is required since Korea doesn't have the NPP decommissioning experience. In this paper, the process flow of decontamination is described throughout the foreign case study. And, factors needed to be considered to progress decontamination smoothly are introduced. For the planning of the decontamination, there are several important decisions to be made as follows : - whether the large components are included in the decontamination items or not - whether there are a delay factors like the fuel failure - what items applied to before/after decontamination - applied technologies - using what equipment. The decontamination plan is not fixed. It can be changed by the circumstances of progress. The schedule can be shortened by the good efficiency

  19. Decontamination in the Republic of Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To continue the decontamination work in the Republic of Belarus, which was carried out by the military troops, the state specialized enterprises were formed in Gomel and Mogilev in 1991. The organization and regulations were developed inside the country: instructions, rules, radiological and hygienic criteria and norms. The enterprises concentrated on decontamination of the most socially significant facilities: kindergartens, schools, medical institutions and industrial enterprises. During 9 years Gomel State Specialized Enterprise 'Polessje' decontaminated 130 kindergartens, schools and hospitals. The total decontaminated area was 450 000 m2. The ventilation systems and equipment at 27 industrial enterprises in Gomel were decontaminated. The practical decontamination methods for areas, buildings, roofs, industrial equipment, ventilation systems were developed and tested. The special rules for handling wastes contaminated with Cs were elaborated. The paper analyzes and sums up the acquired experience which is important for implementation of rehabilitation programs and improvement of decontamination methods. (author)

  20. persimmon tannin-formaldehyde gel decontamination of dilute aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    in the present work, the extracted juice of unripe astringent persimmon fruit, designated as (kakishibu) was found to have an extremely high affinity for uranium ion. to develop efficient adsorbent for uranium ion the juice was immobilized in formaldehyde. the removal of uranium ion onto the formed gel was found to be affected by several factors such as, concentration of formaldehyde in gel, equilibration time, solution ph, concentration of uranium ion, mass of adsorbent, presence of some cations and anions . the sorption isotherm was discussed in the light of Freundlich and Langmuir models. from Freundlich equation, the exponent 1/n was found in the range of 1>1/n0, δS0 and δG0 were calculated . the capacity of adsorbent was also determined by column technique and found to 20.20 mg/g

  1. Decontamination of alpha contaminated metallic waste by cerium IV redox process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decontamination of alpha contaminated metallic waste is an important aspect in the management of waste generated during dismantling and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Present work on cerium redox process targets decontamination of alpha contaminated metallic waste till it qualifies for the non alpha waste category for disposal in near surface disposal facility. Recovery of the alpha radio nuclides and cerium from aqueous secondary waste streams was also studied deploying solvent extraction process and established. The alpha-lean secondary waste stream has been immobilised in cement based matrix for final disposal. (author)

  2. Decontamination of graphite by chemical treatment; Descontaminacion de grafito por tratamiento quimico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gascon, J. L.; Pina, G.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a study of decontamination of i-graphite by means of chemical treatment has been carried out within the project CARBOWASTE belonging to the 7th program of the EU (2007-2013). Decontamination through chemical treatment for i-graphite with aqueous solutions depends on the composition of the lixiviation, the temperature or the physical state in which is located the i-graphite, powder or block. In the first place was studied the influence of these factors using i-graphite powder and later graphite block.

  3. Micelles as Soil and Water Decontamination Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Afzal; Shahzad, Suniya; Munir, Azeema; Nadagouda, Mallikarjuna N; Khan, Gul Shahzada; Shams, Dilawar Farhan; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Rana, Usman Ali

    2016-05-25

    Contaminated soil and water pose a serious threat to human health and ecosystem. For the treatment of industrial effluents or minimizing their detrimental effects, preventive and remedial approaches must be adopted prior to the occurrence of any severe environmental, health, or safety hazard. Conventional treatment methods of wastewater are insufficient, complicated, and expensive. Therefore, a method that could use environmentally friendly surfactants for the simultaneous removal of both organic and inorganic contaminants from wastewater is deemed a smart approach. Surfactants containing potential donor ligands can coordinate with metal ions, and thus such compounds can be used for the removal of toxic metals and organometallic compounds from aqueous systems. Surfactants form host-guest complexes with the hydrophobic contaminants of water and soil by a mechanism involving the encapsulation of hydrophobes into the self-assembled aggregates (micelles) of surfactants. However, because undefined amounts of surfactants may be released into the aqueous systems, attention must be paid to their own environmental risks as well. Moreover, surfactant remediation methods must be carefully analyzed in the laboratory before field implementation. The use of biosurfactants is the best choice for the removal of water toxins as such surfactants are associated with the characteristics of biodegradability, versatility, recovery, and reuse. This Review is focused on the currently employed surfactant-based soil and wastewater treatment technologies owing to their critical role in the implementation of certain solutions for controlling pollution level, which is necessary to protect human health and ensure the quality standard of the aquatic environment. PMID:27136750

  4. A decontamination system for chemical weapons agents using a liquid solution on a solid sorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A decontamination system for chemical warfare agents was developed and tested that combines a liquid decontamination reagent solution with solid sorbent particles. The components have fewer safety and environmental concerns than traditional chlorine bleach-based products or highly caustic solutions. The liquid solution, based on Decon GreenTM, has hydrogen peroxide and a carbonate buffer as active ingredients. The best solid sorbents were found to be a copolymer of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and n-lauryl methacrylate (Polytrap 6603 Adsorber); or an allyl methacrylate cross-linked polymer (Poly-Pore E200 Adsorber). These solids are human and environmentally friendly and are commonly used in cosmetics. The decontaminant system was tested for reactivity with pinacolyl methylphosphonofluoridate (Soman, GD), bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide (Mustard, HD), and S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) O-ethyl methylphosphonothioate (VX) by using NMR Spectroscopy. Molybdate ion (MoO4-2) was added to the decontaminant to catalyze the oxidation of HD. The molybdate ion provided a color change from pink to white when the oxidizing capacity of the system was exhausted. The decontaminant was effective for ratios of agent to decontaminant of up to 1:50 for VX (t1/2 ≤ 4 min), 1:10 for HD (t1/2 1/2 < 2 min). The vapor concentrations of GD above the dry sorbent and the sorbent with decontamination solution were measured to show that the sorbent decreased the vapor concentration of GD. The E200 sorbent had the additional advantage of absorbing aqueous decontamination solution without the addition of an organic co-solvent such as isopropanol, but the rate depended strongly on mixing for HD

  5. Bioremediation of 60Co from simulated spent decontamination solutions of nuclear power reactors by bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spent decontamination solutions generated from nuclear power reactors contain radionuclides of cobalt (60Co, 56Co and 57Co) along with a large excess (105) of non-radioactive metal ions (Fe, Ni and Cr). Our previous studies demonstrated that bioremediation of 60Co from simulated effluents using fungal biomass can provide an alternative to conventional ion exchangers. In this study, we used several bacteria to further improve the process of bioremediation by decreasing biomass requirement and treatment period. Further, metabolite activation in specific bacterial species resulted in enhanced bioremediation of 60Co from simulated effluent. Optimization of conditions in simulated effluent for the eight bacterial species to accomplish maximum 60Co removal is discussed. (author)

  6. Metal Decontamination, Magnox, United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultra high pressure (UHP) water blasting was a successful technique deployed at Hinkley Point A, in the United Kingdom, for an isolated population of pond skips. UHP blasting achieved levels that allowed the skips to be routed via metal melt to the Energy Solutions Bear Creek facility, in the United States of America, which allowed the beneficial reuse of metal in accordance with the waste hierarchy. However, owing to higher levels of 90Sr in the remaining Magnox skips, metal melt was not an acceptable option for the skips. Decontamination trials were conducted on a representative population of remaining Magnox skips using UHP blasting and UHP blasting with abrasive. The trials demonstrated that for the remaining population of Magnox skips, and skips shared between sites via Sellafield and existing fuel routes, UHP blasting (and other techniques) could not deliver a consistent decontamination factor, or a high enough decontamination factor to significantly and reliably reduce intermediate level waste (ILW) skips to LLW or LLW skips to metal melt acceptance criteria. Based on the trial results, there was a significant risk that many ILW skips would remain ILW after decontamination with UHP blasting, along with the creation of a secondary wet ILW arising. This, coupled with a significant amount of worker dose expended for no apparent benefit, made direct disposal of the skips as LLW the only viable option. It also demonstrated that a significant amount of the radioactivity was in the base metal, or driven into the base metal by the decontamination processes. This left disposal as the only remaining option. The skips were combined with other low activity waste streams and disposed of as LLW, using averaging techniques. This technique was viable until recent restrictive guidance was received from the LLW repository regarding methods of averaging the activity of discrete waste items over a waste consignment. The added restrictions from the guidance eliminated the

  7. Study of the {sup 60}Co speciation in the aqueous radioactive waste of the la Hague nuclear reprocessing plant; environmental behaviour after discharges in the waters of the channel; Etude de la speciation du {sup 60}Co dans les effluents de l'usine de retraitement de combustibles irradies de la Hague; devenir apres rejet dans les eaux de la Manche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudaire, J.M

    1999-07-01

    {sup 60}Co is produced as an activation product and is present in the low-level aqueous radioactive waste released from the La Hague plant. At present, the concentration in the sea (non filtered at 0.45 {mu}m) at the Goury site are close to or even below, the detection limit: 0.2 mBq.l{sup -1}. The {sup 60}Co speciation depends on the type of effluent considered: in the effluent A ('active'), the cobalt is in the form of a stable trivalent complex; in the effluent V (to be checked), the cobalt is in majority (50% of the activity release) in the form of particles (>0.45 {mu}m), and then in the form of two soluble species: ionic divalent (Co{sup 2+}) and some stable complexes. The evolution of the reprocessing techniques used does not affect the speciation. So, since the nuclear reprocessing plant started at the La Hague plant in 1966, the chemical species discharged in the sea shows time variation related to the evolution of the type of effluent discharged. Thus, since 1994, the particles of cobalt are the main species discharged in the Channel (the V effluents represent more than 85% of the total {sup 60}Co activity released). The effect of instantaneous dilution into the marine conditions involving a variation of pH, oxido-reduction, ionic strength, a gradient of salinity, does not interfere with the evolution of the chemical species discharged. Nevertheless, during the discharge of the V effluent, the main constituents of the sea water (Mg{sup 2+} and Ca{sup 2+}) go through a precipitation. This comes with the coprecipitation of the ion Co{sup 2+} and with the particles of cobalt (complexes are not affected), and it can be responsible for an increase in the concentration in the particles. The chemical behaviour of the cobalt in the Channel is different from those of conservative element such as antimony. The ionic cobalt and the particles have a small dispersion in the water (cobalt has a very high particle/dissolved distribution factor, it is a non

  8. Problematika formaldehida v odpadnih vodah lesne industrije: Problem of waste effluents in wood industry - the possibilities of biological treatment:

    OpenAIRE

    Muck, Tadeja

    1999-01-01

    Wood industry does not pollute waters to a great extend, nevertheless we must be aware that the problem still exists. Waste effluents in wood industry contain very high portion of dangerous and toxic substance - formaldehyde. That is why it is inevitably vital to start with detailed analysis of waste effluents and with studies of possibilities of decontamination. Statistical analysis are showing that wood industry are not well aware of the fact how quickly the ecological balance can be destro...

  9. Verification of wet blasting decontamination technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macoho Co., Ltd. participated in the projects of 'Decontamination Verification Test FY 2011 by the Ministry of the Environment' and 'Decontamination Verification Test FY 2011 by the Cabinet Office.' And we tested verification to use a wet blasting technology for decontamination of rubble and roads contaminated by the accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant of the Tokyo Electric Power Company. As a results of the verification test, the wet blasting decontamination technology showed that a decontamination rate became 60-80% for concrete paving, interlocking, dense-grated asphalt pavement when applied to the decontamination of the road. When it was applied to rubble decontamination, a decontamination rate was 50-60% for gravel and approximately 90% for concrete and wood. It was thought that Cs-134 and Cs-137 attached to the fine sludge scraped off from a decontamination object and the sludge was found to be separated from abrasives by wet cyclene classification: the activity concentration of the abrasives is 1/30 or less than the sludge. The result shows that the abrasives can be reused without problems when the wet blasting decontamination technology is used. (author)

  10. Metal separations using aqueous biphasic partitioning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aqueous biphasic extraction (ABE) processes offer the potential for low-cost, highly selective separations. This countercurrent extraction technique involves selective partitioning of either dissolved solutes or ultrafine particulates between two immiscible aqueous phases. The extraction systems that the authors have studied are generated by combining an aqueous salt solution with an aqueous polymer solution. They have examined a wide range of applications for ABE, including the treatment of solid and liquid nuclear wastes, decontamination of soils, and processing of mineral ores. They have also conducted fundamental studies of solution microstructure using small angle neutron scattering (SANS). In this report they review the physicochemical fundamentals of aqueous biphase formation and discuss the development and scaleup of ABE processes for environmental remediation

  11. Decontamination of surfaces contaminated by radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The framework of the dissertation has been developed by the combination of research results at EIR/PSI and their subsequent application and further development as an entrepreneur at decontamination jobs throughout the nuclear industry. The work presented is arranged into 3 categories correpsonding to the chronological sequence of the decontamination process: 1) Decontamination process: preliminary investigations, theoretical elements about the formation of the contamination-layer and the decontamination mechanisms, analysis of activity profiles in contaminated materials, scale-up issues: laboratory-industrial project and decontamination model, method for treatment of boric acid and its use as deco-medium, economic aspects of the decontamination problem and test method for decontamination processes. 2) Description of the newly developed decontamination processes: formic acid/formaldehyd deco-process for steels. Key advantages: effective decontamination with generation of small quantities of an easily disposable secondary waste, universal DECOHA-decontamination process for metals on HBF4-basis for decommissioning. Key advantages: minimal radiation exposure for personnel, total regeneration of the deco-medium, minimal secondary waste, low-investment- and operating costs. This process was transfered to Recytec S.A. and was selected by UDSSR and, subsequently, a decontamination plant has been built in Chernobyl for the processing of 5 tons per day of stainless steel for unrestricted use, chemical decontamination process for concrete and brickwork. Key advantages: quick, economical, independent of geometry, little secondary waste, no damage to concrete surface. 3) Method for free release measurement of decontaminated materials for unrestricted use, by modification of geometry. The mentioned innovation have been applied several times in industry, for instance on the nuclear ship 'Otto Hahn', in the nuclear power plants Niederaichbach, Lingen, Juelich, in a Swiss watch

  12. Development and assessment of two decontamination processes: closed electropolishing system for decontamination of underwater surfaces -vibratory decontamination with abrasives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two decontamination processes have been developed to decontaminate the stainless steel components of nuclear power plants. The first process uses an underwater closed electropolishing system for the decontamination of large stainless steel surfaces in flooded systems without loss of electrolyte. Large underwater contaminated areas can be treated with an electropolishing head covering an area of 2 m2 in one step. The decontamination factors achieved with this technique range between 100 and 1000. The second process consists in the decontamination of nuclear components using vibratory equipment with self-cleaning abrasives generating a minimum quantity of waste. This technique may reach contamination factors similar to those obtained with other abrasive methods (brush abrasion, abrasive blasting, etc...). The obtained decontamination factors range between 5 and 50. Only a small quantity of waste is generated, which is treated and reduced in volume by filtration and evaporation

  13. Decontamination in a Russian settlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decontamination was carried out in and around three houses in Novo Bobovichi, Russia, in the autumn of 1995. It was demonstrated that significant reductions in the dose rate both indoor (DRF = 0.34) and outdoor (DRF = 0.20) can be achieved when a careful cleaning is undertaken. This report describes the decontamination work carried out and the results obtained. The roofs of the houses were swept and cleaned by special roof cleaning equipment. The soil around the houses was removed by hand while carefully monitoring the ground for residual contamination. By monitoring the decline in the dose rate during the different stages of the work the dose reducing effect of each action has been estimated. This report also describes a test of a triple digging method that reduces the dose rate without generating waste. In the appendices of the report the measurement data are available for further analysis. (au) 16 tabs., 15 ills

  14. Decontamination in a Russian settlement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roed, J.; Lange, C.; Andersson, K.G. [and others

    1996-03-01

    Decontamination was carried out in and around three houses in Novo Bobovichi, Russia, in the autumn of 1995. It was demonstrated that significant reductions in the dose rate both indoor (DRF = 0.34) and outdoor (DRF = 0.20) can be achieved when a careful cleaning is undertaken. This report describes the decontamination work carried out and the results obtained. The roofs of the houses were swept and cleaned by special roof cleaning equipment. The soil around the houses was removed by hand while carefully monitoring the ground for residual contamination. By monitoring the decline in the dose rate during the different stages of the work the dose reducing effect of each action has been estimated. This report also describes a test of a triple digging method that reduces the dose rate without generating waste. In the appendices of the report the measurement data are available for further analysis. (au) 16 tabs., 15 ills.

  15. Decontamination of radionuclides in food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The release of radionuclides arising from the Chernobyle accident led to widespread contamination of the northern hemisphere through fallout. This accident provided again an opportunity to investigate how and to what extent the radionuclides contamination in crops and animal derived foods could be reduced. The following topics are included in this paper. (1) How to reduce the transfer of radiostrontium and/or cesium from soil to crops: A pH increase of soil is effective for reducing their plant uptake. (2) How to reduce the transfer of radiocesium to animal derived foods: Ammonium-ferric-cyanoferrate (AFCF) should be the most effective compound for radiocesium excretion in the feces. Experiments with lactating cows and/or poultry gave extremely good results with respect to low radiocesium concentrations in milk, meat and eggs. (3) Removal coefficients of radiostrontium, cesium and iodine from contaminated leaf vegetables and cereals during food processing and culinary preparation: Though different by species, more than 80% of cesium and about 50% of strontium and iodine can be removed during culinary preparation of washing and boiling. (4) Simultaneous decontamination of radiocesium and iodine from drinking water and liquid milk: Metal ferrocyanide-anion exchange resin, specifically Fe ferrocyanide one, was successfully used for a rapid and simple decontamination of radiocesium and iodine in the liquid samples arising from the Chernobyle accident. (5) Removal of radiocesium from meat: The meat structurally contaminated with radiocesium is easily and very successfully decontaminated by pickling in NaCl solution and the decontamination is much speeded up by freezing meat before pickling. (author)

  16. Skin contamination - prevention and decontaminating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed examination is made of the structure of human skin. Measures were drawn up to prevent skin contamination in nuclear installations as well as contaminated skin was decontaminated from the personnel. By systematically applying these measures a significant level of success was achieved in preventing contamination in nuclear installations. Cases where more far-reaching chemical methods had to be used were kept to a minimum. (R.P.)

  17. Bacterial infections: antibiotics and decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Dinah

    Infectious disease is caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa and micro-organisms including the mycoplasmas, rickettsiae and chlamydiae. Most of the infections commonly encountered in the UK are caused either by bacteria or viruses. This article describes bacterial structure and function to explain how antibiotics work and the processes of decontamination such as cleaning, disinfection and sterilisation, which are important in infection control. PMID:15224613

  18. Radiation decontamination of poultry viscera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application of gamma radiation for decontamination of poultry viscera was examined. Exposure to a dose of 20 kGy rendered the viscera sterile (10 cycles, respectively, eliminating the coliforms to oC) produced enhanced levels of TVBN and TCA soluble products accompanied by higher drip loss. Activities of proteolytic enzymes, except acid protease, did not show any significant change during post-irradiation storage at either temperature

  19. Decontamination of Surfaces by Ultrasonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made of factors such as frequency, intensity, and time in the case of steel and of cotton cloth contaminated by fission products. Results show that the method is only of value in the case of steel and that it is necessary to operate at an optimum frequency of 80 khz and with an intensity of at least 4 W/cm2. The difficulty of proposing a valid explanation for the decontamination mechanism is discussed. (authors)

  20. Treatment of liquid wastes from decontamination of nuclear power plants by heterogeneous photocatalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nuclear power plants high radiation fields are produced, not only in the core but also in the auxiliary systems, due, mainly, to the activation of corrosion products by means of a mechanism known as 'Activity Transport'.With the purpose of reducing at minimum values the intensity of radiation fields and of avoiding the operative problems generated by the deposition of oxides in tanks and pipelines, it is necessary to remove the oxide films, carriers of activity, from the components in auxiliary systems in nuclear power plants and this is usually carried on by chemical cleaning.This process, known as decontamination, is done employing mixtures of oligocarboxilic acids such as NTA, EDTA, oxalic acid, citric acid, etc., at concentration nearly 1% and pH 3-4.The resulting liquid wastes of this process cannot be discharged directly to the environment but must be properly treated.Conventional treatments such as thermolysis, chemical oxidation and others show some problems and, in addition, some of these substances are resistant to degradation.Previous work done in the Unidad de Actividad Quimica del Centro Atomico Constituyentes (UAQ-CAC) indicated that Heterogeneous Photocatalysis, belonging to the Advanced Oxidation Technologies (AOTs), could be a useful procedure for the treatment of liquid decontamination wastes. This method consists on the irradiation of an aqueous suspension of a semiconductor, generally TiO2, containing the substrate to be degraded, employing wavelengths shorter than the semiconductor's 'band-gap'.In this way, oxidant and reducing molecules are generated.The advantages compared to other AOTs are its low cost, the ability to work at room temperature and pressure, it uses only oxygen as oxidizing agent and can be operated in 'batch' and continuum.In the present work we employed a recycling system, with a black-light tubular UV lamp (366nm) installed inside as the source of illumination, to study the degradation of oxalic and citric acid by means

  1. Contamination with radioactive materials and decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The content of the monograph mainly designed for personnel in nuclear power plants, radiochemical laboratories and laboratories of nuclear medicine departments is basically divided into two parts. In the general part, the contamination of persons and objects with radioactive substances is discussed and the physico-chemical principles of decontamination are presented. The main part of the publication is devoted to concrete practical decontamination procedures. Special attention is devoted to the decontamination of components of nuclear power plants with WWER reactors and to the decontamination of the equipment of radiochemical and radiological laboratories (in-service, after accidents and during decommissioning). Also described is the decontamination of garments, underwear, protective aids, rooms, buildings, terrain and water. Also included is a chapter on the disposal of radioactive wastes generated during decontamination. (A.K.)

  2. Decontamination by fractional distillation of a radioactive mixture of perchlorethylene, bitumen, and sludges from chemical co-precipitations; Decontamination par distillation fractionnee d'un melange radioactif constitue par du perchlorethylene, du bitume et des boues de coprecipitation chimique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefillatre, G.; Hullo, R. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Chusclan (France). Centre de Production de Plutonium de Marcoule

    1969-07-01

    It is not possible to incinerate the contaminated organic waste containing chlorine, produced at the Marcoule Centre. The only valid method for these solvents of average activity is fractional distillation. This report presents a pilot fractional distillation plant designed for decontaminating the residual solvents produced by the Centre's Waste Processing Station. These contaminated solvents come from the decontamination of a screw extrusion apparatus with perchlorethylene; this equipment is used for coating the radioactive sludges with bitumen. The pilot plant operates discontinuously and is used to decontaminate the perchlorethylene, to separate the perchlorethylene from the water, and to process the distillation residue. The electrically heated boiler is fitted with a removable base in the form of a disposable container. The installations decontamination factor is 3.4 x 10{sup 6} when solvents with a specific activity of 0.23 Ci/m{sup 3} are used. The average flow-rate for a distillation run is 10 l/hr at atmospheric pressure, and 21 l/hr at a residual pressure of 40 torr. The decontamination factor for the installation is better at atmospheric pressure than in a vacuum. (authors) [French] Les effluents organiques contamines chlores du Centre de Marcoule ne peuvent etre incineres. Le seul mode de traitement qui s'impose pour ces solvants de moyenne activite s'avere etre la distillation fractionnee. Ce rapport presente une installation pilote de distillation fractionnee qui a ete concue pour decontaminer des solvants residuaires provenant de la Station de Traitement des Effluents du Centre. Ces solvants contamines resultent de la decontamination au moyen de perchlorethylene d'une extrudeuse a vis servant a l'enrobage par le bitume des boues radioactives de cette station. L'installation pilote fonctionne en discontinu et assure a la fois la decontamination du perchlorethylene, la separation du perchlorethylene et de l'eau et le

  3. Geographic assistance of decontamination strategy elaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Those who elaborates the strategy of decontamination of vast territories is to take into consideration the heterogeneity of such elements of landscape as relief, lithology, humidity and types of soils and, vegetation, both on local and regional level. Geographic assistance includes evaluation of efficacy of decontamination technologies in different natural conditions, identification of areas of their effective application and definition of ecological damage, estimation of balances of the radionuclides in the landscapes to create background of the decontamination strategy

  4. The effect of communication during mass decontamination

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, Holly; Drury, John; Rubin, G James; Williams, Richard; Amlot, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – Reports from small-scale incidents in which decontamination was conducted suggest that a successful communication strategy is vital in order to increase public compliance with, and reduce public anxiety about, decontamination. However, it has not been possible to examine public behaviour during large scale incidents involving decontamination. The aim of the research reported here was to examine the relationship between people’s positive perceptions of responding agencies...

  5. Public experiences of mass casualty decontamination

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, Holly; Drury, John; Rubin, G James; Williams, Richard; Amlôt, Richard

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we analyze feedback from simulated casualties who took part in field exercises involving mass decontamination, to gain an understanding of how responder communication can affect people’s experiences of and compliance with decontamination. We analyzed questionnaire data gathered from 402 volunteers using the framework approach, to provide an insight into the public’s experiences of decontamination and how these experiences are shaped by the actions of emergency responders. Fac...

  6. Cold atmospheric plasma decontamination against nosocomial bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Klämpfl , Tobias Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Nosocomial pathogens are a considerable public threat. In order to limit their spread, cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) was investigated as new alternative to common decontamination strategies. During my work I developed a Surface micro-discharge (SMD) electrode system, characterized the CAP generated at ambient air conditions, studied its decontaminating behavior against nosocomial bacteria such as Clostridium difficile endospores and revealed factors influencing the decontamination. All in all...

  7. Soil decontamination at Rocky Flats Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description is given of work being done at Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) to decontaminate soil contaminated with plutonium-239. How the contamination came about is described, as well as what has been done to contain it while decontamination methods are being developed. The purpose of the work is to decontaminate the soil so that it can be returned to the site instead of having to package, ship, and store it

  8. Decontamination Efficacy and Skin Toxicity of Two Decontaminants against Bacillus anthracis

    OpenAIRE

    Chad W Stratilo; Crichton, Melissa K. F.; Sawyer, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    Decontamination of bacterial endospores such as Bacillus anthracis has traditionally required the use of harsh or caustic chemicals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a chlorine dioxide decontaminant in killing Bacillus anthracis spores in solution and on a human skin simulant (porcine cadaver skin), compared to that of commonly used sodium hypochlorite or soapy water decontamination procedures. In addition, the relative toxicities of these decontaminants were compared in ...

  9. Vibratory finishing as a decontamination process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major objective of this research is to develop vibratory finishing into a large-scale decontamination technique that can economicaly remove transuranic and other surface contamination from large volumes of waste produced by the operation and decommissioning of retired nuclear facilities. The successful development and widespread application of this decontamination technique would substantially reduce the volume of waste requiring expensive geologic disposal. Other benefits include exposure reduction for decontamination personnel and reduced risk of environmental contamination. Laboratory-scale studies showed that vibratory finishing can rapidly reduce the contamination level of transuranic-contaminated stainless steel and Plexiglas to well below the 10-nCi/g limit. The capability of vibratory finishing as a decontamination process was demonstrated on a large scale. The first decontamination demonstration was conducted at the Hanford N-Reactor, where a vibratory finisher was installed to reduce personnel exposure during the summer outage. Items decontaminated included fuel spacers, process-tube end caps, process-tube inserts, pump parts, ball-channel inspection tools and miscellaneous hand tools. A second demonstration is currently being conducted in the decontamination facility at the Hanford 231-Z Building. During this demonstration, transuranic-contaminated material from decommissioned plutonium facilities is being decontaminated to <10 nCi/g to minimize the volume of material that will require geologic disposal. Items that are being decontaminated include entire glove boxes, process-hood structural material and panels, process tanks, process-tank shields, pumps, valves and hand tools used during the decommissioning work

  10. Proceedings of the concrete decontamination workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourteen papers were presented. These papers describe concrete surface removal methods and equipment, as well as experiences in decontaminating and removing both power and experimental nuclear reactors

  11. Proceedings of the concrete decontamination workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halter, J.M.; Sullivan, R.G.; Currier, A.J.

    1980-05-28

    Fourteen papers were presented. These papers describe concrete surface removal methods and equipment, as well as experiences in decontaminating and removing both power and experimental nuclear reactors.

  12. Decontamination of protective clothing against radioactive contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to describe the experimental results of external surface mechanical decontamination of the studied materials forming selected suits. Seven types of personal protective suits declaring protection against radioactive aerosol contamination in different price ranges were selected for decontamination experiments. The outcome of this study is to compare the efficiency of a double-step decontamination process on various personal protective suits against radioactive contamination. A comparison of the decontamination effectiveness for the same type of suit, but for the different chemical mixtures (140La in a water-soluble or in a water-insoluble compound), was performed. (authors)

  13. Handbook of radioactive contamination and decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this book is to present a comprehensive picture of the fundamentals of general decontamination of solid surfaces and water. This concerns primarily decontamination of the operational facilities in nuclear power plants equipped with pressure water reactors, and decontamination of the equipment systems in radiochemical laboratories and nuclear medicine departments. Other special decontamination branches of current interest are also dealt with briefly. In common other branches of applied science and technology, the art of decontamination is being continuously enriched by the progress achieved in a variety of relevant scientific disciplines, and it employs the advances in the practice. To keep pace with the rapidly developing technology, and to prevent a lagging art of decontamination from becoming a limiting factor in the further development of nuclear energetics and other utilization of radionuclides, it seems that for some time to come main trends in the development of decontamination will include: development and use of new decontamination methods; utilization of progressive elements of automation and robotics; development and use of such decontamination formulations as would minimize the volume of radioactive wastes and that would produce wastes in a form in which they could be either easily further treated or safely disposed of without any undue risk of endangering human health or polluting human environment. (author). refs.; figs.; tabs

  14. Laboratory Scoping Tests Of Decontamination Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M.; Nash, Charles A.; Crawford, Charles L.; McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.

    2014-01-21

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to acceptable concentrations in the LAW glass, and diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task seeks to examine the potential treatment of this stream to remove radionuclides and subsequently disposition the decontaminated stream elsewhere, such as the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF), for example. The treatment process envisioned is very similar to that used for the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) that has been operating for years at the Savannah River Site (SRS), and focuses on using mature radionuclide removal technologies that are also

  15. Laboratory Scoping Tests Of Decontamination Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to acceptable concentrations in the LAW glass, and diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task seeks to examine the potential treatment of this stream to remove radionuclides and subsequently disposition the decontaminated stream elsewhere, such as the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF), for example. The treatment process envisioned is very similar to that used for the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) that has been operating for years at the Savannah River Site (SRS), and focuses on using mature radionuclide removal technologies that are also

  16. Cytotoxicity assays to evaluate tannery effluents treated by photoelectrooxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, N; Moraes, J P; Klauck, C R; Gehlen, G; Rodrigues, M A S; Ziulkoski, A L

    2015-12-01

    The advanced oxidation process (AOP) is used to increase the treatment efficiency of effluents however, it is necessary to compare the toxicity of treated and untreated effluents to evaluate if the decontamination process does not cause any biological harm. Cultured cells have been previously used to assess the genotoxic and cytotoxic potential of various compounds. Hence, the aim of this work was to assess the applicability of cytotoxicity assays to evaluate the toxicity related to the AOP treatment. Samples of an industrial effluent were collected after their treatment by a conventional method. Cytotoxicity of standard and AOP treated effluents was assessed in CRIB and HEp-2 cell line using the MTT and neutral red assays. We observed decrease at cell viability in the both assays (50% MTT and 13% NRU) when cells were exposed to the AOP treatment in the highest concentration. Thus, cytotoxic assays in cultured cells can be explored as an useful method to evaluate toxicity as well as to optimize effluents treatment process. PMID:26628242

  17. Detritiation of Tritiated Effluent Gas and Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a demonstration scale equipment for treatment of tritium in off-gas, Pt/SDBC as oxidation catalyst and Zeolite 13X as adsorbent was charged in the beds, respectively. It was confirmed from the performance test that decontamination factor of the equipment showed more than 100 under the flow rate of off-gas of 90 l/hr and at the temperature of 65 ∼ 80 .deg. C. A small scale CECE process has been developed combining LPCE catalytic column with SPE (solid polymer electrolyte) electrolysis. The catalytic column was a trickle-bed type packed with the mixture of 1 wt% Pt/SDBC catalyst and 4 mm Dixon wire-mesh ring. The experimental results of the CECE process proved that the decontamination factor of 13 ∼ 20 under the operating conditions of the water of the 4 l/day and the effluent hydrogen gas of 16.2 mol/h. A design code of CECE process also developed which will be applied the tritium industry. An experimental method for the reduction of tritiated organic waste by using catalytic oxidation was tested in a heated catalytic reactor of 0.5 wt% Pd/Al2O3. The simulated organic liquid was converted to water over 99%. A gas chromatographic column material was developed for the separation of mixed hydrogen isotopes. 17 wt% Pd-Pt on alumina showed 90% separation efficiency at 77 % yield for the separation of 29.2 % D2-H2 gas mixture

  18. The decontamination of actual radioactive metal wastes using supercritical CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study, we applied aqueous HNO3 in CO2 microemulsion for decontamination of radioactive wastes considered to be important in nuclear industry. Nonionic surfactants was used to measure the formation regions of HNO3 in CO2 microemulsion as concentration of nitric acid. HNO3 in CO2 microemulsion formatted at higher pressure over 50bar to 100bar than that of H2O. When we did experiment using stirrer and ultrasonic for microemulsion formation, ultrasonic was excellently better than stirrer. Based on this result we performed decontamination experiments with actual radioactive metal wastes(bolt, nut). In the case of 6M(efficiency : 95%) nitric acid, efficiency is better than that of 1M(efficiency : 75%). but, some of the specimen surface was damaged. Comparing decontamination efficiency as the difference of mixing method, decontamination by ultrasonic is two times superior to stirrer. Continuing the present study will greatly attribute to improve decontamination process of nuclear industry as well as other industry

  19. Supplemental stack-effluent monitoring at the Safety Light Corporation, Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supplemental stack effluent monitoring was performed at the Safety Light Corporation (SLC) in Bloomsburg, PA, on August 16 through 20, 1982. Monitoring of the SLC stack effluents at the point of relese indicated concentrations of aqueous tritium above the guideline levels established for unrestricted areas. However, environmental air sampling off-site indicated that the levels of all forms of tritium, including aqueous tritium, were well within the guidelines. Analyses performed by both the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) and SLC of the stack effluents produced comparable results. It is concluded that the environmental tritium monitoring and control program established by SLC is adequate. Monitoring data are included

  20. Decontamination Technology Development for Nuclear Research Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technology development of surface decontamination in the uranium conversion facility before decommissioning, technology development of component decontamination in the uranium conversion facility after decommissioning, uranium sludge treatment technology development, radioactive waste soil decontamination technology development at the aim of the temporary storage soil of KAERI, Optimum fixation methodology derivation on the soil and uranium waste, and safety assessment methodology development of self disposal of the soil and uranium waste after decontamination have been performed in this study. The unique decontamination technology applicable to the component of the nuclear facility at room temperature was developed. Low concentration chemical decontamination technology which is very powerful so as to decrease the radioactivity of specimen surface under the self disposal level was developed. The component decontamination technology applicable to the nuclear facility after decommissioning by neutral salt electro-polishing was also developed. The volume of the sludge waste could be decreased over 80% by the sludge waste separation method by water. The electrosorption method on selective removal of U(VI) to 1 ppm of unrestricted release level using the uranium-containing lagoon sludge waste was tested and identified. Soil decontamination process and equipment which can reduce the soil volume over 90% were developed. A pilot size of soil decontamination equipment which will be used to development of real scale soil decontamination equipment was designed, fabricated and demonstrated. Optimized fixation methodology on soil and uranium sludge was derived from tests and evaluation of the results. Safety scenario and safety evaluation model were development on soil and uranium sludge aiming at self disposal after decontamination

  1. INEEL Liquid Effluent Inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Major, C.A.

    1997-06-01

    The INEEL contractors and their associated facilities are required to identify all liquid effluent discharges that may impact the environment at the INEEL. This liquid effluent information is then placed in the Liquid Effluent Inventory (LEI) database, which is maintained by the INEEL prime contractor. The purpose of the LEI is to identify and maintain a current listing of all liquid effluent discharge points and to identify which discharges are subject to federal, state, or local permitting or reporting requirements and DOE order requirements. Initial characterization, which represents most of the INEEL liquid effluents, has been performed, and additional characterization may be required in the future to meet regulations. LEI information is made available to persons responsible for or concerned with INEEL compliance with liquid effluent permitting or reporting requirements, such as the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System, Wastewater Land Application, Storm Water Pollution Prevention, Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasures, and Industrial Wastewater Pretreatment. The State of Idaho Environmental Oversight and Monitoring Program also needs the information for tracking liquid effluent discharges at the INEEL. The information provides a baseline from which future liquid discharges can be identified, characterized, and regulated, if appropriate. The review covered new and removed buildings/structures, buildings/structures which most likely had new, relocated, or removed LEI discharge points, and at least 10% of the remaining discharge points.

  2. Magnetic separation for soil decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) is a physical separation process that is used to extract magnetic particles from mixtures. The technology is used on a large scale in the kaolin clay industry to whiten or brighten kaolin clay and increase its value. Because all uranium and plutonium compounds are slightly magnetic, HGMS can be used to separate these contaminants from non-magnetic soils. A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was signed in 1992 between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lockheed Environmental Systems and Technologies Company (LESAT) to develop HGMS for soil decontamination. This paper reports progress and describes the HGMS technology

  3. Nuclear reactor effluent monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minns, J.L.; Essig, T.H. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Radiological environmental monitoring and effluent monitoring at nuclear power plants is important both for normal operations, as well as in the event of an accident. During normal operations, environmental monitoring verifies the effectiveness of in-plant measures for controlling the release of radioactive materials in the plant. Following an accident, it would be an additional mechanism for estimating doses to members of the general public. This paper identifies the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulatory basis for requiring radiological environmental and effluent monitoring, licensee conditions for effluent and environmental monitoring, NRC independent oversight activities, and NRC`s program results.

  4. An extremely radioresistant green eukaryote for radionuclide bio-decontamination in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear activities generate radioactive elements which require processes for their decontamination. Although biological remediation has proved to be efficient in industrial applications, no biotechnology solution is currently operational for highly radioactive media. Such a solution requires organisms that accumulate radionuclides while withstanding radioactivity. This paper describes the potentialities of an extremophile autotrophic eukaryote, Coccomyxa actinabiotis nov. sp., that we isolated from a nuclear facility and which withstands huge ionizing radiation doses, up to 20 000 Gy. Half the population survives 10 000 Gy, which is comparable to the hyper-radioresistant well-known prokaryote Deinococcus radiodurans. The cell metabolic profile investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance was hardly affected by radiation doses of up to 10 000 Gy. Cellular functioning completely recovered within a few days. This outstanding micro-alga also strongly accumulates radionuclides, including 238U, 137Cs, 110mAg, 60Co, 54Mn, 65Zn, and 14C (decontamination above 85% in 24 h, concentration factor, 1000-450 000 mL g-1 fresh weight). In 1 h, the micro-alga revealed as effective as the conventional physico-chemical ion exchangers to purify nuclear effluents. Using this organism, an efficient real-scale radionuclide bio-decontamination process was performed in a nuclear fuel storage pool with an important reduction of waste volume compared to the usual physico-chemical process. The feasibility of new decontamination solutions for the nuclear industry and for environmental clean-up operations is demonstrated. (authors)

  5. Development of decontamination agent for radioactively contaminated urban surface and its decontamination properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, B. G.; Won, H. J.; Jyung, K. J.; Lee, B. G.; Oh, W. Z. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    The decontamination of the urban building surfaces, based on the covering of clay suspensions, has been studied. An ammonium ion was effective as an ion exchanger of contaminated radionuclides. But, ammonium ion appears to be a powerful flocculant for clay suspension. We overcomes the phenomena by adding the hectorite as an additive, and developed stable clay decontamination agent which contained 15 times ammonium ion of cation exchange capacity of the natural clay. From the fluid behavior experiments of the developed clay decontamination agent were non-Newtonian and shear thinning fluid. The agents would be effectively sprayed on the contaminated building surfaces with very low spraying energy. Optimum synthetic condition were determined by the experiments of surface contact angle, fluid characteristics and decontamination behaviors. The decontamination performance of the clay decontamination agents on typical urban building construction materials, the flow behaviors of the suspensions, decontamination characteristics on specimen are reported in this paper. (author) 11 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Development of decontamination agent for radioactively contaminated urban surface and its decontamination properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decontamination of the urban building surfaces, based on the covering of clay suspensions, has been studied. An ammonium ion was effective as an ion exchanger of contaminated radionuclides. But, ammonium ion appears to be a powerful flocculant for clay suspension. We overcomes the phenomena by adding the hectorite as an additive, and developed stable clay decontamination agent which contained 15 times ammonium ion of cation exchange capacity of the natural clay. From the fluid behavior experiments of the developed clay decontamination agent were non-Newtonian and shear thinning fluid. The agents would be effectively sprayed on the contaminated building surfaces with very low spraying energy. Optimum synthetic condition were determined by the experiments of surface contact angle, fluid characteristics and decontamination behaviors. The decontamination performance of the clay decontamination agents on typical urban building construction materials, the flow behaviors of the suspensions, decontamination characteristics on specimen are reported in this paper. (author) 11 refs., 5 figs

  7. Cost effectiveness of dilute chemical decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic principles of dilute chemical decontamination are described, as well as the method of application. Methods of computing savings in radiation dose and costs are presented, with results from actual experience and illustrative examples. It is concluded that dilute chemical decontamination is beneficial in many cases. It reduces radiation exposure of workers, saves money, and simplifies maintenance work

  8. Project gnome decontamination and decommissioning plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document presents the operational plan for conducting the final decontamination and decommissioning work at the site of the first U.S. nuclear detonation designed specifically for peaceful purposes and the first underground event on the Plowshare Program to take place outside the Nevada Test Site. The plan includes decontamination and decommissioning procedures, radiological guidelines, and the NV concept of operations

  9. PND fuel handling decontamination: facilities and techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of various decontamination techniques and equipment has become a critical part of Fuel Handling maintenance work at Ontario Hydro's Pickering Nuclear Division. This paper presents an overview of the set up and techniques used for decontamination in the PND Fuel Handling Maintenance Facility and the effectiveness of each. (author). 1 tab., 9 figs

  10. Chemically reducing decontamination method for radioactive metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention concerns a decontamination method of electrolytically reducing radioactive metal wastes, then chemically dissolving the surface thereof with a strong acid decontaminating solution. This method utilizes dissolving characteristics of stainless steels in the strong acid solution. That is, in the electrolytic reduction operation, a portion of the metal wastes is brought into contact with a strong acid decontaminating solution, and voltage and current are applied to the portion and keep it for a long period of time so as to make the potential of the immersed portion of the metal wastes to an active soluble region. Then, the electrolytic reduction operation is stopped, and the metal wastes are entirely immersed in the decontaminating solution to decontaminate by chemical dissolution. As the decontaminating solution, strong acid such as sulfuric acid, nitric acid is used. Since DC current power source capacity required for causing reaction in the active soluble region can be decreased, the decontamination facility can be minimized and simplified, and necessary electric power can be saved even upon decontamination of radioactive metal wastes made of stainless steels and having a great area. Further, chemical dissolution can be conducted without adding an expensive oxidizing agent. (N.H.)

  11. INTEGRATED VERTICAL AND OVERHEAD DECONTAMINATION SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities performed during FY98 and describes the planned activities for FY99. Accomplishments for FY98 include identifying and selecting decontamination, the screening of potential characterization technologies, development of minimum performance factors for the decontamination technology, and development and identification of Applicable, Relevant and Appropriate Regulations (ARARs).

  12. Testing and evaluation of eight decontamination chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report covers experimental work comparing eight different decontamination chemicals. Seven of these chemicals have some novelty, or are not currently in use at the ICPP. The eighth is a common ICPP decontamination reagent used as a baseline for effective comparison. Decontamination factors, waste generation values, and corrosion rates are tabulated for these chemicals. Recommendations are given for effective methods of non-sodium or low-sodium decontamination chemicals. The two most effective chemical for decontamination found in these test were a dilute hydrofluoric and nitric acid (HF/HNO3) mixture and a fluoroboric acid solution. The fluoroboric acid solution (1 molar) was by far the most effective decontamination reagent, but suffered the problem of generating significant final calcine volume. The HF/HNO3 solution performed a very good decontamination of the SIMCON coupons while generating only small amounts of calcine volume. Concentration variables were also tested, and optimized for these two solutions. Several oxidation/reduction decon chemical systems were also tested. These systems were similar to the TURCO 4502 and TURCO 4521 solutions used for general decontamination at the ICPP. A low sodium alternative, nitric acid/potassium permanganate, to the ''high sodium'' TURCO 4502 was tested extensively, optimized and recommended for general ICPP use. A reductive chemical solution, oxalic acid/nitric acid was also shown to have significant advantages

  13. Electrochemical decontamination system for actinide processing gloveboxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedman, D.E.; Lugo, J.L.; Ford, D.K.; Nelson, T.O.; Trujillo, V.L.; Martinez, H.E.

    1998-03-01

    An electrolytic decontamination technology has been developed and successfully demonstrated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for the decontamination of actinide processing gloveboxes. The technique decontaminates the interior surfaces of stainless steel gloveboxes utilizing a process similar to electropolishing. The decontamination device is compact and transportable allowing it to be placed entirely within the glovebox line. In this way, decontamination does not require the operator to wear any additional personal protective equipment and there is no need for additional air handling or containment systems. Decontamination prior to glovebox decommissioning reduces the potential for worker exposure and environmental releases during the decommissioning, transport, and size reduction procedures which follow. The goal of this effort is to reduce contamination levels of alpha emitting nuclides for a resultant reduction in waste level category from High Level Transuranic (TRU) to low Specific Activity (LSA, less than or equal 100 nCi/g). This reduction in category results in a 95% reduction in disposal and disposition costs for the decontaminated gloveboxes. The resulting contamination levels following decontamination by this method are generally five orders of magnitude below the LSA specification. Additionally, the sodium sulfate based electrolyte utilized in the process is fully recyclable which results in the minimum of secondary waste. The process bas been implemented on seven gloveboxes within LANL`s Plutonium Facility at Technical Area 55. Of these gloveboxes, two have been discarded as low level waste items and the remaining five have been reused.

  14. Recent advances in Canadian decontamination technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 1973 to 1994, 15 full- and one sub-system decontaminations of CANDU®reactors were carried out using CAN-DECON™ and CAN-DEREM Plus™ processes. The CAN-DECON™ process was developed in the late 1960s and was initially applied in Nuclear Power Demonstration Reactor and Gentilly-1 Nuclear Generating Station on a trial basis, before it was applied as full-system decontamination at Douglas Point in 1975. The decontaminations of the CANDU® reactors, although successful, did highlight some short-comings of the process, and the CAN-DEREM™ and CAN-DEREM Plus™ processes were developed to address these. This paper presents a brief review of the previous decontamination of CANDU® reactors, discussing some key process issues (e.g., carbon steel corrosion, waste volume and low decontamination factors). The paper reviews advances in these decontamination processes, focusing on several major improvements to the process. These include the development of CAN-DEREM™ and CAN-DEREM Plus™ processes to improve process effectiveness, reduction in carbon steel corrosion by use of an effective corrosion inhibitor and the development of a reducing agent to improve process effectiveness. The paper also provides an overview of some of the recent application of the decontamination processes at Chalk River Laboratories, and recent decontamination process qualification for a CANDU® reactor. (author)

  15. Decontamination manual of RI handling laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on experiences in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), the essential and practical knowledge of radioactive contamination and its decontamination, and the method and procedure of floor decontamination are described for researcher and managing person in charge of handling radioisotopes (RI) in RI handling laboratories. Essential knowledge concerns the uniqueness of solid surface contamination derived from RI half lives and quantities, surface contamination density limit, and mode/mechanism of contamination. The principle of decontamination is a single conduct with recognition of chemical form of the RI under use. As the practical knowledge, there are physical and chemical methods of solid surface decontamination. The latter involves use of inorganic acids, chelaters and surfactants. Removal and replacement of contaminated solid like floor material are often effective. Distribution mapping of surface contamination can be done by measuring the radioactivity in possibly contaminated areas, and is useful for planning of effective decontamination. Floor surface decontamination is for the partial and spread areas of the floor. It is essential to conduct the decontamination with reagent from the highly to less contaminated areas. Skin decontamination with either neutral detergent or titanium oxide is also described. (N.I.)

  16. The 3rd power unit roofing decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most features of the 3rd power unit (PU) roofing decontamination are described: 1) the most active materials were thrown into the 4th PU ruins before the Ukrytie construction completion; 2) the decontamination was fulfilled using remote-controlled mechanisms and manual devices (the main part). 6 figs.; 1 tab

  17. Decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this coordinated research programme (CRP) were to promote the exchange of information on the practical experience by Member States in decontamination and decommissioning. The scope of the programme included several areas of decontamination and decommissioning rather than focusing on a single aspect of it, in line with recommendation of the experts who participated in Phase 1 of the CRP. Experts felt that this format would generate better awareness of decontamination and decommissioning and would be more effective vehicle for the exchange of information by stimulating broader discussion on all aspects of decontamination and decommissioning. Special emphasis was given to the development of principles and methodologies to facilitate decommissioning and to the new methods and techniques for optimization of decontamination and disassembly of equipment. Refs, figs, tabs

  18. Liquid Effluent Retention Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF) is located in the central part of the Hanford Site. LERF is permitted by the State of Washington and has three liquid...

  19. GEOTHERMAL EFFLUENT SAMPLING WORKSHOP

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report outlines the major recommendations resulting from a workshop to identify gaps in existing geothermal effluent sampling methodologies, define needed research to fill those gaps, and recommend strategies to lead to a standardized sampling methodology.

  20. Concrete decontamination and demolition methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Division of Environmental Control Technology, requested Nuclear Energy Services to prepare a handbook for the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of DOE-owned and commercially-owned radioactive facilities. the objective of the handbook is to provide the nuclear industry with guidance on the state-of-the-art methods and equipment available for decommissioning and to provide the means to estimate decommissioning costs and environmental impact. The methods available for concrete decontamination and demolition are summarized to provide an overview of some of the state-of-the-art techniques to be discussed at this workshop. The pertinent information on each method will include the selection factors such as the rate of performance in terms of concrete removal per unit time (cubic yards per day), manpower required by craft, unit cost (dollars per cubic yard) and the advantages and disadvantages. The methods included in this overview are those that have been routinely used in nuclear and nonnuclear applications or demonstrated in field tests. These methods include controlled blasting, wrecking ball or slab, backhoe mounted ram, flame torch, thermic lance, rock splitter, demolition compound, sawing, core stitch drilling, explosive cutting, paving breaker and power chisel, drill and spall, scarifying, water cannon and grinding

  1. Psychosocial considerations for mass decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mass exposure to explosions, infectious agents, food-borne illnesses, chemicals or radiological materials may require mass decontamination that have critical psychosocial implications for the public and for both traditional and non-traditional responders in terms of impact and of response. Five main issues are common to mass decontamination events: (i) perception, (ii) somatisation, (iii) media role and communication, (iv) information sharing, (v) behavioural guidance and (vi) organisational issues. Empirical evidence is drawn from a number of cases, including Chernobyl; Goiania, Brazil; the sarin gas attack in Tokyo; the anthrax attacks in the USA; Three Mile Island; and by features of the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome pandemic. In this paper, a common platform for mass casualty management is explored and suggestions for mass interventions are proposed across the complete event timeline, from pre-event threat and warning stages through to the impact and reconstruction phases. Implication for responders, health care and emergency infrastructure, public behaviour, screening processes, risk communication and media management are described. (authors)

  2. Decontamination Technology Development for Nuclear Research Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The originative CO2 pellet blasting equipment was developed by improving additional components such as feed screw, idle roller and air-lock feeder to clear up the problems of freezing and discontinuity of blasting and by adopting pneumatically operated vacuum suction head and vacuum cup to prevent recontamination by collecting contaminant particulates simultaneously with the decontamination. The optimum decontamination process was established according to the kind of materials such as metal, concrete and plastic and the type of contaminants such as particulate, fixed chemical compound and oil. An excellent decontamination performances were verified by means of the lab-scale hot test with radioactive specimen and the technology demonstration in IMEF hot cell. The PFC dry decontamination equipment applicable to the surface contaminated with high radioactive particulate was developed. This equipment consists of the unit processes such as spray, collection, filtration and dry distillation designed originatively applicable to inside of dry hot cell. Through the demonstration of PFC spray decontamination process in IMEF hot cell, we secured on-site applicability and the decontamination efficiency more than 90 %. We investigated the characteristics of dismantled metal waste melting and the radionuclide(Co, Cs, U) distribution into ingot and slag by melting decontamination experiments using electric arc melter. We obtained the decontamination factors greater than 100 for Cs and of 10∼100 for uranium. The pilot scale(200 kg/batch) demonstration for melting decontamination was carried out successfully using high temperature melting facility at KAERI. The volume reduction factor of 1/7 and the economical feasibility of the melting decontamination were verified.

  3. Evaluation of an integrated approach involving chemical and biological processes for the detoxification of gold tailings effluent in Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical and bio-remediation measures for the detoxification of pollutants such as cyanide and heavy metals in mine tailings effluent have been developed over the years. The study sought to evaluate the decrease in the concentrations of Cu, Zn, Fe, Cd, As and Pb through the integration of the processes involving photo-oxidation, activated carbon, hydrogen peroxide and bacterial degradation to decontaminate wastewater from the gold ore treatment plant until release into the environment in Ghana. The levels of trace metals Cu (0.345 mg l-1), Zn (0.07 mg l-1) and Fe (0.146 mg l-1 ) in treated effluent released into natural water bodies after bacterial degradation was generally within international and local standards for effluent discharges. Except for As, the levels of Cd and Pb which are hazardous heavy metals that may pose adverse health and environmental effects were within acceptable limits. The toxicity of these metals were in the increasing order Pb < Cd < As. The anthropogenic source of As in the chemically processed arseno-pyritic rock ores of the study area and the marginal 14–49% efficiency of As of the different detoxification processes could have contributed to the high levels of As in the effluent. If optimal conditions are attained for the decontamination processes used, the multi-remediation approach could be an effective solution for the decontamination of mine tailings effluent. (au)

  4. Process of zirconium decontamination for recovering uranium and molybdenum contained in sulphuric mineral lixivia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process of zirconium decontamination for recovering uranium and molybdenum contained in sulphuric mineral lixivia, is presented. The process consists in uranium and molybdenum joint extraction using an aqueous solution of long chain alkyl amine in inert diluent, under controlled flow conditions, doing selective washing of rich uranium and molybdenum solvent with sulfuric solution containing zirconium complexant agent. The selective reextraction of uranium using sodium chloride sulfuric solution, and the molybdenum final reextraction using sodium carbonate aqueous solution are done, obtaining uranium and molybdenum final concentrates by precipitation. The final concentrates are obtained with purity grades adjusted to commercial specifications. (M.C.K.)

  5. Decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contamination is the presence of radioactive substances in or on the materials, human body or other places where it is undesirable or could be harmful. Contamination in nuclear installation may occur during normal operation or due to occurrences of incident or accident. Contamination may result in external as well as internal exposure of the radiation workers. External exposure is from the deposited activity in or on the surfaces. Internal exposure is either due to inhalation of resuspended activity or due to skin absorption through cross contamination and failure of protective barriers or inadvertent ingestion, by mouth due to wrong hygienic habits. To prevent contamination in nuclear installations, efforts are to be made at each stage i.e., design, construction, commissioning, operation, maintenance and decommissioning

  6. Decontamination techniques for BWR power generation plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report describes various techniques used for decontamination in BWR power generation plants. Objectives and requirements for decontamination in BWR power plants are first discussed focusing on reduction in dose, prevention of spread of contamination, cleaning of work environments, exposure of equipment parts for inspection, re-use of decontaminated resources, and standards for decontamination. Then, the report outlines major physical, chemical and electrochemical decontamination techniques generally used in BWR power generation plants. The physical techniques include suction of deposits in tanks, jet cleaning, particle blast cleaning, ultrasonic cleaning, coating with special paints, and flushing cleaning. The chemical decontamination techniques include the use of organic acids etc. for dissolution of oxidized surface layers and treatment of secondary wastes such as liquids released from primary decontamination processes. Other techniques are used for removal of penetrated contaminants, and soft and hard cladding in and on equipment and piping that are in direct contact with radioactive materials used in nuclear power generation plants. (N.K.)

  7. Effect of Chemical Reagents in Foam Decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decontamination foam comprises at least one surfactant to generate the foam and one or more chemical reactants to achieve the dissolution of the contaminants at the solid surface. In order to improve the efficiency of decontamination foam, the present study attempts to find the optimum condition of chemical reagents to the foaming solution. This paper deals with understanding the effects of chemical reagents involved in foam decontamination efficiency, evaluation of side effect on foam stability and finally the improvement brought by formulation science. Basic experiments using the nanoparticle-based complex fluid decontamination foam have been performed in order to development of decontamination foam technology. Results show that in the case of coexistence of chemical reagents, for the purpose of the good foam ability and foam stability, it is necessary to increase the concentration of surfactant. In corrosion test, metal materials including carbon steel, stainless steel 304, aluminum, inconel 600 and cupper, generally corrosion solubility percent in nitric acid solution were higher than in phosphoric acid solution. Bench-scale testing was used to evaluate the efficacy of three decontamination formulations on contaminant carbon steel component of dry oven. The results shows decontamination factor was in the range of 6.1∼13.4. Results suggest that our foam formulations have a feasibility potential to removal of about 83∼93% total radioactivity in contaminant

  8. Effect of Chemical Reagents in Foam Decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Han Beom; Yoonm Inho; Jung, Chonghun; Choi, Wangkyu [Korea Atomic Energy research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The decontamination foam comprises at least one surfactant to generate the foam and one or more chemical reactants to achieve the dissolution of the contaminants at the solid surface. In order to improve the efficiency of decontamination foam, the present study attempts to find the optimum condition of chemical reagents to the foaming solution. This paper deals with understanding the effects of chemical reagents involved in foam decontamination efficiency, evaluation of side effect on foam stability and finally the improvement brought by formulation science. Basic experiments using the nanoparticle-based complex fluid decontamination foam have been performed in order to development of decontamination foam technology. Results show that in the case of coexistence of chemical reagents, for the purpose of the good foam ability and foam stability, it is necessary to increase the concentration of surfactant. In corrosion test, metal materials including carbon steel, stainless steel 304, aluminum, inconel 600 and cupper, generally corrosion solubility percent in nitric acid solution were higher than in phosphoric acid solution. Bench-scale testing was used to evaluate the efficacy of three decontamination formulations on contaminant carbon steel component of dry oven. The results shows decontamination factor was in the range of 6.1∼13.4. Results suggest that our foam formulations have a feasibility potential to removal of about 83∼93% total radioactivity in contaminant.

  9. Foam decontamination of the pneumatic transfer network at La Hague

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turchat, J.P.; Fournel, B. [CEA Cadarache, Dept. d' Entreposage et de Stockage des Dechets, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2001-07-01

    The foam cleaning process is based on the filling of an equipment with an aqueous foam containing suitable chemical reagents and, if necessary, its recirculation through a recycling loop. The major advantage of the technique is the reduction of the amount of liquid thus reducing the secondary waste production. Moreover, due to its high viscosity, the foam bed is able to carry solid contamination out of the equipment without needing a further dissolution of the solid deposit. The process has been recently experimented in La Hague on a 22 metres pipe. The pipe is part of the Pneumatic Transfer Network, which basic function is to transfer the small jugs containing liquid samples, from production points to laboratories in order to analyse them. As some contamination may incidentally exit from the jugs, it is necessary to dismantle sections of the pipe or to decontaminate the internal surfaces of the pipe essentially consisting of aluminium. The total length of the pipe network has been estimated in the range of 80 km. The CEA is working on the decontamination of the network since 1994 in association with COGEMA. A new process enabling the circulation of the foam under depression has been implemented. Furthermore, a mobile installation has been worked out by the CEA for this demonstration operation. (author)

  10. Foam decontamination of the pneumatic transfer network at La Hague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The foam cleaning process is based on the filling of an equipment with an aqueous foam containing suitable chemical reagents and, if necessary, its recirculation through a recycling loop. The major advantage of the technique is the reduction of the amount of liquid thus reducing the secondary waste production. Moreover, due to its high viscosity, the foam bed is able to carry solid contamination out of the equipment without needing a further dissolution of the solid deposit. The process has been recently experimented in La Hague on a 22 metres pipe. The pipe is part of the Pneumatic Transfer Network, which basic function is to transfer the small jugs containing liquid samples, from production points to laboratories in order to analyse them. As some contamination may incidentally exit from the jugs, it is necessary to dismantle sections of the pipe or to decontaminate the internal surfaces of the pipe essentially consisting of aluminium. The total length of the pipe network has been estimated in the range of 80 km. The CEA is working on the decontamination of the network since 1994 in association with COGEMA. A new process enabling the circulation of the foam under depression has been implemented. Furthermore, a mobile installation has been worked out by the CEA for this demonstration operation. (author)

  11. Summary of decontamination cover manufacturing experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulrich, G.B.; Berry, H.W.

    1995-02-01

    Decontamination cover forming cracks and vent cup assembly leaks through the decontamination covers were early manufacturing problems. The decontamination cover total manufacturing process yield was as low as 55%. Applicable tooling and procedures were examined. All manufacturing steps from foil fabrication to final assembly leak testing were considered as possible causes or contributing factors to these problems. The following principal changes were made to correct these problems: (1) the foil annealing temperature was reduced from 1375{degrees} to 1250{degrees}C, (2) the decontamination cover fabrication procedure (including visual inspection for surface imperfections and elimination of superfluous operations) was improved, (3) the postforming dye penetrant inspection procedure was revised for increased sensitivity, (4) a postforming (prewelding) 1250{degrees}C/1 h vacuum stress-relief operation was added, (5) a poststress relief (prewelding) decontamination cover piece-part leak test was implemented, (6) the hold-down fixture used during the decontamination cover-to-cup weld was modified, and concomitantly, and (7) the foil fabrication process was changed from the extruding and rolling of 63-mm-diam vacuum arc-remelted ingots (extrusion process) to the rolling of 19-mm-square arc-melted drop castings (drop cast process). Since these changes were incorporated, the decontamination cover total manufacturing process yield has been 91 %. Most importantly, more than 99% of the decontamination covers welded onto vent cup assemblies were acceptable. The drastic yield improvement is attributed primarily to the change in the foil annealing temperature from 1375{degrees} to 1250{degrees}C and secondarily to the improvements in the decontamination cover fabrication procedure.

  12. Summary of decontamination cover manufacturing experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decontamination cover forming cracks and vent cup assembly leaks through the decontamination covers were early manufacturing problems. The decontamination cover total manufacturing process yield was as low as 55%. Applicable tooling and procedures were examined. All manufacturing steps from foil fabrication to final assembly leak testing were considered as possible causes or contributing factors to these problems. The following principal changes were made to correct these problems: (1) the foil annealing temperature was reduced from 1375 degrees to 1250 degrees C, (2) the decontamination cover fabrication procedure (including visual inspection for surface imperfections and elimination of superfluous operations) was improved, (3) the postforming dye penetrant inspection procedure was revised for increased sensitivity, (4) a postforming (prewelding) 1250 degrees C/1 h vacuum stress-relief operation was added, (5) a poststress relief (prewelding) decontamination cover piece-part leak test was implemented, (6) the hold-down fixture used during the decontamination cover-to-cup weld was modified, and concomitantly, and (7) the foil fabrication process was changed from the extruding and rolling of 63-mm-diam vacuum arc-remelted ingots (extrusion process) to the rolling of 19-mm-square arc-melted drop castings (drop cast process). Since these changes were incorporated, the decontamination cover total manufacturing process yield has been 91 %. Most importantly, more than 99% of the decontamination covers welded onto vent cup assemblies were acceptable. The drastic yield improvement is attributed primarily to the change in the foil annealing temperature from 1375 degrees to 1250 degrees C and secondarily to the improvements in the decontamination cover fabrication procedure

  13. Decontamination of Rooibostea by radurization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microbiological quality of a 'raw' agricultural commodity such as Rooibos tea is determined by a set of factors during harvesting and processing. Results suggest that a fermentation process takes place during processing, with members of the Enterobacteriaceae playing a dominant role. Against this background, as well as fluctuating hygienic conditions during processing, the high microbial population (107 to 5 x 108 /g) and even the possible presence of food-borne pathogens such as salmonellae, may be explaned. No real quarantee for the microbiological status of the product can be given, unless it is subjected to a terminal decontamination process (preferably after final packaging). Radurisation appears to be an ideal process for this purpose, and treatment at 8 kGy resulted in more than a 5000-fold (>99,9%) reduction of the microbial population. This was sufficient to eliminate all pathogens without harming the organoleptic quality of the product

  14. Decontamination formulation with sorbent additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker; Mark D. , Comstock; Robert H.

    2007-10-16

    A decontamination formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents, and toxic industrial chemicals. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack, and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The formulation includes at least one solubilizing agent, a reactive compound, a bleaching activator, a sorbent additive, and water. The highly adsorbent, water-soluble sorbent additive (e.g., sorbitol or mannitol) is used to "dry out" one or more liquid ingredients, such as the liquid bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate) and convert the activator into a dry, free-flowing powder that has an extended shelf life, and is more convenient to handle and mix in the field.

  15. Radiation decontamination of poultry viscera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamdar, S.N. [Food Technology Division, FIPLY, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)], E-mail: snjam2@yahoo.com; Harikumar, P. [Food Technology Division, FIPLY, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2008-04-15

    Application of gamma radiation for decontamination of poultry viscera was examined. Exposure to a dose of 20 kGy rendered the viscera sterile (<1 CFU/10 g tissue), while 5 and 10 kGy reduced the total bacterial count by 4 and 6 log{sub 10} cycles, respectively, eliminating the coliforms to <1 CFU/g of tissue. Analysis of organoleptic and biochemical parameters [proximate composition, total volatile basic nitrogen (TVBN), lipid peroxidation (TBARS value), and levels of TCA soluble peptides and proteolytic enzyme] showed that gamma irradiation (20 kGy) followed by storage at 4 deg. C for 62 days induced no significant change (except lipid peroxidation) in the acceptability of poultry viscera. However, storage at ambient temperature (26 {sup o}C) produced enhanced levels of TVBN and TCA soluble products accompanied by higher drip loss. Activities of proteolytic enzymes, except acid protease, did not show any significant change during post-irradiation storage at either temperature.

  16. Contamination and decontamination in Fukushima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application of International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendation, decontamination, nuclear waste repository, agriculture crisis, and contamination and uncleanness are described. The first failure in application of ICRP recommendation was to decide 20 mSv of reference level, because the work site could not take the special measures by this value. The next failure was to change many reference levels to the lowest values. It was important to decide the values depending on the conditions of sites. A model of nuclear waste repository, which prevents the diffusion of Cs, is proposed. In order to solve the problem of agricultural land containing Cs, we find a control method that the cultivated crops do not absorb the radioactive Cs. The education for basic knowledge of radioactive substances, its health effects and contamination will help to perform the reasonable and best decision making for safety. (S.Y.)

  17. Guide for decontaminating swimming pool at schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of TEPCO Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident due to the Great East Japan Earthquake, a huge amount of radioactive materials was widely dispersed and precipitated into the environment. Swimming pools in Fukushima prefectures were contaminated with the radioactives. We JAEA carried out several demonstration tests to decontaminate the radioactives and discharge the pool water safely. We concluded the results obtained from the tests as 'Guide for decontaminating Swimming Pool at School' and released it quickly. Following this, we also released the guide in English. This manuscript, as an experimental report of the swimming pool water decontamination, is consisted from the guide in Japanese and English prepared. (author)

  18. Mechanical and chemical decontamination of surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decontamination does not mean more than a special technique of cleaning surfaces by methods well known in the industry. The main difference consists in the facts that more than just the visible dirt is to be removed and that radioactive contamination cannot be seen. Especially, intensive mechanical and chemical carry-off methods are applied to attack the surfaces. In order to minimize damages caused to the surfaces, the decontamination method is to adapt to the material and the required degree of decontamination. The various methods, their advantages and disadvantages are described, and the best known chemical solutions are shown. (orig./RW)

  19. Recent developments in full-system decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent studies designed to qualify full-system decontamination as a dose reduction measure in U.S. commercial LWRs are summarized. An on-site decontamination of discharged BWR fuel bundles and highly irradiated stainless steel specimens showed no adverse effects when alkaline permanganate LOMI, a solvent was used. AP/CAN-DECON a solvent led to intergranular attack of some fuel bundle components fabricated from Inconel X-750. A cost-benefit study showed full-system decontamination to be cost-effective if performed as part of a major outage. Plans for further work are identified. (author)

  20. Deactivation, Decontamination and Decommissioning Project Summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, David Shane; Webber, Frank Laverne

    2001-07-01

    This report is a compilation of summary descriptions of Deactivation, Decontamination and Decommissioning, and Surveillance and Maintenance projects planned for inactive facilities and sites at the INEEL from FY-2002 through FY-2010. Deactivations of contaminated facilities will produce safe and stable facilities requiring minimal surveillance and maintenance pending further decontamination and decommissioning. Decontamination and decommissioning actions remove contaminated facilities, thus eliminating long-term surveillance and maintenance. The projects are prioritized based on risk to DOE-ID, the public, and the environment, and the reduction of DOE-ID mortgage costs and liability at the INEEL.

  1. Decontamination formulation with additive for enhanced mold remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Mark D.; Irvine, Kevin; Berger, Paul; Comstock, Robert

    2010-02-16

    Decontamination formulations with an additive for enhancing mold remediation. The formulations include a solubilizing agent (e.g., a cationic surfactant), a reactive compound (e.g., hydrogen peroxide), a carbonate or bicarbonate salt, a water-soluble bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate), a mold remediation enhancer containing Fe or Mn, and water. The concentration of Fe.sup.2+ or Mn.sup.2+ ions in the aqueous mixture is in the range of about 0.0001% to about 0.001%. The enhanced formulations can be delivered, for example, as a foam, spray, liquid, fog, mist, or aerosol for neutralization of chemical compounds, and for killing certain biological compounds or agents and mold spores, on contaminated surfaces and materials.

  2. Optimization of decontamination strategy for CANDU-PHW reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical models of the decontamination process are developed and combined with an existing model of 60Co production in CANDU PHW reactors to predict the effects of decontamination on long term 60Co build-up in reactor primary heat transport systems. The effects of decontamination interval, decontamination factor, and post-decontamination corrosion release are calculated. An optimum decontamination strategy for a Pickering G.S. type reactor is developed on the basis of a cost-benefit analysis. This study indicates that the optimum decontamination interval is approximately six years. This optimum interval is relatively insensitive to variations in the costs of personnel exposure, the cost of a decontamination, the decontamination factor, and the post-decontamination corrosion model used. (author)

  3. Actinides separation and long-lived fission products from the high activity effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this document is to study the decontamination of a high activity effluent in minor actinides-α transmitters (241Am, 243Am, 243Cm, 245Cm, 237Np, 238Pu, 242Pu, 235U, 238U) and long-life fissions products (133Cs, 137Cs) and then the separation of Am, Cm, Np, Cs and Pu, U traces. (TEC). 16 figs., 1 tab

  4. Evidence based decontamination protocols for the removal of external Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) from contaminated hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvivier, Wilco F; Peeters, Ruth J P; van Beek, Teris A; Nielen, Michel W F

    2016-02-01

    External contamination can cause false positive results in forensic hair testing for drugs of abuse and is therefore a major concern when hair evidence is used in court. Current literature about decontamination strategies is mainly focused on external cocaine contamination and no consensus on the best decontamination procedure for hair samples containing cannabinoids has been reached so far. In this study, different protocols with solvents, both organic as well as aqueous, were tested on blank and drug user hair for their performance on removing external cannabis contamination originating from either smoke or indirect contact with cannabis plant material. Smoke contamination was mimicked by exposing hair samples to smoke from a cannabis cigarette and indirect contact contamination by handling hair with cannabis contaminated gloves or hands. Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) levels in the hair samples and wash solvents were determined using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Aqueous surfactant solutions removed more THC contamination compared to water, but much less than organic solvents. Methanol, dichloromethane and chloroform were most efficient in removing THC contamination. Due to its lower environmental impact, methanol was chosen as the preferred decontamination solvent. After testing of different sequential wash steps on externally contaminated blank hair, three protocols performed equally well, removing all normal level and more than 99% of unrealistically high levels of external cannabis contamination. Thorough testing on cannabis users' hair, both as such and after deliberate contamination, showed that using these protocols all contamination could be washed from the hair while no incorporated THC was removed from truly positive samples. The present study provides detailed scientific evidence in support of the recommendations of the Society of Hair Testing: a protocol using a single methanol wash followed by a single aqueous

  5. Critical review of advanced decontamination methods and their application and selection of methods suitable for disposal decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is structured as follows: (i) Critical review of advanced decontamination methods (chemical methods; electrochemical methods; mechanical methods - high-pressure water jet, abrasive methods, ultrasonic methods); (ii) Effective management of the entire decontamination process; (iii) Proposal for advanced decontamination methods suitable for disposal decontamination; and (iv) Effect of decontamination on waste management. It is concluded that (i) No single universal method exists for efficient decontamination of different materials, so a combination of methods must be used; (ii) The decontamination process should be optimised so that its cost should not exceed the cost of contaminated material handling without decontamination. The following methods were selected for additional examination: dry abrasive blasting, chemical decontamination, and ultrasonic decontamination. (P.A.)

  6. Processing of miscellaneous radioactive effluents by continous flocculation decantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the nuclear power plant of Chooz an installation for flocculation and chemical precipitation has been built to treat miscellaneous radioactive effluents continuously. It is an industrial prototype of 5 m3/h resulting of several years of research, first on lab scale in a discontinous system and finally in a continuous pilot plant of small size (500 l/h). The process is based on the adsorption of radioactivity on a floc of copper-ferrocyanide precipitated by ferric chloride. The water is then filtered. After a series of preliminary tests and modifications, it has been possible to develop a technique which satisfies the specified decontamination conditions and to reduce the discharges of radioactivity to the Meuse to only 5 - 10% of the authorized limits. The process aims principally at the treatment of laundry waste, but other effluents such as drains from the rocks, pool water and used decontamination solutions (of the primary pumps) have been treated. A technico-economic evaluation of the process in comparison with evaporation is clearly in favour of the flocculation. 31 figs, 40 tables, 12 refs

  7. Metal Surface Decontamination by the PFC Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PFC (per-fluorocarbon) spray decontamination equipment was fabricated and its decontamination behavior was investigated. Europium oxide powder was mixed with the isotope solution which contains Co-60 and Cs-137. The different shape of metal specimens artificially contaminated with europium oxide powder was used as the surrogate contaminants. Before and after the application of the PFC spray decontamination method, the radioactivity of the metal specimens was measured by MCA. The decontamination factors were in the range from 9.6 to 62.4. The spent PFC solution was recycled by distillation. Before and after distillation, the turbidity of PFC solution was also measured. From the test results, it was found that more than 98% of the PFC solution could be recycled by a distillation. (authors)

  8. Plasma Air Decontamination System (PADS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed Plasma Air Decontamination System (PADS) is a trace contaminant control device based on non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma technology that...

  9. Surface decontamination using dry ice snow cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The water washing and steam blast cleaning method are currently used in nuclear power plants in decontamination. These methods produce lots of secondary wastes and tend to damage the work surface. A dry ice snow cleaning device with an adjustable nozzle was developed for the decontamination purpose. Glass with finger prints and scratched acrylic plastics surface with adsorbed oil-dust mixture were tested to see the cleaning ability of the developed device. Traces of finger prints and oil-dust mixture could not be detected after cleaning. The radioactivity of pump housing in a primary system of Wolsung Nuclear Power Plant was also tested. The maximum of 82% of radioactivity was reduced after dry ice snow cleaning. This device is expected to be used in decontamination of expensive electronic and optical instruments and detectors that cannot be decontaminated by water

  10. Urban Decontamination Experience at Pripyat Ukraine - 13526

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paskevych, Sergiy [Institute for Safety Problems of Nuclear Power Plants, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 36 a Kirova str. Chornobyl, Kiev region, 07200 (Ukraine); Voropay, Dmitry [Federal State Unitary Enterprise ' Russian State Center of Inventory and Registration and Real Estate - Federal Bureau of Technical Inventory' , 37-2 Bernadsky Prospekt, Moscow Russia 119415 (Russian Federation); Schmieman, Eric [Battelle Memorial Institute, PO Box 999 MSIN K6-90, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes the efficiency of radioactive decontamination activities of the urban landscape in the town of Pripyat, Ukraine. Different methods of treatment for various urban infrastructure and different radioactive contaminants are assessed. Long term changes in the radiation condition of decontaminated urban landscapes are evaluated: 1. Decontamination of the urban system requires the simultaneous application of multiple methods including mechanical, chemical, and biological. 2. If a large area has been contaminated, decontamination of local areas of a temporary nature. Over time, there is a repeated contamination of these sites due to wind transport from neighboring areas. 3. Involvement of earth-moving equipment and removal of top soil by industrial method achieves 20-fold reduction in the level of contamination by radioactive substances, but it leads to large amounts of waste (up to 1500 tons per hectare), and leads to the re-contamination of treated areas due to scatter when loading, transport pollutants on the wheels of vehicles, etc.. (authors)

  11. Decontamination of laryngoscopes in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucx, M J; Dankert, J; Beenhakker, M M; Harrison, T E

    2001-01-01

    In this study the decontamination procedures of laryngoscopes in Dutch hospitals are described, based on a structured telephone questionnaire. There were substantial differences between decontamination procedures in Dutch hospitals and the standards of the APIC (Association of Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology), CDC (Centers of Disease Control) and ASA (American Society of Anesthesiology) were met in full in 19.4% of the hospitals. The standards of manual decontamination, used in 78% of the 139 hospitals, were particularly disappointing; manual cleaning was considered inadequate in 22.9% of these hospitals and manual disinfection did not meet the standards of the APIC, CDC or ASA in any of these hospitals. Decontamination by instrument cleaning machines as a standard procedure was used in 30 (22%) hospitals. In three of these hospitals the blades were subsequently sterilized. We suggest adherence to the infection control guidelines of the CDC, APIC and ASA, until the safety of less conservative infection control practices are demonstrated. PMID:11575419

  12. Dilute chemical decontamination program. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An evaluation of dilute chemical decontamination technology for Boiling Water Reactor (BWRs) was completed under the Dilute Chemical Decontamination Program. An integrated process was developed and demonstrated under simulated BWR decontamination chemical conditions using a 76 cm long section of 15 cm piping removed from an operating BWR. Reasonable process conditions are: 0.012 M oxalic acid and 0.005 M citric acid at pH 3.0 and 900C with a controlled dissolved oxygen concentration of 0.75 ppM. A novel reagent regeneration process using anion-exchange resin preloaded with oxalate and citrate anions was developed to remove the dissolved corrosion products, including Fe(III), from solution during the decontamination. A limited corrosion testing program was completed and no severe adverse effects were identified

  13. Plasma Air Decontamination System (PADS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed Plasma Air Decontamination System (PADS) is a trace contaminant control device based on non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma technology. Compared to...

  14. PROCESS OF DECONTAMINATING MATERIAL CONTAMINATED WITH RADIOACTIVITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overholt, D.C.; Peterson, M.D.; Acken, M.F.

    1958-09-16

    A process is described for decontaminating metallic objects, such as stainless steel equipment, which consists in contacting such objects with nltric acid in a concentration of 35 to 60% to remove the major portion of the contamination; and thereafter contacting the partially decontaminated object with a second solution containing up to 20% of alkali metal hydroxide and up to 20% sodium tartrate to remove the remaining radioactive contaminats.

  15. Depressurized pipes decontamination by using circulation foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decontamination of pipes remains a necessity in order to reduce the radiation level during maintenance or dismantling operations but it is not so easy to do it, especially in case of a long pipe network. To achieve this operation, the use of chemistry is one of the more relevant methods; moreover, the liquid waste production still remains an issue that it can be avoided by the use of decontamination foams. (authors)

  16. Processing of waste solutions from electrochemical decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of electropolishing as a decontamination technique will be effective only if we can minimize the amount of secondary waste requiring disposal and economically recycle part of the decontamination electrolyte. Consequently, a solution purification method is needed to remove the dissolved contamination and metal in the electrolyte. This report describes the selection of a purification method for a phosphoric acid electrolyte from the following possible acid reclamation processes: ion exchange, solvent extraction, precipitation, distillation, electrolysis, and membrane separation

  17. LASL experience in decontamination of the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This discussion represents one part of a major effort in soil decontamination at the Los Alamos site. A contaminated industrial waste line in the Los Alamos townsite was removed, and a plutonium incineration facility, and a filter building contaminated with actinium-227 were dismantled. The former plutonium handling facility has been decontaminated, and canyons and an old firing site contaminated with strontium-90 have been surveyed

  18. Chemical Decontamination at Browns Ferry Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In May, 2002, the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Board of Directors approved the recovery and restart of Unit 1 at Browns Ferry Nuclear Station. As an initial step in the site characterization and restart feasibility review, a majority of the primary reactor circuit was chemically decontaminated. Close cooperation between TVA and vendor personnel resulted in project completion ahead of schedule with outstanding results. The final average decontamination factors were excellent, and the final dose rates were very low, with contact readings on most points between one and three mRem/hr. In addition to allowing TVA to do a complete and thorough job of determining the feasibility of the Unit 1 restart, the decontamination effort will greatly reduce personnel exposure during plant recovery, both whole body exposure to gamma radiation and airborne exposure during pipe replacement efforts. The implementation of lessons learned from previous decontamination work performed at Browns Ferry, as well as decontamination efforts at other plants aided greatly in the success. Specific items of note are: (1) The initial leak check of the temporary decontamination system should include ancillary systems such as the spent resin system, as well as the main circulation loop. This could save time and dose exposure if leaks are discovered before the use of such systems is required. (2) Due to the quick turnaround time from the award of contract, a vendor representative was onsite early in the project to help with engineering efforts and procedures. This aided greatly in completing preparations for the decontamination. (3) The work was performed under a single maintenance activity. This resulted in great craft and plant support. (4) The constant coverage by the site's decontamination flush directors provided timely plant support and interface. (5) The FPC system isolation and back flushing to prevent residual chemicals from being left in the FPC system should have been addressed in more

  19. Collection of lectures delivered at decontamination course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The collection contains 10 lectures read at the decontamination workshop DEK '85 held between 29-31 Oct 1985 at the Nuclear Research Institute at Rez, all of which fall under the INIS Subject Scope. The workshop, whose first course was held in 1975, is destined for personnel of various institutions who are decontamination process users but also for designers of nuclear installations, personnel of safety of work inspectorates, hygiene services, etc. (Z.M.)

  20. Decontamination and disposal of PCB wastes.

    OpenAIRE

    Johnston, L E

    1985-01-01

    Decontamination and disposal processes for PCB wastes are reviewed. Processes are classed as incineration, chemical reaction or decontamination. Incineration technologies are not limited to the rigorous high temperature but include those where innovations in use of oxident, heat transfer and residue recycle are made. Chemical processes include the sodium processes, radiant energy processes and low temperature oxidations. Typical processing rates and associated costs are provided where possible.

  1. Criteria and evaluation of three decontamination techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Past decontamination and solvent recovery activities at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), which is part of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), have resulted in the accumulation of 1.5 million gallons of radioactively contaminated sodium-bearing liquid waste. Future decontamination activities at the ICPP could result in the production of 5 million gallons or more of sodium-bearing waste using the current decontamination techniques of chemical/water flushes and steam jet cleaning. This waste requires a large amount of cold chemical additive to process because the low melting temperatures of sodium and potassium salts cause agglomeration in the bed of the calciner vessel. Criteria have been established for evaluating methods and technologies available for decontaminating equipment and facilities. The criteria were weighted according to their relative importance using a Kepner-Tregoe Problem Solving process. These criteria were used to rank three decontamination techniques new to the ICPP: laser ablation, liquid abrasive blasting and CO2 pellet blasting, against the standard decontamination techniques of sodium-based chemical cleaning and water/steam jets used

  2. Decontamination of skin in emergency situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report briefly discusses the organization of decontamination personnel and facilities to be used for decontamination in the event of an emergency, and outlines the author's experience in carrying out decontamination of the skin of tourists who came back to Japan after staying in Kiev at the time of the accident at Chernobyl (about 150 km away from Kiev). In Japan at present, no nuclear facilities seem to have sufficient personnel who are in charge of skin decontamination activities required in the event of an emergency, and emergency measures are generally limited to the development of emergency plans and implementation of drills. It is necessary to establish training courses for medical doctors and other medical personnel. Each plant has plans for skin decontamination procedures designed for professional workers in the plant. Plans should also be established for general people who might suffer skin decontamination in the event of an accident. What is the most important is to ease their anxiety about the contamination of their skin. The procedures, including washing and shampooing, used for the tourist returning from Kiev are described, and some problems encountered or expected to occur in similar cases are outlined and discussed. (Nogami, K.)

  3. Decontamination and rehabilitation of CELESTE I facility from IPEN-CNEN/SP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is a continuation of the work reported during the IV-CGEN meeting. It deals with the decontamination/intervention of IPEN's Rand D reprocessing installation named CELESTE I. An evaluation of the radiological risks observed inside the hot cells are presented. The internal contamination was due to Am-241, Cs-137, Ce-144, U-238, Th-234, U-235, Ra-226 and Pu-239, in small amounts. Experiments on chemical decontamination have shown the best methodology and chemicals that must be used on stainless steel surface and other construction materials from the hot cells. It was concluded that nitric acid 1M and the complexing agent EDTA (aqueous solution 0,1M) have presented the desired effects to reduce the contamination. Due to surface contamination level in the hot cells, a first chemical remote decontamination was required in order to reduce the gross alpha, beta and gamma activities, followed by a direct cleaning and local decontamination. These actions make possible to remove and replace equipment as well as to take out the wastes. (author)

  4. Detritiation of Tritiated Effluent Gas and Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Do Hee; Kim, Kwang Rag; Paek, Seung Woo; Lee, Min Soo; Yim, Sung Paal; Chung Hong Suk

    2007-06-15

    In a demonstration scale equipment for treatment of tritium in off-gas, Pt/SDBC as oxidation catalyst and Zeolite 13X as adsorbent was charged in the beds, respectively. It was confirmed from the performance test that decontamination factor of the equipment showed more than 100 under the flow rate of off-gas of 90 l/hr and at the temperature of 65 {approx} 80 .deg. C. A small scale CECE process has been developed combining LPCE catalytic column with SPE (solid polymer electrolyte) electrolysis. The catalytic column was a trickle-bed type packed with the mixture of 1 wt% Pt/SDBC catalyst and 4 mm Dixon wire-mesh ring. The experimental results of the CECE process proved that the decontamination factor of 13 {approx} 20 under the operating conditions of the water of the 4 l/day and the effluent hydrogen gas of 16.2 mol/h. A design code of CECE process also developed which will be applied the tritium industry. An experimental method for the reduction of tritiated organic waste by using catalytic oxidation was tested in a heated catalytic reactor of 0.5 wt% Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The simulated organic liquid was converted to water over 99%. A gas chromatographic column material was developed for the separation of mixed hydrogen isotopes. 17 wt% Pd-Pt on alumina showed 90% separation efficiency at 77 % yield for the separation of 29.2 % D{sub 2}-H{sub 2} gas mixture.

  5. Effluent polishing by means of advanced oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three different Advanced Oxidation Processes (ozonation at pH 7.5, electron beam irradiation and a combination ozonation/electron beam irradiation) have been applied to study decomposition of aqueous naphthalene-1,5-disulfonic acid (1,5-NDSA) with regard to mineralization and formation of biodegradable intermediates. Formation of biodegradable intermediates could not be indicated for any of the processes used, single electron beam irradiation treatment was the most efficient process for mineralization of organic carbon contained in aqueous 1,5-NDSA. Applied to a real wastewater effluent from a mixed municipal/industrial wastewater electron beam irradiation with a radiation dose of 2 kGy was sufficient to reduce the concentrations of all naphthalene sulfonic acids and some of the alkylphenol ethoxylates by about 2 orders of magnitude. Moreover, high energy electrons effectively inactivate indicator bacteria in effluents from municipal wastewater treatment plants and eliminate simultaneously any estrogenic activity originating from natural and synthetic hormones also contained in the wastewater effluents. Inactivation of bacteria and bacterial spores by electron beam irradiation was found to be practically unaffected by the water matrix and suspended solids. There is a strong indication from literature data that these findings are also relevant to viruses of concern in water hygiene like poliovirus. Cost analysis of the irradiation process based on actual numbers from the first full scale wastewater treatment plant in the Republic of Korea indicated a total cost of about 0.2 US$/m3 treated water for 2 kGy irradiation dose. (author)

  6. Integrating effluent management

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    The paper discusses a closed recycle shrimp farm in Thailand which integrates effluent management. The closed recycle system can reduce risk of heavy metals, pesticides, ammonia, and other toxic particles coming in with water from natural sources by reducing the quantity of water brought to the farm.

  7. Handling Technology of Low Decontaminated TRU Fuel for the Simplified Pelletizing Method Fuel Fabrication System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the FaCT project, the advanced aqueous reprocessing and the simplified pelletizing fuel fabrication has been developed principally because it was the most promising concept for the future commercial plant with capacity of 200 tHM a year. The advanced aqueous reprocessing consisted of simplified low decontaminated extraction process and minor actinides recovery process allows the products to remain some amount of fission products. This low decontaminated process brings benefit such as cost reduction for reprocessing, proliferation resistance etc. However, new development issues are given to the fuel fabrication system because source material is the low decontaminated TRU fuel produced from such reprocessing process. Various R and D for measures against high radio-activity and high heat generation by such fuel are going on toward to the C and R in 2010. The interim summarizing in 2008 generally shows that in-cell remote equipment is expected to be feasible and measures against heat generation is generally expected to be feasible as well. (author)

  8. A study of low-cost adsorbent materials for removing Cr(VI from aqueous waste effluent Estudio de materiales adsorbentes de bajo costo para remover Cr(VI de efluentes acuosos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castillo Serna Elianna

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available  

    The present paper shows very high potential for two types of solid (a commercial alumina and material obtained by composting, i.e. matured compost on Cr(VI adsorption/elimination in aqueous solution using a concentration range close to those previously detected in waste-water from Colombian industries. Both had important properties for eliminating Cr(VI, the compost being more important as it represents low-cost material. Optimal conditions for chromium adsorption on alumina and compost were established. Initial Cr(VI alumina concentration was 10 mgL-1, with 100 mL/g volume of solution per adsorbent mass, pH=2.0, 1 hour equilibrium time and 150 rpm stirring. For compost, initial Cr(VI concentration was = 3 mg L-1, 50 mL/g volume of solution per adsorbent mass, pH=2.5, 3 hour equilibrium time and 150 rpm stirring. The experiments showed that compost adsorption properties could be enhanced by adding small quantities of alumina. Compost could thus be chosen as a promising material for use in bioremediation chromium-containing waste water in a management programme for using solid waste in for minimising environmental impact.

     

     

    Chemical cleaning, decontamination and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical cleaning of process equipments and pipings in chemical/petrochemical industries is necessitated for improving operation, for preventing premature failures and for avoiding contamination. In developing a chemical formulation for cleaning equipments, the important aspects to be considered include (i) effective removal of corrosion products and scales, (ii) minimum corrosion of the base metal, (iii) easy to handle chemicals and (iv) economic viability. As on date, a wide variety of chemical formulations are available, many of them are either proprietory or patented. For evolving an effective formulation, knowledge of the oxides of various metals and alloys on the one hand and acid concentration, complexing agents and inhibitors to be incorporated on the other, is quite essential. Organic acids like citric acid, acetic acid and formic acid are more popular ones, often used with EDTA for effective removal of corrosion products from ferrous components. The report enumerates some of the concepts in developing effective formulations for chemical cleaning of carbon steel components and further, makes an attempt to suggest simple formulations to be developed for chemical decontamination. (author). 6 refs., 3 fi gs., 4 tabs

  9. Decontamination and decommissioning costing efforts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of a wide variety of facilities ranging from reactors to fuel cycle processing buildings throughout the country. The D and D effort represents a large financial investment and a considerable challenge for the DOE and contractor program and project managers. Specifically, the collection and sharing of useful cost data and development of cost estimates are difficult in an environment in which the availability of these data is limited and the technologies and project methods are evolving. Sound cost data are essential for developing project cost estimates; baselines; and project management, benchmarking, and continuous improvement purposes. This paper will focus on some initiatives that in coordination with other federal agencies and international organizations, the DOE Environmental Management Applied Cost Engineering (ACE) Team is taking to standardize cost definitions; to collect, analyze, and report D and D cost data; and to develop fast, accurate, and easy-to-use cost-estimating models for D and D work

  10. Decontamination Efficacy and Skin Toxicity of Two Decontaminants against Bacillus anthracis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad W Stratilo

    Full Text Available Decontamination of bacterial endospores such as Bacillus anthracis has traditionally required the use of harsh or caustic chemicals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a chlorine dioxide decontaminant in killing Bacillus anthracis spores in solution and on a human skin simulant (porcine cadaver skin, compared to that of commonly used sodium hypochlorite or soapy water decontamination procedures. In addition, the relative toxicities of these decontaminants were compared in human skin keratinocyte primary cultures. The chlorine dioxide decontaminant was similarly effective to sodium hypochlorite in reducing spore numbers of Bacillus anthracis Ames in liquid suspension after a 10 minute exposure. After five minutes, the chlorine dioxide product was significantly more efficacious. Decontamination of isolated swine skin contaminated with Bacillus anthracis Sterne with the chlorine dioxide product resulted in no viable spores sampled. The toxicity of the chlorine dioxide decontaminant was up to two orders of magnitude less than that of sodium hypochlorite in human skin keratinocyte cultures. In summary, the chlorine dioxide based decontaminant efficiently killed Bacillus anthracis spores in liquid suspension, as well as on isolated swine skin, and was less toxic than sodium hypochlorite in cultures of human skin keratinocytes.

  11. Loop cleanup with redox decontamination technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The corrosion rate of stainless steel in nitric acid solution will be enhanced by existence of Ce4+. The goal of this study is to develop a circular decontamination process in medium of nitric acid, in order to use it in a loop clean up. That needs a specially designed electrolytic cell to oxidize the Ce3+ into Ce4+. This regenerator's structure should be simple and easy to operate, and can meet the requirements of practical decontamination operation. The concentration of Ce4+ in the nitric acid solution was selected to provide a suitable corrosion rate to contaminated stainless steel. The total concentration of cerium (III+IV) was also optimized to ensure that the regeneration rate of Ce4+ could satisfy the consumption rate of Ce4+ during decontaminating process. The operation parameters were selected strictly on the basis of our experimental results, so that the regeneration rate of Ce4+ can be higher reasonably in proper operation conditions and not arise any problem related to safety of operation and nuclear aspects. It is considered that this decontamination process could be applied into either decommissioning or maintenance stage of nuclear facilities. The concentration of Ce4+ and temperature are the main factors for corrosion rate, other factors should also be considered during decision of decontamination process. With the regenerator developed under contract No 7959/RB could obtain sufficient decontamination factors, when use following conditions: concentration of Ce4+ is higher than 0.2 mol/1, the total concentration of cerium (III+IV) is higher than 0.4 mol/1, concentration of nitric acid is higher than 2 mol/1, temperature of decontamination operation is within 25 deg. C - 40 deg. C and temperature of regeneration is within 40 deg C - 50 deg.C

  12. Radiation dose reduction by chemical decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with the role of chemical decontamination for reducing radiation exposure during major maintenance activities like in-service inspection of coolant channels and EMCCR works on the Primary Heat Transport System and associated components. In order to achieve the man rem reduction, MAPS has successfully carried out six decontamination campaigns of PHT system, three for MAPS-1 and three for MAPS-2. The complexing agent EDTA used in the first four DCDs was changed over to Nitrilo Tri-Acetic acid (NTA) in the subsequent two DCDs and the beneficial effects of the same on dose reduction are detailed. With the use of Nitrilo Tri-Acetic acid (NTA) as complexing agent, the need to add during the process to augment the loss due to IX pickup and radiation decomposition was avoided as NTA displayed better radiation stability and was not getting picked up in the cation IX. Good decontamination factors were observed in the monel with NTA, as copper and nickel complexes of NTA had lower stability constants than that with EDTA. An overview of all these decontaminations along with the brief description of the process and benefits in terms of dose reduction is described. Further, the chemical decontamination procedures adopted for minimising the loose and the fixed contamination on the seal plugs of the 306 coolant channels of Unit-2 during EMCCR works is also presented. The pressure tubes are rolled into the end fittings which have got seal plugs to prevent the PHT water coming out of the system. The 612 seal plugs made of stainless steel were decontaminated using ∼ 10% diammonium hydrogen citrate maintaining a temperature of 70 to 80 deg C. All the 612 seal plugs were successfully decontaminated in 41 batches. The process details and results obtained are reviewed. (author)

  13. Decontamination of radionuclides on construction materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A wide variety of materials can become contaminated by radionuclides, either from a terrorist attack or an industrial or nuclear accident. The final disposition of these materials depends, in large part, on the effectiveness of decontamination measures. This study reports on investigations into the decontamination of a selection of building materials. The aim has been to find an effective, easy-to-use and inexpensive decontamination system for radionuclides of cesium and cobalt, considering both the chemical and physical nature of these potential contaminants. The basic method investigated was surface washing, due to its ease and simplicity. In the present study, a basic decontamination formulation was modified by adding isotope-specific sequestering agents, to enhance the removal of cesium(I) and cobalt(II) from such construction materials as concrete, marble, aluminum and painted steel. Spiking solutions contained 134Cs or 60Co, which were prepared by neutron activation in the SLOWPOKE-2 nuclear reactor facility at the Royal Military College of Canada. Gamma spectroscopy was used to determine the decontamination efficiency. The results showed that the addition of sequestering agents generally improved the radiological decontamination. Although the washing of both cesium and cobalt from non-porous materials, such as aluminum and painted steel, achieved a 90-95 % removal, the decontamination of concrete and marble was more challenging, due to the porous nature of the materials. Nevertheless, the removal efficiency from 6-year-old concrete increased from 10 % to approximately 50 % for cobalt(II), and from 18 to 55 % for cesium(I), with the use of isotope binding agents, as opposed to a simple water wash. (author)

  14. Self-Decontaminating Fibrous Materials Reactive toward Chemical Threats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromberg, Lev; Su, Xiao; Martis, Vladimir; Zhang, Yunfei; Hatton, T Alan

    2016-07-13

    Polymers that possess highly nucleophilic pyrrolidinopyridine (Pyr) and primary amino (vinylamine, VAm) groups were prepared by free-radical copolymerization of N,N-diallylpyridin-4-amine (DAAP) and N-vinylformamide (NVF) followed by acidic hydrolysis of NVF into VAm. The resulting poly(DAAP-co-VAm-co-NVF) copolymers were water-soluble and reacted with water-dispersible polyurethane possessing a high content of unreacted isocyanate groups. Spray-coating of the nylon-cotton (NYCO), rayon, and poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide) (Kevlar 119) fibers pretreated with phosphoric acid resulted in covalent bonding of the polyurethane with the hydroxyl groups on the fiber surface. A second spray-coating of aqueous solutions of poly(DAAP-co-VAm-co-NVF) on the polyurethane-coated fiber enabled formation of urea linkages between unreacted isocyanate groups of the polyurethane layer and the amino groups of poly(DAAP-co-VAm-co-NVF). Fibers with poly(DAAP-co-VAm-co-NVF) attached were compared with fibers modified by adsorption of water-insoluble poly(butadiene-co-pyrrolidinopyridine) (polyBPP) in terms of the stability against polymer leaching in aqueous washing applications. While the fibers modified by attachment of poly(DAAP-co-VAm-co-NVF) exhibited negligible polymer leaching, over 65% of adsorbed polyBPP detached and leached from the fibers within 7 days. Rayon fibers modified by poly(DAAP-co-VAm-co-NVF) were tested for sorption of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) in the presence of moisture using dynamic vapor sorption technique. Capability of the fibers modified with poly(DAAP-co-VAm-co-NVF) to facilitate hydrolysis of the sorbed DMMP in the presence of moisture was uncovered. The self-decontaminating property of the modified fibers against chemical threats was tested using a CWA simulant diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) in aqueous media at pH 8.7. Fibers modified with poly(DAAP-co-VAm-co-NVF) facilitated hydrolysis of DFP with the half-lives up to an order of magnitude

  15. Decontamination of some liquid wastes of medium activity with a new solvent type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decontamination of a reference MAWsub(s) (an alkaline solution coming from the solvent washing and an acidic solution consisting of the mixture of aqueous raffinates deriving from uranium and plutonium purification cycles) by hydroxamic acid is reported. The results of the ''in batch'' decontamination tests, using extraction chromatography techniques, are given. The extraction chromatography techniques do not give the expected performances for the tests in column. Discontinuous liquid extraction tests using traced solutions show that Pu, Am, Zr, Nb are extracted but not U and Ru. The strip of Pu, Am and Zr with an oxalic acid solution is quantitative. Continuous tests using mixer settler batteries, and a simulated alkaline solution and complete extraction-reextraction runs using a simulated solution are conducted. The results of a discontinuous conclusive experiments using a true alkaline solution coming from a reprocessing plant are given

  16. Decontamination of liquid nuclear wastes by fixation of radioactive elements on nickel and zinc ferrocyanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickel and zinc ferrocyanides are very efficient products for the removal of several ions from aqueous solutions. Owing to a preparation process by slow growth on solid alkaline ferrocyanide placed in a concentrated nickel or zinc solution, these products can be used in columns. The optimal recovery conditions of radioactive cesium and silver were determined on several types of nickel and zinc ferrocyanides. The decontamination factor for cesium or silver is over 1000 for synthetic solutions. The presence of other alkaline ions does not modify these results. In the case of nuclear liquid wastes containing lithium borate, the cesium decontamination remains high. Silver is generally retained with a good efficiency. However, the fixation is sometimes impossible owing to complex forms. This effect could be avoided by acidification. The drawback of ferrocyanides is a slight release of some cations of the products. 38 refs.; 5 figs.; 5 tabs

  17. General recommendations for decontamination procedures to individuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fundamental criteria in handling radioactive contaminated persons are discussed and methods of monitoring, including monitoring of contaminated wounds, as well as decontamination measures with reference to particularly exposed regions of the body are described. Each decontamination procedure has to be carried out cautiously and has to be stopped as soon as skin lesion would be ensured from too strong mechanical cleansing, in order to avoid any additional incorporation by an injured skin. As a rule, any residual radioactivity still adherent to the skin surface can be neglected as soon as avoidance of spreading of the contamination to surrounding areas is assured. Experience showed that contaminations with radioactive dust can be removed from the skin surface quite easily by such simple means like water and soap. Radioisotopes, however, as used in nuclear medicine, usually are having a higher adhesive effect to the skin surface, thus making conditions for decontamination more difficult. Measures related to the decontamination procedure such as monitoring, mode of sampling for bioassay in case of incidents, handling of waste resulting from decontamination, as well as self-protective aspects are discussed in the annex. (orig.)

  18. W-12 valve pit decontamination demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waste tank W-12 is a tank in the ORNL Low-Level Liquid Waste (LLLW) system that collected waste from Building 3525. Because of a leaking flange in the discharge line from W-12 to the evaporator service tank (W-22) and continual inleakage into the tank from an unknown source, W-12 was removed from service to comply with the Federal Facilities Agreement requirement. The initial response was to decontaminate the valve pit between tank W-12 and the evaporator service tank (W-22) to determine if personnel could enter the pit to attempt repair of the leaking flange. Preventing the spread of radioactive contamination from the pit to the environment and to other waste systems was of concern during the decontamination. The drain in the pit goes to the process waste system; therefore, if high-level liquid waste were generated during decontamination activities, it would have to be removed from the pit by means other than the available liquid waste connection. Remote decontamination of W-12 was conducted using the General Mills manipulator bridge and telescoping trolley and REMOTEC RM-10 manipulator. The initial objective of repairing the leaking flange was not conducted because of the repair uncertainty and the unknown tank inleakage. Rather, new piping was installed to empty the W-12 tank that would bypass the valve pit and eliminate the need to repair the flange. The radiological surveys indicated that a substantial decontamination factor was achieved

  19. Mechanical decontamination techniques for floor drain systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The unprecedented nature of cleanup activities at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) following the 1979 accident has necessitated the development of new techniques to deal with radiation and contamination in the plant. One of these problems was decontamination of floor drain systems, which had become highly contaminated with various forms of dirt and sludge containing high levels of fission products and fuel from the damaged reactor core. The bulk of this contamination is loosely adherent to the drain pipe walls; however, significant amounts of contamination have become incorporated into pipe wall oxide and corrosion layers and embedded in microscopic pits and fissures in the pipe wall material. The need to remove this contamination was recognized early in the TMI-2 cleanup effort. A program consisting of development and laboratory testing of floor drain decontamination techniques was undertaken early in the cleanup with support from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). Based on this initial research, two techniques were judged to show promise for use at TMI-2: a rotating brush hone system and a high-pressure water mole nozzle system. Actual use of these devices to clean floor drains at TMI-2 has yielded mixed decontamination results. The decontamination effectiveness that has been obtained is highly dependent on the nature of the contamination in the drain pipe and the combination of decontamination techniques used

  1. Decontamination of 125I in Medical Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiological laboratory for diagnoses was contaminated by 125I. A large-scale survey of gamma-radiation has been made in different locations of the floors and walls of the lab to determine the contaminated area and its activity. The activity level before decontamination for the wall and floor was 1400 and 2000 Bq/cm2 respectively. Decontamination was carried out by using ethyl alcohol, potassium permanganate, ethylene diamine tetracetic acid and tissue papers. Decontamination factor has been calculated and it was 175 and 200 for the wall and floor respectively. D and D computer code has been used to calculate Total Effective Dose Equivalent (TEDE). TEDE from the wall and floor before decontamination were 3.05 and 4.35 ( mSv/yr ) while after decontamination were 18 and 23μSv/yr respectively. These results are lower than the Egyptian and the international regulations (10 mSv/y for the public ) according to International Atomic Energy agency, IAEA, Safety Series, SS, no. 115 (1994).

  2. Radiation methods for decontamination of liquid wastes and ecological problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors discuss several possible approaches to the use of radiation for the purposes of rational use of water resources and protecting them from pollution and depletion. The authors note that radiation decontamination makes it possible to solve a number of important problems in protecting fundamental elements of the biosphere by: reducing the uptake of fresh water from natural sources for industrial and household needs and sharply cutting the release of unpurified waste water by creating circulating water systems based on rapid methods of thorough purification; employing a combination of different physical and chemical methods with a final stage that uses radiation-prolonged adsorption to give the water a high degree of purity; preventing bacterial contamination of soils when liquid and semiliquid wastes from cities and livestock farms are used as fertilizers; utilizing the excess active sludges that accumulate in biological treatment factilities as feed additives and fertilizer; and eliminating the release to the atmosphere of effluents from the incineration of highly polluted waste water which often contains carcinogenic and poisonous substances

  3. Assessment of the impact of textile effluents on microbial diversity in Tirupur district, Tamil Nadu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabha, Shashi; Gogoi, Anindita; Mazumder, Payal; Ramanathan, AL.; Kumar, Manish

    2016-03-01

    The expedited advent of urbanization and industrialization for economic growth has adversely affected the biological diversity, which is one of the major concerns of the developing countries. Microbes play a crucial role in decontaminating polluted sites and degrades pollution load of textile effluent. The present study was based on identification of microbial diversity along the Noyaal river of Tirupur area. River water samples from industrial and non-industrial sites and effluent samples of before and after treatment were tested and it was found that microbial diversity was higher in the river water at the industrial site (Kasipalayam) as compared to the non-industrial site (Perur). Similarly, the microbial populations were found to be high in the untreated effluent as compared to the treated one by conventional treatment systems. Similar trends were observed for MBR treatment systems as well. Pseudomonas sp., Achromobacter sp. (bacterial species) and Aspergillus fumigates (fungal species), found exclusively at the industrial site have been reported to possess decolorization potential of dye effluent, thus can be used for treatment of dye effluent. The comparison of different microbial communities from different dye wastewater sources and textile effluents was done, which showed that the microbes degrade dyestuffs, reduce toxicity of wastewaters, etc. From the study, it can be concluded that the microbial community helps to check on the pollutants and minimize their affect. Therefore, there is a need to understand the systematic variation in microbial diversity with the accumulation of pollution load through monitoring.

  4. Development of laser decontamination. 5. Decontamination test of the hot samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Process of laser decontamination system is as follows. As the material is irradiated by laser beam, its surface is instantaneously heated and ablated. Laser decontamination system is able to decontaminate thoroughly. In this work, the characteristics of laser beam transmission by optical fibers, and decontamination effect of laser beam irradiation to test pieces which are cut down of pipe in the hot facility, are experimented for apply laser decontamination technique to radioactive wastes treatment and decommissioning of nuclear fuel facilities. The results are as follows. (1) Beam transmission: Transmission of Q switch pulse YAG laser's beam by optical fibers are examined. Transmission energy is in proportion to incident energy to fiber. Transmission energy of bundled fiber is 168mJ to 406mJ of incident energy. In the case of incident energy was 425mJ, transmission energy was decrease, because some fibers of bundled fiber were damaged by laser beam. (2) Decontamination test of the hot samples: Counting rate of pipe test piece were decreased more than 90% by first irradiation of Q switch pulse YAG laser. Counting rate of pipe test piece were decreased no more than 4% by on and after second irradiation of Q switch pulse YAG laser. To move the test piece slowly, and to raise the density of irradiation energy, and to use the helium gas for auxiliary gas are effective to increase decontamination effect. (author)

  5. Zero effluent; Efluente zero

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro, Silvio Rogerio; Santos, Angelo Francisco dos [Liquigas Distribuidora S.A., Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    A scenery of water shortage and the search for profitability improvement obligate the companies to exercise their creativity and to adopt alternative methods to the conventional ones to preserve the environmental resources. The 'Effluent Zero' project comes from a paradigms changing that the environmental preservation is a necessary cost. It brings a new analysis approach of this problem with the purpose to adapt the investments and operational costs with the effluents treatment to the demands of the productive processes. In Liquigas, the project brought significant results; made a potential reduction of nearly 90% in the investments of the effluents treatment systems. That means nearly 13% in reduction in the total investments in modernization and upgrade of the existents companies installations and of 1,6% in the total operational costs of the Company. Further more, it has contributed for a reduction of until 43% of the water consumption in the bottling process of the Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG). This way, the project resulted in effective actions of environmental protection with relevant economic benefits. (author)

  6. Decontamination trade study for the Light Duty Utility Arm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various methods were evaluated for decontaminating the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA). Physical capabilities of each method were compared with the constraints and requirements for the LDUA Decontamination System. Costs were compared and a referred alternative was chosen

  7. Development of decontamination, decommissioning and environmental restoration technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Through the project of Development of decontamination, decommissioning and environmental restoration technology, the followings were studied. 1. Development of decontamination and repair technology for nuclear fuel cycle facilities 2. Development of dismantling technology 3. Development of environmental restoration technology. (author)

  8. Experiences with decontaminating tritium-handling apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium-handling apparatus has been decontaminated as part of the downsizing of the LLNL Tritium Facility. Two stainless-steel glove boxes that had been used to process lithium deuteride-tritide (LiDT) slat were decontaminated using the Portable Cleanup System so that they could be flushed with room air through the facility ventilation system. In this paper the details on the decontamination operation are provided. A series of metal (palladium and vanadium) hydride storage beds have been drained of tritium and flushed with deuterium, in order to remove as much tritium as possible. The bed draining and flushing procedure is described, and a calculational method is presented which allows estimation of the tritium remaining in a bed after it has been drained and flushed. Data on specific bed draining and flushing are given

  9. Training of skin decontamination and its results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the nuclear power and radioisotope handling facilities, one of the most important problems is a radioactive contamination on skin. Hand skin contamination occurs very often in the operation area and such surface contamination must be removed as soon as possible to prevent an internal contamination. From 1967 to 1975, training courses for skin decontamination had been held with total 536 of trainee based on the radiation protection manual at the Oarai Research Establishment of JAERI. In the training courses, fresh pig skin samples used instead of human skin were contaminated with 137Cs, 131I, 85Sr, 60Co, 144Ce, 88Y, 239Pu, fission products and activated metal corrosion particles, respectively. These samples were washed practically by each trainee with the skin decontamination method recommended in the manual. Results obtained in the training showed that such training itself is a significant work and this skin decontamination method is an excellent first aid. (auth.)

  10. Decontamination tests on tritium-contaminated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These tests are designed to try out various processes liable to be applied to the decontamination of a material contaminated with tritium. The samples are thin stainless- steel slabs contaminated in the laboratory with elements extracted from industrial installations. The measurement of the initial and residual activities is carried out using an open-window BERTHOLD counter. The best results are obtained by passing a current of pre-heated (300 deg. C) air containing water vapour. This process makes it possible to reach a decontamination factor of 99.5 per cent in 4 hours. In a vacuum, the operation has to be prolonged to 100 hours in order to obtain a decontamination factor of 99.2 per cent. Wet-chemical or electrolytic treatments are efficient but their use is limited by the inherent corrosion risks. A study of the reappearance of the contamination has made it possible to observe that this phenomenon occurs whatever the process used. (authors)

  11. Radioactive scrap metal decontamination technology assessment report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the DOE complex there exists a tremendous quantity of radioactive scrap metal. As an example, it is estimated that within the gaseous diffusion plants there exists in excess of 700,000 tons of contaminated stainless steel. At present, valuable material is being disposed of when it could be converted into a high quality product. Liquid metal processing represents a true recycling opportunity for this material. By applying the primary production processes towards the material's decontamination and re-use, the value of the strategic resource is maintained while drastically reducing the volume of material in need of burial. Potential processes for the liquid metal decontamination of radioactively contaminated metal are discussed and contrasted. Opportunities and technology development issues are identified and discussed. The processes compared are: surface decontamination; size reduction, packaging and burial; melting technologies; electric arc melting; plasma arc centrifugal treatment; air induction melting; vacuum induction melting; and vacuum induction melting and electroslag remelting

  12. Radioactive scrap metal decontamination technology assessment report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckentin, J.M.; Damkroger, B.K.; Schlienger, M.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Liquid Metal Processing Lab.

    1996-04-01

    Within the DOE complex there exists a tremendous quantity of radioactive scrap metal. As an example, it is estimated that within the gaseous diffusion plants there exists in excess of 700,000 tons of contaminated stainless steel. At present, valuable material is being disposed of when it could be converted into a high quality product. Liquid metal processing represents a true recycling opportunity for this material. By applying the primary production processes towards the material`s decontamination and re-use, the value of the strategic resource is maintained while drastically reducing the volume of material in need of burial. Potential processes for the liquid metal decontamination of radioactively contaminated metal are discussed and contrasted. Opportunities and technology development issues are identified and discussed. The processes compared are: surface decontamination; size reduction, packaging and burial; melting technologies; electric arc melting; plasma arc centrifugal treatment; air induction melting; vacuum induction melting; and vacuum induction melting and electroslag remelting.

  13. Biodegradation of concrete intended for their decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decontamination of sub-structural materials represents a stake of high importance because of the high volume generated. It is agreed then to propose efficient and effective processes. The process of bio-decontamination of the hydraulic binders leans on the mechanisms of biodegradation of concretes, phenomenon characterized in the 40's by an indirect attack of the material by acids stem from the microbial metabolism: sulphuric acid (produced by Thiobacillus), nitric acid (produced by Nitrosomonas and Nitrobacter) and organic acids (produced by fungi). The principle of the bio-decontamination process is to apply those microorganisms on the surface of the contaminated material, in order to damage its surface and to retrieve the radionuclides. One of the multiple approaches of the process is the use of a bio-gel that makes possible the micro-organisms application. (author)

  14. Decontamination of medical radioisotopes from hard surfaces using peelable polymer-based decontamination agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Medical radioisotopes used to treat and diagnose patients often contaminate surfaces in patient treatment rooms. They are typically short-lived and decay within a matter of days or weeks. However, down time in a medical facility related to radioisotope contamination is costly and can impact patient care. Most liquid or solid spills can be contained and disposed in radioactive wastes fairly completely and quickly; however residual contamination may remain on the contacted surface. Although liquid decontamination agents can be used to address the issue of residual contamination, they often require multiple applications with attendant scrubbing and wiping. Liquid decontamination can also produce large volumes of low-level radioactive waste. To look at reducing radioactive waste volumes, research was conducted on the efficacy of three low-volume peel able decontamination agents. Testing was performed on hard surfaces, such as vinyl composition floor tiles and stainless steel, which are found in many hospitals, research laboratories, and universities. The tiles were contaminated with the medical use isotopes of 99mTc, Tl-201, and I-131 and subsequently decontaminated with one of the three decontamination agents. Quantitative and qualitative data were obtained for each of three different peel able decontamination agent formulations. Quantitative data included environmental temperature and relative humidity, application thickness, dry time, contact time, and decontamination efficacy of the agents on the tested surfaces. Qualitative factors included ease of application and pee lability, as well as sag resistance and odor of each agent. Initial studies showed that under standard conditions there were reproducible differences in the decontamination efficacies among the three different decontamination formulations. (author)

  15. Decontamination of CAGR gas circulator components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the development and full-scale trial of two methods for removal of radioactive contamination on the surfaces of CAGR gas circulator components. The two methods described are a particle impact cleaning (PIC) decontamination technique and an electrochemical technique, 'electro-swabbing', which is based on the principle of decontamination by electro-polishing. In developing these techniques it was necessary to take account of the physical and chemical nature of the surface deposits on the gas circulator components; these were shown to consist of magnetite-type oxide and carbonaceous material. In order to follow the progress of the decontamination it was also necessary to develop a surface sampling technique which was effective and precise under these conditions; an electrochemical technique, employing similar principles to the electro-swabbing process, was developed for this purpose. The full-scale trial of the PIC decontamination technique was carried out on an inlet guide vane (IGV) assembly, this having been identified as the component from the gas circulator which contributes most to the radiation dose accumulated during routine circulator maintenance. The technique was shown to be practically viable and some 99% of the radioactive contamination was readily removed from the treated surfaces with only negligible surface damage being caused. The full-scale trial of the electro-swabbing decontamination technique was carried out on a gas circulator impeller. High decontamination factors were again achieved with ≥ 99% of the radioactive contamination being removed from the treated surfaces. The technique has practical limitations in terms of handling and treatment of waste-arisings. However, the use of specially-designed swabbing electrodes may allow the treatment of constricted geometries inaccessible to techniques such as PIC. The technique is also highly suitable for the treatment of soft-finish materials and of components fabricated from a

  16. High temperature decontamination of stainless steel surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dilute Chemical Decontamination process that is carried out at low temperatures (<90 °C) is effective in obtaining good decontamination factors (DFs) on carbon steel (CS) system surfaces of PHWRs as the formulation is efficient in dissolving magnetite present on CS surfaces. However, this low temperature dilute chemical decontamination process is not effective in achieving appreciable DFs on stainless steel (SS) surfaces of nuclear power reactors as it is not efficient in dissolving Cr and Ni substituted oxides present on these surfaces. Hence, a high temperature process was evaluated for the effective decontamination of SS surfaces. Among the various formulations evaluated, formulation consisting of 5 mM NTA and 10 mM N2H4 at 160 °C was found to be appropriate for high temperature decontamination application. Dissolution of various oxides like, magnetite (Fe3O4), mixed ferrites (NiFe2O4, ZnFe2O4, MgFe2O4 etc), Cr oxide (Cr2O3), bonaccordite (Ni2FeBO5) etc. was carried out in NTA at 160 °C. Significant increase in dissolution rate was observed for these oxides at 160 °C. On increasing the temperature from 80 to 180 °C, the dissolution rate of Fe3O4 increased about 6 fold. The optimised formulation (5 mM NTA with 10 mM N2H4) was employed for removing the oxide formed on SS-304, SS-316, SS-403 and SS-410 under simulated reactor water chemistry conditions. Oxide deposits from all the above surfaces could be completely removed by this high temperature process. This paper gives the summary of the results from the laboratory experiments and a simulated high temperature decontamination process. (author)

  17. The ultrasonic copper and brass decontamination study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of ultra-sounds as a decontamination technic does not bring an absolute solution. As a function of the materials it seemed necessary to find what was the optimum conditions for using the ultra-sounds and to define not only the ultra-sonic factors but also the chemical solutions which bring some appreciable decontamination factors without bringing any too important corrosion processus. This report gives the results of this study applied to copper and brass. This study allowed to select some effective treatment baths on the two types of contamination: plutonium and fission products. (authors)

  18. Green coffee decontamination by electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microbiological load of green coffee is a real problem considering that it is extremely sensitive to contamination. Irradiation is a decontamination method for a lot of foodstuffs, being a feasible, very effective and environment friendly one. Beans and ground green coffee were irradiated with electron beams up to 40 kGy. Microbial load, rheological behavior, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and visible spectroscopy were carried out. The results show that electron beam irradiation of green coffee could decontaminate it without severe changes in its properties

  19. Decontamination of spices by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of gamma irradiation (8 kGy) on decontamination of pre packed (in polyethylene) and unpacked spices such as black pepper and chilli, was studied over a storage period of 12 months. Radiation dose of 8.0 kGyu completely decontaminated by the spices. Fungal packaged samples. Water content increased from a range values of 7.6-8.5% to 11.4 to 15.2% the increase was higher in red chilli than black pepper. Colour values significantly changed during storage, however the influence of radiation was not consistent. (author)

  20. Radio decontamination experiences of pharmaceuticals products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibilities for the radio decontamination radioimmunodetection of Mafenide 10% cream, Bariopac powder and Ranitidine raw material by means of the application of different dose level of gamma rays were studied. Microbiological and Physicochemical evaluations were carried out before and after the treatment . The industrial production was irradiated with 3 and 1 kGy as the adequate dose, in a continuous way. It was concluded that the application of ionising radiations with decontamination aims is an alternative to guarantee the microbiological quality of these pharmaceuticals

  1. Green coffee decontamination by electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemtanu, Monica R. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Department of Electron Accelerators, 409 Atomistilor St., P.O. Box MG-36, RO 76 900, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)]. E-mail: monica@infim.ro; Brasoveanu, Mirela [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Department of Electron Accelerators, 409 Atomistilor St., P.O. Box MG-36, RO 76 900, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Grecu, Maria Nicoleta [National Institute for Materials Physics, RO 77 125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Minea, R. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Department of Electron Accelerators, 409 Atomistilor St., P.O. Box MG-36, RO 76 900, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

    2005-10-15

    Microbiological load of green coffee is a real problem considering that it is extremely sensitive to contamination. Irradiation is a decontamination method for a lot of foodstuffs, being a feasible, very effective and environment friendly one. Beans and ground green coffee were irradiated with electron beams up to 40 kGy. Microbial load, rheological behavior, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and visible spectroscopy were carried out. The results show that electron beam irradiation of green coffee could decontaminate it without severe changes in its properties.

  2. Localization of decontamination waste in the territory of Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various environmental conditions in decontamination waste storage areas in the Zhitomir, Kiev, Chernigov, Rovno, Cherkassy, Sumy Regions of Ukraine are analyzed. Typical designs and basic parameters of decontamination waste storage areas implemented in 17 contractor designs are described. Theoretical grounds of safe storage of decontamination waste in the areas are discussed

  3. Decontamination of a waste dumpside of s.p. DIAMO

    OpenAIRE

    Břenek, Roman; Santarius, Andrzej; Hudeček, Vlastimil

    2014-01-01

    The article indicates possible methods to remedy environmental damage in the Ostramo Lagoon locality. Authors deal with the description of locality, composition of waste and description of current work performed in decontamination of this locality. The article describes also the technical solution of decontamination of the territory and recommendations for possible future use of the decontaminated areas

  4. 40 CFR 761.79 - Decontamination standards and procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Decontamination standards and..., AND USE PROHIBITIONS Storage and Disposal § 761.79 Decontamination standards and procedures. (a) Applicability. This section establishes decontamination standards and procedures for removing PCBs, which...

  5. 41 CFR 101-45.001 - Demilitarization and decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... decontamination. 101-45.001 Section 101-45.001 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property..., ABANDONMENT, OR DESTRUCTION OF PERSONAL PROPERTY § 101-45.001 Demilitarization and decontamination. (a... characteristics, or otherwise making it unfit for further use. (b) Demilitarization or decontamination of...

  6. Decontamination of the heavy water system of the RA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The heavy water system of the RA reactor was decontaminated of 60Co. The solution used for decontamination was 7% H3PO4 and 3% CrO3. The decontamination factor ranged from 10 to 100. From the results the distribution of 60Co in the heavy water, and on stainless and aluminium parts was determined (author)

  7. Removal of Pyrethrin from Aqueous Effluents by Adsorptive Micellar Flocculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pardon K. Kuipa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The equilibrium adsorption of pyrethrin onto aggregates formed by the flocculation of micelles of the surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS with aluminium sulphate is reported. The experimental results were analysed using different adsorption isotherms (Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson, Sips, Radke-Prausnitz, Temkin, linear equilibrium, and the Dubin-Radushkevich isotherms. The Freundlich and linear equilibrium isotherms best describe the adsorption of pyrethrin onto SDS micellar flocs, with the Freundlich adsorption constant, KF, and the mass distribution coefficient, KD, of 64.266 ((mg/g(L/mg1/n and 119.65 L/g, respectively. Applicability of the Freundlich adsorption model suggests that heterogeneous surface adsorption affects the adsorption. The mean free energy value estimated using the Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm was 0.136 kJ/mol indicating that physisorption may be predominant in the adsorption process.

  8. Recent advances in photocatalytic treatment of pollutants in aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, P Anil Kumar; Reddy, P Venkata Laxma; Kwon, Eilhann; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Akter, Tahmina; Kalagara, Sudhakar

    2016-05-01

    Photocatalysis can be an excellent solution for resolving the world's energy and environmental problems. It has a wide range of applications for the decontamination of diverse hazardous pollutants in aqueous media. Technological progress in this research field has been achieved toward the improvement of the solar sensitivity to enhance the efficiency of pollutant decontamination. As a result, various strategies have been introduced to upgrade photocatalytic performance with the modification of prototypical photocatalyst such as doping, dye sensitization, semiconductor coupling, mesoporous supports, single site, and nano-based catalysts. In this review, a brief survey is presented to describe those strategies based on the evaluation made against various pollutants (such as pharmaceuticals, pesticides, heavy metals, detergents, and dyes) in aqueous media. PMID:26915711

  9. Radiation treatment of sewage effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The water demand of the past several years increased rapidly. Recycling of municipal wastewater is the effective means of coping with water shortage in Tokyo. We studied the radiation treatment method of further purification of the effluent from sewage treatment plant. By gamma irradiation the refractory organic substances in effluent were decomposed. The COD values decreased and the light brown color faded with increasing dose. The high molecular weight components in effluent were degraded to lower molecular weight substances and were decomposed finally to carbon dioxide. Recent attention has been given to the disadvantages of using chlorine as a disinfectant of municipal wastewater effluents. It has been shown that the chlorination of organic substances in water may produce chlorinated hydrocarbons with carcinogenic properties. So a development of the effective sterilization method for the effluent has been needed instead of chlorine. The radiation sterilization of coliforms and total bacteria in primary effluent, secondary effluent and rapid sand filtered effluent were studied. Coliforms were very sensitive to radiation treatment in comparison with total bacteria. Especially, coliforms in secondary and rapid sand filtered effluents were disinfected to 10 % of initial at 0.1 kGy. (author)

  10. Amélioration de la qualité microbiologique des effluents secondaires par stockage en bassins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trad-Rais M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbiological quality improvement of secondary effluent by reservoir storage. Storing secondary effluents is of particular interest for water resource management. It constitutes further treatment which reduces the microbial contamination of water to a level where it can be used for the irrigation of all crops, without restriction. The storage of treated wastewater takes place during the winter, ensuring that such a resource is not lost and enabling a larger area to be irrigated during the dry season, thereby increasing agricultural production. Storage trials in reservoirs were conducted in north-eastern Tunisia. Their objective was to determine the length and conditions of secondary effluent decontamination as well as the impact of seasonal storage on water quality. The results indicate that the decontamination of effluents slows down with increased reservoir depth. For a depth of less than 150 cm, a reduction of fecal coliforms in the order of 3 log units is attained in 3 days when the average temperature of the water ranges from 22 to 25 degrees C; when this temperature is between 25.5 and 28 degrees C, the same reduction takes 8 days. Below 20 degrees C, decontamination is considerably reduced: for a mean water temperature ranging from 12.5 to 18 degrees C, the reduction of fecal coliforms reaches 3 log units only after a retention time of 17 days in the reservoir. Seasonal storage from 2 to 7 months does not affect the bacteriological quality of water: after decontamination, no proliferation of bacterial indicators occurs during storage.

  11. Decontamination and dismantling at the CEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the dismantling policy at the CEA (French Research Center on the atomic energy), the financing of the decontamination and the dismantling, the regulatory framework, the knowledge and the technology developed at the CEA, the radiation protection, the environment monitoring and the installations. (A.L.B.)

  12. Decontamination of operational nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to reduce the radiation fields around nuclear power plants, and, consequently, to limit the radiation exposure of and dose commitments to the operating and maintenance personnel, the contamination build-up should be kept to a minimum. The most fruitful approach, from the point of view of economics and efficiency, is to tackle the problems of contamination and decontamination in the design and construction phases of the reactor. To do this, knowledge gained from the operation of existing power reactors should be used to make improvements in new designs. New structural materials with low corrosion rates or whose constituents are not activated by neutrons should also be used. For older reactors, in most cases it is already too late to incorporate design changes without extensive and expensive modifications. For these plants, decontamination remains the most efficient way to reduce radiation fields. The aim of this report is to deal with the different decontamination methods that may be applied to nuclear power plant circuits and equipment during operation. The factors that have to be considered in determining the type and the extent of the methods used are the engineering and the planning of the decontamination operation and the treatment of the resulting waste generated during the process are also discussed

  13. Building 003 decontamination and disposition. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decontamination and disposition (D and D) of the contaminated facilities in Building 003 are complete. The Hot Cave, the building radioactive exhaust system, the radioactive liquid waste system, and the fume hoods were removed. The more significant D and D activities are summarized, special techniques are noted, and problems and their resolution are discussed. Results of the radiological monitoring are presented

  14. Decontamination and decommissioning focus area. Technology summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents details of the facility deactivation, decommissioning, and material disposition research for development of new technologies sponsored by the Department of Energy. Topics discussed include; occupational safety, radiation protection, decontamination, remote operated equipment, mixed waste processing, recycling contaminated metals, and business opportunities

  15. Ultrasonic decontamination of nuclear fuel. Feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrasonic decontamination of nuclear fuel is an expeditious way to reduce radiation exposures resulting in a minimal volume of waste. The fuel assemblies are set up in the fuel preparation machine one at a time and treated without prior disassemblage. By decontaminating 20% of the BWR fuel assemblies annually, there is a potential to reduce the collective dose by approximately 40-50%. Including also improved reactivity of the fuel, this amounts to an economic benefit of about 4 MSEK per reactor and year. The costs for performing the decontamination can be economically justified if the plants do not plan for short outages each year. The decontamination method could also be used for the purpose of removing tramp Uranium following a fuel failure or minor core accident. An additional benefit is removal of loosely adherent crud. The waste produced will be handled in a closed filtering circuit. The method is suggested to be verified in a test on discharged burnt-up fuel at site. The next step will be to develop the method further in order to be able to remove also tenacious crud. 12 refs, 4 tabs

  16. Laser decontamination of the radioactive lightning rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between 1970 and 1980 Brazil experienced a significant market for radioactive lightning rods (RLR). The device consists of an air terminal with one or more sources of americium-241 attached to it. The sources were used to ionize the air around them and to increase the attraction of atmospheric discharges. Because of their ineffectiveness, the nuclear regulatory authority in Brazil suspended the license for manufacturing, commerce and installation of RLR in 1989, and determined that the replaced RLR were to be collected to a centralized radioactive waste management facility for treatment. The first step for RLR treatment is to remove the radioactive sources. Though they can be easily removed, some contaminations are found all over the remaining metal scrap that must decontaminated for release, otherwise it must be treated as radioactive waste. Decontamination using various chemicals has proven to be inefficient and generates large amounts of secondary wastes. This work shows the preliminary results of the decontamination of 241Am-contaminated metal scrap generated in the treatment of radioactive lightning rods applying laser ablation. A Nd:YAG nanoseconds laser was used with 300 mJ energy leaving only a small amount of secondary waste to be treated. - Highlights: • The process generates minimal additional secondary waste. • The effectiveness of this technique may allow certain materials to be recycled reducing radioactive waste volumes. • The process allows reuse of decontaminated metals

  17. Remote methods for decontamination and decommissioning operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three methods for the decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities are described along with operational experience associated with each method. Each method described in some way reduces radiation exposure to the operating personnel involved. Electrochemical decontamination of process tanks is described using an in-situ method. Descriptions of two processes, electropolishing and cerium redox decontamination, are listed. A method of essentially smokeless cutting of process piping using a plasma-arc cutting torch is described. In one technique, piping is cut remotely from a distance using a specially modified torch holder. In another technique, cutting is done with master-slave manipulators inside a hot cell. Finally, a method for remote cutting and scarification of contaminated concrete is described. This system, which utilizes high-pressure water jets, is coupled to a cutting head or rotating scarification head. The system is suited for cutting contaminated concrete for removal or removing a thin layer in a controlled manner for decontamination. 4 refs., 6 figs

  18. Chemical decontamination method for radioactive metal waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When contaminants mainly composed of copper remained on the surface of stainless steel wastes sent from an electrolytic reduction as a first step are chemically decontaminated, metal wastes are discriminated to carbon steel wastes and stainless steel wastes. Then, the carbon steel wastes are applied only with the first step of immersing in a sulfuric acid solution, and stainless steel wastes are applied with a first step of immersing into a sulfuric acid solution for electrolytic reduction for a predetermined period of time and a second step of immersing into a liquid in which an oxidative metal salt is added to sulfuric acid. The decontamination liquid which is used for immersing the stainless steel wastes in the second step and the oxidation force of which is lowered is used as the sulfuric acid solution in the first step for the carbon steel wastes. In view of the above, the decontamination liquid of the second step can be utilized most effectively, enabling to greatly decrease the secondary wastes and to improve decontamination efficiency. (T.M.)

  19. Chemical decontamination method for radioactive metal waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention relates to a decontamination method for radioactive metal waste products derived from equipment that handles radioactive materials whose surfaces have been contaminated; in particular it concerns a decontamination method that reduces the amount of radioactive waste by decontaminating radioactive waste substances to a level of radioactivity in line with normal waste products. In order to apply chemical decontamination to metal waste products whose surfaces are divided into carbon steel waste and stainless steel waste; the carbon steel waste is treated using only a primary process in which the waste is immersed in a sulfuric acid solution, while the stainless steel waste must be treated with both the primary process and then electrolytically reduces it for a specific length of time and a secondary process that uses a solution of sulfuric acid mixed with oxidizing metal salts. The method used to categorize metal waste into carbon steel waste and stainless steel waste involves determining the presence, or absence, of magnetism. Voltage is applied for a fixed duration; once that has stopped, electrolytic reduction repeats the operative cycle of applying, then stopping voltage until the potential of the radioactive metal waste is retained in the active region. 1 fig. 2 tabs

  20. Decontamination and decorporation: the clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decontamination and decorporation are quite interrelated when dealing with a contaminated person. Some clinical experiences from a transuranium production facility are offered. Skin decontamination is accomplished by washing with detergent and water. Stubborn cases are treated with sodium hypochlorite followed by rinsing, and emery cloth is used on more stubborn nail or finger pad contamination. If inhaled, the usual skin cleansing followed by nasal douche with normal saline decontaminates reachable areas and one of the DTPA salts given via aerosol both decontaminates and decorporates the inner recesses. Saline laxative reduces the time inhaled, and ingested particles remain in the gastro-intestinal tract. Conservatism prevails in general, but most persons found to have inhaled contamination are given a single chelation within the hour of discovery and if subsequently found to have over 10% M.P.P.B. of a soluble actinide are offered further chelation. Single dose chelation has been found to be relatively innocuous and usually sufficient. The longest case of chelation therapy spanned 2-1/4 years and encompassed 123 doses of CaNa-DTPA

  1. Decontamination and decorporation: the clinical experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poda, G.A.

    1979-01-01

    Decontamination and decorporation are quite interrelated when dealing with a contaminated person. Some clinical experiences from a transuranium production facility are offered. Skin decontamination is accomplished by washing with detergent and water. Stubborn cases are treated with sodium hypochlorite followed by rinsing, and emery cloth is used on more stubborn nail or finger pad contamination. If inhaled, the usual skin cleansing followed by nasal douche with normal saline decontaminates reachable areas and one of the DTPA salts given via aerosol both decontaminates and decorporates the inner recesses. Saline laxative reduces the time inhaled, and ingested particles remain in the gastro-intestinal tract. Conservatism prevails in general, but most persons found to have inhaled contamination are given a single chelation within the hour of discovery and if subsequently found to have over 10% M.P.P.B. of a soluble actinide are offered further chelation. Single dose chelation has been found to be relatively innocuous and usually sufficient. The longest case of chelation therapy spanned 2-1/4 years and encompassed 123 doses of CaNa-DTPA.

  2. Ultrasonic decontamination of nuclear fuel. Feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, A.; Libal, A.; Norbaeck, J.; Wegemar, B.

    1995-05-01

    Ultrasonic decontamination of nuclear fuel is an expeditious way to reduce radiation exposures resulting in a minimal volume of waste. The fuel assemblies are set up in the fuel preparation machine one at a time and treated without prior disassemblage. By decontaminating 20% of the BWR fuel assemblies annually, there is a potential to reduce the collective dose by approximately 40-50%. Including also improved reactivity of the fuel, this amounts to an economic benefit of about 4 MSEK per reactor and year. The costs for performing the decontamination can be economically justified if the plants do not plan for short outages each year. The decontamination method could also be used for the purpose of removing tramp Uranium following a fuel failure or minor core accident. An additional benefit is removal of loosely adherent crud. The waste produced will be handled in a closed filtering circuit. The method is suggested to be verified in a test on discharged burnt-up fuel at site. The next step will be to develop the method further in order to be able to remove also tenacious crud. 12 refs, 4 tabs.

  3. DWTF [decontamination and waste treatment facilities] assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study has been to evaluate the adequacy of present and proposed decontamination and waste treatment facilities (DWTF) at LLNL, to determine the cost effectiveness for proposed improvements, and possible alternatives for accomplishing these improvements. To the extent possible, we have also looked at some of the proposed environmental compliance and cleanup (ECC) projects

  4. Thermal decontamination of transformers: A new technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After evaluating a number of methods for decontaminating or disposing of transformers that contained polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), it was concluded that no entirely satisfactory procedure or technology was yet available which was permanent, effective, safe, relatively simple, and based on proven technology or conventional practice. The most desirable compromise appears to be thermal decontamination. It is proposed to decontaminate transformers by controlled incineration in a specially designed, indirect-fired furnace which resembles the conventional bell-type, vertical elevator, metal heat treating type of furnace. The design differs in the incorporation of those essential features required to achieve oxidation of the organic components, to provide internal air circulation needed to ensure efficient heat and mass transfer, and other factors. The most appropriate decontamination facility would provide for implementation of the following procedures: draining of PCB-containing liquids from the transformer; limited disassembly of the transformer, which in most instances would imply only removal of the top cover to expose the insides; and controlled incineration with any vapors generated being conducted to a secondary combustion chamber. Experiments were conducted in a kiln to simulate the proposed transformer incinerator. Results show that exposure of the transformer segments to a temperature in the 950-1,000 degree C range for over 90 min is generally sufficient to reduce the PCB content to under 1 ppM. Based on the work conducted, a suitable bell furnace was constructed and added to the Swan Hills (Alberta) waste treatment facility. 2 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Radiation decontamination of meat lyophylized products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is an increasing demand for a powder soups and sauces composed with lyophylizated meat. Technology of lyophylization is not always accompanied by thermal treatment of raw materials. That is the reason the meat lyophylization process does not ensure as good microbiological quality as is required. Degree of microbiological decontamination and organoleptic properties of lyophilized meat were investigated after radiation treatment

  6. Study of Electrolyte for Electrochemical Decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Removal of metallic surface contamination by anodic dissolution in an electrochemical has pervaded in industrial use for many years. The removal of radioactive contaminations by this same technique has more recently attracted attention. Allen and Arrowsmith have reported extensive work with phosphoric acid as the electrolyte. Phosphoric acid is very efficient electrolyte for removing radioactive contaminations and does furnish an electro-polished surface that is quite smooth. But inadequate processes for the spent electrolyte caused unwanted waste. Such unwanted waste is also caused in other acidic electrolytes (for example, nitric acid or sulfuric acid). Most of the radioactivity is assumed to be localized in about ten micron thickness on the surface: therefore, a surface decontamination method should be useful as a decontamination technique. In particular, electrolytic decontamination is considered to be the most useful method because of a high volume reduction factor and easy application on metal waste of diverse shapes. In this paper, we consider that NaNO3 solution is suitable for electrochemical decontamination

  7. LASL experience in decontamination of the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1972 the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) has been actively involved in land area surveys for radioactive contamination and has gained considerable experience in cleanup of lands considered to have unacceptable levels of radioactive contamination. Experience and means of arriving at recommendations for decontamination at levels as low as reasonably achievable

  8. Testing and evaluation of light ablation decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report details the testing and evaluation of light ablation decontamination. It details WINCO contracted research and application of light ablation efforts by Ames Laboratory. Tests were conducted with SIMCON (simulated contamination) coupons and REALCON (actual radioactive metal coupons) under controlled conditions to compare cleaning effectiveness, speed and application to plant process type equipment

  9. Decontamination and decommissioning focus area. Technology summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    This report presents details of the facility deactivation, decommissioning, and material disposition research for development of new technologies sponsored by the Department of Energy. Topics discussed include; occupational safety, radiation protection, decontamination, remote operated equipment, mixed waste processing, recycling contaminated metals, and business opportunities.

  10. Separation of radionuclides from electrochemical decontamination waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study demonstrated the efficiency and applicability of a combined process for the separation of radionuclides from organic complexonates containing waste. A combination of photo-catalytic degradation of organic complexonates followed by the sorption of the radionuclides onto a strongly acidic ion exchanger offers a promising route for the treatment of the spent electrochemical decontamination solution. (authors)

  11. Microbial decontamination of spices by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of gamma irradiation on the microbiological quality of spices was studied. It was found that the dose of 6 KGg decreases the cell count by a factor of 2-3 however complete decontamination is obtained at a dose of 10 KGg

  12. Surface decontamination as a technical and technological discipline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical and physical properties are described of the surface, the contaminant and the decontamination system, i.e., the three components of the decontamination process. A survey is presented of decontamination processes for a solid contaminant and for the decontamination of a contaminant bound to the surface. Problems of decontamination are then discussed, connected with the construction and project designing of facilities which shall operate in a radiation field. The generation of contaminants is described and the principles given of project design and design of facilities with regard to radiation hygiene, economy and disposal. (J.P.)

  13. Study on the Decontamination of Radionuclides in Spent Phosphogypsum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Chong Hun; Won, H. J.; Moon, J. K.

    2010-01-15

    The objective of the study is to confirm the possibility of further R and D thru pre-study on the decontamination technology for the safe, high decontamination factor, low waste arising and cost effective removal of radionuclide in spent phosphogypsum. The following contents were studied. 1) Decontamination of Radionuclide in Phosphogypsum - Effect of decontamination chemical formulation on Ra removal - Effect of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration on Ra removal - Effect of Sr concentration on Ra removal 2) Removal of Radionuclide in Liquid Waste from Decontamination of Phosphogypsum - Ra removal by chromate treatment - Ra removal by zeolite and ACF treatment

  14. Radiological measurements during decontamination of PFBR MOX fuel elements using ultrasonic decontamination technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a fuel fabrication facility fabrication of MOX fuel elements involving various metallurgical processes is carried out in leak tight glove boxes because of high radio toxicity associated with plutonium,. A fuel pin consists of a thin walled tube loaded with cylindrical fuel pellets with plugs welded on both ends. The pellet loading and welding processes result in cross contamination on the tube surface near the edges. It is important that finished fuel pins should not contain any transferable contamination on the surface beyond safe limits applicable for unrestricted release before subjecting the pins to manual handling for quality control checks. Hence it is imperative that thorough decontamination of fuel pins is essential for safe handling. Conventional decontamination methods result in undue personal exposures and generation of solid waste. Though there are number of techniques available for decontamination of non-fuel elements in the nuclear industry, very few of them can be used for decontamination of fuel elements because of possible damage to fuel clad, Ultrasonic cleaning process, using dc-mineralized water as medium does not affect the properties of the clad and is simple to implement and fast to carry out. This paper brings out radiological measurements carried out to study the effectiveness of ultrasonic decontamination technique and the factors involved in achieving required degree of decontamination with reduced individual exposure

  15. Fate of the chemical warfare agent O-ethyl S-2-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothiolate (VX) on soil following accelerant-based fire and liquid decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravett, M R; Hopkins, F B; Self, A J; Webb, A J; Timperley, C M; Riches, J R

    2014-08-01

    In the event of alleged use of organophosphorus nerve agents, all kinds of environmental samples can be received for analysis. These might include decontaminated and charred matter collected from the site of a suspected chemical attack. In other scenarios, such matter might be sampled to confirm the site of a chemical weapon test or clandestine laboratory decontaminated and burned to prevent discovery. To provide an analytical capability for these contingencies, we present a preliminary investigation of the effect of accelerant-based fire and liquid decontamination on soil contaminated with the nerve agent O-ethyl S-2-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothiolate (VX). The objectives were (a) to determine if VX or its degradation products were detectable in soil after an accelerant-based fire promoted by aviation fuel, including following decontamination with Decontamination Solution 2 (DS2) or aqueous sodium hypochlorite, (b) to develop analytical methods to support forensic analysis of accelerant-soaked, decontaminated and charred soil and (c) to inform the design of future experiments of this type to improve analytical fidelity. Our results show for the first time that modern analytical techniques can be used to identify residual VX and its degradation products in contaminated soil after an accelerant-based fire and after chemical decontamination and then fire. Comparison of the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) profiles of VX and its impurities/degradation products from contaminated burnt soil, and burnt soil spiked with VX, indicated that the fire resulted in the production of diethyl methylphosphonate and O,S-diethyl methylphosphonothiolate (by an unknown mechanism). Other products identified were indicative of chemical decontamination, and some of these provided evidence of the decontaminant used, for example, ethyl 2-methoxyethyl methylphosphonate and bis(2-methoxyethyl) methylphosphonate following decontamination with DS2. Sample preparation

  16. Development of a suppression method for deposition of radioactive cobalt after chemical decontamination. (1) Effect of the ferrite film coating on suppression of cobalt deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last decade, chemical decontamination at the beginning of periodical inspection has been applied to many Japanese BWR plants in order to reduce radiation exposure. However, following the chemical decontamination, a rapid dose rate increase can be seen in some plants after just a few operation cycles. Oxide film, which easily incorporates radioactivity, might be formed after the chemical decontamination. We developed a new way to reduce the recontamination after the chemical decontamination to maintain long-term continued decontamination effects without any chemical injections or chemical controls in reactor water during operation. In our approach, a fine ferrite film is formed by the Hitachi Ferrite Coat process after oxide films formed during the plant operation are removed by the chemical decontamination process. We select Fe(HCOO)2 aqueous solution, H2O2, and N2H4 as the treatment chemicals for fine ferrite film formation for suitable BWR plant application. Our laboratory experiment results confirm a 60Co deposition reduction effect of 1/5 compared with that of nontreatment for up to 3,100 hours. The fine ferrite film that was formed on the specimen before the 60Co deposition test remains as a film structure after the test. The corrosion amount of the specimen is suppressed to 1/4 through the effect of the fine ferrite film. (author)

  17. Electrolytic decontamination of the 3013 inner can

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disposition of plutonium recovered from nuclear weapons or production residues must be stored in a manner that ensures safety. The criteria that has been established to assure the safety of stored materials for a minimum of 50 years is DOE-STD-3013. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has designed a containment package in accordance with the DOE standard. The package consists of an optional convenience (food pack) can, a welded type 304L stainless steel inner (primary) can, and a welded type 304L stainless steel outer (secondary) can. With or without the food pack can, the material is placed inside the primary can and welded shut under a helium atmosphere. This activity takes place totally within the confinement of the glove box line. Following the welding process, the can is checked for leaks and then sent down the line for decontamination. Once decontaminated, the sealed primary can may be removed from the glove box line. Welding of the secondary container takes place outside the glove box line. The highly automated decontamination process that has been developed to support the packaging of Special Nuclear Materials is based on an electrolytic process similar to the wide spread industrial technique of electropolishing. The can is placed within a specially designed stainless steel fixture built within a partition of a glove box. This fixture is then filled with a flowing electrolyte solution. A low DC electric current is made to flow between the can, acting as the anode, and the fixture, acting as the cathode. Following the decontamination, the system provides a flow of rinse water through the fixture to rinse the can of remaining salt residues. The system then carried out a drying cycle. Finally, the fixture is opened from the opposite side of the partition and the can surface monitored directly and through surface smears to assure that decontamination is adequate

  18. Electrolytic decontamination of the 3013 inner can

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disposition of plutonium recovered from nuclear weapons or production residues must be stored in a manner that ensures safety. The criteria that has been established to assure the safety of stored materials for a minimum of 50 years is DOE-STD-3013. This standard specifies both the requirements for containment and furthermore specifies that the inner container be decontaminated to a level of ≤20 dpm/100 cm2 swipable and ≤500 dpm/100 cm2 direct alpha such that a failure of the outer containment barrier will have a lower probability of resulting in a spread of contamination. The package consists of an optional convenience (food pack) can, a welded type 304L stainless steel inner (primary) can, and a welded type 304L stainless steel outer (secondary) can. Following the welding process, the can is checked for leaks and then sent down the line for decontamination. Once decontaminated, the sealed primary can may be removed from the glove box line. Welding of the secondary container takes place outside the glove box line. The highly automated decontamination process that has been developed to support the packaging of Special Nuclear Materials is based on an electrolytic process similar to the wide spread industrial technique of electropolishing. The can is placed within a specially designed stainless steel fixture built within a partition of a glove box. The passage of current through this electrolytic cell results in a uniform anodic dissolution of the surface metal layers of the can. This process results in a rapid decontamination of the can. The electrolyte is fully recyclable, and the separation of the chromium from the actinides results in a compact, non RCRA secondary waste product

  19. LABORATORY OPTIMIZATION TESTS OF TECHNETIUM DECONTAMINATION OF HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT LOW ACTIVITY WASTE OFF-GAS CONDENSATE SIMULANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Nash, C.; McCabe, D.

    2014-09-29

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to acceptable concentrations in the LAW glass, and diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task examines the potential treatment of this stream to remove radionuclides and subsequently disposition the decontaminated stream elsewhere, such as the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF), for example. The treatment process envisioned is very similar to that used for the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) that has been operating for years at the Savannah River Site (SRS), and focuses on using mature radionuclide removal technologies that are also

  20. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 252: Area 25 Engine Test Stand 1 Decontamination Pad, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit 252 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 252 consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-07-02, Engine Test Stand-1 (ETS-1) Decontamination Pad. Located in Area 25 at the intersection of Road H and Road K at the Nevada Test Site, ETS-1 was designed for use as a mobile radiation checkpoint and for vehicle decontamination. The CAS consists of a concrete decontamination pad with a drain, a gravel-filled sump, two concrete trailer pads, and utility boxes. Constructed in 1966, the ETS-1 facility was part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station (NRDS) complex and used to test nuclear rockets. The ETS-1 Decontamination Pad and mobile radiation check point was built in 1968. The NRDS complex ceased primary operations in 1973. Based on site history, the focus of the field investigation activities will be to determine if any primary contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) (including radionuclides, total volatile organic compounds, total semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons as diesel-range organics, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, total pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls) are present at this site. Vertical extent of migration of suspected vehicle decontamination effluent COPCs is expected to be less than 12 feet below ground surface. Lateral extent of migration of COPCs is expected to be limited to the sump area or near the northeast corner of the decontamination pad. Using a biased sampling approach, near-surface and subsurface sampling will be conducted at the suspected worst-case areas including the sump and soil near the northeast corner of the decontamination pad. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible e valuation

  1. Application of gamma irradiation in ginseng for both photodegradation of pesticide pentachloronitrobenzene and microbial decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigates the feasibility of using gamma irradiation for photodegradation of a common residual fungicide, pentachloronitrobenzene (PCNB), in ginseng, and for microbial decontamination. American ginseng, Panax quinquefolius, was subjected to gamma irradiation. PCNB residues were analyzed by gas chromatography with electron capture detection and mass spectrometry. Eighty percent of PCNB (100 ppm) in a methanol aqueous solution was degraded by 5 kGy irradiation, and the primary degradation product was pentachloroaniline. Furthermore, contaminated PCNB (3.7 ppm) in ginseng were reduced to 0.2 ppm after 20 kGy irradiation. The IC50 for treatment of Sclerotium rolfsii with 20 kGy irradiated PCNB was about 2.7 times higher than that for treatment with unirradiated PCNB. The survival rate of mouse fibroblast L929 cells treated with 20 kGy irradiated PCNB was about 12.9% higher than that of L929 cells treated with unirradiated PCNB. Additionally, after 20 kGy irradiation, less than 5% reduction of contents of ginsenoside Rb1 and Re were observed, and amounts of ginsenosides Rc, Rd, and Rg1 were not reduced significantly. The minimal gamma dose for microbial decontamination was 10 kGy. Therefore, gamma irradiation can be used for both PCNB photodegradation and microbial decontamination of ginseng without obvious loses of ginsenoside contents.

  2. Studies on the treatment of uranium mill effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overflow waters from the tailings pond in which liquid effluents in the form of barren liquors from uranium mill are discharged may contain 10 pci/litre of radium activity as against the maximum permissible discharge limit of 3 pci/litre and 10 mg/litre of soluble manganese as against the allowable limit of 0.3 mg/litre. These contaminants must be removed and/or made insoluble to ensure environmental safety. Studies were, therefore, carried out to develop methods for: (1) decontamination of both barren liquors and overflow waters and (2) their insolubilisation prior to their release in the pond. Based on the results, a scheme of treatment is formulated. Radium activity in the barren liquor is insolubilised by addition of 25 mg Ba2+/litre and precipitation. The liquor is then neutralised with lime. The sludges on liquid-solid separation are subjected to air digestion to stabilise manganese(II) to highly insoluble manganese(IV) oxide. Supernatant and the digested sludges are discharged to the tailings pond. Overflow waters from the pond are treated with 5 to 10 mgs/litre of permanganate to remove manganese and radium. The precipitates resulting in the process may be disposed as solid radioactive wastes and decontaminated water may be released to the environment or if it meets the mill specification, may be reused as process water thus ruling out even the slightest possibility of environmental pollution. The overall cost of chemicals required for the treatment mentioned above works out to be Rs. 0.30 per cubic metre of effluent. (M.G.B.)

  3. Solubility studies of oxovanadium(V) formate and vanadyl formate in aqueous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solubility of oxovanadium(V) formate and vanadyl formate in aqueous medium has been determined. These compounds are important for preparation of strong reducing V(II) compounds which are used in stainless steel based nuclear power plants for decontamination

  4. Decontamination of gravels contaminated with uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Rock types of high radioactivity were quartz, lamprophyre, and schist. • The larger the gravel size, the more the concentration of the gravel is reduced. • Average removal efficiency of gravel after the third washing was about 37%. • Removal efficiency of the contaminated gravel was not related to its size. • The higher the gravel weight, the more the concentration of gravel is reduced. - Abstract: Gravel washing equipment and electrokinetic–electrodialytic decontamination equipment were manufactured to decontaminate gravel contaminated with uranium. The removal efficiency according to the gravel size and weight and the removal efficiency according to the lapsed time using the manufactured equipment were investigated through several experiments. The volume of gravel in the high uranium concentration group was about 10%, the rock types of which were quartz, lamprophyre, and schist. The larger the gravel size, the higher the contaminated concentration of gravel. The average uranium (238U) concentration of gravel after the first washing was about 1.45 Bq/g, and the average removal efficiency of gravel after the third washing was about 37%. In addition, the removal efficiency of the contaminated gravel was not related to its size. The contaminated concentration of the gravel decreased with an increasing gravel weight. In addition, the removal efficiency of contaminated gravel was not related to its weight. When the electrokinetic–electrodialytic decontamination period of 5 days, 10 days, 15 days, and 20 days elapsed, the 238U in the gravel was removed by about 40%, 65%, 72%, and 81%. The more the electrokinetic–electrodialytic decontamination time elapsed, the more the removal efficiency ratio of 238U decreased. Finally, the gravel with a size of less than 10 cm was treated by soil washing and electrokinetic decontamination methods with soil, and gravel with size of more than 10 cm but less than 20 cm was treated by gravel washing and

  5. Decontamination of solid surface with detergent ODS-5 and its individual components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The desorption was examined of 147Pm adsorbed from an aqueous solution (pH 2.6) in static conditions on a coating as typically used on military equipment. The desorption was performed with an aqueous solutions of the ODS-5 decontaminating and deactivating mixture and its components at various concentrations. The results indicate that the desorption proceeds in two qualitatively different stages, viz., a short-term stage and a long-term stage. The loss of contaminant activity in dependence on the concentration of the desorption solution was also examined. The results show that solutions of the surfactant ODS-5 and its components are not best suited to the static desorption of radionuclides of the lanthanide type. 6 tabs., 2 figs., 7 refs

  6. Experimental analysis of plastic materials containing radionuclides for decontamination viability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident on 11 March, 2011, the high radioactive dosage was found in polluted water for agriculture use at Baba, Haramachi, Minami-Soma, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. Field experiment for decontamination of water had been studied by using commercial plastic materials. The agricultural water comes from Tetsuzan dam is full of radioactive-contaminated water. Experimental analysis showed that the plastic materials can take up radioactive elements for several months soaked in the polluted agricultural water. The quantitative analyses using X-ray fluorescence analysis, Ge semiconductor and scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SEM-EDS), revealed the detection of the radionuclides on the plastic materials with diatom and clays. The results suggest the adsorption of radionuclides on the surface of plastic materials due to FDNPP accident. The plastic materials associated with clays and diatoms could be stronger carriers of radionuclides in the polluted water. Adherence of diatoms to the plastic fiber in the water for 7 months suggested that some plastic materials were taking up heavy metals (Zn, Ba, Pb, Sb) with radioactive elements (Cs etc.). Mechanisms by which radioactive pollutants and microorganisms are adsorbed onto and desorbed from clays at aqueous interface can be understood by combining chemical analysis with electron microscopy observation. (author)

  7. Studies on residue-free decontaminants for chemical warfare agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, George W

    2015-03-17

    Residue-free decontaminants based on hydrogen peroxide, which decomposes to water and oxygen in the environment, are examined as decontaminants for chemical warfare agents (CWA). For the apparent special case of CWA on concrete, H2O2 alone, without any additives, effectively decontaminates S-2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl O-ethyl methylphosphonothioate (VX), pinacolyl methylphosphorofluoridate (GD), and bis(2-choroethyl) sulfide (HD) in a process thought to involve H2O2 activation by surface-bound carbonates/bicarbonates (known H2O2 activators for CWA decontamination). A plethora of products are formed during the H2O2 decontamination of HD on concrete, and these are characterized by comparison to synthesized authentic compounds. As a potential residue-free decontaminant for surfaces other than concrete (or those lacking adsorbed carbonate/bicarbonate) H2O2 activation for CWA decontamination is feasible using residue-free NH3 and CO2 as demonstrated by reaction studies for VX, GD, and HD in homogeneous solution. Although H2O2/NH3/CO2 ("HPAC") decontaminants are active for CWA decontamination in solution, they require testing on actual surfaces of interest to assess their true efficacy for surface decontamination. PMID:25710477

  8. Development of strippable gel for surface decontamination applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strippable gels are an attractive option for decontamination of surfaces particularly when materials are to be reused after decontamination. The process in general results in good decontamination performance with minimal secondary waste generation. This paper reports on development of strippable gel formulation using polyvinyl alcohol as the gel former. Peeling behavior of the gel film improved when glycerol was used as plasticizer. Incorporation of decontaminating agents is essential for the gel to be effective, so a number of decontaminating agents were screened based on their miscibility with the gel, smooth peeling, and good decontamination performance. Based on this study, a strippable gel, ‘INDIGEL’ was formulated as a potential candidate for surface decontamination applications. Extensive trials on evaluation of decontamination performance of Indigel were done on simulated surfaces like stainless steel tray, stainless steel fume hood, PVC floor, granite and ceramic table tops. Results show that Indigel is highly effective for decontamination of surfaces contaminated with all types of radionuclides. Simplicity of its use coupled with good decontamination ability will find application in nuclear and other chemical industries. (author)

  9. Disposal of tritiated effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After some introductory remarks on the origin of tritium, its properties and its behaviour in a reprocessing plant three alternative methods for the disposal of tritiated effluents produced during reprocessing are described (deep well injection, in-situ solidification, deep-sea dumping) and compared with each other under various aspects. The study is based on the concept of a 1400 t/a reprocessing plant for LWR fuel, which annually produces 3000 m3 of tritiated waste water with a tritium content of 6.5 x 1012 Bq/m3 as well as a residual fission product and actinide content. An assessment of the three methods under the aspects of simplicity, reliability, safety, costs, state of development and materials handling revealed advantages in favour of 'injection', followed by 'dumping' and 'in-situ solidification'. (orig./HP)

  10. Decontamination flowsheet development for a waste oil containing mixed radioactive contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The majority of waste oils contaminated with both radioactive and hazardous components are generated in nuclear power plant, research lab. and uranium-refinery operations. The waste oils are complex, requiring a detailed examination of the waste management strategies and technology options. It may appear that incineration offers a total solution, but this may not be true in all cases. An alternative approach is to decontaminate the waste oils to very low contaminant levels, so that the treated oils can be reused, burned as fuel in boilers, or disposed of by commercial incineration. This paper presents selected experimental data and evaluation results gathered during the development of a decontamination flowsheet for a specific waste oil stores at Chalk River Labs. (CRL). The waste oil contains varying amounts of lube oils, grease, paint, water, particulates, sludge, light chloro- and fluoro-solvents, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), complexing chemicals, uranium, chromium, iron, arsenic and manganese. To achieve safe management of this radioactive and hazardous waste, several treatment and disposal methods were screened. Key experiments were performed at the laboratory-scale to confirm and select the most appropriate waste-management scheme based on technical, environmental and economic criteria. The waste-oil-decontamination flowsheet uses a combination of unit operations, including prefiltration, acid scrubbing, and aqueous-leachage treatment by precipitation, microfiltration, filter pressing and carbon adsorption. The decontaminated oil containing open-quotes de minimisclose quotes levels of contaminants will undergo chemical destruction of PCBs and final disposal by incineration. The recovered uranium will be recycled to a uranium milling process

  11. Flow of Aqueous Humor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Google Plus Email Print this page Flow of Aqueous Humor Most, but not all, forms ... aqueous humor) produced by the eye's ciliary body flows out freely (follow blue arrow). Aqueous humor flows ...

  12. INDUSTRIAL EFFLUENT TREATMENT USING IONIZING RADIATION COMBINED TO TITANIUM DIOXIDE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, C.L.; Oikawa, H.; Mori, M.N.; Sampa, M.H.O.

    2004-10-04

    The Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) with OH radicals are the most efficient to mineralize organic compounds, and there are various methods to generate OH radicals as the use of ozone, hydrogen peroxide and ultra-violet radiation and ionizing radiation. The irradiation of aqueous solutions with high-energy electrons results in the excitation and ionizing of the molecules and rapid (10{sup -14} - 10{sup -9} s) formation of reactive intermediates. These reactive species will react with organic compounds present in industrial effluent inducing their decomposition. Titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) catalyzed photoreaction is used to remove a wide range of pollutants in air and water media, combined to UV/VIS light, FeO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, but as far as known there is no report on the combination with ionizing radiation. In some recent studies, the removal of organic pollutants in industrial effluent, such as Benzene, Toluene, and Xylene from petroleum production using ionizing radiation was investigated. It has been ob served that none of the methods can be used individually in wastewater treatment applications with good economics and high degree of energy efficiency. In the present work, the efficiency of ionizing radiation in presence of TiO{sub 2} to treat industrial effluent was evaluated. The main aim to combine these technologies is to improve the efficiency for very hard effluents and to reduce the processing cost for future implementation to large-scale design.

  13. Nuclear disaster. Fukushima, hundred years of decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article gives an overview of what will have to be done on the site of Fukushima to decontaminate and to dismantle it. Based on the experience gained in Three Mile Island and in Chernobyl, experts foresee ten years of work within the reactor cores, thirty years around the plant, sixty years of decontamination within the no man's land area around the plant; and centuries as far as scattered spots are concerned more than hundred kilometres away from the plant. Three radionuclides must be surveyed, but with different half lives: iodine 131 (8 days), caesium 137 (30 years), and plutonium 239 (24000 years). The expertise of French companies (Areva, Assystem, Bouygues and Vinci) in reactor dismantling, dismantling procedure design, and public works (protection arch like in Chernobyl) is briefly evoked, as well as the French approach for post-accident management

  14. Surface decontamination by heterogeneous foams and suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A variety of methods was used to investigate the surface of stainless steel as delivered or treated (electrochemically polished, machine ground). Micro X-ray spectral analysis evidenced a uniform distribution of alloying elements. Auger spectroscopy revealed the layer-by-layer composition by elements and the thickness of the superficial oxide film. The distribution of heterogeneous uranium dioxide powders on the stainless steel surface was examined by microprobe analysis (using Comebax). In the order of increasing contamination by uranium dioxide, the surfaces can be arranged as: untreated - polished - ground. The behaviour of hydrogen peroxide in alkaline solutions was studied by spectrophotometry and laser analysis. Decontamination of stainless steel surfaces from UO2 by microgaseous emulsions in alkaline media with surfactants present was tested. The decontamination factor was determined as a function of the size and volume of gas bubbles. It was shown to rise with increasing gas content. (author)

  15. APSIC Guidelines for environmental cleaning and decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Moi Lin; Apisarnthanarak, Anucha; Thu, Le Thi Anh; Villanueva, Victoria; Pandjaitan, Costy; Yusof, Mohamad Yasim

    2015-01-01

    This document is an executive summary of APSIC Guidelines for Environmental Cleaning and Decontamination. It describes best practices in routine cleaning and decontamination in healthcare facilities as well as in specific settings e.g. management of patients with isolation precautions, food preparation areas, construction and renovation, and following a flood. It recommends the implementation of environmental hygiene program to keep the environment safe for patients, staff and visitors visiting a healthcare facility. Objective assessment of cleanliness and quality is an essential component of this program as a method for identifying quality improvement opportunities. Recommendations for safe handling of linen and bedding; as well as occupational health and safety issues are included in the guidelines. A training program is vital to ensure consistent adherence to best practices. PMID:26719796

  16. Radiation decontamination unit for the community hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freestanding radiation decontamination units including surgical capability can be developed and made operational in small/medium sized community hospitals at relatively small cost and with minimal plant reconstrution. The Radiological Assistance Program of the United States Department of Energy and the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center Training Site of Oak Rige Associated Universities are ready to support individual hospitals and physicians in this endeavor. Adequate planning rather than luck, should be used in dealing with potential radiation accident victims. The radiation emergency team is headed by a physician on duty in the hospital. The senior administrative person on duty is responsible for intramural and extramural communications. Rapid mobilization of the radiation decontamination unit is important

  17. Impact of LWR decontamination on radwaste systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increased radiation levels around certain reactors in the United States and accompanying increases in personnel exposures are causing a reexamination of options available to utilities to continue operation. One of the options is decontamination of the primary system to reduce radiation levels. The Battelle-Northwest study of decontamination and its impact on radwaste systems has been directed towards existing reactors and allied systems as they are employed during their operational lifetimes. Decommissioning and cleanup during such work are not within the scope of this project although certain processes and waste systems might be similar. Rupture debris cleanup represents a special situation that requires different design features and concepts and it is not a part of this study

  18. Room source management decontamination in Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A surface,work materials and tools contamination it produced for Ra-226 sources management in des use in Uruguayan radioactive waste and sources management and storage room specifically in the Uruguay Republic University in Nuclear Search Center. A surface contamination direct was performed measurement with Eberline alpha particles Contamat FHT 111M with 42 496/30 sounder. It found greater and least contamination grade in all cement floor as well as in tables where was managed with Ra-226 sources. A value measured surface contamination can see in the Room scheme with more 200 Bq/cm in extension small places. A segregation between work materials and tools considerate d free contamination was realized. The contaminated objects was separated for a future treatment. A proceeding followed in the decontamination was inhale, abrasion,sweep essays in different representative zones, obtain decontamination factors and residual activity

  19. Pool decontamination method in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To enable radioactive substance decontamination in a short time by applying ultrasonic cavitation effect to the surface of a stainless cavity (pool) deposited with such radioactive substances. Method: Upon decontamination, an ultrasonic cleaner is caused to flow in water, before discharging water in a cavity after fuel exchange, and supported on supports of a driving device so that the sonic radiation surface of an ultrasonic oscillator is opposed to the side wall surface of the cavity. Then, clean water is supplied to a tubular re-cleaning device provided with a plurality of jetting ports, the ultrasonic oscillator is excited, water is discharged from the cavity and the driving device is reciprocated, whereby the ultrasonic cleaner conducts ultrasonic cleaning while moving in a zig-zag manner along the trace shown in the drawing to remove the radioactive materials deposited on the cavity surface into water. (Kawakami, Y.)

  20. Laser radiation - application for surface decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Possibilities of uses laser radiation for decontamination of metal surfaces was considered. The principle of the method is to evaporate a very thin layer of material from the surface via ablation using intensive and focused laser beam. The material removed should then be transferred to a filter by a carrier gas. Some of the obtained data, regarding use of pulsed Nd:YAG laser and energy transfer through an optical fiber, were presented here too. Fundamentals of light interaction with a metal surface were also considered in order to be able to predict conditions and possible ways of successful ablation. It was pointed out that the development of the method would bring several benefits: improved safety - decontamination can be performed remotely, reduced waste volume and less secondary waste, no hazardous chemicals and thus no concerns over chemical handling. (author)

  1. Evaluation of commercially available decontamination chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effectiveness of commercially available decontamination solutions was compared with the effectiveness of 10% oxalic acid in controlled laboratory tests. Type 304L stainless steel and Inconel 625 specimens were used. Contamination was sludge from Savannah River Plant (SRP) high level waste tanks. Measured amounts of contamination were placed on each specimen. They were then heated to bond the contamination to the surface and cleaned according to the manufacturer's directions. The effectiveness of the product was determined by monitoring specimens before and after cleaning. Four of the 16 solutions evaluated removed all the contamination from Type 304L stainless steel. Inconel 625 was more difficult to decontaminate. Further tests are planned with the chemicals that were most effective in this test. 4 refs., 6 tabs

  2. Evaluation of commercially available decontamination chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effectiveness of commercially available decontamination solutions was compared with the effectiveness of 10% oxalic acid in controlled lab. tests. Type 304L stainless steel and Inconel 625 specimens were used. Contamination was sludge from Savannah River Plant (SRP) high level waste tanks. Measured amounts of contamination were placed on each specimen. They were then heated to bond the contamination to the surface and cleaned according to the manufacturer's directions. The effectiveness of the produce was determined by monitoring specimens before and after cleaning. Four of the 16 solutions evaluated removed all the contamination from Type 304L stainless steel. Inconel 625 was more difficult to decontaminate. Further tests are planned with the chemicals that were most effective in this test

  3. Electrodialytic decontamination of spent ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of a novel electrodialytic decontamination process for the selective removal of radioactive Cs from spent ion exchange resins containing large amounts of Li is described. The process involves passage of a dc electric current through a bed of the spent ion exchange resin in a specially designed electrodialytic cell. The radiocesium so removed from a volume of the spent resin is concentrated onto a much smaller volume of a Cs selective sorbent to achieve a significant radioactive waste volume reduction. Technical feasibility of the electrodialytic resin decontamination process has been demonstrated on a bench scale with a batch of simulated spent ion exchange resin and using potassium cobalt ferrocyanide as the Cs selective sorbent. A volume reduction factor between 10 and 17 has been estimated. The process appears to be economically attractive. Improvements in process economics can be expected from optimization of the process. Other possible applications of the EDRD process have been identified

  4. Electrochemical decontamination of Pu contaminated stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrochemical decontamination has been demonstrated to be very effective in removing plutonium nitrate contamination (0.5 μg cm-2) on stainless steels. The amount of metal dissolved to achieve a DF of 102 to 103 was 2 to 7 μm depending on the electrolyte used. In unstirred electrolytes 1M HNO3, 1M HNO3/0.1M NaF, 5M HNO3 perform best. Under stirred electrolyte conditions, there is a general marginal fall in effectiveness except for 5M HNO3 where there is a slight improvement. The optimum performance is a compromise between maximizing the electrolyte throwing power and minimizing substrate surface roughening during decontamination. (author)

  5. Decontamination of tannic drugs with ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selected types of tannin-containing plant drugs were gamma irradiated with dosed of 5, 10 and 25 kGy. A statistically significant decrease was observed in the number of microorganisms, bacteria and fungi. With higher doses, the tannin contents in all types under study increased by 4 to 66%, in some also with lower doses. Infusions prepared from the initial material met the requirements of the standard for microbiological harmlessness. The results obtained allowed to arrive at the conclusion that tannic drugs for the preparation of infusions need not be decontaminated while decontamination should be recommended for presentations designed for direct oral application. A dose of 25 kGy should be used that will guarantee microbial harmlessness as well as the preservation of the contents. (M.D.). 7 tabs., 10 refs

  6. Microbiological decontamination of natural honey by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degree of microbiological decontamination, organoleptic and physico-chemical properties of natural honeys were investigated after radiation treatment. Seven kinds of honeys were irradiated with the beams of 10 MeV electrons from a 10 kW linear accelerator ''Elektronika 10-10'' at the dose 10 kGy. It was shown, that after irradiation, the total count of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and moulds decrease by 99%. The antibiotic value in investigated honeys increased in turn from 1.67 to 2.67 after irradiation. Such factors and parameters of investigated honeys as their consistency, content of water and saccharose, acidity, the diastase and 5-HMF values were not changed significantly after irradiation. Decontamination by irradiation is a process which allows us to obtain high microbiological purity of honeys. It is especially needed, when honeys are used in surgical treatment of injuries and in nutrition of babies with food deficiency

  7. Microbiological decontamination of natural honey by irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migdał, W.; Owczarczyk, H. B.; K ȩdzia, B.; Hołderna-K ȩdzia, E.; Madajczyk, D.

    2000-03-01

    Degree of microbiological decontamination, organoleptic and physico-chemical properties of natural honeys were investigated after radiation treatment. Seven kinds of honeys were irradiated with the beams of 10 MeV electrons from a 10 kW linear accelerator "Elektronika 10-10" at the dose 10 kGy. It was shown, that after irradiation, the total count of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and moulds decrease by 99%. The antibiotic value in investigated honeys increased in turn from 1.67 to 2.67 after irradiation. Such factors and parameters of investigated honeys as their consistency, content of water and saccharose, acidity, the diastase and 5-HMF values were not changed significantly after irradiation. Decontamination by irradiation is a process which allows us to obtain high microbiological purity of honeys. It is especially needed, when honeys are used in surgical treatment of injuries and in nutrition of babies with food deficiency.

  8. Chemical decontamination for decommissioning purposes. (Vigorous decontamination tests of steel samples in a special test loop)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the research activities described was to develop vigorous decontamination techniques for decommissioning purposes, taking into account the cost of treatment of the radwaste, to achieve possibly unrestricted release of the treated components, and to obtain know-how for in situ hard decontamination. The decontamination procedures for strong decontamination have been optimized in static and dynamic tests (DECO-loop). The best values have been found for: (i) hydrochloric acid: 4 to 5% vol. at low temperature, 0.7 to 1% vol. at high temperature (800C); (ii) hydrofluoric plus nitric acid: 1.5% vol. HF + 5% vol. HNO3 at low temperature; 0.3 to 0.5% vol. HF + 2.5 to 5% vol. HNO3 at high temperature. High flow rates are not necessary, but a good re-circulation of the solution is needed. The final contamination levels, after total oxide removal, are in accordance with limits indicated for unrestricted release of materials in some countries. The arising of the secondary waste is estimated. Decontamination of a 10 m2 surface would typically produce 0.5 to 3.0 kg of dry waste, corresponding to 1.6 to 10 kg of concrete conditioned waste

  9. Decontamination performance of low-pressure ARC decontamination technology using carbon monoxide gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have been studying a dry surface decontamination technology using a Low-Pressure Arc, characterized by features such as less secondary wastes. To date, we have obtained results on the decontamination performance of argon Low-Pressure Arc decontamination technology for test pieces of BWR corrosion product film containing Co-60, and found that the Co-60 residual ratio was heavily dependent on the pressure in the chamber (Kanbe, et al., 2003). A Co-60 residual ratio of 20% was achieved only if the pressure in the chamber was reduced to some tens of pascals. We have investigated the performance of a Low-Pressure Arc when using carbon monoxide gas, in the expectation of an improvement in decontamination performance due to a chemical reaction caused by carbon monoxide, in addition to the heat effects of the Low-Pressure Arc. As a result, a Co-60 residual ratio of 20% or less was achieved. Nor was there any dependence of a Co-60 residual ratio on the gas fraction of the mixed gases (Ar/CO = 80/20-50/50 in volume %). A Co-60 residual ratio of 20% was the same level as in the case of a pure argon atmosphere, but was achieved even at pressures of several hundred pascals. The potential of decontamination even at pressures above several hundred pascals would have the advantage of facilitating the collection of radioactive dust using a gas flow by the proposed method. (authors)

  10. Advanced robotics for decontamination and dismantlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decontamination and dismantlement (D ampersand D) robotics technology application area of the US Department of Energy's Robotics Technology Development Program is explained and described. D ampersand D robotic systems show real promise for the reduction of human exposure to hazards, for improvement of productivity, and for the reduction of secondary waste generation. Current research and development pertaining to automated floor characterization, robotic equipment removal, and special inspection is summarized. Future research directions for these and emerging activities is given

  11. Method for electrochemical decontamination of radioactive metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekechukwu, Amy A.

    2008-06-10

    A decontamination method for stripping radionuclides from the surface of stainless steel or aluminum material comprising the steps of contacting the metal with a moderately acidic carbonate/bicarbonate electrolyte solution containing sodium or potassium ions and thereafter electrolytically removing the radionuclides from the surface of the metal whereby radionuclides are caused to be stripped off of the material without corrosion or etching of the material surface.

  12. Role of livestock effluent suspended particulate in sealing effluent ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, J McL; Warren, B R

    2015-05-01

    Intensive livestock feed-lots have become more prevalent in recent years to help in meeting the predicted food production targets based on expected population growth. Effluent from these is stored in ponds, representing a potential concern for seepage and contamination of groundwater. Whilst previous literature suggests that effluent particulate can limit seepage adequately in combination with a clay liner, this research addresses potential concerns for sealing of ponds with low concentration fine and then evaluates this against proposed filter-cake based methodologies to describe and predict hydraulic reduction. Short soil cores were compacted to 98% of the maximum dry density and subject to ponded head percolation with unfiltered-sediment-reduced effluent, effluent filtered to sealing was shown to follow mathematical models of filter-cake formation, but without the formation of a physical seal on top of the soil surface. Management considerations based on the results are presented. PMID:25721977

  13. New technologies for PCB [polychlorinated biphenyl] decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) were mixed with chlorobenzenes to reduce viscosity and provide for both electrical insulation and convective heat transfers. These mixtures were known as askarels, and ca 99.8% of PCBs used in electrical applications are contained in askarel-filled transformers and capacitors. It is estimated that there are ca 180 million gal of PCB-contaminated oil distributed through over 3 million transformers in the USA. Technology used for decontaminating these transformers depends on the concentration of the PCB contamination. At low PCB concentrations of up to ca 2,000 ppM, chemical methods can be used; at higher concentrations, alternative disposal options become more attractive. For chemical treatment, a small mobile unit using quick-reacting reagents has been developed for on-site decontamination. For highly contaminated transformers, retrofilling is very attractive since the owner's liability is minimized at minimum cost. Conventional flush/drain procedures have such drawbacks as the inability to remove oil trapped in windings and the leaching of trapped PCBs back into the uncontaminated retrofill oil over time. A new process has been developed to solve the leaching problem and to decontaminate the drained askarel at room temperature using a catalyst. An alternative disposal strategy involves dismantling the transformer carcass, incinerating non-recyclable materials, and cleaning the metals and wire with solvent. 8 figs

  14. Use of laser ablation in nuclear decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development and the use of clean decontamination process appear to be one of the main priorities for industries especially for nuclear industries. This is especially due to the fact of wastes minimization which is one of the principal commitments. One answer would be to use a photonic process such as the LASER process. The principle of this process is based on the absorption, by the contaminant, of the photon's energy. This energy then will propagate into the material and create some mechanical waves responsible of the interfaces embrittlement and de-cohesion. As we can see, this process so called LASER ablation does not use any chemicals and allows us to avoid any production of liquid waste. Since now a couple of years, the Clean-Up Business Unit of AREVA group (BE/CL) investigates this new decontamination technology. Many tests have been done in inactive conditions on various simulants such as paints, inks, resins, metallic oxides firstly in order to estimate its efficiency but also to fully qualify it. After that, we decided to move on hot tests to fully validate this new process and to show its interest for the nuclear industry. Those hot tests have been done on two kinds of contaminated material (on tank pieces covered with a thick metallic oxide layer and on metallic pieces covered with grease). Some information such as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-Ray scattering spectroscopy and decontamination factors (DF) will be provided in this paper. (authors)

  15. Electrochemical decontamination in easily processed electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metallic surfaces can be reduced to very low levels of residual activity by electrochemical decontamination, thus reducing decommissioning and disposal costs. Two electrolyte systems have been developed which minimize the volume for disposal of secondary waste containing the bulk of the activity. Kraftanlagen, Heidelberg has developed a system for use in an immersion tank based on a KBr solution of acetylacetone. This leads to a continuous precipitation of the insoluble acetylacetonates of ferrous substrates together with such active species as 60Co. The bath performance can be maintained by continuous acetylacetone addition. From pilot scale trials, a solids waste volume of 1.1 dm3/m2 of surface decontaminated has been determined. Harwell has developed both immersion and in-situ processes based on nitric acid, as the spent electrolyte is compatible with existing UK waste treatment philosophy - potentially yielding an immobilized product volume of 0.6 dm3/m2 area treated. Nitric acid has the additional advantage of suppressing any hydrogen production. Both processes have been developed from laboratory to microprocessor controlled pilot scale units which have been demonstrated successfully for the treatment of genuine waste. The immersion tank process uses electroetching at low current densities for the treatment of extended areas, while the in-situ technique uses electropolishing in 6M HNO3 in an engineered head connected to a service trolley by an umbilical. This has also shown potential for incorporation in an integrated monitoring/decontamination system under robotic control. (abstract)

  16. Decontamination impacts on solidification and waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research to determine chemical and physical conditions which could lead to thermal excursions, gas generation, and/or general degradation of decontamination-reagent-loaded resins has shown that IRN-78, IONAC A-365, and IRN-77 organic ion exchange resin moisture contents vary significantly depending on the counter ion ''loading.'' The extent/vigor of the reaction is very highly dependent on the degree of dewatering of the resins and on the method of solution addition. The heat generation may be due, in part, to the heat of neutralization. In studies of the long-term compatibility effects of decontamination waste resins in contact with waste package container materials in the presence of decontamination reagents, radiolysis products and gamma irradiation, it has been found that the corrosion of carbon steel and austenitic stainless steel in mixed bed resins is enhanced by gamma irradiation. However, cracking in high density polyethylene is essentially eliminated because of the rapid removal of oxygen from the environment by gamma-induced oxidation of the large resin mass. 13 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Laser decontamination of the radioactive lightning rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potiens, A. J.; Dellamano, J. C.; Vicente, R.; Raele, M. P.; Wetter, N. U.; Landulfo, E.

    2014-02-01

    Between 1970 and 1980 Brazil experienced a significant market for radioactive lightning rods (RLR). The device consists of an air terminal with one or more sources of americium-241 attached to it. The sources were used to ionize the air around them and to increase the attraction of atmospheric discharges. Because of their ineffectiveness, the nuclear regulatory authority in Brazil suspended the license for manufacturing, commerce and installation of RLR in 1989, and determined that the replaced RLR were to be collected to a centralized radioactive waste management facility for treatment. The first step for RLR treatment is to remove the radioactive sources. Though they can be easily removed, some contaminations are found all over the remaining metal scrap that must decontaminated for release, otherwise it must be treated as radioactive waste. Decontamination using various chemicals has proven to be inefficient and generates large amounts of secondary wastes. This work shows the preliminary results of the decontamination of 241Am-contaminated metal scrap generated in the treatment of radioactive lightning rods applying laser ablation. A Nd:YAG nanoseconds laser was used with 300 mJ energy leaving only a small amount of secondary waste to be treated.

  18. Decontamination of radionuclides from skin: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazrart, Anissa; Bérard, Philippe; Leiterer, Alexandra; Ménétrier, Florence

    2013-08-01

    The accident in Fukushima has emphasized the need to increase the capacity of health protection for exposed workers, first responders, and the general public in a major accident situation with release of radioactivity. Skin contamination is one of the most probable risks following major nuclear or radiological incidents, but this risk also exists and incidents can happen in industry, research laboratories, or in nuclear medicine departments. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the products currently used after skin contamination in order to highlight the needs and ways to improve the medical management of victims. From this review, it can be observed that the current use of these radiological decontamination products is essentially based on empiricism. In addition, some of these products are harsh and irritating, even toxic, possibly damaging the skin barrier. In some emergency situations in which clean water is in short supply, most of the current products cannot be used. Research on the mechanisms of action of decontaminating products is needed to develop a decontamination strategy. PMID:23799505

  19. Decontamination of radionuclides from skin: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accident in Fukushima has emphasized the need to increase the capacity of health protection for exposed workers, first responders, and the general public in a major accident situation with release of radioactivity. Skin contamination is one of the most probable risks following major nuclear or radiological incidents, but this risk also exists and incidents can happen in industry, research laboratories, or in nuclear medicine departments. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the products currently used after skin contamination in order to highlight the needs and ways to improve the medical management of victims. From this review, it can be observed that the current use of these radiological decontamination products is essentially based on empiricism. In addition, some of these products are harsh and irritating, even toxic, possibly damaging the skin barrier. In some emergency situations in which clean water is in short supply, most of the current products cannot be used. Research on the mechanisms of action of decontaminating products is needed to develop a decontamination strategy. (authors)

  20. Decontamination of radioactive materials. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive materials to which an individual may be exposed are not rare. These potential sources of accidental radiation include medical and food sterilizers, therapeutic devices, industrial radiography sources, research laboratories, transportation accidents, nuclear medicine laboratories, and nuclear power plants. While radiation accidents occur infrequently, one of the problems is that ionizing radiation cannot be detected by the human senses. Contamination accidents involve not only some exposure to radiation as the individuals carry the radioactive materials either internally or externally, and are thus continually exposed to radiation until the contaminant is removed. The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) has published ''''Management of Persons Accidentally Contaminated with Radionuclides'''' as report No. 65. One of the chapters, entitled ''''Therapy Procedures and Drugs,'''' details the decontamination of radionuclides. It is the goal of this article to outline and establish procedures and resources for the decontamination of contaminated individuals. Here, we review the treatment of contamination and describe drugs for internal decontamination in Japan. (author). 56 refs

  1. Facility effluent monitoring plan for WESF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SIMMONS, F.M.

    1999-09-01

    The FEMP for the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) provides sufficient information on the WESF effluent characteristics and the effluent monitoring systems so that a compliance assessment against applicable requirements may be performed. Radioactive and hazardous material source terms are related to specific effluent streams that are in turn, related to discharge points and, finally are compared to the effluent monitoring system capability.

  2. Liquid Effluent Retention Facility/Effluent Treatment Facility Hazards Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document establishes the technical basis in support of Emergency Planning activities for the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and Effluent Treatment Facility the Hanford Site. The document represents an acceptable interpretation of the implementing guidance document for DOE ORDER 5500.3A. Through this document, the technical basis for the development of facility specific Emergency Action Levels and the Emergency Planning Zone is demonstrated

  3. Dairy shed effluent treatment and recycling: Effluent characteristics and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyfe, Julian; Hagare, Dharma; Sivakumar, Muttucumaru

    2016-09-15

    Dairy farm milking operations produce considerable amounts of carbon- and nutrient-rich effluent that can be a vital source of nutrients for pasture and crops. The study aim was to characterise dairy shed effluent from a commercial farm and examine the changes produced by treatment, storage and recycling of the effluent through a two-stage stabilisation pond system. The data and insights from the study are broadly applicable to passive pond systems servicing intensive dairy and other livestock operations. Raw effluent contained mostly poorly biodegradable particulate organic material and organically bound nutrients, as well as a large fraction of fixed solids due to effluent recycling. The anaerobic pond provided effective sedimentation and biological treatment, but hydrolysis of organic material occurred predominantly in the sludge and continually added to effluent soluble COD, nutrients and cations. Sludge digestion also suppressed pH in the pond and increased salt levels through formation of alkalinity. High sludge levels significantly impaired pond treatment performance. In the facultative pond, BOD5 concentrations were halved; however smaller reductions in COD showed the refractory nature of incoming organic material. Reductions in soluble N and P were proportional to reductions in respective particulate forms, suggesting that respective removal mechanisms were not independent. Conditions in the ponds were unlikely to support biological nutrient removal. Recycling caused conservative inert constituents to accumulate within the pond system. Material leaving the system was mostly soluble (86% TS) and inert (65% TS), but salt concentrations remained below thresholds for safe land application. PMID:27213866

  4. Biodegradation of concrete intended for their decontamination; Biodegradation de matrices cimentaires en vue de leur decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jestin, A

    2005-05-15

    The decontamination of sub-structural materials represents a stake of high importance because of the high volume generated. It is agreed then to propose efficient and effective processes. The process of bio-decontamination of the hydraulic binders leans on the mechanisms of biodegradation of concretes, phenomenon characterized in the 40's by an indirect attack of the material by acids stem from the microbial metabolism: sulphuric acid (produced by Thiobacillus), nitric acid (produced by Nitrosomonas and Nitrobacter) and organic acids (produced by fungi). The principle of the bio-decontamination process is to apply those microorganisms on the surface of the contaminated material, in order to damage its surface and to retrieve the radionuclides. One of the multiple approaches of the process is the use of a bio-gel that makes possible the micro-organisms application. (author)

  5. Impact of decontamination on LWR radioactive waste treatment systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Only at N-Reactor is there a means to accommodate radwaste produced during decontamination. The Dresden system is expected to be ready to accommodate such solutions by the summer of 1979. Solidification of the processed decontamination waste may be a significant problem. There is doubt that the materials in current radwaste treatment systems can handle chemicals from a concentrated process. The total storage volume, for concentrated decontamination, is not sufficient in existing radwaste treatment systems. Greater attention should be placed on designing reactors and radwaste treatment systems for decontamination. A means of handling waste material resulting from leaks in the primary system during the decontamination must be developed. On-site storage of solidified decontamination wastes may be a viable option, but license amendments will be necessary

  6. Decontamination system study for the Tank Waste Retrieval System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the findings of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's decontamination study in support of the Tank Waste Retrieval System (TWRS) development program. Problems associated with waste stored in existing single shell tanks are discussed as well as the justification for the TWRS program. The TWRS requires a decontamination system. The subsystems of the TWRS are discussed, and a list of assumptions pertinent to the TWRS decontamination system were developed. This information was used to develop the functional and operational requirements of the TWRS decontamination system. The requirements were combined with a comprehensive review of currently available decontamination techniques to produced a set of evaluation criteria. The cleaning technologies and techniques were evaluated, and the CO2 blasting decontamination technique was chosen as the best technology for the TWRS

  7. Experimental study on decontamination effect of water jets spray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear components, pipes, casks and so on are contaminated after long usage and should be decontaminated before their repair or maintenance. There are various ways of decontamination such as ultrasonic wave cleaning, mechanical brushing, electric polishing and so forth, but most common is water jet spray. Water jet dynamic pressure along the axis of the nozzle (Pm) depends upon that of nozzle exit (Po) and the distance between nozzle exit and the surface to be decontaminated. The decontamination effect greatly depends not only on the pressure (Pm) but on the nozzle scanning speed (Vs). But the relation of these effects on decontamination is not known yet. The authors studied the characteristics of water jets from various types of nozzles by measuring pressure distribution in the water jets, made simulated sample pieces of crud, and removed the deposit by water jets. As a result of these experimental studies, the authors can obtain the formulated relation between decontamination factor and the former various factors

  8. Decontamination of metal surface contaminated by uranyl solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decontamination degrees was measured for the metallic equipments in the uranium conversion plant by a chemical decontamination and contamination degrees also measured. Most equipments was made of stainless steel and contacted with uranium(VI) and nitric acid solution. So, metallic surfaces was contaminated with uranium(VI) materials. And decontamination degrees can be expressed by alpha activity measurements. For the alpha activity measurements, metallic specimens were selected in the three representative processes, dissolution process, solvent extraction, and Ammonium Uranyl Carbonate(AUC) precipitation and were prepared to rectangular parallelepipeds with 18mm width and 18mm length and 5mm height. The metallic surfaces can be decontaminated under 10 Bq/cm2 alpha activity due to uranium by only water decontamination, and under 0.04 Bq/cm2 alpha activity by 10% nitric acid decontamination that is ground activity level

  9. Decontamination of uranium-contaminated equipment and parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Uranium enrichment pilot plant was decommissioned in 1985-1986. The decontamination concept and methods and results for the equipment and parts decontaminated are discussed. The kinds of metals involved in the decontamination action were copper, nickel, aluminium alloy, mild steel, and stainless steel. Decontamination results showed the surface contamination levels of most parts decontaminated achieved the required level. The uranium content in aluminium ingots after metal refining was from 33 to 232 ppm. The decontamination liquid wastes were treated with the multiprecipitation method. The contents of uranium, nickel, and fluoride in the supernatant were 0.02-0.1 mg/1, 0.02 mg/1, and 0.13 mg/1, respectively

  10. Separation schemes of high level nuclear effluents (HLW) by solvent extraction: HDEHP and TBP processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two schemes of actinide separation from high-level effluents by solvent extraction were developed using as extractants HDEHP or TBP respectively. The separation methods were defined by experimental study of simulated and real high-level waste solutions. Decontamination factors better than 103 have been obtained. Separation factors between trivalent actinides and rare earths better than 900 for Eu and 5000 for Ce allow subsequent transmutation of americium and curium. Performances are limited by actinide retention in precipitates produced during storage and acidity lowering. Nevertheless in some cases with acetic acid and noble metals an almost quantitative solubilization of adsorbed actinides and even a plutonium depolymerization are possible. Experimental results are discussed

  11. Chemical decontamination for decommissioning (DFD) and DFDX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DFD is an acronym for the 'Decontamination for Decommissioning' process developed in 1996 by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The process was designed to remove radioactivity from the surfaces of metallic components to allow these components to be recycled or free-released for disposal as non-radioactive. DFD is a cyclic process consisting of fluoroboric acid, potassium permanganate and oxalic acid. The process continues to uniformly remove base metal once oxide dissolution is complete. The DFD process has been applied on numerous components, sub-systems and systems including the reactor systems at Big Rock Point and Maine Yankee in the United States, and the Jose Cabrera (Zorita) Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) in Spain. The Big Rock Point site has been returned to Greenfield and at Maine Yankee the land under the license was reduced for an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). In the upcoming months in Zorita NPP in Spain will initiate dismantlement and decommissioning activities to return the site to a non-nuclear facility. The development of the EPRI DFD process has been an on-going evolution and much has been learned from its use in the past. It is effective in attaining very high decontamination factors; however, DFD also produces secondary waste in the form of ion exchange resins. This secondary waste generation adds to the decommissioning quota but this can be improved upon at a time when radioactive waste storage at nuclear facilities and waste disposal sites is limited. To reduce the amount of secondary waste, EPRI has developed the DFDX process. This new process is an enhancement to the DFD process and produces a smaller amount of metallic waste rather than resin waste; this reduction in volume being a factor of ten or greater. Electrochemical ion exchange cells are the heart of the DFDX system and contain electrodes and cation ion exchange resin. It has been used very successfully in small system applications and the next evolution

  12. New decontamination process using foams containing particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One key point in the dismantling of nuclear facilities is the thorough cleaning of radiation- exposed surfaces on which radioactive deposits have formed. This cleaning step is often achieved by successive liquid rinses with specific solutions containing alkaline, acidic, or even oxidizing species depending on whether the aim is to dissolve greasy deposits (like ter-butylphosphate) or to corrode surfaces on micrometric thicknesses. An alternative process to reduce the amount of chemicals and the volume of the resulting nuclear wastes consists in using the same but foamed solutions (1). Carrying less liquid, the resulting foams still display similar kinetics of dissolution rates and their efficiency is determined by their ability to hold sufficient wetnesses during the time required for the decontamination. Classical foam decontamination process illustrated by foam pulverization or circulation in the 90 turned five years ago into a specific static process using high-lifetime viscosified foam at a steady state. One way to slow down the liquid drainage is to raise liquid viscosity by adding organic viscosifiers like xanthan gum (2). In 2005, new studies started on an innovative process proposed by S. Faure and based on triphasic foams containing particles [3]. The aim is to generate new decontamination foams containing less quantities of organics materials (surfactants and viscosifiers). Silica particles are obviously known to stabilize or destabilize foams (4). In the frame of S. Guignot Ph.D., new fundamental studies are initiated in order to clarify the role of silica solid microparticles in these foams. Our final goal is to determine whether this kind of new foam can be stable for several hours for a decontamination process. The results we will report focus on wet foams used for nuclear decontamination and incorporating fumed silica. The study is conducted on a vertical foam column in a pseudo-free drainage configuration, and aims at investigating the influence of

  13. New decontamination process using foams containing particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guignot, S.; Faure, S. [CEA Marcoule, Lab. des Procedes Avances de Decontamination, 30 (France)

    2008-07-01

    One key point in the dismantling of nuclear facilities is the thorough cleaning of radiation- exposed surfaces on which radioactive deposits have formed. This cleaning step is often achieved by successive liquid rinses with specific solutions containing alkaline, acidic, or even oxidizing species depending on whether the aim is to dissolve greasy deposits (like ter-butylphosphate) or to corrode surfaces on micrometric thicknesses. An alternative process to reduce the amount of chemicals and the volume of the resulting nuclear wastes consists in using the same but foamed solutions (1). Carrying less liquid, the resulting foams still display similar kinetics of dissolution rates and their efficiency is determined by their ability to hold sufficient wetnesses during the time required for the decontamination. Classical foam decontamination process illustrated by foam pulverization or circulation in the 90 turned five years ago into a specific static process using high-lifetime viscosified foam at a steady state. One way to slow down the liquid drainage is to raise liquid viscosity by adding organic viscosifiers like xanthan gum (2). In 2005, new studies started on an innovative process proposed by S. Faure and based on triphasic foams containing particles [3]. The aim is to generate new decontamination foams containing less quantities of organics materials (surfactants and viscosifiers). Silica particles are obviously known to stabilize or destabilize foams (4). In the frame of S. Guignot Ph.D., new fundamental studies are initiated in order to clarify the role of silica solid microparticles in these foams. Our final goal is to determine whether this kind of new foam can be stable for several hours for a decontamination process. The results we will report focus on wet foams used for nuclear decontamination and incorporating fumed silica. The study is conducted on a vertical foam column in a pseudo-free drainage configuration, and aims at investigating the influence of

  14. Steam generator channel head decontamination by remote grit blast methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A decontamination technique using a high pressure water spray containing an abrasive grit has been developed and employed in the decontamination of steam generator channel heads. The spray, which is remotely controlled, removes the corrosion product deposits that form on primary system surfaces and reduces the area dose rates. The remote grit blast technique has proven to be a viable method for decontamination of steam generator channel head surfaces

  15. Decontamination planning based on computer simulation code CDE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decontamination planning based on a computer simulation code CDE is discussed in this paper. Large amount of radionuclides had been discharged to environment in the accident of the Tokyo Electronic Power Company Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. CDE has been developed to support planning the decontamination. From the present study, it is validated that the computer simulation is very useful to predict the effect of the scenario before actions, and to plan the decontamination. (J.P.N.)

  16. Use of zeolites for decontamination of radioactively contamined working surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of using zeolites in decontaminates applied for cleaning up radioactively contaminated working clothes and surfaces is studied. It has been established that zeolites can be used for decontamination of working clothes, as well as, working surfaces presented by metals, ceramic tile, wood coated with paint or varnish, glass. The data on different zeolite-based decontaminate in comparison with a known detergent 'Zashchita' are given

  17. Electropulse method of decontamination of nuclear power plant equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of existing methods of decontamination of nuclear power plant equipment; it describes the advantages and disadvantages of the existing methods. A new promising method for decontamination of removable NPP equipment with a complex surface configuration. The technology and the advantages of the proposed method. Presented physical -mathematical model that calculates non- steady field electrolyte concentration, temperature and electric field in the electrolyte during electro surface treatment. Key words: corrosion, radioactive contamination, decontamination, equipment, nuclear power plant

  18. Communication during mass casualty decontamination: highlighting the gaps

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, Holly; Drury, John; Rubin, G James; Williams, Richard; Amlot, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Following the World Trade Centre attacks of September 2001, there has been an increased focus in the emergency planning community on methods of managing chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear (CBRN) incidents. This has, necessarily, included consideration of methods and processes for rapid decontamination of large numbers of potentially contaminated people. Real-life decontamination incidents have suggested that some contaminated casualties may not comply with decontamination protocol...

  19. Modelling Mass Casualty Decontamination Systems Informed by Field Exercise Data

    OpenAIRE

    Richard Amlôt; Egan, Joseph R.

    2012-01-01

    In the event of a large-scale chemical release in the UK decontamination of ambulant casualties would be undertaken by the Fire and Rescue Service (FRS). The aim of this study was to track the movement of volunteer casualties at two mass decontamination field exercises using passive Radio Frequency Identification tags and detection mats that were placed at pre-defined locations. The exercise data were then used to inform a computer model of the FRS component of the mass decontamination proces...

  20. Assessment of human skin decontamination from radioactive contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A suitable and practicable means for assessing skin decontamination and percutaneous adsorption of radioactive skin contaminants is developed by comparing the streams of beta-particles and gamma-quanta characterizing the penetration and distribution of radioactive skin contaminants. The principal requirements which a preparation for human skin decontaminants should meet are: effectiveness of the preparation, minimal percutaneous absorption, broad activity spectrum on compounds and radionuclides, preservation of integrity of the treated skin and a simple method of use of the decontaminant. (author)

  1. Immobilisation in cement of ion exchange resins arising from the purification of reagents, used for the decontamination of reactor circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decontamination of reactors normally results in large volumes of liquid effluent. At present the most effective method of reducing the volume of waste is to remove the activity by passing the solution through an ion exchange column. The aim of the programme at present is to show that ion exchange resins used to remove activity from decontaminating agents can be successfully immobilised in cement. To achieve this, blends of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) and ground granulated Blast Furnace Slag (BFS) will be used initially. Initial results presented in a previous report showed that BFS blended with OPC in the ratio 9:1 produced a satisfactory product containing 40% ion exchange resin. Further work has now been undertaken to improve the product's properties and the waste loading. The use of microsilica, a finely divided form of silicon dioxide, has also been investigated as an additive to cement. This has resulted in a further improvement in the product's properties. The mechanical and rheological properties of waste forms incorporating microsilica have been investigated. The final part of the report deals with the immobilisation of ion exchange resin which has been treated with simulant decontaminating solution, together with an assessment of the effect of picolinic acid and formic acid on cement hydration. A new technique for measuring the expansion of grouts in the first 48 hours curing has been evaluated. (author)

  2. Design of a decontamination section of the post-irradiation examination laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Post-Irradiation Examination Laboratory activities include the decontamination of expensive equipment of different sizes and weight, involving the complexity and extension of the necessary decontamination. A decontamination section has been designed for that purpose. (author)

  3. ''Green'' Biopolymers for Improved Decontamination of Metals from Surfaces: Sorptive Characterization and Coating Properties.. Annual report to be submitted to DOE Program Managers for posting on web page

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposed research aims to develop a fundamental understanding of important biological and physical chemical parameters for effective decontamination of metal surfaces using environmentally benign aqueous-based biopolymer solutions. Understanding how heavy metal-chelating biopolymers coat and interact with contaminated surfaces will benefit the development of novel, safe, easy-to-apply decontamination methodologies for removal of radionuclides and heavy metals. The benefits of these methodologies will include the following: decreased exposure hazards for workers; decreased secondary waste generation; increased efficiency of decontamination; positive public appeal and development of novel, nature-friendly business opportunities; and lower cost of cleanup to the government. We propose to use aqueous biopolymer solutions to coat a contaminated metal surface (i.e., steel), solubilize the heavy metals (e.g., uranium) from the surface, and bind the heavy metals into the biopolymer. The biopolymer coating (containing the immobilized hazardous metal contaminants) will then be removed as a viscous film, as a dry powder, or by washing. This ''apply, wait, and remove'' procedure will reduce the amount of worker time spent in decontamination activities

  4. Road surface washing system for decontaminating radioactive substances. Experiment of radioactive decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Great East Japan Earthquake that occurred on March 11, 2011 resulted in the explosion of the TEPCO Fukushima 1st Nuclear Power Plant and the global dispersion of a large quantity of radioactive substances. A high radiation dose was particularly recorded in Fukushima prefecture several weeks after the accident, although the level is presently sufficiently low. However, considering that the adverse effects of low but extended exposure to radiation are yet to be negated, there is the urgent need for further decontamination. In our study, we focused on the efficient decontamination of radioactive substances in residential areas, for which we propose a high-pressure water jet system for washing road surfaces. The system differs from conventional systems of its type that were initially designed for use in the immediate environment of the nuclear reactors of the TEPCO Fukushima 1st Nuclear Power Plant. The proposed system consists of multiple washing, transporter, and server robots. The washing robots decontaminate the road surface using high-pressure water jets and are transported between washed and unwashed areas by the transporter robots. The server robots supply the water used for washing and absorb the polluted water together with ground dust. In this paper, we describe the concept of the system and present the results of decontamination experiments. Particular attention is given to the washing robot and its mechanism and control method. The results of the integration of the washing robot in an experimental system confirmed the feasibility of the proposed system. (author)

  5. Full system decontamination experience in BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, N.; Sugai, K.; Katayouse, N.; Fujimori, A.; Iida, K.; Hayashi, K. [Tokyo Electric Power Company, Tokyo (Japan); Kanasaki, T.; Inami, I. [Toshiba Corporation, Yokohama (Japan); Strohmer, F. [Framatome ANP Gmbh, Eelangen (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    At the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station unit 3, unit 2, unit 5 and unit 1 of Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), the replacement of the core shroud and internals has been conducted since 1997 in this order. The welded core internals in operating BWR plants were replaced to improve stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance. At present these units are operating smoothly. The developed technology concept is to restore those internals in open air inside the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). To reduce the radiation dose rate inside the RPV, not only a shielding method was applied to cut the radiation from the irradiated structures but also a chemical decontamination method was applied to dissolve the radioactive crud deposited on the surface by using chemical agents. The calculated decontamination factor (DF) at the RPV bottom reached 35-117. As result, the dose rate decreased to approximately 0.1 mSv/h under water. Before and after the installation of the in-vessel shielding, a mechanical cleaning was extensively applied inside the RPV to remove the residual crud as well as the swarf, chips from cutting. As a result, the dose rate at the RPV bottom decreased to ranging from 0.2 to 0.4 mSv/h in air. A working environment for human access, which was better than expected, was established inside the RPV, resulting in 70, 140, 50 and 70 man-Sv (estimated) saving respectively at unit 3 (1F-3), unit 2(1F-2), unit 5(1F-5) and unit 1(1F-1). All four full system decontamination (FSDs) contributed to the successful realization of the core shroud replacement project under the dry condition in RPV.

  6. Decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1973, when the IAEA first introduced the subject of decontamination and decommissioning into its programme, twelve Agency reports reflecting the needs of the Member States on these topics have been published. These reports summarize the work done by various Technical Committees, Advisory Groups, and International Symposia. While the basic technology to accomplish decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) is fairly well developed, the Agency feels that a more rapid exchange of information and co-ordination of work are required to foster technology, reduce duplication of effort, and provide useful results for Member States planning D and D activities. Although the Agency's limited financial resources do not make possible direct support of every research work in this field, the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) creates a forum for outstanding workers from different Member States brought into closer contact with one another to provide for more effective interaction and, perhaps subsequently, closer collaboration. The first IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on decontamination and decommissioning was initiated in 1984. Nineteen experts from 11 Member States and two international organizations (CEC, OECD/NEA) took part in the three Research Co-ordination Meetings (RCM) during 1984-87. The final RCM took place in Pittsburgh, USA, in conjunction with the 1987 International Decommissioning Symposium (sponsored by the US DOE and organized in co-operation with the IAEA and OECD/NEA). The present document summarizes the salient features and achievements of the co-ordinated research work performed during the 1984-87 programme period. The document consists of two parts: Part 1, Summary of the three research co-ordination meetings and Part 2, Final submissions by participants on the research work performed during 1984-1987. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 7 reports presented. Refs, figs and tabs

  7. KEWB facilities decontamination and disposition. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decontamination and disposition of the KEWB facilities, Buildings 073, 643, 123, and 793, are complete. All of the facility equipment, including reactor enclosure, reactor vessel, fuel handling systems, controls, radioactive waste systems, exhaust systems, electrical services, and protective systems were removed from the site. Buildings 643, 123, and 793 were completely removed, including foundations. The floor and portions of the walls of Building 073 were covered over by final grading. Results of the radiological monitoring and the final survey are presented. 9 tables, 19 figures

  8. Decontamination of TRIGA Mark II reactor, Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TRIGA Mark II Reactor in the Centre for Research and Development Nuclear Technique Bandung has been partially decommissioned as part of an upgrading project. The upgrading project was carried out from 1995 to 2000 and is being commissioned in 2001. The decommissioning portion of the project included disassembly of some components of the reactor core, producing contaminated material. This contaminated material (grid plate, reflector, thermal column, heat exchanger and pipe) will be sent to the Decontamination Facility at the Radioactive Waste Management Development Centre. (author)

  9. Automated Single Cell Data Decontamination Pipeline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tennessen, Kristin [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Pati, Amrita [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.

    2014-03-21

    Recent technological advancements in single-cell genomics have encouraged the classification and functional assessment of microorganisms from a wide span of the biospheres phylogeny.1,2 Environmental processes of interest to the DOE, such as bioremediation and carbon cycling, can be elucidated through the genomic lens of these unculturable microbes. However, contamination can occur at various stages of the single-cell sequencing process. Contaminated data can lead to wasted time and effort on meaningless analyses, inaccurate or erroneous conclusions, and pollution of public databases. A fully automated decontamination tool is necessary to prevent these instances and increase the throughput of the single-cell sequencing process

  10. Investigation of electrokinetic decontamination of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments have been conducted to investigate the capabilities of electrokinetic decontamination of concrete. Batch equilibration studies have determined that the loading of cesium and strontium on concrete may be decreased using electrolyte solutions containing competing cations, while solubilization of uranium and cobalt, that precipitate at high pH, will require lixiviants containing complexing agents. Dynamic electrokinetic experiments showed greater mobility of cesium than strontium, while some positive results were obtained for the transport of cobalt through concrete using EDTA and for uranium using carbonate

  11. Microwave-Based Water Decontamination System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Byerly, Diane (Inventor); Sognier, Marguerite (Inventor); Dusl, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A system for decontaminating a medium. The system can include a medium having one or more contaminants disposed therein. The contaminants can be or include bacteria, fungi, parasites, viruses, and combinations thereof. A microwave energy radiation device can be positioned proximate the medium. The microwave energy radiation device can be adapted to generate a signal having a frequency from about 10 GHz to about 100 GHz. The signal can be adapted to kill one or more of the contaminants disposed within the medium while increasing a temperature of the medium by less than about 10 C.

  12. Microbiological decontamination of some herbs by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research work on the microbiological decontamination of the medical herbs by electron beam was carried out. The seven samples of the herbs granules were irradiated at the doses 3, 6 and 10 kGy. It has been shown, that D10 values are varied in several samples after irradiation. Additional, research work, by gas chromatographic method, on the composition volatile oils (salvia, orange, peppermint and anise), after irradiation at the dose 4.4 and 8.8 kGy was carried out. It was not significant differences in the compositions between control and irradiated oils. (author). 12 figs, 2 tabs

  13. Radiation protection at the RA reactor in 1987, Part IV: Decontamination, actions and collection of liquid and solid radioactive wastes for the RA reactor needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Certain amount of solid waste results from RA reactor operation, the mean quantity of which depends on the duration of reactor operation and related activities. During repair, when reactor is not operated as well under accidental conditions, the quantity of waste is higher, dependent on the type of repair and comprehensiveness of decontamination of the working surface, contaminated tools and components. The waste is sorted and packed on the spot where they appeared according to the existing regulations and principles of radiation protection with aim to minimize unnecessary exposure of the radiation protection personnel who deals with control, transport, radioactive waste treatment and decontamination. During exceptional operations (decontamination, repair, bigger volume of contaminated material, etc.) professional staff of the Radiation protection department gives recommendations and helps in planning the actions related to repair, sorting and packaging of radioactive waste in special containers, identification of the contaminants, etc. During 1987, due to repairs of the reactor components, the activity of the decontamination staff resulted in 500 liters of liquid effluents, and 0.4 m3 of solid radioactive waste. The waste was contaminated mostly by isotopes 137Cs, 60Co, 3H

  14. Comparative effectiveness of extraction and adsorption methods in treatment of phenolic effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehppel, C.A.; Kochetkova, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    This paper compares two methods of decontamination and refinement of industrial phenolic effluents: first, extraction by means of butyl acetate; second, adsorption on activated semicoke. The method of adsorption is valid for phenols in water, but not valid for pyroligneous effluents containing various homologs: ketones, fatty acids, pyridine bases and ammonia. The effectiveness of the two methods of purifying industrial effluents was investigated and effects of the treatment of waste water containing a mixture of phenols and homologs were studied in an industrial setting, with negative results, and under laboratory conditions. In the laboratory, effectiveness of refinement by both methods was determined according to the coefficients of distribution of summary phenols (Kr). A table presents the results of this laboratory investigation, and shows that the coefficients of distribution (Kr) are very close in number in both the extractive and adsorbent methods of refinement. However, in the extraction of phenols by butyl acetate 25 kg per ton of phenols are lost constituting 20-25% of the cost. In dephenolization by semicoke the adsorbent regenerates the solvent by means of benzol resulting in the production of marketable phenols. Activated semicoke is recommended for refining industrial effluents in the production of phenol, several plastic masses and additives for fuels and lubricants. (In Russian)

  15. Trace uranium analysis using AdSV for reused water/effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determining uranium in ppb level is considered to be most crucial for reuse of water originated in nuclear industries at the time of decontamination of plant effluents generated during uranium (fuel ) production, fuel rod fabrication, application in nuclear reactors and comparatively small amount of effluents obtained during laboratory research and developmental work. Higher level of uranium in percentage level can be analyzed through gravimetry, titration etc, whereas inductively coupled plasma-atomic energy spectroscopy (ICP-AES), neutron activation analysis, fluorimeter are well suited for ppm level. For ppb level of uranium, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) or stripping voltammeter serve the purpose. High precision, accuracy and sensitivity are the crucial for uranium analysis in trace (ppb) level, which are satisfied by ICP-MS and adsorptive stripping voltammeter (AdSV). Voltammeter has been found to be less expensive, requires low maintenance and is convenient for measuring uranium in presence of large number of other ions in the waste effluent. In this paper, necessity of uranium concentration quantification for recovery as well as safe disposal of plant effluent, working mechanism of voltammeter w.r.t. uranium analysis in ppb level with its standard deviation has been represented. (author)

  16. Decontamination between dismantling of the Rapsodie primary coolant circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The large-scale decontamination of FBR sodium loops is a novel task, as only a limited number of laboratory-scale results are available to date. The principal objective of this work is to develop a suitable decontamination procedure for application to the primary loops of the RAPSODIE fast breeder reactor as part of decommissionning to Stage 2

  17. Study on the decontamination of primary cooling pump in Hanaro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The HANARO, a multi-purpose research reactor of 30 MWth open-tank-in-pool type, has been under normal operation since its initial criticality in February, 1995. Recently, ten years after the initial operation of the HANARO, one of the two primary cooling pumps was decontaminated for overhaul maintenance in 2004. Before decontamination exposure doserate and surface contamination level of primary cooling pump measured at 4 points. After final decontamination exposure doserate and surface contamination level of primary cooling pump remeasured by same method done before. It is easy to decontaminate the out side exposed surfaces of the pump, but it is difficult to approach the inside surface due to double volute installed in the casing. Therefore, a new decontamination facility has been developed to solve this problem. A concentrated de-contaminant (DX-300) is rotated in the closed pump casing by the impeller actuated by a temporary motor. Nuclide particles are removed by the emulsification effect of the de-contaminant and the surface contaminants are chemically removed from the pump by the corrosion and dissolution effect. The inside surfaces of the primary cooling pump have been decontaminated by using the facility. As results, the contamination level of the inside surfaces was maintained below the surface contamination limit

  18. Development of decontamination, decommissioning and environmental restoration technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Jik; Kwon, H. S.; Kim, G. N. and others

    1999-03-01

    Through the project of 'Development of decontamination, decommissioning and environmental restoration technology', the followings were studied. 1. Development of decontamination and repair technology for nuclear fuel cycle facilities 2. Development of dismantling technology 3. Development of environmental restoration technology. (author)

  19. Research on decontamination of cesium contaminated soil by electrokinetic process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this research, electrokinetic process was applied for the decontamination of cesium contaminated soil. As a result, about 4.0 times cesium removal was achieved by applying a DC electric field of 80 V/m to comparing zero electric field in treatment for 30 days. Therefore, the electrokinetic process has a possibility to decontamination of cesium contaminated soil. (author)

  20. Stability of Decontamination Foam Containing Silica Nanoparticles and Viscosifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, In Ho; Jung, Chong Hun; Yoon, Suk Bon; Kim, Chorong; Jung, Jun Young; Park, Sang Yoon; Moon, Jei Kwon; Choi, Wang Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    This formulation can significantly decrease the amounts of chemical reagents and secondary waste. The advantage of decontamination foam is its potentially wide application for metallic walls, overhead surfaces, and the elements of complex components and facilities. In addition, foam is a good material for in situ decontamination because it generates low final waste volumes owing to its volume expansion. The application of foam allows for remote decontamination processing using only an injection nozzle and the equipment to generate the decontamination foam, which reduces operator exposure to high radioactivity. The decontamination efficiency can be enhanced by improving the contact time between chemical reagents and a contaminated surface through the addition of surfactants and viscosifiers into the decontamination foam. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of silica nanoparticles and a viscosifier on the foam stability and the dissolution behaviors of corroded specimens using a non-ionic surfactant. This study showed the effect of viscosifiers and nanoparticles on the foam stability when developing new formulations of decontamination foam. The addition of xanthan gum and the mixture of xanthan gum and silica nanoparticles (M-5) significantly increased the foam stability, compared to the surfactant solution alone. This result indicates that both the viscosifier and nanoparticles have a synergistic effect on the foam stability. As the contact time increased, the dissolution rate increased to become similar to the dissolution that contained decontamination liquid.