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Sample records for aptamer-targeted cell-specific rna

  1. Anti-HCV RNA Aptamers Targeting the Genomic cis-Acting Replication Element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Berzal-Herranz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV replication is dependent on the existence of several highly conserved functional genomic RNA domains. The cis-acting replication element (CRE, located within the 3' end of the NS5B coding region of the HCV genome, has been shown essential for efficient viral replication. Its sequence and structural features determine its involvement in functional interactions with viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and distant RNA domains of the viral genome. This work reports the use of an in vitro selection strategy to select aptamer RNA molecules against the complete HCV-CRE. After six selection cycles, five potential target sites were identified within this domain. Inhibition assays using a sample of representative aptamers showed that the selected RNAs significantly inhibit the replication (>80% of a subgenomic HCV replicon in Huh-7 cell cultures. These results highlight the potential of aptamer RNA molecules as therapeutic antiviral agents.

  2. An RNA Aptamer Targets the PDZ-Binding Motif of the HPV16 E6 Oncoprotein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyaeva, Tamara A.; Nicol, Clare; Cesur, Özlem [School of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Faculty of Biological Sciences and Astbury Centre for Structural Molecular Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Travé, Gilles [UMR 7242 CNRS-Université de Strasbourg, Ecole Supérieure de Biotechnologie, Boulevard Sébastien Brant, Illkirch 67412 (France); Blair, George Eric; Stonehouse, Nicola J., E-mail: n.j.stonehouse@leeds.ac.uk [School of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Faculty of Biological Sciences and Astbury Centre for Structural Molecular Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-24

    Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) is a high-risk DNA tumour virus which is the primary causative agent of cervical cancer. Cell transformation arises from deregulated expression of the E6 and E7 oncogenes. E6 has been shown to bind a number of cellular proteins, including p53 and proteins containing a PDZ domain. This study reports the first RNA aptamers to E6. These have been employed as molecular tools to further investigate E6-p53 and E6-PDZ interactions. This study is focussed on two aptamers (termed F2 and F4) which induced apoptosis in cells derived from an HPV16-transformed cervical carcinoma. The molecules were able to inhibit the interaction between E6 and PDZ1 from Magi1, with F2 being the most effective inhibitor. Neither of the aptamers inhibited E6-p53 interaction or p53 degradation. This study shows the specificity of this approach and highlights the potential benefits of the E6 aptamers as potential therapeutic or diagnostic agents in the future.

  3. An RNA Aptamer Targets the PDZ-Binding Motif of the HPV16 E6 Oncoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) is a high-risk DNA tumour virus which is the primary causative agent of cervical cancer. Cell transformation arises from deregulated expression of the E6 and E7 oncogenes. E6 has been shown to bind a number of cellular proteins, including p53 and proteins containing a PDZ domain. This study reports the first RNA aptamers to E6. These have been employed as molecular tools to further investigate E6-p53 and E6-PDZ interactions. This study is focussed on two aptamers (termed F2 and F4) which induced apoptosis in cells derived from an HPV16-transformed cervical carcinoma. The molecules were able to inhibit the interaction between E6 and PDZ1 from Magi1, with F2 being the most effective inhibitor. Neither of the aptamers inhibited E6-p53 interaction or p53 degradation. This study shows the specificity of this approach and highlights the potential benefits of the E6 aptamers as potential therapeutic or diagnostic agents in the future

  4. Aptamers and aptamer targeted delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Amy C.; Levy, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    When aptamers first emerged almost two decades ago, most were RNA species that bound and tagged or inhibited simple target ligands. Very soon after, the ‘selectionologists’ developing aptamer technology quickly realized more potential for the aptamer. In recent years, advances in aptamer techniques have enabled the use of aptamers as small molecule inhibitors, diagnostic tools and even therapeutics. Aptamers are now being employed in novel applications. We review, herein, some of the recent a...

  5. Tumor cell-specific photothermal killing by SELEX-derived DNA aptamer-targeted gold nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Ramya; Lee, Alexander Sheng Wei; Yap, Lim Wei; Jans, David A.; Wagstaff, Kylie M.; Cheng, Wenlong

    2015-12-01

    Despite widespread availability of cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents, the killing of tumour cells without affecting healthy surrounding tissue remains elusive, although recent developments in terms of plasmonic nanoparticles capable of photothermal killing have some promise. Here we describe novel DNA aptamer-tethered gold nanorods (GNRs) that act as efficient photothermal therapeutics against tumour cells, but not their isogenic normal cell counterparts. A modified Cell-SELEX process was developed to select a novel DNA aptamer (KW16-13) that specifically recognised and was internalised by cells of the MCF10CA1h human breast ductal carcinoma line but not by those of its isogenic normal counterpart (MCF10A). GNRs conjugated to KW16-13 were readily internalized by the MCF10CA1h tumour cells with minimal uptake by MCF10A normal cells. Upon near infrared (NIR) light irradiation, tumour cell death of >96%, could be effected, compared to 71-fold tumor cell death than GNRs-targeted with a previously described aptamer. This demonstrates the significant potential for aptamer functionalised-GNRs to be used effective and above all selective anti-cancer photothermal therapeutics.Despite widespread availability of cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents, the killing of tumour cells without affecting healthy surrounding tissue remains elusive, although recent developments in terms of plasmonic nanoparticles capable of photothermal killing have some promise. Here we describe novel DNA aptamer-tethered gold nanorods (GNRs) that act as efficient photothermal therapeutics against tumour cells, but not their isogenic normal cell counterparts. A modified Cell-SELEX process was developed to select a novel DNA aptamer (KW16-13) that specifically recognised and was internalised by cells of the MCF10CA1h human breast ductal carcinoma line but not by those of its isogenic normal counterpart (MCF10A). GNRs conjugated to KW16-13 were readily internalized by the MCF10CA1h tumour cells with minimal uptake by MCF10A normal cells. Upon near infrared (NIR) light irradiation, tumour cell death of >96%, could be effected, compared to 71-fold tumor cell death than GNRs-targeted with a previously described aptamer. This demonstrates the significant potential for aptamer functionalised-GNRs to be used effective and above all selective anti-cancer photothermal therapeutics. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Confocal images of aptamer incubated with 293T, A549 or HeLa cells, FTIR spectra of PEG-GNR, gel electrophoresis of Apt-GNR and time dependent temperature curve of GNRs. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07831h

  6. The long noncoding RNA RNCR2 directs mouse retinal cell specification

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    Blackshaw Seth

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent work has identified that many long mRNA-like noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs are expressed in the developing nervous system. Despite their abundance, the function of these ncRNAs has remained largely unexplored. We have investigated the highly abundant lncRNA RNCR2 in regulation of mouse retinal cell differentiation. Results We find that the RNCR2 is selectively expressed in a subset of both mitotic progenitors and postmitotic retinal precursor cells. ShRNA-mediated knockdown of RNCR2 results in an increase of both amacrine cells and Müller glia, indicating a role for this lncRNA in regulating retinal cell fate specification. We further report that RNCR2 RNA, which is normally nuclear-retained, can be exported from the nucleus when fused to an IRES-GFP sequence. Overexpression of RNCR2-IRES-GFP phenocopies the effects of shRNA-mediated knockdown of RNCR2, implying that forced mislocalization of RNCR2 induces a dominant-negative phenotype. Finally, we use the IRES-GFP fusion approach to identify specific domains of RNCR2 that are required for repressing both amacrine and Müller glial differentiation. Conclusion These data demonstrate that the lncRNA RNCR2 plays a critical role in regulating mammalian retinal cell fate specification. Furthermore, we present a novel approach for generating dominant-negative constructs of lncRNAs, which may be generally useful in the functional analysis of this class of molecules.

  7. Redirecting T Cell Specificity Using T Cell Receptor Messenger RNA Electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Sarene; Shimasaki, Noriko; Bertoletti, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Autologous T lymphocytes genetically modified to express T cell receptors or chimeric antigen receptors have shown great promise in the treatment of several cancers, including melanoma and leukemia. In addition to tumor-associated antigens and tumor-specific neoantigens, tumors expressing viral peptides can also be recognized by specific T cells and are attractive targets for cell therapy. Hepatocellular carcinoma cells often have hepatitis B virus DNA integration and can be targeted by hepatitis B virus-specific T cells. Here, we describe a method to engineer hepatitis B virus-specific T cell receptors in primary human T lymphocytes based on electroporation of hepatitis B virus T cell receptor messenger RNA. This method can be extended to a large scale therapeutic T cell production following current good manufacturing practice compliance and is applicable to the redirection of T lymphocytes with T cell receptors of other virus specificities such as Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, and chimeric receptors specific for other antigens expressed on cancer cells. PMID:27236807

  8. Aptamers targeting different functional groups of 17 beta-estradiol

    OpenAIRE

    Vanschoenbeek, Katrijn; Vanbrabant, Jeroen; Hosseinkhani, Baharak; Vermeeren, Veronique; Michiels, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers, short synthetic ssDNA or RNA molecules with a specific three-dimensional structure, are promising recognition elements in biosensor technology. In vitro generation of aptamers with high sensitivity and specificity toward a broad range of analytes has been achieved using the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) process. This iterative pathway of aptamer generation consists of sequential positive and counterselection steps. The present research aimed to se...

  9. In vitro Selection and Interaction Studies of a DNA Aptamer Targeting Protein A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Stoltenburg

    Full Text Available A new DNA aptamer targeting Protein A is presented. The aptamer was selected by use of the FluMag-SELEX procedure. The SELEX technology (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment is widely applied as an in vitro selection and amplification method to generate target-specific aptamers and exists in various modified variants. FluMag-SELEX is one of them and is characterized by the use of magnetic beads for target immobilization and fluorescently labeled oligonucleotides for monitoring the aptamer selection progress. Structural investigations and sequence truncation experiments of the selected aptamer for Protein A led to the conclusion, that a stem-loop structure at its 5'-end including the 5'-primer binding site is essential for aptamer-target binding. Extensive interaction analyses between aptamer and Protein A were performed by methods like surface plasmon resonance, MicroScale Thermophoresis and bead-based binding assays using fluorescence measurements. The binding of the aptamer to its target was thus investigated in assays with immobilization of one of the binding partners each, and with both binding partners in solution. Affinity constants were determined in the low micromolar to submicromolar range, increasing to the nanomolar range under the assumption of avidity. Protein A provides more than one binding site for the aptamer, which may overlap with the known binding sites for immunoglobulins. The aptamer binds specifically to both native and recombinant Protein A, but not to other immunoglobulin-binding proteins like Protein G and L. Cross specificity to other proteins was not found. The application of the aptamer is directed to Protein A detection or affinity purification. Moreover, whole cells of Staphylococcus aureus, presenting Protein A on the cell surface, could also be bound by the aptamer.

  10. In situ isolation of mRNA from individual plant cells: creation of cell-specific cDNA libraries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karrer, E.E.; Lincoln, J.E.; Hogenhout, S.A.; Bennett, A.B.; Bostock, R.M.; Martineau, B.; Lucas, W.J.; Gilchrist, D.G.; Alexander, D.

    1995-01-01

    A method for isolating and cloning mRNA populations from individual cells in living, intact plant tissues is described. The contents of individual cells were aspirated into micropipette tips filled with RNA extraction buffer. The mRNA from these cells was purified by binding to oligo(dT)-linked magn

  11. An aptamer-targeting photoresponsive drug delivery system using ``off-on'' graphene oxide wrapped mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yuxia; Hu, Hao; Zhang, Molly Gu; Song, Jibin; Nie, Liming; Wang, Shouju; Niu, Gang; Huang, Peng; Lu, Guangming; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a novel aptamer-targeting photoresponsive drug delivery system by non-covalent assembly of a Cy5.5-AS1411 aptamer conjugate on the surface of graphene oxide wrapped doxorubicin (Dox)-loaded mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN-Dox@GO-Apt) for light-mediated drug release and aptamer-targeted cancer therapy. The two ``off-on'' switches of the MSN-Dox@GO-Apt were controlled by aptamer targeting and light triggering, respectively. The Cy5.5-AS1411 ligand provides MSN-Dox@GO-Apt with nucleolin specific targeting and real-time indicator abilities by ``off-on'' Cy5.5 fluorescence recovery. The GO acts as a gatekeeper to prevent the loaded Dox from leaking in the absence of laser irradiation, and to control the Dox release in response to laser irradiation. When the GO wrapping falls off upon laser irradiation, the ``off-on'' photoresponsive drug delivery system is activated, thus inducing chemotherapy. Interestingly, with an increase in laser power, the synergism of chemotherapy and photothermal therapy in a single MSN-Dox@GO-Apt platform led to much more effective cancer cell killing than monotherapies, providing a new approach for treatment against cancer.We have developed a novel aptamer-targeting photoresponsive drug delivery system by non-covalent assembly of a Cy5.5-AS1411 aptamer conjugate on the surface of graphene oxide wrapped doxorubicin (Dox)-loaded mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN-Dox@GO-Apt) for light-mediated drug release and aptamer-targeted cancer therapy. The two ``off-on'' switches of the MSN-Dox@GO-Apt were controlled by aptamer targeting and light triggering, respectively. The Cy5.5-AS1411 ligand provides MSN-Dox@GO-Apt with nucleolin specific targeting and real-time indicator abilities by ``off-on'' Cy5.5 fluorescence recovery. The GO acts as a gatekeeper to prevent the loaded Dox from leaking in the absence of laser irradiation, and to control the Dox release in response to laser irradiation. When the GO wrapping falls off upon

  12. Cell-specific detection of microRNA expression during cardiomyogenesis by combined in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Mikael; Andersen, Ditte Caroline; Silahtaroglu, Asli;

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression by mediating translational repression or mRNA degradation of their targets, and several miRNAs control developmental decisions through embryogenesis. In the developing heart, miRNA targets comprise key players mediating cardiac lineage determination. Ho...

  13. First report of in vitro selection of RNA aptamers targeted to recombinant Loxosceles laeta spider toxins

    OpenAIRE

    Sapag, Amalia; Salinas-Luypaert, Catalina; Constenla-Muñoz, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Background Loxoscelism is the envenomation caused by the bite of Loxosceles spp. spiders. It entails severe necrotizing skin lesions, sometimes accompanied by systemic reactions and even death. There are no diagnostic means and treatment is mostly palliative. The main toxin, found in several isoforms in the venom, is sphingomyelinase D (SMD), a phospholipase that has been used to generate antibodies intended for medical applications. Nucleic acid aptamers are a promising alternative to antibo...

  14. An aptamer-targeting photoresponsive drug delivery system using "off-on" graphene oxide wrapped mesoporous silica nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yuxia; Hu, Hao; Zhang, Molly Gu; Song, Jibin; Nie, Liming; Wang, Shouju; Niu, Gang; Huang, Peng; Lu, Guangming; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-04-14

    We have developed a novel aptamer-targeting photoresponsive drug delivery system by non-covalent assembly of a Cy5.5-AS1411 aptamer conjugate on the surface of graphene oxide wrapped doxorubicin (Dox)-loaded mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN-Dox@GO-Apt) for light-mediated drug release and aptamer-targeted cancer therapy. The two "off-on" switches of the MSN-Dox@GO-Apt were controlled by aptamer targeting and light triggering, respectively. The Cy5.5-AS1411 ligand provides MSN-Dox@GO-Apt with nucleolin specific targeting and real-time indicator abilities by "off-on" Cy5.5 fluorescence recovery. The GO acts as a gatekeeper to prevent the loaded Dox from leaking in the absence of laser irradiation, and to control the Dox release in response to laser irradiation. When the GO wrapping falls off upon laser irradiation, the "off-on" photoresponsive drug delivery system is activated, thus inducing chemotherapy. Interestingly, with an increase in laser power, the synergism of chemotherapy and photothermal therapy in a single MSN-Dox@GO-Apt platform led to much more effective cancer cell killing than monotherapies, providing a new approach for treatment against cancer. PMID:25782595

  15. Nucleic-Acid-Binding Chromophores as Efficient Indicators of Aptamer-Target Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwabena Sarpong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The binding affinity and specificity of nucleic acid aptamers have made them valuable candidates for use as sensors in diagnostic applications. In particular, chromophore-functionalized aptamers offer a relatively simple format for detection and quantification of target molecules. We describe the use of nucleic-acid-staining reagents as an effective tool for detecting and signaling aptamer-target interactions. Aptamers varying in size and structure and targeting a range of molecules have been used in conjunction with commercially available chromophores to indicate and quantify the presence of cognate targets with high sensitivity and selectivity. Our assay precludes the covalent modification of nucleic acids and relies on the differential fluorescence signal of chromophores when complexed with aptamers with or without their cognate target. We also evaluate factors that are critical for the stability of the complex between the aptamer and chromophore in presence or absence of target molecules. Our results indicate the possibility of controlling those factors to enhance the sensitivity of target detection by the aptamers used in such assays.

  16. Aptamer/target binding-induced triple helix forming for signal-on electrochemical biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yinfei; Liu, Jinquan; He, Dinggen; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Shi, Hui; Wen, Li

    2015-10-01

    Owing to its diversified structures, high affinity, and specificity for binding a wide range of non-nucleic acid targets, aptamer is a useful molecular recognition tool for the design of various biosensors. Herein, we report a new signal-on electrochemical biosensing platform which is based on an aptamer/target binding-induced strand displacement and triple-helix forming. The biosensing platform is composed of a signal transduction probe (STP) modified with a methylene blue (MB) and a sulfhydryl group, a triplex-forming oligonucleotides probe (TFO) and a target specific aptamer probe (Apt). Through hybridization with the TFO probe and the Apt probe, the self-assembled STP on Au electrode via Au-S bonding keeps its rigid structure. The MB on the STP is distal to the Au electrode surface. It is eT off state. Target binding releases the Apt probe and liberates the end of the MB tagged STP to fold back and form a triplex-helix structure with TFO (STP/TFO/STP), allowing MB to approach the Au electrode surface and generating measurable electrochemical signals (eT ON). As test for the feasibility and universality of this signal-on electrochemical biosensing platform, two aptamers which bind to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and human α-thrombin (Tmb), respectively, are selected as models. The detection limit of ATP was 7.2 nM, whereas the detection limit of Tmb was 0.86 nM. PMID:26078174

  17. Inhibition of Influenza Virus Replication by DNA Aptamers Targeting a Cellular Component of Translation Initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Paloma; Pérez-Morgado, M Isabel; Gonzalez, Víctor M; Martín, M Elena; Nieto, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    The genetic diversity of the influenza virus hinders the use of broad spectrum antiviral drugs and favors the appearance of resistant strains. Single-stranded DNA aptamers represent an innovative approach with potential application as antiviral compounds. The mRNAs of influenza virus possess a 5'cap structure and a 3'poly(A) tail that makes them structurally indistinguishable from cellular mRNAs. However, selective translation of viral mRNAs occurs in infected cells through a discriminatory mechanism, whereby viral polymerase and NS1 interact with components of the translation initiation complex, such as the eIF4GI and PABP1 proteins. We have studied the potential of two specific aptamers that recognize PABP1 (ApPABP7 and ApPABP11) to act as anti-influenza drugs. Both aptamers reduce viral genome expression and the production of infective influenza virus particles. The interaction of viral polymerase with the eIF4GI translation initiation factor is hindered by transfection of infected cells with both PABP1 aptamers, and ApPABP11 also inhibits the association of NS1 with PABP1 and eIF4GI. These results indicate that aptamers targeting the host factors that interact with viral proteins may potentially have a broad therapeutic spectrum, reducing the appearance of escape mutants and resistant subtypes. PMID:27070300

  18. Redirecting T-Cell Specificity to EGFR Using mRNA to Self-limit Expression of Chimeric Antigen Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Hillary G; Torikai, Hiroki; Zhang, Ling; Maiti, Sourindra; Dai, Jianliang; Do, Kim-Anh; Singh, Harjeet; Huls, Helen; Lee, Dean A; Champlin, Richard E; Heimberger, Amy B; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2016-06-01

    Potential for on-target, but off-tissue toxicity limits therapeutic application of genetically modified T cells constitutively expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) from tumor-associated antigens expressed in normal tissue, such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Curtailing expression of CAR through modification of T cells by in vitro-transcribed mRNA species is one strategy to mitigate such toxicity. We evaluated expression of an EGFR-specific CAR coded from introduced mRNA in human T cells numerically expanded ex vivo to clinically significant numbers through coculture with activating and propagating cells (AaPC) derived from K562 preloaded with anti-CD3 antibody. The density of AaPC could be adjusted to affect phenotype of T cells such that reduced ratio of AaPC resulted in higher proportion of CD8 and central memory T cells that were more conducive to electrotransfer of mRNA than T cells expanded with high ratios of AaPC. RNA-modified CAR T cells produced less cytokine, but demonstrated similar cytolytic capacity as DNA-modified CAR T cells in response to EGFR-expressing glioblastoma cells. Expression of CAR by mRNA transfer was transient and accelerated by stimulation with cytokine and antigen. Loss of CAR abrogated T-cell function in response to tumor and normal cells expressing EGFR. We describe a clinically applicable method to propagate and modify T cells to transiently express EGFR-specific CAR to target EGFR-expressing tumor cells that may be used to limit on-target, off-tissue toxicity to normal tissue. PMID:27163741

  19. Cell-Specific mRNA Profiling of the Caenorhabditis elegans Somatic Gonadal Precursor Cells Identifies Suites of Sex-Biased and Gonad-Enriched Transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroetz, Mary B; Zarkower, David

    2015-12-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans somatic gonad differs greatly between the two sexes in its pattern of cell divisions, migration, and differentiation. Despite decades of study, the genetic pathways directing early gonadal development and establishing sexual dimorphism in the gonad remain largely unknown. To help define the genetic networks that regulate gonadal development, we employed cell-specific RNA-seq. We identified transcripts present in the somatic gonadal precursor cells and their daughter cells of each sex at the onset of sexual differentiation. We identified several hundred gonad-enriched transcripts, including the majority of known regulators of early gonadal development, and transgenic reporter analysis confirmed the effectiveness of this approach. Before the division of the somatic gonad precursors, few sex-biased gonadal transcripts were detectable; less than 6 hr later, after their division, we identified more than 250 sex-biased transcripts, of which about a third were enriched in the somatic gonad compared to the whole animal. This indicates that a robust sex-biased developmental program, some of it gonad-specific, initiates in the somatic gonadal precursor cells around the time of their first division. About 10% of male-biased transcripts had orthologs with male-biased expression in the early mouse gonad, suggesting possible conservation of gonad sex differentiation. Cell-specific analysis also identified approximately 70 previously unannotated mRNA isoforms that are enriched in the somatic gonad. Our data illustrate the power of cell-specific transcriptome analysis and suggest that early sex differentiation in the gonad is controlled by a relatively small suite of differentially expressed genes, even after dimorphism has become apparent. PMID:26497144

  20. Identification of a third region of cell-specific alternative splicing in human fibronectin mRNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors describe here a third region of variability in human fibronectin (FN) due to alternative RNA splicing. Two other positions of alternative splicing have been reported previously (ED and IIICS). The third region involves a 273-nucleotide exon encoding exactly one 91-amino acid repeat of type III homology, located between the DNA- and the cell-binding domains of FN, which is either included in or excluded from FN mRNA. The two mRNA variants arising by an exon-skipping mechanism are present in cells known to synthesize the cellular form of FN. However, liver cells, which are the source of plasma FN, produce only messengers without the extra type III sequence. Therefore, the region described here resembles, both structurally and functionally, the previously described ED (for extra domain) region, located toward the C terminus of the molecule between the cell- and heparin- (hep 2) binding domains. The authors conclude that both the extra type III repeat (names EDII) and ED represent sequences restricted to cellular FN. Combination of all the possible patterns of splicing in the three regions described to date may generate up to 20 distinct FN polypeptides from a single gene

  1. Theranostic MUC-1 aptamer targeted gold coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging and photothermal therapy of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhdarzadeh, Morteza; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Saei, Amir Ata; Varnamkhasti, Behrang Shiri; Omidi, Yadollah; Fateh, Mohsen; Ghavami, Mahdi; Shanehsazzadeh, Saeed; Dinarvand, Rassoul

    2016-07-01

    Favorable physiochemical properties and the capability to accommodate targeting moieties make superparamegnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) popular theranostic agents. In this study, we engineered SPIONs for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and photothermal therapy of colon cancer cells. SPIONs were synthesized by microemulsion method and were then coated with gold to reduce their cytotoxicity and to confer photothermal capabilities. Subsequently, the NPs were conjugated with thiol modified MUC-1 aptamers. The resulting NPs were spherical, monodisperse and about 19nm in size, as shown by differential light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). UV and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the successful gold coating. MTT results showed that Au@SPIONs have insignificant cytotoxicity at the concentration range of 10-100μg/ml (P>0.05) and that NPs covered with protein corona exerted lower cytotoxicity than bare NPs. Furthermore, confocal microscopy confirmed the higher uptake of aptamer-Au@SPIONs in comparison with non-targeted SPIONs. MR imaging revealed that SPIONs produced significant contrast enhancement in vitro and they could be exploited as contrast agents. Finally, cells treated with aptamer-Au@SPIONs exhibited a higher death rate compared to control cells upon exposure to near infrared light (NIR). In conclusion, MUC1-aptamer targeted Au@SPIONs could serve as promising theranostic agents for simultaneous MR imaging and photothermal therapy of cancer cells. PMID:27015647

  2. Characterisation of aptamer-target interactions by branched selection and high-throughput sequencing of SELEX pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont, Daniel M; Larsen, Niels; Jensen, Jan K;

    2015-01-01

    Nucleic acid aptamer selection by systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) has shown great promise for use in the development of research tools, therapeutics and diagnostics. Typically, aptamers are identified from libraries containing up to 10(16) different RNA or DNA...... sequences by 5-10 rounds of affinity selection towards a target of interest. Such library screenings can result in complex pools of many target-binding aptamers. New high-throughput sequencing techniques may potentially revolutionise aptamer selection by allowing quantitative assessment of the dynamic...... provide detailed information about aptamer binding sites, preferences for specific target conformations, and functional effects of the aptamers. The procedure was applied on a diverse pool of 2'-fluoropyrimidine-modified RNA enriched for aptamers specific for the serpin plasminogen activator inhibitor-1...

  3. A sol-gel-integrated protein array system for affinity analysis of aptamer-target protein interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Ji-Young; Kim, Eunkyung; Kang, Jeehye; Kim, Soyoun

    2011-06-01

    A sol-gel microarray system was developed for a protein interaction assay with high activity. Comparing to 2-dimensional microarray surfaces, sol-gel can offer a more dynamic and broad range for proteins. In the present study, this sol-gel-integrated protein array was used in binding affinity analysis for aptamers. Six RNA aptamers and their target protein, yeast TBP (TATA-binding protein), were used to evaluate this method. A TBP-containing sol-gel mixture was spotted using a dispensing workstation under high-humidity conditions and each Cy-3-labeled aptamer was incubated. The dissociation constants (K(d)) were calculated by plotting the fluorescent intensity of the bound aptamers as a function of the TBP concentrations. The K(d) value of the control aptamer was found to be 8 nM, which agrees well with the values obtained using the conventional method, electric mobility shift assay. The sol-gel-based binding affinity measurements fit well with conventional binding affinity measurements, suggesting their possible use as an alternative to the conventional method. In addition, aptamer affinity measurements by the sol-gel-integrated protein chip make it possible to develop a simple high-throughput affinity method for screening high-affinity aptamers. PMID:21749295

  4. Ex Vivo and In Vivo Imaging and Biodistribution of Aptamers Targeting the Human Matrix MetalloProtease-9 in Melanomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Kryza

    Full Text Available The human Matrix MetalloProtease-9 (hMMP-9 is overexpressed in tumors where it promotes the release of cancer cells thus contributing to tumor metastasis. We raised aptamers against hMMP-9, which constitutes a validated marker of malignant tumors, in order to design probes for imaging tumors in human beings. A chemically modified RNA aptamer (F3B, fully resistant to nucleases was previously described. This compound was subsequently used for the preparation of F3B-Cy5, F3B-S-acetylmercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG and F3B-DOTA. The binding properties of these derivatives were determined by surface plasmon resonance and electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Optical fluorescence imaging confirmed the binding to hMMP-9 in A375 melanoma bearing mice. Quantitative biodistribution studies were performed at 30 min, 1h and 2 h post injection of 99mTc-MAG-aptamer and 111In-DOTA-F3B. 99mTc radiolabeled aptamer specifically detected hMMP-9 in A375 melanoma tumors but accumulation in digestive tract was very high. Following i.v. injection of 111In-DOTA-F3B, high level of radioactivity was observed in kidneys and bladder but digestive tract uptake was very limited. Tumor uptake was significantly (student t test, p<0.05 higher for 111In-DOTA-F3B with 2.0%ID/g than for the 111In-DOTA-control oligonucleotide (0.7%ID/g with tumor to muscle ratio of 4.0. Such difference in tumor accumulation has been confirmed by ex vivo scintigraphic images performed at 1h post injection and by autoradiography, which revealed the overexpression of hMMP-9 in sections of human melanomas. These results demonstrate that F3B aptamer is of interest for detecting hMMP-9 in melanoma tumor.

  5. Ex Vivo and In Vivo Imaging and Biodistribution of Aptamers Targeting the Human Matrix MetalloProtease-9 in Melanomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryza, David; Debordeaux, Frédéric; Azéma, Laurent; Hassan, Aref; Paurelle, Olivier; Schulz, Jürgen; Savona-Baron, Catherine; Charignon, Elsa; Bonazza, Pauline; Taleb, Jacqueline; Fernandez, Philippe; Janier, Marc; Toulmé, Jean Jacques

    2016-01-01

    The human Matrix MetalloProtease-9 (hMMP-9) is overexpressed in tumors where it promotes the release of cancer cells thus contributing to tumor metastasis. We raised aptamers against hMMP-9, which constitutes a validated marker of malignant tumors, in order to design probes for imaging tumors in human beings. A chemically modified RNA aptamer (F3B), fully resistant to nucleases was previously described. This compound was subsequently used for the preparation of F3B-Cy5, F3B-S-acetylmercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG) and F3B-DOTA. The binding properties of these derivatives were determined by surface plasmon resonance and electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Optical fluorescence imaging confirmed the binding to hMMP-9 in A375 melanoma bearing mice. Quantitative biodistribution studies were performed at 30 min, 1h and 2 h post injection of 99mTc-MAG-aptamer and 111In-DOTA-F3B. 99mTc radiolabeled aptamer specifically detected hMMP-9 in A375 melanoma tumors but accumulation in digestive tract was very high. Following i.v. injection of 111In-DOTA-F3B, high level of radioactivity was observed in kidneys and bladder but digestive tract uptake was very limited. Tumor uptake was significantly (student t test, pDOTA-F3B with 2.0%ID/g than for the 111In-DOTA-control oligonucleotide (0.7%ID/g) with tumor to muscle ratio of 4.0. Such difference in tumor accumulation has been confirmed by ex vivo scintigraphic images performed at 1h post injection and by autoradiography, which revealed the overexpression of hMMP-9 in sections of human melanomas. These results demonstrate that F3B aptamer is of interest for detecting hMMP-9 in melanoma tumor. PMID:26901393

  6. Cell-specific precursor processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Jens F; Bundgaard, Jens R

    2010-01-01

    The singular gene for a peptide hormone is expressed not only in a specific endocrine cell type but also in other endocrine cells as well as in entirely different cells such as neurons, adipocytes, myocytes, immune cells, and cells of the sex-glands. The cellular expression pattern for each gene...... varies with development, time and species. Endocrine regulation is, however, based on the release of a given hormone from an endocrine cell to the general circulation from whose cappilaries the hormone reaches the specific target cell elsewhere in the body. The widespread expression of hormone genes in...... different cells and tissues therefore requires control of biogenesis and secretion in order to avoid interference with the function of a specific hormonal peptide from a particular endocrine cell. Several mechanisms are involved in such control, one of them being cell-specific processing of prohormones. The...

  7. Detection of Tumor Cell-Specific mRNA in the Peripheral Blood of Patients with Breast Cancer — Evaluation of Several Markers with Real-Time Reverse Transcription-PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Andergassen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is widely known that cells from epithelial tumors, e.g., breast cancer, detach from their primary tissue and enter blood circulation. We show that the presence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs in samples of patients with primary and metastatic breast cancer can be detected with an array of selected tumor-marker-genes by reverse transcription real-time PCR. The focus of the presented work is on detecting differences in gene expression between healthy individuals and adjuvant and metastatic breast cancer patients, not an accurate quantification of these differences. Therefore, total RNA was isolated from blood samples of healthy donors and patients with primary or metastatic breast cancer after enrichment of mononuclear cells by density gradient centrifugation. After reverse transcription real-time PCR was carried out with a set of marker genes (BCSP, CK8, Her2, MGL, CK18, CK19. B2M and GAPDH were used as reference genes. Blood samples from patients with metastatic disease revealed increased cytokine gene levels in comparison to normal blood samples. Detection of a single gene was not sufficient to detect CTCs by reverse transcription real-time PCR. Markers used here were selected based on a recent study detecting cancer cells on different protein levels. The combination of such a marker array leads to higher and more specific discovery rates, predominantly in metastatic patients. Identification of CTCs by PCR methods may lead to better diagnosis and prognosis and could help to choose an adequate therapy.

  8. Cdc42-mediated tubulogenesis controls cell specification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesavan, Gokul; Sand, Fredrik Wolfhagen; Greiner, Thomas Uwe;

    2009-01-01

    Understanding how cells polarize and coordinate tubulogenesis during organ formation is a central question in biology. Tubulogenesis often coincides with cell-lineage specification during organ development. Hence, an elementary question is whether these two processes are independently controlled...... later for maintaining apical cell polarity. Finally, we show that Cdc42 controls cell specification non-cell-autonomously by providing the correct microenvironment for proper control of cell-fate choices of multipotent progenitors. For a video summary of this article, see the PaperFlick file with the......, or whether proper cell specification depends on formation of tubes. To address these fundamental questions, we have studied the functional role of Cdc42 in pancreatic tubulogenesis. We present evidence that Cdc42 is essential for tube formation, specifically for initiating microlumen formation and...

  9. Cell-specific modulation of surfactant proteins by ambroxol treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambroxol [trans-4-(2-amino-3,5-dibromobenzylamino)-cyclohexanole hydrochloride], a mucolytic agent, was postulated to provide surfactant stimulatory properties and was previously used to prevent surfactant deficiency. Currently, the underlying mechanisms are not exactly clear. Because surfactant homeostasis is regulated by surfactant-specific proteins (SP), we analyzed protein amount and mRNA expression in whole lung tissue, isolated type II pneumocytes and bronchoalveolar lavage of Sprague-Dawley rats treated with ambroxol i.p. (75 mg/kg body weight, twice a day [every 12 h]). The methods used included competitive polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Northern blotting, Western immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. In isolated type II pneumocytes of ambroxol-treated animals, SP-C protein and mRNA content were increased, whereas SP-A, -B and -D protein, mRNA, and immunoreactivity remained unaffected. However, ambroxol treatment resulted in a significant increase of SP-B and in a decrease of SP-D in whole lung tissue with enhanced immunostaining for SP-B in Clara Cells. SP-A and SP-D were significantly decreased in BAL fluid of ambroxol-treated animals. The data suggest that surfactant protein expression is modulated in a cell-specific manner by ambroxol, as type II pneumocytes exhibited an increase in SP-C, whereas Clara cells exhibited an increase in the immunoreactivity for SP-B accounting for the increased SP-B content of whole lung tissue. The results indicate that ambroxol may exert its positive effects, observed in the treatment of diseases related to surfactant deficiency, via modulation of surfactant protein expression

  10. Identification of a novel male germ cell-specific gene TESF-1 in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mammalian spermatogenesis is precisely regulated by many germ cell-specific factors. In search for such a germ cell-specific factor, we have identified a novel mouse gene testis-specific factor 1 (TESF-1). Messenger RNA of TESF-1 was found only in the testis and its expression appeared to be regulated in a developmental manner. Further analysis demonstrated that the expression of TESF-1 was specifically in male germ cells, supported by the observation that we were not able to detect the TESF-1 mRNA from at/at homozygous mutant testes, which lack germ cells. The deduced amino acid sequence of TESF-1 contains a leucine-zipper motif, a potential nuclear localization signal, and two cAMP- and cGMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation sites. The green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged TESF-1 fusion protein was expressed in COS-7 cells and localized primarily in the nucleus. Taken together, these results indicate that TESF-1 is a novel male germ cell-specific gene, and its protein product may function as a nuclear factor involved in the regulation of spermatogenesis

  11. Male germ cell-specific expression of a novel Patched-domain containing gene Ptchd3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway plays an important role in various biological processes, including pattern formation, cell fate determination, proliferation, and differentiation. Hh function is mediated through its membrane receptor Patched. Herein, we have characterized a novel Patched-domain containing gene Ptchd3 in mouse. Messenger RNA of Ptchd3 was exclusively detected in the testis, and existed in two isoforms Ptchd3a and Ptchd3b. The expression of these two mRNA isoforms was shown to be developmentally regulated in testes, and specifically found in male germ cells. Further analysis revealed that the Ptchd3 protein was located on the midpiece of mouse, rat and human sperm. Collectively, these results indicate that Ptchd3 is a novel male germ cell-specific gene and may be involved in the Hh signaling to regulate sperm development and/or sperm function

  12. Ontogenesis and cell specific localization of Fas ligand expression in the rat testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Abrizio, Piera; Baldini, Enke; Russo, Paola F; Biordi, Leda; Graziano, Filomena M; Rucci, Nadia; Properzi, Giuliana; Francavilla, Sandro; Ulisse, Salvatore

    2004-10-01

    Over the past few years, a number of experimental evidences suggested the involvement of Fas Ligand (FasL) expressing Sertoli cells to induce apoptosis of Fas bearing germ cells. However, the FasL expression during testicular development and its cell specific localization within the testis is still a matter of debate. In the present study, we have monitored FasL expression during rat testis development by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and evaluated cell specific localization of FasL expression, by in situ RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, on adult rat testis. RT-PCR analysis, performed on total RNA from rat testes obtained from 1 day up to 1-year-old animals, demonstrated the presence of FasL transcripts at all developmental stages examined. In situ RT-PCR analysis clearly indicated the presence of FasL mRNA in Sertoli cells of adult testis, while we could never detect FasL transcripts in germ cells. Immunohistochemistry experiments showed a strong immunostaining for FasL in Sertoli cells of adult testis and again, no immunopositivity was observed in germ cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that FasL expression in rat testis is present from the early postnatal days up to the adult, and the Sertoli cells is the main FasL expressing cell within the seminiferous tubule. PMID:15379972

  13. Cell-specific regulation of apoptosis by designed enediynes.

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolaou, K. C.; Stabila, P; Esmaeli-Azad, B; Wrasidlo, W; Hiatt, A

    1993-01-01

    The naturally occurring enediyne antibiotics are a unique class of antitumor drugs that combine reactive enediynes with additional structural features conferring affinity for DNA. Dynemicin A, in which an enediyne core is attached to an anthraquinone group capable of DNA intercalation, readily cleaves double-stranded DNA. This activity is thought to be the basis of its potent antitumor cytotoxicity. To investigate cell-specific mechanisms of cytotoxicity in the absence of DNA affinity, we hav...

  14. Anatomy of a new B-cell-specific enhancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, W; Benoist, C.; Mathis, D

    1989-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex class II molecules, like the immunoglobulins, are prominent B-lymphocyte markers. Herein, we describe a B-cell-specific enhancer associated with the murine class II gene, Ek alpha. This enhancer has a complex anatomy that suggests interactions between remotely spaced elements. Of particular interest is the finding that two CCAAT boxes spaced one kilobase apart are important for enhancer activity. Somewhat surprisingly, the E alpha and immunoglobulin enhanc...

  15. Potential cell-specific functions of CXCR4 in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Christian; Döring, Yvonne; Noels, Heidi

    2016-05-10

    The chemokine CXCL12 and its receptor CXCR4 form an important axis contributing to cellular functions in homeostasis and disease. In addition, the atypical CXCL12 receptor CXCR7 may shape the availability and function of CXCL12. Further to their role through progenitor cell mobilization, CXCL12 and CXCR4 may affect native atherogenesis by modifying atherosclerosis-relevant cellular functions. This short review intends to provide a concise summary of current knowledge with regards to cell-specific functions of CXCL12 and its receptors CXCR4 and CXCR7 with potential implications for the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:25586789

  16. Birthdating studies reshape models for pituitary gland cell specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Shannon W; Mortensen, Amanda H; Camper, Sally A

    2011-04-15

    The intermediate and anterior lobes of the pituitary gland are derived from an invagination of oral ectoderm that forms Rathke's pouch. During gestation proliferating cells are enriched around the pouch lumen, and they appear to delaminate as they exit the cell cycle and differentiate. During late mouse gestation and the postnatal period, anterior lobe progenitors re-enter the cell cycle and expand the populations of specialized, hormone-producing cells. At birth, all cell types are present, and their localization appears stratified based on cell type. We conducted a birth dating study of Rathke's pouch derivatives to determine whether the location of specialized cells at birth is correlated with the timing of cell cycle exit. We find that all of the anterior lobe cell types initiate differentiation concurrently with a peak between e11.5 and e13.5. Differentiation of intermediate lobe melanotropes is delayed relative to anterior lobe cell types. We discovered that specialized cell types are not grouped together based on birth date and are dispersed throughout the anterior lobe. Thus, the apparent stratification of specialized cells at birth is not correlated with cell cycle exit. Thus, the currently popular model of cell specification, dependent upon timing of extrinsic, directional gradients of signaling molecules, needs revision. We propose that signals intrinsic to Rathke's pouch are necessary for cell specification between e11.5 and e13.5 and that cell-cell communication likely plays an important role in regulating this process. PMID:21262217

  17. Male germ cell-specific knockout of cholesterogenic cytochrome P450 lanosterol 14α-demethylase (Cyp51)[S

    OpenAIRE

    Keber, Rok; Ačimovič, Jure; Majdič, Gregor; Motaln, Helena; Rozman, Damjana; Horvat, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 lanosterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51) and its products, meiosis-activating sterols (MASs), were hypothesized by previous in vitro studies to have an important role in regulating meiosis and reproduction. To test this in vivo, we generated a conditional male germ cell-specific knockout of the gene Cyp51 in the mouse. High excision efficiency of Cyp51 allele in germ cells resulted in 85–89% downregulation of Cyp51 mRNA and protein levels in germ cells. Quantitative metabolic profil...

  18. Cell-specific synaptic plasticity induced by network oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarnadze, Shota; Bäuerle, Peter; Santos-Torres, Julio; Böhm, Claudia; Schmitz, Dietmar; Geiger, Jörg Rp; Dugladze, Tamar; Gloveli, Tengis

    2016-01-01

    Gamma rhythms are known to contribute to the process of memory encoding. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms at the molecular, cellular and network levels. Using local field potential recording in awake behaving mice and concomitant field potential and whole-cell recordings in slice preparations we found that gamma rhythms lead to activity-dependent modification of hippocampal networks, including alterations in sharp wave-ripple complexes. Network plasticity, expressed as long-lasting increases in sharp wave-associated synaptic currents, exhibits enhanced excitatory synaptic strength in pyramidal cells that is induced postsynaptically and depends on metabotropic glutamate receptor-5 activation. In sharp contrast, alteration of inhibitory synaptic strength is independent of postsynaptic activation and less pronounced. Further, we found a cell type-specific, directionally biased synaptic plasticity of two major types of GABAergic cells, parvalbumin- and cholecystokinin-expressing interneurons. Thus, we propose that gamma frequency oscillations represent a network state that introduces long-lasting synaptic plasticity in a cell-specific manner. PMID:27218453

  19. Cell-specific monitoring of protein synthesis in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos Kourtis

    Full Text Available Analysis of general and specific protein synthesis provides important information, relevant to cellular physiology and function. However, existing methodologies, involving metabolic labelling by incorporation of radioactive amino acids into nascent polypeptides, cannot be applied to monitor protein synthesis in specific cells or tissues, in live specimens. We have developed a novel approach for monitoring protein synthesis in specific cells or tissues, in vivo. Fluorescent reporter proteins such as GFP are expressed in specific cells and tissues of interest or throughout animals using appropriate promoters. Protein synthesis rates are assessed by following fluorescence recovery after partial photobleaching of the fluorophore at targeted sites. We evaluate the method by examining protein synthesis rates in diverse cell types of live, wild type or mRNA translation-defective Caenorhabditis elegans animals. Because it is non-invasive, our approach allows monitoring of protein synthesis in single cells or tissues with intrinsically different protein synthesis rates. Furthermore, it can be readily implemented in other organisms or cell culture systems.

  20. Characterization of promoter elements required for cell-specific expression of the neurotensin/neuromedin N gene in a human endocrine cell line.

    OpenAIRE

    Evers, B M; X Wang; Zhou, Z; Townsend, C M; McNeil, G P; Dobner, P R

    1995-01-01

    Expression of the gene encoding neurotensin/neuromedin N (NT/N) is mostly limited to the brain and specialized enteroendocrine cells (N cells) of the distal small intestine. We have analyzed the NT/N DNA sequences upstream of the RNA start site that direct cell-specific expression using a novel human endocrine cell line, BON, that resembles intestinal N cells in several important aspects, including NT/N precursor protein processing, ratios of different NT/N mRNA forms, and high levels of cons...

  1. Towards an understanding of cell-specific functions of signal-dependent transcription factors

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Dawn X.; Glass, Christopher K.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to regulate gene expression in a cell-specific manner is a feature of many broadly expressed signal-dependent transcription factors, including nuclear hormone receptors and transcription factors that are activated by cell surface receptors for extracellular signals. As the most plastic cells of the hematopoietic system, macrophages are responsive to a wide spectrum of regulatory molecules and provide a robust model system for investigation of the basis for cell-specific transcript...

  2. Onset of cell-specific gene expression in the developing mouse pancreas.

    OpenAIRE

    Gittes, G K; Rutter, W J

    1992-01-01

    A central question in developmental biology has been the initiation of cell-specific gene expression and its temporal relationship to morphogenesis. We have coupled embryo microdissection with the exquisite sensitivity of the polymerase chain reaction to define the onset of cell-specific gene expression during pancreatic organogenesis. Using the precise assignment of gestational age by the number of somites in each embryo, we determined the onset of transcription of major genes of the endocri...

  3. An RNA editing fingerprint of cancer stem cell reprogramming

    OpenAIRE

    Crews, Leslie A; Jiang, Qingfei; Zipeto, Maria A; de Lazzari, Elisa; Court, Angela C.; Ali, Shawn; Barrett, Christian L.; Frazer, Kelly A; Jamieson, Catriona HM

    2015-01-01

    Background Deregulation of RNA editing by adenosine deaminases acting on dsRNA (ADARs) has been implicated in the progression of diverse human cancers including hematopoietic malignancies such as chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Inflammation-associated activation of ADAR1 occurs in leukemia stem cells specifically in the advanced, often drug-resistant stage of CML known as blast crisis. However, detection of cancer stem cell-associated RNA editing by RNA sequencing in these rare cell populatio...

  4. Profilin is required for viral morphogenesis, syncytium formation, and cell-specific stress fiber induction by respiratory syncytial virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barik Sailen

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Actin is required for the gene expression and morphogenesis of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, a clinically important Pneumovirus of the Paramyxoviridae family. In HEp-2 cells, RSV infection also induces actin stress fibers, which may be important in the immunopathology of the RSV disease. Profilin, a major regulator of actin polymerization, stimulates viral transcription in vitro. Thus, we tested the role of profilin in RSV growth and RSV-actin interactions in cultured cells (ex vivo. Results We tested three cell lines: HEp-2 (human, A549 (human, and L2 (rat. In all three, RSV grew well and produced fused cells (syncytium, and two RSV proteins, namely, the phosphoprotein P and the nucleocapsid protein N, associated with profilin. In contrast, induction of actin stress fibers by RSV occurred in HEp-2 and L2 cells, but not in A549. Knockdown of profilin by RNA interference had a small effect on viral macromolecule synthesis but strongly inhibited maturation of progeny virions, cell fusion, and induction of stress fibers. Conclusions Profilin plays a cardinal role in RSV-mediated cell fusion and viral maturation. In contrast, interaction of profilin with the viral transcriptional proteins P and N may only nominally activate viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Stress fiber formation is a cell-specific response to infection, requiring profilin and perhaps other signaling molecules that are absent in certain cell lines. Stress fibers per se play no role in RSV replication in cell culture. Clearly, the cellular architecture controls multiple steps of host-RSV interaction, some of which are regulated by profilin.

  5. Cell-specific intracellular anticancer drug delivery from mesoporous silica nanoparticles with pH sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhong; Cai, Kaiyong; Hu, Yan; Zhang, Beilu; Xu, Dawei

    2012-05-01

    A nanoreservoir for efficient intracellular anticancer drug delivery based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles end-capped with lactobionic acid-grafted bovine serum albumin is fabricated. It demonstrates great potential for both cell-specific endocytosis and intracellular pH-responsive controlled release of drugs. A possible endocytosis pathway/mechanism of the smart controlled drug release system is proposed. PMID:23184747

  6. Towards an understanding of cell-specific functions of signal-dependent transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dawn X; Glass, Christopher K

    2013-12-01

    The ability to regulate gene expression in a cell-specific manner is a feature of many broadly expressed signal-dependent transcription factors (SDTFs), including nuclear hormone receptors and transcription factors that are activated by cell surface receptors for extracellular signals. As the most plastic cells of the hematopoietic system, macrophages are responsive to a wide spectrum of regulatory molecules and provide a robust model system for investigation of the basis for cell-specific transcriptional responses at a genome-wide level. Here, focusing on recent studies in macrophages, we review the evidence suggesting a model in which cell-specific actions of SDTFs are the consequence of priming functions of lineage determining transcription factors. We also discuss recent findings relating lineage-determining and SDTF activity to alterations in the epigenetic landscape as well as the production and function of enhancer RNAs. These findings have implications for the understanding of how natural genetic variation impacts cell-specific programs of gene expression and suggest new approaches for altering gene expression in vivo. PMID:24130129

  7. RNA genetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingo, E. (Instituto de Biologia Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Canto Blanco, Madrid (ES)); Holland, J.J. (California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (USA). Dept. of Biology); Ahlquist, P. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (USA). Dept. of Plant Pathology)

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on RNA genetics: Retroviruses, Viroids, and RNA recombination, Volume 2. Topics covered include: Replication of retrovirus genomes, Hepatitis B virus replication, and Evolution of RNA viruses.

  8. Involvement of the cell-specific pigment genes pks and sult in bacterial defense response of sea urchins Strongylocentrotus intermedius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, Konstantin V; Ageenko, Natalya V; Kurilenko, Valeria V

    2013-03-26

    Bacterial infections are one of the most important problems in mass aquaculture, causing the loss of millions of juvenile organisms. We isolated 22 bacterial strains from the cavity fluid of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus pallidus and used phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences to separate the bacterial strains into 9 genera (Aliivibrio, Bizionia, Colwellia, Olleya, Paenibacillus, Photobacterium, Pseudoalteromonas, Shewanella, and Vibrio). Incubating Strongylocentrotus intermedius larvae with a strain from each of the 9 bacterial genera, we investigated the viability of the larvae, the amount of pigment cells, and the level of polyketide synthase (pks) and sulfotransferase (sult) gene expression. Results of the assay on sea urchin development showed that all bacterial strains, except Pseudoalteromonas and Bizionia, suppressed sea urchin development (resulting in retardation of the embryos' development with cellular disorders) and reduced cell viability. We found that pks expression in the sea urchin larvae after incubation with the bacteria of 9 tested genera was significantly increased, while the sult expression was increased only after the treatment with Pseudoalteromonas and Shewanella. Shikimic acid, which is known to activate the biosynthesis of naphthoquinone pigments, increased the tolerance of the sea urchin embryos to the bacteria. In conclusion, we show that the cell-specific pigment genes pks and sult are involved in the bacterial defense response of sea urchins. PMID:23548362

  9. Cell-specific differences in the requirements for translation quality control

    OpenAIRE

    Reynolds, Noah M.; Ling, Jiqiang; Roy, Hervé; Banerjee, Rajat; Repasky, Sarah E.; Hamel, Patrice; Ibba, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Protein synthesis has an overall error rate of approximately 10-4 for each mRNA codon translated. The fidelity of translation is mainly determined by two events: synthesis of cognate amino acid:tRNA pairs by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) and accurate selection of aminoacyl-tRNAs (aa-tRNAs) by the ribosome. To ensure faithful aa-tRNA synthesis, many aaRSs employ a proofreading (“editing”) activity, such as phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetases (PheRS) that hydrolyze mischarged Tyr-tRNAPhe. Eukary...

  10. Cell-specific information processing in segregating populations of Eph receptor ephrin-expressing cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Claus; Sherman, Andrew; Chen, Ginny I; Pasculescu, Adrian; Poliakov, Alexei; Hsiung, Marilyn; Larsen, Brett; Wilkinson, David G; Linding, Rune; Pawson, Tony

    2009-01-01

    Cells have self-organizing properties that control their behavior in complex tissues. Contact between cells expressing either B-type Eph receptors or their transmembrane ephrin ligands initiates bidirectional signals that regulate cell positioning. However, simultaneously investigating how...... information is processed in two interacting cell types remains a challenge. We implemented a proteomic strategy to systematically determine cell-specific signaling networks underlying EphB2- and ephrin-B1-controlled cell sorting. Quantitative mass spectrometric analysis of mixed populations of EphB2- and...... revealed that signaling between mixed EphB2- and ephrin-B1-expressing cells is asymmetric and that the distinct cell types use different tyrosine kinases and targets to process signals induced by cell-cell contact. We provide systems- and cell-specific network models of contact-initiated signaling between...

  11. ACE2 is required for daughter cell-specific G1 delay in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Laabs, Tracy L.; Markwardt, David D.; Slattery, Matthew G.; Newcomb, Laura L.; Stillman, David J.; Heideman, Warren

    2003-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells reproduce by budding to yield a mother cell and a smaller daughter cell. Although both mother and daughter begin G1 simultaneously, the mother cell progresses through G1 more rapidly. Daughter cell G1 delay has long been thought to be due to a requirement for attaining a certain critical cell size before passing the commitment point in the cell cycle known as START. We present an alternative model in which the daughter cell-specific Ace2 ...

  12. Phenotype-based cell-specific metabolic modeling reveals metabolic liabilities of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yizhak, Keren; Gaude, Edoardo; Le Dévédec, Sylvia; Waldman, Yedael Y; Stein, Gideon Y; van de Water, Bob; Frezza, Christian; Ruppin, Eytan

    2014-01-01

    Utilizing molecular data to derive functional physiological models tailored for specific cancer cells can facilitate the use of individually tailored therapies. To this end we present an approach termed PRIME for generating cell-specific genome-scale metabolic models (GSMMs) based on molecular and phenotypic data. We build >280 models of normal and cancer cell-lines that successfully predict metabolic phenotypes in an individual manner. We utilize this set of cell-specific models to predict drug targets that selectively inhibit cancerous but not normal cell proliferation. The top predicted target, MLYCD, is experimentally validated and the metabolic effects of MLYCD depletion investigated. Furthermore, we tested cell-specific predicted responses to the inhibition of metabolic enzymes, and successfully inferred the prognosis of cancer patients based on their PRIME-derived individual GSMMs. These results lay a computational basis and a counterpart experimental proof of concept for future personalized metabolic modeling applications, enhancing the search for novel selective anticancer therapies. PMID:25415239

  13. Integrative characterization of germ cell-specific genes from mouse spermatocyte UniGene library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddy Edward M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The primary regulator of spermatogenesis, a highly ordered and tightly regulated developmental process, is an intrinsic genetic program involving male germ cell-specific genes. Results We analyzed the mouse spermatocyte UniGene library containing 2155 gene-oriented transcript clusters. We predict that 11% of these genes are testis-specific and systematically identified 24 authentic genes specifically and abundantly expressed in the testis via in silico and in vitro approaches. Northern blot analysis disclosed various transcript characteristics, such as expression level, size and the presence of isoform. Expression analysis revealed developmentally regulated and stage-specific expression patterns in all of the genes. We further analyzed the genes at the protein and cellular levels. Transfection assays performed using GC-2 cells provided information on the cellular characteristics of the gene products. In addition, antibodies were generated against proteins encoded by some of the genes to facilitate their identification and characterization in spermatogenic cells and sperm. Our data suggest that a number of the gene products are implicated in transcriptional regulation, nuclear integrity, sperm structure and motility, and fertilization. In particular, we found for the first time that Mm.333010, predicted to contain a trypsin-like serine protease domain, is a sperm acrosomal protein. Conclusion We identify 24 authentic genes with spermatogenic cell-specific expression, and provide comprehensive information about the genes. Our findings establish a new basis for future investigation into molecular mechanisms underlying male reproduction.

  14. Cancer cell specific cytotoxic gene expression mediated by ARF tumor suppressor promoter constructs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • ARF promoter showed higher responsiveness to deregulated E2F activity than the E2F1 promoter. • ARF promoter showed higher cancer cell-specificity than E2F1 promoter to drive gene expression. • HSV-TK driven by ARF promoter showed higher cancer cell-specific cytotoxicity than that driven by E2F1 promoter. - Abstract: In current cancer treatment protocols, such as radiation and chemotherapy, side effects on normal cells are major obstacles to radical therapy. To avoid these side effects, a cancer cell-specific approach is needed. One way to specifically target cancer cells is to utilize a cancer specific promoter to express a cytotoxic gene (suicide gene therapy) or a viral gene required for viral replication (oncolytic virotherapy). For this purpose, the selected promoter should have minimal activity in normal cells to avoid side effects, and high activity in a wide variety of cancers to obtain optimal therapeutic efficacy. In contrast to the AFP, CEA and PSA promoters, which have high activity only in a limited spectrum of tumors, the E2F1 promoter exhibits high activity in wide variety of cancers. This is based on the mechanism of carcinogenesis. Defects in the RB pathway and activation of the transcription factor E2F, the main target of the RB pathway, are observed in almost all cancers. Consequently, the E2F1 promoter, which is mainly regulated by E2F, has high activity in wide variety of cancers. However, E2F is also activated by growth stimulation in normal growing cells, suggesting that the E2F1 promoter may also be highly active in normal growing cells. In contrast, we found that the tumor suppressor ARF promoter is activated by deregulated E2F activity, induced by forced inactivation of pRB, but does not respond to physiological E2F activity induced by growth stimulation. We also found that the deregulated E2F activity, which activates the ARF promoter, is detected only in cancer cell lines. These observations suggest that ARF promoter

  15. Cancer cell specific cytotoxic gene expression mediated by ARF tumor suppressor promoter constructs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurayoshi, Kenta [Department of Bioscience, School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, 2-1 Gakuen, Sanda, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan); Ozono, Eiko [Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary, University of London, John Vane Science Centre, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ (United Kingdom); Iwanaga, Ritsuko; Bradford, Andrew P. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Anschutz Medical Campus, 12800 East 19th Avenue, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Komori, Hideyuki [Center for Stem Cell Biology, Life Sciences Institute, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Ohtani, Kiyoshi, E-mail: btm88939@kwansei.ac.jp [Department of Bioscience, School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, 2-1 Gakuen, Sanda, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • ARF promoter showed higher responsiveness to deregulated E2F activity than the E2F1 promoter. • ARF promoter showed higher cancer cell-specificity than E2F1 promoter to drive gene expression. • HSV-TK driven by ARF promoter showed higher cancer cell-specific cytotoxicity than that driven by E2F1 promoter. - Abstract: In current cancer treatment protocols, such as radiation and chemotherapy, side effects on normal cells are major obstacles to radical therapy. To avoid these side effects, a cancer cell-specific approach is needed. One way to specifically target cancer cells is to utilize a cancer specific promoter to express a cytotoxic gene (suicide gene therapy) or a viral gene required for viral replication (oncolytic virotherapy). For this purpose, the selected promoter should have minimal activity in normal cells to avoid side effects, and high activity in a wide variety of cancers to obtain optimal therapeutic efficacy. In contrast to the AFP, CEA and PSA promoters, which have high activity only in a limited spectrum of tumors, the E2F1 promoter exhibits high activity in wide variety of cancers. This is based on the mechanism of carcinogenesis. Defects in the RB pathway and activation of the transcription factor E2F, the main target of the RB pathway, are observed in almost all cancers. Consequently, the E2F1 promoter, which is mainly regulated by E2F, has high activity in wide variety of cancers. However, E2F is also activated by growth stimulation in normal growing cells, suggesting that the E2F1 promoter may also be highly active in normal growing cells. In contrast, we found that the tumor suppressor ARF promoter is activated by deregulated E2F activity, induced by forced inactivation of pRB, but does not respond to physiological E2F activity induced by growth stimulation. We also found that the deregulated E2F activity, which activates the ARF promoter, is detected only in cancer cell lines. These observations suggest that ARF promoter

  16. Cell-specific differences in the requirements for translation quality control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reynolds, Noah M; Ling, Jiqiang; Roy, Hervé;

    2010-01-01

    Protein synthesis has an overall error rate of approximately 10(-4) for each mRNA codon translated. The fidelity of translation is mainly determined by two events: synthesis of cognate amino acid:tRNA pairs by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) and accurate selection of aminoacyl-tRNAs (aa-tRNAs)...... reveal unexpectedly divergent requirements for quality control in different cell compartments and suggest that the limits of translational accuracy may be largely determined by cellular physiology....

  17. Cancer cell specific cytotoxic gene expression mediated by ARF tumor suppressor promoter constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurayoshi, Kenta; Ozono, Eiko; Iwanaga, Ritsuko; Bradford, Andrew P; Komori, Hideyuki; Ohtani, Kiyoshi

    2014-07-18

    In current cancer treatment protocols, such as radiation and chemotherapy, side effects on normal cells are major obstacles to radical therapy. To avoid these side effects, a cancer cell-specific approach is needed. One way to specifically target cancer cells is to utilize a cancer specific promoter to express a cytotoxic gene (suicide gene therapy) or a viral gene required for viral replication (oncolytic virotherapy). For this purpose, the selected promoter should have minimal activity in normal cells to avoid side effects, and high activity in a wide variety of cancers to obtain optimal therapeutic efficacy. In contrast to the AFP, CEA and PSA promoters, which have high activity only in a limited spectrum of tumors, the E2F1 promoter exhibits high activity in wide variety of cancers. This is based on the mechanism of carcinogenesis. Defects in the RB pathway and activation of the transcription factor E2F, the main target of the RB pathway, are observed in almost all cancers. Consequently, the E2F1 promoter, which is mainly regulated by E2F, has high activity in wide variety of cancers. However, E2F is also activated by growth stimulation in normal growing cells, suggesting that the E2F1 promoter may also be highly active in normal growing cells. In contrast, we found that the tumor suppressor ARF promoter is activated by deregulated E2F activity, induced by forced inactivation of pRB, but does not respond to physiological E2F activity induced by growth stimulation. We also found that the deregulated E2F activity, which activates the ARF promoter, is detected only in cancer cell lines. These observations suggest that ARF promoter is activated by E2F only in cancer cells and therefore may be more cancer cell-specific than E2F1 promoter to drive gene expression. We show here that the ARF promoter has lower activity in normal growing fibroblasts and shows higher cancer cell-specificity compared to the E2F1 promoter. We also demonstrate that adenovirus expressing HSV

  18. Irreversibility of T-Cell Specification: Insights from Computational Modelling of a Minimal Network Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manesso, Erica; Kueh, Hao Yuan; Freedman, George; Rothenberg, Ellen V.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives A cascade of gene activations under the control of Notch signalling is required during T-cell specification, when T-cell precursors gradually lose the potential to undertake other fates and become fully committed to the T-cell lineage. We elucidate how the gene/protein dynamics for a core transcriptional module governs this important process by computational means. Methods We first assembled existing knowledge about transcription factors known to be important for T-cell specification to form a minimal core module consisting of TCF-1, GATA-3, BCL11B, and PU.1 aiming at dynamical modeling. Model architecture was based on published experimental measurements of the effects on each factor when each of the others is perturbed. While several studies provided gene expression measurements at different stages of T-cell development, pure time series are not available, thus precluding a straightforward study of the dynamical interactions among these genes. We therefore translate stage dependent data into time series. A feed-forward motif with multiple positive feed-backs can account for the observed delay between BCL11B versus TCF-1 and GATA-3 activation by Notch signalling. With a novel computational approach, all 32 possible interactions among Notch signalling, TCF-1, and GATA-3 are explored by translating combinatorial logic expressions into differential equations for BCL11B production rate. Results Our analysis reveals that only 3 of 32 possible configurations, where GATA-3 works as a dimer, are able to explain not only the time delay, but very importantly, also give rise to irreversibility. The winning models explain the data within the 95% confidence region and are consistent with regard to decay rates. Conclusions This first generation model for early T-cell specification has relatively few players. Yet it explains the gradual transition into a committed state with no return. Encoding logics in a rate equation setting allows determination of

  19. Hypoxia- and radiation-inducible, breast cell-specific targeting of retroviral vectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To facilitate a more efficient radiation and chemotherapy of mammary tumours, synthetic enhancer elements responsive to hypoxia and ionizing radiation were coupled to the mammary-specific minimal promoter of the murine whey acidic protein (WAP) encoding gene. The modified WAP promoter was introduced into a retroviral promoter conversion (ProCon) vector. Expression of a transduced reporter gene in response to hypoxia and radiation was analysed in stably infected mammary cancer cell lines and an up to 9-fold increase in gene expression demonstrated in comparison to the respective basic vector. Expression analyses in vitro, moreover, demonstrated a widely preserved mammary cell-specific promoter activity. For in vivo analyses, xenograft tumours consisting of infected human mammary adenocarcinoma cells were established in SCID/beige mice. Immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated a hypoxia-specific, markedly increased WAP promoter-driven expression in these tumours. Thus, this retroviral vector will facilitate a targeted gene therapeutic approach exploiting the unique environmental condition in solid tumours

  20. Germ Cell-Specific Excision of loxP-Flanked Transgenes in Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Naoto; Kume, Sachi; Hattori-Ihara, Shoko; Sadaie, Sakiko; Hayashi, Makoto; Yoshizaki, Goro

    2016-04-01

    Cre/loxP-mediated DNA excision in germ cell lineages could contribute substantially to the study of germ cell biology in salmonids, which are emerging as a model species in this field. However, a cell type-specific Cre/loxPsystem has not been successfully developed for any salmonid species. Therefore, we examined the feasibility of Cre/loxP-mediated, germ cell-specific gene excision and transgene activation in rainbow trout. Double-transgenic (wTg) progeny were obtained by mating a transgenic male carryingcrewith a transgenic female carrying thehsc-LRLGgene;crewas driven by rainbow troutvasaregulatory regions and thehsc-LRLGgene was made up of the rainbow troutheat-shock-cognate71promoter, theDsRedgene flanked by twoloxPsites, and theEgfpgene. PCR analysis, fluorescence imaging, and histological analysis revealed that excision of theloxP-flanked sequence and activation ofEgfpoccurred only in germ cells of wTg fish. However, progeny tests revealed that the excision efficiency ofloxP-flanked sequence in germ cells was low (≤3.27%). In contrast, the other wTg fish derived from two differentcre-transgenic males frequently excised theloxP-flanked sequence in germ cells (≤89.25%). Thus, we showed for the first time successful germ cell-specific transgene manipulation via the Cre/loxPsystem in rainbow trout. We anticipate that this technology will be suitable for studies of cell function through cell targeting, cell-linage tracing, and generating cell type-specific conditional gene knockouts and separately for developing sterile rainbow trout in aquaculture. PMID:26911430

  1. Foxi3 Deficiency Compromises Hair Follicle Stem Cell Specification and Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirokova, Vera; Biggs, Leah C; Jussila, Maria; Ohyama, Takahiro; Groves, Andrew K; Mikkola, Marja L

    2016-07-01

    The hair follicle is an ideal system to study stem cell specification and homeostasis due to its well characterized morphogenesis and stereotypic cycles of stem cell activation upon each hair cycle to produce a new hair shaft. The adult hair follicle stem cell niche consists of two distinct populations, the bulge and the more activation-prone secondary hair germ (HG). Hair follicle stem cells are set aside during early stages of morphogenesis. This process is known to depend on the Sox9 transcription factor, but otherwise the establishment of the hair follicle stem cell niche is poorly understood. Here, we show that that mutation of Foxi3, a Forkhead family transcription factor mutated in several hairless dog breeds, compromises stem cell specification. Further, loss of Foxi3 impedes hair follicle downgrowth and progression of the hair cycle. Genome-wide profiling revealed a number of downstream effectors of Foxi3 including transcription factors with a recognized function in hair follicle stem cells such as Lhx2, Runx1, and Nfatc1, suggesting that the Foxi3 mutant phenotype results from simultaneous downregulation of several stem cell signature genes. We show that Foxi3 displays a highly dynamic expression pattern during hair morphogenesis and cycling, and identify Foxi3 as a novel secondary HG marker. Absence of Foxi3 results in poor hair regeneration upon hair plucking, and a sparse fur phenotype in unperturbed mice that exacerbates with age, caused by impaired secondary HG activation leading to progressive depletion of stem cells. Thus, Foxi3 regulates multiple aspects of hair follicle development and homeostasis. Stem Cells 2016;34:1896-1908. PMID:26992132

  2. Deregulated sex chromosome gene expression with male germ cell-specific loss of Dicer1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne R Greenlee

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of endogenous, non-coding RNAs that mediate post-transcriptional gene silencing by inhibiting mRNA translation and promoting mRNA decay. DICER1, an RNase III endonuclease encoded by Dicer1, is required for processing short 21-22 nucleotide miRNAs from longer double-stranded RNA precursors. Here, we investigate the loss of Dicer1 in mouse postnatal male germ cells to determine how disruptions in the miRNA biogenesis pathway may contribute to infertility. Reduced levels of Dicer1 transcripts and DICER1 were confirmed in germ cell knock-out (GCKO testes by postnatal day 18 (P18. Compared to wild-type (WT at 8 weeks, GCKO males had no change in body weight; yet showed significant reductions in testis mass and sperm number. Histology and fertility tests confirmed spermatogenic failure in GCKO males. Array analyses at P18 showed that in comparison to WT testes, 75% of miRNA genes and 37% of protein coding genes were differentially expressed in GCKO testes. Among these, 96% of miRNA genes were significantly down-regulated, while 4% miRNA genes were overexpressed. Interestingly, we observed preferential overexpression of genes encoded on the sex chromosomes in GCKO testes, including more than 80% of previously identified targets of meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI. Compared to WT, GCKO mice showed higher percentages of germ cells at early meiotic stages (leptotene and zygotene but lower percentages at later stages (pachytene, diplotene and metaphase I providing evidence that deletion of Dicer1 leads to disruptions in meiotic progression. Therefore, deleting Dicer1 in early postnatal germ cells resulted in deregulation of transcripts encoded by genes on the sex chromosomes, impaired meiotic progression and led to spermatogenic failure and infertility.

  3. Diverse cell-specific expression of myoglobin isoforms in brain, kidney, gill and liver of the hypoxia-tolerant carp and zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossins, Andrew R; Williams, Daryl R; Foulkes, Nick S; Berenbrink, Michael; Kipar, Anja

    2009-03-01

    Myoglobin (Mb) is famous as a muscle-specific protein--yet the common carp expresses the gene (cMb1) encoding this protein in a range of non-muscle tissues and also expresses a novel isoform (cMb2) in the brain. Using a homologous antibody and riboprobes, we have established the relative amounts and cellular sites of non-muscle Mb expression in different tissues. The amounts of carp myoglobin (cMb) in supernatants of different tissues were just 0.4-0.7% relative to that of heart supernatants and were upregulated by two-to-four fold in liver, gill and brain following 5 days of hypoxic treatment. Brain exhibited both cMb proteins in western analysis, whereas all other tissues had only cMb1. We have also identified cells expressing cMb protein and cMb mRNA using immunohistology and RNA in situ hybridisation (RNA-ISH), respectively. Mb was strongly expressed throughout all cardiac myocytes and a subset of skeletal muscle fibres, whereas it was restricted to a small range of specific cell types in each of the non-muscle tissues. These include pillar and epithelial cells in secondary gill lamellae, hepatocytes, some neurones, and tubular epithelial cells in the kidney. Capillaries and small blood vessels in all tissues exhibited Mb expression within vascular endothelial cells. The cMb2 riboprobe located expression to a subset of neurones but not to endothelial cells. In zebrafish, which possesses only one Mb gene, a similar expression pattern of Mb protein and mRNA was observed. This establishes a surprisingly cell-specific distribution of Mb within non-muscle tissues in both carp and zebrafish, where it probably plays an important role in the regulation of microvascular, renal and brain function. PMID:19218513

  4. Cell-specific DNA methylation patterns of retina-specific genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannath L Merbs

    Full Text Available Many studies have demonstrated that epigenetic mechanisms are important in the regulation of gene expression during embryogenesis, gametogenesis, and other forms of tissue-specific gene regulation. We sought to explore the possible role of epigenetics, specifically DNA methylation, in the establishment and maintenance of cell type-restricted gene expression in the retina. To assess the relationship between DNA methylation status and expression level of retinal genes, bisulfite sequence analysis of the 1000 bp region around the transcription start sites (TSS of representative rod and cone photoreceptor-specific genes and gene expression analysis were performed in the WERI and Y79 human retinoblastoma cell lines. Next, the homologous genes in mouse were bisulfite sequenced in the retina and in non-expressing tissues. Finally, bisulfite sequencing was performed on isolated photoreceptor and non-photoreceptor retinal cells isolated by laser capture microdissection. Differential methylation of rhodopsin (RHO, retinal binding protein 3 (RBP3, IRBP cone opsin, short-wave-sensitive (OPN1SW, cone opsin, middle-wave-sensitive (OPN1MW, and cone opsin, long-wave-sensitive (OPN1LW was found in the retinoblastoma cell lines that inversely correlated with gene expression levels. Similarly, we found tissue-specific hypomethylation of the promoter region of Rho and Rbp3 in mouse retina as compared to non-expressing tissues, and also observed hypomethylation of retinal-expressed microRNAs. The Rho and Rbp3 promoter regions were unmethylated in expressing photoreceptor cells and methylated in non-expressing, non-photoreceptor cells from the inner nuclear layer. A third regional hypomethylation pattern of photoreceptor-specific genes was seen in a subpopulation of non-expressing photoreceptors (Rho in cones from the Nrl -/- mouse and Opn1sw in rods. These results demonstrate that a number of photoreceptor-specific genes have cell-specific differential DNA

  5. Protein carbonylation after traumatic brain injury: cell specificity, regional susceptibility, and gender differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Rachel C; Buonora, John E; Jacobowitz, David M; Mueller, Gregory P

    2015-01-01

    Protein carbonylation is a well-documented and quantifiable consequence of oxidative stress in several neuropathologies, including multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer׳s disease, and Parkinson׳s disease. Although oxidative stress is a hallmark of traumatic brain injury (TBI), little work has explored the specific neural regions and cell types in which protein carbonylation occurs. Furthermore, the effect of gender on protein carbonylation after TBI has not been studied. The present investigation was designed to determine the regional and cell specificity of TBI-induced protein carbonylation and how this response to injury is affected by gender. Immunohistochemistry was used to visualize protein carbonylation in the brains of adult male and female Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to controlled cortical impact (CCI) as an injury model of TBI. Cell-specific markers were used to colocalize the presence of carbonylated proteins in specific cell types, including astrocytes, neurons, microglia, and oligodendrocytes. Results also indicated that the injury lesion site, ventral portion of the dorsal third ventricle, and ventricular lining above the median eminence showed dramatic increases in protein carbonylation after injury. Specifically, astrocytes and limited regions of ependymal cells adjacent to the dorsal third ventricle and the median eminence were most susceptible to postinjury protein carbonylation. However, these patterns of differential susceptibility to protein carbonylation were gender dependent, with males showing significantly greater protein carbonylation at sites distant from the lesion. Proteomic analyses were also conducted and determined that the proteins most affected by carbonylation in response to TBI include glial fibrillary acidic protein, dihydropyrimidase-related protein 2, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase C, and fructose-bisphosphate aldolase A. Many other proteins, however, were not carbonylated by CCI. These findings indicate that there is both regional

  6. An innovative pre-targeting strategy for tumor cell specific imaging and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Si-Yong; Peng, Meng-Yun; Rong, Lei; Jia, Hui-Zhen; Chen, Si; Cheng, Si-Xue; Feng, Jun; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2015-08-01

    A programmed pre-targeting system for tumor cell imaging and targeting therapy was established based on the ``biotin-avidin'' interaction. In this programmed functional system, transferrin-biotin can be actively captured by tumor cells with the overexpression of transferrin receptors, thus achieving the pre-targeting modality. Depending upon avidin-biotin recognition, the attachment of multivalent FITC-avidin to biotinylated tumor cells not only offered the rapid fluorescence labelling, but also endowed the pre-targeted cells with targeting sites for the specifically designed biotinylated peptide nano-drug. Owing to the successful pre-targeting, tumorous HepG2 and HeLa cells were effectively distinguished from the normal 3T3 cells via fluorescence imaging. In addition, the self-assembled peptide nano-drug resulted in enhanced cell apoptosis in the observed HepG2 cells. The tumor cell specific pre-targeting strategy is applicable for a variety of different imaging and therapeutic agents for tumor treatments.A programmed pre-targeting system for tumor cell imaging and targeting therapy was established based on the ``biotin-avidin'' interaction. In this programmed functional system, transferrin-biotin can be actively captured by tumor cells with the overexpression of transferrin receptors, thus achieving the pre-targeting modality. Depending upon avidin-biotin recognition, the attachment of multivalent FITC-avidin to biotinylated tumor cells not only offered the rapid fluorescence labelling, but also endowed the pre-targeted cells with targeting sites for the specifically designed biotinylated peptide nano-drug. Owing to the successful pre-targeting, tumorous HepG2 and HeLa cells were effectively distinguished from the normal 3T3 cells via fluorescence imaging. In addition, the self-assembled peptide nano-drug resulted in enhanced cell apoptosis in the observed HepG2 cells. The tumor cell specific pre-targeting strategy is applicable for a variety of different imaging

  7. The role of microRNA in tumor and ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MicroRNA (miRNA) are noncoding RNA of 21∼25 nucleotides that act as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, it plays a multiple role in the regulation of cell growth and development. miRNA mutation or ectopia expression is associated with a variety of tumor. Ionizing radiation which has a carcinogenic or tumor suppressive effect induces changes in miRNA, miRNA expression changes induced by radiation are also cell-specific and gender-specific. (authors)

  8. MEF2C and EBF1 Co-regulate B Cell-Specific Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Nikki R; Davis, Matthew; Chai, Li; Winoto, Astar; Tjian, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells are capable of self-renewal or differentiation along three main lineages: myeloid, erythroid, and lymphoid. One of the earliest lineage decisions for blood progenitor cells is whether to adopt the lymphoid or myeloid fate. Previous work had shown that myocyte enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) is indispensable for the lymphoid fate decision, yet the specific mechanism of action remained unclear. Here, we have identified early B cell factor-1 (EBF1) as a co-regulator of gene expression with MEF2C. A genome-wide survey of MEF2C and EBF1 binding sites identified a subset of B cell-specific genes that they target. We also determined that the p38 MAPK pathway activates MEF2C to drive B cell differentiation. Mef2c knockout mice showed reduced B lymphoid-specific gene expression as well as increased myeloid gene expression, consistent with MEF2C's role as a lineage fate regulator. This is further supported by interaction between MEF2C and the histone deacetylase, HDAC7, revealing a likely mechanism to repress the myeloid transcription program. This study thus elucidates both activation and repression mechanisms, identifies regulatory partners, and downstream targets by which MEF2C regulates lymphoid-specific differentiation. PMID:26900922

  9. Selection of apoptotic cell specific human antibodies from adult bone marrow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Grönwall

    Full Text Available Autoreactive antibodies that recognize neo-determinants on apoptotic cells in mice have been proposed to have protective, homeostatic and immunoregulatory properties, although our knowledge about the equivalent antibodies in humans has been much more limited. In the current study, human monoclonal antibodies with binding specificity for apoptotic cells were isolated from the bone marrow of healthy adults using phage display technology. These antibodies were shown to recognize phosphorylcholine (PC-associated neo-determinants. Interestingly, three of the four identified apoptotic cell-specific antibody clones were encoded by VH3 region rearrangements with germline or nearly germline configuration without evidence of somatic hypermutation. Importantly, the different identified antibody clones had diverse heavy chain CDR3 and deduced binding surfaces as suggested by structure modeling. This may suggest a potentially great heterogeneity in human antibodies recognizing PC-related epitopes on apoptotic cells. To re-construct the postulated structural format of the parental anti-PC antibody, the dominant clone was also expressed as a recombinant human polymeric IgM, which revealed a substantially increased binding reactivity, with dose-dependent and antigen-inhibitable binding of apoptotic cells. Our findings may have implication for improved prognostic testing and therapeutic interventions in human inflammatory disease.

  10. Editing T cell specificity towards leukemia by zinc-finger nucleases and lentiviral gene transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Angelo; Magnani, Zulma; Liu, Pei-Qi; Reik, Andreas; Chu, Victoria; Paschon, David E.; Zhang, Lei; Kuball, Jurgen; Camisa, Barbara; Bondanza, Attilio; Casorati, Giulia; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Ciceri, Fabio; Bordignon, Claudio; Greenberg, Philip D.; Holmes, Michael C.; Gregory, Philip D.; Naldini, Luigi; Bonini, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    The transfer of high-avidity T-cell receptor (TCR) genes isolated from rare tumor-specific lymphocytes into polyclonal T cells is an attractive cancer immunotherapy strategy. However, TCR gene transfer results in competition for surface expression and inappropriate pairing between the exogenous and endogenous TCR chains, resulting in suboptimal activity and potentially harmful unpredicted specificities. We designed zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) promoting the disruption of endogenous TCR β and α chain genes. ZFN-treated lymphocytes lacked CD3/TCR surface expression and expanded with IL-7 and IL-15. Upon lentiviral transfer of a TCR for the WT1 tumor antigen, these TCR-edited cells expressed the new TCR at high levels, were easily expanded to near-purity, and proved superior in specific antigen recognition to matched TCR-transferred cells. In contrast to TCR-transferred cells, TCR edited lymphocytes did not mediate off-target reactivity while maintaining anti-tumor activity in vivo, thus demonstrating that complete editing of T-cell specificity generate tumor-specific lymphocytes with improved biosafety profile. PMID:22466705

  11. Molecular Cloning and Functional Analysis of ESGP, an Embryonic Stem Cell and Germ Cell Specific Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Mei CHEN; Zhong-Wei DU; Zhen YAO

    2005-01-01

    Several putative Oct-4 downstream genes from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells have been identified using the suppression-subtractive hybridization method. In this study, one of the novel genes encoding an ES cell and germ cell specific protein (ESGP) was cloned by rapid amplification of cDNA ends.ESGP contains 801 bp encoding an 84 amino acid small protein and has no significant homology to any known genes. There is a signal peptide at the N-terminal of ESGP protein as predicted by SeqWeb (GCG)(SeqWeb version 2.0.2, http://gcg.biosino.org:8080/). The result of immunofluorescence assay suggested that ESGP might encode a secretory protein. The expression pattern of ESGP is consistent with the expression of Oct-4 during embryonic development. ESGP protein was detected in fertilized oocyte, from 3.5 day postcoital (dpc) blastocyst to 17.5 dpc embryo, and was only detected in testis and ovary tissues in adult. In vitro, ESGP was only expressed in pluripotent cell lines, such as embryonic stem cells, embryonic carcinoma cells and embryonic germ cells, but not in their differentiated progenies. Despite its specific expression,forced expression of ESGP is not indispensable for the effect of Oct-4 on ES cell self-renewal, and does not affect the differentiation to three germ layers.

  12. Sleeping Beauty system to redirect T-cell specificity for human applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Sourindra; Huls, Helen; Singh, Harjeet; Dawson, Margaret; Figliola, Matthew; Olivares, Simon; Rao, Pullavathi; Jue, Yi; Multani, Asha; Yang, Ge; Zhang, Ling; Kellar, Denise; Ang, Sonny; Torikai, Hiroki; Rabinovich, Brian; Lee, Dean A.; Kebriaei, Partow; Hackett, Perry; Champlin, Richard E.; Cooper, Laurence J.N.

    2013-01-01

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon/transposase DNA plasmid system is used to genetically modify cells for long-term transgene expression. We adapted the SB system for human application and generated T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) specific for CD19. Electro-transfer of CD19-specific SB DNA plasmids in PBMC and propagation on CD19+ artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) was used to numerically expand CD3+ T cells expressing CAR. By Day 28 of co-culture >90% of expanded CD3+ T cells expressed CAR. CAR+ T cells specifically killed CD19+ target cells and consisted of subsets expressing biomarkers consistent with central memory, ieffector memory, and effector phenotypes. CAR+ T cells contracted numerically in the absence of CD19 antigen, did not express SB11 transposase, and maintained a polyclonal TCRVα and TCRVβ repertoire. Quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization (Q-FISH) revealed that CAR+ T cells preserved telomere length. Quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) and FISH showed CAR transposon integrated on average once per T-cell genome. CAR+ T cells in peripheral blood can be detected by Q-PCR at a sensitivity of 0.01%. These findings lay the groundwork as the basis of our first-in-human clinical trials of the non-viral SB system for the investigational treatment of CD19+ B-cell malignancies (currently under three INDs #: 14193, 14577, and 14739). PMID:23377665

  13. A transgenic mouse model of neuroepithelial cell specific inducible overexpression of dopamine D1-receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, K; Araki, K; McCarthy, D M; Sims, J R; Ren, J Q; Zhang, X; Bhide, P G

    2010-10-27

    Dopamine and its receptors appear in the brain during early embryonic period suggesting a role for dopamine in brain development. In fact, dopamine receptor imbalance resulting from impaired physiological balance between D1- and D2-receptor activities can perturb brain development and lead to persisting changes in brain structure and function. Dopamine receptor imbalance can be produced experimentally using pharmacological or genetic methods. Pharmacological methods tend to activate or antagonize the receptors in all cell types. In the traditional gene knockout models the receptor imbalance occurs during development and also at maturity. Therefore, assaying the effects of dopamine imbalance on specific cell types (e.g. precursor versus postmitotic cells) or at specific periods of brain development (e.g. pre- or postnatal periods) is not feasible in these models. We describe a novel transgenic mouse model based on the tetracycline dependent inducible gene expression system in which dopamine D1-receptor transgene expression is induced selectively in neuroepithelial cells of the embryonic brain at experimenter-chosen intervals of brain development. In this model, doxycycline-induced expression of the transgene causes significant overexpression of the D1-receptor and significant reductions in the incorporation of the S-phase marker bromodeoxyuridine into neuroepithelial cells of the basal and dorsal telencephalon indicating marked effects on telencephalic neurogenesis. The D1-receptor overexpression occurs at higher levels in the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) than the lateral ganglionic eminence (LGE) or cerebral wall (CW). Moreover, although the transgene is induced selectively in the neuroepithelium, D1-receptor protein overexpression appears to persist in postmitotic cells. The mouse model can be modified for neuroepithelial cell-specific inducible expression of other transgenes or induction of the D1-receptor transgene in other cells in specific brain regions by

  14. PEGylated and targeted extracellular vesicles display enhanced cell specificity and circulation time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooijmans, S A A; Fliervoet, L A L; van der Meel, R; Fens, M H A M; Heijnen, H F G; van Bergen En Henegouwen, P M P; Vader, P; Schiffelers, R M

    2016-02-28

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are increasingly being recognized as candidate drug delivery systems due to their ability to functionally transfer biological cargo between cells. However, the therapeutic applicability of EVs may be limited due to a lack of cell-targeting specificity and rapid clearance of exogenous EVs from the circulation. In order to improve EV characteristics for drug delivery to tumor cells, we have developed a novel method for decorating EVs with targeting ligands conjugated to polyethylene glycol (PEG). Nanobodies specific for the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) were conjugated to phospholipid (DMPE)-PEG derivatives to prepare nanobody-PEG-micelles. When micelles were mixed with EVs derived from Neuro2A cells or platelets, a temperature-dependent transfer of nanobody-PEG-lipids to the EV membranes was observed, indicative of a 'post-insertion' mechanism. This process did not affect EV morphology, size distribution, or protein composition. After introduction of PEG-conjugated control nanobodies to EVs, cellular binding was compromised due to the shielding properties of PEG. However, specific binding to EGFR-overexpressing tumor cells was dramatically increased when EGFR-specific nanobodies were employed. Moreover, whereas unmodified EVs were rapidly cleared from the circulation within 10min after intravenous injection in mice, EVs modified with nanobody-PEG-lipids were still detectable in plasma for longer than 60min post-injection. In conclusion, we propose post-insertion as a novel technique to confer targeting capacity to isolated EVs, circumventing the requirement to modify EV-secreting cells. Importantly, insertion of ligand-conjugated PEG-derivatized phospholipids in EV membranes equips EVs with improved cell specificity and prolonged circulation times, potentially increasing EV accumulation in targeted tissues and improving cargo delivery. PMID:26773767

  15. PCPP-260, PURKINJE CELL-SPECIFIC CYCLE AMP-REGULATED MEMBRANE PHOSPHOPROTEIN OF (M SUB R) 260,000

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study reports the existence of Purkinje cell-specific phosphoprotein, Mr260,000 (PCPP-260), a neuronal membrance phosphoprotein, in cerebellar Purkinje cells. PCPP-260, which on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis has an apparaent molecular mass ...

  16. Delineation of glutamate pathways and secretory responses in pancreatic islets with β-cell-specific abrogation of the glutamate dehydrogenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vetterli, Laurène; Carobbio, Stefania; Pournourmohammadi, Shirin; Martin-Del-Rio, Rafael; Skytt, Dorte M; Waagepetersen, Helle S.; Tamarit-Rodriguez, Jorge; Maechler, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    In pancreatic β-cells, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) modulates insulin secretion, although its function regarding specific secretagogues is unclear. This study investigated the role of GDH using a β-cell-specific GDH knockout mouse model, called βGlud1(-/-). The absence of GDH in islets isolated ...

  17. GATA-3 promotes T-cell specification by repressing B-cell potential in pro-T cells in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.E. García (Marcos); R.G.J. Klein Wolterink (Roel); F. Lemâitre (Fabrice); C. Le Goff (Carine); M. Hasan (Milena); R.W. Hendriks (Rudi); A. Cumano (Ana); J.P. di Santo (James)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractTranscription factors orchestrate T-lineage differentiation in the thymus. One critical checkpoint involves Notch1 signaling that instructs T-cell commitment at the expense of the B-lineage program. While GATA-3 is required for T-cell specification, its mechanism of action is poorly unde

  18. CHD7 targets active gene enhancer elements to modulate ES cell-specific gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Schnetz

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available CHD7 is one of nine members of the chromodomain helicase DNA-binding domain family of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes found in mammalian cells. De novo mutation of CHD7 is a major cause of CHARGE syndrome, a genetic condition characterized by multiple congenital anomalies. To gain insights to the function of CHD7, we used the technique of chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by massively parallel DNA sequencing (ChIP-Seq to map CHD7 sites in mouse ES cells. We identified 10,483 sites on chromatin bound by CHD7 at high confidence. Most of the CHD7 sites show features of gene enhancer elements. Specifically, CHD7 sites are predominantly located distal to transcription start sites, contain high levels of H3K4 mono-methylation, found within open chromatin that is hypersensitive to DNase I digestion, and correlate with ES cell-specific gene expression. Moreover, CHD7 co-localizes with P300, a known enhancer-binding protein and strong predictor of enhancer activity. Correlations with 18 other factors mapped by ChIP-seq in mouse ES cells indicate that CHD7 also co-localizes with ES cell master regulators OCT4, SOX2, and NANOG. Correlations between CHD7 sites and global gene expression profiles obtained from Chd7(+/+, Chd7(+/-, and Chd7(-/- ES cells indicate that CHD7 functions at enhancers as a transcriptional rheostat to modulate, or fine-tune the expression levels of ES-specific genes. CHD7 can modulate genes in either the positive or negative direction, although negative regulation appears to be the more direct effect of CHD7 binding. These data indicate that enhancer-binding proteins can limit gene expression and are not necessarily co-activators. Although ES cells are not likely to be affected in CHARGE syndrome, we propose that enhancer-mediated gene dysregulation contributes to disease pathogenesis and that the critical CHD7 target genes may be subject to positive or negative regulation.

  19. RNA oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L. K.; Cejvanovic, V.; Henriken, T.;

    2015-01-01

    .9 significant hazard ratio for death compared with the quartile with the lowest 8oxoGuo excretion when adjusted for age, sex, BMI, smoker status, s-HbA1c, urine protein excretion and s-cholesterol. We conclude that it is now established that RNA oxidation is an independent risk factor for death in type 2...

  20. Cloning and chromosomal assignment of a human cDNA encoding a T cell- and natural killer cell-specific trypsin-like serine protease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cDNA clone encoding a human T cell- and natural killer cell-specific serine protease was obtained by screening a phage λgt10 cDNA library from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes with the mouse Hanukah factor cDNA clone. In an RNA blot-hybridization analysis, this human Hanukah factor cDNA hybridized with a 1.3-kilobase band in allogeneic-stimulated cytotoxic T cells and the Jurkat cell line, but this transcript was not detectable in normal muscle, liver, tonsil, or thymus. By dot-blot hybridization, this cDNA hybridized with RNA from three cytolytic T-cell clones and three noncytolytic T-cell clones grown in vitro as well as with purified CD16+ natural killer cells and CD3+, CD16- T-cell large granular lymphocytes from peripheral blood lymphocytes (CD = cluster designation). The nucleotide sequence of this cDNA clone encodes a predicted serine protease of 262 amino acids. The active enzyme is 71% and 77% similar to the mouse sequence at the amino acid and DNA level, respectively. The human and mouse sequences conserve the active site residues of serine proteases--the trypsin-specific Asp-189 and all 10 cysteine residues. The gene for the human Hanukah factor serine protease is located on human chromosome 5. The authors propose that this trypsin-like serine protease may function as a common component necessary for lysis of target cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells

  1. Evaluation of the T helper 17 cell specific genes and the innate lymphoid cells counts in the peripheral blood of patients with the common variable immunodeficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazdak Ganjalikhani-Hakemi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID is characterized by a deficiency in the immune system with a heterogeneous collection of disorders resulting in antibody deficiency and recurrent infections. T helper 17 (Th17 cells promote B-cell survival and synergize with the B-cell activating factor to induce their differentiation into the plasma cells. A sub-population of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs also produces interleukin 17 (IL-17. This study aimed to measure the Th17 specific genes and ILCs counts in the CVID patients in comparison with control subjects. Materials and Methods: Total messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA was extracted from the whole blood samples of 10 CVID patients and 10 healthy individuals. IL-17, retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor C2 (RORC2, IL-23R, and IL-9 gene expression were measured using the quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Count of lineage negative/CD127 + /CD90 + ILCs in the blood samples was performed by the flow cytometry method. Results: The transcript levels of IL-17 and RORC2 in CVID patients was strongly lower than control subjects (P = 0.049 and P = 0.046, respectively, but slight reduction in the IL-23R expression (P = 0.252 have seen in the CVID patients. Accordingly, the number of ILCs decreased significantly (P = 0.04. Interestingly, IL-9 mRNA level was more significantly in the CVID patients (P = 0.001. Conclusion: The results presented in this study show that the Th17 cell specific genes expression (as the determiner Th17 cells and ILCs (another lymphoid source of IL-17 are decreased in patients with CVID and this could be an explanation for the defect of their humoral immune response. In addition, elevation of the IL-9 gene expression may shed a new light into the way toward the understanding of the mechanism of autoimmunity in the CVID patients.

  2. Altered gp130 signalling ameliorates experimental colitis via myeloid cell-specific STAT3 activation and myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Däbritz, Jan; Judd, Louise M; Chalinor, Heather V; Menheniott, Trevelyan R; Giraud, Andrew S

    2016-01-01

    STAT3 regulates the expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) during inflammation, infection and cancer. Hyperactivation of STAT3 in gp130(757F/F) mice is associated with protection from experimental colitis. This study determined mechanisms for this protection and compared this to mice with myeloid-specific STAT3-deficiency (LysMcre/STAT3(flox); gp130(757F/F) LysMcre/STAT3(flox)). Acute and chronic colitis was induced and colons were removed for histological, mRNA and protein analysis. Cell populations from spleen, mesenteric lymph node and colon were analyzed for different myeloid cell populations using flow cytometry. Functions of MDSCs and LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophages were further characterized by in vitro and in vivo assays. Here we show that the resistance to experimental colitis in gp130(757F/F) mice is via myeloid-cell specific STAT3 activation, MDSC expansion and increased production of suppressive and protective cytokines. PMID:26848037

  3. T cell-specific inactivation of mouse CD2 by CRISPR/Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beil-Wagner, Jane; Dössinger, Georg; Schober, Kilian; vom Berg, Johannes; Tresch, Achim; Grandl, Martina; Palle, Pushpalatha; Mair, Florian; Gerhard, Markus; Becher, Burkhard; Busch, Dirk H; Buch, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system can be used to mutate target sequences by introduction of double-strand breaks followed by imprecise repair. To test its use for conditional gene editing we generated mice transgenic for CD4 promoter-driven Cas9 combined with guide RNA targeting CD2. We found that within CD4(+) and CD8(+) lymphocytes from lymph nodes and spleen 1% and 0.6% were not expressing CD2, respectively. T cells lacking CD2 carryied mutations, which confirmed that Cas9 driven by cell-type specific promoters can edit genes in the mouse and may thus allow targeted studies of gene function in vivo. PMID:26903281

  4. T cell-specific inactivation of mouse CD2 by CRISPR/Cas9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beil-Wagner, Jane; Dössinger, Georg; Schober, Kilian; vom Berg, Johannes; Tresch, Achim; Grandl, Martina; Palle, Pushpalatha; Mair, Florian; Gerhard, Markus; Becher, Burkhard; Busch, Dirk H.; Buch, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system can be used to mutate target sequences by introduction of double-strand breaks followed by imprecise repair. To test its use for conditional gene editing we generated mice transgenic for CD4 promoter-driven Cas9 combined with guide RNA targeting CD2. We found that within CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes from lymph nodes and spleen 1% and 0.6% were not expressing CD2, respectively. T cells lacking CD2 carryied mutations, which confirmed that Cas9 driven by cell-type specific promoters can edit genes in the mouse and may thus allow targeted studies of gene function in vivo. PMID:26903281

  5. Dimethylfumarate attenuates restenosis after acute vascular injury by cell-specific and Nrf2-dependent mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Joo Oh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Excessive proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs and incomplete re-endothelialization is a major clinical problem limiting the long-term efficacy of percutaneous coronary angioplasty. We tested if dimethylfumarate (DMF, an anti-psoriasis drug, could inhibit abnormal vascular remodeling via NF−E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2-NAD(PH quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1 activity. DMF significantly attenuated neointimal hyperplasia induced by balloon injury in rat carotid arteries via suppression of the G1 to S phase transition resulting from induction of p21 protein in VSMCs. Initially, DMF increased p21 protein stability through an enhancement in Nrf2 activity without an increase in p21 mRNA. Later on, DMF stimulated p21 mRNA expression through a process dependent on p53 activity. However, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 or NQO1 activity, well-known target genes induced by Nrf2, were dispensable for the DMF induction of p21 protein and the effect on the VSMC proliferation. Likewise, DMF protected endothelial cells from TNF-α-induced apoptosis and the dysfunction characterized by decreased eNOS expression. With knock-down of Nrf2 or NQO1, DMF failed to prevent TNF-α-induced cell apoptosis and decreased eNOS expression. Also, CD31 expression, an endothelial specific marker, was restored in vivo by DMF. In conclusion, DMF prevented abnormal proliferation in VSMCs by G1 cell cycle arrest via p21 upregulation driven by Nrf2 and p53 activity, and had a beneficial effect on TNF-α-induced apoptosis and dysfunction in endothelial cells through Nrf2–NQO1 activity suggesting that DMF might be a therapeutic drug for patients with vascular disease.

  6. She2p, a novel RNA-binding protein tethers ASH1 mRNA to the Myo4p myosin motor via She3p

    OpenAIRE

    Böhl, Florian; Kruse, Claudia; Frank, Andrea; Ferring, Dunja; Jansen, Ralf-Peter

    2000-01-01

    RNA localization is a widespread mechanism to achieve localized protein synthesis. In budding yeast, localization of ASH1 mRNA controls daughter cell-specific accumulation of the transcriptional regulator Ash1p, which determines mating type switching. ASH1 mRNA localization depends on four independently acting sequences (‘zipcodes’) within the mRNA. In addition, the class V myosin Myo4p and a set of She proteins with as yet unknown function are essential for ASH1 localization. Here we show th...

  7. Cloning, functional characterization, and mechanism of action of the B-cell-specific transcriptional coactivator OCA-B.

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Y.; Roeder, R. G.

    1995-01-01

    Biochemical purification and cognate cDNA cloning studies have revealed that the previously described transcriptional coactivator OCA-B consists of a 34- or 35-kDa polypeptide with sequence relationships to known coactivators that function by protein-protein interactions. Studies with a recombinant protein have proved that a single OCA-B polypeptide is the main determinant for B-cell-specific activation of immunoglobulin (Ig) promoters and provided additional insights into its mechanism of ac...

  8. Yeast mother cell-specific ageing, genetic (in)stability, and the somatic mutation theory of ageing

    OpenAIRE

    Laun, Peter; Bruschi, Carlo V.; Dickinson, J. Richard; Rinnerthaler, Mark; Heeren, Gino; Schwimbersky, Richard; Rid, Raphaela; Breitenbach, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Yeast mother cell-specific ageing is characterized by a limited capacity to produce daughter cells. The replicative lifespan is determined by the number of cell cycles a mother cell has undergone, not by calendar time, and in a population of cells its distribution follows the Gompertz law. Daughter cells reset their clock to zero and enjoy the full lifespan characteristic for the strain. This kind of replicative ageing of a cell population based on asymmetric cell divisions is investigated as...

  9. The Impact of Lipoprotein-Associated Oxidative Stress on Cell-Specific Microvesicle Release in Patients with Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Nielsen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Microvesicles (MVs are small cell-derived particles shed upon activation. Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH particularly when associated with Achilles tendon xanthomas (ATX predisposes to atherosclerosis, possibly through oxLDL-C interaction with the CD36 receptor. To investigate the hypothesis that MVs derived from cells involved in atherosclerosis are increased in FH and that CD36 expressing MVs (CD36+ MVs may be markers of oxLDL-C-induced cell activation, cell-specific MVs were measured in FH patients with and without ATX and their association with atherogenic lipid profile was studied. Approach and Results. Thirty FH patients with and without ATX and twenty-three controls were included. Plasma concentrations of MVs and CD36+ MVs derived from platelets (PMVs, erythrocytes (ErytMVs, monocytes (MMVs, and endothelial cells (EMVs, as well as tissue factor-positive cells (TF+ MVs, were measured by flow cytometry. Total MVs, MMVs, EMVs, ErytMVs, and TF+ MVs were significantly increased in FH patients, compared to controls. CD36+ MVs derived from endothelial cells and monocytes were significantly higher in FH patients and oxLDL-C predicted all the investigated cell-specific CD36+ MVs in FH patients with ATX. Conclusions. MVs derived from cells involved in atherosclerosis were increased in FH and may contribute to elevated atherothrombosis risk. The increased cell-specific CD36+ MVs observed in FH may represent markers of oxLDL-C-induced cell activation.

  10. Improved Synthesis Strategy for Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA) appropriate for Cell-specific Fluorescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipkorn, Rüdiger; Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Hennrich, Ute; Nokihara, Kiyoshi; Beining, Marcel; Braun, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Progress in genomics and proteomics attended to the door for better understanding the recent rapid expanding complex research field of metabolomics. This trend in biomedical research increasingly focuses to the development of patient-specific therapeutic approaches with higher efficiency and sustainability. Simultaneously undesired adverse reactions are avoided. In parallel, the development of molecules for molecular imaging is required not only for the imaging of morphological structures but also for the imaging of metabolic processes like the aberrant expression of the cysteine protease cathepsin B (CtsB) gene and the activity of the resulting product associated with metastasis and invasiveness of malign tumors. Finally the objective is to merge imaging and therapy at the same level. The design of molecules which fulfil these responsibilities is pivotal and requires proper chemical methodologies. In this context our modified solid phase peptide chemistry using temperature shifts during synthesis is considered as an appropriate technology. We generated highly variable conjugates which consist of molecules useful as diagnostically and therapeutically active molecules. As an example the modular PNA products with the complementary sequence to the CtsB mRNA and additionally with a cathepsin B cleavage site had been prepared as functional modules for distinction of cell lines with different CtsB gene expression. After ligation to the modular peptide-based BioShuttle carrier, which was utilized to facilitate the delivery of the functional modules into the cells' cytoplasm, the modules were scrutinized. PMID:22211082

  11. Improved Synthesis Strategy for Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA appropriate for Cell-specific Fluorescence Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rüdiger Pipkorn, Manfred Wiessler, Waldemar Waldeck, Ute Hennrich, Kiyoshi Nokihara, Marcel Beining, Klaus Braun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Progress in genomics and proteomics attended to the door for better understanding the recent rapid expanding complex research field of metabolomics. This trend in biomedical research increasingly focuses to the development of patient-specific therapeutic approaches with higher efficiency and sustainability. Simultaneously undesired adverse reactions are avoided. In parallel, the development of molecules for molecular imaging is required not only for the imaging of morphological structures but also for the imaging of metabolic processes like the aberrant expression of the cysteine protease cathepsin B (CtsB gene and the activity of the resulting product associated with metastasis and invasiveness of malign tumors. Finally the objective is to merge imaging and therapy at the same level. The design of molecules which fulfil these responsibilities is pivotal and requires proper chemical methodologies. In this context our modified solid phase peptide chemistry using temperature shifts during synthesis is considered as an appropriate technology. We generated highly variable conjugates which consist of molecules useful as diagnostically and therapeutically active molecules. As an example the modular PNA products with the complementary sequence to the CtsB mRNA and additionally with a cathepsin B cleavage site had been prepared as functional modules for distinction of cell lines with different CtsB gene expression. After ligation to the modular peptide-based BioShuttle carrier, which was utilized to facilitate the delivery of the functional modules into the cells' cytoplasm, the modules were scrutinized.

  12. Cell-specific abnormalities of glutamate transporters in schizophrenia: sick astrocytes and compensating relay neurons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullumsmith, R E; O'Donovan, S M; Drummond, J B; Benesh, F S; Simmons, M; Roberts, R; Lauriat, T; Haroutunian, V; Meador-Woodruff, J H

    2016-06-01

    Excitatory amino-acid transporters (EAATs) bind and transport glutamate, limiting spillover from synapses due to their dense perisynaptic expression primarily on astroglia. Converging evidence suggests that abnormalities in the astroglial glutamate transporter localization and function may underlie a disease mechanism with pathological glutamate spillover as well as alterations in the kinetics of perisynaptic glutamate buffering and uptake contributing to dysfunction of thalamo-cortical circuits in schizophrenia. We explored this hypothesis by performing cell- and region-level studies of EAAT1 and EAAT2 expression in the mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus in an elderly cohort of subjects with schizophrenia. We found decreased protein expression for the typically astroglial-localized glutamate transporters in the mediodorsal and ventral tier nuclei. We next used laser-capture microdissection and quantitative polymerase chain reaction to assess cell-level expression of the transporters and their splice variants. In the mediodorsal nucleus, we found lower expression of transporter transcripts in a population of cells enriched for astrocytes, and higher expression of transporter transcripts in a population of cells enriched for relay neurons. We confirmed expression of transporter protein in neurons in schizophrenia using dual-label immunofluorescence. Finally, the pattern of transporter mRNA and protein expression in rodents treated for 9 months with antipsychotic medication suggests that our findings are not due to the effects of antipsychotic treatment. We found a compensatory increase in transporter expression in neurons that might be secondary to a loss of transporter expression in astrocytes. These changes suggest a profound abnormality in astrocyte functions that support, nourish and maintain neuronal fidelity and synaptic activity. PMID:26416546

  13. Polycomb-Mediated Repression and Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Interact to Regulate Merkel Cell Specification during Skin Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina N Perdigoto

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An increasing amount of evidence indicates that developmental programs are tightly regulated by the complex interplay between signaling pathways, as well as transcriptional and epigenetic processes. Here, we have uncovered coordination between transcriptional and morphogen cues to specify Merkel cells, poorly understood skin cells that mediate light touch sensations. In murine dorsal skin, Merkel cells are part of touch domes, which are skin structures consisting of specialized keratinocytes, Merkel cells, and afferent neurons, and are located exclusively around primary hair follicles. We show that the developing primary hair follicle functions as a niche required for Merkel cell specification. We find that intraepidermal Sonic hedgehog (Shh signaling, initiated by the production of Shh ligand in the developing hair follicles, is required for Merkel cell specification. The importance of Shh for Merkel cell formation is further reinforced by the fact that Shh overexpression in embryonic epidermal progenitors leads to ectopic Merkel cells. Interestingly, Shh signaling is common to primary, secondary, and tertiary hair follicles, raising the possibility that there are restrictive mechanisms that regulate Merkel cell specification exclusively around primary hair follicles. Indeed, we find that loss of Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2 in the epidermis results in the formation of ectopic Merkel cells that are associated with all hair types. We show that PRC2 loss expands the field of epidermal cells competent to differentiate into Merkel cells through the upregulation of key Merkel-differentiation genes, which are known PRC2 targets. Importantly, PRC2-mediated repression of the Merkel cell differentiation program requires inductive Shh signaling to form mature Merkel cells. Our study exemplifies how the interplay between epigenetic and morphogen cues regulates the complex patterning and formation of the mammalian skin structures.

  14. Polycomb-Mediated Repression and Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Interact to Regulate Merkel Cell Specification during Skin Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar, Carmit; Tsai, Pai-Chi; Valdes, Victor J.; Cohen, Idan; Santoriello, Francis J.; Zhao, Dejian; Hsu, Ya-Chieh; Ezhkova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    An increasing amount of evidence indicates that developmental programs are tightly regulated by the complex interplay between signaling pathways, as well as transcriptional and epigenetic processes. Here, we have uncovered coordination between transcriptional and morphogen cues to specify Merkel cells, poorly understood skin cells that mediate light touch sensations. In murine dorsal skin, Merkel cells are part of touch domes, which are skin structures consisting of specialized keratinocytes, Merkel cells, and afferent neurons, and are located exclusively around primary hair follicles. We show that the developing primary hair follicle functions as a niche required for Merkel cell specification. We find that intraepidermal Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling, initiated by the production of Shh ligand in the developing hair follicles, is required for Merkel cell specification. The importance of Shh for Merkel cell formation is further reinforced by the fact that Shh overexpression in embryonic epidermal progenitors leads to ectopic Merkel cells. Interestingly, Shh signaling is common to primary, secondary, and tertiary hair follicles, raising the possibility that there are restrictive mechanisms that regulate Merkel cell specification exclusively around primary hair follicles. Indeed, we find that loss of Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) in the epidermis results in the formation of ectopic Merkel cells that are associated with all hair types. We show that PRC2 loss expands the field of epidermal cells competent to differentiate into Merkel cells through the upregulation of key Merkel-differentiation genes, which are known PRC2 targets. Importantly, PRC2-mediated repression of the Merkel cell differentiation program requires inductive Shh signaling to form mature Merkel cells. Our study exemplifies how the interplay between epigenetic and morphogen cues regulates the complex patterning and formation of the mammalian skin structures. PMID:27414999

  15. Identification and characterization of a T-cell-specific enhancer adjacent to the murine CD4 gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Sawada, S; Littman, D R

    1991-01-01

    Expression of the CD4 and CD8 glycoproteins is a tightly regulated process tied to the maturation of functionally distinct classes of thymocytes. Therefore, understanding of the mechanism of expression of the genes encoding CD4 and CD8 is likely to yield important insight into regulation of the differentiated functions of T cells. Here, we report the identification of a T-cell-specific enhancer in a DNase I-hypersensitive region about 13 kb 5' of the transcription initiation site of the murin...

  16. The determination of mother cell-specific mating type of switching in yeast by a specific regulator of HO transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Nasmyth, Kim

    1987-01-01

    In haploid homothallic budding yeast, cell division gives rise to a mother cell which proceeds to switch its mating type and a daughter cell (the bud) which does not. Switching is initiated by a specific double strand cleavage of mating type DNA by an endonuclease encoded by the HO gene. Previous data suggest that the pattern of HO transcription is responsible for the mother cell specificity of switching. HO is transcribed transiently, at START, during the cell cycle of mother cells but not a...

  17. Crosslinking of the T cell-specific accessory molecules CD7 and CD28 modulates T cell adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    Regulated adhesion enables T cells to migrate through tissue and transiently interact with an endless succession of cells. Monoclonal antibody (mAb) engagement of the CD3/T cell receptor (TCR) complex results in a rapid and transient augmentation of the adhesion function of LFA-1 and VLA integrin molecules on human T cells. We show in this study that mAb crosslinking of the T cell-specific accessory molecules CD7 and CD28, or treatment with the Ca2+ ionophore A23187, results in the rapid indu...

  18. Beta-cell specific deletion of Dicer1 leads to defective insulin secretion and diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalis, Martins; Bolmeson, Caroline; Esguerra, Jonathan L.S.;

    2011-01-01

    -blown diabetes mellitus in adulthood that recapitulated the natural history of the spontaneous disease in mice. Reduced insulin gene expression and concomitant reduced insulin secretion preceded the hyperglycaemic state and diabetes development. Immunohistochemical, flow cytometric and ultrastructural analyses...... revealed altered islet morphology, marked decreased ß-cell mass, reduced numbers of granules within the ß-cells and reduced granule docking in adult RIP-Cre Dicer1(¿/¿) mice. ß-cell specific Dicer1 deletion did not appear to disrupt fetal and neonatal ß-cell development as 2-week old RIP-Cre Dicer1...... and diabetes development....

  19. A neomorphic cancer cell-specific role of MAGE-A4 in trans-lesion synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Yanzhe; Mutter-Rottmayer, Elizabeth; Greenwalt, Alicia M.; Goldfarb, Dennis; Yan, Feng; Yang, Yang; Martinez-Chacin, Raquel C.; Pearce, Kenneth H.; Tateishi, Satoshi; Major, Michael B.; Vaziri, Cyrus

    2016-01-01

    Trans-lesion synthesis (TLS) is an important DNA-damage tolerance mechanism that permits ongoing DNA synthesis in cells harbouring damaged genomes. The E3 ubiquitin ligase RAD18 activates TLS by promoting recruitment of Y-family DNA polymerases to sites of DNA-damage-induced replication fork stalling. Here we identify the cancer/testes antigen melanoma antigen-A4 (MAGE-A4) as a tumour cell-specific RAD18-binding partner and an activator of TLS. MAGE-A4 depletion from MAGE-A4-expressing cancer...

  20. DOF-binding sites additively contribute to guard cell-specificity of AtMYB60 promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cominelli Eleonora

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously demonstrated that the Arabidopsis thaliana AtMYB60 protein is an R2R3MYB transcription factor required for stomatal opening. AtMYB60 is specifically expressed in guard cells and down-regulated at the transcriptional levels by the phytohormone ABA. Results To investigate the molecular mechanisms governing AtMYB60 expression, its promoter was dissected through deletion and mutagenesis analyses. By studying different versions of AtMYB60 promoter::GUS reporter fusions in transgenic plants we were able to demonstrate a modular organization for the AtMYB60 promoter. Particularly we defined: a minimal promoter sufficient to confer guard cell-specific activity to the reporter gene; the distinct roles of different DOF-binding sites organised in a cluster in the minimal promoter in determining guard cell-specific expression; the promoter regions responsible for the enhancement of activity in guard cells; a promoter region responsible for the negative transcriptional regulation by ABA. Moreover from the analysis of single and multiple mutants we could rule out the involvement of a group of DOF proteins, known as CDFs, already characterised for their involvement in flowering time, in the regulation of AtMYB60 expression. Conclusions These findings shed light on the regulation of gene expression in guard cells and provide new promoter modules as useful tools for manipulating gene expression in guard cells, both for physiological studies and future biotechnological applications.

  1. DGP1, a drought-induced guard cell-specific promoter and its function analysis in tobacco plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Jun; GONG; Ximing; LIN; Huiqiong; SONG; Quanbo; CHEN; J

    2005-01-01

    The genetic regulation of stomatal movement mainly depends on an efficient control system of gene expression, and guard cell-specific promoter is becoming the best choice. Here we combined the dehydration responsive element (DRE) with guard cell specific element (GCSE) to construct a novel promoter, DGP1. Histochemical assays in transgenic tobacco carryingβ-glucuronidase (gus) gene fused to DGP1 demonstrated that GUS activity was found to be highly inducible by drought treatment and specifically restricted to guard cells. No GUS activity was detected in roots, stems or flowers after treatment. Further quantitative analysis showed that GUS activity in the epidermal strips was apparently induced by dehydration and dramatically increased with the elongation of treatment. The GUS activity after 8 h treatment was 179 times that of those without treatment. Although GUS activity in roots, stems or mesophyll increased after treatment, no great changes were observed. These results suggested that DGP1 could drive target gene expressed in guard cells when plant is subjected to drought stress. And this gets us prepared to control opening and closing of stomata through plant gene engineering.

  2. Disturbed α-Cell Function in Mice with β-Cell Specific Overexpression of Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Ahrén

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Exogenous administration of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP has been shown to inhibit both insulin and glucagon secretion. This study examined α-cell function in mice with β-cell specific overexpression of human IAPP (hIAPP after an oral protein gavage (75 mg whey protein/mouse. Baseline glucagon levels were higher in transgenic mice (41±4.0 pg/mL, n=6 than in wildtype animals (19±5.1 pg/mL, n=5, P=.015. In contrast, the glucagon response to protein was impaired in transgenic animals (21±2.7 pg/mL in transgenic mice versus 38±5.7 pg/mL in wildtype mice at 15 minutes; P=.027. Baseline insulin levels did not differ between the groups, while the insulin response, as the glucagon response, was impaired after protein challenge (P=.018. Glucose levels were not different between the groups and did not change significantly after protein gavage. Acetaminophen was given through gavage to the animals (2 mg/mouse to estimate gastric emptying. The plasma acetaminophen profile was similar in the two groups of mice. We conclude that disturbances in glucagon secretion exist in mice with β-cell specific overexpression of human IAPP, which are not secondary to changes in gastric emptying. The reduced glucagon response to protein challenge may reflect a direct inhibitory influence of hIAPP on glucagon secretion.

  3. Reversibility of β-Cell-Specific Transcript Factors Expression by Long-Term Caloric Restriction in db/db Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunjun Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes (T2D is characterized by β-cell dedifferentiation, but underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The purpose of the current study was to explore the mechanisms of β-cell dedifferentiation with and without long-term control of calorie intake. We used a diabetes mouse model (db/db to analyze the changes in the expression levels of β-cell-specific transcription factors (TFs and functional factors with long-term caloric restriction (CR. Our results showed that chronic euglycemia was maintained in the db/db mice with long-term CR intervention, and β-cell dedifferentiation was significantly reduced. The expression of Glut2, Pdx1, and Nkx6.1 was reversed, while MafA expression was significantly increased with long-term CR. GLP-1 pathway was reactivated with long-term CR. Our work showed that the course of β-cell dedifferentiation can intervene by long-term control of calorie intake. Key β-cell-specific TFs and functional factors play important roles in maintaining β-cell differentiation. Targeting these factors could optimize T2D therapies.

  4. Extracellular RNA Communication (ExRNA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Until recently, scientists believed RNA worked mostly inside the cell that produced it. Some types of RNA help translate genes into proteins that are necessary for...

  5. Combinatorics of RNA-RNA interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Thomas J X; Reidys, Christian

    2012-01-01

    RNA-RNA binding is an important phenomenon observed for many classes of non-coding RNAs and plays a crucial role in a number of regulatory processes. Recently several MFE folding algorithms for predicting the joint structure of two interacting RNA molecules have been proposed. Here joint structure...

  6. Enhancement of cell-specific transgene expression from a Tet-Off regulatory system using a transcriptional amplification strategy in the rat brain

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Beihui; Wang, Shu; Brenner, Michael; Paton, Julian FR; Kasparov, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    Background The Tet-Off system uses a tetracycline-controlled transactivator protein (tTA) and a tetracycline-responsive promoter element (TRE) to regulate expression of a target gene. This system can be used to achieve regulatable transgene expression in specific cell types by employing a cell-specific promoter to drive tTA expression. Wide applications of this attractive approach are, however, hindered by relatively weak transcriptional activity of most cell-specific promoters. We report her...

  7. Expression of NR2B in cerebellar granule cells specifically facilitates effect of motor training on motor learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianwei Jiao

    Full Text Available It is believed that gene/environment interaction (GEI plays a pivotal role in the development of motor skills, which are acquired via practicing or motor training. However, the underlying molecular/neuronal mechanisms are still unclear. Here, we reported that the expression of NR2B, a subunit of NMDA receptors, in cerebellar granule cells specifically enhanced the effect of voluntary motor training on motor learning in the mouse. Moreover, this effect was characterized as motor learning-specific and developmental stage-dependent, because neither emotional/spatial memory was affected nor was the enhanced motor learning observed when the motor training was conducted starting at the age of 3 months old in these transgenic mice. These results indicate that changes in the expression of gene(s that are involved in regulating synaptic plasticity in cerebellar granule cells may constitute a molecular basis for the cerebellum to be involved in the GEI by facilitating motor skill learning.

  8. Conserved functional antagonism of CELF and MBNL proteins controls stem cell-specific alternative splicing in planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solana, Jordi; Irimia, Manuel; Ayoub, Salah; Orejuela, Marta Rodriguez; Zywitza, Vera; Jens, Marvin; Tapial, Javier; Ray, Debashish; Morris, Quaid; Hughes, Timothy R; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Rajewsky, Nikolaus

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to transcriptional regulation, the function of alternative splicing (AS) in stem cells is poorly understood. In mammals, MBNL proteins negatively regulate an exon program specific of embryonic stem cells; however, little is known about the in vivo significance of this regulation. We studied AS in a powerful in vivo model for stem cell biology, the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. We discover a conserved AS program comprising hundreds of alternative exons, microexons and introns that is differentially regulated in planarian stem cells, and comprehensively identify its regulators. We show that functional antagonism between CELF and MBNL factors directly controls stem cell-specific AS in planarians, placing the origin of this regulatory mechanism at the base of Bilaterians. Knockdown of CELF or MBNL factors lead to abnormal regenerative capacities by affecting self-renewal and differentiation sets of genes, respectively. These results highlight the importance of AS interactions in stem cell regulation across metazoans. PMID:27502555

  9. Pooling across cells to normalize single-cell RNA sequencing data with many zero counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L Lun, Aaron T; Bach, Karsten; Marioni, John C

    2016-01-01

    Normalization of single-cell RNA sequencing data is necessary to eliminate cell-specific biases prior to downstream analyses. However, this is not straightforward for noisy single-cell data where many counts are zero. We present a novel approach where expression values are summed across pools of cells, and the summed values are used for normalization. Pool-based size factors are then deconvolved to yield cell-based factors. Our deconvolution approach outperforms existing methods for accurate normalization of cell-specific biases in simulated data. Similar behavior is observed in real data, where deconvolution improves the relevance of results of downstream analyses. PMID:27122128

  10. Promoter- and cell-specific epigenetic regulation of CD44, Cyclin D2, GLIPR1 and PTEN by Methyl-CpG binding proteins and histone modifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarzenbach Heidi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the current study was to analyze the involvement of methyl-CpG binding proteins (MBDs and histone modifications on the regulation of CD44, Cyclin D2, GLIPR1 and PTEN in different cellular contexts such as the prostate cancer cells DU145 and LNCaP, and the breast cancer cells MCF-7. Since global chromatin changes have been shown to occur in tumours and regions of tumour-associated genes are affected by epigenetic modifications, these may constitute important regulatory mechanisms for the pathogenesis of malignant transformation. Methods In DU145, LNCaP and MCF-7 cells mRNA expression levels of CD44, Cyclin D2, GLIPR1 and PTEN were determined by quantitative RT-PCR at the basal status as well as after treatment with demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine and/or histone deacetylase inhibitor Trichostatin A. Furthermore, genomic DNA was bisulfite-converted and sequenced. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was performed with the stimulated and unstimulated cells using antibodies for MBD1, MBD2 and MeCP2 as well as 17 different histone antibodies. Results Comparison of the different promoters showed that MeCP2 and MBD2a repressed promoter-specifically Cyclin D2 in all cell lines, whereas in MCF-7 cells MeCP2 repressed cell-specifically all methylated promoters. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that all methylated promoters associated with at least one MBD. Treatment of the cells by the demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-CdR caused dissociation of the MBDs from the promoters. Only MBD1v1 bound and repressed methylation-independently all promoters. Real-time amplification of DNA immunoprecipitated by 17 different antibodies showed a preferential enrichment for methylated lysine of histone H3 (H3K4me1, H3K4me2 and H3K4me3 at the particular promoters. Notably, the silent promoters were associated with unmodified histones which were acetylated following treatment by 5-aza-CdR. Conclusions This study is one

  11. Promoter- and cell-specific epigenetic regulation of CD44, Cyclin D2, GLIPR1 and PTEN by Methyl-CpG binding proteins and histone modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the current study was to analyze the involvement of methyl-CpG binding proteins (MBDs) and histone modifications on the regulation of CD44, Cyclin D2, GLIPR1 and PTEN in different cellular contexts such as the prostate cancer cells DU145 and LNCaP, and the breast cancer cells MCF-7. Since global chromatin changes have been shown to occur in tumours and regions of tumour-associated genes are affected by epigenetic modifications, these may constitute important regulatory mechanisms for the pathogenesis of malignant transformation. In DU145, LNCaP and MCF-7 cells mRNA expression levels of CD44, Cyclin D2, GLIPR1 and PTEN were determined by quantitative RT-PCR at the basal status as well as after treatment with demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine and/or histone deacetylase inhibitor Trichostatin A. Furthermore, genomic DNA was bisulfite-converted and sequenced. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was performed with the stimulated and unstimulated cells using antibodies for MBD1, MBD2 and MeCP2 as well as 17 different histone antibodies. Comparison of the different promoters showed that MeCP2 and MBD2a repressed promoter-specifically Cyclin D2 in all cell lines, whereas in MCF-7 cells MeCP2 repressed cell-specifically all methylated promoters. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that all methylated promoters associated with at least one MBD. Treatment of the cells by the demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-CdR) caused dissociation of the MBDs from the promoters. Only MBD1v1 bound and repressed methylation-independently all promoters. Real-time amplification of DNA immunoprecipitated by 17 different antibodies showed a preferential enrichment for methylated lysine of histone H3 (H3K4me1, H3K4me2 and H3K4me3) at the particular promoters. Notably, the silent promoters were associated with unmodified histones which were acetylated following treatment by 5-aza-CdR. This study is one of the first to reveal the histone code and MBD profile

  12. The miRNA Plasma Signature in Response to Acute Aerobic Exercise and Endurance Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren; Åkerström, Thorbjörn; Rinnov, Anders;

    2014-01-01

    MiRNAs are potent intracellular posttranscriptional regulators and are also selectively secreted into the circulation in a cell-specific fashion. Global changes in miRNA expression in skeletal muscle in response to endurance exercise training have been reported. Therefore, our aim was to establish...... training. Global miRNA (742 miRNAs) measurements were performed as a screening to identify detectable miRNAs in plasma. Using customized qPCR panels we quantified the expression levels of miRNAs detected in the screening procedure (188 miRNAs). We demonstrate a dynamic regulation of circulating miRNA (ci...

  13. Boswellia sacra essential oil induces tumor cell-specific apoptosis and suppresses tumor aggressiveness in cultured human breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhail Mahmoud M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gum resins obtained from trees of the Burseraceae family (Boswellia sp. are important ingredients in incense and perfumes. Extracts prepared from Boswellia sp. gum resins have been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and anti-neoplastic effects. Essential oil prepared by distillation of the gum resin traditionally used for aromatic therapy has also been shown to have tumor cell-specific anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities. The objective of this study was to optimize conditions for preparing Boswellea sacra essential oil with the highest biological activity in inducing tumor cell-specific cytotoxicity and suppressing aggressive tumor phenotypes in human breast cancer cells. Methods Boswellia sacra essential oil was prepared from Omani Hougari grade resins through hydrodistillation at 78 or 100 oC for 12 hours. Chemical compositions were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry; and total boswellic acids contents were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Boswellia sacra essential oil-mediated cell viability and death were studied in established human breast cancer cell lines (T47D, MCF7, MDA-MB-231 and an immortalized normal human breast cell line (MCF10-2A. Apoptosis was assayed by genomic DNA fragmentation. Anti-invasive and anti-multicellular tumor properties were evaluated by cellular network and spheroid formation models, respectively. Western blot analysis was performed to study Boswellia sacra essential oil-regulated proteins involved in apoptosis, signaling pathways, and cell cycle regulation. Results More abundant high molecular weight compounds, including boswellic acids, were present in Boswellia sacra essential oil prepared at 100 oC hydrodistillation. All three human breast cancer cell lines were sensitive to essential oil treatment with reduced cell viability and elevated cell death, whereas the immortalized normal human breast cell line was more resistant to essential oil

  14. Analyzing MiRNA-LncRNA Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraskevopoulou, Maria D; Hatzigeorgiou, Artemis G

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are noncoding transcripts usually longer than 200 nts that have recently emerged as one of the largest and significantly diverse RNA families. The biological role and functions of lncRNAs are still mostly uncharacterized. Their target-mimetic, sponge/decoy function on microRNAs was recently uncovered. miRNAs are a class of noncoding RNA species (~22 nts) that play a central role in posttranscriptional regulation of protein coding genes by mRNA cleavage, direct translational repression and/or mRNA destabilization. LncRNAs can act as miRNA sponges, reducing their regulatory effect on mRNAs. This function introduces an extra layer of complexity in the miRNA-target interaction network. This chapter focuses on the study of miRNA-lncRNA interactions with either in silico or experimentally supported analyses. The proposed methodologies can be appropriately adapted in order to become the backbone of advanced multistep functional miRNA analyses. PMID:26721498

  15. GermlncRNA: a unique catalogue of long non-coding RNAs and associated regulations in male germ cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Alfred Chun-Shui; Gao, Huayan; Xiao, Sizhe; Liao, Jinyue; Wang, Daxi; Tu, Jiajie; Rennert, Owen M; Chan, Wai-Yee; Lee, Tin-Lap

    2015-01-01

    Spermatogenic failure is a major cause of male infertility, which affects millions of couples worldwide. Recent discovery of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) as critical regulators in normal and disease development provides new clues for delineating the molecular regulation in male germ cell development. However, few functional lncRNAs have been characterized to date. A major limitation in studying lncRNA in male germ cell development is the absence of germ cell-specific lncRNA annotation. Current lncRNA annotations are assembled by transcriptome data from heterogeneous tissue sources; specific germ cell transcript information of various developmental stages is therefore under-represented, which may lead to biased prediction or fail to identity important germ cell-specific lncRNAs. GermlncRNA provides the first comprehensive web-based and open-access lncRNA catalogue for three key male germ cell stages, including type A spermatogonia, pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids. This information has been developed by integrating male germ transcriptome resources derived from RNA-Seq, tiling microarray and GermSAGE. Characterizations on lncRNA-associated regulatory features, potential coding gene and microRNA targets are also provided. Search results from GermlncRNA can be exported to Galaxy for downstream analysis or downloaded locally. Taken together, GermlncRNA offers a new avenue to better understand the role of lncRNAs and associated targets during spermatogenesis. Database URL: http://germlncrna.cbiit.cuhk.edu.hk/ PMID:25982314

  16. Structural and Functional Characterization of Two Alternative Splicing Variants of Mouse Endothelial Cell-Specific Chemotaxis Regulator (ECSCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongchang Chang

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells (ECs that line the lumen of blood vessels are important players in blood vessel formation, and EC migration is a key component of the angiogenic process. Thus, identification of genes that are specifically or preferentially expressed in vascular ECs and in-depth understanding of their biological functions may lead to discovery of new therapeutic targets. We have previously reported molecular characterization of human endothelial cell-specific molecule 2 (ECSM2/endothelial cell-specific chemotaxis regulator (ECSCR. In the present study, we cloned two mouse full-length cDNAs by RT-PCR, which encode two putative ECSCR isoform precursors with considerable homology to the human ECSCR. Nucleotide sequence and exon-intron junction analyses suggested that they are alternative splicing variants (ECSCR isoform-1 and -2, differing from each other in the first and second exons. Quantitative RT-PCR results revealed that isoform-2 is the predominant form, which was most abundant in heart, lung, and muscles, and moderately abundant in uterus and testis. In contrast, the expression of isoform-1 seemed to be more enriched in testis. To further explore their potential cellular functions, we expressed GFP- and FLAG-tagged ECSCR isoforms, respectively, in an ECSCR deficient cell line (HEK293. Interestingly, the actual sizes of either ECSCR-GFP or -FLAG fusion proteins detected by immunoblotting are much larger than their predicted sizes, suggesting that both isoforms are glycoproteins. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that both ECSCR isoforms are localized at the cell surface, which is consistent with the structural prediction. Finally, we performed cell migration assays using mouse endothelial MS1 cells overexpressing GFP alone, isoform-1-GFP, and isoform-2-GFP, respectively. Our results showed that both isoforms significantly inhibited vascular epidermal growth factor (VEGF-induced cell migration. Taken together, we have provided several lines

  17. Combinatorial microRNA target predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krek, Azra; Grün, Dominic; Poy, Matthew N.;

    2005-01-01

    MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs that recognize and bind to partially complementary sites in the 3' untranslated regions of target genes in animals and, by unknown mechanisms, regulate protein production of the target transcript1, 2, 3. Different combinations of microRNAs are expressed in...... different cell types and may coordinately regulate cell-specific target genes. Here, we present PicTar, a computational method for identifying common targets of microRNAs. Statistical tests using genome-wide alignments of eight vertebrate genomes, PicTar's ability to specifically recover published micro......RNA targets, and experimental validation of seven predicted targets suggest that PicTar has an excellent success rate in predicting targets for single microRNAs and for combinations of microRNAs. We find that vertebrate microRNAs target, on average, roughly 200 transcripts each. Furthermore, our results...

  18. Folic Acid Conjugated Chitosan for Targeted Delivery of siRNA to Activated Macrophages in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Chuanxu; Gao, Shan; Kjems, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    was conjugated to chitosan (FA–CS) and used to formulate siRNA into nanoparticles capable of cell specific delivery. The physiochemical properties of the nanoparticles, including size, zeta-potential and encapsulation efficiency, were characterized and the intracellular uptake and gene silencing...

  19. Conserved functional antagonism of CELF and MBNL proteins controls stem cell-specific alternative splicing in planarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solana, Jordi; Irimia, Manuel; Ayoub, Salah; Orejuela, Marta Rodriguez; Zywitza, Vera; Jens, Marvin; Tapial, Javier; Ray, Debashish; Morris, Quaid; Hughes, Timothy R; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Rajewsky, Nikolaus

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to transcriptional regulation, the function of alternative splicing (AS) in stem cells is poorly understood. In mammals, MBNL proteins negatively regulate an exon program specific of embryonic stem cells; however, little is known about the in vivo significance of this regulation. We studied AS in a powerful in vivo model for stem cell biology, the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. We discover a conserved AS program comprising hundreds of alternative exons, microexons and introns that is differentially regulated in planarian stem cells, and comprehensively identify its regulators. We show that functional antagonism between CELF and MBNL factors directly controls stem cell-specific AS in planarians, placing the origin of this regulatory mechanism at the base of Bilaterians. Knockdown of CELF or MBNL factors lead to abnormal regenerative capacities by affecting self-renewal and differentiation sets of genes, respectively. These results highlight the importance of AS interactions in stem cell regulation across metazoans. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16797.001 PMID:27502555

  20. Ubiquitin-fusion degradation pathway: A new strategy for inducing CD8 cells specific for mycobacterial HSP65

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) plays an indispensable role in inducing MHC class I-restricted CD8+ T cells. In this study, we exploited UPS to induce CD8+ T cells specific for mycobacterial HSP65 (mHSP65), one of the leading vaccine candidates against infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A chimeric DNA termed pU-HSP65 encoding a fusion protein between murine ubiquitin and mHSP65 was constructed, and C57BL/6 (B6) mice were immunized with the DNA using gene gun bombardment. Mice immunized with the chimeric DNA acquired potent resistance against challenge with the syngeneic B16F1 melanoma cells transfected with the mHSP65 gene (HSP65/B16F1), compared with those immunized with DNA encoding only mHSP65. Splenocytes from the former group of mice showed a higher grade of cytotoxic activity against HSP65/B16F1 cells and contained a larger number of granzyme B- or IFN-γ-producing CD8+ T cells compared with those from the latter group of mice

  1. Cell-specific localization of alkaloids in Catharanthus roseus stem tissue measured with Imaging MS and Single-cell MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kotaro; Takahashi, Katsutoshi; Mizuno, Hajime; Anegawa, Aya; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Fukaki, Hidehiro; Ohnishi, Miwa; Yamazaki, Mami; Masujima, Tsutomu; Mimura, Tetsuro

    2016-04-01

    Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don is a medicinal plant well known for producing antitumor drugs such as vinblastine and vincristine, which are classified as terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs). The TIA metabolic pathway in C. roseus has been extensively studied. However, the localization of TIA intermediates at the cellular level has not been demonstrated directly. In the present study, the metabolic pathway of TIA in C. roseus was studied with two forefront metabolomic techniques, that is, Imaging mass spectrometry (MS) and live Single-cell MS, to elucidate cell-specific TIA localization in the stem tissue. Imaging MS indicated that most TIAs localize in the idioblast and laticifer cells, which emit blue fluorescence under UV excitation. Single-cell MS was applied to four different kinds of cells [idioblast (specialized parenchyma cell), laticifer, parenchyma, and epidermal cells] in the stem longitudinal section. Principal component analysis of Imaging MS and Single-cell MS spectra of these cells showed that similar alkaloids accumulate in both idioblast cell and laticifer cell. From MS/MS analysis of Single-cell MS spectra, catharanthine, ajmalicine, and strictosidine were found in both cell types in C. roseus stem tissue, where serpentine was also accumulated. Based on these data, we discuss the significance of TIA synthesis and accumulation in the idioblast and laticifer cells of C. roseus stem tissue. PMID:27001858

  2. RNA structures regulating nidovirus RNA synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Born, Erwin van den

    2006-01-01

    Viruses depend on their host cell for the production of their progeny. The genetic information that is required to regulate this process is contained in the viral genome. In the case of plus-stranded RNA viruses, like nidoviruses, the RNA genome is directly involved in translation (resulting in the

  3. RNA modifications by oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Henrik E; Specht, Elisabeth; Broedbaek, Kasper;

    2012-01-01

    to encompass various classes of novel regulatory RNAs, including, e.g., microRNAs. It is well known that DNA is constantly oxidized and repaired by complex genome maintenance mechanisms. Analogously, RNA also undergoes significant oxidation, and there are now convincing data suggesting that oxidation......, and the consequent loss of integrity of RNA, is a mechanism for disease development. Oxidized RNA is found in a large variety of diseases, and interest has been especially devoted to degenerative brain diseases such as Alzheimer disease, in which up to 50-70% of specific mRNA molecules are reported oxidized, whereas...... other RNA molecules show virtually no oxidation. The iron-storage disease hemochromatosis exhibits the most prominent general increase in RNA oxidation ever observed. Oxidation of RNA primarily leads to strand breaks and to oxidative base modifications. Oxidized mRNA is recognized by the ribosomes...

  4. Irreducibility in RNA structures

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Emma Y.; Reidys, Christian M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we study irreducibility in RNA structures. By RNA structure we mean RNA secondary as well as RNA pseudoknot structures. In our analysis we shall contrast random and minimum free energy (mfe) configurations. We compute various distributions: of the numbers of irreducible substructures, their locations and sizes, parameterized in terms of the maximal number of mutually crossing arcs, $k-1$, and the minimal size of stacks $\\sigma$. In particular, we analyze the size of the largest ...

  5. Temporal network based analysis of cell specific vein graft transcriptome defines key pathways and hub genes in implantation injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Bhasin

    Full Text Available Vein graft failure occurs between 1 and 6 months after implantation due to obstructive intimal hyperplasia, related in part to implantation injury. The cell-specific and temporal response of the transcriptome to vein graft implantation injury was determined by transcriptional profiling of laser capture microdissected endothelial cells (EC and medial smooth muscle cells (SMC from canine vein grafts, 2 hours (H to 30 days (D following surgery. Our results demonstrate a robust genomic response beginning at 2 H, peaking at 12-24 H, declining by 7 D, and resolving by 30 D. Gene ontology and pathway analyses of differentially expressed genes indicated that implantation injury affects inflammatory and immune responses, apoptosis, mitosis, and extracellular matrix reorganization in both cell types. Through backpropagation an integrated network was built, starting with genes differentially expressed at 30 D, followed by adding upstream interactive genes from each prior time-point. This identified significant enrichment of IL-6, IL-8, NF-κB, dendritic cell maturation, glucocorticoid receptor, and Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells (TREM-1 signaling, as well as PPARα activation pathways in graft EC and SMC. Interactive network-based analyses identified IL-6, IL-8, IL-1α, and Insulin Receptor (INSR as focus hub genes within these pathways. Real-time PCR was used for the validation of two of these genes: IL-6 and IL-8, in addition to Collagen 11A1 (COL11A1, a cornerstone of the backpropagation. In conclusion, these results establish causality relationships clarifying the pathogenesis of vein graft implantation injury, and identifying novel targets for its prevention.

  6. Contribution of distinct homeodomain DNA binding specificities to Drosophila embryonic mesodermal cell-specific gene expression programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian W Busser

    Full Text Available Homeodomain (HD proteins are a large family of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors (TFs having diverse developmental functions, often acting within the same cell types, yet many members of this family paradoxically recognize similar DNA sequences. Thus, with multiple family members having the potential to recognize the same DNA sequences in cis-regulatory elements, it is difficult to ascertain the role of an individual HD or a subclass of HDs in mediating a particular developmental function. To investigate this problem, we focused our studies on the Drosophila embryonic mesoderm where HD TFs are required to establish not only segmental identities (such as the Hox TFs, but also tissue and cell fate specification and differentiation (such as the NK-2 HDs, Six HDs and identity HDs (I-HDs. Here we utilized the complete spectrum of DNA binding specificities determined by protein binding microarrays (PBMs for a diverse collection of HDs to modify the nucleotide sequences of numerous mesodermal enhancers to be recognized by either no or a single subclass of HDs, and subsequently assayed the consequences of these changes on enhancer function in transgenic reporter assays. These studies show that individual mesodermal enhancers receive separate transcriptional input from both I-HD and Hox subclasses of HDs. In addition, we demonstrate that enhancers regulating upstream components of the mesodermal regulatory network are targeted by the Six class of HDs. Finally, we establish the necessity of NK-2 HD binding sequences to activate gene expression in multiple mesodermal tissues, supporting a potential role for the NK-2 HD TF Tinman (Tin as a pioneer factor that cooperates with other factors to regulate cell-specific gene expression programs. Collectively, these results underscore the critical role played by HDs of multiple subclasses in inducing the unique genetic programs of individual mesodermal cells, and in coordinating the gene regulatory

  7. Expression and characterization of hydrophobin HGFI fused with the cell-specific peptide TPS in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Baolong; Huang, Yujian; Zhang, Suai; Wang, Dandan; Xu, Haijin; Kong, Deling; Qiao, Mingqiang

    2012-05-01

    The cell-specific peptide TPS (TPSLEQRTVYAK) has been proposed as a potential candidate for fabricating tissue engineering scaffolds based on its ability of binding to human endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) with high affinity and specificity. In this study, the class I hydrophobin hgfI gene from Grifola frondosa and the tps were fused and cloned into pPIC9. The fusion gene was expressed in Pichia pastoris under the control of alcohol oxidase 1 promoter. Tricine-SDS-PAGE and Western blotting confirmed that the fusion protein TPS-linker-HGFI (TLH) was successfully secreted into the culture medium. The fusion protein TLH was purified by ultrafiltration and reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Water contact angle (WCA) demonstrated that similar to recombinant HGFI (rHGFI), the purified TLH could convert the surface wettability of polystyrene and mica. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements indicated that the purified TLH could form stable films on the hydrophobic siliconized glass surface. The cell adhesion examination showed that the TLH modified poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) could specially facilitate the EPC (particularly EPC derived from human) binding, while rHGFI modified PCL could nonselectively enhance cells adhesion. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that demonstrates that the TPS peptide was immobilized on biomaterial-PCL surface by fusion with hydrophobin. The potential application of this finding in combination with biomedical devices for EPC culture, will facilitate the current techniques used for cell-based therapies. PMID:22440542

  8. Working with RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Working with RNA is not a special discipline in molecular biology. However, RNA is chemically and structurally different from DNA and a few simple work rules have to be implemented to maintain the integrity of the RNA. Alkaline pH, high temperatures, and heavy metal ions should be avoided when...

  9. Fast Prediction of RNA-RNA Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salari, Raheleh; Backofen, Rolf; Sahinalp, S. Cenk

    Regulatory antisense RNAs are a class of ncRNAs that regulate gene expression by prohibiting the translation of an mRNA by establishing stable interactions with a target sequence. There is great demand for efficient computational methods to predict the specific interaction between an ncRNA and its target mRNA(s). There are a number of algorithms in the literature which can predict a variety of such interactions - unfortunately at a very high computational cost. Although some existing target prediction approaches are much faster, they are specialized for interactions with a single binding site.

  10. Combinatorics of RNA-RNA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Thomas J X; Reidys, Christian M

    2012-02-01

    RNA-RNA binding is an important phenomenon observed for many classes of non-coding RNAs and plays a crucial role in a number of regulatory processes. Recently several MFE folding algorithms for predicting the joint structure of two interacting RNA molecules have been proposed. Here joint structure means that in a diagram representation the intramolecular bonds of each partner are pseudoknot-free, that the intermolecular binding pairs are noncrossing, and that there is no so-called "zigzag" configuration. This paper presents the combinatorics of RNA interaction structures including their generating function, singularity analysis as well as explicit recurrence relations. In particular, our results imply simple asymptotic formulas for the number of joint structures. PMID:21541694

  11. Combinatorics of RNA-RNA interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Thomas J X

    2010-01-01

    RNA-RNA binding is an important phenomenon observed for many classes of non-coding RNAs and plays a crucial role in a number of regulatory processes. Recently several MFE folding algorithms for predicting the joint structure of two interacting RNA molecules have been proposed. Here joint structure means that in a diagram representation the intramolecular bonds of each partner are pseudoknot-free, that the intermolecular binding pairs are noncrossing, and that there is no so-called ``zig-zag'' configuration. This paper presents the combinatorics of RNA interaction structures including their generating function, singularity analysis as well as explicit recurrence relations. In particular, our results imply simple asymptotic formulas for the number of joint structures.

  12. The dendritic cell-specific C-type lectin DC-SIGN is a receptor for Schistosoma mansoni egg antigens and recognizes the glycan antigen Lewis x.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Die, van I.M.; Vliet, van SJ; Nyame, AK; Cummings, RD; Bank, CM; Appelmelk, B.J.; Geijtenbeek, T.B.H.; Kooijk, van Y.

    2003-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni soluble egg antigens (SEAs) are crucially involved in modulating the host immune response to infection by S. mansoni. We report that human dendritic cells bind SEAs through the C-type lectin dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN). Monoclonal antibodies agai

  13. Hepatoblast and mesenchymal cell-specific gene-expression in fetal rat liver and in cultured fetal rat liver cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mansuroglu, Tümen; Dudás, József; Elmaouhoub, Abderrahim; Joza, Tobias; Ramadori, Giuliano

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether passaged rat fetal liver cells are functional hepatoblasts. Hepatocyte/hepatoblast- and liver myofibroblast-gene-expressions were studied in adult and fetal rat liver tissues as well as in primary and passaged cultures of isolated rat fetal liver cells at both the mRNA and protein level. Desmin- and Alpha-Smooth Muscle Actin (SMA)-positive cells were located in the walls of liver vessels, whereas Desmin-positive/SMA-negative cells were distribute...

  14. Methods for RNA Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivarius, Signe

    While increasing evidence appoints diverse types of RNA as key players in the regulatory networks underlying cellular differentiation and metabolism, the potential functions of thousands of conserved RNA structures encoded in mammalian genomes remain to be determined. Since the functions of most...... RNAs rely on interactions with proteins, the establishment of protein-binding profiles is essential for the characterization of RNAs. Aiming to facilitate RNA analysis, this thesis introduces proteomics- as well as transcriptomics-based methods for the functional characterization of RNA. First, RNA......-protein pulldown combined with mass spectrometry analysis is applied for in vivo as well as in vitro identification of RNA-binding proteins, the latter succeeding in verifying known RNA-protein interactions. Secondly, acknowledging the significance of flexible promoter usage for the diversification of the...

  15. Fast prediction of RNA-RNA interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Backofen Rolf

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulatory antisense RNAs are a class of ncRNAs that regulate gene expression by prohibiting the translation of an mRNA by establishing stable interactions with a target sequence. There is great demand for efficient computational methods to predict the specific interaction between an ncRNA and its target mRNA(s. There are a number of algorithms in the literature which can predict a variety of such interactions - unfortunately at a very high computational cost. Although some existing target prediction approaches are much faster, they are specialized for interactions with a single binding site. Methods In this paper we present a novel algorithm to accurately predict the minimum free energy structure of RNA-RNA interaction under the most general type of interactions studied in the literature. Moreover, we introduce a fast heuristic method to predict the specific (multiple binding sites of two interacting RNAs. Results We verify the performance of our algorithms for joint structure and binding site prediction on a set of known interacting RNA pairs. Experimental results show our algorithms are highly accurate and outperform all competitive approaches.

  16. The Nanos3-3'UTR is required for germ cell specific NANOS3 expression in mouse embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitomi Suzuki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The regulation of gene expression via a 3' untranslated region (UTR plays essential roles in the discrimination of the germ cell lineage from somatic cells during embryogenesis. This is fundamental to the continuation of a species. Mouse NANOS3 is an essential protein required for the germ cell maintenance and is specifically expressed in these cells. However, the regulatory mechanisms that restrict the expression of this gene in the germ cells is largely unknown at present. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In our current study, we show that differences in the stability of Nanos3 mRNA between germ cells and somatic cells is brought about in a 3'UTR-dependent manner in mouse embryos. Although Nanos3 is transcribed in both cell lineages, it is efficiently translated only in the germ lineage. We also find that the translational suppression of NANOS3 in somatic cells is caused by a 3'UTR-mediated mRNA destabilizing mechanism. Surprisingly, even when under the control of the CAG promoter which induces strong ubiquitous transcription in both germ cells and somatic cells, the addition of the Nanos3-3'UTR sequence to the coding region of exogenous gene was effective in restricting protein expression in germ cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our current study thus suggests that Nanos3-3'UTR has an essential role in translational control in the mouse embryo.

  17. RNA Viruses Infecting Pest Insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    RNA viruses are viruses whose genetic material is ribonucleic acid (RNA). RNA viruses may be double or single-stranded based on the type of RNA they contain. Single-stranded RNA viruses can be further grouped into negative sense or positive-sense viruses according to the polarity of their RNA. Fur...

  18. Calcium Influx of Mast Cells Is Inhibited by Aptamers Targeting the First Extracellular Domain of Orai1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Renshan; Yang, Yongqiang; Ran, Xinze; Yang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Using the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) method, we identified oligonucleotides that bind to the first extracellular domain of the Orai1 protein with high affinities and high specificities. These ligands were isolated from a random single-strand DNA (ssDNA) library with 40 randomized sequence positions, using synthesized peptides with amino acid sequences identical to the first extracellular domain of the Orai1 protein as the targets for SELEX selection. Seven aptamers were obtained after 12 rounds of SELEX. An enzyme-linked oligonucleotide assay (ELONA) was performed to determine the affinities of the aptamers. Aptamer Y1 had the highest affinity (Kd = 1.72×10−8 mol/L) and was selected for functional experiments in mast cells. Using LAD2 cells with the human high-affinity IgE receptor and Ca2+ release activation channel (CRAC), we demonstrated that Aptamer Y1 blocked IgE-mediated β-hexosaminidase release from cells triggered by biotin-IgE and streptavidin. A specific binding assay showed that Aptamer Y1 not only bound the Orai1 peptide specifically but also that the Orai1 peptide did not bind significantly to other random oligonucleotide molecules. Furthermore, Aptamer Y1 regulation of intracellular Ca2+ mobilization was investigated by probing intracellular Ca2+ with a Fluo-4-AM fluorescent probe. We found that Aptamer Y1 inhibits Ca2+ influx into antigen-activated mast cells. These results indicate that the target of Aptamer Y1 in the degranulation pathway is upstream of Ca2+ influx. Therefore, these oligonucleotide agents represent a novel class of CRAC inhibitors that may be useful in the fight against allergic diseases. PMID:27390850

  19. Fluorescence-Guided Probes of Aptamer-Targeted Gold Nanoparticles with Computed Tomography Imaging Accesses for in Vivo Tumor Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng-Hung; Kuo, Tsung-Rong; Su, Hsin-Jan; Lai, Wei-Yun; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Chen, Jinn-Shiun; Wang, Di-Yan; Wu, Yi-Chun; Chen, Chia-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Recent development of molecular imaging probes for fluorescence-guided surgery has shown great progresses for determining tumor margin to execute the tissue resection. Here we synthesize the fluorescent gold nanoparticles conjugated with diatrizoic acid and nucleolin-targeted AS1411 aptamer. The nanoparticle conjugates exhibit high water-solubility, good biocompatibility, visible fluorescence and strong X-ray attenuation for computed tomography (CT) contrast enhancement. The fluorescent nanoparticle conjugates are applied as a molecular contrast agent to reveal the tumor location in CL1-5 tumor-bearing mice by CT imaging. Furthermore, the orange-red fluorescence emitting from the conjugates in the CL1-5 tumor can be easily visualized by the naked eyes. After the resection, the IVIS measurements show that the fluorescence signal of the nanoparticle conjugates in the tumor is greatly enhanced in comparison to that in the controlled experiment. Our work has shown potential application of functionalized nanoparticles as a dual-function imaging agent in clinical fluorescence-guided surgery. PMID:26507179

  20. Simultaneous DNA and RNA isolation from brain punches for epigenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spengler Dietmar

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation play an important role for gene expression and are regulated by developmental and environmental signals. DNA methylation typically occurs in a highly tissue- and cell-specific manner. This raises a severe challenge when studying discrete, small regions of the brain where cellular heterogeneity is high and tissue quantity limited. Because gene expression and methylation are often tightly linked it appears of interest to compare both parameters in the same sample. Findings We present a refined method for the simultaneous extraction of DNA for bisulfite sequencing and RNA for expression analysis from small mouse brain tissue punches. This method can also be easily adapted for other small tissues or cell populations. Conclusions The method described herein results in DNA and RNA of a quantity and quality permitting highly reliable bisulfite analysis and quantitative RT-PCR measurements, respectively.

  1. RNA-dependent RNA polymerases of plants

    OpenAIRE

    Fraenkel-Conrat, H

    1983-01-01

    The existence of RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (EC 2.7.7.48) in plants has been definitely proven by their isolation in pure form from cucumber and tobacco in our laboratory and from cowpea at Wageningen. These enzymes are single-chain proteins of 100-130 kilodaltons. They show clear physical and biochemical differences characteristic for a given plant species, even when their amounts in the plants were greatly increased prior to isolation by infection with the same virus. The role of these e...

  2. RNA decay by messenger RNA interferases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Mikkel; Overgaard, Martin; Winther, Kristoffer Skovbo; Gerdes, Kenn

    2008-01-01

    Two abundant toxin-antitoxin (TA) gene families, relBE and mazEF, encode mRNA cleaving enzymes whose ectopic overexpression abruptly inhibits translation and thereby induces a bacteriostatic condition. Here we describe and discuss protocols for the overproduction, purification, and analysis of mRNA...... cleaving enzymes such as RelE of Escherichia coli and the corresponding antitoxin RelB. In particular, we describe a set of plasmid vectors useful for the detailed analysis of cleavage sites in model mRNAs....

  3. Inhibition of mammalian RNA polymerase by 5,6-dichlororibofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB) and DRB triphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, C; Hausen, P

    1978-01-01

    DRB triphosphate inhibits activity of isolated RNA polymerase B, and, to a lesser extent, that of polymerase A. The same holds true for transcription in isolated nuclei. It does not act as an initiation inhibitor. In all cases, high concentrations of DRB triphosphate are required. Cells do not phosphorylate DRB to a measurable extent. hn RNA resistant to DRB is initiated with both ATP and GTP in the presence of the drug. These experiments render the hypothesis unlikely that DRB triphosphate in the cell specifically interferes with the initiation reaction of polymerase B. PMID:704359

  4. The specificity of long noncoding RNA expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloss, Brian S; Dinger, Marcel E

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as a fundamental molecular class whose members play pivotal roles in the regulation of the genome. The observation of pervasive transcription of mammalian genomes in the early 2000s sparked a revolution in the understanding of information flow in eukaryotic cells and the incredible flexibility and dynamic nature of the transcriptome. As a molecular class, distinct loci yielding lncRNAs are set to outnumber those yielding mRNAs. However, like many important discoveries, the road leading to uncovering this diverse class of molecules that act through a remarkable repertoire of mechanisms, was not a straight one. The same characteristic that most distinguishes lncRNAs from mRNAs, i.e. their developmental-stage, tissue-, and cell-specific expression, was one of the major impediments to their discovery and recognition as potentially functional regulatory molecules. With growing numbers of lncRNAs being assigned to biological functions, the specificity of lncRNA expression is now increasingly recognized as a characteristic that imbues lncRNAs with great potential as biomarkers and for the development of highly targeted therapeutics. Here we review the history of lncRNA research and how technological advances and insight into biological complexity have gone hand-in-hand in shaping this revolution. We anticipate that as increasing numbers of these molecules, often described as the dark matter of the genome, are characterized and the structure-function relationship of lncRNAs becomes better understood, it may ultimately be feasible to decipher what these non-(protein)-coding genes encode. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Clues to long noncoding RNA taxonomy1, edited by Dr. Tetsuro Hirose and Dr. Shinichi Nakagawa. PMID:26297315

  5. Topology of RNA-RNA interaction structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jørgen Ellegaard; Huang, Fenix Wenda; Penner, Robert;

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The topological filtration of interacting RNA complexes is studied, and the role is analyzed of certain diagrams called irreducible shadows, which form suitable building blocks for more general structures. We prove that, for two interacting RNAs, called interaction structures, there exist...

  6. Uterine epithelial cells specifically induce interferon-stimulated genes in response to polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid independently of estradiol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mickey V Patel

    Full Text Available Interferon β (IFNβ is an antiviral cytokine secreted in response to pathogenic exposure that creates a restrictive intracellular environment through the action of downstream interferon-stimulated genes (ISG. The objective of this study was to examine the expression of IFNβ and ISG in both human uterine epithelial cells (UEC and the ECC-1 uterine epithelial cell line and determine if expression changes with TLR stimulation and hormone exposure. Stimulation of primary uterine epithelial cells and ECC-1 cells with the TLR3 agonist poly (I:C induced the mRNA expression of IFNβ, MxA, OAS2 and PKR. Other TLR agonists including imiquimod and CpG had no effect on either IFNβ or ISG expression. In contrast to ECC-1 cell responses which were slower, maximal IFNβ upregulation in UEC occurred 3 hours post-stimulation and preceded the ISG response which peaked approximately 12 hours after poly (I:C exposure. Unexpectedly, estradiol, either alone or prior to treatment with poly (I:C, had no effect on IFNβ or ISG expression. Blockade of the IFN receptor abrogated the upregulation of MxA, OAS2 and PKR. Furthermore, neutralizing antibodies against IFNβ partially inhibited the upregulation of all three ISG. Estradiol, directly and in the presence of poly (I:C had no effect on IFNβ and ISG expression. These results indicate that uterine epithelial cells are important sentinels of the innate immune system and demonstrate that uterine epithelial cells are capable of mounting a rapid IFN-mediated antiviral response that is independent of estradiol and is therefore potentially sustained throughout the menstrual cycle to aid in the defense of the uterus against potential pathogens.

  7. Plant RNA binding proteins for control of RNA virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Huh, Sung Un; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2013-01-01

    Plant RNA viruses have effective strategies to infect host plants through either direct or indirect interactions with various host proteins, thus suppressing the host immune system. When plant RNA viruses enter host cells exposed RNAs of viruses are recognized by the host immune system through processes such as siRNA-dependent silencing. Interestingly, some host RNA binding proteins have been involved in the inhibition of RNA virus replication, movement, and translation through RNA-specific b...

  8. Ab initio RNA folding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RNA molecules are essential cellular machines performing a wide variety of functions for which a specific three-dimensional structure is required. Over the last several years, the experimental determination of RNA structures through x-ray crystallography and NMR seems to have reached a plateau in the number of structures resolved each year, but as more and more RNA sequences are being discovered, the need for structure prediction tools to complement experimental data is strong. Theoretical approaches to RNA folding have been developed since the late nineties, when the first algorithms for secondary structure prediction appeared. Over the last 10 years a number of prediction methods for 3D structures have been developed, first based on bioinformatics and data-mining, and more recently based on a coarse-grained physical representation of the systems. In this review we are going to present the challenges of RNA structure prediction and the main ideas behind bioinformatic approaches and physics-based approaches. We will focus on the description of the more recent physics-based phenomenological models and on how they are built to include the specificity of the interactions of RNA bases, whose role is critical in folding. Through examples from different models, we will point out the strengths of physics-based approaches, which are able not only to predict equilibrium structures, but also to investigate dynamical and thermodynamical behavior, and the open challenges to include more key interactions ruling RNA folding. (topical review)

  9. Ab initio RNA folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cragnolini, Tristan; Derreumaux, Philippe; Pasquali, Samuela

    2015-06-01

    RNA molecules are essential cellular machines performing a wide variety of functions for which a specific three-dimensional structure is required. Over the last several years, the experimental determination of RNA structures through x-ray crystallography and NMR seems to have reached a plateau in the number of structures resolved each year, but as more and more RNA sequences are being discovered, the need for structure prediction tools to complement experimental data is strong. Theoretical approaches to RNA folding have been developed since the late nineties, when the first algorithms for secondary structure prediction appeared. Over the last 10 years a number of prediction methods for 3D structures have been developed, first based on bioinformatics and data-mining, and more recently based on a coarse-grained physical representation of the systems. In this review we are going to present the challenges of RNA structure prediction and the main ideas behind bioinformatic approaches and physics-based approaches. We will focus on the description of the more recent physics-based phenomenological models and on how they are built to include the specificity of the interactions of RNA bases, whose role is critical in folding. Through examples from different models, we will point out the strengths of physics-based approaches, which are able not only to predict equilibrium structures, but also to investigate dynamical and thermodynamical behavior, and the open challenges to include more key interactions ruling RNA folding.

  10. RNA Localization in Astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Rune

    2012-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) localization is a mechanism by which polarized cells can regulate protein synthesis to specific subcellular compartments in a spatial and temporal manner, and plays a pivotal role in multiple physiological processes from embryonic development to cell differentiation and...... cell protrusions of both cell types. Moreover, the NGS analysis revealed that the mRNA of the intermediate filament proteins nestin and glial fibrilary acidic protein (GFAP) significantlyaccumulatedin astrocyte protrusions, which was examined in closer detail. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH...

  11. Generation of siRNA Nanosheets for Efficient RNA Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyejin; Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Jong Bum

    2016-04-01

    After the discovery of small interference RNA (siRNA), nanostructured siRNA delivery systems have been introduced to achieve an efficient regulation of the target gene expression. Here we report a new siRNA-generating two dimensional nanostructure in a formation of nanosized sheet. Inspired by tunable mechanical and functional properties of the previously reported RNA membrane, siRNA nanosized sheets (siRNA-NS) with multiple Dicer cleavage sites were prepared. The siRNA-NS has two dimensional structure, providing a large surface area for Dicer to cleave the siRNA-NS for the generation of functional siRNAs. Furthermore, downregulation of the cellular target gene expression was achieved by delivery of siRNA-NS without chemical modification of RNA strands or conjugation to other substances.

  12. Developed and evaluated a multiplex mRNA profiling system for body fluid identification in Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Feng; Luo, Haibo; Hou, Yiping

    2015-10-01

    In forensic casework, identification the cellular origin from a biological sample is crucial to the case investigation and reconstruction in crime scene. DNA/RNA co-extraction for STR typing and human body fluids identification has been proposed as an efficient and comprehensive assay for forensic analysis. Several cell-specific messenger RNA (mRNA) markers for identification of the body fluids have been proposed by previous studies. In this study, a novel multiplex mRNA profiling system included 19 markers was developed and performed by reverse transcription endpoint polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The multiplex combined 3 housekeeping gene markers and 16 cell-specific markers that have been used to identify five types of human body fluids: peripheral blood, semen, saliva, vaginal secretions and menstrual blood. The specificity, sensitivity, stability and detectability of the mixture were explored in our study. Majority of the cell-specific mRNA markers showed high specificity, although cross-reactivity was observed sporadically. Specific profiling for per body fluid was obtained. Moreover, the interpretation guidelines for inference of body fluid types were performed according to the A. Lindenbergh et al. The scoring guidelines can be applied to any RNA multiplex, which was based on six different scoring categories (observed, observed and fits, sporadically observed and fits, not observed, sporadically observed, not reliable, and non-specific due to high input). The simultaneous extraction of DNA showed positive full or partial profiling results of all samples. It demonstrated that the approach of combined STR-profiling and RNA profiling was suitable and reliable to detect the donor and origin of human body fluids in Chinese Han population. PMID:26311108

  13. Shapes of interacting RNA complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fu, Benjamin Mingming; Reidys, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Shapes of interacting RNA complexes are studied using a filtration via their topological genus. A shape of an RNA complex is obtained by (iteratively) collapsing stacks and eliminating hairpin loops.This shape-projection preserves the topological core of the RNA complex and for fixed topological...... genus there are only finitely many such shapes. Our main result is a new bijection that relates the shapes of RNA complexes with shapes of RNA structures. This allows to compute the shape polynomial of RNA complexes via the shape polynomial of RNA structures. We furthermore present a linear time uniform...... sampling algorithm for shapes of RNA complexes of fixed topological genus....

  14. Electronic fingerprinting of RNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Gegenheimer, P

    1988-01-01

    Software has been developed to assist RNA fingerprinting analysis. One program generates, from a DNA sequence data file, the oligonucleotides resulting from digestion of an RNA transcript labeled with any specified nucleotide(s). Oligonucleotides are sorted according to their position on the fingerprint. Expected molar yields and products of secondary redigestion are also indicated. A second program facilitates calculation of experimental molar yields of oligonucleotides.

  15. mRNA turnover rate limits siRNA and microRNA efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Larsson, Erik; Sander, Chris; Marks, Debora

    2010-01-01

    What determines how strongly an mRNA responds to a microRNA or an siRNA? We know that properties of the sequence match between the small RNA and the mRNA are crucial. However, large-scale validations of siRNA efficacies have shown that certain transcripts remain recalcitrant to perturbation even after repeated redesign of the siRNA (Krueger et al, 2007). Weak response to RNAi may thus be an inherent property of the mRNA, but the underlying factors have proven difficult to uncover. siRNAs indu...

  16. Dual stimulus of hyperthermia and intracellular redox environment triggered release of siRNA for tumor-specific therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanfang; Yang, Yang; Xie, Xiangyang; Xu, Xueqing; Xia, Xuejun; Wang, Hongliang; Li, Lin; Dong, Wujun; Ma, Panpan; Liu, Yuling

    2016-06-15

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) offers a new and potential therapeutic strategy for tackling many diseases at the molecular level. Recently, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) conjugated with siRNA via disulfide-bonds (designated as siRNA-CPPs) were reported to form glutathione-sensitive carriers. However, non-cell specificity, CPPs degradation and the unwanted reduction of siRNA-CPPs before reaching the targeted tissue in vivo hampered the development of siRNA-CPPs. Herein, utilizing the dual stimulus of hyperthermia and the intracellular redox environment, we devised a thermosensitive liposome (TSL) containing an Asparagine-Glycine-Arginine (NGR) peptide and reducible siRNA-CPPs for tumor-specific siRNA transfection (siRNA-CPPs/NGR-TSL), in which siRNA-CPPs were "caged" in NGR-TSL to overcome their limitations in vivo. The functional nanocarrier possessed a small particle size of approximately 90nm, a high drug encapsulation efficiency of approximately 86% and good serum stability. Both free siRNA-CPPs and siRNA-CPPs/NGR-TSL (preheated) silenced c-myc in human fibrosarcoma (HT-1080) cells in vitro. However, in an HT-1080 xenograft murine model, siRNA-CPPs/NGR-TSL with hyperthermia displayed superior in vivo antitumor efficacy (about 3-fold) and gene silencing efficiency (about 2-fold) compared with free siRNA-CPPs under hyperthermia. This study demonstrates that the constructed vesicle in combination with hyperthermia could greatly improve the in vivo stability of siRNA-CPPs and synergistically enhance its cancer therapy efficiency. PMID:27106526

  17. Topology of RNA-RNA interaction structures

    CERN Document Server

    Andersen, Jørgen E; Penner, Robert C; Reidys, Christian M

    2011-01-01

    The topological filtration of interacting RNA complexes is studied and the role is analyzed of certain diagrams called irreducible shadows, which form suitable building blocks for more general structures. We prove that for two interacting RNAs, called interaction structures, there exist for fixed genus only finitely many irreducible shadows. This implies that for fixed genus there are only finitely many classes of interaction structures. In particular the simplest case of genus zero already provides the formalism for certain types of structures that occur in nature and are not covered by other filtrations. This case of genus zero interaction structures is already of practical interest, is studied here in detail and found to be expressed by a multiple context-free grammar extending the usual one for RNA secondary structures. We show that in $O(n^6)$ time and $O(n^4)$ space complexity, this grammar for genus zero interaction structures provides not only minimum free energy solutions but also the complete partit...

  18. Yeast nuclear RNA processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jade; Bernstein; Eric; A; Toth

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear RNA processing requires dynamic and intricately regulated machinery composed of multiple enzymes and their cofactors.In this review,we summarize recent experiments using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system that have yielded important insights regarding the conversion of pre-RNAs to functional RNAs,and the elimination of aberrant RNAs and unneeded intermediates from the nuclear RNA pool.Much progress has been made recently in describing the 3D structure of many elements of the nuclear degradation machinery and its cofactors.Similarly,the regulatory mechanisms that govern RNA processing are gradually coming into focus.Such advances invariably generate many new questions,which we highlight in this review.

  19. Alignments of RNA structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blin, Guillaume; Denise, Alain; Dulucq, Serge; Herrbach, Claire; Touzet, Hélène

    2010-01-01

    We describe a theoretical unifying framework to express the comparison of RNA structures, which we call alignment hierarchy. This framework relies on the definition of common supersequences for arc-annotated sequences and encompasses the main existing models for RNA structure comparison based on trees and arc-annotated sequences with a variety of edit operations. It also gives rise to edit models that have not been studied yet. We provide a thorough analysis of the alignment hierarchy, including a new polynomial-time algorithm and an NP-completeness proof. The polynomial-time algorithm involves biologically relevant edit operations such as pairing or unpairing nucleotides. It has been implemented in a software, called gardenia, which is available at the Web server http://bioinfo.lifl.fr/RNA/gardenia. PMID:20431150

  20. Sensing of RNA viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2012-01-01

    Our knowledge regarding the contribution of the innate immune system in recognizing and subsequently initiating a host response to an invasion of RNA virus has been rapidly growing over the last decade. Descriptions of the receptors involved and the molecular mechanisms they employ to sense viral...... pathogen-associated molecular patterns have emerged in great detail. This review presents an overview of our current knowledge regarding the receptors used to detect RNA virus invasion, the molecular structures these receptors sense, and the involved downstream signaling pathways....

  1. Gene Suppression of Mouse Testis In Vivo Using Small Interfering RNA Derived from Plasmid Vectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated whether inhibiting gene expression by small interfering RNA (siRNA) can be used for an in vivo model using a germ cell-specific gene (Tex101) as a model target in mouse testis. We generated plasmid-based expression vectors of siRNA targeting the Tex101 gene and transfected them into postnatal day 10 mouse testes by in vivo electroporation. After optimizing the electroporation conditions using a vector transfected into the mouse testis, a combination of high- and low-voltage pulses showed excellent transfection efficiency for the vectors with minimal tissue damage, but gene suppression was transient. Gene suppression by in vivo electroporation may be helpful as an alternative approach when designing experiments to unravel the basic role of testicular molecules

  2. Strategies underlying RNA silencing suppression by negative strand RNA viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Hemmes, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    The research described in this thesis focused on the strategies of negative strand RNA viruses to counteract antiviral RNA silencing. In plants and insects, RNA silencing has been shown to act as a sequence specific antiviral defence mechanism that is characterised by the processing of double stranded (ds)RNA ‘trigger’ molecules into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) by enzymes of the Dicer family. The siRNA molecules are essential components of the RNA induced silencing complex (RISC), which u...

  3. Branched RNA: A New Architecture for RNA Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Aviñó

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Branched RNAs with two and four strands were synthesized. These structures were used to obtain branched siRNA. The branched siRNA duplexes had similar inhibitory capacity as those of unmodified siRNA duplexes, as deduced from gene silencing experiments of the TNF-α protein. Branched RNAs are considered novel structures for siRNA technology, and they provide an innovative tool for specific gene inhibition. As the method described here is compatible with most RNA modifications described to date, these compounds may be further functionalized to obtain more potent siRNA derivatives and can be attached to suitable delivery systems.

  4. Studying RNA-protein interactions in vivo by RNA immunoprecipitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selth, Luke A; Close, Pierre; Svejstrup, Jesper Q

    The crucial roles played by RNA-binding proteins in all aspects of RNA metabolism, particularly in the regulation of transcription, have become increasingly evident. Moreover, other factors that do not directly interact with RNA molecules can nevertheless function proximally to RNA polymerases and...... have significant effects on gene expression. RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP) is a powerful technique used to detect direct and indirect interactions between individual proteins and specific RNA molecules in vivo. Here, we describe RIP methods for both yeast and mammalian cells....

  5. The RNA interference revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lenz

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of double-stranded RNA-mediated gene silencing has rapidly led to its use as a method of choice for blocking a gene, and has turned it into one of the most discussed topics in cell biology. Although still in its infancy, the field of RNA interference has already produced a vast array of results, mainly in Caenorhabditis elegans, but recently also in mammalian systems. Micro-RNAs are short hairpins of RNA capable of blocking translation, which are transcribed from genomic DNA and are implicated in several aspects from development to cell signaling. The present review discusses the main methods used for gene silencing in cell culture and animal models, including the selection of target sequences, delivery methods and strategies for a successful silencing. Expected developments are briefly discussed, ranging from reverse genetics to therapeutics. Thus, the development of the new paradigm of RNA-mediated gene silencing has produced two important advances: knowledge of a basic cellular mechanism present in the majority of eukaryotic cells and access to a potent and specific new method for gene silencing.

  6. B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1: potential stratification factor and therapeutic target for epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qianying; Gui, Ting; Qian, Qiuhong; Li, Lei; Shen, Keng

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer, a vexing challenge for clinical management, still lacks biomarkers for early diagnosis, precise stratification, and prognostic evaluation of patients. B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 (BMI1), a member of the polycomb group of proteins, engages in diverse cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, senescence, and stem cell renewal. In addition, BMI1, as a cancer stem-cell marker, participates in tumorigenesis through various pathways. Rewardingly, recent studies have also revealed a relationship between BMI1 expression and the clinical grade/stage, therapy response, and survival outcome in a majority of human malignancies, including epithelial ovarian cancer. Therefore, BMI1 might serve as a potential stratification factor and treatment target for epithelial ovarian cancer, pending evidence from further investigations. PMID:27578986

  7. B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1: potential stratification factor and therapeutic target for epithelial ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qianying; Gui, Ting; Qian, Qiuhong; Li, Lei; Shen, Keng

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer, a vexing challenge for clinical management, still lacks biomarkers for early diagnosis, precise stratification, and prognostic evaluation of patients. B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 (BMI1), a member of the polycomb group of proteins, engages in diverse cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, senescence, and stem cell renewal. In addition, BMI1, as a cancer stem-cell marker, participates in tumorigenesis through various pathways. Rewardingly, recent studies have also revealed a relationship between BMI1 expression and the clinical grade/stage, therapy response, and survival outcome in a majority of human malignancies, including epithelial ovarian cancer. Therefore, BMI1 might serve as a potential stratification factor and treatment target for epithelial ovarian cancer, pending evidence from further investigations.

  8. Messenger RNA (mRNA) nanoparticle tumour vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phua, Kyle K. L.; Nair, Smita K.; Leong, Kam W.

    2014-06-01

    Use of mRNA-based vaccines for tumour immunotherapy has gained increasing attention in recent years. A growing number of studies applying nanomedicine concepts to mRNA tumour vaccination show that the mRNA delivered in nanoparticle format can generate a more robust immune response. Advances in the past decade have deepened our understanding of gene delivery barriers, mRNA's biological stability and immunological properties, and support the notion for engineering innovations tailored towards a more efficient mRNA nanoparticle vaccine delivery system. In this review we will first examine the suitability of mRNA for engineering manipulations, followed by discussion of a model framework that highlights the barriers to a robust anti-tumour immunity mediated by mRNA encapsulated in nanoparticles. Finally, by consolidating existing literature on mRNA nanoparticle tumour vaccination within the context of this framework, we aim to identify bottlenecks that can be addressed by future nanoengineering research.

  9. Natural RNA circles function as efficient microRNA sponges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Birkballe; Jensen, Trine I; Clausen, Bettina Hjelm;

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression that act by direct base pairing to target sites within untranslated regions of messenger RNAs. Recently, miRNA activity has been shown to be affected by the presence of miRNA sponge transcripts, the so-called comp......MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression that act by direct base pairing to target sites within untranslated regions of messenger RNAs. Recently, miRNA activity has been shown to be affected by the presence of miRNA sponge transcripts, the so......-called competing endogenous RNA in humans and target mimicry in plants. We previously identified a highly expressed circular RNA (circRNA) in human and mouse brain. Here we show that this circRNA acts as a miR-7 sponge; we term this circular transcript ciRS-7 (circular RNA sponge for miR-7). ciRS-7 contains more......R-138 sponge, suggesting that miRNA sponge effects achieved by circRNA formation are a general phenomenon. This study serves as the first, to our knowledge, functional analysis of a naturally expressed circRNA....

  10. Strategies underlying RNA silencing suppression by negative strand RNA viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmes, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    The research described in this thesis focused on the strategies of negative strand RNA viruses to counteract antiviral RNA silencing. In plants and insects, RNA silencing has been shown to act as a sequence specific antiviral defence mechanism that is characterised by the processing of double strand

  11. A closely related group of RNA-dependent RNA polymerases from double-stranded RNA viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Bruenn, J A

    1993-01-01

    Probably one of the first proteinaceous enzymes was an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDRP). Although there are several conserved motifs present in the RDRPs of most positive and double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses, the RDRPs of the dsRNA viruses show no detectable sequence similarity outside the conserved motifs. There is now, however, a group of dsRNA viruses of lower eucaryotes whose RDRPs are detectably similar. The origin of this sequence similarity appears to be common descent from one o...

  12. lncRNA-RNA Interactions across the Human Transcriptome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szcześniak, Michał Wojciech; Makałowska, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) represent a numerous class of non-protein coding transcripts longer than 200 nucleotides. There is possibility that a fraction of lncRNAs are not functional and represent mere transcriptional noise but a growing body of evidence shows they are engaged in a plethora of molecular functions and contribute considerably to the observed diversification of eukaryotic transcriptomes and proteomes. Still, however, only ca. 1% of lncRNAs have well established functions and much remains to be done towards decipherment of their biological roles. One of the least studied aspects of lncRNAs biology is their engagement in gene expression regulation through RNA-RNA interactions. By hybridizing with mate RNA molecules, lncRNAs could potentially participate in modulation of pre-mRNA splicing, RNA editing, mRNA stability control, translation activation, or abrogation of miRNA-induced repression. Here, we implemented a similarity-search based method for transcriptome-wide identification of RNA-RNA interactions, which enabled us to find 18,871,097 lncRNA-RNA base-pairings in human. Further analyses showed that the interactions could be involved in processing, stability control and functions of 57,303 transcripts. An extensive use of RNA-Seq data provided support for approximately one third of the interactions, at least in terms of the two RNA components being co-expressed. The results suggest that lncRNA-RNA interactions are broadly used to regulate and diversify the human transcriptome. PMID:26930590

  13. RNA thermodynamic structural entropy

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Martin, Juan Antonio; Clote, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Conformational entropy for atomic-level, three dimensional biomolecules is known experimentally to play an important role in protein-ligand discrimination, yet reliable computation of entropy remains a difficult problem. Here we describe the first two accurate and efficient algorithms to compute the conformational entropy for RNA secondary structures, with respect to the Turner energy model, where free energy parameters are determined from UV absorption experiments. An algorithm to compute th...

  14. RNA Interference in livestock

    OpenAIRE

    Merkl, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    RNA Interference (RNAi) allows experimental reduction of gene expression, providing a tool for the investigation of gene function, disease therapy and the generation of animal models for human diseases. RNAi offers an opportunity to carry out precise genetic manipulations in a wide variety of species. This thesis describes the use of RNAi to downregulate two porcine genes, the whey protein Beta-Lactoglobulin (BLG) and the tumor suppressor protein p53. BLG is a major component in porcine and r...

  15. The Functions of RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerases in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Willmann, Matthew R.; Endres, Matthew W.; Cook, Rebecca T.; Gregory, Brian D.

    2011-01-01

    One recently identified mechanism that regulates mRNA abundance is RNA silencing, and pioneering work in Arabidopsis thaliana and other genetic model organisms helped define this process. RNA silencing pathways are triggered by either self-complementary fold-back structures or the production of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) that gives rise to small RNAs (smRNAs) known as microRNAs (miRNAs) or small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs). These smRNAs direct sequence-specific regulation of various gene trans...

  16. MicroRNA from tuberculosis RNA: A bioinformatics study

    OpenAIRE

    Wiwanitkit, Somsri; Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2012-01-01

    The role of microRNA in the pathogenesis of pulmonary tuberculosis is the interesting topic in chest medicine at present. Recently, it was proposed that the microRNA can be a useful biomarker for monitoring of pulmonary tuberculosis and might be the important part in pathogenesis of disease. Here, the authors perform a bioinformatics study to assess the microRNA within known tuberculosis RNA. The microRNA part can be detected and this can be important key information in further study of the p...

  17. RNA viruses can hijack vertebrate microRNAs to suppress innate immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trobaugh, Derek W.; Gardner, Christina L.; Sun, Chengqun; Haddow, Andrew D.; Wang, Eryu; Chapnik, Elik; Mildner, Alexander; Weaver, Scott C.; Ryman, Kate D.; Klimstra, William B.

    2014-02-01

    Currently, there is little evidence for a notable role of the vertebrate microRNA (miRNA) system in the pathogenesis of RNA viruses. This is primarily attributed to the ease with which these viruses mutate to disrupt recognition and growth suppression by host miRNAs. Here we report that the haematopoietic-cell-specific miRNA miR-142-3p potently restricts the replication of the mosquito-borne North American eastern equine encephalitis virus in myeloid-lineage cells by binding to sites in the 3' non-translated region of its RNA genome. However, by limiting myeloid cell tropism and consequent innate immunity induction, this restriction directly promotes neurologic disease manifestations characteristic of eastern equine encephalitis virus infection in humans. Furthermore, the region containing the miR-142-3p binding sites is essential for efficient virus infection of mosquito vectors. We propose that RNA viruses can adapt to use antiviral properties of vertebrate miRNAs to limit replication in particular cell types and that this restriction can lead to exacerbation of disease severity.

  18. RNA-SSPT: RNA Secondary Structure Prediction Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Freed; Mahboob, Shahid; Gulzar, Tahsin; Din, Salah U; Hanif, Tanzeela; Ahmad, Hifza; Afzal, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    The prediction of RNA structure is useful for understanding evolution for both in silico and in vitro studies. Physical methods like NMR studies to predict RNA secondary structure are expensive and difficult. Computational RNA secondary structure prediction is easier. Comparative sequence analysis provides the best solution. But secondary structure prediction of a single RNA sequence is challenging. RNA-SSPT is a tool that computationally predicts secondary structure of a single RNA sequence. Most of the RNA secondary structure prediction tools do not allow pseudoknots in the structure or are unable to locate them. Nussinov dynamic programming algorithm has been implemented in RNA-SSPT. The current studies shows only energetically most favorable secondary structure is required and the algorithm modification is also available that produces base pairs to lower the total free energy of the secondary structure. For visualization of RNA secondary structure, NAVIEW in C language is used and modified in C# for tool requirement. RNA-SSPT is built in C# using Dot Net 2.0 in Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 Professional edition. The accuracy of RNA-SSPT is tested in terms of Sensitivity and Positive Predicted Value. It is a tool which serves both secondary structure prediction and secondary structure visualization purposes. PMID:24250115

  19. Genetic relatedness of orbiviruses by RNA-RNA blot hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RNA-RNA blot hybridization was developed in order to identify type-specific genes among double-stranded (ds) RNA viruses, to assess the genetic relatedness of dsRNA viruses and to classify new strains. Viral dsRNA segments were electrophoresed through 10% polyacrylamide gels, transferred to membranes, and hybridized to [5'32P]-pCp labeled genomic RNA from a related strain. Hybridization was performed at 520C, 50% formamide, 5X SSC. Under these conditions heterologous RNA species must share ≥ 74% sequence homology in order to form stable dsRNA hybrids. Cognate genes of nine members of the Palyam serogroup of orbiviruses were identified and their sequence relatedness to the prototype. Palyam virus, was determined. Reciprocal blot hybridizations were performed using radiolabeled genomic RNA of all members of the Palyam serogroup. Unique and variant genes were identified by lack of cross-homology or by weak homology between segments. Since genes 2 and 6 exhibited the highest degree of sequence variability, response to the vertebrate immune system may be a major cause of sequence divergence among members of a single serogroup. Changuinola serogroup isolates were compared by dot-blot hybridization, while Colorado tick fever (CTF) serogroup isolates were compared by the RNA-RNA blot hybridization procedure described for reovirus and Palyam serogroup isolates. Preliminary blot hybridization data were also obtained on the relatedness of members of different Orbivirus serogroups

  20. Current preclinical small interfering RNA (siRNA)-based conjugate systems for RNA therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Hyeon; Kang, Yoon Young; Jang, Hyo-Eun; Mok, Hyejung

    2016-09-01

    Recent promising clinical results of RNA therapeutics have drawn big attention of academia and industries to RNA therapeutics and their carrier systems. To improve their feasibility in clinics, systemic evaluations of currently available carrier systems under clinical trials and preclinical studies are needed. In this review, we focus on recent noticeable preclinical studies and clinical results regarding siRNA-based conjugates for clinical translations. Advantages and drawbacks of siRNA-based conjugates are discussed, compared to particle-based delivery systems. Then, representative siRNA-based conjugates with aptamers, peptides, carbohydrates, lipids, polymers, and nanostructured materials are introduced. To improve feasibility of siRNA conjugates in preclinical studies, several considerations for the rational design of siRNA conjugates in terms of cleavability, immune responses, multivalent conjugations, and mechanism of action are also presented. Lastly, we discuss lessons from previous preclinical and clinical studies related to siRNA conjugates and perspectives of their clinical applications. PMID:26514375

  1. RNA Silencing in Aspergillus nidulans Is Independent of RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerases

    OpenAIRE

    Hammond, T. M.; Keller, N P

    2005-01-01

    The versatility of RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRPs) in eukaryotic gene silencing is perhaps best illustrated in the kingdom Fungi. Biochemical and genetic studies of Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Neurospora crassa show that these types of enzymes are involved in a number of fundamental gene-silencing processes, including heterochromatin regulation and RNA silencing in S. pombe and meiotic silencing and RNA silencing in N. crassa. Here we show that Aspergillus nidulans, another model fung...

  2. Nanoparticle siRNA against BMI-1 with a Polyethylenimine-Laminarin Conjugate for Gene Therapy in Human Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xueling; Liu, Lei; Zhou, Yuxue; Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Li, Huixiang

    2016-01-20

    The B-cell-specific Moloney leukemia virus inset site 1 gene (BMI-1) has attracted considerable attention in recent years because of its key role in breast cancer development and metastasis. The downregulation of BMI-1 expression via small interfering RNA (siRNA) effectively inhibits tumor growth. However, the successful application of this therapy is limited by the unavailability of an appropriate vector for siRNA transfer. Therefore, this study aimed to construct a novel laminarin-based nonviral gene transfer vector to carry a constructed BMI-1-targeting siRNA and to investigate the in vitro and in vivo antitumor effects of this siRNA on breast cancer cells. To enhance the siRNA-carrying capacity, we introduced polyethylenimine (PEI) to laminarin's surface via N,N'-carbonyldiimidazole, which produced the cationic PEI-modified laminarin conjugate nLP. Subsequent in vitro experiments indicated that nLP not only formed a nanoparticle with a diameter of 200 nm through electrostatic interactions with siRNA but also showed high efficiency (95.0%) in the delivery siRNA to MCF-7 cells. The nanoparticle targeting BMI-1 (nLP/siBMI-2) reduced BMI-1 expression in breast MCF-7 cells by 90.9% reduction. An in vivo tumor suppression experiment demonstrated that the nLP/siBMI-2 nanoparticle had relatively low toxicity and good gene-therapeutic efficacy, with a tumor inhibition rate of 46.6%. PMID:26629893

  3. Cell-specific targeting of lentiviral vectors mediated by fusion proteins derived from Sindbis virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, or avian sarcoma/leukosis virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marino Michael P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to efficiently and selectively target gene delivery vectors to specific cell types in vitro and in vivo remains one of the formidable challenges in gene therapy. We pursued two different strategies to target lentiviral vector delivery to specific cell types. In one of the strategies, vector particles bearing a membrane-bound stem cell factor sequence plus a separate fusion protein based either on Sindbis virus strain TR339 glycoproteins or the vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein were used to selectively transduce cells expressing the corresponding stem cell factor receptor (c-kit. An alternative approach involved soluble avian sarcoma/leukosis virus receptors fused to cell-specific ligands including stem cell factor and erythropoietin for targeting lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with avian sarcoma/leukosis virus envelope proteins to cells that express the corresponding receptors. Results The titers of unconcentrated vector particles bearing Sindbis virus strain TR339 or vesicular stomatitis virus G fusion proteins plus stem cell factor in the context of c-kit expressing cells were up to 3.2 × 105 transducing units per ml while vector particles lacking the stem cell factor ligand displayed titers that were approximately 80 fold lower. On cells that lacked the c-kit receptor, the titers of stem cell factor-containing vectors were approximately 40 times lower compared to c-kit-expressing cells. Lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with avian sarcoma/leukosis virus subgroup A or B envelope proteins and bearing bi-functional bridge proteins encoding erythropoietin or stem cell factor fused to the soluble extracellular domains of the avian sarcoma/leukosis virus subgroup A or B receptors resulted in efficient transduction of erythropoietin receptor or c-kit-expressing cells. Transduction of erythropoietin receptor-expressing cells mediated by bi-functional bridge proteins was found to be dependent on the dose, the

  4. Global Mapping of Human RNA-RNA Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Eesha; Sterne-Weiler, Tim; O'Hanlon, Dave; Blencowe, Benjamin J

    2016-05-19

    The majority of the human genome is transcribed into non-coding (nc)RNAs that lack known biological functions or else are only partially characterized. Numerous characterized ncRNAs function via base pairing with target RNA sequences to direct their biological activities, which include critical roles in RNA processing, modification, turnover, and translation. To define roles for ncRNAs, we have developed a method enabling the global-scale mapping of RNA-RNA duplexes crosslinked in vivo, "LIGation of interacting RNA followed by high-throughput sequencing" (LIGR-seq). Applying this method in human cells reveals a remarkable landscape of RNA-RNA interactions involving all major classes of ncRNA and mRNA. LIGR-seq data reveal unexpected interactions between small nucleolar (sno)RNAs and mRNAs, including those involving the orphan C/D box snoRNA, SNORD83B, that control steady-state levels of its target mRNAs. LIGR-seq thus represents a powerful approach for illuminating the functions of the myriad of uncharacterized RNAs that act via base-pairing interactions. PMID:27184080

  5. Transfer RNA and human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Jamie A; Francklyn, Christopher S; Robey-Bond, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Pathological mutations in tRNA genes and tRNA processing enzymes are numerous and result in very complicated clinical phenotypes. Mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA) genes are "hotspots" for pathological mutations and over 200 mt-tRNA mutations have been linked to various disease states. Often these mutations prevent tRNA aminoacylation. Disrupting this primary function affects protein synthesis and the expression, folding, and function of oxidative phosphorylation enzymes. Mitochondrial tRNA mutations manifest in a wide panoply of diseases related to cellular energetics, including COX deficiency (cytochrome C oxidase), mitochondrial myopathy, MERRF (Myoclonic Epilepsy with Ragged Red Fibers), and MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes). Diseases caused by mt-tRNA mutations can also affect very specific tissue types, as in the case of neurosensory non-syndromic hearing loss and pigmentary retinopathy, diabetes mellitus, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Importantly, mitochondrial heteroplasmy plays a role in disease severity and age of onset as well. Not surprisingly, mutations in enzymes that modify cytoplasmic and mitochondrial tRNAs are also linked to a diverse range of clinical phenotypes. In addition to compromised aminoacylation of the tRNAs, mutated modifying enzymes can also impact tRNA expression and abundance, tRNA modifications, tRNA folding, and even tRNA maturation (e.g., splicing). Some of these pathological mutations in tRNAs and processing enzymes are likely to affect non-canonical tRNA functions, and contribute to the diseases without significantly impacting on translation. This chapter will review recent literature on the relation of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic tRNA, and enzymes that process tRNAs, to human disease. We explore the mechanisms involved in the clinical presentation of these various diseases with an emphasis on neurological disease. PMID:24917879

  6. Entamoeba lysyl-tRNA synthetase contains a cytokine-like domain with chemokine activity towards human endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Castro de Moura

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Immunological pressure encountered by protozoan parasites drives the selection of strategies to modulate or avoid the immune responses of their hosts. Here we show that the parasite Entamoeba histolytica has evolved a chemokine that mimics the sequence, structure, and function of the human cytokine HsEMAPII (Homo sapiens endothelial monocyte activating polypeptide II. This Entamoeba EMAPII-like polypeptide (EELP is translated as a domain attached to two different aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS that are overexpressed when parasites are exposed to inflammatory signals. EELP is dispensable for the tRNA aminoacylation activity of the enzymes that harbor it, and it is cleaved from them by Entamoeba proteases to generate a standalone cytokine. Isolated EELP acts as a chemoattractant for human cells, but its cell specificity is different from that of HsEMAPII. We show that cell specificity differences between HsEMAPII and EELP can be swapped by site directed mutagenesis of only two residues in the cytokines' signal sequence. Thus, Entamoeba has evolved a functional mimic of an aaRS-associated human cytokine with modified cell specificity.

  7. RNA Thermodynamic Structural Entropy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Garcia-Martin

    Full Text Available Conformational entropy for atomic-level, three dimensional biomolecules is known experimentally to play an important role in protein-ligand discrimination, yet reliable computation of entropy remains a difficult problem. Here we describe the first two accurate and efficient algorithms to compute the conformational entropy for RNA secondary structures, with respect to the Turner energy model, where free energy parameters are determined from UV absorption experiments. An algorithm to compute the derivational entropy for RNA secondary structures had previously been introduced, using stochastic context free grammars (SCFGs. However, the numerical value of derivational entropy depends heavily on the chosen context free grammar and on the training set used to estimate rule probabilities. Using data from the Rfam database, we determine that both of our thermodynamic methods, which agree in numerical value, are substantially faster than the SCFG method. Thermodynamic structural entropy is much smaller than derivational entropy, and the correlation between length-normalized thermodynamic entropy and derivational entropy is moderately weak to poor. In applications, we plot the structural entropy as a function of temperature for known thermoswitches, such as the repression of heat shock gene expression (ROSE element, we determine that the correlation between hammerhead ribozyme cleavage activity and total free energy is improved by including an additional free energy term arising from conformational entropy, and we plot the structural entropy of windows of the HIV-1 genome. Our software RNAentropy can compute structural entropy for any user-specified temperature, and supports both the Turner'99 and Turner'04 energy parameters. It follows that RNAentropy is state-of-the-art software to compute RNA secondary structure conformational entropy. Source code is available at https://github.com/clotelab/RNAentropy/; a full web server is available at http

  8. RNA interference in Lepidoptera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terenius, Ole; Papanicolaou, Alexie; Garbutt, Jennie S.;

    2011-01-01

    Gene silencing through RNA interference (RNAi) has revolutionized the study of gene function, particularly in non-model insects. However, in Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies) RNAi has many times proven to be difficult to achieve. Most of the negative results have been anecdotal and the positive...... in RNAi experiments in Lepidoptera are discussed. The review also points to a need to further investigate the mechanism of RNAi in lepidopteran insects and its possible connection to the innate immune response. Our general understanding of RNAi in Lepidoptera will be further aided in the future as...

  9. RNA-PAIRS: RNA probabilistic assignment of imino resonance shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahrami, Arash; Clos, Lawrence J.; Markley, John L.; Butcher, Samuel E. [National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison (United States); Eghbalnia, Hamid R., E-mail: eghbalhd@uc.edu [University of Cincinnati, Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology (United States)

    2012-04-15

    The significant biological role of RNA has further highlighted the need for improving the accuracy, efficiency and the reach of methods for investigating RNA structure and function. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is vital to furthering the goals of RNA structural biology because of its distinctive capabilities. However, the dispersion pattern in the NMR spectra of RNA makes automated resonance assignment, a key step in NMR investigation of biomolecules, remarkably challenging. Herein we present RNA Probabilistic Assignment of Imino Resonance Shifts (RNA-PAIRS), a method for the automated assignment of RNA imino resonances with synchronized verification and correction of predicted secondary structure. RNA-PAIRS represents an advance in modeling the assignment paradigm because it seeds the probabilistic network for assignment with experimental NMR data, and predicted RNA secondary structure, simultaneously and from the start. Subsequently, RNA-PAIRS sets in motion a dynamic network that reverberates between predictions and experimental evidence in order to reconcile and rectify resonance assignments and secondary structure information. The procedure is halted when assignments and base-parings are deemed to be most consistent with observed crosspeaks. The current implementation of RNA-PAIRS uses an initial peak list derived from proton-nitrogen heteronuclear multiple quantum correlation ({sup 1}H-{sup 15}N 2D HMQC) and proton-proton nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-{sup 1}H 2D NOESY) experiments. We have evaluated the performance of RNA-PAIRS by using it to analyze NMR datasets from 26 previously studied RNAs, including a 111-nucleotide complex. For moderately sized RNA molecules, and over a range of comparatively complex structural motifs, the average assignment accuracy exceeds 90%, while the average base pair prediction accuracy exceeded 93%. RNA-PAIRS yielded accurate assignments and base pairings consistent with imino

  10. RNA SURVEILLANCE– AN EMERGING ROLE FOR RNA REGULATORY NETWORKS IN AGING

    OpenAIRE

    Montano, Monty; Long, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we describe recent advances in the field of RNA regulatory biology and relate these advances to aging science. We introduce a new term, RNA surveillance, an RNA regulatory process that is conserved in metazoans, and describe how RNA surveillance represents molecular cross-talk between two emerging RNA regulatory systems – RNA interference and RNA editing. We discuss how RNA surveillance mechanisms influence mRNA and microRNA expression and activity during lifespan. Additionall...

  11. Germ cell specific overactivation of WNT/βcatenin signalling has no effect on folliculogenesis but causes fertility defects due to abnormal foetal development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manish; Camlin, Nicole J.; Holt, Janet E.; Teixeira, Jose M.; McLaughlin, Eileen A.; Tanwar, Pradeep S.

    2016-01-01

    All the major components of the WNT signalling pathway are expressed in female germ cells and embryos. However, their functional relevance in oocyte biology is currently unclear. We examined ovaries collected from TCFGFP mice, a well-known Wnt reporter mouse model, and found dynamic changes in the Wnt/βcatenin signalling activity during different stages of oocyte development and maturation. To understand the functional importance of Wnt signalling in oocytes, we developed a mouse model with the germ cell-specific constitutive activation of βcatenin using cre recombinase driven by the DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box protein 4 (Ddx4) gene promoter. Histopathological and functional analysis of ovaries from these mutant mice (Ctnnb1ex3cko) showed no defects in ovarian functions, oocytes, ovulation and early embryonic development. However, breeding of the Ctnnb1ex3cko female mice with males of known fertility never resulted in birth of mutant pups. Examination of uteri from time pregnant mutant females revealed defects in ectoderm differentiation leading to abnormal foetal development and premature death. Collectively, our work has established the role of active WNT/βcatenin signalling in oocyte biology and foetal development, and provides novel insights into the possible mechanisms of complications in human pregnancy such as repeated spontaneous abortion, sudden intrauterine unexpected foetal death syndrome and stillbirth. PMID:27265527

  12. An efficient strategy to induce and maintain in vitro human T cells specific for autologous non-small cell lung carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenda Canderan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The efficient expansion in vitro of cytolytic CD8+ T cells (CTLs specific for autologous tumors is crucial both for basic and translational aspects of tumor immunology. We investigated strategies to generate CTLs specific for autologous Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma (NSCLC, the most frequent tumor in mankind, using circulating lymphocytes. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Classic Mixed Lymphocyte Tumor Cultures with NSCLC cells consistently failed to induce tumor-specific CTLs. Cross-presentation in vitro of irradiated NSCLC cells by autologous dendritic cells, by contrast, induced specific CTL lines from which we obtained a high number of tumor-specific T cell clones (TCCs. The TCCs displayed a limited TCR diversity, suggesting an origin from few tumor-specific T cell precursors, while their TCR molecular fingerprints were detected in the patient's tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, implying a role in the spontaneous anti-tumor response. Grafting NSCLC-specific TCR into primary allogeneic T cells by lentiviral vectors expressing human V-mouse C chimeric TCRalpha/beta chains overcame the growth limits of these TCCs. The resulting, rapidly expanding CD4+ and CD8+ T cell lines stably expressed the grafted chimeric TCR and specifically recognized the original NSCLC. CONCLUSIONS: This study defines a strategy to efficiently induce and propagate in vitro T cells specific for NSCLC starting from autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes.

  13. Binding of USF to a non-canonical E-box following stress results in a cell-specific derepression of the lama3 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virolle, Thierry; Coraux, Christelle; Ferrigno, Olivier; Cailleteau, Laurence; Ortonne, Jean-Paul; Pognonec, Philippe; Aberdam, Daniel

    2002-04-15

    Expression of the lama3 gene, encoding the laminin alpha3A chain, is restricted to specialized epithelia. We previously showed that lama3 gene expression is controlled by an epithelial enhancer through the cooperative effect of AP-1 binding sites. In fibroblasts, there is no lama3 expression because of the recruitment of a repressor complex absent or inactive in epithelial cells. In this paper, we show evidence that this repression of the lama3 gene is relieved by exogenous and UV-induced USF-1 through its interaction with a non-canonical E-box site. Using a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, we find that UV stress induces USF to bind to the lama3 promoter in vivo. We further demonstrate that this loss of cell specificity is directly related to the accessibility of the E-box, resulting in a strong induction in fibroblasts, while expression remains constitutively high in keratinocytes. This accessibility appears to be dependent upon the recruitment of a fibroblastic repressor complex. Therefore, we speculate that anchorage of this repressor complex in fibroblasts modifies the enhancer geometry, allowing USF to interact under stress-inducing conditions with its heptameric binding site. PMID:11937633

  14. Intracellular high mobility group B1 protein (HMGB1) represses HIV-1 LTR-directed transcription in a promoter- and cell-specific manner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated whether the high mobility group B 1 (HMGB1), an abundant nuclear protein in all mammalian cells, affects HIV-1 transcription. Intracellular expression of human HMGB1 repressed HIV-1 gene expression in epithelial cells. This inhibitory effect of HMGB1 was caused by repression of long terminal repeat (LTR)-mediated transcription. Other viral promoters/enhancers, including simian virus 40 or cytomegalovirus, were not inhibited by HMGB1. In addition, HMGB1 inhibition of HIV-1 subtype C expression was dependent on the number of NFκB sites in the LTR region. The inhibitory effect of HMGB1 on viral gene expression observed in HeLa cells was confirmed by an upregulation of viral replication in the presence of antisense HMGB1 in monocytic cells. In contrast to what was found in HeLa cells and monocytic cells, endogenous HMGB1 expression did not affect HIV-1 replication in unstimulated Jurkat cells. Thus, intracellular HMGB1 affects HIV-1 LTR-directed transcription in a promoter- and cell-specific manner

  15. Guard cell-specific upregulation of sucrose synthase 3 reveals that the role of sucrose in stomatal function is primarily energetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daloso, Danilo M; Williams, Thomas C R; Antunes, Werner C; Pinheiro, Daniela P; Müller, Caroline; Loureiro, Marcelo E; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2016-03-01

    Isoform 3 of sucrose synthase (SUS3) is highly expressed in guard cells; however, the precise function of SUS3 in this cell type remains to be elucidated. Here, we characterized transgenic Nicotiana tabacum plants overexpressing SUS3 under the control of the stomatal-specific KST1 promoter, and investigated the changes in guard cell metabolism during the dark to light transition. Guard cell-specific SUS3 overexpression led to increased SUS activity, stomatal aperture, stomatal conductance, transpiration rate, net photosynthetic rate and growth. Although only minor changes were observed in the metabolite profile in whole leaves, an increased fructose level and decreased organic acid levels and sucrose to fructose ratio were observed in guard cells of transgenic lines. Furthermore, guard cell sucrose content was lower during light-induced stomatal opening. In a complementary approach, we incubated guard cell-enriched epidermal fragments in (13) C-NaHCO3 and followed the redistribution of label during dark to light transitions; this revealed increased labeling in metabolites of, or associated with, the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The results suggest that sucrose breakdown is a mechanism to provide substrate for the provision of organic acids for respiration, and imply that manipulation of guard cell metabolism may represent an effective strategy for plant growth improvement. PMID:26467445

  16. Alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein bridges RNA and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Vienna L; Choi, Mehee; Petrillo, Jessica E; Gehrke, Lee

    2007-07-20

    Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) RNA replication requires the viral coat protein (CP). AMV CP is an integral component of the viral replicase; moreover, it binds to the viral RNA 3'-termini and induces the formation of multiple new base pairs that organize the RNA conformation. The results described here suggest that AMV coat protein binding defines template selection by organizing the 3'-terminal RNA conformation and by positioning the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) at the initiation site for minus strand synthesis. RNA-protein interactions were analyzed by using a modified Northwestern blotting protocol that included both viral coat protein and labeled RNA in the probe solution ("far-Northwestern blotting"). We observed that labeled RNA alone bound the replicase proteins poorly; however, complex formation was enhanced significantly in the presence of AMV CP. The RNA-replicase bridging function of the AMV CP may represent a mechanism for accurate de novo initiation in the absence of canonical 3' transfer RNA signals. PMID:17400272

  17. Switching off small RNA regulation with trap-mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Martin; Johansen, Jesper; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Valentin-Hansen, Poul

    2009-01-01

    Small non-coding regulatory RNAs in bacteria have been shown predominantly to be tightly regulated at the level of transcription initiation, and sRNAs that function by an antisense mechanism on trans-encoded target mRNAs have been shown or predicted to act stoichiometrically. Here we show that Mic......M, which silences the expression of an outer membrane protein, YbfM under most growth conditions, does not become destabilized by target mRNA overexpression, indicating that the small RNA regulator acts catalytically. Furthermore, our regulatory studies suggested that control of micM expression is unlikely...... to operate at the level of transcription initiation. By employing a highly sensitive genetic screen we uncovered a novel RNA-based regulatory principle in which induction of a trap-mRNA leads to selective degradation of a small regulatory RNA molecule, thereby abolishing the sRNA-based silencing of...

  18. RNA regulons and the RNA-protein interaction network

    OpenAIRE

    Imig, J.; Kanitz, A.; Gerber, AP

    2012-01-01

    The development of genome-wide analysis tools has prompted global investigation of the gene expression program, revealing highly coordinated control mechanisms that ensure proper spatiotemporal activity of a cell's macromolecular components. With respect to the regulation of RNA transcripts, the concept of RNA regulons, which – by analogy with DNA regulons in bacteria – refers to the coordinated control of functionally related RNA molecules, has emerged as a unifying theory that describes the...

  19. RNA-RNA interaction prediction based on multiple sequence alignments

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Andrew X; Qin, Jing; Reidys, Christian M

    2010-01-01

    Recently, $O(N^6)$ time and $O(N^4)$ space dynamic programming algorithms have become available that compute the partition function of RNA-RNA interaction complexes for pairs of RNA sequences. These algorithms and the biological requirement of more reliable interactions motivate to utilize the additional information contained in multiple sequence alignments and to generalize the above framework to the partition function and base pairing probabilities for multiple sequence alignments.

  20. RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase 6 Is Required for Efficient hpRNA-Induced Gene Silencing in Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Harmoko, Rikno; Fanata, Wahyu Indra Duwi; Yoo, Jae Yong; Ko, Ki Seong; Rim, Yeong Gil; Uddin, Mohammad Nazim; Siswoyo, Tri Agus; Lee, Seung Sik; Kim, Dool Yi; Lee, Sang Yeol; Lee, Kyun Oh

    2013-01-01

    In plants, transgenes with inverted repeats are used to induce efficient RNA silencing, which is also frequently induced by highly transcribed sense transgenes. RNA silencing induced by sense transgenes is dependent on RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6 (RDR6), which converts single-stranded (ss) RNA into double-stranded (ds) RNA. By contrast, it has been proposed that RNA silencing induced by self-complementary hairpin RNA (hpRNA) does not require RDR6, because the hpRNA can directly fold back o...

  1. RNA interference and antiviral therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an evolutionally conserved gene silencing mechanism present in a variety of eukaryotic species. RNAi uses short double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) to trigger degradation or translation repression of homologous RNA targets in a sequence-specific manner. This system can be induced effectively in vitro and in vivo by direct application of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), or by expression of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) with non-viral and viral vectors. To date, RNAi has been extensively used as a novel and effective tool for functional genomic studies, and has displayed great potential in treating human diseases, including human genetic and acquired disorders such as cancer and viral infections. In the present review, we focus on the recent development in the use of RNAi in the prevention and treatment of viral infections. The mechanisms,strategies, hurdles and prospects of employing RNAi in the pharmaceutical industry are also discussed.

  2. Effects of Shen-Fu Injection on the Expression of T-Cell-Specific Transcription Factors T-bet/Gata-3 in Porcine Postresuscitation Lung Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Gu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Shen-Fu injection (SFI derived from the ancient traditional Chinese medicine. In this study, the effects of SFI on the expression of T-bet/GATA-3 and its potential mechanisms causing the shift of T cells from Th2 to Th1 on postresuscitation lung injury were examined in a porcine model of cardiac arrest. 30 pigs were randomly divided into SHAM ( and three return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC groups ( per group; 24 pigs were subjected to 8 min of electrically induced cardiac arrest and 2 min of basic life support, which received central venous injection of Shen-Fu (SFI, epinephrine (EP or saline (SA. After successful ROSC, 18 surviving pigs were sacrificed at 24 h after ROSC ( per group. The levels of serum and lung tissue interleukin (IL-4 and interferon (IFN-γ were measured by ELISA, and the protein and mRNA levels of GATA-3 and T-bet in the lung tissue were determined by western blotting and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Compared with the EP and SA groups, SFI treatment reduced the levels of IL-4 (, increased levels of IFN-γ (, and induced T-bet mRNA upregulation and GATA-3 mRNA downregulation (. SFI attenuated lung injury and regulated lung immune disorders. Therefore, SFI could protect postresuscitation lung injury by modulating a Th1/Th2 imbalance.

  3. Gomafu lncRNA knockout mice exhibit mild hyperactivity with enhanced responsiveness to the psychostimulant methamphetamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Joanna Y.; Sone, Masamitsu; Nashiki, Chieko; Pan, Qun; Kitaichi, Kiyoyuki; Yanaka, Kaori; Abe, Takaya; Takao, Keizo; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Blencowe, Benjamin J.; Nakagawa, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    The long noncoding RNA Gomafu/MIAT/Rncr2 is thought to function in retinal cell specification, stem cell differentiation and the control of alternative splicing. To further investigate physiological functions of Gomafu, we created mouse knockout (KO) model that completely lacks the Gomafu gene. The KO mice did not exhibit any developmental deficits. However, behavioral tests revealed that the KO mice are hyperactive. This hyperactive behavior was enhanced when the KO mice were treated with the psychostimulant methamphetamine, which was associated with an increase in dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. RNA sequencing analyses identified a small number of genes affected by the deficiency of Gomafu, a subset of which are known to have important neurobiological functions. These observations suggest that Gomafu modifies mouse behavior thorough a mild modulation of gene expression and/or alternative splicing of target genes. PMID:27251103

  4. Semiautomated improvement of RNA alignments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ebbe Sloth; Lind-Thomsen, Allan; Knudsen, Bjarne;

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a semiautomated RNA sequence editor (SARSE) that integrates tools for analyzing RNA alignments. The editor highlights different properties of the alignment by color, and its integrated analysis tools prevent the introduction of errors when doing alignment editing. SARSE readily...... the SARSE editor makes it a flexible tool to improve all RNA alignments with relatively little human intervention. Online documentation and software are available at (http://sarse.ku.dk)....

  5. RNA nanoparticles come of age

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John J.Rossi

    2011-01-01

    @@ RNA has multiple functions in nature, including informa- tional transfer (mRNA) Ill, adaptor function (tRNAs) [2], guide functions (snRNAs, snoRNAs) [3,4]catalytic func- tion (ribozymes and the large ribosomal RNA) [5-7], and environmental sensing (riboswitehes) [8].In contrast, DNA only serves as an information storage molecule, and proteins serve as structural and enzymatic molecules.

  6. Messenger RNA Profiling for Forensic Body Fluid Identifica-tion:Research and Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zheng; ZHANG Su-hua; ZHOU Di; ZHAO Shu-min; LI Cheng-tao

    2013-01-01

    Identifying the origin of body fluids left at a crime scene can give a significant insight into crime scene reconstruction by supporting a link betw een sample donors and actual criminal acts. How ev-er, the conventional body fluid identification methods are prone to various limitations, such as time con-sumption, intensive labor, nonparallel manner, varying degrees of sensitivity and limited specificity. Re-cently, the analysis of cell-specific messenger RNA expression (mRNA profiling) has been proposed to supplant conventional methods for body fluid identification. Since 2011, the collaborative exercises have been organized by the European DNA Profiling Group (EDNAP ) in order to evaluate the robustness and reproducibility of mRNA profiling for body fluid identification. The major advantages of mRNA profil-ing, compared to the conventional methods, include higher sensitivity, greater specificity, the ability of detecting several body fluids in one multiplex reaction, and compatibilitywith current DNA extraction and analysis procedure. In the current review ,we provided an overview of the present know ledge and detection methodologies of mRNA profiling for forensic body fluid identification and discussed its possi-ble practical application to forensic casew ork.

  7. Oncolytic adenovirus mediated Survivin knockdown by RNA interference suppresses human colorectal carcinoma growth in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Chun-Yi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer is a one of the most common alimentary malignancies. Survivin has been proved by many studies to be an ideal target for cancer gene therapy because of its strong anti-apoptotic effect. The reduction of Survivin expression by means of chemically synthesized small interfering RNA or small hairpin RNA expressed from plasmid and resulted growth inhibition of cancer cells had been proved by many studies including ours, but the transfection efficiency was not encouraging. So for the first time we constructed the Survivin shRNA into an oncolytic adenovirus, tested its effects on colorectal cancer cell lines and nude mice xenograft model. Methods In this study, we constructed an oncolytic adenovirus with a Survivin targeted small hairpin RNA and a reporter gene (ZD55-Sur-EGFP. The expression of Survivin mRNA and protein were analyzed by RT-PCR and western blot. The cell growth and apoptosis were tested by in vitro cytopathic assay, MTT assay and flow cytometry respectively. The effect of the constructed virus on xenograft model was evaluated by tumor volume and western blot analysis. Results ZD55-Sur-EGFP replicated in cancer cells specifically, reduced the expression of Survivin mRNA and protein expression effectively (P Conclusion We conclude Survivin RNA interference combining with oncolytic adenovirus virotherapy to be a promising treatment for colorectal cancer.

  8. CD8(+) T cells specific to a single Yersinia pseudotuberculosis epitope restrict bacterial replication in the liver but fail to provide sterilizing immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Haiqian; Gonzalez-Juarbe, Norberto; Blanchette, Krystle; Crimmins, Gregory; Bergman, Molly A; Isberg, Ralph R; Orihuela, Carlos J; Dube, Peter H

    2016-09-01

    CD8(+) T cells use contact-dependent cytolysis of target cells to protect the host against intracellular pathogens. We have previously shown that CD8(+) T cells and perforin are required to protect against the extracellular pathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Here we establish an experimental system where CD8(+) T cells specific to a single model antigen are the only memory response present at time of challenge. Using mice immunized with a vaccine strain of Listeria monocytogenes that expresses secreted ovalbumin (Lm-OVA), we show that OVA-specific CD8(+) T cells are generated and provide limited protection against challenge with virulent OVA(+)Y. pseudotuberculosis. Perforin expression by OVA-specific CD8(+) T cells was required, as Lm-OVA-immunized perforin-deficient mice showed higher bacterial burden as compared to Lm-OVA-immunized perforin-sufficient mice. Surprisingly, antigen-specific T cell protection waned over time, as Lm-OVA-immune mice eventually succumbed to Yersinia infection. Kinetic analysis of infection in mice with and without OVA-specific CD8(+) T cells revealed that bacterial numbers increased sharply in OVA-naïve mice until death, while OVA-immune mice held bacterial burden to a lower level throughout the duration of illness until death. Clonal analysis of bacterial populations in OVA-naïve and OVA-immune mice at distinct time points revealed equivalent and severe bottle-neck effects for bacteria in both sets of mice immediately after intravenous challenge, demonstrating a dominant role for other aspects of the immune system regardless of CD8(+) T cell status. These studies indicate that CD8(+) T cells against a single antigen can restrict Y. pseudotuberculosis colonization in a perforin-dependent manner, but ultimately are insufficient in their ability to provide sterilizing immunity and protect against death. PMID:27268148

  9. Bifurcations in the interplay of messenger RNA, protein and nonprotein coding RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, S-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: zhdanov@catalysis.ru

    2008-07-18

    The interplay of messenger RNA (mRNA), protein, produced via translation of this RNA, and nonprotein coding RNA (ncRNA) may include regulation of the ncRNA production by protein and (i) ncRNA-protein association resulting in suppression of the protein regulatory activity or (ii) ncRNA-mRNA association resulting in degradation of the miRNA-mRNA complex. The kinetic models describing these two scenarios are found to predict bistability provided that protein suppresses the ncRNA formation.

  10. Bifurcations in the interplay of messenger RNA, protein and nonprotein coding RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interplay of messenger RNA (mRNA), protein, produced via translation of this RNA, and nonprotein coding RNA (ncRNA) may include regulation of the ncRNA production by protein and (i) ncRNA-protein association resulting in suppression of the protein regulatory activity or (ii) ncRNA-mRNA association resulting in degradation of the miRNA-mRNA complex. The kinetic models describing these two scenarios are found to predict bistability provided that protein suppresses the ncRNA formation

  11. Bifurcations in the interplay of messenger RNA, protein and nonprotein coding RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2008-07-01

    The interplay of messenger RNA (mRNA), protein, produced via translation of this RNA, and nonprotein coding RNA (ncRNA) may include regulation of the ncRNA production by protein and (i) ncRNA-protein association resulting in suppression of the protein regulatory activity or (ii) ncRNA-mRNA association resulting in degradation of the miRNA-mRNA complex. The kinetic models describing these two scenarios are found to predict bistability provided that protein suppresses the ncRNA formation.

  12. Cell differentiation by interaction of two HMG-box proteins: Mat1-Mc activates M cell-specific genes in S.pombe by recruiting the ubiquitous transcription factor Ste11 to weak binding sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaerulff, S; Dooijes, D; Clevers, H;

    1997-01-01

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe mfm1 gene is expressed in an M cell-specific fashion. This regulation requires two HMG-box proteins: the ubiquitous Ste11 transcription factor and the M cell-controlling protein Mat1-Mc. Here we report that the mfm1 promoter contains a single, weak Stell-binding site...

  13. AMPLIFICATION OF RIBOSOMAL RNA SEQUENCES

    Science.gov (United States)

    This book chapter offers an overview of the use of ribosomal RNA sequences. A history of the technology traces the evolution of techniques to measure bacterial phylogenetic relationships and recent advances in obtaining rRNA sequence information. The manual also describes procedu...

  14. Catalysis and prebiotic RNA synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, James P.

    1993-01-01

    The essential role of catalysis for the origins of life is discussed. The status of the prebiotic synthesis of 2',5'- and 3'5'-linked oligomers of RNA is reviewed. Examples of the role of metal ion and mineral catalysis in RNA oligomer formation are discussed.

  15. RNA er jo bare matematik!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaavand, Jakob Lindblad

    2011-01-01

    Hvordan kan man kurere sygdomme med matematiske geometriske strukturer? Det kan man i princippet, hvis de geometriske figurer er RNA-molekyler, og sygdommen skyldes syge gener.......Hvordan kan man kurere sygdomme med matematiske geometriske strukturer? Det kan man i princippet, hvis de geometriske figurer er RNA-molekyler, og sygdommen skyldes syge gener....

  16. RNA Structural Alignments, Part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havgaard, Jakob Hull; Gorodkin, Jan

    Simultaneous alignment and secondary structure prediction of RNA sequences is often referred to as "RNA structural alignment." A class of the methods for structural alignment is based on the principles proposed by Sankoff more than 25 years ago. The Sankoff algorithm simultaneously folds and aligns...

  17. Epigenetic microRNA Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiklund, Erik Digman

    2011-01-01

    and confirming transcriptional start sites can be difficult. Epigenetics, gene regulatory and DNA modification mechanisms not involving a change to the primary sequence, have been implied in the regulation of a number of miRNA loci. Both epigenetic and miRNA signatures are broadly altered in cancer......, and are thought to play essential roles in cancer etiology and progression. Here, we aimed to identify epigenetic miRNA deregulation in bladder and oral carcinoma, and to develop a robust approach to epigenetic miRNA prediction and detection. In addition, non-canonical epigenetic functions directed by a nuclear...... miRNA were investigated. In summary, we report that the miR-200 family and miR-205 are coordinately epigenetically regulated in a variety of cell lines, tumors and normal tissues. MiR-200c expression is correlated with bladder cancer disease progression, and miR-375 levels in oral rinse can...

  18. Phenotypic MicroRNA Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Soloveva

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Microarray technology has become a very popular approach in cases where multiple experiments need to be conducted repeatedly or done with a variety of samples. In our lab, we are applying our high density spots microarray approach to microscopy visualization of the effects of transiently introduced siRNA or cDNA on cellular morphology or phenotype. In this publication, we are discussing the possibility of using this micro-scale high throughput process to study the role of microRNAs in the biology of selected cellular models. After reverse-transfection of microRNAs and siRNA, the cellular phenotype generated by microRNAs regulated NF-κB expression comparably to the siRNA. The ability to print microRNA molecules for reverse transfection into cells is opening up the wide horizon for the phenotypic high content screening of microRNA libraries using cellular disease models.

  19. The RNA synthesis machinery of negative-stranded RNA viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortín, Juan, E-mail: jortin@cnb.csic.es [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología (CSIC) and CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias (ISCIII), Madrid (Spain); Martín-Benito, Jaime, E-mail: jmartinb@cnb.csic.es [Department of Macromolecular Structures, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología (CSIC), Madrid (Spain)

    2015-05-15

    The group of Negative-Stranded RNA Viruses (NSVs) includes many human pathogens, like the influenza, measles, mumps, respiratory syncytial or Ebola viruses, which produce frequent epidemics of disease and occasional, high mortality outbreaks by transmission from animal reservoirs. The genome of NSVs consists of one to several single-stranded, negative-polarity RNA molecules that are always assembled into mega Dalton-sized complexes by association to many nucleoprotein monomers. These RNA-protein complexes or ribonucleoproteins function as templates for transcription and replication by action of the viral RNA polymerase and accessory proteins. Here we review our knowledge on these large RNA-synthesis machines, including the structure of their components, the interactions among them and their enzymatic activities, and we discuss models showing how they perform the virus transcription and replication programmes. - Highlights: • Overall organisation of NSV RNA synthesis machines. • Structure and function of the ribonucleoprotein components: Atomic structure of the RNA polymerase complex. • Commonalities and differences between segmented- and non-segmented NSVs. • Transcription versus replication programmes.

  20. The RNA synthesis machinery of negative-stranded RNA viruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The group of Negative-Stranded RNA Viruses (NSVs) includes many human pathogens, like the influenza, measles, mumps, respiratory syncytial or Ebola viruses, which produce frequent epidemics of disease and occasional, high mortality outbreaks by transmission from animal reservoirs. The genome of NSVs consists of one to several single-stranded, negative-polarity RNA molecules that are always assembled into mega Dalton-sized complexes by association to many nucleoprotein monomers. These RNA-protein complexes or ribonucleoproteins function as templates for transcription and replication by action of the viral RNA polymerase and accessory proteins. Here we review our knowledge on these large RNA-synthesis machines, including the structure of their components, the interactions among them and their enzymatic activities, and we discuss models showing how they perform the virus transcription and replication programmes. - Highlights: • Overall organisation of NSV RNA synthesis machines. • Structure and function of the ribonucleoprotein components: Atomic structure of the RNA polymerase complex. • Commonalities and differences between segmented- and non-segmented NSVs. • Transcription versus replication programmes

  1. The RNA WikiProject: community annotation of RNA families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daub, Jennifer; Gardner, Paul P; Tate, John; Ramsköld, Daniel; Manske, Magnus; Scott, William G; Weinberg, Zasha; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Bateman, Alex

    2008-12-01

    The online encyclopedia Wikipedia has become one of the most important online references in the world and has a substantial and growing scientific content. A search of Google with many RNA-related keywords identifies a Wikipedia article as the top hit. We believe that the RNA community has an important and timely opportunity to maximize the content and quality of RNA information in Wikipedia. To this end, we have formed the RNA WikiProject (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:WikiProject_RNA) as part of the larger Molecular and Cellular Biology WikiProject. We have created over 600 new Wikipedia articles describing families of noncoding RNAs based on the Rfam database, and invite the community to update, edit, and correct these articles. The Rfam database now redistributes this Wikipedia content as the primary textual annotation of its RNA families. Users can, therefore, for the first time, directly edit the content of one of the major RNA databases. We believe that this Wikipedia/Rfam link acts as a functioning model for incorporating community annotation into molecular biology databases. PMID:18945806

  2. Cellular Dynamics of RNA Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Chengqi; Pan, Tao

    2011-01-01

    Conspectus Decades of research have identified over 100 types of ribonucleosides that are post-transcriptionally modified. Many modified nucleosides are conserved in bacteria, archeae and eukaryotes, while some modified nucleosides are unique to each branch of life. However, the cellular and functional dynamics of RNA modifications remains largely unexplored, mostly due to the lack of functional hypotheses and experimental methods for quantification and large scale analysis. Just as many well characterized protein and DNA modifications, many RNA modifications are not essential for life. Instead, increasingly more evidence indicates that RNA modifications can play regulatory roles in cells, especially in response to stress conditions. In this Account, we review some known examples of RNA modifications that are dynamically controlled in cells and introduce some contemporary technologies and methods that enhance the studies of cellular dynamics of RNA modifications. Examples of RNA modifications discussed in this Account include (Figure 1): (1) 4-thio uridine (s4U) which can act as a cellular sensor of near UV-light; (2) queuosine (Q) which is a potential biomarker for malignancy; (3) N6-methyl adenine (m6A) which is the prevalent modification in eukaryotic mRNAs; and (4) pseudouridine (ψ) which are inducible by nutrient deprivation. Two recent technical advances that stimulated the studies of cellular dynamics of modified ribonucleosides are also described. First, a genome-wide method combines primer extension and microarray to study N1-methyl adenine (m1A) hypomodification in human tRNA. Second, a quantitative mass spectrometric method investigates dynamic changes of a wide range of tRNA modifications under stress conditions in yeast. In addition, we discuss potential mechanisms that control dynamic regulation of RNA modifications, and hypotheses for discovering potential RNA de-modification enzymes. We conclude the Account by highlighting the need to develop new

  3. Deciphering the RNA landscape by RNAome sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.W.J. Derks (Kasper); B. Misovic (Branislav); M.C.G.N. van den hout (Mirjam); C. Kockx (Christel); C.P. Gomez (Cesar Payan); R.W.W. Brouwer; H. Vrieling (Harry); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); J. Pothof (Joris)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractCurrent RNA expression profiling methods rely on enrichment steps for specific RNA classes, thereby not detecting all RNA species in an unperturbed manner. We report strand-specific RNAome sequencing that determines expression of small and large RNAs from rRNA-depleted total RNA in a sin

  4. Tumour-initiating cell-specific miR-1246 and miR-1290 expression converge to promote non-small cell lung cancer progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen Cai; Chin, Tan Min; Yang, Henry; Nga, Min En; Lunny, Declan Patrick; Lim, Edwin Kok Hao; Sun, Li Li; Pang, Yin Huei; Leow, Yi Ning; Malusay, Shanneen Rossellini Y; Lim, Priscilla Xin Hui; Lee, Jeravan Zili; Tan, Benedict Jian Wei; Shyh-Chang, Ng; Lim, Elaine Hsuen; Lim, Wan Teck; Tan, Daniel Shao Weng; Tan, Eng Huat; Tai, Bee Choo; Soo, Ross Andrew; Tam, Wai Leong; Lim, Bing

    2016-01-01

    The tumour-initiating cell (TIC) model accounts for phenotypic and functional heterogeneity among tumour cells. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are regulatory molecules frequently aberrantly expressed in cancers, and may contribute towards tumour heterogeneity and TIC behaviour. More recent efforts have focused on miRNAs as diagnostic or therapeutic targets. Here, we identified the TIC-specific miRNAs, miR-1246 and miR-1290, as crucial drivers for tumour initiation and cancer progression in human non-small cell lung cancer. The loss of either miRNA impacted the tumour-initiating potential of TICs and their ability to metastasize. Longitudinal analyses of serum miR-1246 and miR-1290 levels across time correlate their circulating levels to the clinical response of lung cancer patients who were receiving ongoing anti-neoplastic therapies. Functionally, direct inhibition of either miRNA with locked nucleic acid administered systemically, can arrest the growth of established patient-derived xenograft tumours, thus indicating that these miRNAs are clinically useful as biomarkers for tracking disease progression and as therapeutic targets. PMID:27325363

  5. Worldwide population genetic analysis and natural selection in the Plasmodium vivax Generative Cell Specific 1 (PvGCS1) as a transmission-blocking vaccine candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrizi, Akram Abouie; Dodangeh, Fatemeh; Zakeri, Sedigheh; Djadid, Navid Dinparast

    2016-09-01

    GENERATIVE CELL SPECIFIC 1 (GCS1) is one of the Transmission Blocking Vaccine (TBV) candidate antigens, which is expressed on the surface of male gametocytes and gametes of Plasmodium species. Since antigenic diversity could inhibit the successful development of a malaria vaccine, it is crucial to determine the diversity of gcs1 gene in global malaria-endemic areas. Therefore, gene diversity and selection of gcs1 gene were analyzed in Iranian Plasmodium vivax isolates (n=52) and compared with the corresponding sequences from worldwide clinical P. vivax isolates available in PlasmoDB database. Totally 12 SNPs were detected in the pvgcs1 sequences as compared to Sal-1 sequence. Five out of 12 SNPs including three synonymous (T797C, G1559A, and G1667T) and two amino acid replacements (Y133S and Q634P) were detected in Iranian pvgcs1 sequences. According to four amino acid replacements (Y133S, N575S, Q634P and D637N) observed in all world PvGCS1 sequences, totally 5 PvGCS1 haplotypes were detected in the world, that three of them observed in Iranian isolates including the PvGCS-A (133S/634Q, 92.3%), PvGCS-B (133Y/634Q, 5.8%), and PvGCS-C (133S/634P, 1.9%). The overall nucleotide diversity (π) for all 52 sequences of Iranian pvgcs1 gene was 0.00018±0.00006, and the value of dN-dS (-0.00031) were negative, however, it was not statistically significant. In comparison with global isolates, Iranian and PNG pvgcs1 sequences had the lowest nucleotide and haplotype diversity, while the highest nucleotide and haplotype diversity was observed in China population. Moreover, epitope prediction in this antigen showed that all B-cell epitopes were located in conserved regions. However, Q634P (in one Iranian isolate) and D637N (observed in Thailand, China, Vietnam and North Korea) mutations are involved in predicted IURs. The obtained results in this study could be used in development of PvGCS1 based malaria vaccine. PMID:27180894

  6. Production of transgenic cashmere goat embryos expressing red fluorescent protein and containing IGF1 hair-follicle-cell specific expression cassette by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BOU; ShorGan

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, cashmere goat fetal fibroblasts were transfected with pCDsR-KI, a hair-follicle-cell specific expression vector for insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) that contains two markers for selection (red fluorescent protein gene and neomycin resistant gene). The transgenic fibroblasts cell lines were obtained after G418 selection. Prior to the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), the maturation rate of caprine cumulus oocytes complexes (COCs) was optimized to an in vitro maturation time of 18 h. Parthenogenetic ooctyes were used as a model to investigate the effect of two activation methods, one with calcium ionophore IA23187 plus 6-DMAP and the other with ethanol plus 6-DMAP. The cleavage rates after 48 h were respectively 88.7% and 86.4%, with no significant difference (P>0.05). There was no significant difference between the cleavage rate and the blastocyst rate in two different media (SO- Faa and CR1aa; 86.3% vs 83.9%, P>0.05 and 23.1% vs 17.2%,P>0.05). The fusion rate of a 190 V/mm group (62.4%) was significantly higher than 130 V/mm (32.8%) and 200 V/mm (42.9%), groups (P<0.05). After transgenic somatic cell nuclear transfer (TSCNT) manipulation, 203 reconstructed embryos were obtained in which the cleavage rate after in vitro development (IVD) for 48 h was 79.3% (161/203). The blastocyst rate after IVD for 7 to 9 d was 15.3% (31/203). There were 17 embryos out of 31 strongly ex- pressing red fluorescence. Two of the red fluorescent blastocysts were randomly selected to identify transgene by polymerase chain reaction. Both were positive. These results showed that: (i) RFP and Neor genes were correctly expressed indicating that transgenic somatic cell lines and positive trans- genic embryos were obtained; (ii) one more selection at the blastocyst stage was necessary although the donor cells were transgenic positive, because only partially transgenic embryos expressing red fluorescence were obtained; and (iii) through TSCNT manipulation and

  7. Production of transgenic cashmere goat embryos expressing red fluorescent protein and containing IGF1 hair-follicle-cell specific expression cassette by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO XuDong; YANG DongShan; Ao XuDong; WU Xia; LI GuangPeng; WANG LingLing; BAO MingTao; XUE Lian; BOU ShorGan

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, cashmere goat fetal flbroblasta were transfected with pCDsR-KI, a hair-follicle-cell specific expression vector for insulin-like growth factor 1(IGF1) that contains two markers for selection (red fluorescent protein gene and neomycin resistant gene). The transgenic fibroblasta cell lines were obtained after G418 selection. Prior to the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), the maturation rate of caprine cumulus oocytes complexes (COCs) was optimized to an in vitro maturation time of 18 h.Parthenogenetic ooctyes were used as a model to Investigate the effect of two activation methods, one with calcium ionophore IA23187 plus 6-DMAP and the other with ethanol plus 6-DMAP. The cleavage rates after 48 h were respectively 88.7% and 86.4%, with no significant difference (P>0.05). There was no significant difference between the cleavage rate and the blastocyst rate in two different media (SO-Faa and CR1aa; 86.3% va 83.9%, P>0.05 and 23.1% vs 17.2%, P>0.05). The fusion rate of a 190 V/mm group (62.4%) was significantly higher than 130 V/mm (32.8%) and 200 V/mm (42.9%), groups (P<0.05).After transgenic somatic cell nuclear transfer (TSCNT) manipulation, 203 reconstructed embryos were obtained in which the cleavage rate after in vitro development (IVD) for 48 h was 79.3% (161/203). The blastocyst rate after IVD for 7 to 9 d was 15.3% (31/203). There were 17 embryos out of 31 strongly ex-pressing red fluorescence. Two of the red fluorescent blastocysta were randomly selected to identify transgene by polymeraee chain reaction. Both were positive. These results showed that: (i) RFP and Neo genes were correctly expressed indicating that transgenlc somatic cell lines and positive trans-genic embryos were obtained; (ii) one more selection at the blastocyst stage was necessary although the donor cells were transgenic positive, because only partially transgenic embryos expressing red fluorescence were obtained; and (iii) through TSCNT manipulation and

  8. Sulphation of N-linked oligosaccharides of vesicular stomatitis and influenza virus envelope glycoproteins: host cell specificity, subcellular localization and identification of substituted saccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaivanova, V K; Spiro, R G

    1998-02-01

    The presence of sulphate groups on various saccharide residues of N-linked carbohydrate units has now been observed in a number of glycoproteins. To explore the cell specificity of this post-translational modification, we evaluated sulphate incorporation into virus envelope glycoproteins by a variety of cells, since it is believed that assembly of their N-linked oligosaccharides is to a large extent dependent on the enzymic machinery of the host. Employing the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) envelope glycoprotein (G protein) as a model, we noted that the addition of [35S]sulphate substituents into its complex carbohydrate units occurred in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK), Madin-Darby bovine kidney, LLC-PK1 and BHK-21 cell lines but was not detectable in BRL 3A, BW5147.3, Chinese hamster ovary, HepG2, NRK-49F, IEC-18, PtK1 or 3T3 cells. The sulphate groups were exclusively located on C-3 of galactose [Gal(3-SO4)] and/or C-6 of N-acetylglucosamine [GlcNAc(6-SO4)] residues in the N-acetyllactosamine sequence of the branch chains. Moreover, we observed that the pronounced host-cell-dependence of the terminal galactose sulphation was reflected by the 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulphate:Gal-3-O-sulphotransferase activity assayed in vitro. Comparative studies carried out on the haemagglutinin of the influenza virus envelope formed by MDCK and LLC-PK1 cells indicated that sulphate in this glycoprotein was confined to its complex N-linked oligosaccharides where it occurred as Gal(3-SO4) and GlcNAc(6-SO4) on peripheral chains as well as on the mannose-substituted N-acetylglucosamine of the core. Since sulphation in both internal and peripheral locations of the virus glycoproteins was found to be arrested by the alpha1-->2 mannosidase inhibitor, kifunensine, as well as by the intracellular migration block imposed by brefeldin A, it was concluded that this modification is a late biosynthetic event which most likely takes place in the trans-Golgi network. PMID:9445377

  9. RNA Sociology: Group Behavioral Motifs of RNA Consortia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guenther Witzany

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available RNA sociology investigates the behavioral motifs of RNA consortia from the social science perspective. Besides the self-folding of RNAs into single stem loop structures, group building of such stem loops results in a variety of essential agents that are highly active in regulatory processes in cellular and non-cellular life. RNA stem loop self-folding and group building do not depend solely on sequence syntax; more important are their contextual (functional needs. Also, evolutionary processes seem to occur through RNA stem loop consortia that may act as a complement. This means the whole entity functions only if all participating parts are coordinated, although the complementary building parts originally evolved for different functions. If complementary groups, such as rRNAs and tRNAs, are placed together in selective pressure contexts, new evolutionary features may emerge. Evolution initiated by competent agents in natural genome editing clearly contrasts with statistical error replication narratives.

  10. Funktionelle Charakterisierung von RNA abhängigen RNA Polymerasen aus Dictyostelium discoideum

    OpenAIRE

    Wiegand, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Zellulär kodierte RNA abhängige RNA Polymerasen (RNA-dependent RNA polymerases, RdRPs) katalysieren die Synthese eines RNA Strangs komplementär zu einer einzelsträngigen RNA Matrize. RdRPs sind in vielen eukaryotischen Organismen in RNA-vermittelte Genregulationsprozesse involviert und in einigen Organismen notwendig für einen funktionierenden RNA Interferenz (RNAi) Mechanismus (zusammengefasst in Maida and Masutomi, 2011). Vor Beginn dieser Arbeit konnten im Genom von Dictyostelium discoideu...

  11. Screening of Modified RNA duplexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schyth, Brian Dall; Bramsen, Jesper Bertram; Kjems, Jørgen;

    Because of sequence specific gene targeting activity siRNAs are regarded as promising active compounds in gene medicine. But one serious problem with delivering siRNAs as treatment is the now well-established non-specific activities of some RNA duplexes. Cellular reactions towards double stranded...... protection against a fish pathogenic virus. This protection corresponded with an interferon response in the fish. Here we use this fish model to screen siRNAs containing various chemical modifications of the RNA backbone for their antiviral activity, the overall aim being identification of an siRNA form with...

  12. Hepatitis Delta Virus RNA Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hsin Tseng

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis delta virus (HDV is a distant relative of plant viroids in the animal world. Similar to plant viroids, HDV replicates its circular RNA genome using a double rolling-circle mechanism. Nevertheless, the production of hepatitis delta antigen (HDAg, which is indispensible for HDV replication, is a unique feature distinct from plant viroids, which do not encode any protein. Here the HDV RNA replication cycle is reviewed, with emphasis on the function of HDAg in modulating RNA replication and the nature of the enzyme involved.

  13. Pumilio-based RNA in vivo imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilsner, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Subcellular, sequence-specific detection of RNA in vivo is a powerful tool to study the macromolecular transport that occurs through plasmodesmata. The RNA-binding domain of Pumilio proteins can be engineered to bind RNA sequences of choice and fused to fluorescent proteins for RNA imaging. This chapter describes the construction of a Pumilio-based imaging system to track the RNA of Tobacco mosaic virus in vivo, and practical aspects of RNA live-cell imaging. PMID:25287212

  14. Pumilio-based RNA in vivo imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Tilsner, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Subcellular, sequence-specific detection of RNA in vivo is a powerful tool to study the macromolecular transport that occurs through plasmodesmata. The RNA-binding domain of Pumilio proteins can be engineered to bind RNA sequences of choice and fused to fluorescent proteins for RNA imaging. This chapter describes the construction of a Pumilio-based imaging system to track the RNA of Tobacco mosaic virus in vivo, and practical aspects of RNA live-cell imaging.

  15. Mechanistic analysis of RNA synthesis by RNA-dependent RNA polymerase from two promoters reveals similarities to DNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    OpenAIRE

    Adkins, S; Stawicki, S S; Faurote, G; Siegel, R W; Kao, C. C.

    1998-01-01

    The brome mosaic virus (BMV) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) directs template-specific synthesis of (-)-strand genomic and (+)-strand subgenomic RNAs in vitro. Although the requirements for (-)-strand RNA synthesis have been characterized previously, the mechanism of subgenomic RNA synthesis has not. Mutational analysis of the subgenomic promoter revealed that the +1 cytidylate and the +2 adenylate are important for RNA synthesis. Unlike (-)-strand RNA synthesis, which required only a hig...

  16. Identification of Subtype Specific miRNA-mRNA Functional Regulatory Modules in Matched miRNA-mRNA Expression Data: Multiple Myeloma as a Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunpeng Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification of miRNA-mRNA modules is an important step to elucidate their combinatorial effect on the pathogenesis and mechanisms underlying complex diseases. Current identification methods primarily are based upon miRNA-target information and matched miRNA and mRNA expression profiles. However, for heterogeneous diseases, the miRNA-mRNA regulatory mechanisms may differ between subtypes, leading to differences in clinical behavior. In order to explore the pathogenesis of each subtype, it is important to identify subtype specific miRNA-mRNA modules. In this study, we integrated the Ping-Pong algorithm and multiobjective genetic algorithm to identify subtype specific miRNA-mRNA functional regulatory modules (MFRMs through integrative analysis of three biological data sets: GO biological processes, miRNA target information, and matched miRNA and mRNA expression data. We applied our method on a heterogeneous disease, multiple myeloma (MM, to identify MM subtype specific MFRMs. The constructed miRNA-mRNA regulatory networks provide modular outlook at subtype specific miRNA-mRNA interactions. Furthermore, clustering analysis demonstrated that heterogeneous MFRMs were able to separate corresponding MM subtypes. These subtype specific MFRMs may aid in the further elucidation of the pathogenesis of each subtype and may serve to guide MM subtype diagnosis and treatment.

  17. Shapes of RNA pseudoknot structures

    CERN Document Server

    Reidys, Christian M

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we study $\\mathcal{I}_k$- and $\\mathcal{J}_k$-shapes of $k$-noncrossing, $\\sigma$-canonical RNA structures. These shapes, if induced by RNA secondary structures coincide with the $\\pi$- and $\\pi'$-shapes introduced by \\cite{Giegerich:04ashape}. Using a novel approach we compute the generating functions of $\\mathcal{I}_k$- and $\\mathcal{J}_k$-shapes as well as the generating functions of all $\\mathcal{I}_k$- and $\\mathcal{J}_k$-shapes induced by $k$-noncrossing, $\\sigma$-canonical RNA structures for fixed $n$. By means of singularity analysis of the generating functions, we derive explicit asymptotic expressions and can prove that $\\mathcal{I}_k$- and $\\mathcal{J}_k$-shapes lead to a meaningful categorization of RNA pseudoknot structures.

  18. GPU accelerated Rna folding algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Rizk, Guillaume; Lavenier, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    Many bioinformatics studies require the analysis of RNA or DNA structures. More specifically, extensive work is done to elaborate efficient algorithms able to predict the 2-D folding structures of RNA or DNA sequences. However, the high computational complexity of the algorithms, combined with the rapid increase of genomic data, triggers the need of faster methods. Current approaches focus on parallelizing these algorithms on multiprocessor systems or on clusters, yielding to good performance...

  19. The Annotation of RNA Motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Westhof

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The recent deluge of new RNA structures, including complete atomic-resolution views of both subunits of the ribosome, has on the one hand literally overwhelmed our individual abilities to comprehend the diversity of RNA structure, and on the other hand presented us with new opportunities for comprehensive use of RNA sequences for comparative genetic, evolutionary and phylogenetic studies. Two concepts are key to understanding RNA structure: hierarchical organization of global structure and isostericity of local interactions. Global structure changes extremely slowly, as it relies on conserved long-range tertiary interactions. Tertiary RNA–RNA and quaternary RNA–protein interactions are mediated by RNA motifs, defined as recurrent and ordered arrays of non-Watson–Crick base-pairs. A single RNA motif comprises a family of sequences, all of which can fold into the same three-dimensional structure and can mediate the same interaction(s. The chemistry and geometry of base pairing constrain the evolution of motifs in such a way that random mutations that occur within motifs are accepted or rejected insofar as they can mediate a similar ordered array of interactions. The steps involved in the analysis and annotation of RNA motifs in 3D structures are: (a decomposition of each motif into non-Watson–Crick base-pairs; (b geometric classification of each basepair; (c identification of isosteric substitutions for each basepair by comparison to isostericity matrices; (d alignment of homologous sequences using the isostericity matrices to identify corresponding positions in the crystal structure; (e acceptance or rejection of the null hypothesis that the motif is conserved.

  20. From ugly duckling to swan: unexpected identification from cell-SELEX of an anti-Annexin A2 aptamer targeting tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Cibiel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cell-SELEX is now widely used for the selection of aptamers against cell surface biomarkers. However, despite negative selection steps using mock cells, this method sometimes results in aptamers against undesirable targets that are expressed both on mock and targeted cells. Studying these junk aptamers might be useful for further applications than those originally envisaged. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cell-SELEX was performed to identify aptamers against CHO-K1 cells expressing human Endothelin type B receptor (ETBR. CHO-K1 cells were used for negative selection of aptamers. Several aptamers were identified but no one could discriminate between both cell lines. We decided to study one of these aptamers, named ACE4, and we identified that it binds to the Annexin A2, a protein overexpressed in many cancers. Radioactive binding assays and flow cytometry demonstrated that the aptamer was able to bind several cancer cell lines from different origins, particularly the MCF-7 cells. Fluorescence microscopy revealed it could be completely internalized in cells in 2 hours. Finally, the tumor targeting of the aptamer was evaluated in vivo in nude mice xenograft with MCF-7 cells using fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (fDOT imaging. Three hours after intravenous injection, the aptamer demonstrated a significantly higher uptake in the tumor compared to a scramble sequence. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Although aptamers could be selected during cell-SELEX against other targets than those initially intended, they represent a potential source of ligands for basic research, diagnoses and therapy. Here, studying such aptamers, we identify one with high affinity for Annexin A2 that could be a promising tool for biomedical application.

  1. Topical application of a G-Quartet aptamer targeting nucleolin attenuates choroidal neovascularization in a model of age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaderer, Derek; Cashman, Siobhan M; Kumar-Singh, Rajendra

    2015-11-01

    Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) associated with the 'wet' form of age related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the most common causes of central vision loss among the elderly. The 'wet' form of AMD is currently treated by intravitreal delivery of anti-VEGF agents. However, intravitreal injections are associated with complications and long-term inhibition of VEGF leads to macular atrophy. Thus, there is currently an unmet need for the development of therapies for CNV that target molecules other than VEGF. Here, we describe nucleolin as a novel target for the 'wet' form of AMD. Nucleolin was found on the surface of endothelial cells that migrate from the choroid into the subretinal space in the laser-induced model of 'wet' AMD. AS1411 is a previously described G-quartet oligonucleotide that has been shown to bind nucleolin. We found that AS1411 inhibited the formation of tubes by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by approximately 27.4% in vitro. AS1411 co-localized with the site of laser induced CNV in vivo. Intravitreally injected AS1411 inhibited laser-induced CNV by 37.6% and attenuated infiltration of macrophages by 40.3%. Finally, topical application of AS1411 led to a 43.4% reduction in CNV. Our observations have potential implications for the development of therapies for CNV and specifically for the 'wet' form of AMD. PMID:26368850

  2. Theranostic MUC-1 aptamer targeted gold coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging and photothermal therapy of colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azhdarzadeh, Morteza; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Saei, Amir Ata;

    2016-01-01

    . SPIONs were synthesized by microemulsion method and were then coated with gold to reduce their cytotoxicity and to confer photothermal capabilities. Subsequently, the NPs were conjugated with thiol modified MUC-1 aptamers. The resulting NPs were spherical, monodisperse and about 19nm in size, as shown by...

  3. RNA silencing in plants by the expression of siRNA duplexes

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Shanfa; Shi, Rui; Tsao, Cheng-Chung; Yi, Xiaoping; Li, Laigeng; Chiang, Vincent L.

    2004-01-01

    In animal cells, stable RNA silencing can be achieved by vector-based small interfering RNA (siRNA) expression system, in which Pol III RNA gene promoters are used to drive the expression of short hairpin RNA, however, this has not been demonstrated in plants. Whether Pol III RNA gene promoter is capable of driving siRNA expression in plants is unknown. Here, we report that RNA silencing was achieved in plants through stable expression of short hairpin RNA, which was driven by Pol III RNA gen...

  4. Kinetic oscillations in the expression of messenger RNA, regulatory protein, and nonprotein coding RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2008-06-01

    The interplay of messenger RNA (mRNA), protein, produced via translation of this RNA, and nonprotein coding RNA (ncRNA) may include regulation of the ncRNA production by protein and (i) ncRNA-mRNA association or (ii) ncRNA-protein association resulting in degradation of the corresponding complex. The kinetic models, describing these two scenarios and taking into account that the association of ncRNA with a target occurs after ncRNA conversion from the initial form to the final form (e.g., from a long RNA to microRNA), are found to predict oscillations provided that the rate of ncRNA formation increases with increasing protein population.

  5. Isolation of Microarray-Grade Total RNA, MicroRNA, and DNA from a Single PAXgene Blood RNA Tube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruhøffer, Mogens; Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt; Voss, Thorsten;

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a procedure for isolation of microRNA and genomic DNA in addition to total RNA from whole blood stabilized in PAXgene Blood RNA tubes. The procedure is based on automatic extraction on a BioRobot MDx and includes isolation of DNA from a fraction of the stabilized blood and......RNA was tested using spotted locked nucleic acid-based microarrays. We conclude that the yield and quality of total RNA, microRNA, and DNA from a single PAXgene blood RNA tube is sufficient for downstream microarray analysis....

  6. Packaging shRNA retroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kenneth; Marran, Krista; Valentine, Amy; Hannon, Gregory J

    2013-08-01

    To silence a mammalian gene by RNAi using an encoded trigger, a short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) is integrated into the host cell genome as a stable transgene. Target cells are infected with viral plasmid containing shRNA inserted into the vector backbone. Before infection, the plasmid is transfected into a packaging cell line, which provides the trans-acting factors necessary for virus production. These include, minimally, capsid proteins and reverse transcriptase, but they can also include other regulatory factors (e.g., tat for some lentiviral vectors). It is critical to choose the correct packaging cell system for the viral backbone to be used. The packaging cell also defines the host range of the virus, depending on the envelope protein that it expresses. Ecotropic viruses are limited to rodent hosts, whereas amphotropic viruses have a broader host range that also includes humans. Often, investigators will express a nonretroviral envelope, such as vesicular stomatitus virus (VSV) glycoprotein, to enhance virus stability and host range and to enable viruses to be concentrated following production. Although viruses carrying shRNAs are packaged almost identically to viruses carrying protein-encoding genes, one twist is worth noting. shRNAs are efficiently cleaved by the host RNAi biogenesis machinery, which can reduce the level of viral genomic RNAs and consequently viral titers. Therefore, titers can be enhanced by cotransfecting the viral plasmid with a small interfering RNA (siRNA) that targets DGCR-8/Pasha, which is a core microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis component. siRNAs against Drosha can also be used. PMID:23906912

  7. Cell-Specific Expression of Homospermidine Synthase, the Entry Enzyme of the Pyrrolizidine Alkaloid Pathway in Senecio vernalis, in Comparison with Its Ancestor, Deoxyhypusine Synthase1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Stefanie; Anke, Sven; Kahmann, Uwe; Hänsch, Robert; Hartmann, Thomas; Ober, Dietrich

    2002-01-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are constitutive plant defense compounds with a sporadic taxonomic occurrence. The first committed step in PA biosynthesis is catalyzed by homospermidine synthase (HSS). Recent evidence confirmed that HSS evolved by gene duplication from deoxyhypusine synthase (DHS), an enzyme involved in the posttranslational activation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A. To better understand the evolutionary relationship between these two enzymes, which are involved in completely different biological processes, we studied their tissue-specific expression. RNA-blot analysis, reverse transcriptase-PCR, and immunolocalization techniques demonstrated that DHS is constitutively expressed in shoots and roots of Senecio vernalis (Asteraceae), whereas HSS expression is root specific and restricted to distinct groups of endodermis and neighboring cortex cells located opposite to the phloem. All efforts to detect DHS by immunolocalization failed, but studies with promoter-β-glucuronidase fusions confirmed a general expression pattern, at least in young seedlings of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). The expression pattern for HSS differs completely from its ancestor DHS due to the adaptation of HSS to the specific requirements of PA biosynthesis. PMID:12226485

  8. Synthesis of infectious poliovirus RNA by purified T7 RNA polymerase.

    OpenAIRE

    Van Der Werf, S.; Bradley, J; Wimmer, E; Studier, F W; Dunn, J J

    1986-01-01

    Plasmids containing the entire cDNA sequence of poliovirus type 1 (Mahoney strain) under control of a promoter for T7 RNA polymerase have been constructed. Purified T7 RNA polymerase efficiently transcribes the entire poliovirus cDNA in either direction to produce full-length poliovirus RNA [(+)RNA] or its complement [(-)RNA]. The (+)RNA produced initially had 60 nucleotides on the 5' side of the poliovirus RNA sequence, including a string of 18 consecutive guanine residues generated in the o...

  9. Manipulating Immune Tolerance with micro-RNA Regulated Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KevinScottGoudy

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The successful use of in vivo gene therapy depends upon controlling the immune response to the therapeutic transgene to allow stable, long-term transgene expression. Over the last decade several vector-based and pharmacological approaches to control the immune-mediated clearance of transgene expressing cells after viral delivery have been explored. One important outcome from these studies is the concept that expression of transgene in tolerance-promoting organs, such as the liver and tolerogenic antigen presenting cells, can help safeguard transgene expressing cells from immune-mediated clearance. With this in mind, gene therapists are specifically targeting these avenues by manipulating their vectors in three main areas: i incorporating tissue/cell specific promoters, ii viral-capsid engineering to alter tropism and avoid pre-existing immunity, and iii including micro-RNA (miR targets into expression cassettes. The combination of these three layers of vector regulation greatly enhances the targeting of “tolerogenic cells” and limits the off-target expression of the transgene, which can lead to the induction of transgene-specific pathogenic effector T cells. In this review, we discuss the application of using miR transgene regulation to generate tolerogenic responses and speculate on possible mechanisms used by the liver to induce the transgene specific regulatory T cells.

  10. Predicting RNA Structure Using Mutual Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freyhult, E.; Moulton, V.; Gardner, P. P.

    2005-01-01

    Background: With the ever-increasing number of sequenced RNAs and the establishment of new RNA databases, such as the Comparative RNA Web Site and Rfam, there is a growing need for accurately and automatically predicting RNA structures from multiple alignments. Since RNA secondary structure is of...

  11. RSRE: RNA structural robustness evaluator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Wenjie; Bo, Xiaochen; Zheng, Zhiqiang; Wang, Shengqi

    2007-07-01

    Biological robustness, defined as the ability to maintain stable functioning in the face of various perturbations, is an important and fundamental topic in current biology, and has become a focus of numerous studies in recent years. Although structural robustness has been explored in several types of RNA molecules, the origins of robustness are still controversial. Computational analysis results are needed to make up for the lack of evidence of robustness in natural biological systems. The RNA structural robustness evaluator (RSRE) web server presented here provides a freely available online tool to quantitatively evaluate the structural robustness of RNA based on the widely accepted definition of neutrality. Several classical structure comparison methods are employed; five randomization methods are implemented to generate control sequences; sub-optimal predicted structures can be optionally utilized to mitigate the uncertainty of secondary structure prediction. With a user-friendly interface, the web application is easy to use. Intuitive illustrations are provided along with the original computational results to facilitate analysis. The RSRE will be helpful in the wide exploration of RNA structural robustness and will catalyze our understanding of RNA evolution. The RSRE web server is freely available at http://biosrv1.bmi.ac.cn/RSRE/ or http://biotech.bmi.ac.cn/RSRE/. PMID:17567615

  12. Biogenesis, delivery, and function of extracellular RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James G. Patton

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Extracellular RNA (exRNA Communication Consortium was launched by the National Institutes of Health to focus on the extent to which RNA might function in a non-cell-autonomous manner. With the availability of increasingly sensitive tools, small amounts of RNA can be detected in serum, plasma, and other bodily fluids. The exact mechanism(s by which RNA can be secreted from cells and the mechanisms for the delivery and uptake by recipient cells remain to be determined. This review will summarize current knowledge about the biogenesis and delivery of exRNA and outline projects seeking to understand the functional impact of exRNA.

  13. Inducible Systemic RNA Silencing in Caenorhabditis elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Timmons, Lisa; Tabara, Hiroaki; Mello, Craig C.; Fire, Andrew Z.

    2003-01-01

    Introduction of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) can elicit a gene-specific RNA interference response in a variety of organisms and cell types. In many cases, this response has a systemic character in that silencing of gene expression is observed in cells distal from the site of dsRNA delivery. The molecular mechanisms underlying the mobile nature of RNA silencing are unknown. For example, although cellular entry of dsRNA is possible, cellular exit of dsRNA from normal anim...

  14. RNA-Based Vaccines in Cancer Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan A. McNamara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA vaccines traditionally consist of messenger RNA synthesized by in vitro transcription using a bacteriophage RNA polymerase and template DNA that encodes the antigen(s of interest. Once administered and internalized by host cells, the mRNA transcripts are translated directly in the cytoplasm and then the resulting antigens are presented to antigen presenting cells to stimulate an immune response. Alternatively, dendritic cells can be loaded with either tumor associated antigen mRNA or total tumor RNA and delivered to the host to elicit a specific immune response. In this review, we will explain why RNA vaccines represent an attractive platform for cancer immunotherapy, discuss modifications to RNA structure that have been developed to optimize mRNA vaccine stability and translational efficiency, and describe strategies for nonviral delivery of mRNA vaccines, highlighting key preclinical and clinical data related to cancer immunotherapy.

  15. RNA folding during transcription by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase analyzed by RNA self-cleavage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have used a self-cleaving RNA molecule related to a subsequence of plant viroids (a hammerhead) to study the length-dependent folding of RNA produced during transcription by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase. Transcript elongation is arrested at defined positions using chain-terminating ribonucleoside triphosphate analogues (3'-deoxyNTP's or 3'-O-methylNTP's). When the transcript can form the hammerhead structure it self-cleaves to give a truncated product. The experiment yields an RNA sequencing ladder which terminates at the length at which cleavage becomes possible; the sequencing ladder is compared to those generated by using a noncleaving transcript or by using [α-thio]ATP in place of ATP. They have shown that 15-18 nucleotides (nt) of RNA past the cleavage point must be synthesized before the transcript can self-cleave within a ternary complex, whereas RNA freed from the complex by heating can cleave with only 3 or more nt present beyond the cleavage point. There are sequence-dependent as well as length-dependent effects. The results suggest that 12 ± 1 nt are sequestered within the ternary complex and are consistent with the presence of a DNA-RNA hybrid within the transcription bubble, as proposed by others. The results indicate that the hammerhead structure does not disrupt the hybrid. Self-cleaving of the transcript offers a simple structural probe for studying less well-characterized transcription complexes. The relevance of the results to models for transcription termination is discussed

  16. RNA folding during transcription by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase analyzed by RNA self-cleavage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monforte, J.A.; Kahn, J.D.; Hearst, J.E. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (USA) Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

    1990-08-28

    The authors have used a self-cleaving RNA molecule related to a subsequence of plant viroids (a hammerhead) to study the length-dependent folding of RNA produced during transcription by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase. Transcript elongation is arrested at defined positions using chain-terminating ribonucleoside triphosphate analogues (3{prime}-deoxyNTP's or 3{prime}-O-methylNTP's). When the transcript can form the hammerhead structure it self-cleaves to give a truncated product. The experiment yields an RNA sequencing ladder which terminates at the length at which cleavage becomes possible; the sequencing ladder is compared to those generated by using a noncleaving transcript or by using ({alpha}-thio)ATP in place of ATP. They have shown that 15-18 nucleotides (nt) of RNA past the cleavage point must be synthesized before the transcript can self-cleave within a ternary complex, whereas RNA freed from the complex by heating can cleave with only 3 or more nt present beyond the cleavage point. There are sequence-dependent as well as length-dependent effects. The results suggest that 12 {plus minus} 1 nt are sequestered within the ternary complex and are consistent with the presence of a DNA-RNA hybrid within the transcription bubble, as proposed by others. The results indicate that the hammerhead structure does not disrupt the hybrid. Self-cleaving of the transcript offers a simple structural probe for studying less well-characterized transcription complexes. The relevance of the results to models for transcription termination is discussed.

  17. MicroRNA Regulation of Lipid Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Flowers, Elena; Froelicher, Erika Sivarajan; Aouizerat, Bradley E.

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNA are structural components of an epigenetic mechanism of post-transcriptional regulation of messenger RNA translation. Recently, there is significant interest in the application of microRNA as a blood-based biomarker of underlying physiologic conditions, and the therapeutic administration of microRNA inhibitors and mimics. The purpose of this review is to describe the current body of knowledge on microRNA regulation of genes involved in lipid metabolism, and to introduce the role of m...

  18. A Regulatory RNA Inducing Transgenerationally Inherited Phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lea Møller

    variation in Arabidopsis enables different regulatory networks and mechanisms to shape the phenotypic characteristics. The thesis describes the identification of regulatory RNA encoded by an enzyme encoding gene. The RNA regulates by inducing transgenerationally inherited phenotypes. The function of the RNA...... is dependent on the genetic background illustrating that polymorphisms are found in either interactors or target genes of the RNA. Furthermore, the RNA provides a mechanistic link between accumulation of glucosinolate and onset of flowering....

  19. Modulation of RNA function by aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    OpenAIRE

    Schroeder, R; Waldsich, C; Wank, H

    2000-01-01

    One of the most important families of antibiotics are the aminoglycosides, including drugs such as neomycin B, paromomycin, gentamicin and streptomycin. With the discovery of the catalytic potential of RNA, these antibiotics became very popular due to their RNA-binding capacity. They serve for the analysis of RNA function as well as for the study of RNA as a potential therapeutic target. Improvements in RNA structure determination recently provided first insights into the decoding site of the...

  20. A 22-nt artificial microRNA mediates widespread RNA silencing in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    McHale, Marcus; Eamens, Andrew L.; Finnegan, E Jean; Waterhouse, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    It is known that 22-nucleotide (nt) microRNAs (miRNAs) derived from asymmetric duplexes trigger phased small-interfering RNA (phasiRNA) production from complementary targets. Here we investigate the efficacy of 22-nt artificial miRNA (amiRNA)-mediated RNA silencing relative to conventional hairpin RNA (hpRNA) and 21-nt amiRNA-mediated RNA silencing. CHALCONE SYNTHASE (CHS) was selected as a target in Arabidopsis thaliana due to the obvious and non-lethal loss of anthocyanin accumulation upon ...

  1. Borate Minerals and RNA Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Di Mauro

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The abiotic origin of genetic polymers faces two major problems: a prebiotically plausible polymerization mechanism and the maintenance of their polymerized state outside a cellular environment. The stabilizing action of borate on ribose having been reported, we have explored the possibility that borate minerals stabilize RNA. We observe that borate itself does not stabilize RNA. The analysis of a large panel of minerals tested in various physical-chemical conditions shows that in general no protection on RNA backbone is exerted, with the interesting exception of ludwigite (Mg2Fe3+BO5. Stability is a fundamental property of nucleic polymers and borate is an abundant component of the planet, hence the prebiotic interest of this analysis.

  2. RNA-dependent RNA polymerases from cowpea mosaic virus-infected cowpea leaves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorssers, L.C.J.

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the research described in this thesis was the purification and identification of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase engaged in replicating viral RNA in cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV)- infected cowpea leaves.Previously, an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase produced upon infection of Vigna unguiculata

  3. MicroRNA and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansson, Martin D; Lund, Anders H

    2012-01-01

    biological phenomena and pathologies. The best characterized non-coding RNA family consists in humans of about 1400 microRNAs for which abundant evidence have demonstrated fundamental importance in normal development, differentiation, growth control and in human diseases such as cancer. In this review, we...... summarize the current knowledge and concepts concerning the involvement of microRNAs in cancer, which have emerged from the study of cell culture and animal model systems, including the regulation of key cancer-related pathways, such as cell cycle control and the DNA damage response. Importantly, microRNA...

  4. lncRHOXF1, a Long Noncoding RNA from the X Chromosome That Suppresses Viral Response Genes during Development of the Early Human Placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkala, Ian; Wang, Jianle; Syrett, Camille M; Goetzl, Laura; López, Carolina B; Anguera, Montserrat C

    2016-06-15

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) can regulate gene expression in a cell-specific fashion during development. Here, we identify a novel lncRNA from the X chromosome that we named lncRHOXF1 and which is abundantly expressed in trophectoderm and primitive endoderm cells of human blastocyst-stage embryos. lncRHOXF1 is a spliced and polyadenylated lncRNA about 1 kb in length that is found in both the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments of in vitro differentiated human trophectoderm progenitor cells. Gain-of-function experiments in human embryonic stem cells, which normally lack lncRHOXF1 RNA, revealed that lncRHOXF1 reduced proliferation and favored cellular differentiation. lncRHOXF1 knockdown using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in human trophectoderm progenitors increased expression of viral response genes, including type I interferon. Sendai virus infection of human trophectoderm progenitor cells increased lncRHOXF1 RNA levels, and siRNA-mediated disruption of lncRHOXF1 during infection reduced the expression of viral response genes leading to higher virus replication. Thus, lncRHOXF1 RNA is the first example of a lncRNA that regulates the host response to viral infections in human placental progenitor cells, and we propose that it functions as a repressor of the viral response during early human development. PMID:27066803

  5. Genome-wide analysis of the mouse lung transcriptome reveals novel molecular gene interaction networks and cell-specific expression signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Robert W

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lung is critical in surveillance and initial defense against pathogens. In humans, as in mice, individual genetic differences strongly modulate pulmonary responses to infectious agents, severity of lung disease, and potential allergic reactions. In a first step towards understanding genetic predisposition and pulmonary molecular networks that underlie individual differences in disease vulnerability, we performed a global analysis of normative lung gene expression levels in inbred mouse strains and a large family of BXD strains that are widely used for systems genetics. Our goal is to provide a key community resource on the genetics of the normative lung transcriptome that can serve as a foundation for experimental analysis and allow predicting genetic predisposition and response to pathogens, allergens, and xenobiotics. Methods Steady-state polyA+ mRNA levels were assayed across a diverse and fully genotyped panel of 57 isogenic strains using the Affymetrix M430 2.0 array. Correlations of expression levels between genes were determined. Global expression QTL (eQTL analysis and network covariance analysis was performed using tools and resources in GeneNetwork http://www.genenetwork.org. Results Expression values were highly variable across strains and in many cases exhibited a high heri-tability factor. Several genes which showed a restricted expression to lung tissue were identified. Using correlations between gene expression values across all strains, we defined and extended memberships of several important molecular networks in the lung. Furthermore, we were able to extract signatures of immune cell subpopulations and characterize co-variation and shared genetic modulation. Known QTL regions for respiratory infection susceptibility were investigated and several cis-eQTL genes were identified. Numerous cis- and trans-regulated transcripts and chromosomal intervals with strong regulatory activity were mapped. The Cyp1a1 P

  6. Circular RNA expands its territory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Chunyang; Lyu, Dongbin; Huang, Shenglin

    2016-03-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) represent a novel class of widespread non-coding RNAs in eukaryotes. They are unusually stable RNA molecules with cell type-specific expression patterns, and are predominantly present in the cytoplasm. We recently demonstrated the existence of abundant circRNAs in exosomes and suggest a potential application of exosomal circRNAs for cancer detection. PMID:27308606

  7. Avian influenza virus RNA extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    The efficient extraction and purification of viral RNA is critical for down-stream molecular applications whether it is the sensitive and specific detection of virus in clinical samples, virus gene cloning and expression, or quantification of avian influenza (AI) virus by molecular methods from expe...

  8. Design of nanodrugs for miRNA targeting in tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Byunghee; Ghosh, Subrata K; Kumar, Mohanraja; Moore, Anna; Yigit, Mehmet V; Medarova, Zdravka

    2014-06-01

    The delivery of oligonucleotide antagonists to cytosolic RNA targets such as microRNA represents an avenue for the post-transcriptional control of cellular phenotype. In tumor cells, oncogenic miRNAs, termed oncomirs, are tightly linked to processes that ultimately determine cancer initiation, progression, and response to therapy. Therefore, the capacity to redirect tumor cell fate towards therapeutically beneficial phenotypes holds promise in a future clinical scenario. Previously, we have designed "nanodrugs" for the specific inhibition of oncogenic microRNAs in tumor cells. The basic design of these nanodrugs includes dextran coated iron oxide nanoparticles, conjugated to a tumor-targeting peptide, and a locked nucleic acid (LNA)-modified antisense oligonucleotide that stably binds and inhibits the complementary mature miRNA. Here, we focus on elucidating an optimal nanodrug design for effective miRNA inhibition in tumor cells. Specifically, we investigate the choice of chemical linker for the conjugation of the oligonucleotide to the nanoparticles and evaluate the contribution of tumor-cell targeting to nanodrug uptake and functionality. We find that short labile linkers (SPDP; N-Succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio)-propionate) are superior to non-labile short linkers (GMBS; N-(gamma-Maleimidobutyryloxy)succinimide ester) or non-labile long linkers (PEG24; Succinimidyl-([N-maleimidopropionamido]-24ethyleneglycol)ester) in terms of their capacity to gain access to the cytosolic cellular compartment and to engage their cognate miRNA. Furthermore, using the nanodrug design that incorporates SPDP as a linker, we establish that the addition of tumor-cell targeting through functionalization of the nanodrug with the alphavbeta3-specific cyclic RGDfK-PEG peptide does not confer an advantage in vitro at long incubation times required for inhibition. PMID:24749405

  9. RNA-DNA Differences Are Generated in Human Cells within Seconds After RNA Exits Pol II

    OpenAIRE

    Isabel X. Wang; Leighton J. Core; Hojoong Kwak; Lauren Brady; Alan Bruzel; Lee McDaniel; Allison L. Richards; Ming Wu; Christopher Grunseich; John T. Lis; Vivian G. Cheung

    2014-01-01

    RNA sequences are expected to be identical to their corresponding DNA sequences. Here, we found all 12 types of RNA-DNA sequence differences (RDDs) in nascent RNA. Our results show that RDDs begin to occur in RNA chains about 55 nucleotides from the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) active site. These RDDs occur so soon after transcription that they are incompatible with known deaminase-mediated RNA editing mechanisms. Moreover, the 55-nucleotide delay in appearance indicates they do not arise durin...

  10. Overview of MicroRNA Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Mott, Justin L.; Mohr, Ashley M

    2015-01-01

    In considering an overview of microRNA biology, it is useful to consider microRNAs as a part of cellular communication. At the simplest level, microRNAs act to decrease the expression of mRNAs that contain stretches of sequence complementary to the microRNA. This function can be likened to the function of endogenous or synthetic short interfering RNA (siRNA). However, microRNA function is more complicated and nuanced than this ‘on-off’ model would suggest. Further, many microRNA targets are t...

  11. MicroRNA mimicry blocks pulmonary fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Montgomery, Rusty L.; Yu, Guoying; Latimer, Paul A.; Stack, Christianna; Robinson, Kathryn; Dalby, Christina M; Kaminski, Naftali; van Rooij, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, great enthusiasm has evolved for microRNA (miRNA) therapeutics. Part of the excitement stems from the fact that a miRNA often regulates numerous related mRNAs. As such, modulation of a single miRNA allows for parallel regulation of multiple genes involved in a particular disease. While many studies have shown therapeutic efficacy using miRNA inhibitors, efforts to restore or increase the function of a miRNA have been lagging behind. The miR-29 family has gained a lot of ...

  12. Comparison of Whole Blood RNA Preservation Tubes and Novel Generation RNA Extraction Kits for Analysis of mRNA and MiRNA Profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Häntzsch, Madlen; Tolios, Alexander; Beutner, Frank; Nagel, Dorothea; Thiery, Joachim; Teupser, Daniel; Holdt, Lesca M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Whole blood expression profiling is frequently performed using PAXgene (Qiagen) or Tempus (Life Technologies) tubes. Here, we compare 6 novel generation RNA isolation protocols with respect to RNA quantity, quality and recovery of mRNA and miRNA. Methods 3 PAXgene and 3 Tempus Tubes were collected from participants of the LIFE study with (n = 12) and without (n = 35) acute myocardial infarction (AMI). RNA was extracted with 4 manual protocols from Qiagen (PAXgene Blood miRNA Kit), ...

  13. Viral RNA polymerase scanning and the gymnastics of Sendai virus RNA synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    mRNA synthesis from nonsegmented negative-strand RNA virus (NNV) genomes is unique in that the genome RNA is embedded in an N protein assembly (the nucleocapsid) and the viral RNA polymerase does not dissociate from the template after release of each mRNA, but rather scans the genome RNA for the next gene-start site. A revised model for NNV RNA synthesis is presented, in which RNA polymerase scanning plays a prominent role. Polymerase scanning of the template is known to occur as the viral transcriptase negotiates gene junctions without falling off the template

  14. Structural characterization of mRNA-tRNA translocation intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agirrezabala, Xabier; Liao, Hstau Y; Schreiner, Eduard; Fu, Jie; Ortiz-Meoz, Rodrigo F; Schulten, Klaus; Green, Rachel; Frank, Joachim

    2012-04-17

    Cryo-EM analysis of a wild-type Escherichia coli pretranslocational sample has revealed the presence of previously unseen intermediate substates of the bacterial ribosome during the first phase of translocation, characterized by intermediate intersubunit rotations, L1 stalk positions, and tRNA configurations. Furthermore, we describe the domain rearrangements in quantitative terms, which has allowed us to characterize the processivity and coordination of the conformational reorganization of the ribosome, along with the associated changes in tRNA ribosome-binding configuration. The results are consistent with the view of the ribosome as a molecular machine employing Brownian motion to reach a functionally productive state via a series of substates with incremental changes in conformation. PMID:22467828

  15. iDoRNA: An Interacting Domain-based Tool for Designing RNA-RNA Interaction Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jittrawan Thaiprasit

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available RNA-RNA interactions play a crucial role in gene regulation in living organisms. They have gained increasing interest in the field of synthetic biology because of their potential applications in medicine and biotechnology. However, few novel regulators based on RNA-RNA interactions with desired structures and functions have been developed due to the challenges of developing design tools. Recently, we proposed a novel tool, called iDoDe, for designing RNA-RNA interacting sequences by first decomposing RNA structures into interacting domains and then designing each domain using a stochastic algorithm. However, iDoDe did not provide an optimal solution because it still lacks a mechanism to optimize the design. In this work, we have further developed the tool by incorporating a genetic algorithm (GA to find an RNA solution with maximized structural similarity and minimized hybridized RNA energy, and renamed the tool iDoRNA. A set of suitable parameters for the genetic algorithm were determined and found to be a weighting factor of 0.7, a crossover rate of 0.9, a mutation rate of 0.1, and the number of individuals per population set to 8. We demonstrated the performance of iDoRNA in comparison with iDoDe by using six RNA-RNA interaction models. It was found that iDoRNA could efficiently generate all models of interacting RNAs with far more accuracy and required far less computational time than iDoDe. Moreover, we compared the design performance of our tool against existing design tools using forty-four RNA-RNA interaction models. The results showed that the performance of iDoRNA is better than RiboMaker when considering the ensemble defect, the fitness score and computation time usage. However, it appears that iDoRNA is outperformed by NUPACK and RNAiFold 2.0 when considering the ensemble defect. Nevertheless, iDoRNA can still be an useful alternative tool for designing novel RNA-RNA interactions in synthetic biology research. The source code of iDoRNA

  16. The predictive value of microRNA-126 in relation to first line treatment with capecitabine and oxaliplatin in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MicroRNA-126 is the only microRNA (miRNA) known to be endothelial cell-specific influencing angiogenesis in several ways. The aim of the present study was to analyse the possible predictive value of miRNA-126 in relation to first line capecitabine and oxaliplatin (XELOX) in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). The study included 89 patients with mCRC. In situ hybridization (ISH) was performed to detect miRNA-126 in formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissue from primary tumours. The expression of miRNA-126, area per image (μm2), was measured using image analysis. Clinical response was evaluated according to RECIST. Progression free survival (PFS) was compared using the Kaplan-Meier method and the log rank test. Tumours were classified as low or high miRNA-126 expressing tumours using the median value from the patients with response as cut-off. The median miRNA-126 expression level was significantly higher in patients responding to XELOX, 3629 μm2 (95% CI, 2566-4846), compared to the patients not responding, 1670 μm2 (95% CI, 1436-2041), p < 0.0001. The positive predictive value was 90%, and the negative predictive value was 71%. The median PFS of patients with high expressing tumours was 11.5 months (95% CI, 9.0-12.7 months) compared to 6.0 months (95% CI, 4.8-6.9 months) for patients with low expressing tumours, p < 0.0001. Angiogenesis quantified by ISH of miRNA-126 was related to response to first line XELOX in patients with mCRC, translating to a significant difference in PFS. The predictive value of miRNA-126 remains to be further elucidated in prospective studies

  17. Structural characterization of mRNA-tRNA translocation intermediates

    OpenAIRE

    Agirrezabala, Xabier; Liao, Hstau Y.; Schreiner, Eduard; Fu, Jie; Ortiz-Meoz, Rodrigo F.; Schulten, Klaus; Green, Rachel; Frank, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Cryo-EM analysis of a wild-type Escherichia coli pretranslocational sample has revealed the presence of previously unseen intermediate substates of the bacterial ribosome during the first phase of translocation, characterized by intermediate intersubunit rotations, L1 stalk positions, and tRNA configurations. Furthermore, we describe the domain rearrangements in quantitative terms, which has allowed us to characterize the processivity and coordination of the conformational reorganization of t...

  18. The mechanism of pRNA-mediated release of RNA polymerase from Bacillus subtilis 6S-1 RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Beckmann, Benedikt

    2010-01-01

    Adaptation of the transcriptome to nutrient limitation and resupply is a fundamental process in bacteria, particularly in natural habitats. Bacterial 6S RNA, an ubiquitous and growth phasedependent regulator of transcription, binds to RNA polymerase (RNAP) and inhibits transcription during stationary growth. Upon nutrient resupply, RNAP acts as an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase by transcribing large amounts of short RNAs (pRNAs) fro...

  19. Double-Stranded RNA Binding May Be a General Plant RNA Viral Strategy To Suppress RNA Silencing

    OpenAIRE

    Mérai, Zsuzsanna; Kerényi, Zoltán; Kertész, Sándor; Magna, Melinda; Lakatos, Lóránt; Silhavy, Dániel

    2006-01-01

    In plants, RNA silencing (RNA interference) is an efficient antiviral system, and therefore successful virus infection requires suppression of silencing. Although many viral silencing suppressors have been identified, the molecular basis of silencing suppression is poorly understood. It is proposed that various suppressors inhibit RNA silencing by targeting different steps. However, as double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) play key roles in silencing, it was speculated that dsRNA binding might be a g...

  20. Relationships among the positive strand and double-strand RNA viruses as viewed through their RNA-dependent RNA polymerases.

    OpenAIRE

    Bruenn, J A

    1991-01-01

    The sequences of 50 RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRPs) from 43 positive strand and 7 double strand RNA (dsRNA) viruses have been compared. The alignment permitted calculation of distances among the 50 viruses and a resultant dendrogram based on every amino acid, rather than just those amino acids in the conserved motifs. Remarkably, a large subgroup of these viruses, including vertebrate, plant, and insect viruses, forms a single cluster whose only common characteristic is exploitation of ...

  1. siRNA and RNAi optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagia, Adele; Eritja, Ramon

    2016-05-01

    The discovery and examination of the posttranscriptional gene regulatory mechanism known as RNA interference (RNAi) contributed to the identification of small interfering RNA (siRNA) and the comprehension of its enormous potential for clinical purposes. Theoretically, the ability of specific target gene downregulation makes the RNAi pathway an appealing solution for several diseases. Despite numerous hurdles resulting from the inherent properties of siRNA molecule and proper delivery to the target tissue, more than 50 RNA-based drugs are currently under clinical testing. In this work, we analyze the recent literature in the optimization of siRNA molecules. In detail, we focused on describing the most recent advances of siRNA field aimed at optimize siRNA pharmacokinetic properties. Special attention has been given in describing the impact of RNA modifications in the potential off-target effects (OTEs) such as saturation of the RNAi machinery, passenger strand-mediated silencing, immunostimulation, and miRNA-like OTEs as well as to recent developments on the delivery issue. The novel delivery systems and modified siRNA provide significant steps toward the development of reliable siRNA molecules for therapeutic use. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:316-329. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1337 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26840434

  2. Amino acid modifications on tRNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Yuan; Kelly Sheppard; Dieter S(o)ll

    2008-01-01

    The accurate formation of cognate aminoacyl-transfer RNAs (aa-tRNAs) is essential for the fidelity of translation.Most amino acids are esterified onto their cognate tRNA isoacceptors directly by aa.tRNA synthetases.However,in the case of four amino acids (Gin,Asn,Cys and Sec),aminoacyl-tRNAs are made through indirect pathways in many organisms across all three domains of life.The process begins with the charging ofnoncognate amino acids to tRNAs by a specialized synthetase in the case of Cys-tRNAcys formation or by synthetases with relaxed specificity,such as the non-discriminating glutamyl-tRNA,non-discriminating aspartyl-tRNA and seryl-tRNA synthetases.The resulting misacylated tRNAs are then converted to cognate pairs through transformation of the amino acids on the tRNA,which is catalyzed by a group of tRNA-dependent modifying enzymes,such as tRNA-dependent amidotransferases,Sep-tRNA:Cys-tRNA synthase,O-phosphoseryi-tRNA kinase and Sep-tRNA:Sec-tRNA synthase.The majority of these indirect pathways are widely spread in all domains of life and thought to be part of the evolutionary process.

  3. Theoretical Search for RNA Folding Nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid B. Pereyaslavets

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The functions of RNA molecules are defined by their spatial structure, whose folding is regulated by numerous factors making RNA very similar to proteins. Prediction of RNA folding nuclei gives the possibility to take a fresh look at the problems of the multiple folding pathways of RNA molecules and RNA stability. The algorithm previously developed for prediction of protein folding nuclei has been successfully applied to ~150 various RNA structures: hairpins, tRNAs, structures with pseudoknots, and the large structured P4-P6 domain of the Tetrahymena group I intron RNA. The calculated Φ-values for tRNA structures agree with the experimental data obtained earlier. According to the experiment the nucleotides of the D and T hairpin loops are the last to be involved in the tRNA tertiary structure. Such agreement allowed us to do a prediction for an example of large structured RNA, the P4-P6 RNA domain. One of the advantages of our method is that it allows us to make predictions about the folding nucleus for nontrivial RNA motifs: pseudoknots and tRNA.

  4. Application of Live-Cell RNA Imaging Techniques to the Study of Retroviral RNA Trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrin V. Bann

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses produce full-length RNA that serves both as a genomic RNA (gRNA, which is encapsidated into virus particles, and as an mRNA, which directs the synthesis of viral structural proteins. However, we are only beginning to understand the cellular and viral factors that influence trafficking of retroviral RNA and the selection of the RNA for encapsidation or translation. Live cell imaging studies of retroviral RNA trafficking have provided important insight into many aspects of the retrovirus life cycle including transcription dynamics, nuclear export of viral RNA, translational regulation, membrane targeting, and condensation of the gRNA during virion assembly. Here, we review cutting-edge techniques to visualize single RNA molecules in live cells and discuss the application of these systems to studying retroviral RNA trafficking.

  5. How the RNA isolation method can affect microRNA microarray results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podolska, Agnieszka; Kaczkowski, Bogumil; Litman, Thomas;

    2011-01-01

    RNA microarray analysis on porcine brain tissue. One method is a phenol-guanidine isothiocyanate-based procedure that permits isolation of total RNA. The second method, miRVana™ microRNA isolation, is column based and recovers the small RNA fraction alone. We found that microarray analyses give different results...... that depend on the RNA fraction used, in particular because some microRNAs appear very sensitive to the RNA isolation method. We conclude that precautions need to be taken when comparing microarray studies based on RNA isolated with different methods.......The quality of RNA is crucial in gene expression experiments. RNA degradation interferes in the measurement of gene expression, and in this context, microRNA quantification can lead to an incorrect estimation. In the present study, two different RNA isolation methods were used to perform micro...

  6. Expanding networks of RNA virus evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koonin Eugene V

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In a recent BMC Evolutionary Biology article, Huiquan Liu and colleagues report two new genomes of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA viruses from fungi and use these as a springboard to perform an extensive phylogenomic analysis of dsRNA viruses. The results support the old scenario of polyphyletic origin of dsRNA viruses from different groups of positive-strand RNA viruses and additionally reveal extensive horizontal gene transfer between diverse viruses consistent with the network-like rather than tree-like mode of viral evolution. Together with the unexpected discoveries of the first putative archaeal RNA virus and a RNA-DNA virus hybrid, this work shows that RNA viral genomics has major surprises to deliver. See research article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2148/12/91

  7. Inverse Folding of RNA Pseudoknot Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, James Z M; Reidys, Christian M

    2010-01-01

    Background: RNA exhibits a variety of structural configurations. Here we consider a structure to be tantamount to the noncrossing Watson-Crick and \\pairGU-base pairings (secondary structure) and additional cross-serial base pairs. These interactions are called pseudoknots and are observed across the whole spectrum of RNA functionalities. In the context of studying natural RNA structures, searching for new ribozymes and designing artificial RNA, it is of interest to find RNA sequences folding into a specific structure and to analyze their induced neutral networks. Since the established inverse folding algorithms, {\\tt RNAinverse}, {\\tt RNA-SSD} as well as {\\tt INFO-RNA} are limited to RNA secondary structures, we present in this paper the inverse folding algorithm {\\tt Inv} which can deal with 3-noncrossing, canonical pseudoknot structures. Results: In this paper we present the inverse folding algorithm {\\tt Inv}. We give a detailed analysis of {\\tt Inv}, including pseudocodes. We show that {\\tt Inv} allows to...

  8. Concepts and introduction to RNA bioinformatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorodkin, Jan; Hofacker, Ivo L.; Ruzzo, Walter L.

    2014-01-01

    RNA bioinformatics and computational RNA biology have emerged from implementing methods for predicting the secondary structure of single sequences. The field has evolved to exploit multiple sequences to take evolutionary information into account, such as compensating (and structure preserving) base...

  9. Total Cellular RNA Modulates Protein Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Subhabrata; DeMott, Christopher M; Reverdatto, Sergey; Burz, David S; Shekhtman, Alexander

    2016-08-16

    RNA constitutes up to 20% of a cell's dry weight, corresponding to ∼20 mg/mL. This high concentration of RNA facilitates low-affinity protein-RNA quinary interactions, which may play an important role in facilitating and regulating biological processes. In the yeast Pichia pastoris, the level of ubiquitin-RNA colocalization increases when cells are grown in the presence of dextrose and methanol instead of methanol as the sole carbon source. Total RNA isolated from cells grown in methanol increases β-galactosidase activity relative to that seen with RNA isolated from cells grown in the presence of dextrose and methanol. Because the total cellular RNA content changes with growth medium, protein-RNA quinary interactions can alter in-cell protein biochemistry and may play an important role in cell adaptation, critical to many physiological and pathological states. PMID:27456029

  10. Double-stranded RNA resists condensation

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Li; Pabit, Suzette A.; Meisburger, Steve P.; Pollack, Lois

    2011-01-01

    Much attention has focused on DNA condensation because of its fundamental biological importance. The recent discovery of new roles for RNA duplexes demands efficient packaging of dsRNA for therapeutics. Here we report measurements of short DNA and RNA duplexes in the presence of trivalent ions. Under conditions where UV spectroscopy indicates condensation of DNA duplexes into (insoluble) precipitates, RNA duplexes remain soluble. SAXS results suggest that the differing surface topologies of R...

  11. RNA Binding Specificity of Drosophila Muscleblind†

    OpenAIRE

    Goers, Emily S.; Voelker, Rodger B.; Gates, Devika P.; Berglund, J. Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Members of the muscleblind family of RNA binding proteins found in Drosophila and mammals are key players in both the human disease myotonic dystrophy and the regulation of alternative splicing. Recently, the mammalian muscleblind-like protein, MBNL1, has been shown to have interesting RNA binding properties with both endogenous and disease-related RNA targets. Here we report the characterization of RNA binding properties of the Drosophila muscleblind protein Mbl. Mutagenesis of double-strand...

  12. RNA sequencing: advances, challenges and opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Ozsolak, Fatih; Milos, Patrice M.

    2010-01-01

    In the few years since its initial application, massively parallel cDNA sequencing, or RNA-seq, has allowed many advances in the characterization and quantification of transcriptomes. Recently, several developments in RNA-seq methods have provided an even more complete characterization of RNA transcripts. These developments include improvements in transcription start site mapping, strand-specific measurements, gene fusion detection, small RNA characterization and detection of alternative spli...

  13. RNA-Seq for Plant Pathogenic Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Kimbrel, Jeffrey A.; Yanming Di; Cumbie, Jason S.; Chang, Jeff H.

    2011-01-01

    The throughput and single-base resolution of RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) have contributed to a dramatic change in transcriptomic-based inquiries and resulted in many new insights into the complexities of bacterial transcriptomes. RNA-Seq could contribute to similar advances in our understanding of plant pathogenic bacteria but it is still a technology under development with limitations and unknowns that need to be considered. Here, we review some new developments for RNA-Seq and highlight recent...

  14. Engineering RNA sequence specificity of Pumilio repeats

    OpenAIRE

    Cheong, Cheom-Gil; Hall, Traci M. Tanaka

    2006-01-01

    Puf proteins bind RNA sequence specifically and regulate translation and stability of target mRNAs. A “code” for RNA recognition has been deduced from crystal structures of the Puf protein, human Pumilio1, where each of eight repeats binds an RNA base via a combination of three side chains at conserved positions. Here, we report the creation of seven soluble mutant proteins with predictably altered sequence specificity, including one that binds tightly to adenosine-uracil-rich element RNA. Th...

  15. Aging - RNA in Development and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cookson, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    Given that RNA is involved in virtually all biological processes, it is perhaps not surprising that several RNA binding proteins are associated with aging and with different age related disorders. Other chapters in this volume will discuss some specific examples of diseases where RNA plays a role that are also associated with aging, such as cancer and inflammation, so here I will discuss some general aspects of how RNA changes with the aging process. I will also discuss some specific examples...

  16. Optimal alphabets for an RNA world.

    OpenAIRE

    Gardner, Paul P.; Holland, Barbara R; Moulton, Vincent; Hendy, Mike; Penny, David

    2003-01-01

    Experiments have shown that the canonical AUCG genetic alphabet is not the only possible nucleotide alphabet. In this work we address the question 'is the canonical alphabet optimal?' We make the assumption that the genetic alphabet was determined in the RNA world. Computational tools are used to infer the RNA secondary structure (shape) from a given RNA sequence, and statistics from RNA shapes are gathered with respect to alphabet size. Then, simulations based upon the replication and select...

  17. RNA recombination in animal and plant viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, M M

    1992-01-01

    An increasing number of animal and plant viruses have been shown to undergo RNA-RNA recombination, which is defined as the exchange of genetic information between nonsegmented RNAs. Only some of these viruses have been shown to undergo recombination in experimental infection of tissue culture, animals, and plants. However, a survey of viral RNA structure and sequences suggests that many RNA viruses were derived form homologous or nonhomologous recombination between viruses or between viruses ...

  18. Prediction for RNA planar pseudoknots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Hengwu; Zhu Daming; Liu Zhendong; Li Hong

    2007-01-01

    Based on m-stems and semi-extensible structure, a model is presented to represent RNA planar pseudoknots, and corresponding dynamic programming algorithm is designed and implemented to predict arbitrary planar pseudoknots and simple non-planar pseudoknots with O(n4) time and O(n3) space. The algorithm folds total 245 sequences in the Pseudobase database, and the test results indicate that the algorithm has good accuracy, sensitivity and specificity.

  19. Riboswitches and the RNA World

    OpenAIRE

    Breaker, Ronald R.

    2012-01-01

    Riboswitches are structured noncoding RNA domains that selectively bind metabolites and control gene expression (Mandal and Breaker 2004a; Coppins et al. 2007; Roth and Breaker 2009). Nearly all examples of the known riboswitches reside in noncoding regions of messenger RNAs where they control transcription or translation. Newfound classes of riboswitches are being reported at a rate of about three per year (Ames and Breaker 2009), and these have been shown to selectively respond to fundament...

  20. Studium transgenní RNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fojtová, Miloslava

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 68, č. 3 (2003), s. 166-171. ISSN 0366-0486. [Metodické dny /3./. Milovy, 20.10.2003-24.10.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GP521/01/P042; GA ČR GA521/01/0037 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : transgenes expression * RNA * nuclear run on Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  1. Cellular Dynamics of RNA Modification

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Chengqi; Pan, Tao

    2011-01-01

    Decades of research have identified over 100 types of ribonucleosides that are post-transcriptionally modified. Many modified nucleosides are conserved in bacteria, archeae and eukaryotes, while some modified nucleosides are unique to each branch of life. However, the cellular and functional dynamics of RNA modifications remains largely unexplored, mostly due to the lack of functional hypotheses and experimental methods for quantification and large scale analysis. Just as many well characteri...

  2. Discovery of Nuclear DNA-like RNA (dRNA, hnRNA) and Ribonucleoproteins Particles Containing hnRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, G P

    2016-01-01

    On August 9-11, 2014, Cold Spring Harbor (USA) hosted a special symposium dedicated to the discovery of messenger or informational RNA and the main events in the subsequent studies of its synthesis, regulation of synthesis, maturation, and transport. The existence of mRNA in bacteria was first suggested in 1961 by Jacob and Monod, based on genetic studies [1]. The same year, Brenner et al. confirmed the hypothesis [2]. Our laboratory played a key role in the discovery of messenger RNA in eukaryotes, as well as in the discovery of the nuclear ribonucleoproteins that contain it and in the elucidation of their structural organization. Therefore, I was invited to represent Russia at the Symposium and deliver a speech on these topics. However, my visa had only been issued after the end of the Symposium, and, therefore, the presentation was delivered by my former colleague G.N. Yenikolopov, who works at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. The transcript of the lecture is presented below. PMID:27099780

  3. Structural features of microRNA (miRNA) precursors and their relevance to miRNA biogenesis and small interfering RNA/short hairpin RNA design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krol, Jacek; Sobczak, Krzysztof; Wilczynska, Urszula; Drath, Maria; Jasinska, Anna; Kaczynska, Danuta; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J

    2004-10-01

    We have established the structures of 10 human microRNA (miRNA) precursors using biochemical methods. Eight of these structures turned out to be different from those that were computer-predicted. The differences localized in the terminal loop region and at the opposite side of the precursor hairpin stem. We have analyzed the features of these structures from the perspectives of miRNA biogenesis and active strand selection. We demonstrated the different thermodynamic stability profiles for pre-miRNA hairpins harboring miRNAs at their 5'- and 3'-sides and discussed their functional implications. Our results showed that miRNA prediction based on predicted precursor structures may give ambiguous results, and the success rate is significantly higher for the experimentally determined structures. On the other hand, the differences between the predicted and experimentally determined structures did not affect the stability of termini produced through "conceptual dicing." This result confirms the value of thermodynamic analysis based on mfold as a predictor of strand section by RNAi-induced silencing complex (RISC). PMID:15292246

  4. Pumilio turns on microRNA function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triboulet, Robinson; Gregory, Richard I

    2010-10-01

    Pumilio proteins PUM1 and PUM2 are shown to regulate microRNA-dependent gene silencing by induction of a conformational switch in the 3' untranslated region of p27 mRNA. This conformational change is required for efficient microRNA-mediated repression of this cell-cycle regulator in rapidly proliferating cells. PMID:20885420

  5. Cisplatin Targeting of Bacterial Ribosomal RNA Hairpins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayani N. P. Dedduwa-Mudalige

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is a clinically important chemotherapeutic agent known to target purine bases in nucleic acids. In addition to major deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA intrastrand cross-links, cisplatin also forms stable adducts with many types of ribonucleic acid (RNA including siRNA, spliceosomal RNAs, tRNA, and rRNA. All of these RNAs play vital roles in the cell, such as catalysis of protein synthesis by rRNA, and therefore serve as potential drug targets. This work focused on platination of two highly conserved RNA hairpins from E. coli ribosomes, namely pseudouridine-modified helix 69 from 23S rRNA and the 790 loop of helix 24 from 16S rRNA. RNase T1 probing, MALDI mass spectrometry, and dimethyl sulfate mapping revealed platination at GpG sites. Chemical probing results also showed platination-induced RNA structural changes. These findings reveal solvent and structural accessibility of sites within bacterial RNA secondary structures that are functionally significant and therefore viable targets for cisplatin as well as other classes of small molecules. Identifying target preferences at the nucleotide level, as well as determining cisplatin-induced RNA conformational changes, is important for the design of more potent drug molecules. Furthermore, the knowledge gained through studies of RNA-targeting by cisplatin is applicable to a broad range of organisms from bacteria to human.

  6. tmRDB (tmRNA database)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwieb, Christian; Gorodkin, Jan; Knudsen, Bjarne;

    2003-01-01

    functional in all bacteria. In this release of tmRDB, 186 new entries from 10 bacterial groups for a total of 274 tmRNA sequences have been added. Lists of the tmRNAs and the corresponding tmRNA-encoded tag-peptides are presented in alphabetical and phylogenetic order. The tmRNA sequences are aligned...

  7. RNAome sequencing delineates the complete RNA landscape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.W.J. Derks (Kasper); J. Pothof (Joris)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractStandard RNA expression profiling methods rely on enrichment steps for specific RNA classes, thereby not detecting all RNA species. For example, small and large RNAs from the same sample cannot be sequenced in a single sequence run. We designed RNAome sequencing, which is a strand-specif

  8. Peptides as catalysts in the RNA world

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieczorek, Rafal; Dörr, Mark; Luisi, Pier Luigi;

    The emergence of RNA chains from prebiotic soup is considered a stumbling block in the RNA world theory (Orgel 2004). Both the activation of RNA monomers and their subsequent oligomerization is hard to achieve in accepted early Earth conditions, thus putting doubt on the prebiotic plausibility of...

  9. Viral counterdefense on RNA silencing : analysis of RNA silencing suppressors from arthropod-borne negative strand RNA plant viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Schnettler, E.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes that RNA silencing suppressor (RSS) proteins encoded by negative-stranded RNA plant viruses are able to interfere with different RNA silencing pathways in a variety of organisms by interacting with double stranded (ds)RNA molecules. These RSS proteins are able to counteract the antiviral RNA silencing response in their plant host and insect vector, and even in mammalian cells, that are non-hosts for these viruses. Whereas Rice hoja blanca virus NS3 has been shown to bind...

  10. The differential expression of alternatively polyadenylated transcripts is a common stress-induced response mechanism that modulates mammalian mRNA expression in a quantitative and qualitative fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollerer, Ina; Curk, Tomaz; Haase, Bettina; Benes, Vladimir; Hauer, Christian; Neu-Yilik, Gabriele; Bhuvanagiri, Madhuri; Hentze, Matthias W; Kulozik, Andreas E

    2016-09-01

    Stress adaptation plays a pivotal role in biological processes and requires tight regulation of gene expression. In this study, we explored the effect of cellular stress on mRNA polyadenylation and investigated the implications of regulated polyadenylation site usage on mammalian gene expression. High-confidence polyadenylation site mapping combined with global pre-mRNA and mRNA expression profiling revealed that stress induces an accumulation of genes with differentially expressed polyadenylated mRNA isoforms in human cells. Specifically, stress provokes a global trend in polyadenylation site usage toward decreased utilization of promoter-proximal poly(A) sites in introns or ORFs and increased utilization of promoter-distal polyadenylation sites in intergenic regions. This extensively affects gene expression beyond regulating mRNA abundance by changing mRNA length and by altering the configuration of open reading frames. Our study highlights the impact of post-transcriptional mechanisms on stress-dependent gene regulation and reveals the differential expression of alternatively polyadenylated transcripts as a common stress-induced mechanism in mammalian cells. PMID:27407180

  11. RNA versatility governs tRNA function: Why tRNA flexibility is essential beyond the translation cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Claus-D

    2016-05-01

    tRNAs undergo multiple conformational changes during the translation cycle that are required for tRNA translocation and proper communication between the ribosome and translation factors. Recent structural data on how destabilized tRNAs utilize the CCA-adding enzyme to proofread themselves put a spotlight on tRNA flexibility beyond the translation cycle. In analogy to tRNA surveillance, this review finds that other processes also exploit versatile tRNA folding to achieve, amongst others, specific aminoacylation, translational regulation by riboswitches or a block of bacterial translation. tRNA flexibility is thereby not restricted to the hinges utilized during translation. In contrast, the flexibility of tRNA is distributed all over its L-shape and is actively exploited by the tRNA-interacting partners to discriminate one tRNA from another. Since the majority of tRNA modifications also modulate tRNA flexibility it seems that cells devote enormous resources to tightly sense and regulate tRNA structure. This is likely required for error-free protein synthesis. PMID:26990636

  12. FLDS: A Comprehensive dsRNA Sequencing Method for Intracellular RNA Virus Surveillance

    OpenAIRE

    Urayama, Syun-ichi; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Nunoura, Takuro

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the distribution and diversity of RNA viruses is still limited in spite of their possible environmental and epidemiological impacts because RNA virus-specific metagenomic methods have not yet been developed. We herein constructed an effective metagenomic method for RNA viruses by targeting long double-stranded (ds)RNA in cellular organisms, which is a hallmark of infection, or the replication of dsRNA and single-stranded (ss)RNA viruses, except for retroviruses. This novel dsRNA ...

  13. Double-Stranded RNA Resists Condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Pabit, Suzette A.; Meisburger, Steve P.; Pollack, Lois

    2011-03-01

    Much attention has been focused on DNA condensation because of its fundamental biological importance. The recent discovery of new roles for RNA duplexes demands efficient packaging of double-stranded RNA for therapeutics. Here we report measurements of short DNA and RNA duplexes in the presence of trivalent ions. Under conditions where UV spectroscopy indicates condensation of DNA duplexes into (insoluble) precipitates, RNA duplexes remain soluble. Small angle x-ray scattering results suggest that the differing surface topologies of RNA and DNA may be crucial in generating the attractive forces that result in precipitation.

  14. Engineering RNA sequence specificity of Pumilio repeats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Cheom-Gil; Hall, Traci M. Tanaka

    2006-01-01

    Puf proteins bind RNA sequence specifically and regulate translation and stability of target mRNAs. A “code” for RNA recognition has been deduced from crystal structures of the Puf protein, human Pumilio1, where each of eight repeats binds an RNA base via a combination of three side chains at conserved positions. Here, we report the creation of seven soluble mutant proteins with predictably altered sequence specificity, including one that binds tightly to adenosine-uracil-rich element RNA. These data show that Pumilio1 can be used as a scaffold to engineer RNA-binding proteins with designed sequence specificity. PMID:16954190

  15. Structural principles of CRISPR RNA processing

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The Cas6 superfamily, the Cas5d subclass, and the host RNase III endoribonucleases are responsible for generation of small RNAs (crRNA) that function in the CRISPR-Cas immunity. The three enzymes may also interact with the crRNA-associated nucleic acid interference complexes. Recent development in structural biology of Cas6 and Cas5d and their complexes with RNA substrates has lent new insights on principles of crRNA processing and the structural basis for linking crRNA processing to interfer...

  16. RNA catalysis and the origins of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgel, Leslie E.

    1986-01-01

    The role of RNA catalysis in the origins of life is considered in connection with the discovery of riboszymes, which are RNA molecules that catalyze sequence-specific hydrolysis and transesterification reactions of RNA substrates. Due to this discovery, theories positing protein-free replication as preceding the appearance of the genetic code are more plausible. The scope of RNA catalysis in biology and chemistry is discussed, and it is noted that the development of methods to select (or predict) RNA sequences with preassigned catalytic functions would be a major contribution to the study of life's origins.

  17. Nucleolar dominance and ribosomal RNA gene silencing

    OpenAIRE

    Tucker, Sarah; Vitins, Alexa; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2010-01-01

    Nucleolar dominance is an epigenetic phenomenon that occurs in genetic hybrids and describes the expression of 45S rRNA genes inherited from one progenitor due to the silencing of the other progenitor’s rRNA genes. Nucleolar dominance is a manifestation of rRNA gene dosage control, which also occurs in non-hybrids, regulating the number of active rRNA genes according to the cellular demand for ribosomes and protein synthesis. Ribosomal RNA gene silencing involves changes in DNA methylation an...

  18. RNA-protein interactions: an overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Re, Angela; Joshi, Tejal; Kulberkyte, Eleonora;

    2014-01-01

    RNAs bound by individual RBPs, or vice versa, for both in vitro and in vivo methodologies. To help highlight the biological significance of RBP mediated regulation, online resources on experimentally verified protein-RNA interactions are briefly presented. Finally, we present the major tools to...... sequence and structural features uniquely characterizing protein-RNA interactions.......RNA binding proteins (RBPs) are key players in the regulation of gene expression. In this chapter we discuss the main protein-RNA recognition modes used by RBPs in order to regulate multiple steps of RNA processing. We discuss traditional and state-of-the-art technologies that can be used to study...

  19. Analysis of extracellular RNA by digital PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji eTakahashi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The transfer of extracellular RNA is emerging as an important mechanism for intracellular communication. The ability for the transfer of functionally active RNA molecules from one cell to another within vesicles such as exosomes enables a cell to modulate cellular signaling and biological processes within recipient cells. The study of extracellular RNA requires sensitive methods for the detection of these molecules. In this methods article, we will describe protocols for the detection of such extracellular RNA using sensitive detection technologies such as digital PCR. These protocols should be valuable to researchers interested in the role and contribution of extracellular RNA to tumor cell biology.

  20. Expanding networks of RNA virus evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Koonin Eugene V; Dolja Valerian V

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In a recent BMC Evolutionary Biology article, Huiquan Liu and colleagues report two new genomes of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses from fungi and use these as a springboard to perform an extensive phylogenomic analysis of dsRNA viruses. The results support the old scenario of polyphyletic origin of dsRNA viruses from different groups of positive-strand RNA viruses and additionally reveal extensive horizontal gene transfer between diverse viruses consistent with the network-like r...

  1. Maintaining RNA integrity in a homogeneous population of mammary epithelial cells isolated by Laser Capture Microdissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helbling Jean-Christophe

    2010-12-01

    (300,000 to 600,000 μm2 ranges between 5 to 10 ng. RNA integrity number (RIN was ca. 8.0 and selectivity of this LCM protocol was demonstrated through qPCR analyses for several alveolar cell specific genes, including LALBA (α-lactalbumin and CSN1S2 (αs2-casein, as well as Krt14 (cytokeratin 14, CD3e and CD68 which are specific markers of MMC, lymphocytes and macrophages, respectively. Conclusions RNAs isolated from MEC in this manner were of very good quality for subsequent linear amplification, thus making it possible to establish a referential gene expression profile of the healthy MEC, a useful platform for tumor biomarker discovery.

  2. The miRNA plasma signature in response to acute aerobic exercise and endurance training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Nielsen

    Full Text Available MiRNAs are potent intracellular posttranscriptional regulators and are also selectively secreted into the circulation in a cell-specific fashion. Global changes in miRNA expression in skeletal muscle in response to endurance exercise training have been reported. Therefore, our aim was to establish the miRNA signature in human plasma in response to acute exercise and chronic endurance training by utilizing a novel methodological approach. RNA was isolated from human plasma collected from young healthy men before and after an acute endurance exercise bout and following 12 weeks of endurance training. Global miRNA (742 miRNAs measurements were performed as a screening to identify detectable miRNAs in plasma. Using customized qPCR panels we quantified the expression levels of miRNAs detected in the screening procedure (188 miRNAs. We demonstrate a dynamic regulation of circulating miRNA (ci-miRNA levels following 0 hour (miR-106a, miR-221, miR-30b, miR-151-5p, let-7i, miR-146, miR-652 and miR-151-3p, 1 hour (miR-338-3p, miR-330-3p, miR-223, miR-139-5p and miR-143 and 3 hours (miR-1 after an acute exercise bout (P<0.00032. Where ci-miRNAs were all downregulated immediately after an acute exercise bout (0 hour the 1 and 3 hour post exercise timepoints were followed by upregulations. In response to chronic training, we identified seven ci-miRNAs with decreased levels in plasma (miR-342-3p, let-7d, miR-766, miR-25, miR-148a, miR-185 and miR-21 and two miRNAs that were present at higher levels after the training period (miR-103 and miR-107 (P<0.00032. In conclusion, acute exercise and chronic endurance training, likely through specific mechanisms unique to each stimulus, robustly modify the miRNA signature of human plasma.

  3. TruSeq Stranded mRNA and Total RNA Sample Preparation Kits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Total RNA-Seq enabled by ribosomal RNA (rRNA) reduction is compatible with formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) samples, which contain potentially critical biological information. The family of TruSeq Stranded Total RNA sample preparation kits provides a unique combination of unmatched data quality for both mRNA and whole-transcriptome analyses, robust interrogation of both standard and low-quality samples and workflows compatible with a wide range of study designs.

  4. Molecular Bases of Viral RNA Targeting by Viral Small Interfering RNA-Programmed RISC▿

    OpenAIRE

    Pantaleo, Vitantonio; Szittya, György; Burgyán, József

    2007-01-01

    RNA silencing is conserved in a broad range of eukaryotes and operates in the development and maintenance of genome integrity in many organisms. Plants have adapted this system for antiviral defense, and plant viruses have in turn developed mechanisms to suppress RNA silencing. RNA silencing-related RNA inactivation is likely based on target RNA cleavage or translational arrest. Although it is widely assumed that virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) promotes the endonucleolytic cleavage of the...

  5. siRNA Design Software for a Target Gene-Specific RNA Interference

    OpenAIRE

    Naito, Yuki; Ui-Tei, Kumiko

    2012-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a mechanism through which small interfering RNA (siRNA) induces sequence-specific posttranscriptional gene silencing. RNAi is commonly recognized as a powerful tool not only for functional genomics but also for therapeutic applications. Twenty-one-nucleotide-long siRNA suppresses the expression of the intended gene whose transcript possesses perfect complementarity to the siRNA guide strand. Hence, its silencing effect has been assumed to be extremely specific. Howe...

  6. Emerging roles of RNA modifications in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marbaniang, Carmelita Nora; Vogel, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    RNA modifications are known to abound in stable tRNA and rRNA, where they cluster around functionally important regions. However, RNA-seq based techniques profiling entire transcriptomes are now uncovering an abundance of modified ribonucleotides in mRNAs and noncoding RNAs, too. While most of the recent progress in understanding the regulatory influence of these new RNA modifications stems from eukaryotes, there is growing evidence in bacteria for modified nucleotides beyond the stable RNA species, including modifications of small regulatory RNAs. Given their small genome size, good genetic tractability, and ample knowledge of modification enzymes, bacteria offer excellent model systems to decipher cellular functions of RNA modifications in many diverse physiological contexts. This review highlights how new global approaches combining classic analysis with new sequencing techniques may usher in an era of bacterial epitranscriptomics. PMID:26803287

  7. Delivery materials for siRNA therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanasty, Rosemary; Dorkin, Joseph Robert; Vegas, Arturo; Anderson, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has broad potential as a therapeutic to reversibly silence any gene. To achieve the clinical potential of RNAi, delivery materials are required to transport short interfering RNA (siRNA) to the site of action in the cells of target tissues. This Review provides an introduction to the biological challenges that siRNA delivery materials aim to overcome, as well as a discussion of the way that the most effective and clinically advanced classes of siRNA delivery systems, including lipid nanoparticles and siRNA conjugates, are designed to surmount these challenges. The systems that we discuss are diverse in their approaches to the delivery problem, and provide valuable insight to guide the design of future siRNA delivery materials.

  8. Advances in imaging RNA in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Nynne Meyn; Oparka, Karl J.; Tilsner, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that many RNAs are targeted to specific locations within cells, and that RNA-processing pathways occur in association with specific subcellular structures. Compartmentation of mRNA translation and RNA processing helps to assemble large RNA–protein complexes, while RNA...... targeting allows local protein synthesis and the asymmetric distribution of transcripts during cell polarisation. In plants, intercellular RNA trafficking also plays an additional role in plant development and pathogen defence. Methods that allow the visualisation of RNA sequences within a cellular context......, and preferably at subcellular resolution, can help to answer important questions in plant cell and developmental biology. Here, we summarise the approaches currently available for localising RNA in vivo and address the specific limitations inherent with plant systems....

  9. Systems perspectives on mRNA processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adrienne E McKee; Pamela A Silver

    2007-01-01

    The application of genomic technologies to the study of mRNA processing is increasingly conducted in metazoan organisms in order to understand the complex events that occur during and after transcription. Large-scale systems analyses of mRNA-protein interactions and mRNA dynamics have revealed specificity in mRNA transcription, splicing, transport, translation, and turnover, and have begun to make connections between the different layers of mRNA processing. Here, we review global studies of post-transcriptional processes and discuss the challenges facing our understanding of mRNA regulation in metazoan organisms. In parallel, we examine genome-scale investigations that have expanded our knowledge of RNA-binding proteins and the networks of mRNAs that they regulate.

  10. Self-assembled RNA interference microsponges for efficient siRNA delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Bum; Hong, Jinkee; Bonner, Daniel K.; Poon, Zhiyong; Hammond, Paula T.

    2012-04-01

    The encapsulation and delivery of short interfering RNA (siRNA) has been realized using lipid nanoparticles, cationic complexes, inorganic nanoparticles, RNA nanoparticles and dendrimers. Still, the instability of RNA and the relatively ineffectual encapsulation process of siRNA remain critical issues towards the clinical translation of RNA as a therapeutic. Here we report the synthesis of a delivery vehicle that combines carrier and cargo: RNA interference (RNAi) polymers that self-assemble into nanoscale pleated sheets of hairpin RNA, which in turn form sponge-like microspheres. The RNAi-microsponges consist entirely of cleavable RNA strands, and are processed by the cell’s RNA machinery to convert the stable hairpin RNA to siRNA only after cellular uptake, thus inherently providing protection for siRNA during delivery and transport to the cytoplasm. More than half a million copies of siRNA can be delivered to a cell with the uptake of a single RNAi-microsponge. The approach could lead to novel therapeutic routes for siRNA delivery.

  11. RNA degradation compromises the reliability of microRNA expression profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muckenthaler Martina U

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression and their expression is frequently altered in human diseases, including cancer. To correlate clinically relevant parameters with microRNA expression, total RNA is frequently prepared from samples that were archived for various time periods in frozen tissue banks but, unfortunately, RNA integrity is not always preserved in these frozen tissues. Here, we investigate whether experimentally induced RNA degradation affects microRNA expression profiles. Results Tissue samples were maintained on ice for defined time periods prior to total RNA extraction, which resulted in different degrees of RNA degradation. MicroRNA expression was then analyzed by microarray analysis (miCHIP or microRNA-specific real-time quantitative PCR (miQPCR. Our results demonstrate that the loss of RNA integrity leads to in unpredictability of microRNA expression profiles for both, array-based and miQPCR assays. Conclusion MicroRNA expression cannot be reliably profiled in degraded total RNA. For the profiling of microRNAs we recommend use of RNA samples with a RNA integrity number equal to or above seven.

  12. Investigation of Content, Stoichiometry and Transfer of miRNA from Human Neural Stem Cell Line Derived Exosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Stevanato

    Full Text Available Exosomes are small (30-100 nm membrane vesicles secreted by a variety of cell types and only recently have emerged as a new avenue for cell-to-cell communication. They are natural shuttles of RNA and protein cargo, making them attractive as potential therapeutic delivery vehicles. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are short non-coding RNAs which regulate biological processes and can be found in exosomes. Here we characterized the miRNA contents of exosomes derived from human neural stem cells (hNSCs. Our investigated hNSC line is a clonal, conditionally immortalized cell line, compliant with good manufacturing practice (GMP, and in clinical trials for stroke and critical limb ischemia in the UK (clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01151124, NCT02117635, and NCT01916369. By using next generation sequencing (NGS technology we identified the presence of a variety of miRNAs in both exosomal and cellular preparations. Many of these miRNAs were enriched in exosomes indicating that cells specifically sort them for extracellular release. Although exosomes have been proven to contain miRNAs, the copy number quantification per exosome of a given miRNA remains unclear. Herein we quantified by real-time PCR a highly shuttled exosomal miRNA subtype (hsa-miR-1246 in order to assess its stoichiometry per exosome. Furthermore, we utilized an in vitro system to confirm its functional transfer by measuring the reduction in luciferase expression using a 3' untranslated region dual luciferase reporter assay. In summary, NGS analysis allowed the identification of a unique set of hNSC derived exosomal miRNAs. Stoichiometry and functional transfer analysis of one of the most abundant identified miRNA, hsa-miR-1246, were measured to support biological relevance of exosomal miRNA delivery.

  13. Phenotypic MicroRNA Microarrays

    OpenAIRE

    Veronica Soloveva; Michel Liuzzi; Jin Yeop Kim; Hi Chul Kim; Jin Yeong Heo; Yong-Jun Kwon

    2013-01-01

    Microarray technology has become a very popular approach in cases where multiple experiments need to be conducted repeatedly or done with a variety of samples. In our lab, we are applying our high density spots microarray approach to microscopy visualization of the effects of transiently introduced siRNA or cDNA on cellular morphology or phenotype. In this publication, we are discussing the possibility of using this micro-scale high throughput process to study the role of microRNAs in the bio...

  14. An all RNA hypercycle network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Nilesh; Lehman, Niles

    The RNA world hypothesis suggests RNA-based catalysis and information storage as the first step in the evolution of life on the Earth. The central process of the RNA world was the replica-tion of RNA, which may have involved the joining of oligonucleotides, perhaps by recombination rather than organization along a linear template. To assist this build-up of information, a hy-percycle may have played a significant role by allowing cooperation between autocatalytic units in a cyclic linkage in such a way that there is a mutual survival and regulated growth of all the units involved (1). Compared to non-coupled self-replicating units, which can only sustain a limited amount of genetic information, the hypercycle allows the maintenance of large amounts of information through cooperation among otherwise competitive units. However, hypercycles have never been empirically demonstrated in the absence of cell-like compartmentalization. In the current work, hypercyclic behavior is demonstrated in the autocatalytic assembly of Azoar-cus group I ribozyme (2). Three different constructs of the Azoarcus ribozyme with different internal guide sequences (IGS) -GUG (canonical), GAG, and GCG -are capable of a min-imal amount of self-assembly when broken into two fragments. Here, self-assembly depends on a mismatch with non-complementary sequences, CGU, CAU and CUU, respectively, to be recognized by IGS via autocatalysis. Yet when all three constructs are present in the same reaction vessel, concomitant assembly of all three is enhanced through an interdependent hy-percyclic reaction network. Analysis of these reactions indicates that each system is capable of guiding its own reproduction weakly, along with providing enhanced catalytic support for the reproduction of one other construct system through matched IGS-tag interactions. Also, when co-incubated with non-interacting (i.e., selfish) yet efficient self-assembly systems, the hypercyclic assembly outcompetes the selfish self

  15. DNA-Aptamers Binding Aminoglycoside Antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Nadia Nikolaus; Beate Strehlitz

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers are short, single stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that are able to bind specifically and with high affinity to their non-nucleic acid target molecules. This binding reaction enables their application as biorecognition elements in biosensors and assays. As antibiotic residues pose a problem contributing to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens and thereby reducing the effectiveness of the drug to fight human infections, we selected aptamers targeted against the aminog...

  16. Circular RNA and miR-7 in Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Birkballe; Kjems, Jørgen; Damgaard, Christian Kroun

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) play important roles in fine-tuning gene expression and are often deregulated in cancer. The identification of competing endogenous RNA and circular RNA (circRNA) as important regulators of miRNA activity underscores the increasing complexity of ncRNA-mediated regulatory networks...

  17. MicroRNA mimicry blocks pulmonary fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Rusty L; Yu, Guoying; Latimer, Paul A; Stack, Christianna; Robinson, Kathryn; Dalby, Christina M; Kaminski, Naftali; van Rooij, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, great enthusiasm has evolved for microRNA (miRNA) therapeutics. Part of the excitement stems from the fact that a miRNA often regulates numerous related mRNAs. As such, modulation of a single miRNA allows for parallel regulation of multiple genes involved in a particular disease. While many studies have shown therapeutic efficacy using miRNA inhibitors, efforts to restore or increase the function of a miRNA have been lagging behind. The miR-29 family has gained a lot of attention for its clear function in tissue fibrosis. This fibroblast-enriched miRNA family is downregulated in fibrotic diseases which induces a coordinate increase of many extracellular matrix genes. Here, we show that intravenous injection of synthetic RNA duplexes can increase miR-29 levels in vivo for several days. Moreover, therapeutic delivery of these miR-29 mimics during bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis restores endogenous miR-29 function whereby decreasing collagen expression and blocking and reversing pulmonary fibrosis. Our data support the feasibility of using miRNA mimics to therapeutically increase miRNAs and indicate miR-29 to be a potent therapeutic miRNA for treating pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:25239947

  18. Modulation of RNA function by aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, R; Waldsich, C; Wank, H

    2000-01-01

    One of the most important families of antibiotics are the aminoglycosides, including drugs such as neomycin B, paromomycin, gentamicin and streptomycin. With the discovery of the catalytic potential of RNA, these antibiotics became very popular due to their RNA-binding capacity. They serve for the analysis of RNA function as well as for the study of RNA as a potential therapeutic target. Improvements in RNA structure determination recently provided first insights into the decoding site of the ribosome at high resolution and how aminoglycosides might induce misreading of the genetic code. In addition to inhibiting prokaryotic translation, aminoglycosides inhibit several catalytic RNAs such as self-splicing group I introns, RNase P and small ribozymes in vitro. Furthermore, these antibiotics interfere with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication by disrupting essential RNA-protein contacts. Most exciting is the potential of many RNA-binding antibiotics to stimulate RNA activities, conceiving small-molecule partners for the hypothesis of an ancient RNA world. SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) has been used in this evolutionary game leading to small synthetic RNAs, whose NMR structures gave valuable information on how aminoglycosides interact with RNA, which could possibly be used in applied science. PMID:10619838

  19. Evaluation of microRNA alignment techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemann, Mark; Kaspi, Antony; El-Osta, Assam

    2016-08-01

    Genomic alignment of small RNA (smRNA) sequences such as microRNAs poses considerable challenges due to their short length (∼21 nucleotides [nt]) as well as the large size and complexity of plant and animal genomes. While several tools have been developed for high-throughput mapping of longer mRNA-seq reads (>30 nt), there are few that are specifically designed for mapping of smRNA reads including microRNAs. The accuracy of these mappers has not been systematically determined in the case of smRNA-seq. In addition, it is unknown whether these aligners accurately map smRNA reads containing sequence errors and polymorphisms. By using simulated read sets, we determine the alignment sensitivity and accuracy of 16 short-read mappers and quantify their robustness to mismatches, indels, and nontemplated nucleotide additions. These were explored in the context of a plant genome (Oryza sativa, ∼500 Mbp) and a mammalian genome (Homo sapiens, ∼3.1 Gbp). Analysis of simulated and real smRNA-seq data demonstrates that mapper selection impacts differential expression results and interpretation. These results will inform on best practice for smRNA mapping and enable more accurate smRNA detection and quantification of expression and RNA editing. PMID:27284164

  20. Fetal Bovine Serum RNA Interferes with the Cell Culture derived Extracellular RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhiyun; Batagov, Arsen O; Carter, David R F; Krichevsky, Anna M

    2016-01-01

    Fetal bovine serum (FBS) has been used in eukaryotic cell cultures for decades. However, little attention has been paid to the biological effects associated with RNA content of FBS on cell cultures. Here, using RNA sequencing, we demonstrate that FBS contains a diverse repertoire of protein-coding and regulatory RNA species, including mRNA, miRNA, rRNA, and snoRNA. The majority of them (>70%) are retained even after extended ultracentrifugation in the preparations of vesicle-depleted FBS (vdFBS) commonly utilized in the studies of extracellular vesicles (EV) and intercellular communication. FBS-associated RNA is co-isolated with cell-culture derived extracellular RNA (exRNA) and interferes with the downstream RNA analysis. Many evolutionally conserved FBS-derived RNA species can be falsely annotated as human or mouse transcripts. Notably, specific miRNAs abundant in FBS, such as miR-122, miR-451a and miR-1246, have been previously reported as enriched in cell-culture derived EVs, possibly due to the confounding effect of the FBS. Analysis of publically available exRNA datasets supports the notion of FBS contamination. Furthermore, FBS transcripts can be taken up by cultured cells and affect the results of highly sensitive gene expression profiling technologies. Therefore, precautions for experimental design are warranted to minimize the interference and misinterpretations caused by FBS-derived RNA. PMID:27503761

  1. RNA structures that resist degradation by Xrn1 produce a pathogenic Dengue virus RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Erich G; Moon, Stephanie L; Wilusz, Jeffrey; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus is a growing global health threat. Dengue and other flaviviruses commandeer the host cell's RNA degradation machinery to generate the small flaviviral RNA (sfRNA), a noncoding RNA that induces cytopathicity and pathogenesis. Host cell exonuclease Xrn1 likely loads on the 5' end of viral genomic RNA and degrades processively through ∼10 kB of RNA, halting near the 3' end of the viral RNA. The surviving RNA is the sfRNA. We interrogated the architecture of the complete Dengue 2 sfRNA, identifying five independently-folded RNA structures, two of which quantitatively confer Xrn1 resistance. We developed an assay for real-time monitoring of Xrn1 resistance that we used with mutagenesis and RNA folding experiments to show that Xrn1-resistant RNAs adopt a specific fold organized around a three-way junction. Disrupting the junction's fold eliminates the buildup of disease-related sfRNAs in human cells infected with a flavivirus, directly linking RNA structure to sfRNA production. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01892.001. PMID:24692447

  2. Prohead RNA: a noncoding viral RNA of novel structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Alyssa C; Bartley, Laura E; Schroeder, Susan J

    2016-07-01

    Prohead RNA (pRNA) is an essential component of the powerful Φ29-like bacteriophage DNA packaging motor. However, the specific role of this unique RNA in the Φ29 packaging motor remains unknown. This review examines pRNA as a noncoding RNA of novel structure and function. In order to highlight the reasons for exploring the structure and function of pRNA, we (1) provide an overview of Φ29-like bacteriophage and the Φ29 DNA packaging motor, including putative motor mechanisms and structures of its component parts; (2) discuss pRNA structure and possible roles for pRNA in the Φ29 packaging motor; (3) summarize pRNA self-assembly; and (4) describe the prospective therapeutic applications of pRNA. Many questions remain to be answered in order to connect what is currently known about pRNA structure to its novel function in the Φ29 packaging motor. The knowledge gained from studying the structure, function, and sequence variation in pRNA will help develop tools to better navigate the conformational landscapes of RNA. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:428-437. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1330 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26810250

  3. FLDS: A Comprehensive dsRNA Sequencing Method for Intracellular RNA Virus Surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urayama, Syun-Ichi; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Nunoura, Takuro

    2016-03-26

    Knowledge of the distribution and diversity of RNA viruses is still limited in spite of their possible environmental and epidemiological impacts because RNA virus-specific metagenomic methods have not yet been developed. We herein constructed an effective metagenomic method for RNA viruses by targeting long double-stranded (ds)RNA in cellular organisms, which is a hallmark of infection, or the replication of dsRNA and single-stranded (ss)RNA viruses, except for retroviruses. This novel dsRNA targeting metagenomic method is characterized by an extremely high recovery rate of viral RNA sequences, the retrieval of terminal sequences, and uniform read coverage, which has not previously been reported in other metagenomic methods targeting RNA viruses. This method revealed a previously unidentified viral RNA diversity of more than 20 complete RNA viral genomes including dsRNA and ssRNA viruses associated with an environmental diatom colony. Our approach will be a powerful tool for cataloging RNA viruses associated with organisms of interest. PMID:26877136

  4. The use of 125iodine-labeled RNA for detection of the RNA binding to ribosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The in vitro labeling of RNA with radioactive iodine is the efficient method to obtain the RNA with high specific activity. The present paper reports on the application of this technique to the production of iodine-labeled RNA for use in the experiment of binding RNA to ribosomes. Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) RNA was used as natural mRNA, and E. coli S-30 preparation was used as a source of ribosomes. The TMV-RNA was prepared by bentonite-phenol extraction from TMV, and the method used for the iodation of RNA was based on the procedure described by Getz et al. The iodine-labeled RNA was incubated in a cell-free protein synthesizing system (S-30) prepared from E. coli K-12. After the incubation, the reaction mixture was layered onto sucrose gradient, centrifuged, and fractionated into 18 fractions. Optical density at 260 nm was measured, and radioactivity was counted, for each fraction. The binding of mRNA to ribosomes occurred even at 0 deg C, and the occurrence of the nonspecific binding was also shown. Consequently, the specific binding, i.e. the formation of the initiation complex being involved in amino acid incorporation, may be estimated by subtracting the radioactivity associated with monosomes in the presence of both rRNA and ATA from that in the presence of rRNA only. It was shown that the iodine-labeled RNA can be used for the studies of binding RNA to ribosomes. (Kako, I.)

  5. Disruption of Specific RNA-RNA Interactions in a Double-Stranded RNA Virus Inhibits Genome Packaging and Virus Infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, Teodoro; Sung, Po-Yu; Roy, Polly

    2015-12-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) causes hemorrhagic disease in economically important livestock. The BTV genome is organized into ten discrete double-stranded RNA molecules (S1-S10) which have been suggested to follow a sequential packaging pathway from smallest to largest segment during virus capsid assembly. To substantiate and extend these studies, we have investigated the RNA sorting and packaging mechanisms with a new experimental approach using inhibitory oligonucleotides. Putative packaging signals present in the 3'untranslated regions of BTV segments were targeted by a number of nuclease resistant oligoribonucleotides (ORNs) and their effects on virus replication in cell culture were assessed. ORNs complementary to the 3' UTR of BTV RNAs significantly inhibited virus replication without affecting protein synthesis. Same ORNs were found to inhibit complex formation when added to a novel RNA-RNA interaction assay which measured the formation of supramolecular complexes between and among different RNA segments. ORNs targeting the 3'UTR of BTV segment 10, the smallest RNA segment, were shown to be the most potent and deletions or substitution mutations of the targeted sequences diminished the RNA complexes and abolished the recovery of viable viruses using reverse genetics. Cell-free capsid assembly/RNA packaging assay also confirmed that the inhibitory ORNs could interfere with RNA packaging and further substitution mutations within the putative RNA packaging sequence have identified the recognition sequence concerned. Exchange of 3'UTR between segments have further demonstrated that RNA recognition was segment specific, most likely acting as part of the secondary structure of the entire genomic segment. Our data confirm that genome packaging in this segmented dsRNA virus occurs via the formation of supramolecular complexes formed by the interaction of specific sequences located in the 3' UTRs. Additionally, the inhibition of packaging in-trans with inhibitory ORNs

  6. Differential MicroRNA Expression Profile in Myxomatous Mitral Valve Prolapse and Fibroelastic Deficiency Valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yei-Tsung; Wang, Juan; Wee, Abby S. Y.; Yong, Quek-Wei; Tay, Edgar Lik-Wui; Woo, Chin Cheng; Sorokin, Vitaly; Richards, Arthur Mark; Ling, Lieng-Hsi

    2016-01-01

    Myxomatous mitral valve prolapse (MMVP) and fibroelastic deficiency (FED) are two common variants of degenerative mitral valve disease (DMVD), which is a leading cause of mitral regurgitation worldwide. While pathohistological studies have revealed differences in extracellular matrix content in MMVP and FED, the molecular mechanisms underlying these two disease entities remain to be elucidated. By using surgically removed valvular specimens from MMVP and FED patients that were categorized on the basis of echocardiographic, clinical and operative findings, a cluster of microRNAs that expressed differentially were identified. The expressions of has-miR-500, -3174, -17, -1193, -646, -1273e, -4298, -203, -505, and -939 showed significant differences between MMVP and FED after applying Bonferroni correction (p < 0.002174). The possible involvement of microRNAs in the pathogenesis of DMVD were further suggested by the presences of in silico predicted target sites on a number of genes reported to be involved in extracellular matrix homeostasis and marker genes for cellular composition of mitral valves, including decorin (DCN), aggrecan (ACAN), fibromodulin (FMOD), α actin 2 (ACTA2), extracellular matrix protein 2 (ECM2), desmin (DES), endothelial cell specific molecule 1 (ESM1), and platelet/ endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM1), as well as inverse correlations of selected microRNA and mRNA expression in MMVP and FED groups. Our results provide evidence that distinct molecular mechanisms underlie MMVP and FED. Moreover, the microRNAs identified may be targets for the future development of diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutics. PMID:27213335

  7. Analysis of miR-302 host RNA as a stem cell marker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahimi, Karim

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells have unique properties including self-renewal and multipotency that are shared with cancer stem cells (CSCs). MicroRNAs are short non-coding RNAs that posttranscriptionally regulate gene expression either by degradation or by translation inhibition of their mRNA targets. MiRNAs are...... involved in many biological processes. The MiR-302s/367 gene is a polycistronic miRNA cluster including miR-302b/c/a/d and miR-367, that is expressed under the contol of Oct4, Sox2 and Nanog and is a direct target of the Wnt/β- catenin signaling pathway. MiR-302 has been shown to induce pluripotency in...... somatic cells and to repress mRNAs required for differentiation. In this study, we explored the possibility to use the miR-302 promoter/enhancer to drive stem cell specific expression of reporter genes. We first performed 'Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends' (RACE) for the 5’ and 3’ ends of mmiR-302 and...

  8. RNA-binding protein Dnd1 inhibits microRNA access to target mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kedde, Martijn; Strasser, Markus J; Boldajipour, Bijan;

    2007-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are inhibitors of gene expression capable of controlling processes in normal development and cancer. In mammals, miRNAs use a seed sequence of 6-8 nucleotides (nt) to associate with 3' untranslated regions (3'UTRs) of mRNAs and inhibit their expression. Intriguingly, occasionally...... evolutionary conserved RNA-binding protein (RBP), counteracts the function of several miRNAs in human cells and in primordial germ cells of zebrafish by binding mRNAs and prohibiting miRNAs from associating with their target sites. These effects of Dnd1 are mediated through uridine-rich regions present in the...

  9. Disrupted tRNA Genes and tRNA Fragments: A Perspective on tRNA Gene Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akio Kanai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transfer RNAs (tRNAs are small non-coding RNAs with lengths of approximately 70–100 nt. They are directly involved in protein synthesis by carrying amino acids to the ribosome. In this sense, tRNAs are key molecules that connect the RNA world and the protein world. Thus, study of the evolution of tRNA molecules may reveal the processes that led to the establishment of the central dogma: genetic information flows from DNA to RNA to protein. Thanks to the development of DNA sequencers in this century, we have determined a huge number of nucleotide sequences from complete genomes as well as from transcriptomes in many species. Recent analyses of these large data sets have shown that particular tRNA genes, especially in Archaea, are disrupted in unique ways: some tRNA genes contain multiple introns and some are split genes. Even tRNA molecules themselves are fragmented post-transcriptionally in many species. These fragmented small RNAs are known as tRNA-derived fragments (tRFs. In this review, I summarize the progress of research into the disrupted tRNA genes and the tRFs, and propose a possible model for the molecular evolution of tRNAs based on the concept of the combination of fragmented tRNA halves.

  10. Disrupted tRNA Genes and tRNA Fragments: A Perspective on tRNA Gene Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs with lengths of approximately 70-100 nt. They are directly involved in protein synthesis by carrying amino acids to the ribosome. In this sense, tRNAs are key molecules that connect the RNA world and the protein world. Thus, study of the evolution of tRNA molecules may reveal the processes that led to the establishment of the central dogma: genetic information flows from DNA to RNA to protein. Thanks to the development of DNA sequencers in this century, we have determined a huge number of nucleotide sequences from complete genomes as well as from transcriptomes in many species. Recent analyses of these large data sets have shown that particular tRNA genes, especially in Archaea, are disrupted in unique ways: some tRNA genes contain multiple introns and some are split genes. Even tRNA molecules themselves are fragmented post-transcriptionally in many species. These fragmented small RNAs are known as tRNA-derived fragments (tRFs). In this review, I summarize the progress of research into the disrupted tRNA genes and the tRFs, and propose a possible model for the molecular evolution of tRNAs based on the concept of the combination of fragmented tRNA halves. PMID:25629271

  11. A chemical screen for biological small molecule–RNA conjugates reveals CoA-linked RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Kowtoniuk, Walter Eugene; Shen, Yinghua; Heemstra, Jennifer M.; Agarwal, Isha; Liu, David Ruchien

    2009-01-01

    Compared with the rapidly expanding set of known biological roles for RNA, the known chemical diversity of cellular RNA has remained limited primarily to canonical RNA, 3'-aminoacylated tRNAs, nucleobase-modified RNAs, and 5'-capped mRNAs in eukaryotes. We developed two methods to detect in a broad manner chemically labile cellular small molecule-RNA conjugates. The methods were validated by the detection of known tRNA and rRNA modifications. The first method analyzes small molecules cleaved ...

  12. Network of tRNA Gene Sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Fang-ping; LI Sheng; MA Hong-ru

    2008-01-01

    A network of 3719 tRNA gene sequences was constructed using simplest alignment. Its topology, degree distribution and clustering coefficient were studied. The behaviors of the network shift from fluctuated distribution to scale-free distribution when the similarity degree of the tRNA gene sequences increases. The tRNA gene sequences with the same anticodon identity are more self-organized than those with different anticodon identities and form local clusters in the network. Some vertices of the local cluster have a high connection with other local clusters, and the probable reason was given. Moreover, a network constructed by the same number of random tRNA sequences was used to make comparisons. The relationships between the properties of the tRNA similarity network and the characters of tRNA evolutionary history were discussed.

  13. Cell-Specific Aptamers as Emerging Therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Cindy Meyer; Ulrich Hahn; Andrea Rentmeister

    2011-01-01

    Aptamers are short nucleic acids that bind to defined targets with high affinity and specificity. The first aptamers have been selected about two decades ago by an in vitro process named SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment). Since then, numerous aptamers with specificities for a variety of targets from small molecules to proteins or even whole cells have...

  14. Cell-Specific Aptamers as Emerging Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy Meyer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are short nucleic acids that bind to defined targets with high affinity and specificity. The first aptamers have been selected about two decades ago by an in vitro process named SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment. Since then, numerous aptamers with specificities for a variety of targets from small molecules to proteins or even whole cells have been selected. Their applications range from biosensing and diagnostics to therapy and target-oriented drug delivery. More recently, selections using complex targets such as live cells have become feasible. This paper summarizes progress in cell-SELEX techniques and highlights recent developments, particularly in the field of medically relevant aptamers with a focus on therapeutic and drug-delivery applications.

  15. RNA virus genomics: a world of possibilities

    OpenAIRE

    Edward C Holmes

    2009-01-01

    The increasing availability of complete genome sequences of RNA viruses has the potential to shed new light on fundamental aspects of their biology. Here, I use case studies of 3 RNA viruses to explore the impact of genomic sequence data, with particular emphasis on influenza A virus. Notably, the studies of RNA virus genomics undertaken to date largely focused on issues of evolution and epidemiology, and they have given these disciplines new impetus. However, genomic data have so far made fe...

  16. DNA and RNA technology in soil biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereg, Lily

    2016-04-01

    DNA technology has come a long way and state of the art techniques are currently used in the analysis of soil biodiversity. Current methods will be presented and their strengths and limitations discussed. RNA technology, for the study of gene expression and potential activity of functional groups in the soil, is lagging behind, mostly due to the difficulties of extracting stable RNA from the soil. The potentials and challenges of adopting RNA technology for soil analysis will be discussed.

  17. Improved native affinity purification of RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Batey, Robert T.; Kieft, Jeffrey S.

    2007-01-01

    RNA biochemical or structural studies often require an RNA sample that is chemically pure, and most protocols for its in vitro production use denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to achieve this. Unfortunately, many RNAs do not quantitatively refold into an active conformation after denaturation, creating significant problems for downstream characterization or use. In addition, this traditional purification method is not amenable to studies demanding high-throughput RNA production. R...

  18. Grape RNA-Seq analysis pipeline environment

    OpenAIRE

    KNOWLES, D. G.; Roder, M.; Merkel, A.; Guigo, R.

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: The avalanche of data arriving since the development of NGS technologies have prompted the need for developing fast, accurate and easily automated bioinformatic tools capable of dealing with massive datasets. Among the most productive applications of NGS technologies is the sequencing of cellular RNA, known as RNA-Seq. Although RNA-Seq provides similar or superior dynamic range than microarrays at similar or lower cost, the lack of standard and user-friendly pipelines is a bottlen...

  19. RNA Binding Domain of Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Cary K.; Mitchell, James R.; Collins, Kathleen

    2001-01-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein reverse transcriptase that extends the ends of chromosomes. The two telomerase subunits essential for catalysis in vitro are the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and the telomerase RNA. Using truncations and site-specific mutations, we identified sequence elements of TERT and telomerase RNA required for catalytic activity and protein-RNA interaction for Tetrahymena thermophila telomerase. We found that the TERT amino and carboxyl termini, although evol...

  20. RAPID-SELEX for RNA Aptamers

    OpenAIRE

    Szeto, Kylan; Latulippe, David R.; Ozer, Abdullah; Pagano, John M.; Brian S White; Shalloway, David; Lis, John T.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2013-01-01

    Aptamers are high-affinity ligands selected from DNA or RNA libraries via SELEX, a repetitive in vitro process of sequential selection and amplification steps. RNA SELEX is more complicated than DNA SELEX because of the additional transcription and reverse transcription steps. Here, we report a new selection scheme, RAPID-SELEX (RNA Aptamer Isolation via Dual-cycles SELEX), that simplifies this process by systematically skipping unnecessary amplification steps. Using affinity microcolumns, we...

  1. Development of Studies on RNA Interference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li ZHANG; Yaqiong ZHANG; Lina SHE; Wenting XU; Yangying JIA; Shiqing XIE; WenliSUN; Quan LIANG

    2012-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi), caused by endogenous or exogenous double- stranded RNA (dsRNA) homologous with target genes, refers to gene silencing widely existing in animals and plants. It was first found in plants, and now it has developed into a kind of biotechnology as well as an important approach in post- genome era. This paper is to summarize the achievements of studies on RNAi tech- nology in basic biology, medicine, pharmacy, botany and other fields.

  2. Characterization of the RNA content of chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Mondal, Tanmoy; Rasmussen, Markus; Pandey, Gaurav Kumar; Isaksson, Anders; Kanduri, Chandrasekhar

    2010-01-01

    Noncoding RNA (ncRNA) constitutes a significant portion of the mammalian transcriptome. Emerging evidence suggests that it regulates gene expression in cis or trans by modulating the chromatin structure. To uncover the functional role of ncRNA in chromatin organization, we deep sequenced chromatin-associated RNAs (CARs) from human fibroblast (HF) cells. This resulted in the identification of 141 intronic regions and 74 intergenic regions harboring CARs. The intronic and intergenic CARs show s...

  3. Small catalytic RNA: Structure, function and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monforte, J.A.

    1991-04-01

    We have utilized a combination of photochemical cross-linking techniques and site-directed mutagenesis to obtain secondary and tertiary structure information for the self-cleaving, self-ligating subsequence of RNA from the negative strand of Satellite Tobacco Ringspot Virus. We have found that the helical regions fold about a hinge to promoting four different possible tertiary interactions, creating a molecular of similar shape to a paperclip. A model suggesting that the paperclip'' and hammerhead'' RNAs share a similar three dimensional structure is proposed. We have used a self-cleaving RNA molecule related to a subsequence of plant viroids, a hammerhead,'' to study the length-dependent folding of RNA produced during transcription by RNA polymerase. We have used this method to determine the length of RNA sequestered within elongating E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase complexes. The data show that for E. coli RNA polymerase 12{plus minus}1 nucleotides are sequestered within the ternary complex, which is consistent with the presence of an RNA-DNA hybrid within the transcription bubble, as proposed by others. The result for T7 RNA polymerase differs from E. coli RNA polymerase, with only 10{plus minus}1 nucleotides sequestered within the ternary complex, setting a new upper limit for the minimum RNA-DNA required for a stable elongating complex. Comparisons between E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase are made. The relevance of the results to models or transcription termination, abortive initiation, and initiation to elongation mode transitions are discussed.

  4. Small catalytic RNA: Structure, function and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monforte, J.A.

    1991-04-01

    We have utilized a combination of photochemical cross-linking techniques and site-directed mutagenesis to obtain secondary and tertiary structure information for the self-cleaving, self-ligating subsequence of RNA from the negative strand of Satellite Tobacco Ringspot Virus. We have found that the helical regions fold about a hinge to promoting four different possible tertiary interactions, creating a molecular of similar shape to a paperclip. A model suggesting that the ``paperclip`` and ``hammerhead`` RNAs share a similar three dimensional structure is proposed. We have used a self-cleaving RNA molecule related to a subsequence of plant viroids, a ``hammerhead,`` to study the length-dependent folding of RNA produced during transcription by RNA polymerase. We have used this method to determine the length of RNA sequestered within elongating E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase complexes. The data show that for E. coli RNA polymerase 12{plus_minus}1 nucleotides are sequestered within the ternary complex, which is consistent with the presence of an RNA-DNA hybrid within the transcription bubble, as proposed by others. The result for T7 RNA polymerase differs from E. coli RNA polymerase, with only 10{plus_minus}1 nucleotides sequestered within the ternary complex, setting a new upper limit for the minimum RNA-DNA required for a stable elongating complex. Comparisons between E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase are made. The relevance of the results to models or transcription termination, abortive initiation, and initiation to elongation mode transitions are discussed.

  5. RNA topology remolds electrostatic stabilization of viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Erdemci-Tandogan, G; Wagner, J; Schoot, van de, R.; Podgornik, R.; Zandi, R.

    2014-01-01

    Simple RNA viruses efficiently encapsulate their genome into a nano-sized protein shell: the capsid. Spontaneous coassembly of the genome and the capsid proteins is driven predominantly by electrostatic interactions between the negatively charged RNA and the positively charged inner capsid wall. Using field theoretic formulation we show that the inherently branched RNA secondary structure allows viruses to maximize the amount of encapsulated genome and make assembly more efficient, allowing v...

  6. Synthesis and characterization of rabies virus glycoprotein-tagged amphiphilic cyclodextrins for siRNA delivery in human glioblastoma cells: in vitro analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, Matt; Malhotra, Meenakshi; McCarthy, David J; Godinho, Bruno M D C; Cryan, John F; Darcy, Raphael; O'Driscoll, Caitriona M

    2015-04-25

    In man brain cancer is an aggressive, malignant form of tumour, it is highly infiltrative in nature, is associated with cellular heterogeneity and affects cerebral hemispheres of the brain. Current drug therapies are inadequate and an unmet clinical need exists to develop new improved therapeutics. The ability to silence genes associated with disease progression by using short interfering RNA (siRNA) presents the potential to develop safe and effective therapies. In this work, in order to protect the siRNA from degradation, promote cell specific uptake and enhance gene silencing efficiency, a PEGylated cyclodextrin (CD)-based nanoparticle, tagged with a CNS-targeting peptide derived from the rabies virus glycoprotein (RVG) was formulated and characterized. The modified cyclodextrin derivatives were synthesized and co-formulated to form nanoparticles containing siRNA which were analysed for size, surface charge, stability, cellular uptake and gene-knockdown in brain cancer cells. The results identified an optimised co-formulation prototype at a molar ratio of 1:1.5:0.5 (cationic cyclodextrin:PEGylated cyclodextrin:RVG-tagged PEGylated cyclodextrin) with a size of 281 ± 39.72 nm, a surface charge of 26.73 ± 3 mV, with efficient cellular uptake and a 27% gene-knockdown ability. This CD-based formulation represents a potential nanocomplex for systemic delivery of siRNA targeting brain cancer. PMID:25703259

  7. Funcionalidades dos RNA não codificantes (ncRNA e pequenos RNA reguladores, nos mamíferos (RNA non-coding -ncRNA- functionalities and small RNA regulators in mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dias Correia, J. H. R.:

    Full Text Available Os ácidos ribonucleicos não codificadores de proteínas (ncRNA são um importante conjunto de RNA dentro da totalidade dos transcritos existentes nas células animais. Os ncRNA contêm nas suas moléculas informações variadas que lhes permitem ter diversas funções. Nos ncRNA há que considerar diversos tipos , mas para o seu funcionamento há que atender aos aspectos subjacentes ao emparelhamento entre moléculas. O fenómeno do RNA de interferência (RNAi desencadeado pelos ncRNA (mi/siRNA revelou que a estabilidade e tradução dos RNA mensageiros (mRNA e a estrutura da cromatina podem ser reguladas por esses ncRNA nos animais. A biogénese, mecanismos de acção (cisão ou repressão da tradução , tal como a distinção entre miRNA e siRNA vão sendo descobertas correlativamente com a respectiva identificação e especificidade celular. A presença de miRNA específicos no tecido muscular está bem assinalada tal como a sua possível regulação em hipertrofias musculares notáveis em ovinos (Texel. As potencialidades do conhecimento aprofundado dos fenómenos de RNAi e a construção de miRNA exógenos específicos e sua introdução em células, tecidos ou órgãos, antevêm diversas hipóteses biotecnológicas, terapêuticas, produtivas ou preventivas, acauteladas que estejam as muitas implicações envolvidas.

  8. A chemical screen for biological small molecule-RNA conjugates reveals CoA-linked RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowtoniuk, Walter E; Shen, Yinghua; Heemstra, Jennifer M; Agarwal, Isha; Liu, David R

    2009-05-12

    Compared with the rapidly expanding set of known biological roles for RNA, the known chemical diversity of cellular RNA has remained limited primarily to canonical RNA, 3'-aminoacylated tRNAs, nucleobase-modified RNAs, and 5'-capped mRNAs in eukaryotes. We developed two methods to detect in a broad manner chemically labile cellular small molecule-RNA conjugates. The methods were validated by the detection of known tRNA and rRNA modifications. The first method analyzes small molecules cleaved from RNA by base or nucleophile treatment. Application to Escherichia coli and Streptomyces venezuelae RNA revealed an RNA-linked hydroxyfuranone or succinyl ester group, in addition to a number of other putative small molecule-RNA conjugates not previously reported. The second method analyzes nuclease-generated mononucleotides before and after treatment with base or nucleophile and also revealed a number of new putative small molecule-RNA conjugates, including 3'-dephospho-CoA and its succinyl-, acetyl-, and methylmalonyl-thioester derivatives. Subsequent experiments established that these CoA species are attached to E. coli and S. venezuelae RNA at the 5' terminus. CoA-linked RNA cannot be generated through aberrant transcriptional initiation by E. coli RNA polymerase in vitro, and CoA-linked RNA in E. coli is only found among smaller (approximately < 200 nucleotide) RNAs that have yet to be identified. These results provide examples of small molecule-RNA conjugates and suggest that the chemical diversity of cellular RNA may be greater than previously understood. PMID:19416889

  9. A chemical screen for biological small molecule–RNA conjugates reveals CoA-linked RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowtoniuk, Walter E.; Shen, Yinghua; Heemstra, Jennifer M.; Agarwal, Isha; Liu, David R.

    2009-01-01

    Compared with the rapidly expanding set of known biological roles for RNA, the known chemical diversity of cellular RNA has remained limited primarily to canonical RNA, 3′-aminoacylated tRNAs, nucleobase-modified RNAs, and 5′-capped mRNAs in eukaryotes. We developed two methods to detect in a broad manner chemically labile cellular small molecule–RNA conjugates. The methods were validated by the detection of known tRNA and rRNA modifications. The first method analyzes small molecules cleaved from RNA by base or nucleophile treatment. Application to Escherichia coli and Streptomyces venezuelae RNA revealed an RNA-linked hydroxyfuranone or succinyl ester group, in addition to a number of other putative small molecule–RNA conjugates not previously reported. The second method analyzes nuclease-generated mononucleotides before and after treatment with base or nucleophile and also revealed a number of new putative small molecule–RNA conjugates, including 3′-dephospho-CoA and its succinyl-, acetyl-, and methylmalonyl-thioester derivatives. Subsequent experiments established that these CoA species are attached to E. coli and S. venezuelae RNA at the 5′ terminus. CoA-linked RNA cannot be generated through aberrant transcriptional initiation by E. coli RNA polymerase in vitro, and CoA-linked RNA in E. coli is only found among smaller (≲200 nucleotide) RNAs that have yet to be identified. These results provide examples of small molecule-RNA conjugates and suggest that the chemical diversity of cellular RNA may be greater than previously understood. PMID:19416889

  10. Structure of an Rrp6-RNA exosome complex bound to poly(A) RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasmuth, Elizabeth V.; Januszyk, Kurt; Lima, Christopher D. [MSKCC

    2014-08-20

    The eukaryotic RNA exosome processes and degrades RNA by directing substrates to the distributive or processive 3' to 5' exoribonuclease activities of Rrp6 or Rrp44, respectively. The non-catalytic nine-subunit exosome core (Exo9) features a prominent central channel. Although RNA can pass through the channel to engage Rrp44, it is not clear how RNA is directed to Rrp6 or whether Rrp6 uses the central channel. Here we report a 3.3 Å crystal structure of a ten-subunit RNA exosome complex from Saccharomyces cerevisiae composed of the Exo9 core and Rrp6 bound to single-stranded poly(A) RNA. The Rrp6 catalytic domain rests on top of the Exo9 S1/KH ring above the central channel, the RNA 3' end is anchored in the Rrp6 active site, and the remaining RNA traverses the S1/KH ring in an opposite orientation to that observed in a structure of a Rrp44-containing exosome complex. Solution studies with human and yeast RNA exosome complexes suggest that the RNA path to Rrp6 is conserved and dependent on the integrity of the S1/KH ring. Although path selection to Rrp6 or Rrp44 is stochastic in vitro, the fate of a particular RNA may be determined in vivo by the manner in which cofactors present RNA to the RNA exosome.

  11. RNA structure prediction: progress and perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Ya-Zhou; Wang, Feng-Hua; Tan, Zhi-Jie

    2014-01-01

    Many recent exciting discoveries have revealed the versatility of RNAs and their importance in a variety of cellular functions which are strongly coupled to RNA structures. To understand the functions of RNAs, some structure prediction models have been developed in recent years. In this review, the progress in computational models for RNA structure prediction is introduced and the distinguishing features of many outstanding algorithms are discussed, emphasizing three dimensional (3D) structure prediction. A promising coarse-grained model for predicting RNA 3D structure, stability and salt effect is also introduced briefly. Finally, we discuss the major challenges in the RNA 3D structure modeling.

  12. Coarse-grained modelling of supercoiled RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matek, Christian; Šulc, Petr; Randisi, Ferdinando; Doye, Jonathan P. K.; Louis, Ard A.

    2015-12-01

    We study the behaviour of double-stranded RNA under twist and tension using oxRNA, a recently developed coarse-grained model of RNA. Introducing explicit salt-dependence into the model allows us to directly compare our results to data from recent single-molecule experiments. The model reproduces extension curves as a function of twist and stretching force, including the buckling transition and the behaviour of plectoneme structures. For negative supercoiling, we predict denaturation bubble formation in plectoneme end-loops, suggesting preferential plectoneme localisation in weak base sequences. OxRNA exhibits a positive twist-stretch coupling constant, in agreement with recent experimental observations.

  13. Quality control of chemically damaged RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simms, Carrie L; Zaher, Hani S

    2016-10-01

    The "central dogma" of molecular biology describes how information contained in DNA is transformed into RNA and finally into proteins. In order for proteins to maintain their functionality in both the parent cell and subsequent generations, it is essential that the information encoded in DNA and RNA remains unaltered. DNA and RNA are constantly exposed to damaging agents, which can modify nucleic acids and change the information they encode. While much is known about how cells respond to damaged DNA, the importance of protecting RNA has only become appreciated over the past decade. Modification of the nucleobase through oxidation and alkylation has long been known to affect its base-pairing properties during DNA replication. Similarly, recent studies have begun to highlight some of the unwanted consequences of chemical damage on mRNA decoding during translation. Oxidation and alkylation of mRNA appear to have drastic effects on the speed and fidelity of protein synthesis. As some mRNAs can persist for days in certain tissues, it is not surprising that it has recently emerged that mRNA-surveillance and RNA-repair pathways have evolved to clear or correct damaged mRNA. PMID:27155660

  14. RNA silencing movement in plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Glykeria Mermigka; Frederic Verret; Kriton Kalantidis

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular organisms, like higher plants, need to coordinate their growth and development and to cope with environmental cues. To achieve this, various signal molecules are transported between neighboring cells and distant organs to control the fate of the recipient cells and organs. RNA silencing produces cell non-autonomous signal molecules that can move over short or long distances leading to the sequence specific silencing of a target gene in a well defined area of cells or throughout the entire plant, respectively. The nature of these signal molecules, the route of silencing spread, and the genes involved in their production, movement and reception are discussed in this review. Additionally, a short section on features of silencing spread in animal models is presented at the end of this review.

  15. Exploring the RNA editing potential of RNA-Seq data by ExpEdit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Antonio, Mattia; Picardi, Ernesto; Castrignanò, Tiziana; D'Erchia, Anna Maria; Pesole, Graziano

    2015-01-01

    Revealing the impact of A-to-I RNA editing in RNA-Seq experiments is relevant in humans because RNA editing can influence gene expression. In addition, its deregulation has been linked to a variety of human diseases. Exploiting the RNA editing potential in complete RNA-Seq datasets, however, is a challenging task. Indeed, no dedicated software is available, and sometimes deep computational skills and appropriate hardware resources are required. To explore the impact of known RNA editing events in massive transcriptome sequencing experiments, we developed the ExpEdit web service application. In the present work, we provide an overview of ExpEdit as well as methodologies to investigate known RNA editing in human RNA-Seq datasets. PMID:25577388

  16. RNA-DNA Differences Are Generated in Human Cells within Seconds after RNA Exits Polymerase II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel X. Wang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available RNA sequences are expected to be identical to their corresponding DNA sequences. Here, we found all 12 types of RNA-DNA sequence differences (RDDs in nascent RNA. Our results show that RDDs begin to occur in RNA chains ∼55 nt from the RNA polymerase II (Pol II active site. These RDDs occur so soon after transcription that they are incompatible with known deaminase-mediated RNA-editing mechanisms. Moreover, the 55 nt delay in appearance indicates that they do not arise during RNA synthesis by Pol II or as a direct consequence of modified base incorporation. Preliminary data suggest that RDD and R-loop formations may be coupled. These findings identify sequence substitution as an early step in cotranscriptional RNA processing.

  17. Integrated analysis of microRNA and mRNA expression: Adding biological significance to microRNA target predictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Iterson (Mat); S. Bervoets (Sander); E.J. de Meijer (Emile); H.P. Buermans (Henk); P.A.C. 't Hoen (Peter); R.X. Menezes (Renée); J.M. Boer (Judith)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractCurrent microRNA target predictions are based on sequence information and empirically derived rules but do not make use of the expression of microRNAs and their targets. This study aimed to improve microRNA target predictions in a given biological context, using in silico predictions, mi

  18. RNA three-way junctions can act as flexible RNA structural elements in large RNA molecules: a molecular simulation analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beššeová, Ivana; Réblová, Kamila; Leontis, N.B.; Šponer, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 6 (2009), s. 830-831. ISSN 0739-1102. [The 17th Conversation. 16.06.2009-20.06.2009, Albany] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : RNA three-way junctions * RNA Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  19. Coupling of RNA Polymerase II Transcription Elongation with Pre-mRNA Splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldi, Tassa; Cortazar, Michael A; Sheridan, Ryan M; Bentley, David L

    2016-06-19

    Pre-mRNA maturation frequently occurs at the same time and place as transcription by RNA polymerase II. The co-transcriptionality of mRNA processing has permitted the evolution of mechanisms that functionally couple transcription elongation with diverse events that occur on the nascent RNA. This review summarizes the current understanding of the relationship between transcriptional elongation through a chromatin template and co-transcriptional splicing including alternative splicing decisions that affect the expression of most human genes. PMID:27107644

  20. The structural basis of tRNA mimicry and conformational plasticity by a viral RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colussi, Timothy M.; Costantino, David A.; Hammond, John A.; Ruehle, Grant M.; Nix, Jay C.; Kieft, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    RNA is arguably the most functionally diverse biological macromolecule. In some cases a single discrete RNA sequence performs multiple roles and this can be conferred by a complex three-dimensional structure. This multifunctionality can also be driven or enhanced by the ability of a given RNA to assume different conformational (and therefore functional) states1. Despite its biological importance, a detailed structural understanding of the paradigm of RNA structure-driven multifunctionality is lacking. Examples to address this gap are found in single-stranded positive-sense RNA viruses, a prototype being the tRNA-like structure (TLS) found at the 3′ end of the Turnip Yellow Mosaic Virus (TYMV). This TLS not only acts like a tRNA to drive aminoacylation of the viral genomic RNA (gRNA)2-4, but also interacts with other structures in the gRNA's 3′ untranslated region5, contains the promoter for negative strand synthesis, and influences several infection-critical processes6. This TLS RNA can provide a glimpse into the structural basis of RNA multifunctionality and plasticity, but for decades its high-resolution structure has remained elusive. Here, we present the crystal structure of the complete TYMV TLS to 2.0 Å resolution. Globally, the RNA adopts a shape that mimics tRNA, but it uses a very different set of intramolecular interactions to achieve this shape. These interactions also allow the TLS to readily switch conformations. In addition, the TLS structure is ‘two-faced’: one ‘face’ closely mimics tRNA and drives aminoacylation, the other ‘face’ diverges from tRNA and enables additional functionality. The TLS is thus structured to perform several functions and interact with diverse binding partners, and we demonstrate its ability to specifically bind to ribosomes. PMID:24909993

  1. CompaRNA: a server for continuous benchmarking of automated methods for RNA secondary structure prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Puton, T.; Kozlowski, L. P.; Rother, K. M.; Bujnicki, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    We present a continuous benchmarking approach for the assessment of RNA secondary structure prediction methods implemented in the CompaRNA web server. As of 3 October 2012, the performance of 28 single-sequence and 13 comparative methods has been evaluated on RNA sequences/structures released weekly by the Protein Data Bank. We also provide a static benchmark generated on RNA 2D structures derived from the RNAstrand database. Benchmarks on both data sets offer insight into the relative perfor...

  2. Small RNA binding is a common strategy to suppress RNA silencing by several viral suppressors

    OpenAIRE

    Lakatos, Lóránt; Csorba, Tibor; Pantaleo, Vitantonio; Chapman, Elisabeth J.; Carrington, James C.; LIU, Yu-Ping; Dolja, Valerian V.; Calvino, Lourdes Fernández; López-Moya, Juan José; Burgyán, József

    2006-01-01

    RNA silencing is an evolutionarily conserved system that functions as an antiviral mechanism in higher plants and insects. To counteract RNA silencing, viruses express silencing suppressors that interfere with both siRNA- and microRNA-guided silencing pathways. We used comparative in vitro and in vivo approaches to analyse the molecular mechanism of suppression by three well-studied silencing suppressors. We found that silencing suppressors p19, p21 and HC-Pro each inhibit the intermediate st...

  3. Defective RNA processing enhances RNA silencing and influences flowering of Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Herr, Alan J.; Molnàr, Attila; Jones, Alex; Baulcombe, David C.

    2006-01-01

    Many eukaryotic cells use RNA-directed silencing mechanisms to protect against viruses and transposons and to suppress endogenous gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. RNA silencing also is implicated in epigenetic mechanisms affecting chromosome structure and transcriptional gene silencing. Here, we describe enhanced silencing phenotype (esp) mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana that reveal how proteins associated with RNA processing and 3′ end formation can influence RNA silencing. T...

  4. Export of RNA silencing from C. elegans tissues does not require the RNA channel SID-1

    OpenAIRE

    Jose, Antony M.; Smith, Jessica J.; Hunter, Craig P.

    2009-01-01

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) triggers RNA interference (RNAi) to silence genes of matching sequence. In some animals this experimentally induced silencing is transported between cells, and studies in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans have shown that the dsRNA channel SID-1 is required for the import of such transported silencing signals. Gene silencing can also be triggered by endogenously expressed RNAi triggers, but it is unknown whether such silencing is transported between cells. Here, w...

  5. Characterization of an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity associated with La France isometric virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Goodin, M M; Schlagnhaufer, B; Weir, T; Romaine, C. P.

    1997-01-01

    Purified preparations of La France isometric virus (LIV), an unclassified, double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) virus of Agaricus bisporus, were associated with an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDRP) activity. RDRP activity cosedimented with the 36-nm isometric particles and genomic dsRNAs of LIV during rate-zonal centrifugation in sucrose density gradients, suggesting that the enzyme is a constituent of the virion. Enzyme activity was maximal in the presence of all four nucleotides, a reducing agent ...

  6. An RNA toolbox for single-molecule force spectroscopy studies

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Precise, controllable single-molecule force spectroscopy studies of RNA and RNA-dependent processes have recently shed new light on the dynamics and pathways of RNA folding and RNA-enzyme interactions. A crucial component of this research is the design and assembly of an appropriate RNA construct. Such a construct is typically subject to several criteria. First, single-molecule force spectroscopy techniques often require an RNA construct that is longer than the RNA molecules used for bulk bio...

  7. SiRNA Mediated Gene Silencing: A Mini Review

    OpenAIRE

    M.V Jeevitha; S.U Ajisha; Baby Joseph

    2012-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) technology has become a novel tool for silencing gene expression in cells or organisms. RNA interference is the process that double-stranded RNA induces the homology-dependent degradation of cognate mRNA mediated by 21-23 nucleotide short interfering RNA (siRNA). RNA interference is a powerful mechanism of gene silencing that underlies many aspects of eukaryotic biology. On the molecular level, RNAi is mediated by a family of ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes called R...

  8. miRNA Profiles of Monocyte-Lineage Cells Are Consistent with Complicated Roles in HIV-1 Restriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice E. Clements

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Long-lived HIV-1 reservoirs include tissue macrophages. Monocyte-derived macrophages are more susceptible to infection and more permissive to HIV-1 replication than monocytes for reasons that may include the effects of different populations of miRNAs in these two cell classes. Specifically, miRs-28-3p, -150, -223, -198, and -382 exert direct or indirect negative effects on HIV-1 and are reportedly downmodulated during monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation. Here, new experimental results are presented along with reviews and analysis of published studies and publicly available datasets, supporting a broader role of miRNAs in HIV-1 restriction than would be suggested by a simple and uniform downregulation of anti-HIV miRNAs during monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation. Although miR-223 is downregulated in macrophages, other putatively antiviral miRNAs are more abundant in macrophages than in monocytes or are rare and/or variably present in both cell classes. Our analyses point to the need for further studies to determine miRNA profiles of monocytes and macrophages, including classic and newly identified subpopulations; examine the sensitivity of miRNA profiling to cell isolation and differentiation protocols; and characterize rigorously the antiviral effects of previously reported and novel predicted miRNA-HIV-1 interactions in cell-specific contexts.

  9. MiRNA expression profile and miRNA-mRNA integrated analysis (MMIA) during podocyte differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhigui; Wang, Lifeng; Xu, Jing; Yang, Zhuo

    2015-06-01

    The podocyte is a prominent cell type, which encases the capillaries of glomerulus. Podocyte-selective deletion of Dicer or Drosha was reported to induce proteinuria and glomerulosclerosis, suggesting the essential role of microRNA (miRNA) in podocytes for renal function. However, no comprehensive miRNA expression or miRNA-mRNA integrated analysis (MMIA) can be found during podocyte differentiation. Herein, miRNA and mRNA microarrays are presented, which were carried out in differentiated and undifferentiated mouse podocyte cell lines (MPC5). A total of 50 abnormal miRNAs (26 down-regulated and 24 up-regulated) were identified in differentiated and undifferentiated podocytes. Using MMIA, 80 of the 743 mRNAs (>twofold change) were predicted for potential crosstalk with 30 miRNAs of the 50 abnormal miRNAs. In addition, the gene ontology of mRNAs and the pathway analysis of miRNAs revealed a new potential-regulated network during podocyte differentiation. The expressions of three remarkably changed miRNAs (miR-34c, miR-200a and miR-467e) and four mRNAs (Runx1t1, Atp2a2, Glrp1, and Mmp15), were randomly chosen for further validation by the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and their expression trends were consistent with the microarray data. Reference searching was also conducted to confirm our data and to find potential new molecules and miRNA-target pairs involved in the podocyte differentiation. The dual luciferase reporter assay for miR-200a/GLRX and let-7b/ARL4D confirmed the prediction of MMIA. The results of this study provide a detailed integration of mRNA and miRNA during podocyte differentiation. The molecular integration mode will open up new perspectives for a better understanding of the mechanism during podocyte differentiation. PMID:25433550

  10. Inducible control of subcellular RNA localization using a synthetic protein-RNA aptamer interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J Belmont

    Full Text Available Evidence is accumulating in support of the functional importance of subcellular RNA localization in diverse biological contexts. In different cell types, distinct RNA localization patterns are frequently observed, and the available data indicate that this is achieved through a series of highly coordinated events. Classically, cis-elements within the RNA to be localized are recognized by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs, which then direct specific localization of a target RNA. Until now, the precise control of the spatiotemporal parameters inherent to regulating RNA localization has not been experimentally possible. Here, we demonstrate the development and use of a chemically-inducible RNA-protein interaction to regulate subcellular RNA localization. Our system is composed primarily of two parts: (i the Tet Repressor protein (TetR genetically fused to proteins natively involved in localizing endogenous transcripts; and (ii a target transcript containing genetically encoded TetR-binding RNA aptamers. TetR-fusion protein binding to the target RNA and subsequent localization of the latter are directly regulated by doxycycline. Using this platform, we demonstrate that enhanced and controlled subcellular localization of engineered transcripts are achievable. We also analyze rules for forward engineering this RNA localization system in an effort to facilitate its straightforward application to studying RNA localization more generally.

  11. Fluorescence anisotropy: analysis of tRNA binding to the T box riboswitch antiterminator RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, S; Anupam, R; Hines, J V

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence anisotropy can be utilized in drug discovery screening assays to identify compounds that disrupt medicinally important RNA-macromolecular complexes. Here we describe the application of this technique to monitor tRNA binding to T box riboswitch antiterminator RNA. PMID:25352143

  12. Comprehensive analysis of RNA-Seq data reveals extensive RNA editing in a human transcriptome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Zhiyu; Cheng, Yanbing; Tan, Bertrand Chin-Ming;

    2012-01-01

    RNA editing is a post-transcriptional event that recodes hereditary information. Here we describe a comprehensive profile of the RNA editome of a male Han Chinese individual based on analysis of ∼767 million sequencing reads from poly(A)(+), poly(A)(-) and small RNA samples. We developed a...

  13. Roles of RNA silencing in mammalian cells: Sources and effects on long dsRNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svoboda, Petr

    Vídeň : IMBA, 2007. ---. [Microsymposium on Small RNA s /2./. 21.05.2007-23.05.2007, Vídeň] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA501110701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : dsRNA * RNA i * L1 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  14. Rapid generation of microRNA sponges for microRNA inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joost Kluiver

    Full Text Available MicroRNA (miRNA sponges are transcripts with repeated miRNA antisense sequences that can sequester miRNAs from endogenous targets. MiRNA sponges are valuable tools for miRNA loss-of-function studies both in vitro and in vivo. We developed a fast and flexible method to generate miRNA sponges and tested their efficiency in various assays. Using a single directional ligation reaction we generated sponges with 10 or more miRNA binding sites. Luciferase and AGO2-immuno precipitation (IP assays confirmed effective binding of the miRNAs to the sponges. Using a GFP competition assay we showed that miR-19 sponges with central mismatches in the miRNA binding sites are efficient miRNA inhibitors while sponges with perfect antisense binding sites are not. Quantification of miRNA sponge levels suggests that this is at least in part due to degradation of the perfect antisense sponge transcripts. Finally, we provide evidence that combined inhibition of miRNAs of the miR-17∼92 cluster results in a more effective growth inhibition as compared to inhibition of individual miRNAs. In conclusion, we describe and validate a method to rapidly generate miRNA sponges for miRNA loss-of-function studies.

  15. Nanoplasmonic probes of RNA folding and assembly during pre-mRNA splicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Anh H.; Lee, Jong Uk; Sim, Sang Jun

    2016-02-01

    RNA splicing plays important roles in transcriptome and proteome diversity. Herein, we describe the use of a nanoplasmonic system that unveils RNA folding and assembly during pre-mRNA splicing wherein the quantification of mRNA splice variants is not taken into account. With a couple of SERS-probes and plasmonic probes binding at the boundary sites of exon-2/intron-2 and intron-2/exon-3 of the pre-mature RNA of the β-globin gene, the splicing process brings the probes into the plasmonic bands. For plasmonic probes, a plasmon shift increase of ~29 nm, corresponding to intron removal and exon-2 and exon-3 connection to form the mRNA molecule, is measured by plasmonic coupling. The increased scattering intensity and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) fingerprinting reveal the clear dynamics of pre-mRNA splicing. Moreover, a time-resolved experiment of individual RNA molecules exhibited a successful splicing and an inhibited splicing event by 33 μM biflavonoid isoginkgetin, a general inhibitor of RNA splicing. The results suggest that the RNA splicing is successfully monitored with the nanoplasmonic system. Thus, this platform can be useful for studying RNA nanotechnology, biomolecular folding, alternative splicing, and maturation of microRNA.

  16. RNA-binding protein RBM20 represses splicing to orchestrate cardiac pre-mRNA processing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maatz, H.; Jens, M.; Liss, M.; Schafer, S.; Heinig, M.; Kirchner, M.; Adami, E.; Rintisch, C.; Dauksaite, V.; Radke, M.H.; Selbach, M.; Barton, P.J.; Cook, S.A.; Rajewsky, N.; Gotthardt, M.; Landthaler, M.; Hubner, N.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the RNA-binding protein RBM20 have been implicated in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), a major cause of chronic heart failure, presumably through altering cardiac RNA splicing. Here, we combined transcriptome-wide crosslinking immunoprecipitation (CLIP-seq), RNA-seq, and

  17. Cutting Edge: MicroRNA-223 Regulates Myeloid Dendritic Cell-Driven Th17 Responses in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifergan, Igal; Chen, Siqi; Zhang, Bin; Miller, Stephen D

    2016-02-15

    Myeloid cells play a crucial role in the induction and sustained inflammation in neuroinflammatory disorders, such as multiple sclerosis. miR-223, a myeloid cell-specific microRNA, is one of the most upregulated microRNAs in multiple sclerosis patients. We demonstrate that miR-223-knockout mice display significantly reduced active and adoptive-transfer experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis that is characterized by reduced numbers of myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) and Th17 cells in the CNS. Knockout mDCs have increased PD-L1 and decreased IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-23 expression, as well as a reduced capacity to drive Th17, but not Th1, cell differentiation. Thus, miR-223 controls mDC-induced activation of pathologic Th17 responses during autoimmune inflammation. PMID:26783338

  18. Tat RNA silencing suppressor activity contributes to perturbation of lymphocyte miRNA by HIV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Lianbo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNA (miRNA-mediated RNA silencing is integral to virtually every cellular process including cell cycle progression and response to virus infection. The interplay between RNA silencing and HIV-1 is multifaceted, and accumulating evidence posits a strike-counterstrike interface that alters the cellular environment to favor virus replication. For instance, miRNA-mediated RNA silencing of HIV-1 translation is antagonized by HIV-1 Tat RNA silencing suppressor activity. The activity of HIV-1 accessory proteins Vpr/Vif delays cell cycle progression, which is a process prominently modulated by miRNA. The expression profile of cellular miRNA is altered by HIV-1 infection in both cultured cells and clinical samples. The open question stands of what, if any, is the contribution of Tat RNA silencing suppressor activity or Vpr/Vif activity to the perturbation of cellular miRNA by HIV-1. Results Herein, we compared the perturbation of miRNA expression profiles of lymphocytes infected with HIV-1NL4-3 or derivative strains that are deficient in Tat RNA silencing suppressor activity (Tat K51A substitution or ablated of the vpr/vif open reading frames. Microarrays recapitulated the perturbation of the cellular miRNA profile by HIV-1 infection. The miRNA expression trends overlapped ~50% with published microarray results on clinical samples from HIV-1 infected patients. Moreover, the number of miRNA perturbed by HIV-1 was largely similar despite ablation of Tat RSS activity and Vpr/Vif; however, the Tat RSS mutation lessened HIV-1 downregulation of twenty-two miRNAs. Conclusions Our study identified miRNA expression changes attributable to Tat RSS activity in HIV-1NL4-3. The results accomplish a necessary step in the process to understand the interface of HIV-1 with host RNA silencing activity. The overlap in miRNA expression trends observed between HIV-1 infected CEMx174 lymphocytes and primary cells supports the utility of cultured

  19. RNA Encapsidation and Packaging in the Phleboviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornak, Katherine E; Lanchy, Jean-Marc; Lodmell, J Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The Bunyaviridae represents the largest family of segmented RNA viruses, which infect a staggering diversity of plants, animals, and insects. Within the family Bunyaviridae, the Phlebovirus genus includes several important human and animal pathogens, including Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV), Uukuniemi virus (UUKV), and the sandfly fever viruses. The phleboviruses have small tripartite RNA genomes that encode a repertoire of 5-7 proteins. These few proteins accomplish the daunting task of recognizing and specifically packaging a tri-segment complement of viral genomic RNA in the midst of an abundance of host components. The critical nucleation events that eventually lead to virion production begin early on in the host cytoplasm as the first strands of nascent viral RNA (vRNA) are synthesized. The interaction between the vRNA and the viral nucleocapsid (N) protein effectively protects and masks the RNA from the host, and also forms the ribonucleoprotein (RNP) architecture that mediates downstream interactions and drives virion formation. Although the mechanism by which all three genomic counterparts are selectively co-packaged is not completely understood, we are beginning to understand the hierarchy of interactions that begins with N-RNA packaging and culminates in RNP packaging into new virus particles. In this review we focus on recent progress that highlights the molecular basis of RNA genome packaging in the phleboviruses. PMID:27428993

  20. Mitochondrial RNA granules: Compartmentalizing mitochondrial gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdain, Alexis A; Boehm, Erik; Maundrell, Kinsey; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2016-03-14

    In mitochondria, DNA replication, gene expression, and RNA degradation machineries coexist within a common nondelimited space, raising the question of how functional compartmentalization of gene expression is achieved. Here, we discuss the recently characterized "mitochondrial RNA granules," mitochondrial subdomains with an emerging role in the regulation of gene expression. PMID:26953349

  1. The NIH Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra M. Ainsztein

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Extracellular RNA (exRNA Communication Consortium, funded as an initiative of the NIH Common Fund, represents a consortium of investigators assembled to address the critical issues in the exRNA research arena. The overarching goal is to generate a multi-component community resource for sharing fundamental scientific discoveries, protocols, and innovative tools and technologies. The key initiatives include (a generating a reference catalogue of exRNAs present in body fluids of normal healthy individuals that would facilitate disease diagnosis and therapies, (b defining the fundamental principles of exRNA biogenesis, distribution, uptake, and function, as well as development of molecular tools, technologies, and imaging modalities to enable these studies, (c identifying exRNA biomarkers of disease, (d demonstrating clinical utility of exRNAs as therapeutic agents and developing scalable technologies required for these studies, and (e developing a community resource, the exRNA Atlas, to provide the scientific community access to exRNA data, standardized exRNA protocols, and other useful tools and technologies generated by funded investigators.

  2. RNA trafficking in parasitic plant systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan L LeBlanc

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available RNA trafficking in plants contributes to local and long-distance coordination of plant development and response to the environment. However, investigations of mobile RNA identity and function are hindered by the inherent difficulty of tracing a given molecule of RNA from its cell of origin to its destination. Several methods have been used to address this problem, but all are limited to some extent by constraints associated with accurately sampling phloem sap or detecting trafficked RNA. Certain parasitic plant species form symplastic connections to their hosts and thereby provide an additional system for studying RNA trafficking. The haustorial connections of Cuscuta and Phelipanche species are similar to graft junctions in that they are able to transmit mRNAs, viral RNAs, siRNAs and proteins from the host plants to the parasite. In contrast to other graft systems, these parasites form connections with host species that span a wide phylogenetic range, such that a high degree of nucleotide sequence divergence may exist between host and parasites and allow confident identification of most host RNAs in the parasite system. The ability to identify host RNAs in parasites, and vice versa, will facilitate genomics approaches to understanding RNA trafficking. This review discusses the nature of host parasite connections and the potential significance of host RNAs for the parasite. Additional research on host-parasite interactions is needed to interpret results of RNA trafficking studies, but parasitic plants may provide a fascinating new perspective on RNA trafficking.

  3. Mammalian Mitochondrial ncRNA Database

    OpenAIRE

    Anandakumar, Shanmugam; Vijayakumar, Saravanan; Arumugam, Nagarajan; Gromiha, M. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian Mitochondrial ncRNA is a web-based database, which provides specific information on non-coding RNA in mammals. This database includes easy searching, comparing with BLAST and retrieving information on predicted structure and its function about mammalian ncRNAs. Availability The database is available for free at http://www.iitm.ac.in/bioinfo/mmndb/

  4. Beginning to understand microRNA function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tingting Du; Phillip D Zamore

    2007-01-01

    @@ MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are -22 nt small RNAs expressed by plants, animals, viruses and at least one unicellular organism, the green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii [1]. Most miRNAs are transcribed as primary miRNAs (pri-miRNAs) by RNA polymerase Ⅱ, although a few are transcribed by RNA polymerase Ⅲ.

  5. Modeling sRNA-regulated Plasmid Maintenance

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Chen Chris

    2016-01-01

    We study a theoretical model for the toxin-antitoxin (hok/sok) mechanism for plasmid maintenance in bacteria. Toxin-antitoxin systems enforce the maintenance of a plasmid through post-segregational killing of cells that have lost the plasmid. Key to their function is the tight regulation of expression of a protein toxin by an sRNA antitoxin. Here, we focus on the nonlinear nature of the regulatory circuit dynamics of the toxin-antitoxin mechanism. The mechanism relies on a transient increase in protein concentration rather than on the steady state of the genetic circuit. Through a systematic analysis of the parameter dependence of this transient increase, we confirm some known design features of this system and identify new ones: for an efficient toxin-antitoxin mechanism, the synthesis rate of the toxin's mRNA template should be lower that of the sRNA antitoxin, the mRNA template should be more stable than the sRNA antitoxin, and the mRNA-sRNA complex should be more stable than the sRNA antitoxin. Moreover, ...

  6. A structural determinant required for RNA editing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Nan; Yang, Yun; Sachsenmaier, Nora; Muggenhumer, Dominik; Bi, Jingpei; Waldsich, Christina; Jantsch, Michael F.; Jin, Yongfeng

    2011-01-01

    RNA editing by adenosine deaminases acting on RNAs (ADARs) can be both specific and non-specific, depending on the substrate. Specific editing of particular adenosines may depend on the overall sequence and structural context. However, the detailed mechanisms underlying these preferences are not fully understood. Here, we show that duplex structures mimicking an editing site in the Gabra3 pre-mRNA unexpectedly fail to support RNA editing at the Gabra3 I/M site, although phylogenetic analysis suggest an evolutionarily conserved duplex structure essential for efficient RNA editing. These unusual results led us to revisit the structural requirement for this editing by mutagenesis analysis. In vivo nuclear injection experiments of mutated editing substrates demonstrate that a non-conserved structure is a determinant for editing. This structure contains bulges either on the same or the strand opposing the edited adenosine. The position of these bulges and the distance to the edited base regulate editing. Moreover, elevated folding temperature can lead to a switch in RNA editing suggesting an RNA structural change. Our results indicate the importance of RNA tertiary structure in determining RNA editing. PMID:21427087

  7. Non-coding RNA in Deinococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Researches on DNA damage and repair pathways of Deinococcus radiodurans show its extreme resistance to ionizing radiation, ultraviolet radiation and reactive oxygen species. Non-coding (ncRNA) RNAs are involved in a variety of processes such as transcriptional regulations, RNA processing and modification, mRNA translation, protein transportation and stability. The conserved secondary structures of intergenic regions of Deinococcus radiodurans R1 were predicted using Stochastic Context Free Grammar (SCFG) scan strategy. Results showed that 28 ncRNA families were present in the non-coding regions of the genome of Deinococcus radiodurans R1. Among these families, IRE is the largest family, followed by Histone3, tRNA, SECIS. DicF, ctRNA-pGA1 and tmRNA are one discovered in bacteria. Results from the comparison with other organisms showed that these ncRNA can be applied to the study of biological function of Deinococcus radiodurans and supply reference for the further study of DNA damage and repair mechanisms of this bacterium. (authors)

  8. Zinc'ing down RNA polymerase I

    OpenAIRE

    Chanfreau, Guillaume F.

    2013-01-01

    Most RNA polymerases contain zinc, yet the precise function of zinc and its influence of polymerases stability are unknown. A recent study provides evidence that zinc levels control the stability of RNA polymerase I in vivo and that the enzyme might serve as a zinc reservoir for other proteins.

  9. MicroRNA: Mechanism of Gene Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    MicroRNA (miR) are a class of small RNAs that regulate gene expression by inhibiting translation of protein encoding transcripts through activation of a specific cellular pathway. The small RNA classified as miR are short sequences of 18-26 nucleotide long, encoded by nuclear genes with distinctive...

  10. A comparison of RNA folding measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freyhult, E.; Gardner, P. P.; Moulton, V.

    2005-01-01

    Background In the last few decades there has been a great deal of discussion concerning whether or not noncoding RNA sequences (ncRNAs) fold in a more well-defined manner than random sequences. In this paper, we investigate several existing measures for how well an RNA sequence folds, and compare...

  11. Messenger RNA surveillance: neutralizing natural nonsense

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weischelfeldt, Joachim Lütken; Lykke-Andersen, Jens; Porse, Bo

    2005-01-01

    Messenger RNA transcripts that contain premature stop codons are degraded by a process termed nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). Although previously thought of as a pathway that rids the cell of non-functional mRNAs arising from mutations and processing errors, new research suggests a more general...

  12. Biomaterials for mRNA Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Reesor, Emma K. G.; Xu, Yingjie; Zope, Harshal R.; Zetter, Bruce R.; Shi, Jinjun

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) has recently emerged with remarkable potential as an effective alternative to DNA-based therapies because of several unique advantages. mRNA does not require nuclear entry for transfection activity and has a negligible chance of integrating into the host genome which excludes the possibility of potentially detrimental genomic alternations. Chemical modification of mRNA has further enhanced its stability and decreased its activation of innate immune responses. Additionally, mRNA has been found to have rapid expression and predictable kinetics. Nevertheless, the ubiquitous application of mRNA remains challenging given its unfavorable attributes, such as large size, negative charge and susceptibility to enzymatic degradation. Further refinement of mRNA delivery modalities is therefore essential for its development as a therapeutic tool. This review provides an exclusive overview of current state-of-the-art biomaterials and nanotechnology platforms for mRNA delivery, and discusses future prospects to bring these exciting technologies into clinical practice. PMID:26280625

  13. Isolation of total RNA from pollens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijli, K M; Singh, B P; Sridhara, S; Arora, N

    2001-05-01

    Isolation of total RNA from plant materials has been difficult, due to the presence of complex organic substances and the associated pigmentation. In fact, there is a dearth of standardized protocols for isolating total RNA from pollens. To find a simple and reliable method for isolating total RNA from pollen, four methods, viz. phenol/SDS (PS), guanidine HCl (GH), tri-reagent (TR), and modified SDS-betaME (SB) were tested with fresh pollen of Ricinus communis (procured at -70 degrees C) and pollen dried at 30-37 degrees C. The quality and quantity of RNA was superior for the material processed at -70 degrees C. SB gave the highest RNA yield (2.35 mg/g, OD260/280 >2.0), compared to other methods. The results obtained by the SB method were found to be comparable with the widely used tri-reagent method. This was validated with other pollens of Imperata cylindrica and Xanthium strumarium. The yield obtained from graded amounts of pollen was consistent with SB, compared to the TR method. The RNA isolated by SB gave good quality mRNA for synthesizing cDNA. The SDS-betaME method is simple, efficient, and uses less expensive reagents. Hence, we recommend the modified SDS-betaME method for isolating total RNA from pollens. PMID:11426703

  14. The canonical RNA interference pathway in animals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nejepínská, Jana; Flemr, Matyáš; Svoboda, Petr

    Berlin - Heidelberg: Springer, 2012 - (Mallick, B.; Gosh, Z.), s. 111-149 ISBN 978-3-642-22516-1 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Argonaute * Dicer * dsRNA * RNAi * siRNA Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  15. Forms and Functions of Telomerase RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Kathleen

    Telomerase adds single-stranded telomeric DNA repeats to chromosome ends. Unlike other polymerases involved in genome replication, telomerase synthe¬sizes DNA without use of a DNA template. Instead, the enzyme active site copies a template carried within the integral RNA subunit of the telomerase ribonucleo-protein (RNP) complex. In addition to providing a template, telomerase RNA has non-template motifs with critical functions in the catalytic cycle of repeat synthesis. In its complexity of structure and function, telomerase RNA resembles the non-coding RNAs of RNP machines like the ribosome and spliceosome that evolved from catalytic RNAs of the RNA World. However, unlike these RNPs, telomerase evolved its RNP identity after advent of the Protein World. Insights about telomer-ase have broad significance for understanding non-coding RNA biology as well as chromosome end maintenance and human disease.

  16. Exploring RNA structure by integrative molecular modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masquida, Benoît; Beckert, Bertrand; Jossinet, Fabrice

    2010-01-01

    RNA molecular modelling is adequate to rapidly tackle the structure of RNA molecules. With new structured RNAs constituting a central class of cellular regulators discovered every year, the need for swift and reliable modelling methods is more crucial than ever. The pragmatic method based...... on interactive all-atom molecular modelling relies on the observation that specific structural motifs are recurrently found in RNA sequences. Once identified by a combination of comparative sequence analysis and biochemical data, the motifs composing the secondary structure of a given RNA can be extruded...... in three dimensions (3D) and used as building blocks assembled manually during a bioinformatic interactive process. Comparing the models to the corresponding crystal structures has validated the method as being powerful to predict the RNA topology and architecture while being less accurate regarding...

  17. Single Guide RNA Library Design and Construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tim; Lander, Eric S; Sabatini, David M

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes how to generate a single guide RNA (sgRNA) library for use in genetic screens. There are many online tools available for predicting sgRNA sequences with high target specificity and/or cleavage activity. Here, we refer the user to genome-wide sgRNA sequence predictions that we have developed for both the human and mouse and that are available from the Broad Institute website. Once a set of target genes and corresponding sgRNA sequences has been identified, customized oligonucleotide pools can be rapidly synthesized by a number of commercial vendors. Thereafter, as described here, the oligonucleotides can be efficiently cloned into an appropriate lentiviral expression vector backbone. The resulting plasmid pool can then be packaged into lentiviral particles and used to generate knockouts in any cell line of choice. PMID:26933249

  18. The structural basis of transfer RNA mimicry and conformational plasticity by a viral RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colussi, Timothy M; Costantino, David A; Hammond, John A; Ruehle, Grant M; Nix, Jay C; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2014-07-17

    RNA is arguably the most functionally diverse biological macromolecule. In some cases a single discrete RNA sequence performs multiple roles, and this can be conferred by a complex three-dimensional structure. Such multifunctionality can also be driven or enhanced by the ability of a given RNA to assume different conformational (and therefore functional) states. Despite its biological importance, a detailed structural understanding of the paradigm of RNA structure-driven multifunctionality is lacking. To address this gap it is useful to study examples from single-stranded positive-sense RNA viruses, a prototype being the tRNA-like structure (TLS) found at the 3' end of the turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV). This TLS not only acts like a tRNA to drive aminoacylation of the viral genomic (g)RNA, but also interacts with other structures in the 3' untranslated region of the gRNA, contains the promoter for negative-strand synthesis, and influences several infection-critical processes. TLS RNA can provide a glimpse into the structural basis of RNA multifunctionality and plasticity, but for decades its high-resolution structure has remained elusive. Here we present the crystal structure of the complete TYMV TLS to 2.0 Å resolution. Globally, the RNA adopts a shape that mimics tRNA, but it uses a very different set of intramolecular interactions to achieve this shape. These interactions also allow the TLS to readily switch conformations. In addition, the TLS structure is 'two faced': one face closely mimics tRNA and drives aminoacylation, the other face diverges from tRNA and enables additional functionality. The TLS is thus structured to perform several functions and interact with diverse binding partners, and we demonstrate its ability to specifically bind to ribosomes. PMID:24909993

  19. Analysis of RNA binding by the dengue virus NS5 RNA capping enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittney R Henderson

    Full Text Available Flaviviruses are small, capped positive sense RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Dengue virus and other related flaviviruses have evolved RNA capping enzymes to form the viral RNA cap structure that protects the viral genome and directs efficient viral polyprotein translation. The N-terminal domain of NS5 possesses the methyltransferase and guanylyltransferase activities necessary for forming mature RNA cap structures. The mechanism for flavivirus guanylyltransferase activity is currently unknown, and how the capping enzyme binds its diphosphorylated RNA substrate is important for deciphering how the flavivirus guanylyltransferase functions. In this report we examine how flavivirus NS5 N-terminal capping enzymes bind to the 5' end of the viral RNA using a fluorescence polarization-based RNA binding assay. We observed that the K(D for RNA binding is approximately 200 nM Dengue, Yellow Fever, and West Nile virus capping enzymes. Removal of one or both of the 5' phosphates reduces binding affinity, indicating that the terminal phosphates contribute significantly to binding. RNA binding affinity is negatively affected by the presence of GTP or ATP and positively affected by S-adensyl methoninine (SAM. Structural superpositioning of the dengue virus capping enzyme with the Vaccinia virus VP39 protein bound to RNA suggests how the flavivirus capping enzyme may bind RNA, and mutagenesis analysis of residues in the putative RNA binding site demonstrate that several basic residues are critical for RNA binding. Several mutants show differential binding to 5' di-, mono-, and un-phosphorylated RNAs. The mode of RNA binding appears similar to that found with other methyltransferase enzymes, and a discussion of diphosphorylated RNA binding is presented.

  20. Four RNA families with functional transient structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jing Yun A; Meyer, Irmtraud M

    2015-01-01

    Protein-coding and non-coding RNA transcripts perform a wide variety of cellular functions in diverse organisms. Several of their functional roles are expressed and modulated via RNA structure. A given transcript, however, can have more than a single functional RNA structure throughout its life, a fact which has been previously overlooked. Transient RNA structures, for example, are only present during specific time intervals and cellular conditions. We here introduce four RNA families with transient RNA structures that play distinct and diverse functional roles. Moreover, we show that these transient RNA structures are structurally well-defined and evolutionarily conserved. Since Rfam annotates one structure for each family, there is either no annotation for these transient structures or no such family. Thus, our alignments either significantly update and extend the existing Rfam families or introduce a new RNA family to Rfam. For each of the four RNA families, we compile a multiple-sequence alignment based on experimentally verified transient and dominant (dominant in terms of either the thermodynamic stability and/or attention received so far) RNA secondary structures using a combination of automated search via covariance model and manual curation. The first alignment is the Trp operon leader which regulates the operon transcription in response to tryptophan abundance through alternative structures. The second alignment is the HDV ribozyme which we extend to the 5' flanking sequence. This flanking sequence is involved in the regulation of the transcript's self-cleavage activity. The third alignment is the 5' UTR of the maturation protein from Levivirus which contains a transient structure that temporarily postpones the formation of the final inhibitory structure to allow translation of maturation protein. The fourth and last alignment is the SAM riboswitch which regulates the downstream gene expression by assuming alternative structures upon binding of SAM. All

  1. Two classes of short interfering RNA in RNA silencing

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton, Andrew; Voinnet, Olivier; Chappell, Louise; Baulcombe, David

    2015-01-01

    RNA silencing is a eukaryotic genome defence system that involves processing of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into 21–26 nt, short interfering RNA (siRNA). The siRNA mediates suppression of genes corresponding to the dsRNA through targeted RNA degradation. In some plant systems there are additional silencing processes, involving systemic spread of silencing and RNA-directed methylation/transcriptional suppression of homologous genomic DNA. We show here that siRNAs produced in plants from a gree...

  2. Structure of RNA 3′-phosphate cyclase bound to substrate RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Desai, Kevin K.; Bingman, Craig A.; Cheng, Chin L.; Phillips, George N.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2014-01-01

    RNA 3′-phosphate cyclase (RtcA) catalyzes the ATP-dependent cyclization of a 3′-phosphate to form a 2′,3′-cyclic phosphate at RNA termini. Cyclization proceeds through RtcA–AMP and RNA(3′)pp(5′)A covalent intermediates, which are analogous to intermediates formed during catalysis by the tRNA ligase RtcB. Here we present a crystal structure of Pyrococcus horikoshii RtcA in complex with a 3′-phosphate terminated RNA and adenosine in the AMP-binding pocket. Our data reveal that RtcA recognizes s...

  3. RNA editing changes the identity of a mitochondrial tRNA in marsupials.

    OpenAIRE

    Börner, G V; Mörl, M.; Janke, A.; Pääbo, S

    1996-01-01

    In the mitochondrial genome of marsupials, the tRNA gene located at the position where in other mammals an aspartyl-tRNA is encoded carries the glycine anticodon GCC. Post-transcriptionally, an RNA editing mechanism affects the second position of the anticodon such that the aspartate anticodon GUC is created in approximately 50% of the mature tRNA pool. We show that the unedited version of this tRNA'Asp' (GCC) can be specifically aminoacylated with glycine in vitro, while the edited version b...

  4. Investigating the role of TTP in mRNA decay and pre-mRNA processing

    OpenAIRE

    Reznik, Boris

    2012-01-01

    The AU-rich element (ARE) is a cis-encoded determinant within mRNA 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) that contributes to mRNA translation and stability in the cell. Tristetraprolin (TTP) is an RNA binding protein that specifically binds to mRNAs containing AREs and activates their rapid decay. TTP is rapidly activated following external stimulus and modulates the gene expression program of the responding cell. To better understand TTP- mediated mRNA decay activity, I identified the RNA binding p...

  5. The Dnmt2 RNA methyltransferase homolog of Geobacter sulfurreducens specifically methylates tRNA-Glu

    OpenAIRE

    Shanmugam, R; Aklujkar, M.; Schaefer, M.; Reinhardt, R; Nickel, O.; Reuter, G; Lovley, D.; Ehrenhofer-Murray, A.; Nelle, W.; Ankri, S; Helm, M.; Jurkowski, T.; Jeltsch, A.

    2014-01-01

    Dnmt2 enzymes are conserved in eukaryotes, where they methylate C38 of tRNA-Asp with high activity. Here, the activity of one of the very few prokaryotic Dnmt2 homologs from Geobacter species (GsDnmt2) was investigated. GsDnmt2 was observed to methylate tRNA-Asp from flies and mice. Unexpectedly, it had only a weak activity toward its matching Geobacter tRNA-Asp, but methylated Geobacter tRNA-Glu with good activity. In agreement with this result, we show that tRNA-Glu is methylated in Geobact...

  6. MicroRNA in the immune system, microRNA as an immune system

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Li-Fan; Liston, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    The advent of microRNA has potentially uncovered a new level of complexity to be considered for every biological process. Through the modulation of transcription and translation, microRNA alter the basal state of cells and the outcome of stimulatory events. The exact effect of the microRNA network and individual microRNA on cellular processes is only just starting to be dissected. In the immune system, microRNA appear to have a key role in the early differentiation and effector differentiatio...

  7. A structural and primary sequence comparison of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases

    OpenAIRE

    Bruenn, Jeremy A.

    2003-01-01

    A systematic bioinformatic approach to identifying the evolutionarily conserved regions of proteins has verified the universality of a newly described conserved motif in RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (motif F). In combination with structural comparisons, this approach has defined two regions that may be involved in unwinding double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) for transcription. One of these is the N-terminal portion of motif F and the second is a large insertion in motif F present in the RNA-depende...

  8. MicroRNA and Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, L

    2016-01-01

    Noncoding RNAs are important regulatory molecules of cellular processes. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that bind to complementary sequences in the 3' untranslated region of target mRNAs, leading to degradation of the target mRNAs and/or inhibition of their translation. Some miRNAs are essential for normal animal development; however, many other miRNAs are dispensable for development but play a critical role in pathological conditions, including tumorigenesis and metastasis. miRNA genes often reside at fragile chromosome sites and are deregulated in cancer. Some miRNAs function as oncogenes or tumor suppressors, collectively termed "oncomirs." Specific metastasis-regulating miRNAs, collectively termed "metastamirs," govern molecular processes and pathways in malignant progression in either a tumor cell-autonomous or a cell-nonautonomous manner. Recently, exosome-transferred miRNAs have emerged as mediators of the tumor-stroma cross talk. In this chapter, we focus on the functions, mechanisms of action, and therapeutic potential of miRNAs, particularly oncomirs and metastamirs. PMID:27613133

  9. RNA processing and ribonucleoprotein assembly studied in vivo by RNA transfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present a method for studying RNA processing and ribonucleoprotein assembly in vivo, by using RNA synthesized in vitro. SP6-transcribed 32P-labeled U2 small nuclear RNA precursor molecules were introduced into cultured human 293 cells by calcium phosphate-mediated uptake, as in standard DNA transfection experiments. RNase protection mapping demonstrated that the introduced pre-U2 RNA underwent accurate 3' end processing. The introduced U2 RNA was assembled into ribonucleoprotein particles that reacted with an antibody specific for proteins known to be associated with the U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle. The 3' end-processed, ribonucleoprotein-assembled U2 RNA accumulated in the nuclear fraction. When pre-U2 RNA with a 7-methylguanosine group at the 5' end was introduced into cells, it underwent conversion to a 2,2,7-trimethylguanosine cap structure, a characteristic feature of the U-small nuclear RNAs. Pre-U2 RNA introduced with an adenosine cap (Ap-ppG) also underwent processing, small nuclear ribonucleoprotein assembly, and nuclear accumulation, establishing that a methylated guanosine cap structure is not required for these steps in U2 small nuclear ribonucleprotein biosynthesis. Beyond its demonstrated usefulness in the study of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein biosynthesis, RNA transfection may be of general applicability to the investigation of eukaryotic RNA processing in vivo and may also offer opportunities for introducing therapeutically targeted RNAs (ribozymes or antisense RNA) into cells

  10. In vitro RNA synthesis by infectious pancreatic necrosis virus-associated RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, P P; Jamieson, P B; Dobos, P

    1982-03-01

    The presence of an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase was demonstrated in purified infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV). The enzyme was active in vitro without any pretreatment of the virus. Optimum activity was shown at 30 degrees C, pH 8 and in the presence of 6 mM-magnesium ions. Approx. 50% of the polymerase product remained associated with the dsRNA template of the virions. The remainder was found as extravirion ssRNA broken down to 5S to 7S fragments by virus-associated RNase(s). Although the addition of bentonite considerably reduced the amount of RNA synthesized, it protected the ssRNA product from degradation. This, in turn, permitted the synthesis of small amounts of ssRNA, which when analysed by sucrose gradient centrifugation or polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis behaved identically to the 24S single-stranded virus mRNA produced in infected cells. The virion polymerase was not stimulated by S-adenosyl-L-methionine or the addition of cellular or capped reovirus ssRNA. Several other modifications of the assay system were tried in an attempt to increase 24S RNA synthesis, but with little success. When [3H]uridine-labelled virus was used in the polymerase reaction, some labelled 24S ssRNA was obtained, indicating that in vitro transcription may proceed by a semi-conservative (displacement) mechanism. PMID:6175731

  11. A comprehensive comparison of general RNA-RNA interaction prediction methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Daniel; Meyer, Irmtraud M

    2016-04-20

    RNA-RNA interactions are fast emerging as a major functional component in many newly discovered non-coding RNAs. Basepairing is believed to be a major contributor to the stability of these intermolecular interactions, much like intramolecular basepairs formed in RNA secondary structure. As such, using algorithms similar to those for predicting RNA secondary structure, computational methods have been recently developed for the prediction of RNA-RNA interactions.We provide the first comprehensive comparison comprising 14 methods that predict general intermolecular basepairs. To evaluate these, we compile an extensive data set of 54 experimentally confirmed fungal snoRNA-rRNA interactions and 102 bacterial sRNA-mRNA interactions. We test the performance accuracy of all methods, evaluating the effects of tool settings, sequence length, and multiple sequence alignment usage and quality.Our results show that-unlike for RNA secondary structure prediction-the overall best performing tools are non-comparative energy-based tools utilizing accessibility information that predict short interactions on this data set. Furthermore, we find that maintaining high accuracy across biologically different data sets and increasing input lengths remains a huge challenge, causing implications forde novotranscriptome-wide searches. Finally, we make our interaction data set publicly available for future development and benchmarking efforts. PMID:26673718

  12. RNA exosome-regulated long non-coding RNA transcription controls super-enhancer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pefanis, Evangelos; Wang, Jiguang; Rothschild, Gerson; Lim, Junghyun; Kazadi, David; Sun, Jianbo; Federation, Alexander; Chao, Jaime; Elliott, Oliver; Liu, Zhi-Ping; Economides, Aris N; Bradner, James E; Rabadan, Raul; Basu, Uttiya

    2015-05-01

    We have ablated the cellular RNA degradation machinery in differentiated B cells and pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by conditional mutagenesis of core (Exosc3) and nuclear RNase (Exosc10) components of RNA exosome and identified a vast number of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and enhancer RNAs (eRNAs) with emergent functionality. Unexpectedly, eRNA-expressing regions accumulate R-loop structures upon RNA exosome ablation, thus demonstrating the role of RNA exosome in resolving deleterious DNA/RNA hybrids arising from active enhancers. We have uncovered a distal divergent eRNA-expressing element (lncRNA-CSR) engaged in long-range DNA interactions and regulating IgH 3' regulatory region super-enhancer function. CRISPR-Cas9-mediated ablation of lncRNA-CSR transcription decreases its chromosomal looping-mediated association with the IgH 3' regulatory region super-enhancer and leads to decreased class switch recombination efficiency. We propose that the RNA exosome protects divergently transcribed lncRNA expressing enhancers by resolving deleterious transcription-coupled secondary DNA structures, while also regulating long-range super-enhancer chromosomal interactions important for cellular function. PMID:25957685

  13. Kinetic models of the interference of gene transcription to ncRNA and mRNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2011-06-01

    The experiments indicate that the transcription of genes into ncRNA can positively or negatively interfere with transcription into mRNA. We propose two kinetic models describing this effect. The first model is focused on the ncRNA-induced chromatin modification facilitating the transcription of the downstream gene into mRNA. The second model includes the competition between the transcription into ncRNA and the binding of activator to a regulatory site of the downstream gene transcribed into mRNA. Our analysis based on the mean-field kinetic equations and Monte Carlo simulations shows the likely dependences of the transcription rate on RNA polymerase concentration in situations with different rate-limiting steps. Our models can also be used to scrutinize the dependence of the transcription rate on other kinetic parameters. Our kinetic Monte Carlo simulations show that the first model predicts stochastic bursts in the mRNA formation provided that the transcription into ncRNA is slow, while the second model predicts in addition anti-phase stochastic bursts in the mRNA and ncRNA formation provided that that the protein attachment to and detachment from a regulatory site is slow.

  14. Phloem RNA-binding proteins as potential components of the long-distance RNA transport system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VICENTE ePALLAS

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available RNA-binding proteins (RBPs govern a myriad of different essential processes in eukaryotic cells. Recent evidence reveals that apart from playing critical roles in RNA metabolism and RNA transport, RBPs perform a key function in plant adaption to various environmental conditions. Long distance RNA transport occurs in land plants through the phloem, a conducting tissue that integrates the wide range of signalling pathways required to regulate plant development and response to stress processes. The macromolecules in the phloem pathway vary greatly and include defence proteins, transcription factors, chaperones acting in long distance trafficking, and RNAs (mRNAs, siRNAs and miRNAs. How these RNA molecules translocate through the phloem is not well understood, but recent evidence indicates the presence of translocatable RNA-binding proteins in the phloem, which act as potential components of long distance RNA transport system. This review updates our knowledge on the characteristics and functions of RBPs present in the phloem.

  15. RNA Secondary Structure Modulates FMRP's Bi-Functional Role in the MicroRNA Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Phillip; Ceman, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs act by post-transcriptionally regulating the gene expression of 30%-60% of mammalian genomes. MicroRNAs are key regulators in all cellular processes, though the mechanism by which the cell activates or represses microRNA-mediated translational regulation is poorly understood. In this review, we discuss the RNA binding protein Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP) and its role in microRNA-mediated translational regulation. Historically, FMRP is known to function as a translational suppressor. However, emerging data suggests that FMRP has both an agonistic and antagonistic role in regulating microRNA-mediated translational suppression. This bi-functional role is dependent on FMRP's interaction with the RNA helicase Moloney leukemia virus 10 (MOV10), which modifies the structural landscape of bound mRNA, therefore facilitating or inhibiting its association with the RNA-Induced Silencing Complex. PMID:27338369

  16. Combining miRNA and mRNA Expression Profiles in Wilms Tumor Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Nicole; Werner, Tamara V.; Backes, Christina; Trampert, Patrick; Gessler, Manfred; Keller, Andreas; Lenhof, Hans-Peter; Graf, Norbert; Meese, Eckart

    2016-01-01

    Wilms tumor (WT) is the most common childhood renal cancer. Recent findings of mutations in microRNA (miRNA) processing proteins suggest a pivotal role of miRNAs in WT genesis. We performed miRNA expression profiling of 36 WTs of different subtypes and four normal kidney tissues using microarrays. Additionally, we determined the gene expression profile of 28 of these tumors to identify potentially correlated target genes and affected pathways. We identified 85 miRNAs and 2107 messenger RNAs (mRNA) differentially expressed in blastemal WT, and 266 miRNAs and 1267 mRNAs differentially expressed in regressive subtype. The hierarchical clustering of the samples, using either the miRNA or mRNA profile, showed the clear separation of WT from normal kidney samples, but the miRNA pattern yielded better separation of WT subtypes. A correlation analysis of the deregulated miRNA and mRNAs identified 13,026 miRNA/mRNA pairs with inversely correlated expression, of which 2844 are potential interactions of miRNA and their predicted mRNA targets. We found significant upregulation of miRNAs-183, -301a/b and -335 for the blastemal subtype, and miRNAs-181b, -223 and -630 for the regressive subtype. We found marked deregulation of miRNAs regulating epithelial to mesenchymal transition, especially in the blastemal subtype, and miRNAs influencing chemosensitivity, especially in regressive subtypes. Further research is needed to assess the influence of preoperative chemotherapy and tumor infiltrating lymphocytes on the miRNA and mRNA patterns in WT. PMID:27043538

  17. RNA interference and Register Machines (extended abstract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Hamano

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi is a mechanism whereby small RNAs (siRNAs directly control gene expression without assistance from proteins. This mechanism consists of interactions between RNAs and small RNAs both of which may be single or double stranded. The target of the mechanism is mRNA to be degraded or aberrated, while the initiator is double stranded RNA (dsRNA to be cleaved into siRNAs. Observing the digital nature of RNAi, we represent RNAi as a Minsky register machine such that (i The two registers hold single and double stranded RNAs respectively, and (ii Machine's instructions are interpreted by interactions of enzyme (Dicer, siRNA (with RISC com- plex and polymerization (RdRp to the appropriate registers. Interpreting RNAi as a computational structure, we can investigate the computational meaning of RNAi, especially its complexity. Initially, the machine is configured as a Chemical Ground Form (CGF, which generates incorrect jumps. To remedy this problem, the system is remodeled as recursive RNAi, in which siRNA targets not only mRNA but also the machine instructional analogues of Dicer and RISC. Finally, probabilistic termination is investigated in the recursive RNAi system.

  18. MiRNA Biogenesis and Intersecting Pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ben Chaabane, Samir

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that function as guide molecules in RNA silencing. Plant miRNAs are critical for plant growth, development and stress response, and are processed in Arabidopsis from primary miRNA transcripts (pri-miRNAs) by the endonuclease activity of the DICER-LIKE1...... (DCL1) protein complex. Mature miRNAs are loaded onto and guide an ARGONAUTE1 (AGO1) effector complex, leading to target mRNA silencing. The miRNA pathway is under tight temporal and spatial control and is regulated at multiple levels from transcription and precursor processing through miRNA mode of...... action and turnover. During my PhD period we have shown that the STA1 protein, a factor for pre-mRNA splicing and mRNA stability, is specifically involved in the splicing of pri-miRNAs and in the modulation of DCL1 transcript levels. Also, we established a novel and essential regulatory network in which...

  19. Nonenzymatic microorganism identification based on ribosomal RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, Jeffrey T.; Pierini, Alicia M.; Stokes, Jeffrey A.; Wahlund, Thomas M.; Read, Betsy; Bechtel, James H.; Bronk, Burt V.

    1999-11-01

    Effective defense against biological warfare (BW) agents requires rapid, fieldable and accurate systems. For micro- organisms like bacteria and viruses, ribosomal RNA (rRNA) provides a valuable target with multiple advantages of species specificity and intrinsic target amplification. Vegetative and spore forms of bacteria contain approximately 104 copies of rRNA. Direct detection of rRNA copies can eliminate some of the interference and preparation difficulties involved in enzymatic amplification methods. In order to apply the advantages of rRNA to BW defense, we are developing a fieldable system based on 16S rRNA, physical disruption of the micro-organism, solid phase hybridization, and fluorescence detection. Our goals include species-specific identification, complete operation from raw sample to identification in 15 minutes or less, and compact, fieldable instrumentation. Initial work on this project has investigated the lysis and hybridization steps, the species-specificity of oligonucleotides probes, and the development of a novel electromagnetic method to physically disrupt the micro- organisms. Target bacteria have been Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis). Continuing work includes further development of methods to rapidly disrupt the micro-organisms and release the rRNA, improved integration and processing, and extension to bacterial and mammalian viruses like MS2 and vesicular stomatitis virus.

  20. RNA Structure Duplications and Flavivirus Host Adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villordo, Sergio M; Carballeda, Juan M; Filomatori, Claudia V; Gamarnik, Andrea V

    2016-04-01

    Flaviviruses include a highly diverse group of arboviruses with a global distribution and a high human disease burden. Most flaviviruses cycle between insects and vertebrate hosts; thus, they are obligated to use different cellular machinery for their replication and mount different mechanisms to evade specific antiviral responses. In addition to coding for viral proteins, the viral genome contains signals in RNA structures that govern the amplification of viral components and participate in triggering or evading antiviral responses. In this review, we focused on new information about host-specific functions of RNA structures present in the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) of flavivirus genomes. Models and conservation patterns of RNA elements of distinct flavivirus ecological groups are revised. An intriguing feature of the 3' UTR of insect-borne flavivirus genomes is the conservation of complex RNA structure duplications. Here, we discuss new hypotheses of how these RNA elements specialize for replication in vertebrate and invertebrate hosts, and present new ideas associating the significance of RNA structure duplication, small subgenomic flavivirus RNA formation, and host adaptation. PMID:26850219

  1. The art of editing RNA structural alignments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ebbe Sloth

    2014-01-01

    rewarded by great insight into the evolution of structure and function of your favorite RNA molecule. In this chapter I will review the methods and considerations that go into constructing RNA structural alignments at the secondary and tertiary structure level; introduce software, databases, and algorithms......Manual editing of RNA structural alignments may be considered more art than science, since it still requires an expert biologist to take multiple levels of information into account and be slightly creative when constructing high-quality alignments. Even though the task is rather tedious, it is...

  2. Viral IRES RNA structures and ribosome interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Kieft, Jeffrey S.

    2008-01-01

    In eukaryotes, protein synthesis initiates primarily by a mechanism that requires a modified nucleotide ‘cap’ on the mRNA and also proteins that recruit and position the ribosome. Many pathogenic viruses use an alternative, cap-independent mechanism that substitutes RNA structure for the cap and many proteins. The RNAs driving this process are called internal ribosome-entry sites (IRESs) and some are able to bind the ribosome directly using a specific 3D RNA structure. Recent structures of IR...

  3. RNA topology remoulds electrostatic stabilization of viruses

    CERN Document Server

    Erdemci-Tandogan, Gonca; van der Schoot, Paul; Podgornik, Rudolf; Zandi, Roya

    2013-01-01

    Simple RNA viruses efficiently encapsulate their genome into a nano-sized protein shell-the capsid. Spontaneous co-assembly of the genome and the capsid proteins is driven predominantly by electrostatic interactions between the negatively charged RNA and the positively charged inner capsid wall. Using field theoretic formulation we show that the inherently branched RNA secondary structure allows viruses to {\\sl maximize} the amount of encapsulated genome and make assembly more efficient, allowing viral RNAs to out-compete cellular RNAs during replication in infected host cells.

  4. RNA topology remolds electrostatic stabilization of viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemci-Tandogan, Gonca; Wagner, Jef; van der Schoot, Paul; Podgornik, Rudolf; Zandi, Roya

    2014-03-01

    Simple RNA viruses efficiently encapsulate their genome into a nano-sized protein shell: the capsid. Spontaneous coassembly of the genome and the capsid proteins is driven predominantly by electrostatic interactions between the negatively charged RNA and the positively charged inner capsid wall. Using field theoretic formulation we show that the inherently branched RNA secondary structure allows viruses to maximize the amount of encapsulated genome and make assembly more efficient, allowing viral RNAs to out-compete cellular RNAs during replication in infected host cells.

  5. Circulating miRNA and cancer diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    miRNAs are a class of small RNA molecules with regulatory function, and play an important role in tumor development and progression. It has been demonstrated that tumor-derived miRNAs exist in the circulating nucleic acids of cancer patients. This phenomenon implies that detection of the circulating miRNA may be an effective method for non-invasive diagnosis of cancer. In this review, we summarize the applications of the circulating miRNA as biomarkers in cancer diagnosis, as well as the latest research progress in this area.

  6. miRNA-Based Therapeutic Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Ishida, Masaharu; Selaru, Florin M.

    2012-01-01

    Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNA species, thought to act primarily through downregulation of target mRNA species with subsequent decrease in encoded proteins. Recent studies revealed that miRNAs play pivotal roles in physiology and disease, and therapeutic targeting has started being investigated. Generally, the up-regulation of miRNAs is achieved through administration of synthetic miRNAs or administration of miRNA expressing vectors. The down-regulation of miRNAs is achieved thr...

  7. Exploring complex miRNA-mRNA interactions with Bayesian networks by splitting-averaging strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Lin

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background microRNAs (miRNAs regulate target gene expression by controlling their mRNAs post-transcriptionally. Increasing evidence demonstrates that miRNAs play important roles in various biological processes. However, the functions and precise regulatory mechanisms of most miRNAs remain elusive. Current research suggests that miRNA regulatory modules are complicated, including up-, down-, and mix-regulation for different physiological conditions. Previous computational approaches for discovering miRNA-mRNA interactions focus only on down-regulatory modules. In this work, we present a method to capture complex miRNA-mRNA interactions including all regulatory types between miRNAs and mRNAs. Results We present a method to capture complex miRNA-mRNA interactions using Bayesian network structure learning with splitting-averaging strategy. It is designed to explore all possible miRNA-mRNA interactions by integrating miRNA-targeting information, expression profiles of miRNAs and mRNAs, and sample categories. We also present an analysis of data sets for epithelial and mesenchymal transition (EMT. Our results show that the proposed method identified all possible types of miRNA-mRNA interactions from the data. Many interactions are of tremendous biological significance. Some discoveries have been validated by previous research, for example, the miR-200 family negatively regulates ZEB1 and ZEB2 for EMT. Some are consistent with the literature, such as LOX has wide interactions with the miR-200 family members for EMT. Furthermore, many novel interactions are statistically significant and worthy of validation in the near future. Conclusions This paper presents a new method to explore the complex miRNA-mRNA interactions for different physiological conditions using Bayesian network structure learning with splitting-averaging strategy. The method makes use of heterogeneous data including miRNA-targeting information, expression profiles of miRNAs and

  8. Selective amplification of Brucella melitensis mRNA from a mixed host-pathogen total RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galindo Cristi L

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brucellosis is a worldwide anthropozoonotic disease caused by an in vivo intracellular pathogen belonging to genus Brucella. The characterization of brucelae transcriptome's during host-pathogen interaction has been limited due to the difficulty of obtaining an adequate quantity of good quality eukaryotic RNA-free pathogen RNA for downstream applications. Findings Here, we describe a combined protocol to prepare RNA from intracellular B. melitensis in a quantity and quality suitable for pathogen gene expression analysis. Initially, B. melitensis total RNA was enriched from a host:pathogen mixed RNA sample by reducing the eukaryotic RNA..Then, to increase the Brucella RNA concentration and simultaneously minimize the contaminated host RNA in the mixed sample, a specific primer set designed to anneal to all B. melitensis ORF allows the selective linear amplification of sense-strand prokaryotic transcripts in a previously enriched RNA sample. Conclusion The novelty of the method we present here allows analysis of the gene expression profile of B. melitensis when limited amounts of pathogen RNA are present, and is potentially applicable to both in vivo and in vitro models of infection, even at early infection time points.

  9. SR proteins are NXF1 adaptors that link alternative RNA processing to mRNA export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-McNicoll, Michaela; Botti, Valentina; de Jesus Domingues, Antonio M; Brandl, Holger; Schwich, Oliver D; Steiner, Michaela C; Curk, Tomaz; Poser, Ina; Zarnack, Kathi; Neugebauer, Karla M

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear export factor 1 (NXF1) exports mRNA to the cytoplasm after recruitment to mRNA by specific adaptor proteins. How and why cells use numerous different export adaptors is poorly understood. Here we critically evaluate members of the SR protein family (SRSF1-7) for their potential to act as NXF1 adaptors that couple pre-mRNA processing to mRNA export. Consistent with this proposal, >1000 endogenous mRNAs required individual SR proteins for nuclear export in vivo. To address the mechanism, transcriptome-wide RNA-binding profiles of NXF1 and SRSF1-7 were determined in parallel by individual-nucleotide-resolution UV cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (iCLIP). Quantitative comparisons of RNA-binding sites showed that NXF1 and SR proteins bind mRNA targets at adjacent sites, indicative of cobinding. SRSF3 emerged as the most potent NXF1 adaptor, conferring sequence specificity to RNA binding by NXF1 in last exons. Interestingly, SRSF3 and SRSF7 were shown to bind different sites in last exons and regulate 3' untranslated region length in an opposing manner. Both SRSF3 and SRSF7 promoted NXF1 recruitment to mRNA. Thus, SRSF3 and SRSF7 couple alternative splicing and polyadenylation to NXF1-mediated mRNA export, thereby controlling the cytoplasmic abundance of transcripts with alternative 3' ends. PMID:26944680

  10. Delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) using the sleeping beauty transposon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Bradley S

    2010-11-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an evolutionarily conserved process that silences gene expression through double-stranded RNA species in a sequence-specific manner. Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) can promote sequence-specific degradation and/or translational repression of target RNA by activation of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). Traditionally, silencing in mammalian cells had been achieved by transfection of synthetically derived siRNA duplexes, resulting in transient gene suppression of the target sequence. As the technology was advanced, inhibitory short-hairpin-shaped RNAs (shRNAs) could be produced by transcription from RNA polymerase-III (pol-III)-driven promoters, such as H1, U6, or cytomegalovirus (CMV)-enhanced pol III promoters. Following transcription, the shRNAs are processed by the enzyme Dicer into active siRNA. This approach allows for the continuous production of siRNA within cells using a DNA template and offers increased options for delivery of the pol-III-driven transcriptional units. A number of different viral vectors, as well as plasmid DNAs, have been utilized to deliver shRNA to mammalian cells. Here, the Tc1/mariner DNA transposon Sleeping Beauty (SB) is used as a tool to deliver shRNA-encoding transcriptional units. The SB transposon system uses a "cut-and-paste" mechanism to insert the transposon into random TA dinucleotides within the target genome. The shRNAs are then processed and used for gene knockdown. PMID:21041394

  11. Mapping RNA–RNA interactome and RNA structure in vivo by MARIO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tri C.; Cao, Xiaoyi; Yu, Pengfei; Xiao, Shu; Lu, Jia; Biase, Fernando H.; Sridhar, Bharat; Huang, Norman; Zhang, Kang; Zhong, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    The pervasive transcription of our genome presents a possibility of revealing new genomic functions by investigating RNA interactions. Current methods for mapping RNA–RNA interactions have to rely on an ‘anchor' protein or RNA and often require molecular perturbations. Here we present the MARIO (Mapping RNA interactome in vivo) technology to massively reveal RNA–RNA interactions from unperturbed cells. We mapped tens of thousands of endogenous RNA–RNA interactions from mouse embryonic stem cells and brain. We validated seven interactions by RNA antisense purification and one interaction using single-molecule RNA–FISH. The experimentally derived RNA interactome is a scale-free network, which is not expected from currently perceived promiscuity in RNA–RNA interactions. Base pairing is observed at the interacting regions between long RNAs, including transposon transcripts, suggesting a class of regulatory sequences acting in trans. In addition, MARIO data reveal thousands of intra-molecule interactions, providing in vivo data on high-order RNA structures. PMID:27338251

  12. siRNA Design Software for a Target Gene-Specific RNA Interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Yuki; Ui-Tei, Kumiko

    2012-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a mechanism through which small interfering RNA (siRNA) induces sequence-specific posttranscriptional gene silencing. RNAi is commonly recognized as a powerful tool not only for functional genomics but also for therapeutic applications. Twenty-one-nucleotide-long siRNA suppresses the expression of the intended gene whose transcript possesses perfect complementarity to the siRNA guide strand. Hence, its silencing effect has been assumed to be extremely specific. However, accumulated evidences revealed that siRNA could downregulate unintended genes with partial complementarities mainly to the seven-nucleotide seed region of siRNA. This phenomenon is referred to as off-target effect. We have revealed that the capability to induce off-target effect is strongly correlated to the thermodynamic stability in siRNA seed-target duplex. For understanding accurate target gene function and successful therapeutic application, it may be critical to select a target gene-specific siRNA with minimized off-target effect. Here we present our siRNA design software for a target-specific RNAi. In addition, we also introduce the software programs open to the public for designing functional siRNAs. PMID:22701467

  13. MicroRNA Expression Is Altered in an Ovalbumin-Induced Asthma Model and Targeting miR-155 with Antagomirs Reveals Cellular Specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian W Plank

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression that are differentially regulated during development and in inflammatory diseases. A role for miRNAs in allergic asthma is emerging and further investigation is required to determine whether they may serve as potential therapeutic targets. We profiled miRNA expression in murine lungs from an ovalbumin-induced allergic airways disease model, and compared expression to animals receiving dexamethasone treatment and non-allergic controls. Our analysis identified 29 miRNAs that were significantly altered during allergic inflammation. Target prediction analysis revealed novel genes with altered expression in allergic airways disease and suggests synergistic miRNA regulation of target mRNAs. To assess the impacts of one induced miRNA on pathology, we targeted miR-155-5p using a specific antagomir. Antagomir administration successfully reduced miR-155-5p expression with high specificity, but failed to alter the disease phenotype. Interestingly, further investigation revealed that antagomir delivery has variable efficacy across different immune cell types, effectively targeting myeloid cell populations, but exhibiting poor uptake in lymphocytes. Our findings demonstrate that antagomir-based targeting of miRNA function in the lung is highly specific, but highlights cell-specificity as a key limitation to be considered for antagomir-based strategies as therapeutics.

  14. RNA polymerase III transcription in cancer: the BRF2 connection

    OpenAIRE

    Schramm Laura; Cabarcas Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    Abstract RNA polymerase (pol) III transcription is responsible for the transcription of small, untranslated RNAs involved in fundamental metabolic processes such mRNA processing (U6 snRNA) and translation (tRNAs). RNA pol III transcription contributes to the regulation of the biosynthetic capacity of a cell and a direct link exists between cancer cell proliferation and deregulation of RNA pol III transcription. Accurate transcription by RNA pol III requires TFIIIB, a known target of regulatio...

  15. Characterizing the transcriptome upon depletion of RNA processing factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herudek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The human genome is pervasively transcribed and produces an enormous amount of non-coding RNA (ncRNA). Compared to protein-coding transcripts, many classes of ncRNAs are very unstable and rapidly degraded by the RNA decay machinery. The RNA exosome complex is a main RNA ‘degrader’ in the human...... nucleus and is responsible for the proper processing and decay of a wide range of RNA molecules. Notably, the RNA exosome complex associates with a plethora of co-factors and activators that assist in the recognition of specific RNA substrates. Although many exosome partners have been characterized...

  16. Spatial and temporal dynamics of the RNA silencing response

    OpenAIRE

    Groenenboom, M.A.C.

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis we studied various aspects of siRNA mediated silencing. siRNA mediated silencing is initiated by the introduction of dsRNA, transgenes and viral infection. Our first goal was to study the ability of the core pathway of RNA silencing to explain transgene and dsRNA induced silencing. To that extend we developed and studied concise models of the RNA silencing pathway. Secondly, we investigated the efficacy of RNA silencing to reduce viral infections, and added a replicating RNA vi...

  17. relA-dependent RNA polymerase activity in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Ryals, J; Bremer, H

    1982-01-01

    Parameters relating to RNA synthesis were measured after a temperature shift from 30 to 42 degrees C, in a relA+ and relA- isogenic pair of Escherichia coli strains containing a temperature-sensitive valyl tRNA synthetase. The following results were obtained: (i) the rRNA chain growth rate increased 2-fold in both strains; (ii) newly synthesized rRNA became unstable in both strains; (iii) the stable RNA gene activity (rRNA and tRNA, measured as stable RNA synthesis rate relative to the total ...

  18. The polymerase of negative-stranded RNA viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Morin, Benjamin; Kranzusch, Philip J.; Rahmeh, Amal A.; Whelan, Sean P. J.

    2013-01-01

    Negative-sense (NS) RNA viruses deliver into cells a mega-dalton RNA-protein complex competent for transcription. Within this complex, the RNA is protected in a nucleocapsid protein (NP) sheath which the viral polymerase negotiates during RNA synthesis. The NP-RNA templates come as nonsegemented (NNS) or segmented (SNS), necessitating distinct strategies for transcription by their polymerases. Atomic-level understanding of the NP-RNA of both NNS and SNS RNA viruses show that the RNA must be t...

  19. Improved native affinity purification of RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batey, Robert T; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2007-08-01

    RNA biochemical or structural studies often require an RNA sample that is chemically pure, and most protocols for its in vitro production use denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to achieve this. Unfortunately, many RNAs do not quantitatively refold into an active conformation after denaturation, creating significant problems for downstream characterization or use. In addition, this traditional purification method is not amenable to studies demanding high-throughput RNA production. Recently, we presented the first general method for producing almost any RNA sequence that employs an affinity tag that is removed during the purification process. Because technical difficulties prevented application of this method to many RNAs, we have developed an improved version that utilizes a different activatable ribozyme and affinity tag that are considerably more robust, rapid, and broadly applicable. PMID:17548432

  20. Fight plant pests using RNA interference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ CAS plant physiologists have recently invented a plant-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) technique to effectively and specifically control the gene expression of the cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera) and stunt its growth.

  1. From the RNA world to the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullenger, Bruce A; Nair, Smita

    2016-06-17

    The study of RNA has continually emphasized the structural and functional versatility of RNA molecules. This versatility has inspired translational and clinical researchers to explore the utility of RNA-based therapeutic agents for a wide variety of medical applications. Several RNA therapeutics, with diverse modes of action, are being evaluated in large late-stage clinical trials, and many more are in early clinical development. Hundreds of patients are enrolled in large trials testing messenger RNAs to combat cancer, small interfering RNAs to treat renal and hepatic disorders, and aptamers to combat ocular and cardiovascular disease. Results from these studies are generating considerable interest among the biomedical community and the public and will be important for the future development of this emerging class of therapeutic agents. PMID:27313039

  2. Biochemistry and Function of the RNA Exosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lubas, Michal Szymon; Chlebowski, Aleksander; Dziembowski, Andrzej;

    2012-01-01

    Discovery of the evolutionary conserved RNA exosome was a milestone in RNA biology. First identified as an activity essential for the processing of ribosomal RNA, the exosome has since proved to be central for RNA processing and degradation in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells....... This multisubunit protein complex consists of a catalytically inert 9-subunit core endowed with associated ribonucleolytic activities and further assisted by compartment-specific cofactors required for its activation and substrate targeting. Although many features of exosome biology are known, fundamental aspects...... are still under investigation. In this chapter, we review current biochemical and functional knowledge of eukaryotic exosomes. After introducing some of their nuclear and cytoplasmic functions, we discuss the structural organization and evolutionary aspects of exosome complexes. Finally, we describe...

  3. A probabilistic model of RNA conformational space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frellsen, Jes; Moltke, Ida; Thiim, Martin; Mardia, Kanti; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Hamelryck, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The increasing importance of non-coding RNA in biology and medicine has led to a growing interest in the problem of RNA 3-D structure prediction. As is the case for proteins, RNA 3-D structure prediction methods require two key ingredients: an accurate energy function and a conformational sampling...... procedure. Both are only partly solved problems. Here, we focus on the problem of conformational sampling. The current state of the art solution is based on fragment assembly methods, which construct plausible conformations by stringing together short fragments obtained from experimental structures. However......, the discrete nature of the fragments necessitates the use of carefully tuned, unphysical energy functions, and their non-probabilistic nature impairs unbiased sampling. We offer a solution to the sampling problem that removes these important limitations: a probabilistic model of RNA structure that...

  4. Symbiont-mediated RNA interference in insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitten, Miranda M. A.; Facey, Paul D.; Del Sol, Ricardo; Fernández-Martínez, Lorena T.; Evans, Meirwyn C.; Mitchell, Jacob J.; Bodger, Owen G.

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) methods for insects are often limited by problems with double-stranded (ds) RNA delivery, which restricts reverse genetics studies and the development of RNAi-based biocides. We therefore delegated to insect symbiotic bacteria the task of: (i) constitutive dsRNA synthesis and (ii) trauma-free delivery. RNaseIII-deficient, dsRNA-expressing bacterial strains were created from the symbionts of two very diverse pest species: a long-lived blood-sucking bug, Rhodnius prolixus, and a short-lived globally invasive polyphagous agricultural pest, western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis). When ingested, the manipulated bacteria colonized the insects, successfully competed with the wild-type microflora, and sustainably mediated systemic knockdown phenotypes that were horizontally transmissible. This represents a significant advance in the ability to deliver RNAi, potentially to a large range of non-model insects. PMID:26911963

  5. Molecular biology Mediating transcription and RNA export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Jonathan D.; Taatjes, Dylan J.

    2016-01-01

    The finding that the Mediator protein complex contributes to messenger RNA export from the nucleus in yeast adds to a growing list of roles for the complex in regulating transcriptional processes. PMID:26450052

  6. The RNA Response to DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giono, Luciana E; Nieto Moreno, Nicolás; Cambindo Botto, Adrián E; Dujardin, Gwendal; Muñoz, Manuel J; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2016-06-19

    Multicellular organisms must ensure genome integrity to prevent accumulation of mutations, cell death, and cancer. The DNA damage response (DDR) is a complex network that senses, signals, and executes multiple programs including DNA repair, cell cycle arrest, senescence, and apoptosis. This entails regulation of a variety of cellular processes: DNA replication and transcription, RNA processing, mRNA translation and turnover, and post-translational modification, degradation, and relocalization of proteins. Accumulated evidence over the past decades has shown that RNAs and RNA metabolism are both regulators and regulated actors of the DDR. This review aims to present a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge on the many interactions between the DNA damage and RNA fields. PMID:26979557

  7. Endonuclease V cleaves at inosines in RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vik, Erik Sebastian; Nawaz, Meh Sameen; Strøm Andersen, Pernille; Fladeby, Cathrine; Bjørås, Magnar; Dalhus, Bjørn; Alseth, Ingrun

    2013-01-01

    Endonuclease V orthologues are highly conserved proteins found in all kingdoms of life. While the prokaryotic enzymes are DNA repair proteins for removal of deaminated adenosine (inosine) from the genome, no clear role for the eukaryotic counterparts has hitherto been described. Here we report that human endonuclease V (ENDOV) and also Escherichia coli endonuclease V are highly active ribonucleases specific for inosine in RNA. Inosines are normal residues in certain RNAs introduced by specific deaminases. Adenosine-to-inosine editing is essential for proper function of these transcripts and defects are linked to various human disease. Here we show that human ENDOV cleaves an RNA substrate containing inosine in a position corresponding to a biologically important site for deamination in the Gabra-3 transcript of the GABA(A) neurotransmitter. Further, human ENDOV specifically incises transfer RNAs with inosine in the wobble position. This previously unknown RNA incision activity may suggest a role for endonuclease V in normal RNA metabolism. PMID:23912683

  8. MicroRNA involvement in glioblastoma pathogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MicroRNAs are endogenously expressed regulatory noncoding RNAs. Altered expression levels of several microRNAs have been observed in glioblastomas. Functions and direct mRNA targets for these microRNAs have been relatively well studied over the last years. According to these data, it is now evident, that impairment of microRNA regulatory network is one of the key mechanisms in glioblastoma pathogenesis. MicroRNA deregulation is involved in processes such as cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle regulation, invasion, glioma stem cell behavior, and angiogenesis. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of miRNA functions in glioblastoma with an emphasis on its significance in glioblastoma oncogenic signaling and its potential to serve as a disease biomarker and a novel therapeutic target in oncology.

  9. MicroRNA Dysregulation in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar ede Faria Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by central nervous system (CNS demyelination and axonal degeneration. Although the cause of MS is still unknown, it is widely accepted that novel drug targets need to focus on both decreasing inflammation and promoting CNS repair. In MS and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE non-coding small microRNAs (miRNAs are dysregulated in the immune and central nervous systems. Since individual miRNAs are able to downregulate multiple targeted mRNA transcripts, even minor changes in miRNA expression may lead to significant alterations in post-transcriptional gene expression. Herein, we review miRNA signatures reported in CNS tissue and immune cells of MS patients and consider how altered miRNA expression may influence MS pathology.

  10. Structural Biology of Bacterial RNA Polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiko S. Murakami

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Since its discovery and characterization in the early 1960s (Hurwitz, J. The discovery of RNA polymerase. J. Biol. Chem. 2005, 280, 42477–42485, an enormous amount of biochemical, biophysical and genetic data has been collected on bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP. In the late 1990s, structural information pertaining to bacterial RNAP has emerged that provided unprecedented insights into the function and mechanism of RNA transcription. In this review, I list all structures related to bacterial RNAP (as determined by X-ray crystallography and NMR methods available from the Protein Data Bank, describe their contributions to bacterial transcription research and discuss the role that small molecules play in inhibiting bacterial RNA transcription.

  11. Sequence fingerprints of microRNA conservation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Shi

    Full Text Available It is known that the conservation of protein-coding genes is associated with their sequences both various species, such as animals and plants. However, the association between microRNA (miRNA conservation and their sequences in various species remains unexplored. Here we report the association of miRNA conservation with its sequence features, such as base content and cleavage sites, suggesting that miRNA sequences contain the fingerprints for miRNA conservation. More interestingly, different species show different and even opposite patterns between miRNA conservation and sequence features. For example, mammalian miRNAs show a positive/negative correlation between conservation and AU/GC content, whereas plant miRNAs show a negative/positive correlation between conservation and AU/GC content. Further analysis puts forward the hypothesis that the introns of protein-coding genes may be a main driving force for the origin and evolution of mammalian miRNAs. At the 5' end, conserved miRNAs have a preference for base U, while less-conserved miRNAs have a preference for a non-U base in mammals. This difference does not exist in insects and plants, in which both conserved miRNAs and less-conserved miRNAs have a preference for base U at the 5' end. We further revealed that the non-U preference at the 5' end of less-conserved mammalian miRNAs is associated with miRNA function diversity, which may have evolved from the pressure of a highly sophisticated environmental stimulus the mammals encountered during evolution. These results indicated that miRNA sequences contain the fingerprints for conservation, and these fingerprints vary according to species. More importantly, the results suggest that although species share common mechanisms by which miRNAs originate and evolve, mammals may develop a novel mechanism for miRNA origin and evolution. In addition, the fingerprint found in this study can be predictor of miRNA conservation, and the findings are helpful

  12. Random k-noncrossing RNA structures

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, William Y. C.; Han, Hillary S. W.; Reidys, Christian M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a combinatorial framework that provides an interpretation of RNA pseudoknot structures as sampling paths of a Markov process. Our results facilitate a variety of applications ranging from the energy-based sampling of pseudoknot structures as well as the ab initio folding via hidden Markov models. Our main result is an algorithm that generates RNA pseudoknot structures with uniform probability. This algorithm serves as a steppingstone to sequence-specific as well as...

  13. Conservation of small RNA pathways in platypus

    OpenAIRE

    Murchison, Elizabeth P.; Kheradpour, Pouya; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Smith, Carly; Hodges, Emily; Xuan, Zhenyu; Kellis, Manolis; Grützner, Frank; Stark, Alexander; Hannon, Gregory J.

    2008-01-01

    Small RNA pathways play evolutionarily conserved roles in gene regulation and defense from parasitic nucleic acids. The character and expression patterns of small RNAs show conservation throughout animal lineages, but specific animal clades also show variations on these recurring themes, including species-specific small RNAs. The monotremes, with only platypus and four species of echidna as extant members, represent the basal branch of the mammalian lineage. Here, we examine the small RNA pat...

  14. The Mitochondrial RNA Landscape of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Turk, Edward M.; Das, Vaijayanti; Seibert, Ryan D.; Andrulis, Erik D.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential organelles that harbor a reduced genome, and expression of that genome requires regulated metabolism of its transcriptome by nuclear-encoded proteins. Despite extensive investigation, a comprehensive map of the yeast mitochondrial transcriptome has not been developed and all of the RNA-metabolizing proteins have not been identified, both of which are prerequisites to elucidating the basic RNA biology of mitochondria. Here, we present a mitochondrial transcriptome ma...

  15. Prebiotic RNA Synthesis by Montmorillonite Catalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohan Jheeta

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes our recent findings on the role of mineral salts in prebiotic RNA synthesis, which is catalyzed by montmorillonite clay minerals. The clay minerals not only catalyze the synthesis of RNA but also facilitate homochiral selection. Preliminary data of these findings have been presented at the “Horizontal Gene Transfer and the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA” conference at the Open University, Milton Keynes, UK, 5–6 September 2013. The objective of this meeting was to recognize the significance of RNA in LUCA. We believe that the prebiotic RNA synthesis from its monomers must have been a simple process. As a first step, it may have required activation of the 5'-end of the mononucleotide with a leaving group, e.g., imidazole in our model reaction (Figure 1. Wide ranges of activating groups are produced from HCN under plausible prebiotic Earth conditions. The final step is clay mineral catalysis in the presence of mineral salts to facilitate selective production of functional RNA. Both the clay minerals and mineral salts would have been abundant on early Earth. We have demonstrated that while montmorillonite (pH 7 produced only dimers from its monomers in water, addition of sodium chloride (1 M enhanced the chain length multifold, as detected by HPLC. The effect of monovalent cations on RNA synthesis was of the following order: Li+ > Na+ > K+. A similar effect was observed with the anions, enhancing catalysis in the following order: Cl− > Br− > I−. The montmorillonite-catalyzed RNA synthesis was not affected by hydrophobic or hydrophilic interactions. We thus show that prebiotic synthesis of RNA from its monomers was a simple process requiring only clay minerals and a small amount of salt.

  16. Protein–RNA interactions: a structural analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Susan; Daley, David T A; Luscombe, Nicholas M.; Berman, Helen M.; Thornton, Janet M.

    2001-01-01

    A detailed computational analysis of 32 protein–RNA complexes is presented. A number of physical and chemical properties of the intermolecular interfaces are calculated and compared with those observed in protein–double-stranded DNA and protein–single-stranded DNA complexes. The interface properties of the protein–RNA complexes reveal the diverse nature of the binding sites. van der Waals contacts played a more prevalent role than hydrogen bond contacts, and prefer...

  17. Force-induced denaturation of RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Gerland, U.; Bundschuh, R.; Hwa, T.

    2001-01-01

    We describe quantitatively a RNA molecule under the influence of an external force exerted at its two ends as in a typical single-molecule experiment. Our calculation incorporates the interactions between nucleotides by using the experimentally-determined free energy rules for RNA secondary structure and models the polymeric properties of the exterior single-stranded regions explicitly as elastic freely-jointed chains. We find that in spite of complicated secondary structures, force-extension...

  18. Rfam: updates to the RNA families database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardner, Paul P; Daub, Jennifer; Tate, John G;

    2008-01-01

    Rfam is a collection of RNA sequence families, represented by multiple sequence alignments and covariance models (CMs). The primary aim of Rfam is to annotate new members of known RNA families on nucleotide sequences, particularly complete genomes, using sensitive BLAST filters in combination wit...... website, methodologies and data used by Rfam are discussed. Rfam is freely available on the Web at http://rfam.sanger.ac.uk/and http://rfam.janelia.org/....

  19. Topology and prediction of RNA pseudoknots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reidys, Christian; Huang, Fenix; Andersen, Jørgen Ellegaard;

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: Several dynamic programming algorithms for predicting RNA structures with pseudoknots have been proposed that differ dramatically from one another in the classes of structures considered. Results: Here, we use the natural topological classification of RNA structures in terms of...... dynamic programming approach for energy minimization, partition function and stochastic sampling. It admits a topology-dependent parametrization of pseudoknot penalties that increases the sensitivity and positive predictive value of predicted base pairs by 10–20% compared with earlier approaches. More...

  20. Prebiotic RNA Synthesis by Montmorillonite Catalysis

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes our recent findings on the role of mineral salts in prebiotic RNA synthesis, which is catalyzed by montmorillonite clay minerals. The clay minerals not only catalyze the synthesis of RNA but also facilitate homochiral selection. Preliminary data of these findings have been presented at the “Horizontal Gene Transfer and the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA)” conference at the Open University, Milton Keynes, UK, 5–6 September 2013. The objective of this meeting was to...

  1. Prebiotic RNA Synthesis by Montmorillonite Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jheeta, Sohan; Joshi, Prakash C.

    2014-08-01

    This review summarizes our recent findings on the role of mineral salts in prebiotic RNA synthesis, which is catalyzed by montmorillonite clay minerals. The clay minerals not only catalyze the synthesis of RNA but also facilitate homochiral selection. Preliminary data of these findings have been presented at the "Horizontal Gene Transfer and the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA)" conference at the Open University, Milton Keynes, UK, 5-6 September 2013. The objective of this meeting was to recognize the significance of RNA in LUCA. We believe that the prebiotic RNA synthesis from its monomers must have been a simple process. As a first step, it may have required activation of the 5'-end of the mononucleotide with a leaving group, e.g., imidazole in our model reaction (Figure 1). Wide ranges of activating groups are produced from HCN under plausible prebiotic Earth conditions. The final step is clay mineral catalysis in the presence of mineral salts to facilitate selective production of functional RNA. Both the clay minerals and mineral salts would have been abundant on early Earth. We have demonstrated that while montmorillonite (pH 7) produced only dimers from its monomers in water, addition of sodium chloride (1 M) enhanced the chain length multifold, as detected by HPLC. The effect of monovalent cations on RNA synthesis was of the following order: Li+ > Na+ > K+. A similar effect was observed with the anions, enhancing catalysis in the following order: Cl- > Br- > I-. The montmorillonite-catalyzed RNA synthesis was not affected by hydrophobic or hydrophilic interactions. We thus show that prebiotic synthesis of RNA from its monomers was a simple process requiring only clay minerals and a small amount of salt.

  2. A Cross-chiral RNA Polymerase Ribozyme

    OpenAIRE

    Sczepanski, Jonathan T.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2014-01-01

    Thirty years ago it was shown that the non-enzymatic, template-directed polymerization of activated mononucleotides proceeds readily in a homochiral system, but is severely inhibited by the presence of the opposing enantiomer. 1 This finding poses a severe challenge for the spontaneous emergence of RNA-based life, and has led to the suggestion that either RNA was preceded by some other genetic polymer that is not subject to chiral inhibition 2 or chiral symmetry was broken through chemical pr...

  3. Hijacking the translation apparatus by RNA viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Bushell, Martin; Sarnow, Peter

    2002-01-01

    As invading viruses do not harbor functional ribosomes in their virions, successful amplification of the viral genomes requires that viral mRNAs compete with cellular mRNAs for the host cell translation apparatus. Several RNA viruses have evolved remarkable strategies to recruit the host translation initiation factors required for the first steps in translation initiation by host cell mRNAs. This review describes the ways that three families of RNA viruses effectively usurp limiting translati...

  4. Rates of spontaneous mutation among RNA viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Drake, J W

    1993-01-01

    Simple methods are presented to estimate rates of spontaneous mutation from mutant frequencies and population parameters in RNA viruses. Published mutant frequencies yield a wide range of mutation rates per genome per replication, mainly because mutational targets have usually been small and, thus, poor samples of the mutability of the average base. Nevertheless, there is a clear central tendency for lytic RNA viruses (bacteriophage Q beta, poliomyelitis, vesicular stomatitis, and influenza A...

  5. RNA Viruses: ROS-Mediated Cell Death

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Latif Reshi; Yi-Che Su; Jiann-Ruey Hong

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are well known for being both beneficial and deleterious. The main thrust of this review is to investigate the role of ROS in ribonucleic acid (RNA) virus pathogenesis. Much evidences has accumulated over the past decade, suggesting that patients infected with RNA viruses are under chronic oxidative stress. Changes to the body's antioxidant defense system, in relation to SOD, ascorbic acid, selenium, carotenoids, and glutathione, have been reported in various tis...

  6. Homologous Recombination in Negative Sense RNA Viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Worobey; Guan-Zhu Han

    2011-01-01

    Recombination is an important process that influences biological evolution at many different levels. More and more homologous recombination events have been reported among negative sense RNA viruses recently. While sporadic authentic examples indicate that homologous recombination does occur, recombination seems to be generally rare or even absent in most negative sense RNA viruses, and most of the homologous recombination events reported in the literature were likely generated artificially d...

  7. Conserved RNA secondary structures promote alternative splicing

    OpenAIRE

    Shepard, PJ; Hertel, KJ

    2008-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is carried out by the spliceosome, which identifies exons and removes intervening introns. Alternative splicing in higher eukaryotes results in the generation of multiple protein isoforms from gene transcripts. The extensive alternative splicing observed implies a flexibility of the spliceosome to identify exons within a given pre-mRNA. To reach this flexibility, splice-site selection in higher eukaryotes has evolved to depend on multiple parameters such as splice-site stren...

  8. Targeting RNA Splicing for Disease Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Havens, Mallory A.; Duelli, Dominik M.; Hastings, Michelle L.

    2013-01-01

    Splicing of pre-messenger RNA into mature messenger RNA is an essential step for expression of most genes in higher eukaryotes. Defects in this process typically affect cellular function and can have pathological consequences. Many human genetic diseases are caused by mutations that cause splicing defects. Furthermore, a number of diseases are associated with splicing defects that are not attributed to overt mutations. Targeting splicing directly to correct disease-associated aberrant splicin...

  9. tRNA Core Hypothesis for the Transition from the RNA World to the Ribonucleoprotein World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savio T. de Farias

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Herein we present the tRNA core hypothesis, which emphasizes the central role of tRNAs molecules in the origin and evolution of fundamental biological processes. tRNAs gave origin to the first genes (mRNA and the peptidyl transferase center (rRNA, proto-tRNAs were at the core of a proto-translation system, and the anticodon and operational codes then arose in tRNAs molecules. Metabolic pathways emerged from evolutionary pressures of the decoding systems. The transitions from the RNA world to the ribonucleoprotein world to modern biological systems were driven by three kinds of tRNAs transitions, to wit, tRNAs leading to both mRNA and rRNA.

  10. The structural basis of pathogenic subgenomic flavivirus RNA (sfRNA) production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Erich G; Costantino, David A; Rabe, Jennifer L; Moon, Stephanie L; Wilusz, Jeffrey; Nix, Jay C; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2014-04-18

    Flaviviruses are emerging human pathogens and worldwide health threats. During infection, pathogenic subgenomic flaviviral RNAs (sfRNAs) are produced by resisting degradation by the 5'→3' host cell exonuclease Xrn1 through an unknown RNA structure-based mechanism. Here, we present the crystal structure of a complete Xrn1-resistant flaviviral RNA, which contains interwoven pseudoknots within a compact structure that depends on highly conserved nucleotides. The RNA's three-dimensional topology creates a ringlike conformation, with the 5' end of the resistant structure passing through the ring from one side of the fold to the other. Disruption of this structure prevents formation of sfRNA during flaviviral infection. Thus, sfRNA formation results from an RNA fold that interacts directly with Xrn1, presenting the enzyme with a structure that confounds its helicase activity. PMID:24744377

  11. RNA targeting by small molecules: Binding of protoberberine, benzophenanthridine and aristolochia alkaloids to various RNA structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gopinatha Suresh Kumar

    2012-07-01

    Studies on RNA targeting by small molecules to specifically control certain cellular functions is an area of remarkable current interest. For this purpose, a basic understanding of the molecular aspects of the interaction of small molecules with various RNA structures is essential. Alkaloids are a group of natural products with potential therapeutic utility, and very recently, their interaction with many RNA structures have been reported. Especially noteworthy are the protoberberines and aristolochia alkaloids distributed widely in many botanical families. Many of the alkaloids of these group exhibit excellent binding affinity to many RNA structures that may be exploited to develop RNA targeted therapeutics. This review attempts to present the current status on the understanding of the interaction of these alkaloids with various RNA structures, mainly highlighting the biophysical aspects.

  12. Influenza virus RNA polymerase: insights into the mechanisms of viral RNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Te Velthuis, Aartjan J W; Fodor, Ervin

    2016-08-01

    The genomes of influenza viruses consist of multiple segments of single-stranded negative-sense RNA. Each of these segments is bound by the heterotrimeric viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and multiple copies of nucleoprotein, which form viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP) complexes. It is in the context of these vRNPs that the viral RNA polymerase carries out transcription of viral genes and replication of the viral RNA genome. In this Review, we discuss our current knowledge of the structure of the influenza virus RNA polymerase, and insights that have been gained into the molecular mechanisms of viral transcription and replication, and their regulation by viral and host factors. Furthermore, we discuss how advances in our understanding of the structure and function of polymerases could help in identifying new antiviral targets. PMID:27396566

  13. MiRNA profiles of prostate carcinoma detected by multi-platform miRNA screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wach, Sven; Nolte, Elke; Szczyrba, Jaroslaw; Stöhr, Robert; Hartmann, Arndt; Orntoft, Torben; Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt; Eltze, Elke; Wieland, Wolf; Keck, Bastian; Ekici, Arif B; Grässer, Friedrich; Wullich, Bernd

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNA molecules that regulate gene expression via posttranscriptional inhibition of protein synthesis. They play a vital role in tumorigenesis. To characterize the diagnostic potential of miRNAs in prostate cancer, a leading cause of cancer mortality, we performed...... screening of miRNA expression profiles. We used commercially available microarrays to establish miRNA expression profiles from a cohort of 20 cancer samples. The expression of selected miRNAs was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR and the identity of miRNA expressing cells was determined by miRNA in...... situ hybridization. We identified 25 miRNAs that showed a significant differential expression in cancer samples. The comparison with previously published data generated by deep sequencing of cDNA libraries of small RNA molecules revealed a concordance rate of 47% among miRNAs identified with both...

  14. Flaviviral Replication Complex: Coordination between RNA Synthesis and 5’-RNA Capping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie J. Klema

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Genome replication in flavivirus requires (— strand RNA synthesis, (+ strand RNA synthesis, and 5’-RNA capping and methylation. To carry out viral genome replication, flavivirus assembles a replication complex, consisting of both viral and host proteins, on the cytoplasmic side of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER membrane. Two major components of the replication complex are the viral non-structural (NS proteins NS3 and NS5. Together they possess all the enzymatic activities required for genome replication, yet how these activities are coordinated during genome replication is not clear. We provide an overview of the flaviviral genome replication process, the membrane-bound replication complex, and recent crystal structures of full-length NS5. We propose a model of how NS3 and NS5 coordinate their activities in the individual steps of (— RNA synthesis, (+ RNA synthesis, and 5’-RNA capping and methylation.

  15. The 5' untranslated region of alfalfa mosaic virus RNA 1 is involved in negative-strand RNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlot, A Corina; Bol, John F

    2003-10-01

    The three genomic RNAs of alfalfa mosaic virus each contain a unique 5' untranslated region (5' UTR). Replacement of the 5' UTR of RNA 1 by that of RNA 2 or 3 yielded infectious replicons. The sequence of a putative 5' stem-loop structure in RNA 1 was found to be required for negative-strand RNA synthesis. A similar putative 5' stem-loop structure is present in RNA 2 but not in RNA 3. PMID:14512577

  16. Bioconjugated gold nanoparticles enhance cellular uptake: A proof of concept study for siRNA delivery in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jianfeng; O'Driscoll, Caitriona M; Holmes, Justin D; Rahme, Kamil

    2016-07-25

    The chemistry of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) facilitates surface modifications and thus these bioengineered NPs have been investigated as a means of delivering a variety of therapeutic cargos to treat cancer. In this study we have developed AuNPs conjugated with targeting ligands to enhance cell-specific uptake in prostate cancer cells, with a purpose of providing efficient non-viral gene delivery systems in the treatment of prostate cancer. As a consequence, two novel AuNPs were synthesised namely AuNPs-PEG-Tf (negatively charged AuNPs with the transferrin targeting ligands) and AuNPs-PEI-FA (positively charged AuNPs with the folate-receptor targeting ligands). Both bioconjugated AuNPs demonstrated low cytotoxicity in prostate cancer cells. The attachment of the targeting ligand Tf to AuNPs successfully achieved receptor-mediated cellular uptake in PC-3 cells, a prostate cancer cell line highly expressing Tf receptors. The AuNPs-PEI-FA effectively complexed small interfering RNA (siRNA) through electrostatic interaction. At the cellular level the AuNPs-PEI-FA specifically delivered siRNA into LNCaP cells, a prostate cancer cell line overexpressing prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA, exhibits a hydrolase enzymic activity with a folate substrate). Following endolysosomal escape the AuNPs-PEI-FA.siRNA formulation produced enhanced endogenous gene silencing compared to the non-targeted formulation. Our results suggest both formulations have potential as non-viral gene delivery vectors in the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:27188645

  17. RNA interference: Antiviral weapon and beyond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quan-Chu Wang; Qing-He Nie; Zhi-Hua Feng

    2003-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a remarkable type of gene regulation based on sequence-specific targeting and degradation of RNA. The term encompasses related pathways found in a broad range of eukaryotic organisms, including fungi, plants, and animals. RNA interference is part of a sophisticated network of interconnected pathways for cellular defense, RNA surveillance, and development and it may become a powerful tool to manipulate gene expression experimentally. RNAi technology is currently being evaluated not only as an extremely powerful instrument for functional genomic analyses, but also as a potentially useful method to develop specific dsRNA based gene-silencing therapeutics.Several laboratories have been interested in using RNAi to control viral infection and many reports in Nature and in Cell show that short interfering (si) RNAs can inhibit infection by HIV-1, polio and hepatitis C viruses in a sequence-specific manner. RNA-based strategies for gene inhibition in mammalian cells have recently been described, which offer the promise of antiviral therapy.

  18. Protein Dynamics in an RNA Binding Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kathleen

    2006-03-01

    Using ^15N NMR relaxation measurements, analyzed with the Lipari-Szabo formalism, we have found that the human U1A RNA binding protein has ps-ns motions in those loops that make contact with RNA. Specific mutations can alter the extent and pattern of motions, and those proteins inevitably lose RNA binding affinity. Proteins with enhanced mobility of loops and termini presumably lose affinity due to increased conformational sampling by those parts of the protein that interact directly with RNA. There is an entropic penalty associated with locking down those elements upon RNA binding, in addition to a loss of binding efficiency caused by the increased number of conformations adopted by the protein. However, in addition to local conformational heterogeneity, analysis of molecular dynamics trajectories by Reorientational Eigenmode Dynamics reveals that loops of the wild type protein undergo correlated motions that link distal sites across the binding surface. Mutations that disrupt correlated motions result in weaker RNA binding, implying that there is a network of interactions across the surface of the protein. (KBH was a Postdoctoral Fellow with Al Redfield from 1985-1990). This work was supported by the NIH (to KBH) and NSF (SAS).

  19. RNA secondary structure prediction using soft computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Shubhra Sankar; Pal, Sankar K

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of RNA structure is invaluable in creating new drugs and understanding genetic diseases. Several deterministic algorithms and soft computing-based techniques have been developed for more than a decade to determine the structure from a known RNA sequence. Soft computing gained importance with the need to get approximate solutions for RNA sequences by considering the issues related with kinetic effects, cotranscriptional folding, and estimation of certain energy parameters. A brief description of some of the soft computing-based techniques, developed for RNA secondary structure prediction, is presented along with their relevance. The basic concepts of RNA and its different structural elements like helix, bulge, hairpin loop, internal loop, and multiloop are described. These are followed by different methodologies, employing genetic algorithms, artificial neural networks, and fuzzy logic. The role of various metaheuristics, like simulated annealing, particle swarm optimization, ant colony optimization, and tabu search is also discussed. A relative comparison among different techniques, in predicting 12 known RNA secondary structures, is presented, as an example. Future challenging issues are then mentioned. PMID:23702539

  20. Ethical Perspectives on RNA Interference Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mette Ebbesen, Thomas G. Jensen, Svend Andersen, Finn Skou Pedersen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference is a mechanism for controlling normal gene expression which has recently begun to be employed as a potential therapeutic agent for a wide range of disorders, including cancer, infectious diseases and metabolic disorders. Clinical trials with RNA interference have begun. However, challenges such as off-target effects, toxicity and safe delivery methods have to be overcome before RNA interference can be considered as a conventional drug. So, if RNA interference is to be used therapeutically, we should perform a risk-benefit analysis. It is ethically relevant to perform a risk-benefit analysis since ethical obligations about not inflicting harm and promoting good are generally accepted. But the ethical issues in RNA interference therapeutics not only include a risk-benefit analysis, but also considerations about respecting the autonomy of the patient and considerations about justice with regard to the inclusion criteria for participation in clinical trials and health care allocation. RNA interference is considered a new and promising therapeutic approach, but the ethical issues of this method have not been greatly discussed, so this article analyses these issues using the bioethical theory of principles of the American bioethicists, Tom L. Beauchamp and James F. Childress.