WorldWideScience

Sample records for aquatic lebanese environments

  1. Antimicrobial-resistant patterns of Escherichia coli and Salmonella strains in the aquatic Lebanese environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is the first to be conducted in Lebanon on the isolation and molecular characterization and the antimicrobial resistance profile of environmental pathogenic bacterial strains. Fifty-seven samples of seawater, sediment, crab, and fresh water were collected during the spring and summer seasons of 2003. The isolation of Escherichia coli and Salmonella using appropriate selective media revealed that 94.7% of the tested samples were contaminated with one or both of the tested bacteria. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was then used to identify the species of both bacteria using various sets of primers. Many pathogenic E. coli isolates were detected by PCR out of which two were identified as O157:H7 E. coli. Similarly, the species of many of the Salmonella isolates was molecularly identified. The confirmed isolates of Salmonella and E. coli were then tested using the disk diffusion method for their susceptibility to four different antimicrobials revealing high rates of antimicrobial resistance. - First report of antibiotic resistance in bacteria in the environment in Lebanon

  2. Aquatic Environment 2000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, L. M.; Bijl, L. van der; Boutrup, S.; Iversen, T. M.; Ellermann, T.; Hovmand, M. F.; Bøgestrand, J.; Grant, R.; Hansen, J.; Jensen, J. P.; Stockmarr, J.; Laursen, K. D.

    The report summarizes the results of the Danish Aquatic Monitoring and Assessment Programme 1998-2003. Danish Environmental Protection Agency 2000: NOVA-2003. Programbeskrivelse for det nationale program for overvågning af vandmiljøet 1998-2003. 397 pp. - Redegørelse fra Miljøstyrelsen nr. 1 (in...

  3. Aquatic environment pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Anechitoae Constantin; Grigorut Cornel; Ciortescu Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    From immemorial times people have been concerned with environment protection, certainly on a scale corresponding to the impact of human activities on it, taking into account, from the very beginning, the interest on the health of drinking water sources, where their animals drank and where their respective communities could drink clean water and use it in daily cooking, until nowadays, when the marine environment has turned into an international policy. Taking into account that the natural env...

  4. Tritium in the aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium is of environmental importance because it is released from nuclear facilities in relatively large quantities and because it has a half life of 12.26 y. Most of the tritium released into the atmosphere eventually reaches the aqueous environment, where it is rapidly taken up by aquatic organisms. This paper reviews the current literature on tritium in the aquatic environment. Conclusions from the review, which covered studies of algae, aquatic macrophytes, invertebrates, fish, and the food chain, were that aquatic organisms incorporate tritium into their tissue-free water very rapidly and reach concentrations near those of the external medium. The rate at which tritium from tritiated water is incorporated into the organic matter of cells is slower than the rate of its incorporation into the tissue-free water. If organisms consume tritiated food, incorporation of tritium into the organic matter is faster, and a higher tritium concentration is reached than when the organisms are exposed to only tritiated water alone. Incorporation of tritium bound to molecules into the organic matter depends on the chemical form of the ''carrier'' molecule. No evidence was found that biomagnification of tritium occurs at higher trophic levels. Radiation doses from tritium releases to large populations of humans will most likely come from the consumption of contaminated water rather than contaminated aquatic food products

  5. Tritium in the aquatic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Hoffman, F.O.; Frank, M.L.

    1986-02-01

    Tritium is of environmental importance because it is released from nuclear facilities in relatively large quantities and because it has a half life of 12.26 y. Most of the tritium released into the atmosphere eventually reaches the aqueous environment, where it is rapidly taken up by aquatic organisms. This paper reviews the current literature on tritium in the aquatic environment. Conclusions from the review, which covered studies of algae, aquatic macrophytes, invertebrates, fish, and the food chain, were that aquatic organisms incorporate tritium into their tissue-free water very rapidly and reach concentrations near those of the external medium. The rate at which tritium from tritiated water is incorporated into the organic matter of cells is slower than the rate of its incorporation into the tissue-free water. If organisms consume tritiated food, incorporation of tritium into the organic matter is faster, and a higher tritium concentration is reached than when the organisms are exposed to only tritiated water alone. Incorporation of tritium bound to molecules into the organic matter depends on the chemical form of the ''carrier'' molecule. No evidence was found that biomagnification of tritium occurs at higher trophic levels. Radiation doses from tritium releases to large populations of humans will most likely come from the consumption of contaminated water rather than contaminated aquatic food products.

  6. Tritium in the aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of the tritium released from nuclear facilities into the atmosphere eventually reaches the aqueous environment where it is rapidly taken up by aquatic organisms. This paper reviews the current literature on tritium in the aquatic environment. Conclusions from the review, which covered algae, aquatic plants, invertebrates, fish, and food chain studies, were that aquatic organisms incorporate tritium into their tissue free water very rapidly and reach concentrations near that of the external medium. Incorporation of tritium from triated water into the organic matter of cells is at a slower rate than incorporation into the tissue free water. If organisms consume tritiated food, incorporation of tritium into the organic matter is faster and a higher tritium concentration is reached than when the organisms are exposed to only tritiated water. Incorporation of tritium bound to molecules into the organic matter depends on the chemical form of the 'carrier' molecule. No evidence was found that biomagnification of tritium occurs at higher tropic levels. Radiation doses to large populations of humans from tritium releases will most likely be from the consumption of contaminated water rather than contaminated aquatic food products. (author)

  7. Aquatic and Terrestrial Environment 2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J. M.; Boutrup, S.; Bijl, L. van der;

    This report presents the 2004 results of the Danish National Monitoring and Assess-ment Programme for the Aquatic and Terrestrial Environments (NOVANA). 2004 was the first year in which terrestrial nature was included in the monitoring pro-gramme. The report reviews the state of the groundwater......, watercourses, lakes and marine waters and the pressures upon them and reviews the monitoring of terrestrial natural habitats and selected plants and animals. The report is based on the annual reports prepared for each subprogramme by the Topic Centres. The latter reports are mainly based on data collected and...

  8. Radioactivity in the Canadian aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sources of radionuclides arising from natural anthropogenic processes as well as technologically enhanced natural radiation are discussed. Transport, distribution and behaviour of these radionuclides in aquatic systems are influenced by physical, chemical, biological and geological processes and conditions in freshwater and marine environments. Dosimetry of aquatic organisms, as well as various methods of measuring dose rate are presented. Effects of ionizing radiation (acute and chronic exposure) on aquatic organisms, populations and ecosystems are reviewed. This review covers the entire spectrum of the aquatic environment. Results of many studies are summarized. 300+ refs

  9. Impact of Organic farming on aquatic environment

    OpenAIRE

    Kristensen, Erik Steen; Knudsen, Marie Trydemann

    2004-01-01

    The effects of conversion to organic farming on N leaching are discussed in the presentation. Problems in European aquatic environment are presented along with the development of organic farming in Denmark and the rest of Europe. Recent Danish studies on the N leaching effects by conversion of mixed dairy and arable farms are presented. The studies estimate that N leaching is lower from organic compared to conventional mixed dairy farms, whereas N leaching at organic arable farms are comparab...

  10. Nano-plastics in the aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, K; Hansson, L-A; Cedervall, T

    2015-10-01

    The amount of plastics released to the environment in modern days has increased substantially since the development of modern plastics in the early 1900s. As a result, concerns have been raised by the public about the impact of plastics on nature and on, specifically, aquatic wildlife. Lately, much attention has been paid to macro- and micro-sized plastics and their impact on aquatic organisms. However, micro-sized plastics degrade subsequently into nano-sizes whereas nano-sized particles may be released directly into nature. Such particles have a different impact on aquatic organisms than larger pieces of plastic due to their small size, high surface curvature, and large surface area. This review describes the possible sources of nano-sized plastic, its distribution and behavior in nature, the impact of nano-sized plastic on the well-being of aquatic organisms, and the difference of impact between nano- and micro-sized particles. We also identify research areas which urgently need more attention and suggest experimental methods to obtain useful data. PMID:26337600

  11. Rubber tire leachates in the aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, J J

    1997-01-01

    Tires have a deleterious effect on the environment. This review discusses the background of scrap tires discarded in the environment, including tire composition, adverse environmental effects, threats to public health and safety, and solid waste management. Despite the widespread use of scrap tires in environmental applications, both land-based and aquatic, data on the indicators of environmental degradation are extremely scarce. Indicators of environmental degradation include analysis of chemicals within the water and sediment, analysis of contaminants within organisms, and analysis of the biological effects of these compounds on plants, animals, microbes, and organelles. Although these indicators are most useful when used in parallel, a review of the available information on chemical characterization of tire leachate from tire storage facilities, manufacturing, usage in recycling applications, and toxicity exposure studies, of vegetation surveys from waste tire areas and reviews of mammalian tire product toxicity, and of toxicity, mutagenicity, and carcinogenicity of tire exposure in experimental aquatic animals, microbes, and organelles is presented. The major characteristics of these studies are discussed in specific sections. The "Discussion and Conclusions" section discusses and summarizes the biological effects and chemical characterization of tire leachates. A global environmental perspective is included to improve our understanding of the deficiency of the current knowledge of tire leachate toxicity from various sources and to encourage interdisciplinary studies to establish the pattern of pollution associated with waste tire management. PMID:9216257

  12. Biofilm-flow interactions in aquatic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, K. T.; Kazemifar, F.; Blois, G.; Aybar, M.; Perez Calleja, P.; Nerenberg, R.; Sinha, S.; Hardy, R. J.; Best, J.; Sambrook Smith, G.

    2015-12-01

    Biofilms are pervasive in aquatic environments, growing in pipes and channels in water supply systems, on permeable riverbeds, etc. The permeable, heterogeneous, and deformable structure of the biofilms make their interaction with surrounding fluid flow important from a range of perspectives, such as mass and momentum transport, and biofilm deformation and detachment due to shear stresses. Our understanding of these processes is limited, in part due to technical obstacles for performing such measurements. We have attempted to address these challenges using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and fluorescence imaging techniques in a water channel flow facility to obtain time-resolved velocity vector fields of flow around cylinders covered with biofilms at different growth stages. Analysis is focused on the coupled dynamics of turbulence and the biofilm development under different flow and nutrient conditions.

  13. Consequences of radioactive deposition on aquatic environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The publication concentrates on the analyses of the main effects of radioactive deposition on Nordic aquatic environments. A modelling approach is applied for predicting the temporal behaviour of concentrations in fish of inland freshwater ecosystems. The observed values are considered in parallel with the calculations. The time-integrated consequences, the radiation doses are estimated for the relatively significant dose pathways. After a preliminary study of various lake environments in Nordic countries, three representative examples of lake systems were selected for closer consideration: small forest lake, medium-sized forest lake and mountain lake. The effects of changes in the trophic levels of lakes are also tentatively accounted for. The results of the analyses indicate that the radiological consequences of shallow forest lakes are greater than those of mountain lakes which usually have shorter turnover times compared to forest lakes. In long-term consideration, the fish ingestion pathway may in general become important and, in addition to the external exposure, has a high contribution to the expected doses. (orig.) (8 refs., 11 figs., 9 tabs.)

  14. Toxaphene in the aquatic environment of Greenland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The octa- and nonachlorinated bornanes (toxaphene) CHBs 26, 40, 41, 44, 50 and 62 were analysed in Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus), shorthorn sculpin (Myoxocephalus scorpius), ringed seal (Pusa hispida) and black guillemot eggs (Cepphus grylle) from Greenland. Despite their high trophic level, ringed seals had the lowest concentrations of these species, with a Σ6Toxaphene median concentration of 13–20 ng/g lipid weight (lw), suggesting metabolisation. The congener composition also suggests transformation of nona- to octachlorinated congeners. Black guillemot eggs had the highest concentrations (Σ6Toxaphene median concentration of 971 ng/g lw). Although concentrations were higher in East than in West Greenland differences were smaller than for other persistent organic pollutants. In a circumpolar context, toxaphene had the highest concentrations in the Canadian Arctic. Time trend analyses showed significant decreases for black guillemot eggs and juvenile ringed seals, with annual rates of −5 to −7% for Σ6Toxaphene. The decreases were generally steepest for CHBs 40, 41 and 44. - Highlights: • Toxaphene was detected in freshwater and marine species of Greenland. • Relatively low concentrations in ringed seal suggest metabolisation. • The concentrations in Greenland appear lower than those in the Canadian Arctic. • Significant decreases were found in juvenile ringed seals and black guillemot eggs. - The banned insecticide toxaphene is widely present in the aquatic environment of Greenland, but concentrations are decreasing

  15. Actinide elements in aquatic and terrestrial environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: water-sediment interactions of U, Pu, Am, and Cm; relative availability of actinide elements from abiotic to aquatic biota; comparative uptake of transuranic elements by biota bordering Pond 3513; metabolic reduction of 239Np from Np(V) to Np(IV) in cotton rats; evaluation of hazards associated with transuranium releases to the biosphere; predicting Pu in bone; adsorption--solubility--complexation phenomena in actinide partitioning between sorbents and solution; comparative soil extraction data; and comparative plant uptake data

  16. Communal resilience: the Lebanese case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric BOUTIN

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In a turbulent and aggressive environment, organizations are subject to external events. They are sometimes destabilized and can disappear. This context explains the multiplication of works studying resilience of human organizations. Resilience is then defined as the ability of the organization studied to face an external shock.This paper proposes a state of the art of resilience concept and considers the interests of the transposition of the concept to the field of a territorial community. A case study will lead us to apply the concept of resilience to the Lebanese nation.

  17. Monitoring aquatic environments with autonomous systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jesper Philip Aagaard

    High frequency measurements from autonomous sensors have become a widely used tool among aquatic scientists. This report focus primarily on the use of ecosystem metabolism based on high frequency oxygen measurements and relates the calculations to spatial variation, biomass of the primary producers...... in epilimnion were primarily a result of metabolism and gas exchange with the atmosphere, while only 10% of the variation was due to physical movement of water across the thermocline. 3) Dense macrophyte populations in oligotrophic systems may have a higher GPP than expected based on nutrient...... conditions in the water phase and in shallow systems the macrophytes can completely dominate primary production. This was despite the fact that the plants in the studied system were light-saturated most of the light hours and occasionally carbon limited. It was also shown that the GPP and the total...

  18. Actinide elements in aquatic and terrestrial environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress is reported in terrestrial ecology studies with regard to plutonium in biota from the White Oak Creek forest; comparative distribution of plutonium in two forest ecosystems; an ecosystem model of plutonium dynamics; actinide element metabolism in cotton rats; and crayfish studies. Progress is reported in aquatic studies with regard to transuranics in surface waters, frogs, benthic algae, and invertebrates from pond 3513; and radioecology of transuranic elements in cotton rats bordering waste pond 3513. Progress is also reported in stability of trivalent plutonium in White Oak Lake water; chemistry of plutonium, americium, curium, and uranium in pond water; uranium, thorium, and plutonium in small mammals; and effect of soil pretreatment on the distribution of plutonium

  19. Learning from data for aquatic and geothenical environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhattacharya, B.

    2005-01-01

    The book presents machine learning as an approach to build models that learn from data, and that can be used to complement the existing modelling practice in aquatic and geotechnical environments. It provides concepts of learning from data, and identifies segmentation (clustering), classification, r

  20. LEVELS OF SYNTHETIC MUSKS COMPOUNDS IN AQUATIC ENVIRONMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synthetic musk compounds are consumer chemicals manufactured as fragrance materials Due to their high worldwide usage and release, they frequently occur in the aquatic and marine environments. The U.S. EPA (ORD, Las Vegas) developed surface-water monitoring methodology and conduc...

  1. Biota and biological principles of the aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first of several compilations of briefing papers on water quality prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey is presented. Each briefing paper is prepared in a simple, nontechnical, easy to understand manner. This U.S. Geological Survey Circular contains papers on selected biota and biological principles of the aquatic environment. Briefing papers are included on Why biology in water quality studies , Stream biology, Phytoplankton, Periphyton, Drift organisms in streams, Family Chironomidae (Diptera), Influences of water temperature on aquatic biota, and Stream channelization: Effects on stream fauna

  2. Measurements for modeling radionuclide transfer in the aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytical methods for measuring radionuclides in the aquatic environment are discussed for samples of fresh water and seawater, fish and shellfish, biota such as algae, plankton, seaweed, and aquatic plants, and sediment. Consideration is given to radionuclide collection and concentration, sample preservation, radiochemical and instrumental analysis, and quality assurance. Major problems are the very low environmental levels of the radionuclides of interest, simultaneous occurrence of radionuclides in several chemical and physical forms and the numerous factors that affect radionuclide levels in and transfers among media. Some radionuclides of importance in liquid effluents from nuclear power stations are listed, and sources of radiochemical analytical methods are recommended

  3. Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and by the year 2000. In December, 1992, the Tulane/Xavier CBR was awarded a five year grant to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ''Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin'' project is a broad research and education program aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Studies include defining the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The Mississippi River Basin represents a model system for analyzing and solving contamination problems that are found in aquatic systems world-wide. These research and education projects are particularly relevant to the US Department of Energy's programs aimed at addressing aquatic pollution problems associated with DOE National Laboratories. First year funding supported seven collaborative cluster projects and twelve initiation projects. This report summarizes research results for period December 1992--December 1993

  4. Artificial Radiotracer Applications in Aquatic Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of artificial radiotracers in the environment is analogous to their use in the human body. In both domains they provide data on flow rates and pathways, on exchange with materials and on their final discharge from the studied system. Artificially injected radiotracers have been used to investigate flow in natural waters since the 1950's. Identification of flow paths, diagnosis of blockages or leakage, measurement of flow rates, dispersion and exchange processes, such as biological uptake or sorption, are all aspects to which a wide range of artificial radioactive tracers have been applied. Increasingly radiotracers are used in combination with numerical modelling to improve confidence in the predictive capacity of models used in the management of our water resources and to extend their spatial applicability. In turn this allows us to use less and less tracer and demonstrate that the human and environmental impact of modern radiotracer studies is minimal. (author)

  5. Chapter 1. Chlorofluorocarbons in aquatic environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This guidebook brings together the results of some of these studies, as they apply to the groundwater environment, and summarizes the principles of CFC dating, with special emphasis on applications and limitations of the methods. Methods of sample collection and analysis are also presented, along with new software to aid in the interpretation of measured groundwater concentrations of CFCs. Often the application of multiple environmental tracers to a particular hydrological system enhances the level of understanding that can be gained. Applications of CFCs in groundwater studies will complement and enhance uses of other atmospheric environmental tracers in the hydrological sciences, including uses of tritium and tritium/helium-3 and sulphur hexafluoride. In the southern hemisphere and in low latitude/equatorial regions, the CFCs are particularly promising additional tools for groundwater dating because of very low tritium levels prevailing there and the associated problems for tritium dating. In addition, those regions were not affected so much by local industrial CFC emissions, as was the case for decades in western Europe and in the USA. However, the potential of applications for CFCs as groundwater tracers in low latitude regions has not yet been fully explored

  6. Occurrence of aminopolycarboxylates in the aquatic environment of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aminopolycarboxylic acids, such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), 1,3-propylenediaminetetraacetic acid (1,3-PDTA), β-alaninediacetic acid (β-ADA), and methylglycinediacetic acid (MGDA), are used in large quantities in a broad range of industrial applications and domestic products in order to solubilize or inactivate various metal ions by complex formation. Due to the wide field of their application, their high polarity and partly low degradability, these substances reach the aquatic environment at considerable concentrations (in the μg/L-range) and have also been detected in drinking water. This review evaluates and summarizes the results of long-term research projects, monitoring programs, and published papers concerning the pollution of the aquatic environment by aminopolycarboxylates in Germany. Concentrations and loads of aminopolycarboxylates are presented for various types of water including industrial and domestic waste waters, surface waters (rivers and lakes), raw waters, and drinking waters

  7. Nutrition considerations in special environments for aquatic sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellingwerff, Trent; Pyne, David B; Burke, Louise M

    2014-08-01

    Elite athletes who compete in aquatic sports face the constant challenge of arduous training and competition schedules in difficult and changing environmental conditions. The huge range of water temperatures to which swimmers and other aquatic athletes are often exposed (16-31 °C for open-water swimming), coupled with altered aquatic thermoregulatory responses as compared with terrestrial athletes, can challenge the health, safety, and performance of these athletes. Other environmental concerns include air and water pollution, altitude, and jetlag and travel fatigue. However, these challenging environments provide the potential for several nutritional interventions that can mitigate the negative effects and enhance adaptation and performance. These interventions include providing adequate hydration and carbohydrate and iron intake while at altitude; optimizing body composition and fluid and carbohydrate intake when training or competing in varying water temperatures; and maximizing fluid and food hygiene when traveling. There is also emerging information on nutritional interventions to manage jetlag and travel fatigue, such as the timing of food intake and the strategic use of caffeine or melatonin. Aquatic athletes often undertake their major global competitions where accommodations feature cafeteria-style buffet eating. These environments can often lead to inappropriate choices in the type and quantity of food intake, which is of particular concern to divers and synchronized swimmers who compete in physique-specific sports, as well as swimmers who have a vastly reduced energy expenditure during their taper. Taken together, planned nutrition and hydration interventions can have a favorable impact on aquatic athletes facing varying environmental challenges. PMID:24937361

  8. Simplified Method for Dissolved DNA Determination in Aquatic Environments

    OpenAIRE

    DeFlaun, Mary F.; Paul, John H.; Davis, Dean

    1986-01-01

    A method was developed for the determination of dissolved DNA in aquatic environments. The method is based upon the concentration of dissolved DNA by ethanol precipitation of 0.2-μm-pore-size filtered water. The DNA in concentrated extracts was quantified by the fluorescence of Hoechst 33258-DNA complexes. Fluorescence not attributable to DNA was corrected for by DNase I digestion of the extracts and averaged 25% of the total fluorescence for all samples. The effectiveness of the procedure fo...

  9. DISSIPATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL RISK OF FIPRONIL ON AQUATIC ENVIRONMENT

    OpenAIRE

    JOAQUIM G. MACHADO-NETO; MAYRA A.P. FIGUEIREDO; WILSON G. MANRIQUE

    2013-01-01

    Pesticides have been used in agriculture to avoid productivity losses caused by various organisms. However, the indiscriminate use of these chemicals has resulted in negative impacts on the environment, such as residues in soil, water, air, plants and animals. Fipronil is a phenylpyrazole insecticide widely used in agricultural management to control pests of sugar cane in Brazil, and it can be leached into aquatic ecosystems. The present study aimed to evaluate the environmental risk of toxic...

  10. Birds as Bioindicators of Pollution in Aquatic and Terrestrial Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Cotín Martínez, Javier

    2012-01-01

    [eng] Birds have been widely used as bioindicators. In this study we face the use of birds as bioindicators of metal pollution in two different scenarios of contamination: one that takes place in an aquatic environment, the Ebro river basin, and a second that occurs in a terrestrial environment, the Bolivian Andes. In the case of the Ebro river basin, the pollution threat is a factory located at the river bend, close to Flix, that due to its long operational activity and along with the co...

  11. 1988 activity report of the Atmospheric and Aquatic Environment Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1988 activity report of the Atmospheric and Aquatic Environment Department of EDF (Electricity of France) is presented. The activities are focused on the following subjects: development studies in the fields of hydraulic, hydrobiology, meteorology and atmospheric polluants physico-chemistry; application studies involving data analysis from operating or under development power systems; actions concerning cooperation with the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of the Industry. The investigations related to water and atmosphere are reported, as well as congress communications and papers

  12. Silver nanoparticles in aquatic environments: Physiochemical behavior and antimicrobial mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chiqian; Hu, Zhiqiang; Deng, Baolin

    2016-01-01

    Nanosilver (silver nanoparticles or AgNPs) has unique physiochemical properties and strong antimicrobial activities. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the physicochemical behavior (e.g., dissolution and aggregation) and antimicrobial mechanisms of nanosilver in aquatic environments. The inconsistency in calculating the Gibbs free energy of formation of nanosilver [ΔGf(AgNPs)] in aquatic environments highlights the research needed to carefully determine the thermodynamic stability of nanosilver. The dissolutive release of silver ion (Ag(+)) in the literature is often described using a pseudo-first-order kinetics, but the fit is generally poor. This paper proposes a two-stage model that could better predict silver ion release kinetics. The theoretical analysis suggests that nanosilver dissolution could occur under anoxic conditions and that nanosilver may be sulfidized to form silver sulfide (Ag2S) under strict anaerobic conditions, but more investigation with carefully-designed experiments is required to confirm the analysis. Although silver ion release is likely the main antimicrobial mechanism of nanosilver, the contributions of (ion-free) AgNPs and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation to the overall toxicity of nanosilver must not be neglected. Several research directions are proposed to better understand the dissolution kinetics of nanosilver and its antimicrobial mechanisms under various aquatic environmental conditions. PMID:26519626

  13. DISSIPATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL RISK OF FIPRONIL ON AQUATIC ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOAQUIM G. MACHADO-NETO

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Pesticides have been used in agriculture to avoid productivity losses caused by various organisms. However, the indiscriminate use of these chemicals has resulted in negative impacts on the environment, such as residues in soil, water, air, plants and animals. Fipronil is a phenylpyrazole insecticide widely used in agricultural management to control pests of sugar cane in Brazil, and it can be leached into aquatic ecosystems. The present study aimed to evaluate the environmental risk of toxic concentrations and dissipation of fipronil to Poecilia reticulata, based on the 96-h median lethal concentration (LC50 value estimated at 0.08 ± 0.01 mg/L without sediment and 0.09 ± 0.01 mg/L with sediment of fipronil in the aquatic environment. These values of fipronil were classified as extremely toxic to P. reticulata in both cases, which showed high environmental risk of poisoning to a shallow film of water of 1 ha and 0.30 m deep, with and without sediment. On the other hand, in bodies of water 1 ha and 2.0 m deep, it was of moderate toxicity. Dissipation of fipronil in the water was not affected by temperature, sediment or photoperiod. The minimum time to which fipronil caused 50% acute mortality (0.08 mg/L after dilution of 0.75 mg/L was 242 days; the withdrawal period, after which no mortality occurs (0.025 mg/L, was 263 days.

  14. Environmental protection and stewardship of subglacial aquatic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Peter T.; Vincent, Warwick F.

    Environmental stewardship is a guiding principle of the Antarctic Treaty System. Efforts began in the 1990s to generate specific guidelines for stewardship of many terrestrial environments, including surface lakes and rivers. The relatively recent documentation of widespread subglacial aquatic environments, and planning for acquiring samples from them, has generated a need for stewardship guidelines for these environments. In response to a request from the U.S. National Science Foundation, the National Research Council of the National Academies of Sciences (NAS) created the Committee on the Principles of Environmental and Scientific Stewardship for the Exploration and Study of Subglacial Environments. The committee made 13 recommendations and a decision tree as a framework and flow chart for environmental management decisions. The committee report was also largely the basis of a Code of Conduct (CoC) for the exploration of subglacial environments formulated by a Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research Action Group. Both the NAS report and CoC have been used as guidance, to varying degrees, by subglacial research currently in progress.

  15. Forestry and the aquatic environment: studies in an Irish context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Giller

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on the interaction between plantation forestry and aquatic environments is essential to develop environmentally compatible and sustainable management further. Given, in Ireland, the generally low levels of atmospheric pollution, its geology and maritime climate, and the unique fauna and flora due to its island history, such studies are important not only in the regional context, but also internationally, as they provide an opportunity to examine the effect of forestry and forest management practices on aquatic systems per se, without the complications of acidification. Here, some of the major findings of forestry and water research in Ireland have been reviewed and compared with those from the UK and elsewhere. Plantation forests do not exacerbate acidification in the south of Ireland (Munster as a whole so that the influence of forestry on water chemistry is far less important than in other parts of the country (such as Wicklow and Mayo. The main forestry influence on streams in Munster is more likely through physical factors, but their nature is unclear. In a few catchments some negative effects are evident, but in many others apparently positive forest effects occur. In this context, smaller scale catchment-level effects appear to be more important in explaining the various relationships between plantation forests and stream ecology than larger scale regional factors. The management of riparian zones, particularly in forested catchments, is of major importance for the structure and functioning of aquatic communities and further work is needed on best management practices. It is suggested that it is unreasonable to base forest management on national Forest-Fisheries guidelines since regions vary too much and the signal from local conditions is too strong. The approach for environmentally benign, scientifically sound forestry management has to be at the catchment scale. Trees in the right places may be beneficial ecologically but

  16. Arsenic in the aquatic environment - speciation and biological effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landner, L. [Swedish Environmental Research Group (MFG)

    1998-03-01

    The present report is a contribution to EC Commission`s undertaking to review existing EC provisions on the substances for which Sweden has been granted transitional provisions. The provisions imply that Sweden may maintain more stringent regulations on four substances until the end of 1998. The present report deals with speciation and biological effects of arsenic in three types of aquatic environments - marine water, estuarine or brackish water and freshwater. The similarity between arsenate and phosphate and the interference in phosphorylation reactions is discussed. It is clear that in Scandinavian inland waters the concentration of phosphorous is on average lower than in most inland waters in continental Europe. However, in most inland waters phosphorus is the limiting factor for phytoplankton development and eutrophication, which means that there is a clear risk for detrimental effects in the great majority of inland waters, also eutrophic waters 167 refs, 27 figs, 12 tabs. Exemption Substances Project (Directive 89/677/EEC)

  17. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS IN AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER BASIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John A. McLachlan

    2003-12-01

    In December 1992, the CBR was awarded a five-year grant of $25M from the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ''Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin'' project was an interdisciplinary, collaborative research and education project aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments. This project funded 15 collaborative cluster multi-year projects and 41 one-year initiation projects out of 165 submitted research proposals. This project was carried out by 134 research and technical support faculty from Xavier University (School of Arts and Sciences, and College of Pharmacy) and Tulane University (Schools of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering, Medicine, and Public Health and Tropical Medicine), and 173 publications and 140 presentations were produced. More than 100 graduate and undergraduate students were trained through these collaborative cluster and initiation research projects. Nineteen Tulane graduate students received partial funding to conduct their own competitively-chosen research projects, and 28 Xavier undergraduate LIFE Scholars and 30 LIFE Interns were supported with DOE funding to conduct their mentored research projects. Studies in this project have defined: (1) the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, (2) the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and (3) the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The bayou and spoil banks of Bayou Trepagnier were mapped and analyzed in terms of risks associated with the levels of hydrocarbons and metals at specific sample sites. Data from contaminated sample sites have been incorporated into a large database and used in GIS analyses to track the fate and transport of heavy metals from spoil banks into the surrounding marsh. These data are crucial

  18. Physical speciation of thorium in aquatic subsurface environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During this work laboratory simulated experiments were conducted to study the physical speciation of thorium by using ultrafiltration technique. Thorium has only one stable oxidation state i.e. IV, under all redox conditions in natural waters and therefore, its speciation is dominated by its interaction with various fraction of aquatic humic substances(AHS). Samples of water were collected from oligotropic environment having DOC in the range of 60 - 70 ppm. Th(IV) ions are extremely particle reactive having Kd value of the order of 106, hence to avoid adsorption on suspended particulate matter, spiking of the solution with Th(NO3)4 was carried out in ground water samples after filtering through 0.22 μm pore size using suction filtration. Experimental results show that 70% of the spiked Th is in association with low molecular weight colloids i.e 500 NMWL followed by < 500 NMWL. (author)

  19. Transuranic radionuclides dispersed into the aquatic environment, a bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noshkin, V.E.; Stoker, A.C.; Wong, Kai M. [and others

    1994-04-01

    The purpose of this project was to compile a bibliography of references containing environmental transuranic radionuclide data. Our intent was to identify those parameters affecting transuranic radionuclide transport that may be generic and those that may be dependent on chemical form and/or environmental conditions (i.e., site specific) in terrestrial, aquatic and atmospheric environments An understanding of the unique characteristics and similarities between source terms and environmental conditions relative to transuranic radionuclide transport and cycling will provide the ability to assess and predict the long term impact on man and the environment. An additional goal of our literature review, was to extract the ranges of environmental transuranic radionuclide data from the identified references for inclusion in a data base. Related to source term, these ranges of data can be used to calculate the dose to man from the radionuclides, and to perform uncertainty analyses on these dose assessments. On the basis of our reviews, we have arbitrarily outlined five general source terms. These are fallout, fuel cycle waste, accidents, disposal sites and resuspension. Resuspension of the transuranic radionuclides is a unique source term, in that the radionuclides can originate from any of the other source terms. If these transuranic radionuclides become resuspended into the air, they then become important as a source of inhaled radionuclides.

  20. Tritium in the aquatic environment and the associated risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium, which is naturally present in the environment under tritiated water form, participates to the global water cycle. Today, nuclear fuel cycle facilities represent the main source of man-made tritium. The civilian production is estimated to be about 2 x 104 TBq/y, corresponding to a third of the natural production. Due to the fact that tritium releases are very local, concentrations in water higher than natural background (of 0.1 to 0.9 Bq/l for surface waters) are observed around these sites. Measurements in French aquatic environment reveal tritium concentration generally below 10 Bq/1 for underground waters and below 20 Bq/l for rivers. Nevertheless, some ground waters and some rivers presents locally a concentration up to a few hundreds of Bq/l. Moreover, measurements performed in France are generally coherent with monitoring in other European countries. Furthermore, the associated radiological impact for a potential individual taking all this water needs from a 100 Bq/l tritiated water source, was evaluated to about one thousandth of the natural background. (authors)

  1. Safety assessment of boron in aquatic and terrestrial environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterwick, L; de Oude, N; Raymond, K

    1989-06-01

    Boron is a naturally occurring material and is used in industrial and domestic products. Its major release into the environment is through weathering processes and wastewater discharge. Boron is an essential nutrient for plants, but can above certain concentrations be toxic to aquatic and terrestrial organisms. This paper assesses the ecotoxicology and environmental safety of boron. It draws together the data for toxicological effects of boron and compares these with environmental concentrations of boron, measured in Europe and the U.S.A. Generally, environmental concentrations of boron found in surface water are below levels identified as toxic to aquatic organisms. Concentrations high enough to produce toxic effects in laboratory tests are found in areas where weathering of boron-rich formations and deposits occurs, such as in the southwestern United States. However, reproducing populations of the most sensitive species, rainbow trout, have been observed in surface waters in these regions, indicating no cause for concern. The prime concern for effects on terrestrial plants centers on the use of irrigation water with elevated levels of boron. At present, there is no evidence of widespread damage to crops resulting from this practice. In some areas, wastewater is used for irrigation and crops grown under these conditions are generally confined to those relatively insensitive to boron toxicity. Good irrigation practices will be necessary, however, in arid regions with high evapotranspiration rates and care will be needed when using wastewater, particularly in areas with naturally high boron levels. It is not anticipated that there will be any significant increase in the discharge of boron to the environment in the foreseeable future. The use of boron-containing products is expected to increase, but glass will remain the dominant market and the use of boron in detergents in Europe is expected to decrease due to the introduction of bleach activators and liquid

  2. Occurrence of veterinary pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment in Flanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servaes, K.; Vanermen, G.; Seuntjens, P.

    2009-04-01

    There is a growing interest in the occurrence of pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment. Pharmaceuticals are classified as so-called ‘emerging pollutants'. ‘Emerging pollutants' are not necessarily new chemical compounds. Often these compounds are already present in the environment for a long time. But, their occurrence and especially their impact on the environment has only recently become clear. Consequently, data on their occurrence are rather scarce. In this study, we focus on the occurrence of veterinary pharmaceuticals in surface water in Flanders. We have only considered active substances administered to cattle, pigs and poultry. Based on the literature and information concerning the use in Belgium, a selection of 25 veterinary pharmaceuticals has been made. This selection consists of the most important antibiotics and antiparasitic substances applied in veterinary medicine in Belgium. We develop an analytical methodology based on UPLC-MS/MS for the detection of these veterinary pharmaceuticals in surface water. Therefore, the mass characteristics as well as the optimum LC conditions will be determined. To obtain limits of detection as low as possible, the samples are concentrated prior to analysis using solid phase extraction (SPE). Different SPE cartridges will be tested during the method development. At first, this SPE sample pre-treatment is performed off-line. In a next step, online SPE is optimized for this purpose. The analytical procedure will be subject to an in-house validation study, thereby determining recovery, repeatability (% RSD), limits of detection and limits of quantification. Finally, the developed methodology will be applied for monitoring the occurrence of veterinary pharmaceuticals in surface water and groundwater in Flanders. These water samples will be taken in areas characterized by intensive cattle breeding. Moreover, the samples will be collected during springtime. In this season, farmers apply manure, stored during winter

  3. Assessing pesticide exposure of the aquatic environment in tropical catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Frederik; Zurbrügg, Christian; Eggen, Rik; Castillo, Luisa; Ruepert, Clemens; Stamm, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Today, pesticides are intensively used in agriculture across the globe. Worldwide about 2.4×106 tons of pesticides are used annually on 1.6×109 ha of arable land. This yields a global average use of pesticides of 1.53 kg ha-1 year-1. Available data suggest that the use in the agricultural sector will continue to grow. Recently it was estimated that within the last decade, the world pesticide market increased by 93% and the Brazilian market alone by 190%. Though pesticides are intensively used in many low and middle income countries (LAMICs), scientifically sound data of amounts and types of pesticide use and the resulting impact on water quality are lacking in many of these countries. Therefore it is highly relevant to: i) identify risk areas where pesticides affect environmental health, ii) understand the environmental behavior of pesticides in vulnerable tropical ecosystems; and iii) develop possible mitigation options to reduce their exposure to ecosystems and humans. Here we present a project that will focus on assessing pesticide exposure of the aquatic environment and humans in tropical catchments of LAMICs. A catchment in the Zarcero province in Costa Rica will be the test case. Pesticide exposure will be assessed by passive sampling. In order to cover a broad range of compounds of possible use, two sampling devices will be used: SDB membranes for collecting polar compounds and silicon sheets for accumulating apolar pesticides. Extracts will be subsequently analysed by GC-MSMS and LC-HRMS.

  4. Metal contents in tench otoliths: relationships to the aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adami, G; Miletić, M; Siviero, P; Barbieri, P; Reisenhofer, E

    2001-01-01

    A monitoring of the quality of waters was attempted determining metal accumulation in target organs as otoliths of freshwater fish. Tenchs of age ranging between 2 and 10 years were sampled in three different canals receiving wastewater from industrial, agricultural and urban activities. Metal contents were determined in both lapilli and asterisci otoliths, using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). Analytical data are reported for minor metals and for some trace metals. Al, Fe and Zn have contents depending on the environment where the fish has lived, while Na, K, Ca and Sr contents are insensitive to the different aquatic habitat. Considering the two types of otolith separately, lapilli display a different affinity for trace metals (Al, Fe and Zn), while in asterisci this affinity is matched only for zinc. The high affinity of zinc for both types of otoliths suggests using this metal for discriminating the fresh waters by checking its accumulation in otoliths, as well as correlating this accumulation with age of the fish: a negative power curve equation is proposed. Since highest concentrations are found in individuals of 2-3 yr., it is advisable to use this fish for such environmental studies. PMID:11554178

  5. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for triclocarban in aquatic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Kun; Zou, Yanmin; Liu, Jianxia; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Meng; Zhou, Jun; Zhang, Zhen; Gai, Zikuan

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive, competitive indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed for the detection of triclocarban (TCC) in waters and sediments. Haptens were synthesized by derivatizing the paraposition of a phenyl moiety of TCC. The synthesized hapten was then coupled to bovine thyroglobulin to be used as an immunogen, based on which, a high affinity monoclonal antibody 4D5 was produced with the hybridoma technique. Under the optimized conditions, using the monoclonal antibody, excellent performances of the assay were obtained: satisfactory sensitivity (IC50 (50% inhibition concentration) value, 0.43 ng/mL; limit of detection, 0.05 ng/mL); good linear range (0.05-10 ng/mL); and satisfactory accuracy (recoveries 70.7-107% in waters; 74.8-98.3% in sediments). Furthermore, TCC was found with the concentration ranging from not detected to 422.12 ng/L in waters and from 6.68 ng/g to 78.67 ng/g in sediments in Yunliang River, Ancient Canal and Hongqiao Port in Zhenjiang City. In conclusion ELISA could be applied for monitoring TCC in aquatic environments. PMID:26540528

  6. Bioavailability and Bioaccumulation of Metal-Based Engineered Nanomaterials in Aquatic Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luoma, Samuel; Khan, Farhan R.; Croteau, Marie-Noelle

    2014-01-01

    Bioavailability of Me-ENMs to aquatic organisms links their release into the environment to ecological implications. Close examination shows some important differences in the conceptual models that define bioavailability for metals and Me-ENMs. Metals are delivered to aquatic animals from Me-ENMs...

  7. Plutonium in the aquatic environment around the Rocky Flats facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Rocky Flats Plant of the United States Energy Research and Development Administration has been fabricating and chemically recovering plutonium for over 20 years. During that time, small amounts of plutonium have been released with liquid process and sanitary waste discharges. The liquid waste flows through a series of holding ponds from which it is discharged into a creek that is part of a municipal drinking water supply. The water flows for about 1.5 km between the last holding pond and the municipal drinking water reservoir. In addition, liquid wastes containing high levels of chemical contaminants and plutonium concentrations less than allowable drinking water standards have been discharged to large evaporation ponds. The fate of the plutonium in both the surface and subsurface aquatic environment has been extensively monitored and studied. It has been found that plutonium does not move very far or very rapidly through subsurface water. The majority of the plutonium released through surface water has been contained in the sediments of the plant holding ponds. Small amounts of plutonium have also been found in the sediments of the draining creek and in the sediments of the receiving reservoir. Higher than normal amounts of plutonium were released from the waste treatment plants during times when suspended solids were high. Various biological species have been examined and plutonium concentration factors determined. Considerably less than 1% of the 210 mCi of plutonium released has been detected in biological systems including man. After more than 20 years of large scale operations, no health or environmental hazard has been identified due to the release of small amounts of plutonium. (author)

  8. Survival and detection of bacteria in an aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amy, P S; Hiatt, H D

    1989-04-01

    A genetically engineered plasmid, pPSA131, was used as a DNA probe to detect homologous DNA in Escherichia coli HB101(pPSA131) after it was mixed with aquatic microorganisms from Lake Mead, Nevada, water samples. An isolate from the pLAFR1 chromosomal library of Pseudomonas syringae Cit 7 was used to detect parent P. syringae Cit 7 that had been mixed with Lake Mead water. E. coli(pPSA131) was kept in variously treated samples of lake water or buffer, and its survival was measured by viable cell counting on modified Luria-Bertani (LB) agar. Full-strength LB agar proved better than 0.1 x LB agar at recovering E. coli(pPSA131) after survival in low-nutrient environments. Survival of E. coli(pPSA131) remained high in filtered (0.22-micron pore size) lake water and salts buffer on both selective and nonselective agars but was lower in untreated lake water or lake water filtered with a 0.8-micron-pore-size membrane. Total recoverable colonies grown on LB agar were higher when lake water was filter treated (0.8-micron pore size) than when lake water was untreated. Microorganisms recovered from lake water alone grew rapidly on nonselective media, probably because of the "bottle effect." After being mixed with Lake Mead water, E. coli(pPSA131) and P. syringae were detected by colony blotting with non-radioactively labeled DNA probes. E. coli(pPSA131) were recovered at three times during 48 h from variously treated samples of lake water and from a mixture with Lake Mead water organisms. Colonies were supported on either nonselective or selective agar for comparison.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2658805

  9. Lebanese household carbon footprint: Measurements, analysis and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, Rawad; Tall, Ibrahim; Nachabe, Nour; Chaaban, Farid

    2016-07-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to estimate the carbon footprint of a typical Lebanese household, and compare the results with international standards and trends. The estimation of this footprint will reflect the impact of the daily Lebanese household activities on the environment in terms of carbon dioxide emissions. The method used in estimating the carbon emissions is based on gathering the primary footprints from various household activities. Another proposed method that provides more accurate results is the estimation of emissions based on secondary footprint, which reflects the total emissions not only from the regular activities but also from a lifecycle perspective. Practical and feasible solutions were proposed to help reduce the amount of C02 emissions per household. This would lead to a better air quality, money savings, greenhouse gases emissions reduction and would ensure the sustainability and prosperity of future generations. A detailed survey was conducted in which the questions were focused mainly on energy, food, and transportation issues. The fourteen questions were addressed to one hundred families in different Lebanese regions coming from different social and economic backgrounds. This diversity would constitute a reflective sample of the actual Lebanese society, allowing us to extrapolate the gathered results on a national level.

  10. The occurrence and ecological risk assessment of phthalate esters (PAEs) in urban aquatic environments of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lulu; Liu, Jingling; Liu, Huayong; Wan, Guisheng; Zhang, Shaowei

    2015-07-01

    Phthalate esters (PAEs) are widely used in the manufacturing of plastics, and the demand for PAEs has grown rapidly, especially in China. This trend will lead to much more environmental PAE contamination. PAEs are listed as priority substances in the European Union and are therefore subject to ecological risk assessments. This paper reviews the literature concerning the pollution status of PAEs and their ecological risk to aquatic environments. Risk quotients (RQs) based on the predicted no effect concentration and PAE concentrations in aquatic environments demonstrated significant (10 ≤ RQ effects for algae, Daphnia, and fish in aquatic environments near PAE-based industrial and urban areas. Thus, the ecological risk of PAEs in Chinese aquatic environments should be considered, especially in areas where commercial plastics are produced. PMID:25847103

  11. Sunlight affects aggregation and deposition of graphene oxide in the aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, we investigate the role of simulated sunlight on the physicochemical properties, aggregation, and deposition of graphene oxide (GO) in aquatic environments. Results show that light exposure under varied environmental conditions significantly impacts the physicochem...

  12. Sunlight-induced Transformations of Graphene-based Nanomaterials in Aquatic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graphene-based nanomaterials and other related carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) can be released from products during their life cycles. Upon entry into aquatic environments, they are potentially transformed by photochemical reactions, oxidation reactions and biological processes, all ...

  13. The Intercultural Model of National Lebanese Market

    OpenAIRE

    Duguleana L.; Popovici S.C.

    2014-01-01

    The paper emphasizes the importance of intercultural marketing approaches on the internationally globalized market. The ethnical structure of population determines the fractionation of consumers’ characteristics on the national market. The paper presents the elements of the intercultural Lebanese model which generate the national specificity of Lebanese market. The Lebanese cultural model is validated with the dimensions of Hofstede’s model and based on the results of a quantitative mar...

  14. High Molecular Weight Petrogenic and Pyrogenic Hydrocarbons in Aquatic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrajano, T. A., Jr.; Yan, B.; O'Malley, V.

    2003-12-01

    Geochemistry is ultimately the study of sources, movement, and fate of chemicals in the geosphere at various spatial and temporal scales. Environmental organic geochemistry focuses such studies on organic compounds of toxicological and ecological concern (e.g., Schwarzenbach et al., 1993, 1998; Eganhouse, 1997). This field emphasizes not only those compounds with potential toxicological properties, but also the geological systems accessible to the biological receptors of those hazards. Hence, the examples presented in this chapter focus on hydrocarbons with known health and ecological concern in accessible shallow, primarily aquatic, environments.Modern society depends on oil for energy and a variety of other daily needs, with present mineral oil consumption throughout the 1990s exceeding 3×109 t yr-1 (NRC, 2002). In the USA, e.g., ˜40% of energy consumed and 97% of transportation fuels are derived from oil. In the process of extraction, refinement, transport, use, and waste production, a small but environmentally significant fraction of raw oil materials, processed products, and waste are released inadvertently or purposefully into the environment. Because their presence and concentration in the shallow environments are often the result of human activities, these organic materials are generally referred to as "environmental contaminants." Although such reference connotes some form of toxicological or ecological hazard, specific health or ecological effects of many organic "environmental contaminants" remain to be demonstrated. Some are, in fact, likely innocuous at the levels that they are found in many systems, and simply adds to the milieu of biogenic organic compounds that naturally cycle through the shallow environment. Indeed, virtually all compounds in crude oil and processed petroleum products have been introduced naturally to the shallow environments as oil and gas seepage for millions of years ( NRC, 2002). Even high molecular weight (HMW) polyaromatic

  15. NOVANA. National Monitering and Assessment Programme for the Aquatic and Terrestrial Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, L. M.; Bijl, L. van der; Boutrup, S.

    This report is Part 2 of the Programme Description of NOVANA - the National Monitoring and Assessment Programme for the Aquatic and Terrestrial Environments. Part 2 comprises a de-tailed description of the nine NOVANA subprogrammes: Background monitoring of air......This report is Part 2 of the Programme Description of NOVANA - the National Monitoring and Assessment Programme for the Aquatic and Terrestrial Environments. Part 2 comprises a de-tailed description of the nine NOVANA subprogrammes: Background monitoring of air...

  16. The Intercultural Model of National Lebanese Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duguleana L.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper emphasizes the importance of intercultural marketing approaches on the internationally globalized market. The ethnical structure of population determines the fractionation of consumers’ characteristics on the national market. The paper presents the elements of the intercultural Lebanese model which generate the national specificity of Lebanese market. The Lebanese cultural model is validated with the dimensions of Hofstede’s model and based on the results of a quantitative market research. The paper formulates marketing strategies for the intercultural marketing approach on Lebanese market.

  17. Ecology of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophs in aquatic environments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koblížek, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 6 (2015), s. 854-870. ISSN 0168-6445 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-11281S; GA MŠk LO1416 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : photoheterotrophs * microbial loop * aquatic food webs Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 13.244, year: 2014

  18. Work values among Lebanese workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidani, Y M; Gardner, W L

    2000-10-01

    On the basis of a review of the existing literature, the authors tested 4 hypotheses to determine the applicability of work values in Arab societies to employees in Lebanese organizations. Only 1 hypothesis was supported: Organizational policies that ran counter to the worker's religious values had an adverse effect on job satisfaction. There was no support for the hypotheses (a) that workers' religiosity in inversely related to positive attitudes toward women's involvement at work, (b) that employee satisfaction is related to a mechanistic organizational design, or (c) that workers with an internal locus of control experience higher job satisfaction. The Lebanese workers, thus, did not appear to share some of the attributes claimed to exist in Arab societies. PMID:11059205

  19. Are we going about chemical risk assessment for the aquatic environment the wrong way?

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Andrew C.; Sumpter, John P.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of protecting the aquatic environment through testing thousands of chemicals against hundreds of aquatic species with thousands of endpoints while also considering mixtures is impossible given the present resources. Much of the impetus for studies on micropollutants, such as pharmaceuticals, came from the topic of endocrine disruption in wild fish. But despite concern over reductions in fish fertility, there is little evidence that fish populations are in peril. Indeed, fish biologis...

  20. Survival and detection of bacteria in an aquatic environment.

    OpenAIRE

    Amy, P. S.; Hiatt, H D

    1989-01-01

    A genetically engineered plasmid, pPSA131, was used as a DNA probe to detect homologous DNA in Escherichia coli HB101(pPSA131) after it was mixed with aquatic microorganisms from Lake Mead, Nevada, water samples. An isolate from the pLAFR1 chromosomal library of Pseudomonas syringae Cit 7 was used to detect parent P. syringae Cit 7 that had been mixed with Lake Mead water. E. coli(pPSA131) was kept in variously treated samples of lake water or buffer, and its survival was measured by viable c...

  1. Biogenic Mn oxides for effective adsorption of Cd from aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biogenic Mn oxides exert important controls on trace metal cycling in aquatic and soil environments. A Mn-oxidizing bacterium Bacillus sp. WH4 was isolated from Fe-Mn nodules of an agrudalf in central China. The biogenic Mn oxides formed by mediation of this Mn oxidizing microorganism were identified as short-ranged and nano-sized Mn oxides. Cd adsorption isotherms, pH effect on adsorption and kinetics were investigated in comparison with an abiotic Mn oxide todorokite. Maximum adsorption of Cd to the biogenic Mn oxides and todorokite was 2.04 and 0.69 mmol g-1 sorbent, respectively. Thus, the biogenic Mn oxides were more effective Cd adsorbents than the abiotic Mn oxide in the aquatic environment. The findings could improve our knowledge of biogenic Mn oxides formation in the environment and their important roles in the biogeochemical cycles of heavy metals. - Biogenic Mn oxides effectively adsorb Cd from aquatic environments.

  2. Biogenic Mn oxides for effective adsorption of Cd from aquatic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng Youting [State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Graduate School, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Zheng Yuanming; Zhang Limei [State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); He Jizheng, E-mail: jzhe@rcees.ac.c [State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China)

    2009-08-15

    Biogenic Mn oxides exert important controls on trace metal cycling in aquatic and soil environments. A Mn-oxidizing bacterium Bacillus sp. WH4 was isolated from Fe-Mn nodules of an agrudalf in central China. The biogenic Mn oxides formed by mediation of this Mn oxidizing microorganism were identified as short-ranged and nano-sized Mn oxides. Cd adsorption isotherms, pH effect on adsorption and kinetics were investigated in comparison with an abiotic Mn oxide todorokite. Maximum adsorption of Cd to the biogenic Mn oxides and todorokite was 2.04 and 0.69 mmol g{sup -1} sorbent, respectively. Thus, the biogenic Mn oxides were more effective Cd adsorbents than the abiotic Mn oxide in the aquatic environment. The findings could improve our knowledge of biogenic Mn oxides formation in the environment and their important roles in the biogeochemical cycles of heavy metals. - Biogenic Mn oxides effectively adsorb Cd from aquatic environments.

  3. Ecogenotoxicity testing of aquatic environment by comet assay in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Mukherjee

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the goals of environmental monitoring is the detection of potentially hazardous compounds in water. We have set up a standard method to apply the Comet assay in aquatic plants that could be of great interest to evaluate cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and oxidative stress on the same species regarded as most sensitive to environmental pollutants. The aim of the present study was to set up of standardized procedure to evaluate genotoxicity in aquatic plants- Ceratophyllum demersum one that is submerged free floating and the other is Lemna minor - a fresh water floating plant by Comet assay. Electrophoresis and unwinding times were adapted to obtain minimum DNA migration evaluated as tail intensity % or tail moment in the control group and, at the same time maximum sensitivity for DNA damage with known genotoxicants. We further investigated the cytotoxicity and oxidative stress induced in the same species. Based on the repeatability of results obtained we suggest that Ceratophyllum, Lemna can serve as model species and Comet assay could be adopted to monitor the eco-genotoxicity of water pollutants.

  4. Kinesiological Analysis of Stationary Running Performed in Aquatic and Dry Land Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima Alberton Cristine

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to analyze the electromyographic (EMG signals of the rectus femoris (RF, vastus lateralis (VL, semitendinosus (ST and short head of the biceps femoris (BF during the performance of stationary running at different intensities in aquatic and dry land environments. The sample consisted of 12 female volunteers who performed the stationary running exercise in aquatic and dry land environments at a submaximal cadence (80 beats·min-1 controlled by a metronome and at maximal velocity, with EMG signal measurements from the RF, VL, ST and BF muscles. The results showed a distinct pattern between environments for each muscle examined. For the submaximal cadence of 80 beats·min-1, there was a reduced magnitude of the EMG signal in the aquatic environment, except for the ST muscle, the pattern of which was similar in both environments. In contrast to the submaximal cadence, the pattern of the EMG signal from all of the muscles showed similar magnitudes for both environments and phases of movement at maximal velocity, except for the VL muscle. Therefore, the EMG signals from the RF, VL, ST and BF muscles of women during stationary running had different patterns of activation over the range of motion between aquatic and dry land environments for different intensities. Moreover, the neuromuscular responses of the lower limbs were optimized by an increase in intensity from submaximal cadence to maximal velocity.

  5. Monitoring aquatic environment pollution: a major component of environment management systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper is based on the international experiences mostly of the UK (United Kingdom) and Europe on monitoring aquatic pollution and controlling water pollution which have a long history of the legislation involved. The U.K. control of water pollution and regulatory laws are very effective as in shown by the fact that 96 percent of rivers in England and Wales are suitable for potable supplies with conventional water treatment. Current British legislation is basically contained n the 1951, 1960 and 1974 acts of parliament in the U.K. A common feature of all this environment legislation is the high level of consultation which has taken place between government and all concerned and al those concerned in the development of legislation and drawing up regulations etc. and involved in implementation of them. Similarly considerable discussion takes place with the controlling authorities by dischargers over the detailed implementation of legislation in the U.K. Consequently these harmonious attitudes have been responsible for the effectiveness of the U.K. legislation. In the U.K. control of discharges of industrial effluents to sewers and to all natural waters including underground water is vested in the regional water authorities, which on application, issue consent permitting discharges of industrial effluents to sewers and to all natural waters including underground waters in vested in the regional water authorities, which on application, issue consent permitting discharges to be made subject to conditions and limitations in the consent/authorisation/approval. The paper critically reviews major aspects of the philosophy of aquatic pollution control and monitoring, as statistics reveal deadly state of liquid effluent contamination water bodies in Pakistan. Without prompt installation of treatment plants we may face a tragedy of catastrophic magnitude. (author)

  6. Inorganic nanomaterials in the aquatic environment: behavior, toxicity, and interaction with environmental elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzyżewska Iwona

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present characteristics, toxicity and environmental behavior of nanoparticles (NPs (silver, copper, gold, zinc oxide, titanium dioxide, iron oxide that most frequently occur in consumer products. In addition, NPs are addressed as the new aquatic environmental pollutant of the 21st century. NPs are adsorbed onto particles in the aquatic systems (clay minerals, fulvic and humic acids, or they can adsorb environmental pollutants (heavy metal ions, organic compounds. Nanosilver (nAg is released from consumer products into the aquatic environment. It can threaten aquatic organisms with high toxicity. Interestingly, copper nanoparticles (Cu-NPs demonstrate higher toxicity to bacteria and aquatic microorganisms than those of nanosilver nAg. Their small size and reactivity can cause penetration into the tissues and interfere with the metabolic systems of living organisms and bacterial biogeochemical cycles. The behavior of NPs is not fully recognized. Nevertheless, it is known that NPs can agglomerate, bind with ions (chlorides, sulphates, phosphates or organic compounds. They can also be bound or immobilized by slurry. The NPs behavior depends on process conditions, i.e. pH, ionic strength, temperature and presence of other chemical compounds. It is unknown how NPs behave in the aquatic environment. Therefore, the research on this problem should be carried out under different process conditions. As for the toxicity, it is important to understand where the differences in the research results come from. As NPs have an impact on not only aquatic organisms but also human health and life, it is necessary to recognize their toxic doses and know standards/regulations that determine the permissible concentrations of NPs in the environment.

  7. Mercury Release to Aquatic Environments from Anthropogenic Sources in China from 2001 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Maodian; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Xuejun; Chen, Long; Wang, Huanhuan; Luo, Yao; Zhang, Haoran; Shen, Huizhong; Tong, Yindong; Ou, Langbo; Xie, Han; Ye, Xuejie; Deng, Chunyan

    2016-08-01

    Based on an analysis of measured data and distribution factors, we developed the China Aquatic Mercury Release (CAMR) model, which we used to calculate an inventory of mercury (Hg) that was released to aquatic environments from primary anthropogenic sources in China. We estimated a total release of 98 tons of Hg in 2012, including coal-fired power plants (17%), nonferrous metal smelting (33%), coal mining and washing (25%), domestic sewage (17%), and other sectors (8.3%). The total primary anthropogenic Hg released to aquatic environments in China decreased at an annual average rate of 1.7% between 2001 and 2012, even though GDP grew at an annual average rate of 10% during this period. In addition to the Hg that was released to aquatic environments in China's provinces, we estimated the Hg release amounts and intensities (in g/km(2)·yr) for China's 58 secondary river basins. The highest aquatic Hg release intensities in China were associated with industrial wastewater on the North China Plain and domestic sewage in eastern China and southern China. We found that the overall uncertainty of our inventory ranges from -22% to 32%. We suggest that the inventory provided by this study can help establish a more accurate map of regional and global Hg cycling; it also has implications for water quality management in China. PMID:27379546

  8. Antibiotic resistance in urban aquatic environments: can it be controlled?

    OpenAIRE

    Manaia, Célia; Macedo, Gonçalo; Fatta-Kassinos, Despo; Nunes, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, numerous evidences have contributed to establish a link between the natural and humanimpacted environments and the growing public health threat that is the antimicrobial resistance. In the environment, in particular in areas subjected to strong anthropogenic pressures, water plays a major role on the transformation and transport of contaminants including antibiotic residues, antibioticresistant bacteria, and antibiotic resistance genes. Therefore, ...

  9. Turnover of eroded soil organic carbon after deposition in terrestrial and aquatic environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkels, Frédérique; Cammeraat, Erik; Kalbitz, Karsten;

    The fate of eroded soil organic carbon (SOC) after deposition is a large uncertainty in assessing the impact of soil erosion on C budgets. Globally, large amounts of SOC are transported by erosion and a substantial part is transferred into adjacent inland waters, linking terrestrial and aquatic C...... cycling. However, the net effect on C fluxes between soils, inland waters and atmosphere remains uncertain. In this study, we determined SOC turnover in terrestrial and aquatic environments and indentified its major controls. A European gradient of agricultural sites was sampled, spanning a wide range...... (soils vs. inland waters) play a crucial role in determining C turnover. Erosion measures preventing deposition in aquatic environments could therefore be an important carbon saving strategy. We envisage that these quantitative results can be used to parameterize biogeochemical models and contribute to...

  10. Are we going about chemical risk assessment for the aquatic environment the wrong way?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Andrew C; Sumpter, John P

    2016-07-01

    The goal of protecting the aquatic environment through testing thousands of chemicals against hundreds of aquatic species with thousands of endpoints while also considering mixtures is impossible given the present resources. Much of the impetus for studies on micropollutants, such as pharmaceuticals, came from the topic of endocrine disruption in wild fish. But despite concern over reductions in fish fertility, there is little evidence that fish populations are in peril. Indeed, fish biologists suggest that many cyprinid populations have been recovering for the past 30 to 40 yr. The central assumption, key to current risk assessment, that effects observed in the laboratory or predicted by models are readily transferrable to the population level, is therefore questionable. The neglect in monitoring wildlife populations is the key weakness in environmental protection strategies. If we do not know whether aquatic wildlife species are declining or increasing, how valuable are our other ecotoxicological activities? Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1609-1616. © 2016 SETAC. PMID:27331653

  11. Presence, fate and effects of the intense sweetener sucralose in the aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sucralose (1,6-dichloro-1,6-dideoxy-b-D-fructo-furanosyl 4-chloro-4-deoxy-a-D-galactopyranoside), sold under the trade name Splenda®, has been detected in municipal effluents and surface waters in the United States and Europe. The environmental presence of sucralose has led to interest in the possibility of toxic effects in non-target species. This review presents an environmental risk assessment of sucralose based on available data concerning its presence, fate and effects in the environment. Sucralose, which is made by selective chlorination of sucrose, is a highly stable compound, which undergoes negligible metabolism in mammals, including humans, and displays a low biodegradation potential in the environment. This intense sweetener is highly soluble in water, displays a low bioaccumulation potential and a low sorption potential to soil and organic matter, and thus is predominantly present in the water column. The predicted environmental concentration (PEC) for sucralose, based on measured data in surface waters, was determined to be 10 μg/L. Aquatic toxicity studies using standardized, validated protocols used in regulatory decision making indicate that sucralose does not alter survival, growth and reproduction of aquatic organisms (such as plants, algae, crustaceans and fish) at concentrations > 9000 times higher than those detected in the environment. Some studies, using non-standardized protocols, have reported behavioral and other non-traditional responses in aquatic organisms, but the relevance of these findings for assessing adverse effects on individuals and populations will require further investigation. In terms of traditional risk assessment, the proposed predicted no effect concentration for aquatic organisms (PNEC) was determined to be 0.93 mg/L, based on the lowest no effect concentration (NOEC) from a validated chronic study with mysid shrimp and an application factor of 100. The resultant PEC/PNEC quotient was determined to be well below 1 (PEC

  12. Presence, fate and effects of the intense sweetener sucralose in the aquatic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tollefsen, Knut Erik, E-mail: ket@niva.no [Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), Gaustadalleen 21, N-0349 Oslo (Norway); Nizzetto, Luca [Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), Gaustadalleen 21, N-0349 Oslo (Norway); Huggett, Duane B. [Department of Biological Sciences, University of North Texas, P.O. Box 310559, Denton, TX 76203 (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Sucralose (1,6-dichloro-1,6-dideoxy-b-D-fructo-furanosyl 4-chloro-4-deoxy-a-D-galactopyranoside), sold under the trade name Splenda Registered-Sign , has been detected in municipal effluents and surface waters in the United States and Europe. The environmental presence of sucralose has led to interest in the possibility of toxic effects in non-target species. This review presents an environmental risk assessment of sucralose based on available data concerning its presence, fate and effects in the environment. Sucralose, which is made by selective chlorination of sucrose, is a highly stable compound, which undergoes negligible metabolism in mammals, including humans, and displays a low biodegradation potential in the environment. This intense sweetener is highly soluble in water, displays a low bioaccumulation potential and a low sorption potential to soil and organic matter, and thus is predominantly present in the water column. The predicted environmental concentration (PEC) for sucralose, based on measured data in surface waters, was determined to be 10 {mu}g/L. Aquatic toxicity studies using standardized, validated protocols used in regulatory decision making indicate that sucralose does not alter survival, growth and reproduction of aquatic organisms (such as plants, algae, crustaceans and fish) at concentrations > 9000 times higher than those detected in the environment. Some studies, using non-standardized protocols, have reported behavioral and other non-traditional responses in aquatic organisms, but the relevance of these findings for assessing adverse effects on individuals and populations will require further investigation. In terms of traditional risk assessment, the proposed predicted no effect concentration for aquatic organisms (PNEC) was determined to be 0.93 mg/L, based on the lowest no effect concentration (NOEC) from a validated chronic study with mysid shrimp and an application factor of 100. The resultant PEC/PNEC quotient was determined to be

  13. APPLICATION OF SALMONIDS (SALMONIDAE N THE BIOMONITORING OF AQUATIC ENVIRONMENT (REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yanovych

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Due to the pollution of fisheries water bodies by industrial and agricultural waste waters, as well as by xenobiotics coming from other sources, taking into account a pridictable increase in the amounts of such effluents in the short and long terms, the problems related to the study of the effects of the pollutants of different nature and origin on aquatic organisms, especially fish, as well as a prediction of possible adverse consequences on aquatic ecosystems, becomes particularly important. The aim of our work was an analysis and synthesis of existing literature data concerning the indication in the biomonitoring of aquatic environments based on biological markers of salmonids as highly sensitive objects of fish fauna to external factors. Findings. The review summarizes and systematizes the data concerning the use of salmonids in biomonitoring studies. Furthermore, we highlighted and characterized the specificity of bioindication parameters of the aquatic environment state, such as the biochemical, genetic, physiological, morphological, histopathological, behavioral and population markers and noted the effects of hydroecosystem ecotoxication on different levels of biological organization (cell, individual, population, fish community. We also described the possibility of biological monitoring based on saprobic indexes identified for indicator species belonging to salmonids. Originality. In the article describes the structure, pros and cons of the use of specific biomarkers of individual salmonid fish and their populations for assessing the ecological status of aquatic environments. Practical value. The data given in the article can be used to improve the system of the ecological monitoring of aquatic environments by extending the range of indicator indices with organism and population biomarkers of highly sensitive salmonid species.

  14. Crude oil derived petroleum products in the aquatic environment: priorities for control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The available data on the environmental fate, behaviour and toxicity of five groups of petroleum products is reviewed and the information used to identify the priority of oil products for pollution control to protect the aquatic environment. The oil product groups comprise gasolines, kerosenes, other light fuel oil distillates, residual heavy fuel oils and lubricating oils. (author)

  15. Potential Upstream Strategies for the Mitigation of Pharmaceuticals in the Aquatic Environment: a Brief Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Benjamin D

    2016-06-01

    Active pharmaceutical ingredients represent a class of pollutants of emerging concern, and there is growing evidence that these pollutants can cause damage to the aquatic environment. As regulations to address these concerns are expected in developed nations, decision-makers are looking to the scientific community for potential solutions. To inform these regulatory efforts, further information on the potential strategies to reduce the levels of pharmaceuticals entering the aquatic environment is needed. End-of-pipe (i.e., wastewater treatment) technologies that can remove pharmaceuticals exist; however, they are costly to install and operate. Thus, the goal of this brief review is to look beyond end-of-pipe solutions and present various upstream mitigation strategies discussed within the scientific literature. Programs such as pharmaceutical take-back programs currently exist to attempt to reduce pharmaceutical concentrations in the environment, although access and coverage are often limited for many programs. Other potential strategies include redesigning pharmaceuticals to minimize aquatic toxicity, increasing the percent of the pharmaceuticals metabolized in the body, selecting less harmful pharmaceuticals for use, starting new prescriptions at lower dosages, selecting pharmaceuticals with lower excretion rates, and implementing source treatment such as urine separating toilets. Overall, this brief review presents a summary of the upstream preventative recommendations to mitigate pharmaceuticals from entering the aquatic environment with an emphasis on regulatory efforts in the USA and concludes with priorities for further research. PMID:27068434

  16. NOVANA - National Monitoring and Assessment Programme for the Aquatic and Terrestrial Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, L. M.

    This report is Part 1 of the Programme Description of NOVANA - the Nationwide Monitoring and Assessment Programme for the Aquatic and Terrestrial Environments. Part 1 comprises a general description of the background for the programme, including the international obliga-tions and requirements...

  17. Antibiotic resistance in urban aquatic environments: can it be controlled?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaia, Célia M; Macedo, Gonçalo; Fatta-Kassinos, Despo; Nunes, Olga C

    2016-02-01

    Over the last decade, numerous evidences have contributed to establish a link between the natural and human-impacted environments and the growing public health threat that is the antimicrobial resistance. In the environment, in particular in areas subjected to strong anthropogenic pressures, water plays a major role on the transformation and transport of contaminants including antibiotic residues, antibiotic-resistant bacteria, and antibiotic resistance genes. Therefore, the urban water cycle, comprising water abstraction, disinfection, and distribution for human consumption, and the collection, treatment, and delivery of wastewater to the environment, is a particularly interesting loop to track the fate of antibiotic resistance in the environment and to assess the risks of its transmission back to humans. In this article, the relevance of different transepts of the urban water cycle on the potential enrichment and spread of antibiotic resistance is reviewed. According to this analysis, some gaps of knowledge, research needs, and control measures are suggested. The critical rationale behind the measures suggested and the desirable involvement of some key action players is also discussed. PMID:26649735

  18. Understanding the Water Crisis in China: Towards a Harmonious Aquatic Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Jianbo; WANG Thanh; JIANG Guibin

    2011-01-01

    @@ China is one of the 13 countries in the world with the most limited water resources.With the fast economic development and urbanization in recent years, the demand of water is continuously increasing and severe water shortage has occurred.The situation is further exacerbated by unevenly distribution, low water use efficiency and serious contamination.As a result, wetland areas have decreased significantly and algal blooms occur more frequently, indicating increased deterioration of the aquatic ecosystem.In order to obtain a sustainable development, scientific utilization of water resources and protection of the aquatic environment are urgently needed.

  19. Mechanisms and pathways of aniline elimination from aquatic environments.

    OpenAIRE

    Lyons, C D; Katz, S; Bartha, R.

    1984-01-01

    The fate of aniline, a representative of arylamine pollutants derived from the manufacture of dyes, coal liquefaction, and pesticide degradation, was comprehensively evaluated by use of unpolluted and polluted pond water as model environments. Evaporation plus autoxidation proved to be minor elimination mechanisms, removing ca. 1% of the added aniline per day. Instantaneous binding to humic components of a 0.1% sewage sludge inoculum removed 4%. Biodegradation of aniline in pond water was acc...

  20. ACCUMULATION OF POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS IN AQUATIC ORGANISMS AND ENVIRONMENT

    OpenAIRE

    ÇAKIROĞULLARI, Gül

    2010-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were discovered in the late of the 19th century and their usefulness for industry, because of their physical properties, was recognized early. The PCBs have been used commercially, since 1930, as dielectric and heat-exchange fluids and in a variety of other applications. They have become widely distributed in the environment throughout the world, and are persistent and accumulate in food webs. PCBs accumulate in the fatty tissues of humans and other animals an...

  1. Fate of artificial sweeteners and perfluoroalkyl acids in aquatic environment

    OpenAIRE

    Perkola, Noora

    2014-01-01

    The newly detected chemicals, the environmental distribution, fate, and effects in the environment of which are not well known, are called emerging compounds. Artificial sweeteners are one group of emerging compounds. The consumption of artificial sweeteners is high, and because they do not significantly metabolise, all that is consumed finds its way to wastewater treatment plants. Two artificial sweeteners, acesulfame and sucralose, do not degrade in wastewater treatment either, leading to e...

  2. Isolation of drug-resistant Aeromonas hydrophila from aquatic environments.

    OpenAIRE

    McNicol, L A; Aziz, K. M.; Huq, I; Kaper, J B; Lockman, H A; Remmers, E F; Spira, W M; Voll, M. J.; Colwell, R R

    1980-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant strains of Aeromonas hydrophila have been isolated from the natural environment in the Chesapeake Bay and areas surrounding Dacca and the Matlab region of Bangladesh. The Bangladesh strains carried resistance to chloramphenicol, streptomycin, and tetracycline, and 57% of them had a multiple streptomycin-tetracycline resistance phenotype correlated with the presence of a large plasmid. The Chesapeake Bay strains were resistant to polymyxin B ane tetracycline, but showed ne...

  3. Priority and emerging flame retardants in the aquatic environment: analytical development, occurrence and risk

    OpenAIRE

    Cristale, Joyce

    2013-01-01

    [spa]The presence of priority and emerging flame retardants (FR) in the environment deserve attention since many of these substances are toxic and persistent. The aim of this thesis was to evaluate the occurrence and impact of priority and emerging flame retardants in the aquatic environment. To accomplish this main objective, the present thesis involved the development of multiresidue methods for the analysis of different FR families in water, sediment, dust and sewage sludge and the applica...

  4. Interactions of 238PuO2 heat sources with terrestrial and aquatic environments. Interim summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Observations and some conclusions made of the interactions of 238PuO2 heat sources with terrestrial and aquatic environments may be used in predicting heat source behavior in the event of contact of these heat sources with land or ocean and in assessing the risk to the environment. These studies indicate that plutonium transport from the heat sources is mostly a physical process involving the movement of extremely fine particles rather than the chemical migration of plutonium ions

  5. Azospirillum genomes reveal transition of bacteria from aquatic to terrestrial environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Wisniewski-Dyé

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Fossil records indicate that life appeared in marine environments ∼3.5 billion years ago (Gyr and transitioned to terrestrial ecosystems nearly 2.5 Gyr. Sequence analysis suggests that "hydrobacteria" and "terrabacteria" might have diverged as early as 3 Gyr. Bacteria of the genus Azospirillum are associated with roots of terrestrial plants; however, virtually all their close relatives are aquatic. We obtained genome sequences of two Azospirillum species and analyzed their gene origins. While most Azospirillum house-keeping genes have orthologs in its close aquatic relatives, this lineage has obtained nearly half of its genome from terrestrial organisms. The majority of genes encoding functions critical for association with plants are among horizontally transferred genes. Our results show that transition of some aquatic bacteria to terrestrial habitats occurred much later than the suggested initial divergence of hydro- and terrabacterial clades. The birth of the genus Azospirillum approximately coincided with the emergence of vascular plants on land.

  6. Removal of cytostatic drugs from aquatic environment: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiefeng; Chang, Victor W C; Giannis, Apostolos; Wang, Jing-Yuan

    2013-02-15

    Cytostatic drugs have been widely used for chemotherapy for decades. However, many of them have been categorized as carcinogenic, mutagenic and teratogenic compounds, triggering widespread concerns about their occupational exposure and ecotoxicological risks to the environment. This review focuses on trace presence, fate and ecotoxicity of various cytostatic compounds in the environment, with an emphasis on the major sources contributing to their environmental concentrations. Past records have documented findings mainly on hospital effluents though little effort has been directed to household discharges. There is also a lack in physico-chemical data for forecasting the chemodynamics of cytostatics in natural waters along with its human metabolites and environmental transformation products. In this light, obtaining comprehensive ecotoxicity data is becoming pressingly crucial to determine their actual impacts on the ecosystem. Literature review also reveals urinary excretion as a major contributor to various cytostatic residues appeared in the water cycle. As such, engaging urine source-separation as a part of control strategy holds a rosy prospect of addressing the "emerging" contamination issue. State-of-the-art treatment technologies should be incorporated to further remove cytostatic residues from the source-separating urine stream. The benefits, limitations and trends of development in this domain are covered for membrane bio-reactor, reverse/forward osmosis and advanced oxidation processes. Despite the respective seeming advantages of source separation and treatment technology, a combined strategy may cost-effectively prevent the cytostatic residues from seeping into the environment. However, the combination calls for further evaluation on the associated technological, social-economic and administrative issues at hand. PMID:23337605

  7. Removal of cytostatic drugs from aquatic environment: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jiefeng [Division of Environmental and Water Resources, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Chang, Victor W.C., E-mail: wcchang@ntu.edu.sg [Division of Environmental and Water Resources, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Giannis, Apostolos [Residues and Resource Reclamation Centre (R3C), Nanyang Environment and Water Research Institute, Nanyang Technological University, 1 Cleantech Loop, CleanTech One, Singapore 637141 (Singapore); Wang, Jing-Yuan [Division of Environmental and Water Resources, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Residues and Resource Reclamation Centre (R3C), Nanyang Environment and Water Research Institute, Nanyang Technological University, 1 Cleantech Loop, CleanTech One, Singapore 637141 (Singapore)

    2013-02-15

    Cytostatic drugs have been widely used for chemotherapy for decades. However, many of them have been categorized as carcinogenic, mutagenic and teratogenic compounds, triggering widespread concerns about their occupational exposure and ecotoxicological risks to the environment. This review focuses on trace presence, fate and ecotoxicity of various cytostatic compounds in the environment, with an emphasis on the major sources contributing to their environmental concentrations. Past records have documented findings mainly on hospital effluents though little effort has been directed to household discharges. There is also a lack in physico-chemical data for forecasting the chemodynamics of cytostatics in natural waters along with its human metabolites and environmental transformation products. In this light, obtaining comprehensive ecotoxicity data is becoming pressingly crucial to determine their actual impacts on the ecosystem. Literature review also reveals urinary excretion as a major contributor to various cytostatic residues appeared in the water cycle. As such, engaging urine source-separation as a part of control strategy holds a rosy prospect of addressing the “emerging” contamination issue. State-of-the-art treatment technologies should be incorporated to further remove cytostatic residues from the source-separating urine stream. The benefits, limitations and trends of development in this domain are covered for membrane bio-reactor, reverse/forward osmosis and advanced oxidation processes. Despite the respective seeming advantages of source separation and treatment technology, a combined strategy may cost-effectively prevent the cytostatic residues from seeping into the environment. However, the combination calls for further evaluation on the associated technological, social-economic and administrative issues at hand. Highlights: ► We review the environmental occurrence, fate and ecotoxicity of cytostatic drugs. ► Four major sources contributing to

  8. Removal of cytostatic drugs from aquatic environment: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cytostatic drugs have been widely used for chemotherapy for decades. However, many of them have been categorized as carcinogenic, mutagenic and teratogenic compounds, triggering widespread concerns about their occupational exposure and ecotoxicological risks to the environment. This review focuses on trace presence, fate and ecotoxicity of various cytostatic compounds in the environment, with an emphasis on the major sources contributing to their environmental concentrations. Past records have documented findings mainly on hospital effluents though little effort has been directed to household discharges. There is also a lack in physico-chemical data for forecasting the chemodynamics of cytostatics in natural waters along with its human metabolites and environmental transformation products. In this light, obtaining comprehensive ecotoxicity data is becoming pressingly crucial to determine their actual impacts on the ecosystem. Literature review also reveals urinary excretion as a major contributor to various cytostatic residues appeared in the water cycle. As such, engaging urine source-separation as a part of control strategy holds a rosy prospect of addressing the “emerging” contamination issue. State-of-the-art treatment technologies should be incorporated to further remove cytostatic residues from the source-separating urine stream. The benefits, limitations and trends of development in this domain are covered for membrane bio-reactor, reverse/forward osmosis and advanced oxidation processes. Despite the respective seeming advantages of source separation and treatment technology, a combined strategy may cost-effectively prevent the cytostatic residues from seeping into the environment. However, the combination calls for further evaluation on the associated technological, social-economic and administrative issues at hand. Highlights: ► We review the environmental occurrence, fate and ecotoxicity of cytostatic drugs. ► Four major sources contributing to

  9. Azole Fungicides as Synergists in the Aquatic Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjergager, Maj-Britt Andersen

    reasonableapproach for non-interacting contaminants, synergizing compounds, enhancing the toxicity of others, maycompromise the predictive ability of the models. Though only rarely occurring, the phenomenon ofsynergism is of great concern, making apparently low and non-toxic contaminant concentrations apotential...... hazard.This PhD thesis evaluates the role of the so called azole fungicides as synergists in the aquaticenvironment through an assessment of the effect of sorption, time and azole concentration on theoccurrence and magnitude of synergistic interactions with pyrethroid insecticides towards the...... aquaticcrustacean Daphnia magna in both laboratory experiments and natural-like environments. In the PhDthesis, synergy is defined as happening in mixtures where either EC50 values decrease more than two-foldbelow the prediction by the model of Concentration Addition (horizontal assessment of synergy) or wherethe...

  10. Biogeochemistry of radionuclides in aquatic environments. Annual progress report, 1975--1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work is a combination of studies on natural radionuclides 210Po and 210Pb in aquatic environments and on the biogeochemistry of the transuranium elements 239Pu, 240Pu, and 241Am, in the Bikini Lagoon. The objectives of the biogeochemical studies are to evaluate the cycling of the radionuclides in the aquatic environment from their sources, their distribution within ecosystems, their uptake by biota, and their sinks. Detailed studies of the conditions which now exist some 17 years since the last nuclear detonations at Bikini should give a basis for predicting the effects of large-scale or low-level continuous releases of nuclear waste products in the marine environment

  11. Cesium-137 monitoring of aquatic and terrestrial environment in Goiania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the Goiania radiological accident, aprox. 1200 Ci of Cs - 137 were inadvertently manipulated and an unknown fraction of this total was available for environmental dispertion during at least 6 weeks, before efficient remedial action could be undertaken. The main dispersion pathways were rainwater run-off and soil ressuspension and further deposition. Cs-137 monitoring in the local environment started in the first week of October, including to date aprox. 1300 measurements of soil, vegetable (fruits and kitchen-gardens), ground and drinking water, sediments and fish, aerosol, precipitation and external dose measurement with TL dosimeters, in the surroundings of the main contamination spots. Until the conclusion of de-contamination activities in late December, the ranges of Cs-137 in a 50m radius of evacuated areas were as follows: 102-104 Bq/Kg for surface soils and edible vegetables, 100-101mBq/m3 in air and 10 Bq/l in all water types. River sediment and fish 5-10 Km downstream the accident are ranged respectively 102-103 and 102/Kg. These data indicated the pathways and locations for intervention for further reduction of radiation exposure. This intervention consisted mainly in tree-tipping and surface soil removal. (author)

  12. Progestagens for human use, exposure and hazard assessment for the aquatic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besse, Jean-Philippe [Unite Biologie des ecosystemes aquatiques, Laboratoire d' ecotoxicologie, Cemagref, 3bis quai Chauveau CP 220, 69336 Lyon cedex 09 (France); Garric, Jeanne, E-mail: jeanne.garric@cemagref.f [Unite Biologie des ecosystemes aquatiques, Laboratoire d' ecotoxicologie, Cemagref, 3bis quai Chauveau CP 220, 69336 Lyon cedex 09 (France)

    2009-12-15

    Little information is available on the environmental occurrence and ecotoxicological effects of pharmaceutical gestagens released in the aquatic environment. Since eighteen different gestagens were found to be used in France, preliminary exposure and hazard assessment were done. Predicted environmental concentrations (PECs) suggest that if parent gestagens are expected to be found in the ng l{sup -1} range, some active metabolites could be present at higher concentrations, although limited data on metabolism and environmental fate limit the relevance of PECs. The biological effects are not expected to be restricted to progestagenic activity. Both anti-androgenic activity (mainly for cyproterone acetate, chlormadinone acetate and their metabolites) and estrogenic activity (mainly for reduced metabolites of levonorgestrel and norethisterone) should also occur. All these molecules are likely to have a cumulative effect among themselves or with other xenoestrogens. Studies on occurrence, toxicity and degradation time are therefore needed for several of these compounds. - Gestagens exposure and hazard assessment for the aquatic environment.

  13. Progestagens for human use, exposure and hazard assessment for the aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little information is available on the environmental occurrence and ecotoxicological effects of pharmaceutical gestagens released in the aquatic environment. Since eighteen different gestagens were found to be used in France, preliminary exposure and hazard assessment were done. Predicted environmental concentrations (PECs) suggest that if parent gestagens are expected to be found in the ng l-1 range, some active metabolites could be present at higher concentrations, although limited data on metabolism and environmental fate limit the relevance of PECs. The biological effects are not expected to be restricted to progestagenic activity. Both anti-androgenic activity (mainly for cyproterone acetate, chlormadinone acetate and their metabolites) and estrogenic activity (mainly for reduced metabolites of levonorgestrel and norethisterone) should also occur. All these molecules are likely to have a cumulative effect among themselves or with other xenoestrogens. Studies on occurrence, toxicity and degradation time are therefore needed for several of these compounds. - Gestagens exposure and hazard assessment for the aquatic environment.

  14. Medicinal Water? The occurrence and fate of pharmaceuticals in aquatic environments A short communication

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo Sánchez-Murillo

    2016-01-01

    Although very little is known about the transport, fate and toxic effects of medical compounds in aquatic environments, the presence of these compounds in potable water sources can no longer be overlooked. We can argue that trace concentrations of drugs in the water is relatively a minor problem, however, the current and future demands on global potable freshwater supplies will probably lead to greater incidents of indirect and direct water-reuse situations at the local, regional, and cr...

  15. Azospirillum genomes reveal transition of bacteria from aquatic to terrestrial environments.

    OpenAIRE

    Florence Wisniewski-Dyé; Kirill Borziak; Gurusahai Khalsa-Moyers; Gladys Alexandre; Sukharnikov, Leonid O.; Kristin Wuichet; Gregory B Hurst; W Hayes McDonald; Robertson, Jon S.; Valérie Barbe; Alexandra Calteau; Zoé Rouy; Sophie Mangenot; Claire Prigent-Combaret; Philippe Normand

    2011-01-01

    International audience Fossil records indicate that life appeared in marine environments ∼3.5 billion years ago (Gyr) and transitioned to terrestrial ecosystems nearly 2.5 Gyr. Sequence analysis suggests that "hydrobacteria" and "terrabacteria" might have diverged as early as 3 Gyr. Bacteria of the genus Azospirillum are associated with roots of terrestrial plants; however, virtually all their close relatives are aquatic. We obtained genome sequences of two Azospirillum species and analyze...

  16. Removal of inorganic mercury from aquatic environments by multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Yaghmaeian, Kamyar; Khosravi Mashizi, Reza; Nasseri, Simin; Mahvi, Amir Hossein; Alimohammadi, Mahmood; Nazmara, Shahrokh

    2015-01-01

    Background Mercury is considered as a toxic heavy metal in aquatic environments due to accumulation in bodies of living organisms. Exposure to mercury may lead to different toxic effects in humans including damages to kidneys and nervous system. Materials and methods Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were selected as sorbent to remove mercury from aqueous solution using batch technique. ICP instrument was used to determine the amount of mercury in solution. Moreover, pH, contact time and...

  17. Progestagens for human use. Exposure and hazard assessment for the aquatic environment

    OpenAIRE

    Besse, J.P.; Garric, J.

    2009-01-01

    Little information is available on the environmental occurrence and ecotoxicological effects of pharmaceutical gestagens released in the aquatic environment. Since eighteen different gestagens were found to be used in France, preliminary exposure and hazard assessment were done. Predicted environmental concentrations (PECs) suggest that if parent gestagens are expected to be found in the ng l−1 range, some active metabolites could be present at higher concentrations, although limited da...

  18. Natural and active chemical remediation of toxic metals, organics, and radionuclides in the aquatic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McPherson, G.; Pintauro, P.; O`Connor, S. [and others

    1996-05-02

    This project focuses on the chemical aspects of remediation, with the underlying theme that chemical remediation does occur naturally. Included are studies on the fate of heavy metal and organic contaminants discharged into aquatic environments; accurate assay metal contaminants partitioned into soils, water and tissue; development of novel polymeric membranes and microporous solids for the entrapment of heavy metals; and the development of hybrid chemo-enzymatic oxidative schemes for aromatics decontamination. 49 refs.

  19. Azospirillum Genomes Reveal Transition of Bacteria from Aquatic to Terrestrial Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Wisniewski-Dye, Florence; Borziak, Kirill; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai; Alexandre, Gladys; O.Sukharnikov, Leonid; Wuichet, Kristin; B. Hurst, Gregory; Hayes Mcdonald, W.; S. Robertson, Jon; Barbe, Valerie; Calteau, Alexandra; Rouy, Zoe; Mangenot, Sophie; Prigent-Combaret, Claire; Normand, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Fossil records indicate that life appeared in marine environments ∼3.5 billion years ago (Gyr) and transitioned to terrestrial ecosystems nearly 2.5 Gyr. Sequence analysis suggests that "hydrobacteria" and "terrabacteria" might have diverged as early as 3 Gyr. Bacteria of the genus Azospirillum are associated with roots of terrestrial plants; however, virtually all their close relatives are aquatic. We obtained genome sequences of two Azospirillum species and analyzed their gene origins. Whil...

  20. Diversity and Impact of Prokaryotic Toxins on Aquatic Environments: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Tenreiro

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms are ubiquitous in all habitats and are recognized by their metabolic versatility and ability to produce many bioactive compounds, including toxins. Some of the most common toxins present in water are produced by several cyanobacterial species. As a result, their blooms create major threats to animal and human health, tourism, recreation and aquaculture. Quite a few cyanobacterial toxins have been described, including hepatotoxins, neurotoxins, cytotoxins and dermatotoxins. These toxins are secondary metabolites, presenting a vast diversity of structures and variants. Most of cyanobacterial secondary metabolites are peptides or have peptidic substructures and are assumed to be synthesized by non-ribosomal peptide synthesis (NRPS, involving peptide synthetases, or NRPS/PKS, involving peptide synthetases and polyketide synthases hybrid pathways. Besides cyanobacteria, other bacteria associated with aquatic environments are recognized as significant toxin producers, representing important issues in food safety, public health, and human and animal well being. Vibrio species are one of the most representative groups of aquatic toxin producers, commonly associated with seafood-born infections. Some enterotoxins and hemolysins have been identified as fundamental for V. cholerae and V. vulnificus pathogenesis, but there is evidence for the existence of other potential toxins. Campylobacter spp. and Escherichia coli are also water contaminants and are able to produce important toxins after infecting their hosts. Other bacteria associated with aquatic environments are emerging as toxin producers, namely Legionella pneumophila and Aeromonas hydrophila, described as responsible for the synthesis of several exotoxins, enterotoxins and cytotoxins. Furthermore, several Clostridium species can produce potent neurotoxins. Although not considered aquatic microorganisms, they are ubiquitous in the environment and can easily contaminate drinking

  1. Diversity and impact of prokaryotic toxins on aquatic environments: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valério, Elisabete; Chaves, Sandra; Tenreiro, Rogério

    2010-10-01

    Microorganisms are ubiquitous in all habitats and are recognized by their metabolic versatility and ability to produce many bioactive compounds, including toxins. Some of the most common toxins present in water are produced by several cyanobacterial species. As a result, their blooms create major threats to animal and human health, tourism, recreation and aquaculture. Quite a few cyanobacterial toxins have been described, including hepatotoxins, neurotoxins, cytotoxins and dermatotoxins. These toxins are secondary metabolites, presenting a vast diversity of structures and variants. Most of cyanobacterial secondary metabolites are peptides or have peptidic substructures and are assumed to be synthesized by non-ribosomal peptide synthesis (NRPS), involving peptide synthetases, or NRPS/PKS, involving peptide synthetases and polyketide synthases hybrid pathways. Besides cyanobacteria, other bacteria associated with aquatic environments are recognized as significant toxin producers, representing important issues in food safety, public health, and human and animal well being. Vibrio species are one of the most representative groups of aquatic toxin producers, commonly associated with seafood-born infections. Some enterotoxins and hemolysins have been identified as fundamental for V. cholerae and V. vulnificus pathogenesis, but there is evidence for the existence of other potential toxins. Campylobacter spp. and Escherichia coli are also water contaminants and are able to produce important toxins after infecting their hosts. Other bacteria associated with aquatic environments are emerging as toxin producers, namely Legionella pneumophila and Aeromonas hydrophila, described as responsible for the synthesis of several exotoxins, enterotoxins and cytotoxins. Furthermore, several Clostridium species can produce potent neurotoxins. Although not considered aquatic microorganisms, they are ubiquitous in the environment and can easily contaminate drinking and irrigation water

  2. Turnover of eroded soil organic carbon after deposition in terrestrial and aquatic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkels, Frédérique; Cammeraat, Erik; Kalbitz, Karsten; van Oost, Kristof; Ellerbrock, Ruth; Follain, Stéphane; Fuchslueger, Lucia; Gerke, Horst; Heckrath, Goswin; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Kuhn, Nikolaus; van Loon, Emiel; Quinton, John; Richter, Andreas; Salvador-Blanes, Sébastien; Sommer, Michael; Steffens, Markus

    2015-04-01

    The fate of eroded soil organic carbon (SOC) after deposition is a large uncertainty in assessing the impact of soil erosion on C budgets. Globally, large amounts of SOC are transported by erosion and a substantial part is transferred into adjacent inland waters, linking terrestrial and aquatic C cycling. However, the net effect on C fluxes between soils, inland waters and atmosphere remains uncertain. In this study, we determined SOC turnover in terrestrial and aquatic environments and indentified its major controls. A European gradient of agricultural sites was sampled, spanning a wide range soil properties (e.g. texture, aggregation, etc.), SOC quantity and quality. In a 16-week incubation experiment, SOC turnover was determined for conditions reflecting downslope soils or inland waters. Moreover, we studied the impact of labile C inputs ('priming') on SOC stability using 13C labeled cellulose. Physical and chemical soil properties and SOC molecular composition were assessed as potential controls on C turnover. SOC deposition in aquatic environments resulted in upto 3.5 times higher C turnover than deposition on downslope soils. Labile C inputs enlarged total CO2 emissions, with the largest increase for aquatic conditions. Solid-state 13C NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy showed broad similarities in SOC molecular composition. Soil and SOC properties could not (yet) fully explain variation in SOC turnover between the sites. However, temporal trends in CO2 emissions clearly differed between downslope soils and inland waters. We established a quantitative model, based on the ten sites of the European gradient, that is capable to describe CO2 emissions for SOC deposited on soils and in inland waters and upon different levels of labile C inputs. Our findings indicate that deposition conditions (soils vs. inland waters) play a crucial role in determining C turnover. Erosion measures preventing deposition in aquatic environments could therefore be an important carbon saving

  3. Fish otoliths as archives of metal concentrations in the aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Little is known of the relationship between the concentrations of metals in the laminations of the fish otolith and that in the environment. It is imperative that a concentration response relationship be demonstrated if otoliths are to be used as archives of metal concentrations in the aquatic environment. The aim of this preliminary study was to determine if there was an increase in concentration of Mn in the laminations of the fish otolith when fish were exposed to an elevated level of this metal. SIMS was used to measure Mn in the otolith. The findings will be discussed

  4. Occurrence of anionic surfactants in treated sewage: Risk assessment to aquatic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mungray, Arvind Kumar [Department of Chemical Engineering, S.V. National Institute of Technology, Surat 395007 (India)], E-mail: akm@ched.svnit.ac.in; Kumar, Pradeep [Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India)], E-mail: pkumafce@iitr.ernet.in

    2008-12-30

    A comparative evaluation of occurrence of and risk to aquatic environment due to anionic surfactants (AS) in treated effluents from three main treatment processes, i.e. activated sludge process (ASP), oxidation pond (OP), and upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor (UASBR) is presented. UASBR effluents contained substantial concentrations of AS (4.25-5.91 mg/L as average AS removal was not found to exceed 18%). Post-treatment of UASBR effluent using 1-1.6 days detention, anaerobic polishing ponds (PP) was also found quite ineffective. In UASBR-PP combine, AS reduced only up to 30%. Effluents from OP based sewage treatment plants (STPs) also contained significant concentrations of AS. On the contrary, effluent AS or linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) concentrations recorded in ASP effluents were quite low (less than 0.2 mg/L). Unlike UASBR, LAS or AS removals greater than 99% are achieved in ASP. Treated effluents from UASBR and OP based STPs when discharged to aquatic ecosystems are likely to cause substantial risk to aquatic environment due to the presence of AS while effluents from ASP are not supposed to pose risk. Need to find an effective aerobic post-treatment unit to UASBR for desired removal of AS is emphasized.

  5. Occurrence of anionic surfactants in treated sewage: Risk assessment to aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparative evaluation of occurrence of and risk to aquatic environment due to anionic surfactants (AS) in treated effluents from three main treatment processes, i.e. activated sludge process (ASP), oxidation pond (OP), and upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor (UASBR) is presented. UASBR effluents contained substantial concentrations of AS (4.25-5.91 mg/L as average AS removal was not found to exceed 18%). Post-treatment of UASBR effluent using 1-1.6 days detention, anaerobic polishing ponds (PP) was also found quite ineffective. In UASBR-PP combine, AS reduced only up to 30%. Effluents from OP based sewage treatment plants (STPs) also contained significant concentrations of AS. On the contrary, effluent AS or linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) concentrations recorded in ASP effluents were quite low (less than 0.2 mg/L). Unlike UASBR, LAS or AS removals greater than 99% are achieved in ASP. Treated effluents from UASBR and OP based STPs when discharged to aquatic ecosystems are likely to cause substantial risk to aquatic environment due to the presence of AS while effluents from ASP are not supposed to pose risk. Need to find an effective aerobic post-treatment unit to UASBR for desired removal of AS is emphasized

  6. Transfer of radionuclides at the uranium and thorium decay chains in aquatic and terrestrial environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report examines the transfer of radionuclides from the uranium and thorium decay chains (U-238, Ra-226, Th-232, Th-230, Po-210 and Pb-210) through the aquatic and terrestrial environment. This transfer is characterized by a transfer coefficient; environmental and experimental factors which cause this coefficient to vary are presented and discussed in this report. Furthermore, based on a literature survey, the report indicates the range of coefficients found for the aquatic sector (that is, sediment and freshwater and marine organisms) and for the terrestrial sector (that is, plants and domestic and wild animals). Afterwards, generalisations are formulated on the transfer of the different radionuclides through the multiple environmental compartments. 75 refs

  7. The Chernobyl reactor accident and the aquatic environment of the UK: a fisheries viewpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The monitoring programme undertaken by the Directorate throughout the UK following the Chernobyl reactor accident is described. The results of sampling and analysis of fish, shellfish, seaweed and other materials are discussed. Chernobyl fallout was readily detected in all sectors of the aquatic environment, particularly during May when the highest concentrations were observed. An assessment of the radiological impact of the fallout shows that freshwater fish were the most important source of individual (critical group) exposure though, based on cautious assumptions, the effective dose equivalent is around 1 mSv in a year. The collective effective dose equivalent commitment from Chernobyl due to aquatic ingestion pathways, predominantly marine fish, is estimated to be 30 man Sv. (author)

  8. Extracellular enzyme activities of aquatic bacteria in polluted environment: 1. Proteolytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proteolytic activity (PA) of heterotrophic aquatic bacteria from differently polluted lakes was tested. Lake Dringis located in the Aukstaitija National Park was selected as an ecosystem that exhibits a low degree of impact by human activity, whereas Lake Druksiai was selected as being a chronically polluted water body. Industrial and residential waste flows into Lake Druksiai, the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant cooling reservoir, via its tributaries (URS-2, MS and IRS-1.2). The PA of the lakes was found to be different. The total mean PA of Lake Dringis bacteria was 2.5 to 16 times greater than that from Lake Druksiai tributaries, URS-2, MS and IRS-1.2 and their mouths. Thus, the research showed that the PA of aquatic bacteria is related with the ecological state of the environment. Toxic materials entering the hydro ecosystem with industrial and residential waste waters exert a negative impact on the PA of heterotrophic bacteria. (author)

  9. Studies on radioactivity in aquatic and atmospheric environs of coastal Karnataka, Kaiga and Goa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic study on background radiation level and radionuclide distribution in the environs of coastal Karnataka, Kaiga and Goa has been initiated. In the first phase, a reliable baseline data on background radiation level and distribution of radionuclides in the terrestrial environs of coastal Karnataka and Kaiga was established. Investigations for establishing baseline data in aquatic and atmospheric environs of coastal Karnataka and terrestrial environs of Goa is now under progress. Atmospheric radon daughter concentrations, diurnal variations, seasonal variations and radon emanation rates are studied. A new approach to the model based on diffusion theory is formulated to understand 222Rn migration in soil. Experimental results are analysed on the basis of the new model and interpreted. The results of these systematic investigations are presented and discussed. (author)

  10. Aquatic plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, T. V.; Sand-Jensen, K.

    2006-01-01

    Aquatic fl owering plants form a relatively young plant group on an evolutionary timescale. The group has developed over the past 80 million years from terrestrial fl owering plants that re-colonised the aquatic environment after 60-100 million years on land. The exchange of species between...... terrestrial and aquatic environments continues today and is very intensive along stream banks. In this chapter we describe the physical and chemical barriers to the exchange of plants between land and water....

  11. Using sediment cores to establish targets for the remediation of aquatic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lintern, Anna; Anderson, Marion; Leahy, Paul; Deletic, Ana; McCarthy, David

    2016-01-01

    When assigning site-specific restoration targets for deteriorating aquatic systems, it is necessary to have an understanding of the undisturbed or background state of the system. However, the site-specific characteristics of aquatic systems prior to disturbance are mostly unknown, due to the lack of historical water and sediment quality data. This study aims to introduce a method for filling this gap in our understanding, using dated sediment cores from the beds of aquatic environments. We used Bolin Billabong, a floodplain lake of the Yarra River (South-East Australia), as a case study to demonstrate the application of this method. We identified the concentrations of aluminium, cadmium, chromium, copper, iron, lead, manganese, nickel, tin and zinc at 8 cm intervals through the sediment core. This showed that aluminium, chromium, copper, iron, lead, nickel, tin and zinc concentrations in Bolin Billabong sediments significantly increased after European settlement in the river catchment in the mid-19th century. The differences between current Australian sediment quality guidelines trigger values and the background metal concentrations in Bolin Billabong sediments underscore the value of using locally relevant background toxicant concentrations when setting water and sediment quality targets. PMID:26877046

  12. The Impact of Mining Activity upon the Aquatic Environment in the Southern Apuseni Mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SIGISMUND DUMA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Southern Apuseni Mountains, mining activities have taken place since Antiquity, leaving their marks upon the natural environment, the aquatic one inclusively. If the traditional technologies had a low impact upon the aquatic environment, the ones in the modern period have affected it up to the “dead water” level. It is about the disorganization of the hydrographical basins and especially about aggressive pollution of surface waters with some of the most toxic chemical substances such as cyanides, as well as by an increase in the contents of metallic ions, chlorides, sulphides, sulphates, suspensions and fixed residuum. The decrease in pH, and implicitly the acidification of waters, is also remarkable. It must be mentioned that no systematic studies of the impact of mining activities upon the aquatic environment have been conducted in the area in the last years. In these conditions, the data about water quality have been taken over from the studies conducted by author between 1996 and 1998. The cause of the lack of concern in the field is no other but the cease in ore valorization activities in the majority of the mining objectives in the area. As none of the tailings settling ponds has guard canals, the direct pluvial waters and the ones drained from the slopes transport tailings with noxes which they subsequently discharge in the local pluvial network. In these conditions, both the quality of the mine waters which run freely into the emissary and of the ones that flow from the waste dumps remain mainly in the qualitative parameters analyzed and presented in the study.

  13. Probing the fate of soil-derived core and intact polar GDGTs in aquatic environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Peterse

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We have performed incubation experiments in order to examine the fate of branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (brGDGT membrane lipids upon entering an aquatic environment and to asses the suitability of brGDGTs as tracers for fluvial land-sea transport of soil organic carbon. We incubated a soil from the Rakaia River catchment on the South Island of New Zealand using Rakaia River water and ocean water collected near the river mouth as inocula for a period of up to 152 days. The concentrations of brGDGTs derived from intact polar ("living"; IPL lipids and core ("fossil"; CL lipids remained stable over the course of the experiment, suggesting an absence of significant brGDGT production or degradation. Moreover, the lack of change in brGDGT distribution during the experiment implies that the initial soil signature remains unaltered during transport through the aquatic environment, at least over the time frame of the experiment. In contrast, the total pool of isoprenoid GDGTs (isoGDGTs, currently attributed to soil Thaumachaeota, increased substantially (27–72% in all incubation setups by the end of the experiment. As a consequence, a decrease in Branched and Isoprenoid Tetraether (BIT index values – a proxy for the relative input of fluvially discharged soil material into a marine system – became evident after an incubation period of 30 days, with a maximum final decrease of 0.88 to 0.74 in the experiment with river water. The relative distribution within the isoGDGT pool shows changes with time, suggesting different membrane adaptation rates to the aquatic environment, or a shift in source organism(s. While the stability of soil brGDGTs in aquatic environments reinforces their potential as tracers for land-sea transport of soil organic carbon and their use in paleoclimate reconstructions, the distributional differences between GDGTs in river water and nearby soil indicate that further research is needed to pinpoint the sources of

  14. Probing the fate of soil-derived core and intact polar GDGTs in aquatic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterse, F.; Moy, C. M.; Eglinton, T. I.

    2014-07-01

    We have performed incubation experiments in order to examine the fate of branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (brGDGT) membrane lipids upon entering an aquatic environment and to asses the suitability of brGDGTs as tracers for fluvial land-sea transport of soil organic carbon. We incubated a soil from the Rakaia River catchment on the South Island of New Zealand using Rakaia River water and ocean water collected near the river mouth as inocula for a period of up to 152 days. The concentrations of brGDGTs derived from intact polar ("living"; IPL) lipids and core ("fossil"; CL) lipids remained stable over the course of the experiment, suggesting an absence of significant brGDGT production or degradation. Moreover, the lack of change in brGDGT distribution during the experiment implies that the initial soil signature remains unaltered during transport through the aquatic environment, at least over the time frame of the experiment. In contrast, the total pool of isoprenoid GDGTs (isoGDGTs), currently attributed to soil Thaumachaeota, increased substantially (27-72%) in all incubation setups by the end of the experiment. As a consequence, a decrease in Branched and Isoprenoid Tetraether (BIT) index values - a proxy for the relative input of fluvially discharged soil material into a marine system - became evident after an incubation period of 30 days, with a maximum final decrease of 0.88 to 0.74 in the experiment with river water. The relative distribution within the isoGDGT pool shows changes with time, suggesting different membrane adaptation rates to the aquatic environment, or a shift in source organism(s). While the stability of soil brGDGTs in aquatic environments reinforces their potential as tracers for land-sea transport of soil organic carbon and their use in paleoclimate reconstructions, the distributional differences between GDGTs in river water and nearby soil indicate that further research is needed to pinpoint the sources of GDGTs that are

  15. Waste heat discharges in the aquatic environment -- impact and monitoring 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies on ecological impacts, on fishes in particular, of waste heat discharges in the aquatic environment are briefly reviewed. These studies cover the susceptibility of fishes to disease and predation, population biology, parasite proliferation and its impact on fishes, synergistic effects due to heat and other stresses such as chemicals, pollutant, lowering of saturation limit of dissolved oxygen at elevated temperature and radioactivity. Experiences of monitoring waste heat discharges at the Rajasthan Atomic Power Station (RAPS) and the Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS) are presented. Entrainment losses and impingement losses are also reviewed. Requirements for thermal monitoring are mentioned. (M.G.B.)

  16. Natural and active chemical remediation of toxic metals and radionuclides in the aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The focus of this research is the non-biological, chemical remediation of toxic heavy metals and radionuclides in aquatic environments. This Tulane/Xavier group includes researchers from Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, and Geology. Active methods using novel zeolites and ion exchange membranes are currently being evaluated for use in removing heavy metals from natural waters. In addition, field and laboratory studies of metal ion exchange reactions and competitive, heavy metal adsorption on clay substrates are underway to determine sediment metal sequestering capacity. A summary of progress to date and future work is presented

  17. Investigation of individual radiation exposures from discharges to the aquatic environment: techniques used in habits surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The techniques used by the Fisheries Radiobiological Laboratory (FRL) in conducting habits surveys are described and discussed. The main objectives of these surveys are to investigate exposure pathways to the public resulting from radioactive discharges to the aquatic environment and to provide the basic data from which critical groups can be identified. Preparation, conduct and interpretation of the results of surveys are described and possible errors obtained by the interview technique are highlighted. A means of verifying the results of interviews by a logging technique has been devised and some comparative results are presented. (author)

  18. Production of extracellular nucleic acids by genetically altered bacteria in aquatic-environment microcosms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The factors which affect the production of extracellular DNA by genetically altered strains of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas cepacia, and Bradyrhizobium japonicum in aquatic environments were investigated. Cellular nucleic acids were labeled in vivo by incubation with [3H]thymidine or [3H]adenine, and production of extracellular DNA in marine waters, artificial seawater, or minimal salts media was determined by detecting radiolabeled macromolecules in incubation filtrates. The presence or absence of the ambient microbial community had little effect on the production of extracellular DNA. Three of four organisms produced the greatest amounts of extracellular nucleic acids when incubated in low-salinity media (2% artificial seawater) rather than high-salinity media (10 to 50% artificial seawater). The greatest production of extracellular nucleic acids by P. cepacia occurred at pH 7 and 37 degree C, suggesting that extracellular-DNA production may be a normal physiologic function of the cell. Incubation of labeled P. cepacia cells in water from Bimini Harbor, Bahamas, resulted in labeling of macromolecules of the ambient microbial population. Collectively these results indicate that (i) extracellular-DNA production by genetically altered bacteria released into aquatic environments is more strongly influenced by physicochemical factors than biotic factors, (ii) extracellular-DNA production rates are usually greater for organisms released in freshwater than marine environments, and (iii) ambient microbial populations can readily utilize materials released by these organisms

  19. Surfactants in aquatic and terrestrial environment: occurrence, behavior, and treatment processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardak, K; Drogui, P; Daghrir, R

    2016-02-01

    Surfactants belong to a group of chemicals that are well known for their cleaning properties. Their excessive use as ingredients in care products (e.g., shampoos, body wash) and in household cleaning products (e.g., dishwashing detergents, laundry detergents, hard-surface cleaners) has led to the discharge of highly contaminated wastewaters in aquatic and terrestrial environment. Once reached in the different environmental compartments (rivers, lakes, soils, and sediments), surfactants can undergo aerobic or anaerobic degradation. The most studied surfactants so far are linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS), quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs), alkylphenol ethoxylate (APEOs), and alcohol ethoxylate (AEOs). Concentrations of surfactants in wastewaters can range between few micrograms to hundreds of milligrams in some cases, while it reaches several grams in sludge used for soil amendments in agricultural areas. Above the legislation standards, surfactants can be toxic to aquatic and terrestrial organisms which make treatment processes necessary before their discharge into the environment. Given this fact, biological and chemical processes should be considered for better surfactants removal. In this review, we investigate several issues with regard to: (1) the toxicity of surfactants in the environment, (2) their behavior in different ecological systems, (3) and the different treatment processes used in wastewater treatment plants in order to reduce the effects of surfactants on living organisms. PMID:26590059

  20. Distribution of quinolones, sulfonamides, tetracyclines in aquatic environment and antibiotic resistance in Indochina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru eSuzuki

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Southeast Asia has become the center of rapid industrial development and economic growth. However, this growth has far outpaced investment in public infrastructure, leading to the unregulated release of many pollutants, including wastewater-related contaminants such as antibiotics. Antibiotics are of major concern because they can easily be released into the environment from numerous sources, and can subsequently induce development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Recent studies have shown that for some categories of drugs this source-to-environment antibiotic resistance relationship is more complex. This review summarizes current understanding regarding the presence of quinolones, sulfonamides, and tetracyclines in aquatic environments of Indochina and the prevalence of bacteria resistant to them. Several noteworthy findings are discussed: 1 quinolone contamination and the occurrence of quinolone resistance are not correlated; 2 occurrence of the sul sulfonamide resistance gene varies geographically; and 3 microbial diversity might be related to the rate of oxytetracycline resistance.

  1. Lebanese Young Citizens’ Attitudes toward Peace and Democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khayrazad Kari Jabbour

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Lebanon is a small democratic country with a population of less than four million and a range of diversity; there are at least 18 different religious sects and 19 different political parties. The diversity among ethnic, religious and/or political groups has created conflicts that severely impact the Lebanese economy, environment, politics and most importance our young citizens. The aim of this investigation is to capture students’ awareness and attitudes toward the accountability and mechanisms of peace and democracy. Data for the study was obtained from extensive literature reviews and questionnaire surveys of 70 high school students. The investigation was conducted in the fall of the year 2013. The results of the study showed that most Lebanese young citizen view peace and democracy process associated with the end of violence and conflict behaviors; very small percent of respondents believe that bringing peace and democracy process should be answered by the people or by themselves. Results also indicate a lack of a sense of security among young citizen. This raises the urgent need to put into practice an effective peace education program that inspires and motivates young citizens to be involved in the peace and the democracy building process.

  2. Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Quarterly project status report, July 1, 1994--September 30, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document references information pertaining to the presence of hazardous materials in the Mississippi River Basin. Topics discussed include: The biological fate, transport, and ecotoxicity of toxic and hazardous wastes; biological uptake and metabolism; sentinels of aquatic contamination; bioremediation; microorganisms; biomarkers of exposure and ecotoxicity; expert geographical information systems for assessing hazardous wastes in aquatic environments; and enhancement of environmental education at Tulane and Xavier

  3. A study of bioaccumulation occurring in a spatial and temporal aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The impacts of spatial, temporal, and hydrodynamics on the bioaccumulation in the Chernobyl cooling lake were evaluated using a two-dimensional aquatic exposure assessment model. The model framework integrated spatial and temporal heterogeneity effects of radioactive environments, changes in abundance and distribution of aquatic populations, spatial and temporal dependent (or density-dependent) radionuclide ingestion rates, and population biomass changes. Plankton population growth was integrated into the hydrodynamic-transport model to determine the plankton biomass density change and distributions. The exposure estimation was conducted in a two-dimensional finite element mesh which was used in the hydrodynamic-transport model. Results indicated that bioaccumulation factors with the assumption of steady-state and homogeneous conditions significantly over-estimated the radionuclide concentration accumulated in fish. The impacts of changes of biomass distributions and variable ingestion rates on the bioaccumulation varied spatially and temporally. Results also revealed that a higher radiobiological turn-over rate could be a dominate factor in determining the radionuclide fate in biota when the ecological processes, such as population growth, were relatively slow. Two different predator-prey relationships were applied. Their impacts on the bioaccumulation of fish varied spatially and temporally. Overall, the results suggest that a more realistic physical description of contaminated environments and ecosystems is necessary in studying bioaccumulation occurring in nature

  4. Medicinal Water? The occurrence and fate of pharmaceuticals in aquatic environments A short communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Sánchez-Murillo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Although very little is known about the transport, fate and toxic effects of medical compounds in aquatic environments, the presence of these compounds in potable water sources can no longer be overlooked. We can argue that trace concentrations of drugs in the water is relatively a minor problem, however, the current and future demands on global potable freshwater supplies will probably lead to greater incidents of indirect and direct water-reuse situations at the local, regional, and cross-border levels. It is important to remark that the solution of this emerging ecological issue does not rely on new and better wastewater treatment technologies, but a new paradigm of responsibility and the understanding of the relations between anthropogenic actions and their ecological effects as well. The objective of this brief communication is to present the state of the art of research conducted in the last decade in Europe and United States concerning the presence of pharmaceuticals products in aquatic environments.

  5. Measurement and interpretation of microbial adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) in aquatic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammes, Frederik; Goldschmidt, Felix; Vital, Marius; Wang, Yingying; Egli, Thomas

    2010-07-01

    There is a widespread need for cultivation-free methods to quantify viability of natural microbial communities in aquatic environments. Adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) is the energy currency of all living cells, and therefore a useful indicator of viability. A luminescence-based ATP kit/protocol was optimised in order to detect ATP concentrations as low as 0.0001 nM with a standard deviation of water samples from a variety of aquatic environments (drinking water, groundwater, bottled water, river water, lake water and wastewater effluent) were analysed for extracellular ATP and microbial ATP in comparison with flow-cytometric (FCM) parameters. Microbial ATP concentrations ranged between 3% and 97% of total ATP concentrations, and correlated well (R(2)=0.8) with the concentrations of intact microbial cells (after staining with propidium iodide). From this correlation, we calculated an average ATP-per-cell value of 1.75x10(-10)nmol/cell. An even better correlation (R(2)=0.88) was observed between intact biovolume (derived from FCM scatter data) and microbial ATP concentrations, and an average ATP-per-biovolume value of 2.95x10(-9)nmol/microm(3) was calculated. These results support the use of ATP analysis for both routine monitoring and research purposes, and contribute towards a better interpretation of ATP data. PMID:20605621

  6. Investigation and assessment of tritium concentration of aquatic environment surrounding haiyang nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate tritium concentrations of aquatic environment surrounding Haiyang nuclear power plant, and make a analysis of the influencial factors of the tritium concentration; to assess the accumulated-effective dose of the residents surrounding nuclear power plant. Methods: We collected 16 sample points, including surface water, groundwater, drinking water and sea water within 30 km surrounding Haiyang nuclear power plant in wet period and dry period. The pretreatment and preparation of samples referred to the recommended methods of the national standards GB 12375-90. The low background liquid scintillation spectrometer is used to measure the tritium concentration. Result: The average level of the tritium concentration of water samples was (0.62 ± 0.163) Bq · L-1, the range of the tritium concentrations was from 0.27Bq · L-1 to 0.93Bq · L-1. The difference of the tritium concentrations between two different periods analyzed by the paired t test was considered statistically significant. (P-1, 0.008 μ Sv · a-1, 0.007 μ Sv · a-1, respectively. Conclusion: The activity concentration of tritium in the aquatic environment surrounding Haiyang nuclear power plant was at the lower level than that of others; according to the limited value that is regulated by basic standards for protection against ionizing radiation and of the safety of radiation sources (GB 18871-2002) (2 mSv), the accumulated-effective dose which residents suffered was in background level of radiation. (authors)

  7. Isolation and characterization of Arcobacter spp. from fresh seafood and the aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laishram, Martina; Rathlavath, Srinu; Lekshmi, Manjusha; Kumar, Sanath; Nayak, Binaya Bhusan

    2016-09-01

    Arcobacter is an emerging pathogen associated with foods of animal origin. Members of the genus Arcobacter are increasingly being isolated from fish, shellfish and the aquatic environment. In the present study, we analyzed fish, shellfish and water samples for the presence of Arcobacter spp. by conventional isolation as well as by direct PCR on the enrichment broth. Of 100 samples comprising of 42 finfish, 34 shellfish and 24 water samples analyzed, Arcobacter spp. was isolated from 8 (19%) finfish, 5 (14.7%) shellfish and 5 (20.8%) water samples. Arcobacter DNA was detected in 24 (24%) samples by direct PCR on the enrichment broth. Based on m-PCR specific to different Arcobacter spp. and 16S rRNA sequence analyses, majority (19) of the isolates were identified as Arcobacter butzleri, while two isolates were Arcobacter mytili. All Arcobacter butzleri isolates harbored putative virulence genes cadF, ciaB, mviN, pldA, tlyA and cj1349. The two isolates of A. mytili harbored mviN and cj1349 genes only. The study highlights emerging problem of the contamination of aquatic environment and fresh seafood with potentially pathogenic Arcobacter spp. PMID:27261768

  8. Indirect photochemical transformations of acyclovir and penciclovir in aquatic environments increase ecological risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jibin; Li, Guiying; An, Taicheng; Nie, Xiangping

    2016-03-01

    Acyclovir and penciclovir, 2 antiviral drugs, are increasingly detected in aquatic environments. The present study explores the natural photochemical transformation mechanisms and fate of these drugs, examining direct and indirect photochemical transformation under simulated sunlight irradiation. The 2 antiviral drugs are photostable under certain conditions but significantly degrade in the presence of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (DOM). The degradation rate associated with the drugs' indirect photochemical transformation scaled with chromophoric DOM concentration. Quenchers and sensitizers were used to identify indirect photochemical transformation mechanism. Results suggested that both pharmaceuticals could be transformed by reacting with (1) O2 , (•) OH, and excited chromophoric DOM. The (1) O2 played an important role in indirect photochemical transformation. Furthermore, the reaction kinetics between their substructural molecules, guanine, isocytosine, and imidazole, with different reactive oxygen species were evaluated to determine which substrate functionalities were most susceptible to singlet oxygenation. Imidazole was identified as the reaction site for (1) O2 , and preliminary (1) O2 oxidation mechanisms were further evaluated based on liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric results. Finally, aquatic ecotoxicity assessment of phototransformed solutions revealed that the degradation of acyclovir and penciclovir may not ultimately diminish environmental risk because of either formation of more toxic intermediates than parent pharmaceuticals or some synergistic effects existing between the intermediates. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:584-592. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26356329

  9. Applying physicochemical approaches to control phosphogypsum heavy metal releases in aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, Rawaa; El Samrani, Antoine G; Kazpard, Véronique; Bassil, Joseph; Lartiges, Bruno; Saad, Zeinab; Chou, Lei

    2013-12-01

    One of the most important sources of solid waste in the Mediterranean Basin ecosystem originated from the phosphate fertilizer industries, which discharge phosphogypsum (PG) directly into aquatic environments or are stacked on stockpiles. The present study investigates metal release from PG under the influence of variable pH, increasing PG mass content, and complexing organic matter ligands. Major ions from PG leachates, grain size and charge, main functional groups along with metal leachability (Pb, Cd, Cr, Cu, and Zn) were determined using ion chromatography, laser diffraction, zetameter, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and atomic absorption spectroscopy, respectively. The complete dissolution of PG recorded is at 2 g/L. Saturation and supersaturation with respect to PG may occur at concentrations of 3 and 4 g/L, respectively, revealing a clustering phenomenon leading to heavy metal encapsulation within the aggregates. Organic ligands such as citrate may trigger the cationic exchange within the PG suspension leading to ion release. As these factors are considered as specific process involving the release of contaminants from PG during storage under natural conditions, this study could set the foundations for PG remediation in aquatic environment. Organic ligands under controlled pH conditions could be utilized in treating fertilizer industrial wastes by taking into consideration the particularity of the receiving area, thus decreasing metal hazardous impact on natural media. PMID:23764982

  10. A novel photosynthetic strategy for adaptation to low-iron aquatic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, D.; Folea, I.M.; Jolley, C.C.; Kouril, R.; Lubner, C.E.; Lin, S.; Kolber, D.; Wolfe-Simon, Felisa; Golbeck, J.H.; Boekema, E.J.; Fromme, P.

    2011-01-01

    Iron (Fe) availability is a major limiting factor for primary production in aquatic environments. Cyanobacteria respond to Fe deficiency by derepressing the isiAB operon, which encodes the antenna protein IsiA and flavodoxin. At nanomolar Fe concentrations, a PSI-IsiA supercomplex forms, comprising a PSI trimer encircled by two complete IsiA rings. This PSI-IsiA supercomplex is the largest photosynthetic membrane protein complex yet isolated. This study presents a detailed characterization of this complex using transmission electron microscopy and ultrafast fluorescence spectroscopy. Excitation trapping and electron transfer are highly efficient, allowing cyanobacteria to avoid oxidative stress. This mechanism may be a major factor used by cyanobacteria to successfully adapt to modern low-Fe environments. ?? 2010 American Chemical Society.

  11. Pollution Pathways of Pharmaceutical Residues in the Aquatic Environment on the Island of Mallorca, Spain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodríguez-Navas, Carlos; Björklund, Erland; Bak, Søren Alex;

    2013-01-01

    of discharge of the pharmaceuticals into the aquatic environment. The data indicate that reuse of treated domestic wastewater for irrigation (which supplies some 30 % of the total water demand in Mallorca) contributes to the contamination of GW. In addition, leaching from landfills is identified as another......This work determines the principal environmental pollution pathways of pharmaceuticals on the island of Mallorca (Spain). The evaluation was made on the basis of the quantification of pharmaceutical residues by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry in several environmental water samples......, including wastewater-treatment plant effluents, municipal solid waste landfill leachates, groundwater (GW), and marine water. An overall set of 19 pharmaceuticals has been identified in the environment of the 27 human pharmaceuticals investigated in this study. WWTP effluents are the main source...

  12. Semipermeable membrane devices in monitoring of organic pollutants in the aquatic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabaliunas, D.

    1999-03-01

    Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) are passive samplers capable of concentrating hydrophobic chemicals from water, sediments, soil and air. They consist of layflat polymeric membrane such as polyethylene containing a thin film of synthetic lipid such as triolein. The transport of hydrophobic chemicals through the membrane into the lipid is governed by the process of passive diffusion. Therefore, SPMDs sample chemicals in a way similar to organisms. This thesis deals with the application of SPMDs in the monitoring of concentrations and effects of organic pollutants in the aquatic environment. SPMDs were exposed to various pesticides (organochlorines, synthetic pyrethroids, dinitroanilines, amides) in laboratory flow-through experiments to study the uptake kinetics of organic chemicals from water. To compare the uptake of model compounds by SPMDs and aquatic organisms, the membrane samplers were exposed to chemicals side-by-side with bivalves. Mixtures of chemicals accumulated by SPMDs and mussels were tested in standard toxicity and genotoxicity assays (Microtox, Mutatox, invertebrate toxicity tests, the Ames test, sister chromatid exchange test). These studies showed that the uptake pattern of organic compounds by SPMDs and aquatic organisms was similar, and the passive samplers accumulated levels of chemicals sufficient for standard bioassays. To further validate the method, SPMDs were deployed in a number of polluted water sources in Lithuania. Bioassay-directed fractionation and chemical analytical methods were used to identify pollutants sampled (PAHs, PCBs, organochlorines) and their effects were evaluated in bioassays. SPMDs proved to be useful tools in monitoring of organic pollutants under the field conditions. Criteria for bioassays to be integrated with the SPMD technique were defined based on the results of these studies. Some important factors in the integration of SPMDs and bioassays (toxicity of SPMD-inherent oleic and sediment

  13. The main sources of pollution of the aquatic environment in Hellas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumantakis, J.; Dimitrakopoulos, D.; Markantonis, K.; Grigorakou, E.; Vassiliou, E.

    2003-04-01

    The research team of the laboratory of Engineering Geology &Hydrogeology of NTUA and P.P.C. have carried out several research projects since 1990. The conclusions of these projects for the main sources of pollution of the aquatic environment in Hellas are the following: Human activities : a) Urban and industrial wastes (solid and liquids) are disposed or discharged to the surface or groundwater bodies causing degradation of their quality (case studies of Athens Basin, Lavrio region, Atalanti plain), b) intensive use of pesticides and fertilizers for agriculture, through the process of percolation or leaching causes the deterioration of aquifers and surface water (case studies of Plolemais Basin, Korinth region, Elassona Basin, Atalanti plain, Thrapsana Basin Iraklio), c) current exploitations and old or abandoned mining sites, disturb the aquatic environment and create new hydraulic connections between clean and polluted aquifers or the sea (case studies of Lavrio region, Ptolemais Basin, Megalopoli Basin), d) over-pumping of aquifers mainly for irrigation but also in some cases for dewatering of mines, results in continues drawdown of the groundwater level and intrusion of sea (case studies of Korinth region, Athens basin, Naxos island, Nea Peramos Kavala, Marathon, Argolida Field, Atalanti plain, Achaia region, Stratoni area Chalkidiki, Gouves Iraklio). Geological Environment: a) extensive karstification of limestones that spread up all over the Greek region (33%) causes the intrusion of the sea far into the land (case studies of Lavrio region, Kefalonia island, Hymettus mountain), b) the chemical composition of the geological formations through the process of ion exchange and solubility pollute the groundwater resources (case studies of Vegoritis Basin, Katsika Chalkidiki, Florina region). The proposed measures to face these problems are : - the orthological management of the water resources - the artificial recharge of the aquifers, - proper waste management

  14. Extracellular enzyme activities of aquatic bacteria in polluted environment: 2. Amylolytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water samples were taken from Lake Drukshiai tributaries (Ricanka); Gulbinele Stream affected by urban rain sewerage from Visaginas; Gulbinele Stream into which municipal sewage from Visaginas (MS) and industrial rain sewerage from the Ignalina NPP and their mouth, and Lake Dringis. Lake Dringis, in Aukstaitija National Park, was selected as an ecosystem pattern of a weak anthropogenic influence, while Lake Drukshiai was chosen as a regularly polluted water body. Lake Drukshiai, the cooling basin of the Ignalina NPP (IRS-1.2), is being polluted with industrial and municipal sewage through its tributaries. The amylolytic activity (AA) of heterotrophic aquatic bacteria was tested. The highest total mean AA of aquatic bacteria was calculated in Lake Dringis. Here, the results were significantly higher than in Lake Drukshiai tributaries and their mouths, excepting the mouths of the Ricanka and MS. The lowest mean of AA in Lake Drukshiai was characteristic of the IRS-1.2 tributary. A comparison of the mean AA of active isolates showed that certain bacterial strains from the sites of varying degrees of pollution could be noted for a relatively high level of enzymatic activity. Thus, anthropogenic pollution exerts a negative effect on the total mean AA, although certain strains of bacteria are able to adapt to the stressful environment and remain active. (author)

  15. Antibiotic resistance profiles of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from various Greek aquatic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olga, Pappa; Apostolos, Vantarakis; Alexis, Galanis; George, Vantarakis; Athena, Mavridou

    2016-05-01

    A large number of antibiotic-resistantP. aeruginosaisolates are continuously discharged into natural water basins mainly through sewage. However, the environmental reservoirs of antibiotic resistance factors are poorly understood. In this study, the antibiotic resistance patterns of 245 isolates from various aquatic sites in Greece were analysed. Twenty-three isolates with resistance patterns cefotaxime-aztreonam-ceftazidime, cefotaxime-aztreonam-meropenem, cefotaxime-ceftazidime-meropenem, cefotaxime-ceftazidime-aztreonam-meropenem and cefotaxime-ceftazidime-cefepime-aztreonam-meropenem were screened phenotypically for the presence of extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs), while 77 isolates with various resistant phenotypes were screened for the presence of class 1 and class 2 integrase genes. The aztreonam-resistant isolates and ESBL producers were the main resistant phenotypes in all habitats tested. In 13/77 isolates class 1 integron was detected, while all tested isolates were negative for the presence of the class 2 integrase gene. CTX-M group 9 β-lactamase was present in a small number of isolates (three isolates) highlighting the emergence of ESBL genes in aquatic environments. As a conclusion, it seems that Greek water bodies could serve as a potential reservoir of resistantP. aeruginosaisolates posing threats to human and animal health. PMID:26917780

  16. The evolutionary puzzle of egg size, oxygenation and parental care in aquatic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga Goncalves, Ines; Ahnesjö, Ingrid; Kvarnemo, Charlotta

    2015-08-22

    Offspring fitness generally improves with increasing egg size. Yet, eggs of most aquatic organisms are small. A common but largely untested assumption is that larger embryos require more oxygen than they can acquire through diffusion via the egg surface, constraining egg size evolution. However, we found no detrimental effects of large egg size on embryo growth and survival under hypoxic conditions. We tested this in the broad-nosed pipefish, Syngnathus typhle, whose males provide extensive care (nourishment, osmoregulation and oxygenation) to their young in a brood pouch on their bodies. We took advantage of this species' pronounced variation in egg size, correlating positively with female size, and tested the effect of hypoxia (40% dissolved oxygen) versus fully oxygenated (100%) water on embryo size and survival of large versus small eggs after 18 days of paternal brooding. Egg size did not affect embryo survival, regardless of O2 treatment. While hypoxia affected embryo size negatively, both large and small eggs showed similar reductions in growth. Males in hypoxia ventilated more and males with large eggs swam more, but neither treatment affected their position in the water column. Overall, our results call into question the most common explanation for constrained egg size evolution in aquatic environments. PMID:26290070

  17. Evaluation and modeling of the parameters affecting fluoride toxicity level in aquatic environments by bioassay method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Shamsollahi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fluoride exists in various forms in nature and water resources. , The rising level of fluoride in water resources due to discharge of industrial effluents can cause toxicity in aquatic organisms. To prevent toxicity, it is necessary to determine maximum fluoride toxicity as well as effluent discharge limits. The aim of this study was to determine the maximum fluoride toxicity and the factors affecting fluoride toxicity to provide a model in order to determine the effluent discharge limits. Methods: Daphnia magna bioassay in the absence of confounding factors was used to determine the maximum level of fluoride toxicity. Then, bioassay was repeated in the presence of the confounding factors (hardness, temperature and exposure time to determine their effects. Results: In the absence of intervening factors, fluoride LC50 levels determined after 24, 48 and 72 hours exposure were 4.9, 46.5 and 38.7 mg/l, respectively.. Also, the influence of confounding factors on LC50 values was reported significant by Minitab software. Conclusion: Increasing the water hardness reduced fluoride toxicity, and increasing the water temperature and exposure time increased fluoride toxicity in aquatic environments. Therefore, while determining the wastewater discharge limit in terms of fluoride concentration, it is essential to take the effect of confounding factors on fluoride toxicity into account in order to prevent toxicity in the open water resources.

  18. Theoretical analysis of the cost of antagonistic activity for aquatic bacteria in oligotrophic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-von-Wobeser, Eneas; Eguiarte, Luis E; Souza, Valeria; Soberón-Chávez, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Many strains of bacteria produce antagonistic substances that restrain the growth of others, and potentially give them a competitive advantage. These substances are commonly released to the surrounding environment, involving metabolic costs in terms of energy and nutrients. The rate at which these molecules need to be produced to maintain a certain amount of them close to the producing cell before they are diluted into the environment has not been explored so far. To understand the potential cost of production of antagonistic substances in water environments, we used two different theoretical approaches. Using a probabilistic model, we determined the rate at which a cell needs to produce individual molecules in order to keep on average a single molecule in its vicinity at all times. For this minimum protection, a cell would need to invest 3.92 × 10(-22) kg s(-1) of organic matter, which is 9 orders of magnitude lower than the estimated expense for growth. Next, we used a continuous model, based on Fick's laws, to explore the production rate needed to sustain minimum inhibitory concentrations around a cell, which would provide much more protection from competitors. In this scenario, cells would need to invest 1.20 × 10(-11) kg s(-1), which is 2 orders of magnitude higher than the estimated expense for growth, and thus not sustainable. We hypothesize that the production of antimicrobial compounds by bacteria in aquatic environments lies between these two extremes. PMID:26074891

  19. Investigation of the transport of actinide-bearing soil colloids in the soil-aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium-233 particle size dependent distribution ratios for the 10 to 60 range were determined for muscatine silt loam, Burbank loamy sand, Ritzville silt loam, Fuquay sand, and Idaho sandy clay. A mathematical method for the analysis of centrifuge data was developed to determine particle size dependent distribution ratio for the 10 to 60 nm range. Comparison of the distribution ratio data for the 0 to 60 nm particle size range strongly suggests that particles in the 1 to 10 nm (8000 to 50,000 MW) range play a dominate role. Since these particles are probably humic acid polymers, future research should be focused on humic acid complexing of radionuclides. A mathematical analysis is given to demonstrate the role of humic acid complexing in the transport of radionuclides in the soil-aquatic environment

  20. Prediction of climate impacts on pesticide leaching to the aquatic environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriksen, Hans Joergen; Rosenbom, A.; van der Keur, P.; Kjaer, J.; Sonnenborg, T. [GEUS Danmark, Copenhagen (Denmark); Olesen, J.E. [Aarhus Univ., Tjele (Denmark); Nistrup Joergensen, L. [Aarhus Unv., Slagelse (Denmark); Boessing Christensen, O. [Danmarks Meteorologiske Institut (DMI), Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2013-10-01

    The report evaluates direct (precipitation, actual evapotranspiration and temperature) and indirect (crop rotations, crop management, and pesticide use) climatic change effects on pesticide-leaching to groundwater and the aquatic environment by use of MACRO and MIKE SHE model. The analysis is based on five model pesticides: low-dose herbicides, ordinary herbicides, strongly sorbing herbicides, fungicides and insecticides, and selected farm types (arable and dairy) for the variable saturated sandy soil (Jyndevad) and loamy soil (Faardrup). The evaluation has the aim at describing the implications of future climatic factors on pesticide leaching to groundwater as realistic as possible, based on realistic doses and parameters from MACRO setups from the Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme. (Author)

  1. Diatoms: a novel source for the neurotoxin BMAA in aquatic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Liying; Eriksson, Johan; Lage, Sandra; Jonasson, Sara; Shams, Shiva; Mehine, Martin; Ilag, Leopold L; Rasmussen, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or Lou Gehrig's disease is a neurological disorder linked to environmental exposure to a non-protein amino acid, β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA). The only organisms reported to be BMAA-producing, are cyanobacteria--prokaryotic organisms. In this study, we demonstrate that diatoms--eukaryotic organisms--also produce BMAA. Ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry revealed the occurrence of BMAA in six investigated axenic diatom cultures. BMAA was also detected in planktonic field samples collected on the Swedish west coast that display an overrepresentation of diatoms relative to cyanobacteria. Given the ubiquity of diatoms in aquatic environments and their central role as primary producers and the main food items of zooplankton, the use of filter and suspension feeders as livestock fodder dramatically increases the risk of human exposure to BMAA-contaminated food. PMID:24392143

  2. Presence of pesticide residues in water, sediment and biological samples taken from aquatic environments in Honduras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to detect the presence of persistent pesticides in water, sediment and biological samples taken from aquatic environments in Honduras during the period 1995-98. Additionally, the LC50 for 2 fungicides and 2 insecticides on post-larval Penaeus vannamei was determined in static water bioassays. A total of 80 water samples, 16 sediment samples and 7 biological samples (fish muscle tissue) were analyzed for detection of organochlorine and organophosphate pesticide residues. The results of sample analyses indicate a widespread contamination of Honduran continental and coastal waters with organochlorine pesticides. Most detections were of low (50 values and were therefore found to be much more toxic to the post-larval shrimp than the fungicides tridemorph and propiconazole. (author)

  3. A Study on the Evaluation Techniques of Pollutant Transport in Aquatic Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study on the numerical modeling has been performed to evaluate the characteristics of hydrodynamics and pollutant transport in aquatic environment such as river, lake, estuary and coastal areas. A EFDC among the lots of codes was selected to analyze the characteristics of code and the applications. A EFDC is a general-purpose modeling package for simulating three-dimensional flow, transport, and biogeochemical processes in surface water systems including rivers, lakes, estuaries, reservoirs, wetlands and coastal regions. The structure of the EFDC model includes four major modules: a hydrodynamic model, a water quality model, a sediment transport model, and a toxic model. This report was described the characteristics of the EFDC model and examples of application in lake, river, estuary and ocean

  4. Naphthenic acids degradation and toxicity mitigation in tailings wastewater systems and aquatic environments: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannel, Prakash R; Gan, Thian Y

    2012-01-01

    Naphthenic acids, NAs (classical formula C(n)H(2n+z)O(2), where n is the carbon numbers, z represents zero or negative even integers), found in oil sands process waters (OSPWs), are toxic to aquatic environments depending upon several factors such as pH, salinity, molecular size and chemical structure of NAs. Among various available methods, biodegradation seems to be generally the most cost-effective method for decreasing concentrations of NAs (n ≤ 21) and reducing their associated toxicity in OSPW, however the mechanism by which the biodegradation of NAs occurs are poorly understood. Ozonation is superior over biodegradation in decreasing higher molecular weight alkyl branched NAs (preferentially, n ≥ 22, -6 ≥ z ≥ -12) as well as enabling accelerated biodegradation and reducing toxicity. Photolysis (UV at 254 nm) is effective in cleaving higher molecular weight NAs into smaller fragments that will be easier for microorganisms to degrade, whereas photocatalysis can metabolize selective NAs (0 ≥ z ≥ -6) efficiently and minimize their associated toxicity. Phytoremediation is applicable for metabolizing specific NAs (O(2), O(3), O(4), and O(5) species) and minimizing their associated toxicities. Petroleum coke (PC) adsorption is effective in reducing the more structurally complex NAs (preferentially 12 ≥ n ≥ 18 and z = -10, -12) and their toxicity in OSPWs, depending upon the PC content, pH and temperature. Several factors have influence on the degradation of NAs in OSPWs and aquatic environments, which include molecular mass and chemical structure of NAs, sediment structure, temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, nutrients, and bacteria types. PMID:22217078

  5. Transmission of Vibrio cholerae is antagonized by lytic phage and entry into the aquatic environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J Nelson

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Cholera outbreaks are proposed to propagate in explosive cycles powered by hyperinfectious Vibrio cholerae and quenched by lytic vibriophage. However, studies to elucidate how these factors affect transmission are lacking because the field experiments are almost intractable. One reason for this is that V. cholerae loses the ability to culture upon transfer to pond water. This phenotype is called the active but non-culturable state (ABNC; an alternative term is viable but non-culturable because these cells maintain the capacity for metabolic activity. ABNC bacteria may serve as the environmental reservoir for outbreaks but rigorous animal studies to test this hypothesis have not been conducted. In this project, we wanted to determine the relevance of ABNC cells to transmission as well as the impact lytic phage have on V. cholerae as the bacteria enter the ABNC state. Rice-water stool that naturally harbored lytic phage or in vitro derived V. cholerae were incubated in a pond microcosm, and the culturability, infectious dose, and transcriptome were assayed over 24 h. The data show that the major contributors to infection are culturable V. cholerae and not ABNC cells. Phage did not affect colonization immediately after shedding from the patients because the phage titer was too low. However, V. cholerae failed to colonize the small intestine after 24 h of incubation in pond water-the point when the phage and ABNC cell titers were highest. The transcriptional analysis traced the transformation into the non-infectious ABNC state and supports models for the adaptation to nutrient poor aquatic environments. Phage had an undetectable impact on this adaptation. Taken together, the rise of ABNC cells and lytic phage blocked transmission. Thus, there is a fitness advantage if V. cholerae can make a rapid transfer to the next host before these negative selective pressures compound in the aquatic environment.

  6. Carbon Nanotube Integrative Sampler (CNIS) for passive sampling of nanosilver in the aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Li; Fischer, Jillian; Martin, Jonathan; Hoque, Md Ehsanul; Telgmann, Lena; Hintelmann, Holger; Metcalfe, Chris D; Yargeau, Viviane

    2016-11-01

    Nanomaterials such as nanosilver (AgNP) can be released into the aquatic environment through production, usage, and disposal. Sensitive and cost-effective methods are needed to monitor AgNPs in the environment. This work is hampered by a lack of sensitive methods to detect nanomaterials in environmental matrixes. The present study focused on the development, calibration and application of a passive sampling technique for detecting AgNPs in aquatic matrixes. A Carbon Nanotube Integrative Sampler (CNIS) was developed using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as the sorbent for accumulating AgNPs and other Ag species from water. Sampling rates were determined in the laboratory for different sampler configurations and in different aquatic matrixes. The sampler was field tested at the Experimental Lakes Area, Canada, in lake water dosed with AgNPs. For a configuration of the CNIS consisting of CNTs bound to carbon fiber (i.e. CNT veil) placed in Chemcatcher® housing, the time weighted average (TWA) concentrations of silver estimated from deployments of the sampler in lake mesocosms dosed with AgNPs were similar to the measured concentrations of "colloidal silver" (i.e. <0.22μm in size) in the water column. For a configuration of CNIS consisting of CNTs in loose powder form placed in a custom made housing that were deployed in a whole lake dosed with AgNPs, the estimated TWA concentrations of "CNIS-labile Ag" were similar to the concentrations of total silver measured in the epilimnion of the lake. However, sampling rates for the CNIS in various matrixes are relatively low (i.e. 1-20mL/day), so deployment periods of several weeks are required to detect AgNPs at environmentally relevant concentrations, which can allow biofilms to develop on the sampler and could affect the sampling rates. With further development, this novel sampler may provide a simple and sensitive method for screening for the presence of AgNPs in surface waters. PMID:27343941

  7. Social Boundaries and Secularism in the Lebanese Left

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugbølle, Sune

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the social meaning of boundaries in Lebanon through debates about secularism in and around the Lebanese Left. The aim is to elucidate the political and social meaning of ‘Left’ in a Lebanese context, and the positioning of liminal political subjectivity in a system organized......, namely, a person who expressly transgresses, subverts and challenges social boundaries and their institutional organization....

  8. Monitoring of the aquatic environment by species accumulator of pollutants: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar RAVERA

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a short review on the biomonitoring of aquatic environments by animal and plant species accumulators of toxic pollutants ("scavengers". This monitoring is based on the relationship between the pollutant concentration in the organism and that in its environment, and not on alterations produced by pollution on the biota. The latter is the basis of other types of biomonitoring, such as those based on the biotic and diversity indices and saprobic scale. The various aspects of monitoring by pollutant accumulators are illustrated; for example, the uptake and loss of pollutants, the "critical organs" and "tissues", the detoxification mechanisms and the most common factors (C.F., BAF, BSAF for establishing a connection between the pollutant concentration in the organism and that in its environment. Several examples of this monitoring on heavy metals, radioisotopes and organic micropollutants are reported. The advantages of this monitoring, the characteristics of the species to be used as bioaccumulators and some practical suggestions are listed. A close collaboration between the scientific teams working on the biomonitoring based on accumulator organisms and on the chemical monitoring is recommended from the scientific and economic point of view.

  9. Axial allometry in a neutrally buoyant environment: effects of the terrestrial-aquatic transition on vertebral scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, K E; Pierce, S E

    2016-03-01

    Ecological diversification into new environments presents new mechanical challenges for locomotion. An extreme example of this is the transition from a terrestrial to an aquatic lifestyle. Here, we examine the implications of life in a neutrally buoyant environment on adaptations of the axial skeleton to evolutionary increases in body size. On land, mammals must use their thoracolumbar vertebral column for body support against gravity and thus exhibit increasing stabilization of the trunk as body size increases. Conversely, in water, the role of the axial skeleton in body support is reduced, and, in aquatic mammals, the vertebral column functions primarily in locomotion. Therefore, we hypothesize that the allometric stabilization associated with increasing body size in terrestrial mammals will be minimized in secondarily aquatic mammals. We test this by comparing the scaling exponent (slope) of vertebral measures from 57 terrestrial species (23 felids, 34 bovids) to 23 semi-aquatic species (pinnipeds), using phylogenetically corrected regressions. Terrestrial taxa meet predictions of allometric stabilization, with posterior vertebral column (lumbar region) shortening, increased vertebral height compared to width, and shorter, more disc-shaped centra. In contrast, pinniped vertebral proportions (e.g. length, width, height) scale with isometry, and in some cases, centra even become more spool-shaped with increasing size, suggesting increased flexibility. Our results demonstrate that evolution of a secondarily aquatic lifestyle has modified the mechanical constraints associated with evolutionary increases in body size, relative to terrestrial taxa. PMID:26679743

  10. Ecological limitations on aquatic mosquito predator colonization in the urban environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, John; Keating, Joseph; Mbogo, Charles M; Kahindi, Samuel; Beier, John C

    2004-12-01

    Urban malaria cases are becoming common in Africa as more people move into cities and industrialization proceeds. While many species of Anopheles mosquitoes vector malaria in rural areas, only a few are found within cities. The success of anthropophilic species in cities, such as members of the An. gambiae complex, may be explained by limitations on colonization by predator species in urban environments. Habitats that are temporal or structurally simple have lower predator survivorship in a variety of ecosystems, but these have not been investigated previously in an urban area. Areas within and around the Kenyan coastal town of Malindi were previously sampled for the presence of standing water using a geographic sampling strategy with probability proportional to size sampling of planned well-drained, unplanned poorly-drained, planned poorly-drained, unplanned well-drained, and peri-urban locations. Standing aquatic habitats in these areas were reassessed. During monthly sampling, presence/absence of mosquitoes and predator taxa were noted, as were ecological habitat variables: structural complexity and presence of water. Lambda statistics were calculated to associate predator guilds, habitat types, location variables, and ecological variables. All predator guilds found in habitats were strongly associated with habitat type, as were the structural complexity and temporal nature of the habitats. Types of habitat were heterogeneously distributed throughout Malindi, with swimming pools as a common habitat type in planned urban areas and tire track pools a common habitat type in peri-urban areas of Malindi. Predator colonization of aquatic habitats in Malindi was strongly influenced by habitat type, and not associated with location characteristics. Ecological variables were affected by the type of habitats, which are co-associated with planning and drainage in Malindi. While habitat types are distributed heterogeneously within Malindi, habitats with low predation

  11. Investigating hypoxia in aquatic environments: diverse approaches to addressing a complex phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Friedrich

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we synthesize the new knowledge on oxygen and oxygen-related phenomena in aquatic systems, resulting from the EU-FP7 project HYPOX ("In situ monitoring of oxygen depletion in hypoxic ecosystems of coastal and open seas, and land-locked water bodies", www.hypox.net. In view of the anticipated oxygen loss in aquatic systems due to eutrophication and climate change, HYPOX was set up to improve capacities to monitor hypoxia as well as to understand its causes and consequences. Temporal dynamics and spatial patterns of hypoxia were analysed in field studies in various aquatic environments, including the Baltic Sea, the Black Sea, Scottish and Scandinavian fjords, Ionian Sea lagoons and embayments, and in Swiss lakes. Examples of episodic and rapid (hours occurrences of hypoxia as well as seasonal changes in bottom-water oxygenation in stratified systems are discussed. Geologically-driven hypoxia caused by gas seepage is demonstrated. Using novel technologies, temporal and spatial patterns of water-column oxygenation, from basin-scale seasonal patterns to meter-scale submicromolar oxygen distributions were resolved. Existing multi-decadal monitoring data were used to demonstrate the imprint of climate change and eutrophication on long-term oxygen distributions. Organic and inorganic proxies were used to extend investigations on past oxygen conditions to centennial and even longer timescales not resolved by monitoring. The effects of hypoxia on faunal communities and biogeochemical processes were also addressed in the project. An investigation of benthic fauna is presented as an example of hypoxia-devastated benthic communities that slowly recover upon a reduction in eutrophication in a system where natural and anthropogenic hypoxia overlap. Biogeochemical investigations reveal that oxygen intrusions have a strong effect on microbially-mediated redox cycling of elements. Observations and modeling studies of the sediments demonstrate the

  12. Investigating hypoxia in aquatic environments: diverse approaches to addressing a complex phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, J.; Janssen, F.; Aleynik, D.; Bange, H. W.; Boltacheva, N.; Çagatay, M. N.; Dale, A. W.; Etiope, G.; Erdem, Z.; Geraga, M.; Gilli, A.; Gomoiu, M. T.; Hall, P. O. J.; Hansson, D.; He, Y.; Holtappels, M.; Kirf, M. K.; Kononets, M.; Konovalov, S.; Lichtschlag, A.; Livingstone, D. M.; Marinaro, G.; Mazlumyan, S.; Naeher, S.; North, R. P.; Papatheodorou, G.; Pfannkuche, O.; Prien, R.; Rehder, G.; Schubert, C. J.; Soltwedel, T.; Sommer, S.; Stahl, H.; Stanev, E. V.; Teaca, A.; Tengberg, A.; Waldmann, C.; Wehrli, B.; Wenzhöfer, F.

    2014-02-01

    In this paper we provide an overview of new knowledge on oxygen depletion (hypoxia) and related phenomena in aquatic systems resulting from the EU-FP7 project HYPOX ("In situ monitoring of oxygen depletion in hypoxic ecosystems of coastal and open seas, and landlocked water bodies", http://www.hypox.net). In view of the anticipated oxygen loss in aquatic systems due to eutrophication and climate change, HYPOX was set up to improve capacities to monitor hypoxia as well as to understand its causes and consequences. Temporal dynamics and spatial patterns of hypoxia were analyzed in field studies in various aquatic environments, including the Baltic Sea, the Black Sea, Scottish and Scandinavian fjords, Ionian Sea lagoons and embayments, and Swiss lakes. Examples of episodic and rapid (hours) occurrences of hypoxia, as well as seasonal changes in bottom-water oxygenation in stratified systems, are discussed. Geologically driven hypoxia caused by gas seepage is demonstrated. Using novel technologies, temporal and spatial patterns of water-column oxygenation, from basin-scale seasonal patterns to meter-scale sub-micromolar oxygen distributions, were resolved. Existing multidecadal monitoring data were used to demonstrate the imprint of climate change and eutrophication on long-term oxygen distributions. Organic and inorganic proxies were used to extend investigations on past oxygen conditions to centennial and even longer timescales that cannot be resolved by monitoring. The effects of hypoxia on faunal communities and biogeochemical processes were also addressed in the project. An investigation of benthic fauna is presented as an example of hypoxia-devastated benthic communities that slowly recover upon a reduction in eutrophication in a system where naturally occurring hypoxia overlaps with anthropogenic hypoxia. Biogeochemical investigations reveal that oxygen intrusions have a strong effect on the microbially mediated redox cycling of elements. Observations and

  13. Distribution and culturability of the uncultivated 'AGG58 cluster' of the Bacteroidetes phylum in aquatic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Louise A; Fuller, Katherine E; Thomas, Ellen M; Turley, Carol M; Fry, John C; Weightman, Andrew J

    2004-03-01

    Members of the Bacteroidetes phylum are abundant in aquatic habitats when assessed by fluorescent in situ hybridisation and in some 16S rRNA gene libraries. In this study 16S rRNA gene clone libraries were constructed with bacterial primers that amplify Bacteroidetes sequences well (27F, 1492R) from coastal seawater near Plymouth (UK) during a phytoplankton bloom. Most of the clones (66%, 106/160) affiliated with the Bacteroidetes phylum, and of these 62% (66/106; or 41% 66/160 of the entire library) clustered with marine bacterioplankton clones env.agg58, Arctic97A-17, CF17, CF96 and CF101. This phylogenetic branch of Bacteroidetes was designated the 'AGG58 cluster', and its presence in various aquatic environments was investigated. Two pairs of AGG58-specific 16S rRNA-gene-targeted polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers were designed and successfully used to detect the cluster in DNA extracts from three UK coastal seawater sites, and from freshwater River Taff epilithon. In addition, 600 putative Bacteroidetes strains were isolated from these sites on relatively high-nutrient agar media. AGG58 cluster specific probes were used to screen the amplified 16S rRNA gene products from the isolates, but no members of the AGG58 cluster were discovered. The least specific probe hybridised with one River Taff water isolate (RW262 NCIMB 13979) which formed a monophyletic group with the genera Crocinitomix, Brumimicrobium and Cryomorpha of the family Cryomorphaceae in the Bacteroidetes phylum. RW262 probably represents the first isolate of a new genus within this family. This study provides new evidence that the uncultivated AGG58 group is abundant, globally distributed, and can be rapidly detected with the new PCR primers described. PMID:19712324

  14. Use of Aeromonas spp. as General Indicators of Antimicrobial Susceptibility among Bacteria in Aquatic Environments in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Masaru; Tagaki, Chie; Fukuda, Akira; Okubo, Torahiko; Boonla, Chanchai; Suzuki, Satoru; Seki, Kanako; Takada, Hideshige; Tamura, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobials are widely used, not only for treating human infections, but also for treatment of livestock and in fish farms. Human habitats in Southeastern Asian countries are located in close proximity to aquatic environments. As such, the human populations within these regions are at risk of exposure to antimicrobial resistant bacteria, and thereby disseminating antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs). In this study, we collected water samples from 15 sites (5 sites in Chao Phraya River, 2 sites at the mouth of Chao Phraya River, 3 sites in Ta Chin River, and 5 sites at city canals) and 12 sites (6 sites at city canals; 2 sites at chicken farms; 2 sites at pig farms; and 2 samples from sites at pig farms, which were subsequently treated at a biogas plant) in Thailand in 2013 and 2014, respectively. In total, 117 Aeromonas spp. were isolated from the water samples, and these organisms exhibited various antimicrobial susceptibility profiles. Notably, there was a significant correlation between the environmental concentration of tetracyclines and the rates of tetracycline resistance in the isolated Aeromonas spp.; however, both the concentration and rates of tetracycline resistance in samples derived from pig farms were higher than those of samples harvested from other aquatic environments. These findings suggest that the high concentrations of antimicrobials observed in these aquatic environments likely select for ARGs. Furthermore, they indicate that Aeromonas spp. comprise an effective marker for monitoring antimicrobial resistance in aquatic environments. PMID:27433156

  15. Use of Aeromonas spp. as General Indicators of Antimicrobial Susceptibility among Bacteria in Aquatic Environments in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Masaru; Tagaki, Chie; Fukuda, Akira; Okubo, Torahiko; Boonla, Chanchai; Suzuki, Satoru; Seki, Kanako; Takada, Hideshige; Tamura, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobials are widely used, not only for treating human infections, but also for treatment of livestock and in fish farms. Human habitats in Southeastern Asian countries are located in close proximity to aquatic environments. As such, the human populations within these regions are at risk of exposure to antimicrobial resistant bacteria, and thereby disseminating antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs). In this study, we collected water samples from 15 sites (5 sites in Chao Phraya River, 2 sites at the mouth of Chao Phraya River, 3 sites in Ta Chin River, and 5 sites at city canals) and 12 sites (6 sites at city canals; 2 sites at chicken farms; 2 sites at pig farms; and 2 samples from sites at pig farms, which were subsequently treated at a biogas plant) in Thailand in 2013 and 2014, respectively. In total, 117 Aeromonas spp. were isolated from the water samples, and these organisms exhibited various antimicrobial susceptibility profiles. Notably, there was a significant correlation between the environmental concentration of tetracyclines and the rates of tetracycline resistance in the isolated Aeromonas spp.; however, both the concentration and rates of tetracycline resistance in samples derived from pig farms were higher than those of samples harvested from other aquatic environments. These findings suggest that the high concentrations of antimicrobials observed in these aquatic environments likely select for ARGs. Furthermore, they indicate that Aeromonas spp. comprise an effective marker for monitoring antimicrobial resistance in aquatic environments. PMID:27433156

  16. A modelling framework for the transport, transformation and biouptake of manufactured nanoparticles in the aquatic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofts, Stephen; Keller, Virginie; Dumont, Egon; Williams, Richard; Praetorius, Antonia; von der Kammer, Frank

    2016-04-01

    The development of innovative new chemical products is a key aspect of the modern economy, yet society demands that such development is environmentally sustainable. Developing knowledge of how new classes of chemicals behave following release to the environment is key to understanding the hazards that will potentially result. Nanoparticles are a key example of a class of chemicals that have undergone a significant expansion in production and use in recent years and so there is a need to develop tools to predict their potential hazard following their deliberate or incidental release to the environment. Generalising the understanding of the environmental behaviour of manufactured nanoparticles in general is challenging, as they are chemically and physically diverse (e.g. metals, metal oxides, carbon nanotubes, cellulose, quantum dots). Furthermore, nanoparticles may be manufactured with capping agents to modify their desired behaviour in industrial applications; such agents may also influence their environmental behaviour. Also, nanoparticles may become significantly modified from their as-manufactured forms both prior to and after the point of environmental release. Tools for predicting nanoparticle behaviour and hazard need to be able to consider a wide range of release scenarios and aspects of nanoparticle behaviour in the environment (e.g. dissolution, transformation of capping agents, agglomeration and aggregation behaviour), where such behaviours are not shared by all types of nanoparticle. This implies the need for flexible, futureproofed tools capable of being updated to take new understanding of behavioural processes into account as such knowledge emerges. This presentation will introduce the NanoFASE model system, a multimedia modelling framework for the transport, transformation and biouptake of manufactured nanoparticles. The complete system will comprise atmospheric, terrestrial and aquatic compartments to allow holistic simulation of nanoparticles; this

  17. Worldwide occurrence and effects of antifouling paint booster biocides in the aquatic environment: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinou, I K; Albanis, T A

    2004-04-01

    Organic booster biocides were recently introduced as alternatives to organotin compounds in antifouling products, after restrictions imposed on the use of tributyltin (TBT) in 1987. Replacement products are generally based on copper metal oxides and organic biocides. This ban has led to an increase in alternative coating products containing the above biocides. The most commonly used biocides in antifouling paints are: Irgarol 1051, diuron, Sea-nine 211, dichlofluanid, chlorothalonil, zinc pyrithione, TCMS (2,3,3,6-tetrachloro-4-methylsulfonyl) pyridine, TCMTB [2-(thiocyanomethylthio) benzothiazole], and zineb. Since 1993, several studies have demonstrated the presence of these biocides in European coastal environment as a result of their increased use. More recently, the presence of these biocides was also revealed in waters from Japan, United States, Singapore, Australia and Bermuda. This paper reviews the currently available data on the occurrence of these biocides in the aquatic environment. Some data dealing with the environmental fate, partitioning, behaviour and risk assessment of antifouling paint booster biocides are also reported in order to discuss the detected levels of contamination. PMID:14749112

  18. Pollution pathways of pharmaceutical residues in the aquatic environment on the island of Mallorca, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Navas, Carlos; Björklund, Erland; Bak, Søren A; Hansen, Martin; Krogh, Kristine A; Maya, Fernando; Forteza, Rafael; Cerdà, Víctor

    2013-07-01

    This work determines the principal environmental pollution pathways of pharmaceuticals on the island of Mallorca (Spain). The evaluation was made on the basis of the quantification of pharmaceutical residues by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in several environmental water samples, including wastewater-treatment plant effluents, municipal solid waste landfill leachates, groundwater (GW), and marine water. An overall set of 19 pharmaceuticals has been identified in the environment of the 27 human pharmaceuticals investigated in this study. WWTP effluents are the main source of discharge of the pharmaceuticals into the aquatic environment. The data indicate that reuse of treated domestic wastewater for irrigation (which supplies some 30 % of the total water demand in Mallorca) contributes to the contamination of GW. In addition, leaching from landfills is identified as another, but minor, possible source of introduction of pharmaceuticals to GW aquifers. Finally, WWTP effluents ending in the Mediterranean Sea, primarily highly urbanized coastal areas, cause pharmaceutical residues to occur in marine water bodies. PMID:23440447

  19. Application of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in quantitative bioanalyses of organic molecules in aquatic environment and organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussy, Ugo; Li, Ke; Li, Weiming

    2016-05-01

    Analytical methods using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for the simultaneous determination of metabolites or contaminants (or both) in various tissues of aquatic organisms and in the aquatic environment have received increasing attention in the last few years. This review discusses the findings relevant to such procedures published between 2005 and 2015. The aim is to evaluate the advantages, restrictions, and performances of the procedures from sample preparation to mass spectrometry measurement. To support these discussions, a general knowledge on LC-MS/MS is also provided. PMID:26996906

  20. LADTAP-2, Organ Doses to Man and Other Biota from Aquatic Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of problem or function: LADTAP2 performs environmental dose analyses for releases of liquid effluents from light-water nuclear power plants into surface waters during routine operation. The analyses estimate radiation doses to individuals, population groups, and biota from ingestion (aquatic foods, water, and terrestrial irrigated foods) and external exposure (shoreline, swimming, and boating) pathways. The calculated doses provide information for National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) evaluations and for determining compliance with Appendix I of 10 CFR 50 (the 'ALARA' philosophy). The program consists of a hydrologic model chosen to represent mixing in the effluent impoundment system and the receiving surface waters and the exposure pathway models which estimate exposure of selected groups at various water usage locations in the environment. Two types of population doses are calculated. An ALARA analysis is performed based on exposure of people within 50 miles of the site, and a NEPA analysis is performed based on exposure of the entire U.S. population to effluents from the site. A population-dose analysis prepared in the form of a cost-benefit table presents the total-body and thyroid doses from each radionuclide released and the population doses (total-body and thyroid) per curie of each radionuclide released. 2 - Method of solution: The impoundment system is represented by one of four hydrologic models: direct release to the receiving water, linear flow with no mixing (the plug-flow model), linear flow through the impoundment with partial recirculation through the reactor (the partially mixed model), or complete mixing in the impoundment with partial recirculation through the reactor (the completely mixed model). The last three account for radiological decay during transit through the impoundment system. Optional models are available to estimate dilution in nontidal rivers and near-shore lake environments. The consequence calculation part of

  1. Experimental Design and Analysis of the Fate of Nanoparticulate Titanium Dioxide in Aquatic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Chengcheng

    The increase in the production and use of engineered nanomaterials has been considered to result in potential environmental risks and health issues. Of the commonly used nanomaterials, TiO2 has raised intensive concern due to its wide-spread application in food, drugs, cosmetics, catalysis, ultraviolet blocker, and sorbents for water treatment, etc. It is believed that TiO2 nanomaterials possess distinct transport, transfer and toxicity in the aquatic environment. This research applies the design of experiments methodology to investigate the fate of engineered TiO2 nanoparticles with various functional groups in the simulated aquatic environment. Multiple linear regression models were used to analyze the experimental fate data. The engineered TiO2 NPs with -CH3, -SH, -OH, -COOH and -SO3H functional groups were prepared by the surface silanization, and characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The surface charge, aggregation and surface chemistry of engineered TiO2 NPs were investigated by dynamic (electrophoretic) light scattering. Results obtained from the multiple linear regression model show that the pH, the ionic strength and the cation type affect the surface charge, aggregation, and adsorption capability in individual and associated forms. Moreover, the surface functional group on TiO2 NPs surface dominates the fate in the simulated aquatic environment. Especially, the zeta potential of TiO2 NPs decreased with the increase of pH value in low salt concentration, whereas SO3H-, COOH-, OH- and SH- TiO2 NPs slightly increased when pH increased. The zeta potential of TiO2 NPs also increased with the increasing salt concentration at the whole pH range and COOH-TiO2 NPs are more sensitive to the salt concentration in the zeta potential. Furthermore, the zeta potential of TiO2 NPs in solutions containing CaCl2 is higher than that in NaCl. The hydrodynamic size was little affected by the pH value or had

  2. Sulfonamide and tetracycline resistance genes in total- and culturable-bacterial assemblages in South African aquatic environments

    OpenAIRE

    Satoru eSuzuki; Mitsuko eOgo; Tatsuya eKoike; Hideshige eTakada; Brent eNewman

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) are ubiquitous in the natural environment. The introduction of effluent derived antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) into aquatic environments is of concern in the spreading of genetic risk. This study showed the prevalence of sulfonamide and tetracycline resistance genes, sul1, sul2, sul3 and tet(M), in the total bacterial assemblage and colony forming bacterial assemblage in river and estuarine water and sewage treatment plants (STP) in South Africa. There ...

  3. Sulfonamide and tetracycline resistance genes in total- and culturable-bacterial assemblages in South African aquatic environments

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Satoru; Ogo, Mitsuko; Koike, Tatsuya; Takada, Hideshige; Newman, Brent

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistant bacteria are ubiquitous in the natural environment. The introduction of effluent derived antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) into aquatic environments is of concern in the spreading of genetic risk. This study showed the prevalence of sulfonamide and tetracycline resistance genes, sul1, sul2, sul3, and tet(M), in the total bacterial assemblage and colony forming bacterial assemblage in river and estuarine water and sewage treatment plants (STP) in South Africa. There was no ...

  4. Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Annual technical report, December 30, 1992--December 29, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and by the year 2000. In December, 1992, the Tulane/Xavier CBR was awarded a five year grant to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ``Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin`` project is a broad research and education program aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Studies include defining the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The Mississippi River Basin represents a model system for analyzing and solving contamination problems that are found in aquatic systems world-wide. These research and education projects are particularly relevant to the US Department of Energy`s programs aimed at addressing aquatic pollution problems associated with DOE National Laboratories. First year funding supported seven collaborative cluster projects and twelve initiation projects. This report summarizes research results for period December 1992--December 1993.

  5. Numerical modelling of distribution the discharged heat water from thermal power plant on the aquatic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issakhov, Alibek

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents a mathematical model of distribution the discharged heat water from thermal power plant under various operational capacities on the aquatic environment. It was solved by the Navier-Stokes and temperature equations for an incompressible fluid in a stratified medium were based on the splitting method by physical parameters which approximated by the finite volume method. The numerical solution of the equation system was divided into four stages. At the first step it was assumed that the momentum transfer carried out only by convection and diffusion. While the intermediate velocity field was solved by 5-step Runge-Kutta method. At the second stage, the pressure field was solved by found the intermediate velocity field. Whereas Poisson equation for the pressure field was solved by Jacobi method. The third step assumes that the transfer was carried out only by pressure gradient. Finally the fourth step of the temperature equation was also solved as motion equations, with 5-step Runge-Kutta method. The algorithm was parallelized on high-performance computer. The obtained numerical results of three-dimensional stratified turbulent flow were compared with experimental data. What revealed qualitatively and quantitatively approximately the basic laws of hydrothermal processes occurring in the reservoir-cooler.

  6. Thresholds of toxicological concern for endocrine active substances in the aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Melanie; Daginnus, Klaus; Deviller, Genevieve; de Wolf, Watze; Dungey, Stephen; Galli, Corrado; Gourmelon, Anne; Jacobs, Miriam; Matthiessen, Peter; Micheletti, Christian; Nestmann, Earle; Pavan, Manuela; Paya-Perez, Ana; Ratte, Hans-Toni; Safford, Bob; Sokull-Klüttgen, Birgit; Stock, Frauke; Stolzenberg, Hans-Christian; Wheeler, James; Willuhn, Marc; Worth, Andrew; Comenges, Jose Manuel Zaldivar; Crane, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The threshold of toxicological concern (TTC) concept proposes that an exposure threshold value can be derived for chemicals, below which no significant risk to human health or the environment is expected. This concept goes further than setting acceptable exposure levels for individual chemicals, because it attempts to set a de minimis value for chemicals, including those of unknown toxicity, by taking the chemical's structure or mode of action (MOA) into consideration. This study examines the use of the TTC concern concept for endocrine active substances (EAS) with an estrogenic MOA. A case study formed the basis for a workshop of regulatory, industry and academic scientists held to discuss the use of the TTC in aquatic environmental risk assessment. The feasibility and acceptability, general advantages and disadvantages, and the specific issues that need to be considered when applying the TTC concept for EAS in risk assessment were addressed. Issues surrounding the statistical approaches used to derive TTCs were also discussed. This study presents discussion points and consensus findings of the workshop. PMID:19558199

  7. Research Trends in Emerging Contaminants on the Aquatic Environments of Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Miraji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuity for discovery and production of new chemicals, allied products, and uses has currently resulted into generation of recent form of contaminants known as Emerging Contaminants (ECs. Once in the aquatic environment ECs are carcinogenic and cause other threats to both human’s and animals’ health. Due to their effects this study was aimed at investigating research trends of ECs in Tanzania. Findings revealed that USA and EU countries were leading in ECs researches, little followed by Asia, South Africa, and then Zambia. Only few guidelines from USA-EPA, WHO, Canada, and Australia existed. Neither published guidelines nor regulations for ECs existed in Tanzania; rather only the occurrence of some disinfection by-products and antibiotics was, respectively, reported in Arusha and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. As these reports had a limited coverage of ECs, henceforth, these findings constitute the first-line reference materials for ECs research in Tanzania which shall be useful for future monitoring and regulation planning.

  8. Influence of humic-acid complexing on the mobility of Americium in the soil aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffusion data indicate the Am, Cm and Np migrate 1.2, 0.8, and 26 centimeters, respectively, in a thousand years. Thus, excluding mass transport by moving water or wind, actinide elements, such as Cm, Am, and Np that find their way to the soil-aquatic environment are relatively immobile. Measured diffusion coefficients, corrected for distribution between the aqueous and soil phases, tortuosity, negative absorption, and relative fluidity are in reasonable agreement with aqueous diffusion coefficients. However, agreement depends strongly on measurement method used to determine distribution ratios. Two sets of experiments with 241Am and 152Eu tracers have been done to measure distribution ratios as a function of the aqueous humic acid concentration. In the first experiments the solid phase was kaolinite and in the second series of distribution ratios were measured with Burbank sandy loam. Both of these experiments indicated that Am(III) and Eu(III) form very strong humic acid complexes with formation constants of approximately 105. Additional experiments are being done to establish the average number of Am(III)s or Eu(III)s bound to the humic acid polymer

  9. Stable hydrogen and carbon isotopic compositions of biogenic methanes from several shallow aquatic environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stable hydrogen (δD) and carbon (δ/sup 13/C) isotopic compositions of methane gas bubbles formed in the sediments of several shallow aquatic environments were measured and found to range from -3460/oo to -2630/oo and from -75.00/oo to -51.50/oo, respectively. Evaluation of the δD data with a previously published model implies that acetate dissimilation accounts for about 50% to 80% of the total methane production. δD-CH/sub 4/ and δ/sup 13/C-CH/sub 4/ are generally inversely correlated; this indicates that the observed isotopic variation is not solely due to differential methane oxidation. δ/sup 13/C-CH/sub 4/ values reported in this paper imply that methane produced in these sediments is generally substantially more /sup 13/C-depleted than the estimated average atmospheric methane source. Methane with a δD near the estimated atmospheric source average is produced in some of these sediments; this apparent agreement may be fortuitous as few relevant data are available

  10. TAME - the terrestrial-aquatic model of the environment: model definition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klos, R.A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Mueller-Lemans, H. [Tergoso AG fuer Umweltfragen, Sargans (Switzerland); Dorp, F. van [Nationale Genossenschaft fuer die Lagerung Radioaktiver Abfaelle (NAGRA), Baden (Switzerland); Gribi, P. [Colenco AG, Baden (Switzerland)

    1996-10-01

    TAME - the Terrestrial-Aquatic Model of the Environment is a new computer model for use in assessments of the radiological impact of the release of radionuclides to the biosphere, following their disposal in underground waste repositories. Based on regulatory requirements, the end-point of the calculations is the maximum annual individual dose to members of a hypothetical population group inhabiting the biosphere region. Additional mid- and end-points in the TAME calculations are dose as function of time from eleven exposure pathways, foodstuff concentrations and the distribution of radionuclides in the modelled biosphere. A complete description of the mathematical representations of the biosphere in TAME is given in this document, based on a detailed review of the underlying conceptual framework for the model. Example results are used to illustrate features of the conceptual and mathematical models. The end-point of dose is shown to be robust for the simplifying model assumptions used to define the biosphere for the example calculations. TAME comprises two distinct sub-models - one representing the transport of radionuclides in the near-surface environment and one for the calculation of dose to individual inhabitants of that biosphere. The former is the result of a detailed review of the modelling requirements for such applications and is based on a comprehensive consideration of all features, events and processes (FEPs) relevant to Swiss biospheres, both in the present-day biosphere and in potential future biosphere states. Representations of the transport processes are derived from first principles. Mass balance for water and solid material fluxes is used to determine the rates of contaminant transfer between components of the biosphere system. The calculation of doses is based on existing representations of exposure pathways and draws on experience both from Switzerland and elsewhere. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  11. Trace enrichment of metal ions in aquatic environments by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapolelo, M; Torto, N

    2004-09-01

    Sorption properties of baker's yeast cells, characterised as Saccharomyces cerevisiae were evaluated for trace enrichment of metal ions: Cd(2+), Cr(3+), Cr(6+), Cu(2+), Pb(2+) and Zn(2+) from aqueous environments. Metal concentration was determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Parameters affecting metal uptake such as solution pH, incubation time, amount of yeast biomass and effect of glucose concentration (energy source) were optimised. Further studies were carried out to evaluate the effects on metal uptake after treating yeast with glucose as well as with an organic solvent. The results showed that trace enrichment of the metals under study with yeast, depends upon the amount of yeast biomass, pH and incubation time. Treatment of yeast cells with 10-20mM glucose concentration enhanced metal uptake with exception to Cr(6+), whose metal enrichment capacity decreased at glucose concentration of 60mM. Of the investigated organic solvents THF and DMSO showed the highest and lowest capacity, respectively, to enhance metal uptake by yeast cells. Trace enrichment of metal ions from stream water, dam water, treated wastewater from a sewage plant and wastewater from an electroplating plant achieved enrichment factors (EF) varying from 1 to 98, without pre-treatment of the sample. pH adjustment further enhanced the EF for all samples. The results from these studies demonstrate that yeast is a viable trace metal enrichment media that can be used freely suspended in solution to achieve very high EF in aquatic environments. PMID:18969566

  12. TAME - the terrestrial-aquatic model of the environment: model definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TAME - the Terrestrial-Aquatic Model of the Environment is a new computer model for use in assessments of the radiological impact of the release of radionuclides to the biosphere, following their disposal in underground waste repositories. Based on regulatory requirements, the end-point of the calculations is the maximum annual individual dose to members of a hypothetical population group inhabiting the biosphere region. Additional mid- and end-points in the TAME calculations are dose as function of time from eleven exposure pathways, foodstuff concentrations and the distribution of radionuclides in the modelled biosphere. A complete description of the mathematical representations of the biosphere in TAME is given in this document, based on a detailed review of the underlying conceptual framework for the model. Example results are used to illustrate features of the conceptual and mathematical models. The end-point of dose is shown to be robust for the simplifying model assumptions used to define the biosphere for the example calculations. TAME comprises two distinct sub-models - one representing the transport of radionuclides in the near-surface environment and one for the calculation of dose to individual inhabitants of that biosphere. The former is the result of a detailed review of the modelling requirements for such applications and is based on a comprehensive consideration of all features, events and processes (FEPs) relevant to Swiss biospheres, both in the present-day biosphere and in potential future biosphere states. Representations of the transport processes are derived from first principles. Mass balance for water and solid material fluxes is used to determine the rates of contaminant transfer between components of the biosphere system. The calculation of doses is based on existing representations of exposure pathways and draws on experience both from Switzerland and elsewhere. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  13. Effect-directed analysis supporting monitoring of aquatic environments--An in-depth overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brack, Werner; Ait-Aissa, Selim; Burgess, Robert M; Busch, Wibke; Creusot, Nicolas; Di Paolo, Carolina; Escher, Beate I; Mark Hewitt, L; Hilscherova, Klara; Hollender, Juliane; Hollert, Henner; Jonker, Willem; Kool, Jeroen; Lamoree, Marja; Muschket, Matthias; Neumann, Steffen; Rostkowski, Pawel; Ruttkies, Christoph; Schollee, Jennifer; Schymanski, Emma L; Schulze, Tobias; Seiler, Thomas-Benjamin; Tindall, Andrew J; De Aragão Umbuzeiro, Gisela; Vrana, Branislav; Krauss, Martin

    2016-02-15

    Aquatic environments are often contaminated with complex mixtures of chemicals that may pose a risk to ecosystems and human health. This contamination cannot be addressed with target analysis alone but tools are required to reduce this complexity and identify those chemicals that might cause adverse effects. Effect-directed analysis (EDA) is designed to meet this challenge and faces increasing interest in water and sediment quality monitoring. Thus, the present paper summarizes current experience with the EDA approach and the tools required, and provides practical advice on their application. The paper highlights the need for proper problem formulation and gives general advice for study design. As the EDA approach is directed by toxicity, basic principles for the selection of bioassays are given as well as a comprehensive compilation of appropriate assays, including their strengths and weaknesses. A specific focus is given to strategies for sampling, extraction and bioassay dosing since they strongly impact prioritization of toxicants in EDA. Reduction of sample complexity mainly relies on fractionation procedures, which are discussed in this paper, including quality assurance and quality control. Automated combinations of fractionation, biotesting and chemical analysis using so-called hyphenated tools can enhance the throughput and might reduce the risk of artifacts in laboratory work. The key to determining the chemical structures causing effects is analytical toxicant identification. The latest approaches, tools, software and databases for target-, suspect and non-target screening as well as unknown identification are discussed together with analytical and toxicological confirmation approaches. A better understanding of optimal use and combination of EDA tools will help to design efficient and successful toxicant identification studies in the context of quality monitoring in multiply stressed environments. PMID:26779957

  14. Aquatic Environment, Housing, and Management in the Eighth Edition of the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals: Additional Considerations and Recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Mason, Timothy J.; Matthews, Monte

    2012-01-01

    The eighth edition of the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals recognizes the widespread use of aquatic and semiaquatic research animals by including, among other references, an entire section on aquatic animals in its chapter on environment, housing, and management. Recognizing the large number of aquatic and semiaquatic species used in research and the inherent diversity in animal needs, the Guide refers the reader to texts and journal reviews for specific recommendations and su...

  15. Origin, causes and effects of increased nitrite concentrations in aquatic environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Philips, S.; Laanbroek, H.J.; Verstraete, W.

    2002-01-01

    Literature frequently mentions increased nitrite concentrations along with its inhibitory effect towards bacteria and aquatic life. Nitrite accumulation has been studied for decades, and although numerous causal factors have already been commented on in literature, the mechanism of nitrite accumulat

  16. IMPLICATIONS TO THE AQUATIC ENVIRONMENT OF POLYNUCLEAR AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS LIBERATED FROM NORTHERN GREAT PLAINS COAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of leaching processes upon Western Great Plains coal was investigated to ascertain the potential impact of the organic components on aquatic organisms. Acute and chronic toxicity testing of coal leachate indicated no lipophilic fraction containing polynuclear aromatic...

  17. Use of Aeromonas spp. as general indicators of antimicrobial susceptibility among bacteria in aquatic environments in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Masaru eUsui; Chie eTagaki; Akira eFukuda; Torahiko eOkubo; Chanchai eBoonla; Satoru eSuzuki; Kanako eSeki; Hideshige eTakada; Yutaka eTamura

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobials are widely used, not only for treating human infections, but also for treatment of livestock and in fish farms. Human habitats in Southeastern Asian countries are located in close proximity to aquatic environments. As such, the human populations within these regions are at risk of exposure to antimicrobial resistant bacteria (ARB), and thereby disseminating antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs). In this study, we collected water samples from 15 sites (5 sites in Chao Phraya Riv...

  18. Long-Term Sorption of Metals Is Similar among Plastic Types: Implications for Plastic Debris in Aquatic Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Rochman, Chelsea M.; Hentschel, Brian T.; Teh, Swee J.

    2014-01-01

    Concerns regarding plastic debris and its ability to accumulate large concentrations of priority pollutants in the aquatic environment led us to quantify relationships between different types of mass-produced plastic and metals in seawater. At three locations in San Diego Bay, we measured the accumulation of nine targeted metals (aluminum, chromium, manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, zinc, cadmium and lead) sampling at 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months, to five plastic types: polyethylene terephthalate ...

  19. Use of Quantitative Real-Time PCR for Direct Detection of Serratia marcescens in Marine and Other Aquatic Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Joyner, Jessica; Wanless, David; Sinigalliano, Christopher D.; Erin K Lipp

    2014-01-01

    Serratia marcescens is the etiological agent of acroporid serratiosis, a distinct form of white pox disease in the threatened coral Acropora palmata. The pathogen is commonly found in untreated human waste in the Florida Keys, which may contaminate both nearshore and offshore waters. Currently there is no direct method for detection of this bacterium in the aquatic or reef environment, and culture-based techniques may underestimate its abundance in marine waters. A quantitative real-time PCR ...

  20. Preliminary studies of quality assessment of aquatic environments from Cluj suburban areas, based on some invertebrates bioindicators and chemical indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Gheorghe Stan; Laurenţiu C. Stoian; A. Bianca Badea; Andrea Gagyi-Palffy

    2010-01-01

    Systematic categories of invertebrates bioindicators correlated with some chemical parameters,were an effective way to characterize the quality of lotic (Someş River) and lentic (Lake Gilău) aquatic environment from Cluj-Napoca area. Invertebrate fauna was represented by species belonging to the following dominant systematic categories: Nematoda, Annelida, Crustacea and Insecta. This paper containsalso some preliminary data on the bioindicators species belonging to Protozoa phylum. Dominant g...

  1. The Effects of Dissolved Organic Matter on Pollutant Removal and Formation in Aquatic Environment: From Stormwater to Drinking Water

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, Meng-Horng

    2012-01-01

    Hydrophobic organic pollutants (HOPs), such as polyaromatic hydrocarbons primarily from automobile exhausts and dissolved organic matter (DOM) are ubiquitous in the aquatic environment. The association between DOM and HOPs as a bound interaction of DOM-HOPs minimizes the bioavailability of free HOPs and their potential health effects. In addition, DOM is also the precursor of disinfection by-products involving the disinfection treatment processes.It is very important to understand the relat...

  2. Chemical calibration, performance, validation and applications of the polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) in aquatic environments

    OpenAIRE

    Morin, N.; Miège, C.; Coquery, M.; Randon, J.

    2012-01-01

    POCIS (Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Sampler) is a relatively recent integrative sampler developed to trap hydrophilic organic micropollutants in aquatic environments. Nevertheless, at present, there is no review dealing specifically with this tool. The aim of this paper was to compile information from numerous references based on POCIS in order to discuss on the evaluation of time-weighted average concentrations (calibration methods, sampling rates, performance and reference compounds&#...

  3. Cosmet'eau -Changes in the personal care product consumption practices: from whistle-blowers to impacts on aquatic environments

    OpenAIRE

    Bressy, Adèle; Carré, Catherine; Caupos, Émilie; De Gouvello, Bernard; Deroubaix, José-Frédéric; Deutsch, Jean-Claude; Mailler, Romain; Marconi, Anthony; Neveu, Pascale; Paulic, Laurent; Pichon, Sébastien; Rocher, Vincent; Severin, Irina; SOYER, Mathilde; Moilleron, Régis

    2016-01-01

    International audience The Cosmet'eau project (2015-2018) investigates the " changes in the personal care product (PCP) consumption practices: from whistle-blowers to impacts on aquatic environments. " In this project, the example of PCPs will be used to understand how public health concerns related to micropollutants can be addressed by public authorities – including local authorities –, industries and consumers. The project aims to characterize the possible changes in PCP consumption pra...

  4. Hydrology of Lebanese catchments in the Mediterranean context

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad, Merheb

    2015-01-01

    Lebanon is a small mountainous country with a typical Mediterranean climate and a high spatial variability of precipitation with a substantial amount occurring as snow. Moreover, the majority of Lebanese terrains are karstic. It is a heavily urbanized country with increasing anthropogenic pressure on water resources. Furthermore, the Lebanese catchments are poorly-gauged due mainly to a large gap of data (1975 - 2000) caused by the civil war (1975 - 1990). However, previous studies on regiona...

  5. Determination of Primary Spectral Bands for Remote Sensing of Aquatic Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MingXia He

    2007-12-01

    the spectral curve, and thus maximizes the potential of accurately deriving properties of the water column and/or bottom of various aquatic environments with a multi-band sensor.

  6. Impact on the aquatic environment of hydro-peaking in hydroelectric plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are a number of types of hydroelectric installations on French rivers. Some of these intermittently turbine water stored in dammed reservoirs, in order to use available reserves at the most opportune moment for power generation. These plants, run under 'hydro-peaking' management procedures, cause variations in discharge in river sections downstream of the restitution, on a daily or weekly scale. To answer questions concerning the impact of such variations in discharge on the aquatic environment, EDF launched a research program aimed at describing and better understanding the physical and biological phenomena related to hydro-peaking and assessing the possible impact of this type of plant management on French streams. Seven sites subjects to hydro-peaking were studied on rivers with mean flow rates lower than 20 m3/s (which corresponds to over 65 % of EDF hydro-peaking sites). Four themes in particular were examined: hydraulic characterization of hydro-peaking, modifications in thermal regime and water quality, response of benthic invertebrates and response of fish populations to hydro-peaking. For fish as well as for invertebrates, the role of the base discharge - in the absence of peaking flow - and that of the morphology of the river bed (and, in particular, the presence of shelter for fish) during periods of strong discharge were clearly highlighted. Impact assessment requires a precise diagnosis of the state of biocenoses. To carry out such a diagnosis, one must reason in terms of species, life phase (particularly the most sensitive phases) and population structure as well as the type of stream and the faunizone involved. A risk assessment is possible by means of simultaneous study of the morphology of the river bed and the response of the signal generated by hydro-peaking in terms of hydrology and physical characteristics downstream of the restitution. (authors)

  7. Interaction of mining activities and aquatic environment: A review from Greek mine sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasileiou, Eleni; Kallioras, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    In Greece a significant amount of mineral and ore deposits have been recorded accompanied by large industrial interest and a long mining history. Today many active and/or abandoned mine sites are scattered within the country; while mining activities take place in different sites for exploiting various deposits (clay, limestone, slate, gypsum, kaolin, mixed sulphide ores (lead, zinc, olivine, pozzolan, quartz lignite, nickel, magnesite, aluminum, bauxite, gold, marbles etc). The most prominent recent ones are: (i) the lignite exploitation that is extended in the area of Ptolemais (Western Macedonia) and Megalopolis (Central Peloponnese); and (ii) the major bauxite deposits located in central Greece within the Parnassos-Ghiona geotectonic zone and on Euboea Island. In the latter area, significant ores of magnesite were exploited and mixed sulphide ores. Centuries of intensive mining exploitation and metallurgical treatment of lead-silver deposits in Greece, have also resulted in significant abandoned sites, such as the one in Lavrion. Mining activities in Lavrio, were initiated in ancient times and continued until the 1980s, resulting in the production of significant waste stockpiles deposited in the area, crucial for the local water resources. Ιn many mining sites, environmental pressures are also recorded after the mine closure to the aquatic environment, as the surface waters flow through waste dump areas and contaminated soils. This paper aims to the geospatial visualization of the mining activities in Greece, in connection to their negative (surface- and/or ground-water pollution; overpumping due to extensive dewatering practices) or positive (enhanced groundwater recharge; pit lakes, improvement of water budget in the catchment scale) impacts on local water resources.

  8. Occurrence and fate of nitrification and urease inhibitors in the aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheurer, Marco; Brauch, Heinz-Jürgen; Schmidt, Carsten K; Sacher, Frank

    2016-08-10

    Nitrification and urease inhibitors (NUIs) decelerate the bacterial oxidation of nitrogen species by suppressing the activity of soil microorganisms. Thus, nitrogen losses can be limited and the efficiency of nitrogen fertilizers can be increased. After application NUI transfers to surface water may occur through leaching or surface run-off. In order to assess the occurrence of nitrification and urease inhibitors in the aquatic environment a multi-analyte high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method was developed. 1H-1,2,4-Triazole and dicyandiamide (DCD) were detected for the first time in German surface waters. Only at a few sites 1H-1,2,4-triazole has been episodically detected with concentrations up to the μg L(-1)-range. DCD was ubiquitously present in German surface waters. An industrial site was identified as the point source of DCD being responsible for exceptionally high DCD concentrations of up to 7.2 mg L(-1) in close proximity to the point of discharge. Both compounds were also detected in at least one wastewater treatment plant effluent, but their concentrations in surface waters did not correlate with those of typical markers for domestic wastewater. Other NUIs were not detected in any of the samples. Laboratory-scale batch tests proved that 1H-1,2,4-triazole and DCD are not readily biodegradable, are not prone to hydrolysis and do not tend to adsorb onto soil particles. Ozonation and activated carbon filtration proved to be ineffective for their removal. PMID:27058057

  9. Occurrence and solid-liquid partition of sulfonated naphthalene-formaldehyde condensates in the aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Frank T; Merklinger, Michael; Wenz, Michael; Brauch, Heinz-J; Lehmann, Markus; Pinter, Istvan

    2005-03-15

    Sulfonated naphthalene-formaldehyde condensates (SNFC) are high production volume chemicals used in a variety of applications, for example, as concrete plasticizers, tanning agents, or dye dispersants. They enter the aquatic environment primarily by the wastewater path. The occurrence and fate of the monomers, which are different isomers of mono- and disulfonated naphthalene, was intensively investigated in previous studies. However, the environmental fate of the persistent higher molecular SNFC is so far widely unknown. This paper describes an ultrasonic extraction under alkaline conditions, followed by ion-pair HPLC with fluorescence detection for the analysis of SNFC oligomers from solid environmental matrixes such as sewage sludge, suspended solids, and river sediments. Limits of quantification of about 0.1 mg kg-1 d.m. were well below the measured concentrations in environmental samples. SNFC were adsorbed to suspended solids and river sediments in three major German rivers (Rhine, Neckar, and Danube) in concentrations typically up to several mg kg(-1) d.m. A total content of about 4 g kg(-1) d.m. was measured in a sewage sludge of a municipal wastewater treatment plant, which receives wastewater from a textile dyeing plant. Furthermore, the first quantitative field data on the partition of SNFC and their monomers between the aqueous phase and solid environmental compartments are presented. Solid-liquid partition coefficients (Kd) of oligomers with a chain-length ranging from three to six naphthalenesulfonate units were derived from the analysis of corresponding wastewater and sewage sludge samples and from suspended solids and river water samples, respectively. Determined Kd values were in the range from 10(2) to 10(4) L kg(-1). PMID:15819205

  10. Tulane/Xavier University Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Quarterly progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This progress report covers activities for the period January 1 - March 31, 1995 on project concerning 'Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin.' The following activities are each summarized by bullets denoting significant experiments/findings: biotic and abiotic studies on the biological fate, transport and ecotoxicity of toxic and hazardous waste in the Mississippi River Basin; assessment of mechanisms of metal-induced reproductive toxicity in quatic species as a biomarker of exposure; hazardous wastes in aquatic environments: biological uptake and metabolism studies; ecological sentinels of aquatic contamination in the lower Mississippi River system; bioremediation of selected contaminants in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin; a sensitive rapid on-sit immunoassay for heavy metal contamination; pore-level flow, transport, agglomeration and reaction kinetics of microorganism; biomarkers of exposure and ecotoxicity in the Mississippi River Basin; natural and active chemical remediation of toxic metals, organics and radionuclides in the aquatic environment; expert geographical information systems for assessing hazardous wastes in aquatic environments; enhancement of environmental education; and a number of just initiated projects including fate and transport of contaminants in aquatic environments; photocatalytic remediation; radionuclide fate and modeling from Chernobyl

  11. Tulane/Xavier University Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Quarterly progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    This progress report covers activities for the period January 1 - March 31, 1995 on project concerning `Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin.` The following activities are each summarized by bullets denoting significant experiments/findings: biotic and abiotic studies on the biological fate, transport and ecotoxicity of toxic and hazardous waste in the Mississippi River Basin; assessment of mechanisms of metal-induced reproductive toxicity in quatic species as a biomarker of exposure; hazardous wastes in aquatic environments: biological uptake and metabolism studies; ecological sentinels of aquatic contamination in the lower Mississippi River system; bioremediation of selected contaminants in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin; a sensitive rapid on-sit immunoassay for heavy metal contamination; pore-level flow, transport, agglomeration and reaction kinetics of microorganism; biomarkers of exposure and ecotoxicity in the Mississippi River Basin; natural and active chemical remediation of toxic metals, organics and radionuclides in the aquatic environment; expert geographical information systems for assessing hazardous wastes in aquatic environments; enhancement of environmental education; and a number of just initiated projects including fate and transport of contaminants in aquatic environments; photocatalytic remediation; radionuclide fate and modeling from Chernobyl.

  12. Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Annual technical report, 30 December 1992--29 December 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and beyond the year 2000. In 1989, the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR) was established as the umbrella organization which coordinates environmental research at both universities. In December, 1992, the Tulane/Xavier DBR was awarded a five year grant to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ''Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin'' project is a broad research and education program aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Studies include defining the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The Mississippi River Basin represents a model system for analyzing and solving contamination problems that are found in aquatic systems world-wide. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases

  13. Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Annual technical report, 30 December 1992--29 December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and beyond the year 2000. In 1989, the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR) was established as the umbrella organization which coordinates environmental research at both universities. In December, 1992, the Tulane/Xavier DBR was awarded a five year grant to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ``Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin`` project is a broad research and education program aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Studies include defining the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The Mississippi River Basin represents a model system for analyzing and solving contamination problems that are found in aquatic systems world-wide. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  14. Detection and identification of free-living amoeba from aquatic environment in different seasons in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, K.; Hsu, B.; Tsai, H.; Huang, P.; Tsai, J.; Kao, P.; Huang, K.; Chen, J.

    2013-12-01

    Free-living amoeba includes Acanthamoeba and Naegleria, which are widely distributed in water and soil. Human infection with free-living amoeba leads to serious illness, even lethal. For example, central nervous system infection will cause amoebic meningoencephalitis, and infections will cause amoebic keratitis. The presence of free-living amoeba in environment water can be used as a water quality indicator in ecosystem assessment. In Taiwan, reservoirs are indispensable because of the water source are limited by the steep terrain and the short river flow. Therefore, we need to pay more attention in the quality control of reservoirs water. The aims of this study are to investigate the presence of free-living amoeba in Taiwan reservoirs, and to compare the differences among seasons. At last, the identification and genotyping of Acanthamoeba and Naegleria are investigated. In this study, we use polymerase chain reaction with specific primers to analyze the presence of free-living amoeba in aquatic environment. We collected total 60 samples from reservoirs in Taiwan. The water samples are divided into two parts for both direct concentration method and culture method. The results show the different detection rates among seasons. For Acanthamoeba, the detection rates were 28.3% (17 of 60 water samples), 21.7% (13 of 60 water samples) and 8.3% (5 of 60 water samples) in autumn, winter and spring, respectively. For Naegleria, the detection rates were 6.7% (4 of 60 water samples), 0% (0 of 60 water samples) and 0% (0 of 60 water samples) were detected positive in autumn, winter and spring, respectively. Sequence analysis showed that the major genotypes in Acanthamoeba were T3, T4, T10 and T11 in autumn, T2, T4 and T10 in winter, T4 in spring. Due to the presences of Acanthamoeba and Naegleria in reservoirs, we should pay more attention in water quality monitoring to prevent the potential risks of diseases. Keywords: free-living amoeba, Acanthamoeba, Naegleria, polymerase

  15. Orientalism Now: Lebanese History, Identity and Alterity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwan Anthony Nader

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this essay we apply Edward Said’s theory of Orientalism to a study of Lebanese culture and identity. The starting point is pedagogical, the intellectual license assumed by western thinkers in constructing, interpreting and articulating the history of the East. However, does this theory help us to understand the crisis of identity that has been the source of so much conflict in Lebanon in the past? What we contend is that though undeniably Said’s Orientalism has generated arguments and counterarguments, it remains, as regards the history of Lebanon, a reductive concept that simplifies the difference between European outsider and Eastern “other”. Rather, it is necessary to take into account what in contemporary sociological terms is a far more complex encounter between Christians, Muslims and Jews. Geographically, the physical landscape encompasses division and even inaccessibility. This cultural palimpsest resists homogeneity: Maronites, for example, the most prominent Christian sect, have since the twelfth century looked to Rome for spiritual guidance; Sunnis and Shiites assert their own denominational allegiances; and Jews, though their presence has been almost completely eliminated, their identity remains evident in the electoral registers, and emblematised in the empty places of worship.Our modus operandi is to adopt an ontological and epistemological approach in the study of Orientalism, while, at the same time, exploring the realities of sectarian divisions in Lebanon, which determine how people, in the formation of identity, respond to and interact with their immediate surroundings. Bearing in mind the inherent religious differences that divide the Lebanese, where then is otherness to be located? Arguably, the ideological fissures that exist between them have allowed outsiders to penetrate their culture and to monopolise their knowledge.  

  16. Detection of endocrine active substances in the aquatic environment in southern Taiwan using bioassays and LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuang-Yu; Chou, Pei-Hsin

    2016-06-01

    Endocrine active substances, including naturally occurring hormones and various synthetic chemicals have received much concern owing to their endocrine disrupting potencies. It is essential to monitor their environmental occurrence since these compounds may pose potential threats to biota and human health. In this study, yeast-based reporter assays were carried out to investigate the presence of (anti-)androgenic, (anti-)estrogenic, and (anti-)thyroid compounds in the aquatic environment in southern Taiwan. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was also used to measure the environmental concentrations of selected endocrine active substances for assessing potential ecological risks and characterizing contributions to the endocrine disrupting activities. Bioassay results showed that anti-androgenic (ND-7489 μg L(-1) flutamide equivalent), estrogenic (ND-347 ng L(-1) 17β-estradiol equivalent), and anti-thyroid activities were detected in the dissolved and particulate phases of river water samples, while anti-estrogenic activities (ND-10 μg L(-1) 4-hydroxytamoxifen equivalent) were less often found. LC-MS/MS analysis revealed that anti-androgenic and estrogenic contaminants, such as bisphenol A, triclosan, and estrone were frequently detected in Taiwanese rivers. In addition, their risk quotient values were often higher than 1, suggesting that they may pose an ecological risk to the aquatic biota. Further identification of unknown anti-androgenic and estrogenic contaminants in Taiwanese rivers may be necessary to protect Taiwan's aquatic environment. PMID:26971174

  17. Fate of engineered cerium oxide nanoparticles in an aquatic environment and their toxicity toward 14 ciliated protist species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Pu, Zhichao; Du, Songyan; Chen, Yongsheng; Jiang, Lin

    2016-05-01

    The potential environmental impacts of engineered cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs) on aquatic organisms have remained largely unknown. Therefore, the laboratory study featured herein was performed to determine the fate of CeO2 NPs in an aquatic environment and their toxicity towards 14 different ciliated protist species at a specified population level. An investigation of 48 h aggregation kinetics in the Dryl's solution showed the CeO2 NPs to be relatively stable. The pH values in three test medium were too far away from PZC, which explained the stability of CeO2 NPs. CeO2 NPs generally elicited more toxicity with increasing NP concentration, following certain dose-response relationships. Nano-CeO2 resulted in greater toxicity in a particle state than when added as bulk material. LC50 values showed a negative correlation with the surface-to-volume ratio for these protists, suggesting that surface adsorption of CeO2 NPs might contribute to the observed toxicity. Additionally, acute toxic responses of 14 ciliated protist species to CeO2 NPs were not significantly phylogenetically conserved. The results of these observations provide a better insight into the potential risks of CeO2 NPs in an aquatic environment. PMID:26986089

  18. Influence of pH on the survival of Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides populations living in aquatic environments highly contaminated with chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, María; Bartolomé, M Carmen; Sánchez-Fortún, Sebastián

    2013-12-01

    The accommodation of photosynthetic organisms to adverse conditions, such as pH changes in the aquatic environment, and their response to aquatic pollutants is essential to develop future biosensors. The present study reports the ability of both Cr(VI)-sensitive and tolerant Dyctiosphaerium chlorelloides strains to live in aqueous solutions highly contaminated with hexavalent chromium under varying ranges of pH, by the determination of chromium toxic effects on these strains. Studies of cell growth, photosynthetic quantum yield and gross photosynthesis rate show that both D. chlorelloides strains are able to survive in alkaline and moderately acidified (pH 4.25) aquatic environments. Below this pH value cell populations from both strains exposed for short periods of time to Cr(VI) showed alterations in the three parameters studied. There were no significant differences comparing the response of both strains at pH change in the culture medium. However, Cr(VI)-tolerant strain exhibits a better fit to maintain cell growth than Cr(VI)-sensitive strain when both were subjected to pH 4.25 in the culture medium. The absence of significant differences in photosynthetic activity results for both strains suggests that the lower sensitivity exhibited by Cr(VI)-tolerant strain would be due to cellular morphological changes rather than changes in cellular activity. PMID:24125866

  19. Environmental Parasitology. Interactions between parasites and pollutants in the aquatic environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sures B.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been an increasing number of papers showing how parasitism and pollution can interact with each other in aquatic organisms. Among the variety of investigated aspects especially the combined effects of pollution and simultaneous infection on the health of aquatic hosts (molluscs, crustaceans, fish, mammals is of considerable interest. Effects of pollution on the occurrence and distribution of parasites is another interesting field of “Environmental Parasitology” attracting increasing attention. This mini-review presents some promising examples of interdisciplinary studies paying attention to the fact that under natural conditions no organism will only be affected by either parasites or pollution.

  20. Biodegradation and anticholinesrerase activity of methyl isocyanate in the aquatic environment of Bhopal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SenGupta, R.; Sarkar, A.; Kureishy, T.W.

    at the aquatic fate of MIC and acetylcholinesterase (ACHE) inhibition in aquatic living beings. There are two lakes at Bhopal, one of them, the Upper Lake, is the source of water supply to the city and is quite some distance from the Union Carbide factory..., the source of pollution (Fig. 1). It is also the recipient of sewage from the city. The other lake, the Lower Lake, is very close to the factory, smaller in area and is completely eutrophic. The MIC-affected area of Bhopal is shown in Fig. 1. This report...

  1. Hazardous materials in Aquatic environments of the Mississippi River basin. Quarterly project status report, 1 January 1994--30 March 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelghani, A.

    1994-06-01

    Projects associated with this grant for studying hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin are reviewed and goals, progress and research results are discussed. New, one-year initiation projects are described briefly.

  2. Cosmet'eau-Changes in the personal care product consumption practices: from whistle-blowers to impacts on aquatic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressy, Adèle; Carré, Catherine; Caupos, Émilie; de Gouvello, Bernard; Deroubaix, José-Frédéric; Deutsch, Jean-Claude; Mailler, Romain; Marconi, Anthony; Neveu, Pascale; Paulic, Laurent; Pichon, Sébastien; Rocher, Vincent; Severin, Irina; Soyer, Mathilde; Moilleron, Régis

    2016-07-01

    The Cosmet'eau project (2015-2018) investigates the "changes in the personal care product (PCP) consumption practices: from whistle-blowers to impacts on aquatic environments." In this project, the example of PCPs will be used to understand how public health concerns related to micropollutants can be addressed by public authorities-including local authorities, industries, and consumers. The project aims to characterize the possible changes in PCP consumption practices and to evaluate the impact of their implementation on aquatic contamination. Our goals are to study the whistle-blowers, the risk perception of consumers linked with their practices, and the contamination in parabens and their substitutes, triclosan, and triclocarban from wastewater to surface water. The project investigates the following potential solutions: modifications of industrial formulation or changes in consumption practices. The final purpose is to provide policy instruments for local authorities aiming at building effective strategies to fight against micropollutants in receiving waters. PMID:27179812

  3. Management of contaminated aquatic environment with implementation of multi criteria decision analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Problems of using the multi criteria analysis methods (MAM) to management of contaminated aquatic territories are considered. The MAM review is presented. Two practical problems of ranking the proposed measured for management of the contaminated bottom sediments are investigated with application of different MAM

  4. Spatial and temporal distribution of free-living protozoa in aquatic environments of a Brazilian semi-arid region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luisa Quinino de Medeiros

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Free-living protozoa organisms are distributed in aquatic environments and vary widely in both qualitative and quantitative terms. The unique ecological functions they exhibit in their habitats help to maintain the dynamic balance of these environments. Despite their wide range and abundance, studies on geographical distribution and ecology, when compared to other groups, are still scarce. This study aimed to identify and record the occurrence of free-living protozoa at three points in Piancó-Piranhas-Açu basin, in a semi-arid area of Rio Grande do Norte (RN state, and to relate the occurrence of taxa with variations in chlorophyll a, pH and temperature in the environments. Samples were collected in the Armando Ribeiro Gonçalves Dam, from two lentic environments upstream and a lotic ecosystem downstream. Sixty-five taxa of free-living protozoa were found. The Student's t-test showed significant inter-variable differences (p <0.05. Similar protozoan species were recorded under different degrees of trophic status according to chlorophyll a concentrations, suggesting the organisms identified are not ideal for indicating trophic level. We hypothesize that food availability, the influence of lentic and lotic systems and the presence of aquatic macrophytes influenced protozoan dynamics during the study period.

  5. Occurrence of xenobiotic ligands for retinoid X receptors and thyroid hormone receptors in the aquatic environment of Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Xenobiotic RXR agonists and antagonists were found in river systems in Taiwan. • Potential TR antagonists were mainly detected in water extracts. • Samples collected near the river mouths exhibited high RXR disrupting activity. • RXR/TR antagonist activity in water became stronger after HPLC fractionation. • Bioassays are useful tools to investigate xenobiotic ligands for nuclear receptors. - Abstract: Various synthetic compounds are frequently discharged into the environment via human activities. Among them, certain contaminants may disrupt normal physiological functions of wildlife and humans via interactions with nuclear receptors. To protect human health and the environment, it is important to detect environmental ligands for human nuclear receptors. In this study, yeast-based reporter gene assays were used to investigate the occurrence of xenobiotic ligands for retinoid X receptors (RXR) and thyroid hormone receptors (TR) in the aquatic environment of Taiwan. Experimental results revealed that RXR agonist/antagonist activity was detected in river water and sediment samples. In particular, high RXR agonist/antagonist activity was found in the samples collected near river mouths. Additionally, few samples also elicited significant TR antagonist activity. Our findings show that the aquatic environment of Taiwan was contaminated with RXR and TR ligands. Further study is necessary to identify these xenobiotic RXR and TR agonists and antagonists

  6. The Lebanese Brevet Professionnel: Resurgence of a Lower Secondary Vocational Track

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaardingerbroek, Barend; Jaber, Lama Ziad; El-Masri, Yasmine Hachem

    2008-01-01

    The Lebanese Brevet Professionnel (BP) is an occupationally-specific vocational qualification at lower secondary level. Despite being on the margins of Lebanese education, the BP has been showing signs of a resurgence over the past few years. This paper discusses the structure and role of the BP in the context of the Lebanese education system and…

  7. Fabrication of nano-mosquitocides using chitosan from crab shells: Impact on non-target organisms in the aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugan, Kadarkarai; Anitha, Jaganathan; Dinesh, Devakumar; Suresh, Udaiyan; Rajaganesh, Rajapandian; Chandramohan, Balamurugan; Subramaniam, Jayapal; Paulpandi, Manickam; Vadivalagan, Chitravel; Amuthavalli, Pandiyan; Wang, Lan; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou; Wei, Hui; Alsalhi, Mohamad Saleh; Devanesan, Sandhanasamy; Kumar, Suresh; Pugazhendy, Kannaiyan; Higuchi, Akon; Nicoletti, Marcello; Benelli, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    Mosquitoes are arthropods of huge medical and veterinary relevance, since they vector pathogens and parasites of public health importance, including malaria, dengue and Zika virus. Currently, nanotechnology is considered a potential eco-friendly approach in mosquito control research. We proposed a novel method of biofabrication of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) using chitosan (Ch) from crab shells. Ch-AgNP nanocomposite was characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, FTIR, SEM, EDX and XRD. Ch-AgNP were tested against larvae and pupae of the malaria vector Anopheles stephensi obtaining LC50 ranging from 3.18 ppm (I) to 6.54 ppm (pupae). The antibacterial properties of Ch-AgNP were proved against Bacillus subtilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Salmonella typhi, while no growth inhibition was reported in assays conducted on Proteus vulgaris. Concerning non-target effects, in standard laboratory considtions the predation efficiency of Danio rerio zebrafishes was 68.8% and 61.6% against I and II instar larvae of A. stephensi, respectively. In a Ch-AgNP-contaminated environment, fish predation was boosted to 89.5% and 77.3%, respectively. Quantitative analysis of antioxidant enzymes SOD, CAT and LPO from hepatopancreas of fresh water crabs Paratelphusa hydrodromous exposed for 16 days to a Ch-AgNP-contaminated aquatic environment were conducted. Notably, deleterious effects of Ch-AgNP contaminating aquatic enviroment on the non-target crab P. hydrodromous were observed, particularly when doses higher than 8-10ppm are tested. Overall, this research highlights the potential of Ch-AGNP for the development of newer control tools against young instar populations of malaria mosquitoes, also highlighting some risks concerned the employ of nanoparticles in aquatic environments. PMID:27344400

  8. Evaluation of removal efficiency of 2-chlorophenol in aquatic environments by modified fly ash

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Malakootian; Alireza Mesdaghinia; Shima Rezaei

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chlorophenols are classified as priority toxic pollutants. These acidic organic compounds present a serious potential hazard for human health and aquatic life. Chlorophenols accumulate in water, soil and air due to high stability, and impart an unpleasant taste and odor to drinking water and can exert negative effects on different biological processes. Among the different methods of removal, adsorption process by low price adsorbents, such as fly ash (FA) is common. Therefore, in ...

  9. An assessment of aquatic radiation pathways in Ireland, 2008 Environment Report RL 16/08

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides an assessment of aquatic radiation exposure pathways in Ireland relating to anthropogenic radioactivity in the Irish Sea. It comprises the results of a habits survey undertaken on the north east coast of Ireland; a dose assessment using the habits survey data; 2007 monitoring data provided by the RPII; and recommendations for changes to the 2007 east coast of Ireland marine monitoring programme conducted by the RPII

  10. Protein Method for Investigating Mercuric Reductase Gene Expression in Aquatic Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Ogunseitan, O A

    1998-01-01

    A colorimetric assay for NADPH-dependent, mercuric ion-specific oxidoreductase activity was developed to facilitate the investigation of mercuric reductase gene expression in polluted aquatic ecosystems. Protein molecules extracted directly from unseeded freshwater and samples seeded with Pseudomonas aeruginosa PU21(Rip64) were quantitatively assayed for mercuric reductase activity in microtiter plates by stoichiometric coupling of mercuric ion reduction to a colorimetric redox chain through ...

  11. Predicting transfers of 137Cs in terrestrial and aquatic environments: a whole-ecosystem approach

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Jim; Cross, M.; Wright, S M

    2002-01-01

    lt is well known that during the years after a nuclear accident the bioavailability and environmental mobility of radionuclides may change significantly, resulting in significant changes in contamination of foodstuffs and surface waters. Studies on 137Cs and, to a lesser extent, 90Sr, have quantified these changes in some ecosystems. However, variability in temporal changes of these radionuclides in aquatic and terrestrial systems is not yet well quantified. Estimation of such variability is ...

  12. Identifying the risk to the aquatic environment of endocrine disrupters derived from agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Matthiessen, Peter; Arnold, David; Johnson, Andrew; Pepper, Tim; Pottinger, Tom G.; Pulman, Kim G. T.; Williams, Richard

    2005-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. The purpose of this project was to review possible inputs to UK headwater streams of steroid hormones originating from livestock, to investigate hormone contamination in some streams in which concentrations were expected to be maximal, and to draw conclusions about possible risks that these hormones may pose to aquatic organisms. 2. The review concluded that although livestock in the UK excretes more steroid sex hormones (oestradiol and testosterone) than the hu...

  13. Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Quarterly project status report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    This quarterly project status report discusses research projects being conducted on hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River basin. We continued to seek improvement in our methods of communication and interactions to support the inter-disciplinary, inter-university collaborators within this program. In addition to the defined collaborative research teams, there is increasing interaction among investigators across projects. Planning for the second year of the project has included the development of our internal request for proposals, and refining the review process for selection of proposals for funding.

  14. Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin Project management. Technical quarterly progress report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLachlan, J.; Ide, C.F.; O`Connor, S.

    1996-08-01

    This quarterly report summarizes accomplishments for the Project examining hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Among the many research areas summarized are the following: assessment of mechanisms of metal-induced reproductive toxicity in aquatic species as a biomarker of exposure; hazardous wastes in aquatic environment;ecological sentinels of aquatic contamination in the lower Mississippi River System; remediation of selected contaminants; rapid on-site immunassay for heavy metal contamination; molecular mechanisms of developmental toxicity induced by retinoids and retinoid-like molecules; resuseable synthetic membranes for the removal of aromatic and halogenated organic pollutants from waste water; Effects of steroid receptor activation in neurendocrine cell of the mammalian hypothalamus; modeling and assessment of environmental quality of louisiana bayous and swamps; enhancement of environmental education. The report also contains a summary of publications resulting from this project and an appendix with analytical core protocals and target compounds and metals.

  15. Revisiting the concept of recalcitrance and organic matter persistence in soils and aquatic systems: Does environment trump chemistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Spiotta, E.

    2014-12-01

    Most ecological models of decomposition rely on plant litter chemistry. However, growing evidence suggests that the chemical composition of organic matter (OM) is not a good predictor of its eventual fate in terrestrial or aquatic environments. New data on variable decomposition rates of select organic compounds challenge concepts of chemical recalcitrance, i.e. the inherent ability of certain molecular structures to resist biodegradation. The role of environmental or "ecosystem" properties on influencing decomposition dates back to some of the earliest research on soil OM. Despite early recognition that the physical and aqueous matrices are critical in determining the fate of organic compounds, the prevailing paradigm hinges on intrinsic chemical properties as principal predictors of decay rate. Here I build upon recent reviews and discuss new findings that contribute to three major transformations in our understanding of OM persistence: (1) a shift away from an emphasis on chemical recalcitrance as a primary predictor of turnover, (2) new interpretations of radiocarbon ages which challenge predictions of reactivity, and (3) the recognition that most detrital OM accumulating in soils and in water has been microbially processed. Predictions of OM persistence due to aromaticity are challenged by high variability in lignin and black C turnover observed in terrestrial and aquatic environments. Contradictions in the behavior of lignin are, in part, influenced by inconsistent methodologies among research communities. Even black C, long considered to be one of the most recalcitrant components of OM, is susceptible to biodegradation, challenging predictions of the stability of aromatic structures. At the same time, revised interpretations of radiocarbon data suggest that organic compounds can acquire long mean residence times by various mechanisms independent of their molecular structure. Understanding interactions between environmental conditions and biological

  16. Effect of co-existing kaolinite and goethite on the aggregation of graphene oxide in the aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guanxing; Guo, Huiyuan; Zhao, Jian; Liu, Yonghong; Xing, Baoshan

    2016-10-01

    Broad applications of graphene oxide (GO) will result in the release of GO into aquatic environments, where clay minerals and metal (hydr)oxides are commonly present. Thereby the interactions between GO and a binary system containing clay minerals and metal (hydr)oxides can occur. We investigated the aggregation of GO with kaolinite and kaolinite-goethite associations (KGAs) in aquatic systems under different pHs, ionic strengths, and GO concentrations. GO suspension was unstable at low pHs, and the aggregation of GO occurred in the presence of KGA-4% and KGA-10% until pH 5 and 6, respectively. Kaolinite decreased the critical coagulation concentration (CCC) of GO at pH 5.5 from around 50 to 20 mM NaCl due to the reduced energy barrier. Heteroaggregation of GO with KGAs was extremely sensitive to ionic strength at pH 5.5, and the CCC of GO in the presence of KGA-10% increased from less than 1 mM NaCl to 5 mM NaCl with the increase of pH from 5.5 to 9. The heteroaggregation extent of GO with KGAs was enhanced firstly, then reduced with the increase of GO concentrations at pH 5.0, which is likely because KGA plates were more efficiently wrapped by large-size GO sheets with increasing GO concentrations. These findings are useful for understanding and predicting the fate of GO in the relatively complicated aquatic and soil environments where binary minerals co-exist. PMID:27379727

  17. The evolution of an annual life cycle in killifish: adaptation to ephemeral aquatic environments through embryonic diapause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furness, Andrew I

    2016-08-01

    An annual life cycle is characterized by growth, maturity, and reproduction condensed into a single, short season favourable to development, with production of embryos (seeds, cysts, or eggs) capable of surviving harsh conditions which juveniles or adults cannot tolerate. More typically associated with plants in desert environments, or temperate-zone insects exposed to freezing winters, the evolution of an annual life cycle in vertebrates is fairly novel. Killifish, small sexually dimorphic fishes in the Order Cyprinodontiformes, have adapted to seasonally ephemeral water bodies across much of Africa and South America through the independent evolution of an annual life history. These annual killifish produce hardy desiccation-resistant eggs that undergo diapause (developmental arrest) and remain buried in the soil for long periods when fish have perished due to the drying of their habitat. Killifish are found in aquatic habitats that span a continuum from permanent and stable to seasonal and variable, thus providing a useful system in which to piece together the evolutionary history of this life cycle using natural comparative variation. I first review adaptations for life in ephemeral aquatic environments in killifish, with particular emphasis on the evolution of embryonic diapause. I then bring together available evidence from a variety of approaches and provide a scenario for how this annual life cycle evolved. There are a number of features within Aplocheiloidei killifish including their inhabitation of marginal or edge aquatic habitat, their small size and rapid attainment of maturity, and egg properties that make them particularly well suited to the colonization of ephemeral waters. PMID:25969869

  18. Bioremediation of Heavy Metals from Soil and Aquatic Environment: An Overview of Principles and Criteria of Fundamental Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchita Dixit

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metals are natural constituents of the environment, but indiscriminate use for human purposes has altered their geochemical cycles and biochemical balance. This results in excess release of heavy metals such as cadmium, copper, lead, nickel, zinc etc. into natural resources like the soil and aquatic environments. Prolonged exposure and higher accumulation of such heavy metals can have deleterious health effects on human life and aquatic biota. The role of microorganisms and plants in biotransformation of heavy metals into nontoxic forms is well-documented, and understanding the molecular mechanism of metal accumulation has numerous biotechnological implications for bioremediation of metal-contaminated sites. In view of this, the present review investigates the abilities of microorganisms and plants in terms of tolerance and degradation of heavy metals. Also, advances in bioremediation technologies and strategies to explore these immense and valuable biological resources for bioremediation are discussed. An assessment of the current status of technology deployment and suggestions for future bioremediation research has also been included. Finally, there is a discussion of the genetic and molecular basis of metal tolerance in microbes, with special reference to the genomics of heavy metal accumulator plants and the identification of functional genes involved in tolerance and detoxification.

  19. Aquatic microphylla Azolla: a perspective paradigm for sustainable agriculture, environment and global climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollah, Bharati; Patra, Ashok Kumar; Mohanty, Santosh Ranjan

    2016-03-01

    This review addresses the perspectives of Azolla as a multifaceted aquatic resource to ensure ecosystem sustainability. Nitrogen fixing potential of cyanobacterial symbiont varies between 30 and 60 kg N ha(-1) which designates Azolla as an important biological N source for agriculture and animal industry. Azolla exhibits high bioremediation potential for Cd, Cr, Cu, and Zn. Azolla mitigates greenhouse gas emission from agriculture. In flooded rice ecosystem, Azolla dual cropping decreased CH4 emission by 40 % than did urea alone and also stimulated CH4 oxidation. This review highlighted integrated approach using Azolla that offers enormous public health, environmental, and cost benefits. PMID:26697861

  20. Is there a risk associated with the insect repellent DEET (N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide) commonly found in aquatic environments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanzo, S.D.; Watkinson, A.J.; Murby, E.J.; Kolpin, D.W.; Sandstrom, M.W.

    2007-01-01

    DEET (N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide) is the active ingredient of most commercial insect repellents. This compound has commonly been detected in aquatic water samples from around the world indicating that DEET is both mobile and persistent, despite earlier assumptions that DEET was unlikely to enter aquatic ecosystems. DEET's registration category does not require an ecological risk assessment, thus information on the ecological toxicity of DEET is sparse. This paper reviews the presence of DEET in aqueous samples from around the world (e.g. drinking water, streams, open seawater, groundwater and treated effluent) with reported DEET concentrations ranging from 40–3000 ng L− 1. In addition, new DEET data collected from 36 sites in coastal waterways from eastern Australia (detections ranging from 8 to 1500 ng L− 1) are examined. A summary of new and existing toxicity data are discussed with an emphasis on preparing a preliminary risk assessment for DEET in the aquatic environment. Collated information on DEET in the aquatic environment suggests risk to aquatic biota at observed environmental concentrations is minimal. However, the information available was not sufficient to conduct a full risk assessment due to data deficiencies in source characterisation, transport mechanisms, fate, and ecotoxicity studies. These risks warrant further investigation due to the high frequency that this organic contaminant is detected in aquatic environments around the world.

  1. Radioactivity in the aquatic environment. A review of UK research 1994-1997 and recommendations for future work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The national Radioactivity Research and Environmental Monitoring Committee (RADREM) provides a forum for liaison on UK research and monitoring in the radioactive substances and radioactive waste management fields. The committee aims to ensure that there is no unnecessary overlap between, or significant omission from, the research programmes of the various parts of Government, the regulatory bodies or industry. This report has been produced by the Aquatic Environment Sub-Committee (AESC) of RADREM. AESC is responsible for providing RADREM with scientific advice in the field of research relating to radionuclides in the aquatic environment, for reporting on the progress of research in this field and on future research requirements. The objectives of this report are presented in Section 2, and the membership of AESC given in Section 3. This report describes a review of research undertaken in the field of radioactivity in aquatic systems over the last three years (Section 4). The review updates previous reviews, the most recent of which being in 1993 (AESC, 1994). Future research requirements have been identified by AESC, considering past work and work in progress, and are presented in Section 5. Specific research requirements are discussed in Section 5, whilst Section 6 summarises the main areas where future research is identified as a priority. These areas are as follows: the movement and uptake of 99Tc and 14C in aquatic systems and biota; geochemical processes; off-shore sediments; non-equilibrium systems; radiation exposure during civil engineering works; further work on movement of radionuclides in salt marshes; development and validation of models. The specific objectives of this report are as follows: 1. To provide a summary of research undertaken in this field over the last three years. 2. To identify future research requirements. 3. To attach priorities to the future research requirements. It should be noted that the purpose of the report is to identify areas

  2. Molecular ecology of aquatic microbes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    Abstracts of reports are presented from a meeting on Molecular Ecology of Aquatic Microbes. Topics included: opportunities offered to aquatic ecology by molecular biology; the role of aquatic microbes in biogeochemical cycles; characterization of the microbial community; the effect of the environment on aquatic microbes; and the targeting of specific biological processes.

  3. Theoretical training bases for young athletes in aquatic sports on the natural environment: Bodyboard.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Mecías Calvo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The bodyboard is a surfing discipline whose growth has been considerably since the 60s, so it is considered one of the fastest growing aquatic sport in the world. Despite this, scientific research of this discipline has been reflected poorly compared to other sports. As in any other sport, the bodyboarder requires of specific physical and physiological conditions to help it to practice the sport effectively as it does not follow a specific training or develop conditioning programs. Therefore, this article comes up with the idea of providing a basis for determining the most appropriate training based on study objectives and bodyboard actions to improve physical, technical and psychological condition of the bodyboarders based on the particularities of their own sport and the athlete, taking into account scientific studies in the field at hand: the Bodyboard.

  4. [Escherichia coli: diversity of biochemical phenotypes in aquatic environments (Santa, Fe, Argentina)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emiliani, F; Lajmanovich, R; González, S M

    2001-01-01

    During certain environmental conditions, the floating aquatic vegetation, mainly represented by Eichhornia crassipes (water hyacinth) invade and even cover water courses assigned to recreational activities or to the supply of drinkable water. The rhizosphere of these plants constitutes an unknown biotope of bacteria of sanitary interest, possibly different from waters without vegetation and of the sediment of the same aquatic system. To verify such possibility, 206 isolated strains in MacConkey Agar (Difco) were typified and identified (78 from water, 65 from sediment and 63 from rhizosphere) using the API 20 E system (v. 4.0) and Apilab plus software (v 3.3.3), both of bioMérieux (Marcy-l'Etoile, France, 1998). Nineteen different biochemical phenotypes from E. coli were found. The 79% of the population belonged to only 7 phenotypes; the 21% remaining, to the other 12 phenotypes. Twelve phenotypes did not share the biotopes, while only 4 were in the three. These results (and those obtained by other authors who used the API 20 E system in other biotopes) suggest that it would be possible to characterize the rhizosphere using those phenotypes that are found in smaller proportion. The greatest index of diversity (H) and evenness (E) were found in the rhizosphere (H = 2.903; E = 0.874). The dendrogram (average distances and UPGMA method) reaffirms the dissimilarity in biochemical phenotypes of E. coli populations of the rhizosphere with regard to the other biotopes. The most abundant bacterial species in the three biotopes were E. coli, Klebsiella terrigena and K. pneumoniae, corresponding to 75.2% of the community. The rhizosphere differed from Serratia odorifera and from Klebsiella spp. because of its higher rate of isolation. PMID:11494758

  5. From municipal sewage to drinking water: fate and removal of pharmaceutical residues in the aquatic environment in urban areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberer, Th; Reddersen, K; Mechlinski, A

    2002-01-01

    Recently, the occurrence and fate of pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) in the aquatic environment was recognized as one of the emerging issues in environmental chemistry and as a matter of public concern. Residues of PhACs have been found as contaminants in sewage, surface, and ground- and drinking water samples. Since June 2000, a new long-term monitoring program of sewage, surface, ground- and drinking water has been carried out in Berlin, Germany. Samples, collected periodically from selected sites in the Berlin area, are investigated for residues of PhACs and related contaminants. The purpose of this monitoring is to investigate these compounds over a long time period to get more reliable data on their occurrence and fate in the different aquatic compartments. Moreover, the surface water investigations allow the calculation of season-dependent contaminant loads in the Berlin waters. In the course of the monitoring program, PhACs and some other polar compounds were detected at concentrations up to the microg/L-level in all compartments of the Berlin water cycle. The monitoring is accompanied and supported by several other investigations such as laboratory column experiments and studies on bank filtration and drinking water treatment using conventional or membrane filtration techniques. PMID:12227607

  6. Bioavailability and bioaccumulation of metal-based engineered nanomaterials in aquatic environments: concepts and processes: chapter 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoma, Samuel N.; Khan, Farhan R.; Croteau, Marie-Noële

    2014-01-01

    Bioavailability of Me-ENMs to aquatic organisms links their release into the environment to ecological implications. Close examination shows some important differences in the conceptual models that define bioavailability for metals and Me-ENMs. Metals are delivered to aquatic animals from Me-ENMs via water, ingestion, and incidental surface exposure. Both metal released from the Me-ENM and uptake of the nanoparticle itself contribute to bioaccumulation. Some mechanisms of toxicity and some of the metrics describing exposure may differ from metals alone. Bioavailability is driven by complex interaction of particle attributes, environmental transformations, and biological traits. Characterization of Me-ENMs is an essential part of understanding bioavailability and requires novel methodologies. The relative importance of the array of processes that could affect Me-ENM bioavailability remains poorly known, but new approaches and models are developing rapidly. Enough is known, however, to conclude that traditional approaches to exposure assessment for metals would not be adequate to assess risks from Me-ENMs.

  7. The bioconcentration and bioaccumulation factors for molybdenum in the aquatic environment from natural environmental concentrations up to the toxicity boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a regulatory context, bioaccumulation or bioconcentration factors are used for considering secondary poisoning potential and assessing risks to human health via the food chain. In this paper, literature data on the bioaccumulation of molybdenum in the aquatic organisms are reviewed and assessed for relevance and reliability. The data available in the literature were generated at exposure concentrations below those recommended in the REACH registration dossiers for molybdenum compounds i.e. PNECfreshwater 12.7 mg Mo/L. To address possible environmental concerns at regulatorily-relevant molybdenum concentrations, both a field study and a laboratory study were conducted. In the field study, whole body and organ-specific molybdenum levels were evaluated in fish (eel, stickleback, perch, carp bream, roach) held in the discharge water collector tanks of a molybdenum processing plant, containing a mean measured molybdenum level of 1.03 mg Mo/L. In the laboratory study, rainbow trout were exposed to two different nominal molybdenum levels (1.0 and 12.7 mg Mo/L), for 60 days followed by a 60-day depuration period. Whole body concentrations in rainbow trout during the exposure period were between < 0.20 and 0.53 mg Mo/L. Muscle tissue molybdenum concentrations in fish taken from both experiments remained below 0.2 mg/kg dry wt. These studies show an inverse relationship between exposure concentration and bioconcentration or bioaccumulation factor for molybdenum. In aquatic organisms, and in fish in particular, internal molybdenum concentrations are maintained in the presence of variation in external molybdenum concentrations. These observations must be considered when evaluating potential risks associated with the bioconcentration and/or bioaccumulation of molybdenum in the aquatic environment. -- Highlights: ► Addressing environmental concerns at regulatory-relevant molybdenum concentrations. ► Inverse relationship between exposure levels and BAF (BAF increases as Mo

  8. [The Lebanese emigration in Sub-Saharan western Africa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labaki, B

    1993-01-01

    The author examines the history of Lebanese migration to western Africa. Aspects considered include changes in countries of origin and destination, Africanization policies, wars in Lebanon, independence movements, economic status of migrants, temporary and return migration, and the brain drain. (SUMMARY IN ENG AND SPA) PMID:12287075

  9. Muslim Egyptian and Lebanese Students' Conceptions of Biological Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    BouJaoude, Saouma; Wiles, Jason R.; Asghar, Anila; Alters, Brian

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we investigated distinctions among the diversity of religious traditions represented by Lebanese and Egyptian Muslim high school students regarding their understanding and acceptance of biological evolution and how they relate the science to their religious beliefs. We explored secondary students' conceptions of evolution among…

  10. The Lebanese Brevet Chemistry and Physics Examinations: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaardingerbroek, Barend; Jaber, Lama Z.; Rizk, Nadya G.; Bayoud, Jana M.

    2009-01-01

    The high-stakes Lebanese Brevet examinations are undertaken by almost all school students at the end of year 9 and include papers in Chemistry and Physics. This research presents an analysis of the 2007 examinations in these two science subjects using official statistics and response patterns arising from samples of candidate scripts. The…

  11. Evaluation of the potential of Pistia stratiotes L. (water lettuce) for bioindication and phytoremediation of aquatic environments contaminated with arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnese, F S; Oliveira, J A; Lima, F S; Leão, G A; Gusman, G S; Silva, L C

    2014-08-01

    Specimens of Pistia stratiotes were subjected to five concentrations of arsenic (As) for seven days. Growth, As absorption, malondialdehyde (MDA) content, photosynthetic pigments, enzymatic activities, amino acids content and anatomical changes were assessed. Plant arsenic accumulation increased with increasing metalloid in the solution, while growth rate and photosynthetic pigment content decreased. The MDA content increased, indicating oxidative stress. Enzymatic activity and amino acids content increased at the lower doses of As, subsequently declining in the higher concentrations. Chlorosis and necrosis were observed in the leaves. Leaves showed starch accumulation and increased thickness of the mesophyll. In the root system, there was a loss and darkening of roots. Cell layers formed at the insertion points on the root stems may have been responsible for the loss of roots. These results indicate that water lettuce shows potential for bioindication and phytoremediation of As-contaminated aquatic environments. PMID:25627371

  12. Detection and size measurement of individual hemozoin nanocrystals in aquatic environment using a whispering gallery mode resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Woosung; Zhu, Jiangang; Faraz, Monifi; Coban, Cevayir; Yang, Lan; 10.1364/OE.20.029426

    2013-01-01

    We, for the first time, report the detection and the size measurement of single nanoparticles (i.e. polystyrene) in aquatic environment using mode splitting in a whispering gallery mode (WGM) optical resonator, namely a microtoroid resonator. Using this method we achieved detecting and measuring individual synthetic hemozoin nanocrystals, which are a hemoglobin degradation by-product of malarial parasites, dispersed in a solution or in air. The results of size measurement in solution and in air agree with each other and with those obtained using scanning electron microscope and dynamic light scattering. Moreover, we compare the sensing capabilities of the degenerate (single resonance) and non-degenerate (split mode, doublet) operation regimes of the WGM resonator.

  13. Chernobyl radionuclides in the environment: Tracers for the tight coupling of atmospheric, terrestrial, and aquatic geochemical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Observations of the temporal trend in concentrations of Chernobyl radionuclides in atmospheric, terrestrial, and aquatic reservoirs near Duebendorf (Zurich) aided in quantifying fluxes and transfer velocities from one reservoir to another. Radionuclide dry and wet deposition rates and velocities from the atmosphere, washout from the catchment basins into surface waters, and deposition rates and mechanisms in lakes were determined. The results from these studies were compared to those from earlier observations on the fate of the radionuclides released by bomb tests, from reactor accidents, and from the purposeful tracer experiments in lakes. The results from our observations indicate the extent to which the Chernobyl radionuclides trace the movement of other atmospheric trace contaminants in the environment

  14. Triclosan as a surrogate for household biocides: an investigation into biocides in aquatic environments of a highly urbanized region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-Feng; Ying, Guang-Guo; Liu, You-Sheng; Zhang, Qian-Qian; Zhao, Jian-Liang; Liu, Shuang-Shuang; Chen, Jun; Peng, Feng-Jiao; Lai, Hua-Jie; Pan, Chang-Gui

    2014-07-01

    Biocides are widely formulated in household and personal care products. We investigated the distribution and ecological risks of 16 household biocides in aquatic environments of a highly urbanized region in South China, evaluated triclosan as a chemical indicator for this group of household chemicals, and proposed a novel approach to predict the environmental occurrence and fate of these household biocides by using triclosan usage data and a level-III fugacity model. Eleven biocides were quantitatively detected at concentrations up to 264 ± 15.3 ng/L for climbazole in surface water, and up to 5649 ± 748 ng/g for triclocarban in sediment of four rivers in the region. The distribution of biocides in the aquatic environments was significantly correlated with environmental variables such as total nitrogen, total phosphorus and population. Domestic sewage in the region was the dominant pollution source for most biocides such as azole fungicides (fluconazole, climbazole, clotrimazole, ketoconazole, miconazole, and carbendazim) and disinfectants (triclosan and triclocarban). Preliminary risk assessment showed high ecological risks posed by two biocides carbendazim and triclosan in river waters. Mostly important, triclosan was found to be a reliable chemical indicator to surrogate household biocides both in water and sediment based on the correlation analysis. In addition, the fugacity modeling could provide simulated concentrations comparable to the monitoring results. Therefore, with the usage data of the chemical indicator triclosan and correlation formula with other biocides, this model can be applied for predicting the occurrence and fate of various household biocides in a catchment. PMID:24793342

  15. Preliminary studies of quality assessment of aquatic environments from Cluj suburban areas, based on some invertebrates bioindicators and chemical indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Stan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Systematic categories of invertebrates bioindicators correlated with some chemical parameters,were an effective way to characterize the quality of lotic (Someş River and lentic (Lake Gilău aquatic environment from Cluj-Napoca area. Invertebrate fauna was represented by species belonging to the following dominant systematic categories: Nematoda, Annelida, Crustacea and Insecta. This paper containsalso some preliminary data on the bioindicators species belonging to Protozoa phylum. Dominant groups were crustaceans (the sampling points in Lake Gilău and annelids (Somes River and among species Gammarus pulex, Daphnia pulex, Tubifex tubifex. The fauna composition shows the β-α mesosaprobic character of the water, with an evolution from β mesosaprobity upstream the Cluj-Napoca city to polysaprobic downstream of the city. This aspect has been observed and analyzed according to chemical parameters (pH, TDS, ORP, EC, t and indices of saprobity (relative cleanliness, state of relative pollution, the deficit of species, saprobiological index.Systematic categories of invertebrates bioindicators correlated with some chemical parameters, were an effective way to characterize the quality of lotic (Someş River and lentic (Lake Gilău aquatic environment from Cluj-Napoca area. Invertebrate fauna was represented by species belonging to the following dominant systematic categories: Nematoda, Annelida, Crustacea and Insecta. This paper contains also some preliminary data on the bioindicators species belonging to Protozoa phylum. Dominant groups were crustaceans (the sampling points in Lake Gilău and annelids (Somes River and among species Gammarus pulex, Daphnia pulex, Tubifex tubifex. The fauna composition shows the β-α mesosaprobic character of the water, with an evolution from β mesosaprobity upstream the Cluj-Napoca city to polysaprobic downstream of the city. This aspect has been observed and analyzed according to chemical parameters (pH, TDS, ORP

  16. A Review on the Toxicity and Non-Target Effects of Macrocyclic Lactones in Terrestrial and Aquatic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumaret, Jean-Pierre; Errouissi, Faiek; Floate, Kevin; Römbke, Jörg; Wardhaugh, Keith

    2012-01-01

    The avermectins, milbemycins and spinosyns are collectively referred to as macrocyclic lactones (MLs) which comprise several classes of chemicals derived from cultures of soil micro-organisms. These compounds are extensively and increasingly used in veterinary medicine and agriculture. Due to their potential effects on non-target organisms, large amounts of information on their impact in the environment has been compiled in recent years, mainly caused by legal requirements related to their marketing authorization or registration. The main objective of this paper is to critically review the present knowledge about the acute and chronic ecotoxicological effects of MLs on organisms, mainly invertebrates, in the terrestrial and aquatic environment. Detailed information is presented on the mode-of-action as well as the ecotoxicity of the most important compounds representing the three groups of MLs. This information, based on more than 360 references, is mainly provided in nine tables, presenting the effects of abamectin, ivermectin, eprinomectin, doramectin, emamectin, moxidectin, and spinosad on individual species of terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates as well as plants and algae. Since dung dwelling organisms are particularly important non-targets, as they are exposed via dung from treated animals over their whole life-cycle, the information on the effects of MLs on dung communities is compiled in an additional table. The results of this review clearly demonstrate that regarding environmental impacts many macrocyclic lactones are substances of high concern particularly with larval instars of invertebrates. Recent studies have also shown that susceptibility varies with life cycle stage and impacts can be mitigated by using MLs when these stages are not present. However information on the environmental impact of the MLs is scattered across a wide range of specialised scientific journals with research focusing mainly on ivermectin and to a lesser extent on abamectin

  17. Toxic effects of crude-oil-contaminated soil in aquatic environment on Carassius auratus and their hepatic antioxidant defense system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yuanyuan; ZHOU Qixing; PENG Shengwei; MA Lena Q; NIU Xiaowei

    2009-01-01

    Under the indoor simulant conditions, toxic effects of crude-oil-contaminated soil which was put into aquatic environment on the young fishes Carassius auratus and their hepatic antioxidant system after a 20-d exposure were investigated. Results showed that the relationship between the mortality of C. auratus and the exposed doses could be divided to 3 phases: fishes exposed to the low dose groups (0.5--5.0 g/L) were dead due to the ingestion of crude-oil-contaminated soils in aquatic environment; at the medium dose groups (5.0--25.0 g/L) fishes were dead due to the penetration of toxic substances; at the high dose groups (25.0--50.0 g/L) fishes were dead due to environmental stress. The highest mortality and death speed were found in the 1.0 g/L dose group, and the death speed was sharply increased in the 50.0 g/L dose group in the late phase of the exposure. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) and the content of malaondialdehyde (MDA) in the hepatic tissues of C. auratus were induced significantly. The activity of SOD was first increased and then decreased, and was significantly inhibited in the 50.0 g/L dose group. The activity of CAT was highly induced, and restored to a little more than the control level when the exposed doses exceeded 10.0 g/L. The activity of GST was the most sensitive, it was significantly induced in all dose groups, and the highest elevation was up to 6 times in the 0.5 g/L dose group compared with the control. The MDA content was significantly elevated in the 50.0 g/L dose group, and the changes of the MDA content were opposite with the changes of the GST activity.

  18. Determination and occurrence of secondary alkane sulfonates (SAS) in aquatic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baena-Nogueras, Rosa María; González-Mazo, Eduardo; Lara-Martín, Pablo A

    2013-05-01

    A new methodology has been developed for the determination of secondary alkane sulfonates (SAS), an anionic surfactant, in environmental matrices. Sediment and sludge samples were extracted using pressurized liquid extraction and sonication, whereas wastewater and surface water samples were processed using solid-phase extraction. Extraction recoveries were acceptable for both aqueous (78-120%) and solid samples (83-100%). Determination of SAS was carried out by high or ultra performance liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry using ion trap and time-of-flight detectors. The methodology was applied to samples from Guadalete River (SW Spain), where SAS concentrations below 1 μg L(-1) were measured in surface water, and from 72 to 9737 μg kg(-1) in sediments. Differential partitioning was observed for SAS homologues as those having a longer hydrocarbon chain which preferentially sorbed onto particulate matter. A preliminary environmental risk assessment also showed that SAS measured levels were not harmful to the aquatic community in the sampling area. PMID:23421983

  19. Impacts of emerging contaminants on surrounding aquatic environment from a youth festival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jheng-Jie; Lee, Chon-Lin; Fang, Meng-Der; Tu, Bo-Wen; Liang, Yu-Jen

    2015-01-20

    The youth festival as we refer to Spring Scream, a large-scale pop music festival, is notorious for the problems of drug abuse and addiction. The origin, temporal magnitudes, potential risks and mass inputs of emerging contaminants (ECs) were investigated. Thirty targeted ECs were analyzed by solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (SPE-LC-MS/MS). Sampling strategy was designed to characterize EC behavior in different stages (before and after the youth festival), based on multivariate data analysis to explore the contributions of contaminants from normal condition to the youth festival. Wastewater influents and effluents were collected during the youth festival (approximately 600 000 pop music fans and youth participated). Surrounding river waters are also sampled to illustrate the touristic impacts during peak season and off-season. Seasonal variations were observed, with the highest concentrations in April (Spring Scream) and the lowest in October (off-season). Acetaminophen, diclofenac, codeine, ampicillin, tetracycline, erythromycin-H2O, and gemfibrozil have significant pollution risk quotients (RQs > 1), indicating ecotoxicological concerns. Principal component analysis (PCA) and weekly patterns provide a perspective in assessing the touristic impacts and address the dramatic changes in visitor population and drug consumption. The highest mass loads discharged into the aquatic ecosystem corresponded to illicit drugs/controlled substances such as ketamine and MDMA, indicating the high consumption of ecstasy during Spring Scream. PMID:25495157

  20. [Mechanisms of Cr (VI) toxicity to fish in aquatic environment: A review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong-xing; Wu, Xing; Bi, Ran; Li, Li-xia; Gao, Mi; Li, Dan; Xie, Ling-tian

    2015-10-01

    With increasing consumption and applications of chromium in metallurgy, electroplating, tanning process and stainless steel industry, chromium contamination has become a global environmental problem. In general, Cr(VI) has higher permeability across the cell membrane than Cr(III) and hence is considered more toxic than Cr(III). Oxidative stress could be induced following reactive oxygen species (ROS) normally produced in fish under Cr(VI) exposure due to its variable valences. Furthermore, the intermediates of Cr, e.g. Cr(V) and Cr(IV) , produced by cellular reduction processes can bind with DNA and result in mutagenic effects. These combined effects will threaten the growth, development and population structure of different fish species. In this paper, we reviewed published results on the toxic effects of Cr(VI) in fish at levels of molecules, tissues, organs and individuals. The mechanisms of toxicity and detoxification of Cr(VI) in various aspects were discussed. In addition, we also put forward perspectives on the toxicity of chromium in aquatic organisms. PMID:26995935

  1. Persistence and bioavaiability of manufactured silver nanoparticles in the aquatic environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dai, Lina; Banta, Gary Thomas; Selck, Henriette;

    2011-01-01

    information is available in dissolution of MNPs in a complex environment, such as sediment, which is believed to be the final sink for released MNPs. We tested the dissolution of PVP-coated silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and compared the ion diffusive kinetics with Ag(I) in 3 different media (MilliQ water......The environmental behavior of manufactured nanoparticles (MNPs) has received increasing attention. One of the focuses is whether they exist as particles or as dissolved ions in the environment. The dissolution of MNPs is a key to understand their behaviors in the environment. However, little...

  2. A Simple Model of Tetracycline Antibiotic Resistance in the Aquatic Environment (with Application to the Poudre River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Sanchez

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance is a major concern, yet it is unclear what causes the relatively high densities of resistant bacteria in the anthropogenically impacted environment. There are various possible scenarios (hypotheses: (A Input of resistant bacteria from wastewater and agricultural sources is significant, but they do not grow in the environment; (B Input of resistant bacteria is negligible, but the resistant bacteria (exogenous or endogenous grow due to the selection pressure of the antibiotic; (C Exogenous bacteria transfer the resistance to the endogenous bacteria and those grow. This paper presents a simple mechanistic model of tetracycline resistance in the aquatic environment. It includes state variables for tetracyclines, susceptible and resistant bacteria, and particulate and dissolved organic matter in the water column and sediment bed. The antibiotic partitions between freely dissolved, dissolved organic matter (DOM-bound and solids-bound phases, and decays. Bacteria growth is limited by DOM, inhibited by the antibiotic (susceptible bacteria only and lower due to the metabolic cost of carrying the resistance (resistant bacteria only. Resistant bacteria can transfer resistance to the susceptible bacteria (conjugation and lose the resistance (segregation. The model is applied to the Poudre River and can reproduce the major observed (literature data patterns of antibiotic concentration and resistance. The model suggests observed densities of resistant bacteria in the sediment bed cannot be explained by input (scenario A, but require growth (scenarios B or C.

  3. Analysis, occurrence, fate and risks of proton pump inhibitors, their metabolites and transformation products in aquatic environment: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosma, Christina I; Lambropoulou, Dimitra A; Albanis, Triantafyllos A

    2016-11-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) which include omeprazole, esomeprazole, lansoprazole, pantoprazole and rabeprazole, are extensively used for the relief of gastro-intestinal disorders. Despite their high worldwide consumption, PPIs are extensively metabolized in human bodies and therefore are not regularly detected in monitoring studies. Very recently, however, it has been shown that some omeprazole metabolites may enter and are likely to persist in aquatic environment. Hence, to fully assess the environmental exposures and risks associated with PPIs, it is important to better understand and evaluate the fate and behavior not only of the parent compound but also of their metabolites and their transformation products arising from biotic and abiotic processes (hydrolysis, photodegradation, biodegradation etc.) in the environment. In this light, the purpose of this review is to summarize the present state of knowledge on the introduction and behavior of these chemicals in natural and engineering systems and highlight research needs and gaps. It draws attention to their transformation, the increase contamination by their metabolites/TPs in different environmental matrices and their potential adverse effects in the environment. Furthermore, existing research on analytical developments with respect to sample treatment, separation and detection of PPIs and their metabolites/TPs is provided. PMID:27380396

  4. Evaluation of removal efficiency of 2-chlorophenol in aquatic environments by modified fly ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Malakootian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chlorophenols are classified as priority toxic pollutants. These acidic organic compounds present a serious potential hazard for human health and aquatic life. Chlorophenols accumulate in water, soil and air due to high stability, and impart an unpleasant taste and odor to drinking water and can exert negative effects on different biological processes. Among the different methods of removal, adsorption process by low price adsorbents, such as fly ash (FA is common. Therefore, in this study, the effects of oxidation of FA as modified adsorbent were investigated when the adsorption of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP was increased. Methods: This experimental study was conducted from March to September of 2013. FA obtained from Zarand power plant (located in Kerman province was oxidized with potassium permanganate. Effective factors on the oxidation of FA, such as temperature, oxidation time and concentrations of oxidizers were optimized. Raw sewage of Zarand coal washing plant was tested under optimal conditions. All tests were carried out according to the standard methods book for the examination of water and wastewater. Results: Optimal condition for the preparation of oxidized FA was obtained at 70°C, 1 hour, and 1 mM of potassium permanganate concentration. The absorber obtained was able to remove 96.22% of 2-CP under optimized conditions (pH=3, 2 hours, adsorbent dose 0.8 g and room temperature. The removal efficiency of the real wastewater under optimal conditions was 82.1%. Conclusion: Oxidized FA can be used for the removal of this pollutant from industry wastewater due to its high efficiency of removal in real wastewater, it is easy and inexpensive to prepare and could modify the sorbent.

  5. Biodegradation and toxicity of vegetable oils in contaminated aquatic environments: Effect of antioxidants and oil composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, Darine A; Suidan, Makram T; Venosa, Albert D

    2016-03-15

    Antioxidants may affect the oxidative rate of vegetable oils determining their fate and impact in contaminated aquatic media. In previous studies, we demonstrated the effectiveness of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), one of the most used antioxidants in edible oils, in enhancing the biodegradation of glyceryl trilinoleate, a pure triacylglycerol of cis,cis-9,12-octadecadienoic acid (C18:2 delta), through retarding its oxidative polymerization relatively to the oil with no added antioxidant. In this study, the effect of BHT on the biodegradation and toxicity of purified canola oil, a mixed-acid triacylglycerol with high C18:1 content, was investigated in respirometric microcosms and by use of the Microtox® assay. Investigations were carried out in the absence and presence (200 mg kg(-1)) of the antioxidant, and at an oil loading of 0.31 L m(-2) (333 gal acre(-1)). Substantial oil mineralization was achieved after 16 weeks of incubation (>77%) and was not significantly different (p>0.05) between the two BHT treatments, demonstrating an important role of the oil fatty acid composition in determining the potency of antioxidants and, consequently, the fate of spilled vegetable oils. Furthermore, for both treatments, toxicity was measured at early stages of the experiments and disappeared at a later stage of incubation. The observed transient toxicity was associated with the combined effect of toxic biodegradation intermediates and autoxidation products. These results were supported by the gradual disappearance of BHT in the microcosms initially supplemented with the antioxidant, reaching negligible amounts after only 2 weeks of incubation. PMID:26780134

  6. Guidelines to Avoid Biocontamination of Antarctic Subglacial Aquatic Environments: Forward Contamination Concerns, Environmental Management and Scientific Stewardship of Icy analogue environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Race, M. S.; Hobbie, J.; et al.

    2007-12-01

    For more than a decade, scientists and space mission planners have recognized the importance of collaborative information exchange with the Antarctic research community to address their many shared exploration challenges, from drilling methods, remote sample collection, and data interpretation, to concerns about cross contamination that could adversely impact both the environment and interpretation of scientific data. Another shared concern exists in the regulatory realm; both the Antarctic and outer space environments are subject to separate international treaties that impose regulatory controls and oversight with serious implications for exploration planning. In recent years, both communities have faced the need to adjust their regulatory controls in light of fast-paced advances in scientific understanding of extreme environments, particularly related to potential microbial life. Both communities have sought and received advice from the National Research Council (NRC) through studies that suggested ways to update their respective oversight and regulatory systems while allowing for continued scientific exploration. A recently completed NRC study "Exploration of Antarctic Subglacial Aquatic Environments: Environmental and Scientific Stewardship" provided a suite of recommendations to address1) 'cleanliness' levels necessary for equipment and devices used in exploration of subglacial aquatic environments, as well as 2) the scientific basis for contamination standards, and 3) the steps for defining an overall exploration strategy conducive to sound environmental management and scientific stewardship. This talk will present the findings of the recent multinational NRC study, which is likely to translate into useful information for analogue studies that proceed to test techniques and capabilities for exploring an Europan ocean, other icy celestial locations, and related science targets on Earth. As the science and exploration of subglacial environments grows beyond its

  7. Strategies for Transferring Mixtures of Organic Contaminants from Aquatic Environments into Bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, Annika; Mayer, Philipp; Schäfer, Sabine; Witt, Gesine; Haase, Nora; Escher, Beate I

    2016-06-01

    Mixtures of organic contaminants are ubiquitous in the environment. Depending on their persistence and physicochemical properties, individual chemicals that make up the mixture partition and distribute within the environment and might then jointly elicit toxicological effects. For the assessment and monitoring of such mixtures, a variety of cell-based in vitro and low-complexity in vivo bioassays based on algae, daphnids or fish embryos are available. A very important and sometimes unrecognized challenge is how to combine sampling, extraction and dosing to transfer the mixtures from the environment into bioassays, while conserving (or re-establishing) their chemical composition at adjustable levels for concentration-effect assessment. This article outlines various strategies for quantifiable transfer from environmental samples including water, sediment, and biota into bioassays using total extraction or polymer-based passive sampling combined with either solvent spiking or passive dosing. PMID:26804122

  8. Strategies for Transferring Mixtures of Organic Contaminants from Aquatic Environments into Bioassays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahnke, Annika; Mayer, Philipp; Schäfer, Sabine;

    2016-01-01

    Mixtures of organic contaminants are ubiquitous in the environment. Depending on their persistence and physicochemical properties, individual chemicals that make up the mixture partition and distribute within the environment and might then jointly elicit toxicological effects. For the assessment...... and monitoring of such mixtures, a variety of cell-based in vitro and low-complexity in vivo bioassays based on algae, daphnids or fish embryos are available. A very important and sometimes unrecognized challenge is how to combine sampling, extraction and dosing to transfer the mixtures from the...... environment into bioassays, while conserving (or re-establishing) their chemical composition at adjustable levels for concentration-effect assessment. This article outlines various strategies for quantifiable transfer from environmental samples including water, sediment, and biota into bioassays using total...

  9. A novel triplex quantitative PCR strategy for quantification of toxigenic and nontoxigenic Vibrio cholerae in aquatic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliem, Rupert; Schauer, Sonja; Plicka, Helga; Obwaller, Adelheid; Sommer, Regina; Steinrigl, Adolf; Alam, Munirul; Reischer, Georg H; Farnleitner, Andreas H; Kirschner, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a severe human pathogen and a frequent member of aquatic ecosystems. Quantification of V. cholerae in environmental water samples is therefore fundamental for ecological studies and health risk assessment. Beside time-consuming cultivation techniques, quantitative PCR (qPCR) has the potential to provide reliable quantitative data and offers the opportunity to quantify multiple targets simultaneously. A novel triplex qPCR strategy was developed in order to simultaneously quantify toxigenic and nontoxigenic V. cholerae in environmental water samples. To obtain quality-controlled PCR results, an internal amplification control was included. The qPCR assay was specific, highly sensitive, and quantitative across the tested 5-log dynamic range down to a method detection limit of 5 copies per reaction. Repeatability and reproducibility were high for all three tested target genes. For environmental application, global DNA recovery (GR) rates were assessed for drinking water, river water, and water from different lakes. GR rates ranged from 1.6% to 76.4% and were dependent on the environmental background. Uncorrected and GR-corrected V. cholerae abundances were determined in two lakes with extremely high turbidity. Uncorrected abundances ranged from 4.6×10(2) to 2.3×10(4) cell equivalents liter(-1), whereas GR-corrected abundances ranged from 4.7×10(3) to 1.6×10(6) cell equivalents liter(-1). GR-corrected qPCR results were in good agreement with an independent cell-based direct detection method but were up to 1.6 log higher than cultivation-based abundances. We recommend the newly developed triplex qPCR strategy as a powerful tool to simultaneously quantify toxigenic and nontoxigenic V. cholerae in various aquatic environments for ecological studies as well as for risk assessment programs. PMID:25724966

  10. Search for the evidence of endocrine disruption in the aquatic environment: Lessons to be learned from joint biological and chemical monitoring in the European Project COMPREHEND

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggen, R.I.L.; Bengtsson, B.E.; Bowmer, C.T.; Gerritsen, A.A.M.; Gibert, M.; Hylland, K.; Johnson, A.C.; Leonards, P.E.G.; Nakari, T.; Norrgren, L.; Sumpter, J.P.; Suter, M.J.F.; Svenson, A.; Pickering, A.D.

    2003-01-01

    Between January 1999 and December 2001, the European Community project COMPREHEND was performed. The overall aim of COMPREHEND was to assess endocrine disruption in the aquatic environment in Europe, consequent to effluent discharge, with emphasis on estrogenic activity. COMPREHEND demonstrated the

  11. Passive sampling in regulatory chemical monitoring of nonpolar organic compounds in the aquatic environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booij, K.; Robinson, C.D.; Burgess, R.M.; Mayer, P.; Roberts, C.A.; Ahrens, L.; Allan, I.J.; Brant, J.; Jones, L.; Kraus, U.R.; Larsen, M.M.; Lepom, P.; Petersen, J.; Pröfrock, D.; Roose, P.; Schäfer, S.; Smedes, F.; Tixier, C.; Vorkamp, K.; Whitehouse, P.

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed compliance monitoring requirements in the EuropeanUnion, the United States, and the Oslo-Paris Convention for the protection of themarine environment of the North-East Atlantic, and evaluated if these are met bypassive sampling methods for nonpolar compounds. The strengths andshortcoming

  12. Passive Sampling in Regulatory Chemical Monitoring of Nonpolar Organic Compounds in the Aquatic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    We reviewed compliance monitoring requirements in the European Union (EU), the United States(USA), and the Oslo-Paris Convention for the protection of the marine environment of the North-East Atlantic (OSPAR), and evaluated if these are met by passive sampling methods for nonpola...

  13. Antibiotic contamination and occurrence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in aquatic environments of northern Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoa, Phan Thi Phuong; Managaki, Satoshi; Nakada, Norihide; Takada, Hideshige; Shimizu, Akiko; Anh, Duong Hong; Viet, Pham Hung; Suzuki, Satoru

    2011-07-01

    The ubiquitous application and release of antibiotics to the environment can result in bacterial antibiotic resistance, which in turn can be a serious risk to humans and other animals. Southeast Asian countries commonly apply an integrated recycling farm system called VAC (Vegetable, Aquaculture and Caged animal). In the VAC environment, antibiotics are released from animal and human origins, which would cause antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB). This study evaluated occurrence of ARB in the VAC environment in northern Vietnam, with quantitative analysis of antibiotic pollution. We found that sulfonamides were commonly detected at all sites. In dry season, while sulfamethazine was a major contaminant in pig farm pond (475-6662 ng/l) and less common in city canal and aquaculture sites, sulfamethoxazole was a major one in city canal (612-4330 ng/l). Erythromycin (154-2246 ng/l) and clarithromycin (2.8-778 ng/ml) were the common macrolides in city canal, but very low concentrations in pig farm pond and aquaculture sites. High frequencies of sulfamethoxazole-resistant bacteria (2.14-94.44%) were found whereas the occurrence rates of erythromycin-resistant bacteria were lower (Aeromonas were the major genera. Twenty three of 25 genera contained sul genes. This study showed specific contamination patterns in city and VAC environments and concluded that ARB occurred not only within contaminated sites but also those less contaminated. Various species can obtain resistance in VAC environment, which would be reservoir of drug resistance genes. Occurrence of ARB is suggested to relate with rainfall condition and horizontal gene transfer in diverse microbial community. PMID:21669325

  14. Transport and fate of radionuclides in aquatic environments - the use of ecosystem modelling for exposure assessments of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In safety assessments of nuclear facilities, a wide range of radioactive isotopes and their potential hazard to a large assortment of organisms and ecosystem types over long time scales need to be considered. Models used for these purposes have typically employed approaches based on generic reference organisms, stylised environments and transfer functions for biological uptake exclusively based on bioconcentration factors (BCFs). These models are of non-mechanistic nature and involve no understanding of uptake and transport processes in the environment, which is a severe limitation when assessing real ecosystems. In this paper, ecosystem models are suggested as a method to include site-specific data and to facilitate the modelling of dynamic systems. An aquatic ecosystem model for the environmental transport of radionuclides is presented and discussed. With this model, driven and constrained by site-specific carbon dynamics and three radionuclide specific mechanisms: (i) radionuclide uptake by plants (ii) excretion by animals, and (iii) adsorption to organic surfaces, it was possible to estimate the radionuclide concentrations in all components of the modelled ecosystem with only two radionuclide specific input parameters (BCF for plants and K d). The importance of radionuclide specific mechanisms for the exposure to organisms was examined, and probabilistic and sensitivity analyses to assess the uncertainties related to ecosystem input parameters were performed. Verification of the model suggests that this model produces analogous results to empirically derived data for more than 20 different radionuclides

  15. Tritium in the aquatic environment and the associated risk; Le tritium dans le milieu aquatique et le risque associe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tort, V.; Lefaure, C. [Centre d`Etude sur l`Evaluation de la Protection dans le Domaine Nucleaire, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Linden, G.; Herbelet, J. [Office de Protection contre les Rayonnements Ionisants, 78 - le Vesinet (France)

    1997-10-01

    Tritium, which is naturally present in the environment under tritiated water form, participates to the global water cycle. Today, nuclear fuel cycle facilities represent the main source of man-made tritium. The civilian production is estimated to be about 2 x 10{sup 4} TBq/y, corresponding to a third of the natural production. Due to the fact that tritium releases are very local, concentrations in water higher than natural background (of 0.1 to 0.9 Bq/l for surface waters) are observed around these sites. Measurements in French aquatic environment reveal tritium concentration generally below 10 Bq/1 for underground waters and below 20 Bq/l for rivers. Nevertheless, some ground waters and some rivers presents locally a concentration up to a few hundreds of Bq/l. Moreover, measurements performed in France are generally coherent with monitoring in other European countries. Furthermore, the associated radiological impact for a potential individual taking all this water needs from a 100 Bq/l tritiated water source, was evaluated to about one thousandth of the natural background. (authors)

  16. The radiological consequences of releases from nuclear facilities to the aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The release of radioactive materials to the environment is an inescapable consequence of the utilization of nuclear energy. The objective therefore is to decide on what basis and against what criteria regulatory action should be taken to protect the environment against the impact of radioactive substances. In properly regulated situations releases of such material will be minor in character and their radiological implications will rest largely in the field of public health. There are now some three decades of experience in respect of the environmental impact of radioactive materials, and certain major conclusions can be drawn. This paper reviews this experience in broad terms, and draws conclusions relevant to the regulatory problem. Future problems, especially in the context of an expanding use of nuclear power, are considered and priority research needs and opportunities indicated. (author)

  17. Passive sampling of pharmaceuticals and personal care products in aquatic environments

    OpenAIRE

    Zdena Křesinová; Klára Petrů; Ondřej Lhotský; Torgeir Rodsand; Tomáš Cajthaml

    2016-01-01

    Passive sampling is a rapidly developing technology, which is widely used for the monitoring of pollutants in different environments. Passive sampling offers significant advantages over traditional grab sampling. In the present review, the authors summarize the current literature on the methods of passive sampling used in the environmental monitoring of polar or semi-polar compounds in aqueous matrices. Methods of calibrating, design and deployment of samplers are also discussed. A major focu...

  18. Ecological limitations on aquatic mosquito predator colonization in the urban environment

    OpenAIRE

    Carlson, John; Keating, Joseph; Mbogo, Charles M; Kahindi, Samuel; Beier, John C

    2004-01-01

    Urban malaria cases are becoming common in Africa as more people move into cities and industrialization proceeds. While many species of Anopheles mosquitoes vector malaria in rural areas, only a few are found within cities. The success of anthropophilic species in cities, such as members of the An. gambiae complex, may be explained by limitations on colonization by predator species in urban environments. Habitats that are temporal or structurally simple have lower predator survivorship in a v...

  19. A genetically explicit model of speciation by sensory drive within a continuous population in aquatic environments

    OpenAIRE

    Kawata, Masakado; Shoji, Ayako; Kawamura, Shoji; Seehausen, Ole

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The sensory drive hypothesis predicts that divergent sensory adaptation in different habitats may lead to premating isolation upon secondary contact of populations. Speciation by sensory drive has traditionally been treated as a special case of speciation as a byproduct of adaptation to divergent environments in geographically isolated populations. However, if habitats are heterogeneous, local adaptation in the sensory systems may cause the emergence of reproductively isolated spe...

  20. A genetically explicit model of speciation by sensory drive within a continuous population in aquatic environments

    OpenAIRE

    Seehausen Ole; Kawamura Shoji; Shoji Ayako; Kawata Masakado

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The sensory drive hypothesis predicts that divergent sensory adaptation in different habitats may lead to premating isolation upon secondary contact of populations. Speciation by sensory drive has traditionally been treated as a special case of speciation as a byproduct of adaptation to divergent environments in geographically isolated populations. However, if habitats are heterogeneous, local adaptation in the sensory systems may cause the emergence of reproductively isol...

  1. Observation and characterization of mode splitting in microsphere resonators in aquatic environment

    OpenAIRE

    Woosung, Kim; Ozdemir, Sahin Kaya; Zhu, Jiangang; Yang, Lan

    2011-01-01

    Whispering gallery mode (WGM) optical resonators utilizing resonance shift (RS) and mode splitting (MS) techniques have emerged as highly sensitive platforms for label-free detection of nano-scale objects. RS method has been demonstrated in various resonators in air and liquid. MS in microsphere resonators has not been achieved in aqueous environment up to date, despite its demonstration in microtoroid resonators. Here, we demonstrate scatterer-induced MS of WGMs in microsphere resonators in ...

  2. Cytostatics in the aquatic environment : analysis, occurrence, and possibilities for removal

    OpenAIRE

    Koval'ová, L'ubomíra

    2009-01-01

    Many pharmaceuticals have attracted the attention of environmental scientists and are of concern due to their observed occurrence in surface water, ground water, drinking water, sediment, and soil. Further investigations have considered their removal efficiencies in wastewater treatment processes and their ecotoxicological effects. Cytostatics are a class of pharmaceuticals used in the treatment of cancer and have the potential to negatively impact the environment. It is hypothesized that due...

  3. Passive Sampling in Regulatory Chemical Monitoring of Nonpolar Organic Compounds in the Aquatic Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Booij, Kees; Robinson, Craig D.; Burgess, Robert M.; Mayer, Philipp; Roberts, Cindy A; Ahrens, Lutz; Allan, Ian J; Brant, Jan; Jones, Lisa; Kraus, Uta R.; Larsen, Martin M.; Lepom, Peter; Petersen, Jördis; Pröfrock, Daniel; Roose, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed compliance monitoring requirements in the European Union, the United States, and the Oslo-Paris Convention for the protection of the marine environment of the North-East Atlantic, and evaluated if these are met by passive sampling methods for nonpolar compounds. The strengths and shortcomings of passive sampling are assessed for water, sediments, and biota. Passive water sampling is a suitable technique for measuring concentrations of freely dissolved compounds. This method yields...

  4. Occurrence, sources, and fate of pharmaceuticals in aquatic environment and soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the rapid economic development, a better living condition leads to longer life expectancy, which increased the total population, in particular the elderly group. It may result in increase in the demand of pharmaceuticals for people in domestic use or in hospital. Although most sewage treatment plants or waste water treatment plantsmet the regulatory requirement, there are still many pharmaceuticals removed incompletely and thus discharged to the environment. Therefore, the pharmaceuticals residue draws the public concern because they might cause adverse effects on the organism even human beings. Recently, many studies have published on the source and occurrence as well as the fate of pharmaceuticals all over the world. This paper summarized and reviewed the recent studies on the sources, occurrence, fate and the effects of the most common pharmaceuticals. Finally, it gave the suggestion and risk management for controlling the pharmaceuticals. - Highlights: • The sources of pharmaceutical residuals are studied. • Occurrence and fate of pharmaceutical in environment are studied. • Risk management and recommendation are provided on pharmaceutical pollution. - Concentration of pharmaceuticals in the natural environment is lower than in effluent of sewage treatment plants in which carbamazepine is found frequently in soil and water body

  5. Eating habits and obesity among Lebanese university students

    OpenAIRE

    Abdallah Abbass; Achkar Alice; Yahia Najat; Rizk Sandra

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background In the past year Lebanon has been experiencing a nutritional transition in food choices from the typical Mediterranean diet to the fast food pattern. As a consequence, the dietary habits of young adults have been affected; thus, overweight and obesity are increasingly being observed among the young. The purpose of this study is to assess the prevalence of overweight and obesity on a sample of students from the Lebanese American University (in Beirut) and to examine their e...

  6. Happiness, health, and religiosity among Lebanese young adults

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed M. Abdel-Khalek

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate the associations between, and sex-related differences in happiness, health, and religiosity. A sample (N = 476) of Lebanese undergraduates took part in the study (215 men and 261 women). They answered Arabic versions of the Oxford Happiness Inventory (OHI), the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS), the Love of Life Scale, as well as five self-generated rating scales. Men obtained a significantly higher mean score on happiness and mental health than did their female...

  7. First "Chinese Culture Day" Held In Lebanese University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiong; Liang

    2013-01-01

    <正>At the invitation of the Lebanese University,a 10-member Chinese University Students Delegation,sent by the CPAFFC visited Lebanon and held the first "Chinese Culture Day" in cooperation with the university’s Tourism and Hotel Management Department from November 14 to 20,2012. The university’s president,Dr. Adnan Hassan,a former Minister of State,met the delegation and expressed

  8. Cogeneration systems: a proposal for the lebanese electric grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cogeneration systems have become an important source of energy due to their efficiency and their ability to reduce pollutant emissions. These systems could be integrated into the Lebanese electric grid.This work presents astudy concerning the optimized cogeneration capacity to be installed in Lebanon by the private sector. Genetic algorithm (GA) optimization method is then used. The optimization technique takes into account the economic issue, and then the economic-environmental one. Many solutions are suggested according to environmental criteria. (author)

  9. A laboratory experiment on the behaviour of soil-derived core and intact polar GDGTs in aquatic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterse, F.; Moy, C. M.; Eglinton, T. I.

    2015-02-01

    We have performed incubation experiments in order to examine the behaviour of soil-derived branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (brGDGT) membrane lipids upon entering an aquatic environment and to evaluate the processes that potentially take place during their fluvial transport from land to sea. We incubated a soil from the Rakaia River catchment on the South Island of New Zealand using Rakaia River water and ocean water collected near the river mouth as inocula for a period of up to 152 days. The concentrations, as well as the relative distribution of brGDGTs derived from intact polar ("living"; IPL) lipids and core ("fossil"; CL) lipids remained unaltered over the course of the experiment. Although the stability of the brGDGTs may be a consequence of the higher than natural soil : water ratio used in the laboratory experiment, the substantial increase (27-72%) in the total pool of isoprenoid GDGTs (isoGDGTs) in all incubation setups, including the control using distilled water, indicates that entering an aquatic environment does influence the behaviour of soil-derived GDGTs. However, the availability of water appears to be more important than its properties. As a consequence of increasing isoGDGT concentrations, a decrease in Branched and Isoprenoid Tetraether (BIT) index values - a proxy for the relative input of fluvially discharged soil material into a marine system - became evident after an incubation period of 30 days, with a maximum final decrease of 0.88 to 0.74 in the experiment with river water. The relative distribution within the isoGDGT pool shows changes with time, suggesting that isoGDGT producers may either have different rates of membrane adaptation or production/degradation, or that preferential release from the soil matrix or a shift in source organism(s) may take place. While the apparent stability of soil brGDGTs during this incubation experiment reinforces their potential as tracers for land-sea transport of soil organic carbon and

  10. Distribution and Characterization of Kepone-Resistant Bacteria in the Aquatic Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Orndorff, S. A.; Colwell, R R

    1980-01-01

    Effects of the chlorinated insecticide Kepone on the ecology of Chesapeake Bay and James River bacteria were studied. Kepone-resistant bacteria present in a given environment were found to reflect the degree of fecal and/or high organic pollution of the sampling sites, based on total numbers and generic composition of the populations of Kepone-resistant bacteria. The presence of Kepone-resistant bacteria was found to be correlated (α = 0.01) with total coliforms, fecal coliforms, and total ae...

  11. Subject-3: Study on migration of radionuclides released into terrestrial and aquatic environment after nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subject-3 has been focused on the migration behavior of long-lived radionuclides in the terrestrial surface environment, especially in connection with their chemical and physical forms. Migration behavior of radionuclides is strongly affected with their chemical and physical forms (for example; Gunten and Benes 1995). One of the two categories in Subject-3 consists of migration from surface soils including aging effects of hot particles, plant uptake from contaminated soils, and resuspension of radionuclides. The other is run off by river system, considering the role of organic materials. (author)

  12. Observation and characterization of mode splitting in microsphere resonators in aquatic environment

    CERN Document Server

    Woosung, Kim; Zhu, Jiangang; Yang, Lan

    2011-01-01

    Whispering gallery mode (WGM) optical resonators utilizing resonance shift (RS) and mode splitting (MS) techniques have emerged as highly sensitive platforms for label-free detection of nano-scale objects. RS method has been demonstrated in various resonators in air and liquid. MS in microsphere resonators has not been achieved in aqueous environment up to date, despite its demonstration in microtoroid resonators. Here, we demonstrate scatterer-induced MS of WGMs in microsphere resonators in water. We determine the size range of particles that induces MS in a microsphere in water as a function of resonator mode volume and quality factor. The results are confirmed by the experimental observations.

  13. Subject-3: Study on migration of radionuclides released into terrestrial and aquatic environment after nuclear accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amano, H.; Matsunaga, T.; Ueno, T.; Nagao, S.; Yanase, N. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Arkhipov, A.N. [Chernobyl Scientific and Technical Center for International Research (Ukraine); Tkachenko, Yu. [The State Enterprise Regional Monitoring and Domestic Control (RADEC) (Unknown)

    2001-03-01

    Subject-3 has been focused on the migration behavior of long-lived radionuclides in the terrestrial surface environment, especially in connection with their chemical and physical forms. Migration behavior of radionuclides is strongly affected with their chemical and physical forms (for example; Gunten and Benes 1995). One of the two categories in Subject-3 consists of migration from surface soils including aging effects of hot particles, plant uptake from contaminated soils, and resuspension of radionuclides. The other is run off by river system, considering the role of organic materials. (author)

  14. Antibiotic resistance among aquatic bacteria in natural freshwater environments of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Woon; Joung, Yochan; Han, Ji-Hye; Jung, Wonwha; Kim, Seung Bum

    2015-12-01

    The taxonomic diversity and antibiotic resistance among freshwater bacterial communities in the major water bodies of Korea was examined using 437 penicillin-resistant, and 110 tetracycline-resistant bacterial isolates. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, most isolates were assigned to Proteobacteria, which was then followed by Bacteroidetes. Strains of Aeromonas were found as the most abundant penicillin-resistant populations, whereas those affiliated to diverse species including enteric groups were found as the most abundant tetracycline-resistant populations. Most strains exhibited multiple antibiotic resistance, and all tested strains were resistant to penicillin and hygromycin. High levels of resistance were observed for antibiotics acting on cell wall synthesis, whereas low levels were for those acting on DNA replication or transcription in general. It is apparent from this study that penicillin resistance is widespread among environmental bacteria, although the antibiotic has been generally non-detectable in the environment. It is also likely from the taxonomic composition of the resistant communities that various sources including terrestrial animals and humans may contribute to antibiotic resistance in the freshwater environment. PMID:26608770

  15. Aggregation and resuspension of graphene oxide in simulated natural surface aquatic environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of experiments were performed to simulate the environmental behavior and fate of graphene oxide nanoparticles (GONPs) involved in the surface environment relating to divalent cations, natural organic matter (NOM), and hydraulics. The electrokinetic properties and hydrodynamic diameters of GONPs was systematically determined to characterize GONPs stability and the results indicated Ca2+ (Mg2+) significantly destabilized GONPs with high aggregate strength factors (SF) and fractal dimension (FD), whereas NOM decreased aggregate SF with lower FD and improved GONPs stability primarily because of increasing steric repulsion and electrostatic repulsion. Furthermore, the GONPs resuspension from the sand bed into overlying water with shear flow confirmed that the release would be restricted by Ca2+ (Mg2+), however, enhanced by NOM. The interaction energy based on Derjaguin–Landau–Verwey–Overbeek theory verifies the aggregation and resuspension well. Overall, these experiments provide an innovative look and more details to study the behavior and fate of GONPs. - Highlights: • Aggregation and resuspension of GONPs relating to surface environment are presented. • Aggregate strength factors of GONPs aggregates are quantitated by breakage experiment. • Compactness of the aggregates is closely related to fractal dimension. • Models for GONPs aggregation and breakage are synthetically proposed. • Interaction energy based on DLVO theory could interpret aggregation and resuspension of GONPs. - Aggregation and resuspension of graphene oxide relating to divalent cations, natural organic matter (NOM), and hydraulics are investigated based on DLVO theory

  16. Allelopathy of Aquatic Autotrophs

    OpenAIRE

    Gross, Elisabeth

    2003-01-01

    Allelopathy in aquatic environments may provide a competitive advantage to angiosperms, algae, or cyanobacteria in their interaction with other primary producers. Allelopathy can influence the competition between different photoautotrophs for resources and change the succession of species, for exarnple, in phytoplankton cornmunities. Field evidence and laboratory studies indicate that allelopathy occurs in all aquatic habitats (marine and freshwater), and that ail prirnary producing organisms...

  17. Accumulation and discharge behavior of Cs-137 by zebra fish (Brachydanio rerio) in different aquatic environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uptake and release kinetics of 137Cs from water by the tropical fish Brachydanio rerio was studied under controlled laboratory conditions. The accumulation of this radionuclide from food was avoided by feeding the fish separately in an inactive environment. A steep inverse dependence of bioconcentration factor (BCF) with potassium concentration was observed. This can formally be described by the Equation BCF=5.2 · [K+]-0.44. The elimination rate constant K in fresh water conditions was found to have a magnitude of 0.014±0.003 d-1 which corresponded to a biological half-life of 51±10 days. The uptake and release kinetics of Brachydanio rerio were compared with earlier studies of fresh water fishes. (author) 26 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 tab

  18. Determination of coal tar and creosote constituents in the aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creosote and its parent material, coal tar, are complex mixtures. Assessment of their fate and concentrations in the environment needs to consider a wide variety of both compounds and matrices. Analyses are typically complicated, consisting of sample extraction, purification and chromatography-based final characterization steps. Several new techniques have been introduced to reduce or simplify the number of steps, solvent and time required. Recently developed extraction methods include supercritical fluid, accelerated solvent, microwave and solid-phase microextraction. On-line purification and coupling of extraction and chromatography have also emerged. HPLC and GC remain the major tools for performing the final separations. Application of mass spectrometry has increased as more reliable, versatile and less expensive units have become available, such as the ion trap and mass selective detectors. Fluorescence and diode array UV, in concert with HPLC, and C-, S- and N-selective gas chromatographic detectors are also being applied

  19. Use of quantitative real-time PCR for direct detection of serratia marcescens in marine and other aquatic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, Jessica; Wanless, David; Sinigalliano, Christopher D; Lipp, Erin K

    2014-03-01

    Serratia marcescens is the etiological agent of acroporid serratiosis, a distinct form of white pox disease in the threatened coral Acropora palmata. The pathogen is commonly found in untreated human waste in the Florida Keys, which may contaminate both nearshore and offshore waters. Currently there is no direct method for detection of this bacterium in the aquatic or reef environment, and culture-based techniques may underestimate its abundance in marine waters. A quantitative real-time PCR assay was developed to detect S. marcescens directly from environmental samples, including marine water, coral mucus, sponge tissue, and wastewater. The assay targeted the luxS gene and was able to distinguish S. marcescens from other Serratia species with a reliable quantitative limit of detection of 10 cell equivalents (CE) per reaction. The method could routinely discern the presence of S. marcescens for as few as 3 CE per reaction, but it could not be reliably quantified at this level. The assay detected environmental S. marcescens in complex sewage influent samples at up to 761 CE ml(-1) and in septic system-impacted residential canals in the Florida Keys at up to 4.1 CE ml(-1). This detection assay provided rapid quantitative abilities and good sensitivity and specificity, which should offer an important tool for monitoring this ubiquitous pathogen that can potentially impact both human health and coral health. PMID:24375136

  20. Development of short, acute exposure hazard estimates: a tool for assessing the effects of chemical spills in aquatic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejarano, Adriana C; Farr, James K

    2013-08-01

    Management decisions aimed at protecting aquatic resources following accidental chemical spills into rivers and coastal estuaries require estimates of toxic thresholds derived from realistic spill conditions: acute pulse exposures of short duration (h), information which often is unavailable. Most existing toxicity data (median lethal concentration or median effective concentration) come from tests performed under constant exposure concentrations and exposure durations in the 24-h to 96-h range, conditions not typical of most chemical spills. Short-exposure hazard concentration estimates were derived for selected chemicals using empirical toxicity data. Chemical-specific 5th percentile hazard concentrations (HC5) of species sensitivity distributions (SSD) from individual exposure durations (6-96 h) were derived via bootstrap resampling and were plotted against their original exposure durations to estimate HC5s and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) at shorter exposures (1, 2, and 4 h). This approach allowed the development of short-exposure HC5s for 12 chemicals. Model verification showed agreement between observed and estimated short-exposure HC5s (r(2) adjusted = 0.95, p overprotective, these were derived from environmentally realistic exposure durations, providing risk-assessors with a tool to manage field decisions. Environ Toxicol Chem 2013;32:1918-1927. © 2013 SETAC. PMID:23625642

  1. Effect-Based Tools for Monitoring and Predicting the Ecotoxicological Effects of Chemicals in the Aquatic Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard E. Connon

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ecotoxicology faces the challenge of assessing and predicting the effects of an increasing number of chemical stressors on aquatic species and ecosystems. Herein we review currently applied tools in ecological risk assessment, combining information on exposure with expected biological effects or environmental water quality standards; currently applied effect-based tools are presented based on whether exposure occurs in a controlled laboratory environment or in the field. With increasing ecological relevance the reproducibility, specificity and thus suitability for standardisation of methods tends to diminish. We discuss the use of biomarkers in ecotoxicology including ecotoxicogenomics-based endpoints, which are becoming increasingly important for the detection of sublethal effects. Carefully selected sets of biomarkers allow an assessment of exposure to and effects of toxic chemicals, as well as the health status of organisms and, when combined with chemical analysis, identification of toxicant(s. The promising concept of “adverse outcome pathways (AOP” links mechanistic responses on the cellular level with whole organism, population, community and potentially ecosystem effects and services. For most toxic mechanisms, however, practical application of AOPs will require more information and the identification of key links between responses, as well as key indicators, at different levels of biological organization, ecosystem functioning and ecosystem services.

  2. Porto Tolle thermoelectric power station and aquatic environment of Po Delta (Italy): Synthesis of data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 2400 MW, oil-fueled power station of Porto Tolle (Italy) potentially affects riverine, lagoon and marine sectors of the Po Delta. A synthesis is provided of the data gathered by several research lines, which studied different aspects of the environment during the pre-operational and operational period. Comparisons are made between the two periods and between stations more or less influenced by cooling water discharge. When river water is used for cooling (the majority of cases), some effects on water quality characteristics and on plankton community abundances are evident in the immediate vicinity of the outlet. In the lagoon (Sacca del Canarin) and in the stretch of sea in front of it, effects directly connected with the thermal effluent could not be detected. The geomorphological evolution of the lagoon, however, was influenced by the hydraulic modification brought about by the cooling circuit. This resulted in an enhancement of the biological production of the lagoon. The sea area is not affected in a significant way, but concern is raised about the interaction of cooling discharge and the eutrophic load from the Po River

  3. Radiocesium retention in the aquatic, terrestrial and urban environment: a quantitative and unifying analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The frayed edges of 10 A phyllosilicates (micaceous minerals), responsible for the highly selective sorption of poorly hydrated alkali cations (Cs, Rb, K) in NH$/sb4$, are quantitatively characterized by masking the planar sites with silver-thiourea. Both the capacity of the frayed edge sites (FES) and the Cs-to-K selectivity coefficient of these sites can be measured. The loading dependence of the Cs-to-K selectivity coefficient in the FES of 4 micaceous minerals demonstrates a pronounced degree of heterogeneity. Only a small fraction of the FES ($<$10%) exhibits extremely high Cs preference. For studying complex mineralogical systems (soils, sediments, rocks and ceramics) a new parameter is introduced: the ''radiocesium interception potential'', defined as the product of FES capacity and the Cs-to-K (or NH$/sb4$) selectivity coefficient in the FES at ''zero'' Cs loading. This parameter is a powerful tool in describing and predicting the highly selective sorption processes in the FES. Under freshwater conditions the radiocesium distribution coefficient can be quantitatively predicted by considering a competition with K and NH$/sb4$ in the FES. In a marine environment Na, and to a lesser extent Ca and Mg, also have to be taken into account. Finally, evidences for a redistribution process are given: sorbed Cs ions diffuse to the interlayers of the clay particles. This phenomenon explains the increasing ''fixation'' of radiocesium with time

  4. Micronuclei as biomarkers of genotoxicity of gamma radiation in aquatic environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Luanna R.S.; Silva, Edvane B.; Melo, Ana M.M.A. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (GERAR/DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear. Grupo de Estudos em Radioprotecao e Radioecologia; Silva, Ronaldo C. da [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Genetica; Amancio, Francisco F. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Biofisica e Radiobiologia. Lab. de Radiobiologia

    2011-07-01

    Ionizing radiation is a genotoxic agent, inducing gene mutations and cellular death. Several efforts have been defendants in the development of techniques for measurement of radiation damage in biological systems. Among these techniques, micronuclei test has been showing as a great bio marker of DNA damage, being used in environmental monitoring to detect genotoxic agents in the environment. Additionally, organisms as Biomphalaria glabrata, freshwater molluscs, presents itself as an excellent model to assess damage caused by physical and chemical agents, due their biological and environmental characteristics. The snails were divided into groups of 5 individuals exposed to doses of 0 (control), 25, 35, 45 and 55 Gy of {sup 60}Co. After 48 hours of irradiation, the hemo lymph was collected and prepared the slides, which were stained with Giemsa and analyzed the cellular changes in haemocytes Statistical analysis was accomplished through chi-square test, ANOVA and Tukey test (p< 0,05). The results indicated that B. glabrata showed to be sensitive to gamma radiation. The snails irradiated with 35 Gy showed a decrease of haemocytes, while that of 55 Gy increased. Cellular and morphological changes were observed at doses of 35, 45 and 55 Gy and the dose of 55 Gy, the most radiotoxic. (author)

  5. Micronuclei as biomarkers of genotoxicity of gamma radiation in aquatic environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation is a genotoxic agent, inducing gene mutations and cellular death. Several efforts have been defendants in the development of techniques for measurement of radiation damage in biological systems. Among these techniques, micronuclei test has been showing as a great bio marker of DNA damage, being used in environmental monitoring to detect genotoxic agents in the environment. Additionally, organisms as Biomphalaria glabrata, freshwater molluscs, presents itself as an excellent model to assess damage caused by physical and chemical agents, due their biological and environmental characteristics. The snails were divided into groups of 5 individuals exposed to doses of 0 (control), 25, 35, 45 and 55 Gy of 60Co. After 48 hours of irradiation, the hemo lymph was collected and prepared the slides, which were stained with Giemsa and analyzed the cellular changes in haemocytes Statistical analysis was accomplished through chi-square test, ANOVA and Tukey test (p< 0,05). The results indicated that B. glabrata showed to be sensitive to gamma radiation. The snails irradiated with 35 Gy showed a decrease of haemocytes, while that of 55 Gy increased. Cellular and morphological changes were observed at doses of 35, 45 and 55 Gy and the dose of 55 Gy, the most radiotoxic. (author)

  6. Multi-metal contamination with uranium trend impact on aquatic environment and consequences for fish immune system and adaptive responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guernic, A.; Gagnaire, B. [IRSN/PRP-ENV/SERIS/LECO (France); Sanchez, W. [Institut national de l' environnement industriel et des risques - INERIS (France); Betoulle, S. [Champagne Ardenne University (France)

    2014-07-01

    Human activities have conducted to an increase of concentrations of various metals in aquatic ecosystems, including uranium. Its extraction and use have been rapidly magnified because of its role in the nuclear fuel cycle. These activities have led to high concentrations of uranium in the aquatic environment and thus a potential risk to exposed organisms, including fish. Consequences can be observed through metabolic and physiological responses, called biomarkers. Some biomarkers are interesting in order to evaluate the effects of metal contamination, among other immunotoxicity markers, antioxidant defenses and genotoxicity. The aims of this study are: i) to investigate the effects of a multi-metal contamination on a fish, the three-spined stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus, and ii) to observe the adaptive capacity of fish due to a combination of stress (chemical stress and biological stress). To meet the first objective, six water bodies (ponds and lakes) located in two departments (Cantal and Haute-Vienne, France) were chosen according to their proximity to old uranium mines and to their levels of metal contamination related to chemical processes appeared during extraction. 240 three-spined sticklebacks were caged for 28 days in the six selected sites. A battery of biomarkers was measured in fish sampled after 14 and 28 of caging. The results for the Haute-Vienne department showed that caged fish in the pond with the highest uranium concentration (20 μg.L{sup -1}) presented the most DNA damage after 14 days of caging. Leukocyte phagocytosis (marker of immunotoxicity) of caged fish in this pond was lower at 14 days and greater at 28 days compared to other ponds without uranium. The multi-metal contamination negatively affected other parameters such as the condition index, oxidative activity, viability of lysosomal membrane and leukocytes distribution. In order to study the response of fish to a combined stress (chemical + biological) (objective ii), a second

  7. Multi-metal contamination with uranium trend impact on aquatic environment and consequences for fish immune system and adaptive responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human activities have conducted to an increase of concentrations of various metals in aquatic ecosystems, including uranium. Its extraction and use have been rapidly magnified because of its role in the nuclear fuel cycle. These activities have led to high concentrations of uranium in the aquatic environment and thus a potential risk to exposed organisms, including fish. Consequences can be observed through metabolic and physiological responses, called biomarkers. Some biomarkers are interesting in order to evaluate the effects of metal contamination, among other immunotoxicity markers, antioxidant defenses and genotoxicity. The aims of this study are: i) to investigate the effects of a multi-metal contamination on a fish, the three-spined stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus, and ii) to observe the adaptive capacity of fish due to a combination of stress (chemical stress and biological stress). To meet the first objective, six water bodies (ponds and lakes) located in two departments (Cantal and Haute-Vienne, France) were chosen according to their proximity to old uranium mines and to their levels of metal contamination related to chemical processes appeared during extraction. 240 three-spined sticklebacks were caged for 28 days in the six selected sites. A battery of biomarkers was measured in fish sampled after 14 and 28 of caging. The results for the Haute-Vienne department showed that caged fish in the pond with the highest uranium concentration (20 μg.L-1) presented the most DNA damage after 14 days of caging. Leukocyte phagocytosis (marker of immunotoxicity) of caged fish in this pond was lower at 14 days and greater at 28 days compared to other ponds without uranium. The multi-metal contamination negatively affected other parameters such as the condition index, oxidative activity, viability of lysosomal membrane and leukocytes distribution. In order to study the response of fish to a combined stress (chemical + biological) (objective ii), a second

  8. Religion, Rule of Law, or the Family Honour? Moral Commitment among Lebanese Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosn, Irma-Kaarina

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined the moral development of Lebanese 1st graders. Interviews with sixty-three Lebanese children (28 girls and 35 boys, ages 6-7.5) were analysed for the study. The children (25 Christian and 38 Muslim) were interviewed about moral dilemmas children of this age might encounter in their daily life. The data revealed that…

  9. Oxidation of diclofenac with chlorine dioxide in aquatic environments: influences of different nitrogenous species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingling; Liu, Haijin; Liu, Guoguang; Xie, Youhai; Ni, Tianjun

    2015-06-01

    The oxidation of diclofenac (DCF), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug and emerging water pollutant, with chlorine dioxide was investigated under simulated water disinfection conditions. The reaction kinetics as functions of the initial concentrations of DCF, different nitrogenous species, and different pE values were experimentally determined. The results demonstrated that DCF reacted rapidly with ClO2, where more than 75 % of DCF (≤3.00 μM) was removed by 18.94 μM ClO2 within 60 s. All of the reactions followed pseudo first-order kinetics with respect to DCF, and the rate constant, k obs, exhibited a significant decrease from 4.21 × 10(-2) to 8.09 × 10(-3) s(-1), as the initial DCF concentration was increased from 1.00 to 5.00 μM. Furthermore, the degradation kinetics of DCF was clearly dependent on nitrogen-containing ion concentrations in the reaction solution. Ammonium and nitrite ions inhibited the DCF degradation by ClO2, whereas nitrate ion clearly initiated its promotion. In contrast, the inhibitory effect of NO2 (-) was more robust than that of NH4 (+). When the values of pE were gradually increased, the transformation of NH4 (+) to NO2 (-), and subsequently to NO3 (-), would occur, the rate constants were initially decreased, and then increased. When NH4 (+) and NO2 (-) coexisted, the inhibitory effect on the DCF degradation was less than the sum of the partial inhibitory effect. However, when NO2 (-) and NO3 (-) coexisted, the actual inhibition rate was greater than the theoretical estimate. These results indicated that the interaction of NH4 (+) and NO2 (-) was antagonistic, while the coexistence of NO2 (-) and NO3 (-) was observed to have a synergistic effect in aqueous environments. PMID:25604564

  10. Nonmagnetotactic multicellular prokaryotes from low-saline, nonmarine aquatic environments and their unusual negative phototactic behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Christopher T; Abreu, Fernanda; Lins, Ulysses; Bazylinski, Dennis A

    2010-05-01

    Magnetotactic multicellular prokaryotes (MMPs) are unique magnetotactic bacteria of the Deltaproteobacteria class and the first found to biomineralize the magnetic mineral greigite (Fe(3)S(4)). Thus far they have been reported only from marine habitats. We questioned whether MMPs exist in low-saline, nonmarine environments. MMPs were observed in samples from shallow springs in the Great Boiling Springs geothermal field and Pyramid Lake, both located in northwestern Nevada. The temperature at all sites was ambient, and salinities ranged from 5 to 11 ppt. These MMPs were not magnetotactic and did not contain magnetosomes (called nMMPs here). nMMPs ranged from 7 to 11 microm in diameter, were composed of about 40 to 60 Gram-negative cells, and were motile by numerous flagella that covered each cell on one side, characteristics similar to those of MMPs. 16S rRNA gene sequences of nMMPs show that they form a separate phylogenetic branch within the MMP group in the Deltaproteobacteria class, probably representing a single species. nMMPs exhibited a negative phototactic behavior to white light and to wavelengths of < or =480 nm (blue). We devised a "light racetrack" to exploit this behavior, which was used to photoconcentrate nMMPs for specific purposes (e.g., DNA extraction) even though their numbers were low in the sample. Our results show that the unique morphology of the MMP is not restricted to marine and magnetotactic prokaryotes. Discovery of nonmagnetotactic forms of the MMP might support the hypothesis that acquisition of the magnetosome genes involves horizontal gene transfer. To our knowledge, this is the first report of phototaxis in bacteria of the Deltaproteobacteria class. PMID:20363801

  11. Bodies in sequestered and non-sequestered aquatic environments: a comparative taphonomic study using decompositional scoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Donno, A; Campobasso, C P; Santoro, V; Leonardi, S; Tafuri, S; Introna, F

    2014-12-01

    The study of decomposition by using accumulated degree days (ADDs) has been suggested not only in terrestrial decay but also for water-related deaths. Previous studies have demonstrated that the accumulation of thermal energy as a function of the post-mortem submersion interval (PMSI) can be derived from a descriptive decompositional scoring system (DSS). In order to verify how useful can the total aquatic decomposition score (TADS) for ADD prediction be, a comparative taphonomic study has been performed between two series of bodies: 16 corpses found floating in shallower waters with a presumptive PMSI from 3 to 118 days and exposed to water temperatures (Tw) between 10.5 and 20.3 °C approximately equating from a minimum of 46 to 1.392 ADD; 52 bodies, all victims of a single shipwreck, found in sequestered environments and subjected to constant Tw of 4 °C for 210 days approximately equating to 840 ADD. The two series of bodies have revealed different stages of decay and a large DSS variability. In most of bodies, freshly formed adipocere was able to delay the appearance of later decompositional stages explaining why most of the bodies were in relatively good condition. Although promising, the accuracy of the TADS model can be affected by adipocere and animal activity. The TADS model suffers of the same limitations for ADD calculations as they can give a false perception of accuracy due to the complexity of integrating all changing factors affecting human decay in sequestered and non-sequestered marine environments (currents, animal activity, water temperatures, depth of submersion). PMID:25498931

  12. Sulfonamide and tetracycline resistance genes in total- and culturable-bacterial assemblages in South African aquatic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Satoru; Ogo, Mitsuko; Koike, Tatsuya; Takada, Hideshige; Newman, Brent

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistant bacteria are ubiquitous in the natural environment. The introduction of effluent derived antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) into aquatic environments is of concern in the spreading of genetic risk. This study showed the prevalence of sulfonamide and tetracycline resistance genes, sul1, sul2, sul3, and tet(M), in the total bacterial assemblage and colony forming bacterial assemblage in river and estuarine water and sewage treatment plants (STP) in South Africa. There was no correlation between antibiotic concentrations and ARGs, suggesting the targeted ARGs are spread in a wide area without connection to selection pressure. Among sul genes, sul1 and sul2 were major genes in the total (over 10-2 copies/16S) and colony forming bacteria assemblages (∼10-1 copies/16S). In urban waters, the sul3 gene was mostly not detectable in total and culturable assemblages, suggesting sul3 is not abundant. tet(M) was found in natural assemblages with 10-3 copies/16S level in STP, but was not detected in colony forming bacteria, suggesting the non-culturable (yet-to-be cultured) bacterial community in urban surface waters and STP effluent possess the tet(M) gene. Sulfamethoxazole (SMX) resistant (SMXr) and oxytetracycline (OTC) resistant (OTCr) bacterial communities in urban waters possessed not only sul1 and sul2 but also sul3 and tet(M) genes. These genes are widely distributed in SMXr and OTCr bacteria. In conclusion, urban river and estuarine water and STP effluent in the Durban area were highly contaminated with ARGs, and the yet-to-be cultured bacterial community may act as a non-visible ARG reservoir in certain situations. PMID:26300864

  13. Who possesses drug resistance genes in the aquatic environment?: sulfamethoxazole (SMX) resistance genes among the bacterial community in water environment of Metro-Manila, Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Satoru; Ogo, Mitsuko; Miller, Todd W.; Shimizu, Akiko; Takada, Hideshige; Siringan, Maria Auxilia T.

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence has shown that antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) are ubiquitous in natural environments, including sites considered pristine. To understand the origin of ARGs and their dynamics, we must first define their actual presence in the natural bacterial assemblage. Here we found varying distribution profiles of sul genes in “colony forming bacterial assemblages” and “natural bacterial assemblages.” Our monitoring for antibiotic contamination revealed that sulfamethoxazole (SMX) is a major contaminant in aquatic environments of Metro-Manila, which would have been derived from human and animal use, and subsequently decreased through the process of outflow from source to the sea. The SMX-resistant bacterial rate evaluated by the colony forming unit showed 10 to 86% of the total colony numbers showed higher rates from freshwater sites compared to marine sites. When sul genes were quantified by qPCR, colony-forming bacteria conveyed sul1 and sul2 genes in freshwater and seawater (10−5–10−2 copy/16S) but not sul3. Among the natural bacterial assemblage, all sul1, sul2, and sul3 were detected (10−5–10−3 copy/16S), whereas all sul genes were at an almost non-detectable level in the freshwater assemblage. This study suggests that sul1 and sul2 are main sul genes in culturable bacteria, whereas sul3 is conveyed by non-culturable bacteria in the sea. As a result marine bacteria possess sul1, sul2 and sul3 genes in the marine environment. PMID:23641240

  14. The role of physical processes controlling the behaviour of radionuclide contaminants in the aquatic environment: a review of state-of-the-art modelling approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is aimed at presenting and discussing the methodologies implemented in state-of-the-art models for predicting the physical processes of radionuclide migration through the aquatic environment, including transport due to water currents, diffusion, settling and re-suspension. Models are briefly described, model parameter values reviewed and values recommended. The different modelling approaches are briefly classified and the advantages and disadvantages of the various model approaches and methodologies are assessed.

  15. INTERPRETATION OF COPPER AND ZINC CONTAMINATION IN THE AQUATIC ENVIRONMENT OF PENINSULAR MALAYSIA WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO A POLLUTED RIVER, SEPANG RIVER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Three different aquatic ecosystems(an urban pond,Kelana Jays Pond;a polluted river,Sepang River;and the intertidal and offshore areas of the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia)with different sets of ecological backgrounds and human activities were reviewed and assessed for the levels of Cu and Zn contamination with special reference to those found in polluted sediments collected from the Sepang River.The discussion on the contamination levels of Cu and Zn in the aquatic environment of Peninsular Malaysia was based on a comparison of the metal contamination of 4 kinds of aquatic environments.The comparison of 4 different areas was based on①total concentrations of 2 metals;②the concentrations and percentages of the nonresistant(EFLE,acid-reducible and oxidisable-organic)and resistant geochemical fractions;and③correlation coefficients(R-values)based on data of 4 areas separately and a combination of 4 areas.The Sepang River recorded nonresistant fractions of 63.1%for Zn and 55.8%for Cu in addition toslightly lower metal concentrations when compared to those(60%-70%)reported before the shutting down of the piggery activities in that area.These nonresistant metal percentages(55%-63%)indicated that the metal concentrations were still dominated by anthropogenic sources since nonresistant fraction of metals were mostly contributed by anthropogenic sources.The positive results from the four different aquatic environments assessed here provided strong evidence to show that Malaysia's aquatic environment had received anthropogenic Cu and Zn.The present study also showed that thepercentage of the nonresistant fraction and the R-values based on correlation analysis of Cu and Zn could be used as indicators of Cu and Zn pollution in the Malaysian aquatic ecosystem.Based on the present data,the correlation coefficients(R-values)are potential indicators of EFLE Cu and acid-reducible Cu of the sediments.The use of R-values as indicators of metal pollution is suggested and it is

  16. The fate of EDTA and DTPA in aquatic environments receiving waste water from two pulp and paper mills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remberger, M.; Svenson, Anders

    1997-10-01

    To evaluate the fate of the complexing agents in receiving waters, two basic questions have been addressed: (i) are EDTA and DTPA found in the aquatic environment after discharge into receiving waters and (ii) are they photolytically converted. Two mills, one pulp mill localized at a fresh water lake and one pulp and paper mill at a brackish water were investigated, both mills using bleaching technologies with EDTA and DTPA as complexing agents. Samples were collected at the discharge point and along a gradient in the receiving waters at two occasions: summer at solstice and winter with low light intensity. Samples were taken from surface water, an intermediate depth, and bottom water. A new analytical method was applied, which made it possible to quantify the analytes at sub-{mu}g/l level. The complexing agents EDTA and DTPA and their primary degradation products were detected in the effluent and the receiving waters in the vicinity of the mills. DTPA and the degradation products could be detected a few kilometers from the effluent point while EDTA could be detected in more remote locations at fairly constant concentrations. The absorption of light in the sun spectrum in the water columns of the receiving waters was studied at different localities and during summer and winter conditions. The theoretical photochemical half-life of the ferric complex of EDTA in the surface layer of a central Swedish lake was confirmed. Analysis of EDTA in samples of receiving waters after photolytic treatment showed however, that a large portion of the complexing agent was unaffected by the treatment, indicating that most of the EDTA was complexed with other metals. EDTA in brackish water samples was unaffected by the photolytic treatment upon addition of excess ferric ions, except in winter close to the discharge point. The ease by which the ferric complexes are photochemically converted in ideal conditions seems to be hampered in receiving waters. 42 refs, 16 figs, 2 tabs

  17. Construction of a self- luminescent cyanobacterial bioreporter that detects a broad range of bioavailable heavy metals in aquatic environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keila eMartin-Betancor

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A self-luminescent bioreporter strain of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942 was constructed by fusing the promoter region of the smt locus (encoding the transcriptional repressor SmtB and the metallothionein SmtA to luxCDABE from Photorhabdus luminescens; the sensor smtB gene controlling the expression of smtA was cloned in the same vector. The bioreporter performance was tested with a range of heavy metals and was shown to respond linearly to divalent Zn, Cd, Cu, Co, Hg and monovalent Ag. Chemical modelling was used to link bioreporter response with metal speciation and bioavailability. Limits of Detection (LODs, Maximum Permissive Concentrations (MPCs and dynamic ranges for each metal were calculated in terms of free ion concentrations. The ranges of detection varied from 11 to 72 pM for Hg2+ (the ion to which the bioreporter was most sensitive to 1.54-5.35 µM for Cd2+ with an order of decreasing sensitivity as follows: Hg2+ >> Cu2+ >> Ag+ > Co2+ ≥ Zn2+ > Cd2+. However, the maximum induction factor reached 75-fold in the case of Zn2+ and 56-fold in the case of Cd2+, implying that Zn2+ is the preferred metal in vivo for the SmtB sensor, followed by Cd2+, Ag+ and Cu2+ (around 45-50-fold induction, Hg2+ (30-fold and finally Co2+ (20-fold. The bioreporter performance was tested in real environmental samples with different water matrix complexity artificially contaminated with increasing concentrations of Zn, Cd, Ag and Cu, confirming its validity as a sensor of free heavy metal cations bioavailability in aquatic environments.

  18. Construction of a self-luminescent cyanobacterial bioreporter that detects a broad range of bioavailable heavy metals in aquatic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Betancor, Keila; Rodea-Palomares, Ismael; Muñoz-Martín, M A; Leganés, Francisco; Fernández-Piñas, Francisca

    2015-01-01

    A self-luminescent bioreporter strain of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942 was constructed by fusing the promoter region of the smt locus (encoding the transcriptional repressor SmtB and the metallothionein SmtA) to luxCDABE from Photorhabdus luminescens; the sensor smtB gene controlling the expression of smtA was cloned in the same vector. The bioreporter performance was tested with a range of heavy metals and was shown to respond linearly to divalent Zn, Cd, Cu, Co, Hg, and monovalent Ag. Chemical modeling was used to link bioreporter response with metal speciation and bioavailability. Limits of Detection (LODs), Maximum Permissive Concentrations (MPCs) and dynamic ranges for each metal were calculated in terms of free ion concentrations. The ranges of detection varied from 11 to 72 pM for Hg(2+) (the ion to which the bioreporter was most sensitive) to 1.54-5.35 μM for Cd(2+) with an order of decreasing sensitivity as follows: Hg(2+) > Cu(2+) > Ag(+) > Co(2+) ≥ Zn(2+) > Cd(2+). However, the maximum induction factor reached 75-fold in the case of Zn(2+) and 56-fold in the case of Cd(2+), implying that Zn(2+) is the preferred metal in vivo for the SmtB sensor, followed by Cd(2+), Ag(+) and Cu(2+) (around 45-50-fold induction), Hg(2+) (30-fold) and finally Co(2+) (20-fold). The bioreporter performance was tested in real environmental samples with different water matrix complexity artificially contaminated with increasing concentrations of Zn, Cd, Ag, and Cu, confirming its validity as a sensor of free heavy metal cations bioavailability in aquatic environments. PMID:25806029

  19. Tulane/Xavier University hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Annual technical report, January 1--December 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-02

    Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and beyond the year 2000. In 1989, the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR) was established as the umbrella organization which coordinates environmental research at both universities. In December, 1992, the Tulane/Xavier CBR was awarded a five year grant to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin project is a broad research and education program aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Studies include defining the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The Mississippi River Basin represents a model system for analyzing and solving contamination problems that are found in aquatic systems world-wide. Summaries which describe objectives, goals, and accomplishments are included on ten collaborative cluster projects, two education projects, and six initiation projects. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  20. Antibiotic resistance in bacteria isolated from freshwater aquacultures and prediction of the persistence and toxicity of antimicrobials in the aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Seung J; Jang, Eunhee; Lee, Sang-Hun; Yoo, Byeong-Hak; Kim, Sun-Kyoung; Kim, Tak-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria isolated from freshwater aquaculture effluents was investigated. The bacterial strains were collected from four different freshwater aquaculture effluents (catfish, trout, eel, and loach). Based on sequence of 16S rRNA, a total of 20 bacterial strains was isolated and one half of the isolated bacteria were Aeromonas sp. The antimicrobial sensitivity test was performed using the disc diffusion method. Individual antibiotic-resistant bacteria to antimicrobials were 41.7% and multiple antibiotic resistant bacteria were 58.3%. The disinfection of antibiotic-resistant bacteria by electron beam (E-beam) irradiation was carried out using an electron accelerator. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria were effectively disinfected by E-beam irradiation. The isolated bacteria were completely disinfected at a dose of less than 2 kGy. The persistence and toxicity of each antimicrobial in the aquatic environment was estimated due to the human health and ecosystems. In order to estimate the persistence and toxicity of antimicrobials in the aquatic environment, two quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) models were used. The persistence and toxicity of each antimicrobial were influenced on its hydrophobicity. In addition, QSAR models showed that isoelectric point and hydrogen bonding acceptor are key parameters to estimate the persistence and toxicity of antimicrobials in the aquatic environment. PMID:23452215

  1. A survey of blood pressure in Lebanese children and adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassem Abou Merhi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blood pressure varies between populations due to ethnic and environmental factors. Therefore, normal blood pressure values should be determined for different populations. Aims: The aim of this survey was to produce blood pressure nomograms for Lebanese children in order to establish distribution curves of blood pressure by age and sex. Subjects and Methods: We conducted a survey of blood pressure in 5710 Lebanese schoolchildren aged 5 to 15 years (2918 boys and 2792 girls, and studied the distribution of systolic and diastolic blood pressure in these children and adolescents. Blood pressure was measured with a mercury sphygmomanometer using a standardized technique. Results: Both systolic and diastolic blood pressure had a positive correlation with weight, height, age, and body mass index (r= 0.648, 0.643, 0.582, and 0.44, respectively (P < .001. There was no significant difference in the systolic and diastolic blood pressure in boys compared to girls of corresponding ages. However, the average annual increase in systolic blood pressure was 2.86 mm Hg in boys and 2.63 mm Hg in girls, whereas the annual increase in diastolic blood pressure was 1.72 mm Hg in boys and 1.48 mm Hg in girls. The prevalence of high and high-normal blood pressure at the upper limit of normal (between the 90th and 95th percentile, at risk of future hypertension if not managed adequately, was 10.5% in boys and 6.9% in girls, with similar distributions among the two sexes. Conclusions: We present the first age-specific reference values for blood pressure of Lebanese children aged 5 to 15 years based on a good representative sample. The use of these reference values should help pediatricians identify children with normal, high-normal and high blood pressure.

  2. A survey of blood pressure in Lebanese children and adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassem Abou Merhi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blood pressure varies between populations due to ethnic and environmental factors. Therefore, normal blood pressure values should be determined for different populations. Aims : The aim of this survey was to produce blood pressure nomograms for Lebanese children in order to establish distribution curves of blood pressure by age and sex. Subjects and Methods: We conducted a survey of blood pressure in 5710 Lebanese schoolchildren aged 5 to 15 years (2918 boys and 2792 girls, and studied the distribution of systolic and diastolic blood pressure in these children and adolescents. Blood pressure was measured with a mercury sphygmomanometer using a standardized technique. Results: Both systolic and diastolic blood pressure had a positive correlation with weight, height, age, and body mass index (r= 0.648, 0.643, 0.582, and 0.44, respectively (P < .001. There was no significant difference in the systolic and diastolic blood pressure in boys compared to girls of corresponding ages. However, the average annual increase in systolic blood pressure was 2.86 mm Hg in boys and 2.63 mm Hg in girls, whereas the annual increase in diastolic blood pressure was 1.72 mm Hg in boys and 1.48 mm Hg in girls. The prevalence of high and high-normal blood pressure at the upper limit of normal (between the 90 th and 95 th percentile, at risk of future hypertension if not managed adequately, was 10.5% in boys and 6.9% in girls, with similar distributions among the two sexes. Conclusions: We present the first age-specific reference values for blood pressure of Lebanese children aged 5 to 15 years based on a good representative sample. The use of these reference values should help pediatricians identify children with normal, high-normal and high blood pressure.

  3. Electrical performance improvement of the lebanese electric power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electric power is a vital prerequisite in any modern economy. In Lebanon, the availability of a reliable power supply at a reasonable cost is necessary for economic growth and development of the country's infrastructure. The optimal combination and co-ordination between using advanced technology in the power components and implementing high level information processing methods is a major challenge for the development of a modern electric energy supply system. This report provides an overview of the results of the research ''Electrical performance improvement of the Lebanese Electric Power System ''during the period 1987-1994, and a comprehensive summary of the work done in the last two years with emphasis on Energy Management Systems(EMS). The aim of the rehabilitation and expansion program is to re-operate the Lebanese Electric Power System (LEPS) as an integrated power system.The headline of any such policy is the implementation of a control strategy within the framework of a national control centre and software applications. The implementation of basic EMS concepts to the Lebanese utility associated with the techno-economical justification of EMS-S?CADA (Supervisor Control and Data Acquisition) systems and the major data requirements are investigated. This work outlines the load management problems and provides a statistical analysis of the collected data for the execution of a national energy conservation program. In addition, it investigates the development and installation of the estimator as an EMS tool. The mathematical modeling of the state estimator is discussed. A PC based software package was developed and customized to account for the LEPS specifics. This state estimator is used as an intermediate solution in the absence of a national control center. The state estimator software package was implemented on a LEPS model to determine the minimum control requirements for the observability of the system. This observability was studied on the basis of a

  4. Beliefs about wife beating: an exploratory study with Lebanese students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeid, Nadine; Chang, Doris F; Ginges, Jeremy

    2010-06-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in understanding the sociocultural contexts and risk factors for domestic violence in the Arab world. This study provides an analysis of the religious, legal, and familial contexts of domestic violence in Lebanon and assesses contemporary attitudes toward women and wife beating in a sample of 206 Lebanese university students. Gender, patriarchal attitudes, religion, childhood experiences with family violence, and mother's employment status were investigated as predictors of attitudes toward wife beating. Consistent with feminist theories of wife abuse, gender and attitudes toward women's roles emerged as the strongest predictors of beliefs about wife beating. PMID:20445079

  5. A multiple testing approach for hazard evaluation of complex mixtures in the aquatic environment: the use of diesel oil as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, B T; Romanenko, V I

    1989-01-01

    Traditional single species toxicity tests and multiple component laboratory-scaled microcosm assays were combined to assess the toxicological hazard of diesel oil, a model complex mixture, to a model aquatic environment. The immediate impact of diesel oil dosed on a freshwater community was studied in a model pond microcosm over 14 days: a 7-day dosage and a 7-day recovery period. A multicomponent laboratory microcosm was designed to monitor the biological effects of diesel oil (1.0 mg litre(-1)) on four components: water, sediment (soil + microbiota), plants (aquatic macrophytes and algae), and animals (zooplanktonic and zoobenthic invertebrates). To determine the sensitivity of each part of the community to diesel oil contamination and how this model community recovered when the oil dissipated, limnological, toxicological, and microbiological variables were considered. Our model revealed these significant occurrences during the spill period: first, a community production and respiration perturbation, characterized in the water column by a decrease in dissolved oxygen and redox potential and a concomitant increase in alkalinity and conductivity; second, marked changes in microbiota of sediments that included bacterial heterotrophic dominance and a high heterotrophic index (0.6), increased bacterial productivity, and the marked increases in numbers of saprophytic bacteria (10 x) and bacterial oil degraders (1000 x); and third, column water acutely toxic (100% mortality) to two model taxa: Selenastrum capricornutum and Daphnia magna. Following the simulated clean-up procedure to remove the oil slick, the recovery period of this freshwater microcosm was characterized by a return to control values. This experimental design emphasized monitoring toxicological responses in aquatic microcosm; hence, we proposed the term 'toxicosm' to describe this approach to aquatic toxicological hazard evaluation. The toxicosm as a valuable toxicological tool for screening aquatic

  6. The Lebanese electricity system in the context of sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Lebanese electricity system has been evaluated in terms of its sustainability. An integrated approach was adopted to assess the life-cycle technical, environmental, energy and economic attributes of the system. The findings show that the Lebanese electricity system is characterized by a weak performance in all analysed aspects related to the sustainability of energy systems. Specifically, the system lacks adequacy and security leading to a supply-demand deficit and poor diversity. It gives rise to significant environmental emissions (including green-house gases), and produces large economic inefficiencies. The costs and benefits of optimising the performance of the centralised electricity system are presented, indicating substantial net benefits (together with considerable benefits in reduced environmental impacts across the life-cycle assessment categories, including carbon emissions) from improving the transmission and distribution networks, upgrading existing conventional plants to their design standards, and shifting towards the use of natural gas. The expected levelised cost of various energy sources in Lebanon also indicates that renewable energy sources are competitive alternatives at the present time.

  7. Syro-Lebanese migration to Colombia, Venezuela and Curacão: From mainly christian to predominantly Muslim phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Bruckmayr

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study provides a long term perspective on Syro-Lebanese migration to the southern (Circum- Caribbean. Starting in the late 19th century this still continuing migratory process has witnessed major waves of arrivals in the area from its inception until the 1930s and then again since the beginning of the Lebanon war. Characteristically, these two periods are also representing a shift from a mainly Christian to a predominantly Muslim phenomenon now subject to the forces of globalization. With respect to current European immigration and integration debates, the latter provides us with a glimpse on Muslim immigrant affairs outside of the exclusive club usually meant by the term "the West" and taken to be the sole recipient of such migratory movements. Focusing mainly on the Colombian experience of SyroLebanese migrants, the modes of adapting to local culture and environment of both waves, as well as those of an intermediary wave directed mostly at Venezuela, shall be compared and evaluated in search for differences, continuities and similarities.

  8. Reactivity and transfer of tributyl-tin and mercury in aquatic environments; Etude de la reactivite et du transfert du tributyletain et du mercure dans les environnements aquatiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tessier, E.

    2004-12-15

    Aquatic ecosystems are particularly affected by tributyl-tin (TBT) and mercury (Hg) chronic contamination. These micro-pollutants are ubiquitous and persistent and occurred at trace level, likely to drastically impair aquatic environments. TBT and Hg biogeochemical cycles are driven by transformation and transfer mechanisms between the different environmental compartments. These natural processes have been studied in details by using novel analytical methods and environmental design to improve the risk assessment. The first part of this work focus on the mechanistic study of TBT and Hg reactivity and transfer in reconstituted aquatic ecosystems. These experiments involve both state-of-the-art analytical speciation techniques, partly based on quantification by isotopic dilution and experimental tools simulating the environmental conditions. Kinetics of TBT and Hg distribution (adsorption, bioaccumulation, biodegradation, clearance) have been simultaneously characterized in all compartments of the microcosms presenting a simple biological organization. In a second step, volatilization kinetics of TBT at real interfaces have been studied to assess the potential remobilization and elimination pathways of butyl-tin compounds. Finally, in a third part, stable isotopic tracers of Hg have been employed to discriminate and quantify the coupled methylation and demethylation kinetics in estuarine sediments, by forcing different environmental factors (oxygenation, microbial activity). (author)

  9. Inventory of Engineered Nanoparticle-Containing Consumer Products Available in the Singapore Retail Market and Likelihood of Release into the Aquatic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Leu, Yu-Rui; Aitken, Robert J.; Riediker, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Consumer products containing engineered nanoparticles (ENP) are already entering the marketplace. This leads, inter alia, to questions about the potential for release of ENP into the environment from commercial products. We have inventoried the prevalence of ENP-containing consumer products in the Singapore market by carrying out onsite assessments of products sold in all major chains of retail and cosmetic stores. We have assessed their usage patterns and estimated release factors and emission quantities to obtain a better understanding of the quantities of ENP that are released into which compartments of the aquatic environment in Singapore. Products investigated were assessed for their likelihood to contain ENP based on the declaration of ENP by producers, feature descriptions, and the information on particle size from the literature. Among the 1,432 products investigated, 138 were “confirmed” and 293 were “likely” to contain ENP. Product categories included sunscreens, cosmetics, health and fitness, automotive, food, home and garden, clothing and footwear, and eyeglass/lens coatings. Among the 27 different types of nanomaterials identified, SiO2 was predominant, followed by TiO2 and ZnO, Carbon Black, Ag, and Au. The amounts of ENP released into the aquatic system, which was estimated on the basis of typical product use, ENP concentration in the product, daily use quantity, release factor, and market share, were in the range of several hundred tons per year. As these quantities are likely to increase, it will be important to further study the fate of ENP that reach the aquatic environment in Singapore. PMID:26213957

  10. Quinolone co-resistance in ESBL- or AmpC-producing Escherichia coli from an Indian urban aquatic environment and their public health implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Priyanka; Kanaujia, Pawan Kumar; Singh, Nambram Somendro; Sharma, Shalu; Kumar, Shakti; Virdi, Jugsharan Singh

    2016-01-01

    Quinolone and β-lactam antibiotics constitute major mainstay of treatment against infections caused by pathogenic Escherichia coli. Presence of E. coli strains expressing co-resistance to both these antibiotic classes in urban aquatic environments which are consistently being used for various anthropogenic activities represents a serious public health concern. From a heterogeneous collection of 61 E. coli strains isolated from the river Yamuna traversing through the National Capital Territory of Delhi (India), those harboring blaCTX-M-15 (n = 10) or blaCMY-42 (n = 2) were investigated for co-resistance to quinolones and the molecular mechanisms thereof. Resistance was primarily attributed to amino acid substitutions in the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of GyrA (S83L ± D87N) and ParC (S80I ± E84K). One of the E. coli strains, viz., IPE, also carried substitutions in GyrB and ParE at positions Ser492→Asn and Ser458→Ala, respectively. The phenotypically susceptible strains nevertheless carried plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) gene, viz., qnrS, which showed co-transfer to the recipient quinolone-sensitive E. coli J53 along with the genes encoding β-lactamases and led to increase in minimal inhibitory concentrations of quinolone antibiotics. To the best of our knowledge, this represents first report of molecular characterization of quinolone co-resistance in E. coli harboring genes for ESBLs or AmpC β-lactamases from a natural aquatic environment of India. The study warrants true appreciation of the potential of urban aquatic environments in the emergence and spread of multi-drug resistance and underscores the need to characterize resistance genetic elements vis-à-vis their public health implications, irrespective of apparent phenotypic resistance. PMID:26498967

  11. The Adoption of "E-Banking" by Lebanese Banks: Success and Critical Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Elissar Toufaily; Naoufel Daghfous; Roy Toffoli

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the organizational, structural, and strategic factors that can speed up or slow down the adoption of E-banking innovations by financial institutions in the Lebanese market. A conceptual model is developed based on a review of the major innovation adoption theories and other research findings, and tested with a survey administered through a census of the population of Lebanese banks. Findings revealed that the organizational variables of bank size, presence of functional ...

  12. Reclaiming the community public sphere: communal individuals, communities and the lebanese system

    OpenAIRE

    di Ricco, Massimo

    2008-01-01

    The Lebanese confessional system, besides the continuous reshapes assisted since its establishment, finds its peculiarity in the institutional recognition of various confessional communities and in its structure based on the idea of the power-sharing. Each recognized Lebanese community enjoys of political quotas in the national Parliament, and the system provides them with prerogatives in managing the personal status law of their own members, making the community autonomous from state interfe...

  13. Diversity and abundance of aquatic macroinvertebrates in a lotic environment in Midwestern São Paulo State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Lucas Bochini

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the diversity and abundance of an aquatic macroinvertebrate community in the Vargem Limpa stream located in Bauru, Midwestern São Paulo State, and characterized the water quality based on biological parameters. The sampling was carried out during the rain season (December, 2004. It was analyzed and identified 3,068 organisms belonging to 9 macroinvertebrate families. The system showed low richness and diversity of organisms in response to water quality.

  14. Caloric density of aquatic macrophytes in different environments of the Baía river subsystem, upper Paraná river floodplain, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Célia de Almeida Lopes; Anna Christina Esper Amaro de Faria; Gislaine Iachstel Manetta; Evanilde Benedito-Cecilio

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the caloric density of leaves, stems and roots of aquatic macrophytes in different environments of the Baía subsystem (Baía river and Fechada and Guaraná lagoons) on the Upper Paraná river floodplain, in addition to identify the variability between ecological groups. Samplings of Eichhornia crassipes, Salvinia spp, Pistia stratiotes, Eichhornia azurea, Polygonum sp, Cyperaceae and Poaceae were carried out in February 2003. Spatial differences in the calor...

  15. Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research; project: hazardous materials in aquatic environments; subproject: biomarkers and risk assessment in Bayou Trepagnier, LA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and beyond the year 2000. the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR) was established in 1989 as the umbrella organization to coordinate environmental research at both universities. CBR projects funded by the DOE under the Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments grant are defining the following: (1) the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants through wetlands environments, (2) the actual and potential impact of contaminants on ecological systems and health, (3) the mechanisms and new technologies through which these impacts might be remediated, and (4) new programs aimed at educating and training environmental workers of the future. The subproject described in this report, 'Biomarkers and Risk Assessment in Bayou Trepagnier, LN', is particularly relevant to the US Department of Energy's Environmental Restoration and Waste Management program aimed at solving problems related to hazard monitoring and clean-up prioritization at sites with aquatic pollution problems in the DOE complex

  16. Assessment of background concentrations of organometallic compounds (methylmercury, ethyllead and butyl- and phenyltin) in French aquatic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalheiro, Joana; Sola, Cristina; Baldanza, Julie; Tessier, Emmanuel; Lestremau, François; Botta, Fabrizio; Preud'homme, Hugues; Monperrus, Mathilde; Amouroux, David

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this work is to estimate background concentrations of organometallic compounds, such as tributyltin (TBT), dibutyltin (DBT), monobutyltin (MBT), triphenyltin (TPhT), diphenyltin (DPhT), monophenyltin (MPhT), methylmercury (MeHg), inorganic mercury (iHg) and diethyllead (Et2Pb) in the aquatic environment at the French national scale. Both water and sediment samples were collected all over the country, resulting in 152 water samples and 123 sediment samples collected at 181 sampling points. Three types of surface water bodies were investigated: rivers (140 sites), lakes (19 sites) and coastal water (42 sites), spread along the 11 French river basins. The choice of sites was made on the basis of previous investigation results and the following target criteria: reference, urban sites, agricultural and industrial areas. The analytical method was properly validated for both matrices prior to analysis, resulting in low limits of quantification (LOQ), good precision and linearity in agreement with the Water Framework Directive demands. The results were first evaluated as a function of their river basins, type of surrounding pressure and water bodies. Later, background concentrations at the French national scale were established for both water and sediment matrices, as well as their threshold, i.e., the concentration that distinguishes background from anomalies or contaminations. Background concentrations in water are ranging between <0.04-0.14 ng Hg. L(-1) for MeHg, <0.14-2.10 ng Hg. L(-1) for iHg, <1.0-8.43 ng Pb. L(-1) for Et2Pb and 0.49-151 ng Sn. L(-1), <0.08-3.04 ng Sn. L(-1) and <0.08-0.25 ng Sn. L(-1) for MBT, DBT and TBT, respectively. For sediments, background concentrations were set as <0.09-1.11 ng Hg. g(-1) for MeHg, <0.06-24.3 ng Pb. g(-1) for Et2Pb and <1.4-13.4 ng Sn. g(-1), <0.82-8.54 ng Sn. g(-1), <0.25-1.16 ng Sn. g(-1) and <0.08-0.61 ng Sn. g(-1) for MBT, DBT, TBT and DPhT, respectively. TBT occurs in higher concentrations

  17. Relationship between P and the most reactive fraction of Fe(III) oxyhydroxide in various aquatic and sedimentary environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anschutz, Pierre

    2014-05-01

    Phosphorus can experience a series of biogeochemical pathways. Primary P has an igneous origin and occurs mostly as apatite in bedrocks. Once P is dissolved as phosphate ion, it can incorporate organic matter or become adsorbed onto inorganic particles. The liberation of P from organic matter through bacterial respiration produces a subsequent flux back to the biota or a storage in Fe and Al oxyhydroxides, or in authigenic or biogenic phosphate minerals. The adsorption of phosphate on Fe- and Al-oxide and oxyhydroxide has been extensively studied in soil science because phosphorus is a limiting nutrient in terrestrial ecosystems, and sorptive removal of natural or fertilizer phosphorus impacts the production level of crops and forests. Fe(III) oxides/oxyhydroxides are subject to reductive dissolution, and consequently redox conditions play an important role in soil P-bioavailability. The main process of phosphorus removal from the aquatic systems is burial with sediments. Exchange between sediment and overlying water takes place through benthic biogeochemical processes, including organic-P mineralization, redox-driven Fe-P cycling, and benthic phosphorus efflux from sediments. A portion of the pore-water phosphate derived from organic matter mineralization may be adsorbed onto detrital or authigenic iron oxyhydroxides in the oxidized zone of the sediment. Once advected in the reduced zone of sediments through burial or bioturbation, the most reducible fraction of Fe(III) phase can be reduced and solubilized, leading to a release of phosphate. Eventually, P can be buried over long period as relict organic-P, P associated with refractory iron oxides, and apatite. Therefore, Fe-bound P is often the initial sink of P supplied by organic matter, but not the major final sink. Several techniques have been developed to extract P bound to Fe(III) phases. The citrate-dithionite buffered (CDB) solution is one of the most often used solution to measure Fe(III)-bound P. CDB

  18. Attitudes of Lebanese university students towards surgical hymen reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awwad, Johnny; Nassar, Anwar; Usta, Ihab; Shaya, Monique; Younes, Zeina; Ghazeeri, Ghina

    2013-11-01

    Many cultural and religious beliefs place virginity at a high level of social significance, in that women who lose their virginity before marriage may face humiliation, ostracism, divorce, and extreme violence. This led to an increase in the demand for virginity restoration through surgical hymen reconstruction among these cultures. However, data regarding the acceptance of hymenoplasty in societies that consider sexuality a taboo are scarce. In this cross-sectional study, we investigated the effects of gender and religion on sexual attitudes towards hymenoplasty, premarital sex, and virginity in a sample of 600 Lebanese university students. Our findings showed that approval of hymenoplasty was low among participants regardless of gender (25.7 % men vs. 19.1 % women) and religious affiliations (22.5 % Muslims vs. 22.3 % Christians). Arguments for rejection were rooted in moral ethics and personal convictions: "form of deceiving and cheating" (80.7 %) and "betrayal of honesty in the relationship" (80.4 %). Reasons for acceptance included: personal belief in "women's rights, autonomy, and freedom" (72.2 %) and "physical harm and death" (63.5 %).Male participants were more likely to approve premarital coital sex than females (61.0 vs. 27.3 %). Muslims were also more likely to reject marrying a non-virgin than Christians (39.9 vs. 18.0 %). Female participants expressed more tolerance towards marrying a non-virgin male partner (78.3 vs. 57.3 %). Low acceptance of hymenoplasty among Lebanese university students was found to be related to moral ethics and personal convictions independently from gender and religious affiliation. Differences in sexual attitudes towards premarital coital sex and virginity, however, were more significantly influenced by culture and religion. PMID:23979785

  19. A toxicidade em ambientes aquáticos: discussão e métodos de avaliação Toxicity in aquatic environments: discussion and evaluation methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Regina Costa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aquatic toxicity tests are assays performed with different aquatic organisms of different ecological organization levels. Such tests are a source of information on the toxicity of a given substance or wastewater under controlled conditions, and they complement the physico-chemical analyses. Moreover, they allow one to evaluate the risks resulting from the presence of toxic substances in the environment. Algae, crustaceans, fishes and bacteria are frequently used in toxicity tests. In this work, we will present the main aspects related to the aquatic toxicity tests and a discussion of their applicability will also be presented.

  20. Detection of the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance gene erm(44) and a novel erm(44) variant in staphylococci from aquatic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendlandt, Sarah; Heß, Stefanie; Li, Jun; Feßler, Andrea T; Wang, Yang; Kadlec, Kristina; Gallert, Claudia; Schwarz, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    Resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramin B antibiotics (MLSB) is not restricted to staphylococci from clinical samples but can also be present in staphylococci from the aquatic environment. Two coagulase-negative staphylococci-Staphylococcus xylosus and S. saprophyticus were obtained from sewage and receiving river water samples and were investigated for the genetic basis of inducible MLSB resistance by whole-genome sequencing. Two rRNA methylases encoded by erm(44) and a novel erm(44) variant were identified, which had only 84% amino acid identity. While fragments of phage DNA were found in the vicinity of the erm(44) gene of S. xylosus, no relics of mobile genetic elements were detected in the sequences flanking the erm(44) variant gene in the S. saprophyticus strain. The functionality of the erm genes was confirmed by cloning and transformation experiments. Based on the obtained sequences, specific PCR assays for both erm genes were developed and used to identify erm(44) in another 7 S. xylosus and 17 S. saprophyticus isolates from aquatic environments. PMID:26207047

  1. Distribution, speciation, environmental risk, and source identification of heavy metals in surface sediments from the karst aquatic environment of the Lijiang River, Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Daoquan; Wang, Yinghui; Zhang, Ruijie; Guo, Jing; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Kefu

    2016-05-01

    The distribution and speciation of several heavy metals, i.e., As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Pb, and Zn, in surface sediments from the karst aquatic environment of the Lijiang River, Southwest China, were studied comparatively. The mean contents of Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb, and Zn were 1.72, 38.07, 0.18, 51.54, and 142.16 mg/kg, respectively, which were about 1.5-6 times higher than their corresponding regional sediment background values. Metal speciation obtained by the optimized BCR protocol highlighted the bioavailable threats of Cd, Cu, and Zn, which were highly associated with the exchangeable fraction (the labile phase). Hierarchical cluster analysis indicated that in sediments, As and Cr were mainly derived from natural and industrial sources, whereas fertilizer application might lead to the elevated level of Cd. Besides, Cu, Hg, Pb, and Zn were related to traffic activities. The effects-based sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) showed that Hg, Pb, and Zn could pose occasional adverse effects on sediment-dwelling organisms. However, based on the potential ecological risk assessment (PER) and risk assessment code (RAC), Cd was the most outstanding pollutant and posed the highest ecological hazard and bioavailable risk among the selected metals. Moreover, the metal partitioning between water and sediments was quantified through the calculation of the pseudo-partitioning coefficient (K P), and result implied that the sediments in this karst aquatic environment cannot be used as stable repositories for the metal pollutants. PMID:26832870

  2. Bioaerosol emissions from open microalgal processes and their potential environmental impacts: what can be learned from natural and anthropogenic aquatic environments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sialve, Bruno; Gales, Amandine; Hamelin, Jérôme; Wery, Nathalie; Steyer, Jean-Philippe

    2015-06-01

    Open processes for microalgae mass cultivation and/or wastewater treatment present an air-water interface. Similarly to other open air-aquatic environments, they are subject to contamination, but as such, they also represent a source of bioaerosols. Indeed, meteorological, physico-chemical and biological factors cause aerial dispersion of the planktonic community. Operating conditions like liquid mixing or gas injection tend to both enhance microbial activity, as well as intensify aerosolization. Bacteria, virus particles, fungi and protozoa, in addition to microalgae, are all transient or permanent members of the planktonic community and can thus be emitted as aerosols. If they should remain viable, subsequent deposition on various habitats could instigate their colonization of other environments and the potential expression of their ecological function. PMID:25845483

  3. A rational approach to selecting and ranking some pharmaceuticals of concern for the aquatic environment and their relative importance compared with other chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnachie, Rachel L; Johnson, Andrew C; Sumpter, John P

    2016-04-01

    Aquatic organisms can be exposed to thousands of chemicals discharged by the human population. Many of these chemicals are considered disruptive to aquatic wildlife, and the literature on the impacts of these chemicals grows daily. However, because time and resources are not infinite, research must focus on the chemicals that represent the greatest threat. One group of chemicals of increasing concern is pharmaceuticals, for which the primary challenge is to identify which represent the greatest threat. In the present study, a list of 12 pharmaceuticals was compiled based on scoring the prevalence of different compounds from previous prioritization reviews. These included rankings based on prescription data, environmental concentrations, predicted environmental concentration/predicted no-effect concentration (PEC/PNEC) ratios, persistency/bioaccumulation/(eco)toxicity (PBT), and fish plasma model approaches. The most frequently cited were diclofenac, paracetamol, ibuprofen, carbamazepine, naproxen, atenolol, ethinyl estradiol, aspirin, fluoxetine, propranolol, metoprolol, and sulfamethoxazole. For each pharmaceutical, literature on effect concentrations was compiled and compared with river concentrations in the United Kingdom. The pharmaceuticals were ranked by degree of difference between the median effect and median river concentrations. Ethinyl estradiol was ranked as the highest concern, followed by fluoxetine, propranolol, and paracetamol. The relative risk of these pharmaceuticals was compared with those of metals and some persistent organic pollutants. Pharmaceuticals appear to be less of a threat to aquatic organisms than some metals (Cu, Al, Zn) and triclosan, using this ranking approach. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1021-1027. © 2015 The Authors. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC. PMID:26184376

  4. Development of naturally occurring siliceous material for the preferential removal of thorium from U-Th aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During this work laboratory simulated experiments were conducted to study the preferential removal of thorium by using siliceous material having particle size of about 2000 μm. Siliceous material was prepared by decomposing the organic layer on soil particles by giving treatment with HNO3 and H2O2. Experimental solutions were generated by spiking the tap water with Th(NO3)4 and UO2(NO3)2. Highly particle reactive nature of thorium was exploited for the separation of Th from aquatic stream containing U/Th. The Kd value of Th(IV) ions is 106 which is two order of magnitude higher than uranium (IV and VI). Experimental results show that 90% of the spiked Th is in association with silicious material whereas uranium is only 20-30%. (author)

  5. Environmental and radiological safety studies. Interaction of 238PuO2 heat sources with terrestrial and aquatic environments. Progress report, July 1-September 30, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The containers for 238PuO2 heat sources in radioisotope thermoelectric generators are designed with large safety factors to ensure that they will withstand reentry from orbit and impact with the earth and safely contain the nuclear fuel until it is recovered. Existing designs have proved more than adequately safe, but the Space and Terrestrial Division of the Department of Energy Office of Advanced Nuclear Systems and Projects continually seeks more information about the heat sources to improve their safety. The work discussed here includes studies of the effects on the heat source of terrestrial and aquatic environments to obtain data for design of even safer systems. The data obtained in several ongoing experiments are presented; these data tables will be updated quarterly. Discussions of experimental details are minimized and largely repetitive in succeeding reports. Compilations of usable data generated in each experiment are emphasized. These compilations include data from environmental chamber experiments that simulate terrestrial conditions, experiments to measure PuO2 dissolution rates, soil column experiments to measure sorption of plutonium by soils, and several aquatic experiments

  6. Subjective Happiness of Lebanese College Youth in Lebanon: Factorial Structure and Invariance of the Arabic Subjective Happiness Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghnie, Lamia; Kazarian, Shahe S.

    2012-01-01

    The present study evaluated the subjective happiness of Lebanese college youth using a multi-item rather than a single-item subjective happiness measure. An Arabic translation of the Subjective Happiness Scale (SHS) was administered to 273 Lebanese college youth from state- and private-run higher institutions of learning, as was the Arabic Adult…

  7. Assessment of human resources management practices in Lebanese hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Diana

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sound human resources (HR management practices are essential for retaining effective professionals in hospitals. Given the recruitment and retention reality of health workers in the twenty-first century, the role of HR managers in hospitals and those who combine the role of HR managers with other responsibilities should not be underestimated. The objective of this study is to assess the perception of HR managers about the challenges they face and the current strategies being adopted. The study also aims at assessing enabling factors including role, education, experience and HR training. Methods A cross-sectional survey design of HR managers (and those who combine their role as HR manager with other duties in Lebanese hospitals was utilized. The survey included a combination of open- and close-ended questions. Questions included educational background, work experience, and demographics, in addition to questions about perceived challenges and key strategies being used. Quantitative data analysis included uni-variate analysis, whereas thematic analysis was used for open-ended questions. Results A total of 96 respondents from 61 hospitals responded. Respondents had varying levels of expertise in the realm of HR management. Thematic analysis revealed that challenges varied across respondents and participating hospitals. The most frequently reported challenge was poor employee retention (56.7%, lack of qualified personnel (35.1%, and lack of a system for performance evaluation (28.9%. Some of the strategies used to mitigate the above challenges included offering continuing education and training for employees (19.6%, improving salaries (14.4%, and developing retention strategies (10.3%. Mismatch between reported challenges and strategies were observed. Conclusion To enable hospitals to deliver good quality, safe healthcare, improving HR management is critical. There is a need for a cadre of competent HR managers who can fully

  8. Eating habits and obesity among Lebanese university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah Abbass

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past year Lebanon has been experiencing a nutritional transition in food choices from the typical Mediterranean diet to the fast food pattern. As a consequence, the dietary habits of young adults have been affected; thus, overweight and obesity are increasingly being observed among the young. The purpose of this study is to assess the prevalence of overweight and obesity on a sample of students from the Lebanese American University (in Beirut and to examine their eating habits. Methods A cross-sectional survey of 220 students (43.6% male and 56.4% female, aged 20 ± 1.9 years, were chosen randomly from the Lebanese American University (LAU campus during the fall 2006 semester. Students were asked to fill out a self-reported questionnaire that included questions on their eating, drinking and smoking habits. Also, their weight, height, percentage body fat and body mass index were measured. Body mass index (BMI was used to assess students' weight status. Statistical analyses were performed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences software (version 13.0 to determine overweight and obesity among students and to categorize eating habits. Results This study showed that the majority of the students (64.7% were of normal weight (49% male students compared to 76.8% female students. The prevalence of overweight and obesity was more common among male students compared to females (37.5% and 12.5% vs. 13.6% and 3.2%, respectively. In contrast, 6.4% female students were underweight as compared to 1% males. Eating habits of the students showed that the majority (61.4% reported taking meals regularly. Female students showed healthier eating habits compared to male students in terms of daily breakfast intake and meal frequency. 53.3% of female students reported eating breakfast daily or three to four times per week compared to 52.1% of male students. There was a significant gender difference in the frequency of meal intake (P

  9. Comparative radiological and conventional pollution impact recording in the aquatic environment by use of a cytogenetic tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. The effects of ionizing radiation can be viewed at all levels of biological organization, ranging from the molecular to ecosystem level. Effects on organisms can be traced to molecular and cellular responses, as radiation impact does not necessarily lead to observable effects on specimens, population or ecosystem. This is because the measurable attributes of the levels differ, despite the fact that all levels are interrelated. The cytogenetic effects of radioactive and conventional pollution as they are recorded in organisms of natural ecosystem and the apportionment of causes to each kind of pollutants is a relative new field in radioecological research. There is limited evidence on field observations in international literature; even there is a lot of evidence in concerning laboratory experiments. The study of in situ effects of ionizing radiation in the cytogenetic level is the key for determining the radiological status of the ecosystem considered, based on the relation: concentration of pollutant in abiotic components and/or bioaccumulation → dose rate → effect on organism at the cellular level. Several field studies on the comparative effects of ionizing radiation and chemical pollution in some selected areas in the Mediterranean, the Black Sea and in inland waters combined with laboratory experiments have shown a conceptual model of response of organisms, which is unique for ionizing radiation and chemical pollution. This model is based on the effects of different pollutants on aquatic biota (Crustacea, Polychaeta, Oligochatea, Fish embryos etc), as they have been recorded at the cellular level. The environmental assessment of an aquatic ecosystem with regards to ionizing radiation in comparison to effects of chemical pollutants is based on determining the distribution frequency of chromosomal aberrations induced in cells of natural populations. Cytogenetic methods are used in pollution research because of their high

  10. The plastid genome of Najas flexilis: adaptation to submersed environments is accompanied by the complete loss of the NDH complex in an aquatic angiosperm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena L Peredo

    Full Text Available The re-colonization of aquatic habitats by angiosperms has presented a difficult challenge to plants whose long evolutionary history primarily reflects adaptations to terrestrial conditions. Many aquatics must complete vital stages of their life cycle on the water surface by means of floating or emergent leaves and flowers. Only a few species, mainly within the order Alismatales, are able to complete all aspects of their life cycle including pollination, entirely underwater. Water-pollinated Alismatales include seagrasses and water nymphs (Najas, the latter being the only freshwater genus in the family Hydrocharitaceae with subsurface water-pollination. We have determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the plastid genome of Najas flexilis. The plastid genome of N. flexilis is a circular AT-rich DNA molecule of 156 kb, which displays a quadripartite structure with two inverted repeats (IR separating the large single copy (LSC from the small single copy (SSC regions. In N. flexilis, as in other Alismatales, the rps19 and trnH genes are localized in the LSC region instead of within the IR regions as in other monocots. However, the N. flexilis plastid genome presents some anomalous modifications. The size of the SSC region is only one third of that reported for closely related species. The number of genes in the plastid is considerably less. Both features are due to loss of the eleven ndh genes in the Najas flexilis plastid. In angiosperms, the absence of ndh genes has been related mainly to the loss of photosynthetic function in parasitic plants. The ndh genes encode the NAD(PH dehydrogenase complex, believed essential in terrestrial environments, where it increases photosynthetic efficiency in variable light intensities. The modified structure of the N. flexilis plastid genome suggests that adaptation to submersed environments, where light is scarce, has involved the loss of the NDH complex in at least some photosynthetic angiosperms.

  11. The plastid genome of Najas flexilis: adaptation to submersed environments is accompanied by the complete loss of the NDH complex in an aquatic angiosperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peredo, Elena L; King, Ursula M; Les, Donald H

    2013-01-01

    The re-colonization of aquatic habitats by angiosperms has presented a difficult challenge to plants whose long evolutionary history primarily reflects adaptations to terrestrial conditions. Many aquatics must complete vital stages of their life cycle on the water surface by means of floating or emergent leaves and flowers. Only a few species, mainly within the order Alismatales, are able to complete all aspects of their life cycle including pollination, entirely underwater. Water-pollinated Alismatales include seagrasses and water nymphs (Najas), the latter being the only freshwater genus in the family Hydrocharitaceae with subsurface water-pollination. We have determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the plastid genome of Najas flexilis. The plastid genome of N. flexilis is a circular AT-rich DNA molecule of 156 kb, which displays a quadripartite structure with two inverted repeats (IR) separating the large single copy (LSC) from the small single copy (SSC) regions. In N. flexilis, as in other Alismatales, the rps19 and trnH genes are localized in the LSC region instead of within the IR regions as in other monocots. However, the N. flexilis plastid genome presents some anomalous modifications. The size of the SSC region is only one third of that reported for closely related species. The number of genes in the plastid is considerably less. Both features are due to loss of the eleven ndh genes in the Najas flexilis plastid. In angiosperms, the absence of ndh genes has been related mainly to the loss of photosynthetic function in parasitic plants. The ndh genes encode the NAD(P)H dehydrogenase complex, believed essential in terrestrial environments, where it increases photosynthetic efficiency in variable light intensities. The modified structure of the N. flexilis plastid genome suggests that adaptation to submersed environments, where light is scarce, has involved the loss of the NDH complex in at least some photosynthetic angiosperms. PMID:23861923

  12. Harm of Antibiotics in Aquatic Environment on Health%水环境中抗生素对健康的危害

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡譞予

    2015-01-01

    抗生素的不合理和不规范使用所造成的水环境污染问题日益受到人们的重视。本文综述了水环境中抗生素污染的来源及对生态环境和人体健康的危害,指出医用抗生素、农用抗生素和制药工业废水中的抗生素是最高污染源头。抗生素进入水体后,给水生生态系统造成不良影响,不仅诱导产生耐药性细菌,也使水生生物受到影响;还可在农副产品中残留,通过饮水、食物链等方式对人体健康构成潜在的威胁,严重干扰人体的各项生理机能,破坏人体免疫系统,降低人体的免疫功能。%The water pollution problem caused by the unreasonable and nonstandard using of antibiotics has raised extensive concerns in recent years. This paper reviews the sources of antibiotic pollution in the aquatic environment and its harm to the ecological environment and human health, points out that medical antibiotics, agricultural antibiotics and antibiotics in pharmaceutical wastewater are the upmost sources of pollution. Antibiotics polluted in the water can cause adverse effects to the aquatic ecosystem, which can not only induce bacterial resistance and affect the aquatic organisms, but also remain in agricultural products, thus pose a potential threat to human health through drinking water, food chain, etc, then seriously disturb the physiological function of human body, damage the body’s immune system and reduce immunologic function of human body.

  13. Evaluation of medication adherence in Lebanese hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassine, Mohammad; Al-Hajje, Amal; Awada, Sanaa; Rachidi, Samar; Zein, Salam; Bawab, Wafa; Bou Zeid, Mayssam; El Hajj, Maya; Salameh, Pascale

    2016-09-01

    Controlling hypertension is essential in cardiovascular diseases. Poor medication adherence is associated with poor disease outcomes, waste of healthcare resources, and contributes to reduced blood pressure control. This study evaluates treatment adherence to antihypertensive therapy in Lebanese hypertensive patients by estimating the proportion of adherent hypertensive patients using a validated tool and investigates what factors predict this behavior. A questionnaire-based cross-sectional study was conducted on a random sample of 210 hypertensive outpatients selected from clinics located in tertiary-care hospitals and from private cardiology clinics located in Beirut. Adherence level was measured using a validated 8-item Modified Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMMAS). Among 210 patients, 50.5% showed high adherence, 27.1% medium adherence, and 22.4% low adherence to medication. Mean MMMAS score was 6.59±2.0. In bivariate analyses, having controlled blood pressure (p=0.003) and taking a combination drug (p=0.023) were predictors of high adherence. Forgetfulness (p<0.01), complicated drug regimen (p=0.001), and side effects (p=0.006) were predictors of low adherence after multiple liner regression. Logistic regression results showed that calcium channel blockers (p=0.030) were associated with increased adherence levels. In conclusion, developing multidisciplinary intervention programs to address the factors identified, in addition to educational strategies targeting healthcare providers, are necessary to enhance patient adherence. PMID:26232704

  14. Happiness, health, and religiosity among Lebanese young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Abdel-Khalek

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to estimate the associations between, and sex-related differences in happiness, health, and religiosity. A sample (N = 476 of Lebanese undergraduates took part in the study (215 men and 261 women. They answered Arabic versions of the Oxford Happiness Inventory (OHI, the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS, the Love of Life Scale, as well as five self-generated rating scales. Men obtained a significantly higher mean score on happiness and mental health than did their female counterparts, whereas women obtained a significantly higher mean score on religiosity. All the Pearson correlations between the study scales were significant and positive but one (between the self-rating scales of physical health and religiosity among men. Principal components analysis yielded one salient component separately in men and women, and labeled “Happiness, health, and religiosity.” The predictors of happiness as assessed with the OHI were love of life and SWLS, and happiness self-rating scale. Based on the responses of the present sample, it was concluded that those who consider themselves as felt happiness, reported higher mental and physical health, and being more religious.

  15. The Experiment Study of the Influence on Plant Seeds and Aquatic Bio-logical Survival in High Altitude Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈霈润

    2015-01-01

    There is A certain foundation in this experiment. It was the second time we did this experiment. The purposes are three parts, first, explore the 30000~40000 meters high sky with two cameras recording the scene. The Second, find out whether the high sky condition (temperature, air pressure, cosmic ray) make influence on plants seeds. The third, text whether normal aquatic animal is able to survive in high sky. The conclusions are also three parts. It is important to set a deadline for my group member to finish the assignment, and also check their process, or they might delay their own part of work or they are not in charge of the work. As the leader, I should be thoughtful. Not only about members’assignment, but also the details of their work, previously. Discuss about each task with group to ensure the correctness. Last but not least, every part of the experiment needs to be tested carefully. Only if we try our best to prevent accidents that might happen, then the experiment is able to suc⁃cess.

  16. Cell-Based Sensor System Using L6 Cells for Broad Band Continuous Pollutant Monitoring in Aquatic Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evamaria Stütz

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Pollution of drinking water sources represents a continuously emerging problem in global environmental protection. Novel techniques for real-time monitoring of water quality, capable of the detection of unanticipated toxic and bioactive substances, are urgently needed. In this study, the applicability of a cell-based sensor system using selected eukaryotic cell lines for the detection of aquatic pollutants is shown. Readout parameters of the cells were the acidification (metabolism, oxygen consumption (respiration and impedance (morphology of the cells. A variety of potential cytotoxic classes of substances (heavy metals, pharmaceuticals, neurotoxins, waste water was tested with monolayers of L6 cells (rat myoblasts. The cytotoxicity or cellular effects induced by inorganic ions (Ni2+ and Cu2+ can be detected with the metabolic parameters acidification and respiration down to 0.5 mg/L, whereas the detection limit for other substances like nicotine and acetaminophen are rather high, in the range of 0.1 mg/L and 100 mg/L. In a close to application model a real waste water sample shows detectable signals, indicating the existence of cytotoxic substances. The results support the paradigm change from single substance detection to the monitoring of overall toxicity.

  17. Development of naturally occurring siliceous material for the preferential removal of thorium from U-Th from aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During this work highly particle reactive nature of thorium was exploited for the separation of Th from aquatic stream containing U/Th. The Kd value of Th(IV) ions is 106 which is two order of magnitude higher than uranium (IV and VI). Laboratory simulated experiments were conducted to study the preferential removal of thorium by using siliceous material having particle size of about 2,000 μm. Siliceous material was prepared by decomposing the organic layer on soil particles by giving treatment with HNO3 and H2O2. Experimental solutions were generated by spiking the surface water with Th (NO3)4 and UO2(NO3)2. Experimental results shows preferential uptake of Th compared to U by siliceous material. This association is further improved by coating the siliceous material with high and low molecular weight organic materials i.e. humic and fulvic acid, respectively. Characterization of the organic material was done by ATR-FTIR whereas determination of Th was done by ICP-OES and alpha spectrometry. Experimental results clearly showed that Th and U sorption capacity is 1 and 0.3 μg mg-1 (w/w), respectively, in case of siliceous material. Thorium sorption is increased five and eight times in the case of coating with fulvic acid and humic acid, respectively. Whereas the same does not shows any pronounced impact on sorption of uranium. (author)

  18. Cell-based sensor system using L6 cells for broad band continuous pollutant monitoring in aquatic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubisch, Rebekka; Bohrn, Ulrich; Fleischer, Maximilian; Stütz, Evamaria

    2012-01-01

    Pollution of drinking water sources represents a continuously emerging problem in global environmental protection. Novel techniques for real-time monitoring of water quality, capable of the detection of unanticipated toxic and bioactive substances, are urgently needed. In this study, the applicability of a cell-based sensor system using selected eukaryotic cell lines for the detection of aquatic pollutants is shown. Readout parameters of the cells were the acidification (metabolism), oxygen consumption (respiration) and impedance (morphology) of the cells. A variety of potential cytotoxic classes of substances (heavy metals, pharmaceuticals, neurotoxins, waste water) was tested with monolayers of L6 cells (rat myoblasts). The cytotoxicity or cellular effects induced by inorganic ions (Ni(2+) and Cu(2+)) can be detected with the metabolic parameters acidification and respiration down to 0.5 mg/L, whereas the detection limit for other substances like nicotine and acetaminophen are rather high, in the range of 0.1 mg/L and 100 mg/L. In a close to application model a real waste water sample shows detectable signals, indicating the existence of cytotoxic substances. The results support the paradigm change from single substance detection to the monitoring of overall toxicity. PMID:22737014

  19. Issues that restrain teachers from adapting student-centered instruction in lebanese school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khayrazad Kari Jabbour

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The typical Lebanese classroom is teacher centered, whereby the teacher is respected and is considered to be the bearer of all information. Student centered teaching methods are not in the Lebanese teacher expectations and the usual teacher-student relationships in that learner are not expected to assume responsibility for their educational development by taking a center-stage role in their own learning process. This paper aims to highlight the issues that prevent teachers from adopting a student-centered teaching method. A small scale survey from 100 teachers of 10 different schools selected from various areas in Lebanon was undertaken. The survey results were compared and tested in order to evaluate the reason for not adapting student centered instruction in the Lebanese schools.

  20. Nanomaterials in the aquatic environment: A European Union-United States perspective on the status of ecotoxicity testing, research priorities, and challenges ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selck, Henriette; Handy, Richard D; Fernandes, Teresa F; Klaine, Stephen J; Petersen, Elijah J

    2016-05-01

    The European Union-United States Communities of Research were established in 2012 to provide a platform for scientists to develop a "shared repertoire of protocols and methods to overcome nanotechnology environmental health and safety (nanoEHS) research gaps and barriers" (www.us-eu.org/). Based on work within the Ecotoxicology Community of Research (2012-2015) the present Focus article provides an overview of the state of the art of nanomaterials (NMs) in the aquatic environment by addressing different research questions, with a focus on ecotoxicological test systems and the challenges faced when assessing NM hazards (e.g., uptake routes, bioaccumulation, toxicity, test protocols, and model organisms). The authors' recommendation is to place particular importance on studying the ecological effects of aged/weathered NMs, as-manufactured NMs, and NMs released from consumer products in addressing the following overarching research topics: 1) NM characterization and quantification in environmental and biological matrices; 2) NM transformation in the environment and consequences for bioavailability and toxicity; 3) alternative methods to assess exposure; 4) influence of exposure scenarios on bioavailability and toxicity; 5) development of more environmentally realistic bioassays; and 6) uptake, internal distribution, and depuration of NMs. Research addressing these key topics will reduce uncertainty in ecological risk assessment and support the sustainable development of nanotechnology. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1055-1067. © 2016 SETAC. PMID:27089437

  1. Ethinyl Estradiol and Other Human Pharmaceutical Estrogens in the Aquatic Environment: A Review of Recent Risk Assessment Data

    OpenAIRE

    Laurenson, James P.; Bloom, Raanan A.; Page, Stephen; Sadrieh, Nakissa

    2014-01-01

    Interest in pharmaceuticals in the environment has increased substantially in recent years. Several studies in particular have assessed human and ecological risks from human pharmaceutical estrogens, such as 17α-ethinyl estradiol (EE2). Regulatory action also has increased, with the USA and other countries developing rules to address estrogens and other pharmaceuticals in the environment. Accordingly, the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research at the US Food and Drug Administration has condu...

  2. A Simple Model of Tetracycline Antibiotic Resistance in the Aquatic Environment (with Application to the Poudre River)

    OpenAIRE

    Sarah Sanchez; Xiaodan Ruan; Hellweger, Ferdi L.

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a major concern, yet it is unclear what causes the relatively high densities of resistant bacteria in the anthropogenically impacted environment. There are various possible scenarios (hypotheses): (A) Input of resistant bacteria from wastewater and agricultural sources is significant, but they do not grow in the environment; (B) Input of resistant bacteria is negligible, but the resistant bacteria (exogenous or endogenous) grow due to the selection pressure of the ant...

  3. Investigating the significance of dissolved organic contaminants in aquatic environments: coupling passive sampling with in vitro bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emelogu, Emmanuel S; Pollard, Pat; Robinson, Craig D; Smedes, Foppe; Webster, Lynda; Oliver, Ian W; McKenzie, Craig; Seiler, T B; Hollert, Henner; Moffat, Colin F

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the feasibility of coupling passive sampling and in vitro bioassay techniques for both chemical and ecotoxicological assessment of complex mixtures of organic contaminants in water. Silicone rubber passive sampling devices (SR-PSDs) were deployed for 8-9 weeks in four streams and an estuary of an agricultural catchment in North East (NE) Scotland. Extracts from the SR-PSDs were analysed for freely dissolved hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) and screened for wide range of pesticides. The total concentrations of dissolved PAHs (∑PAH(40), parent and branched) in the water column of the catchment varied from 38 to 69 ng L(-1), whilst PCBs (∑PCB(32)) ranged 0.02-0.06 ng L(-1). A number and level of pesticides and acid/urea herbicides of varying hydrophobicity (logK(OW)s ~2.25 to ~5.31) were also detected in the SR extracts, indicating their occurrence in the catchment. The acute toxicity and EROD induction potentials of SR extracts from the study sites were evaluated with rainbow trout liver (Oncorhynchus mykiss; RTL-W1) cell line. Acute cytotoxicity was not observed in cells following 48 h exposure to the SR extracts using neutral red uptake assay as endpoint. But, on a sublethal level, for every site, statistically significant EROD activity was observed to some degree following 72 h exposure to extracts, indicating the presence of compounds with dioxin-like effect that are bioavailable to aquatic organisms in the water bodies of the catchment. Importantly, only a small fraction of the EROD induction could be attributed to the PAHs and PCBs that were determined. This preliminary study demonstrates that the coupling of silicone rubber passive sampling techniques with in vitro bioassays is feasible and offers a cost effective early warning signal on water quality deterioration. PMID:22850278

  4. Isomer-specific analysis of nonylphenols with estrogenic activity and their distribution in aquatic environment in relation to endocrine disrupters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y.S.; Katase, T.; Inoue, T. [Nihon Univ., Fujisawa, Kanagawa (Japan). College of Bioresource Sciences; Horii, Y.; Yamashita, N. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Makino, M.; Uchiyama, T.; Fujimoto, Y. [Nihon Univ., Chiba (Japan). College of Pharmacy

    2004-09-15

    The effect of estrogen-exposure on levels of a larval storage protein of Balanus amphitrite, cypris major protein (CMP), which is related to barnacle vitellin, has been examined at low concentrations (0.01-1.0 {mu}g/l) of 4-nonylphenol (NP) and 17{beta}-estradiol (E2) (1.0 {mu}g/l) from egg hatching until the nauplius cypris stage. Eventually, the exposure to 0.01 {mu}g/l of NP led to a ca. 50% increase in the optical density of the CMP. There are theoretically ca. 170 kinds of isomers of NP, based on the structure of the nonyl side chain in NP. We fractionated a commercial NP by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to give six fractions (Fr. 1- Fr. 6). Fr. 3 - Fr. 5 were further separated to afford 14 fractions by using gas chromatograph equipped with a preparative fraction collector (GC-PFC) and 11 NP isomers were identified by gas chromatograph equipped with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). The chemical structures of 11 isomers (NP1 to NP14) were characterized and estrogenicities of the selected isomers were tested in recombinant yeast screen system. The 4-(1,1-dimethyl-2-ethyl-pentyl)- phenol (NP7) was found to exhibit the highest estrogenic activity corresponding to 1.9 x 10{sup -3} that of E2. The NP4 and 6 were structurally in diastereomer. The individual isomer of NP in aquatic samples taken from Ariake Sea and Tokyo, Japan was analyzed by steam distillation extraction in the present study.

  5. Possible use of EPDM in radioactive waste disposal: Long term low dose rate and short term high dose rate irradiation in aquatic and atmospheric environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, changes in the properties of ethylene propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM) irradiated with different dose rates in ambient atmosphere and aqueous environment were investigated. Irradiations were carried out both with low dose and high dose rate irradiation sources. EPDM samples which were differentiated from each other by peroxide type and 5-ethylidene 2-norbornene (ENB) contents were used. Long term low dose rate irradiations were carried out for the duration of up to 2.5 years (total dose of 1178 kGy) in two different irradiation environments. Dose rates (both high and low), irradiation environments (in aquatic and open to atmosphere), and peroxide types (aliphatic or aromatic) were the parameters studied. Characterization of irradiated EPDM samples were performed by hardness, compression, tensile, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), TGA–FTIR, ATR-FTIR, XRD and SEM tests. It was observed that the irradiation in water environment led to a lower degree of degradation when compared to that of irradiation open to atmosphere for the same irradiation dose. In addition, irradiation environment, peroxide type and dose rate had effects on the extent of change in the properties of EPDM. It was observed that EPDM is relatively radiation resistant and a candidate polymer for usage in radioactive waste management. - Highlights: ► Possible use of EPDM in radioactive waste management was studied. ► The low dose rate irradiations were carried out for duration of up to 2.5 years. ► Characterizations of irradiated samples were performed. ► EPDM could possibly be a candidate material to be used in the radioactive waste management.

  6. Aquatic Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanville, W. D.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of aquatic sediments and its effect upon water quality, covering publications of 1976-77. This review includes: (1) sediment water interchange; (2) chemical and physical characterization; and (3) heavy water in sediments. A list of 129 references is also presented. (HM)

  7. Nonmagnetotactic Multicellular Prokaryotes from Low-Saline, Nonmarine Aquatic Environments and Their Unusual Negative Phototactic Behavior▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Lefèvre, Christopher T; Abreu, Fernanda; Lins, Ulysses; Dennis A. Bazylinski

    2010-01-01

    Magnetotactic multicellular prokaryotes (MMPs) are unique magnetotactic bacteria of the Deltaproteobacteria class and the first found to biomineralize the magnetic mineral greigite (Fe3S4). Thus far they have been reported only from marine habitats. We questioned whether MMPs exist in low-saline, nonmarine environments. MMPs were observed in samples from shallow springs in the Great Boiling Springs geothermal field and Pyramid Lake, both located in northwestern Nevada. The temperature at all ...

  8. Epistemological Beliefs in Science: An Exploratory Study of Lebanese University Students' Epistemologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, Nadya; Jaber, Lama; Halwany, Sarah; BouJaoude, Saouma

    2012-01-01

    Beliefs about the nature of knowledge and knowing have been investigated extensively in educational and developmental psychology research. Hofer's framework on personal epistemology is adopted in the present study for assessing Lebanese university students' epistemologies of science. Participants were 213 students in their first year of…

  9. SP-D as a biomarker for COPD in the Lebanese population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akiki, Zeina; Fakih, Dalia; Jounblat, Rania; Chamat, Souleima; Waked, Mirna; Sørensen, Grith Lykke; Nadif, Rachel; Salameh, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    Background: Surfactant protein D (SP-D), a promising systemic biomarker of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was never evaluated in the Lebanese population. Objective: The validity of serum SP-D as a biomarker for COPD, in comparison with C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen was inv...

  10. Perceptions of Rape and Attitudes toward Women in a Sample of Lebanese Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebeiz, Maria J.; Harb, Charles

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated values, ambivalent sexism, religiosity, religious differences, gender, and attitudes toward rape victims as predictors of rape myths in a sample of Lebanese students (N = 300). Values of self-transcendence and conservation, gender, hostile sexism, and attitudes toward rape victims emerged as significant predictors of rape…

  11. The Problem of Open Cheating and Invigilator Compliance in the Lebanese Brevet and Baccalaureat Examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaardingerbroek, Barend; Shehab, Saadeddine S.; Alameh, Sahar K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a study on examination room cheating during Lebanese Brevet and Baccalaureat examinations with a focus on "open cheating"--malpractices which are aided and abetted by examination invigilators. Findings suggest that the problem is widespread and is largely attributable to the empathy invigilators feel with candidates. The…

  12. The Lebanese mutation as an important cause of familial hypercholesterolemia in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto F.L.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH is a common autosomal disorder that affects about one in 500 individuals in most Western populations and is caused by a defect in the low-density-lipoprotein receptor (LDLr gene. In this report we determined the molecular basis of FH in 59 patients from 31 unrelated Brazilian families. All patients were screened for the Lebanese mutation, gross abnormalities of the LDLr gene, and the point mutation in the codon 3500 of the apolipoprotein B-100 gene. None of the 59 patients presented the apoB-3500 mutation, suggesting that familial defective ApoB-100 (FDB is not a major cause of inherited hypercholesterolemia in Brazil. A novel 4-kb deletion in the LDLr gene, spanning from intron 12 to intron 14, was characterized in one family. Both 5' and 3' breakpoint regions were located within Alu repetitive sequences, which are probably involved in the crossing over that generated this rearrangement. The Lebanese mutation was detected in 9 of the 31 families, always associated with Arab ancestry. Two different LDLr gene haplotypes were demonstrated in association with the Lebanese mutation. Our results suggest the importance of the Lebanese mutation as a cause of FH in Brazil and by analogy the same feature may be expected in other countries with a large Arab population, such as North American and Western European countries.

  13. 76 FR 9268 - Financial Crimes Enforcement Network; Imposition of Special Measure Against the Lebanese Canadian...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-17

    ... Against the Lebanese Canadian Bank SAL as a Financial Institution of Primary Money Laundering Concern... money laundering concern pursuant to 31 U.S.C. 5318A. FinCEN is issuing this notice of proposed... Act amended the anti- money laundering provisions of the Bank Secrecy Act (``BSA''), codified at 12...

  14. The Effect of Diglossia on Arabic Vocabulary Development in Lebanese Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedda, Olfat Darwiche; Oweini, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the researchers attempted to address the main hypothesis that diglossia may impede vocabulary growth of Lebanese bilingual students [in L1 Arabic], but they should eventually catch up in the upper cycle. A correlation design based on a two-stage random sample was used with 100 participants including pre-schoolers, first, second,…

  15. Mandibular Canine Dimorphism in Establishing Sex Identity in the Lebanese Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouad Ayoub

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective. In forensic investigations, mandibular canines provide excellent materials to identify gender since they are more likely to survive disasters. The objective of this study was to investigate gender dimorphism by comparing the mesiodistal width of mandibular permanent canines and intercanine distance in a group of Lebanese population. Methods. Participants consisted of undergraduate students from the School of Dentistry, Lebanese University, for two academic years who fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Canine widths and intercanine distance were measured by one operator directly on dental casts using a digital caliper. Results. One hundred thirty-three Lebanese dental students (54 males and 69 females aged 18–25 were included in the study. The intercanine distance was significantly greater in males (P value 0.05 and females (P value > 0.05. The mean width of canine was greater than 7.188 mm for males. Conclusion. The parameters measured in the present study are of great help in sex identification in forensic investigations in the Lebanese adult population.

  16. Mandibular Canine Dimorphism in Establishing Sex Identity in the Lebanese Population

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective. In forensic investigations, mandibular canines provide excellent materials to identify gender since they are more likely to survive disasters. The objective of this study was to investigate gender dimorphism by comparing the mesiodistal width of mandibular permanent canines and intercanine distance in a group of Lebanese population. Methods. Participants consisted of undergraduate students from the Sch...

  17. M-Health, New Prospect for School Health Education through Mobile Technologies at Lebanese School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Khayrazad Kari

    2013-01-01

    Supporting school health programs to improve the emotionally and physically health status of Lebanese students has never been more important. The use of mobile and wireless technologies to promote school health programs has the potential to transform the school health education and service delivery in Lebanon. This article explores the possibility…

  18. Microplastic as a Vector for Chemicals in the Aquatic Environment: Critical Review and Model-Supported Reinterpretation of Empirical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelmans, Albert A; Bakir, Adil; Burton, G Allen; Janssen, Colin R

    2016-04-01

    The hypothesis that 'microplastic will transfer hazardous hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOC) to marine animals' has been central to the perceived hazard and risk of plastic in the marine environment. The hypothesis is often cited and has gained momentum, turning it into paradigm status. We provide a critical evaluation of the scientific literature regarding this hypothesis. Using new calculations based on published studies, we explain the sometimes contrasting views and unify them in one interpretive framework. One explanation for the contrasting views among studies is that they test different hypotheses. When reframed in the context of the above hypothesis, the available data become consistent. We show that HOC microplastic-water partitioning can be assumed to be at equilibrium for most microplastic residing in the oceans. We calculate the fraction of total HOC sorbed by plastics to be small compared to that sorbed by other media in the ocean. We further demonstrate consistency among (a) measured HOC transfer from microplastic to organisms in the laboratory, (b) measured HOC desorption rates for polymers in artificial gut fluids (c) simulations by plastic-inclusive bioaccumulation models and (d) HOC desorption rates for polymers inferred from first principles. We conclude that overall the flux of HOCs bioaccumulated from natural prey overwhelms the flux from ingested microplastic for most habitats, which implies that microplastic ingestion is not likely to increase the exposure to and thus risks of HOCs in the marine environment. PMID:26946978

  19. The toxicity of molybdate to freshwater and marine organisms. II. Effects assessment of molybdate in the aquatic environment under REACH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The REACH Molybdenum Consortium initiated an extensive research program in order to generate robust PNECs, based on the SSD approach, for both the freshwater and marine environments. This activity was part of the REACH dossier preparation and to form the basis for scientific dialogues with other national and international regulatory authorities. Chronic ecotoxicity data sets for the freshwater and marine environments served as starting point for the derivation of PNECs for both compartments, in accordance with the recommended derivation procedures established by the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA). The HC5,50%s that were derived from the generated Species Sensitivity Distributions were 38.2 mg Mo/L and 5.75 mg Mo/L for the freshwater and marine water compartment, respectively. Uncertainty analysis on both data sets and available data on bioaccumulation at high exposure levels justified an assessment factor of 3 on both HC5,50% leading to a PNECfreshwater of 12.7 mg Mo/L and a PNECmarine of 1.92 mg Mo/L. As there are currently insufficient ecotoxicological data available for the derivation of PNECs in the sediment compartment, the equilibrium partitioning method was applied; typical KD-values for both the freshwater and marine compartments were identified and combined with the respective PNEC, leading to a PNECsediment of 22,600 mg/kg dry weight and 1980 mg/kg dry weight for freshwater and marine sediments, respectively. The chronic data sets were also used for the derivation of final chronic values using the procedures that are outlined by the US Environmental Protection Agency for deriving such water benchmarks. Comparing PNECs with FCVs showed that both methodologies result in comparable protective concentration levels for molybdenum in the environment. -- Highlights: ► Derivation of freshwater and marine safe levels based on chronic ecotoxicity data. ► PNEC derivation according to EU guidance, using the statistical extrapolation. ► Determination of a

  20. Methods for the determination of low-level actinide concentrations and their behaviour in the aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intentional and accidental releases have contaminated the environment with radionuclides, posing a potential health hazard to populations of the polluted regions. Low concentrations of the actinides in the environment and complex sample matrices have made their determination a time consuming and complicated task. Separation methods based on anion exchange and extraction chromatography were developed, and subsequently modified, for analysis of different sample matrices in this work. These methods were used for the investigations of the behaviour of actinides in the environment. Chemical properties play an important role in the phenomena affecting the migration of radionuclides. The method based on anion exchange was used to study the behaviour of U in a small U-Th deposit and also the behaviour of Pu, Am and Cm in a lake system after the Chernobyl accident. The speciation of U and Pu in natural waters has also been investigated. A trend of higher 234U/238U activity ratios with lower 238U concentrations was seen in the ground waters in the Palmottu analogue study site in southern Finland. This indicates chemical leaching of U(VI) in oxidising conditions and preferable dissolution of 234U due to the recoil effects of the alpha decay in reducing conditions. The factors affecting the distribution of U concentrations and the 234U/238U activity ratios in filtered ground water and the particulate fraction in the Palmottu are also discussed. The concentrations of Pu, Am and Cm in filtered water, particulate and surface sediment samples in Lake Paeijaenne in southern Finland have been determined. Pu, Am and Cm fallout from the Chernobyl accident was minor compared to global fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapon tests. Based on the 238Pu/239,240Pu isotopic ratio, only 10 % of the Pu in the surface layer of the bottom sediment derived from the Chernobyl accident. Three months after the accident, 73 % of the total 239,240Pu concentration was in the surface layer of the bottom

  1. Methods for the determination of low-level actinide concentrations and their behaviour in the aquatic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilvioe, R

    1998-12-31

    Intentional and accidental releases have contaminated the environment with radionuclides, posing a potential health hazard to populations of the polluted regions. Low concentrations of the actinides in the environment and complex sample matrices have made their determination a time consuming and complicated task. Separation methods based on anion exchange and extraction chromatography were developed, and subsequently modified, for analysis of different sample matrices in this work. These methods were used for the investigations of the behaviour of actinides in the environment. Chemical properties play an important role in the phenomena affecting the migration of radionuclides. The method based on anion exchange was used to study the behaviour of U in a small U-Th deposit and also the behaviour of Pu, Am and Cm in a lake system after the Chernobyl accident. The speciation of U and Pu in natural waters has also been investigated. A trend of higher {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios with lower {sup 238}U concentrations was seen in the ground waters in the Palmottu analogue study site in southern Finland. This indicates chemical leaching of U(VI) in oxidising conditions and preferable dissolution of {sup 234}U due to the recoil effects of the alpha decay in reducing conditions. The factors affecting the distribution of U concentrations and the {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios in filtered ground water and the particulate fraction in the Palmottu are also discussed. The concentrations of Pu, Am and Cm in filtered water, particulate and surface sediment samples in Lake Paeijaenne in southern Finland have been determined. Pu, Am and Cm fallout from the Chernobyl accident was minor compared to global fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapon tests. Based on the {sup 238}Pu/{sup 239,240}Pu isotopic ratio, only 10 % of the Pu in the surface layer of the bottom sediment derived from the Chernobyl accident. Three months after the accident, 73 % of the total {sup 239

  2. Is there a risk for the aquatic environment due to the existence of emerging organic contaminants in treated domestic wastewater? Greece as a case-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomaidi, Vasiliki S; Stasinakis, Athanasios S; Borova, Viola L; Thomaidis, Nikolaos S

    2015-01-01

    The ecological threat associated with emerging pollutants detected in wastewater was estimated in country level. Treated wastewater was analyzed for pharmaceuticals and illicit drugs; whereas the concentrations of all emerging contaminants determined in Greek Sewage Treatment Plants were recorded through literature review. Toxicity data was collected after literature review or using ECOSAR and risk quotients (RQs) were calculated for treated wastewater and 25 Greek rivers, for 3 different aquatic organisms (fish, daphnia magna, algae). According to the results, monitoring data was available for 207 micropollutants belonging to 8 different classes. RQ>1 was calculated for 30 compounds in secondary treated wastewater. Triclosan presented RQ>1 (in algae) for all studied rivers; decamethylcyclopentasilane (in daphnia magna), caffeine (in algae) and nonylphenol (in fish) presented RQ>1 in rivers with dilution factors (DF) equal or lower to 1910, 913 and 824, respectively. The class of emerging contaminants that present the greatest threat due to single or mixture toxicity was endocrine disrupters. The mixture of microcontaminants seems to pose significant ecological risk, even in rivers with DF equal to 2388. Future national monitoring programs should include specific microcontaminants that seem to possess environment risk to surface water. PMID:25464317

  3. Species analysis of organotin compounds to investigate their pathway in the aquatic environment; Speziesanalytik von zinnorganischen Verbindungen zur Aufklaerung ihrer Biopfade in der aquatischen Umwelt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuballa, J. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Physikalische und Chemische Analytik

    1997-12-31

    In this thesis the sorption, transport and accumulation behaviour of organotin compounds in the aquatic environment was investigated in order to assess and evaluate the toxic potential. In situ derivatization with sodiumthetraethylborate and extraction with hexane were employed to isolate the tin species from the matrices. Separation and quantification were performed using on-line gas chromatorgraphy coupled with atomic absorption spectrometry. The main conclusion of this work is that organotin compounds show a characteristic bioaccumulation behaviour, which is influenced by the solubility of the species in combination with lipophily and sorption on particles, humic substances and biofilms. (orig.) [Deutsch] In der vorliegenden Arbeit wurden das Sorptions-, Transport- und Akkumulationsverhalten von Organozinnverbindungen in der aquatischen Umwelt untersucht mit dem Ziel einer Abschaetzung und Bewertung des oekologischen Schaedigungspotentials. Die Isolierung der Zinnspezies aus den Matrizes gelang mit der In-Situ-Derivatisierung mit Natriumtetraethylborat und Extraktion mit Hexan. Die Trennung und Quantifizierung erfolgte mittels Gaschromatographie on-line gekoppelt mit Atomabsorptionsspektrometrie. Die wichtigste Aussage dieser Arbeit ist, dass zinnorganische Verbindungen ein charakteristisches Bioakkumulationsverhalten aufweisen, das wesentlich von der Wasserloeslichkeit der Spezies in Verbindung mit der Lipophilie und der Bindung an Partikel, Huminstoffe und Biofilme beeinflusst wird. (orig.)

  4. Evaluation of selected ubiquitous contaminants in the aquatic environment and their transformation products. A pilot study of their removal from a sewage treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, M J Martínez; Uclés, S; Hernando, M D; Dávoli, E; Fernández-Alba, A R

    2011-03-01

    A simple method using direct sample injection combined with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry has been developed for the simultaneous analysis of six alkaloid compounds in environmental samples. The target list includes two psychostimulants (nicotine and caffeine), three metabolites (cotinine, nicotinic acid and paraxanthine) and a coffee chemical (trigonelline). The analytical method was evaluated in three different matrices (surface water, influent and effluent wastewater). The method developed showed an adequate sensitivity, below 0.6 μg L(-1) for wastewater and 0.1 μg L(-1) for river matrices, without any prior treatment of the samples. Finally, the methodology was applied to real samples for evaluation of their removal from a sewage treatment plant and their persistence/fate in the aquatic environment. All compounds studied in this work were detected at all sampling points collected along the Henares River. However, nicotinic acid was only detected three times in treated sewage samples at levels above its detection limit. PMID:21333319

  5. Behavior of 226Ra in the aquatic environment of the uranium mine region of Pocos de Caldas, MG, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sampling and analytical program for 238U, 226Ra and 210Pb was started, at first, in the uranium mine region, at Pocos de Caldas, MG, Brazil. Afterwards, the interaction was studied between 226Ra and local river sediments and waters. Peliminary studies were also done on the mobility of 226Ra retained on solid matter or soil, induced by local waters. Above normal concentrations of 238U, 226Ra and 210Pb were found in local waters, sediments and plants collected on the imediate vicinity of the mine. 226Ra distribution coefficients are on the order of 103 for the different samples assayed. It was concluded that, in the future, 226Ra discharged into liquid environment should be only temporarily retained by sediments. Its transport by surface waters should be predominantly in the soluble form. 226Ra should become the critical radionuclide in terms of internal radiation dose on the local population, due to its ingestion with water. 226Ra retained on solid supports is mobilized by local waters and its solubilization is dependent on the volume of water passed through. (M.A.)

  6. Genotyping of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from lung transplant recipients and aquatic environment-detected in-hospital transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Ewa; Welinder-Olsson, Christina; Gilljam, Marita

    2014-02-01

    Lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is common in lung transplant recipients and may lead to severe complications. Bacteriological surveillance aims to detect transmission of microbes between hospital environment and patients. We sought to determine whether genotyping of P. aeruginosa isolates could improve identifications of pathways of infection. From 2004 to 2009, we performed genotyping with multiple-locus variable number of tandem repeats analysis (MLVA) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of P. aeruginosa isolates cultured from lung transplant recipients at Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg. During a small outbreak in 2008, cultivation and genotyping of isolates from sink and drains samples from the hospital ward were performed. Pseudomona aeruginosa from 11/18 patients were genotyped to unique strains. The remaining seven patients were carriers of a P. aeruginosa strain of cluster A genotype. Pseudomona aeruginosa was isolated in 4/8 water samples, typed by MLVA also as cluster A genotype and confirmed by PFGE to be similar or identical to the isolates from four transplanted patients. In conclusion, genotyping of isolates revealed a clonal relationship between patient and water isolates, indicating in-hospital transmission of P. aeruginosa. We suggest genotyping with MLVA for rapid routine surveillance, with the PFGE method used for extended, confirmatory analyses. PMID:24450429

  7. Who Possesses Drug Resistance Genes in the Aquatic Environment? : Sulfamethoxazole (SMX) Resistance Genes among the Bacterial Community in Water Environment of Metro-Manila, Philippines

    OpenAIRE

    Satoru eSuzuki; Mitsuko eOgo; Miller, Todd W.; Akiko eShimizu; Hideshige eTakada; Maria Auxilia eSiringan

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence has shown that antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) are ubiquitous in natural environments, including sites considered pristine. To understand the origin of ARGs and their dynamics, we must first define their actual presence in the natural bacterial assemblage. Here we found varying distribution profiles of sul genes in “colony forming bacterial assemblages” and “natural bacterial assemblages.” Our monitoring for antibiotic contamination r...

  8. Comparative studies of the global ecological state variation of the aquatic environment in the Crişuri Hydrographic Space between 2007 and 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina Sion

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a comparative study regarding the evolution across time of the quality of aquatic eco-systems in the Crişuri Hydrographic Space (CHS, between 2007 and 2009. Having as a goal a real and complete image of the quality of the environment in the CHS, the ecological monitoringconducted was meant to observe the structure of the aquatic communities (macrozoobenthos, microphytobenthos, phytoplankton and the biotope characteristics (physical and chemical parameters of water: pH, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, CBO5, CCO-Mn, CCO-Cr, nitrites, nitrates, phosphates, amonium, chlorophyll “a”, chlorides, sulphates, fix residues, As, Hg, Cu, Zn, Mn, phenols, detergents etc. The choosing of the monitoring sections, their identification and geographical position were accomplished in 2006. The basic criterion in the choice of the monitoring sections was the identification of all aspects that can influence the quality state of the waters. The monitoring of the quality state of the waters in the CHS was conducted in 40 sections, both on the main courses and their affluents, over a 3-year period. After the results of the analyses of physico-chemical and biological samples were obtained, the categorization of the prelevation sections in quality classes followed; depending on these classes, the modelation of the global ecological states of the watercourses in the CHS was realized by means of mapping techniques (GIS. Most of the monitoring sections were in the good ecological state category. The very good ecological state was determined only for those sections upstream all polluting sources. Nevertheless, some of the prelevation points exceeded both physico-chemically and biologically the limits of the good quality state, entering the category of moderate quality state. No watercourse in the CHS was determined for poor or bad quality state. Generally, a “preservation” of the quality state of the waters from one year to the following was

  9. A rational approach to selecting and ranking some pharmaceuticals of concern for the aquatic environment and their relative importance compared with other chemicals

    OpenAIRE

    Donnachie, Rachel L.; Johnson, Andrew C.; Sumpter, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Aquatic organisms can be exposed to thousands of chemicals discharged by the human population. Many of these chemicals are considered disruptive to aquatic wildlife; the literature on the impacts of these chemicals grows daily. However, since time and resources are not infinite, we must focus on the chemicals which represent the greatest threat. One group of chemicals of increasing concern is the pharmaceuticals, where the struggle is to identify which of them represent the greatest threat. I...

  10. An assessment of Hg in the freshwater aquatic environment related to long-range transported air pollution in Europe and North America (ICP Waters report 97/2009)

    OpenAIRE

    Ranneklev, S.; de Wit, H; Jenssen, M.; Skjelkvåle, B. L.

    2009-01-01

    Long-range transboundary atmospheric transport of the pollutant mercury (Hg) (LTRAP-Hg) poses an ecological threat to aquatic ecosystems and biota. Through fish consumption, mercury and its highly toxic and bioaccumulative organic form methylmercury (MeHg) may cause harmful effects on human health. Factors controlling the bioaccumulation of Hg in aquatic ecosystems are not well understood. In Scandinavia an increased content of Hg in piscivorous fish has been observed the last decade. Today, ...

  11. Aquatic food security:insights into challenges and solutions from an analysis of interactions between fisheries, aquaculture, food safety, human health, fish and human welfare, economy and environment

    OpenAIRE

    Jennings, Simon; Stentiford, Grant D.; Leocadio, Ana M.; Jeffery, Keith R; Metcalfe, Julian D.; Katsiadaki, Ioanna; Auchterlonie, Neil A.; Mangi, Stephen C.; Pinnegar, John K.; Ellis, Tim; Peeler, Edmund J; Luisetti, Tiziana; Baker-Austin, Craig; Brown, Mary; Catchpole, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    Fisheries and aquaculture production, imports, exports and equitability of distribution determine the supply of aquatic food to people. Aquatic food security is achieved when a food supply is sufficient, safe, sustainable, shockproof and sound: sufficient, to meet needs and preferences of people; safe, to provide nutritional benefit while posing minimal health risks; sustainable, to provide food now and for future generations; shock-proof, to provide resilience to shocks in production systems...

  12. Solid waste deposits as a significant source of contaminants of emerging concern to the aquatic and terrestrial environments - A developing country case study from Owerri, Nigeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arukwe, Augustine, E-mail: arukwe@bio.ntnu.no [Department of Biology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Hogskoleringen 5, 7491 Trondheim (Norway); Eggen, Trine [Bioforsk, Norwegian Institute for Agricultural and Environmental Research, Postveien 213, N-4353 Klepp St. (Norway); Moeder, Monika [Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research UFZ, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    isomers), metabolites of non-ionic surfactants (nonylphenol-polyethoxylates), UV-filter compound ethyl methoxy cinnamate (EHMC) and bisphenol A (BPA) were particularly determined in the sediment samples at high {mu}g/kg dry weight concentration. Measuring contaminants in such areas will help in increasing governmental, societal and industrial awareness on the extent and seriousness of the contamination both at waste disposal sites and surrounding terrestrial and aquatic environments. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid waste management in developing countries Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid waste as a significant source of contaminants of emerging concern Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Contaminant leaching from solid waste to surrounding environment Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Detection of several contaminants of emerging concern and with endocrine-disrupting activities Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phthalates are the dominant contaminant group with concentrations that are comparable with other countries.

  13. Solid waste deposits as a significant source of contaminants of emerging concern to the aquatic and terrestrial environments — A developing country case study from Owerri, Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    of isomers), metabolites of non-ionic surfactants (nonylphenol-polyethoxylates), UV-filter compound ethyl methoxy cinnamate (EHMC) and bisphenol A (BPA) were particularly determined in the sediment samples at high μg/kg dry weight concentration. Measuring contaminants in such areas will help in increasing governmental, societal and industrial awareness on the extent and seriousness of the contamination both at waste disposal sites and surrounding terrestrial and aquatic environments. -- Highlights: ► Solid waste management in developing countries ► Solid waste as a significant source of contaminants of emerging concern ► Contaminant leaching from solid waste to surrounding environment ► Detection of several contaminants of emerging concern and with endocrine-disrupting activities ► Phthalates are the dominant contaminant group with concentrations that are comparable with other countries.

  14. Chapter 5. Assessing the Aquatic Hazards of Veterinary Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recent years, there has been increasing awareness of the widespread distribution of low concentrations of veterinary medicine products and other pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment. While aquatic hazard for a select group of veterinary medicines has received previous s...

  15. Adaptations in the structure and innervation of follicle-sinus complexes to an aquatic environment as seen in the Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarko, Diana K; Reep, Roger L; Mazurkiewicz, Joseph E; Rice, Frank L

    2007-09-20

    Florida manatees are large-bodied aquatic herbivores that use large tactile vibrissae for several purposes. Facial vibrissae are used to forage in a turbid water environment, and the largest perioral vibrissae can also grasp and manipulate objects. Other vibrissae distributed over the entire postfacial body appear to function as a lateral line system. All manatee vibrissae emanate from densely innervated follicle-sinus complexes (FSCs) like those in other mammals, although proportionately larger commensurate with the caliber of the vibrissae. As revealed by immunofluorescence, all manatee FSCs have many types of C, Adelta and Abeta innervation including Merkel, club, and longitudinal lanceolate endings at the level of the ring sinus, but they lack other types such as reticular and spiny endings at the level of the cavernous sinus. As in non-whisking terrestrial species, the inner conical bodies of facial FSCs are well innervated but lack Abeta-fiber terminals. Importantly, manatee FSCs have two unique types of Abeta-fiber endings. First, all of the FSCs have exceptionally large-caliber axons that branch to terminate as novel, gigantic spindle-like endings located at the upper ring sinus. Second, facial FSCs have smaller caliber Abeta fibers that terminate in the trabeculae of the cavernous sinus as an ending that resembles a Golgi tendon organ. In addition, the largest perioral vibrissae, which are used for grasping, have exceptionally well-developed medullary cores that have a structure and dense small-fiber innervation resembling that of tooth pulp. Other features of the epidermis and upper dermis structure and innervation differ from that seen in terrestrial mammals. PMID:17640045

  16. Nanoplastics in the aquatic environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelmans, A.A.; Besseling, E.; Shim, W.J.

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of literature reports on the abundance and effects of plastic debris, with an increasing focus on microplastic particles smaller than 5 mm. It has often been suggested that plastic particles in the

  17. Study of Orontes river environment in Syria and Lebanon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Energy Commission of Syria and the Lebanese National Council for Scientific Research represented by the Lebanese Atomic Energy Commission conducted a survey study on Orontes River environment addressing different aspects namely: Radioactivity, metals and trace elements in water, sediments, plants and animals, surface water flow system of the river, physical and chemical properties of the river's water, species of algae. The study aimed to evaluate the possible effects of anthropogenic activities on the river environment and to establishing a basic database, which will enable to predict changes that might happen in the future. (author)

  18. Association between dietary patterns and the risk of metabolic syndrome among Lebanese adults

    OpenAIRE

    Naja, F.; Nasreddine, L.; Itani, L.; Adra, N.; Sibai, A.M.; Hwalla, N.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The main objective of this study was to evaluate the association between dietary patterns and the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its metabolic abnormalities among Lebanese adults, using data from a national nutrition survey. Methods A cross-sectional analysis involving adults aged ≥18 years (n = 323) with no prior history of chronic diseases was conducted. Participants completed a brief sociodemographic and 61-item food frequency questionnaire. Anthropometric measurements and fasting b...

  19. Critical organizational challenges in delivering business value from IT:the Perspective of Lebanese CIOs

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolian, Nazareth; Welch, Christine; Read, Martin; Roberts, Martyn

    2014-01-01

    The collective body of theoretical and empirical research in Information Systems (IS) comes mainly from the West. While there is emerging IS research in some developing countries and parts of the Middle East, the research agenda in Lebanon is so far non-existent. This study forms part of a larger research project to explore and analyze the perceived value of IS and the organizational competencies needed to deliver that value in Lebanon. Many of the challenges faced by Lebanese organizations a...

  20. Transnational Entrepreneurship: A Interview with Lebanese-American Restaurateur Charbel Saliba

    OpenAIRE

    J. Mark MUNOZ

    2015-01-01

    Literature on transnational entrepreneurship, while expanding, leaves much to be desired. For instance, there is paucity of qualitative surveys that capture the “voice” of a real life transnational entrepreneur. This article aims to contribute to the academic and business literature by showcasing the viewpoint of a Lebanese-American transnational entrepreneur. Charbel Saliba is a successful ethnic restaurant owner in Illinois, USA. Through an interview conducted by Dr. J. Mark Munoz of Millik...

  1. Multivariate epidemiologic analysis of type 2 diabetes mellitus risks in the Lebanese population

    OpenAIRE

    Ghassibe-Sabbaghm, Michella; Deeb, Mary; Salloum, Angelique,; Mouzaya, Francis; Haber, Marc; Al-Sarraj, Yasser; Chami, Youssef; Akle, Yasmine; Hirbli, Kamal; Nemr, Rita; Ahdab, Rechdi; Daniel E. Platt; Abchee, Antoine; El-Shanti, Hatem; Zalloua, Pierre A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The burden of diabetes in Lebanon requires well-targeted interventions for screening type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and prediabetes and prevention of risk factors. Newly recruited 998 Lebanese individuals, in addition to 7,292 already available, were studied to investigate the prevalence of diabetes, prediabetes and their associated risk factors. Methods Participants had fasting blood sugar and glycohemoglobin tests in addition to a lipid profile. Clinical and demographic informat...

  2. ANTIOXIDANT, CYTOTOXIC PROPERTIES AND PHYTOCHEMICAL SCREENING OF TWO LEBANESE MEDICINAL PLANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Rammal Hassan; Farhan Hussein; Mohsen Hawraa; Hijazi Akram; Kobeissy Ahmad; Daher Ahmad; Badran Bassam

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays herbal medicine presents a significant adjuvant tool for hard treatment, especially in the case of cancer where modern medicine has access to traditional medicine to deprive the patient of the side effects of therapeutic approaches such as surgery and chemotherapy. Thus, Lebanese 10452 km2 are so rich in medicinal plants such as Eryngium creticum L. and Euphorbia macroclada Boiss that are traditionally used in the treatment of various diseases (leukemia, asthma, skin diseases, antido...

  3. Stress ulcer prophylaxis guidelines: Are they being implemented in Lebanese health care centers?

    OpenAIRE

    Abeer Zeitoun; Maya Zeineddine; Hani Dimassi

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the current practice of stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) in Lebanese Health care centers. METHODS: A multi-center prospective chart review study was conducted over 8 mo. A questionnaire was distributed to pharmacy students who collected data on demographics, SUP medications, dose, route, duration and associated risk factors. The appropriateness of SUP use was determined as per American Society of Health-System Pharmacists guidelines. Institutional review board approval was obta...

  4. Solid waste deposits as a significant source of contaminants of emerging concern to the aquatic and terrestrial environments - a developing country case study from Owerri, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arukwe, Augustine; Eggen, Trine; Möder, Monika

    2012-11-01

    isomers), metabolites of non-ionic surfactants (nonylphenol-polyethoxylates), UV-filter compound ethyl methoxy cinnamate (EHMC) and bisphenol A (BPA) were particularly determined in the sediment samples at high μg/kg dry weight concentration. Measuring contaminants in such areas will help in increasing governmental, societal and industrial awareness on the extent and seriousness of the contamination both at waste disposal sites and surrounding terrestrial and aquatic environments. PMID:22975307

  5. The transformation of Lebanese firms from ISO 9000 certified to TQM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezher, T

    2000-01-01

    Over the past decade, the most effective method of implementing a quality system has been ISO 9000 certification. Lebanese companies have recently followed the same path of adopting and improving their status in quality systems. The overwhelming belief is that ISO 9000 is, by itself, not enough. It is a first stepping-stone in the road to business excellence, but ISO 9000 does not guarantee an improvement in the product or service being offered. All indications are that Total Quality Management (TQM) is the method for improving quality as a whole. This improvement is, of course, entirely reliant on the proper implementation and understanding of the scope and underlying objectives. The relatively new adoption of TQM as an effective tool in the struggle to achieve substantial improvements in quality is made clear in the results of a survey that are presented in this article. Recommendations as how to make the transition between ISO 9000 and TQM are made, and a discussion is provided of the need for organizational change, both internal and external, within companies in the Lebanese market. The aim of this work is to present a clear representation of what is actually occurring within the Lebanese domestic market with regards to the understanding the TQM philosophy. PMID:11710307

  6. Uptake and release kinetics of 134Cs by goldfish (Carassius auratus) and 137Cs by zebra fish (Brachydanio rerio) in controlled aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uptake and release kinetics of 134Cs by Goldfish (Carassius auratus) and 137Cs by Zebra Fish (Brachydanio rerio) from aquatic media of different ionic compositions and temperature was studied in controlled laboratory conditions. The accumulation of radiocesium in the case of Brachydanio rerio is observed to be strongly dependent on the potassium ion concentration of the aquatic medium, but in the case of Carassius auratus this dependence is quite weak. The biological half-lives of the cesium isotopes incorporated into the fish investigated in the present work vary from 19 to 80 days and are influenced by the temperature and the ionic composition of the aquatic medium. (author) 19 refs.; 1 fig.; 3 tabs

  7. N-Acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1) Genotype: A Risk Factor for Urinary Bladder Cancer in a Lebanese Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassine, Ibrahim A.; Kobeissi, Loulou; Jabbour, Michel E.; Dhaini, Hassan R.

    2012-01-01

    In Lebanon, bladder cancer is the second most incident cancer among men. This study investigates a possible association between N-acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1) genotype, a drug-metabolizing enzyme coding gene, and bladder cancer in Lebanese men. A case-control study (54 cases and 105 hospital-based controls) was conducted in two major hospitals in Beirut. Cases were randomly selected from patients diagnosed in the period of 2002–2008. Controls were conveniently identified and selected from the same settings. Data was collected using interview questionnaire and blood analysis. NAT1 genotypes were determined by PCR-RFLP. Statistical analysis revolved around univariate, bivariate, and multivariate logistic regression models, along with checks for effect modification. Results showed NAT1∗14A allele, smoking, occupational exposure to combustion fumes, and prostate-related symptoms, to be risk factors for bladder cancer. The odds of carrying at least one NAT1∗14A allele are 7 times higher in cases compared to controls (OR = 7.86, 95% CI: 1.53–40.39). A gene-environment interaction was identified for NAT1∗14A allele with occupational exposure to combustion fumes. Among carriers of NAT1∗14A allele, the odds of bladder cancer dropped to 2.03 from 3.72. Our study suggests NAT1∗14A allele as a possible biomarker for bladder cancer. Further research is recommended to confirm this association. PMID:22956951

  8. N-Acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1 Genotype: A Risk Factor for Urinary Bladder Cancer in a Lebanese Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim A. Yassine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In Lebanon, bladder cancer is the second most incident cancer among men. This study investigates a possible association between N-acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1 genotype, a drug-metabolizing enzyme coding gene, and bladder cancer in Lebanese men. A case-control study (54 cases and 105 hospital-based controls was conducted in two major hospitals in Beirut. Cases were randomly selected from patients diagnosed in the period of 2002–2008. Controls were conveniently identified and selected from the same settings. Data was collected using interview questionnaire and blood analysis. NAT1 genotypes were determined by PCR-RFLP. Statistical analysis revolved around univariate, bivariate, and multivariate logistic regression models, along with checks for effect modification. Results showed NAT1∗14A allele, smoking, occupational exposure to combustion fumes, and prostate-related symptoms, to be risk factors for bladder cancer. The odds of carrying at least one NAT1∗14A allele are 7 times higher in cases compared to controls (OR=7.86, 95% CI: 1.53–40.39. A gene-environment interaction was identified for NAT1∗14A allele with occupational exposure to combustion fumes. Among carriers of NAT1∗14A allele, the odds of bladder cancer dropped to 2.03 from 3.72. Our study suggests NAT1∗14A allele as a possible biomarker for bladder cancer. Further research is recommended to confirm this association.

  9. Predation by Asian bullfrog tadpoles, Hoplobatrachus tigerinus, against the dengue vector, Aedes aegypti, in an aquatic environment treated with mosquitocidal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugan, Kadarkarai; Priyanka, Vishwanathan; Dinesh, Devakumar; Madhiyazhagan, Pari; Panneerselvam, Chellasamy; Subramaniam, Jayapal; Suresh, Udaiyan; Chandramohan, Balamurugan; Roni, Mathath; Nicoletti, Marcello; Alarfaj, Abdullah A; Higuchi, Akon; Munusamy, Murugan A; Khater, Hanem F; Messing, Russell H; Benelli, Giovanni

    2015-10-01

    Aedes aegypti is a primary vector of dengue and chikungunya. The use of synthetic insecticides to control Aedes populations often leads to high operational costs and adverse non-target effects. Botanical extracts have been proposed for rapid extracellular synthesis of mosquitocidal nanoparticles, but their impact against predators of mosquito larvae has not been well studied. We propose a single-step method for the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) using the extract of Artemisia vulgaris leaves as a reducing and stabilizing agent. AgNP were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). SEM and XRD showed that AgNP were polydispersed, crystalline, irregularly shaped, with a mean size of 30-70 nm. EDX confirmed the presence of elemental silver. FTIR highlighted that the functional groups from plant metabolites capped AgNP, stabilizing them over time. We investigated the mosquitocidal properties of A. vulgaris leaf extract and green-synthesized AgNP against larvae and pupae of Ae. aegypti. We also evaluated the predatory efficiency of Asian bullfrog tadpoles, Hoplobatrachus tigerinus, against larvae of Ae. aegypti, under laboratory conditions and in an aquatic environment treated with ultra-low doses of AgNP. AgNP were highly toxic to Ae. aegypti larval instars (I-IV) and pupae, with LC50 ranging from 4.4 (I) to 13.1 ppm (pupae). In the lab, the mean number of prey consumed per tadpole per day was 29.0 (I), 26.0 (II), 21.4 (III), and 16.7 (IV). After treatment with AgNP, the mean number of mosquito prey per tadpole per day increased to 34.2 (I), 32.4 (II), 27.4 (III), and 22.6 (IV). Overall, this study highlights the importance of a synergistic approach based on biocontrol agents and botanical nano-insecticides for mosquito control. PMID:26091763

  10. Studies on the aquatic environment at Olkiluoto and reference area. 1: Olkiluoto, reference lakes and Eurajoki and Lapijoki rivers in 2009-2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This working report presents the first results of a sampling campaign at Olkiluoto and reference lakes and rivers selected to resemble the aquatic systems expected to form at the site in the future with the post-glacial crustal rebound (land uplift). In 2009-2010, the aim of the studies was to improve the knowledge of the aquatic systems and to produce input data to the safety case for the spent nuclear fuel repository at Olkiluoto. The first main objective was to estimate the areal biomass distribution and measure the dimensions of characteristic aquatic plants and animals. Another objective was to estimate the transfer of different elements from water to the aquatic organisms paying special attention on key elements (Ag, Cl, I, Mo, Nb and Se) in the dose assessment within the safety case. Surface water, sediment, macrophyte, fish and macrobenthos samples were collected from the Olkiluoto coastal area and from the reference lakes for biomass and dimension measurements and analysis of element concentration. Water-to-biota concentration ratios were estimated for the coastal area and for the reference lakes. From rivers, only water samples were collected at this stage. In 2009-2010, sampling procedures and pre-treatment methods were developed and analytical methods were optimised. Thus, the results reported here are indicative by their nature. After 2010, the studies have been continued with better established methods, and the more recent results will be reported later. (orig.)

  11. Studies on the aquatic environment at Olkiluoto and reference area. 1: Olkiluoto, reference lakes and Eurajoki and Lapijoki rivers in 2009-2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kangasniemi, V. [Environmental Research and Assessment EnviroCase Ltd., Pori (Finland); Helin, J.

    2014-03-15

    This working report presents the first results of a sampling campaign at Olkiluoto and reference lakes and rivers selected to resemble the aquatic systems expected to form at the site in the future with the post-glacial crustal rebound (land uplift). In 2009-2010, the aim of the studies was to improve the knowledge of the aquatic systems and to produce input data to the safety case for the spent nuclear fuel repository at Olkiluoto. The first main objective was to estimate the areal biomass distribution and measure the dimensions of characteristic aquatic plants and animals. Another objective was to estimate the transfer of different elements from water to the aquatic organisms paying special attention on key elements (Ag, Cl, I, Mo, Nb and Se) in the dose assessment within the safety case. Surface water, sediment, macrophyte, fish and macrobenthos samples were collected from the Olkiluoto coastal area and from the reference lakes for biomass and dimension measurements and analysis of element concentration. Water-to-biota concentration ratios were estimated for the coastal area and for the reference lakes. From rivers, only water samples were collected at this stage. In 2009-2010, sampling procedures and pre-treatment methods were developed and analytical methods were optimised. Thus, the results reported here are indicative by their nature. After 2010, the studies have been continued with better established methods, and the more recent results will be reported later. (orig.)

  12. The effect of television-mediated aggression and real-life aggression on the behavior of Lebanese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, R C; Ghandour, M

    1984-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of television-mediated aggression and real-life aggression on the behavior of Lebanese children. The sample consisted of 48 boys and 48 girls of Lebanese origin who were students in an elementary school in Beirut, Lebanon. After controlling for pre-experimental aggression, the subjects were randomly assigned to one of the following treatment conditions: human-film aggression, cartoon-film aggression, neutral film, or real-life (act of war) aggression. The results indicated that boys as a group were more aggressive than girls and exhibited more imitative aggression after viewing both violent film and real-life violence. Girls were not more violent after viewing filmed aggression but were affected by the real-life violence. Comparisons of Bandura's work within the Lebanese culture are made. PMID:6470621

  13. Production in aquatic macrophyte communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binzer, Thomas; Sand-Jensen, Kaj

    2002-01-01

    combined a simple mechanistic model and empirical measurements on artificially structured macroalgal communities (Ulva lactuca) with varying thallus absorptance and community density. Predicted and measured values corresponded closely and revealed that gross production in high-light environments...... that inefficient distribution of light can account for the low community production rates in aquatic habitats and the depth distribution of form-functional groups of macroalgae with different canopy structure.......-dimensional structure because of the strong drag and shear forces of moving water. This difference in canopy structure has been suggested to account for the three- to fivefold higher gross production rates in terrestrial than aquatic communities. To evaluate the effect of community structure in aquatic habitats, we...

  14. Assessing and Managing the Current and Future Pest Risk from Water Hyacinth, (Eichhornia crassipes), an Invasive Aquatic Plant Threatening the Environment and Water Security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriticos, Darren J; Brunel, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Understanding and managing the biological invasion threats posed by aquatic plants under current and future climates is a growing challenge for biosecurity and land management agencies worldwide. Eichhornia crassipes is one of the world's worst aquatic weeds. Presently, it threatens aquatic ecosystems, and hinders the management and delivery of freshwater services in both developed and developing parts of the world. A niche model was fitted using CLIMEX, to estimate the potential distribution of E. crassipes under historical and future climate scenarios. Under two future greenhouse gas emission scenarios for 2080 simulated with three Global Climate Models, the area with a favourable temperature regime appears set to shift polewards. The greatest potential for future range expansion lies in Europe. Elsewhere in the northern hemisphere temperature gradients are too steep for significant geographical range expansion under the climate scenarios explored here. In the Southern Hemisphere, the southern range boundary for E. crassipes is set to expand southwards in Argentina, Australia and New Zealand; under current climate conditions it is already able to invade the southern limits of Africa. The opportunity exists to prevent its spread into the islands of Tasmania in Australia and the South Island of New Zealand, both of which depend upon hydroelectric facilities that would be threatened by the presence of E. crassipes. In Europe, efforts to slow or stop the spread of E. crassipes will face the challenge of limited internal biosecurity capacity. The modelling technique demonstrated here is the first application of niche modelling for an aquatic weed under historical and projected future climates. It provides biosecurity agencies with a spatial tool to foresee and manage the emerging invasion threats in a manner that can be included in the international standard for pest risk assessments. It should also support more detailed local and regional management. PMID:27513336

  15. Simultaneous trace analysis of organic arsenic and antimony compounds in an aquatic environment using HPLC/ICP-MS; Simultane Spurenanalytik arsen- und antimonorganischer Verbindungen in der aquatischen Umwelt mittels HPLC/ICP-MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drescher, C.

    2000-07-01

    A method for simultaneous element species analysis of organometallic and inorganic compounds by direct coupling of HPLC and ICP-MS was used for the first time for analyses or arsenic and antimony compounds in an aquatic environment. [German] In der vorliegenden Arbeit wurde erstmalig eine Methode zur simultanen Elementspeziesanalytik metallorganischer und anorganischer Verbindungen mittels direkter Kopplung von HPLC und ICP-MS entwickelt und zur Untersuchung von Arsen und Antimonverbindungen in der aquatischen Umwelt eingesetzt. Ziel der Arbeiten war es, das Potential fluessigkeitschromatographischer Trennmethoden als Basis von Kopplungsmethoden zur simultanen Multielement-Speziesanalytik zu beschreiben und deren Leistungsfaehigkeit im Vergleich mit etablierten Methoden zu bewerten. (orig.)

  16. Caloric density of aquatic macrophytes in different environments of the Baía river subsystem, upper Paraná river floodplain, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia de Almeida Lopes

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to determine the caloric density of leaves, stems and roots of aquatic macrophytes in different environments of the Baía subsystem (Baía river and Fechada and Guaraná lagoons on the Upper Paraná river floodplain, in addition to identify the variability between ecological groups. Samplings of Eichhornia crassipes, Salvinia spp, Pistia stratiotes, Eichhornia azurea, Polygonum sp, Cyperaceae and Poaceae were carried out in February 2003. Spatial differences in the caloric densities were not observed for these plants. Caloric density values varied from 1906.9 cal/g dry weight (root to 4675.0 cal/g dry weight (leaf. However, significant differences between the caloric content averages of the vegetative structures were observed only for Polygonum sp and Salvinia spp. In relation to the ecological groups, the highest average value was verified for the emergent macrophytes (3529.7 ± 722.5, which were significantly different from the floating ones (3056.5 ± 571.0. There was no difference between the sites included in the subsystem when the caloric densities were compared.O presente trabalho teve por objetivo determinar a densidade calórica de folhas, caules e raízes de macrófitas aquáticas, em diferentes ambientes do subsistema Baía (Rio Baía e lagoas Fechada e do Guaraná na planície de inundação do alto rio Paraná, além de identificar a variabilidade entre grupos ecológicos. As amostragens foram realizadas em fevereiro de 2003, sendo coletadas amostras de diferentes macrófitas, Eichhornia crassipes, Salvinia spp, Pistia stratiotes, Eichhornia azurea, Polygonum sp, Cyperaceae e Poaceae. Diferenças espaciais nas densidades calóricas não foram observadas para as plantas estudadas. Os valores de densidade calórica variaram de 1906,9 cal/g de peso seco (raiz a 4675,0 cal/g de peso seco (folha. Entretanto, diferenças significativas entre as médias dos conteúdos calóricos das estruturas vegetativas foram

  17. Transnational Entrepreneurship: A Interview with Lebanese-American Restaurateur Charbel Saliba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mark MUNOZ

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Literature on transnational entrepreneurship, while expanding, leaves much to be desired. For instance, there is paucity of qualitative surveys that capture the “voice” of a real life transnational entrepreneur. This article aims to contribute to the academic and business literature by showcasing the viewpoint of a Lebanese-American transnational entrepreneur. Charbel Saliba is a successful ethnic restaurant owner in Illinois, USA. Through an interview conducted by Dr. J. Mark Munoz of Millikin University, with the assistance of business student Matthew Herek, Saliba shares his thinking on transnational entrepreneurship and its implications on his business..Keywords. Transnational entrepreneurship, Entrepreneurship, International business.JEL. L26, M16.

  18. Epidemiology of major burns at the Lebanese Burn Center in Geitawi, Lebanon

    OpenAIRE

    Ghanimé, G.; Rizkallah, N.; Said, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Burn care is one of the few areas in medicine considered both medically and surgically challenging, with burn injuries affecting people of all ages and both sexes. Between May 1992 and March 2012, 1,524 patients were admitted to the Lebanese Burn Center in Geitawi, with an average length of stay (LOS) of 36.5 days. The most frequently encountered injuries were thermal burns, generally resulting from domestic accidents. Of our patients, 47% were from rural areas and burned body surface (BBS) w...

  19. Post-graduation migration intentions of students of Lebanese medical schools: a survey study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakr Mazen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The international migration of physicians is a global public health problem. Lebanon is a source country with the highest emigration factor in the Middle East and North Africa and the 7th highest in the World. Given that residency training abroad is a critical step in the migration of physicians, the objective of this study was to survey students of Lebanese medical schools about their intentions to train abroad and their post training plans. Methods Our target population consisted of all students of Lebanese medical schools in the pre-final and final years of medical school. We developed the survey questionnaire based on the results of a qualitative study assessing the intentions and motives for students of Lebanese medical schools to train abroad. The questionnaire inquired about student's demographic and educational characteristics, intention to train abroad, the chosen country of abroad training, and post-training intention of returning to Lebanon. Results Of 576 eligible students, 425 participated (73.8% response rate. 406 (95.5% respondents intended to travel abroad either for specialty training (330 (77.6% or subspecialty training (76 (17.9%. Intention to train abroad was associated with being single compared with being married. The top 4 destination countries were the US (301(74.1%, France (49 (12.1%, the United Kingdom (31 (7.6% and Canada (17 (4.2%. One hundred and two (25.1% respondents intended to return to Lebanon directly after finishing training abroad; 259 (63.8% intended to return to Lebanon after working abroad temporarily for a varying number or years; 43 (10.6% intended to never return to Lebanon. The intention to stay indefinitely abroad was associated male sex and having a 2nd citizenship. It was inversely associated with being a student of one of the French affiliated medical schools and a plan to train in a surgical specialty. Conclusion An alarming percentage of students of Lebanese medical schools

  20. CYP2E1 and NQO1 genotypes and bladder cancer risk in a Lebanese population

    OpenAIRE

    Basma, Hussein A; Kobeissi, Loulou H; Jabbour, Michel E.; Moussa, Mohamad A; Dhaini, Hassan R

    2013-01-01

    Urinary bladder cancer incidence in Lebanon ranks among the highest in the world. Cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase1 (NQO1), and N-Acetyltransferase1 (NAT1), are drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) involved in the metabolism of carcinogens, such as arylamines and heterocyclic amines, implicated in bladder cancer. The present study attempts to investigate the role of these DMEs genetic polymorphism in bladder cancer risk among Lebanese men. 54 cases and 106 controls wer...

  1. Nitrous oxide emission by aquatic macrofauna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stief, Peter; Poulsen, Morten; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Brix, Hans; Schramm, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    A large variety of aquatic animals was found to emit the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide when nitrate was present in the environment. The emission was ascribed to denitrification by ingested bacteria in the anoxic animal gut, and the exceptionally high N2O-to-N2 production ratio suggested delayed induction of the last step of denitrification. Filter- and deposit-feeding animal species showed the highest rates of nitrous oxide emission and predators the lowest, probably reflecting the different amounts of denitrifying bacteria in the diet. We estimate that nitrous oxide emission by aquatic animals is quantitatively important in nitrate-rich aquatic environments like freshwater, coastal marine, and deep-sea ecosystems. The contribution of this source to overall nitrous oxide emission from aquatic environments might further increase because of the projected increase of nitrate availability in tropical regions and the numeric dominance of filter- and deposit-feeders in eutrophic ecosystems. PMID:19255427

  2. Aquatic impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of the high reproduction rates of the plankton and good tidal mixing at existing plants, depletion of plankton populations has not occurred. Spawning occurs throughout the Bay for the species of fish present here, so local depletions are insufficient to decrease Bay populations. Impingement totals are small compared to mortality due to other sources. In addition, efforts to reduce these totals are now underway at all three existing plants, Calvert Cliffs, Morgantown, and Chalk Point. Habitat modification effects, usually more subtle in nature, have minor, localized impacts. Coupled together, the power plant monitoring studies show a low cumulative impact on the mesohaline environment. The major area of concern within this region is the impact of cooling water withdrawals upon the nursery and spawning areas of striped bass and other anadromous species. Possum Point and Vienna have the highest potential for impact. New facilities planned for this region (Douglas Point, Summit, and Vienna) would increase withdrawals. The overall impact upon striped bass due to entrainment drops from an estimated 6.6% entrainment (upper bound) of the eggs and larvae spawned in the Maryland portion of the Bay at present to an estimated 3.4% (upper bound) after 1987. The addition of Douglas Point and Summit is more than off-set by the retirements of the once-through cooling units at Vienna. No impingement data are available at any of the present plants; however, degraded water quality at the Baltimore and Washington plants appears to have severely restricted fish populations in these waters. The proposed plants are expected to have no major impacts in the areas of impingement or habitat modification due to the small amount of water withdrawn

  3. Environmental management practices in the Lebanese pharmaceutical industries: implementation strategies and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massoud, May A; Makarem, N; Ramadan, W; Nakkash, R

    2015-03-01

    This research attempts to provide an understanding of the Lebanese pharmaceutical industries' environmental management strategies, priorities, and perceptions as well as drivers, barriers, and incentives regarding the implementation of the voluntary ISO 14001 Environmental Management System. Accordingly, a semistructured in-depth interview was conducted with the pharmaceutical industries. The findings revealed a significant lack of knowledge about the standard among the industries. The main perceived drivers for adopting the ISO 14001 are improving the companies' image and overcoming international trade. The main perceived barriers for acquiring the standard are the lack of government support and the fact that ISO 14001 is not being legally required or enforced by the government. Moreover, results revealed that adopting the ISO 14001 standard is not perceived as a priority for the Lebanese pharmaceutical industries. Although the cost of certification was not considered as a barrier for the implementation of ISO 14001, the majority of the pharmaceutical industries are neither interested nor willing to adopt the Standard if they are not exposed to any regulatory pressure or external demand. They are more concerned with quality and safety issues with the most adopted international standard among the industries being the ISO 9001 quality management system. This study highlights the aspect that financial barriers are not always the hurdles for implementing environmental management strategies in developing countries and underscores the need for regulatory frameworks and enforcement. PMID:25673269

  4. Stress ulcer prophylaxis guidelines:Are they being implemented in Lebanese health care centers?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abeer; Zeitoun; Maya; Zeineddine; Hani; Dimassi

    2011-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the current practice of stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) in Lebanese Health care centers.METHODS:A multi-center prospective chart review study was conducted over 8 mo.A questionnaire was distributed to pharmacy students who collected data on demographics,SUP medications,dose,route,duration and associated risk factors.The appropriateness of SUP use was determined as per American Society of Health-System Pharmacists guidelines.Institutional review board approval was obtained from each hospital center.RESULTS:A total of 1004 patients were included.67% of the patients who received prophylaxis did not have an indication for SUP.The majority (71.6%) of the patients who were administered parenteral drugs can tolerate oral medications.Overall,the regimen of acid-suppressant drugs was suboptimal in 87.6% of the sample.This misuse was mainly observed in non-teaching hospitals.CONCLUSION:This study highlighted the need,in Lebanese hospitals,to establish clinical practice guidelines for the use of SUP;mainly in non-critical care settings.

  5. Stress ulcer prophylaxis guidelines: Are they being implemented in Lebanese health care centers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeer Zeitoun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the current practice of stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP in Lebanese Health care centers. METHODS: A multi-center prospective chart review study was conducted over 8 mo. A questionnaire was distributed to pharmacy students who collected data on demographics, SUP medications, dose, route, duration and associated risk factors. The appropriateness of SUP use was determined as per American Society of Health-System Pharmacists guidelines. Institutional review board approval was obtained from each hospital center. RESULTS: A total of 1004 patients were included. 67% of the patients who received prophylaxis did not have an indication for SUP. The majority (71.6% of the patients who were administered parenteral drugs can tolerate oral medications. Overall, the regimen of acid-suppressant drugs was suboptimal in 87.6% of the sample. This misuse was mainly observed in non-teaching hospitals. CONCLUSION: This study highlighted the need, in Lebanese hospitals, to establish clinical practice guidelines for the use of SUP; mainly in non-critical care settings.

  6. The Lebanese Society for Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (LSIDCM) guidelines for adult community-acquired pneumonia (Cap) in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghnieh, Rima; Yared Sakr, Nadine; Kanj, Souha S; Musharrafieh, Umayya; Husni, Rula; Jradeh, Mona; Al-Awar, Ghassan; Matar, Madona; Jureij, Wafa; Antoine, Saad; Azar, Eid; Abi Hanna, Pierre; Minari, Afaf; Hammoud, Jamale; Kfoury, Joumana; Mahfouz, Tahsin; Abou Chakra, Diaa; Zaatari, Mohamad; Tabbarah, Zuhayr A

    2014-01-01

    Adult community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality which is managed by different disciplines in a heterogeneous fashion. Development of consensus guidelines to standardize these wide variations in care has become a prime objective. The Lebanese Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (LSIDCM) convened to set Lebanese national guidelines for the management of CAP since it is a major and a prevalent disease affecting the Lebanese population. These guidelines, besides being helpful in direct clinical practice, play a major role in establishing stewardship programs in hospitals in an effort to contain antimicrobial resistance on the national level. These guidelines are intended for primary care practitioners and emergency medicine physicians. They constitute an appropriate starting point for specialists' consultation being based on the available local epidemiological and resistance data. This document includes the following: 1/ Rationale and scope of the guidelines; 2/ Microbiology of CAP based on Lebanese data; 3/ Clinical presentation and diagnostic workup of CAP; 4/ Management and prevention strategies based on the IDSA/ATS Consensus Guidelines, 2007, and the ESCMID Guidelines, 2011, and tailored to the microbiological data in Lebanon; 5/ Comparison to regional guidelines. The recommendations made in this document were graded based on the strength of the evidence as in the 2007 IDSA/ATS Consensus Guidelines. Hopefully, these guidelines will be an important step towards standardization of CAP care in Lebanon and set the agenda for further research in this area. PMID:24684125

  7. Situation Reports--Afghanistan, Cyprus, Iran, Kenya, Lebanese Republic, Malagasy Republic, Malaysia (West), People's Democratic Republic of Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    Data relating to population and family planning in eight foreign countries are presented in these situation reports. Countries included are Afghanistan, Cyprus, Iran, Kenya, Lebanese Republic, Malagasy Republic (Madagascar), Malaysia (West), and People's Democratic Republic of Yemen. Information is provided under two topics, general background and…

  8. Report of the results of the fiscal 1997 regional consortium R and D project. Regional consortium field / Development of technology to treat aquatic environment by using microorganisms fixed on carbon fabrics (abbreviation: carbon/aquatic environment project) (first fiscal year); 1997 nendo chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo. Chiiki consortium bun`ya / tanso sen`i nansoshiki eno biseibutsu kochaku gensho wo riyoshita mizukankyo seibi gijutsu no kaihatsu (ryakusho: tanso mizu kankyo project) daiichi nendo seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    Out of the development of technology to arrange the aquatic environment using phenomena of microorganism fixation on carbon fiber soft textures, the paper stated the fiscal 1997 result. On carbon fibers in a state of swaying in water, microorganisms in water fix in an amazingly large quantity. A catalog was compiled of 58 kinds of carbon fabrics trially woven and knitted. When carbon fiber is used as activated sludge carrier, activity of microorganism lasts more than one year. Only a little amount of surplus sludge is generated. The fixed microorganisms are more active in case of carbon fiber than in case of nylon and polyester fibers. Fiber texture models of carbon fiber fixing activated sludge groups were proposed. By pump operation, the water flow inside/outside microorganism groups is being accelerated. Several new strains of bacillus carboniphilus were isolated/identified from soil and marsh. To grasp relationships of characteristics among three elements such as the state of aquatic environment, fiber, and microorganism group, the experiment was prepared. Preliminary work is conducted to derive a simple equation for facility design, and experimental directions to obtain design conditions were proposed. 6 refs., 166 figs., 47 tabs.

  9. Pre-natal Aquatic Preparation

    OpenAIRE

    Frias, Ana; Serra, Célia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Water, a source of well-being, peace, fullness, freedom and harmony. For quite some time now, water is sought after for its renowned benefits in terms of relieving the physical and emotional changes which commonly occur during pregnancy. Objectives: 1) Describe the process of intervention, arising from the use of the aquatic environment in prenatal preparation 2) Relate the gains in health from prenatal preparation aquatica Method: Descriptive creating and applying a prep...

  10. Effect of Aquatic Immersion on Static Balance

    OpenAIRE

    Louder, Talin J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To quantitatively assess measures of static balance and limits of stability (LOS) in an aquatic environment compared to on land. Methods Fifteen healthy, young adults (23 + or - 2 years) performed 90 s static balance trials on land and aquatic immersion at two different depths (greater trochanter, xiphoid process). Measures of 95% ellipse area and center of pressure (CoP) mean velocity were computed from the force data. Additionally, participants completed a visual analog scale (VAS...

  11. Code-Switching in Higher Education in a Multilingual Environment: A Lebanese Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahous, Rima N.; Nabhani, Mona Baroud; Bacha, Nahla Nola

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown that code-switching (CS) between languages in spoken discourse is prevalent in multilingual contexts and is used for many purposes. More recently, it has become the subject of much concern in academic contexts in negatively affecting students' language use and learning. However, while the concern has been increasing, no…

  12. Flood risk assessment and mapping for the Lebanese watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Chadi; Hdeib, Rouya

    2016-04-01

    Of all natural disasters, floods affect the greatest number of people worldwide and have the greatest potential to cause damage. Nowadays, with the emerging global warming phenomenon, this number is expected to increase. The Eastern Mediterranean area, including Lebanon (10452 Km2, 4.5 M habitant), has witnessed in the past few decades an increase frequency of flooding events. This study profoundly assess the flood risk over Lebanon covering all the 17 major watersheds and a number of small sub-catchments. It evaluate the physical direct tangible damages caused by floods. The risk assessment and evaluation process was carried out over three stages; i) Evaluating Assets at Risk, where the areas and assets vulnerable to flooding are identified, ii) Vulnerability Assessment, where the causes of vulnerability are assessed and the value of the assets are provided, iii) Risk Assessment, where damage functions are established and the consequent damages of flooding are estimated. A detailed Land CoverUse map was prepared at a scale of 1/ 1 000 using 0.4 m resolution satellite images within the flood hazard zones. The detailed field verification enabled to allocate and characterize all elements at risk, identify hotspots, interview local witnesses, and to correlate and calibrate previous flood damages with the utilized models. All filed gathered information was collected through Mobile Application and transformed to be standardized and classified under GIS environment. Consequently; the general damage evaluation and risk maps at different flood recurrence periods (10, 50, 100 years) were established. Major results showed that floods in a winter season (December, January, and February) of 10 year recurrence and of water retention ranging from 1 to 3 days can cause total damages (losses) that reach 1.14 M for crop lands and 2.30 M for green houses. Whereas, it may cause 0.2 M to losses in fruit trees for a flood retention ranging from 3 to 5 days. These numbers differs

  13. Contaminação do ambiente aquático por pesticidas. Estudo de caso: águas usadas para consumo humano em Primavera do Leste, Mato Grosso - análise preliminar Aquatic environment contamination by pesticides. Case study: water used for human consumption in Primavera do Leste, Mato Grosso - preliminary analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Freire Gaspar de Carvalho Dores

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available A preliminary analyses of the possible contamination of superficial and underground water by the active ingredients of the pesticide products used in the surroundings of the urban area of Primavera do Leste, Mato Grosso, Brazil, was carried out. A description of the study region and of its environmental characteristics, which can favor the contamination of the local aquatic environment, was presented. The EPA screening criteria, the groundwater ubiquity score (GUS and the criteria proposed by Goss were used to evaluate which pesticides might contaminate the local waters. Among the active ingredients studied, several present risks to the local aquatic environment.

  14. Lake Bathymetric Aquatic Vegetation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Aquatic vegetation represented as polygon features, coded with vegetation type (emergent, submergent, etc.) and field survey date. Polygons were digitized from...

  15. Ossification of ligamentum flavum, a rare cause of myelopathy: First case report of a Lebanese patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Helou, Antonios; Alaywan, Moussa; Tarabay, Antonio; Nachanakian, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Ossification of ligamentum flavum (OLF) is a well-known pathology causing myelopathy, although it is a rare disease. The most commonly affected population is from the Far East and mainly Japanese. However, few reports and studies have shown the prevalence of the disease all over the world. We report the case of a 33-year-old man presenting with signs of progressive myelopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed Th2-Th11 OLF with severe narrowing and intramedullary hypersignal at the level Th2-Th3. This is the first Lebanese case reported in the literature. A decompressive laminectomy with flavectomy was done. This case adds to the previous reported cases on the occurrence of the disease in different populations. PMID:27057241

  16. Lebanese Efforts for a Good Implementation of the Safety and Security Measures for Radioactive Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Lebanese Atomic Energy Commission (LAEC), the regulatory authority, is pursuing a continuous effort to establish an acceptable nuclear security level inside the country and on the borders in order to satisfy and fulfil the related international conventions and resolutions, as well as to be protected against any malicious act or even any unintentional incident involving radioactive or nuclear materials. In this perspective, the management of radioactive sources, combating nuclear illicit trafficking, physical protection and repatriate of the radioactive sources, nuclear materials accountancy and the installation of radiation portal monitors at different locations in Lebanon have been the main tasks achieved. Furthermore, a temporary radioactive waste store is prepared at LAEC premises for safe and secure storage of orphan sources, seized mainly in scrap activities. (author)

  17. Cd and Pb extractability with EDTA in sediments of three contrasted sites of the Lebanese coast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cd and Pb extractability with EDTA were measured from sediment samples collected at three contrasted sites along the Lebanese coastal zones: Akkar, Dora and Selaata. Akkar is located away from any direct source of contamination, while Dora and Selaata receive respectively urban and industrial wastes. The extractability of Cd and Pb from sediments of the aforementioned sites was studied by applying kinetic and equilibrium extractions with EDTA 0.05M. The adjustment of Pb kinetic extractions curves to a two-first order reactions model permitted to kinetically fractionate Pb in the studied sediments into three fractions (readily extractable, less extractable and non extractable) and allowed to conclude that Pb in Selaata represents the highest environmental risk. (author)

  18. Activity concentrations and mean annual effective dose from gamma-emitting radionuclides in the Lebanese diet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the primary factor contributing to the internal effective dose in the human organism is contaminated food, the control of radionuclides in food represents the most important means of protection. This study was conducted to determine the levels of the dietary exposure of the Lebanese population to gamma-emitting radioisotopes. The activity concentrations of gamma-emitting radioisotopes have been measured in food samples that represent the market basket of an adult urban population in Lebanon. The artificial radionuclide 137Cs was measured above detection limits in only fish, meat and milk-based deserts. The most abundant natural radionuclide was 40K (31-121 Bq kg-1), with the highest content in fish and meat samples. The annual mean effective dose contributed by 40K in the reference typical diet was estimated equal to 186 μSv y-1, a value reasonably consistent with findings reported by several other countries. (authors)

  19. Intimate Partner Violence in a Lebanese Population Attending Gynecologic Care: A Cultural Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awwad, Johnny; Ghazeeri, Ghina; Nassar, Anwar H; Bazi, Tony; Fakih, Ahmad; Fares, Farah; Seoud, Muhieddine

    2014-02-12

    Occurrence of intimate partner violence (IPV) against women in the Lebanese society has been largely ignored by local legal and religious authorities. Our aim is to estimate the prevalence of IPV among married Lebanese women, and investigate perception of abuse, referral patterns, and measures taken to deal with abusive situations. In this cross-sectional study, married women aged 20 to 65 presenting to the American University of Beirut Medical Center for gynecological care were interviewed on various forms of IPV. Out of 100 women invited to participate, 91 consented to take part in the survey of whom 37 (40.67%) gave a history of physical abuse, 30 (33.0%) of sexual abuse, 59 (64.8%) of verbal abuse, and 17 (18.7%) of emotional abuse. Spouse-imposed social isolation was reported in 20 (22.0%) women, and economic abuse in 30 (33.0%). Reasons for deciding to stay in an abusive relationship were "lack of any family or social support" (40.5%), "lack of financial resources" (40.5%), and "fear that the partner may take away the children" (37.8%). Women expressed satisfaction with their spouse's treatment irrespective of the existence of various forms of violence. A significant increase in the risk of weapon use against wife was correlated with decreased monthly income of the household, whereas a protective effect was conferred by an increased number of children. This study highlights the need for routine screening in health care settings for better identification of victims of violence. The selective conventional perception of abuse and the reactive normalization of violence observed indicate the necessity for culturally informed interventional strategies to complement screening. PMID:24522858

  20. CYP2E1 and NQO1 genotypes and bladder cancer risk in a Lebanese population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basma, Hussein A; Kobeissi, Loulou H; Jabbour, Michel E; Moussa, Mohamad A; Dhaini, Hassan R

    2013-01-01

    Urinary bladder cancer incidence in Lebanon ranks among the highest in the world. Cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase1 (NQO1), and N-Acetyltransferase1 (NAT1), are drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) involved in the metabolism of carcinogens, such as arylamines and heterocyclic amines, implicated in bladder cancer. The present study attempts to investigate the role of these DMEs genetic polymorphism in bladder cancer risk among Lebanese men. 54 cases and 106 controls were recruited from two hospitals in Beirut. An interview-based questionnaire was administered to assess suspected environmental and occupational risk factors. PCR-RFLP was performed on blood-based DNA samples to determine DMEs genotypes. Associations between bladder cancer and putative risk factors were measured using adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results showed CYP2E1 c1/c1, NAT1*14A, and smoking, to be risk factors for bladder cancer. No significant differences in frequency distribution of the NQO1 genotypes were found in cases versus controls. The odds of carrying the CYP2E1 c1/c1 genotype were 4 times higher in cases compared to controls (OR=3.97, 95% CI: 0.48-32.7). The odds of carrying at least one NAT1*14A allele were 14 times higher in cases versus controls (OR=14.4, 95% CI: 1.016-204.9). Our study suggests CYP2E1 c1/c1, NAT1*14A, and smoking, as potential risk factors for bladder cancer in Lebanese. Further studies with larger samples must be conducted to confirm these findings. PMID:24319536

  1. Surveillance of antimicrobial resistance in Lebanese hospitals: retrospective nationwide compiled data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamoun, Kamal; Farah, Maya; Araj, Georges; Daoud, Ziad; Moghnieh, Rima; Salameh, Pascale; Saade, Danielle; Mokhbat, Jacques; Abboud, Emme; Hamze, Monzer; Abboud, Edmond; Jisr, Tamima; Haddad, Antoine; Feghali, Rita; Azar, Nadim; El-Zaatari, Mohammad; Chedid, Marwan; Haddad, Christian; Zouain Dib Nehme, Mireille; Barakat, Angelique; Husni, Rola

    2016-05-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is closely linked to antimicrobial use and is a growing concern worldwide. Antimicrobial resistance increases healthcare costs substantially in many countries, including Lebanon. National data from Lebanon have, in the most part, been limited to a few academic hospitals. The Lebanese Society of Infectious Diseases conducted a retrospective study to better describe the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of bacterial isolates in Lebanon. Data were based on records retrieved from the bacteriology laboratories of 16 different Lebanese hospitals between January 2011 and December 2013. The susceptibility results of a total 20684 Gram-positive and 55594 Gram-negative bacteria were analyzed. The prevalence rate of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was 27.6% and of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus spp was 1%. Streptococcus pneumoniae had susceptibilities of 46% to oxacillin, 63% to erythromycin, and 98% to levofloxacin. Streptococcus pyogenes had susceptibilities of 94% to erythromycin and 95% to clindamycin. The mean ampicillin susceptibility of Haemophilus influenzae, Salmonella spp, and Shigella spp isolates was 79%, 81.3%, and 62.2%, respectively. The extended-spectrum beta-lactamase production rate for Escherichia coli was 32.3% and for Klebsiella spp was 29.2%. Acinetobacter spp showed high resistance to most antimicrobials, with low resistance to colistin (17.1%). Pseudomonas spp susceptibilities to piperacillin-tazobactam and imipenem were lower than 80% (79.7% and 72.8%, respectively). This study provides population-specific data that are valuable in guiding antimicrobial use in Lebanon and neighbouring countries and will help in the establishment of a surveillance system for antimicrobial resistance following the implementation of a nationwide standardization of laboratory methods and data entry. PMID:26996458

  2. Distributed and Localized Deformation Along the Lebanese Restraining Bend from Geomorphic Observations and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goren, L.; Castelltort, S.; Klinger, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Dead Sea Fault System changes its orientation across Lebanon and forms a restraining bend. The oblique deformation along the Lebanese restraining bend is characterized by a complex suite of tectonic structures, among which, the Yammouneh Fault (YF), is believed to be the main strand that relays deformation from the southern section to the northern section of the Dead Sea Fault System. However, uncertainties regarding slip rates and strain partitioning in Lebanon still prevail. Here, we use morphometric analysis together with analytical and numerical models to constrain rates and modes of distributed and localized deformation along the Lebanese restraining bend.The rivers that drain the western flank of Mount Lebanon show a consistent counterclockwise rotation with respect to an expected orogen perpendicular orientation. Moreover, a pattern of divide disequilibrium in between these rivers emerges from an application of the χ mapping technique, which aims at estimating the degree of geometrical and topological disequilibrium in river networks. These geometrical patterns are compatible with simulation results using a landscape evolution model, which imposes a distributed velocity field along a domain that represents the western flank of Mount Lebanon. We further develop an analytical model that relates the river orientation to a set of kinematic parameters that represents a combined pure and simple shear strain field, and we find the parameters that best explain the present orientation of the western Lebanon rivers. Our results indicate that distributed deformation to the west of the YF takes as much as 30% of the relative Arabia-Sinai plate velocity since the late Miocene, and that the average slip rate along the YF during the same time interval has been 3.8-4.4 mm/yr. The theoretical model can further explain the inferred rotation from Paleomagnetic measurements.

  3. Aquatic intervention in children with neuro-motor impairments

    OpenAIRE

    Getz, M.D.

    2006-01-01

    The present thesis addresses the influence of aquatic interventions on motor performance of children with neuro-motor deficiencies in a functional context. The theoretical framework is based on a functional approach in compliance to the International Classification of Function and Disability (ICF). Chapter 2 addresses the relationship between motor performance in the aquatic environment setting as measured by the Aquatic Independence Measure (AIM) to motor performance on land as measured by t...

  4. Implications of aquatic animal health for human health.

    OpenAIRE

    Dawe, C J

    1990-01-01

    Human health and aquatic animal health are organically related at three distinct interfaces. Aquatic animals serve as important contributors to the nutritional protein, lipid, and vitamin requirements of humans; as carriers and transmitters of many infectious and parasitic diseases to which humans are susceptible; and as indicators of toxic and carcinogenic substances that they can convey, in some part, from aquatic environments to man and other terrestrial animals. Transcending these relatio...

  5. Spreading of Oil Spill on Placid Aquatic Medium

    OpenAIRE

    Derrick O. NJOBUENWU; Millionaire F. N. ABOWEI

    2008-01-01

    Continuous research in the development of suitable predictive model is vital as the input of oil spills into the aquatic environment particularly in the Niger Delta area of Nigeria is alarming due to frequent oil spills. This eventually affects aquatic organisms and shoreline activities. This work developed an semi-empirical expression that can predict the horizontal spreading of Niger Delta Oil Spills (NDOS) on a placid water body using simple physical coefficients of the oil and the aquatic...

  6. A review of the diverse genetic disorders in the Lebanese population: highlighting the urgency for community genetic services

    OpenAIRE

    Nakouzi, Ghunwa; Kreidieh, Khalil; Yazbek, Soha

    2014-01-01

    The review lists the genetic diseases reported in Lebanese individuals, surveys genetic programs and services, and highlights the absence of basic genetic health services at the individual and community level. The incidence of individual diseases is not determined, yet the variety of genetic diseases reported is tremendous, most of which follow autosomal recessive inheritance reflecting the social norms in the population, including high rates of consanguinity, which favor the increase in inci...

  7. Prevalence of Depression in Medical Students at the Lebanese University and Exploring its Correlation With Facebook Relevance: A Questionnaire Study

    OpenAIRE

    Naja, Wadih J; Kansoun, Alaa H; Haddad, Ramzi S

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of major depression is particularly high in medical students, affecting around one-third of this population. Moreover, online social media, in particular Facebook, is becoming an intrinsic part in the life of a growing proportion of individuals worldwide. Objective Our primary objective is to identify the prevalence of depression in medical students at the Lebanese University Faculty of Medicine, a unique state university in Lebanon, its correlation with the utilizat...

  8. A Founder Mutation in PET100 Causes Isolated Complex IV Deficiency in Lebanese Individuals with Leigh Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Sze Chern; Smith, Katherine R.; Stroud, David A.; Compton, Alison G.; Tucker, Elena J.; Dasvarma, Ayan; Gandolfo, Luke C.; Marum, Justine E.; McKenzie, Matthew; Peters, Heidi L.; Mowat, David; Procopis, Peter G.; Wilcken, Bridget; Christodoulou, John; Brown, Garry K.

    2014-01-01

    Leigh syndrome (LS) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder with characteristic bilateral lesions, typically in the brainstem and basal ganglia. It usually presents in infancy and is genetically heterogeneous, but most individuals with mitochondrial complex IV (or cytochrome c oxidase) deficiency have mutations in the biogenesis factor SURF1. We studied eight complex IV-deficient LS individuals from six families of Lebanese origin. They differed from individuals with SURF1 mutations in having ...

  9. Lead and its isotopes in the sediment of three sites on the Lebanese coast: Identification of contamination sources and mobility

    OpenAIRE

    Abi Ghanem, Carine; Chiffoleau, Jean-francois; Bermond, A.; Nakhle, K.; Khalaf, G; Borschneck, D.; Cossa, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Lead concentrations and isotopic composition of sediment samples collected from three sites within the Lebanese coastal zones were measured: at Akkar, Dora and Selaata. Akkar is located far from any direct source of contamination, while Dora and Selaata receive urban and industrial wastes, respectively. Low Pb concentrations (6-16 mu g g(-1)) were detected in the Akkar sediments, and high concentrations of Pb (70-101 mu g g(-1)) were detected in the Dora sediments. Measuring stable isotope ra...

  10. Herbal Products and Dietary Supplements: A Cross-Sectional Survey of Use, Attitudes, and Knowledge Among the Lebanese Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Khoury, Ghada; Ramadan, Wijdan; Zeeni, Nadine

    2016-06-01

    There has been a marked increase in use of herbal products and dietary supplements (HP/DS) in many developed and developing countries. However, data about consumption patterns and awareness about these products in the Lebanese population is scarce. The present study aimed to examine the determinants of HP/DS use in Lebanese adults, identify potential interactions and safety concerns and assess the knowledge and attitudes of consumers towards the efficacy and safety of these products. A face-to-face, 28-item survey was administered to Lebanese adults (n = 726) in community pharmacies across the country. Thirty-five percent of participants reported to be currently consuming at least one HP/DS including 23 % who were consuming vitamins and/or mineral supplements and 18 % consuming herbal products. Significant safety concerns were identified among consumers in the form of disease-supplement, drug-supplement as well as supplement-supplement interactions. Logistic multivariate regression analysis indicated that use of supplements was positively associated with the female gender and increasing age. The majority of respondents falsely believed that HP/DS pose no risk to the general population and that they must be safe to be sold in Lebanon. Moreover, most participants were consuming these products based on recommendations from friends or relatives rather than from healthcare professionals. Substantial misconceptions about HP/DS exist among Lebanese adults, indicating a need for consumers' education from professional and reliable sources on the efficacy and safety of such products. PMID:26659604

  11. N-Acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1) Genotype: A Risk Factor for Urinary Bladder Cancer in a Lebanese Population

    OpenAIRE

    Yassine, Ibrahim A.; Loulou Kobeissi; Jabbour, Michel E.; Dhaini, Hassan R

    2012-01-01

    In Lebanon, bladder cancer is the second most incident cancer among men. This study investigates a possible association between N-acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1) genotype, a drug-metabolizing enzyme coding gene, and bladder cancer in Lebanese men. A case-control study (54 cases and 105 hospital-based controls) was conducted in two major hospitals in Beirut. Cases were randomly selected from patients diagnosed in the period of 2002–2008. Controls were conveniently identified and selected from the s...

  12. The radiological situation at the atolls of Mururoa and Fangataufa. Technical report. V. 2. Radionuclide concentrations measured in the aquatic environment of the atolls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A marine monitoring programme was carried out within the framework of the IAEA's project entitled ''Study of the Radiological Situation at Mururoa and Fangataufa Atolls'' with the aim of assessing present radionuclide concentrations in the marine environment of Mururoa and Fangataufa Atolls. The terms of reference of the marine working group (WG2) included a review of the data provided by the French authorities on radionuclide distributions in the littoral and sub-littoral environments at the atolls. Further, using accredited international laboratories, it was decided to carry out sufficient and new independent monitoring work at and around the atolls in order to validate existing French data and, the same time, to provide a representative and high quality data set on current radionuclide concentrations in the marine environment, with particular reference to the requirement of Task Group A for radiological assessment purposes. This work included measurements of the current radionuclide concentrations in the marine environment, and estimation of concentration factors and Kd values appropriate for the region. The variations in activity concentrations in the lagoons over the past few years are discussed, and the likely sources of activity implied by these data are identified where possible

  13. Species management in aquatic habitats WRc RD Interim 1997

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    This is the Species management in aquatic Habitats WRc Interim 1997 document produced by the Environment Agency in 1997. This document reports progress on R&D Project 640, which aims to provide information on species of conservation value of particular relevance to the Environment Agency, in relation to its activities affecting aquatic environments. A range of stand-alone outputs is being produced, comprising Species Action Plans, practical management guidelines for Agency staff and third par...

  14. Aquatic Life Benchmarks

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Aquatic Life Benchmarks is an EPA-developed set of criteria for freshwater species. These benchmarks are based on toxicity values reviewed by EPA and used in...

  15. Aquatic Research Laboratory (ARL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Columbia River and groundwater well water sources are delivered to the Aquatic Research Laboratory (ARL), where these resources are used to conduct research on fish...

  16. Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentini, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    The term environment refers to the internal and external context in which organizations operate. For some scholars, environment is defined as an arrangement of political, economic, social and cultural factors existing in a given context that have an impact on organizational processes and structures....... For others, environment is a generic term describing a large variety of stakeholders and how these interact and act upon organizations. Organizations and their environment are mutually interdependent and organizational communications are highly affected by the environment. This entry examines the...... origin and development of organization-environment interdependence, the nature of the concept of environment and its relevance for communication scholarships and activities....

  17. Introducing Aquatic Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Kinne, Otto; Browman, Howard I.; Seaman, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    The Inter-Research Science Center (IR) journals Marine Ecology Progress Series (MEPS) and Aquatic Microbial Ecology (AME) have been receiving increasing numbers of high-quality manuscripts that are principally biological, rather than ecological. With regret, we have had to turn these submissions away. Also, leading limnologists have for many years suggested that IR should provide an outlet for top quality articles on freshwater biology and ecology. Aquatic Biology (...

  18. Restoring Damaged Aquatic Ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Cairns, John

    2006-01-01

    Aquatic ecosystems must play a major role to ensure that water, which is both essential and scarce, is always available for both present and future generations. This has become even more urgent in light of the ongoing increase in total world population and predicted changes in the world climate. Since aquatic ecosystems have been damaged at a rate far in excess of both natural restoration and anthropogenic restoration, it is essential that both restorative processes be accelerated. However, e...

  19. RYR2, PTDSS1 and AREG genes are implicated in a Lebanese population-based study of copy number variation in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soueid, Jihane; Kourtian, Silva; Makhoul, Nadine J; Makoukji, Joelle; Haddad, Sariah; Ghanem, Simona S; Kobeissy, Firas; Boustany, Rose-Mary

    2016-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) are a group of neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by ritualistic-repetitive behaviors and impaired verbal and non-verbal communication. Objectives were to determine the contribution of genetic variation to ASDs in the Lebanese. Affymetrix Cytogenetics Whole-Genome 2.7 M and CytoScan(™) HD Arrays were used to detect CNVs in 41 Lebanese autistic children and 35 non-autistic, developmentally delayed and intellectually disabled patients. 33 normal participants were used as controls. 16 de novo CNVs and 57 inherited CNVs, including recognized pathogenic 16p11.2 duplications and 2p16.3 deletions were identified. A duplication at 1q43 classified as likely pathogenic encompasses RYR2 as a potential ASD candidate gene. This previously identified CNV has been classified as both pathogenic, and, of uncertain significance. A duplication of unknown significance at 10q11.22, proposed as a modulator for phenotypic disease expression in Rett syndrome, was also identified. The novel potential autism susceptibility genes PTDSS1 and AREG were uncovered and warrant further genetic and functional analyses. Previously described and novel genetic targets in ASD were identified in Lebanese families with autism. These findings may lead to improved diagnosis of ASDs and informed genetic counseling, and may also lead to untapped therapeutic targets applicable to Lebanese and non-Lebanese patients. PMID:26742492

  20. Nitrous oxide emission by aquatic macrofauna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stief, Peter; Poulsen, Morten; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Brix, Hans; Schramm, Andreas

    2009-01-01

      A large variety of aquatic animals was found to emit the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide when nitrate was present in the environment. The emission was ascribed to denitrification by ingested bacteria in the anoxic animal gut, and the exceptionally high N2O-to-N2 production ratio suggested d...

  1. Passive electroreception in aquatic mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czech-Damal, Nicole U; Dehnhardt, Guido; Manger, Paul; Hanke, Wolf

    2013-06-01

    Passive electroreception is a sensory modality in many aquatic vertebrates, predominantly fishes. Using passive electroreception, the animal can detect and analyze electric fields in its environment. Most electric fields in the environment are of biogenic origin, often produced by prey items. These electric fields can be relatively strong and can be a highly valuable source of information for a predator, as underlined by the fact that electroreception has evolved multiple times independently. The only mammals that possess electroreception are the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) and the echidnas (Tachyglossidae) from the monotreme order, and, recently discovered, the Guiana dolphin (Sotalia guianensis) from the cetacean order. Here we review the morphology, function and origin of the electroreceptors in the two aquatic species, the platypus and the Guiana dolphin. The morphology shows certain similarities, also similar to ampullary electroreceptors in fishes, that provide cues for the search for electroreceptors in more vertebrate and invertebrate species. The function of these organs appears to be very similar. Both species search for prey animals in low-visibility conditions or while digging in the substrate, and sensory thresholds are within one order of magnitude. The electroreceptors in both species are innervated by the trigeminal nerve. The origin of the accessory structures, however, is completely different; electroreceptors in the platypus have developed from skin glands, in the Guiana dolphin, from the vibrissal system. PMID:23187861

  2. Narrative Exemplars and the Celebrity Spokesperson in Lebanese Anti-Domestic Violence Public Service Announcements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Khoury, Jessica R; Shafer, Autumn

    2016-08-01

    Domestic violence is a worldwide epidemic. This study examines the effects of narrative exemplars and a celebrity spokesperson in anti-domestic violence ads on Lebanese college students' attitudes and beliefs towards domestic violence and whether these effects are impacted by personal experience. The practical significance is derived from the high prevalence of domestic violence internationally, making it important to find ways to effectively use media to address this health-related issue that has huge consequences for the individual and society. This study adds to the theoretical understanding of narrative persuasion and media effects. Results indicated that narrative exemplars in anti-domestic violence ads promoting bystander awareness and intervention were more beneficial for people without relevant experience compared to people who know someone affected by domestic violence. Anti-domestic violence ads without narrative exemplars, but that also featured an emotional self-efficacy appeal targeting bystanders, were more effective for participants who know someone who had experienced domestic violence compared to participants without relevant experience. The presence of a celebrity spokesperson elicited more positive attitudes about the ad than a noncelebrity, but failed to directly affect relevant anti-domestic violence attitudes or beliefs. These results highlight the significance of formative audience research in health communication message design. PMID:27441946

  3. Analysis Method for Pesticides Residues by GC/MS in Lebanese Apple

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The apple's crop can be affected by many pests during the growing season, which requires careful monitoring. Both apple fruit and apple tree need to be treated by pesticides in order to protect them from pests. Such treatment often leads to the accumulation of stable pesticides inside the fruit. The local market provides a large variety of pesticides allowing farmers to use more than one active substance in order to protect their crop, often without proper advice. Monitoring pesticides on apples and other agricultural crops is the best way to protect consumers health from the hazards of pesticides residues. The development of new, rapid and effective method to analyze the multi pesticides residues at trace levels in apple samples is essential. This work describes the extraction procedure and the analytical method developed to detect the pesticide residues using the gas-chromatographic-mass spectrometric approach (GC-MS). The developed method was successfully applied to analyze apple samples collected from different Lebanese markets for a one year period in order to monitor the presence of pesticides and their stability in apple fruits during storage. (author)

  4. Acute acalculous cholecystitis in a Lebanese girl with primary Epstein-Barr viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdalani, Marianne; Milad, Nadine; Sahli, Zeyad; Rizk, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) constitutes 5-10% of all cases of cholecystitis in adults, and is even less common in children. The recent literature has described an association between primary Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and AAC, however, it still remains an uncommon presentation of the infection. Most authors advise that the management of AAC in patients with primary EBV infection should be supportive, since the use of antibiotics does not seem to alter the severity or prognosis of the illness. Furthermore, surgical intervention has not been described as necessary or indicated in the management of uncomplicated AAC associated with EBV infection. We report a case of a 16-year-old Lebanese girl with AAC associated with primary EBV infection. She presented to the emergency department, with high-grade fever, fatigue, vomiting and abdominal pain. Liver enzymes were elevated with a cholestatic pattern, and imaging confirmed the diagnosis of AAC. She was admitted to the regular floor, and initial management was conservative. Owing to persistence of fever, antibiotics were initiated on day 3 of admission. She had a smooth clinical course and was discharged home after a total of 9 days, with no complications. PMID:27090538

  5. The way to restructure the Lebanese electric power sector: a challenge for the transitional management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The restructuring of power sectors represents a very complicated process, which faces many obstacles such as public acceptance, economical and political interests of potential groups. This paper illustrates the complexity of an appropriate restructuring model taking into consideration the potential objections during the conceptualisation of the process. The paper emphasises that restructuring plans have to be generated by integrating the socio-economic character of the country and the international experience. Moreover, it presents a set of technical and financial efficiency indicators to evaluate the performance of the concerned entity and to compare it with the international benchmarks. Instead of photocopying a certain model of privatisation and deregulation, the article provides a restructuring design methodology for developing countries, where Lebanon is taken as a case study. The procedure should meet the requirements of a careful change management during the design and implementation phases. The steps of conceptualisation are demonstrated and are turned in an action plan of the Lebanese decision makers: how to turn ideas into reality by developing an appropriate restructuring process. (Author)

  6. Incidence of sickle cell disease and other hemoglobin variants in 10,095 Lebanese neonates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyne Khoriaty

    Full Text Available Hemoglobinopathies are highly prevalent diseases and impose a public health burden. Early diagnosis and treatment can ameliorate the course of these diseases and improve survival. Despite purported high incidence of hemoglobinopathies in Lebanon, there are no nationwide screening programs. In this study, newborn screening utilizing high pressure liquid chromatography was executed in all public hospitals across Lebanon between 2010 and 2013. All newborns with an abnormal hemoglobin (Hb were offered genetic counseling and all those with disease were enrolled in comprehensive hemoglobinopathy clinics. Among newborns, 2.1% were found to have an abnormal Hb variant with sickle Hb being the most common while 0.1% were found to have sickle cell disease (SCD. The majority of those with SCD had non-Lebanese origins. The most common causes of hospitalizations in infants with SCD were acute splenic sequestration and pain crises. No bacteremia or other life threatening infections were noted. At a median follow up 14 months (follow up range 7 to 34 months, all children with disease are alive and compliant with treatment. Systematic screening for SCD and other Hb variants was shown to be feasible, cost effective, and of accurate predictive value. This program was also clinically effective because it led to the identification of babies with disease and to providing them with free early multidisciplinary care. Conclusively, a newborn screening program should be implemented across Lebanon to detect hemoglobinopathies and initiate early therapeutic and preventive strategies and genetic counseling.

  7. Effects of modifications of aquatic ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies under this program historically have been concerned with the effects of a variety of stress factors on aquatic populations and communities. Current research was focused principally on ionizing radiation, and includes studies on the interaction of acute radiation and temperature on fish, the in situ measurement of radiation exposure in an aquatic environment, and the uptake and retention of tritium in a simulated pond community. In response to the expanded responsibilities of the recently formed Energy Research and Development Administration in dealing with all forms of energy related problems, this program will be redirected in the coming year to nonnuclear energy research

  8. Detection of triclocarban and two co-contaminating chlorocarbanilides in US aquatic environments using isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The antimicrobial compound triclocarban (TCC; 3,4,4'-trichlorocarbanilide; CAS-bar 101-20-2) is a high-production-volume chemical, recently suggested to cause widespread contamination of US water resources. To test this hypothesis, we developed an isotope dilution liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry method for ultratrace analysis of TCC (0.9ng/L detection limit) and analyzed low-volume water samples (200mL) along with primary sludge samples from across the United States. All river water samples (100%) collected downstream of wastewater treatment plants had detectable levels of TCC, as compared to 56% of those taken upstream. Concentrations of TCC (mean+/-standard deviation) downstream of sewage treatment plants (84+/-110ng/L) were significantly higher (Pw/w each) in technical grade TCC (99%). Application of the new method for chlorocarbanilide analysis yielded TCC occurrence data for 13 US states, confirmed the role of sewage treatment plants as environmental inputs of TCC, and identified DCC and TetraCC as previously unrecognized pollutants released into the environment alongside TCC

  9. Antibiotics promote aggregation within aquatic bacterial communities

    OpenAIRE

    Corno, Gianluca; Coci, Manuela; Giardina, Marco; Plechuk, Sonia; Campanile, Floriana; Stefani, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    The release of antibiotics (AB) into the environment poses several threats for human health due to potential development of AB-resistant natural bacteria. Even though the use of low-dose antibiotics has been promoted in health care and farming, significant amounts of AB are observed in aquatic environments. Knowledge on the impact of AB on natural bacterial communities is missing both in terms of spread and evolution of resistance mechanisms, and of modifications of community composition and ...

  10. Antibiotics promote aggregation within aquatic bacterial communities

    OpenAIRE

    ManuelaCoci; MarcoGiardina

    2014-01-01

    The release of antibiotics (AB) into the environment poses several threats for human health due to potential development of ABresistant natural bacteria. Even though the use of low-dose antibiotics has been promoted in health care and farming, significant amounts of AB are observed in aquatic environments. Knowledge on the impact of AB on natural bacterial communities is missing both in terms of spread and evolution of resistance mechanisms, and of modifications of community composition and p...

  11. Influence of the aquatic environment on release behavior of fission products. Experimental study of aerosol emission during a PWR severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This experimental study concerns the consequences on the environment of a PWR severe accident. A preliminary bibliographical survey has been undertaken in order to determine the elements to study, and the experimental protocols to use. 4 fission products (Cs, Sr, Ru, Ce) and 3 structure materials (Ag, Fe, In) have been chosen. Tests of cations (Cs+) retention by soils have been done. They showed up the great variability of the results according to experimental procedures (contact time, agitation, solid phase concentration...). The adoption of a standard procedure which would enable the different results comparison is suggested. Then, the dissolution of powders from the 7 elements has been studied in different solutions. Two different phenomena occurs for some elements. We observed a partial dissolution of Ag, In and Ce, according to solution compositions, but fine particles or colloid presence may contribute to the solution total activity. The Cs dissolution is more important but never complete, because of an amalgam formation during calcination with structure materials. Ru doesn't dissolve, and fine particles presence is the reason of solution activity. Soils retention is minimal for the elements that are neutral, like Ru, and maximal for cations, especially Cs+. High contents of organic matter and clay in soils enhance retention. Thanks to the new theoretical source term values, plurielementary aerosols fabrication has debuted. The installation we used (Inducing oven with an aerosol maturation enclosure) allows the obtention of temperatures as high as 2800 - 30000 C and the volatilization of 13 elements between the 16 presents. Suggestions are done that may increase the Ru, Ce and Zr emissions

  12. Sustaining America's Aquatic Biodiversity. Why is Aquatic Biodiversity Declining?

    OpenAIRE

    Helfrich, Louis A.; Neves, Richard J.; Parkhurst, James A. (James Albert)

    2005-01-01

    Discusses reasons for declining aquatic biodiversity and focuses mainly on the issues of habitat loss, introduced species (aquatic exotics), and water pollution; document also includes web links to more information on exotic, invasive species and endangered animals.

  13. Pregnancy outcomes in Lebanese women with multiple sclerosis (the LeMS study): a prospective multicentre study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fares, Jawad; Nassar, Anwar H; Gebeily, Souheil; Kobeissy, Firas; Fares, Youssef

    2016-01-01

    Objective The Lebanese Multiple Sclerosis (LeMS) study aims to assess the influence of pregnancy and delivery on the clinical course of multiple sclerosis (MS) in Lebanese women. Setting This prospective multicentre study took place in three MS referral university medical centres in Lebanon. Participants Included were 29 women over 18 years who had been diagnosed with MS according to the McDonald criteria, and became pregnant between 1995 and 2015. Participating women should have stopped treatment 3 months before conception and become pregnant after the onset of MS. Women were followed up from 1 year preconceptionally and for 4 years postpartum. Main outcome measures The annualised relapse rates per participant during each 3-month period during pregnancy and each year postpartum were compared with the relapse rate during the year before pregnancy using the paired two-tailed t test. p Values <0.05 were considered statistically significant for all analyses (95% CI). Results 64 full-term pregnancies were recorded. All pregnancies (100%) resulted in live births, with no complications or other diseases. In comparison with the prepregnancy year, in which the mean relapse rate±SE was 0.17±0.07, there was a significant reduction in the relapse rate during pregnancy and in the first year postpartum (p=0.02), but an increase in the rate in the second year postpartum (0.21±0.08). Thereafter, from the third year postpartum through the following fourth year, the annualised relapse rate fell slightly but did not differ from the annualised relapse rate recorded in the prepregnancy year (0.17±0.07). Conclusions Pregnancy in Lebanese women with MS does not seem to increase the risk of complications. No relapses were observed during pregnancy and in the first year postpartum; however, relapses rebounded in the second year postpartum, and over the long term, returned to the levels that preceded pregnancy. PMID:27178979

  14. miRNA as potential biomarkers of breast cancer in the Lebanese population and in young women: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah J Nassar

    Full Text Available Relative to western populations, the percentage of women diagnosed with breast cancer at a young age in Lebanon is high. While the younger age of the Lebanese population compared to the West certainly contributes to this difference, potential genetic, reproductive and/or biological factors likely play an important role. The objective of this study is to investigate the contribution of miRNAs in this setting through the analysis of the expression of five reported dysregulated miRNAs, miR-148b, miR-10b, miR-21, miR-221, and miR-155 in 20 normal and 57 cancerous breast tissues from Lebanese breast cancer patients. After finding their relative expression by quantitative reverse transcription real time PCR, the results were analyzed with respect to the patients' clinical and histopathology presentations. Compared to normal breast tissues, significant upregulation of miR-155, miR-21 and miR-148b, notable downregulation of miR-10b and non-significant expression of miR-221 were observed in tumor tissues. Moreover, miR-10b was significantly underexpressed in estrogen/progesterone receptor (ER/PR negative tumors relative to ER/PR positive tumor tissues. miR-155 was also significantly overexpressed in postmenopausal patients and in those of age at diagnosis greater than 40 years old as well as in PR negative or in human epidermal growth factor 2 (Her2 positive tissues. This study is the first one to report miRNA expression patterns in Lebanese breast cancer patients. We found that differential miRNA expression in breast cancer could be variable between Lebanese and Western populations. miR-10b was positively correlated with the ER and PR status and miR-155 could be a noteworthy biomarker for the menopausal state, age at diagnosis, PR and Her2 status. Hence, miRNA can be used as biomarkers for early breast cancer detection.

  15. Algas: da economia nos ambientes aquáticos à bioremediação e à química analítica Algae: from aquatic environment economy to bioremediation and analytical chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Cristina Vidotti

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Algae constitute a large group of many different organisms, essentially aquatic and able to live in all systems giving them sufficient light and humidity. Some algae species have been used in the evaluation or in the bioremediation of aquatic systems. More recently algae have been suggested as interesting tools in the field of analytical chemistry. In this work the most important aspects related to the different uses of algae are presented with a brief discussion.

  16. Contaminated Aquatic Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaglal, Kendrick

    2016-10-01

    A review of the literature published in 2015 relating to the assessment, evaluation and remediation of contaminated aquatic sediments is presented. The review is divided into the following main sections: policy and guidance, methodology, distribution, fate and transport, risk, toxicity and remediation. PMID:27620103

  17. Aspectos cinéticos da degradação de laminados de madeiras em ambientes aquático e terrestre Kinetics aspects of wood sheets decay on aquatic and terrestrial environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. M. APRILE

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available Foi estudada a cinética de decomposição de laminados de diversas espécies de madeiras em ambientes aquático e terrestre da Mata Atlântica. Amostras de laminados de cinco espécies de madeiras foram expostas sobre o solo da floresta, enquanto amostras de 12 espécies foram estudadas na lagoa presente na mesma área. Foram usadas bolsas de decomposição,"litter bags", para a avaliação direta da perda mensal de peso. No ambiente aquático verificou-se um período típico inicial com maior perda de peso, devido à lixiviação. A análise de correlação mostrou que a cor da madeira é inversamente relacionada à taxa de decomposição das angiospermas (r = - 0,95, mas a densidade das madeiras não é uma variável preditiva adequada. O processo foi mais rápido no ambiente aquático, como demostram os coeficientes de decomposição K (Olson, 1963 obtidos: Torresea cearensis, 0,63; Cordia goeldiana, 0,61; Myroscarpus sp., 0,46; Cedrela sp. 0,35; Swietenia macrophyla 0,31; Araucaria angustifolia 0,28; Pinus sp., 0,26; Phoebe porosa, 0,22; Machaerium villosum, 0,22; Dalbergia nigra, 0,21; Peltogyne discolor, 0,20; e Ocotea sp., 0,19. No solo os valores obtidos são os seguintes: Torresea cearensis, 0,48; Cordia goeldiana, 0,43; Phoebe porosa, 0,20; Cedrela sp., 0,20; e Pinus 0,16.Decomposition rates of several wood especies was evaluated under aquatic and terrestrial environment in the Atlantic forest. Wood samples from five species were placed to decompose on the forest floor and twelve of them submerged in a lake, using the litter bags approach to evaluate directly the monthly progressive weight loss. Under lake conditions the decomposition presented tipical a initial period with faster weight loss due to leaching. Correlation analysis showed that wood color is inversely related with decomposition rates of angiosperms (r = - 0,95, but wood density is not a good predectivy variable. Decomposition was faster in the aquatic environment, as

  18. Torture and Long-Term Health Effects Among Lebanese Female Political Prisoners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaddar, Ali; Elsouri, Ghadier; Abboud, Zeinab

    2016-02-01

    Lebanese prisoners during the Israeli occupation of Lebanon (1981-1999) were subject to regular torture. We examined the association between torture events and post-traumatic stress and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) among former women political prisoners. We conducted a retrospective survey and performed health check-ups among 108 former women prisoners. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was measured through the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS), and CVDs were assessed by physicians' diagnoses. The study was conducted between September 2008 and March 2010. All 67 participants in the study reported having been subjected to a variety of torture events. The prevalence of PTSD was 28.4% and that of CVD was 16.42%, respectively. PTSD and CVD were more likely to occur among women who had had longer imprisonment periods, and PTSD specifically was associated with exposure to torture (beating: OR = 1.49; 95% CI [0.48, 4.27] and threatening by rape: OR = 1.43; 95% CI [0.82, 9.30]). CVD was associated with asphyxia with water (OR = 3.86; 95% CI [0.03, 2.28]). Devoutness decreased the risk of PTSD (OR = 0.24; 95% CI [0.08, 1.41]). Torture had adverse long-term effects on prisoners' physiological and psychological health; devoutness played a significant protective role. This study highlights the importance of documenting torture events and identifying the indicators of associated morbidity among surviving political prisoners for the provision of additional resources to care. PMID:25381274

  19. Preference mapping of commercial Labneh (strained yogurt) products in the Lebanese market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaaki, D; Kebbe Baghdadi, O; Najm, N E; Olabi, A

    2012-02-01

    Labneh or strained yogurt is a fermented milk product popular in Lebanon, the Middle East, and in the Balkan regions. With increased consumer awareness about the health benefits of consuming diets low in fat, reduced-fat Labneh products have emerged on the Lebanese market. The objectives of this study were to assess the physicochemical and sensory properties of commercial bovine Labneh products differing in fat content. Seven commercial bovine Labneh brands were chosen. Three brands were available in full-fat, reduced-fat, and zero-fat versions, 3 in full-fat and zero-fat versions, and 1 in full-fat and reduced-fat versions, resulting in a total of 17 tested samples. The moisture, fat, protein, ash, pH, and nitrogen-free extract contents were determined and instrumental texture characteristics measured using a texture analyzer. Nine trained panelists used quantitative descriptive analysis to profile the sensory attributes of the samples and an acceptability test was carried out with 73 panelists. Brand type had a significant effect on all chemical parameters, as did fat level, except for nitrogen-free extract. Instrumental texture analysis showed a significant effect of brand and fat levels, as well as their interaction, on all attributes, except for adhesiveness and fat level. Sensory analysis suggested that significant differences existed between brands for most attributes. Full-fat samples were significantly more yellow, less sweet, and possessed a stronger acidic aftertaste than did their reduced-fat and zero-fat counterparts. Acceptability clearly decreased as fat level decreased from full fat to zero fat, with full-fat Labneh samples rating highest on the acceptability of appearance, flavor, texture, and overall acceptability. PMID:22281316

  20. Algae in Lebanese springs: the influence of wind on the distribution of characterizes species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was conducted by collecting freshwater samples from twenty springs distributed all over Lebanon. These springs vary widely in their altitude and nature. Water samples were analyzed for HCO3-,Cl-, SO42-, and SiO2 and for the major elements Ca, Mg, Na, K and Fe. The analysis of these elements was carried out by atomic absorption Spectrometry using flame air-acetylene whereas the anions were determined by titration and colorimetric methods. It has been found that the major composition in the water samples of the studied springs is predominantly influenced by the composition of parent rocks n Lebanon. The slightly elevated values of pH(7.8) and the large amount of calcium carbonate are a result of dissolution of calcium carbonate, dolomite and lime- stone. The presence of algae is due to wind transportation. In fact, being a country of intersection between the west and the east. Lebanon receives numerous species of Cyanophyta and diatoms of both equatorial and central African origins. Even though most of the Lebanese water springs are calcareous and alkaline, some taxons that usually characterize acidic media were also found to colonize our substrata. Water springs that are characterized by similar chemical composition and similar ecological conditions appear to be dominated by different algae species. Diatoms formed were found in diverse types and species and the pennales were the most dominant in both abundance and diversity. Among the most interesting species encountered in certain stations, it was found Oscillatoria platensis, originating from tropical Africa, probably transported by migratory birds. Its importance lies in its being a food protein source in the ecosystem. In addition, certain species characteristic of the hot European springs, such as Symploca thermalis and Calothrix castelli, were also detected in some springs. The presence of these species appears to be only sporadic.(author)

  1. Hemoglobin level as a risk factor for lower respiratory tract infections in Lebanese children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawsan Mourad

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pneumonia is the biggest single cause of childhood death under the age of 5 years, and anemia affects approximately 30% of infants and children all over the world. Aim: Determination of the relationship between anemia and lower respiratory tract infection as a risk factor in Lebanese children. Patients and Methods A total number of two hundred infants and children aged nine months to twelve years were included; One hundred cases were hospitalized for lower respiratory tract infection in Department of Pediatrics, Makassed General Hospital, and one hundred healthy, age and sex matched controls, were selected from outpatient department. Complete blood count, iron level, ferritin level, and total iron binding capacity were taken if hemoglobin level less than eleven gram per deci-liter. In addition peripheral blood smear, chest radiograph and C-reactive protein were done to hospitalized cases. Definition of iron deficiency anemia and normal laboratory values were predetermined. Results: Anemia was found in 32% of hospitalized cases and 16% of healthy controls. Mean hemoglobin level was 9.99 ± 0.62 gram per deci-liter and 11.99 ± 0.92 gram per deci-liter in anemic and non-anemic group respectively with a significant P-value of 0.001. C-reactive protein levels and number hospitalization days were similar among the anemic and non-anemic group. History of recurrent chest infections was significantly higher in both anemic group and hospitalized cases compared to non-anemic group and healthy controls. Low hemoglobin level was a risk factor for lower respiratory tract infection with a P-value of 0.008. Conclusion: Anemic children were two times more susceptible to lower respiratory tract infection compared to the control group, and iron deficiency anemia was predominating. Accurate diagnosis and prevention of anemia, whatever its etiology, is essential.

  2. Hemoglobin level as a risk factor for lower respiratory tract infections in Lebanese children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawsan Mourad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pneumonia is the biggest single cause of childhood death under the age of 5 years, and anemia affects approximately 30% of infants and children all over the world. Aim: Determination of the relationship between anemia and lower respiratory tract infection as a risk factor in Lebanese children. Patients and Methods A total number of two hundred infants and children aged nine months to twelve years were included; One hundred cases were hospitalized for lower respiratory tract infection in Department of Pediatrics, Makassed General Hospital, and one hundred healthy, age and sex matched controls, were selected from outpatient department. Complete blood count, iron level, ferritin level, and total iron binding capacity were taken if hemoglobin level less than eleven gram per deci-liter. In addition peripheral blood smear, chest radiograph and C-reactive protein were done to hospitalized cases. Definition of iron deficiency anemia and normal laboratory values were predetermined. Results: Anemia was found in 32% of hospitalized cases and 16% of healthy controls. Mean hemoglobin level was 9.99 ΁ 0.62 gram per deci-liter and 11.99 ΁ 0.92 gram per deci-liter in anemic and non-anemic group respectively with a significant P-value of 0.001. C-reactive protein levels and number hospitalization days were similar among the anemic and non-anemic group. History of recurrent chest infections was significantly higher in both anemic group and hospitalized cases compared to non-anemic group and healthy controls. Low hemoglobin level was a risk factor for lower respiratory tract infection with a P-value of 0.008. Conclusion: Anemic children were two times more susceptible to lower respiratory tract infection compared to the control group, and iron deficiency anemia was predominating. Accurate diagnosis and prevention of anemia, whatever its etiology, is essential.

  3. Cultural beliefs that may discourage breastfeeding among Lebanese women: a qualitative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wick Livia

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the health benefits of breastfeeding are well established, early introduction of formula remains a common practice. Cultural beliefs and practices can have an important impact on breastfeeding. This paper describes some common beliefs that may discourage breastfeeding in Lebanon. Methods Participants were healthy first-time mothers recruited from hospitals throughout Lebanon to participate in a study on usage patterns of a telephone hotline for postpartum support. The hotline was available to mothers for the first four months postpartum and patterns of usage, as well as questions asked were recorded. Thematic analysis of the content of questions which referred to cultural beliefs and practices related to breastfeeding was conducted. Results Twenty four percent of the 353 women enrolled in the study called the hotline, and 50% of the calls included questions about breastfeeding. Mothers expressed concern about having adequate amounts of breast milk or the quality of their breast milk. Concerns that the mother could potentially harm her infant though breastfeeding were rooted in a number of cultural beliefs. Having an inherited inability to produce milk, having "bad milk", and transmission of abdominal cramps to infants through breast milk were among the beliefs that were expressed. Although the researchers live and work in Lebanon, they were not aware of many of the beliefs that are reported in this study. Conclusion There are a number of cultural beliefs that could potentially discourage breastfeeding among Lebanese women. Understanding and addressing local beliefs and customs can help clinicians to provide more culturally appropriate counselling about breastfeeding.

  4. Quaternary deformation associated with the Tripoli-Roum Thrust, and the rise of the lebanese coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, A.; Tapponnier, P.; Jacques, E.; Daëron, M.; Klinger, Y.; Sursock, A.

    2003-04-01

    The Tripoli-Roum Thrust, which is part of the Levant Fault zone, appears to take up most of the shortening perpendicular to the Yammuneh Fault, thus producing the rise of Mount Lebanon since the late Neogene. In northern Lebanon, there is clear field evidence of active and recent folding and faulting along this thrust system. Three principal faults, oriented ~NNE-SSW, cut through the recent topography north of Tripoli. These oblique right-lateral strike-slip thrust ramps deform Neogene (Vindobonian to Astian) and Quaternary sedimentary and volcanic beds. The northernmost ramp is responsible for the growth of the young, asymmetric, Borj-el-Arab anticline, which folds Quaternary beachrocks and conglomerates, and reaches the Mediterranean coastline near Aabdé. This feature (thrust and ramp-anticline) continues offshore Tripoli, north of the Palmier and Rankine islands, and is probably responsible for the asymmetric uplift of shorelines and marine-cut terraces topping the islands. Active reverse faulting along the Tripoli-Roum thrust at sea appears to be also responsible for the rise of the many paleo-seacliffs and marine terraces found up to 500m asl along the Lebanese coast between Aabdé in the North and Saida in the South. Near Tabarja, and in the islands offshore Tripoli, we interpret the lowest uplifted marine terraces and double shoreline "trottoirs" identified and mapped by P. Sanlaville, to result from recurrent coseismic uplift during two or three seismic events on the offshore thrust. The last of these events was probably that which destroyed Beyrouth in 551A.D. Shell datings of the uplifted trottoirs yield 0,5 to 0,7 mm/yr as a first estimate of the uplift rate, relative to sea level, of the hanging wall of the Tripoli-Roum thrust ramp.

  5. Are in vitro methods for the detection of endocrine potentials in the aquatic environment predictive for in vivo effects? Outcomes of the Projects SchussenAktiv and SchussenAktivplus in the Lake Constance Area, Germany.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Henneberg

    Full Text Available Many studies about endocrine pollution in the aquatic environment reveal changes in the reproduction system of biota. We analysed endocrine activities in two rivers in Southern Germany using three approaches: (1 chemical analyses, (2 in vitro bioassays, and (3 in vivo investigations in fish and snails. Chemical analyses were based on gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. For in vitro analyses of endocrine potentials in water, sediment, and waste water samples, we used the E-screen assay (human breast cancer cells MCF-7 and reporter gene assays (human cell line HeLa-9903 and MDA-kb2. In addition, we performed reproduction tests with the freshwater mudsnail Potamopyrgus antipodarum to analyse water and sediment samples. We exposed juvenile brown trout (Salmo trutta f. fario to water downstream of a wastewater outfall (Schussen River or to water from a reference site (Argen River to investigate the vitellogenin production. Furthermore, two feral fish species, chub (Leuciscus cephalus and spirlin (Alburnoides bipunctatus, were caught in both rivers to determine their gonadal maturity and the gonadosomatic index. Chemical analyses provided only little information about endocrine active substances, whereas the in vitro assays revealed endocrine potentials in most of the samples. In addition to endocrine potentials, we also observed toxic potentials (E-screen/reproduction test in waste water samples, which could interfere with and camouflage endocrine effects. The results of our in vivo tests were mostly in line with the results of the in vitro assays and revealed a consistent reproduction-disrupting (reproduction tests and an occasional endocrine action (vitellogenin levels in both investigated rivers, with more pronounced effects for the Schussen river (e.g. a lower gonadosomatic index. We were able to show that biological in vitro assays for endocrine potentials in natural stream water reasonably reflect reproduction and endocrine

  6. Aquatic Pest Control. Manual 99.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Agricultural Experiment Station.

    This training manual provides information needed to meet the minimum EPA standards for certification as a commercial applicator of pesticides in the aquatic pest control category. The text discusses various water use situations; aquatic weed identification; herbicide use and effects; and aquatic insects and their control. (CS)

  7. Introduced aquatic plants and algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Non-native aquatic plants such as waterhyacinth and hydrilla severely impair the uses of aquatic resources including recreational faculties (lakes, reservoirs, rivers) as well as timely delivery of irrigation water for agriculture. Costs associated with impacts and management of all types of aquatic...

  8. Human Physiology in an Aquatic Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergast, David R; Moon, Richard E; Krasney, John J; Held, Heather E; Zamparo, Paola

    2015-10-01

    Water covers over 70% of the earth, has varying depths and temperatures and contains much of the earth's resources. Head-out water immersion (HOWI) or submersion at various depths (diving) in water of thermoneutral (TN) temperature elicits profound cardiorespiratory, endocrine, and renal responses. The translocation of blood into the thorax and elevation of plasma volume by autotransfusion of fluid from cells to the vascular compartment lead to increased cardiac stroke volume and output and there is a hyperperfusion of some tissues. Pulmonary artery and capillary hydrostatic pressures increase causing a decline in vital capacity with the potential for pulmonary edema. Atrial stretch and increased arterial pressure cause reflex autonomic responses which result in endocrine changes that return plasma volume and arterial pressure to preimmersion levels. Plasma volume is regulated via a reflex diuresis and natriuresis. Hydrostatic pressure also leads to elastic loading of the chest, increasing work of breathing, energy cost, and thus blood flow to respiratory muscles. Decreases in water temperature in HOWI do not affect the cardiac output compared to TN; however, they influence heart rate and the distribution of muscle and fat blood flow. The reduced muscle blood flow results in a reduced maximal oxygen consumption. The properties of water determine the mechanical load and the physiological responses during exercise in water (e.g. swimming and water based activities). Increased hydrostatic pressure caused by submersion does not affect stroke volume; however, progressive bradycardia decreases cardiac output. During submersion, compressed gas must be breathed which introduces the potential for oxygen toxicity, narcosis due to nitrogen, and tissue and vascular gas bubbles during decompression and after may cause pain in joints and the nervous system. PMID:26426465

  9. Protection and Conservation of the Aquatic Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornel Grigorut

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Concerns about environmental protection and their legal expression led to the formation andaffirmation of a set of common principles of national, regional and international law. Although they knowvarious formulations and specifications in these three legal systems, their fundamental meaning remains thesame, in different situations. They arise and contribute, at the same time, from / to the assertion of theenvironment in general, as common heritage of humanity.

  10. Sustaining America's Aquatic Biodiversity. What is Aquatic Biodiversity; Why Is it Important?

    OpenAIRE

    Helfrich, Louis A.; Neves, Richard J.; Parkhurst, James A. (James Albert)

    2005-01-01

    Describes the term aquatic biodiversity, explains the factors that increase and decrease biodiversity in natural ecosystems, and discusses the value of biodiversity for the health of the environment and quality of life; document also includes web links on national and world biodiversity.

  11. Adaptive features of aquatic mammals' eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mass, Alla M; Supin, Alexander Ya

    2007-06-01

    The eye of aquatic mammals demonstrates several adaptations to both underwater and aerial vision. This study offers a review of eye anatomy in four groups of aquatic animals: cetaceans (toothed and baleen whales), pinnipeds (seals, sea lions, and walruses), sirenians (manatees and dugongs), and sea otters. Eye anatomy and optics, retinal laminar morphology, and topography of ganglion cell distribution are discussed with particular reference to aquatic specializations for underwater versus aerial vision. Aquatic mammals display emmetropia (i.e., refraction of light to focus on the retina) while submerged, and most have mechanisms to achieve emmetropia above water to counter the resulting aerial myopia. As underwater vision necessitates adjusting to wide variations in luminosity, iris muscle contractions create species-specific pupil shapes that regulate the amount of light entering the pupil and, in pinnipeds, work in conjunction with a reflective optic tapetum. The retina of aquatic mammals is similar to that of nocturnal terrestrial mammals in containing mainly rod photoreceptors and a minor number of cones (however, residual color vision may take place). A characteristic feature of the cetacean and pinniped retina is the large size of ganglion cells separated by wide intercellular spaces. Studies of topographic distribution of ganglion cells in the retina of cetaceans revealed two areas of ganglion cell concentration (the best-vision areas) located in the temporal and nasal quadrants; pinnipeds, sirenians, and sea otters have only one such area. In general, the visual system of marine mammals demonstrates a high degree of development and several specific features associated with adaptation for vision in both the aquatic and aerial environments. PMID:17516421

  12. The lebanese society of cardiology: plans and perspectives, navigating against contrary winds and progressing against all odds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossaify, Antoine; Moussallem, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Scientific societies in medicine theoretically aim to improve a medical field as a science; however, this role is expanding nowadays to seeking also the improved practice of a certain medical field. In this regard, the current Lebanese Society of Cardiology (2013-2015) has laid many plans and considered many perspectives. These concern mainly, but not exclusively, the increase of public awareness regarding prevention, investment in research, implementation of guidelines, support of continuous medical education, organization of cardiology symposia and congresses, and achievement of national registries regarding main cardiac conditions, as well as the society's main objective of decreasing the burden of cardiovascular diseases in Lebanon. Nonetheless, the implementation of such plans and perspectives is facing contrary winds related to a multifaceted phenomenon: the dominance of private medicine with a subsequent lack of teamwork, the dominance of private media, the social and political unrest in Lebanon, significant discrepancies in the scientific background of cardiologists, and the absence of a standardized national cardiology licensing exam. Importantly, the implementation of such plans and perspectives requires individual commitment, along with the cooperation of the Order of Physicians, the Syndicate of Hospitals in Lebanon (representing private hospitals) and the Ministry of Health. Moreover, industry must be more committed to medical scientific societies; the support of cardiology events organized without the auspices of the Lebanese Society of Cardiology is not encouraged because of the presence of significant conflict of interest. PMID:25452697

  13. Brachidontes variabilis and Patella sp. as quantitative biological indicators for cadmium, lead and mercury in the Lebanese coastal waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mussel, Brachidontes variabilis, and the limpet, Patella sp., were used as indicators to monitor cadmium, lead and mercury concentrations along the Lebanese coast. Studies were carried out in order to define the best strategy for assessing and minimizing the effects of size and physiological condition on the metal contents of the molluscs, and corrective models were constructed. Metal concentrations in surface water were measured to estimate bioconcentration factors (BCFs). The BCFs varied from 8.3 x 103 to 3.4 x 104, from 7.5 x 103 to 8.0 x 103 and from 3.0 x 104 to 3.2 x 104, for Cd, Pb and Hg, respectively. For limpets, BCFs varied from 1.7 x 104 to 7.4 x 104 for Cd, from 2.5 x 103 to 6 x 103 for Pb and remained fairly constant at around 104 for Hg. The highest BCFs were associated with lowest contamination levels. The results of the geographical survey exhibited a similar large-scale spatial pattern for the two species and followed the metal concentration distributions measured in the waters. - Two molluscs were effective bioindicators for metal pollution in waters along the Lebanese coast

  14. Perceived Out-Group (Dis)Continuity and Attribution of Responsibility for the Lebanese Civil War Mediate Effects of National and Religious Subgroup Identification on Intergroup Attitudes

    OpenAIRE

    Licata, Laurent; Klein, Olivier; Saade, Wafaa; Azzi, Assaad Elia; Branscombe, Nyla R.

    2012-01-01

    Successful reconciliation between groups following a violent conflict requires psychological change. We test a model predicting intergroup attitudes towards Muslims in Lebanon among Maronite (Christian) Lebanese youths. Identification with both their religious subgroup and with the superordinate national group predicted attitudes towards Muslims, in opposite directions. These effects of levels of identification on intergroup attitudes were mediated by attributions of responsibility for the wa...

  15. CAM Photosynthesis in Submerged Aquatic Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is a CO2-concentrating mechanism selected in response to aridity in terrestrial habitats, and, in aquatic environments, to ambient limitations of carbon. Evidence is reviewed for its presence in five genera of aquatic vascular plants, including Isoe??tes, Sagittaria, Vallisneria, Crassula, and Littorella. Initially, aquatic CAM was considered by some to be an oxymoron, but some aquatic species have been studied in sufficient detail to say definitively that they possess CAM photosynthesis. CO2-concentrating mechanisms in photosynthetic organs require a barrier to leakage; e.g., terrestrial C4 plants have suberized bundle sheath cells and terrestrial CAM plants high stomatal resistance. In aquatic CAM plants the primary barrier to CO2 leakage is the extremely high diffusional resistance of water. This, coupled with the sink provided by extensive intercellular gas space, generates daytime CO2(Pi) comparable to terrestrial CAM plants. CAM contributes to the carbon budget by both net carbon gain and carbon recycling, and the magnitude of each is environmentally influenced. Aquatic CAM plants inhabit sites where photosynthesis is potentially limited by carbon. Many occupy moderately fertile shallow temporary pools that experience extreme diel fluctuations in carbon availability. CAM plants are able to take advantage of elevated nighttime CO2 levels in these habitats. This gives them a competitive advantage over non-CAM species that are carbon starved during the day and an advantage over species that expend energy in membrane transport of bicarbonate. Some aquatic CAM plants are distributed in highly infertile lakes, where extreme carbon limitation and light are important selective factors. Compilation of reports on diel changes in titratable acidity and malate show 69 out of 180 species have significant overnight accumulation, although evidence is presented discounting CAM in some. It is concluded that similar proportions of the aquatic

  16. Environment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tošovská, Eva

    Prague: Charles University in Prague, Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education , 2006 - (Zemčík, P.; Žigić, K.), s. 62-66 ISBN 80-7343-110-6 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : environment * Czech Republic Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://www.cerge-ei.cz/publications/books/

  17. Aquatic Ecology Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Population studies were concerned with predicting long-term consequences of mortality imposed on animal populations by man's activities. These studies consisted of development of a generalized life cycle model and an empirical impingement model for use in impact analysis. Chemical effects studies were conducted on chlorine minimization; fouling by the Asiatic clam; identification of halogenated organics in cooling water; and effects of halogenated organics in cooling systems on aquatic organisms. Ecological transport studies were conducted on availability of sediment-bound 137Cs and 60Co to fish; 137Cs and 60Co in White Oak Lake fish; and chromium levels in fish from a lake chronically contaminated with chromates from cooling towers. Progress is also reported on the following: effects of irradiation on thermal tolerance of mosquito fish; toxicity of nickel to the developing eggs and larvae of carp; accumulation of selected heavy metals associated with fly ash; and environmental monitoring of aquatic ecosystems

  18. A Western dietary pattern is associated with overweight and obesity in a national sample of Lebanese adolescents (13-19 years): a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naja, Farah; Hwalla, Nahla; Itani, Leila; Karam, Sabine; Sibai, Abla Mehio; Nasreddine, Lara

    2015-12-14

    Adolescent obesity is associated with both immediate and longer-term health implications. This study aims to identify dietary patterns among a nationally representative sample of Lebanese adolescents aged between 13 and 19 years (n 446) and to assess the association of these patterns with overweight and obesity. Through face-to-face interviews, socio-demographic, lifestyle and anthropometric variables were collected. Dietary intake was assessed using a sixty-one-item FFQ. Dietary patterns were derived by factor analysis. The following two dietary patterns were identified: Western and traditional Lebanese. The Western pattern was characterised by high consumption of red meat, eggs and fast-food sandwiches. The traditional Lebanese pattern reflected high intakes of fruits and vegetables, legumes and fish. Female sex and a higher maternal education level were associated with a greater adherence to the traditional Lebanese pattern. As for the Western pattern, the scores were negatively associated with crowding index, physical activity and frequency of breakfast consumption. After adjustment, subjects belonging to the 3rd tertile of the Western pattern scores had significantly higher odds of overweight compared with those belonging to the 1st tertile (OR 2·3; 95% CI 1·12, 4·73). In conclusion, two distinct dietary patterns were identified among adolescents in Lebanon: the traditional Lebanese and the Western, with the latter pattern being associated with an increased risk of overweight. The findings of this study may be used to guide the development of evidence-based preventive nutrition interventions to curb the obesity epidemic in this age group. PMID:26431469

  19. Understanding carbon regulation in aquatic systems - Bacteriophages as a model

    OpenAIRE

    Swapnil Sanmukh; Krishna Khairnar; Waman Paunikar; Satish Lokhande

    2015-01-01

    The bacteria and their phages are the most abundant constituents of the aquatic environment, and so represent an ideal model for studying carbon regulation in an aquatic system. The microbe-mediated interconversion of bioavailable organic carbon (OC) into dissolved organic carbon (DOC) by the microbial carbon pump (MCP) has been suggested to have the potential to revolutionize our view of carbon sequestration. It is estimated that DOC is the largest pool of organic matter in the ocean and, th...

  20. Influenza Vaccination: A Cross-Sectional Survey of Knowledge, Attitude and Practices among the Lebanese Adult Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada El Khoury

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Influenza is a common preventable infectious disease associated with high mortality and morbidity. Vaccination is the most cost-effective measure to prevent influenza, yet the vaccine uptake is known to be low. No previous studies have assessed the rate of seasonal influenza vaccination use among the Lebanese population, nor examined the knowledge and attitudes towards the influenza vaccine. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was performed in 30 pharmacies randomly selected across Lebanon. A 19-item questionnaire was used to record influenza vaccination status, knowledge and attitudes towards the influenza vaccine among the Lebanese general population. Results: The survey response rate was 93%. Among the 640 study participants, the overall 2014-2015 seasonal influenza vaccination rate was 27.6%. The majority of participants (72.4% reported irregular uptake of the vaccine. Results of the multivariate analysis revealed that elderly people (OR = 2.25, CI = 1.08–4.71, with higher education (OR = 1.42, CI = 1.09–1.84, higher physical activity (OR significantly higher than 1 for all categories, and chronic respiratory disease (OR = 3.24, CI = 1.58–6.62 were more regularly vaccinated, while those who visit the doctor “only when needed” (OR = 0.55, CI = 0.34–0.88 and those who consume more than seven drinks/week (OR = 0.24, CI = 0.09–0.65 were less regularly vaccinated. When introducing knowledge and attitude variables to the model, “thinking that the vaccine was not needed” was the only correlate that demonstrated a significant inverse association with regular influenza vaccination (OR = 0.15; p = 0.017. Conclusions: Suboptimal vaccination rates exist among the Lebanese ambulatory adult population. Clear misinformation on the importance of regular influenza immunization is also highlighted. This evidence underscores a compelling need to raise public awareness regarding the efficacy of the influenza vaccine.

  1. Prevalence of Depression in Medical Students at the Lebanese University and Exploring its Correlation With Facebook Relevance: A Questionnaire Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Ramzi S

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of major depression is particularly high in medical students, affecting around one-third of this population. Moreover, online social media, in particular Facebook, is becoming an intrinsic part in the life of a growing proportion of individuals worldwide. Objective Our primary objective is to identify the prevalence of depression in medical students at the Lebanese University Faculty of Medicine, a unique state university in Lebanon, its correlation with the utilization of the interactive features of Facebook, and the way students may resort to these features. Methods Students of the Lebanese University Faculty of Medicine were assessed for (1) depression and (2) Facebook activity. To screen for major depression, we used the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) scale. To test for Facebook activity, we developed the Facebook Resorting Questionnaire (FbRQ), which measures the degree to which students resort to Facebook. Results A total of 365 out of 480 students (76.0%) participated in the survey. A total of 25 students were excluded, hence 340 students were included in the final analysis. Current depression was reported in 117 students out of 340 (34.4%) and t tests showed female predominance. Moreover, PHQ-9 score multiple regression analysis showed that feeling depressed is explained 63.5% of the time by specific independent variables studied from the PHQ-9 and the FbRQ. Depression varied significantly among the different academic years (P<.001) and it peaked in the third-year students. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that depression and resorting to Facebook had a positive and significant relationship (P=.003) and the different FbRQ categories had significant differences in resorting-to-Facebook power. The like, add friend, and check-in features students used when resorting to Facebook were significantly associated with depression. Conclusions This study showed that depression was highly prevalent among students of the

  2. Identification of sources of priority substances set out in Article 16 of the Water Framework Directive and estimation of their discharges into the German aquatic environment; Ermittlung der Quellen fuer die prioritaeren Stoffe nach Artikel 16 der Wasserrahmenrichtlinie und Abschaetzung ihrer Eintragsmengen in die Gewaesser in Deutschland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, E.; Hillenbrand, T.; Marscheider-Weidemann, F.; Mueller, B.; Wiederhold, J.; Herrchen, M.; Klein, M.

    2002-12-01

    The Water Framework Directive (2000/60/EC) is a new instrument, that inter alia has replaced, harmonized and further developed the control and reduction of point and diffuse discharges of dangerous substances according to Council Directive 76/464/EEC. Article 16 of the Water Framework Directive set out a 'Strategy against pollution of water' which demands specific measures against pollution of water by individual pollutants or groups of pollutants presenting a significant risk to or via the aquatic environment (e.g. by drinking water consumed). For these priority substances community-wide water quality standards and emission controls have to be established. On the basis of Article 16 of Directive 2000/60/EC a list of 33 priority substances has been adopted by the decision of the European Parliament and of the Council of November 2001. This list identifies 11 priority hazardous substances, 14 substances subject to a review for identification as possible priority hazardous substance and 8 priority substances. The Commission will make a proposal for the final classification of the 'substances subject to a review' (priority hazardous or priority substances) not later than 12 months after adoption of this list. The planned measures aim at the cessation or phasing out of discharges, emissions and losses to the aquatic environment within 20 years for the priority hazardous substances and at the progressive reduction for the priority substances. In this project the available data for these 33 substances resp. groups of substances for the Federal Republic of Germany were put forward and described in a standardized pattern. This pattern includes the following items: nomenclature and properties of the substances, monitoring data, production and fields of application of these substances, existing regulations in Germany, releases to environment and possibilities to reduce discharges to the aquatic environment. The basis of the data is the year 2000 as far as

  3. Tool use by aquatic animals

    OpenAIRE

    Mann, Janet; Patterson, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    Tool-use research has focused primarily on land-based animals, with less consideration given to aquatic animals and the environmental challenges and conditions they face. Here, we review aquatic tool use and examine the contributing ecological, physiological, cognitive and social factors. Tool use among aquatic animals is rare but taxonomically diverse, occurring in fish, cephalopods, mammals, crabs, urchins and possibly gastropods. While additional research is required, the scarcity of tool ...

  4. Phytotoxicity of sesquiterpene lactone parthenin on aquatic weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, D K

    1996-01-01

    The sesquiterpene lactone parthenin, one of the major toxins in an obnoxious weed, parthenium (Parthenium hysterophorus L.), was toxic at 50 ppm to the floating aquatic weeds pistia (Pistia stratiotes L.) and lemna (Lemna pausicostata Hegelm.) and at 100 ppm to water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes Mart Solmns.), salvinia (Salvinia molesta Mitchell), azolla (Azolla nilotica Decne.), and spirodella (Spirodella polyrhiza L. Schleid). The lethal dose for the submerged weeds najas (Najas graminea Del.), ceratophyllun (Ceratophyllum demersun L.), and hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata L. f. Royle) was 25 ppm. The submerged aquatic weeds were more sensitive to parthenin. Water hyacinth was used as a representative for studying the phytotoxicity of parthenin on aquatic weeds. Inhibition of water hyacinth by parthenin was associated with decline in water use, root dysfunction, excessive leakage of solutes from roots indicative of massive damage to cellular membranes, loss of dehydrogenase activity in the roots, and loss of chlorophyll in the leaves. Plant death occurred in a period of one to two weeks. Parthenin phytotoxicity is gradually lost in an aquatic environment as a lethal dose became nonlethal in about 30 days under outdoor conditions. Possible buildup of a toxin concentration may affect population dynamics and a shift in the aquatic weed flora in the immediate area of parthenium stands. Accumulation of the toxin in an aquatic environment, however, at a level sufficient to produce such changes in a natural ecosystem as a consequence of rain washing parthenium plants and leaching of toxin from their residue appears to be unlikely. PMID:24226989

  5. [Two Lebanese villages in the Gulf: village transfers and labour markets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nancy, M

    1985-01-01

    This article analyzes the experiences of 2 cohorts of Lebanese emigrants who departed from 2 dissimilar villages, a large agricultural village called Kfar Rumman with a tradition of significant migration to Kuwait beginning in 1950 and a small village called Kaakour located 30 km from Beirut in which agriculture is secondary to stonecutting and emigration to Saudi Arabia has assumed importance more recently. Among 168 current or formar migrants to Kuwait from Kfar-Rumman, 125 are still in Kuwait, almost all with their families. Members of the same village and family have shown great solidarity over 30 years in helping new migrants find jobs, and their network of friendships and alliances in Kuwait has allowed them to diversify their employment opportunities. Transport and construction were the dominant employment of the 1st 75 migrants who entered Kuwait between 1950-60; they were adroit in building up small businesses in Kuwait and in departing for Saudi Arabia or elsewhere when the construction boom slowed in Kuwait and better opportunities arose elsewhere. Among other jobs, migrants in Kuwait worked in plumbing, furniture making, interior decoration, printing, administrative and other salaried employment in the public or private sector, and iron working and transport. The history of Kfar-Rumman in Kuwait depended greatly on the solidarity and collective life of the village, which greatly reduced the external constraints of the labor market and applied internal economic capacities to the most promising situations. Villagers from Kaakour began migrating to Saudi Arabia in 1958; by 1973 the pace had accelarated greatly due to the oil boom. Until 1974 they had little difficulty establishing themselves as stonecutters and in related trades, but competition increased thereafter with the arrival of stoneworkers from other Arab countries and especially after 1978 with the entrance of Asian workers. Village migrants showed great mobility; most workers were single or left

  6. Population dynamics and net primary production of the aquatic macrophite Nymphaea rudgeana C. F. Mey in a lotic environment of the Itanhaém River basin (SP, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAMARGO A. F. M.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we evaluated the population dynamics and obtained estimates of the net primary production of the aquatic macrophyte Nymphaea rudgeana in an arm of the Itanhaém River (São Paulo State, Brazil. This species presents, in the studied area, a broad seasonal variation of biomass. As from November (13.1 g DW/m² we observed a gradual increase of biomass that reached a maximum in February (163.1 g DW/m². Then, the biomass decreased, maintaining low levels until a new growth period. The reduction of biomass is associated to the development of floating aquatic macrophytes (Pistia stratiotes and Salvinia molesta and, subsequently to environmental factors (higher salinity values that are unfavorable to their development. The net primary production of N. rudgeana was estimated from the biomass data, and the annual productivity value was estimated between 3.02 and 3.82 t/ha/year.

  7. Tool use by aquatic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Janet; Patterson, Eric M

    2013-11-19

    Tool-use research has focused primarily on land-based animals, with less consideration given to aquatic animals and the environmental challenges and conditions they face. Here, we review aquatic tool use and examine the contributing ecological, physiological, cognitive and social factors. Tool use among aquatic animals is rare but taxonomically diverse, occurring in fish, cephalopods, mammals, crabs, urchins and possibly gastropods. While additional research is required, the scarcity of tool use can likely be attributable to the characteristics of aquatic habitats, which are generally not conducive to tool use. Nonetheless, studying tool use by aquatic animals provides insights into the conditions that promote and inhibit tool-use behaviour across biomes. Like land-based tool users, aquatic animals tend to find tools on the substrate and use tools during foraging. However, unlike on land, tool users in water often use other animals (and their products) and water itself as a tool. Among sea otters and dolphins, the two aquatic tool users studied in greatest detail, some individuals specialize in tool use, which is vertically socially transmitted possibly because of their long dependency periods. In all, the contrasts between aquatic- and land-based tool users enlighten our understanding of the adaptive value of tool-use behaviour. PMID:24101631

  8. Aquaticity: A discussion of the term and of how it applies to humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varveri, Danae; Karatzaferi, Christina; Pollatou, Elizana; Sakkas, Giorgos K

    2016-04-01

    The relationship between humans and water and the effects on aspects related to human performance has never been studied scientifically. The aim of the current systematic review is to attempt to define the term "aquaticity", present the factors that describe it and reveal the form in which it presents itself in today's society, in order to become a distinct scientific field of study. A systematic review of the literature has been conducted using anecdotal reports from the internet and forums as well as scientific articles and books from databases on issues related to aquatic sports. To the best of our knowledge there are no scientific articles dealing with human's aquaticity. In the current systematic review, four factors have been recognized that are closely related to human aquaticity. Those are related to physical condition in the water, to apnea and ability to immerse, to mental health and to parameters related to body composition. According to our findings, "Aquaticity is the capacity of a terrestrial mammalian organism to function and habitualise in the aquatic environment. The level of aquaticity depends on mental and physical characteristics and can be improved by frequent exposure to the water element". The ideal state of aquaticity is achieved through the activation of the diving reflex, when the human body is totally immersed in water. The development of knowledge regarding the aquatic environment leads humans to an improved state of aquaticity. PMID:27210836

  9. 人工湖水环境分析及其污染控制措施%Analysis on Aquatic Environment of an Artificial Lake and Control Measures to Its Pollution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨银科; 王文科; 邓红章; 孙浩

    2012-01-01

    construction, operation and management of artificial lakes, as well as maintenance of aquatic environment.

  10. Analysis of aflatoxin M1 in milk and yogurt and AFM1 reduction by lactic acid bacteria used in Lebanese industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study a screening survey was undertaken to determine the presence and levels of aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) in locally produced dairy products. For this purpose, a total of 138 dairy samples (milk and yogurt) were analyzed to quantify AFM1 levels in these products. Results obtained showed that AFM1 was found in 40.62% and 32.81% of milk and yogurt samples respectively. The range of contamination levels varied between lower and higher than European regulation limit. Lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus) used in the Lebanese traditional industry were screened for their ability to reduce the level of AFM1. Due to the lack in data on the natural occurrence of AFM1 in Lebanese dairy products, the aim of this work was to report some information and to state these products according to EC regulations. (author)

  11. Skin of the Cretaceous mosasaur Plotosaurus: implications for aquatic adaptations in giant marine reptiles

    OpenAIRE

    Lindgren, Johan; Alwmark, Carl; Caldwell, Michael W.; Anthony R Fiorillo

    2009-01-01

    The physical nature of water and the environment it presents to an organism have long been recognized as important constraints on aquatic adaptation and evolution. Little is known about the dermal cover of mosasauroids (a group of secondarily aquatic reptiles that occupied a wide array of predatory niches in the Cretaceous marine ecosystems 92–65 Myr ago), a lack of information that has hindered inferences about the nature and level of their aquatic adaptations. A newly discovered Plotosaurus...

  12. Exposures from aquatic pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods for estimation aquatic pathways contribution to the total population exposure are discussed. Aquatic pathways are the major factor for radionuclides spreading from the Chernobyl Exclusion zone. An annual outflow of 90Sr and 137Cs comprised 10-20 TBq and 2-4 TBq respectively and the population exposed by this effluence constitutes almost 30 million people. The dynamic of doses from 90Sr and 'Cs, which Dnieper water have to delivered, is calculated. The special software has been developed to simulate the process of dose formation in the of diverse Dnieper regions. Regional peculiarities of municipal tap, fishing and irrigation are considered. Seventy-year prediction of dose structure and function of dose forming is performed. The exposure is estimated for 12 regions of the Dnieper basin and the Crimea. The maximal individual annual committed effective doses due to the use of water by ordinary members of the population in Kiev region from 90Sr and 137Cs in 1986 are 1.7*10-5 Sv and 2.7*10-5 Sv respectively. A commercial fisherman on Kiev reservoir in 1986 received 4.7*10-4 Sv and 5*10-3 Sv from 90Sr and 137Cs, respectively. The contributions to the collective cumulative (over 70 years) committed effective dose (CCCED70) of irrigation, municipal tap water and fish consumption for members of the population respectively are 18%, 43%, 39% in Kiev region, 8%, 25%, 67% in Poltava region, and 50%, 50%, 0% (consumption of Dnieper fish is absent) in the Crimea. The predicted contribution of the Strontium-90 to CCCED70 resulting from the use of water is 80%. The CCCED70 to the population of the Dnieper regions (32.5 million people) is 3000 person-Sv due to the use the Dnieper water

  13. A Western dietary pattern is associated with overweight and obesity in a national sample of Lebanese adolescents (13–19 years): a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Naja, Farah; Hwalla, Nahla; Itani, Leila; Karam, Sabine; Mehio Sibai, Abla; Nasreddine, Lara

    2015-01-01

    Adolescent obesity is associated with both immediate and longer-term health implications. This study aims to identify dietary patterns among a nationally representative sample of Lebanese adolescents aged between 13 and 19 years (n 446) and to assess the association of these patterns with overweight and obesity. Through face-to-face interviews, socio-demographic, lifestyle and anthropometric variables were collected. Dietary intake was assessed using a sixty-one-item FFQ. Dietary patterns wer...

  14. Toxicity of trifluoroacetate to aquatic organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berends, A.G.; Rooij, C.G. de [Solvay S.A., Brussels (Belgium); Boutonnet, J.C. [Elf Atochem, Levallois-Perret (France); Thompson, R.S. [Zeneca Ltd., Devon (United Kingdom). Brixham Environmental Lab.

    1999-05-01

    As a result of the atmospheric degradation of several hydrofluorocarbons and hydrochlorofluorocarbons, trifluoroacetate (TFA) will be formed. Through precipitation, TFA will enter aquatic ecosystems. To evaluate the impact on the aquatic environment, an aquatic toxicity testing program was carried out with sodium trifluoroacetate (NaTFA). During acute toxicity tests, no effects of NaTFA on water fleas (Daphnia magna) and zebra fish (Danio retrio) were found at a concentration of 1,200 mg/L. A 7-d study with duckweed (Lemna gibba Ge) revealed a NOEC of 300 mg/L. On the basis of the results of five toxicity tests with Selenastrum capricornutum, they determined a NOEC of 0.12 mg/L. However, algal toxicity tests with NaTFA and Chlorella vulgaris, Scenedesmus subspicatus, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Dunaliella tertiolecta, Eugelan gracilis, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Navicula pelliculosa, Skeletonema costatum, Anabaena flos-aquae, and Microcystis aeruginosa resulted in EC50 values that were all higher than 100 mg/L. The toxicity of TFA to S. capricornutum could be due to metabolic defluorination to monofluoroacetate (MFA), which is known to inhibit the citric acid cycle. A toxicity test with MFA and S. capricornutum revealed it to be about three orders of magnitude more toxic than TFA. However, a bioactivation study revealed that defluorination of TFA was less than 4%. On the other hand, S. capricornutum exposed to a toxic concentration of NaTFA showed a recovery of growth when citric acid was added, suggesting that TFA (or a metabolite of TFA) interferes with the citric acid cycle. A recovery of the growth of S. capricornutum was also found when TFA was removed from the test solutions. Therefore, TFA should be considered algistatic and not algicidic for S. capricornutum. On the basis of the combined results of the laboratory tests and a previously reported semi-field study, they can consider a TFA concentration of 0.10 mg/L as safe for the aquatic ecosystem.

  15. Aquatic models, genomics and chemical risk management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Keith C; Hinton, David E; Mattingly, Carolyn J; Planchart, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The 5th Aquatic Animal Models for Human Disease meeting follows four previous meetings (Nairn et al., 2001; Schmale, 2004; Schmale et al., 2007; Hinton et al., 2009) in which advances in aquatic animal models for human disease research were reported, and community discussion of future direction was pursued. At this meeting, discussion at a workshop entitled Bioinformatics and Computational Biology with Web-based Resources (20 September 2010) led to an important conclusion: Aquatic model research using feral and experimental fish, in combination with web-based access to annotated anatomical atlases and toxicological databases, yields data that advance our understanding of human gene function, and can be used to facilitate environmental management and drug development. We propose here that the effects of genes and environment are best appreciated within an anatomical context - the specifically affected cells and organs in the whole animal. We envision the use of automated, whole-animal imaging at cellular resolution and computational morphometry facilitated by high-performance computing and automated entry into toxicological databases, as anchors for genetic and toxicological data, and as connectors between human and model system data. These principles should be applied to both laboratory and feral fish populations, which have been virtually irreplaceable sentinals for environmental contamination that results in human morbidity and mortality. We conclude that automation, database generation, and web-based accessibility, facilitated by genomic/transcriptomic data and high-performance and cloud computing, will potentiate the unique and potentially key roles that aquatic models play in advancing systems biology, drug development, and environmental risk management. PMID:21763781

  16. qnrVC-Like Gene Located in a Novel Complex Class 1 Integron Harboring the ISCR1 Element in an Aeromonas punctata Strain from an Aquatic Environment in Shandong Province, China▿

    OpenAIRE

    Xia, Ruirui; Guo, Xianhu; Zhang, Yuzhen; Xu, Hai

    2010-01-01

    A qnrVC-like gene, qnrVC4, was found in a novel complex class 1 integron gene cassette array following the ISCR1 element and blaPER-1 in a multidrug-resistant strain of the aquatic bacterium Aeromonas punctata. The deduced QnrVC4 protein sequence shares 45% to 81% amino acid identity with quinolone resistance determinants QnrB6, QnrA1, QnrS1, QnrC, QnrVC1, and QnrVC3. A Ser-83 to Ile amino acid substitution in gyrase A may be mainly responsible for ciprofloxacin resistance in this strain.

  17. qnrVC-like gene located in a novel complex class 1 integron harboring the ISCR1 element in an Aeromonas punctata strain from an aquatic environment in Shandong Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ruirui; Guo, Xianhu; Zhang, Yuzhen; Xu, Hai

    2010-08-01

    A qnrVC-like gene, qnrVC4, was found in a novel complex class 1 integron gene cassette array following the ISCR1 element and bla(PER-1) in a multidrug-resistant strain of the aquatic bacterium Aeromonas punctata. The deduced QnrVC4 protein sequence shares 45% to 81% amino acid identity with quinolone resistance determinants QnrB6, QnrA1, QnrS1, QnrC, QnrVC1, and QnrVC3. A Ser-83 to Ile amino acid substitution in gyrase A may be mainly responsible for ciprofloxacin resistance in this strain. PMID:20516288

  18. Population dynamics and net primary production of the aquatic macrophite Nymphaea rudgeana C. F. Mey in a lotic environment of the Itanhaém River basin (SP, Brazil)

    OpenAIRE

    A.F.M. Camargo; FLORENTINO E. R.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we evaluated the population dynamics and obtained estimates of the net primary production of the aquatic macrophyte Nymphaea rudgeana in an arm of the Itanhaém River (São Paulo State, Brazil). This species presents, in the studied area, a broad seasonal variation of biomass. As from November (13.1 g DW/m²) we observed a gradual increase of biomass that reached a maximum in February (163.1 g DW/m²). Then, the biomass decreased, maintaining low levels until a new growth period. Th...

  19. Algal Bloom in Aquatic Ecosystems-an Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghorbani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Algae play an important role in all aquatic ecosystems by providing all living organisms of water bodies with preliminary nutrients and energy required. However, abnormal and excessive algal growth so-called algal bloom would be detrimental as much. Given the importance of algae in aquatic environment as well as their sensitivity to environmental changes, algal measurements are of key components of water quality monitoring programs. The algal blooms could include a variety of adverse impacts on environmental, social, cultural and economic environments. The present study is an overview on the algal growth, its mechanisms and mitigating strategies in aquatic ecosystems whereas in spite of the growing knowledge of human being of ecological, physiological, and functional conditions of eutrophication, a systematic understanding of algal blooms is still lacking.

  20. Tunison Laboratory of Aquatic Science

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Tunison Laboratory of Aquatic Science (TLAS), located in Cortland, New York, is a field station of the USGS Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC). TLAS was established...