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Sample records for aquatics stand establishment

  1. Emergent aquatics: stand establishment, management, and species screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, D.C.; Andrews, N.J.; Dubbe, D.R.; Garver, E.G.; Penko, M.; Read, P.E.; Zimmerman, E.S.

    1982-11-01

    Several emergent aquatic species have been identified as potential biomass crops, including Typha spp. (cattail), Scirpus spp. (rush), Sparganium spp. (bur reed), and Phragmites (reed). This report discusses first year results from studies of stand establishment and management, Typha nutrient requirements, wetland species yield comparisons, and Typha micropropagation. In a comparison of the relative effectiveness of seed, seedlings, and rhizomes for stand establishment, rhizomes appeared to be more consistent and productive under a wire variety of conditions. Both rhizomes and seedling established plots grew successfully on excavated peatland sites. First season results from a multiyear fertilizer rate experiment indicate that fertilizer treatment resulted in significantly increased tissue nutrient concentrations which should carry over into subsequent growing seasons. Shoot density and belowground dry weight were also significantly increased by phosphorus + potassium and potassium applications, respectively. First season yields of selected wetland species from managed paddies generally were comparable to yields reported from natural stands. Several particularly productive clones of Typha spp. have been identified. A method of establishing Typha in tissue culture is described.

  2. Factors affecting forage stand establishment

    OpenAIRE

    Sulc R.M.

    1998-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in our knowledge of forage seed physiology, technology, and stand establishment practices; however, stand establishment continues to be one of the most common production problems affecting forage crops in the USA. There is a need for research on stand establishment of forage crops under abiotic and biotic stress. Although the forage seed industry produces and markets seed of high quality, new methods of assessing seed vigor are needed and their use should b...

  3. Factors affecting forage stand establishment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulc R.M.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Significant advances have been made in our knowledge of forage seed physiology, technology, and stand establishment practices; however, stand establishment continues to be one of the most common production problems affecting forage crops in the USA. There is a need for research on stand establishment of forage crops under abiotic and biotic stress. Although the forage seed industry produces and markets seed of high quality, new methods of assessing seed vigor are needed and their use should be expanded in the industry to enable matching seed lot performance to specific environmental conditions where performance can be maximized. Seed treatment and seed coating are used in the forage seed industry, and studies have shown they are of benefit in some environments. There is an increase in no-tillage seeding of forage crops, but improvements in the no-tillage planting equipment are needed to make them better suited to small seeds. Other recent developments in seeding techniques include broadcasting seed with dry granular and fluid fertilizers, which improves the efficiency of the seeding operation.

  4. Logging in hardwood stands established on farm land

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Performance and costs for different harvesting systems in broad leaf stands established on former tillage is presented. The calculations, combined with a forecast of the market development, shows that it is risky to aim production exclusively at bulk products as fibre or fibre/energy. The harvest of fibre or energy wood can, however, be used as a means to increase profitability of a silvicultural programme aimed at production of high quality hardwood lumber. Management and logging in these stands will be carried out with small scale technology, often by the private forest owner. Todays large scale systems are not competitive in these stands. The cost calculations show that we lack economically sound systems for harvesting stands in the interval up to 5 cm DBH. The lowest logging cost for these stands was calculated for motor manual felling and chipping with a chipper/dumper mounted on a farm tractor. This alternative is competitive also in the interval 5-10 cm DBH but there is a number of other feasible systems, e.g. off-road chippers processing motor manually felled and piled trees. Tree section systems with extraction by forwarder or a farm tractor with grapple loader and a bogic trailer operates at low costs to roadside but costs for processing and, maybe, a more expensive secondary transportation must then be added. For thinnings in the interval 10-25 cm DBH tree chipping is the most cost efficient if only energy assortments is to be harvested. However, at the current price relations between energy wood and pulpwood tree section systems are preferable also in stands over 10 cm since it allows a combined harvest of fibre and energy. For the same reason, the seemingly most interesting system in later thinnings is a system with differentiated processing. The term denotes a system where pulpwood is cut motor manually down to 12.5 cm and extracted by forwarder or farm tractor. The remaining tops and branches are processed by an off-road chipper. (36 refs., 11 figs.)

  5. Factors affecting forage stand establishment Fatores que afetam o estabelecimento do estande em plantas forrageiras

    OpenAIRE

    Sulc, R.M.

    1998-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in our knowledge of forage seed physiology, technology, and stand establishment practices; however, stand establishment continues to be one of the most common production problems affecting forage crops in the USA. There is a need for research on stand establishment of forage crops under abiotic and biotic stress. Although the forage seed industry produces and markets seed of high quality, new methods of assessing seed vigor are needed and their use should b...

  6. Aquatic grazers reduce the establishment and growth of riparian plants along an environmental gradient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, G.F.; Sarneel, J.M.; Ravensbergen, L.; Huig, N.; van Paassen, J.; Rip, W.; Bakker, E.S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The establishment of riparian plants is determined by abiotic conditions and grazing, although it is usually presumed that the former are most important. We tested the impact of aquatic grazers on the survival and growth of establishing riparian plants and whether the impact of grazing inter

  7. Evaluating Nitrogen Containing Controlled Release Fertilizers At Stand Establishment In Loblolly Pine.

    OpenAIRE

    Kyle, Kevin Hunter

    2004-01-01

    Evaluating Nitrogen Containing Controlled Release Fertilizers At Stand Establishment In Loblolly Pine Kevin Hunter Kyle Abstract The response of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) to fertilization and weed control at stand establishment, using various formulations of conventional and controlled release N fertilizers was evaluated in a greenhouse study and at two field trials in the Virginia Piedmont, in 2002 and 2003. The greenhouse study evaluated five fertilizer treatments; 1) ch...

  8. Stand establishment and yield potential of organically grown seeded and transplanted medicinal herbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field studies were conducted at Las Cruces, N.M., and Alcalde, N.M., to compare direct seeding to transplanting for stand establishment and yield estimates of calendula (Calendula officinalis L.), catnip (Nepeta cataria L.), lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.), stinging nettles (Urtica dioica L.), a...

  9. Allometric equations for estimating biomass in naturally established Prosopis stands in Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muturi, G.M.; Kariuki, J.G.; Poorter, L.; Mohren, G.M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Forty five Prosopis stems of 2.5-18.0 cm diameter at breast height (DBH) were sampled at Nadapal along the Turkwel riverine forest for development of biomass and volume prediction equations for naturally established stands. Basal diameter (D30), DBH and heights were measured, felled trees and their

  10. Young mangrove stands produce a large and high quality litter input to aquatic systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nga, B.T.; Tinh, H.Q.; Tam, D.T.; Scheffer, M.; Roijackers, R.M.M.

    2005-01-01

    Mangrove swamps are key ecosystems along the Vietnam coast. Although mangrove litter is thought to represent an important input of organic matter and nutrients to the coastal aquatic systems, the factors determining the quality and size of this litter flux have not been studied so far. We monitored

  11. Young mangrove stands produce a large and high quality litter input to aquatic systems

    OpenAIRE

    Nga, B.T.; Tinh, H.Q.; Tam, D.T.; Scheffer, M.; Roijackers, R.M.M.

    2005-01-01

    Mangrove swamps are key ecosystems along the Vietnam coast. Although mangrove litter is thought to represent an important input of organic matter and nutrients to the coastal aquatic systems, the factors determining the quality and size of this litter flux have not been studied so far. We monitored leaf, stipule, twig, and reproductive litter monthly in monocultures of Rhizophora apiculata mangrove forests of 7, 11, 17 and 24 years old in the Camau province, Mekong Delta, Vietnam. Litter trap...

  12. Improvements in the use of aquatic herbicides and establishment of future research directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getsinger, K.D.; Netherland, M.D.; Grue, C.E.; Koschnick, T.J.

    2008-01-01

    Peer-reviewed literature over the past 20 years identifies significant changes and improvements in chemical control strategies used to manage nuisance submersed vegetation. The invasive exotic plants hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata L.f. Royle) and Eurasian watermilfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum L.) continue to spread and remain the plant species of greatest concern for aquatic resource managers at the national scale. Emerging exotic weeds of regional concern such as egeria (Egeria densa Planch.), curlyleaf pondweed (Potamogeton crispus L.), and hygrophila (Hygrophila polysperma (Roxb.) T. Anders), as well as native plants such as variable watermilfoil (Myriophyllum heterophyllum Michx), and cabomba (Cabomba caroliniana Gray) are invasive outside their home ranges. In addition, there is always the threat of new plant introductions such as African elodea (Lagarosiphon major (Ridley) Moss) or narrow-leaf anacharis (Egeria najas Planchon). The registration of the bleaching herbicide fluridone in the mid 1980s for whole-lake and large-scale management stimulated numerous lines of research involving reduction of use rates, plant selectivity, residue monitoring, and impacts on fisheries. In addition to numerous advances, the specificity of fluridone for a single plant enzyme led to the first documented case of herbicide resistance in aquatic plant management. The resistance of hydrilla to fluridone has stimulated a renewed interest by industry and others in the registration of alternative modes of action for aquatic use. These newer chemistries tend to be enzyme-specific compounds with favorable non-target toxicity profiles. Registration efforts have been facilitated by increased cooperation between key federal government agencies that have aquatic weed control and research responsibilities, and regulators within the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). We reviewed past and current research efforts to identify areas in need of further investigation and to establish

  13. Re-establishment of an extinct population of the endangered aquatic plant Potamogeton coloratus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaplan, Zdeněk; Šumberová, Kateřina; Formanová, I.; Ducháček, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 119, Oct. 2014 (2014), s. 91-99. ISSN 0304-3770 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/09/0291; GA ČR GA206/09/0329; GA ČR GB14-36079G Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : aquatic plants * endangered species * population restoration Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.608, year: 2014

  14. Using sediment cores to establish targets for the remediation of aquatic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lintern, Anna; Anderson, Marion; Leahy, Paul; Deletic, Ana; McCarthy, David

    2016-01-01

    When assigning site-specific restoration targets for deteriorating aquatic systems, it is necessary to have an understanding of the undisturbed or background state of the system. However, the site-specific characteristics of aquatic systems prior to disturbance are mostly unknown, due to the lack of historical water and sediment quality data. This study aims to introduce a method for filling this gap in our understanding, using dated sediment cores from the beds of aquatic environments. We used Bolin Billabong, a floodplain lake of the Yarra River (South-East Australia), as a case study to demonstrate the application of this method. We identified the concentrations of aluminium, cadmium, chromium, copper, iron, lead, manganese, nickel, tin and zinc at 8 cm intervals through the sediment core. This showed that aluminium, chromium, copper, iron, lead, nickel, tin and zinc concentrations in Bolin Billabong sediments significantly increased after European settlement in the river catchment in the mid-19th century. The differences between current Australian sediment quality guidelines trigger values and the background metal concentrations in Bolin Billabong sediments underscore the value of using locally relevant background toxicant concentrations when setting water and sediment quality targets. PMID:26877046

  15. Identification of varieties and gene flow in Douglas fir exemplified in artificially established stands in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Fussi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Douglas-fir [Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb. Franco] is an economically valuable non-native tree species in Germany and is considered very promising in view of global climate change. Therefore, the genetic characterization of Douglas-fir populations and seed stands in Germany is essential. We studied coastal and interior Douglas-fir varieties, both present in Germany, by using eleven isoenzyme and four microsatellite loci. By analyzing eight reference populations of known origin we were able to identify the two varieties on the population level using Bayesian and distance based methods. Seven populations present in Bavaria were then successfully assigned to one of the two varieties. Within varieties we found stronger grouping within the interior variety than within the coastal one. Despite lower differences within coastal Douglas-fir we have first indications for the origin of two populations. For two Bavarian populations, natural regeneration was included and genetic data revealed no significant genetic difference between adults and offspring. The parentage analysis for one of the studied stands revealed that a large proportion of adults took part in the reproduction, but some trees were more successful than others in transferring their genes to the next generation. Our study was able to improve variety identification of Douglas-fir using isoenzyme markers and nuclear microsatellites and study reproductive patterns, both are important issues for the management of Douglas-fir stands in Bavaria.

  16. Modifying soil water status and improving stand establishment in a water repellent soil using surfactant coated seed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostka, Stanley; Lampe, Mark; van Mondfrans, Jan; Madsen, Matthew; McMillan, Mica

    2015-04-01

    Surfactant seed coating (SSC) is a technology being developed cooperatively by scientists at the USDA, Agricultural Research Service and Aquatrols to improve stand establishment in water repellent soils, particularly under arid conditions. Early SSC studies have demonstrated that surfactant coatings can dramatically increase soil water content, turfgrass density, cover, and biomass for Kentucky bluegrass, tall fescue and perennial ryegrass sown in water repellent soils under greenhouse conditions. However, in these studies, surfactant loads were excessive (≥ 40 wt% of seed mass). The objective of the current study was to ascertain if a lower surfactant treatment level (10 wt%) would improve emergence and stand establishment in a severely water repellent sandy soil under field conditions. Research was conducted on a golf course near Utrecht, NL. At the time of planting water drop penetration time (WDPT) of the soil was approximately 300 s, indicating severe water repellency. Chewings fescue (Festuca rubra subsp. commutata) seed was treated with ASET-4001 surfactant at a loading rate of 10 wt% using two different proprietary coating procedures (US Patent Application 20100267554). The two different ASET-4001 coatings were compared against untreated seed in a randomized complete block design with four replicates. In order to maximize abiotic stresses, the only applied water came from rainfall. Assessments of stand establishment were made every 7-14 days for three months using a subjective visual assessment of percent grass cover and sward quality based on a 1-10 scale (where 10 is best). At six months post-sowing, 20 mm x 300 mm soil cores were randomly removed from each plot and soil wetting front depth measured. Improved emergence of the surfactant coated seeds over the untreated seeds began to appear 7 days after sowing. However, there were no differences between the two SSC treatments. Establishment was influenced by weather conditions. From mid-June to early

  17. A study for the development of a vegetable planter for Optimum stand establishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seed placement and establishment is probably the most crucial phase in the life of a vegetable crop, therefore, the role of the planter or seeder is of vital importance. The objective of this study was to assess the demand of a vegetable planter/seeder and to collect information from farmers, machinery manufacturers and stakeholders to design a new planter for vegetables, initially for pea crop. To achieve the objective of this study, a survey was conducted in three provinces (Punjab, Sindh and Baluchistan) of the country and 34 farmers, 21 officers from the concerned institutions and 14 manufactures were interviewed. Furthermore, three existing planters/drills used for sowing different crops were picked from different sources for evaluating their comparative performance for planting pea. The status of vegetable planting or sowing as a whole was not found encouraging in the country and most vegetables are grown manually that are time consuming and labour intensive practices. Farmers are vigorously demanding a planter or seeder for vegetables. From the evaluation of existing machines, it was concluded that a pneumatic planter for sowing vegetables on beds is the most precise method that drops 10 to 20 seeds per meter length at recommended forward speed with single seed placement per hill. This ensures not only the optimum seed rate, but also eliminates the need for thinning after germination. Using this machine farmers may be able to save two third of the seed quantity for pea crop together with achieving additional benefits of vegetables mechanisation. Therefore, a vegetable planter, initially for pea, should be developed locally to enhance productivity of vegetables, because root establishment of vegetable crops is very critical factor that affects ultimate yield. (author)

  18. The Effects of Endogenous Mycorrhiza (Glomus spp. on Stand Establishment Rate and Yield of Open Field Tomato Crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANGJELINA VUKSANI

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Graded seeds of a tomato commercial cultivar (Suta F1 were sown in plugged (30 cm3 foam trays filled with vermiculate. For the half of seeds the substrate was homogenously mixed (10% vol/vol with broken expanded clay biologically activated by immobilized propagules of naturally occurring AM-fungi (Glomus intradadices, Glomus etunicatum, Glomus mosseae, Glomus geosporum, Glomus clarum, supplied by BioSym B.V. For the next half, it was homogenously mixed with free clay particles of the same size with the previous one (10% vol/vol. Thirty days after sowing, tomato seedlings were transplanted in to 200 cm3 plastic pots filled with vermiculite. Either AMF non pre inoculated seedlings (non AMF, or AMF pre inoculated (AMF, were equally divided in three subgroups based on the level of salinity applied in the nutrient solution (0, 50 and 100 mM sodium chlorate. On the day of transplanting and 7 days after transplanting, 10 plants were randomly selected for each experimental plot. For each of them, the dry weight of root (RW, leaf (LA, steam (SW and the whole plant (W was determined and based on that, the relative growth rates (RGR and root relative growth rate (RRGR were calculated and used as the parameters assessing the stand establishment rate of tomato seedlings after transplanting. Additionally, stomata conductance and leaf temperature were measured to assess AMF effects on physiological performance of transplanted seedlings. In order to assess the effect of AM fungi pre inoculation on total yield, parallel with pot transplanting, a field experiment was conducted according to a three replication randomized block design. It was proved that the production of open field tomato can be enhanced by the pre inoculation of AM fungi to tomato transplants at the nursery stage. Due to the pre inoculation of AM fungi, the tomato seedlings can subsequently benefit a faster stand establishment rate and higher vigor which is further reflected to a prolonged

  19. Screening of Native Aquatic Macrophytes for Establishing Aquatic Life Criteria%水生态基准大型水生植物受试生物筛选

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘婷婷; 郑欣; 闫振广; 刘征涛

    2014-01-01

    Screening of sensitive test aquatic organisms is critical to water quality criteria for aquatic life. Aquatic macrophytes are one of the most important objects for water quality criteria. In the present study, eight native aquatic macrophytes, Lemna minor, Spirodela polyrrhiza, Salvinia natans, Ceratophyllum demersum, Myriophyllum spicatum, Hydrilla verticillata, Potamogeton crispus, and Potamogeton pectinatus, were obtained based on their geographical locations, availability of toxicity data, and economical and ecological significance. According to the USEPA principles for aquatic life criteria, top 15 pollutants(3 heavy metals and 12 herbicides)were ranked per their toxicities to aquatic macrophytes from the ECOTOX database. Seven aquatic macrophytes showed high sensitivities to pollutants(the cumulative proba-bility was less than 15%). The cumulative probability of Lemna minor to thallium and Linuron was 4.3% and 6.4%; that of Spirodela polyrhiza to paraquat and metsulfuron methyl 7.8%and 11.5%;that of Salvinia natans to N-Methylmethanamine and metolachlor 8.5%and 14.8%; that of Potamogeton pectinatus to 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, linuron and metolachlor 1.2%, 2.1% and 1.9%; that of Pota-mogeton crispus to 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and metsulfuron methyl 10.8% and 7.7%; that of Hydrilla verticillata to bensulfuron methyl and fluridone 12.5%and 7.4%;and that of Ceratophyllum demersum to linuron, copper chloride and metolachlor 8.5%, 7.4%and 11.1%, respectively. These species could be used as test organisms for development of water quality criteria.%为完善保护我国淡水生物的水质基准,从44种国内主要水生植物中筛选了浮萍、紫萍、槐叶苹、金鱼藻、穗状狐尾藻、黑藻、菹草和篦齿眼子菜8种代表性本土大型水生植物,进而参照美国水质基准数据筛选原则,从ECOTOX等数据库中搜集相关毒性数据,通过数据分析筛选出对大型水生植物毒性最大的3

  20. 水生态基准大型水生植物受试生物筛选%Screening of Native Aquatic Macrophytes for Establishing Aquatic Life Criteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘婷婷; 郑欣; 闫振广; 刘征涛

    2014-01-01

    为完善保护我国淡水生物的水质基准,从44种国内主要水生植物中筛选了浮萍、紫萍、槐叶苹、金鱼藻、穗状狐尾藻、黑藻、菹草和篦齿眼子菜8种代表性本土大型水生植物,进而参照美国水质基准数据筛选原则,从ECOTOX等数据库中搜集相关毒性数据,通过数据分析筛选出对大型水生植物毒性最大的3种重金属污染物和12种除草剂污染物。这15种污染物的物种敏感度分布分析显示,7种大型水生植物对污染物表现出高敏感性(累积概率<15%),其中:浮萍对铊和利谷隆的累积概率分别为4.3%和6.4%,紫萍对百草枯和甲磺隆的累积概率分别为7.8%和11.5%,槐叶苹对2,4-滴二甲胺盐和异丙甲草胺的累积概率分别为8.5%和14.8%,篦齿眼子菜对2,4-滴、利谷隆和异丙甲草胺的累积概率分别为1.2%、2.1%和1.9%,菹草对2,4-滴和甲磺隆的累积概率分别为10.8%和7.7%,黑藻对苄嘧磺隆和氟啶酮的累积概率分别为12.5%和7.4%,金鱼藻对利谷隆、氯化铜和异丙甲草胺的累积概率分别为8.5%、7.4%和11.1%。这7种大型水生植物可作为相关污染物水质基准研究的受试生物。%Screening of sensitive test aquatic organisms is critical to water quality criteria for aquatic life. Aquatic macrophytes are one of the most important objects for water quality criteria. In the present study, eight native aquatic macrophytes, Lemna minor, Spirodela polyrrhiza, Salvinia natans, Ceratophyllum demersum, Myriophyllum spicatum, Hydrilla verticillata, Potamogeton crispus, and Potamogeton pectinatus, were obtained based on their geographical locations, availability of toxicity data, and economical and ecological significance. According to the USEPA principles for aquatic life criteria, top 15 pollutants(3 heavy metals and 12 herbicides)were ranked per their toxicities to aquatic macrophytes from the ECOTOX database. Seven aquatic macrophytes

  1. Economic impact at the stand level of changes in growth and yield, and stand establishment following removal of biomass for energy, with and without compensatory fertilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was conducted to determine the environmental and economic impact of full-tree harvesting (FTH) for the production of energy biomass and conventional forest products. It was suggested that FTH results in a disproportionately greater removal of nutrients from the soil than if 'stem- only' harvesting were to take place. This drain in nutrients could result in lower forest productivity in the future. The application of wood ash onto harvested sites could reduce nutrient drain, but this process would carry a cost estimated at $235-$300/ha. A hypothetical case study, carried out in New Brunswick, examined the costs of various methods for forest regeneration after FTH. The case study showed that cumulative growth losses in a spruce-fir stand are more than offset by the additional revenue generated from the sale of energy biomass and by the reduced reforestation costs. Wood ash application could not be justified financially. 41 refs., 17 tabs., 8 figs

  2. Effects of Age and Stand Density of Mother Trees on Early Pinus thunbergii Seedling Establishment in the Coastal Zone, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peili Mao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of age and stand density of mother tree on seed germination, seedling biomass allocation, and seedling growth of Pinus thunbergii were studied. The results showed that age of mother tree did not have significant influences on seed germination, but it was significant on seedling biomass allocation and growth. Seedlings from the minimum and maximum age of mother tree had higher leaf mass ratio and lower root mass ratio than from the middle age of mother tree. Moreover, they also had higher relative height growth rate and slenderness, which were related to their biomass allocation. Stand density of mother tree mainly demonstrated significant effects on seed germination and seedling growth. Seed from higher stand density of mother tree did not decrease germination rate, but had higher mean germination time, indicating that it delayed germination process. Seedlings of higher stand density of mother tree showed higher relative height growth rate and slenderness. These traits of offspring from higher stand density of mother tree were similar to its mother, indicating significant environmental maternal effects. So, mother tree identity of maternal age and environments had important effects on natural regeneration of the coastal P. thunbergii forest.

  3. Start of reproduction and allozyme heterozygosity in Pinus sibirica under different techniques of artificial forest stand establishment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.N. Velisevich

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Siberian stone pine (Pinus sibirica Du Tour is one of the main forest-forming tree species in boreal forests of Eurasia. Large edibleseeds of this species have an important resource value because of their high nutritious properties. Development of approaches toestablishment of early cone producing Siberian stone pine stands including utilization of corresponding genetic background is one of the priorities of forest resource management. The goal of our study was to evaluate the effect of stand density on the differentiation of trees bythe age of first reproduction and the relationship of allozyme heterozygosity and morphological traits variability in Siberian stone pine.Morphological and allozyme variability in artificial Pinus sibirica stands with high and low density was investigated. In the high-densitystand the distance between trees was 0.7 and 3 meters (4080 trees per ha while in the lowdensity stand it was 8 and 8 meters (144 treesper ha. Age of formation of first male and female cones was evaluated by retrospective method based on analysis of tracks of cones ona shoot bark. Tree height, diameter and number of male, female and vegetative shoots in a crown of model trees were measured.Genotypes of the trees were determined by 29 isozyme loci coding for 16 enzymes (ADH, FDH, FEST, GDH, GOT, IDH, LAP, MDH, MNR, PEPCA, 6-PGD, PGI, PGM, SDH, SKDH, SOD. In the low-density stand, the portion of generative trees was higher and differentiation of trees by age of reproduction starting was lower in spite of the smaller age of trees as compared to the high-density stand. Inboth samples, the age of formation of first generative organs was related negatively with stem height, stem diameter and number offemale shoots. In the high-density stand, positive relation of age of first reproduction with total number of shoots and number ofmale shoots was found. In both samples nonreproductive trees were less heterozygous at

  4. Established and potential physiological roles of bicarbonate-sensing soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) in aquatic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresguerres, Martin; Barott, Katie L; Barron, Megan E; Roa, Jinae N

    2014-03-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a recently recognized source of the signaling molecule cyclic AMP (cAMP) that is genetically and biochemically distinct from the classic G-protein-regulated transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs). Mammalian sAC is distributed throughout the cytoplasm and it may be present in the nucleus and inside mitochondria. sAC activity is directly stimulated by HCO3(-), and sAC has been confirmed to be a HCO3(-) sensor in a variety of mammalian cell types. In addition, sAC can functionally associate with carbonic anhydrases to act as a de facto sensor of pH and CO2. The two catalytic domains of sAC are related to HCO3(-)-regulated adenylyl cyclases from cyanobacteria, suggesting the cAMP pathway is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for sensing CO2 levels and/or acid/base conditions. Reports of sAC in aquatic animals are still limited but are rapidly accumulating. In shark gills, sAC senses blood alkalosis and triggers compensatory H(+) absorption. In the intestine of bony fishes, sAC modulates NaCl and water absorption. And in sea urchin sperm, sAC may participate in the initiation of flagellar movement and in the acrosome reaction. Bioinformatics and RT-PCR results reveal that sAC orthologs are present in most animal phyla. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the physiological roles of sAC in aquatic animals and suggests additional functions in which sAC may be involved. PMID:24574382

  5. Reclamation of peat winning fields - a literature review with special reference to the establishment of forest stands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to review existing knowledge on various methods for reclaiming peat winning fields, in order to assess the present and future potential of the afforestation alternative for Swedish fields. From this, a decision on the best use of an existing series of afforestation experiments established after peat winning in central and south Sweden should be made. The study deals with experiences from e.g. growing crops and energy forests, creating artificial lakes, pastures, and berry fields, wetland restoration, and afforestation by planting and by natural seeding from nearby forests. It was concluded that afforestation most likely will be one of the most common after-use alternatives in near future in Sweden, and that priority will be given to extensive afforestation methods. The studies in the afforestation experiments should therefore be focused on (1) the possibilities of natural establishment of seedlings by seeding from nearby forests, (2) the suitability of various tree species for planting, and (3) the need for plant nutrient amendments to secure sustainable site productivity and the possibilities to meet this need by using wood ash as fertilizer. 129 refs

  6. The influence of alternative plant propagation and stand establishment techniques on survival and growth of eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr.) clones.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaczmarek, Donald J.; et. al.,

    2014-02-09

    Four eastern cottonwood clones, including standard operational clone ST66 and three advanced clonal selections were produced and included in a test utilizing five different plant propagation methods. Despite relatively large first-year growth differences among clones, all clones demonstrated similar responses to the treatments and clone 9 cutting treatment interactions were generally non-significant. The effects of changing cutting lengths are consistent with previous studies which indicated the potential for increased plant survival and growth with increased cutting lengths. Differences in stored carbohydrate reserves alone do not appear to completely control first-year growth and development of cuttings. First-year growth of 51 cm long cuttings planted 30.5 cm deep was greater than the same cuttings planted 48 cm deep. Stem form of plants derived from whip-tip propagation did not differ from plants derived from standard, unrooted cuttings. This propagation method offers the potential of far greater production capacity from a cutting orchard and rapid bulk-up of new or limited clones. Stand uniformity assessments suggest that surviving trees of each individual cutting treatment exhibit similar levels of growth variation. Optimization of plantation establishment techniques has the potential to increase growth of young Populus plantations.

  7. Recycling of wood- and peat-ash. A successful way to establish full plant cover and dense birch stand on a cut-away peatland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huotari, N.

    2012-07-01

    peat-ash fertilization ensured an adequate level of nutrients for the early establishment of ground vegetation and birch seedlings in a cut-away peatland. The mosses and herbaceous plants proved to have a major role in retaining the nutrients and heavy metals that otherwise might have leached away from the ash-fertilized cut-away site during the early stages of the afforestation. Although both wood- and peat-ash proved to be suitable for the initial fertilization of afforested cut-away peatlands, a later application of nutrients may be needed to guarantee the growth in a energy-wood stand of downy birch over its entire rotation. (orig.)

  8. Aquatic plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, T. V.; Sand-Jensen, K.

    2006-01-01

    Aquatic fl owering plants form a relatively young plant group on an evolutionary timescale. The group has developed over the past 80 million years from terrestrial fl owering plants that re-colonised the aquatic environment after 60-100 million years on land. The exchange of species between...... terrestrial and aquatic environments continues today and is very intensive along stream banks. In this chapter we describe the physical and chemical barriers to the exchange of plants between land and water....

  9. Tunison Laboratory of Aquatic Science

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Tunison Laboratory of Aquatic Science (TLAS), located in Cortland, New York, is a field station of the USGS Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC). TLAS was established...

  10. Aquatic Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanville, W. D.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of aquatic sediments and its effect upon water quality, covering publications of 1976-77. This review includes: (1) sediment water interchange; (2) chemical and physical characterization; and (3) heavy water in sediments. A list of 129 references is also presented. (HM)

  11. Reclamation of peat winning fields - a literature review with special reference to the establishment of forest stands; Efterbehandling av torvtaekter - en litteraturstudie med tonvikt paa alternativet beskogning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haanell, B; Svensson, Johan; Magnusson, Tord

    1996-12-31

    The aim of this study was to review existing knowledge on various methods for reclaiming peat winning fields, in order to assess the present and future potential of the afforestation alternative for Swedish fields. From this, a decision on the best use of an existing series of afforestation experiments established after peat winning in central and south Sweden should be made. The study deals with experiences from e.g. growing crops and energy forests, creating artificial lakes, pastures, and berry fields, wetland restoration, and afforestation by planting and by natural seeding from nearby forests. It was concluded that afforestation most likely will be one of the most common after-use alternatives in near future in Sweden, and that priority will be given to extensive afforestation methods. The studies in the afforestation experiments should therefore be focused on (1) the possibilities of natural establishment of seedlings by seeding from nearby forests, (2) the suitability of various tree species for planting, and (3) the need for plant nutrient amendments to secure sustainable site productivity and the possibilities to meet this need by using wood ash as fertilizer. 129 refs

  12. Standing out

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz Muñoz De León, Jose Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Standing Out is a documentary about sports commonly called urbans. Many of these were born in the street, some by necessity and others for fun. As these sports have grown and have won a lot of follower the last years, have begun to appear some competitions. But it is a competition to what an athlete should aspire? Many followers of these sports have continued to believe that the most important thing is to enjoy. the sport without other purpose than to fun. Standing Out is a documentary abo...

  13. Carp Control Techniques for Aquatic Plant Establishment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Over the years, fish and wildlife habitat in the Great Lakes basin has been dramatically altered by many factors including water level regulation, the introduction...

  14. Aquatic macrophyte community varies in urban reservoirs with different degrees of eutrophication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suelen Cristina Alves da Silva

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Investigate spatial and temporal variation in the aquatic macrophyte community in four urban reservoirs located in Curitiba metropolitan region, Brazil. We tested the hypothesis that aquatic macrophyte community differ among reservoirs with different degrees of eutrophication. METHODS: The reservoirs selected ranged from oligotrophic/mesotrophic to eutrophic. Sampling occurred in October 2011, January 2012 and June 2012. Twelve aquatic macrophytes stands were sampled at each reservoir. Species were identified and the relative abundance of aquatic macrophytes was estimated. Differences among reservoirs and over sampling periods were analyzed: i through two‑way ANOVAs considering the stand extent (m and the stand biodiversity - species richness, evenness, Shannon-Wiener index and beta diversity (species variation along the aquatic macrophyte stand; and ii through PERMANOVA considering species composition. Indicator species that were characteristic for each reservoir were also identified. RESULTS: The aquatic macrophyte stand extent varied among reservoirs and over sampling periods. Species richness showed only temporal variation. On the other hand, evenness and Shannon-Wiener index varied only among reservoirs. The beta diversity of macrophyte stands did not vary among reservoirs or over time, meaning that species variability among aquatic macrophyte stands was independent of the stand extent and reservoir eutrophication. Community composition depended on the reservoir and sampling period. CONCLUSIONS: Our results support our initial expectation that reservoirs of different degrees of eutrophication have different aquatic macrophyte communities. As a consequence, each reservoir had particular indicator species. Therefore, monitoring and management efforts must be offered for each reservoir individually.

  15. Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database Marine Fishes

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database (NAS) information resource is an established central repository for spatially referenced biogeographic accounts of...

  16. Role of algae and higher aquatic plants in decontamination of cyanide-containing waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cyanide compounds and especially free cyanides stand out among components of wastewaters of hydrometallurgy, electroforming, and other such enterprises with respect to toxicity and danger for man and fauna of water bodies. In this article data on a study of the regularities of decontamination of cyanide-containing wastewaters by hydrophytes are given, the mechanisms of this process are examined, and the results of testing the hydrobotanical method of treating wastewaters of a goldrecovery plant are examined. The experiments were carried out with hydrophytes from the Angara River, Lake Baikal, and small lakes and ponds in the vicinity of Irkutsk and Tashkent. The series of experiments established that algae and higher aquatic plants are resistant to cyanides. A table shows the kinetic parameters of the removal of cyanide by algae and higher aquatic plants collected in Baikal. Of the multitude of species investigated for detoxifying ability, the most resistant were detected in the experimental basins and the most suitable were charophytes

  17. Food Irradiation. Standing legislation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The standing legislation in Mexico on food irradiation matter has its basis on the Constitutional Policy of the Mexican United States on the 4 Th. article by its refers to Secretary of Health, 27 Th. article to the Secretary of Energy and 123 Th. of the Secretary of Work and Social Security. The laws and regulations emanated of the proper Constitution establishing the general features which gives the normative frame to this activity. The general regulations of Radiological Safety expedited by the National Commission for Nuclear Safety and Safeguards to state the specifications which must be fulfill the industrial installations which utilizing ionizing radiations, between this line is founded, just as the requirements for the responsible of the radiological protection and the operation of these establishments. The project of Regulation of the General Health Law in matter of Sanitary Control of Benefits and Services, that in short time will be officialized, include a specific chapter on food irradiation which considers the International Organizations Recommendations and the pertaining harmonization stated for Latin America, which elaboration was in charge of specialized group where Mexico was participant. Additionally, the Secretary of Health has a Mexican Official Standard NOM-033-SSA1-1993 named 'Food irradiation; permissible doses in foods, raw materials and support additives' standing from the year 1995, where is established the associated requirements to the control registers, service constancies and dose limits for different groups of foods, moreover of the specific guidelines for its process. This standard will be adequate considering the updating Regulation of Benefits and Services and the limits established the Regulation for Latin America. The associated laws that cover in general terms it would be the requirements for food irradiation although such term is not manageable. (Author)

  18. Human Exploitation of Aquatic Landscapes. Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Fernandes

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aquatic landscapes such as rivers, lakes, and seas played an important role in past human behaviour, affecting modes of subsistence, patterns of mobility, access to material resources, and technological choices and their developments. The interaction with aquatic landscapes was also influential in the establishment of economic and social structures and in the formation of communal identities. The aim of this special themed issue of Internet Archaeology is to contribute to a better understanding of different forms of human interaction with aquatic landscapes.

  19. Human Exploitation of Aquatic Landscapes. Editorial

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo Fernandes; John Meadows

    2014-01-01

    Aquatic landscapes such as rivers, lakes, and seas played an important role in past human behaviour, affecting modes of subsistence, patterns of mobility, access to material resources, and technological choices and their developments. The interaction with aquatic landscapes was also influential in the establishment of economic and social structures and in the formation of communal identities. The aim of this special themed issue of Internet Archaeology is to contribute to a better understandi...

  20. Species management in aquatic habitats WRc RD Interim 1997

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    This is the Species management in aquatic Habitats WRc Interim 1997 document produced by the Environment Agency in 1997. This document reports progress on R&D Project 640, which aims to provide information on species of conservation value of particular relevance to the Environment Agency, in relation to its activities affecting aquatic environments. A range of stand-alone outputs is being produced, comprising Species Action Plans, practical management guidelines for Agency staff and third par...

  1. Standing Tall: The Benefits of Standing Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Mark P.

    2007-01-01

    In the author's opinion as a pediatric physical therapist, with the exception of a wheelchair, there is no other piece of assistive technology that is more beneficial to children and adults with special needs than a standing device. Postural symmetry during standing and walking activities is extremely important for everyone. Very few children…

  2. Lake Bathymetric Aquatic Vegetation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Aquatic vegetation represented as polygon features, coded with vegetation type (emergent, submergent, etc.) and field survey date. Polygons were digitized from...

  3. Out-standing!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kural, René

    2013-01-01

    Out-standing concerns the Danish tennisplayer Leif Rovsing and his outstanding piece of architecture Danish Tennis Club in Hellerup.......Out-standing concerns the Danish tennisplayer Leif Rovsing and his outstanding piece of architecture Danish Tennis Club in Hellerup....

  4. Thinning in artificially regenerated young beech stands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novák Jiří

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Although beech stands are usually regenerated naturally, an area of up to 5,000 ha year−1 is artificially regenerated by beech in the Czech Republic annually. Unfortunately, these stands often showed insufficient stand density and, consequently, lower quality of stems. Therefore, thinning methods developed for naturally regenerated beech stands are applicable with difficulties. The paper evaluates the data from two thinning experiments established in young artificially regenerated beech stands located in different growing conditions. In both experiments, thinning resulted in the lower amount of salvage cut in following years. Positive effect of thinning on periodic stand basal area increment and on periodic diameter increment of dominant trees was found in the beech stand located at middle elevations. On the other hand, thinning effects in mountain conditions were negligible. Thinning focusing on future stand quality cannot be commonly applied in artificially regenerated beech stands because of their worse initial quality and lower density. However, these stands show good growth and response to thinning, hence their management can be focused on maximising beech wood production.

  5. Aquatic Ecosystem Response to Timber Harvesting for the Purpose of Restoring Aspen

    OpenAIRE

    Bobette E Jones; Monika Krupa; Kenneth W Tate

    2013-01-01

    The removal of conifers through commercial timber harvesting has been successful in restoring aspen, however many aspen stands are located near streams, and there are concerns about potential aquatic ecosystem impairment. We examined the effects of management-scale conifer removal from aspen stands located adjacent to streams on water quality, solar radiation, canopy cover, temperature, aquatic macroinvertebrates, and soil moisture. This 8-year study (2003-2010) involved two projects located ...

  6. Allelopathy of Aquatic Autotrophs

    OpenAIRE

    Gross, Elisabeth

    2003-01-01

    Allelopathy in aquatic environments may provide a competitive advantage to angiosperms, algae, or cyanobacteria in their interaction with other primary producers. Allelopathy can influence the competition between different photoautotrophs for resources and change the succession of species, for exarnple, in phytoplankton cornmunities. Field evidence and laboratory studies indicate that allelopathy occurs in all aquatic habitats (marine and freshwater), and that ail prirnary producing organisms...

  7. Life cycle impacts of topsoil erosion on aquatic ecosystems: case study on Eucalyptus globulus forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinteiro, Paula; Van de Broek, Marijn; Cláudia Dias, Ana; Ridoutt, Bradley; Arroja, Luís

    2016-04-01

    High concentrations of suspended solids (SS), particularly in the clay and silt size fractions, reaching lotic environments and remaining in suspension can be a significant stressors to the biodiversity of these aquatic systems, degrading the water quality and directly affecting the aquatic biota, namely macroinvertebrates, algae and macrophytes. This damage is presently not considered in Life Cycle Assessment studies. This study is devoted to the effects of SS into freshwater systems due to topsoil erosion by water (environmental mechanism), translated into damage to aquatic ecosystem diversity (endpoint impact category), namely to macroinvertebrates, algae and macrophytes. For this, we have developed a framework to conduct an erosion inventory using the WaTEM/SEDEM model and linked this with, a method to derive regional characterisation for endpoint damage on aquatic ecosystem diversity. A case study was performed for Eucalyptus globulus stands in Portugal, with a functional unit of one hectare of land under production forestry management. To demonstrate how this newly SS ecosystem method can help to improve the environmental assessment in forestry, results were compared with the earlier commonly used impact categories from ReCiPe method. The relevance of the impact from SS delivery to freshwater streams is shown, providing a more comprehensive assessment of the SS impact from land use systems on aquatic environments. The SS impacts ranged from 15.5 to 1234.9 PDF.m3.yr.ha-1.revolution-1 for macroinvertebrates, and from 5.2 to 411.9 PDF.m3.yr.ha-1.revolution-1 for algae and macrophytes. For some stands, SS potential impacts on macroinvertebrates have the same order of magnitude than freshwater eutrophication, freshwater ecotoxicity, terrestrial ecotoxicity and terrestrial acidification impacts. For algae and macrophytes, most of the stands present SS impacts of the same order of magnitude as terrestrial ecotoxicity, one order of magnitude higher than freshwater

  8. Aquatic Life Benchmarks

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Aquatic Life Benchmarks is an EPA-developed set of criteria for freshwater species. These benchmarks are based on toxicity values reviewed by EPA and used in...

  9. Aquatic Research Laboratory (ARL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Columbia River and groundwater well water sources are delivered to the Aquatic Research Laboratory (ARL), where these resources are used to conduct research on fish...

  10. Molecular ecology of aquatic microbes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    Abstracts of reports are presented from a meeting on Molecular Ecology of Aquatic Microbes. Topics included: opportunities offered to aquatic ecology by molecular biology; the role of aquatic microbes in biogeochemical cycles; characterization of the microbial community; the effect of the environment on aquatic microbes; and the targeting of specific biological processes.

  11. Introducing Aquatic Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Kinne, Otto; Browman, Howard I.; Seaman, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    The Inter-Research Science Center (IR) journals Marine Ecology Progress Series (MEPS) and Aquatic Microbial Ecology (AME) have been receiving increasing numbers of high-quality manuscripts that are principally biological, rather than ecological. With regret, we have had to turn these submissions away. Also, leading limnologists have for many years suggested that IR should provide an outlet for top quality articles on freshwater biology and ecology. Aquatic Biology (...

  12. Restoring Damaged Aquatic Ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Cairns, John

    2006-01-01

    Aquatic ecosystems must play a major role to ensure that water, which is both essential and scarce, is always available for both present and future generations. This has become even more urgent in light of the ongoing increase in total world population and predicted changes in the world climate. Since aquatic ecosystems have been damaged at a rate far in excess of both natural restoration and anthropogenic restoration, it is essential that both restorative processes be accelerated. However, e...

  13. Variable Attitude Test Stand

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Variable Attitude Test Stand designed and built for testing of the V-22 tilt rotor aircraft propulsion system, is used to evaluate the effect of aircraft flight...

  14. Forest Stand Age

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Source data for forest stand age were obtained from the USDA Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) DataMart and were projected for future scenarios based on selected...

  15. Sustaining America's Aquatic Biodiversity. Why is Aquatic Biodiversity Declining?

    OpenAIRE

    Helfrich, Louis A.; Neves, Richard J.; Parkhurst, James A. (James Albert)

    2005-01-01

    Discusses reasons for declining aquatic biodiversity and focuses mainly on the issues of habitat loss, introduced species (aquatic exotics), and water pollution; document also includes web links to more information on exotic, invasive species and endangered animals.

  16. Contaminated Aquatic Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaglal, Kendrick

    2016-10-01

    A review of the literature published in 2015 relating to the assessment, evaluation and remediation of contaminated aquatic sediments is presented. The review is divided into the following main sections: policy and guidance, methodology, distribution, fate and transport, risk, toxicity and remediation. PMID:27620103

  17. Aquatic Environment 2000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, L. M.; Bijl, L. van der; Boutrup, S.; Iversen, T. M.; Ellermann, T.; Hovmand, M. F.; Bøgestrand, J.; Grant, R.; Hansen, J.; Jensen, J. P.; Stockmarr, J.; Laursen, K. D.

    The report summarizes the results of the Danish Aquatic Monitoring and Assessment Programme 1998-2003. Danish Environmental Protection Agency 2000: NOVA-2003. Programbeskrivelse for det nationale program for overvågning af vandmiljøet 1998-2003. 397 pp. - Redegørelse fra Miljøstyrelsen nr. 1 (in...

  18. Chronic radionuclide low dose exposure for non-human biota: challenges in establishing links between speciation in the exposure sources, bioaccumulation and biological effects. Uranium in aquatic ecosystems: A case-study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the field of environmental radioprotection, the knowledge gaps concern situations leading to chronic exposure at the lower doses typical of the living conditions of organisms influenced by radioactive releases. For any radionuclide and ecosystem, the specificities of these situations are as followed: (i) various chemical forms occur in the environment as a function of the physico-chemical conditions of the medium; (ii) each transfer from one component to another can lead to a modification of these forms with a 'chemical form-specific' mobility and bioavailability; (iii) different categories of non-radioactive toxicants are simultaneously present. In this multipollution context, the biological effects of ionising radiation may be exacerbated or reduced with the potential for action or interaction of all the pollutants present simultaneously. These situations of chronic exposure at low levels are likely to cause toxic responses distinct from those observed after acute exposure at high doses since long-term accumulation mechanisms in cells and tissues may lead to microlocalised accumulation in some target cells or subcellular components. The assessment of these mechanisms is primordial with regard to internal exposure to radionuclides since they increase locally both the radionuclide concentration and the delivered dose, coupling radiological and chemical toxicity. This is the main purpose of the ENVIRHOM research programme, recently launched at IRSN. After a global overview of the experimental strategy and of the first results obtained for phytoplankton and uranium, this paper scans the state of art for uranium within freshwaters and underlines inconsistency encountered when one wants to carry out an Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) on the chemical or on the radiological standpoint. This example argues for future research needs in order to establish well-defined relationship between chemo-toxicity and radiotoxicity for internal contamination. The operational aim

  19. Phytotoxicity of sesquiterpene lactone parthenin on aquatic weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, D K

    1996-01-01

    The sesquiterpene lactone parthenin, one of the major toxins in an obnoxious weed, parthenium (Parthenium hysterophorus L.), was toxic at 50 ppm to the floating aquatic weeds pistia (Pistia stratiotes L.) and lemna (Lemna pausicostata Hegelm.) and at 100 ppm to water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes Mart Solmns.), salvinia (Salvinia molesta Mitchell), azolla (Azolla nilotica Decne.), and spirodella (Spirodella polyrhiza L. Schleid). The lethal dose for the submerged weeds najas (Najas graminea Del.), ceratophyllun (Ceratophyllum demersun L.), and hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata L. f. Royle) was 25 ppm. The submerged aquatic weeds were more sensitive to parthenin. Water hyacinth was used as a representative for studying the phytotoxicity of parthenin on aquatic weeds. Inhibition of water hyacinth by parthenin was associated with decline in water use, root dysfunction, excessive leakage of solutes from roots indicative of massive damage to cellular membranes, loss of dehydrogenase activity in the roots, and loss of chlorophyll in the leaves. Plant death occurred in a period of one to two weeks. Parthenin phytotoxicity is gradually lost in an aquatic environment as a lethal dose became nonlethal in about 30 days under outdoor conditions. Possible buildup of a toxin concentration may affect population dynamics and a shift in the aquatic weed flora in the immediate area of parthenium stands. Accumulation of the toxin in an aquatic environment, however, at a level sufficient to produce such changes in a natural ecosystem as a consequence of rain washing parthenium plants and leaching of toxin from their residue appears to be unlikely. PMID:24226989

  20. Aquatic Pest Control. Manual 99.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Agricultural Experiment Station.

    This training manual provides information needed to meet the minimum EPA standards for certification as a commercial applicator of pesticides in the aquatic pest control category. The text discusses various water use situations; aquatic weed identification; herbicide use and effects; and aquatic insects and their control. (CS)

  1. Introduced aquatic plants and algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Non-native aquatic plants such as waterhyacinth and hydrilla severely impair the uses of aquatic resources including recreational faculties (lakes, reservoirs, rivers) as well as timely delivery of irrigation water for agriculture. Costs associated with impacts and management of all types of aquatic...

  2. Standing wave compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Timothy S.

    1991-01-01

    A compressor for compression-evaporation cooling systems, which requires no moving parts. A gaseous refrigerant inside a chamber is acoustically compressed and conveyed by means of a standing acoustic wave which is set up in the gaseous refrigerant. This standing acoustic wave can be driven either by a transducer, or by direct exposure of the gas to microwave and infrared sources, including solar energy. Input and output ports arranged along the chamber provide for the intake and discharge of the gaseous refrigerant. These ports can be provided with optional valve arrangements, so as to increase the compressor's pressure differential. The performance of the compressor in either of its transducer or electromagnetically driven configurations, can be optimized by a controlling circuit. This controlling circuit holds the wavelength of the standing acoustical wave constant, by changing the driving frequency in response to varying operating conditions.

  3. Stand-alone XLIF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, E. J.; Simony, A.; Hummel, Stefan;

    2015-01-01

    and clinical/radiological results in 22 patients treated with XLIF procedure for DS or degenerative disc disease (DDD). Material and methods: 22 consecutive patients with DS underwent surgery with the XLIF stand-alone procedure, with follow-up of 24 months. Clinical outcome scores were collected. Complications...... (31.8%) underwent revision surgery. Fusion was achieved in 53% (25/49) at 1-year follow-up. Anterior thigh pain was reported in 12 patients postoperatively, and in 2 patients at 1-year follow-up. Conclusions: The XLIF stand-alone procedure improves clinical outcome scores significantly after 1-and 2......-year follow-up, with a 31.8% revision rate. Due to the high revision rate we recommend supplementary posterior instrumentation, to achieve a higher fusion rate. When considering XLIF-stand-alone procedure for DS or DDD without supplemental posterior instrumentation, only single-level disease should...

  4. First Results of Monitoring of Stand Structure Changes in Unmanaged Beech Stands in NP Plitvice Lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Novotny

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: It is possible to monitor and study the natural growth and development of the forest ecosystems in the example of protected forest stands, which were excluded from management, and which are not under a negative influence of human activity. Therefore the aim of the research through the repeated measurements is to estimate the stand structure development on the Medveđak permanent experimental plot in the Plitvice Lakes national park area. In this paper we presented the first preliminary results of established monitoring, i.e. comparison of results of stand structure elements between two measurements (1998 and 2008. Furthermore, obtained results were compared with data from growth-yield tables for common beech stands similar characteristics as researched stand. In this case data from growth-yield tables present managed pure beech stands. Material and Methods: The permanent experimental plot was set in 1998 in the natural stand of mountain beech forest (Lamio orvale-Fagetum sylvaticae Ht. 1938. It is in rectangular shape, dimensions 100×100m, with subplot 60×60 m and 30×30 m. The plot is founded according to the experimental plot setting methodology (Dubravac & Novotny, 1992 and Novotny, 1997 extended on the ICP Forest workgroup demand. Tree crown damage assessment was repeated in 2003, and in June 2008 another measurement of basic stand structural elements was done. Results and Conclusion: The results in this paper show the development of the observed structural elements of the pure beech stand in the natural conditions without the management activities. According to the results of stand structure development (shape of diameter distribution, number of trees, stand basal area and volume and results obtained in other research at the same plot [9] (number, vitality and quality of beech young growth it can be concluded that our stand is developing towards the optimum phase of the secondary virgin forest. Furthermore

  5. Standing for Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Sunstein, Cass Robert

    1999-01-01

    From the legal point of view, there is nothing at all new or unfamiliar in the idea of "animal rights;" on the contrary, it is entirely clear that animals have legal rights. Indeed, the rise of legal rights for animals has been one of the most distinctive features of the last thirty years of federal statutory law. An investigation of the question of standing helps show that the real issues involve problems of enforcement and scope. Human beings often do and should have standing to protect ani...

  6. Aquatic Ecology Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Population studies were concerned with predicting long-term consequences of mortality imposed on animal populations by man's activities. These studies consisted of development of a generalized life cycle model and an empirical impingement model for use in impact analysis. Chemical effects studies were conducted on chlorine minimization; fouling by the Asiatic clam; identification of halogenated organics in cooling water; and effects of halogenated organics in cooling systems on aquatic organisms. Ecological transport studies were conducted on availability of sediment-bound 137Cs and 60Co to fish; 137Cs and 60Co in White Oak Lake fish; and chromium levels in fish from a lake chronically contaminated with chromates from cooling towers. Progress is also reported on the following: effects of irradiation on thermal tolerance of mosquito fish; toxicity of nickel to the developing eggs and larvae of carp; accumulation of selected heavy metals associated with fly ash; and environmental monitoring of aquatic ecosystems

  7. On standing one's ground

    OpenAIRE

    Sinclair, Neil

    2014-01-01

    I provide a positive expressivist account of the permissibility of ‘standing one’s ground’ in some cases of moral conflict, based in part on an illustrative analogy with political disputes. This account suffices to undermine Enoch’s recent argument against expressivism.

  8. ESTABLISHMENT OF Pinus elliottii Engelm STANDS WITH DIRECT FIELD SOWING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Augusto Guimarães Finger

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was undertaken to test the possibility of use of direct field sowing as a method of  forest formation. The soil preparation consisted of mechanic mowing followed by cleaning of small circles of 40 cm of diameter, where four seeds of Pinus elliottii Engelm were sowed, previously stratified, and protected by a bottomless plastic glass fastened to the sowing point. The treatments tested were direct sowing, sowing of seeds involved by paper envelop and seedling plantation as testify treatment. The results were not satisfactory, however, being observed at the most 38.46% of the sowing places with seedlings after 84 days of sowing. The main factor that contribuited to the failure of the method was seedling mortality caused by water deficit and high temperatures.

  9. Tool use by aquatic animals

    OpenAIRE

    Mann, Janet; Patterson, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    Tool-use research has focused primarily on land-based animals, with less consideration given to aquatic animals and the environmental challenges and conditions they face. Here, we review aquatic tool use and examine the contributing ecological, physiological, cognitive and social factors. Tool use among aquatic animals is rare but taxonomically diverse, occurring in fish, cephalopods, mammals, crabs, urchins and possibly gastropods. While additional research is required, the scarcity of tool ...

  10. Bioenergy potential of eight common aquatic weeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasi, S.A.; Nipaney, P.C.; Schaumberg, G.D. (Pondicherry (Central) Univ. (IN). Salim Ali School of Ecology)

    1990-01-01

    Eight common aquatic weeds Salvinia molesta, Hydrilla verticillata, Nymphaea stellata, Azolla pinnata, Ceratopteris sp. Scirpus sp. Cyperus sp, and Utricularia reticulata were digested anaerobically to produce methane. The carbon to nitrogen (C/N) ratio, carbon to phosphorus (C/P) ratio, and the volatile solids (VS) content of the weeds varied widely. No trend between these factors and the methane yield was discernable; the possible reasons are discussed. The energy potential of the weeds per unit area of the weed crop was worked out. Natural stands of salvinia, such as the one employed in the present investigation, would yield energy (methane) of the order of 10{sup 8} Kcal/ha/yr. (author).

  11. Multi-Purpose Test Stand

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Multi-Purpose Test Stand is used for a wide variety of tests. The Stand is designed to be rotated through a range of fixed yaw positions to allow engines to be...

  12. Impact of Stand, Site and Structural Characteristics on Stand Regeneration Planning in Pedunculate Oak Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juro Čavlović

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the fact that stand structure is significantly disturbed and from the assumption that all stands of pedunculate oak at forest level older than 100 years are potentially considered for stand regeneration, it is obvious that forest planning and management have to define their priorities on the basis of which individual, potentially mature and mature stands, will be regenerated. The general objective of this paper is to research the structure and mutual impacts of stand, site and economic factors on the elements of stand structure in a greater area of pedunculate oak forests consisting of old or potentially mature pedunculate oak stands with a disturbed structure. Based on obtained structural relations, the goal was to determine by modeling the easily obtainable elements of the variable (model, which will represent the objective criterion for stand ranking according to the regeneration priority and structural and economic requirements.The subject of the research are pedunculate oak forests in the Central Posavina region, where 37 stands, with stocking of less than 0.8, were randomly selected and divided into 3 age groups (101–120 years, 121–135 years, >135 years in 16 management units.On a total of 146 established plots of 25 m radius, estimates and measurements were carried out of variables at the level of individual model trees (6 trees of the main species – upper storey layer – nearest to the plot centre and of stand and site variables (2 breast-height diameters, crown diameter, tree height, base height of the crown and height of the widest part of the crown, varietal trunk structure, crown defoliation, increment core, breast-height diameter of all trees higher than 1.3 m, seedlings, potential intermediate cutting, died trees, diameters of stump of cut trees, shrub layer, microrelief, canopy, health status, litter, understorey vegetation. The estimated and measured data were processed and appropriate variables for data

  13. Standing Wave Solutions in Nonhomogeneous Delayed Synaptically Coupled Neuronal Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Linghai; STONER Melissa Anne

    2012-01-01

    The authors establish the existence and stability of standing wave solutions of a nonlinear singularly perturbed system of integral differential equations and a nonlinear scalar integral differential equation.It will be shown that there exist six standing wave solutions ((u(x,t),w(x,t)) =(U(x),W(x)) to the nonlinear singularly perturbed system of integral differential equations.Similarly,there exist six standing wave solutions u(x,t) =U(x) to the nonlinear scalar integral differential equation.The main idea to establish the stability is to construct Evans functions corresponding to several associated eigenvalue problems.

  14. ISSP Position Stand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryba, Tatiana; Stambulova, Natalia; Si, Gangyan;

    2013-01-01

    The multicultural landscape of contemporary sport sets a challenge to rethink sport and exercise psychology research and practice through a culturally re␣exive lens. This ISSP Position Stand provides a rigorous synthesis and engagement with existing scholarship to outline a roadmap for future work...... in the ␣eld. The shift to culturally competent sport and exercise psychology implies: (a) recognizing hidden ethnocentric philosophical assumptions permeating much of the current theory, research, and practice; (b) transitioning to professional ethics in which difference is seen as not inherent and...... enhancing cultural competence in the ␣eld of sport and exercise psychology....

  15. Stand for studying microcontrollers

    OpenAIRE

    Гринчак, Николай Васильевич; Кузьмичева, Екатерина Владимировна

    2013-01-01

    The problems of studying the basics of microprocessor technology and microcontrollers in technical high schools are considered in the paper. The version of the educational stand -Control computer LMakPic24-64 is proposed. Due to the thought-up design, the computer has a low cost and is suitable for replication in high school conditions. The computer is also suitable for the development of applications, based on the Microchip 16-bit PIC24 family.The main purpose of the study is to solve the fo...

  16. High Brightness Test Stand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The High Brightness Test Stand is a 2 MeV, less than or equal to 10 kA electron accelerator module. This accelerator module, designed as an upgrade prototype for the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA), combines solid state nonlinear magnetic drives with state-of-the-art induction linac technology. The facility serves a dual role, as it not only provides a test bed for this new technology, but is used to develop high brightness electron optics. We will both further describe the accelerator, as well as present some of the preliminary electron optics measurements

  17. Tool use by aquatic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Janet; Patterson, Eric M

    2013-11-19

    Tool-use research has focused primarily on land-based animals, with less consideration given to aquatic animals and the environmental challenges and conditions they face. Here, we review aquatic tool use and examine the contributing ecological, physiological, cognitive and social factors. Tool use among aquatic animals is rare but taxonomically diverse, occurring in fish, cephalopods, mammals, crabs, urchins and possibly gastropods. While additional research is required, the scarcity of tool use can likely be attributable to the characteristics of aquatic habitats, which are generally not conducive to tool use. Nonetheless, studying tool use by aquatic animals provides insights into the conditions that promote and inhibit tool-use behaviour across biomes. Like land-based tool users, aquatic animals tend to find tools on the substrate and use tools during foraging. However, unlike on land, tool users in water often use other animals (and their products) and water itself as a tool. Among sea otters and dolphins, the two aquatic tool users studied in greatest detail, some individuals specialize in tool use, which is vertically socially transmitted possibly because of their long dependency periods. In all, the contrasts between aquatic- and land-based tool users enlighten our understanding of the adaptive value of tool-use behaviour. PMID:24101631

  18. Beam optics test stand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have constructed a beam optics test stand in order to study adaptive charged particle optics. A low energy, continuous electron beam is used to model a high energy negative ion beam. In addition, the beam can be used as a diagnostic probe to study the correction of spherical aberrations in a solenoid lens. The authors test stand design stresses versatility. The conical glass vacuum system has reentrant electron and diagnostic chambers that allow immediate experimental modifications. As an integral part of the vacuum system, the solenoid lens also serves as structural support for grid focusing systems. Vacuum pumping is provided by an 8'' cryopump and the entire system can be moved about freely. Computer control and data acquisition are interfaced to the beam control and diagnostics. A post acceleration grid and deflection plates have been added to a commercial electron gun to produce a 10 keV beam at 100 μA. The diagnostics consist of phosphor screens, a charge-coupled photodiode array, and an image dissector

  19. Exposures from aquatic pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods for estimation aquatic pathways contribution to the total population exposure are discussed. Aquatic pathways are the major factor for radionuclides spreading from the Chernobyl Exclusion zone. An annual outflow of 90Sr and 137Cs comprised 10-20 TBq and 2-4 TBq respectively and the population exposed by this effluence constitutes almost 30 million people. The dynamic of doses from 90Sr and 'Cs, which Dnieper water have to delivered, is calculated. The special software has been developed to simulate the process of dose formation in the of diverse Dnieper regions. Regional peculiarities of municipal tap, fishing and irrigation are considered. Seventy-year prediction of dose structure and function of dose forming is performed. The exposure is estimated for 12 regions of the Dnieper basin and the Crimea. The maximal individual annual committed effective doses due to the use of water by ordinary members of the population in Kiev region from 90Sr and 137Cs in 1986 are 1.7*10-5 Sv and 2.7*10-5 Sv respectively. A commercial fisherman on Kiev reservoir in 1986 received 4.7*10-4 Sv and 5*10-3 Sv from 90Sr and 137Cs, respectively. The contributions to the collective cumulative (over 70 years) committed effective dose (CCCED70) of irrigation, municipal tap water and fish consumption for members of the population respectively are 18%, 43%, 39% in Kiev region, 8%, 25%, 67% in Poltava region, and 50%, 50%, 0% (consumption of Dnieper fish is absent) in the Crimea. The predicted contribution of the Strontium-90 to CCCED70 resulting from the use of water is 80%. The CCCED70 to the population of the Dnieper regions (32.5 million people) is 3000 person-Sv due to the use the Dnieper water

  20. On the well posedness and further regularity of a diffusive three species aquatic model

    KAUST Repository

    Parshad, R.D.

    2012-01-01

    We consider Upadhay\\'s three species aquatic food chain model, with the inclusion of spatial spread. This is a well established food chain model for the interaction of three given aquatic species. It exhibits rich dynamical behavior, including chaos. We prove the existence of a global weak solution to the diffusive system, followed by existence of local mild and strong solution.

  1. Standing Concertation Committee

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The main items discussed at the meetings of the Standing Concertation Committee in the first quarter of 2009 included: Merit Appraisal and Recognition Scheme (MARS) 2009 exercise The committee took note of 2009 MARS ceiling guidelines giving the advancement budget by career path and amounting to approx 1.80% of the basic salary bill. To this will be added 250 steps CERN-wide, financed by savings from implementation of the international indemnity for 2007, 2008 and the first half of 2009. The specific Senior Staff Guidelines, including the proposed number of promotions from Career Path E to F, were also noted. The guidelines with respect to step distribution were also noted: the minima and maxima remain the same as in previous years. Compliance with the guidelines will continue to be monitored closely (more details, including a frequently asked questions section). It was also noted that Financial Awards (awards for extraordinary service and responsibility allowances) may b...

  2. Standing wave linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consideration is being given to standing wave linear accelerator containing generator, phase shifter, two accelerating resonator sections, charged particle injector and waveguide bridge. Its first arm is oined up with generator via the phase shifter, the second and the third ones-with accelerating sections and the fourth one - with HF-power absorber. HF-power absorber represents a section of circular diaphragmatic wavequide with transformer with input wave and intrawaveguide output load located between injector and the first accelerating section. The section possesses holes in side walls lying on accelerator axis. The distances between centers of the last cell of the fast accelerating section and the first cell of the second accelerating sectiOn equal (2n+3)lambda/4, where n=1, 2, 3..., lambda - wave length of generator. The suggested system enables to improve by one order spectral characteristics of accelerators as compared to the prototype in which magnetrons are used as generator

  3. Standing Concertation Committee

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    ORDINARY MEETING ON 27 FEBRUARY 2008 The main items discussed at the meetings of the Standing Concertation Committee on 27 February 2008 included: Short-term Saved Leave Scheme The Committee noted that, by the end of February 2008, some 600 staff had enrolled in the short-term saved leave scheme: approx. 58% had signed up for 1 slice, 14% for two slices, 5% for three slices and 23% for four slices. Administrative Circular No. 4 (Rev. 4) - Unemployment Insurance Scheme The Committee agreed to recommend the Director-General to approve Administrative Circular No. 4 (Rev. 4) - Unemployment Insurance Scheme. Administrative Circular No. 30 (Rev. 2) - Financial benefits upon taking up appointment and termination of contract The Committee agreed to recommend the Director-General to approve Administrative Circular No. 30 (Rev. 2) - Financial Benefits upon taking up appointment and termination of contract. Progressive Retirement Programme The Progressive Retirement Programme (PR...

  4. STANDING CONCERTATION COMMMITTEE

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    ORDINARY MEETING ON 27 FEBRUARY 2008 The main items discussed at the meetings of the Standing Concertation Committee on 27 February 2008 included: Short-term Saved Leave Scheme The committee noted that, by the end of February 2008, some 600 staff had subscribed to the short-term saved leave scheme: approx 58% had subscribed 1 slice, 14% two slices, 5% three slices and 23% four slices. Administrative Circular No. 4 (Rev. 4) - Unemployment Insurance Scheme The committee agreed to recommend Administrative Circular No. 4 (Rev. 4) - Unemployment Insurance Scheme to the Director-General for approval. Administrative Circular No. 30 (Rev. 2) - Financial benefits upon taking up appointment and termination of contract The committee agreed to recommend Administrative Circular No. 30 (Rev. 2) - Financial Benefits upon taking up appointment and termination of contract to the Director-General for approval. Progressive Retirement Programme The Progressive Retirement Programme (PRP) was extended for a further year to 3...

  5. Standing Concertation Committee

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Ordinary Meeting on 11 May 2009 The meeting of the Standing Concertation Committee held on 11 May 2009 was entirely dedicated to the preparation of the TREF meeting on 19 & 20 May 2009. The Committee took note, discussed and agreed on some clarifications on a number of documents and presentations that the Management planned to submit and/or present to TREF on the following subjects: • Personnel statistics 2008: J. Purvis presented the Personnel Statistics for 2008 prepared by HR Department. In line with the previous year, key messages were firstly, a general reduction in staff (2544 to 2400, - 6%), secondly, a reduction in administrative services personnel (from 422 to 387, - 8%) and thirdly, a marked increase in the number of Users and Unpaid Associates (from 8369 to 9140, + 9%) • Five-Yearly Review 2010: A series of draft documents were submitted for discussion, comprising an introductory document explaining the statutory basis for the following four document...

  6. Standing Concertation Committee

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    Main issues examined at the meeting of 2 October 2009 The October 2009 meeting of the Standing Concertation Committee was entirely devoted to preparation of TREF’s meeting on 21-22 October. The Committee took note of, discussed and agreed on clarifications needed to some of the documents and presentations that the Management intended to submit and/or present to TREF on the following subjects: Equal opportunities The Committee took note of a preliminary report on equal opportunities at CERN drawn up by D. Chromek-Burckhart, the Equal Opportunities Officer, and T. Smith, Chairman of the Equal Opportunities Advisory Panel, containing in particular a proposal for a new process for resolving harassment conflicts. Technical analysis of the CERN Health Insurance Scheme - Actuary’s Report The Committee took note of a presentation by P. Charpentier, Chairman of the CERN Health Insurance Supervisory Board (CHIS Board), on the 2009 actuarial report on the CERN Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS). Th...

  7. Standing Concertation Commmittee

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    Ordinary meeting on 2 november 2007 Extraordinary meeting on 12 November 2007 The main items discussed at the meetings of the Standing Concertation Committee on 2 November 2007 and 12 November included: Restaurants Supervisory Committee Report The committee took note of the report by the chairman of the Restaurants Supervisory Committee (RSC), T. Lagrange. In particular, it was recorded that, in Restaurant No. 1, the new kitchen and free flow arrangements had been inaugurated and all works had been commissioned on schedule in October 2007.The contractor, Novae, had taken over maintenance of the new kitchen. Some price increases were to be expected in the coming months due mainly to strong increases in the cost of basic ingredients. A problem with bad smells in the area of Restaurant No. 1 was being taken care of by tuning the ventilation system. The RSC wished to thank the management and staff of Restaurant No. 2 for their cooperation while Restaurant No 1 was ...

  8. Role Models in Aquatic Occupations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Mabel C.

    1982-01-01

    Provided for each of 12 minority group role models in aquatic occupations are job responsibilities, educational requirements, comments on a typical day at the job, salary range, and recommendations for students wishing to enter the field described. (JN)

  9. Study on the Explainable Ability by Using Airborne LIDAR in Stand Value and Stand Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S. C.; Yeh, J. Y.; Chen, C. T.; Chen, J. C.

    2016-06-01

    Forest canopy structure is composed by the various species. Sun light is a main factor to affect the crown structures after tree competition. However, thinning operation is an appropriate way to control canopy density, which can adjust the competition conditions in the different crown structures. Recently, Airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), has been established as a standard technology for high precision three dimensional forest data acquisition; it could get stand characteristics with three-dimensional information that had develop potential for the structure characteristics of forest canopy. The 65 years old, different planting density of Cryptomeria japonica experiment area was selected for this study in Nanytou, Taiwan. Use the LiDAR image to estimate LiDAR characteristic values by constructed CHM, voxel-based LiDAR, mu0ltiple echoes, and assess the accuracy of stand characteristics with intensity values and field data. The competition index was calculated with field data, and estimate competition index of LiDAR via multiple linear regression. The results showed that the highest accuracy with stand characteristics was stand high which estimate by LiDAR, its average accuracy of 91.03%. LiDAR raster grid size was 20 m × 20 m for the correlation was the best, however, the higher canopy density will reduce the accuracy of the LiDAR characteristic values to estimate the stand characteristics. The significantly affect canopy thickness and the degree of competition in different planting distances.

  10. Stand-up physics

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    A CMS physicist and amateur stand up comic was named the winner of NESTA FameLab 2009. Tom Whyntie battled it out with nine others young scientists from across the UK to win the contest to find the country’s next top science communicator. Tom Whyntie with his prize money after the NESTA Famelab final.Tom Whyntie, who is currently doing his PhD on the CMS experiment, managed to persuade his supervisor to give him a few days off on 5 June so he could fly back to the UK for the final of NESTA FameLab 2009. In the competition, which has been dubbed ‘the X Factor for scientists’, he had just three minutes to explain a complex scientific idea to a panel of judges made up of high-profile science professionals. During the final, he captivated the audience with his talk about how finding nothing at the LHC, far from being a waste of £5 billion, would actually catalyse the next scientific revolution. It Whyntie’s own words: "If the L...

  11. Standing concertation commmittee

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    MEETINGS ON 2 AND 9 DECEMBER 2008 The main items discussed at the meetings of the Standing Concertation Committee on 2 and 9 December 2008 included: Medical Service Report 2007 The Committee took note of the report by Dr. E. Reymond (see http://sc-me.web.cern.ch/sc-me/fr/indexFR.htm) and of a number of points raised during the discussion. It was noted that the number of professional accidents declined in 2007 (361 accidents) in comparison with 2006 (483), as well as their gravity and frequency. The CERN Medical Service carried out a study on cancer prevalence (number of cases) and incidence (new cases per year per 100000 people), between 1993 and 2007, which identified some prostate, breast and colorectal cancers, though less than in the two Host States. Specific preventive actions will be promoted by the CERN CHISboard and the Medical Service in this context as well as in other areas. The committee expressed its thanks to all members of the Medical Service for their work i...

  12. Standing Concertation Committee

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Ordinary meeting on 30 January 2007 The main items discussed at the meeting of the Standing Concertation Committee on 30 January 2007 included: Administrative Circular No. 26: with the introduction of the merit recognition system in the framework of the 5-yearly review of CERN employment conditions, Administrative Circular No. 26 has been revised. The committee took note of the revised document which is being finalized for submission to the Director-General for approval in the near future. Technical analysis of CERN Health Insurance Scheme: the Committee was informed that a group has been set up by the Director-General to analyse the financial situation of the CERN Health Insurance Scheme in the short and long term, and to propose measures to ensure that the Scheme remains in financial balance, with adequate cover, over the medium term. The group's terms of reference and membership were communicated. Voluntary programmes It was announced that the programmes: 'part-time work as a pre-retirement measure...

  13. Standing Concertation Committee

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    ORDINARY MEETING ON 30 JANUARY 2007 The main items discussed at the meeting of the Standing Concertation Committee on 30 January 2007 included: Administrative Circular No. 26: with the introduction of the merit recognition system in the framework of the 5-yearly review of CERN employment conditions, Administrative Circular No. 26 has been revised. The Committee took note of the revised document which is being finalized for submission to the Director-General for approval in the near future. Technical analysis of CERN Health Insurance Scheme: the Committee was informed that a group has been set up by the Director-General to analyse the financial situation of the CERN Health Insurance Scheme in the short and long term, and to propose measures to ensure that the Scheme remains in financial balance, with adequate cover, over the medium term. The group's terms of reference and membership were communicated. Voluntary programmes It was announced that the programmes: 'part-time work as a pre-retirement mea...

  14. Standing Concertation Committee

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    ORDINARY MEETING ON 27 FEBRUARY 2007 The main items discussed at the meeting of the Standing Concertation Committee on 27 February 2007 included: Saved Leave Scheme (SLS): It was announced that a Management/Staff Association working group had been set up to discuss the Saved Leave Scheme (SLS): Members : M. Büttner, E. Chiaveri (chair), Ph. Defert, D. Klem, M. Vitasse, J.-M. Saint-Viteux. It was noted that the Staff Association was launching a questionnaire on SLS and distributed to all members of the personnel. Merit Recognition Guidelines: In the context of the new Merit Appraisal and Recognition Scheme (MARS), the committee took note of the CERN-wide 2007 Merit Recognition Guidelines, including the Frequently Asked Questions on HR Department's dedicated website. Information on CERN's medium and long-term plans (MTP-LTP)/Contract renewals/ External mobility The Committee took note of the information provided on CERN's MTP-LTP and of documentation distributed at the meeting by the Staff ...

  15. Standing Concertation Commmittee

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    Ordinary meeting on 27 February 2007 The main items discussed at the meeting of the Standing Concertation Committee on 27 February 2007 included: Saved Leave Scheme (SLS): It was announced that a Management/Staff Association working group had been set up to discuss the Saved Leave Scheme (SLS): Members: M. Büttner, E. Chiaveri (chair), Ph. Defert, D. Klem, M. Vitasse, J.-M. Saint-Viteux. It was noted that the Staff Association was launching a questionnaire on SLS and distributed to all members of the personnel. Merit Recognition Guidelines : in the context of the new Merit Appraisal and Recognition Scheme (MARS), the committee took note of the CERN-wide 2007 Merit Recognition Guidelines, including the Frequently Asked Questions on HR Department's dedicated website. Information on CERN's medium and long-term plans (MTP-LTP)/Contract renewals/ External mobility The Committee took note of the information provided on CERN's MTP-LTP and of documentation distributed at the meeting by the Staff Associatio...

  16. Tritium in the aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium is of environmental importance because it is released from nuclear facilities in relatively large quantities and because it has a half life of 12.26 y. Most of the tritium released into the atmosphere eventually reaches the aqueous environment, where it is rapidly taken up by aquatic organisms. This paper reviews the current literature on tritium in the aquatic environment. Conclusions from the review, which covered studies of algae, aquatic macrophytes, invertebrates, fish, and the food chain, were that aquatic organisms incorporate tritium into their tissue-free water very rapidly and reach concentrations near those of the external medium. The rate at which tritium from tritiated water is incorporated into the organic matter of cells is slower than the rate of its incorporation into the tissue-free water. If organisms consume tritiated food, incorporation of tritium into the organic matter is faster, and a higher tritium concentration is reached than when the organisms are exposed to only tritiated water alone. Incorporation of tritium bound to molecules into the organic matter depends on the chemical form of the ''carrier'' molecule. No evidence was found that biomagnification of tritium occurs at higher trophic levels. Radiation doses from tritium releases to large populations of humans will most likely come from the consumption of contaminated water rather than contaminated aquatic food products

  17. Tritium in the aquatic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Hoffman, F.O.; Frank, M.L.

    1986-02-01

    Tritium is of environmental importance because it is released from nuclear facilities in relatively large quantities and because it has a half life of 12.26 y. Most of the tritium released into the atmosphere eventually reaches the aqueous environment, where it is rapidly taken up by aquatic organisms. This paper reviews the current literature on tritium in the aquatic environment. Conclusions from the review, which covered studies of algae, aquatic macrophytes, invertebrates, fish, and the food chain, were that aquatic organisms incorporate tritium into their tissue-free water very rapidly and reach concentrations near those of the external medium. The rate at which tritium from tritiated water is incorporated into the organic matter of cells is slower than the rate of its incorporation into the tissue-free water. If organisms consume tritiated food, incorporation of tritium into the organic matter is faster, and a higher tritium concentration is reached than when the organisms are exposed to only tritiated water alone. Incorporation of tritium bound to molecules into the organic matter depends on the chemical form of the ''carrier'' molecule. No evidence was found that biomagnification of tritium occurs at higher trophic levels. Radiation doses from tritium releases to large populations of humans will most likely come from the consumption of contaminated water rather than contaminated aquatic food products.

  18. Tritium in the aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of the tritium released from nuclear facilities into the atmosphere eventually reaches the aqueous environment where it is rapidly taken up by aquatic organisms. This paper reviews the current literature on tritium in the aquatic environment. Conclusions from the review, which covered algae, aquatic plants, invertebrates, fish, and food chain studies, were that aquatic organisms incorporate tritium into their tissue free water very rapidly and reach concentrations near that of the external medium. Incorporation of tritium from triated water into the organic matter of cells is at a slower rate than incorporation into the tissue free water. If organisms consume tritiated food, incorporation of tritium into the organic matter is faster and a higher tritium concentration is reached than when the organisms are exposed to only tritiated water. Incorporation of tritium bound to molecules into the organic matter depends on the chemical form of the 'carrier' molecule. No evidence was found that biomagnification of tritium occurs at higher tropic levels. Radiation doses to large populations of humans from tritium releases will most likely be from the consumption of contaminated water rather than contaminated aquatic food products. (author)

  19. STUDY ON THE EXPLAINABLE ABILITY BY USING AIRBORNE LIDAR IN STAND VALUE AND STAND COMPETITION

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, S.C.; Yeh, J.Y.; Chen, C. T.; Chen, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    Forest canopy structure is composed by the various species. Sun light is a main factor to affect the crown structures after tree competition. However, thinning operation is an appropriate way to control canopy density, which can adjust the competition conditions in the different crown structures. Recently, Airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), has been established as a standard technology for high precision three dimensional forest data acquisition; it could get stand characteristics ...

  20. Potential risk of biochar-amended soil to aquatic systems: an evaluation based on aquatic bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, A C; Prodana, M; Abrantes, N; Keizer, J J; Soares, A M V M; Loureiro, S

    2014-11-01

    It is vital to address potential risks to aquatic ecosystems exposed to runoff and leachates from biochar-amended soils, before large scale applications can be considered. So far, there are no established approaches for such an assessment. This study used a battery of bioassays and representative aquatic organisms for assessing the acute toxicity of water-extractable fractions of biochar-amended soil, at reported application rates (80 t ha(-1)). Biochar-amended aqueous soil extracts contained cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), zinc (Zn), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), arsenic (As) and mercury (Hg) (Σmetals 96.3 µg l(-1)) as well as the 16 priority PAHs defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (Σ16PAHs 106 ng l(-1)) at contents in the range of current EU regulations for surface waters. Nevertheless, acute exposure to soil-biochar (SB) extracts resulted in species-specific effects and dose-response patterns. While the bioluminescent marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri was the most sensitive organism to aqueous SB extracts, there were no effects on the growth of the microalgae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. In contrast, up to 20 and 25% mobility impairment was obtained for the invertebrate Daphnia magna upon exposure to 50 and 100% SB extract concentrations (respectively). Results suggest that a battery of rapid and cost-effective aquatic bioassays that account for ecological representation can complement analytical characterization of biochar-amended soils and risk assessment approaches for surface and groundwater protection. PMID:25213286

  1. Production in aquatic macrophyte communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binzer, Thomas; Sand-Jensen, Kaj

    2002-01-01

    combined a simple mechanistic model and empirical measurements on artificially structured macroalgal communities (Ulva lactuca) with varying thallus absorptance and community density. Predicted and measured values corresponded closely and revealed that gross production in high-light environments...... that inefficient distribution of light can account for the low community production rates in aquatic habitats and the depth distribution of form-functional groups of macroalgae with different canopy structure.......-dimensional structure because of the strong drag and shear forces of moving water. This difference in canopy structure has been suggested to account for the three- to fivefold higher gross production rates in terrestrial than aquatic communities. To evaluate the effect of community structure in aquatic habitats, we...

  2. Aquatic ecosystem response to timber harvesting for the purpose of restoring aspen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobette E Jones

    Full Text Available The removal of conifers through commercial timber harvesting has been successful in restoring aspen, however many aspen stands are located near streams, and there are concerns about potential aquatic ecosystem impairment. We examined the effects of management-scale conifer removal from aspen stands located adjacent to streams on water quality, solar radiation, canopy cover, temperature, aquatic macroinvertebrates, and soil moisture. This 8-year study (2003-2010 involved two projects located in Lassen National Forest. The Pine-Bogard Project consisted of three treatments adjacent to Pine and Bogard Creeks: (i Phase 1 in January 2004, (ii Phase 2 in August 2005, and (iii Phase 3 in January 2008. The Bailey Project consisted of one treatment adjacent to Bailey Creek in September 2006. Treatments involved whole tree removal using track-laying harvesters and rubber tire skidders. More than 80% of all samples analyzed for NO₃-N, NH₄-N, and PO₄-P at Pine, Bogard, and Bailey Creeks were below the detection limit, with the exception of naturally elevated PO₄-P in Bogard Creek. All nutrient concentrations (NO₃-N, NH₄-N, PO₄-P, K, and SO₄-S showed little variation within streams and across years. Turbidity and TSS exhibited annual variation, but there was no significant increase in the difference between upstream and downstream turbidity and TSS levels. There was a significant decrease in stream canopy cover and increase in the potential fraction of solar radiation reaching the streams in response to the Pine-Bogard Phase 3 and Bailey treatments; however, there was no corresponding increase in stream temperatures. Macroinvertebrate metrics indicated healthy aquatic ecosystem conditions throughout the course of the study. Lastly, the removal of vegetation significantly increased soil moisture in treated stands relative to untreated stands. These results indicate that, with careful planning and implementation of site-specific best management

  3. Aquatic ecosystem response to timber harvesting for the purpose of restoring aspen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Bobette E; Krupa, Monika; Tate, Kenneth W

    2013-01-01

    The removal of conifers through commercial timber harvesting has been successful in restoring aspen, however many aspen stands are located near streams, and there are concerns about potential aquatic ecosystem impairment. We examined the effects of management-scale conifer removal from aspen stands located adjacent to streams on water quality, solar radiation, canopy cover, temperature, aquatic macroinvertebrates, and soil moisture. This 8-year study (2003-2010) involved two projects located in Lassen National Forest. The Pine-Bogard Project consisted of three treatments adjacent to Pine and Bogard Creeks: (i) Phase 1 in January 2004, (ii) Phase 2 in August 2005, and (iii) Phase 3 in January 2008. The Bailey Project consisted of one treatment adjacent to Bailey Creek in September 2006. Treatments involved whole tree removal using track-laying harvesters and rubber tire skidders. More than 80% of all samples analyzed for NO₃-N, NH₄-N, and PO₄-P at Pine, Bogard, and Bailey Creeks were below the detection limit, with the exception of naturally elevated PO₄-P in Bogard Creek. All nutrient concentrations (NO₃-N, NH₄-N, PO₄-P, K, and SO₄-S) showed little variation within streams and across years. Turbidity and TSS exhibited annual variation, but there was no significant increase in the difference between upstream and downstream turbidity and TSS levels. There was a significant decrease in stream canopy cover and increase in the potential fraction of solar radiation reaching the streams in response to the Pine-Bogard Phase 3 and Bailey treatments; however, there was no corresponding increase in stream temperatures. Macroinvertebrate metrics indicated healthy aquatic ecosystem conditions throughout the course of the study. Lastly, the removal of vegetation significantly increased soil moisture in treated stands relative to untreated stands. These results indicate that, with careful planning and implementation of site-specific best management practices

  4. Solar Charged Stand Alone Inverter

    OpenAIRE

    M.Vasugi; Prof R.Jayaraman

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with solar powered stand alone inverter which converts the variable dc output of a photovoltaic solar panel into ac that can be fed to loads. Stand alone inverters are used in systems where the inverter get its energy from batteries charged by photo voltaic arrays. A charge controller limits the rate at which electric current is added to or drawn from electric batteries. This charge discharge controller is needed to prevent the battery from being overcharged o...

  5. Rubber tire leachates in the aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, J J

    1997-01-01

    Tires have a deleterious effect on the environment. This review discusses the background of scrap tires discarded in the environment, including tire composition, adverse environmental effects, threats to public health and safety, and solid waste management. Despite the widespread use of scrap tires in environmental applications, both land-based and aquatic, data on the indicators of environmental degradation are extremely scarce. Indicators of environmental degradation include analysis of chemicals within the water and sediment, analysis of contaminants within organisms, and analysis of the biological effects of these compounds on plants, animals, microbes, and organelles. Although these indicators are most useful when used in parallel, a review of the available information on chemical characterization of tire leachate from tire storage facilities, manufacturing, usage in recycling applications, and toxicity exposure studies, of vegetation surveys from waste tire areas and reviews of mammalian tire product toxicity, and of toxicity, mutagenicity, and carcinogenicity of tire exposure in experimental aquatic animals, microbes, and organelles is presented. The major characteristics of these studies are discussed in specific sections. The "Discussion and Conclusions" section discusses and summarizes the biological effects and chemical characterization of tire leachates. A global environmental perspective is included to improve our understanding of the deficiency of the current knowledge of tire leachate toxicity from various sources and to encourage interdisciplinary studies to establish the pattern of pollution associated with waste tire management. PMID:9216257

  6. Aquatic Plants and Lake Ecosystems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorný, Jan; Květ, Jan

    Oxford : Blackwell Science Ltd, 2003 - (O´Sullivan, P.; Reynolds, C.), s. 309-340 ISBN 0-632-04797-6 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/01/1113 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6087904 Keywords : Aquatic macrophytes * green algae Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  7. Macrophytes: Ecology of aquatic plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bornette, G.; Puijalon, S.

    2009-01-01

    Aquatic plants contribute to maintaining key functions and related biodiversity in freshwater ecosystems, and to provide the needs of human societies. The way the ecological niches of macrophytes are determined by abiotic filters and biotic ones is considered. A simple, broadly applicable model of t

  8. Aquatic Macrophyte Risk Assessment for Pesticides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maltby, L.; Arnold, D.; Arts, G.H.P.; Davies, J.; Heimbach, F.; Pickl, C.; Poulsen, V.

    2009-01-01

    Given the essential role that primary producers play in aquatic ecosystems, it is imperative that the potential risk of pesticides to the structure and functioning of aquatic plants is adequately assessed. This book discusses the assessment of the risk of pesticides with herbicidal activity to aquat

  9. Assessment of potential aquatic herbicide impacts to California aquatic ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemering, Geoffrey S; Hayworth, Jennifer D; Greenfield, Ben K

    2008-10-01

    A series of legal decisions culminated in 2002 with the California State Water Resources Control Board funding the San Francisco Estuary Institute to develop and implement a 3-year monitoring program to determine the potential environmental impacts of aquatic herbicide applications. The monitoring program was intended to investigate the behavior of all aquatic pesticides in use in California, to determine potential impacts in a wide range of water-body types receiving applications, and to help regulators determine where to direct future resources. A tiered monitoring approach was developed to achieve a balance between program goals and what was practically achievable within the project time and budget constraints. Water, sediment, and biota were collected under "worst-case" scenarios in close association with herbicide applications. Applications of acrolein, copper sulfate, chelated copper, diquat dibromide, glyphosate, fluridone, triclopyr, and 2,4-D were monitored. A range of chemical analyses, toxicity tests, and bioassessments were conducted. At each site, risk quotients were calculated to determine potential impacts. For sediment-partitioning herbicides, sediment quality triad analysis was performed. Worst-case scenario monitoring and special studies showed limited short-term and no long-term toxicity directly attributable to aquatic herbicide applications. Risk quotient calculations called for additional risk characterizations; these included limited assessments for glyphosate and fluridone and more extensive risk assessments for diquat dibromide, chelated copper products, and copper sulfate. Use of surfactants in conjunction with aquatic herbicides was positively associated with greater ecosystem impacts. Results therefore warrant full risk characterization for all adjuvant compounds. PMID:18293029

  10. Residual Liquefaction under Standing Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirca, V.S. Ozgur; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of an experimental study which deals with the residual liquefaction of seabed under standing waves. It is shown that the seabed liquefaction under standing waves, although qualitatively similar, exhibits features different from that caused by progressive waves....... The experimental results show that the buildup of pore-water pressure and the resulting liquefaction first starts at the nodal section and spreads towards the antinodal section. The number of waves to cause liquefaction at the nodal section appears to be equal to that experienced in progressive waves for the same...... wave height. Recommendations are made as to how to assess liquefaction potential in standing waves. Copyright © 2012 by the International Society of Offshore and Polar Engineers (ISOPE)....

  11. The Stability of Standing Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Riecke, H; Riecke, Hermann; Kramer, Lorenz

    1998-01-01

    We determine the modulational stability of standing waves in quasi-onedimensional systems slightly above the threshold of a supercritical Hopf bifurcation. The stability limits are given by two different long-wavelength destabilisation mechanisms and generically also a short-wavelength destabilisation. The Eckhaus parabola is shifted off-center and can be convex from below or above. For nonzero group velocity the Newell criterion, which near the crossover from standing to traveling waves becomes a rather weak condition, does not determine the destabilisation of all standing waves in one dimension. The cross-over to the non-local equations that are asymptotically valid near threshold is discussed in detail. Our results yield necessary conditions for the stability of traveling rectangles in quasi-twodimensional systems with axial anisotropy and form a starting point for understanding the spatio-temporal chaos of traveling oblique rolls observed in electroconvection of nematic liquid crystals.

  12. Proposed Release Guides to Protect Aquatic Biota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marter, W.L.

    2001-03-28

    At the request of South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) and the Department of Energy (DOE), the Savannah River Laboratory was assigned the task of developing the release guides to protect aquatic biota. A review of aquatic radioecology literature by two leading experts in the field of radioecology concludes that exposure of aquatic biota at one rad per day or less will not produce detectable deleterious effects on aquatic organisms. On the basis of this report, DOE recommends the use of one rad per day as an interim dose standard to protect aquatic biota.

  13. Herbivory and growth in terrestrial and aquatic populations of amphibious stream plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sand-Jensen, Kaj; Jacobsen, Dean

    2002-01-01

    1. Many amphibious plant species grow in the transition between terrestrial and submerged vegetation in small lowland streams. We determined biomass development, leaf turnover rate and invertebrate herbivory during summer in terrestrial and aquatic populations of three amphibious species to...... evaluate advantages and disadvantages of aerial and submerged life. 2. Terrestrial populations had higher area shoot density, biomass and leaf production than aquatic populations, while leaf turnover rate and longevity were the same. Terrestrial populations experienced lower percentage grazing loss of leaf...... apparent loss to standing leaves of all ages. The results imply that variation in density of grazers relative to plant production can account for differences in grazing impact between terrestrial and aquatic populations, and that fast leaf turnover keeps apparent grazing damage down. 4. We conclude that...

  14. A randomized controlled trial of aquatic and land-based exercise in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, H.; Weile, U.; Christensen, R.;

    2008-01-01

    patients reported adverse events (i.e. discomfort) in land-based exercise, while only 3 reported adverse events in the aquatic exercise. Conclusion: Only land-based exercise showed some improvement in pain and muscle strength compared with the control group, while no clinical benefits were detectable after......Objective: To compare the efficacy of aquatic exercise and a land-based exercise programme vs control in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Methods: Primary outcome was change in pain, and in addition Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score questionnaire (KOOS). Standing balance and strength...... was also measured after and at 3-month follow-up. Seventy-nine patients (62 women), with a mean age of 68 years (age range 40-89 years) were randomized to aquatic exercise (n = 27), land-based exercise (n = 25) or control (n = 27). Results: No effect was observed immediately after exercise cessation...

  15. Control stand of scintillation counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paper describes a stand designed to test complex optical elements of the CMS endwindow hadron calorimeter. The optical element (the megatile) represents an assembly where 19 trapezoidal scintillators are sandwiched in light-absorbing and light-reflecting layers. The stand to test the quality of scintillation counters consists of a bench with a carriage double-coordinated actuation mechanism, a group of photodetectors, a high-voltage power unit, a laser control checking system, a PC and a scintillation counter to calibrate photodetectors. One studies in detail the procedure to test megatiles in the course of which minimum 100 trigger statistics is ensured for every megatile

  16. Pre-natal Aquatic Preparation

    OpenAIRE

    Frias, Ana; Serra, Célia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Water, a source of well-being, peace, fullness, freedom and harmony. For quite some time now, water is sought after for its renowned benefits in terms of relieving the physical and emotional changes which commonly occur during pregnancy. Objectives: 1) Describe the process of intervention, arising from the use of the aquatic environment in prenatal preparation 2) Relate the gains in health from prenatal preparation aquatica Method: Descriptive creating and applying a prep...

  17. Carcinogenic hazards in aquatic ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, J.J.

    1979-01-01

    The chemical characterization of contaminants in bottom sediments from the Great Lakes in western New York (Lake Erie) was carried out by applying reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) to fractions derived by routine organic extraction and separation methods. A comparison of the chromatograms from the sediments with those from analogous fractions isolated from tissue samples of aquatic biota showed correlations in the polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) composition. In the HPLC analysis of fractions isolated from sediment, Tubifex worms, aquatic snails, and fish tissue samples clearly indicated a characteristic PAH ''fingerprint' in all segments of the aquatic food chain. The patterns of horizontal distribution of the relative PAH levels indicated a point source of the pollution in the Buffalo River. Feral fish population samples showed several kinds of lesions that appear to be neoplasms. The histology of these lesions is described, and the significance of the data in terms of a possible human health hazard is discussed.

  18. Burnout : de stand van zaken

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taris, T.; Houtman, I.L.D.; Schaufeli, W.

    2013-01-01

    Dit artikel geeft een overzicht van de stand van zaken in het onderzoek naar burnout. Burnout is een syndroom van extreme vermoeidheid (uitputting), afstand nemen van het werk (distantie) en weinig vertrouwen in het eigen kunnen (verminderde competentie), waarbij de oorzaken voor deze aspecten geleg

  19. Modeling the element cycle of aquatic plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquatic plants play an important role in element cycles in wetlands and the efficiency of the process is extremely related to their proportional biomass allocation to above- and belowground organs. Therefore, the framework of most macrophyte productivity models is usually similar with a mass-balance approach consisting of gross production, respiration and mortality losses and the translocation between organs. These growth models are incorporated with decomposition models to evaluate the annual cycle of elements. Perennial emergent macrophytes with a relatively large biomass have a particularly important role in element cycles. Their phenological stages, such as the beginning of hibernation of belowground rhizome systems, emergence of new shoots in spring with resources stocked in the rhizomes, flowering, downward translocation of photosynthetic products later on and then the mortality of the aboveground system in late autumn, depend on the environmental conditions, basically the nutrients, water depth, climatic variations, etc. Although some species retain standing dead shoots for a long time, dead shoots easily fall into water, starting to decompose in the immediate aftermath. However, their decomposition rates in the water are relatively low, causing to accumulate large amounts of organic sediments on the bottom. Together with the deposition of allochthonous suspended matters in the stand, this process decreases the water depth, transforming wetlands gradually into land. The depth of penetration of roots into the sediments to uptake nutrients and water is extremely site specific, however, in water-logged areas, the maximum penetrable depth may be approximately estimated by considering the ability of oxygen transport into the rhizome system. The growth of perennial submerged plants is also estimated by a process similar to that of emergent macrophytes. However, compared with emergent macrophytes, the root system of submerged macrophytes is weaker, and the nutrient

  20. Peru—Second Review Under the Stand-By Arrangement and Requests for Establishment of Performance Criteria, Wavier of Nonobservance of Performance Criteria, and Rephasing of Future Disbursements—2005 Staff Report; Press Release on the Executive Board Discussion; and Statement by the Executive Director for Peru

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses key findings of the Second Review Under the Stand-By Arrangement for Peru. The economy continued to perform well in 2004. Real GDP grew by 5.1 percent, inflation was 3.5 percent at end-December, and the fiscal deficit of the combined public sector narrowed to 1.1 percent of GDP. However, poverty remains high. The reform of the preferential public pension regime was approved in mid-December, and the authorities are making progress toward awarding transportation infrastruct...

  1. Natural regeneration of trees in three types of afforested stands in the Taihang Mountains, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xitian Yang

    Full Text Available Natural regeneration is the natural process by which plants replace themselves. It is a cost-effective way to re-establish vegetation, and it helps to preserve genetic identity and diversity. In this study, we investigated the natural regeneration of trees in three types of afforested stands in the Taihang Mountains, China, which were dominated by Robinia pseudoacacia (black locust, Quercus variabilis (Chinese cork oak and Platycladus orientalis (Chinese arborvitae respectively. A consistent pattern was found among the three types of stands, being that the density of seedlings was positively correlated with the overstory canopy cover and negatively correlated with the covers of shrub, herb and litter layers. While a positive correlation between the density of seedlings and stand age was found for the conifer stands, negative correlations were found for the two types of broadleaf stands. Correlations between the density of saplings and the stand attributes were not consistent among the three types of stands. The two types of broadleaf stands had higher densities of seedlings and saplings than the conifer stands. While the broadleaf stands had adequate recruits for regeneration, the conifer stands did not have enough recruits. Our findings suggest that the overstory canopy should be prevented from being disturbed, any reduction of the canopy cover will decrease the recruits and affect the regeneration.

  2. An instability criterion for nonlinear standing waves on nonzero backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, R K; Susanto, H

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we study the standing wave solutions of an inhomogeneous nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation. The inhomogeneity considered here is a varying coefficient of the nonlinear term. In particular, the nonlinearity is chosen to be repelling (defocusing) except on a finite interval. Localized solutions on a non-zero background, e.g. dark solitons trapped by the inhomogeneity, are identified and studied. A novel instability criterion for such states is established through a topological argument. This allows instability to be determined quickly in many cases by considering simple geometric properties of the standing waves as viewed in the composite phase plane. Numerical calculations accompany the analytical results.

  3. Persistent toxic substances in Mediterranean aquatic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miniero, Roberto; Abate, Vittorio; Brambilla, Gianfranco; Davoli, Enrico; De Felip, Elena; De Filippis, Stefania P; Dellatte, Elena; De Luca, Silvia; Fanelli, Roberto; Fattore, Elena; Ferri, Fabiola; Fochi, Igor; Rita Fulgenzi, Anna; Iacovella, Nicola; Iamiceli, Anna Laura; Lucchetti, Dario; Melotti, Paolo; Moret, Ivo; Piazza, Rossano; Roncarati, Alessandra; Ubaldi, Alessandro; Zambon, Stefano; di Domenico, Alessandro

    2014-10-01

    Fish and fishery products may represent one of the main sources of dietary exposure to persistent toxic substances (PTSs) such as polychlorinated dibenzodioxins, dibenzofurans, and biphenyls; polybromodiphenyl ethers; organochlorine pesticides; perfluorooctanoic acid and perfluorooctane sulfonate; and inorganic mercury and methyl mercury. In this study, PTS contamination of Mediterranean fish and crustaceans caught in Italian coastal waters was investigated in order to increase the representativeness of the occurrence database for wild species. The objectives were to verify the suitability of regulatory limits for PTSs, identify background concentrations values, if any, and examine the possible sources of variability when assessing the chemical body burdens of aquatic species. Twelve wild species of commercial interest and two farmed fish species were chosen. Excluding methyl mercury, chemical concentrations found in wild species fell generally towards the low ends of the concentration ranges found in Europe according to EFSA database and were quite lower than the tolerable maximum levels established in the European Union; farmed fish always showed contamination levels quite lower than those detected in wild species. The data obtained for wild species seemed to confirm the absence of local sources of contamination in the chosen sampling areas; however, species contamination could exceed regulatory levels even in the absence of specific local sources of contamination as a result of the position in the food web and natural variability in species' lifestyle. A species-specific approach to the management of contamination in aquatic organisms is therefore suggested as an alternative to a general approach based only on contaminant body burden. A chemical-specific analysis performed according to organism position in the food chain strengthened the need to develop this approach. PMID:25020099

  4. Aquatic risk assessment of pesticides in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriquiriborde, Pedro; Mirabella, Paula; Waichman, Andrea; Solomon, Keith; Van den Brink, Paul J; Maund, Steve

    2014-10-01

    Latin America is anticipated to be a major growth market for agriculture and production is increasing with use of technologies such as pesticides. Reports of contamination of aquatic ecosystems by pesticides in Latin America have raised concerns about potential for adverse ecological effects. In the registration process of pesticides, all countries require significant data packages on aquatic toxicology and environmental fate. However, there are usually no specific requirements to conduct an aquatic risk assessment. To address this issue, the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry organized a workshop that brought together scientists from academia, government, and industry to review and elaborate on aquatic risk assessment frameworks that can be implemented into regulation of pesticides in Latin America. The workshop concluded that the international framework for risk assessments (protection goals, effects, and exposure assessments, risk characterization, and risk mitigation) is broadly applicable in Latin America but needs further refinement for the use in the region. Some of the challenges associated with these refinements are discussed in the article. It was recognized that there is potential for data sharing both within and outside of the region where conditions are similar. However, there is a need for research to compare local species and environmental conditions to those in other jurisdictions to be able to evaluate the applicability of data used in other countries. Development should also focus on human resources as there is a need to build local capacity and capability, and scientific collaboration and exchange between stakeholders in industry, government, and academia is also important. The meeting also emphasized that, although establishing a regionally relevant risk assessment framework is important, this also needs to be accompanied by enforcement of developed regulations and good management practices to help protect aquatic habitats

  5. Stand-alone photovoltaic applications. Lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IEA Photovoltaic Power Systems Programme (PVPS) is one of the collaborative R and D agreements established within the IEA. The objective of Task III is to promote and facilitate the exchange of information and experiences in the field of PV Systems in Stand-alone and Island Applications (SAPV). The book focuses on the practical experiences gained, and does not aim to provide a complete manual on SAPV. When Task III started its activities in 1993, a collection of 50 'State of the art' projects was published in the book 'Examples of Stand-Alone Photovoltaic Systems'. This publication marked the base line for the work of the task. Now, in 1998, the showcases from each country demonstrate the lessons learned in five years of cooperation. The book consists of two parts. The first part contains eight chapters dealing with a specific aspect of stand-alone PV. The second part introduces 14 national showcase projects in a systematic presentation. Each chapter and showcase can be read independently from the rest of the book. Chapter 2, contributed by The Netherlands, analyses the market for stand-alone PV systems. It gives an overview of the 'traditional' application of stand-alone PV, which is the electrification of remote buildings and which has been addressed in depth in other publications. The focus is on the market niches of service applications that are also interesting for more densely populated areas, e.g. in industrialised countries. The United Kingdom illustrates the economic aspects in Chapter 3. Cost comparisons are made, but more important is the illustration of the non-financial considerations that make PV the preferred choice as a power source for many applications. Switzerland explores in Chapter 4 (financing aspects) different financing mechanisms, and financial policies used to overcome the initial cost barrier. Most of these approaches have been applied in developing countries rather than in the western world. Using various examples from all over the

  6. Management of black Locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) stands in Hungary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) was the first forest tree species to be imported from North America to Europe at the beginning of the 17th century. It is the most important fast-growing stand-forming tree species in Hungary . Black locust plantations can be successfully established in response to arange of economic and ecological opportunities. Plantation survival and productivity are maximized by matching the species' growth characteristics with silvicultura l options and land management needs. In the paper the sequence of forest tending operations in black locust stands is proposed, based on results of long-term st and structure and forest yield trials. Implementing good silvicultural plans and models will lead to profitable black locust stands and greater acceptance of the species by land managers. Black locust would also beavery useful species for energy productions as the related research results have been shown in the paper .

  7. Models for a stand-alone PV system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, A.D.; Sørensen, Poul Ejnar; Hansen, L.H.;

    2001-01-01

    This report presents a number of models for modelling and simulation of a stand-alone photovoltaic (PV) system with a battery bank verified against a system installed at Risø National Laboratory. The work has been supported by the Danish Ministry ofEnergy, as a part of the activities in the Solar...... Energy Centre Denmark. The study is carried out at Risø National Laboratory with the main purpose to establish a library of simple mathematical models for each individual element of a stand-alone PVsystem, namely solar cells, battery, controller, inverter and load. The models for PV module and battery....... The performance of the best linear Blackbox model is compared to the KiBaM model. A validation of each of the implemented mathematical model is performed by an interactive analysis and comparison between simulation results and measurements, acquired from the stand-alone PV system at Risø....

  8. Phytoremediation Potential of Aquatic Macrophyte, Azolla

    OpenAIRE

    Sood, Anjuli; Uniyal, Perm L.; Prasanna, Radha; Ahluwalia, Amrik S.

    2011-01-01

    Aquatic macrophytes play an important role in the structural and functional aspects of aquatic ecosystems by altering water movement regimes, providing shelter to fish and aquatic invertebrates, serving as a food source, and altering water quality by regulating oxygen balance, nutrient cycles, and accumulating heavy metals. The ability to hyperaccumulate heavy metals makes them interesting research candidates, especially for the treatment of industrial effluents and sewage waste water. The us...

  9. Burnout: de stand van zaken

    OpenAIRE

    Taris, T.; Houtman, I.L.D.; Schaufeli, W

    2013-01-01

    Dit artikel geeft een overzicht van de stand van zaken in het onderzoek naar burnout. Burnout is een syndroom van extreme vermoeidheid (uitputting), afstand nemen van het werk (distantie) en weinig vertrouwen in het eigen kunnen (verminderde competentie), waarbij de oorzaken voor deze aspecten gelegen zijn in hetzij de werksfeer, hetzij de manier waarop werknemers omgaan met stresserende aspecten in hun werk. Als werkgerelateerd fenomeen onderscheidt burnout zich van vergelijkbare psychische ...

  10. Environmental Control Plan for the 100 Area Reactor Standing Legacy Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Environmental Control Plan is for the standing legacy waste removal activities at the 100-D, -H, -KE, and -KW reactors. The purpose of this plan is to establish requirements for the specific project or functional activity

  11. Aquatic and Terrestrial Environment 2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J. M.; Boutrup, S.; Bijl, L. van der;

    This report presents the 2004 results of the Danish National Monitoring and Assess-ment Programme for the Aquatic and Terrestrial Environments (NOVANA). 2004 was the first year in which terrestrial nature was included in the monitoring pro-gramme. The report reviews the state of the groundwater......, watercourses, lakes and marine waters and the pressures upon them and reviews the monitoring of terrestrial natural habitats and selected plants and animals. The report is based on the annual reports prepared for each subprogramme by the Topic Centres. The latter reports are mainly based on data collected and...

  12. Aquatic plants clean wastewater lagoons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-09-01

    Water weeds that grow profusely in warm tropical and subtropical regions have always been considered a nuisance; current research is focusing on methods to cull benefits from such aquatic proliferations. Weeds, especially the water hyacinth, are proving to be useful in the purification of wastewater lagoons. The plants extract inorganic and organic toxicants from the effluent. Hyacinths employed in experiments conducted in Puerto Rico are removed from the lagoons to prevent overcrowding. This harvest is sent through a digester to produce methane. (2 diagrams, 3 photos)

  13. EPA Region 7 Aquatic Focus Areas (ECO_RES.R7_AQUATIC_FOCUS_AREAS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This shapefile consists of 347 individual Aquatic Ecological System (AES) polygons that are the Aquatic Conservation Focus Areas for EPA Region 7. The focus areas...

  14. Reducing stand densities in immature and mature stands, applegate watershed, southwest Oregon. Forest Service research note

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Main, M.L.; Amaranthus, M.P.

    1996-02-01

    In the study the authors examined conditions following density management treatments in two adjacent but dissimilar stands in Applegate Watershed, Oregon. An immature stand received a unique density reduction treatment retaining both hardwoods and conifers to encourage long-term survival and growth of its coniferous component. The mature stand density reduction treatment focused on removal of the competitive influence from overstocked, surpressed understory trees and maintaining existing large-diameter conifers. Precommercial thinning greatly reduced stand density and increased quadratic mean diameters in the immature stand. In the immature stand the combination of commercial and precommercial thinnings produced a reduced stand density designed to improve overall stand vigor.

  15. Radioactivity in the Canadian aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sources of radionuclides arising from natural anthropogenic processes as well as technologically enhanced natural radiation are discussed. Transport, distribution and behaviour of these radionuclides in aquatic systems are influenced by physical, chemical, biological and geological processes and conditions in freshwater and marine environments. Dosimetry of aquatic organisms, as well as various methods of measuring dose rate are presented. Effects of ionizing radiation (acute and chronic exposure) on aquatic organisms, populations and ecosystems are reviewed. This review covers the entire spectrum of the aquatic environment. Results of many studies are summarized. 300+ refs

  16. [Soil quality assessment of forest stand in different plantation esosystems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu; Wang, Silong; Feng, Zongwei; Gao, Hong; Wang, Qingkui; Hu, Yalin; Yan, Shaokui

    2004-12-01

    After a clear-cutting of the first generation Cunninghamia lanceolata plantation in 1982, three plantation ecosystems, pure Michelia macclurei stand (PMS), pure Chinese-fir stand (PCS) and their mixed stand, were established in spring 1983, and their effects on soil characteristics were evaluated by measuring some soil physical, chemical, microbiological and biochemical parameters. After 20 years' plantation, all test indices showed differences among different forest management models. Both PMS and MCM had a favorable effect on soil fertility maintenance. Soil quality assessment showed that some soil functions, e.g., water availability, nutrient availability, root suitability and soil quality index were all in a moderate level under the mixed and pure PMS stands, whereas in a relatively lower level under successive PCS stand. The results also showed that there existed close correlations between soil total organic C (TOC), cation exchange capacity (CEC), microbial biomass-C (Cmic) and other soil physical, chemical and biological indices. Therefore, TOC, CEC and Cmic could be used as the indicators in assessing soil quality in this study area. In addition, there were also positive correlations between soil microbial biomass-C and TOC, soil microbial biomass-N and total N, and soil microbial biomass-P and total P in the present study. PMID:15825426

  17. Compatible growth models and stand density diagrams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses a stand average growth model based on the self-thinning rule developed and used to generate stand density diagrams. Procedures involved in testing are described and results are included

  18. Ecology in Small Aquatic Ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikkel René

    % supersaturated in oxygen while the bottom waters becomes anoxic. Dense charophyte stands influenced the hydrodynamics and created favorable conditions for the apical parts in the surface waters, while the basal parts withstood anoxia for up to 12 hours in the bottom waters. Nocturnal convective mixing oxygenated......) both in the small lakes and in the small ephemeral streams on the Great Alvar. Downstream respiration was decoupled from GPP as respiration rates were much higher due to agricultural impact....

  19. Passive electroreception in aquatic mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czech-Damal, Nicole U; Dehnhardt, Guido; Manger, Paul; Hanke, Wolf

    2013-06-01

    Passive electroreception is a sensory modality in many aquatic vertebrates, predominantly fishes. Using passive electroreception, the animal can detect and analyze electric fields in its environment. Most electric fields in the environment are of biogenic origin, often produced by prey items. These electric fields can be relatively strong and can be a highly valuable source of information for a predator, as underlined by the fact that electroreception has evolved multiple times independently. The only mammals that possess electroreception are the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) and the echidnas (Tachyglossidae) from the monotreme order, and, recently discovered, the Guiana dolphin (Sotalia guianensis) from the cetacean order. Here we review the morphology, function and origin of the electroreceptors in the two aquatic species, the platypus and the Guiana dolphin. The morphology shows certain similarities, also similar to ampullary electroreceptors in fishes, that provide cues for the search for electroreceptors in more vertebrate and invertebrate species. The function of these organs appears to be very similar. Both species search for prey animals in low-visibility conditions or while digging in the substrate, and sensory thresholds are within one order of magnitude. The electroreceptors in both species are innervated by the trigeminal nerve. The origin of the accessory structures, however, is completely different; electroreceptors in the platypus have developed from skin glands, in the Guiana dolphin, from the vibrissal system. PMID:23187861

  20. 24 CFR 203.34 - Credit standing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Credit standing. 203.34 Section 203.34 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued....34 Credit standing. A mortgagor must have a general credit standing satisfactory to the Commissioner....

  1. 24 CFR 206.37 - Credit standing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Credit standing. 206.37 Section 206... CONVERSION MORTGAGE INSURANCE Eligibility; Endorsement Eligible Mortgagors § 206.37 Credit standing. Each mortgagor must have a general credit standing satisfactory to the Secretary....

  2. The role of herbivorous water birds in aquatic systems through interactions with aquatic macrophytes, with special reference to the Bewick's Swan - Fennel Pondweed system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, M.R.J.; Nolet, B.A.

    2007-01-01

    The role of aquatic macrophytes in stimulating biodiversity and maintaining clear waters is currently undisputed. The management of (eutrophic) shallow waters is therefore often directed at (re-)establishing macrophyte domination. In contrast, the role of water birds has long been considered of mino

  3. Spatial Pattern Dynamics in Aquatic Ecosystem Modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hong Li

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, several modelling approaches are explored to represent spatial pattern dynamics of aquatic populations in aquatic ecosystems by the combination of models, knowledge and data in different scales. It is shown that including spatially distributed inputs retrieved from Remote Sensing i

  4. Control of Fish and Aquatic Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesser, R. B.; And Others

    This agriculture extension service publication from Pennsylvania State University is a handbook for the water body manager. The bulk of the contents deals with aquatic plant control. The different types of aquatic plants, their reproduction and growth, and their role in the ecology of the water body are introduced in this main section. Also, the…

  5. Estimating Aquatic Insect Populations. Introduction to Sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chihuahuan Desert Research Inst., Alpine, TX.

    This booklet introduces high school and junior high school students to the major groups of aquatic insects and to population sampling techniques. Chapter 1 consists of a short field guide which can be used to identify five separate orders of aquatic insects: odonata (dragonflies and damselflies); ephemeroptera (mayflies); diptera (true flies);…

  6. Juvenile Competency to Stand Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanyan, Sofia T; Sidhu, Shawn S; Bath, Eraka

    2016-01-01

    Competency to stand trial is interpreted as a protected due process right for all defendants and is defined as a defendant's fundamental knowledge and understanding of the criminal charges being filed, roles and procedures within the courtroom, and a general ability to work with the defense counsel. Questions of competency are most often raised by the judge, defense, or the prosecution, and competency evaluations are most often completed by psychiatrists or psychologists with forensic training or work experience. Mental illness, intellectual disability, developmental disorders, and developmental immaturity are the 4 main factors considered in most juvenile competency evaluations. PMID:26593118

  7. Beyond Technology, there Stands Magic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcia Fernandes Lobato

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This article shows evidence that despite the prominent influences of the technological revolution and the spectacular panoramas on the contemporary world, magic seems to stand beyond technology. To support this hypothesis, the author investigates the images on the cinema, pointing out that to discover magic in a film, for instance, it is necessary to recognize its subjective structures disguised in the objectivity of the screen. Finally, the author indicates that in the field of image production, dance films that are created out of a cross-disciplinary effort are another by product of the fusion between art and video, born out of technological advancements.

  8. Phytoremediation potential of aquatic macrophyte, Azolla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Anjuli; Uniyal, Perm L; Prasanna, Radha; Ahluwalia, Amrik S

    2012-03-01

    Aquatic macrophytes play an important role in the structural and functional aspects of aquatic ecosystems by altering water movement regimes, providing shelter to fish and aquatic invertebrates, serving as a food source, and altering water quality by regulating oxygen balance, nutrient cycles, and accumulating heavy metals. The ability to hyperaccumulate heavy metals makes them interesting research candidates, especially for the treatment of industrial effluents and sewage waste water. The use of aquatic macrophytes, such as Azolla with hyper accumulating ability is known to be an environmentally friendly option to restore polluted aquatic resources. The present review highlights the phytoaccumulation potential of macrophytes with emphasis on utilization of Azolla as a promising candidate for phytoremediation. The impact of uptake of heavy metals on morphology and metabolic processes of Azolla has also been discussed for a better understanding and utilization of this symbiotic association in the field of phytoremediation. PMID:22396093

  9. The project New forest stand map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the scope of the project New forest stand map an operational procedure was developed to derive automatically forest stand parameters from airborne laser scanner and satellite data. Those stand parameters were development stage, species combination, crown cover and standing timber volume. Optional were number of trees, dominant tree height and others. The degree of automation is high. The automatically delineated stand boundaries were visually controlled and corrected. All stand parameters were then derived completely automatically. The applicability of the procedure developed was demonstrated with three test sites containing 3000 ha of forest. The New forest stand map was developed as a saleable product. The procedure is robust regarding varying data situations and forest conditions. (author)

  10. Solar Charged Stand Alone Inverter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Vasugi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with solar powered stand alone inverter which converts the variable dc output of a photovoltaic solar panel into ac that can be fed to loads. Stand alone inverters are used in systems where the inverter get its energy from batteries charged by photo voltaic arrays. A charge controller limits the rate at which electric current is added to or drawn from electric batteries. This charge discharge controller is needed to prevent the battery from being overcharged or discharged thus prolonging its life. The charge/discharge control is necessary in order to achieve safety and increase the capacity of the battery. The project has been tested according its operational purposes. Maximum power rating of the experimented solar charge controller is 100W according battery capacities. Cost effective solar charge controller has been designed and implemented to have efficient system and much longer battery lifetime. The dc output is given to inverter and then it is supplied to loads. This method is very cheap and cost effective.

  11. Aquatic Natural Areas Analysis and Evaluation: Oak Ridge Reservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranski, Dr. Michael J. [Catawba College

    2011-04-01

    This report presents an assessment of the natural area value of eight Aquatic Natural Areas (ANAs) and seven Aquatic Reference Areas (ARAs) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Anderson and Roane Counties in east Tennessee. It follows a previous study in 2009 that analyzed and evaluated terrestrial natural areas on the Reservation. The purpose of both studies was to evaluate and rank those specially designated areas on the Reservation that contain sensitive species, special habitats, and natural area value. Natural areas receive special protections through established statutes, regulations, and policies. The ORR contains 33,542 acres (13,574 ha) administered by the Department of Energy. The surface waters of the Reservation range from 1st-order to 5th-order streams, but the majority of the streams recognized as ANAs and ARAs are 1st- and 2nd-order streams. East Fork Poplar Creek is a 4th-order stream and the largest watershed that drains Reservation lands. All the waters of the Reservation eventually reach the Clinch River on the southern and western boundaries of the ORR. All available information was collected, synthesized, and evaluated. Field observations were made to support and supplement the available information. Geographic information system mapping techniques were used to develop several quantitative attributes about the study areas. Narrative descriptions of each ANA and ARA and tables of numerical data were prepared. Criteria for assessment and evaluation were developed, and eight categories of factors were devised to produce a ranking system. The evaluation factors used in the ranking system were: (A) size of area, (B) percentage of watershed protected, (C) taxa present with protected status, (D) overall biotic diversity, (E) stream features, (F) water quality and use support ratings, (G) disturbance regime, and (H) other factors. Each factor was evaluated on a 5-point ranking scale (0-4), and each area received a composite score, where 32 was the

  12. Pesticide runoff from energy crops: A threat to aquatic invertebrates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunzel, Katja; Schäfer, Ralf B; Thrän, Daniela; Kattwinkel, Mira

    2015-12-15

    The European Union aims to reach a 10% share of biofuels in the transport sector by 2020. The major burden is most likely to fall on already established annual energy crops such as rapeseed and cereals for the production of biodiesel and bioethanol, respectively. Annual energy crops are typically cultivated in intensive agricultural production systems, which require the application of pesticides. Agricultural pesticides can have adverse effects on aquatic invertebrates in adjacent streams. We assessed the relative ecological risk to aquatic invertebrates associated with the chemical pest management from six energy crops (maize, potato, sugar beet, winter barley, winter rapeseed, and winter wheat) as well as from mixed cultivation scenarios. The pesticide exposure related to energy crops and cultivation scenarios was estimated as surface runoff for 253 small stream sites in Central Germany using a GIS-based runoff potential model. The ecological risk for aquatic invertebrates, an important organism group for the functioning of stream ecosystems, was assessed using acute toxicity data (48-h LC50 values) of the crustacean Daphnia magna. We calculated the Ecological Risk from potential Pesticide Runoff (ERPR) for all three main groups of pesticides (herbicides, fungicides, and insecticides). Our findings suggest that the crops potato, sugar beet, and rapeseed pose a higher ecological risk to aquatic invertebrates than maize, barley, and wheat. As maize had by far the lowest ERPR values, from the perspective of pesticide pollution, its cultivation as substrate for the production of the gaseous biofuel biomethane may be preferable compared to the production of, for example, biodiesel from rapeseed. PMID:26282752

  13. Ecological effects of lawn greens with pure and mixed stands in an urban setting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiaomei LIU; Shuhua LI; Zhiguo ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    We studied the ecological benefits of four types of urban green spaces (lawn, a Robinia pseudoacacia stand, a Pinus tabulaeformis stand and a mixed stand of both species) in Yuan Dynasty Wall Relics Park, Beijing. Each of the eight sampling sites was about 0.1 hm2. The experiment was carried out in June, 2006 over a period of eight consecutive days, during which we continuously measured air temperature, relative humidity (RH) and wind speed at the four green spaces in both horizontal and vertical directions. The results were as follows: in the horizontal direction, the all-day average temperature at the pine stand was the lowest and its RH was the highest under three different climate conditions. During the day-time high temperature period, the temperature of the lawn was the highest and its RH the lowest. The temperature was lowest for the mixed stand, and the RH was highest for the pine stand. The highest average daily temperature occurred in the locust stand. The temperature and RH of the four green spaces were statistically different at the 0.05 level of significance. In the vertical direction, the average daily temperature of the four green spaces increased with height. The average daily RH of the four-green spaces decreased slightly with increased height. During the high temperature period of the day, the average temperature of the lawn and the P. tabulaeformis stand declined with the increased height, but the temperature at the R. pseudoa-caeia stand and the mixed P. tabulaeformis-R, pseudoaca-cia stand fluctuated greatly. With regard to the effect of lowering the wind speed, the mixed stand was better than the other green spaces. Based on these results, it can be concluded that the mixed Chinese pine and locust stand was the best choice for the establishment of urban green spaces.

  14. Radionuclides in aquatic ecosystems associated with power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview is presented of liquid radioactivity releases to the environment from most of the operating nuclear power reactors in the U.S. through 1973. Concentrations and half-lives of radionuclides in the primary coolant water of a typical boiling water reactor are tabulated. It is noted that the releases of radionuclides from operating nuclear power plants have amounted to small fractions of the limits established by Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 20 (10CFR20). Recommendations are made for research on the effects of nuclear power plants on aquatic ecosystems

  15. Engaging the recreational angling community to implement and manage aquatic protected areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danylchuk, Andy J; Cooke, Steven J

    2011-06-01

    Recreational angling is a popular leisure activity, the quality of which is greatly dependent on fish abundance and well-functioning aquatic ecosystems. Aquatic protected areas (APAs) are used to help maintain and even restore aquatic systems and their associated biota, including fish species that are popular with recreational anglers. Paradoxically, the use of APAs has been a source of much contention and conflict between members of the recreational angling community and those interested in or mandated to protect aquatic resources on the basis of the interests of multiple stakeholder groups. The angling community is concerned about the loss of fishing opportunities and effectiveness of APAs. Although it is still unclear whether establishment of APAs alone can effectively protect aquatic resources, actively including the recreational angling community in the design, implementation, and management of APAs will help ensure the values of this rather substantial user group are incorporated into aquatic conservation strategies. Conversely, the probability of increasing the sustainability of recreational angling and related economies will be greatest if recreational angler groups remain open minded to both short-term and long-term goals of fisheries conservation strategies, including the use of APAs. PMID:21175844

  16. Aquatic invasive species: Lessons from cancer research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda, Adam; Ray, Andrew; Al-Chokhachy, Robert K.; Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Gresswell, Robert E.; Gross, Jackson A.; Kershner, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Aquatic invasive species are disrupting ecosystems with increasing frequency. Successful control of these invasions has been rare: Biologists and managers have few tools for fighting aquatic invaders. In contrast, the medical community has long worked to develop tools for preventing and fighting cancer. Its successes are marked by a coordinated research approach with multiple steps: prevention, early detection, diagnosis, treatment options and rehabilitation. The authors discuss how these steps can be applied to aquatic invasive species, such as the American bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus), in the Northern Rocky Mountain region of the United States, to expedite tool development and implementation along with achievement of biodiversity conservation goals.

  17. A Mixed Picture of AQUATIC PRODUCTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Aquatic products constitute an important part of China's international trade in agricultural products with the strongest competitiveness for export.The aquatic products industry of apparent competitive edge has maintained a considerable trade surplus despite the general trend of trade deficit among agricultural products in recent years.Nevertheless,the great changes taking place in the global economic and trade pattern in late years have given rise to the increasing uncertainties of the supply and demand as well as the price in the international aquatic products market.

  18. Refrigeration system having standing wave compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Timothy S.

    1992-01-01

    A compression-evaporation refrigeration system, wherein gaseous compression of the refrigerant is provided by a standing wave compressor. The standing wave compressor is modified so as to provide a separate subcooling system for the refrigerant, so that efficiency losses due to flashing are reduced. Subcooling occurs when heat exchange is provided between the refrigerant and a heat pumping surface, which is exposed to the standing acoustic wave within the standing wave compressor. A variable capacity and variable discharge pressure for the standing wave compressor is provided. A control circuit simultaneously varies the capacity and discharge pressure in response to changing operating conditions, thereby maintaining the minimum discharge pressure needed for condensation to occur at any time. Thus, the power consumption of the standing wave compressor is reduced and system efficiency is improved.

  19. Spatial prediction of forest stand variables

    OpenAIRE

    Nothdurft, Arne; Saborowski, Joachim; Breidenbach, Johannes

    2009-01-01

    This study aims at the development of a model to predict forest stand variables in management units (stands) from sample plot inventory data. For this purpose we apply a non-parametric most similar neighbour (MSN) approach. The study area is the municipal forest of Waldkirch, 13 km north-east of Freiburg, Germany, which comprises 328 forest stands and 834 sample plots. Low-resolution laser scanning data, classification variables as well rough estimations from the forest management planning se...

  20. Influence of cooling water discharges from Kaiga Nuclear Power Plant on aquatic ecology of the Kadra reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alterations induced in the ambient temperature can lead to wide manifestations in species distribution and community structure. In general, elevated water temperature causes changes in species composition, species dominance, standing crop and productivity of biota including phytoplankton communities in any aquatic ecosystem. Thus warm water discharges from power plants into the receiving water bodies may adversely affect aquatic ecology. In the absence of exhaustive data on the response of aquatic organisms and ecosystems in the tropics to elevated temperatures, the only option is to draw inferences, from the experiences in the subtropical and temperature areas. Since, sufficient data on similar line are not available in tropical environment, present paper delineates certain aspects of aquatic ecology of the Kadra reservoir where cooling water is discharged. The study suggests the heated effluents from Kaiga Nuclear Power plant caused changes in dissolved oxygen and pH of water, heterotrophic bacterial population, sediment biogeochemical cycles related biochemical processes, species composition, species dominance, standing crop and productivity of biota including phytoplankton communities within 500 m from End of Discharge Canal point of Kadra reservoir when two units are running in full capacity. (author)

  1. Standardization of a broth microdilution susceptibility testing method to determine minimum inhibitory concentrations of aquatic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, R.A.; Walker, R.D.; Carson, J.; Coles, M.; Coyne, R.; Dalsgaard, Inger; Gieseker, C.; Hsu, H.M.; Mathers, J.J.; Papapetropoulou, M.; Petty, B.; Teitzel, C.; Reimschuessel, R.

    2005-01-01

    antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods for bacterial isolates from aquatic animal species. QC ranges were established for Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida ATCC 33658 when testing at 22, 28 and 35 degrees C (E. coli only) for 10 different antimicrobial agents...

  2. Assessment of mechanisms of metal-induced reproductive toxicity in aquatic species as a biomarker of exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, M.; George, W.; Preslan, J. [and others

    1996-05-02

    This project discusses the following studies: identification and quantitation of heavy metals and petroleum products present in Bayou Trepagnier relative to control sites; assessment of the uptake and bioaccumulation of metals and organic contaminants of interest in aquatic species; establishment and use of polarographic methods for use in metal speciation studies to identify specific chemical forms present in sediments, waters and organism; and evaluation of contaminants on reproductive function of aquatic species as potential biomarkers of exposure. 14 refs.

  3. New textbooks of science and their reference to the application of scientific method based on the aquatic resources.

    OpenAIRE

    Héctor Toledo Muñoz; Sara Zelada Muñoz; Carmen Soto Martínez

    2012-01-01

    A new didactical curriculum model for teaching science based on aquatic resources has been applied to a group four hundred and fourteen students from primary education, just in establishments situated on the coastal edge of the Tenth Region of Los Lagos, Chile. The themes of the learning strategy were suggested activities in science texts, drawn from interdisciplinary workshops involving classroom teachers, aquatic resources, professional didactic teaching, marine ecology experts, geneticist,...

  4. Freshwater aquatic plant biomass production in Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, K.R.; Sutton, D.L.; Bowes, G.

    1983-01-01

    About 8% (1.2 million ha) of the total surface area of Florida is occupied by freshwater. Many of these water bodies are eutrophic. Nutrients present in these water bodies can be potentially used to culture aquatic plants as a possible feedstock for methane production. This paper summarizes the results of known research findings on biomass production potential of freshwater aquatic plants in Florida and identifies key research needs to improve the quality and quantity of biomass yields. Among floating aquatic plants, biomass yield potential was in the order of water-hyacinth > water lettuce > pennywort > salvinia > duckweed > azolla. Pennywort, duckweed, and azolla appear to perform well during the cooler months compared to other aquatic plants. Among emergent plants, biomass yield potential was in the order of southern wild rice > cattails > soft rush > bulrush. Cultural techniques, nutrient management, and environmental factors influencing the biomass yields were discussed. 68 references.

  5. Antibiotics promote aggregation within aquatic bacterial communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ManuelaCoci

    2014-07-01

    These results represent the first observation of co-aggregation as a successful strategy of AB resistance based on phenotype in aquatic bacterial communities, and can represent a fundamental step in the understanding of the effects of AB.

  6. Nitrous oxide emission by aquatic macrofauna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stief, Peter; Poulsen, Morten; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Brix, Hans; Schramm, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    A large variety of aquatic animals was found to emit the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide when nitrate was present in the environment. The emission was ascribed to denitrification by ingested bacteria in the anoxic animal gut, and the exceptionally high N2O-to-N2 production ratio suggested delayed induction of the last step of denitrification. Filter- and deposit-feeding animal species showed the highest rates of nitrous oxide emission and predators the lowest, probably reflecting the different amounts of denitrifying bacteria in the diet. We estimate that nitrous oxide emission by aquatic animals is quantitatively important in nitrate-rich aquatic environments like freshwater, coastal marine, and deep-sea ecosystems. The contribution of this source to overall nitrous oxide emission from aquatic environments might further increase because of the projected increase of nitrate availability in tropical regions and the numeric dominance of filter- and deposit-feeders in eutrophic ecosystems. PMID:19255427

  7. Submerged Aquatic Vegetation (SAV) - Volusia County Seagrass

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Aquatic vegetation in Volusia County. DEP SEA_GRASSES This polygon GIS data set represents a compilation of statewide seagrass data from various source agencies and...

  8. Effect of Aquatic Immersion on Static Balance

    OpenAIRE

    Louder, Talin J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To quantitatively assess measures of static balance and limits of stability (LOS) in an aquatic environment compared to on land. Methods Fifteen healthy, young adults (23 + or - 2 years) performed 90 s static balance trials on land and aquatic immersion at two different depths (greater trochanter, xiphoid process). Measures of 95% ellipse area and center of pressure (CoP) mean velocity were computed from the force data. Additionally, participants completed a visual analog scale (VAS...

  9. Aquatic arsenic: phytoremediation using floating macrophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M Azizur; Hasegawa, H

    2011-04-01

    Phytoremediation, a plant based green technology, has received increasing attention after the discovery of hyperaccumulating plants which are able to accumulate, translocate, and concentrate high amount of certain toxic elements in their above-ground/harvestable parts. Phytoremediation includes several processes namely, phytoextraction, phytodegradation, rhizofiltration, phytostabilization and phytovolatilization. Both terrestrial and aquatic plants have been tested to remediate contaminated soils and waters, respectively. A number of aquatic plant species have been investigated for the remediation of toxic contaminants such as As, Zn, Cd, Cu, Pb, Cr, Hg, etc. Arsenic, one of the deadly toxic elements, is widely distributed in the aquatic systems as a result of mineral dissolution from volcanic or sedimentary rocks as well as from the dilution of geothermal waters. In addition, the agricultural and industrial effluent discharges are also considered for arsenic contamination in natural waters. Some aquatic plants have been reported to accumulate high level of arsenic from contaminated water. Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes), duckweeds (Lemna gibba, Lemna minor, Spirodela polyrhiza), water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica), water ferns (Azolla caroliniana, Azolla filiculoides, and Azolla pinnata), water cabbage (Pistia stratiotes), hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata) and watercress (Lepidium sativum) have been studied to investigate their arsenic uptake ability and mechanisms, and to evaluate their potential in phytoremediation technology. It has been suggested that the aquatic macrophytes would be potential for arsenic phytoremediation, and this paper reviews up to date knowledge on arsenic phytoremediation by common aquatic macrophytes. PMID:21435676

  10. Correction of electric standing waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kester, Do; Avruch, Ian; Teyssier, David

    2014-12-01

    Electric Standing Waves (ESW) appear in some frequency bands of HIFI, a heterodyne spectrometer aboard the Herschel Space Observatory. ESWs consist of about 10 irregular ripples added to a continuum contribution. They distort the spectra and should be removed. ESWs change so rapidly that the standard ways to mitigate them, do not work. We have built a catalog of thousands of spectra taken on empty sky that contain only the ESW contribution. All ESWs seem to belong to a limited number of multiplicative families. To find representative members of the families we modelled them as splines and chose one representative template model for each family based on Bayesian evidence. The resulting set of models is our catalog of possible ESW templates. To correct a spectrum taken on an astronomical source, we select the template from the catalog that fits with the highest Bayesian evidence and subtract it. This has to be done in the possible presence of spectral lines and of a true astronomical continuuum. Both the true lines and continuum should be unaffected by the procedure. To exclude the lines we use a robustly weighted variety of the (gaussian) likelihood. Ideally the correction should be part of the pipeline with which all HIFI observations have to be processed. This requires a procedure having no failures, no interaction, and limited CPU usage.

  11. The Stand-alone Heliostat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first Autonomous Heliostat has been developed by CIEMAT at PSA facilities in Almeria. This heliostat is an innovative approach to reducing the civil engineering work costs in heliostat fields of central tower plants. Channels, cables and other electric elements have been eliminated in the new heliostat. Thus, one 70-nr, classical T glass/metal heliostat has been adapted to include all the new stand-alone concept components. A PV system is able to drive two sun-tracking DC motors between 5 and 24Vdc, 0 and 15A. The heliostat communicates with the control room 400-m away by using a radio-modem working at 9600 baud. An anemometer, a wind switcher, light and ambient temperature sensors have been installed on the heliostat for self-protection decision-making. A PV panel integrated into the heliostat reflecting surface, eliminates cabling and other elements required for a conventional power supply. Communication lines between master control and local control have been replaced by radio-modem. Testing has validated the technical feasibility of the prototype and quantified the real consumption and efficiencies of new elements. The extra costs produced.by the autonomous concepts are compared with the cost of civil work in conventional heliostat field. (Author) 8 refs

  12. Aquatic invertebrates of the Ribnica and Lepenica Rivers: Composition of the community and water quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jović Aleksandra

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of investigating the community of aquatic invertebrates in the Ribnica and Lepenica Rivers (Kolubara River drainage area are given in the present work. Forty-three taxa are recorded. In relation to other studied streams in Serbia, the investigated rivers are characterized by high diversity of macroinvertebrates. Cluster analysis indicates that the locality on the Lepenica stands apart from those on the Ribnica, which is a consequence of the difference of habitats found at them. Results of saprobiological analysis of the macrozoobenthos in the given rivers indicate that their waters belong to quality classes I and II.

  13. Carbon Storage in Beech Stands on the Chřiby Uplands

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider Jiří; Holušová Kateřina; Rychtář Jan; Vyskot Ilja; Lampartová Ivana

    2015-01-01

    The submitted scientific statement is a contribution to solutions of monitoring the storage of carbon in the woods and its emissions. Four permanent research plots were established in the area of the Chřiby uplands in the Czech Republic. The plots are made of forest stands with nearly 100% of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.). The stands form simple spatial structures of about the same age (about 180 years). They represent, however, varying site conditions (dwarf acid beech stands, herb-ric...

  14. Standing Waves of the Inhomogeneous Klein-Gordon Equations with Critical Exponent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zai Hui GAN; Jian ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the standing wave in the inhomogeneous nonlinear Klein-Gordon equations with critical exponent. Firstly, we obtain the existence of standing waves associated with the ground states by using variational calculus as well as a compactness lemma. Next, we establish some sharp conditions for global existence in terms of the characteristics of the ground state. Then,we show that how small the initial data are for the global solutions to exist. Finally, we prove the instability of the standing wave by combining the former results.

  15. Thinning of Tree Stands in the Arctic Zone of Krasnoyarsk Territory With Different Ecological Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Polyakov, V. I.

    2014-01-01

    In 2001 six permanent sample plots (PSP) were established in forest stands differing in degrees of damage by pollution from the Norilsk industrial region. In 2004 the second forest inventory was carried out at these PSP for evaluation of pollutant impacts on stand condition changes. During both inventory procedures the vigor state of every tree was visually categorized according to 6-points scale of «Forest health regulations in Russian Federation». The changeover of tree into fall was also t...

  16. Resin production in natural Aleppo pine stands in northern Evia, Greece

    OpenAIRE

    K. Spanos; D. Gaitanis; I. Spanos

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the variability in resin yield of Aleppo pines in Evia (Greece) with the aim to exploit this natural resource in a sustainable way. Ten experimental plots were established in natural pine stands for monitoring. Our results revealed significant differences among stands, with high variation among individual trees in each plot. Maximum resin production was achieved in the Livadakia site whereas the minimum was obtained in Kokinomilia. All trees were classified according to their ...

  17. Stand development and regeneration dynamics of managed uneven-aged Picea abies forests in boreal Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Chrimes, Dillon

    2004-01-01

    Volume increment and ingrowth are important aspects of stand development and regeneration dynamics for determining the effectiveness of uneven-aged silvicultural systems. The main objectives of this thesis were to establish the influence of standing volume on volume increment after different kinds of harvest regimes, the influence of overstorey density on height growth of advance regeneration, and the influence of bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) on spruce regeneration in managed uneven-aged...

  18. Aircraft Stand Allocation with Associated Resource Scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Tor Fog; Larsen, Jesper; Lusby, Richard Martin;

    different ground handling resources (taxiways, aircraft stands, gates, etc) at different times. Each resource can be claimed by at most one turn-round at a time. The aircraft stand allocation problem with associated resource scheduling is the problem of allocating the required ground handling resources to...

  19. Theory of standing spin-wave attenuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exchange attenuation of standing spin waves is calculated for an ultrathin magnetic of the order of exchange length thick. Because of the boundary conditions the wave vectors of spin waves in such films high values that are proportional to the inverse film thickness. The exchange attenuation at such wave vectors becomes dominant and can result in smearing of the standing spin wave spectrum

  20. Confirmation of irradiation processing doses for controlling microflora in frozen aquatic products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the research results and existing references in the hygienic standard and technique code of frozen aquatic products, a conclusion is made that the irradiation dose of 4-7 kGy could ensure bacteria count less than 5 x 104 cfu/g and no pathogen microbial detected when microbial count in the products is less than 5 x 106 cfu/g before irradiation. The irradiation dose of 4-7 kGy could be used in establishing irradiation sterilization practice for control microflora of frozen aquatic products. (authors)

  1. Stand age and climate drive forest carbon balance recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besnard, Simon; Carvalhais, Nuno; Clevers, Jan; Herold, Martin; Jung, Martin; Reichstein, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Forests play an essential role in the terrestrial carbon (C) cycle, especially in the C exchanges between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere. Ecological disturbances and forest management are drivers of forest dynamics and strongly impact the forest C budget. However, there is a lack of knowledge on the exogenous and endogenous factors driving forest C recovery. Our analysis includes 68 forest sites in different climate zones to determine the relative influence of stand age and climate conditions on the forest carbon balance recovery. In this study, we only included forest regrowth after clear-cut stand replacement (e.g. harvest, fire), and afforestation/reforestation processes. We synthesized net ecosystem production (NEP), gross primary production (GPP), ecosystem respiration (Re), the photosynthetic respiratory ratio (GPP to Re ratio), the ecosystem carbon use efficiency (CUE), that is NEP to GPP ratio, and CUEclimax, where GPP is derived from the climate conditions. We implemented a non-linear regression analysis in order to identify the best model representing the C flux patterns with stand age. Furthermore, we showed that each C flux have a non-linear relationship with stand age, annual precipitation (P) and mean annual temperature (MAT), therefore, we proposed to use non-linear transformations of the covariates for C fluxes'estimates. Non-linear stand age and climate models were, therefore, used to establish multiple linear regressions for C flux predictions and for determining the contribution of stand age and climate in forest carbon recovery. Our findings depicted that a coupled stand age-climate model explained 33% (44%, average site), 62% (76%, average site), 56% (71%, average site), 41% (59%, average site), 50% (65%, average site) and 36% (50%, average site) of the variance of annual NEP, GPP, Re, photosynthetic respiratory ratio, CUE and CUEclimax across sites, respectively. In addition, we showed that gross fluxes (e.g. GPP and Re) are

  2. Regional-scale stand density management diagrams for Pyrenean oak (Quercus pyrenaica Willd.) stands in north-west Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Castaño-Santamaría J; Barrio-Anta M; Álvarez-Álvarez P

    2013-01-01

    Stand Density Management Diagrams are useful tools for designing and evaluating alternative density management regimes without the need of implementing any silvicultural action, and allowing the future stand conditions to be predicted prior to implementing management schedules. In this study, stand density management diagrams were developed for Pyrenean oak (Quercus pyrenaica Willd.) stands in north-west Spain by including data on stand volume, stand aboveground biomass, stand stem biomass an...

  3. Mercury Release to Aquatic Environments from Anthropogenic Sources in China from 2001 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Maodian; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Xuejun; Chen, Long; Wang, Huanhuan; Luo, Yao; Zhang, Haoran; Shen, Huizhong; Tong, Yindong; Ou, Langbo; Xie, Han; Ye, Xuejie; Deng, Chunyan

    2016-08-01

    Based on an analysis of measured data and distribution factors, we developed the China Aquatic Mercury Release (CAMR) model, which we used to calculate an inventory of mercury (Hg) that was released to aquatic environments from primary anthropogenic sources in China. We estimated a total release of 98 tons of Hg in 2012, including coal-fired power plants (17%), nonferrous metal smelting (33%), coal mining and washing (25%), domestic sewage (17%), and other sectors (8.3%). The total primary anthropogenic Hg released to aquatic environments in China decreased at an annual average rate of 1.7% between 2001 and 2012, even though GDP grew at an annual average rate of 10% during this period. In addition to the Hg that was released to aquatic environments in China's provinces, we estimated the Hg release amounts and intensities (in g/km(2)·yr) for China's 58 secondary river basins. The highest aquatic Hg release intensities in China were associated with industrial wastewater on the North China Plain and domestic sewage in eastern China and southern China. We found that the overall uncertainty of our inventory ranges from -22% to 32%. We suggest that the inventory provided by this study can help establish a more accurate map of regional and global Hg cycling; it also has implications for water quality management in China. PMID:27379546

  4. Ecological and phytopathological status of birch stands on the territory of Krasnoyarsk group of districts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Tatarintsev

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available According to inspection data, the health and vital status of birch (Betula pendula Roth. stands in Krasnoyarsk group of lands (southern part of Central Siberia were estimated (established as satisfactory in general; about half of birch stands near urbanized areas were weakened. The condition of stands decreased significantly with increased recreation use, the effect of technogenic pollution was negligible. The most valuable (important representatives of pathogenic biota identified on birch trees were infestations of necrotic cancer and rot diseases. In birch stands the bacterial dropsy was found to be widespread (agent of infection – Erwinia multivora Scz.-Parf, occurrence of the disease ranged from a single ill tree up to 10–38 % of the stands. The birch stands in taiga areas were affected to a greater extent than in forest-steppe; there were high yield class stands on moist soils. Prevalence of bacteriosis rose with increasing stand age and density and not dependent on recreation use level. Trees with dropsy are dead in fact or potentially. In taiga birch forests the infection and rot of roots was caused by honey agaric (Armillaria mellea sensu lato, that lead to single or, rarely, group tree drying and the fungus usually eliminated already weakened trees. Wood biomass was destroyed by complex of aphyllophorous Hymenomycetes, their hemiparasitic species caused stem rots that decreased stand marketability and also resulted in rot-realated wind-break accumulation. Occurrence of rot was significantly higher in second growth birch stands, possibly above 20 %; the relationship between rot prevalence and forest assessment was not revealed.

  5. Sit-stand and stand-sit transitions in older adults and patients with Parkinson’s disease: event detection based on motion sensors versus force plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zijlstra Agnes

    2012-10-01

    (ICC = 0.61. Conclusions This study demonstrated high agreement of body-fixed-sensor based detection of sit-stand and stand-sit events with that based on force plates in older adults and patients with mild to moderate Parkinson’s disease. Further development and testing is needed to establish reliability for unstandardized performance in clinical and home settings.

  6. INTER-RATER AND INTRA-RATER RELIABILITY OF ACTIVE HIP ABDUCTION TEST FOR STANDING INDUCED LOW BACK PAIN

    OpenAIRE

    Mansi Shah; Pravin Aaron; Subin Solomen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Active hip abduction test (AHAbd) has previously been shown to be a reliable tool for predicting low back pain development during a prolonged standing exposure in previously asymptomatic individuals, but the reliability of AHAbd on patients with standing induced occupational low back pain has not been established. As it is an observation based test, reliability among different raters and same rater must be established. The purpose of this study was to investigate the inter-rater ...

  7. Stand, Viewpoint and Method in Sannong Studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CaoJinqing

    2005-01-01

    It is now a matter of urgency to consider the issue of sannong (farmers, the countryside and agriculture) against the whole background of reform, opening-up and modernization in China and against the backdrop of the whole world, i.e., against the backdrop of the globalization of capital. In my view, one's stand is a key factor in considering this issue. I use the word “stand” in a relatively broad meaning. To put it simply, where do you stand? At what time and in what space do you stand?

  8. Where Do the Women Stand?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    THE legal status of women in acountry is an important benchmarkof the degree of civilization and progressof that country. In the establishment ofthe People’s Republic of China and itsconstruction of the legal system, the legalframework to protect women’s rights andbenefits is improving. Chinese women’slegal status has witnessed great, profoundchange. The construction of the legal system toprotect women’s legal interests has been athree-tiered process: The first stage was from 1949 to theearly 1950s. At the first meeting of all of

  9. Nutrition, illness, and injury in aquatic sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyne, David B; Verhagen, Evert A; Mountjoy, Margo

    2014-08-01

    In this review, we outline key principles for prevention of injury and illness in aquatic sports, detail the epidemiology of injury and illness in aquatic athletes at major international competitions and in training, and examine the relevant scientific evidence on nutrients for reducing the risk of illness and injury. Aquatic athletes are encouraged to consume a well-planned diet with sufficient calories, macronutrients (particularly carbohydrate and protein), and micronutrients (particularly iron, zinc, and vitamins A, D, E, B6, and B12) to maintain health and performance. Ingesting carbohydrate via sports drinks, gels, or sports foods during prolonged training sessions is beneficial in maintaining energy availability. Studies of foods or supplements containing plant polyphenols and selected strains of probiotic species are promising, but further research is required. In terms of injury, intake of vitamin D, protein, and total caloric intake, in combination with treatment and resistance training, promotes recovery back to full health and training. PMID:24937101

  10. Hardwood seedling establishment below Aleppo pine depends on thinning intensity in two Mediterranean sites

    OpenAIRE

    Gavinet, J.; Vilagrosa, A.; Chirino, E.; Granados, M.E.; Vallejo, V.R.; Prévosto, B.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Developing silvicultural methods to help Mediterranean forests adapt to climate change is of high importance. Introducing resprouting hardwood species below pine stands is expected to promote diversity and resilience of these stands, particularly to forest fires. Aims: To examine how the intensity of pine thinning influences understory micro environment and the establishment of various hardwood seedlings in two Mediterranean sites. Methods: Aleppo pine stands were thinned dow...

  11. Tensile and Fatigue Properties of Free-Standing Cu Foils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Caiyun Dai; Xiaofei Zhu; Guangping Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Tensile and fatigue properties of free-standing as-rolled Cu foils were investigated by means of uniaxial tensile and dynamic bending tests. A special testing system was established to evaluate fatigue behavior of a mi-croscale material subjected to dynamic bending load. The experimental results show that the yield strength increases, but the fracture strain and fatigue resistance decrease with decreasing foil thickness. Deformation and fatigue damage behavior was characterized. The size effect on tensile and fatigue properties of the Cu foils are evaluated to get further understanding of the mechanical behavior of the micrometer-scale metallic materials.

  12. Adaptive features of aquatic mammals' eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mass, Alla M; Supin, Alexander Ya

    2007-06-01

    The eye of aquatic mammals demonstrates several adaptations to both underwater and aerial vision. This study offers a review of eye anatomy in four groups of aquatic animals: cetaceans (toothed and baleen whales), pinnipeds (seals, sea lions, and walruses), sirenians (manatees and dugongs), and sea otters. Eye anatomy and optics, retinal laminar morphology, and topography of ganglion cell distribution are discussed with particular reference to aquatic specializations for underwater versus aerial vision. Aquatic mammals display emmetropia (i.e., refraction of light to focus on the retina) while submerged, and most have mechanisms to achieve emmetropia above water to counter the resulting aerial myopia. As underwater vision necessitates adjusting to wide variations in luminosity, iris muscle contractions create species-specific pupil shapes that regulate the amount of light entering the pupil and, in pinnipeds, work in conjunction with a reflective optic tapetum. The retina of aquatic mammals is similar to that of nocturnal terrestrial mammals in containing mainly rod photoreceptors and a minor number of cones (however, residual color vision may take place). A characteristic feature of the cetacean and pinniped retina is the large size of ganglion cells separated by wide intercellular spaces. Studies of topographic distribution of ganglion cells in the retina of cetaceans revealed two areas of ganglion cell concentration (the best-vision areas) located in the temporal and nasal quadrants; pinnipeds, sirenians, and sea otters have only one such area. In general, the visual system of marine mammals demonstrates a high degree of development and several specific features associated with adaptation for vision in both the aquatic and aerial environments. PMID:17516421

  13. Aquatic macroinvertebrates of the Jablanica river, Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanović Katarina S.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on the community of aquatic macroinvertebrates was carried out during 2005 and 2006 at four sampling sites along the Jablanica River, a right-hand tributary of the Kolubara River. Fifty-seven taxa were recorded in the course of the investigation. The most diverse group was Ephemeroptera, followed by Trichoptera and Plecoptera. Members of the Rhitrogena semicolorata group were the most abundant. Our results could be the basis for evaluation of the influence of damming of the Jablanica River on the status of its water and can serve as a model for studying the influ­ence of hydromorphological degradation of aquatic ecosystems.

  14. Effects of modifications of aquatic ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies under this program historically have been concerned with the effects of a variety of stress factors on aquatic populations and communities. Current research was focused principally on ionizing radiation, and includes studies on the interaction of acute radiation and temperature on fish, the in situ measurement of radiation exposure in an aquatic environment, and the uptake and retention of tritium in a simulated pond community. In response to the expanded responsibilities of the recently formed Energy Research and Development Administration in dealing with all forms of energy related problems, this program will be redirected in the coming year to nonnuclear energy research

  15. Aquatic ape theory and fossil hominids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaegen, M J

    1991-06-01

    While most older palaeo-anthropological studies emphasise the similarities of the fossil hominids with modern man, recent studies often stress the unique and the apelike features of the australopithecine dentitions, skulls and postcranial bones. It is worth reconsidering the features of Australopithecus, Homo erectus and Homo neanderthalensis in the light of the so-called Aquatic Ape Theory (AAT) of Hardy and Morgan, and to compare the skeletal parts of our fossil relatives with those of (semi)aquatic animals. Possible convergences are observed with proboscis monkeys, beavers, sea-otters, hippopotamuses, seals, sea-lions, walruses, sea-cows, whales, dolphins, porpoises, penguins and crocodiles. PMID:1909768

  16. Radioactive contamination of aquatic media and organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a brief account of the radioactive wastes produced by peaceful or military uses of Atomic Industry, the author first describes a series of observations carried out 'in the field' on the extent of contamination in aquatic organisms with respect to that of the medium. The experimental studies are then analysed, with reference both to the radioisotope metabolism and to the factors and types of contamination of aquatic organisms by wastes from atomic industry. A precise experimental project is presented at the end of the paper, including almost 300 references. (author)

  17. Steel erected at A-3 Test Stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Workers erect the first fabricated steel girders to arrive at the A-3 Test Stand at Stennis Space Center. Steel work began at the construction site Oct. 29 and is scheduled to continue into next spring.

  18. Basic Stand Alone Carrier Line Items PUF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This release contains the Basic Stand Alone (BSA) Carrier Line Items Public Use Files (PUF) with information from Medicare Carrier claims. The CMS BSA Carrier Line...

  19. Basic Stand Alone Medicare Outpatient Procedures PUF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This release contains the Basic Stand Alone (BSA) Outpatient Procedures Public Use Files (PUF) with information from Medicare outpatient claims. The CMS BSA...

  20. Minnesota DNR Forest Stand Inventory Version 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This layer is a digital inventory of individual forest stands. The data is collected by DNR Foresters in each DNR Forestry Administrative Area, and is updated on a...

  1. Tasty Stand-Ins for Salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ginger Mint Nutmeg Oregano Paprika/smoked paprika Parsley Rosemary Salt-free seasoning mix Tarragon Thyme Use Condiments, ... Much of a Good Thing / Labels: For your health / Quiz: What's the buzz about salt? / Tasty Stand- ...

  2. Basic Stand Alone Medicare Hospice Beneficiary PUF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This release contains the Basic Stand Alone (BSA) Hospice Beneficiary Public Use Files (PUF) with information from Medicare hospice claims. The CMS BSA Hospice...

  3. TMS delivered for A-3 Test Stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    A state-of-the-art thrust measurement system for the A-3 Test Stand under construction at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center was delivered March 17. Once completed, the A-3 stand (seen in background) will allow simulated high-altitude testing on the next generation of rocket engines for America's space program. Work on the stand began in 2007, with activation scheduled for 2012. The stand is the first major test structure to be built at Stennis since the 1960s. The recently delivered TMS was fabricated by Thrust Measurement Systems in Illinois. It is an advanced calibration system capable of measuring vertical and horizontal thrust loads with an accuracy within 0.15 percent at 225,000 pounds.

  4. Acute and long-term effects of irradiation on pine (Pinus silvestris) stands post-Chernobyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkhipov, N.P.; Kuchma, N.D. (Department of Radiology and Land Restoration, Pripyat Research and Industrial Association, Chernobyl (Ukraine)); Askbrant, S. (National Radiation Protection Institute, Stockholm (Sweden)); Pasternak, P.S.; Musica, V.V. (Lyes Research and Industrial Association, Kharykov (Ukraine))

    1994-10-14

    The effect of ionizing irradiation on the viability of pine stands after the fallout from the damaged nuclear energy plant at Chernobyl (ChNPP) was shown within the territory of the 10-km zone. During the period 1986-1991, irradiated and damaged forest stands, so-called 'red forest', located in this area were systematically classified by observation. Mortality rate, re-establishment, development of tree canopies, reproduction anomalies and stand viability were shown to be dependent on absorbed irradiation dose, on the age of the stand and on forest composition. For pine stands in the acutely affected zone, doses of more than 60 Gy resulted in a massive mortality and no regeneration of pine trees since 1987. The injured trees had burned or had dried-up. The drying process was accelerated by a massive production of pathogenic insects invading the dying trees. Specifically, irradiation doses of 10-60 Gy, 1-10 Gy and 0.1-1 Gy caused high, medium and low injury to the forest stands, respectively. Doses of less than 0.1 Gy did not cause any visible damage to the trees. In 1987, repair processes were displayed by the tree canopies and practically the entire viability of the forest stands had recovered except for trees in the acute and highly affected zones. The young forest was reestablished in the same place as the perished trees and new pine saplings were planted on the reclaimed areas.

  5. Inexpensive Guitar Stand Project Really Rocks!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horath, Larry; Horath, Elyse

    2010-01-01

    Anyone who plays a guitar needs a stand to hold the guitar when he or she is not playing it. A guitar is not an instrument that one can lay down or prop against the wall without risking potentially catastrophic and long-term damage. There are several options in pre-made guitar stands made for single or multiple guitars, but as an alternative that…

  6. Aquatic macroinvertebrates and water quality in Sandia Canyon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1990, field studies of water quality and stream macroinvertebrate communities were initiated in Sandia Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The studies were designed to establish baseline data and to determine the effects of routine discharges of industrial and sanitary waste. Water quality measurements were taken and aquatic macroinvertebrates sampled at three permanent stations within the canyon. Two of the three sample stations are located where the stream regularly receives industrial and sanitary waste effluents. These stations exhibited a low diversity of macroinvertebrates and slightly degraded water quality. The last sample station, located approximately 0.4 km (0.25 mi) downstream from the nearest wastewater outfall, appears to be in a zone of recovery where water quality parameters more closely resemble those found in natural streams in the Los Alamos area. A large increase in macroinvertebrate diversity was also observed at the third station. These results indicate that effluents discharged into Sandia Canyon have a marked effect on water quality and aquatic macroinvertebrate communities

  7. Stand-off Raman spectroscopy for the detection of explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the worldwide threat of terrorism, a transportable prototype is being developed combining three OPtical Technologies for the detection and Identification of eXplosives (OPTIX) at a distance of 20 metres. The techniques are laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, pulsed laser fragmentation mid infrared spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. As part of this FP7 project, a stand off Raman system was set up and optimised. Meeting the challenging situations in real life scenarios, different explosives and their precursors were analysed in the presence of interfering substances and on a variety of background materials, (metal, plastics, car doors). Furthermore, detection limits were established, showing that this technique is suitable for trace detection. The influence of the excitation wavelength was investigated by changing the pulsed laser from 532 nm to 355 or 266 nm, which can increase the Raman signal significantly. In addition to the OPTIX project requirements, the stand off distance was successfully extended to 100 metres at a testing ground at the Austrian Armed Forces. Moreover, combining stand off technology with spatial offset Raman scattering it is now possible to identify and quantify substances at up to 40 metres in bottles which are non transparent to the human eye. This method permits the detection of concealed substances in ''real life'' containers from a safe distance, even if the container exhibits interfering fluorescence. An alternative way to probe substances inside turbid bottles was found by using depth resolved stand off Raman spectroscopy. This methodology employs the speed of light to distinguish between samples located at different distances from the setup. (author)

  8. Assortment structure in beech coppice stands in Boljevac region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilović Milorad

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Assortment structure in beech coppice stands was studied in the area of Boljevac. Assortment structure was evaluated according to the articles of the valid standard (JUS. The assortments represented in the assortment structure, based on the stemwood quality are: Logs for matches, sawlogs I II and III classes, mine timber, technical roundwood, pulpwood, wood for excelsior and fuelwood, I and II classes. The results of the analyses show that the value assortment structure (sum of the values of assortments produced from one tree grows significantly with the increase of tree diameter and this dependence is presented by a degree function. The value percentage of logs for matches, sawlogs of the I and II classes, technical roundwood, mine timber, fuelwood and pulpwood, grows with the increase of the tree diameter. The occurrence of better quality logs (sawlogs in these stands, in contrast to the beech coppice stand in the area of Crni Vrh results from the more favourable diameter structure. There are no statistically significant differences between the value assortment structure on the established sample plot series within the same locality, consequently the data ere united. Because of the differences in stand age, the data are not unified for the localities, although there are no statistically significant differences between value assortment structure for diameter degrees represented in them. False heart (red heart is one of very significant defects of beech wood, and its incidence, inter alia, depends on tree age. The low effect of this defect of wood resulted in a significant percentage of logs for matches. Along with the value assortment structure this paper also presents the percentage of assortments depending on tree diameter.

  9. The treatment of radioactive wastewater by ultrasonic standing wave method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • USWM can be considered as the green cleaning separation techniques. • A physical model of suspended radioactive particle is established. • A computer program is developed to achieve numerical calculation and analysis. • The experimental device for low-level radioactive wastes treatment is designed. • Lots of experimental data are used to analysis the influence of the parameters. - Abstract: The radiation hazards of radionuclide arising from the storage of nuclear weapons cannot be ignored to the operators. Ultrasonic standing wave methods can be considered as the green cleaning separation techniques with high efficiency. The application of ultrasonic standing wave methods for liquid radioactive wastes treatment requires solving many problems connected with the proper selection of the frequency and power of ultrasonic transducers, and the processing time, etc. Based on the model of one single suspended radioactive particle subjected to in the field of ultrasonic standing wave, the principle of the treatment of low-level radioactive wastewater by ultrasound was analyzed. The theoretical and simulation results show that under the action of ultrasonic standing wave, the particle will move toward the wave node plane, and the time of particle reaching the plane become shorter when the radius of particle and the frequency and power of ultrasound was enlarged. The experimental results show that the radioactive concentration of wastewater could be reduced from 400 Bq L−1 to 9.3 Bq L−1 and the decontamination efficiency was 97.68%. The decontamination efficiency could not be obviously improved by further increasing the treating time

  10. Birch Stands Growth Increase in Western Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharuk, Viacheslav I.; Kuzmichev, Valeriy V.; Im, Sergey T.; Ranson, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    Birch (Betula pendula Roth) growth within the Western Siberia forest-steppe was analyzed based on long-term (1897-2006) inventory data (height, diameter at breast height [dbh], and stand volume). Analysis of biometry parameters showed increased growth at the beginning of twenty-first century compared to similar stands (stands age = 40-60 years) at the end of nineteenth century. Mean height, dbh, and stem volume increased from 14 to 20 m, from 16 to 22 cm, and from approx. 63 to approx. 220 cu m/ha, respectively. Significant correlations were found between the stands mean height, dbh, and volume on the one hand, and vegetation period length (r(sub s) = 0.71 to 0.74), atmospheric CO2 concentration (r(sub s) = 0.71 to 0.76), and drought index (Standardized Precipitation-Evapotranspiration Index, r(sub s) = -0.33 to -0.51) on the other hand. The results obtained have revealed apparent climate-induced impacts (e.g. increase of vegetation period length and birch habitat drying due to drought increase) on the stands growth. Along with this, a high correlation of birch biometric parameters and [CO2] in ambient air indicated an effect of CO2 fertilization. Meanwhile, further drought increase may switch birch stand growth into decline and greater mortality as has already been observed within the Trans-Baikal forest-steppe ecotone.

  11. Why Care About Aquatic Insects: Uses, Benefits, and Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayflies and other aquatic insects are common subjects of ecological research, and environmental monitoring and assessment. However, their important role in protecting and restoring aquatic ecosystems is often challenged, because their benefits and services to humans are not obv...

  12. Malheur NWR: Initial Survey Instructions for Lacustrine Submergent Aquatic Vegetation

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Submergent aquatic vegetation (SAV) provides the foundation for wildlife use in aquatic systems. Sago pondweed is of particular significance in providing protein by...

  13. Chapter 5. Assessing the Aquatic Hazards of Veterinary Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recent years, there has been increasing awareness of the widespread distribution of low concentrations of veterinary medicine products and other pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment. While aquatic hazard for a select group of veterinary medicines has received previous s...

  14. Aquatics Therapy and the Halliwick Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Alison; Thomson, Ann

    2008-01-01

    Aquatic therapy is the use of the properties of water for the therapeutic benefit of people of all ages and abilities. This article illustrates how people with disabilities may maximize the benefits of activities in water, including individual and group work and swimming. The overall aim is to encourage family activity and social interaction. The…

  15. SUBMERGED AQUATIC VEGETATION GARDENING MX974861

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Submerged Aquatic Vegetation Gardening project will acquire the seed/seedlings of SAVs for planting, will create an SAV gardening guide; and will create SAV plots at volunteers waterfront properties. Volunteers will gather data on plant size and spacing. Water quality test ...

  16. Altitudinal distribution limits of aquatic macroinvertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Philip B.; Morabowen, Andrés; Andino, Patricio;

    2015-01-01

    1. Temperature and oxygen are recognised as the main drivers of altitudinal limits of species distributions. However, the two factors are linked, and both decrease with altitude, why their effects are difficult to disentangle. 2. This was experimentally addressed using aquatic macroinvertebrates...

  17. Systems and Cycles: Learning about Aquatic Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hmelo-Silver, Cindy E.; Jordan, Rebecca; Eberbach, Catherine; Rugaber, Spencer; Goel, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    In this research, the authors present both the design and preliminary testing of a technology-intensive classroom intervention designed to support middle schools students' understanding of an aquatic ecosystem. The goals of their intervention are to help learners develop deep understanding of ecosystems and to use tools that make the relationships…

  18. Applicator Training Manual for: Aquatic Weed Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herron, James W.

    The aquatic weeds discussed in this manual include algae, floating weeds, emersed weeds, and submerged weeds. Specific requirements for pesticide application are given for static water, limited flow, and moving water situations. Secondary effects of improper application rates and faulty application are described. Finally, techniques of limited…

  19. Nitrous oxide emission by aquatic macrofauna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stief, Peter; Poulsen, Morten; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Brix, Hans; Schramm, Andreas

    2009-01-01

      A large variety of aquatic animals was found to emit the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide when nitrate was present in the environment. The emission was ascribed to denitrification by ingested bacteria in the anoxic animal gut, and the exceptionally high N2O-to-N2 production ratio suggested d...

  20. AQUATIC FUNGI FROM NORTH MAHARASHTRA-VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagh S. N.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with five species of aquatic fungi belonging to four genera of hyphomycetes isolated from foam samples collected from Rangawali river of Nandurbar district. The foam spora of this region represents mixture of both tropical and temperate species. Brief notes and illustration are givn for each taxon. Geographical distribution of each species of India is also provided.

  1. Aquatic Habitats: Exploring Desktop Ponds. Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Katharine; Willard, Carolyn

    This book, for grades 2-6, is designed to provide students with a highly motivating and unique opportunity to investigate an aquatic habitat. Students set up, observe, study, and reflect upon their own "desktop ponds." Accessible plants and small animals used in these activities include Elodea, Tubifex worms, snails, mosquito larvae, and fish.…

  2. Aquatic Pest Control. Sale Publication 4071.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamsley, Mary Ann, Ed.; Vermeire, Donna M., Ed.

    The information in this manual applies to control of aquatic pests in recreational waters, agricultural reservoirs, ornamental ponds, coastal bays, estuaries and channels, and drinking water reservoirs. Mechanical, cultural, biological, and chemical control methods are discussed. The majority of the material is devoted to weed control in static…

  3. Aquatic ecotoxicological indicators in life cycle assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pennington, David W.; Payet, Jerome; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    This paper compares available options for the aquatic ecotoxicological effect factor component in life cycle assessment (LCA). The effect factor is expressed here as the change in risk per unit change in cumulative exposure, ƒ´Effect/ƒ´Exposure. The comparison is restricted to approaches linked...

  4. Toxicokinetic modeling challenges for aquatic nanotoxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Yu eChen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanotoxicity has become of increasing concern since the rapid development of metal nanoparticles (NPs. Aquatic nanotoxicity depends on crucial qualitative and quantitative properties of nanomaterials that induce adverse effects on subcellular, tissue, and organ level. The dose-response effects of size-dependent metal NPs, however, are not well investigated in aquatic organisms. In order to determine the uptake and elimination rate constants for metal NPs in the metabolically active/ detoxified pool of tissues, a one-compartmental toxicokinetic model can be applied when subcellular partitioning of metal NPs data would be available. The present review is an attempt to describe the nano-characteristics of toxicokinetics and subcellular partitioning on aquatic organisms with the help of the mechanistic modeling for NP size-dependent physiochemical properties and parameters. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK models can provide an effective tool to estimate the time course of NP accumulation in target organs and is useful in quantitative risk assessments. NP accumulation in fish should take into account different effects of different NP sizes to better understand tissue accumulative capacities and dynamics. The size-dependent NP partition coefficient is a crucial parameter that influences tissue accumulation levels in PBPK modeling. Further research is needed to construct the effective systems-level oriented toxicokinetic model that can provide a useful tool to develop quantitatively the robustly approximate relations that convey a better insight into the impacts of environmental metal NPs on subcellular and tissue/organ responses in aquatic organisms.

  5. Nano-plastics in the aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, K; Hansson, L-A; Cedervall, T

    2015-10-01

    The amount of plastics released to the environment in modern days has increased substantially since the development of modern plastics in the early 1900s. As a result, concerns have been raised by the public about the impact of plastics on nature and on, specifically, aquatic wildlife. Lately, much attention has been paid to macro- and micro-sized plastics and their impact on aquatic organisms. However, micro-sized plastics degrade subsequently into nano-sizes whereas nano-sized particles may be released directly into nature. Such particles have a different impact on aquatic organisms than larger pieces of plastic due to their small size, high surface curvature, and large surface area. This review describes the possible sources of nano-sized plastic, its distribution and behavior in nature, the impact of nano-sized plastic on the well-being of aquatic organisms, and the difference of impact between nano- and micro-sized particles. We also identify research areas which urgently need more attention and suggest experimental methods to obtain useful data. PMID:26337600

  6. Effects of radiation on aquatic organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the onset of nuclear age, nuclear fuel cycle products, nuclear medicine techniques, disposal of radio active wastes on land or in water, fall out of testing nuclear weapons has contributed large amount of radio nuclides to the water bodies. Radio nuclides can imbalance aquatic ecosystem resulting in danger to natural life. The biological effects of radiation on aquatic life are mortality, pathophysiological, reproductive, developmental and genetic changes. A broad review of the results obtained about the aquatic organisms related to different phyla indicates that the lower or less developed or more primitive organisms are more resistant than the higher or more advanced, developed and complex organisms to ionizing radiation. The algae, protozoa are more resistant than the insects, crustaceans, molluscs and fishes. The changes in sensitivity between different stages of development have also been noted. A review of the results of exposing salmonoid gametes, eggs, fingerlings and adults to X-rays supports the concepts that radio sensitivity decreases with age. This paper presents a selective review on effects of radiation and radio nuclides on the aquatic life. It include uses and sources of radiation, effective quantity of radiation, lethal and sub lethal effect, effects on survival, growth, reproduction, behaviour, metabolism, carcinogenicity and mutagenicity. (author)

  7. Carbon Storage in Beech Stands on the Chřiby Uplands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider Jiří

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The submitted scientific statement is a contribution to solutions of monitoring the storage of carbon in the woods and its emissions. Four permanent research plots were established in the area of the Chřiby uplands in the Czech Republic. The plots are made of forest stands with nearly 100% of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.. The stands form simple spatial structures of about the same age (about 180 years. They represent, however, varying site conditions (dwarf acid beech stands, herb-rich beech stands and transitions between them. For quantification of carbon storage, standard dendrometric methods and the Field-Map technology were used. The total amount of carbon was established as the sum of further documented carbon storages in the aboveground biomass, the belowground biomass, woody debris and the forest soil. Determination of total amount of carbon was addressed in a version manner. In the first version, the estimate of the total amount of carbon was established based on Wutzler et al. (2008 equations for the aboveground biomass (AGB and the belowground biomass (BB. In the second version, the AGB was calculated according to Joosten et al. (2004, the BB according to Wirth et al. (2003, the values of storages were consistent with Mund (2004 for woody debris, and with Mackù in Kolektiv (2007 for forest soil. Total carbon storage per hectare of stand is in average 370.2 t. Obtained outcomes support the quantitative results of latest research related to carbon in the woods.

  8. Investigation of sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit in an above knee amputee

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Fan; Zhang, Fan; Huang, He

    2011-01-01

    the objective of this pilot study is twofold: 1) to extract key factors/features in sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit (STS) performed by an above knee (AK) amputee; 2) to propose a convenient way to quantify symmetry. One male unilateral transfemoral amputee participated in the pilot study. The subject was instructed to rise in a comfortable and natural manner and conduct a series of sit-to-stand, stand-to-sit. We simultaneously measured kinematics, kinetics and muscle activities. Principal compo...

  9. Effects of Seven Fungicides on Non-Target Aquatic Fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Dijksterhuis, Jan; van Doorn, Tineke; Samson, Rob; Postma, Jaap

    2011-01-01

    Aquatic risk assessments for fungicides are carried out without information on their toxicity to non-target aquatic fungi. This might cause an underestimation of the toxic effects to the aquatic fungal community. This study focuses on the question whether recently derived concentrations limits for fungicides considered to protect populations of primary producers and (in)vertebrates also do protect the aquatic fungi. A panel of fungal species and Oomycetes was isolated and identified from unpo...

  10. Mapping Aquatic Vegetation in a Large, Shallow Eutrophic Lake: A Frequency-Based Approach Using Multiple Years of MODIS Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohan Liu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aquatic vegetation serves many important ecological and socioeconomic functions in lake ecosystems. The presence of floating algae poses difficulties for accurately estimating the distribution of aquatic vegetation in eutrophic lakes. We present an approach to map the distribution of aquatic vegetation in Lake Taihu (a large, shallow eutrophic lake in China and reduce the influence of floating algae on aquatic vegetation mapping. Our approach involved a frequency analysis over a 2003–2013 time series of the floating algal index (FAI based on moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS data. Three phenological periods were defined based on the vegetation presence frequency (VPF and the growth of algae and aquatic vegetation: December and January composed the period of wintering aquatic vegetation; February and March composed the period of prolonged coexistence of algal blooms and wintering aquatic vegetation; and June to October was the peak period of the coexistence of algal blooms and aquatic vegetation. By comparing and analyzing the satellite-derived aquatic vegetation distribution and 244 in situ measurements made in 2013, we established a FAI threshold of −0.025 and VPF thresholds of 0.55, 0.45 and 0.85 for the three phenological periods. We validated the accuracy of our approach by comparing the results between the satellite-derived maps and the in situ results obtained from 2008–2012. The overall classification accuracy was 87%, 81%, 77%, 88% and 73% in the five years from 2008–2012, respectively. We then applied the approach to the MODIS images from 2003–2013 and obtained the total area of the aquatic vegetation, which varied from 265.94 km2 in 2007 to 503.38 km2 in 2008, with an average area of 359.62 ± 69.20 km2 over the 11 years. Our findings suggest that (1 the proposed approach can be used to map the distribution of aquatic vegetation in eutrophic algae-rich waters and (2 dramatic changes occurred in the

  11. Pesticides and Aquatic Animals: A Guide to Reducing Impacts on Aquatic Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Helfrich, Louis A.; Weigmann, Diana L.; Hipkins, Patricia A.; Stinson, Elizabeth R.

    2009-01-01

    Serves as a general guide for those who may use pesticides in or around natural wetlands, lakes, ponds, rivers, and streams by providing information about the toxicity and safe use of pesticides that have the potential to enter aquatic systems.

  12. Establishment Registration & Device Listing

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This searchable database contains establishments (engaged in the manufacture, preparation, propagation, compounding, assembly, or processing of medical devices...

  13. CAM Photosynthesis in Submerged Aquatic Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is a CO2-concentrating mechanism selected in response to aridity in terrestrial habitats, and, in aquatic environments, to ambient limitations of carbon. Evidence is reviewed for its presence in five genera of aquatic vascular plants, including Isoe??tes, Sagittaria, Vallisneria, Crassula, and Littorella. Initially, aquatic CAM was considered by some to be an oxymoron, but some aquatic species have been studied in sufficient detail to say definitively that they possess CAM photosynthesis. CO2-concentrating mechanisms in photosynthetic organs require a barrier to leakage; e.g., terrestrial C4 plants have suberized bundle sheath cells and terrestrial CAM plants high stomatal resistance. In aquatic CAM plants the primary barrier to CO2 leakage is the extremely high diffusional resistance of water. This, coupled with the sink provided by extensive intercellular gas space, generates daytime CO2(Pi) comparable to terrestrial CAM plants. CAM contributes to the carbon budget by both net carbon gain and carbon recycling, and the magnitude of each is environmentally influenced. Aquatic CAM plants inhabit sites where photosynthesis is potentially limited by carbon. Many occupy moderately fertile shallow temporary pools that experience extreme diel fluctuations in carbon availability. CAM plants are able to take advantage of elevated nighttime CO2 levels in these habitats. This gives them a competitive advantage over non-CAM species that are carbon starved during the day and an advantage over species that expend energy in membrane transport of bicarbonate. Some aquatic CAM plants are distributed in highly infertile lakes, where extreme carbon limitation and light are important selective factors. Compilation of reports on diel changes in titratable acidity and malate show 69 out of 180 species have significant overnight accumulation, although evidence is presented discounting CAM in some. It is concluded that similar proportions of the aquatic

  14. Mural Rights: Establishing Standing for Communities Under American Moral Rights Laws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Ehret

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The origins of mural art have been traced back more than 30,000 years, evidenced by prehistoric images of animals found painted on the walls of the Chauvet Cave in Southern France.1 Throughout history, murals have been employed by man to tell stories and to convey artistic expression. The Ajanta Caves in Maharashtra, India, date back to the third century B.C. and contain intricate mural art depicting the Jataka stories.2 The San Bartolo murals in Guatemala were created in the first century B.C. and represent an important part of Mayan history.3 The significance of mural art still exists in society today and remains an effective way of communicating expression to a large, public audience. Public murals create accessible artistic expression for the enjoyment of all classes of people, help to define urban neighborhoods and offer aesthetic relief from blight and abandonment.

  15. Enhancement of emergence potential and stand establishment of Moringa oleifera Lam. by seed priming

    OpenAIRE

    NOUMAN, Wasif; SIDDIQUI, Muhammad Tahir; BASRA, Shahzad Maqsood Ahmed; Afzal, Irfan

    2012-01-01

    Moringa oleifera is a miracle tree that can be used in multiple ways, including as foodstuff, livestock fodder, a plant growth enhancer, or a water purifier. While the stem cutting method is easy and successful for tree propagation, the recent introduction of moringa as a field crop for biomass production requires propagation through seeds. The germination of stored moringa seeds is a problem of great concern that may be overcome by employing seed priming techniques. A pot study was conducted...

  16. Estimating Stand Volume and Above-Ground Biomass of Urban Forests Using LiDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Giannico

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Assessing forest stand conditions in urban and peri-urban areas is essential to support ecosystem service planning and management, as most of the ecosystem services provided are a consequence of forest stand characteristics. However, collecting data for assessing forest stand conditions is time consuming and labor intensive. A plausible approach for addressing this issue is to establish a relationship between in situ measurements of stand characteristics and data from airborne laser scanning (LiDAR. In this study we assessed forest stand volume and above-ground biomass (AGB in a broadleaved urban forest, using a combination of LiDAR-derived metrics, which takes the form of a forest allometric model. We tested various methods for extracting proxies of basal area (BA and mean stand height (H from the LiDAR point-cloud distribution and evaluated the performance of different models in estimating forest stand volume and AGB. The best predictors for both models were the scale parameters of the Weibull distribution of all returns (except the first (proxy of BA and the 95th percentile of the distribution of all first returns (proxy of H. The R2 were 0.81 (p < 0.01 for the stand volume model and 0.77 (p < 0.01 for the AGB model with a RMSE of 23.66 m3·ha−1 (23.3% and 19.59 Mg·ha−1 (23.9%, respectively. We found that a combination of two LiDAR-derived variables (i.e., proxy of BA and proxy of H, which take the form of a forest allometric model, can be used to estimate stand volume and above-ground biomass in broadleaved urban forest areas. Our results can be compared to other studies conducted using LiDAR in broadleaved forests with similar methods.

  17. Scoping assessment of radiological doses to aquatic organisms and wildlife -- N Springs. [N Springs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poston, T.M.; Soldat, J.K.

    1992-10-01

    Estimated does rates were determined for endemic biota inhabiting the N Springs area based primarily on spring water data collected from the first 6 months of 1991. Radiological dose estimates were computed from measured values of specific radionuclides and modeled levels of radionuclides using established computer codes. The highest doses were predicted in hypothetical populations of clams, fish-eating ducks, and rabbits. The calculated dose estimates did not exceed 1 rad/d, an administrative dose rate established by the US Department of Energy for the protection of native aquatic biota. An administrative dose rate has not been established for terrestrial wildlife.

  18. Scoping assessment of radiological doses to aquatic organisms and wildlife -- N Springs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimated does rates were determined for endemic biota inhabiting the N Springs area based primarily on spring water data collected from the first 6 months of 1991. Radiological dose estimates were computed from measured values of specific radionuclides and modeled levels of radionuclides using established computer codes. The highest doses were predicted in hypothetical populations of clams, fish-eating ducks, and rabbits. The calculated dose estimates did not exceed 1 rad/d, an administrative dose rate established by the US Department of Energy for the protection of native aquatic biota. An administrative dose rate has not been established for terrestrial wildlife

  19. Scoping assessment of radiological doses to aquatic organisms and wildlife -- N Springs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poston, T.M.; Soldat, J.K.

    1992-10-01

    Estimated does rates were determined for endemic biota inhabiting the N Springs area based primarily on spring water data collected from the first 6 months of 1991. Radiological dose estimates were computed from measured values of specific radionuclides and modeled levels of radionuclides using established computer codes. The highest doses were predicted in hypothetical populations of clams, fish-eating ducks, and rabbits. The calculated dose estimates did not exceed 1 rad/d, an administrative dose rate established by the US Department of Energy for the protection of native aquatic biota. An administrative dose rate has not been established for terrestrial wildlife.

  20. Nitrite disrupts multiple physiological functions in aquatic animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo

    2003-01-01

    Nitrite is a potential problem in aquatic environments. Freshwater fish actively take up nitrite across the gills, leading to high internal concentrations. Seawater fish are less susceptible but do take up nitrite across intestine and gills. Nitrite has multiple physiological effects. Its uptake is...... at the expense of chloride, leading to chloride depletion. Nitrite also activates efflux of potassium from skeletal muscle and erythrocytes, disturbing intracellular and extracellular K+ levels. Nitrite transfer across the erythrocytic membrane leads to oxidation of haemoglobin to methaemoglobin (met...... nitrite-induced vasodilation (possibly via nitric oxide generated from nitrite) that is countered by increased cardiac pumping to re-establish blood pressure. Nitrite can form and/or mimic nitric oxide and thereby interfere with processes regulated by this local hormone. Steroid hormone synthesis may be...

  1. Food Irradiation. Standing legislation; Irradiacion de Alimentos. Legislacion Vigente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdejo S, M. [Secretaria de Salud. Subsecretaria de Regulacion y Fomento Sanitario. Direccion de Riesgos Radiologicos. Mariano Escobedo No. 366- 4o. Piso. Col. Nueva Anzures. Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-12-31

    The standing legislation in Mexico on food irradiation matter has its basis on the Constitutional Policy of the Mexican United States on the 4 Th. article by its refers to Secretary of Health, 27 Th. article to the Secretary of Energy and 123 Th. of the Secretary of Work and Social Security. The laws and regulations emanated of the proper Constitution establishing the general features which gives the normative frame to this activity. The general regulations of Radiological Safety expedited by the National Commission for Nuclear Safety and Safeguards to state the specifications which must be fulfill the industrial installations which utilizing ionizing radiations, between this line is founded, just as the requirements for the responsible of the radiological protection and the operation of these establishments. The project of Regulation of the General Health Law in matter of Sanitary Control of Benefits and Services, that in short time will be officialized, include a specific chapter on food irradiation which considers the International Organizations Recommendations and the pertaining harmonization stated for Latin America, which elaboration was in charge of specialized group where Mexico was participant. Additionally, the Secretary of Health has a Mexican Official Standard NOM-033-SSA1-1993 named `Food irradiation; permissible doses in foods, raw materials and support additives` standing from the year 1995, where is established the associated requirements to the control registers, service constancies and dose limits for different groups of foods, moreover of the specific guidelines for its process. This standard will be adequate considering the updating Regulation of Benefits and Services and the limits established the Regulation for Latin America. The associated laws that cover in general terms it would be the requirements for food irradiation although such term is not manageable. (Author)

  2. Standing on a declining surface reduces transient prolonged standing induced low back pain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Kaitlin M; Callaghan, Jack P

    2016-09-01

    While alternating standing position on a sloped surface has proven successful at reducing low back pain during standing, the purpose of this study was to evaluate standing solely on a declining surface to isolate the influence of the postural change. Seventeen participants performed two 75-min prolonged standing occupational simulations- level ground and declining surface. Fifty-three percent of participants (9/17) were categorized as pain developers during the level ground standing condition. For these same pain developers, their average maximum pain scores were 58% lower during sloped standing. All participants showed greater hip flexion, trunk-to-thigh angle flexion, and posterior translation of the trunk center of gravity when standing on the sloped surface. These postural changes could cause the muscles crossing the hip posteriorly to increase passive stiffness and assist with stabilizing the pelvis. This study stresses the importance of hip kinematics, not just lumbar spine posture, in reducing prolonged standing induced low back pain. PMID:27184314

  3. Virginia youth stand up, stand out at 4-H State Congress, June 23-26

    OpenAIRE

    Sutphin, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    More than 600 teens, volunteer leaders, and Virginia Cooperative Extension agents will participate in the 88th annual 4-H State Congress at Virginia Tech's Blacksburg campus from June 23 to 26. This year's theme - "Stand Up, Stand Out for 4-H" - will empower participants to learn about leadership, citizenship, and life skills.

  4. High-voltage test stand at Livermore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the present design and future capability of the high-voltage test stand for neutral-beam sources at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The stand's immediate use will be for testing the full-scale sources (120 kV, 65 A) for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. It will then be used to test parts of the sustaining source system (80 kV, 85 A) being designed for the Magnetic Fusion Test Facility. Following that will be an intensive effort to develop beams of up to 200 kV at 20 A by accelerating negative ions. The design of the test stand features a 5-MVA power supply feeding a vacuum tetrode that is used as a switch and regulator. The 500-kW arc supply and the 100-kW filament supply for the neutral-beam source are battery powered, thus eliminating one or two costly isolation transformers

  5. Weed risk assessment for aquatic plants: modification of a New Zealand system for the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doria R Gordon

    Full Text Available We tested the accuracy of an invasive aquatic plant risk assessment system in the United States that we modified from a system originally developed by New Zealand's Biosecurity Program. The US system is comprised of 38 questions that address biological, historical, and environmental tolerance traits. Values associated with each response are summed to produce a total score for each species that indicates its risk of invasion. To calibrate and test this risk assessment, we identified 39 aquatic plant species that are major invaders in the continental US, 31 species that have naturalized but have no documented impacts (minor invaders, and 60 that have been introduced but have not established. These species represent 55 families and span all aquatic plant growth forms. We found sufficient information to assess all but three of these species. When the results are compared to the known invasiveness of the species, major invaders are distinguished from minor and non-invaders with 91% accuracy. Using this approach, the US aquatic weed risk assessment correctly identifies major invaders 85%, and non-invaders 98%, of the time. Model validation using an additional 10 non-invaders and 10 invaders resulted in 100% accuracy for the former, and 80% accuracy for the latter group. Accuracy was further improved to an average of 91% for all groups when the 17% of species with scores of 31-39 required further evaluation prior to risk classification. The high accuracy with which we can distinguish non-invaders from harmful invaders suggests that this tool provides a feasible, pro-active system for pre-import screening of aquatic plants in the US, and may have additional utility for prioritizing management efforts of established species.

  6. FAO FishCode Aquatic Commons: improving information for responsible fisheries and aquaculture

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Jean (FAO); Reynolds, Eric

    2007-01-01

    FishCode was established by FAO as a programme of global partnerships to promote application of the 1995 Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries and related international fisheries instruments. Aquatics Commons, a program of IAMSLIC, is one of several initiatives that can support the FischCode goals of improving access to fisheries and aquaculture management information and ensure equal participation by developing countries in global information mainstreaming. (Leaflet)

  7. Considerations upon energetic efficiency of a recirculating aquatic system (RAS) for super intensive fish culture

    OpenAIRE

    Petru David; Augustin Pop; Valentin Popovici

    2009-01-01

    The efficiency of the aquaculture using recirculating systems depends on many factors among which the most important it is the energy consumption of the system. To assure a high levelenergy conservation in an aquatic recirculating system, the intensity of water recirculation must be maximized, but this leads to a increasing of the consumed energy for water circulation. That is why is required a rigorous analysis for the energetic consumption for a system of this type and establishment of opti...

  8. Blood Establishment Registration Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This application provides information for active, inactive, and pre-registered firms. Query options are by FEI, Applicant Name, Establishment Name, Other Names,...

  9. Establishment of WTGs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper briefly outlines the reasons for establishing a wind turbine generator and the consequent disadvantages. Consideration is then given to the determining factors affecting the economics of wind turbine generators with special reference to Denmark. (UK)

  10. AN INDIAN ENTREPRENEUR ESTABLISHING

    OpenAIRE

    Vaghela, Amit; Wang, Xiaoran

    2008-01-01

    Title: An Indian Entrepreneur Establishing Business in Europe Course: Master Thesis EFO705 in International Business and Entrepreneurship, Swedish credit points (15 ECTS) Authors: Xiaoran Wang and Amit Vaghela Tutor: Leif Linnskog Problem: How did Mr. Deepak Soni establish and develop his company Anora Pvt Ltd in Poland, a company operating in the branch of textile and clothing? From this research problem, the dissertation will be focused on the internationalization. Purpose: The aim of thesi...

  11. Aquatic macroinvertebrates of the lower Missouri River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulton, Barry C.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Columbia Environmental Research Center (CERC), in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS), and the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MDNR), has been conducting research on the aquatic macroinvertebrates of the lower Missouri River since the mid-1990s. This research was initiated in response to the need for comprehensive characterization of biological communities inhabiting aquatic habitats in large river systems that have historically been poorly studied. The USGS Status and Trends of Biological Resources Program provided partial funding for pilot studies that began in 1993 when the CERC was part of the USFWS. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide stakeholders, scientists, management, and the general public with a basic summary of results from studies conducted by the CERC since that time period.

  12. Medical Care of the Aquatics Athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Andrew W

    2015-01-01

    Competitive swimmers are affected by several musculoskeletal and medical complaints that are unique to the sport. 'Swimmer's shoulder,' the most common overuse injury, is usually caused by some combination of impingement, rotator cuff tendinopathy, scapular dyskinesis, and instability. The condition may be treated with training modifications, stroke error correction, and strengthening exercises targeting the rotator cuff, scapular stabilizers, and core. Implementation of prevention programs to reduce the prevalence of shoulder pathology is crucial. Knee pain usually results from the breaststroke kick in swimmers, and the 'egg beater' kick in water polo players and synchronized swimmers. Lumbar back pain also is common in aquatics athletes. Among the medical conditions of particular importance in swimmers are exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, respiratory illnesses, and ear problems. Participants in other aquatics sports (water polo, diving, synchronized swimming, and open water swimming) may experience medical ailments specific to the sport. PMID:26359841

  13. Nitrous Oxide Emission by Aquatic Macrofauna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stief, Peter; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Schramm, Andreas

    Many macrofauna species co-ingest large quantities of microorganisms some of which survive the gut passage. Denitrifying bacteria, in particular, become metabolically induced by anoxic conditions, nitrate, and labile organic compounds in the gut of invertebrates. A striking consequence of the short......, respectively. Aside from these case studies, we screened more than 20 macrofauna species in various aquatic habitats for nitrous oxide production. Filter- and deposit-feeders that ingest large quantities of microorganisms were the most important emitters of nitrous oxide. In contrast, predatory species that do...... not ingest large quantities of microorganisms produced insignificant amounts of nitrous oxide. With increasing eutrophication, filter- and deposit-feeders often become the dominant feeding guilds of benthic communities. Thus, with increasing nitrate pollution, aquatic macrofauna has the potential to...

  14. [Aquatic animals of medical importance in Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad Junior, Vidal

    2003-01-01

    The injuries caused by venomous and poisonous aquatic animals may provoke important morbidity in the victim. The cnidarians (jellyfishes, especially cubomedusas and Portuguese-Man-of-War) caused nearly 25% of 236 accidents by marine animals, while sea urchins were responsible for about 50% and catfish, stingrays and scorpionfish nearly 25%). In freshwater, stingrays and catfish cause injuries with a very similar mechanism to the poisoning and the effects of the toxins of marine species. In a series of about 200 injuries observed among freshwater fishermen, nearly 40% were caused by freshwater catfish, 5% freshwater stingrays and 55% by traumatogenic fish, such as piranhas and traíras. The author presents the aquatic animals that cause injuries to humans in Brazil, the clinical aspects of the envenoming and the first measures for the control of the severe pain observed mainly in the accidents caused by cnidarians and venomous fishes. PMID:14576874

  15. Aquatic effect assessment for plant protection products

    OpenAIRE

    Brock, T.C.M.; Arts, G.H.P.; Hulscher, ten, T.E.M.; Jong, de, D.; Luttik, R.; Roex, E.; Smit, C.E.; Vliet, van, W.

    2011-01-01

    In this report new proposals for the aquatic effects assessment of plant protection products (pesticides) in the Netherlands are described for edge-of-field surface waters (drainage ditches) falling under the domain of the Plant Protection Product Regulation (pre-registration) and for water bodies falling under the domain of the Water Framework Directive (post-registration). These methods are developed on request of two Dutch ministries (Ministry of Economic Affairs, Agriculture and Innovatio...

  16. Toxicity of trifluoroacetate to aquatic organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berends, A.G.; Rooij, C.G. de [Solvay S.A., Brussels (Belgium); Boutonnet, J.C. [Elf Atochem, Levallois-Perret (France); Thompson, R.S. [Zeneca Ltd., Devon (United Kingdom). Brixham Environmental Lab.

    1999-05-01

    As a result of the atmospheric degradation of several hydrofluorocarbons and hydrochlorofluorocarbons, trifluoroacetate (TFA) will be formed. Through precipitation, TFA will enter aquatic ecosystems. To evaluate the impact on the aquatic environment, an aquatic toxicity testing program was carried out with sodium trifluoroacetate (NaTFA). During acute toxicity tests, no effects of NaTFA on water fleas (Daphnia magna) and zebra fish (Danio retrio) were found at a concentration of 1,200 mg/L. A 7-d study with duckweed (Lemna gibba Ge) revealed a NOEC of 300 mg/L. On the basis of the results of five toxicity tests with Selenastrum capricornutum, they determined a NOEC of 0.12 mg/L. However, algal toxicity tests with NaTFA and Chlorella vulgaris, Scenedesmus subspicatus, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Dunaliella tertiolecta, Eugelan gracilis, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Navicula pelliculosa, Skeletonema costatum, Anabaena flos-aquae, and Microcystis aeruginosa resulted in EC50 values that were all higher than 100 mg/L. The toxicity of TFA to S. capricornutum could be due to metabolic defluorination to monofluoroacetate (MFA), which is known to inhibit the citric acid cycle. A toxicity test with MFA and S. capricornutum revealed it to be about three orders of magnitude more toxic than TFA. However, a bioactivation study revealed that defluorination of TFA was less than 4%. On the other hand, S. capricornutum exposed to a toxic concentration of NaTFA showed a recovery of growth when citric acid was added, suggesting that TFA (or a metabolite of TFA) interferes with the citric acid cycle. A recovery of the growth of S. capricornutum was also found when TFA was removed from the test solutions. Therefore, TFA should be considered algistatic and not algicidic for S. capricornutum. On the basis of the combined results of the laboratory tests and a previously reported semi-field study, they can consider a TFA concentration of 0.10 mg/L as safe for the aquatic ecosystem.

  17. Cyanotoxins: Bioaccumulation and Effects on Aquatic Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Betina Kozlowsky-Suzuki; Ferrão-Filho, Aloysio da S.

    2011-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes with wide geographic distribution that can produce secondary metabolites named cyanotoxins. These toxins can be classified into three main types according to their mechanism of action in vertebrates: hepatotoxins, dermatotoxins and neurotoxins. Many studies on the effects of cyanobacteria and their toxins over a wide range of aquatic organisms, including invertebrates and vertebrates, have reported acute effects (e.g., reduction in survivorship, fe...

  18. Measuring Complexity in an Aquatic Ecosystem

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez, Nelson; Gershenson, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    We apply formal measures of emergence, self-organization, homeostasis, autopoiesis and complexity to an aquatic ecosystem; in particular to the physiochemical component of an Arctic lake. These measures are based on information theory. Variables with an homogeneous distribution have higher values of emergence, while variables with a more heterogeneous distribution have a higher self-organization. Variables with a high complexity reflect a balance between change (emergence) and regularity/orde...

  19. Mechanical performance of aquatic rowing and flying.

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, J.A.; Westneat, M. W.

    2000-01-01

    Aquatic flight, performed by rowing or flapping fins, wings or limbs, is a primary locomotor mechanism for many animals. We used a computer simulation to compare the mechanical performance of rowing and flapping appendages across a range of speeds. Flapping appendages proved to be more mechanically efficient than rowing appendages at all swimming speeds, suggesting that animals that frequently engage in locomotor behaviours that require energy conservation should employ a flapping stroke. The...

  20. Antibiotics promote aggregation within aquatic bacterial communities

    OpenAIRE

    Corno, Gianluca; Coci, Manuela; Giardina, Marco; Plechuk, Sonia; Campanile, Floriana; Stefani, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    The release of antibiotics (AB) into the environment poses several threats for human health due to potential development of AB-resistant natural bacteria. Even though the use of low-dose antibiotics has been promoted in health care and farming, significant amounts of AB are observed in aquatic environments. Knowledge on the impact of AB on natural bacterial communities is missing both in terms of spread and evolution of resistance mechanisms, and of modifications of community composition and ...

  1. Antibiotics promote aggregation within aquatic bacterial communities

    OpenAIRE

    ManuelaCoci; MarcoGiardina

    2014-01-01

    The release of antibiotics (AB) into the environment poses several threats for human health due to potential development of ABresistant natural bacteria. Even though the use of low-dose antibiotics has been promoted in health care and farming, significant amounts of AB are observed in aquatic environments. Knowledge on the impact of AB on natural bacterial communities is missing both in terms of spread and evolution of resistance mechanisms, and of modifications of community composition and p...

  2. Aspects of Aquatic Pollution in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    A.T. Ekubo; J.F.N. Abowei

    2011-01-01

    Water pollution is a major problem in the global context. Yet aquatic resources consists of extremely wide range of floral and fauna resources which offer a broad array of goods with potential utilitarian application in agriculture, innovative industry and the pharmaceutical industry which renders valuable benefits and services. The slow poisoning of the waters is witnessed in Nigeria and the destruction of vegetation and agricultural land by oil spills which occur during petroleum operations...

  3. Aquatic models, genomics and chemical risk management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Keith C; Hinton, David E; Mattingly, Carolyn J; Planchart, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The 5th Aquatic Animal Models for Human Disease meeting follows four previous meetings (Nairn et al., 2001; Schmale, 2004; Schmale et al., 2007; Hinton et al., 2009) in which advances in aquatic animal models for human disease research were reported, and community discussion of future direction was pursued. At this meeting, discussion at a workshop entitled Bioinformatics and Computational Biology with Web-based Resources (20 September 2010) led to an important conclusion: Aquatic model research using feral and experimental fish, in combination with web-based access to annotated anatomical atlases and toxicological databases, yields data that advance our understanding of human gene function, and can be used to facilitate environmental management and drug development. We propose here that the effects of genes and environment are best appreciated within an anatomical context - the specifically affected cells and organs in the whole animal. We envision the use of automated, whole-animal imaging at cellular resolution and computational morphometry facilitated by high-performance computing and automated entry into toxicological databases, as anchors for genetic and toxicological data, and as connectors between human and model system data. These principles should be applied to both laboratory and feral fish populations, which have been virtually irreplaceable sentinals for environmental contamination that results in human morbidity and mortality. We conclude that automation, database generation, and web-based accessibility, facilitated by genomic/transcriptomic data and high-performance and cloud computing, will potentiate the unique and potentially key roles that aquatic models play in advancing systems biology, drug development, and environmental risk management. PMID:21763781

  4. Avian Coronavirus in Wild Aquatic Birds

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, D. K. W.; Leung, C. Y. H.; Gilbert, M.; Joyner, P. H.; Ng, E. M.; Tse, T. M.; Guan, Y; Peiris, J. S. M.; Poon, L.L.M

    2011-01-01

    We detected a high prevalence (12.5%) of novel avian coronaviruses in aquatic wild birds. Phylogenetic analyses of these coronaviruses suggest that there is a diversity of gammacoronaviruses and deltacoronaviruses circulating in birds. Gammacoronaviruses were found predominantly in Anseriformes birds, whereas deltacoronaviruses could be detected in Ciconiiformes, Pelecaniformes, and Anseriformes birds in this study. We observed that there are frequent interspecies transmissions of gammacorona...

  5. Improving Fishpond Sediment by Aquatic Vegetable Rotation

    OpenAIRE

    Ling Tao; Chun-Xue Zhang; Jian-Qiang Zhu; Shi-Yang Zhang; Xiao-Li Li; Gu Li

    2012-01-01

    Continuously intensive fish farming results in pond degradation that needs to be improved. Therefore, the experiment rotating intensive fish culture with two aquatic vegetables lotus (Nelumbo nucifera) and water chestnuts (Eleocharis dulcis) cultivation is conducted aiming at determining the effect of rotation as a sediment management technique on improving the pond sediment and assessing the food safety risk of the vegetables cultivated in the pond sediment from the aspects of heavy metal. T...

  6. Impact of Organic farming on aquatic environment

    OpenAIRE

    Kristensen, Erik Steen; Knudsen, Marie Trydemann

    2004-01-01

    The effects of conversion to organic farming on N leaching are discussed in the presentation. Problems in European aquatic environment are presented along with the development of organic farming in Denmark and the rest of Europe. Recent Danish studies on the N leaching effects by conversion of mixed dairy and arable farms are presented. The studies estimate that N leaching is lower from organic compared to conventional mixed dairy farms, whereas N leaching at organic arable farms are comparab...

  7. Systematic review and meta-analysis comparing land and aquatic exercise for people with hip or knee arthritis on function, mobility and other health outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Heywood Sophie; Batterham Stephanie I; Keating Jennifer L

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Aquatic and land based exercise are frequently prescribed to maintain function for people with arthritis. The relative efficacy of these rehabilitation strategies for this population has not been established. This review investigated the effects of aquatic compared to land based exercise on function, mobility or participants' perception of programs for people with arthritis. Methods Medline, CINAHL, AMED and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical Trials were ...

  8. Stand structural dynamics on pristine and managed boreal peatlands

    OpenAIRE

    Sarkkola, Sakari

    2006-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the stand structure and succession dynamics in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stands on pristine peatlands and in Scots pine and Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) dominated stands on drained peatlands. Furthermore, my focus was on characterising how the inherent and environmental factors and the intermediate thinnings modify the stand structure and succession. For pristine peatlands, the study was based on inventorial stand data, w...

  9. Experiences of countries with new aquatic industries: the development of aquaculture in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaby, M

    2008-04-01

    Although caviar is the most significant and famous fishery product of Iran, in recent years the country has gained a lot of experience and had some significant success with other fishery and aquaculture products. Iranian fisheries and aquaculture production reached 522,000 metric tons in 2005, of which 75% originated from capture fishery and 25% from aquaculture activities. Various fishery and aquaculture activities take place in Iran to help meet domestic demand for aquaculture products and to maintain the existing level of natural resources in seas and rivers (restocking natural sources). The ways in which Iran has been able to make progress in developing aquaculture--which could serve as a model for other countries in the region and for developing countries--are as follows: a) optimising the use of climatic diversity in raising various aquatic species; b) establishing the required governmental and nongovernmental organisations for raising aquatic animals, and planning and creating appropriate relationships between those organisations and entities; c) training skilful manpower and educating specialists in the field of aquatic animal health and diseases; d) increasing per capita consumption of fishery products through sensitising public opinion; and e) meeting the requirements for raising the rate of aquatic animal culture and developing the export of fishery products, i.e. by supplying eyed eggs, feed, broodstock, etc. PMID:18666483

  10. RESAMA: A Network for Monitoring Health and Husbandry Practices in Aquatic Research Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legendre, Laurent; Guillet, Brigitte; Leguay, Emmanuel; Meunier, Emmanuel; Labrut, Sophie; Keck, Nicolas; Bardotti, Massimiliano; Michelet, Lorraine; Sohm, Frédéric

    2016-07-01

    Health monitoring is a crucial aspect of the management of any research animal house. RESAMA is a network strong of 60 academic and private partners acting in France since the end of 2012. The network aims to increase awareness of animal caretakers and researchers on health management issues in facilities holding aquatic model species (zebrafish, Xenopus, medaka, Mexican tetra). To do so, each partner research facility will be visited at least once. The visiting team is composed at least of one veterinarian and one zootechnician specialized in aquatic species. The visit results in a health-monitoring assessment of the facility, which includes a sampling for histo-pathological, bacteriological, and molecular pathogen detection. During the visit, rearing practices are also reviewed through an interview of animal caretakers. However, the present report essentially focuses on the health-monitoring aspect. The ultimate goal of the project is to provide a network-wide picture of health issues in aquatic facilities. Performed in parallel, the rearing practice assessment will ultimately help to establish rational relationship between handling practices and animal health in aquatic facilities. The study is still in progress. Here, we describe the results to be drawn from an analysis of the 23 facilities that had been visited so far. We sampled 720 fish and 127 amphibians and performed a little less than 1400 individual tests. PMID:27192449

  11. Mycoloop: chytrids in aquatic food webs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagami, Maiko; Miki, Takeshi; Takimoto, Gaku

    2014-01-01

    Parasites are ecologically significant in various ecosystems through their role in shaping food web structure, facilitating energy transfer, and controlling disease. Here in this review, we mainly focus on parasitic chytrids, the dominant parasites in aquatic ecosystems, and explain their roles in aquatic food webs, particularly as prey for zooplankton. Chytrids have a free-living zoosporic stage, during which they actively search for new hosts. Zoospores are excellent food for zooplankton in terms of size, shape, and nutritional quality. In the field, densities of chytrids can be high, ranging from 10(1) to 10(9) spores L(-1). When large inedible phytoplankton species are infected by chytrids, nutrients within host cells are transferred to zooplankton via the zoospores of parasitic chytrids. This new pathway, the "mycoloop," may play an important role in shaping aquatic ecosystems, by altering sinking fluxes or determining system stability. The grazing of zoospores by zooplankton may also suppress outbreaks of parasitic chytrids. A food web model demonstrated that the contribution of the mycoloop to zooplankton production increased with nutrient availability and was also dependent on the stability of the system. Further studies with advanced molecular tools are likely to discover greater chytrid diversity and evidence of additional mycoloops in lakes and oceans. PMID:24795703

  12. Mycoloop: chytrids in aquatic food webs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiko eKagami

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Parasites are ecologically significant in various ecosystems through their role in shaping food web structure, facilitating energy transfer, and controlling disease. Here in this review, we mainly focus on parasitic chytrids, the dominant parasites in aquatic ecosystems, and explain their roles in aquatic food webs, particularly as prey for zooplankton. Chytrids have a free-living zoosporic stage, during which they actively search for new hosts. Zoospores are excellent food for zooplankton in terms of size, shape, and nutritional quality. In the field, densities of chytrids can be high, ranging from 101-109 spores L-1. When large inedible phytoplankton species are infected by chytrids, nutrients within host cells are transferred to zooplankton via the zoospores of parasitic chytrids. This new pathway, the ‘mycoloop,’ may play an important role in shaping aquatic ecosystems, by altering sinking fluxes or determining system stability. The grazing of zoospores by zooplankton may also suppress outbreaks of parasitic chytrids. A food web model demonstrated that the contribution of the mycoloop to zooplankton production increased with nutrient availability and was also dependent on the stability of the system. Further studies with advanced molecular tools are likely to discover greater chytrid diversity and evidence of additional mycoloops in lakes and oceans.

  13. Phytoremediation using eichhornia crassipes aquatic plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phytoremediation is a cost effective approach for the Treatment of polluted soil and contaminated water. The effectiveness of one aquatic plant Eichhornia crassipes was evaluated for its capability in removing copper from copper solution using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). The aquatic plant was placed in solutions containing 2 mg/L, 4 mg/L an d 6 mg/L of copper, for a period of 18 days and the change in Cu concentration was measured. Results showed an increase of copper within the plants' root and shoot tissues and a decrease of copper concentration in the solution. It was found that roots tend to accumulate a higher amount of copper than shoots due to translocation process. The maximum growth of Eichhornia crassipes was in the 2 mg/L solution which shows that growth was affected by the presence of Cu in the water. The maximum removal of copper in the solutions containing Eichhornia crassipes was 87.5% from the 4 mg/L solution. Eichhornia crassipes accumulated upto 1265.0 mg/kg of Cu in its roots indicating that this aquatic plant species may be used as a hyper-accumulator for copper. (author)

  14. Sliding and Lower Limb Mechanics during Sit-Stand-Sit Transitions with a Standing Wheelchair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Sheng Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study aimed to investigate the shear displacement between the body and backrest/seat, range of motion (ROM, and force acting on the lower limb joints during sit-stand-sit transitions by operating an electric-powered standing wheelchair. Methods and Materials. The amounts of sliding along the backrest and the seat plane, ROM of lower limb joints, and force acting on the knee/foot were measured in twenty-four people with paraplegia. Results. Without an antishear mechanism, the shear displacement was approximately 9 cm between the user’s body and the backrest/seat surfaces. During standing up, the user’s back slid down and the thigh was displaced rearward, but they moved in opposite directions when wheelchair sat back down. A minimum of 60 degrees of ROM at the hip and knee was needed during sit-stand-sit transitions. The maximal resultant forces acting on the knee restraints could reach 23.5% of body weight. Conclusion. Sliding between the body and backrest/seat occurred while transitioning from sitting to standing and vice versa. A certain amount of ROM at lower limb joints and force acting on the knee was necessitated during sit-stand-sit transitions. Careful consideration needs to be given to who the user of the electric powered standing wheelchair is.

  15. Sit-to-Stand and Stand-to-Sit Control Mechanisms of Two-Wheeled Wheelchair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Ghani, N M; Tokhi, M O

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a mechanism for standing and sitting transformation of a wheelchair using a two-wheeled inverted pendulum concept with reduced torque requirement, in simulation studies. The motivation of this work is to design a compact standing mechanism to help an elderly/disabled person with functional limitation in lower extremities to maneuver in small and confined spaces and enable them to perform standard daily life routines independently. The wheelchair system at the upright standing position is tested with different travel distances, and the challenge is to control both sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit operations in a stable manner using flexible-joint humanoid. An additional spring/damping element is incorporated at each wheel to provide a comfortable ride for the user especially during stand-to-sit transformation task. A PD-fuzzy control with modular structure is implemented, and the performance of the system is observed through visual nastran 4d (vn4d) visualization software and simulation in matlab. The stand-to-sit performance tests have shown more than 38% reduction in tilt and back seat angles fluctuation in linear travel motion using a suspension system, while the initial tilt torque needed is 50% less than the amount required in previous designs. PMID:26902396

  16. Learning to Stand: The Acceptability and Feasibility of Introducing Standing Desks into College Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto M. Benzo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Prolonged sedentary behavior is an independent risk factor for multiple negative health outcomes. Evidence supports introducing standing desks into K-12 classrooms and work settings to reduce sitting time, but no studies have been conducted in the college classroom environment. The present study explored the acceptability and feasibility of introducing standing desks in college classrooms. A total of 993 students and 149 instructors completed a single online needs assessment survey. This cross-sectional study was conducted during the fall semester of 2015 at a large Midwestern University. The large majority of students (95% reported they would prefer the option to stand in class. Most students (82.7% reported they currently sit during their entire class time. Most students (76.6% and instructors (86.6% reported being in favor of introducing standing desks into college classrooms. More than half of students and instructors predicted having access to standing desks in class would improve student’s “physical health”, “attention”, and “restlessness”. Collectively, these findings support the acceptability of introducing standing desks in college classrooms. Future research is needed to test the feasibility, cost-effectiveness and efficacy of introducing standing desks in college classrooms. Such studies would be useful for informing institutional policies regarding classroom designs.

  17. Massless fermions in the standing wave braneworld

    CERN Document Server

    Gogberashvili, Merab; Midodashvili, Levan

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the 5D massless fermionic fields within the standing wave braneworld model. We show that in the case of increasing warp factor there exist localized left spinor field zero modes on the brane, while right fermion wave functions are not normalizable.

  18. Standing waves in fiber-optic interferometers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Haan, V.; Santbergen, R.; Tijssen, M.; Zeman, M.

    2011-01-01

    A study is presented giving the response of three types of fiber-optic interferometers by which a standing wave through an object is investigated. The three types are a Sagnac, Mach–Zehnder and Michelson–Morley interferometer. The response of the Mach–Zehnder interferometer is similar to the Sagnac

  19. Standing alone; Auf eigenen Fuessen stehen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klempert, Oliver; Garus, Katharina

    2011-11-21

    Direct marketing of electric power from renewable energy sources is more profitable than the fixed rates specified by the German Renewables Act (EEG). The intention was to give 'green' power a better standing in the market, but some utilities are sensing big business.

  20. Large optics inspection, tilting, and washing stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, Marion Jay; Ayers, Shannon Lee

    2012-10-09

    A large optics stand provides a risk free means of safely tilting large optics with ease and a method of safely tilting large optics with ease. The optics are supported in the horizontal position by pads. In the vertical plane the optics are supported by saddles that evenly distribute the optics weight over a large area.

  1. Electrohydraulic stand for testing lifting means

    OpenAIRE

    Natalya Babochenko

    2014-01-01

    Article is devoted to electrohydraulic to create test benches for lifting equipment. The author suggests a test stand electrohydraulic lifting means in the form of large-scale working model of the hinge-rod hydraulic manipulator with articulated boom and with one space drive mechanism, as well as examining the use of electrohydraulic control system.

  2. Large optics inspection, tilting, and washing stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, Marion Jay; Ayers, Shannon Lee

    2010-08-24

    A large optics stand provides a risk free means of safely tilting large optics with ease and a method of safely tilting large optics with ease. The optics are supported in the horizontal position by pads. In the vertical plane the optics are supported by saddles that evenly distribute the optics weight over a large area.

  3. Nanopositioning with detection of a standing wave

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holá, M.; Hrabina, J.; Číp, O.; Fejfar, Antonín; Stuchlík, Jiří; Kočka, Jan; Oulehla, J.; Lazar, J.

    Ostrava: TANGER Ltd, 2013, s. 792-796. ISBN 978-80-87294-44-4. [NANOCON 2013. International Conference /5./. Brno (CZ), 16.10.2013-18.10.2013] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : nanometrology * nanopositioning * Fabry-Perot cavity * standing wave * interferometry Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  4. Guitar Strings as Standing Waves: A Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The study demonstrates the induction of one-dimensional standing waves, called "natural-harmonics" on a guitar to provide a unique tone. The analysis shows that a normally complex vibration is composed of a number of simple and discrete vibrations.

  5. Sherry Red Owl, Stands at Dawn Woman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crazy Bull, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces Sherry Red Owl, also known as "Stands at Dawn Woman," because she greets each day as a new opportunity and has spent her life working at new things. She worked at Sinte Gleska University (SGU) during its founding years, taught at an elementary school when few Native teachers were employed in the school systems,…

  6. Residual liquefaction of seabed under standing waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirca, V.S. Ozgur; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of the seabed liquefaction beneath standing waves. Silt (with d50 =0.070mm) was used in the experiments. Two kinds of measurements were carried out: pore water pressure measurements and water surface elevation measurements. These measuremen...

  7. AA, wide quadrupole on measurement stand

    CERN Multimedia

    1981-01-01

    Please look up 8101024 and 8103203 first. Wide quadrupole (QFW, QDW) with end-shims and shimming washers on the measurement stand. With the measurement coil one measured the harmonics of the magnetic field, determined the magnetic centre, and catalogued the effect of washer constellations.

  8. Models for a stand-alone PV system[Photovoltaic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, A.D.; Soerensen, P.; Hansen, L.H.; Bindner, H.

    2000-12-01

    This report presents a number of models for modelling and simulation of a stand-alone photovoltaic (PV) system with a battery bank verified against a system installed at Risoe National Laboratory. The work has been supported by the Danish Ministry of Energy, as a part of the activities in the Solar Energy Centre Denmark. The study is carried out at Risoe National Laboratory with the main purpose to establish a library of simple mathematical models for each individual element of a stand-alone PV system, namely solar cells, battery, controller, inverter and load. The models for PV module and battery are based on the model descriptions found in the literature. The battery model is developed at UMASS and is known as the Kinetic Battery Model (KiBaM). The other component models in the PV system are based on simple electrical knowledge. The implementation is done using Matlab/Simulink, a simulation program that provides a graphical interface for building models as modular block diagrams. The non-linear behaviour of the battery, observed in the measurements, is investigated and compared to the KiBaM model's performance. A set of linear Black box models are estimated based on the battery measurements. The performance of the best linear Black box model is compared to the KiBaM model. A validation of each of the implemented mathematical model is performed by an interactive analysis and comparison between simulation results and measurements, acquired from the stand-alone PV system at Risoe. (au)

  9. Forest Management Intensity Affects Aquatic Communities in Artificial Tree Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petermann, Jana S.; Rohland, Anja; Sichardt, Nora; Lade, Peggy; Guidetti, Brenda; Weisser, Wolfgang W.; Gossner, Martin M.

    2016-01-01

    Forest management could potentially affect organisms in all forest habitats. However, aquatic communities in water-filled tree-holes may be especially sensitive because of small population sizes, the risk of drought and potential dispersal limitation. We set up artificial tree holes in forest stands subject to different management intensities in two regions in Germany and assessed the influence of local environmental properties (tree-hole opening type, tree diameter, water volume and water temperature) as well as regional drivers (forest management intensity, tree-hole density) on tree-hole insect communities (not considering other organisms such as nematodes or rotifers), detritus content, oxygen and nutrient concentrations. In addition, we compared data from artificial tree holes with data from natural tree holes in the same area to evaluate the methodological approach of using tree-hole analogues. We found that forest management had strong effects on communities in artificial tree holes in both regions and across the season. Abundance and species richness declined, community composition shifted and detritus content declined with increasing forest management intensity. Environmental variables, such as tree-hole density and tree diameter partly explained these changes. However, dispersal limitation, indicated by effects of tree-hole density, generally showed rather weak impacts on communities. Artificial tree holes had higher water temperatures (on average 2°C higher) and oxygen concentrations (on average 25% higher) than natural tree holes. The abundance of organisms was higher but species richness was lower in artificial tree holes. Community composition differed between artificial and natural tree holes. Negative management effects were detectable in both tree-hole systems, despite their abiotic and biotic differences. Our results indicate that forest management has substantial and pervasive effects on tree-hole communities and may alter their structure and

  10. Diets and abundances of aquatic and semi-aquatic reptiles in the Alligator Rivers Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mining and milling of uranium in the Alligator River Region in the Northern Territory has raised the possibility that heavy metals and radionuclides might escape into the aquatic system and be accumulated by the reptilian fauna. Aquatic and semi-aquatic reptiles are regularly eaten by Aboriginal people of the region, and data on diets and reproduction of these species, as well as on their dispersion and abundance, are essential before the possibility that reptiles might act as pathways for these contaminants to Aboriginals can be assessed. The objectives of this study were to provide quantitative data on the diets of filesnakes, sand goannas and water goannas, to provide information on seasonal changes in their abundance and distribution within the Magela Creek system; and to describe their reproductive cycles

  11. “Thinking on your feet”: A qualitative evaluation of sit-stand desks in an Australian workplace

    OpenAIRE

    Grunseit, Anne Carolyn; Chau, Josephine Yuk-Yin; van der Ploeg, Hidde Pieter; Bauman, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Background Epidemiological research has established sitting as a new risk factor for the development of non-communicable chronic disease. Sit-stand desks have been proposed as one strategy to reduce occupational sedentary time. This formative research study evaluated the acceptability and usability of manually and electrically operated sit-stand desks in a medium-sized government organisation located in Sydney, Australia. Methods Sitting time pre- and three months post -installation of the si...

  12. Throughfall in different forest stands of Iperó, São Paulo

    OpenAIRE

    Esthevan Augusto Goes Gasparoto; Kelly Cristina Tonell; Emily Tsiemi Shinzato; Roberta de Oliveira Averna Valente

    2014-01-01

    In forestry, throughfall (Pi) is that fraction of rainfall that runs directly through the tree canopy and reaches the ground. It is characterized as the main source of water supply in a watershed. This study aimed to analyze the dynamics of throughfall in three types of forest stands, namely Eucalyptus cloeziana, Pinus sp. and seasonal semideciduous forest (FES), all located in Ipanema National Forest, in the municipality of Iperó-SP. In each stand, a 300 m² plot was established in which ten ...

  13. Experimental and numerical studies on standing surface acoustic wave microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhangming; Xie, Yuliang; Guo, Feng; Ren, Liqiang; Huang, Po-Hsun; Chen, Yuchao; Rufo, Joseph; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-02-01

    Standing surface acoustic waves (SSAW) are commonly used in microfluidics to manipulate cells and other micro/nano particles. However, except for a simple one-dimensional (1D) harmonic standing waves (HSW) model, a practical model that can predict particle behaviour in SSAW microfluidics is still lacking. Herein, we established a two-dimensional (2D) SSAW microfluidic model based on the basic theory in acoustophoresis and our previous modelling strategy to predict the acoustophoresis of microparticles in SSAW microfluidics. This 2D SSAW microfluidic model considers the effects of boundary vibrations, channel materials, and channel dimensions on the acoustic propagation; as an experimental validation, the acoustophoresis of microparticles under continuous flow through narrow channels made of PDMS and silicon was studied. The experimentally observed motion of the microparticles matched well with the numerical predictions, while the 1D HSW model failed to predict many of the experimental observations. Particularly, the 1D HSW model cannot account for particle aggregation on the sidewall in PDMS channels, which is well explained by our 2D SSAW microfluidic model. Our model can be used for device design and optimization in SSAW microfluidics. PMID:26698361

  14. Secular Religious Establishment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2013-01-01

    Secularism as a political doctrine claims that religion and politics should be separated. The compatibility question is whether secularism can accept some forms of religious establishment in the form of institutional linkages between state and organised religion. I argue that the answer to the co...

  15. Establishing a robotics program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steers, William D; LeBeau, Sam; Cardella, Joseph; Fulmer, Brant

    2004-11-01

    Establishing a successful robotics program requires consideration of several issues, including the surgical procedures to be performed, training and personnel, facilities, finance, and marketing. This article considers these factors from an academic health center standpoint and evaluates the benefits and risks of this new technology for urology departments. PMID:15474605

  16. First results of monitoring of stand structure changes in unmanaged beech stands in NP Plitvice Lakes

    OpenAIRE

    Vladimir Novotny; Ivan Balenović; Tomislav Dubravac; Dijana Vuletić; Stjepan Dekanić

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: It is possible to monitor and study the natural growth and development of the forest ecosystems in the example of protected forest stands, which were excluded from management, and which are not under a negative influence of human activity. Therefore the aim of the research through the repeated measurements is to estimate the stand structure development on the Medveđak permanent experimental plot in the Plitvice Lakes national park area. In this paper we presented the f...

  17. The use of aquatic moss (Fontinalis antipyretica as monitor of contamination in standing and running waters: limits and advantages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto M. CENCI

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to verify whether water moss (Fontinalis antipyretica could be used as a monitor of trace element contamination in lotic and lentic waters. The investigation was split up the into three sequential experimental trials. 1 Experiments have been set up in lab in order to evaluate the amount of trace elements (Cd, Pb, Cr, Cu and Hg released by moss during a period of 133 days, under controlled chemical-physical conditions. A release of 64% of Hg, 83% of Cr and 70% of Pb was found, whereas no re lease of Cd and Cu has been observed. 2 Clean moss has successively treated with running water at different pH and then treaded with Cu, Cr, Hg and Pb, in order to evaluate the dynamics of accumulation of trace elements in moss. Specifically, three basins containing 100 liters of Lake Maggiore water were equipped with three distinct pumps (15 l min-1 each ensuring the water circulation into a glass tube were arranged. Afterwards, 105 thallus, equivalent to 4.5 g of Fontinalis antipyretica, were fixed into each glass tube. The accumulation dynamics was calculated by collecting moss and water at the beginning, after 1 h, 6 h, 1 day, 4, 9, 14 and 28 days of the experiment. Results showed that the metals accumulation was significant during the first hour. 3 Samples of clean moss were placed in situ. Nine sites in Lake Orta, characterized by high contents of elements due to the anthropic activities, the Toce River and other minor rivers, have been chosen in order to estimate the ability of moss to accumulate Cu, Cr, Pb and Hg from water, and to localize the metal pollution sources. In three sites the Cu average concentration in Fontinalis antipyretica increased from 167 mg kg-1 dry moss to 2100 mg kg-1 after 14 days and to 2900 mg kg-1 after 28 days. A marked accumulation of Hg was observed in Fontinalis antipyretica located in site no 6 (from an initial concentration of 0.2 mg kg-1 dry moss to 17.7 mg kg-1 after 14 days, and 24.6 mg kg-1 after 28 days. The results showed that Fontinalis antipyretica had the ability to accumulate great amounts of trace elements in a short time (a few days and/or a few weeks, whereas the release occurred more slowly (a few months. Therefore, it could be reasonable to stress that moss can be used to monitor water contamination and sources, and to characterize environments with different types of contaminated, such as industrial and urban areas.

  18. Regional-scale stand density management diagrams for Pyrenean oak (Quercus pyrenaica Willd. stands in north-west Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castaño-Santamaría J

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Stand Density Management Diagrams are useful tools for designing and evaluating alternative density management regimes without the need of implementing any silvicultural action, and allowing the future stand conditions to be predicted prior to implementing management schedules. In this study, stand density management diagrams were developed for Pyrenean oak (Quercus pyrenaica Willd. stands in north-west Spain by including data on stand volume, stand aboveground biomass, stand stem biomass and carbon pools. Data were obtained from Third National Forest Inventory plots (n=1860. The large geographical area analyzed in this study was classified by provenance regions, which were compared in terms of biomass production in order to define areas with similar characteristics for use as management units. The comparisons identified 6 independent groups. Different stand-level models and the associated diagrams for the aforementioned stand variables were therefore developed for each group.

  19. TMS installation at A-1 Test Stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Employees at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center complete installation of the new thrust measurement system on the A-1 Test Stand. The new TMS is a state-of-the-art upgrade from the previous system, which was installed when the testing structure was built in the 1960s. It is an advanced calibration system capable of measuring vertical and horizontal thrust loads with accuracy within 0.15 percent at 225,000 pounds. It also will allow engineers to measure thrust as they gimbal (or tilt) engines during tests. The new TMS is part of upgrades for the A-1 Test Stand in preparation for testing the next generation of American space program rocket engines.

  20. Antibacterial activity of aquatic gliding bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangnoi, Yutthapong; Anantapong, Theerasak; Kanjana-Opas, Akkharawit

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to screen and isolate strains of freshwater aquatic gliding bacteria, and to investigate their antibacterial activity against seven common pathogenic bacteria. Submerged specimens were collected and isolated for aquatic gliding bacteria using four different isolation media (DW, MA, SAP2, and Vy/2). Gliding bacteria identification was performed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. Crude extracts were obtained by methanol extraction. Antibacterial activity against seven pathogenic bacteria was examined by agar-well diffusion assay. Five strains of aquatic gliding bacteria including RPD001, RPD008, RPD018, RPD027 and RPD049 were isolated. Each submerged biofilm and plastic specimen provided two isolates of gliding bacteria, whereas plant debris gave only one isolate. Two strains of gliding bacteria were obtained from each DW and Vy/2 isolation medium, while one strain was obtained from the SAP2 medium. Gliding bacteria strains RPD001, RPD008 and RPD018 were identified as Flavobacterium anhuiense with 96, 82 and 96 % similarity, respectively. Strains RPD049 and RPD027 were identified as F. johnsoniae and Lysobacter brunescens, respectively, with similarity equal to 96 %. Only crude extract obtained from RPD001 inhibited growth of Listeria monocytogenes (MIC 150 µg/ml), Staphylococcus aureus (MIC 75 µg/ml) and Vibrio cholerae (MIC 300 µg/ml), but showed weak inhibitory effect on Salmonella typhimurium (MIC > 300 µg/ml). Gliding bacterium strain RPD008 should be considered to a novel genus separate from Flavobacterium due to its low similarity value. Crude extract produced by RPD001 showed potential for development as a broad antibiotic agent. PMID:26885469

  1. Antibiotics promote aggregation within aquatic bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corno, Gianluca; Coci, Manuela; Giardina, Marco; Plechuk, Sonia; Campanile, Floriana; Stefani, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    The release of antibiotics (AB) into the environment poses several threats for human health due to potential development of AB-resistant natural bacteria. Even though the use of low-dose antibiotics has been promoted in health care and farming, significant amounts of AB are observed in aquatic environments. Knowledge on the impact of AB on natural bacterial communities is missing both in terms of spread and evolution of resistance mechanisms, and of modifications of community composition and productivity. New approaches are required to study the response of microbial communities rather than individual resistance genes. In this study a chemostat-based experiment with 4 coexisting bacterial strains has been performed to mimicking the response of a freshwater bacterial community to the presence of antibiotics in low and high doses. Bacterial abundance rapidly decreased by 75% in the presence of AB, independently of their concentration, and remained constant until the end of the experiment. The bacterial community was mainly dominated by Aeromonas hydrophila and Brevundimonas intermedia while the other two strains, Micrococcus luteus and Rhodococcus sp. never exceed 10%. Interestingly, the bacterial strains, which were isolated at the end of the experiment, were not AB-resistant, while reassembled communities composed of the 4 strains, isolated from treatments under AB stress, significantly raised their performance (growth rate, abundance) in the presence of AB compared to the communities reassembled with strains isolated from the treatment without AB. By investigating the phenotypic adaptations of the communities subjected to the different treatments, we found that the presence of AB significantly increased co-aggregation by 5-6 fold. These results represent the first observation of co-aggregation as a successful strategy of AB resistance based on phenotype in aquatic bacterial communities, and can represent a fundamental step in the understanding of the effects of AB

  2. Ecotoxicological Assessment of Aquatic Genotoxicity Using the Comet Assay

    OpenAIRE

    KHUSNUL YAQIN

    2006-01-01

    Comet assay is a novel biological analysis, which is a sensitive, flexible, simple, rapid, and inexpensive method to assess aquatic genotoxicant. Since Singh and co-workers developed the method in 1988, its use has increased exponentially in various fields. This review discourses on the application of this assay in aquatic ecosystems. Various types of cells from various aquatic organisms have been tested by various genotoxicant both direct- and indirect-acting using the comet assay. The appli...

  3. Aquatic intervention in children with neuro-motor impairments

    OpenAIRE

    Getz, M.D.

    2006-01-01

    The present thesis addresses the influence of aquatic interventions on motor performance of children with neuro-motor deficiencies in a functional context. The theoretical framework is based on a functional approach in compliance to the International Classification of Function and Disability (ICF). Chapter 2 addresses the relationship between motor performance in the aquatic environment setting as measured by the Aquatic Independence Measure (AIM) to motor performance on land as measured by t...

  4. Implications of aquatic animal health for human health.

    OpenAIRE

    Dawe, C J

    1990-01-01

    Human health and aquatic animal health are organically related at three distinct interfaces. Aquatic animals serve as important contributors to the nutritional protein, lipid, and vitamin requirements of humans; as carriers and transmitters of many infectious and parasitic diseases to which humans are susceptible; and as indicators of toxic and carcinogenic substances that they can convey, in some part, from aquatic environments to man and other terrestrial animals. Transcending these relatio...

  5. Impact of Organic Contamination on Some Aquatic Organisms

    OpenAIRE

    Yasser, El-Nahhal; Shawkat, El-Najjar; Samir, Afifi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Contamination of water systems with organic compounds of agricultural uses pose threats to aquatic organisms. Carbaryl, chlorpyrifos, and diuron were considered as model aquatic pollutants in this study. The main objective of this study was to characterize the toxicity of organic contamination to two different aquatic organisms. Materials and Methods: Low concentrations (0.0–60 µmol/L) of carbaryl, diuron and very low concentration (0.0–0.14 µmol/L) of chlorpyrifos and their mixtu...

  6. Movement and fate of mercury in an aquatic ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies have been initiated of the behaviour and distribution of industrial mercury residues in the aquatic ecosystem represented by the Coatzacoalcos river estuary of Mexico. Mercury concentrations were determined in samples of water, river sediments, aquatic animals, aquatic and river-bank vegetation, local food products and in the hair of local inhabitants. Determinations were made by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry and concentrations greater than 50 ppm were found in some samples of bottom muds. (author)

  7. Spreading of Oil Spill on Placid Aquatic Medium

    OpenAIRE

    Derrick O. NJOBUENWU; Millionaire F. N. ABOWEI

    2008-01-01

    Continuous research in the development of suitable predictive model is vital as the input of oil spills into the aquatic environment particularly in the Niger Delta area of Nigeria is alarming due to frequent oil spills. This eventually affects aquatic organisms and shoreline activities. This work developed an semi-empirical expression that can predict the horizontal spreading of Niger Delta Oil Spills (NDOS) on a placid water body using simple physical coefficients of the oil and the aquatic...

  8. Aquatic Models, Genomics and Chemical Risk Management§

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Keith C.; Hinton, David E.; Mattingly, Carolyn J.; Planchart, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The 5th Aquatic Animal Models for Human Disease meeting follows four previous meetings (Hinton et al., 2009; Schmale et al., 2007; Schmale, 2004; Nairn et al., 2001) in which advances in aquatic animal models for human disease research were reported, and community discussion of future direction was pursued. At this meeting, discussion at a workshop entitled Bioinformatics and Computational Biology with Web-based Resources (20 September 2010) led to an important conclusion: Aquatic model resea...

  9. Stand structure and dead wood characterization in cork forest of Calabria region (southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barreca L

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The cork forests are one the most interesting forest ecosystems in the Mediterranean area. Their distribution and ecological characteristics have undergone a significant transformation after the significant changes following the development and establishment of agricultural crops. Currently, only a few stands, which survive in hard to reach places, prove the wide spread distribution of this species was also in the recent past. This study describes the stand structure of some cork forests in Calabria region (southern Italy. In order, to characterize the vertical structure Latham index has been applied, while for the description of the horizontal distribution NBSI group indices has been used. Detailed surveys on dead wood were also conducted determining the occurring volume and its decay stage according to the decay classes system proposed by Hunter. The aim of this study is to provide guidelines for sustainable management of cork forests, improving and promoting the structural complexity and functional efficiency of these forest stands.

  10. Spatial variability of the soil chemical attributes in Tectona grandis stand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Libanio Pelissari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Considering the need for information aimed at identifying and measuring the spatial relationships of edaphic factors that limit the development of teak stands, the objective of this study was to characterize and compare the spatial variability of soil chemical attributes: pH, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, organic matter and aluminum at two and nine years old teak stand localized in State of Mato Grosso, Brazil. Plots were allocated and soil samples were collected at 0-0.2 m depth for geostatistical modeling. Spatial changes of soil chemical attributes were detected and possible fertilization and corrections of soil acidity in specific regions of the stand for the establishment of trees and their development after thinning were recommend.

  11. A composite L-band HH radar backscattering model for coniferous forest stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guoquing; Simonett, David S.

    1988-01-01

    The radar backscattering model developed by Richards et al. (1987), has been improved and further tested in this research. The trunk term may now be calculated from the exact solution to the electromagnetic wave equations instead of the corner reflector equation. Rough surface models have been introduced into the radar model, so that the forward reflectance and the backscattering from the ground surface are now calculated from the same model and, thus, are consistent. The number of trees in an individual pixel is assumed to be Poisson distributed, with tree height in a stand log-normally distributed. The simulated results show that the match of backscattering coefficients for eight forest stands between SIR-B image data and the simulated results are satisfying, and that the trunk term now seems to be convincingly established as the dominant term in the L-band HH radar return from coniferous forest stands.

  12. Methods for calculating dose conversion coefficients for terrestrial and aquatic biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plants and animals may be exposed to ionizing radiation from radionuclides in the environment. This paper describes the underlying data and assumptions to assess doses to biota due to internal and external exposure for a wide range of masses and shapes living in various habitats. A dosimetric module is implemented which is a user-friendly and flexible possibility to assess dose conversion coefficients for aquatic and terrestrial biota. The dose conversion coefficients have been derived for internal and various external exposure scenarios. The dosimetric model is linked to radionuclide decay and emission database, compatible with the ICRP Publication 38, thus providing a capability to compute dose conversion coefficients for any nuclide from the database and its daughter nuclides. The dosimetric module has been integrated into the ERICA Tool, but it can also be used as a stand-alone version

  13. Motor parameter identification for laboratory stand

    OpenAIRE

    Lidmila, Petr

    2014-01-01

    The goal of introduced thesis is to provide measurement of the engines used as a tutorial laboratory stand in the course “Electric drives”. Due to the absence of appropriate measurement centre, the main emphasis is laid on the modernization of older dynymometer, which is going to be used by the students. Dynymometer has been equipped with the electric speed and torque vbmeasurement, data from these measurements are displayed and evaluated by the digital devices very clearly and precisely. Eng...

  14. AA Prototype-Quadrupole on Measurement Stand

    CERN Multimedia

    1978-01-01

    The very particular lattice of the AA required 2 types of quadrupoles: narrow ones (QFN, QDN) and wide ones (QFW, QDW). The wide ones, although not very long (steel length 0.54 m), had an unusually large aperture of 0.75 m in width, 0.68 m "good field". A prototype was built in 1978. Here we see it on its test stand, with Ray Brown positioning the measurement coil.

  15. Beam instrumentation for an ISOL test stand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TRIUMF is constructing a test bed for the first stages of the proposed TISAC accelerated radioactive beam facility. We will present the requirements for the diagnostic system for this test stand and describe the design and development work underway. Scintillators, beamstops and Faraday Cup have been tested using stable, mass analyzed, 12 keV beams of ions from mass 14 to 132. The design of a linear drive, with 10 μm resolution, for scanning wires and slits has begun. (author)

  16. Standing stability evaluation using a triaxial accelerometer

    OpenAIRE

    Mayagoitia, Ruth E.; Lotters, Joost C.; Veltink, Peter H.

    1996-01-01

    A triaxial accelerometer is placed at the back of the subject at the height of the center of mass. Force plate data are collected simultaneously. Subjects stand in a comfortable position with eyes open, eyes closed and doing cognitive tasks; and with feet together with eyes open and closed. The cognitive tasks are: mathematical, auditory Stroop and memory. The force plate data are processed to obtain the center of pressure and from it the parameters of: mean radius, speed and frequency, and b...

  17. AA Prototype-Quadrupole on Measurement Stand

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    The very particular lattice of the AA required 2 types of quadrupoles: narrow ones (QFN, QDN) and wide ones (QFW, QDW). The wide ones, although rather short (steel length 0.54 m), had an unusually large aperture of 0.75 m in width, 0.68 m "good field". A prototype was built at CERN in 1978. Here we see it on its test stand, with a measurement coil inserted, Brian Pincott taking readings.

  18. Down force calibration stand test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Down Force Calibration Stand was developed to provide an improved means of calibrating equipment used to apply, display and record Core Sample Truck (CST) down force. Originally, four springs were used in parallel to provide a system of resistance that allowed increasing force over increasing displacement. This spring system, though originally deemed adequate, was eventually found to be unstable laterally. For this reason, it was determined that a new method for resisting down force was needed

  19. Actinide elements in aquatic and terrestrial environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: water-sediment interactions of U, Pu, Am, and Cm; relative availability of actinide elements from abiotic to aquatic biota; comparative uptake of transuranic elements by biota bordering Pond 3513; metabolic reduction of 239Np from Np(V) to Np(IV) in cotton rats; evaluation of hazards associated with transuranium releases to the biosphere; predicting Pu in bone; adsorption--solubility--complexation phenomena in actinide partitioning between sorbents and solution; comparative soil extraction data; and comparative plant uptake data

  20. Uranium accumulation by aquatic macrophyte, Pistia stratiotes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium accumulation by aquatic macrophyte, Pistia stratiotes from aqueous solution was investigated in laboratory condition. The objective was to evaluate the uranium accumulation potential and adopt the plant in uranium containing medium to improve its uptake capacity. The plant was found to tolerate and grow in the pH range of 3-7. Accumulation of uranium improved with increasing pH and the plant could remove 70% uranium from the medium (20 mg/L) within 24 hours of incubation at pH 5-6. Uptake of uranium on either side of this pH range decreased

  1. Aquatic Exercise and Thermoregulation in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soultanakis, Helen N

    2016-09-01

    Aquatic exercise, in a general sense, is any type of movement performed in the water for the purpose of improving health and fitness. Water, with its properties, provides buoyancy to lighten the "load" of pregnancy, hydrostatic pressure to alleviate pregnancy-induced edema, and many other benefits. Sports in extreme temperatures may involve some risks. The fact that a person's conductivity increases about 25 times in water comes with a great loss, which is the depression of the evaporative mechanism. Altered thermal control mechanisms in water, both in the gravid and the nongravid state, will be addressed in this review. convenience. PMID:27152529

  2. Aquatic ecotoxicological indicators in life cycle assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pennington, David W.; Payet, Jerome; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2004-01-01

    This paper compares available options for the aquatic ecotoxicological effect factor component in life cycle assessment (LCA). The effect factor is expressed here as the change in risk per unit change in cumulative exposure, ƒ´Effect/ƒ´Exposure. The comparison is restricted to approaches linked...... basis represents the best available practice for use in LCA at this time, ƒ´PAFms/ƒ´C = 0.5/HC50; where ƒ´PAFms is the change in the (Potentially Affected) Fraction (PAF) of species that experiences an Increase in exposure above a specified effect level, accounting for the presence of complex background...

  3. Decomposition of aquatic plants in lakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godshalk, G.L.

    1977-01-01

    This study was carried out to systematically determine the effects of temperature and oxygen concentration, two environmental parameters crucial to lake metabolism in general, on decomposition of five species of aquatic vascular plants of three growth forms in a Michigan lake. Samples of dried plant material were decomposed in flasks in the laboratory under three different oxygen regimes, aerobic-to-anaerobic, strict anaerobic, and aerated, each at 10/sup 0/C and 25/sup 0/C. In addition, in situ decomposition of the same species was monitored using the litter bag technique under four conditions.

  4. Aquatic species project report: FY 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, L.M. (National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)); Sprague, S. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States))

    1992-04-01

    This report summarizes the progress and research accomplishments of the Aquatic Species Project, which is managed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for the US Department of Energy. The project is focused on applying genetic engineering techniques to enhance the lipid, or oil, production of microalgae. Those lipids can be extracted and processed into high-energy liquid fuels such as diesel. Because microalgae require carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse'' gas, as a nutrient, project researchers also study the role that microalgae could play in a possible global climate change mitigation strategy.

  5. Aquatic species project report: FY 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, L.M. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Sprague, S. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

    1992-04-01

    This report summarizes the progress and research accomplishments of the Aquatic Species Project, which is managed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for the US Department of Energy. The project is focused on applying genetic engineering techniques to enhance the lipid, or oil, production of microalgae. Those lipids can be extracted and processed into high-energy liquid fuels such as diesel. Because microalgae require carbon dioxide, a major ``greenhouse`` gas, as a nutrient, project researchers also study the role that microalgae could play in a possible global climate change mitigation strategy.

  6. Establishment of Intestinal Bacteriology

    OpenAIRE

    Mitsuoka, Tomotari

    2014-01-01

    Research on intestinal bacteria began around the end of the 19th century. During the last 5 decades of the 20th century, research on the intestinal microbiota made rapid progress. At first, in my work, I first developed a method of comprehensive analysis of the intestinal microbiota, and then I established classification and identification methods for intestinal anaerobes. Using these methods I discovered a number of ecological rules governing the intestinal microbiota and the role of the int...

  7. Test Stand for Linear Induction Accelerator Optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has designed and constructed a test stand to improve the voltage regulation in our Flash X-Ray (FXR) accelerator cell. The goal is to create a more mono-energetic electron beam that will create an x-ray source with a smaller spot size. Studying the interaction of the beam and pulse-power system with the accelerator cell will improve the design of high-current accelerators at Livermore and elsewhere. On the test stand, a standard FXR cell is driven by a flexible pulse-power system and the beam current is simulated with a switched center conductor. The test stand is fully instrumented with high-speed digitizers to document the effect of impedance mismatches when the cell is operated under various full-voltage conditions. A time-domain reflectometry technique was also developed to characterize the beam and cell interactions by measuring the impedance of the accelerator and pulse-power component. Computer models are being developed in parallel with the testing program to validate the measurements and evaluate different design changes. Both 3D transient electromagnetic and circuit models are being used

  8. Standing sausage waves in photospheric magnetic waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorotovič, I.; Erdélyi, R.; Freij, N.; Karlovský, V.; Márquez, I.

    2014-03-01

    Aims: By focussing on the oscillations of the cross-sectional area and the total intensity of magnetic waveguides located in the lower solar atmosphere, we aim to detect and identify magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) sausage waves. Methods: Capturing several high-resolution time series of magnetic waveguides and employing a wavelet analysis, in conjunction with empirical mode decomposition (EMD), makes the MHD wave analysis possible. For this paper, two sunspots and one pore (with a light bridge) were chosen as examples of MHD waveguides in the lower solar atmosphere. Results: The waveguides display a range of periods from 4 to 65 min. These structures display in-phase behaviour between the area and intensity, presenting mounting evidence for sausage modes within these waveguides. The detected periods point towards standing oscillations. Conclusions: The presence of fast and slow MHD sausage waves has been detected in three different magnetic waveguides in the solar photosphere. Furthermore, these oscillations are potentially standing harmonics supported in the waveguides that are sandwiched vertically between the temperature minimum in the lower solar atmosphere and the transition region. The relevance of standing harmonic oscillations is that their exploitation by means of solar magneto-seismology may allow insight into the sub-pixel resolution structure of photospheric MHD waveguides.

  9. Aquatic subsidies transport anthropogenic nitrogen to riparian spiders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stable nitrogen isotopic composition (δ15N) of aquatic biota increases with anthropogenic N inputs such as sewage and livestock waste downstream. Increase in δ15N of riparian spiders downstream may reflect the anthropogenic pollution exposure through predation on aquatic insects. A two-source mixing model based on stable carbon isotopic composition showed the greatest dependence on aquatic insects (84%) by horizontal web-building spiders, followed by intermediate (48%) and low (31%) dependence by cursorial and vertical web-building spiders, respectively. The spider body size was negatively correlated with the dietary proportion of aquatic insects and spider δ15N. The aquatic subsidies transported anthropogenic N to smaller riparian spiders downstream. This transport of anthropogenic N was regulated by spider's guild designation and body size. - Highlights: → δ15N of aquatic insects increases downstream with anthropogenic nitrogen inputs. → δ15N of riparian spiders increases with a high dietary proportion of aquatic insects and smaller spider body size. → The aquatic subsidies transport anthropogenic nitrogen to smaller riparian spiders downstream. - Smaller spiders assimilate anthropogenic nitrogen through the predation on aquatic subsides.

  10. Sustaining America's Aquatic Biodiversity. What is Aquatic Biodiversity; Why Is it Important?

    OpenAIRE

    Helfrich, Louis A.; Neves, Richard J.; Parkhurst, James A. (James Albert)

    2005-01-01

    Describes the term aquatic biodiversity, explains the factors that increase and decrease biodiversity in natural ecosystems, and discusses the value of biodiversity for the health of the environment and quality of life; document also includes web links on national and world biodiversity.

  11. Pressure and Buoyancy in Aquatic Ecosystems. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Transport Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Christina E.

    This module is part of a series designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. This module explores some of the characteristics of aquatic organisms which can be…

  12. ESTABLISHMENT AND EVALUATION OF SWITCHGRASS ON RECLAIMED MINE SOIL [English

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, David; Shankle, Brandon; Oswalt, Ernest; Duckworth, Jeremy; Sanborn, Judd; Buell, Rebecca; Roberson, Bill

    2010-06-30

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a native warm season perennial grass that has productive potential of up to 20 Mg ha-1 of biomass and it persists for decades when harvested once per year. Switchgrass provides excellent ground cover and soil stabilization once established and contributes to soil sequestration of new carbon. Slow establishment on newly reclaimed soil, however, provides for significant erosive opportunities thereby requiring initial soil stabilization with a cover crop. Several planting options were evaluated on two topsoil substitute soils. The planting options included: 1) an existing stand of bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon L.) that was killed with glyphosate followed by disking in red oxidized topsoil substitute and prime farmland topsoil respread in 2007, 2) red oxidized topsoil substitute was seeded directly with switchgrass, 3) browntop millet (Panicum ramosum) was established with switchgrass, 4) or switchgrass was established in senescing browntop millet or wheat without tillage. Switchgrass was successfully established into a bermudagrass sod that had been killed with herbicides and disked as well as into a senescing stand of browntop millet or wheat. Significant soil erosion occurred on the disked area in 2008 leading to considerable repair work followed by planting wheat. Disked areas that did not erode had an excellent stand of switchgrass with 23.3 plants m-2 in November, 2008. Eroded areas replanted in April, 2009 into senescing wheat had 46 plants m-2 by July, 2009. The area planted directly into newly respread soil in May, 2009 was eroded severely by a 75 mm thunderstorm and was repaired, disked and replanted to switchgrass and browntop millet. Switchgrass seeded with browntop millet had a sparse switchgrass stand and was replanted to switchgrass in August, 2009. Rainfall volumes from August, 2009 to October, 2009 totaled 750 mm, but new erosion damage in areas successfully planted to switchgrass has been minimal.

  13. Uranium in aquatic sediments: Where are the guidelines?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    sediments is compared with reference and guideline values and predictions of bio-availability, and biological effects data allows cause and effect relationships to be derived. However, where uranium in aquatic sediments is concerned, there is a lack of national (Australian) and international guidelines that are applicable to tropical sediments and the biological effects data available are limited or confounded by other variables. In the absence of clear uranium guidelines for sediments, an internationally reported 'Predicted No Effect Concentration' for uranium in temperate sediments (Sheppard et. al. 2005), and a value inferred for U from local work (Peck et. al. 2002), are used as 'pseudo-guideline' values to identify sites with concentrations that might present an environmental risk and that should potentially be rehabilitated. The applicability of these U toxicity values as guideline values for establishing closure criteria is questioned. The difficulty in interpreting the potential bioavailability and biological risks of the uranium in the sediments and the need for international guidelines for uranium in aquatic sediments (tropical and temperate) is discussed, along with plans for future work at Ranger. (author)

  14. Considerations upon energetic efficiency of a recirculating aquatic system (RAS for super intensive fish culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petru David

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of the aquaculture using recirculating systems depends on many factors among which the most important it is the energy consumption of the system. To assure a high levelenergy conservation in an aquatic recirculating system, the intensity of water recirculation must be maximized, but this leads to a increasing of the consumed energy for water circulation. That is why is required a rigorous analysis for the energetic consumption for a system of this type and establishment of optimum solutions to minimize the consumption. This paperwork presents a detailed analysis of the energy consumption for a recirculating aquatic system for fish breeding, as well as considerations and solutions for optimization of the energy consumption.

  15. Photoacoustic analysis of the ultrasonic irradiation effect in the photosynthetic activity in aquatic lirium plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report, the application of the photoacoustic technique for monitoring the photosynthesis evolution in aquatic lirium (Eichhornia Crassipes), before and after it was exposed to ultrasonic irradiations. We obtained the disappearance of the phototobaric contribution in the PA signal measured for the irradiated samples with ultrasound of 17 kHz, and therefore of a possible damage in the centers producing the photosynthesis, due to the irradiation. These results show the utility of the ultrasonic irradiation, as well as, of the photosynthesis monitoring by means of the photoacoustic technique, for the elaboration and establishment of methodologies in the control of this aquatic plant, whose propagation causes many consequences extremely unfavorable for the environment, as well as for the diverse human activities that are developed in the bodies of water in the tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world

  16. The subjective postural vertical in standing: reliability and normative data for healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Jeannine; Kreuzpointner, Monica-Antoanela; Krewer, Carmen; Bardins, Stanislav; Schepermann, Andreas; Koenig, Eberhard; Müller, Friedemann; Jahn, Klaus

    2015-04-01

    Impaired verticality perception can cause falls, or even the inability to stand, due to lateropulsion or retropulsion. The internal estimate of verticality can be assessed through the subjective visual, haptic, or postural vertical (SPV). The SPV reflects impaired upright body orientation, but has primarily been assessed in sitting position. The internal representations of body orientation might be different between sitting and standing, mainly because of differences in somatosensory input for the estimation of SPV. To test the SPV during standing, we set up a paradigm using a device that allows movement in three dimensions (the Spacecurl). This study focused on the test-retest and interrater reliabilities of SPV measurements (n = 25) and provides normative values for the age range 20-79 years (n = 60; 10 healthy subjects per decade). The test-retest and interrater reliabilities for SPV measurements in standing subjects were good. The normality values ranged from -1.7° to 2.3° in the sagittal plane, and from -1.6° to 1.2° in the frontal plane. Minor alterations occurred with aging: SPV shifted backward with increasing age, and the variability of verticality estimates increased. Assessment of SPV in standing can be done with reliable results. SPV should next be used to test patients with an impaired sense of verticality, to determine its diagnostic value in comparison to established tools. PMID:25522832

  17. Reliability of Arm Curl and Chair Stand tests for assessing muscular endurance in older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boneth M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to assess the test-retest reliability and level of agreement between measures of the 30 second (30-s Arm Curl and 30-s Chair Stand test in a sample of older adults from Bucaramanga. Materials and methods: a study of evaluation of diagnostic technology was done. Both tests were administered by the same evaluator to 111 adults older than 59 year-old (70,4 ± 7,3, on two occasions, with an interval of time between measures of 4 to 8 days. In the analysis, test-retest reliability was determined using the Intraclass Correlation Coefficient ICC= 2,1 with their confidence interval 95% (CI 95% respective. The agreement level was established by the Bland and Altman method. Results: the test-retest reproducibility of the 30-s Arm Curl test was very good ICC= 0,88 and to the Chair Stand test was good ICC= 0,78. The agreement was very good for both tests of muscle endurance. The CI 95% were between -3,8 and 3,2 stands to 30-s Chair Stand test and between -3,1 and 2,8 curls to 30-s Arm Curl test. Conclusion: the 30-s Arm Curl and 30-s Chair Stand test have good reliability and agreement to assess muscle endurance in older adults functionally independent.

  18. Climatic factors controlling the productivity of pine stands. A model-based analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process-based forest growth model, BIOMASS, is applied to stands of four pine species (Pinus elliottii, P. radiata, P. resinosa, and P. sylvestris) growing in five sub-tropical, temperate and boreal environments (in Australia, New Zealand, Florida, Sweden and Wisconsin). Measured annual above-ground net primary production (ANPP) at these sites ranges from 0.2 to 1.6 kg C m-2. After establishing that simulated ANPP closely matches biomass production measured for the various stands, we analyse model runs to relate simulated productivity to absorbed photosynthetically-active radiation (APAR). Annual photosynthetic productivity (or gross primary production, GPP) simulated for the five stands is linearly related to utilizable APAR, derived by estimating the extent to which photosynthesis is limited by soil water deficit, high air saturation vapor deficit or low temperature. The reduction of GPP due to incomplete radiation interception is 10 to 25% for stands with high leaf area index (LAI) in Australia, New Zealand and Wisconsin and 50 to 60% for low LAI stands in Florida and Sweden. Gross carbon gain is reduced by a further 50 to 70% at sites experiencing cold winters (Sweden and Wisconsin), summer drought (Australia) or high summer humidity deficits (Australia and Wisconsin). Simulated carbon losses due to above-ground respiration average 50% of GPP, but are highly variable among the sites due to large differences in live biomass and tissue nitrogen concentrations. This results in a weaker relationship between simulated NPP and APAR. (au) 93 refs

  19. Throughfall in different forest stands of Iperó, São Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esthevan Augusto Goes Gasparoto

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In forestry, throughfall (Pi is that fraction of rainfall that runs directly through the tree canopy and reaches the ground. It is characterized as the main source of water supply in a watershed. This study aimed to analyze the dynamics of throughfall in three types of forest stands, namely Eucalyptus cloeziana, Pinus sp. and seasonal semideciduous forest (FES, all located in Ipanema National Forest, in the municipality of Iperó-SP. In each stand, a 300 m² plot was established in which ten rain gauges were installed for monitoring throughfall, and three rain gauges were installed in an open area adjacent to the stand for measuring gross precipitation (P. At the end of 25 observations, it was observed that, relative to P values, Pi values were 76.2% in semideciduous forest (FES, 85.1% in E.cloeziana forest and 84.0% in Pinus sp forest. In addition, comparing these stands, a larger leaf canopy coverage and consequently greater capability for water retention was noted in the semideciduous forest. However, no statistical differences were observed (P<0.05 between the stands of interest regarding throughfall.

  20. College Athlete Stands Again…On His Own!

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: NIBIB Robotics College Athlete Stands Again…On His Own! Past ... cells to make new connections. Read More "NIBIB Robotics" Articles Progress for the Paralyzed / College Athlete Stands ...

  1. Mechanical properties of free standing porous anodic alumina films

    OpenAIRE

    Ignashev, E.; Shulgov, V.

    2012-01-01

    Free-standing films of anodic alumina obtained from the one-sided anodization of aluminum were studied. The flexural strength of free-standing porous anodic alumina films to the lateral bending, circular bending, and microhardness were studied.

  2. From terrestrial to aquatic fluxes: Integrating stream dynamics within a dynamic global vegetation modeling framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Jerad; Poulter, Benjamin; Emmett, Kristen; Cross, Molly; Al-Chokhachy, Robert; Maneta, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Integrated terrestrial ecosystem models simulate the dynamics and feedbacks between climate, vegetation, disturbance, and hydrology and are used to better understand biogeography and biogeochemical cycles. Extending dynamic vegetation models to the aquatic interface requires coupling surface and sub-surface runoff to catchment routing schemes and has the potential to enhance how researchers and managers investigate how changes in the environment might impact the availability of water resources for human and natural systems. In an effort towards creating such a coupled model, we developed catchment-based hydrologic routing and stream temperature model to pair with LPJ-GUESS, a dynamic global vegetation model. LPJ-GUESS simulates detailed stand-level vegetation dynamics such as growth, carbon allocation, and mortality, as well as various physical and hydrologic processes such as canopy interception and through-fall, and can be applied at small spatial scales, i.e., 1 km. We demonstrate how the coupled model can be used to investigate the effects of transient vegetation dynamics and CO2 on seasonal and annual stream discharge and temperature regimes. As a direct management application, we extend the modeling framework to predict habitat suitability for fish habitat within the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, a 200,000 km2 region that provides critical habitat for a range of aquatic species. The model is used to evaluate, quantitatively, the effects of management practices aimed to enhance hydrologic resilience to climate change, and benefits for water storage and fish habitat in the coming century.

  3. Selenium toxicosis in wild aquatic birds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohlendorf, H.M.; Kilness, A.W.; Simmons, J.L.; Stroud, R.K.; Hoffman, D.J.; Moore, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    Severe gross and microscopic lesions and other changes were found in adult aquatic birds and in embryos from Kesterson Reservoir (a portion of Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge), Merced County, Calif., during 1984. Adult birds from that area were emaciated, had subacute to extensive chronic hepatic lesions, and had excess fluid and fibrin in the peritoneal cavity. Biochemical changes in their livers included elevated glycogen and non-protein-bound sulfhydryl concentrations and glutathione peroxidase activity but lowered protein, total sulfhydryl, and protein-bound sulfhydryl concentrations. Congenital malformations observed grossly in embryos were often multiple and included anophthalmia, microphthalmia, abnormal beaks, amelia, micromelia, ectrodactyly, and hydrocephaly. Mean concentrations of selenium in livers (94.4 ppm, dry weight) and kidneys (96.6 ppm) of birds collected at the Kesterson ponds were about 10 times those found at a nearby control area (8.3 and 12.2 ppm). We conclude that selenium present in the agricultural drainage water supplied to the Kesterson ponds accumulated in the food chain of aquatic birds to toxic concentrations and caused the lesion and other changes observed.

  4. Aquatic biodiversity assessment for the lazy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Constanze; Schubert, Grit; Calvignac-Spencer, Sébastien

    2016-02-01

    The world is covered in DNA. In any ecosystem, extracellular DNA fragments can be found that once formed the genomes of a variety of micro- and macroorganisms. A few years ago, it was proposed to use this environmental DNA (eDNA) as a source of information on local vertebrate biodiversity (Ficetola et al. 2008; Taberlet et al. 2012). This idea offered an elegant solution to take up the gauntlet of rapidly increasing monitoring needs. Coupled with barcoding efforts, it promised to be cost-efficient in many respects, for example man-hours and taxonomic expertise. Ecologists and conservation biologists with an interest in aquatic ecosystems have enthusiastically adopted and pioneered this new method, producing dozens of eDNA studies. Most of these studies have, however, focused on a single or a few aquatic species. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Valentini et al. (2016) move the field a step further by demonstrating that metabarcoding approaches - which simultaneously target large groups of organisms such as amphibians or fish - can match and sometimes even outperform other inventory methods. PMID:26876232

  5. Aquatic macroinvertebrates of the Grand Calumet River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Last, Laurel L.; Whitman, Richard L.

    2000-01-01

    The Grand Calumet River is potential habitat for a rich community of aquatic macroinvertebrates. Historical surveys of these organisms have been limited to post-industrialization of the Calumet Region; but because river habitats and conditions prior to industrialization have been described, past macroinvertebrate composition can be inferred. In the past 20 years, several surveys have been conducted in the Grand Calumet that have focused on a limited area, but when these studies are amassed the information available covers much of the river. In this paper, the aquatic macroinvertebrate communities in the river are described, and options for restoration are discussed. Many of the macroinvertebrates present are indicators of high levels of pollution, but a few pollution-sensitive species have been found. There is evidence, however, that the sediment quality has improved since the 1960's, likely due to pollution controls that have been put into place. Restoration opportunities should consider the macroinvertebrate community and the potential to improve sediment habitat without damaging the community structure.

  6. COMPOSTING AQUATIC MACROPHYTES: SALVINIA AURICULATA AND EICHHORNIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Kleiber Pessoa Borges

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available High population growth and densities in urban areas and the consumerism present in modern societies have pronounced effect on the generation of organic waste, which may become an environmental problem. Aerobic composting is one of the best known alternatives to treating these wastes. This study aimed to evaluate the applicability of composting as an alternative to the disposal of organic wastes from aquatic macrophytes Eichhornia crassipes and Salvinia auriculata collected in the reservoir UHE Luis Eduardo Magalhães, Tocantins, Brazil and also produce an organic compound from different combinations of macrophytes, prunning residues and organic waste generated by the Campus of Palmas of UFT, TO. The study was conducted in an area of 80m² in unprotected environment at the experimental station of the Campus of Palmas. The experiments were done as three replications in the dry season (from 18.09.2008 to 11.21.2008 and rainy season (from 03.09.2009 to 05.04.2009 and the parameters temperature, pH, total nitrogen and carbon, and organic matter were monitored along with counts of microorganisms. It was possible to produce compost from the combinations of organic wastes within 65 days of composting during the dry season and 55 days in the rainy season. The aquatic macrophytes resulted in a good raw material for composting, since there is not a destination for the excess plant materials removed by the cleaning process of the reservoir.

  7. Intense ultraviolet perturbations on aquatic primary producers

    CERN Document Server

    Guimarais, Mayrene; Horvath, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    During the last decade, the hypothesis that one or more biodiversity drops in the Phanerozoic eon, evident in the geological record, might have been caused by the most powerful kind of stellar explosion so far known (Gamma Ray Bursts) has been discussed in several works. These stellar explosions could have left an imprint in the biological evolution on Earth and in other habitable planets. In this work we calculate the short-term lethality that a GRB would produce in the aquatic primary producers on Earth. This effect on life appears as a result of ultraviolet (UV) re-transmission in the atmosphere of a fraction of the gamma energy, resulting in an intense UV flash capable of penetrating ~ tens of meters in the water column in the ocean. We focus on the action of the UV flash on phytoplankton, as they are the main contributors to global aquatic primary productivity. Our results suggest that the UV flash could cause an hemispheric reduction of phytoplankton biomass in the upper mixed layer of the World Ocean o...

  8. The Total Arsenic Concentrations of Aquatic Products and the Assessment of Arsenic Intake from Aquatic Products in Guangzhou, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Guang-Hui

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the contribution of aquatic products consumed by the resident to the daily dietary arsenic intakes of the residents of Guangzhou of Guangdong province in China. All aquatic products were sampled from supermarkets and terminal markets. Accuracy was assured using standard reference material (GBW08551 and recovery experiments. Total arsenic concentrations of aquatic products were determined after acid digestion by hydride generation atomic fluorescent spectrometry. A wide range of arsenic concentration (0.0075-1.2017 mg/kg was found among the various aquatic products, the mean arsenic concentration in aquatic production was 0.2022 mg/kg. The arsenic concentrations of various aquatic products groups were as follows: Crustacean (0.3176±0.2324 mg/kg >Mollusk fish (0.1979±0.2013 mg/k >Saltwater fish (0.1558±0.1119 mg/kg >Freshwater fish (0.1374±0.0970 mg/kg. The range of daily dietary arsenic intake of various residents through the consumption of aquatic products was 5.96-11.85 µg/day. The freshwater fish had the largest contribution to the daily dietary arsenic intakes from aquatic products in all type aquatic products, accounted for around 50%.

  9. Standing Sound Waves in Air with DataStudio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2010-01-01

    Two experiments related to standing sound waves in air are adapted for using the ScienceWorkshop data-acquisition system with the DataStudio software from PASCO scientific. First, the standing waves are created by reflection from a plane reflector. The distribution of the sound pressure along the standing wave is measured. Second, the resonance…

  10. A Fresh Look at Longitudinal Standing Waves on a Spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Casey

    2013-01-01

    Transverse standing waves produced on a string, as shown in Fig. 1, are a common demonstration of standing wave patterns that have nodes at both ends. Longitudinal standing waves can be produced on a helical spring that is mounted vertically and attached to a speaker, as shown in Fig. 2, and used to produce both node-node (NN) and node-antinode…

  11. 21 CFR 886.1860 - Ophthalmic instrument stand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ophthalmic instrument stand. 886.1860 Section 886...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1860 Ophthalmic instrument stand. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic instrument stand is an AC-powered or nonpowered device intended to store...

  12. DIALOG: Fostering Early Career Development Across the Aquatic Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caroline Susan Weiler, PhD

    2004-11-14

    A total of 447 dissertation abstracts were received for the DIALOG V Program, with 146 individuals applying for the DIALOG V Symposium; 47 were invited and 45 have accepted. This represents a significant increase compared to the DIALOG IV Program in which 221 abstracts were registered and 124 applied for the symposium. The importance of the dissertation registration service is indicated by the increasing number of individuals who take time to register their dissertation even when they are not interested in applying to the symposium. The number of visits to the webpage has also increased significantly over the years. This also reflects graduate interest in being part of the on-line Dissertation Registry and receiving the weekly electronic DIALOG Newsletter. See http://aslo.org/phd.html for details. The DIALOG symposium reaches approximately 40 new PI's at a pivotal point in their research careers. Based on their comments, the symposium changes the way participants think, communicate, and approach their research. The science community and the general population will benefit from the perspectives these new PI's bring back to their home institutions and share with their students and colleagues. This group should act as a catalyst to move the entire field in exciting new, interdisciplinary directions. To reach more graduates, plans are underway to establish the symposium on an annual basis. By facilitating the development of close collegial ties, symposium participants come away with a network of colleagues from around the globe with interests in aquatic science research and education. Past participants are collaborating on research proposals, and all have noted that participation has enabled them to develop a more interdisciplinary view of their field, influencing the way they interpret, communicate, and approacli their research. The dissertation registry provides a unique introduction to the work of this most recent generation of aquatic scientists. Each

  13. Antagonism of Some Aquatic Hyphomycetes against Plant Pathogenic Fungi

    OpenAIRE

    S. C. SATI; P. Arya

    2010-01-01

    The antagonistic activity of five aquatic hyphomycetes, viz., Heliscus lugdunensis, Tetrachaetum elegans, Tetracladium breve, T. marchalianum, and T. nainitalense, against seven plant pathogenic fungi was studied using a dual culture technique. Inhibitory activity of tested aquatic hyphomycetes was determined by measuring the radial growth of plant pathogenic fungi on dual culture plates. Tetrachaetum elegans showed antagonistic activity against Colletotrichum falcatum, Fusarium oxysporum, Py...

  14. VASCULAR PLANTS AS ENGINEERS OF OXYGEN IN AQUATIC SYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The impact of organisms on oxygen is one of the most dramatic examples of ecosystem engineering on Earth. In aquatic systems, which have much lower oxygen concentrations than the atmosphere, vascular aquatic plants can affect oxygen concentrations significantly not only on long t...

  15. Aquatic Bird Bornavirus 1 in Wild Geese, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Anders F.; Nielsen, Jesper B.; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Chriél, Mariann; Smith, Dale A; Bertelsen, Mads F.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate aquatic bird bornavirus 1 in Europe, we examined 333 brains from hunter-killed geese in Denmark in 2014. Seven samples were positive by reverse transcription PCR and were 98.2%-99.8% identical; they were also 97.4%-98.1% identical to reference strains of aquatic bird bornavirus 1...

  16. The Role of Aquatic Ecosystems in the Elimination of Pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contamination of aquatic ecosystems is always of concern to environmental scientists; however, these systems also possess unique capabilities allowing them to eliminate or mitigate certain levels of pollutants. Primarily through the presence of vegetation, aquatic ecosystems are known to be capable...

  17. Pieter Hendrik Nienhuis: aquatic ecologist and environmental scientist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leuven, R.S.E.W.; van den Heuvel, P.J.; van Katwijk, M.; Herman, P.M.J.; van der Velde, G.; Ragas, A.M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Prof. Dr. Pieter Hendrik (Piet) Nienhuis worked for almost 40 years in all aspects of aquatic ecology and environmental science and retired on 31 October 2003. He can be characterised as a distinguished scientist, shaped in an applied estuarine and aquatic research ambience of the former Delta Insti

  18. The Fish Kill Mystery: Learning about Aquatic Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosal, Erica F.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a case where students can learn about aquatic communities. In this case, students speculate on what may have caused a major fish kill in an estuary in North Carolina. In the process, they explore how land runoff and excess nutrients affect aquatic communities. They also learn about the complex life cycle of the dinoflagellate…

  19. Establishing effective working relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Trish

    2016-02-24

    This article, the second in a series of 11, provides support and offers advice to new and existing mentors and practice teachers to enable them to progress in their role and develop a portfolio of evidence. In particular, the article discusses how to establish effective working relationships and emphasises the importance of the student-mentor or student-practice teacher relationship. It examines the essential qualities, attributes and characteristics of an effective mentor or practice teacher. The article provides learning activities and suggests ways in which mentors and practice teachers can undertake various self-assessments, enabling them to gather relevant evidence to demonstrate how they can meet and maintain the requirements for these roles as stipulated by the Nursing and Midwifery Council. PMID:26907148

  20. Cone visual pigments of aquatic mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Lucy A; Robinson, Phyllis R

    2005-01-01

    It has long been hypothesized that the visual systems of animals are evolutionarily adapted to their visual environment. The entrance many millions of years ago of mammals into the sea gave these new aquatic mammals completely novel visual surroundings with respect to light availability and predominant wavelengths. This study examines the cone opsins of marine mammals, hypothesizing, based on previous studies [Fasick et al. (1998) and Levenson & Dizon (2003)], that the deep-dwelling marine mammals would not have color vision because the pressure to maintain color vision in the dark monochromatic ocean environment has been relaxed. Short-wavelength-sensitive (SWS) and long-wavelength-sensitive (LWS) cone opsin genes from two orders (Cetacea and Sirenia) and an additional suborder (Pinnipedia) of aquatic mammals were amplified from genomic DNA (for SWS) and cDNA (for LWS) by PCR, cloned, and sequenced. All animals studied from the order Cetacea have SWS pseudogenes, whereas a representative from the order Sirenia has an intact SWS gene, for which the corresponding mRNA was found in the retina. One of the pinnipeds studied (harp seal) has an SWS pseudogene, while another species (harbor seal) appeared to have an intact SWS gene. However, no SWS cone opsin mRNA was found in the harbor seal retina, suggesting a promoter or splice site mutation preventing transcription of the gene. The LWS opsins from the different species were expressed in mammalian cells and reconstituted with the 11-cis-retinal chromophore in order to determine maximal absorption wavelengths (lambda(max)) for each. The deeper dwelling Cetacean species had blue shifted lambda(max) values compared to shallower-dwelling aquatic species. Taken together, these findings support the hypothesis that in the monochromatic oceanic habitat, the pressure to maintain color vision has been relaxed and mutations are retained in the SWS genes, resulting in pseudogenes. Additionally, LWS opsins are retained in the

  1. Renormalization schemes: Where do we stand?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider the status of the current approaches to the application of the renormalization program to the standard SU2L x U1 theory from the standpoint of the interplay of the scheme chosen for such an application and the attendant high-precision tests of the respective loop effects. We thus review the available schemes and discuss their theoretical relationships. We also show how such schemes stand in numerical relation to one another in the context of high-precision Z0 physics, as an illustration. 15 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Construction of an automated table standing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the construction of an upright stretcher designed for patients in rehabilitation. The standing back to patients' expectations of therapeutic improvement, allowing correct all the troubles of a passive long. It has been shown that this table favors not only physically but also has a psychological reach beyond the scope of physical therapy and strongly affects the recovery. At the same time, the use of an upright stretcher greatly decreases the biomechanical disorders of hospital staff in the process of recovery. Thus the problem of rehabilitation of trafficking in a comprehensive way which not only focuses on the patient's undivided attention but also includes medical and auxiliary personnel.

  3. Cs-137 content in a spruce stand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cs-137 content of a spruce stand was investigated in soil, plant and animal biomasses of a 100 m. 100 m permanent study-site. The total content was 119 kBq.m-2. Most of all, 82.7% were found in soil, of that about 59.5% were bound in the 4 cm thick humus layer. The Cs-137 content of the above growing plant-biomass was 13050 Bq.m-2, these are 11.1% of the total. The Cs-137 contribution, bound in animal biomass was insignificant small. (orig.)

  4. Nanopositioning with detection of a standing wave

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holá, Miroslava; Hrabina, Jan; Číp, Ondřej; Fejfar, A.; Stuchlík, J.; Kočka, J.; Oulehla, Jindřich; Lazar, Josef

    Ostrava: TANGER Ltd, 2013. ISBN 978-80-87294-44-4. [NANOCON 2013. International Conference /5./. Brno (CZ), 16.10.2013-18.10.2013] R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP102/11/P820; GA TA ČR TA02010711; GA TA ČR TE01020233; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA MŠk EE2.4.31.0016 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Nanometrology * Nanopositioning * Fabry-Perot cavity * Standing wave * Interferometry Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  5. Optimal testing of stand-by systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optimal test policy for a safety stand-by system is considered. In this paper we introduce a closed loop policy: the tests are not fixed in advance but a testing decision can be taken at any time. The method of dynamic programming is used to find the optimal policy in the case of a single unit and of a two-unit redundant system. The results are compared with those that would be obtained in the case where the testing policy is fixed in advance. The subject is discussed in relation to nuclear power plants. (author)

  6. Ecological limitations on aquatic mosquito predator colonization in the urban environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, John; Keating, Joseph; Mbogo, Charles M; Kahindi, Samuel; Beier, John C

    2004-12-01

    Urban malaria cases are becoming common in Africa as more people move into cities and industrialization proceeds. While many species of Anopheles mosquitoes vector malaria in rural areas, only a few are found within cities. The success of anthropophilic species in cities, such as members of the An. gambiae complex, may be explained by limitations on colonization by predator species in urban environments. Habitats that are temporal or structurally simple have lower predator survivorship in a variety of ecosystems, but these have not been investigated previously in an urban area. Areas within and around the Kenyan coastal town of Malindi were previously sampled for the presence of standing water using a geographic sampling strategy with probability proportional to size sampling of planned well-drained, unplanned poorly-drained, planned poorly-drained, unplanned well-drained, and peri-urban locations. Standing aquatic habitats in these areas were reassessed. During monthly sampling, presence/absence of mosquitoes and predator taxa were noted, as were ecological habitat variables: structural complexity and presence of water. Lambda statistics were calculated to associate predator guilds, habitat types, location variables, and ecological variables. All predator guilds found in habitats were strongly associated with habitat type, as were the structural complexity and temporal nature of the habitats. Types of habitat were heterogeneously distributed throughout Malindi, with swimming pools as a common habitat type in planned urban areas and tire track pools a common habitat type in peri-urban areas of Malindi. Predator colonization of aquatic habitats in Malindi was strongly influenced by habitat type, and not associated with location characteristics. Ecological variables were affected by the type of habitats, which are co-associated with planning and drainage in Malindi. While habitat types are distributed heterogeneously within Malindi, habitats with low predation

  7. Assessing Sources of Stress to Aquatic Ecosystems: Using Biomarkers and Bioindicators to Characterize Exodure-Response Profiles of Anthropogenic Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, S.M.

    1999-03-29

    Establishing causal relationships between sources of environmental stressors and aquatic ecosystem health if difficult because of the many biotic and abiotic factors which can influence or modify responses of biological systems to stress, the orders of magnitude involved in extrapolation over both spatial and temporal scales, and compensatory mechanisms such as density-dependent responses that operate in populations. To address the problem of establishing causality between stressors and effects on aquatic systems, a diagnostic approach, based on exposure-response profiles for various anthropogenic activities, was developed to help identify sources of stress responsible for effects on aquatic systems at ecological significant levels of biological organization (individual, population, community). To generate these exposure-effects profiles, biomarkers of exposure were plotted against bioindicators of corresponding effects for several major anthropogenic activities including petrochemical , pulp and paper, domestic sewage, mining operations, land-development activities, and agricultural activities. Biomarkers of exposure to environmental stressors varied depending on the type of anthropogenic activity involved. Bioindicator effects, however, including histopathological lesions, bioenergetic status, individual growth, reproductive impairment, and community-level responses were similar among many of the major anthropogenic activities. This approach is valuable to help identify and diagnose sources of stressors in environments impacted by multiple stressors. By identifying the types and sources of environmental stressors, aquatic ecosystems can be more effectively protected and managed to maintain acceptable levels of environmental quality and ecosystem fitness.

  8. Sliding and Lower Limb Mechanics during Sit-Stand-Sit Transitions with a Standing Wheelchair

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. This study aimed to investigate the shear displacement between the body and backrest/seat, range of motion (ROM), and force acting on the lower limb joints during sit-stand-sit transitions by operating an electric-powered standing wheelchair. Methods and Materials. The amounts of sliding along the backrest and the seat plane, ROM of lower limb joints, and force acting on the knee/foot were measured in twenty-four people with paraplegia. Results. Without an antishear mechanism, the sh...

  9. Ecotoxicological Assessment of Aquatic Genotoxicity Using the Comet Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KHUSNUL YAQIN

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Comet assay is a novel biological analysis, which is a sensitive, flexible, simple, rapid, and inexpensive method to assess aquatic genotoxicant. Since Singh and co-workers developed the method in 1988, its use has increased exponentially in various fields. This review discourses on the application of this assay in aquatic ecosystems. Various types of cells from various aquatic organisms have been tested by various genotoxicant both direct- and indirect-acting using the comet assay. The applications of this assay suggest that it is a useful assay to assess aquatic genotoxicants. However, there are some factors, which should be taken into account when using this assay as aquatic ecotoxicological assessment device such as inter-animal and cell variability.

  10. A community-based framework for aquatic ecosystem models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trolle, Didde; Hamilton, D. P.; Hipsey, M. R.; Bolding, Karsten; Bruggeman, J.; Mooij, W. M.; Janse, J. H.; Nielsen, A.; Jeppesen, E.; Elliott, J. A.; Makler-Pick, V.; Petzoldt, T.; Rinke, K.; Flindt, M. R.; Arhonditsis, G. B.; Gal, G.; Bjerring, R.; Tominaga, K.; Hoen, J.; Downing, A. S.; Marques, D. M.; Fragoso, C. R.; Sondergaard, M.; Hanson, P. C.

    2012-01-01

    , and (viii) avoid 're-inventing the wheel', thus accelerating improvements to aquatic ecosystem models. We intend to achieve this as a community that fosters interactions amongst ecologists and model developers. Further, we outline scientific topics recently articulated by the scientific community...... a literature survey, we document the growing importance of numerical aquatic ecosystem models while also noting the difficulties, up until now, of the aquatic scientific community to make significant advances in these models during the past two decades. Through a common forum for aquatic ecosystem...... modellers we aim to (i) advance collaboration within the aquatic ecosystem modelling community, (ii) enable increased use of models for research, policy and ecosystem-based management, (iii) facilitate a collective framework using common (standardised) code to ensure that model development is incremental...

  11. CONTRIBUTIONS TO AQUATIC VEGETATION OF ISAC-UZLINA COMPLEX KNOWLEDGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    STEFAN NICOLAE

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Aquatic vegetation represents an important natural filter for the impurities charge of the Danube river water, constituting a barrier which hinds the polluants entrance in the Black Sea. It is important to mention that the conventional industrial installations, to obtain the treatment objectives of waste waters, use the same physical , chemical and biological principles as that which acts in a natural wet zone. The Isac – Uzlina aquatic complex (Danube Delta Biosphere Reserve was studied and a number of 13 aquatic associations was identified. For every of these, the floristic structure, composition and specific features are also given out. 40 releves of aquatic vegetation from 40 points were used to characterize this aquatic complex.

  12. Ebavõrdne võitlus stand-upi ja kabareetraditsiooni vahel Poolas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Władysław Chłopicki

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article first describes the old cabaret tradition of Polish comedy, and then looks at various forms of stand-up that have been spreading in Poland over the last 20 years, mainly on TV, but some originating in newly established comedy clubs. Within the last twenty years, the new form of stand-up in its American variety has been slowly moving in. The characteristics of this new genre included precisely the topics which were excluded from the old form (such as explicit sex references and scatology as well as the focus on the vernacular. The common features of stand-up included immediacy, playing cultural and linguistic kinship with the audience, impersonations, “shifting consensus”, seeming spontaneity, and occasional self-deprecation. Young performers found a venue in the well known HBO show called “Na stojaka” (an attempt to translate stand-up into Polish, a show which ran for ten years, as well as other venues such as the stand-up competition called “Zabij mnie śmiechem” (“Kill me with laughter” broadcast by the Polsat commercial channel since 2010, in which the winner is rewarded with a trip to an American stand-up school.This kind of stand-up does not meet with universal appeal, as one comment found on the internet clearly shows: “Stand-up Tragedy”. The Polish audiences largely believe that the performance must be first of all funny, and only then “authentic”, while some young performers seem to play mainly on obscenity and scatology and forget the need to amuse. Therefore, even though the new form has been slowly gaining ground, the cabaret prevails both in some of the forms which it shares with stand-up (e.g. non-interactive monologues, which are no longer literary but colloquial, or impersonations and also with regard to popular performers, who largely originate in cabaret or are well-known actors.

  13. Environmental bacteriophages : viruses of microbes in aquatic ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TélesphoreSIME - NGANDO

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery 2-3 decades ago that viruses of microbes are abundant in marine ecosystems, viral ecology has grown increasingly to reach the status of a full scientific discipline in environmental sciences. A dedicated ISVM society, the International Society for Viruses of Microorganisms (http://www.isvm.org/, was recently launched. Increasing studies in viral ecology are sources of novel knowledge related to the biodiversity of living things, the functioning of ecosystems, and the evolution of the cellular world. This is because viruses are perhaps the most diverse, abundant, and ubiquitous biological entities in the biosphere, although local environmental conditions enrich for certain viral types through selective pressure. They exhibit various lifestyles that intimately depend on the deep-cellular mechanisms, and are ultimately replicated by members of all three domains of cellular life (Bacteria, Eukarya, Archaea, as well as by giant viruses of some eukaryotic cells. This establishes viral parasites as microbial killers but also as cell partners or metabolic manipulators in microbial ecology. The present chapter sought to review the literature on the diversity and functional roles of viruses of microbes in environmental microbiology, focusing primarily on prokaryotic viruses (i.e. phages in aquatic ecosystems, which form the bulk of our knowledge in modern environmental viral ecology.

  14. Effects of radioactive nuclides on the reproduction of aquatic organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among various organisms in aquatic environments, fishes are more radiosensitive and critical creatures in terms of the biological effects of radionuclides on the ecosystem. The hatchability of fish eggs is not very sensitive criterion for radiation injury. The differentiation and development of the germ cells of fish embryos are inhibited by the small dose of radiation, and there is some possibility that they are more sensitive indicators of radiation effects. Chromosome aberration is used as an indicator of the effect of small dose of radiation in both cultured cells and cleaved egg cells of fishes. The late effects of radiation have been seen in fishes one or more years after the exposure to the relatively small dose of radiation. The biological materials for detecting the effect of radiation on the quantitative base in future in vitro and in vivo have been established. Current studies are directed toward finding more sensitive indicators of radiation effects, estimating more quantitatively the late effects of radiation on fishes, and analyzing the mechanism of radiation injuries. (Yamashita, S.)

  15. An investigation into student understanding of longitudinal standing waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostal, Jack Alan

    This study investigates the difficulties that introductory university physics students have with the concept of longitudinal standing waves in the context of standing waves in pipes. My goal is to identify difficulties that persist even after standard instruction on longitudinal standing waves and attempt to improve upon that method of instruction. The study follows a four-step design. I first use exploratory surveys and interviews with students to elicit the difficulties present in students' understanding of longitudinal standing waves in pipes. I then use the information gained to create and assessment instrument, the Standing Waves Diagnostic Test, and a curricular intervention, the Longitudinal Standing Waves Tutorial. I then undertake a three-step process of pre-testing students with the Standing Wave Diagnostic Test, intervention with the Longitudinal Standing Waves Tutorial, and post-testing again with the Standing Wave Diagnostic Test to determine the impact of the intervention. This is then compared to data from students in classes where the intervention is not used. Students using the intervention significantly outperform their non-intervention counterparts on the Standing Wave Diagnostic Test. The results of the students pre- and post-tests indicate that significant improvement in students' understandings of longitudinal standing waves can be achieved by the use of the tutorial.

  16. Performance evaluation on aquatic product cold-chain logistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbing Wu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The requirements for high quality and diversification aquatic products are increasing with the improvement of Chinese living standard. However, the distribution between place of production and place of consumption are uneven, which results in large cold-chain logistics demand for aquatic products. At present, the low-level development of cold chain logistics has a bad impact on the circulation of aquatic products in China. So it is very urgent to develop cold-chain logistics in China. Design/methodology/approach: In order to do this, we apply performance evaluation, a well-known management tool, to study Chinese aquatic product cold-chain logistics. In this paper we first propose SISP(Subjects, Indexes, Standards, and Phases of performance evaluation model and ACSSN model(Aquatic product, Customer, Supply Chain, Society, and Node enterprises of supply chain for aquatic products cold-chain logistics performance evaluation. Then an ANP-Fuzzy method is proposed to evaluate the operational performance of Shandong Oriental Ocean Sci-Tech Co., Ltd. Furthermore, a system dynamic model is built to simulate the impact of temperature on the profits in aquatic products cold-chain sales section. Findings: We find out within a reasonable temperature range, lower temperature brings higher profit level. Also, performance improvement methods are proposed and the simulation of performance evaluation system is developed. Practical implications: Our findings can help to improve the level of aquatic product cold-chain logistics in China. Originality/value: The paper proposes the SISP (Subjects, Indexes, Standards, and Phases of performance evaluation model and ACSSN model (Aquatic product, Customer, Supply Chain, Society, and Node enterprises of supply chain for aquatic products cold-chain logistics performance evaluation.

  17. Biotechnology and DNA vaccines for aquatic animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurath, G.

    2008-01-01

    Biotechnology has been used extensively in the development of vaccines for aquaculture. Modern molecular methods such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), cloning and microarray analysis have facilitated antigen discovery, construction of novel candidate vaccines, and assessments of vaccine efficacy, mode of action, and host response. This review focuses on DNA vaccines for finfish to illustrate biotechnology applications in this field. Although DNA vaccines for fish rhabdoviruses continue to show the highest efficacy, DNA vaccines for several other viral and bacterial fish pathogens have now been proven to provide significant protection against pathogen challenge. Studies of the fish rhabdovirus DNA vaccines have elucidated factors that affect DNA vaccine efficacy as well as the nature of the fish innate and adaptive immune responses to DNA vaccines. As tools for managing aquatic animal disease emergencies, DNA vaccines have advantages in speed, flexibility, and safety, and one fish DNA vaccine has been licensed.

  18. Biofilm-flow interactions in aquatic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, K. T.; Kazemifar, F.; Blois, G.; Aybar, M.; Perez Calleja, P.; Nerenberg, R.; Sinha, S.; Hardy, R. J.; Best, J.; Sambrook Smith, G.

    2015-12-01

    Biofilms are pervasive in aquatic environments, growing in pipes and channels in water supply systems, on permeable riverbeds, etc. The permeable, heterogeneous, and deformable structure of the biofilms make their interaction with surrounding fluid flow important from a range of perspectives, such as mass and momentum transport, and biofilm deformation and detachment due to shear stresses. Our understanding of these processes is limited, in part due to technical obstacles for performing such measurements. We have attempted to address these challenges using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and fluorescence imaging techniques in a water channel flow facility to obtain time-resolved velocity vector fields of flow around cylinders covered with biofilms at different growth stages. Analysis is focused on the coupled dynamics of turbulence and the biofilm development under different flow and nutrient conditions.

  19. Sustainable exploitation and management of aquatic resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neuenfeldt, Stefan; Köster, Fritz

    2014-01-01

    surrounding environment.Freshwater fisheries and ecology is devoted to looking at the behaviour of particular speciesof fish and their interaction with the environment. Coastal ecology deals with the structure and function ofthe ecosystems as a habitat for fish and shellfish as well as with coastal area...... ecosystem approach whichutilizes synergies in natural and technical sciencedisciplines. DTU Aqua advises the Danish Ministry ofFood, Agriculture and Fisheries and other publicauthorities, the commercial fisheries, theaquaculture industry and international commissions.DTU Aqua deals with all types ofaquatic...... ocean and how these factors impact the living conditions formarine organisms. Population genetics aims at gaining knowledge on how to preserve and managebiodiversity sustainably. Individual biology deals with the biology of aquatic organisms and theirinteraction with other organisms and with the...

  20. Monitoring aquatic environments with autonomous systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jesper Philip Aagaard

    High frequency measurements from autonomous sensors have become a widely used tool among aquatic scientists. This report focus primarily on the use of ecosystem metabolism based on high frequency oxygen measurements and relates the calculations to spatial variation, biomass of the primary producers...... in epilimnion were primarily a result of metabolism and gas exchange with the atmosphere, while only 10% of the variation was due to physical movement of water across the thermocline. 3) Dense macrophyte populations in oligotrophic systems may have a higher GPP than expected based on nutrient...... conditions in the water phase and in shallow systems the macrophytes can completely dominate primary production. This was despite the fact that the plants in the studied system were light-saturated most of the light hours and occasionally carbon limited. It was also shown that the GPP and the total...

  1. Actinide elements in aquatic and terrestrial environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress is reported in terrestrial ecology studies with regard to plutonium in biota from the White Oak Creek forest; comparative distribution of plutonium in two forest ecosystems; an ecosystem model of plutonium dynamics; actinide element metabolism in cotton rats; and crayfish studies. Progress is reported in aquatic studies with regard to transuranics in surface waters, frogs, benthic algae, and invertebrates from pond 3513; and radioecology of transuranic elements in cotton rats bordering waste pond 3513. Progress is also reported in stability of trivalent plutonium in White Oak Lake water; chemistry of plutonium, americium, curium, and uranium in pond water; uranium, thorium, and plutonium in small mammals; and effect of soil pretreatment on the distribution of plutonium

  2. Sustaining Aquatic Ecosystems in Boreal Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Schindler

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Few boreal waters are managed in a sustainable manner, because cumulative effects of a variety of human activities are not considered. Fisheries and water quality have declined in most large water bodies of the southern boreal zone. Some of the reasons are direct, including overexploitation of fisheries, alteration of flow patterns, introductions of non-native species, and discharge of eutrophying nutrients and persistent contaminants. However, improper management of watersheds and airsheds also causes degradation of aquatic ecosystems. Clear-cut logging, climatic warming, acid precipitation, and stratospheric ozone depletion are among the more important of these indirect stressors. There are important interactions among these stressors, requiring that they not be treated in isolation. Ecological sustainability of boreal waters would require that exploitation of all parts of the boreal landscape be much lower than it is at present. Unfortunately, management for sustainability is lagging far behind scientific understanding in most countries.

  3. Chemodiversity in terpene emissions at a boreal Scots pine stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäck, J.; Aalto, J.; Henriksson, M.; Hakola, H.; He, Q.; Boy, M.

    2011-10-01

    Atmospheric chemistry in background areas is strongly influenced by natural vegetation. Coniferous forests are known to produce large quantities of volatile vapors, especially terpenes to the surrounding air. These compounds are reactive in the atmosphere, and contribute to the formation and growth of atmospheric new particles. Our aim was to analyze the variability of mono- and sesquiterpene emissions between Scots pine trees, in order to clarify the potential errors caused by using emission data obtained from only a few trees in atmospheric chemistry models. We also aimed at testing if stand history and seed origin has an influence on the chemotypic diversity. The inherited, chemotypic variability in mono- and sesquiterpene emission was studied in a seemingly homogeneous 47-yr-old stand in Southern Finland, where two areas differing in their stand regeneration history could be distinguished. Sampling was conducted in August 2009. Terpene concentrations in the air had been measured at the same site for seven years prior to branch sampling for chemotypes. Two main compounds, α-pinene and Δ3-carene formed together 40-97% of the monoterpene proportions in both the branch emissions and in the air concentrations. The data showed a bimodal distribution in emission composition, in particular in Δ3-carene emission within the studied population. 10% of the trees emitted mainly α-pinene and no Δ3-carene at all, whereas 20% of the trees where characterized as high Δ3-carene emitters (Δ3-carene forming >80% of total emitted monoterpene spectrum). An intermediate group of trees emitted equal amounts of both α-pinene and Δ3-carene. The emission pattern of trees at the area established using seeding as the artificial regeneration method differed from the naturally regenerated or planted trees, being mainly high Δ3-carene emitters. Some differences were also seen in e.g. camphene and limonene emissions between chemotypes, but sesquiterpene emissions did not differ

  4. Chemodiversity in terpene emissions at a boreal Scots pine stand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bäck

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric chemistry in background areas is strongly influenced by natural vegetation. Coniferous forests are known to produce large quantities of volatile vapors, especially terpenes to the surrounding air. These compounds are reactive in the atmosphere, and contribute to the formation and growth of atmospheric new particles.

    Our aim was to analyze the variability of mono- and sesquiterpene emissions between Scots pine trees, in order to clarify the potential errors caused by using emission data obtained from only a few trees in atmospheric chemistry models. We also aimed at testing if stand history and seed origin has an influence on the chemotypic diversity. The inherited, chemotypic variability in mono- and sesquiterpene emission was studied in a seemingly homogeneous 47-yr-old stand in Southern Finland, where two areas differing in their stand regeneration history could be distinguished. Sampling was conducted in August 2009. Terpene concentrations in the air had been measured at the same site for seven years prior to branch sampling for chemotypes.

    Two main compounds, α-pinene and Δ3-carene formed together 40–97% of the monoterpene proportions in both the branch emissions and in the air concentrations. The data showed a bimodal distribution in emission composition, in particular in Δ3-carene emission within the studied population. 10% of the trees emitted mainly α-pinene and no Δ3-carene at all, whereas 20% of the trees where characterized as high Δ3-carene emitters (Δ3-carene forming >80% of total emitted monoterpene spectrum. An intermediate group of trees emitted equal amounts of both α-pinene and Δ3-carene. The emission pattern of trees at the area established using seeding as the artificial regeneration method differed from the naturally regenerated or planted trees, being mainly high Δ3-carene emitters. Some differences were

  5. Standing Advisory Group on Safeguards Implementation. A status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The implementation of IAEA safeguards is a subject which attracts the attention of virtually every IAEA Member State. The reasons for this attention are many and varied and although much has been said and written about the subject it is clear that there will be continuing debate. In the hope of establishing a forum for a systematic review of current and anticipated future safeguards implementation problems, in 1975 the Director General called together ten persons from Member States with nuclear programmes at varying stages of development to form the Standing Advisory Group on Safeguards Implementation. The Group was later expanded to twelve and changes were made in its membership from time to time. The Director General called upon the Group to: (1) Evaluate the technical objectives of IAEA safeguards, particularly with a view to ensuring their continued validity in the light of technical developments; (2) assess the effectiveness and efficiency of specific safeguards operating methods in meeting these technical objectives; (3) advise on techniques to be employed in safeguards operations in order to ensure that these techniques conform to the latest international standards; and (4) recommend areas where further work on methods and techniques is needed. This paper reviews the work of the Standing Advisory Group on Safeguards Implementation since its formation in 1975, summarizes the subjects that have been examined and the advice rendered, and outlines the problem areas requiring further study in the interest of maximizing the effectiveness and efficiency of safeguards within the technical, legal and financial constraints which are expected to apply. (author)

  6. Improving Fishpond Sediment by Aquatic Vegetable Rotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Tao

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Continuously intensive fish farming results in pond degradation that needs to be improved. Therefore, the experiment rotating intensive fish culture with two aquatic vegetables lotus (Nelumbo nucifera and water chestnuts (Eleocharis dulcis cultivation is conducted aiming at determining the effect of rotation as a sediment management technique on improving the pond sediment and assessing the food safety risk of the vegetables cultivated in the pond sediment from the aspects of heavy metal. The results showed that after rotation, the content of Total Nitrogen (TN and Organic Matter (OM in the upper 10 cm sediment decreased significantly (p<0.05, with TN content reduced 1.05 and 0.74 g/kg; OM content reduced 0.59 and 0.37%, respectively. The contents of Organic-Phosphorus (OP and Fe/Al-bound Phosphorus (Fe/Al-P in the sediment decreased significantly (p<0.05, with OP reduced 0.05 and 0.04 g/kg, Fe/Al-P reduced 0.19 and 0.15 g/kg, respectively. The heavy metal contents of As, Pb, Cd, Hg, Cr and Zn except Cu in the pond sediment were under Chinese National II Soil Criterion and the contents of As, Pb, Cd, Hg, Cr, Cu and Zn in edible vegetable rhizomes satisfied Safety Requirements for Non-environmental Pollution Vegetable. Rotation of fish culture with aquatic vegetables cultivation effectively mitigated excessive nutrient load in the sediment while recycled the nutrient in the sediment to produce safe vegetables. It could be considered as a viable sediment quality improving technique.

  7. Arsenic accumulation by edible aquatic macrophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falinski, K A; Yost, R S; Sampaga, E; Peard, J

    2014-01-01

    Edible aquatic macrophytes grown in arsenic (As)-contaminated soil and sediment were investigated to determine the extent of As accumulation and potential risk to humans when consumed. Nasturtium officinale (watercress) and Diplazium esculentum (warabi) are two aquatic macrophytes grown and consumed in Hawaii. Neither has been assessed for potential to accumulate As when grown in As-contaminated soil. Some former sugarcane plantation soils in eastern Hawaii have been shown to have concentrations of total As over 500 mg kg(-1). It was hypothesized that both species will accumulate more As in contaminated soils than in non-contaminated soils. N. officinale and D. esculentum were collected in areas with and without As-contaminated soil and sediment. High soil As concentrations averaged 356 mg kg(-1), while low soil As concentrations were 0.75 mg kg(-1). Average N. officinale and D. esculentum total As concentrations were 0.572 mg kg(-1) and 0.075 mg kg(-1), respectively, corresponding to hazard indices of 0.12 and 0.03 for adults. Unlike previous studies where watercress was grown in As-contaminated water, N. officinale did not show properties of a hyperaccumulator, yet plant concentrations in high As areas were more than double those in low As areas. There was a slight correlation between high total As in sediment and soil and total As concentrations in watercress leaves and stems, resulting in a plant uptake factor of 0.010, an order of magnitude higher than previous studies. D. esculentum did not show signs of accumulating As in the edible fiddleheads. Hawaii is unique in having volcanic ash soils with extremely high sorption characteristics of As and P that limit release into groundwater. This study presents a case where soils and sediments were significantly enriched in total As concentration, but the water As concentration was below detection limits. PMID:24210365

  8. Engineering design of vertical test stand cryostat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under Indian Institutions and Fermilab collaboration, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory are jointly developing 2K Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostats for testing SCRF cavities at 2K. The VTS cryostat has been designed for a large testing aperture of 86.36 cm for testing of 325 MHz Spoke resonators, 650 MHz and 1.3 GHz multi-cell SCRF cavities for Fermilab's Project-X. Units will be installed at Fermilab and RRCAT and used to test cavities for Project-X. A VTS cryostat comprises of liquid helium (LHe) vessel with internal magnetic shield, top insert plate equipped with cavity support stand and radiation shield, liquid nitrogen (LN2) shield and vacuum vessel with external magnetic shield. The engineering design and analysis of VTS cryostat has been carried out using ASME B and PV Code and Finite Element Analysis. Design of internal and external magnetic shields was performed to limit the magnetic field inside LHe vessel at the cavity surface 2 shield has been performed to check the effectiveness of LN2 cooling and for compliance with ASME piping code allowable stresses.

  9. Millimeter-area, free standing, phospholipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltramo, Peter J; Van Hooghten, Rob; Vermant, Jan

    2016-05-11

    Minimal model biomembrane studies have the potential to unlock the fundamental mechanisms of cellular function that govern the processes upon which life relies. However, existing methods to fabricate free-standing model membranes currently have significant limitations. Bilayer sizes are often tens of micrometers, decoupling curvature or substrate effects, orthogonal control over tension, and solvent exchange combined with microscopy techniques is not possible, which restricts the studies that can be performed. Here, we describe a versatile platform to generate free standing, planar, phospholipid bilayers with millimeter scale areas. The technique relies on an adapted thin-film balance apparatus allowing for the dynamic control of the nucleation and growth of a planar black lipid membrane in the center of an orifice surrounded by microfluidic channels. Success is demonstrated using several different lipid types, including mixtures that show the same temperature dependent phase separation as existing protocols, moreover, membranes are highly stable. Two advantages unique to the proposed method are the dynamic control of the membrane tension and the possibility to make extremely large area membranes. We demonstrate this by showing how a block polymer, F68, used in drug delivery increases the membrane compliance. Together, the results demonstrate a new paradigm for studying the mechanics, structure, and function of model membranes. PMID:27050618

  10. Science stand-up at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Stephanie McClellan

    2013-01-01

    Supported by host Helen Keen from BBC4’s "It is Rocket Science", six amateur performers from CERN (Sam Gregson, Alex Brown, Benjamin Frisch, Claire Lee, Hugo Day and Clara Nellist) were joined on stage by geek-pop sensation Jonny Berliner and comedians Pierre Novellie and Lieven Scheire for a night of science stand-up comedy.   Host Helen Keen starts off the comedy event. (Image: Piotr Traczyk). Like the genesis of most great things, the LHComedy event began as an idea. Sam Gregson, a PhD student at CERN, had been a regular at the Cambridge Bright Club. This public engagement event promotes scientists’ research through stand-up comedy. Sam thought, “If people came to watch Bright Club at Cambridge and enjoyed the research, why can’t we do it at the biggest scientific experiment in the world?” Sam’s idea gained momentum after being introduced to FameLab participants at CERN. Similar to Bright Club, FameLab is a com...

  11. Turnover of eroded soil organic carbon after deposition in terrestrial and aquatic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkels, Frédérique; Cammeraat, Erik; Kalbitz, Karsten; van Oost, Kristof; Ellerbrock, Ruth; Follain, Stéphane; Fuchslueger, Lucia; Gerke, Horst; Heckrath, Goswin; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Kuhn, Nikolaus; van Loon, Emiel; Quinton, John; Richter, Andreas; Salvador-Blanes, Sébastien; Sommer, Michael; Steffens, Markus

    2015-04-01

    The fate of eroded soil organic carbon (SOC) after deposition is a large uncertainty in assessing the impact of soil erosion on C budgets. Globally, large amounts of SOC are transported by erosion and a substantial part is transferred into adjacent inland waters, linking terrestrial and aquatic C cycling. However, the net effect on C fluxes between soils, inland waters and atmosphere remains uncertain. In this study, we determined SOC turnover in terrestrial and aquatic environments and indentified its major controls. A European gradient of agricultural sites was sampled, spanning a wide range soil properties (e.g. texture, aggregation, etc.), SOC quantity and quality. In a 16-week incubation experiment, SOC turnover was determined for conditions reflecting downslope soils or inland waters. Moreover, we studied the impact of labile C inputs ('priming') on SOC stability using 13C labeled cellulose. Physical and chemical soil properties and SOC molecular composition were assessed as potential controls on C turnover. SOC deposition in aquatic environments resulted in upto 3.5 times higher C turnover than deposition on downslope soils. Labile C inputs enlarged total CO2 emissions, with the largest increase for aquatic conditions. Solid-state 13C NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy showed broad similarities in SOC molecular composition. Soil and SOC properties could not (yet) fully explain variation in SOC turnover between the sites. However, temporal trends in CO2 emissions clearly differed between downslope soils and inland waters. We established a quantitative model, based on the ten sites of the European gradient, that is capable to describe CO2 emissions for SOC deposited on soils and in inland waters and upon different levels of labile C inputs. Our findings indicate that deposition conditions (soils vs. inland waters) play a crucial role in determining C turnover. Erosion measures preventing deposition in aquatic environments could therefore be an important carbon saving

  12. Efficacy of trap modifications for increasing capture rates of aquatic snakes in floating aquatic funnel traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Brian J.; Wylie, Glenn D.; Casazza, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing detection and capture probabilities of rare or elusive herpetofauna of conservation concern is important to inform the scientific basis for their management and recovery. The Giant Gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas) is an example of a secretive, wary, and generally difficult-to-sample species about which little is known regarding its patterns of occurrence and demography. We therefore evaluated modifications to existing traps to increase the detection and capture probabilities of the Giant Gartersnake to improve the precision with which occurrence, abundance, survival, and other demographic parameters are estimated. We found that adding a one-way valve constructed of cable ties to the small funnel opening of traps and adding hardware cloth extensions to the wide end of funnels increased capture rates of the Giant Gartersnake by 5.55 times (95% credible interval = 2.45–10.51) relative to unmodified traps. The effectiveness of these modifications was insensitive to the aquatic habitat type in which they were deployed. The snout-vent length of the smallest and largest captured snakes did not vary among trap modifications. These trap modifications are expected to increase detection and capture probabilities of the Giant Gartersnake, and show promise for increasing the precision with which demographic parameters can be estimated for this species. We anticipate that the trap modifications found effective in this study will be applicable to a variety of aquatic and semi-aquatic reptiles and amphibians and improve conservation efforts for these species.

  13. Aquatic adventitious roots of the wetland plant Meionectes brownii can photosynthesize

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rich, Sarah Meghan; Ludwig, Martha; Pedersen, Ole;

    2011-01-01

    roots during submergence. • Underwater photosynthetic light and CO(2) response curves were determined for aquatic-adapted leaves, stems and aquatic roots of M. brownii. Oxygen microelectrode and (14)CO(2)-uptake experiments determined shoot inputs of O(2) and photosynthate into aquatic roots. • Aquatic...... m(-3) dissolved CO(2), aquatic roots fix carbon at 0.016 µmol CO(2) g(-1) DM s(-1). Illuminated aquatic roots do not rely on exogenous inputs of O(2). • The photosynthetic ability of aquatic roots presumably offers an advantage to submerged M. brownii as aquatic roots, unlike sediment roots, need...

  14. Multiresidue method for the quantitation of 20 pesticides in aquatic products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Ha Ra; Park, Jun Seo; Kim, Junghyun; Han, Sang Beom; Choi, Yong Seok

    2015-12-01

    As the consumption of aquatic products increased, the need for regulation of pesticide residues in aquatic products also emerged. Thus, in this study, a scheduled multiple reaction monitoring (sMRM) method employing a novel extraction and purification step based on QuEChERS with EDTA was developed for the simultaneous quantitation of 20 pesticides (alachlor, aldicarb, carbofuran, diazinon, dimethoate, dimethomorph, ethoprophos, ferimzone, fluridone, hexaconazole, iprobenfos, malathion, methidathion, methiocarb, phenthoate, phosalone, phosmet, phosphamidon, pirimicarb, and simazine) in aquatic products. Additionally, the present method was validated in the aspects of specificity, linearity (r ≥ 0.980), sensitivity (the limit of quantitation (LOQ) ≤ 5 ng/g), relative standard deviation, RSD (1.0% ≤ RSD ≤ 19.4%), and recovery (60.1% ≤ recovery ≤ 117.9%). Finally, the validated method was applied for the determination of the 20 pesticide residues in eel and shrimp purchased from local food markets. In the present study, QuEChERS with EDTA was successfully expanded to residual pesticide analysis for the first time. The present method could contribute to the rapid and successful establishment of the positive list system in South Korea. PMID:26466578

  15. Average Stand Age from Forest Inventory Plots Does Not Describe Historical Fire Regimes in Ponderosa Pine and Mixed-Conifer Forests of Western North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Jens T; Safford, Hugh D; North, Malcolm P; Fried, Jeremy S; Gray, Andrew N; Brown, Peter M; Dolanc, Christopher R; Dobrowski, Solomon Z; Falk, Donald A; Farris, Calvin A; Franklin, Jerry F; Fulé, Peter Z; Hagmann, R Keala; Knapp, Eric E; Miller, Jay D; Smith, Douglas F; Swetnam, Thomas W; Taylor, Alan H

    2016-01-01

    Quantifying historical fire regimes provides important information for managing contemporary forests. Historical fire frequency and severity can be estimated using several methods; each method has strengths and weaknesses and presents challenges for interpretation and verification. Recent efforts to quantify the timing of historical high-severity fire events in forests of western North America have assumed that the "stand age" variable from the US Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program reflects the timing of historical high-severity (i.e. stand-replacing) fire in ponderosa pine and mixed-conifer forests. To test this assumption, we re-analyze the dataset used in a previous analysis, and compare information from fire history records with information from co-located FIA plots. We demonstrate that 1) the FIA stand age variable does not reflect the large range of individual tree ages in the FIA plots: older trees comprised more than 10% of pre-stand age basal area in 58% of plots analyzed and more than 30% of pre-stand age basal area in 32% of plots, and 2) recruitment events are not necessarily related to high-severity fire occurrence. Because the FIA stand age variable is estimated from a sample of tree ages within the tree size class containing a plurality of canopy trees in the plot, it does not necessarily include the oldest trees, especially in uneven-aged stands. Thus, the FIA stand age variable does not indicate whether the trees in the predominant size class established in response to severe fire, or established during the absence of fire. FIA stand age was not designed to measure the time since a stand-replacing disturbance. Quantification of historical "mixed-severity" fire regimes must be explicit about the spatial scale of high-severity fire effects, which is not possible using FIA stand age data. PMID:27196621

  16. Average Stand Age from Forest Inventory Plots Does Not Describe Historical Fire Regimes in Ponderosa Pine and Mixed-Conifer Forests of Western North America.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens T Stevens

    Full Text Available Quantifying historical fire regimes provides important information for managing contemporary forests. Historical fire frequency and severity can be estimated using several methods; each method has strengths and weaknesses and presents challenges for interpretation and verification. Recent efforts to quantify the timing of historical high-severity fire events in forests of western North America have assumed that the "stand age" variable from the US Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA program reflects the timing of historical high-severity (i.e. stand-replacing fire in ponderosa pine and mixed-conifer forests. To test this assumption, we re-analyze the dataset used in a previous analysis, and compare information from fire history records with information from co-located FIA plots. We demonstrate that 1 the FIA stand age variable does not reflect the large range of individual tree ages in the FIA plots: older trees comprised more than 10% of pre-stand age basal area in 58% of plots analyzed and more than 30% of pre-stand age basal area in 32% of plots, and 2 recruitment events are not necessarily related to high-severity fire occurrence. Because the FIA stand age variable is estimated from a sample of tree ages within the tree size class containing a plurality of canopy trees in the plot, it does not necessarily include the oldest trees, especially in uneven-aged stands. Thus, the FIA stand age variable does not indicate whether the trees in the predominant size class established in response to severe fire, or established during the absence of fire. FIA stand age was not designed to measure the time since a stand-replacing disturbance. Quantification of historical "mixed-severity" fire regimes must be explicit about the spatial scale of high-severity fire effects, which is not possible using FIA stand age data.

  17. Average Stand Age from Forest Inventory Plots Does Not Describe Historical Fire Regimes in Ponderosa Pine and Mixed-Conifer Forests of Western North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Jens T.; Safford, Hugh D.; North, Malcolm P.; Fried, Jeremy S.; Gray, Andrew N.; Brown, Peter M.; Dolanc, Christopher R.; Dobrowski, Solomon Z.; Falk, Donald A.; Farris, Calvin A.; Franklin, Jerry F.; Fulé, Peter Z.; Hagmann, R. Keala; Knapp, Eric E.; Miller, Jay D.; Smith, Douglas F.; Swetnam, Thomas W.; Taylor, Alan H.

    2016-01-01

    Quantifying historical fire regimes provides important information for managing contemporary forests. Historical fire frequency and severity can be estimated using several methods; each method has strengths and weaknesses and presents challenges for interpretation and verification. Recent efforts to quantify the timing of historical high-severity fire events in forests of western North America have assumed that the “stand age” variable from the US Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program reflects the timing of historical high-severity (i.e. stand-replacing) fire in ponderosa pine and mixed-conifer forests. To test this assumption, we re-analyze the dataset used in a previous analysis, and compare information from fire history records with information from co-located FIA plots. We demonstrate that 1) the FIA stand age variable does not reflect the large range of individual tree ages in the FIA plots: older trees comprised more than 10% of pre-stand age basal area in 58% of plots analyzed and more than 30% of pre-stand age basal area in 32% of plots, and 2) recruitment events are not necessarily related to high-severity fire occurrence. Because the FIA stand age variable is estimated from a sample of tree ages within the tree size class containing a plurality of canopy trees in the plot, it does not necessarily include the oldest trees, especially in uneven-aged stands. Thus, the FIA stand age variable does not indicate whether the trees in the predominant size class established in response to severe fire, or established during the absence of fire. FIA stand age was not designed to measure the time since a stand-replacing disturbance. Quantification of historical “mixed-severity” fire regimes must be explicit about the spatial scale of high-severity fire effects, which is not possible using FIA stand age data. PMID:27196621

  18. Harmonizing recreational fisheries and conservation objectives for aquatic biodiversity in inland waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowx, I G; Arlinghaus, R; Cooke, S J

    2010-06-01

    The importance of recreational fisheries to local and national economies, and as a generator of immense social welfare throughout the developed world, is well established. Development in the sector and its interaction with non-fishery-related nature conservation objectives for aquatic biodiversity, however, have the potential to generate conflict. This article reviews the intersection between recreational fisheries and nature conservation goals for aquatic biodiversity with specific reference to inland waters in industrialized countries, and the principal management activities and constraints that can lead to conflicts. A SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) analysis was used to review the issues facing sectoral development and identify options for future advancement of recreational fisheries to ameliorate potential conflicts with nature conservation goals. It is concluded that reconciliation of recreational fisheries and modern conservation perspectives is both possible and desirable, because many conservation problems also benefit fisheries quality. Angler buy-in to conservation is probable if (1) management scales are small, (2) threats to conservation originate from outside the fisheries sectors and (3) ecological awareness for the conservation problem is high. If these aspects are not present, reconciliation of recreational fisheries and nature conservation goals is less likely, risking both the aquatic biodiversity and the future of angling. To address these issues, enforcement of legislation and continued communication with angler communities is necessary, as well as development of integrated management policies that build on the instrumental values of aquatic biodiversity for recreational fisheries, while curtailing the more insidious threats to such biodiversity that originate directly from the recreational fisheries sector. PMID:20557659

  19. Development of aquatic life criteria for nitrobenzene in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrobenzene is a toxic pollutant and was the main compound involved in the Songhuajiang accident in 2007, one of the largest water pollution accidents in China in the last decade. No aquatic life criteria for nitrobenzene have previously been proposed. In this study, published toxicity data of nitrobenzene to Chinese aquatic species were gathered, and six resident Chinese aquatic organisms were used in toxicity tests to supplement the existing toxicity data for nitrobenzene. Seventeen genuses mean acute values, three genuses mean chronic values to freshwater aquatic animals, and six genus toxicity values to aquatic plants were collected in total. A criterion maximum concentration of 0.018 mg/L and a criterion continuous concentration of 0.001 mg/L were developed based on these data, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency guidelines. These criteria may be useful in the determination of water quality standard of nitrobenzene. - Highlights: ► China is embarking on development of national water quality criteria system. ► Nitrobenzene is a valuable case in development of water quality criteria in China. ► Several Chinese resident aquatic organisms were chosen to be tested. ► The aquatic life criteria for nitrobenzene were developed. - An acute criterion of 0.018 mg/L and a chronic criterion of 0.001 mg/L for nitrobenzene in China were developed according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) guidelines.

  20. Edaphic, salinity, and stand structural trends in chronosequences of native and non-native dominated riparian forests along the Colorado River, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, David M.; Shafroth, Patrick B.

    2012-01-01

    Tamarix spp. are introduced shrubs that have become among the most abundant woody plants growing along western North American rivers. We sought to empirically test the long-held belief that Tamarix actively displaces native species through elevating soil salinity via salt exudation. We measured chemical and physical attributes of soils (e.g., salinity, major cations and anions, texture), litter cover and depth, and stand structure along chronosequences dominated by Tamarix and those dominated by native riparian species (Populus or Salix) along the upper and lower Colorado River in Colorado and Arizona/California, USA. We tested four hypotheses: (1) the rate of salt accumulation in soils is faster in Tamarix-dominated stands than stands dominated by native species, (2) the concentration of salts in the soil is higher in mature stands dominated by Tamarix compared to native stands, (3) soil salinity is a function of Tamarix abundance, and (4) available nutrients are more concentrated in native-dominated stands compared to Tamarix-dominated stands. We found that salt concentration increases at a faster rate in Tamarix-dominated stands along the relatively free-flowing upper Colorado but not along the heavily-regulated lower Colorado. Concentrations of ions that are known to be preferentially exuded by Tamarix (e.g., B, Na, and Cl) were higher in Tamarix stands than in native stands. Soil salt concentrations in older Tamarix stands along the upper Colorado were sufficiently high to inhibit germination, establishment, or growth of some native species. On the lower Colorado, salinity was very high in all stands and is likely due to factors associated with floodplain development and the hydrologic effects of river regulation, such as reduced overbank flooding, evaporation of shallow ground water, higher salt concentrations in surface and ground water due to agricultural practices, and higher salt concentrations in fine-textured sediments derived from naturally saline

  1. Sizing stand-alone photovoltaic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Bilalis

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available A method of sizing stand-alone photovoltaic systems regarding the reliability to satisfy the load demand, economy of components, and discharge depth exploited by the batteries is presented in this work. Solar radiation data simulated by an appropriate stochastic time series model, and not actual measurements, are used in the sizing procedure. This offers two distinct advantages: (a sizing can be performed even for locations where no actual data exist, (b the influence of the variation of the statistical parameters of solar radiation in sizing can be examined. The method has been applied and tested for several representative locations all over Greece for which monthly daily average values of solar radiation are given by ELOT (Hellenic Organization of Standardization.

  2. Sizing stand-alone photovoltaic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A method of sizing stand-alone photovoltaic systems regarding the reliability to satisfy the load demand, economy of components, and discharge depth exploited by the batteries is presented in this work. Solar radiation data simulated by an appropriate stochastic time series model, and not actual measurements, are used in the sizing procedure. This offers two distinct advantages: (a sizing can be performed even for locations where no actual data exist, (b the influence of the variation of the statistical parameters of solar radiation in sizing can be examined. The method has been applied and tested for several representative locations all over Greece for which monthly daily average values of solar radiation are given by ELOT (Hellenic Organization of Standardization.

  3. Crossmodal Correspondences: Standing Issues and Experimental Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parise, Cesare V

    2016-01-01

    Crossmodal correspondences refer to the systematic associations often found across seemingly unrelated sensory features from different sensory modalities. Such phenomena constitute a universal trait of multisensory perception even in non-human species, and seem to result, at least in part, from the adaptation of sensory systems to natural scene statistics. Despite recent developments in the study of crossmodal correspondences, there are still a number of standing questions about their definition, their origins, their plasticity, and their underlying computational mechanisms. In this paper, I will review such questions in the light of current research on sensory cue integration, where crossmodal correspondences can be conceptualized in terms of natural mappings across different sensory cues that are present in the environment and learnt by the sensory systems. Finally, I will provide some practical guidelines for the design of experiments that might shed new light on crossmodal correspondences. PMID:27311289

  4. Pesticide toxicity index for freshwater aquatic organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munn, Mark D.; Gilliom, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program is designed to assess current water-quality conditions, changes in water quality over time, and the effects of natural and human factors on water quality for the Nation's streams and ground-water resources. For streams, one of the most difficult parts of the assessment is to link chemical conditions to effects on aquatic biota, particularly for pesticides, which tend to occur in streams as complex mixtures with strong seasonal patterns. A Pesticide Toxicity Index (PTI) was developed that combines pesticide exposure of aquatic biota (measured concentrations of pesticides in stream water) with toxicity estimates (standard endpoints from laboratory bioassays) to produce a single index value for a sample or site. The development of the PTI was limited to pesticide compounds routinely measured in NAWQA studies and to toxicity data readily available from existing databases. Qualifying toxicity data were found for one or more types of test organisms for 75 of the 83 pesticide compounds measured in NAWQA samples, but with a wide range of bioassays per compound (1 to 65). There were a total of 2,824 bioassays for the 75 compounds, including 287 48-hour EC50 values (concentration at which 50 percent of test organisms exhibit a nonlethal response) for freshwater cladocerans, 585 96-hour LC50 values (concentration lethal to 50 percent of test organisms) for freshwater benthic invertebrates, and 1,952 96-hour LC50 values for freshwater fish. The PTI for a particular sample is the sum of toxicity quotients (measured concentration divided by the median toxicity concentration from bioassays) for each detected pesticide. The PTI can be calculated for specific groups of pesticides and for specific taxonomic groups.While the PTI does not determine whether water in a sample is toxic, its values can be used to rank or compare the toxicity of samples or sites on a relative basis for use in further analysis or

  5. Regularities of Tree Stand Development in Suramens of the Mari El Republic Trans-Volga Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. P. Demakov

    2015-02-01

    special attention of foresters should be paid on establishing the wood stands when the trees are still young.

  6. Spatial Structure Indices of Mature Pedunculate Oak Stands in NW Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krunoslav Indir

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: In order to potentiate a valid comparison of forest stands, numerous indices were developed to express forest structure numerically. Each of those indices described a specific measured or calculated value. In the present study, three of the stand structure indicators, dependent on tree distance, were used: the aggregation index of Clark and Evans, the species mingling index and the diameter differentiation index. The objectives of this study were: to obtain further information about forest structure using the selected indices and to discover any limitations that the implemented indices might display. Materials and Methods: Mature pedunculate oak stands were selected as objects of the study, all located within the “Repaš – Gabajeva Greda” forest management unit, the Forest Administration of Koprivnica. The stands were aged 75 to 132 years. A systematic 500 m grid of 45 circle sample plots was established. The sample plot radius was 15, 25 or 30 meters, depending on the stand’s age. In 2001, the DBH (diameter at breast height and tree positions in regard to the centre of a plot were measured on each sample plot. The mutual distances between trees were calculated, as well as the values of the three selected stand structure indices. The two procedures of the aggregation index of Clark and Evans were calculated for all 45 sample plots. In the first case only the pedunculate oak trees were observed, and in the other all trees on the plot. The species mingling index and the diameter differentiation index were calculated for each tree in two procedures: in relatio to three and four nearest neighbouring trees. The plot/stand totals were managed as the average index of individual trees. Results: Values of the aggregation index of Clark and Evans after all trees have been observed were from 0.89 to 1.28, which indicated a random distribution of trees. In case of considering only pedunculate oak trees, the index of the plots

  7. Permanent vegetation quadrats on Olkiluoto island. Establishment and results from the first inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes in detail the vegetation quadrats established inside the permanent, follow-up sample plots (Forest Extensive High-level monitoring plots, FEH) on Olkiluoto Island. During summer 2005 a total of 94 sample plots (a 30 m2), each containing eight quadrats (a 1m2), were investigated. The total number of sampled quadrats was 752. Seventy of the 94 plots represent coniferous stands: 57 Norway spruce-dominated and 13 Scots pine-dominated stands. Ten of the plots represent deciduous, birch-dominated (Betula spp.) stands, 7 plots common alder-dominated (Alnus glutinosa) stands, and seven plots are mires. The majority of the coniferous tree stands were growing on sites representing various succession stages of the Myrtillus, Vaccinium-Myrtillus and Deschampsia-Myrtillus forest site types. The pine-dominated stands growing on exposed bedrock clearly differed from the other coniferous stands: the vegetation was characterised by the Cladina, Calluna-Cladina and Empetrum-Vaccinium vitis-idaea/Vaccinium Myrtillus forest site types. The deciduous stands were characterized by tall grasses, especially Calamagrostis epigejos, C. purpurea and Deschampsia flexuosa. The vegetation of the deciduous stands dominated by common alder represented grove-like sites and seashore groves. Typical species for mires included Calamagrostis purpurea, Calla palustris, Equisetum sylvaticum, and especially white mosses (Sphagnum spp.). A total of 184 vascular plant species were found growing within the quadrats. Due to the high number of quadrats in these forests, the spruce stands had the highest total number of species, but the birch and alder-dominated forests had the highest average number of species per quadrat. This basic inventory of the permanent vegetation quadrats on Olkiluoto Island provides a sound starting point for future vegetation surveys. Guidelines for future inventories and supplementary sampling are given in the discussion part of this report. (orig.)

  8. Biomass expansion factors for Eucalyptus globulus stands in Portugal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, P.; Tome, M.

    2012-11-01

    One of several procedures for estimating carbon stocks in forests is the estimation of tree or stand biomass based on forest inventory data. The two approaches normally used to convert field measurements of trees to stand biomass values are allometric biomass equations and biomass expansion factors (BEFs). BEFs are used in published National Forest Inventory results in which biomass is not estimated or as a complement of growth models that do not include biomass predictions. In this paper, the effectiveness of BEFs for estimating total stand biomass in Portuguese Eucalyptus globulus plantations was analyzed. Here, BEF is defined as the ratio of total stand biomass (aboveground biomass plus root biomass) to stand volume with bark. To calculate total biomass, an equation was developed to estimate root biomass as a function of aboveground biomass. Changes of BEF with stand variables were analyzed. Strong relationships were observed between BEF and stand age, stand basal area, stand volume and dominant height. Consequently, an equation to predict BEF as a function of stand variables was fitted, and dominant height was selected as the predictor stand variable. Estimates of total stand biomass based on individual tree allometric equations were compared with estimates obtained with a constant BEF (0.77), used in the Portuguese National Inventory Report on Greenhouse Gases, and with estimates obtained using the dominant height-dependent BEF equation developed in this work. The BEF prediction model proposed in this work may be used to improve E. globulus Portuguese biomass estimates when tree allometric equations cannot be used. (Author) 40 refs.

  9. Stand Diameter Distribution Modelling and Prediction Based on Richards Function

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Ai-guo; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Xiong-qing; He, Cai-yun

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to introduce application of the Richards equation on modelling and prediction of stand diameter distribution. The long-term repeated measurement data sets, consisted of 309 diameter frequency distributions from Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata) plantations in the southern China, were used. Also, 150 stands were used as fitting data, the other 159 stands were used for testing. Nonlinear regression method (NRM) or maximum likelihood estimates method (MLEM) we...

  10. Stand model for upland forests of Southern Arkansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mielke, D.L.; Shugart, H.H.; West, D.C.

    1978-06-01

    A forest stand growth and composition simulator (FORAR) was developed by modifying a stand growth model by Shugart and West (1977). FORAR is a functional stand model which used ecological parameters to relate individual tree growth to environment rather than using Markov probability matrices or differential equations to determine single tree or species replacement rates. FORAR simulated tree growth and species composition of upland forests of Union County, Ark., by considering 33 tree species on a /sup 1///sub 12/ ha circular plot.

  11. Efficiency of group work in harvesting mountainous broadleaf thinning stands

    OpenAIRE

    Legat, Nejc; Zečić, Željko; Krpan, Ante P. B.

    2016-01-01

    Group work was researched for felling, processing, skidding and quality inspection activities in mountainous broadleaf thinning stands with approximately the same terrain and stand conditions. The stands were 55 and 70years old. In the forest communities of the mountainous beech forest with dead nettle (Lamio orvale - Fagetum sylvaticae/Ht. 1938) and the forests of the sessile oak and horn beam with beech (Epimedio - Carpinetum betuli var. Fagus sylvatica/Ht. 1938/Borth.1963), the main tree s...

  12. Ant assemblages in successional stages of Scotch Broom stands

    OpenAIRE

    Dauber, Jens; Simmering, D.

    2006-01-01

    PUBLISHED Scotch Broom (Cytisus scoparius [L.] LINK) stands are important seminatural habitats in cultural landscapes of Ger-many. High structural diversity of broom stands is reflected by a high species diversity of the flora and fauna, giving them a high value for biodiversity conservation. The aim of this study was to assess the composition and structure of ant assemblages among successional stages of Scotch Broom stands, and compare these with assemblages in arable land and the climax ...

  13. Development of aquatic plant bioassays for rapid screening and interpretive risk assessments of metal mining liquid waste waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of non-photosynthetic organisms alone to describe environmental impact has been recognized by regulatory agencies, industry and academia as being totally inadequate both in Europe and North America. Lack of adequate testing methods for photosynthetic aquatic organisms has been recognized as a major impediment to the successful regulation and safe use of pesticides and waste water discharges and is of even more concern to the metal mining industry due to the non-biodegradable nature of its waste streams. This work shows that the chemical effluent limits set in the 'Metal mining liquid effluent regulations and guidelines' provide variable protection of aquatic photosynthetic organisms and aquatic effects of the more toxic metals (e.g., copper, nickel, and zinc) may occur at levels that are one to two orders of magnitude lower than present limits. To establish adequate protection of receiving water bodies it may be necessary to establish site-specific criteria taking into consideration toxicity modifying factors of individual sites. If the establishment of such criteria is determined with a host of ecologically relevant organisms, it will be possible to design effective environmental protection at the least possible cost. (author). 17 refs., 2 tabs

  14. Toxaphene in the aquatic environment of Greenland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The octa- and nonachlorinated bornanes (toxaphene) CHBs 26, 40, 41, 44, 50 and 62 were analysed in Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus), shorthorn sculpin (Myoxocephalus scorpius), ringed seal (Pusa hispida) and black guillemot eggs (Cepphus grylle) from Greenland. Despite their high trophic level, ringed seals had the lowest concentrations of these species, with a Σ6Toxaphene median concentration of 13–20 ng/g lipid weight (lw), suggesting metabolisation. The congener composition also suggests transformation of nona- to octachlorinated congeners. Black guillemot eggs had the highest concentrations (Σ6Toxaphene median concentration of 971 ng/g lw). Although concentrations were higher in East than in West Greenland differences were smaller than for other persistent organic pollutants. In a circumpolar context, toxaphene had the highest concentrations in the Canadian Arctic. Time trend analyses showed significant decreases for black guillemot eggs and juvenile ringed seals, with annual rates of −5 to −7% for Σ6Toxaphene. The decreases were generally steepest for CHBs 40, 41 and 44. - Highlights: • Toxaphene was detected in freshwater and marine species of Greenland. • Relatively low concentrations in ringed seal suggest metabolisation. • The concentrations in Greenland appear lower than those in the Canadian Arctic. • Significant decreases were found in juvenile ringed seals and black guillemot eggs. - The banned insecticide toxaphene is widely present in the aquatic environment of Greenland, but concentrations are decreasing

  15. FY 1987 Aquatic Species Program: Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.A.; Sprague, S.

    1987-09-01

    The goal of the Department of Energy/Solar Energy Research Institute Aquatic Species Program is to develop the technology base to produce liquid fuels from microalagae at prices competitive with conventional alternatives. Microalgae are unusual plants that can accumulate large quantities of oil and can thrive in high-salinity water, which currently has no competing uses. The algal oils, in turn, are readily converted into gasoline and diesel fuels. The best site for successful microalgae production was determined to be the US desert Southwest, with potential applications to other warm areas. Aggressive research is needed, but the improvements required are attainable. The four prime research areas in the development of this technology are growth and production, engineering design, harvesting, and conversion. Algae are selected for three criteria: tolerance to environmental fluctuations, high growth rates, and high lipid production. From 1982 to 1986, the program collected more than 3000 strains of microalgae that are more than twice as tolerant to temperature and salinity fluctuation than the initial strains. Productivity has been increased by a factor of two in outdoor culture systems since 1982, and lipid content has also been increased from 20% of body weight in 1982 to greater than 66% of body weight in 1987. Research programs are ongoing in lipid biochemistry and genetic engineering so that ultimately strains can be modified and improved to combine their best characteristics. An outdoor test facility is being built in Roswell, New Mexico.

  16. Cyanotoxins: Bioaccumulation and Effects on Aquatic Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betina Kozlowsky-Suzuki

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes with wide geographic distribution that can produce secondary metabolites named cyanotoxins. These toxins can be classified into three main types according to their mechanism of action in vertebrates: hepatotoxins, dermatotoxins and neurotoxins. Many studies on the effects of cyanobacteria and their toxins over a wide range of aquatic organisms, including invertebrates and vertebrates, have reported acute effects (e.g., reduction in survivorship, feeding inhibition, paralysis, chronic effects (e.g., reduction in growth and fecundity, biochemical alterations (e.g., activity of phosphatases, GST, AChE, proteases, and behavioral alterations. Research has also focused on the potential for bioaccumulation and transferring of these toxins through the food chain. Although the herbivorous zooplankton is hypothesized as the main target of cyanotoxins, there is not unquestionable evidence of the deleterious effects of cyanobacteria and their toxins on these organisms. Also, the low toxin burden in secondary consumers points towards biodilution of microcystins in the food web as the predominant process. In this broad review we discuss important issues on bioaccumulation and the effects of cyanotoxins, with emphasis on microcystins, as well as drawbacks and future needs in this field of research.

  17. Nutrition for recovery in aquatic sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Louise M; Mujika, Iñigo

    2014-08-01

    Postexercise recovery is an important topic among aquatic athletes and involves interest in the quality, quantity, and timing of intake of food and fluids after workouts or competitive events to optimize processes such as refueling, rehydration, repair, and adaptation. Recovery processes that help to minimize the risk of illness and injury are also important but are less well documented. Recovery between workouts or competitive events may have two separate goals: (a) restoration of body losses and changes caused by the first session to restore performance for the next and (b) maximization of the adaptive responses to the stress provided by the session to gradually make the body become better at the features of exercise that are important for performance. In some cases, effective recovery occurs only when nutrients are supplied, and an early supply of nutrients may also be valuable in situations in which the period immediately after exercise provides an enhanced stimulus for recovery. This review summarizes contemporary knowledge of nutritional strategies to promote glycogen resynthesis, restoration of fluid balance, and protein synthesis after different types of exercise stimuli. It notes that some scenarios benefit from a proactive approach to recovery eating, whereas others may not need such attention. In fact, in some situations it may actually be beneficial to withhold nutritional support immediately after exercise. Each athlete should use a cost-benefit analysis of the approaches to recovery after different types of workouts or competitive events and then periodize different recovery strategies into their training or competition programs. PMID:24901517

  18. Aquatic studies of Gable Mountain Pond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of the biotic and abiotic components of the Gable Mountain Pond (HAPO cooling water disposal pond) ecosystem were undertaken to determine if there was a potential problem for off-site transfer of radioactivity to man originating with the aquatic food web. Most of the 137Cs in the pond is associated with the sediments which are probably the main source of 137Cs for uptake by the biota. Generally, highest concentrations of 137Cs and other radioisotopes were found in the upper two inches of sediments in the northwest end of the pond and in the deeper areas along the long-axis of the pond. Native goldfish had maximum and average 137Cs concentrations of about 340 and 170 pCi/g dry wt, respectively. Algae, macrophytes, and detritus comprised the main food items of the goldfish, and the 137Cs levels in the plants were usually higher than the 137Cs concentration in the fish. The 137Cs concentrations of wild experimental ducks restricted to Gable Mountain Pond were approximately the same as resident coots, but significantly higher than transient wild ducks. Neither the goldfish nor the waterfowl inhabiting the pond attained concentrations of 137Cs exceeding acceptable limits. Sediment, however, could be a source of high concentrations of radioactivity or radioactive contamination concern if the concentration of radiocontaminants increased and/or the pond dries up, and the contaminated sediments become windborne. (U.S.)

  19. Microbial detoxification of metalaxyl in aquatic system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmed H.Massoud; Aly S.Derbalah; El-Sayed.B.Belal

    2008-01-01

    Four microorganisms,Pseudomonas sp.(ER2),Aspergillus niger (ER6),Cladosporium herbarum (ER4) and Penicilluim sp.(ER3),were isolated from cucumber leaves previously treated with metalaxyl using enrichment technique.These isolates were evaluated for detoxification of metalaxyl at the recommended dose level in aquatic system.The effect of pH and temperature on the growth ability of the tested isolates was also investigated by measuring the intracellular protein and mycelia dry weight for bacterial and fungal isolates,respectively.Moreover,the toxicity of metalaxyl after 28 d of treatment with the tested isolates was evaluated to confirm the complete removal of any toxic materials (metalaxyl and its metabolites).The results showed that the optimum degree pH for the growth of metalaxyl degrading isolates (bacterial and fungal isolates) was 7.The temperature 30℃ appeared to be the optimum degree for the growth of either fungal or bacterial isolates.The results showed that Pseudomonas sp.(ER2) was the most effective isolate in metalaxyl degradation followed by Aspergillus niger (ER6),Cladosporium herbarum (ER4) and PeniciUuim sp.(ER3),respectively.There is no toxicity of metalaxyl detected in the supernatant after 28 d of treannent with Pseudomonas sp.(ER2).The results suggest that bioremediation by Pseudomonas sp.(ER2) isolate was considered to be effective method for detoxification of metalaxyl in aqueous media.

  20. The multixenobiotic resistance mechanism in aquatic organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurelec, B. (Center for Marine Research Zagreb, Ruder Boskovic Institute, Croatia (Yugoslavia))

    1992-01-01

    Many aquatic organisms thrive and reproduce in polluted waters. This fact indicates that they are well equipped with a defense system(s) against several toxic xenobiotics simultaneously because water pollution is typically caused by a mixture of a number of pollutants. We have found that the biochemical mechanism underlying such multixenobiotic' resistance in freshwater and marine mussel, in several marine sponges, and in freshwater fish is similar to the mechanism of multidrug resistance (MDR) found in tumor cells that became refractory to treatment with a variety of chemotherapeutic agents. All these organisms possess a verapamil-sensitive potential to bind 2-acetylaminofluorene and vincristine onto membrane vesicles. They all express mRNA for mdr1 gene, and mdr1 protein product, the glycoprotein P170. Finally, in in vivo experiments, the accumulation of xenobiotics is enhanced in all investigated organisms in the presence of verapamil, the inhibitor of the P170 extrusion pump. The knowledge that the presence of one xenobiotic may block the pumping out, and hence accelerating accumulation, of others, may help us to understand and interpret our present and past data on different environmental parameters obtained using indicator organisms.99 references.

  1. Aspects of Aquatic Pollution in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.T. Ekubo

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Water pollution is a major problem in the global context. Yet aquatic resources consists of extremely wide range of floral and fauna resources which offer a broad array of goods with potential utilitarian application in agriculture, innovative industry and the pharmaceutical industry which renders valuable benefits and services. The slow poisoning of the waters is witnessed in Nigeria and the destruction of vegetation and agricultural land by oil spills which occur during petroleum operations. But since the inception of the oil industry in Nigeria, more than twenty-five years ago, there has been no concerned and effective effort on the part of the government, let alone the oil operators, to control environmental problems associated with the industry'. The article reviews the meaning of water pollution, water pollution categories, point source pollution, non-point source pollution, ground water pollution, causes of water pollution, pathogens, chemicals and other contaminants, thermal pollution, transport and chemical reactions of pollution, measurement of pollution, sampling, physical testing, chemical testing, biological testing, control of water pollution, domestic sewage, industrial waste water, agricultural waste water, construction site storm water urban runoff (storm water, radiation pollution, the Federal Environmental Protection Agency, The National Policy on Environment, The national environmental reference laboratory, Water resources management, Strategies under the National Policy on Environment, Industrial water pollution control programme, Industrial effluent standards to provide some information on the Nigeria situation.

  2. Consequences of radioactive deposition on aquatic environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The publication concentrates on the analyses of the main effects of radioactive deposition on Nordic aquatic environments. A modelling approach is applied for predicting the temporal behaviour of concentrations in fish of inland freshwater ecosystems. The observed values are considered in parallel with the calculations. The time-integrated consequences, the radiation doses are estimated for the relatively significant dose pathways. After a preliminary study of various lake environments in Nordic countries, three representative examples of lake systems were selected for closer consideration: small forest lake, medium-sized forest lake and mountain lake. The effects of changes in the trophic levels of lakes are also tentatively accounted for. The results of the analyses indicate that the radiological consequences of shallow forest lakes are greater than those of mountain lakes which usually have shorter turnover times compared to forest lakes. In long-term consideration, the fish ingestion pathway may in general become important and, in addition to the external exposure, has a high contribution to the expected doses. (orig.) (8 refs., 11 figs., 9 tabs.)

  3. Evaluation of seven aquatic sampling methods for amphibians and other aquatic fauna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunzburger, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    To design effective and efficient research and monitoring programs researchers must have a thorough understanding of the capabilities and limitations of their sampling methods. Few direct comparative studies exist for aquatic sampling methods for amphibians. The objective of this study was to simultaneously employ seven aquatic sampling methods in 10 wetlands to compare amphibian species richness and number of individuals detected with each method. Four sampling methods allowed counts of individuals (metal dipnet, D-frame dipnet, box trap, crayfish trap), whereas the other three methods allowed detection of species (visual encounter, aural, and froglogger). Amphibian species richness was greatest with froglogger, box trap, and aural samples. For anuran species, the sampling methods by which each life stage was detected was related to relative length of larval and breeding periods and tadpole size. Detection probability of amphibians varied across sampling methods. Box trap sampling resulted in the most precise amphibian count, but the precision of all four count-based methods was low (coefficient of variation > 145 for all methods). The efficacy of the four count sampling methods at sampling fish and aquatic invertebrates was also analyzed because these predatory taxa are known to be important predictors of amphibian habitat distribution. Species richness and counts were similar for fish with the four methods, whereas invertebrate species richness and counts were greatest in box traps. An effective wetland amphibian monitoring program in the southeastern United States should include multiple sampling methods to obtain the most accurate assessment of species community composition at each site. The combined use of frogloggers, crayfish traps, and dipnets may be the most efficient and effective amphibian monitoring protocol. ?? 2007 Brill Academic Publishers.

  4. The experiences of mastery of stand-by energy demand; Les experiences de MDE stand by

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schilken, P.

    2001-07-01

    In the residential sector of the OECD countries, the electricity losses of domestic appliances in stand-by position represent 1.5% of the total electricity consumption. This study belongs to the SAVE project (pilot campaign of municipal utilities for an improved rational use of energy). Its aim is to observe the policies and experiments implemented by municipalities and municipal energy companies for the abatement of the electricity consumptions of stand-by origin. A working group consisting of the German Stadtwerke and some international partners have debated the possible actions and documents for an efficient information of the public. This document presents the brochures and local actions of this program. (J.S.)

  5. Submerged Aquatic Vegetation of Bogue Sound, North Carolina 1992 Geodatabase

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During 1992, 1:20,000 scale aerial photography for Bogue Sound, North Carolina was collected as part of an effort to map submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in...

  6. Submerged Aquatic Vegetation of Bogue Sound, North Carolina 1992 Biotic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During 1992, 1:20,000 scale aerial photography for Bogue Sound, North Carolina was collected as part of an effort to map submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in...

  7. Submerged Aquatic Vegetation of Bogue Sound, North Carolina 1992 Geoform

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During 1992, 1:20,000 scale aerial photography for Bogue Sound, North Carolina was collected as part of an effort to map submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in...

  8. Submerged Aquatic Vegetation of Bogue Sound, North Carolina 1992 Substrate

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During 1992, 1:20,000 scale aerial photography for Bogue Sound, North Carolina was collected as part of an effort to map submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in...

  9. Draft Mercury Aquatic Wildlife Benchmarks for Great Salt Lake Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document describes the EPA Region 8's rationale for selecting aquatic wildlife dietary and tissue mercury benchmarks for use in interpreting available data collected from the Great Salt Lake and surrounding wetlands.

  10. TESTING OF INSECT MICROSPORIDIAN (MICROSPORA: NOSEMATIDAE) IN NONTARGET AQUATIC SPECIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper reports results of single-species tests with the mosquito microsporidian Nosema algerae and the orthopteran microsporidian N. locustae on nontarget aquatic organisms. rganisms tested were the freshwater grass shrimp (Palaemonetes kadiakensis), the estuarine grass shrim...

  11. Master plan: Guntersville Reservoir Aquatic Plant Management. Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    In 1989, Congress provided funding to start a five-year comprehensive project to manage aquatic plants in Guntersville Reservoir, to be jointly implemented by the US Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). TVA serves as the overall project coordinator and is the lead agency for this project. Known as the Joint Agency Guntersville Project (JAGP), the project will test and demonstrate innovative management technologies, and incorporate the most effective technologies into a comprehensive aquatic plant management plan for Guntersville Reservoir. The JAGP is intended to serve as a National Demonstration Project for aquatic plant management. As part of this JAGP, the Master Plan for Aquatic Plant Management for the Guntersville Reservoir Project, Alabama-Tennessee is authorized by Corps Contract Number DACW62-90-C-0067.

  12. Cytochemical and ultrastructural aspects of aquatic carnivorous plant turions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plachno, B.J.; Adamec, Lubomír; Kozieradzka-Kiszkurno, M.; Świątek, P.; Kamińska, I.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 251, č. 6 (2014), s. 1449-1454. ISSN 0033-183X Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : aquatic carnivorous plants * winter buds * storage functions Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.651, year: 2014

  13. Development of resource shed delineation in aquatic ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental issues in aquatic ecosystems of high management priority involve spatially explicit phenomena that occur over vast areas. A "landscape" perspective is thus necessary, including an understanding of how ecological phenomena at a local scale are affected by physical fo...

  14. Fish and Aquatic Habitat Survey: Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To address the need for baseline inventories of biota and abiotic features, the Columbia River Fisheries Program Office (CRFPO) conducted fish and aquatic habitat...

  15. Biomarkers of toxicological responses in aquatic oligochaete, Lumbriculus. Variegatus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R. Gooneratne; Drewes C

    2005-01-01

    @@ Oligochaete worms are key, non-target,macroinvertebrates in terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems.Aquatic and terrestrial pollution has attracted a great deal of public interest in the past 2 decades.

  16. Selenium in aquatic habitats at Imperial National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — During 1991 and 1992, selenium levels were studied in aquatic communities at Imperial National Wildlife Refuge on the lower Colorado River. Composite samples of...

  17. Risk Assessment Considerations for Veterinary Medicines in Aquatic Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter provides a critical evaluation of prospective and retrospective risk assessment approaches for veterinary medicines in aquatic ecosystems and provides recommendations for possible alternative approaches for hazard characterization.

  18. Coastal Maine Submerged Aquatic Vegetation Data 1993-1997 Biotic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Maine's eelgrass (SAV) meadows form an important aquatic habitat for the state. These meadows provide shelter for juvenile fish, and invertebrates. In certain...

  19. Aquatic insect populations in the MUDA rice agroecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Periodic sampling of aquatic insects was carried out in an experimental plot of the Muda rice agroecosystem. The study which was conducted from August to December 1995, investigated the impact of the pesticides Broadox and Trebon on aquatic insect populations during the rice growing period. The results indicated that there was no significant difference in abundance and diversity of aquatic insects between the treated and non-treated area. The four dominant aquatic insects were from the families; Chironomidae, Dysticidae, Corixidae and Belostomatidae. Water temperature and dissolved oxygen showed changes throughout the rice growing season and the values of these parameters decreased gradually towards the end of the rice growing season in January when the rice plants were maturing. (Author)

  20. Knowing Where They Stand: The Role of Inferred Distributions of Others in Misestimates of Relative Standing

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew D. Gershoff; Katherine A. Burson

    2011-01-01

    People often estimate how they compare to other consumers when they make purchase decisions. Unfortunately, they tend to err in this task, and this can lead to negative consequences in their choices. Previous literature has largely argued that these errors in estimates of relative standing are due to underweighting or ignoring the reference group. Using a novel measure of people's perception of the reference group, we show that consumers do attend to that information but err in their estimate...

  1. Fine root dynamics in lodgepole pine and white spruce stands along productivity gradients in reclaimed oil sands sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamro, Ghulam Murtaza; Chang, Scott X; Naeth, M Anne; Duan, Min; House, Jason

    2015-10-01

    Open-pit mining activities in the oil sands region of Alberta, Canada, create disturbed lands that, by law, must be reclaimed to a land capability equivalent to that existed before the disturbance. Re-establishment of forest cover will be affected by the production and turnover rate of fine roots. However, the relationship between fine root dynamics and tree growth has not been studied in reclaimed oil sands sites. Fine root properties (root length density, mean surface area, total root biomass, and rates of root production, turnover, and decomposition) were assessed from May to October 2011 and 2012 using sequential coring and ingrowth core methods in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl.) and white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench.) Voss) stands. The pine and spruce stands were planted on peat mineral soil mix placed over tailings sand and overburden substrates, respectively, in reclaimed oil sands sites in Alberta. We selected stands that form a productivity gradient (low, medium, and high productivities) of each tree species based on differences in tree height and diameter at breast height (DBH) increments. In lodgepole pine stands, fine root length density and fine root production, and turnover rates were in the order of high > medium > low productivity sites and were positively correlated with tree height and DBH and negatively correlated with soil salinity (P < 0.05). In white spruce stands, fine root surface area was the only parameter that increased along the productivity gradient and was negatively correlated with soil compaction. In conclusion, fine root dynamics along the stand productivity gradients were closely linked to stand productivity and were affected by limiting soil properties related to the specific substrate used for reconstructing the reclaimed soil. Understanding the impact of soil properties on fine root dynamics and overall stand productivity will help improve land reclamation outcomes. PMID:26668730

  2. Construction Starts for Asia's Largest Aquatic Life Museum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xiaoliang

    2002-01-01

    @@ The ground-breaking ceremony for the construction of an aquatic life museum was held on April 18 at the CAS Institute of Hydrobiology (IHB) in the city of Wuhan, capital of central China's Hubei Province. High-ranking officials including CAS Vice-President Chen Yiyu and Vice-Governor of Hubei Province took part in the ceremony. With its abundant aquatic specimens,the forthcoming museum is believed to be the largest of its kind in Asia.

  3. THE AQUATIC-POLYCARBONATE SKYLIGHT FOR SURABAYA INDONESIA

    OpenAIRE

    Danny Santoso Mintorogo

    2007-01-01

    This paper will indicate of how appropriate use of aquatic skylight module installed on buildings in the tropical zone compared to the ones in the subtropical climate. In order for energy saving strategies, the aquatic-polycarbonate skylight system is used in the tropical climate. In the tropical hot humid climate, Indonesia has received huge amount of global direct and diffuse radiations on horizontal roofs throughout the year, approximately 525 watts per square meter of solar radiation will...

  4. Opportunities to improve the quality of aquatic products

    OpenAIRE

    Liviu Todoran; Ioan Bud

    2013-01-01

    Today there are significant changes in consumer preferences toward food components, people increasingly heading towards aquatic products, which is more diversified, and especially due to their qualities of outstanding biological value. Given this situation, operators at all stages of production, processing, storage and distribution along the way of production-capitalization, are responsible to ensure that the technological processes and aquatic products meet’s the requirements ...

  5. Energetic Extremes in Aquatic Locomotion by Coral Reef Fishes

    OpenAIRE

    Fulton, Christopher J.; Johansen, Jacob L.; Steffensen, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Underwater locomotion is challenging due to the high friction and resistance imposed on a body moving through water and energy lost in the wake during undulatory propulsion. While aquatic organisms have evolved streamlined shapes to overcome such resistance, underwater locomotion has long been considered a costly exercise. Recent evidence for a range of swimming vertebrates, however, has suggested that flapping paired appendages around a rigid body may be an extremely efficient means of aquat...

  6. Public lakes, private lakeshore: modeling protection of native aquatic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Susan A; Fulton, David C

    2013-07-01

    Protection of native aquatic plants is an important proenvironmental behavior, because plant loss coupled with nutrient loading can produce changes in lake ecosystems. Removal of aquatic plants by lakeshore property owners is a diffuse behavior that may lead to cumulative impacts on lake ecosystems. This class of behavior is challenging to manage because collective impacts are not obvious to the actors. This paper distinguishes positive and negative beliefs about aquatic plants, in models derived from norm activation theory (Schwartz, Adv Exp Soc Psychol 10:221-279, 1977) and the theory of reasoned action (Fishbein and Ajzen, Belief, attitude, intention, and behavior: an introduction to theory and research, Addison-Wesley, Boston 1975), to examine protection of native aquatic plants by Minnesota lakeshore property owners. We clarify how positive and negative evaluations of native aquatic plants affect protection or removal of these plants. Results are based on a mail survey (n = 3,115). Results suggest that positive evaluations of aquatic plants (i.e., as valuable to lake ecology) may not connect with the global attitudes and behavioral intentions that direct plant protection or removal. Lakeshore property owners' behavior related to aquatic plants may be driven more by tangible personal benefits derived from accessible, carefully managed lakeshore than intentional action taken to sustain lake ecosystems. The limited connection of positive evaluations of aquatic plants to global attitudes and behavioral intentions may reflect either lack of knowledge of what actions are needed to protect lake health and/or unwillingness to lose perceived benefits derived from lakeshore property. PMID:23609308

  7. Pharmacokinetic modeling in aquatic animals. 1. Models and concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, M.G.; Stehly, Guy R.; Hayton, W.L.

    1990-01-01

    While clinical and toxicological applications of pharmacokinetics have continued to evolve both conceptually and experimentally, pharmacokinetics modeling in aquatic animals has not progressed accordingly. In this paper we present methods and concepts of pharmacokinetic modeling in aquatic animals using multicompartmental, clearance-based, non-compartmental and physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models. These models should be considered as alternatives to traditional approaches, which assume that the animal acts as a single homogeneous compartment based on apparent monoexponential elimination.

  8. Efficiency of aquatic macrophytes to treat Nile tilapia pond effluents

    OpenAIRE

    Henry-Silva Gustavo Gonzaga; Camargo Antonio Fernando Monteiro

    2006-01-01

    The effluents from fish farming can increase the quantity of suspended solids and promote the enrichment of nitrogen and phosphorus in aquatic ecosystems. In this context, the aim of this work was to evaluate the efficiency of three species of floating aquatic macrophytes (Eichhornia crassipes, Pistia stratiotes and Salvinia molesta) to treat effluents from Nile tilapia culture ponds. The effluent originated from a 1,000-m² pond stocked with 2,000 male Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus. The ...

  9. Understanding carbon regulation in aquatic systems - Bacteriophages as a model

    OpenAIRE

    Swapnil Sanmukh; Krishna Khairnar; Waman Paunikar; Satish Lokhande

    2015-01-01

    The bacteria and their phages are the most abundant constituents of the aquatic environment, and so represent an ideal model for studying carbon regulation in an aquatic system. The microbe-mediated interconversion of bioavailable organic carbon (OC) into dissolved organic carbon (DOC) by the microbial carbon pump (MCP) has been suggested to have the potential to revolutionize our view of carbon sequestration. It is estimated that DOC is the largest pool of organic matter in the ocean and, th...

  10. Machine Vision Applications to Aquatic Foods: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Bahar Gümüş; Balaban, Murat Ö.; Ünlüsayın, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    Machine vision (MV) is a rapid, economic, consistent and objective inspection and evaluation technique. This non- destructive method has applications in the aquatic food industry. MV can perform many functions at once in an aquatic food processing line: sorting by species, by size, and by visual quality attributes, as well as automated portioning. In this review, the mode of operation and the components of a MV system are introduced, its applications to foods are briefly di...

  11. AMEG: the new SETAC advisory group on aquatic macrophyte ecotoxicology

    OpenAIRE

    Arts, G.; Davies, J; Dobbs, M.; Ebke, P.; Hanson, M.; Hommen, U.; Knauer, K.; Loutseti, S.; Maltby, L.; Mohr, S; Poovey, A.; Poulsen, V.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction and background Primary producers play critical structural and functional roles in aquatic ecosystems; therefore, it is imperative that the potential risks of toxicants to aquatic plants are adequately assessed in the risk assessment of chemicals. The standard required macrophyte test species is the floating (non-sediment-rooted) duckweed Lemna spp. This macrophyte species might not be representative of all floating, rooted, emergent, and submerged macrophyte species because o...

  12. A Comparative Study of Bioethanol Production from Aquatic Weeds

    OpenAIRE

    Kodichetty Ramaiah Sunil; Merin John; Venkatachalapathi Girish; Sirangala Thimappa Girisha

    2015-01-01

    A greatest challenge for society in the 21st century is to meet energy demand, where biomass is subjected for pre-treatment and converted into biofuel (alcohol). Aquatic weeds are potential bio resources which are easily available for biofuel production. Aquatic weeds like Alternanthera sessilis, Typha latifolia, Eichhornia crassipes, Baccopa monnieri, Ipomoea aquatica and Pistia stratiotes are estimated for carbohydrates content. Highest content of reducing sugar was observed in Alternanther...

  13. Aquatic exercise in the treatment of children with cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitrijević Lidija; Bjelaković Bojko; Lazović Milica; Stanković Ivona; Čolović Hristina; Kocić Mirjana; Zlatanović Dragan

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Aquatic exercise is one of the most popular supplementary treatments for children with neuro-motor impairment, especially for cerebral palsy (CP). As water reduces gravity force which increases postural stability, a child with CP exercises more easily in water than on land. Objective. The aim of the study was to examine aquatic exercise effects on gross motor functioning, muscle tone and cardiorespiratory endurance in children with spastic CP. Methods. The study included 1...

  14. Improving efficiency of a regional stand alone bone bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, Jonathan M; Rowan, Clare H; Davidson, Helen; Millar, Ciara; McAlinden, M Gavan

    2016-03-01

    The introduction of a stand-alone Bone Bank in our Regional Orthopaedic Hospital has improved the availability of femoral head allograft. Benninger et al. (Bone Joint J 96-B:1307-1311, 2014), demonstrated their institutions bank to be cost effective despite a 30 % discard rate for harvested allograft. We sought to audit our own discard rates and subsequent cost-effectiveness of our bone bank. Donor recruitment. Before approaching a potential donor, our establishment's nurse specialists review their clinical notes and biochemical laboratory results, available on a regional Electronic Care Records. They view femoral head architecture on radiographs against set criteria, Patient Archive and Communication system (SECTRA, Sweden). In total 1383 femoral heads were harvested, 247 were discarded giving an overall rate of 17.9 %. The most common reasons for discard of harvested graft was a positive microbiology/bacteriology result, n = 96 (38.9 %). After a rise in discard rates in 2007, we have steadily reduced our discard rates since 2006/2007 (28.2 %), 2008/2009 (17 %), 2010/2011 (14.8 %), and finally to 10.3 % in 2012/2013. In the current financial year, our cost to harvest, test, store and release a femoral head is £610. With a structured donor recruitment process and unique pre-operative radiographic analysis we have successfully reduced our discard rates bi-annually making our bone bank increasingly cost-effective. PMID:26138308

  15. Optimum nutrition and nitrogen saturation in Scots pine stands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamm, C.O.; Aronsson, Aron; Flower-Ellis, Jeremy [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. for Production Ecology; Popovic, Budimir [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Research

    1999-07-01

    Long-term field experiments are described, in which nitrogen and other plant nutrients were added regularly to young Scots pine stands at two sites in Sweden, Lisselbo (1969-1988) and Norrliden (1971-1989; some treatments still in progress). A main aim was to establish a range of needle nitrogen concentration levels, as stable as possible, and to study the effects of these and of other factors (other than nutrients, soil acidity changes, irrigation) on tree growth and tree nutrient status. The results confirmed previous experience that nitrogen supply normally is a growth-limiting factor in boreal forest, but showed that regular nitrogen additions can induce boron and magnesium deficiency, and low internal concentrations in the trees, e.g. of potassium and phosphorus. Other aspects of ecosystem functioning at varied nitrogen supply - biomass production, nutrient balances for several elements, vegetation changes, soil acidity changes, nitrification, studied by ourselves or by cooperating research groups - are reviewed. The importance of long-term field experiments in the study of urgent environmental problems, such as nitrogen saturation and soil acidification, is discussed.

  16. Drug Establishments Current Registration Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Drug Establishments Current Registration Site (DECRS) is a database of current information submitted by drug firms to register establishments (facilities) which...

  17. Using a stand-level model to predict light absorption in stands with vertically and horizontally heterogeneous canopies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David I Forrester

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Forest ecosystem functioning is strongly influenced by the absorption of photosynthetically active radiation (APAR, and therefore, accurate predictions of APAR are critical for many process-based forest growth models. The Lambert-Beer law can be applied to estimate APAR for simple homogeneous canopies composed of one layer, one species, and no canopy gaps. However, the vertical and horizontal structure of forest canopies is rarely homogeneous. Detailed tree-level models can account for this heterogeneity but these often have high input and computational demands and work on finer temporal and spatial resolutions than required by stand-level growth models. The aim of this study was to test a stand-level light absorption model that can estimate APAR by individual species in mixed-species and multi-layered stands with any degree of canopy openness including open-grown trees to closed canopies. Methods The stand-level model was compared with a detailed tree-level model that has already been tested in mixed-species stands using empirical data. Both models were parameterised for five different forests, including a wide range of species compositions, species proportions, stand densities, crown architectures and canopy structures. Results The stand-level model performed well in all stands except in the stand where extinction coefficients were unusually variable and it appears unlikely that APAR could be predicted in such stands using (tree- or stand-level models that do not allow individuals of a given species to have different extinction coefficients, leaf-area density or analogous parameters. Conclusion This model is parameterised with species-specific information about extinction coefficients and mean crown length, diameter, height and leaf area. It could be used to examine light dynamics in complex canopies and in stand-level growth models.

  18. Desk-based workers’ perspectives on using sit-stand workstations: a qualitative analysis of the Stand@Work study

    OpenAIRE

    Chau, Josephine Y; Daley, Michelle; Srinivasan, Anu; Dunn, Scott; Bauman, Adrian E; van der Ploeg, Hidde P

    2014-01-01

    Background Prolonged sitting time has been identified as a health risk factor. Sit-stand workstations allow desk workers to alternate between sitting and standing throughout the working day, but not much is known about their acceptability and feasibility. Hence, the aim of this study was to qualitatively evaluate the acceptability, feasibility and perceptions of using sit-stand workstations in a group of desk-based office workers. Methods This article describes the qualitative evaluation of t...

  19. Powered Sit-to-Stand and Assistive Stand-to-Sit Framework for a Powered Transfemoral Prosthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Varol, Huseyin Atakan; Sup, Frank; Goldfarb, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This work extends the three level powered knee and ankle prosthesis control framework previously developed by the authors by adding sitting mode. A middle level finite state based impedance controller is designed to accommodate sitting, sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit transitions. Moreover, a high level Gaussian Mixture Model based intent recognizer is developed to distinguish between standing and sitting modes and switch the middle level controllers accordingly. Experimental results with unila...

  20. Proceedings of the 35. annual aquatic toxicity workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This workshop on aquatic and environmental toxicology covered topics from basic aquatic toxicology to applications in environmental monitoring and protecting the health of aquatic ecosystems. It addressed issues regarding the development of regulations and guidelines, and the development of sediment and water quality criteria. The workshop emphasized an informal exchange of ideas and knowledge on the topics among interested persons from industry, governments and universities. The principles, current problems and approaches in aquatic toxicology and the biological effect on biota were also discussed. The sessions were entitled: environmental effects monitoring; endocrine modulating substances; metal, coal and diamond mining; mechanistic aspects of metal toxicity; genomics, proteomics and metabolomics in aquatic ecotoxicology; northern and Arctic ecosystems; oil sands research; general aquatic toxicology; barriers to biological recovery in metal contaminated sites; pesticides and other agricultural stressors; tools to assess toxicity and bioavailability in support of risk assessment; pharmaceuticals and personal care products; novel biological test methods; ecological risk assessment; national agri-environmental standards initiative; corroborating, extrapolating and predicting adverse effects between laboratory and field; cumulative effects assessment; advances in environmental chemistry; nanotoxicology; and sensory systems. The workshop featured 195 presentations, of which 31 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database.

  1. Proceedings of the 35. annual aquatic toxicity workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liber, K.; Janz, D.M. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada). Toxicology Centre; Burridge, L.E. [Fisheries and Oceans Canada, St. Andrews, NB (Canada)] (eds.)

    2009-07-01

    This workshop on aquatic and environmental toxicology covered topics from basic aquatic toxicology to applications in environmental monitoring and protecting the health of aquatic ecosystems. It addressed issues regarding the development of regulations and guidelines, and the development of sediment and water quality criteria. The workshop emphasized an informal exchange of ideas and knowledge on the topics among interested persons from industry, governments and universities. The principles, current problems and approaches in aquatic toxicology and the biological effect on biota were also discussed. The sessions were entitled: environmental effects monitoring; endocrine modulating substances; metal, coal and diamond mining; mechanistic aspects of metal toxicity; genomics, proteomics and metabolomics in aquatic ecotoxicology; northern and Arctic ecosystems; oil sands research; general aquatic toxicology; barriers to biological recovery in metal contaminated sites; pesticides and other agricultural stressors; tools to assess toxicity and bioavailability in support of risk assessment; pharmaceuticals and personal care products; novel biological test methods; ecological risk assessment; national agri-environmental standards initiative; corroborating, extrapolating and predicting adverse effects between laboratory and field; cumulative effects assessment; advances in environmental chemistry; nanotoxicology; and sensory systems. The workshop featured 195 presentations, of which 31 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database.

  2. Terrestrial-aquatic linkage in stream food webs along a forest chronosequence: multi-isotopic evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Naoto F; Togashi, Hiroyuki; Kato, Yoshiyazu; Yoshimura, Mayumi; Kohmatsu, Yukihiro; Yoshimizu, Chikage; Ogawa, Nanako O; Ohte, Nobuhito; Tokuchi, Naoko; Ohkouchi, Naohiko; Tayasu, Ichiro

    2016-05-01

    Long-term monitoring of ecosystem succession provides baseline data for conservation and management, as well as for understanding the dynamics of underlying biogeochemical processes. We examined the effects of deforestation and subsequent afforestation of a riparian forest of Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) on stable isotope ratios of carbon (δ¹³C) and nitrogen (δ¹⁵N) and natural abundances of radiocarbon (Δ¹⁴C) in stream biota in the Mt. Gomadan Experimental Forest and the Wakayama Forest Research Station, Kyoto University, central Japan. Macroinvertebrates, periphytic algae attached to rock surfaces (periphyton), and leaf litter of terrestrial plants were collected from six headwater streams with similar climate, topography, and bedrock geology, except for the stand ages of riparian forests (from 3 to 49 yr old in five stands and > 90 yr old in one reference stand). Light intensity and δ¹³C values of both periphyton and macroinvertebrates decreased synchronously with forest age in winter. A Bayesian mixing model indicates that periphyton contributions to the stream food webs are maximized in 23-yr-old forests. Except for grazers, most macroinvertebrates showed Δ¹⁴C values similar to those of terrestrial leaf litter, reflecting the influence of modern atmospheric CO₂ Δ¹⁴C values. On the other hand, the Δ¹⁴C values of both periphyton and grazers (i.e., aquatic primary consumers) were significantly lower than that of modern atmospheric CO₂, and were lowest in 23-yr-old forest stands. Previous studies show that root biomass of C. japonica peaks at 15-30 yr after planting. These evidences suggest that soil CO₂ released by root respiration and dispersed by groundwater weathers carbonate substrata, and that dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) with low Δ¹⁴C is incorporated into stream periphyton and some macroinvertebrates. The ecological response in the studied streams to clear-cutting and replanting of Japanese cedar is much

  3. A review of stand basal area growth models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Hong-gang; Zhang Jian-guo; Duan Ai-guo; He Cai-yun

    2007-01-01

    Growth and yield modeling has a long history in forestry. The methods of measuring the growth of stand basal area have evolved from those developed in the U.S.A. and Germany during the last century. Stand basal area modeling has progressed rapidly since the first widely used model was published by the U.S. Forest Service. Over the years, a variety of models have been developed for predicting the growth and yield of uneven/even-aged stands using stand-level approaches. The modeling methodology has not only moved from an empirical approach to a more ecological process-based approach but also accommodated a variety of techniques such as: 1) simultaneous equation methods, 2) difference models, 3) artificial neural network techniques, 4) linear/nonlinear regression models, and 5) matrix models. Empirical models using statistical methods were developed to reproduce accurately and precisely field observations. In contrast, process models have a shorter history, developed originally as research and education tools with the aim of increasing the understanding of cause and effect relationships. Empirical and process models can be married into hybrid models in which the shortcomings of both component approaches can, to some extent, be overcome. Algebraic difference forms of stand basal area models which consist of stand age, stand density and site quality can fully describe stand growth dynamics. This paper reviews the current literature regarding stand basal area models, discusses the basic types of models and their merits and outlines recent progress in modeling growth and dynamics of stand basal area. Future trends involving algebraic difference forms, good fitting variables and model types into stand basal area modeling strategies are discussed.

  4. Microwave Cooking Practices in Minnesota Food Service Establishments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedeen, Nicole; Reimann, David; Everstine, Karen

    2016-03-01

    Uneven cooking due to consumer use of microwave ovens to cook food products that have been prepared but are not ready to eat has been a documented risk factor in several foodborne disease outbreaks. However, the use of microwave ovens in restaurants and other food service establishments has not been well documented. The aim of this study was to describe the types of food service establishments that use microwave ovens, how these ovens are used, types of foods heated or cooked in these ovens, types of microwave ovens used in food service establishments, and the level of compliance with U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines. From 2008 to 2009, the Minnesota Department of Health collected data from a convenience sample of 60 food establishments within the state. Facility types included fast-food restaurants, sit-down restaurants, school food service, nursing homes, hotels and motels, and daycare centers. Food preparation practices were classified as prep-serve, cookserve, or complex. Minnesota environmental health specialists administered a study questionnaire to managers during routine inspections. Establishments included in this study reported using microwave ovens primarily to warm commercial ready-to-eat products (67%) and to warm foods for palatability (50%). No minimum temperatures are required for these processes because these foods do not require pathogen destruction. However, food establishments using complex preparation practices more often reported using microwave ovens for multiple processes and for processes that require pathogen destruction. For establishments that did report microwave oven use for food requiring pathogen destruction, the majority of managers reported following most FDA recommendations for cooking and reheating for hot-holding potentially hazardous foods, but many did not report letting food stand for 2 min after cooking. Additional training on stand time after microwave cooking could be beneficial because of low reporting

  5. Demonstration of free fatty acids in the integument of semi-aquatic and aquatic mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Wilfried; Schmidt, Judith; Busche, Roger; Jacob, Ralf; Naim, Hassan Y

    2012-02-01

    The sensitive red fluorescence dye BODIPY® 665/676, and embedding in the water-soluble resin Technovit® 7100 were used to demonstrate free fatty acids in the epidermis of seven semi-aquatic and aquatic mammalian species with a sparse or dense hair coat. The staining generally marked lipid layers of varying thickness between the lamellae of the Stratum corneum, as found particularly in very densely haired species (otter), but also in rather sparsely haired animals (beaver, nutria), and especially in the seal. The very sparsely haired capybara contained no free fatty acids in the corneal layer system, but exhibited an accumulation of such substances in the vital epidermis. All haired species showed a strongly positive reaction staining of the sebaceous glands. In the hairless species, a distinct intracellular staining was restricted to cells of the thick vital epidermis in the hippopotamus, whereby in the Str. corneum positive intercellular reactions appeared. In the dolphin, on the contrary, positive intercellular reactions became visible in the vital epidermis, whereas in the Str. corneum the lipids concentrated in large longitudinal intracellular vesicles. PMID:21524787

  6. Transfer of radionuclides in aquatic ecosystems - Default concentration ratios for aquatic biota in the Erica Tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of assessing risk to the environment following a given release of radioactivity requires the quantification of activity concentrations in environmental media and reference organisms. The methodology adopted by the ERICA Integrated Approach involves the application of concentration ratios (CR values) and distribution coefficients (Kd values) for aquatic systems. Within this paper the methodologies applied to derive default transfer parameters, collated within the ERICA Tool databases, are described to provide transparency and traceability in the documentation process. Detailed information is provided for the CR values used for marine and freshwater systems. Of the total 372 CR values derived for the marine ecosystem, 195 were identified by literature review. For the freshwater system, the number of values based on review was less, but still constituted 129 from a total of 372 values. In both types of aquatic systems, 70-80% of the data gaps have been filled by employing 'preferable' approaches such as those based on substituting values from taxonomically similar organisms or biogeochemically similar elements

  7. Key processes from tree to stand level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in six factors have been identified as having potential major future impacts on the productivity and survival of forest trees and stands. These factors are atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration, tropospheric ozone concentration, mean annual air temperature and precipitation, extremes in temperature and precipitation, and levels of ultraviolet radiation. Except for precipitation, all of these factors are expected to increase with climatic change. However, the likelihood of their increase or change ranges from the given to the unknown. The way in which one or more of these factors might individually or in combination affect the productivity and survival of trees is discussed, and particularly sensitive physiological processes are identified. For example, increases in winter temperature and a doubling of CO2 will result in early budburst in many species and therefore increase the risk of frost damage. In other species or locations, warm winters may mean insufficient chilling hours and the requirements for release from bud dormancy may not be met. The interaction of these processes with current species distribution, genotype selection, and management alternatives is reviewed. 52 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  8. Theoretical Study on Standing Wave Thermoacoustic Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, S.; Desai, K. P.; Naik, H. B.; Atrey, M. D.

    Applications of thermoacoustic engines are not limited to driving pulse tube cryocoolers. The performance of a thermoacoustic engine is governed by various design parameters like type of resonator, stack geometry, frequency, type of working gas etc. and various operating parameters like heat input, charging pressure etc. It is very important to arrive at an optimum configuration of the engine for which a theoretical model is required. In the present work, a theoretical analysis, based on linear acoustic theory of a standing wave type half wavelength thermoacoustic engine is carried out using DeltaEC software. The system dimensions like length of resonator, stack, hot and cold heat exchangers are fixed with a helium-argon mixture as the working gas and a parallel plate type stack. Later on, two plate spacings, corresponding to helium-argon mixture and nitrogen gas, are used for carrying out analysis with helium, argon, nitrogen, carbon dioxide and helium-argon mixture as working gases of the system. The effect of charging pressure on the performance of the system is studied in terms of resonating frequency, onset temperature, pressure amplitude, acoustic power and efficiency. The conclusions derived from the analysis are reported in the paper.

  9. RAMSES stands guard over the accelerator chain

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    RAMSES, the system that is used to monitor radiation at the LHC, CNGS, CTF3 and n-TOF facilities, will soon be installed at strategic points in the accelerator chain, replacing the older monitoring system ARCON. The replacement programme has already begun.   RAMSES (which stands for “Radiation Monitoring System for the Environment and Safety”) is designed to protect workers, the general public and the environment, both on the Organization’s site and in the surrounding areas. It is currently operational on all the LHC sites and at CTF3, CNGS and n-TOF, while the remaining sites are still equipped with the ARCON (Area CONtroller) system. Daniel Perrin, head of the Instrumentation and Logistics Section of the HSE Unit's Radiation Protection Group, explains: “ARCON was designed for the old LEP accelerator and dates back to the early 1980s, while RAMSES is a much more recent design intended specifically for the LHC. With 389 detectors distributed across 124 mea...

  10. Developing a mobile stand alone photovoltaic generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a recent work developed to create a mobile stand alone photovoltaic generator that can be easily relocated in remote areas to evaluate the feasibility of photovoltaic energy applications. A set of sensors were installed to monitor the electric current and voltage of the energy generated, the energy stored and the energy used by the loads that may be connected to the system. Other parameters like solar radiations (both on the horizontal and on the photovoltaic generation planes) and temperatures (of both the environment and the photovoltaic module) were monitored. This was done while considering the important role of temperature in the photovoltaic module performance. Finally, a measurement and communication hardware was installed to interface the system developed with a conventional computer. In this way, the performance of the overall system in real rural conditions could be evaluated efficiently. Visual software that reads, visualizes and saves the data generated by the system was also developed by means of the LabVIEW programming environment

  11. Differentiated Brand Marketing Strategy for China’s Conventional Aquatic Products

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Hua; Shen, Zhongming

    2015-01-01

    The volume of production and marketing of China’s conventional aquatic products is increasing. Compared with price of livestock and poultry products, price of conventional aquatic products is relatively low. Differentiated brand marketing for China’s conventional aquatic products is a key approach for increasing market demand for conventional aquatic products and increasing value of conventional aquatic products. The differentiated brand marketing is an inevitable trend of market developm...

  12. Lysosomes and autophagy in aquatic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Michael N; Kohler, Angela; Lowe, David; Viarengo, Aldo

    2008-01-01

    The lysosomal-autophagic system appears to be a common target for many environmental pollutants, as lysosomes accumulate many toxic metals and organic xenobiotics, which perturb normal function and damage the lysosomal membrane. In fact, autophagic reactions frequently involving reduced lysosomal membrane integrity or stability appear to be effective generic indicators of cellular well-being in eukaryotes: in social amoebae (slime mold), mollusks and fish, autophagy/membrane destabilization is correlated with many stress and toxicological responses and pathological reactions. Prognostic use of adverse lysosomal and autophagic reactions to environmental pollutants can be used for predicting cellular dysfunction and health in aquatic animals, such as shellfish and fish, which are extensively used as sensitive bioindicators in monitoring ecosystem health; and also represent a significant food resource for at least 20% of the global human population. Explanatory frameworks for prediction of pollutant impact on health have been derived encompassing a conceptual mechanistic model linking lysosomal damage and autophagic dysfunction with injury to cells and tissues. Methods are described for tracking in vivo autophagy of fluorescently labeled cytoplasmic proteins, measuring degradation of radiolabeled intracellular proteins and morphometric measurement of lysosomal/cytoplasmic volume ratio. Additional methods for the determination of lysosomal membrane stability in lower animals are also described, which can be applied to frozen tissue sections, protozoans and isolated cells in vivo. Experimental and simulated results have also indicated that nutritional deprivation (analogous in marine mussels to caloric restriction)-induced autophagy has a protective function against toxic effects mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Finally, coupled measurement of lysosomal-autophagic reactions and simulation modelling is proposed as a practical toolbox for predicting toxic

  13. Tritium behavior in an aquatic ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium behavior in aquatic organisms through a model food chain was investigated. In this model food chain, tritium in water reaches bacteria or Japanese killifish via diatoms and brine shrimps. Tritium accumulation in these organisms as organic bound form was expressed as the R value which is defined as the ratio of tritium specific activity in lyophilized organisms (μCi/gH) to that in water (μCi/gH). The maximum R values were 0.5 in diatoms: Chaetoceros gracilis, 0.2 in bacteria: Escherichia coli, 0.5 in brine shrimps: Artemia salina, and 0.32 in Japanese killifish: Oryzias latipes under the growing condition in which tritium accumulation was due to tritium in tritiated water and not tritiated foods. Brine shrimps and Japanese killifish were grown from larve to adult in tritiated sea water and were fed on tritiated foods (model food chain). Their R values were 0.70 and 0.67, respectively. Bacteria, which grew in tritiated water by adding the hydrolysate of tritiated brine shrimps, showed a maximum R value at 0.32. The R values of each organ of Japanese killifish and of DNA and the nucleotides purified from brine shrimps growing in tritiated water with or without tritiated food were measured to estimate the tritium distribution in the body or various molecules of the organisms. These results did not indicate concentration of tritium in specific organs or compounds. The changes of specific activity of tritium in these organisms were measured when they were transferred to non-tritiated water. These retention of tritium was not only different among the tissues but also depended on whether or not the organisms were reared with tritiated foods. (author)

  14. Modelling changes in forest soil chemistry in the oldest spruce stands in the Potok Dupnianski Catchment in Southern Poland using ForSAFE model

    OpenAIRE

    Małek, Stanisław; Belyazid, Salim; Sverdrup, Harald

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic forest ecosystem model ForSAFE was applied to the oldest spruce forest stand in a forested catchment – the Potok Dupniański (southern Poland), to study changes in forest soil chemistry and possible recovery from acidification following changes in atmospheric deposition. The simulation shows a considerable historical acidification. The model uses data from intensive monitoring of a plot established in 1999 in a spruce stand which was planted in 1880. Observations showed that ...

  15. The impact of sediment removal on the aquatic macroinvertebrate assemblage in a fishpond littoral zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeněk ADÁMEK

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Bottom sediment removal, a widely used technique in restoration management of standing water bodies, has a strong influence on communities of aquatic organisms. As most information on the impact of sediment removal on the aquatic environment comes from studies on lakes, the aim of this study was to describe macroinvertebrate assemblage succession in a fishpond (Štěpánek fishpond, Bohemian-Moravian highlands, Czech Republic littoral zone following restoration by sediment removal during the winter of 2003/2004. Semi-quantitative hand net sampling was undertaken one year before (2003 and in each of the following five years (2004–2008 after sediment removal. A significant decrease in both abundance (approx. 90% of individuals and diversity (approx. 30% of taxa of macroinvertebrates was detected immediately after pond restoration. The values gradually increased over subsequent years, reaching comparable abundance and diversity three years after sediment removal. A significant shift was recorded in the taxonomic and functional composition of the macroinvertebrate assemblage after sediment removal. Mayfly larvae were the dominant invertebrates before restoration, while chironomid larvae and oligochaetes dominated after sediment removal. Phytophilous taxa, grazers and scrapers, and swimming or diving invertebrates were common in 2003, whilst open-water taxa preferring mud and other mostly inorganic microhabitats, gatherers/collectors, and burrowing/boring invertebrates were relatively common after sediment removal. In 2008, the assemblage reverted towards the situation before sediment removal, probably connected with a lower water level and accelerated macrophyte bed succession. Principal Component Analysis on the species data confirmed the differences in invertebrate taxonomic structure among sampling years. Succession of the fishpond invertebrate assemblage in the years following sediment removal was mainly influenced by fish farming practice and

  16. Resin production in natural Aleppo pine stands in northern Evia, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Spanos

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the variability in resin yield of Aleppo pines in Evia (Greece with the aim to exploit this natural resource in a sustainable way. Ten experimental plots were established in natural pine stands for monitoring. Our results revealed significant differences among stands, with high variation among individual trees in each plot. Maximum resin production was achieved in the Livadakia site whereas the minimum was obtained in Kokinomilia. All trees were classified according to their resin production into five classes ranging from not economically profitable (I to highly profitable (V. From a total of 2483 trees, 1043 (42% were in class I whereas the remaining 58% was classified into economically acceptable classes (II–V. A weak correlation (R2 = 0.315 between resin production and tree size was found suggesting that taller trees produced more resin than smaller trees.

  17. Vibration transmission characteristics of the legs of freely standing honeybees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohrseitz, Kristin; Kilpinen, Ole

    The leg vibrations of honeybees standing on a vibrating substrate were measured with laser Doppler vibrometry, both in freely standing bees and in bees attached to a holder. In both cases, no resonances were found. In the fixed bee preparation, the legs moved with approximately the same amplitude...

  18. Approved forest stands for seed collection; 1 : 1 000 000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This map of The Atlas represents the approved forest stands for seed collection of the Slovak Republic. The approved stands rank among the best quality ones of the wood species used for seed collection and they are the result of the previous massive selection expressed by the phenotype value in the forest economic plan. (authors)

  19. Relationships between multipolarized radar backscatter and slash pine stand parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussin, Yousif Ali; Hoffer, Roger M.

    1989-01-01

    Multipolarized L-band (24.5 cm) aircraft radar data was obtained for a primarily forested area in northern Florida. Based on the results of previous studies by Hoffer and Hussin (1989), a swath of medium incidence angle (35-25 deg) data was defined. Three groups of slash pine stands were located in the data: 4- to 17-year-old plantations, 18- to 48-year-old plantations, and 16- to 53-year-old natural stands. Stand data obtained from the forest-products companies operating in the area include age, tree height, diameter-at-breast height, basal area, volume (cords/acre), and density (trees/acre). Each of these stand parameters were compared to each of the four polarizations (HH, VV, VH, and HV) of the radar data for each group of stands. Statistically significant relationships were found between the radar backscatter and the forest stand parameters only for the 4- to 17-year-old slash pine plantation stands. In general, the cross-polarized radar backscatter was more highly correlated with the various stand parameters than the like-polarized backscatter, and the VV-polarized data were more highly correlated than the HH-polarized data.

  20. Studies on radioactivity in aquatic and atmospheric environs of coastal Karnataka, Kaiga and Goa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic study on background radiation level and radionuclide distribution in the environs of coastal Karnataka, Kaiga and Goa has been initiated. In the first phase, a reliable baseline data on background radiation level and distribution of radionuclides in the terrestrial environs of coastal Karnataka and Kaiga was established. Investigations for establishing baseline data in aquatic and atmospheric environs of coastal Karnataka and terrestrial environs of Goa is now under progress. Atmospheric radon daughter concentrations, diurnal variations, seasonal variations and radon emanation rates are studied. A new approach to the model based on diffusion theory is formulated to understand 222Rn migration in soil. Experimental results are analysed on the basis of the new model and interpreted. The results of these systematic investigations are presented and discussed. (author)

  1. Standardization of a broth microdilution susceptibility testing method to determine minimum inhibitory concentrations of aquatic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, R.A.; Walker, R.D.; Carson, J.;

    2005-01-01

    -Hinton broth. These QC ranges were accepted by the CLSI/NCCLS Subcommittee on Veterinary Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing in January 2004. This broth microdilution testing method represents the first standardized method for determining MICs of bacterial isolates whose preferred growth temperatures......A multiple laboratory study was conducted in accordance with the standards established by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI), formerly the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS), for the development of quality control (QC) ranges using dilution...... antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods for bacterial isolates from aquatic animal species. QC ranges were established for Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida ATCC 33658 when testing at 22, 28 and 35 degrees C (E. coli only) for 10 different antimicrobial agents...

  2. Review on environmental alterations propagating from aquatic to terrestrial ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Ralf; Bundschuh, Mirco; Gergs, René; Brühl, Carsten A; Diehl, Dörte; Entling, Martin H; Fahse, Lorenz; Frör, Oliver; Jungkunst, Hermann F; Lorke, Andreas; Schäfer, Ralf B; Schaumann, Gabriele E; Schwenk, Klaus

    2015-12-15

    Terrestrial inputs into freshwater ecosystems are a classical field of environmental science. Resource fluxes (subsidy) from aquatic to terrestrial systems have been less studied, although they are of high ecological relevance particularly for the receiving ecosystem. These fluxes may, however, be impacted by anthropogenically driven alterations modifying structure and functioning of aquatic ecosystems. In this context, we reviewed the peer-reviewed literature for studies addressing the subsidy of terrestrial by aquatic ecosystems with special emphasis on the role that anthropogenic alterations play in this water-land coupling. Our analysis revealed a continuously increasing interest in the coupling of aquatic to terrestrial ecosystems between 1990 and 2014 (total: 661 studies), while the research domains focusing on abiotic (502 studies) and biotic (159 studies) processes are strongly separated. Approximately 35% (abiotic) and 25% (biotic) of the studies focused on the propagation of anthropogenic alterations from the aquatic to the terrestrial system. Among these studies, hydromorphological and hydrological alterations were predominantly assessed, whereas water pollution and invasive species were less frequently investigated. Less than 5% of these studies considered indirect effects in the terrestrial system e.g. via food web responses, as a result of anthropogenic alterations in aquatic ecosystems. Nonetheless, these very few publications indicate far-reaching consequences in the receiving terrestrial ecosystem. For example, bottom-up mediated responses via soil quality can cascade over plant communities up to the level of herbivorous arthropods, while top-down mediated responses via predatory spiders can cascade down to herbivorous arthropods and even plants. Overall, the current state of knowledge calls for an integrated assessment on how these interactions within terrestrial ecosystems are affected by propagation of aquatic ecosystem alterations. To fill

  3. Refinement and use of Certificates of Veterinary Inspection (Health Certificates) for optimal assurance of disease freedom in aquatic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starling, D E; Palić, D; Scarfe, A D

    2007-01-01

    Certificates of Veterinary Inspection (CVI), generally termed "Health Certificates", are pivotal for ensuring that translocated animals are not diseased or do not harbour significant pathogens. While used very successfully with terrestrial animal movement for decades, CVIs for aquatic animals are not well refined, understood or used, despite the availability of several aquatic animal "certification processes", "permits" and "health certificates", including the OIE model health certificates. Correctly designed CVIs provide the single most economical and effective assurance of disease status (generally freedom from specific diseases or pathogens) for individuals or lots of animals, at any point in time. When issued by a qualified independent third-party (typically a licensed and government accredited veterinarian) they provide the official level of assurance necessary for intrastate, interstate and international trade. Tailored modifications of CVIs are also useful for other purposes requiring the evaluation of animal health (e.g. specific pathogen-free (SPF) assurance for premises, risk-mitigating assurance necessary for insurance policies, breeding soundness assurance of broodstock, etc.). Here we discuss necessary information for aquatic animal CVIs: animal, ownership and location; standardized diagnostic results and their interpretation; and language contained in CVIs. Also addressed is the viability for use with multiple aquatic species and diseases/pathogens of interest, and their use in conjunction with established veterinary inspection procedures. A revised model aquatic CVI, with broad potential use for individual operations, states or countries, is offered for discussion, comment and refinement. In addition an optimally designed model CVI may be of use with electronic systems that are evolving in, for example, Europe, the USA and Australia/New Zealand (e.g. TRACES, e-CVI, e-Certs). PMID:18306523

  4. Aquatic ecosystems within the Chernobyl NPP exclusion zone: radioactive contamination, doses and effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For past 17 years after accident the character of radioactive contamination of water objects within the Chernobyl NPP exclusion zone has undergone essential changes. First of all it connected with realisation on a wide area of deactivation works, and also with transformation of radioactive substances in water-soil systems. Besides, during 1991-95 the complex of hydraulic engineering structures as protection dams, interfering washing away of radioactive substances from soils of the left-bank catchment basin and changed a hydrological regime of these territories during a high water, was constructed. The levels of radionuclide contamination of water objects within the Chernobyl NPP exclusion zone was rather stabilised. Due to high water change rate the river bottom sediments have undergone decontamination processes (especially during floods and periods of high water) and over the years have ceased to play the essential role as a secondary source of water contamination. On the other hand, the closed reservoirs have considerably higher levels of radioactive contamination caused by limited water change and by relatively high concentration of radionuclides deposited in the bottom sediments. Therefore, for the majority of standing reservoirs the level of radionuclide content is determined mainly by the rates of mobile radionuclide forms exchange between bottom sediment and water, as well as by the external washout from the catchment basin. In this paper will be considered: (1) the latest data on radionuclide content (Sr-90, Cs-137, Pu-238, Pu-239+240 and Am-241) and dynamics in water, seston, bottom sediments and hydrobionts of different trophic levels and ecological groups; (2) the peculiarities of formation of vegetative communities from lakes within embankment territory of Pripyat River flood-lands and its impact on radionuclide redistribution in aquatic ecosystems; (3) the major hydrochemical factors, which determine the behaviour of radionuclides in the aquatic

  5. Study of methylation sites and factors in contaminated aquatic systems in the Amazon using an optimized radiochemical technique - Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last few years, some new data have brought light on the Hg cycle in the Amazon. Roulet et al (1998 and 1999) found high natural Hg contents in soils and showed that soil erosion, due to agriculture and other human activities, had increased the Hg burdens in aquatic systems. They also showed that, surprisingly, the activity of goldminers on many upstream affluents of the Tapajos river did not result in downstream gradients in dissolved or particulate Hg. Our own data (Malm et al, 1995, 1997) from long term surveys show little or no reduction in fish or human hair Hg levels in different water basins, despite a 3 to 10-fold decrease in goldmining activities since 1990. Regardless of the on-going debate on the relative magnitude of natural and man-made Hg sources in the Amazon, Hg is being transported and increasingly accumulated in productive lakes and floodplains in all the Amazon basin, leading riverine populations to unsafe Hg exposure levels. This Hg transport is done mainly in the particulate form, and the floating vegetation is a very efficient particle trap, besides providing support to an abundant periphyton, features that favor MeHg formation and bio-availability. A high Hg methylation potential in macrophytes is relevant for many reasons. This characteristic tropical aquatic vegetation produces highly bioavailable MeHg, because of its high standing stock (1 kg dw. m-2, Sioli, 1986) in direct contact with the water column and very high relative area. Because the root zone of these floating aquatic plants is densely populated by a varied fauna of invertebrates and fish and represents an essential carbon source for aquatic food chains, it may constitute a major pathway of MeHg uptake into tropical aquatic food webs. In contrast, the production of MeHg in surface sediments is ∼30 times lower than in macrophyte roots, its bioavailability is probably limited, as well as the sediment-water flux of MeHg. Moreover, the role of floating meadows as important

  6. Financial Village Standing in Indonesian Financial System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herry Purnomo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Financial resources of the village that are sourced from a country or a Regional Finance Financial based Law Number 6 Year 2014 of The Village is the mandate of the law that must be allocated to the village. The interconnectedness of the financial position of the village in the financial system of the country or Region concerned the Financial administrative and territorial relations, and there is no setting directly regarding the finances of the village as part of the financial system of the country or the financial area. In respect of the elements of the crime of corruption deeds against financial irregularities of the village there are still disagreements on the interpretation of the law in trapping the perpetrators of corruption on the village chief that implies not satisfy the principle of legality and legal certainty in the ruling of the matter of financial irregularities. In fact, many of the village chief or Councilor caught the criminal offence of corruption over the use of financial irregularities. This research analyzes How the financial position of the village in the financial system of the country or region, as well as whether the financial resources of the village is derived from the state budget or region budget managed in village budget belongs to the category of village finances and whether tort against the financial management of the village can be categorized as a criminal act corruption. How To Cite: Purnomo, H. (2015. Financial Village Standing in Indonesian Financial System. Rechtsidee, 2(2, 121-140. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.21070/jihr.v2i2.81

  7. STAND AT EASE/GARY GREEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gert Van der Westhuizen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Books by ex-conscripts detailing their experiences were few and far betweenin the era of the Border War while more than 500 000 white males were called upfor what was described as “national service”. While books like these are not exactlyflooding the shelves of bookstores, they roll of the presses more regularly now.These works mostly deal with ex-conscript's that actively experienced the war inNamibia and Angola.Stand at ease is different: there is no "cordite and conflict".Green describes himself as a reluctant conscript (one wonders how many ofthe erstwhile national servicemen were of the same view. He was a product of oneof the country's first multi-racial schools - in this case a school that did not subscribeto the former government's apartheid policies.Hence, his period of national service was seen as a necessary evil, somethingthat had to be done - to get it behind one. But he and a few friends were determinedto have as easy a time as possible. Their most important aim was to avoid the"dreaded" call-up to the Border. Green was helped in this endeavour when he wasmedically classified as G3K3. He was called up to 5 South African InfantryBattalion in Ladysmith where he spent a few days before going to Kimberley. Hedid guard duty at 93 Ammunition Depot in Jan Kempdorp in the Northern Capebefore being deployed to the Army Battle School in Lohatla where he spent the restof his days as a national serviceman.He says his time in the military "could hardly be described as constructive orenjoyable", but it was also "a period of unprecedented personal growth and selfdiscovery”.“There is little doubt that during the two years of my conscription, Istopped being a boy and at some point became a man." Green unfortunately does notelaborate too much on this rite of passage.

  8. The experiences of MDE stand-by; Les experiences de MDE stand-by

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-02-01

    The control of the electric power demand (MDE) is a worrying subject for many countries. The consumption of the electrical equipment in stand-by, is evaluated at 20 TWh/year for the ternary and residential sectors in Germany and 5,3 in France. Taking into account the SAVE project (Pilot campaign of municipal utilities for an improved rational use of energy), this study aims to observe the policies and the experiences of local governments in terms of energy consumption reduction. (A.L.B.)

  9. Mountain Pine Beetle Impact on Stand-level Water Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, J. A.; Woods, S.

    2012-12-01

    The recent mountain pine beetle (MPB) epidemic has disturbed millions of hectares throughout the Rocky Mountain West. The most persistent effects of MPB infestation on the stand-level water balance are likely concomitant with the grey stage of the disturbance cycle. The grey stage occurs within 3 to 5 years of the initial infestation after the needles of an infected tree have turned red and fallen off due to tree death. Large numbers of grey-stage trees in a stand may remain on the landscape for up to 20 years, until windthrow or another disturbance sends them to the forest floor. The greater temporal persistence of the grey stage over antecedent stages suggested that an examination of the grey stage would best capture long-term effects of MPB disturbance on the forest water balance. In this study we hypothesized that changes to the forest canopy associated with MPB disturbance may affect the stand-level water balance. The needle loss and windthrow that follows MPB disturbance is expected to increase the amount of precipitation reaching the forest floor. Additionally, overstory evapotranspiration (ET) demand is expected to decrease as MPB-induced tree mortality increases within disturbed stands. The expected cumulative effect of MPB disturbance on the stand-level water balance is an increase in soil moisture due to increased precipitation inputs and reduced overstory ET. This study was conducted in Lubrecht Experimental Forest and adjacent Bureau of Land Management areas near Missoula, Montana. Sub-canopy measurements of soil moisture, precipitation (rain and snow water equivalent), overstory transpiration and micro-meteorological data (net radiation, temperature, wind speed, etc.) were collected in three 50 x 50 meter plots. The plots consisted of a uniform stand of grey-stage lodgepole pine, a uniform stand of non-infested lodgepole pine, and a recent clear-cut stand, which served as a control unit. Water balances for each stand were constructed using a mass

  10. Standing wave and global existence to nonlocal nonlinear Schrödinger equations: the two-dimensional case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Zaihui

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we consider the standing waves and the global existence for two-dimensional nonlocal nonlinear Schrödinger equations. It is a coupled system which describes the spontaneous generation of a magnetic field in a cold plasma under the static limit. The main difficulty in the proofs lies in exploring the inner structure of the equations due to the fact that the nonlocal terms violate the inner scaling invariance, which may cause the non-zero energy for the ground state. For this reason, we first make a proper use of the inner structure of the equations to establish the existence of standing waves, and then we apply an energy scaling to obtain the instability of standing waves. Finally we show a sharp threshold for the global existence of solutions to the nonlocal nonlinear Schrödinger equations by a variational method, which depends again on the inner structure of the equations under consideration.

  11. Travelling waves above the canopy of aquatic vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubimov, D.; Lyubimova, T.; Baidina, D.

    2012-04-01

    number of most dangerous perturbations increases monotonically with d. The effect of the deformability of porous medium on linear stability conditions is also investigated. Non-linear flow regimes are studied numerically by finite difference method. The calculations are performed for the rectangular domains whose length is taken to be equal to the wavelength of most dangerous perturbations according to linear stability theory. The calculations show that for low values of Reynolds number the stationary uni-directional flow is realized. Starting from a certain Reynolds number, the stationary oscillations are established with amplitude and frequency depending on the parameters. Analysis of the velocity fields corresponding to different phases of the oscillation period, shows that the observed waves travel in the direction of the basic flow. The work was made under financial support of Russian Foundation for Basic Research. 1. Ghisalberti, M., Nepf, H.M., 2002, Mixing layers and coherent structures in vegetated aquatic flows, J. of Geophysical Research. 107, C2.

  12. Abstracts of the 34. aquatic toxicity workshop : navigating new waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This workshop provided an opportunity to discuss current research findings in the field of aquatic toxicology and the biological effect on biota. It addressed the challenges of assessing and protecting the health of aquatic ecosystems in Canada. Topics of discussion ranged from basic aquatic toxicology to applications in environmental monitoring, setting regulations and developing criteria for sediment and water quality. The sessions were entitled: acid rain; agricultural stressors; amphibian ecotoxicology; aquaculture; aquatic ecotoxicology and human health; biological test methods development and their application; effects based pesticides research; emerging technologies for tracing contaminants; endocrine disruption; environmental/climate change in aquatic toxicology; environmental effects monitoring; environmental impacts of mercury; environmental risk assessment; Gulfs of Maine and St. Lawrence/Bay of Fundy issues; Maritimes leaders in marine ecotoxicology and prevention; metal and diamond mining; microscale ecotoxicology; multiple stressors in estuaries; municipal wastewaters and water treatment; non-lethal sampling; oil and gas development and production; parasites as indicators of contamination; persistent contaminants; sediment/soil toxicology; selenium ecotoxicology; and, stable isotopes in ecotoxicology. This book featured 162 abstracts, of which 19 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database

  13. Late cretaceous aquatic plant world in Patagonia, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cúneo, N Rubén; Gandolfo, María A; Zamaloa, María C; Hermsen, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    In this contribution, we describe latest Cretaceous aquatic plant communities from the La Colonia Formation, Patagonia, Argentina, based on their taxonomic components and paleoecological attributes. The La Colonia Formation is a geological unit deposited during a Maastrichtian-Danian transgressive episode of the South Atlantic Ocean. This event resulted in the deposition of a series of fine-grained sediments associated with lagoon systems occurring along irregular coastal plains in northern Patagonia. These deposits preserved a diverse biota, including aquatic and terrestrial plants and animals. The aquatic macrophytes can be broadly divided into two groups: free-floating and rooted, the latter with emergent or floating leaves. Free-floating macrophytes include ferns in Salviniaceae (Azolla and Paleoazolla) and a monocot (Araceae). Floating microphytes include green algae (Botryoccocus, Pediastrum and Zygnemataceae). Among the rooted components, marsileaceous water ferns (including Regnellidium and an extinct form) and the eudicot angiosperm Nelumbo (Nelumbonaceae) are the dominant groups. Terrestrial plants occurring in the vegetation surrounding the lagoons include monocots (palms and Typhaceae), ferns with affinities to Dicksoniaceae, conifers, and dicots. A reconstruction of the aquatic plant paleocommuniy is provided based on the distribution of the fossils along a freshwater horizon within the La Colonia Formation. This contribution constitutes the first reconstruction of a Cretaceous aquatic habitat for southern South America. PMID:25148081

  14. Late cretaceous aquatic plant world in Patagonia, Argentina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Rubén Cúneo

    Full Text Available In this contribution, we describe latest Cretaceous aquatic plant communities from the La Colonia Formation, Patagonia, Argentina, based on their taxonomic components and paleoecological attributes. The La Colonia Formation is a geological unit deposited during a Maastrichtian-Danian transgressive episode of the South Atlantic Ocean. This event resulted in the deposition of a series of fine-grained sediments associated with lagoon systems occurring along irregular coastal plains in northern Patagonia. These deposits preserved a diverse biota, including aquatic and terrestrial plants and animals. The aquatic macrophytes can be broadly divided into two groups: free-floating and rooted, the latter with emergent or floating leaves. Free-floating macrophytes include ferns in Salviniaceae (Azolla and Paleoazolla and a monocot (Araceae. Floating microphytes include green algae (Botryoccocus, Pediastrum and Zygnemataceae. Among the rooted components, marsileaceous water ferns (including Regnellidium and an extinct form and the eudicot angiosperm Nelumbo (Nelumbonaceae are the dominant groups. Terrestrial plants occurring in the vegetation surrounding the lagoons include monocots (palms and Typhaceae, ferns with affinities to Dicksoniaceae, conifers, and dicots. A reconstruction of the aquatic plant paleocommuniy is provided based on the distribution of the fossils along a freshwater horizon within the La Colonia Formation. This contribution constitutes the first reconstruction of a Cretaceous aquatic habitat for southern South America.

  15. Acute aquatic toxicity and biodegradation potential of biodiesel fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent studies on the biodegradation potential and aquatic toxicity of biodiesel fuels are reviewed. Biodegradation data were obtained using the shaker flask method observing the appearance of CO2 and by observing the disappearance of test substance with gas chromatography. Additional BOD5 and COD data were obtained. The results indicate the ready biodegradability of biodiesel fuels as well as the enhanced co-metabolic biodegradation of biodiesel and petroleum diesel fuel mixtures. The study examined reference diesel, neat soy oil, neat rape oil, and the methyl and ethyl esters of these vegetable oils as well as various fuel blends. Acute toxicity tests on biodiesel fuels and blends were performed using Oncorhynchus mykiss (Rainbow Trout) in a static non-renewal system and in a proportional dilution flow replacement system. The study is intended to develop data on the acute aquatic toxicity of biodiesel fuels and blends under US EPA Good Laboratory Practice Standards. The test procedure is designed from the guidelines outlined in Methods for Measuring the Acute Toxicity of Effluents and Receiving Waters to Freshwater and Marine Organisms and the Fish Acute Aquatic Toxicity Test guideline used to develop aquatic toxicity data for substances subject to environmental effects test regulations under TSCA. The acute aquatic toxicity is estimated by an LC50, a lethal concentration effecting mortality in 50% of the test population

  16. Geologic processes influence the effects of mining on aquatic ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Travis S.; Clements, William H.; Wanty, Richard B.; Verplanck, Philip L.; Church, Stanley E.; San Juan, Carma A.; Fey, David L.; Rockwell, Barnaby W.; DeWitt, Ed H.; Klein, Terry L.

    2012-01-01

    Geologic processes strongly influence water and sediment quality in aquatic ecosystems but rarely are geologic principles incorporated into routine biomonitoring studies. We test if elevated concentrations of metals in water and sediment are restricted to streams downstream of mines or areas that may discharge mine wastes. We surveyed 198 catchments classified as “historically mined” or “unmined,” and based on mineral-deposit criteria, to determine whether water and sediment quality were influenced by naturally occurring mineralized rock, by historical mining, or by a combination of both. By accounting for different geologic sources of metals to the environment, we were able to distinguish aquatic ecosystems limited by metals derived from natural processes from those due to mining. Elevated concentrations of metals in water and sediment were not restricted to mined catchments; depauperate aquatic communities were found in unmined catchments. The type and intensity of hydrothermal alteration and the mineral deposit type were important determinants of water and sediment quality as well as the aquatic community in both mined and unmined catchments. This study distinguished the effects of different rock types and geologic sources of metals on ecosystems by incorporating basic geologic processes into reference and baseline site selection, resulting in a refined assessment. Our results indicate that biomonitoring studies should account for natural sources of metals in some geologic environments as contributors to the effect of mines on aquatic ecosystems, recognizing that in mining-impacted drainages there may have been high pre-mining background metal concentrations.

  17. Hydrothermal liquefaction of aquatic plants to bio-oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, D.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S.; Fu, H.; Chen, J. [Fudan Univ., Shanghai (China). Dept. of Environmental Science and Engineering

    2010-07-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of producing bio-oils from aquatic plants by hydrothermal liquefaction using 2 typical aquatic plants as feedstocks, notably Enteromorpha prolifera and water hyacinth which are typical aquatic plants found in seawater and freshwater. Bio-oil production from these 2 feedstocks was studied in a batch reactor at controlled temperatures under an initial partial pressure of 2.0 MPa N2. The effects of temperature and reaction time on the liquefaction products yields were also studied. GC-MS and elemental analysis were carried out to analyze the composition of bio-oils. The bio-oil produced from Enteromorpha prolifera contained mainly fatty acids, esters and quite a few heterocyclic compounds. Phenols and their derivatives were found to be the main compounds in bio-oils produced from water hyacinth. An elemental analysis revealed that bio-oils produced from the 2 aquatic plants have higher energy density. It was concluded that the use of aquatic plants as feedstock for liquid fuel can contribute to environmental protection and sustainable energy development by reducing greenhouse gas emissions associated with the burning of fossil fuels. 9 refs., 3 tabs.

  18. Aquatic CAM photosynthesis: a brief history of its discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Jon E.

    2014-01-01

    Aquatic CAM (Crassulacean Acid Metabolism) photosynthesis was discovered while investigating an unrelated biochemical pathway concerned with anaerobic metabolism. George Bowes was a significant contributor to this project early in its infancy. Not only did he provide me with some valuable perspectives on peer review rejections, but by working with his gas exchange system I was able to take our initial observations of diel fluctuations in malic acid to the next level, showing this aquatic plant exhibited dark CO2 uptake. CAM is universal in all aquatic species of the worldwide Lycophyta genus Isoetes and non-existent in terrestrial Isoetes. Outside of this genus aquatic CAM has a limited occurrence in three other families, including the Crassulaceae. This discovery led to fascinating adventures in the highlands of the Peruvian Andes in search of Stylites, a terrestrial relative of Isoetes. Stylites is a plant that is hermetically sealed from the atmosphere and obtains all of its carbon from terrestrial sources and recycles carbon through CAM. Considering the Mesozoic origin of Isoetes in shallow pools, coupled with the fact that aquatic Isoetes universally possess CAM, suggests the earliest evolution of CAM photosynthesis was most likely not in terrestrial plants.

  19. Effects of ionizing radiation on aquatic organisms and ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A panel of experts in November 1971 specifically considered the effects of ionizing radiation on aquatic organisms and ecosystems and formulated detailed suggestions for research in the area. A further panel meeting took place in April 1974. The results of the work are presented in this report which is divided into 3 chapters in the first chapter the concentrations of natural and artificial radionuclides in aquatic environments and the radiation dose rates received by aquatic organisms are discussed. In particular, simple dosimetry models for phytoplankton, zooplankton, mollusca, crustacea and fish are presented which permit the estimation of the dose rates from incorporated radionuclides and from radionuclides in the external environment. In the second chapter the somatic and genetic effects of ionizing radiation on aquatic organisms are reviewed. Somatic effects are discussed separately as effects due to short-term (acute) exposure to near-lethal doses of radiation. Great attention is paid to the effects due to long-term (chronic) exposure at lower doses rates. Consideration is given to behaviour, repair mechanisms and metabolic stimulation after exposure, and also the influence of environmental factors on radiation effects. In the third chapter the potential effects of low-level irradiation on aquatic populations are considered. First, the possible consequences of somatic effects on egg and larval mortality, stock-recruitment, fecundity and ecosystem stability are discussed. Subsequently, the assessment of genetic effects as they relate to population genetics and increased mutation rates are considered

  20. Behaviour of 134Cs in the aquatic ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diminution of 134Cs in the aquatic phases and the absorption of 134Cs by aquatic lives observe the exponential expression. i.e. Y Aebe. The relationships between the enrichment factor of 134Cs(K) and the time(t) in the aquatic lives can be represented by a linear equation, K A + Bt. The value of K in the Alternanthera philoxeroides was about 560. That can be used for monitoring and purifying the water phase contaminated by 134Cs. Fish can absorb 134Cs from water phase and store it in liver and kidney. The specific activity of 134Cs in fish flesh was low but the percentage of radioactivity was high that was about 30% of total radioactivity in the fish. River mud can strongly absorb 134Cs and reduce the absorption by aquatic lives. It is a good adsorbent and purifying agent with low cost for treatment of 134Cs. The K+ can prevent aquatic lives from absorbing Cs+ because of antagonistic function