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Sample records for approach implicates usf1

  1. A Systems Genetics Approach Implicates USF1, FADS3, and Other Causal Candidate Genes for Familial Combined Hyperlipidemia

    OpenAIRE

    Plaisier, Christopher L.; Steve Horvath; Adriana Huertas-Vazquez; Ivette Cruz-Bautista; Herrera, Miguel F.; Teresa Tusie-Luna; Carlos Aguilar-Salinas; Päivi Pajukanta

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesized that a common SNP in the 3' untranslated region of the upstream transcription factor 1 (USF1), rs3737787, may affect lipid traits by influencing gene expression levels, and we investigated this possibility utilizing the Mexican population, which has a high predisposition to dyslipidemia. We first associated rs3737787 genotypes in Mexican Familial Combined Hyperlipidemia (FCHL) case/control fat biopsies, with global expression patterns. To identify sets of co-expressed genes co...

  2. A systems genetics approach implicates USF1, FADS3, and other causal candidate genes for familial combined hyperlipidemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher L Plaisier

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that a common SNP in the 3' untranslated region of the upstream transcription factor 1 (USF1, rs3737787, may affect lipid traits by influencing gene expression levels, and we investigated this possibility utilizing the Mexican population, which has a high predisposition to dyslipidemia. We first associated rs3737787 genotypes in Mexican Familial Combined Hyperlipidemia (FCHL case/control fat biopsies, with global expression patterns. To identify sets of co-expressed genes co-regulated by similar factors such as transcription factors, genetic variants, or environmental effects, we utilized weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA. Through WGCNA in the Mexican FCHL fat biopsies we identified two significant Triglyceride (TG-associated co-expression modules. One of these modules was also associated with FCHL, the other FCHL component traits, and rs3737787 genotypes. This USF1-regulated FCHL-associated (URFA module was enriched for genes involved in lipid metabolic processes. Using systems genetics procedures we identified 18 causal candidate genes in the URFA module. The FCHL causal candidate gene fatty acid desaturase 3 (FADS3 was associated with TGs in a recent Caucasian genome-wide significant association study and we replicated this association in Mexican FCHL families. Based on a USF1-regulated FCHL-associated co-expression module and SNP rs3737787, we identify a set of causal candidate genes for FCHL-related traits. We then provide evidence from two independent datasets supporting FADS3 as a causal gene for FCHL and elevated TGs in Mexicans.

  3. Upstream Transcription Factor 1 (USF1) allelic variants regulate lipoprotein metabolism in women and USF1 expression in atherosclerotic plaque

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Yue-Mei; Hernesniemi, Jussi; Oksala, Niku; Levula, Mari; Raitoharju, Emma; Collings, Auni; Hutri-Kähönen, Nina; Juonala, Markus; Marniemi, Jukka; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Seppälä, Ilkka; Mennander, Ari; Tarkka, Matti; Kangas, Antti J.; Soininen, Pasi

    2014-01-01

    Upstream transcription factor 1 (USF1) allelic variants significantly influence future risk of cardiovascular disease and overall mortality in females. We investigated sex-specific effects of USF1 gene allelic variants on serum indices of lipoprotein metabolism, early markers of asymptomatic atherosclerosis and their changes during six years of follow-up. In addition, we investigated the cis-regulatory role of these USF1 variants in artery wall tissues in Caucasians. In the Cardiovascular Ris...

  4. Upstream Transcription Factor 1 (USF1) allelic variants regulate lipoprotein metabolism in women and USF1 expression in atherosclerotic plaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yue-Mei; Hernesniemi, Jussi; Oksala, Niku; Levula, Mari; Raitoharju, Emma; Collings, Auni; Hutri-Kähönen, Nina; Juonala, Markus; Marniemi, Jukka; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Seppälä, Ilkka; Mennander, Ari; Tarkka, Matti; Kangas, Antti J.; Soininen, Pasi; Salenius, Juha Pekka; Klopp, Norman; Illig, Thomas; Laitinen, Tomi; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Laaksonen, Reijo; Viikari, Jorma; Kähönen, Mika; Raitakari, Olli T.; Lehtimäki, Terho

    2014-01-01

    Upstream transcription factor 1 (USF1) allelic variants significantly influence future risk of cardiovascular disease and overall mortality in females. We investigated sex-specific effects of USF1 gene allelic variants on serum indices of lipoprotein metabolism, early markers of asymptomatic atherosclerosis and their changes during six years of follow-up. In addition, we investigated the cis-regulatory role of these USF1 variants in artery wall tissues in Caucasians. In the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study, 1,608 participants (56% women, aged 31.9 ± 4.9) with lipids and cIMT data were included. For functional study, whole genome mRNA expression profiling was performed in 91 histologically classified atherosclerotic samples. In females, serum total, LDL cholesterol and apoB levels increased gradually according to USF1 rs2516839 genotypes TT < CT < CC and rs1556259 AA < AG < GG as well as according to USF1 H3 (GCCCGG) copy number 0 < 1 < 2. Furthermore, the carriers of minor alleles of rs2516839 (C) and rs1556259 (G) of USF1 gene had decreased USF1 expression in atherosclerotic plaques (P = 0.028 and 0.08, respectively) as compared to non-carriers. The genetic variation in USF1 influence USF1 transcript expression in advanced atherosclerosis and regulates levels and metabolism of circulating apoB and apoB-containing lipoprotein particles in sex-dependent manner, but is not a major determinant of early markers of atherosclerosis. PMID:24722012

  5. Analysis list: USF1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available USF1 Blood,Digestive tract,Liver,Neural,Pluripotent stem cell,Uterus + hg19 http://...dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/USF1.1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/US...F1.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/USF1.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyus...hu-u/hg19/colo/USF1.Blood.tsv,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/US...F1.Digestive_tract.tsv,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/USF1.Liver.tsv

  6. USF1 deficiency activates brown adipose tissue and improves cardiometabolic health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurila, Pirkka-Pekka; Soronen, Jarkko; Kooijman, Sander; Forsström, Saara; Boon, Mariëtte R; Surakka, Ida; Kaiharju, Essi; Coomans, Claudia P; Van Den Berg, Sjoerd A A; Autio, Anu; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Kettunen, Johannes; Tikkanen, Emmi; Manninen, Tuula; Metso, Jari; Silvennoinen, Reija; Merikanto, Krista; Ruuth, Maija; Perttilä, Julia; Mäkelä, Anne; Isomi, Ayaka; Tuomainen, Anita M; Tikka, Anna; Ramadan, Usama Abo; Seppälä, Ilkka; Lehtimäki, Terho; Eriksson, Johan; Havulinna, Aki; Jula, Antti; Karhunen, Pekka J; Salomaa, Veikko; Perola, Markus; Ehnholm, Christian; Lee-Rueckert, Miriam; Van Eck, Miranda; Roivainen, Anne; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Peltonen, Leena; Mervaala, Eero; Jalanko, Anu; Hohtola, Esa; Olkkonen, Vesa M; Ripatti, Samuli; Kovanen, Petri T; Rensen, Patrick C N; Suomalainen, Anu; Jauhiainen, Matti

    2016-01-27

    USF1 (upstream stimulatory factor 1) is a transcription factor associated with familial combined hyperlipidemia and coronary artery disease in humans. However, whether USF1 is beneficial or detrimental to cardiometabolic health has not been addressed. By inactivating USF1 in mice, we demonstrate protection against diet-induced dyslipidemia, obesity, insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis, and atherosclerosis. The favorable plasma lipid profile, including increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and decreased triglycerides, was coupled with increased energy expenditure due to activation of brown adipose tissue (BAT). Usf1 inactivation directs triglycerides from the circulation to BAT for combustion via a lipoprotein lipase-dependent mechanism, thus enhancing plasma triglyceride clearance. Mice lacking Usf1 displayed increased BAT-facilitated, diet-induced thermogenesis with up-regulation of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes, as well as increased BAT activity even at thermoneutrality and after BAT sympathectomy. A direct effect of USF1 on BAT activation was demonstrated by an amplified adrenergic response in brown adipocytes after Usf1 silencing, and by augmented norepinephrine-induced thermogenesis in mice lacking Usf1. In humans, individuals carrying SNP (single-nucleotide polymorphism) alleles that reduced USF1 mRNA expression also displayed a beneficial cardiometabolic profile, featuring improved insulin sensitivity, a favorable lipid profile, and reduced atherosclerosis. Our findings identify a new molecular link between lipid metabolism and energy expenditure, and point to the potential of USF1 as a therapeutic target for cardiometabolic disease. PMID:26819196

  7. Activation of Hepatic Lipase Expression by Oleic Acid: Possible Involvement of USF1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrie J. M. Verhoeven

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Polyunsaturated fatty acids affect gene expression mainly through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs and sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs, but how monounsaturated fatty acids affect gene expression is poorly understood. In HepG2 cells, oleate supplementation has been shown to increase secretion of hepatic lipase (HL. We hypothesized that oleate affects HL gene expression at the transcriptional level. To test this, we studied the effect of oleate on HL promoter activity using HepG2 cells and the proximal HL promoter region (700 bp. Oleate increased HL expression and promoter activity 1.3–2.1 fold and reduced SREBP activity by 50%. Downregulation of SREBP activity by incubation with cholesterol+25-hydroxycholesterol had no effect on HL promoter activity. Overexpression of SREBP2, but not SREBP1, reduced HL promoter activity, which was effected mainly through the USF1 binding site at -307/-312. Oleate increased the nuclear abundance of USF1 protein 2.7 ± 0.6 fold, while USF1 levels were reduced by SREBP2 overexpression. We conclude that oleate increases HL gene expression via USF1. USF1 may be an additional fatty acid sensor in liver cells.

  8. The rs2516839 Polymorphism of the USF1 Gene May Modulate Serum Triglyceride Levels in Response to Cigarette Smoking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Niemiec

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of the USF1 gene (upstream stimulatory factor 1 influence plasma lipid levels. This study aims to determine whether USF1 SNPs interact with traditional risk factors of atherosclerosis to increase coronary artery disease (CAD risk. In the present study serum lipid levels and USF1 gene polymorphisms (rs2516839 and rs3737787 were determined in 470 subjects: 235 patients with premature CAD and 235 controls. A trend of increasing triglycerides (TG levels in relation to the C allele dose of rs2516839 SNP was observed. The synergistic effect of cigarette smoking and C allele carrier state on CAD risk was also found (SIM = 2.69, p = 0.015. TG levels differentiated significantly particular genotypes in smokers (1.53 mmol/L for TT, 1.80 mmol/L for CT and 2.27 mmol/L for CC subjects. In contrast, these differences were not observed in the non-smokers subgroup (1.57 mmol/L for TT, 1.46 mmol/L for CT and 1.49 mmol/L for CC subjects. In conclusion, the rs2516839 polymorphism may modulate serum triglyceride levels in response to cigarette smoking. Carriers of the C allele seem to be particularly at risk of CAD, when exposed to cigarette smoking.

  9. Association of usf1s2 variant in the upstream stimulatory factor 1 gene with premature coronary artery disease in southern population of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najmeh Jouyan

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: It appears that the usf1s2 variant in upstream transcription factor 1 gene is an independent predictor of premature coronary artery disease in our population and applies its effects without affecting blood sugar and lipid levels.

  10. A general integrative genomic feature transcription factor binding site prediction method applied to analysis of USF1 binding in cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Tianyuan

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Transcription factors are key mediators of human complex disease processes. Identifying the target genes of transcription factors will increase our understanding of the biological network leading to disease risk. The prediction of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs is one method to identify these target genes; however, current prediction methods need improvement. We chose the transcription factor upstream stimulatory factor l (USF1 to evaluate the performance of our novel TFBS prediction method because of its known genetic association with coronary artery disease (CAD and the recent availability of USF1 chromatin immunoprecipitation microarray (ChIP-chip results. The specific goals of our study were to develop a novel and accurate genome-scale method for predicting USF1 binding sites and associated target genes to aid in the study of CAD. Previously published USF1 ChIP-chip data for 1 per cent of the genome were used to develop and evaluate several kernel logistic regression prediction models. A combination of genomic features (phylogenetic conservation, regulatory potential, presence of a CpG island and DNaseI hypersensitivity, as well as position weight matrix (PWM scores, were used as variables for these models. Our most accurate predictor achieved an area under the receiver operator characteristic curve of 0.827 during cross-validation experiments, significantly outperforming standard PWM-based prediction methods. When applied to the whole human genome, we predicted 24,010 USF1 binding sites within 5 kilobases upstream of the transcription start site of 9,721 genes. These predictions included 16 of 20 genes with strong evidence of USF1 regulation. Finally, in the spirit of genomic convergence, we integrated independent experimental CAD data with these USF1 binding site prediction results to develop a prioritised set of candidate genes for future CAD studies. We have shown that our novel prediction method, which employs

  11. A promoter polymorphism in the central MHC gene, IKBL, influences the binding of transcription factors USF1 and E47 on disease-associated haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boodhoo, Alvin; Wong, Agnes M L; Williamson, David; Voon, Dominic; Lee, Silvia; Allcock, Richard J N; Price, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    The human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) contains genes that affect susceptibility to numerous immunopathological diseases. We propose that genes in the central MHC between TNFA and HLA-B explain associations between the 8.1 haplotype (HLA-A1, B8, DR3) and disease. IKBL encodes a protein resembling members of the IkappaB protein family that regulate bioavailability of NFkappaB. We have identified two polymorphisms in the 500 bp upstream of the transcription start site of IKBL that distinguish the 8.1 haplotype from the resistant 7.1 haplotype (HLA-A3, B7, DR15). A single nucleotide polymorphism at -62 disrupts a putative E-box binding sequence. To investigate binding of transcription factors in vitro, we exposed 32P-labeled DNA fragments carrying both alleles to nuclear extracts, showing allele-specific binding of nuclear proteins from Jurkat cells but not from other lineages. Supershift studies using Jurkat nuclear extract showed that the E-box protein, E47, and ubiquitously expressed transcription factor USF1 bind to the E-box element of the 7.1 haplotype. Transient transfections of luciferase reporter constructs carrying promoter alleles of IKBL into Jurkat cells showed an effect of IKBL-62 alleles. In contrast, alleles at -421 did not affect transcription factor binding or transcription. IKBL was expressed at low levels in Jurkat cells but not in blood mononuclear cells, and expression declined following mitogenic stimulation. The restriction of IKBL expression to Jurkat cells is consistent with evidence that E47 is expressed in thymocytes and suggests IKBL may affect autoimmunity through an effect on T-cell selection. PMID:15473256

  12. Discursive Study of Religion : Approaches, Definitions, Implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Stuckrad, Kocku

    2013-01-01

    The article explores recent approaches to historical analysis of discourse that have been developed in disciplines such as the sociology of knowledge and historical epistemology. These approaches have only sporadically been taken seriously in the academic study of religion, although they have a grea

  13. Functional variant disrupts insulin induction of USF1: mechanism for USF1-associated dyslipidemias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naukkarinen, J.; Nilsson, E.; Koistinen, H.A.; Soderlund, S.; Lyssenko, V.; Vaag, A.; Poulsen, P.; Groop, L.; Taskinen, M.R.; Peltonen, L.

    2009-01-01

    mutations have been described nor the functional consequences for risk allele carriers been reported at the cellular or tissue level. METHODS AND RESULTS: In this study, we aimed at describing the molecular mechanism through which the strongest associating intronic single-nucleotide polymorphism variant in...

  14. The Religious Implications of an Historical Approach to Jewish Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furst, Rachel

    This project examines the religious implications of an approach to "limmudei kodesh" (primarily the study of Talmud) and "halakhah" (an integration of academic scholarship with traditional Torah study and the evaluation of the educational pros and cons of a curriculum built on such a synthesis). In the concerted effort over the past century to…

  15. Implications of a stochastic approach to air-quality regulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witten, A.J.; Kornegay, F.C.; Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Long, E.C. Jr.; Sharp, R.D.; Walsh, P.J.; Zeighami, E.A.; Gordon, J.S.; Lin, W.L.

    1982-09-01

    This study explores the viability of a stochastic approach to air quality regulations. The stochastic approach considered here is one which incorporates the variability which exists in sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) emissions from coal-fired power plants. Emission variability arises from a combination of many factors including variability in the composition of as-received coal such as sulfur content, moisture content, ash content, and heating value, as well as variability which is introduced in power plant operations. The stochastic approach as conceived in this study addresses variability by taking the SO/sub 2/ emission rate to be a random variable with specified statistics. Given the statistical description of the emission rate and known meteorological conditions, it is possible to predict the probability of a facility exceeding a specified emission limit or violating an established air quality standard. This study also investigates the implications of accounting for emissions variability by allowing compliance to be interpreted as an allowable probability of occurrence of given events. For example, compliance with an emission limit could be defined as the probability of exceeding a specified emission value, such as 1.2 lbs SO/sub 2//MMBtu, being less than 1%. In contrast, compliance is currently taken to mean that this limit shall never be exceeded, i.e., no exceedance probability is allowed. The focus of this study is on the economic benefits offered to facilities through the greater flexibility of the stochastic approach as compared with possible changes in air quality and health effects which could result.

  16. Implications of a Contextualist Approach to Media-Effects Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, David K.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses implications of the contextualism of William McGuire for media-effects research and for the answers media-effects researchers give to questions of social concern. Argues that mass communication research long has contained latent contextualist orientations. (MS)

  17. Macroeconomic implications of virtual shopping : a theoretical approach

    OpenAIRE

    Yetkiner, I. Hakan; Horvath, Csilla

    2000-01-01

    Recently, parallel to developments in the communication technology, online shopping has become increasingly popular for many products, like books, CDs, software, and computers. Most analysts conjecture that the future will witness a wider basket of products and a higher trade volume via the Internet. This paper investigates the economic implications of Internet shopping in a Ricardian equilibrium framework. First, it shows the necessary and sufficient condition for the shift to Internet shopp...

  18. The Interactional Approach to the Teaching of Writing and Its Implications for Second Language Acquisition

    OpenAIRE

    Lies Amin Lestari

    2008-01-01

    Writing is a language skill which is relatively difficult to acquire. A number of efforts have been made to develop the students' writing skill, among others is by applying different approaches to the teaching of writing. This article discusses the interactional approach to the teaching of writing and its implications for second language acquisition.  

  19. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Metabolomics: Clinical Implication and Therapeutic Approach

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    Alok Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is one of the most common motor neurodegenerative disorders, primarily affecting upper and lower motor neurons in the brain, brainstem, and spinal cord, resulting in paralysis due to muscle weakness and atrophy. The majority of patients die within 3–5 years of symptom onset as a consequence of respiratory failure. Due to relatively fast progression of the disease, early diagnosis is essential. Metabolomics offer a unique opportunity to understand the spatiotemporal metabolic crosstalks through the assessment of body fluids and tissue. So far, one of the most challenging issues related to ALS is to understand the variation of metabolites in body fluids and CNS with the progression of disease. In this paper we will review the changes in metabolic profile in response to disease progression condition and also see the therapeutic implication of various drugs in ALS patients.

  20. The BOT approach: Implications for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A much discussed, yet little utilized, alternative method of financing and managing new electric generation facilities in LDCs is the Build Own (Operate) and Transfer (BOT) system. The initial attempts to implement the BOT focussed on fossil fired units, but the allure of the BOT approach has now spilled over to the nuclear power field. The many articles written on the BOT approach have usually been positive and delineated the advantages the new approach could bring to developing and financing new power plants in LDCs. Since so few projects have been implemented under the plan, the pitfalls of implementation still have not been experienced and there have been frustrations in bringing such projects to financial close. LDCs that have attempted to implement the BOT approach for fossil fired units have done so for many reasons. These include a desire to: (a) Attract new foreign equity investment and bank loans; (b) Instill private incentives, including at risk management and technology transfer; (c) Finance ''off balance sheet'' and reduce the ''government'' debt exposure; (d) Fast track construction/plant operations. The BOT approach, which had its beginnings in the early 1980s in the movement toward privatized power, particularly cogeneration and waste-to-energy in the U.S., was adopted in the mid-1980s to finance power projects in LDCs. The projects were to be structured so that the lenders would accept project risks associated with repayment of the debt. While equity investors would be at risk, they could expect a reasonable return on equity. The host government wished to purchase and pay for power consumed, but did not wish to assume sole responsibility for the risks. The BOT approach may have a place in nuclear power development in LDCs. The development of new nuclear power plants including small, simpler, pre-licensed plants may make such plants a more viable option for BOT financing in LDCs. However, these new nuclear technologies are still in the development

  1. Strategic Decision Making for Organizational Sustainability: The Implications of Servant Leadership and Sustainable Leadership Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judita Peterlin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This conceptual paper explores the implications of servant leadership and sustainable leadership for strategic decision making by the top management of an organization. It is argued that a different type of leadership is required if effective strategic decisions are to be made in organizations striving to become more sustainable and that servant leadership and sustainable leadership approaches provide a sound basis to inform these decisions. The contributions of these two leadership approaches are explored, before considering the implications for leadership development. Particularly, the inclusion in leadership development programmes of values based leadership, and the development of integrative thinking, is discussed.

  2. Performativity of economic systems: Approach and implications for taxonomy

    OpenAIRE

    Herrmann-Pillath, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    The paper proposes to ground the taxonomy of economic systems on the identification of strongly performative institutions as distinctive features. I analyse performativity on the basis of the Aoki model of institutions, enriched by current approaches to performativity, which I combine with Searle's notion of a status function. Performativity is conceived as resulting from the conjunction of public representations (sign systems) and behavioral dispositions which channel strategic interactions ...

  3. Multiclass Learning Approaches: A Theoretical Comparison with Implications

    CERN Document Server

    Daniely, Amit; Shwartz, Shai Shalev

    2012-01-01

    We theoretically analyze and compare the following five popular multiclass classification methods: One vs. All, All Pairs, Tree-based classifiers, Error Correcting Output Codes (ECOC) with randomly generated code matrices, and Multiclass SVM. In the first four methods, the classification is based on a reduction to binary classification. We consider the case where the binary classifier comes from a class of VC dimension $d$, and in particular from the class of halfspaces over $\\reals^d$. We analyze both the estimation error and the approximation error of these methods. Our analysis reveals interesting conclusions of practical relevance, regarding the success of the different approaches under various conditions. Our proof technique employs tools from VC theory to analyze the \\emph{approximation error} of hypothesis classes. This is in sharp contrast to most, if not all, previous uses of VC theory, which only deal with estimation error.

  4. Strategic Decision Making for Organizational Sustainability: The Implications of Servant Leadership and Sustainable Leadership Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Judita Peterlin; Noel J. Pearse; Vlado Dimovski

    2015-01-01

    This conceptual paper explores the implications of servant leadership and sustainable leadership for strategic decision making by the top management of an organization. It is argued that a different type of leadership is required if effective strategic decisions are to be made in organizations striving to become more sustainable and that servant leadership and sustainable leadership approaches provide a sound basis to inform these decisions. The contributions of these two leadership approache...

  5. Combining open innovation and agile approaches : implications for IS project managers

    OpenAIRE

    Conboy, Kieran; Morgan, Lorraine

    2010-01-01

    peer-reviewed This paper describes a research-in-progress that explores the applicability and implications of open innovation in a multiple-project environment that employs agile approaches to information systems development. In doing so, it seeks to reveal any resemblance the open innovation model has with the agile process, while simultaneously investigating the challenges of such an approach for project management. This paper argues for a different perspective of project management that...

  6. Taxonomy of Non-Disciplinary Approaches, Applied Implications for Designing Curriculums in Economics

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    A. Paighami

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past, philosophy of education and curriculum designing focused on specialization and single disciplinarity approach .But since the turn of the 20th century, by a vast literature of realizing real and new educational needs and competencies beyond a single discipline, and criticizing the limits of that narrow approach to the reality, defining integrated curriculum or non-disciplinarity approaches has been a topic of discussion .Over the last decades, theorists offered six basic categories for non-disciplinary works :Parallel Disciplinary Approach, Interdisciplinary Approach, Multi-Disciplinary Approach, Cross-Disciplinary Approach, Plural-Disciplinary Approach and Supra/Trans-Disciplinary Approach. Through these approaches, integration seemed to be a matter of degree and method from fundamentally different starting points. Economics also is essentially an integrated discipline from different social sciences, mathematics, economic subjects, knowledge and ideas, and even methodology of natural sciences, and inevitably, its curriculum, educational programs and courses can not be designed unless benefited from these literature and approaches in the curriculum designing subject area. The present article briefly defines the non-disciplinarity approaches and shows their implications, applications and theoretical capacity in designing different possible curriculum and graduate educational courses in Economics.

  7. The effect of sewage effluent on trace metal speciation: implications for the biotic ligand model approach

    OpenAIRE

    Constantino, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and was awarded by Brunel University This research examined the suitability of the biotic ligand model (BLM) approach for assessing environmental risk in surface waters consisting substantially of treated sewage effluent, and the implications of its use within a compliance-based regulatory framework aimed at controlling discharges of metals into the aquatic environment. The results from a series of Daphnia magna acute copp...

  8. Antideuteron production and the physics of coalescence: implications of a new approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the framework of coalescence model, the problem of antideuteron (D¯) production in some high energy nuclear collisions has here been studied with the help of a new combination of models (NCM) outlined in some detail in the text. The totality of the approach, including one useful parametrization, adopted here leads us to obtain finally some theoretical results which are modestly in agreement with the measured data on various aspects of antideuteron production in both Pb + Pb and Au + Au collisions at moderately high energies. The implications of all this are discussed at the end of the paper. (author)

  9. Contextual approach to technology assessment: Implications for one-factor fix solutions to complex social problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, L. H.

    1975-01-01

    The contextual approach is discussed which undertakes to demonstrate that technology assessment assists in the identification of the full range of implications of taking a particular action and facilitates the consideration of alternative means by which the total affected social problem context might be changed by available project options. It is found that the social impacts of an application on participants, institutions, processes, and social interests, and the accompanying interactions may not only induce modifications in the problem contest delineated for examination with respect to the design, operations, regulation, and use of the posited application, but also affect related social problem contexts.

  10. GROWTH ECONOMIC MODELS AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS TO FINANCIAL POLICY DURING TRANSITION. ATHEORETICAL APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BOGDAN FIRTESCU

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available During 1989, the moment of changes in Eastern Europe, in socialist countries political system were transformed, by renouncing communism, and adopting market based economy. The process had major implications on economic systems in countries such Romania, Bulgaria, Hungary, Poland, Czechoslovakia, that from that moment engaged in wide-ranging political, social, economic and institutional reforms. The year 1989 also marked the beginning of the transition from socialist economy to a market economy to centralized countries mentioned, a process with profound implications on the economic system and financial default. This important structural reforms necessary functioning new economic framework and assumed behavior modification specific old economy, focused on socialist property, presumably achieve in conditions of relative stability allowing rapidly and sustainable growth. This paper takes into discussion some models used by FMI and World Bank (WB that had implications on financial policy applied in transition country, referring to absorption theory, monetary approach to balance of payment and stabilization programs, as short terms models, respectively.

  11. Interconnection between 802.15.4 Devices and IPv6: Implications and Existing Approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Hossen, Md Sakhawat; Khan, Razib Hayat; Azfar, Abdullah

    2010-01-01

    The increasing role of home automation in routine life and the rising demand for sensor networks enhanced wireless personal area networks (WPANs) development, pervasiveness of wireless & wired network, and research. Soon arose the need of implementing the Internet Protocol in these devices in order to WPAN standards, raising the way for questions on how to provide seamless communication between wired and wireless technologies. After a quick overview of the Low-rate WPAN standard (IEEE 802.15.4) and the Zigbee stack, this paper focuses on understanding the implications when interconnecting low powered IEEE 802.15.4 devices and a wired IPv6 domain. Subsequently the focus will be on existing approaches to connect LoWPAN devices to the internet and on how these approaches try to solve these challenges, concluding with a critical analysis of interoperability problems.

  12. Approaches to Learning of Medical Students and Practising Physicians: Some Empirical Evidence and Its Implications for Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newble, David I.; Hejka, Eugene J.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews research efforts in learning styles and approaches to learning focusing on effects of the medical school environment. Addresses teaching, curriculum, assessment, and implications for undergraduate, postgraduate, and continuing education. Concludes that medical students should be using the deep approach to learning although traditional…

  13. Approaches to a cortical vision prosthesis: implications of electrode size and placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Breanne P.; Ashmont, Kari R.; House, Paul A.; Greger, Bradley

    2016-04-01

    Objective. In order to move forward with the development of a cortical vision prosthesis, the critical issues in the field must be identified. Approach. To begin this process, we performed a brief review of several different cortical and retinal stimulation techniques that can be used to restore vision. Main results. Intracortical microelectrodes and epicortical macroelectrodes have been evaluated as the basis of a vision prosthesis. We concluded that an important knowledge gap necessitates an experimental in vivo performance evaluation of microelectrodes placed on the surface of the visual cortex. A comparison of the level of vision restored by intracortical versus epicortical microstimulation is necessary. Because foveal representation in the primary visual cortex involves more cortical columns per degree of visual field than does peripheral vision, restoration of foveal vision may require a large number of closely spaced microelectrodes. Based on previous studies of epicortical macrostimulation, it is possible that stimulation via surface microelectrodes could produce a lower spatial resolution, making them better suited for restoring peripheral vision. Significance. The validation of epicortical microstimulation in addition to the comparison of epicortical and intracortical approaches for vision restoration will fill an important knowledge gap and may have important implications for surgical strategies and device longevity. It is possible that the best approach to vision restoration will utilize both epicortical and intracortical microstimulation approaches, applying them appropriately to different visual representations in the primary visual cortex.

  14. Talent or Talents: Intellectual Exceptionality Approaches and their Implications in the Educational Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Javier Barraza-López

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper points out the importance that, in the practice, the educational system gives to the academic talent, leaving in a second place other forms of talent, for example, those comprised in the multiple intelligence or emotional intelligence theories. The purpose of this paper is to present different underlying approaches of talent coexisting in education at various levels, demonstrating some of their potential implications in the educational practice and in the academic achievement of students. In this regard, the emergence of recent theories –as the multiple intelligence Gardner (2001, and the emotional intelligence Mayer and Salovey (1997 theories– has put into question the traditional intelligence approaches, which have influenced the concept and practice of teachers concerning a successful formal education. All of this tends to increase the gap between “smart” and “normal”, perpetuating the segregation culture through academic means. Based on this, this paper exposes the need to take into consideration the students’ different skills and talents when planning and evaluating the teaching-learning process, and enhance teaching training through didactic and evaluation methodologies to achieve such integration. For this, the present study provides some evaluation and classroom methodologies. The study also highlights the need to develop, systematize, and validate a broader range of teaching-learning methodologies that can be transmitted to the faculty, in order to gradually move towards a more inclusive, higher quality education.

  15. The risk implications of approaches to setting soil remediation goals at hazardous waste contaminated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An integrated exposure and carcinogenic risk assessment model for organic contamination in soil, SoilRisk, was developed and used for evaluating the risk implications of both site-specific and uniform-concentration approaches to setting soil remediation goals at hazardous-waste-contaminated sites. SoilRisk was applied to evaluate the uncertainty in the risk estimate due to uncertainty in site conditions at a representative site. It was also used to evaluate the variability in risk across a region of sites that can occur due to differences in site characteristics that affect contaminant transport and fate when a uniform concentration approach is used. In evaluating regional variability, Ross County, Ohio and the State of Ohio were used as examples. All analyses performed considered four contaminants (benzene, trichloroethylene (TCE), chlordane, and benzo[a]pyrene (BAP)) and four exposure scenarios (commercial, recreational and on- and offsite residential). Regardless of whether uncertainty in risk at a single site or variability in risk across sites was evaluated, the exposure scenario specified and the properties of the target contaminant had more influence than variance in site parameters on the resulting variance and magnitude of the risk estimate. In general, variance in risk was found to be greater for the relatively less degradable and more mobile of the chemicals studied (TCE and chlordane) than for benzene which is highly degradable and BAP which is very immobile in the subsurface

  16. The risk implications of approaches to setting soil remediation goals at hazardous waste contaminated sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labieniec, P.A.

    1994-08-01

    An integrated exposure and carcinogenic risk assessment model for organic contamination in soil, SoilRisk, was developed and used for evaluating the risk implications of both site-specific and uniform-concentration approaches to setting soil remediation goals at hazardous-waste-contaminated sites. SoilRisk was applied to evaluate the uncertainty in the risk estimate due to uncertainty in site conditions at a representative site. It was also used to evaluate the variability in risk across a region of sites that can occur due to differences in site characteristics that affect contaminant transport and fate when a uniform concentration approach is used. In evaluating regional variability, Ross County, Ohio and the State of Ohio were used as examples. All analyses performed considered four contaminants (benzene, trichloroethylene (TCE), chlordane, and benzo[a]pyrene (BAP)) and four exposure scenarios (commercial, recreational and on- and offsite residential). Regardless of whether uncertainty in risk at a single site or variability in risk across sites was evaluated, the exposure scenario specified and the properties of the target contaminant had more influence than variance in site parameters on the resulting variance and magnitude of the risk estimate. In general, variance in risk was found to be greater for the relatively less degradable and more mobile of the chemicals studied (TCE and chlordane) than for benzene which is highly degradable and BAP which is very immobile in the subsurface.

  17. An immanent approach to death: Theological implications of a secular view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornel W. du Toit

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The thesis of this article is that contemporary people are increasingly ousting death from their consciousness and focussing instead on the complexities of life in a context of horizontal transcendence. This replaces the Pauline notion that death is the fruit of sin and will be overcome if its real cause, sin, is vanquished through the death and resurrection of Christ. The article shows how religions, the state and civil society have abused human fear of death in the course of history. It examines the way science has ‘biologised’ death and the impact this has on concepts such as soul, the hereafter and identity. Reflection on the hereafter tends to make light of death. The article deals with some philosophical models (especially those of Hegel and Heidegger that incorporate the negative (non-being, death into life (the subject. I then outline a model incorporating death into life at a horizontal transcendental level in order to make death plausible. The example cited is Sölle’s work. The article concludes with a discussion of some theological implications of an immanent approach to death.

  18. An unbiased Bayesian approach to functional connectomics implicates social-communication networks in autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Venkataraman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI studies reveal a complex pattern of hyper- and hypo-connectivity in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD. Whereas rsfMRI findings tend to implicate the default mode network and subcortical areas in ASD, task fMRI and behavioral experiments point to social dysfunction as a unifying impairment of the disorder. Here, we leverage a novel Bayesian framework for whole-brain functional connectomics that aggregates population differences in connectivity to localize a subset of foci that are most affected by ASD. Our approach is entirely data-driven and does not impose spatial constraints on the region foci or dictate the trajectory of altered functional pathways. We apply our method to data from the openly shared Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (ABIDE and pinpoint two intrinsic functional networks that distinguish ASD patients from typically developing controls. One network involves foci in the right temporal pole, left posterior cingulate cortex, left supramarginal gyrus, and left middle temporal gyrus. Automated decoding of this network by the Neurosynth meta-analytic database suggests high-level concepts of “language” and “comprehension” as the likely functional correlates. The second network consists of the left banks of the superior temporal sulcus, right posterior superior temporal sulcus extending into temporo-parietal junction, and right middle temporal gyrus. Associated functionality of these regions includes “social” and “person”. The abnormal pathways emanating from the above foci indicate that ASD patients simultaneously exhibit reduced long-range or inter-hemispheric connectivity and increased short-range or intra-hemispheric connectivity. Our findings reveal new insights into ASD and highlight possible neural mechanisms of the disorder.

  19. Spatialised fate factors for nitrate in catchments: modelling approach and implication for LCA results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basset-Mens, Claudine; Anibar, Lamiaa; Durand, Patrick; van der Werf, Hayo M G

    2006-08-15

    The challenge for environmental assessment tools, such as Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is to provide a holistic picture of the environmental impacts of a given system, while being relevant both at a global scale, i.e., for global impact categories such as climate change, and at a smaller scale, i.e., for regional impact categories such as aquatic eutrophication. To this end, the environmental mechanisms between emission and impact should be taken into account. For eutrophication in particular, which is one of the main impacts of farming systems, the fate factor of eutrophying pollutants in catchments, and particularly of nitrate, reflects one of these important and complex environmental mechanisms. We define this fate factor as: the ratio of the amount of nitrate at the outlet of the catchment over the nitrate emitted from the catchment's soils. In LCA, this fate factor is most often assumed equal to 1, while the observed fate factor is generally less than 1. A generic approach for estimating the range of variation of nitrate fate factors in a region of intensive agriculture was proposed. This approach was based on the analysis of different catchment scenarios combining different catchment types and different effective rainfalls. The evolution over time of the nitrate fate factor as well as the steady state fate factor for each catchment scenario was obtained using the INCA simulation model. In line with the general LCA model, the implications of the steady state fate factors for nitrate were investigated for the eutrophication impact result in the framework of an LCA of pig production. A sensitivity analysis to the fraction of nitrate lost as N(2)O was presented for the climate change impact category. This study highlighted the difference between the observed fate factor at a given time, which aggregates both storage and transformation processes and a "steady state fate factor", specific to the system considered. The range of steady state fate factors obtained for

  20. Exploring shopper marketing approach implications on brand communication at the point-of-purchase: an expert’s opinion qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Silveira, Paulo Duarte; Marreiros, Cristina Galamba

    2014-01-01

    Shopper marketing is a recent approach to marketing. Since shopper marketing is in the early stages of development, it is also an emerging research field and, consequently, questions and challenges to this approach are emerging across all the marketing-mix variables. This paper addresses the implications of adopting a shopper marketing view on the communication variable. Specifically, the purpose of the research is to study the implications of the shopper marketing approach on ...

  1. Purchasing-power-parity (PPP) approach to energy-efficiency measurement: implications for energy and environmental policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The weaknesses of the traditional measure of national output are well known and, in recent years, efforts to find more appropriate alternatives have intensified. One such methodology is the PPP approach which may capture the real value of the GDP. In general, this approach raises the incomes of developing countries by a substantial amount, and this has serious implications for energy indicators on which policies are usually based. A further problem is that non-commercial energy is usually left out of energy-intensity calculations. We analyze the issue of energy-efficiency and carry out calculations based on three approaches: the traditional approach, the PPP-based income approach and an approach which includes non-commercial energy. The results confirm the limitations of using the PPP approach, as its results in a spuriously high energy-efficiency level suggesting high technological sophistication for developing countries. The inclusion of non-commercial energy gives more complete picture. The main conclusion is that applying the PPP method in energy-intensity calculations may be misleading. (Author)

  2. The 'materials balance approach' to pollution: its origin, implications and acceptance

    OpenAIRE

    Pethig, Rüdiger

    2003-01-01

    In their seminal paper on "production, consumption and externalities" (AER, 1969), Ayres and Kneese initiated a research program on comprehensive analysis and management of residuals and pollution based on two pillars: the study of the residuals-generating materials flow subject to the mass balance principle and the concept of pervasive (pollution) externality. The present paper aims at (i) recalling the origin of that program, (ii) sheding some light on its principal implications from today'...

  3. An unbiased Bayesian approach to functional connectomics implicates social-communication networks in autism

    OpenAIRE

    Archana Venkataraman; Duncan, James S.; Daniel Y.-J. Yang; Pelphrey, Kevin A.

    2015-01-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) studies reveal a complex pattern of hyper- and hypo-connectivity in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Whereas rsfMRI findings tend to implicate the default mode network and subcortical areas in ASD, task fMRI and behavioral experiments point to social dysfunction as a unifying impairment of the disorder. Here, we leverage a novel Bayesian framework for whole-brain functional connectomics that aggregates population differ...

  4. Building a quality culture in the Office of Space Flight: Approach, lessons learned and implications for the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, C. Shannon

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the approach and lessons learned by the Office of Space Flight (OSF), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), in its introduction of quality. In particular, the experience of OSF Headquarters is discussed as an example of an organization within NASA that is considering both the business and human elements of the change and the opportunities the quality focus presents to improve continuously. It is hoped that the insights shared will be of use to those embarking upon similar cultural changes. The paper is presented in the following parts: the leadership challenge; background; context of the approach to quality; initial steps; current initiatives; lessons learned; and implications for the future.

  5. Socially Response-Able Mathematics Education: Implications of an Ethical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atweh, Bill; Brady, Kate

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses an approach to mathematics education based on the concept of ethical responsibility. It argues that an ethical approach to mathematics teaching lays the theoretical foundations for social justice concerns in the discipline. The paper develops a particular understanding of ethical responsibility based on the writings of Emanuel…

  6. The CWKB approach to non-reflecting potential and cosmological implications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Biswas; I Chowdhury

    2004-06-01

    We discuss the method of calculating the reflection coeffcient using complex trajectory WKB (CWKB) approximation to understand the non-reflecting nature of the potential $U(x) = -U_{0}= \\text{cosh}^{2}(x=a)$. We show that the repeated reflections between the turning points whose paths are in conformity with Bogolubov transformation technique are essential in obtaining the non-reflecting condition. We also discuss the implications of the results when applied to the particle production scenario. We use the CWKB technique developed by one of the authors (SB) to obtain the results which agree very well with those obtained by exact quantum mechanical calculations.

  7. A bottom-up approach to technological development and its management implications in a commercial fishery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eigaard, Ole Ritzau

    2009-01-01

    characteristics was tested based on the definition of a technological index. Using a proportional odds model, vessel length accounted for most of the variation in technological level on board, with odds of 1.17 (95% confidence interval: 1.16–1.18) of a higher index value for each increase in vessel length of 1 m......Analyses of electronic equipment on board Danish trawlers and gillnetters show that newer, larger vessels have a significantly higher "technological level" than older, smaller vessels. A hypothesis of linkage between fish-finding and navigation technology on board and standard vessel....... Vessel age was also significantly correlated with index values. In considering the technological index as an indicator of fishing power, the results have important implications for capacity-reduction schemes intended to reduce harvest pressure on fish stocks. In the course of such structural management...

  8. Professional approaches in clinical judgements among senior and junior doctors: implications for medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilhammar Ewa

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical experience has traditionally been highly valued in medical education and clinical healthcare. On account of its multi-faceted nature, clinical experience is mostly difficult to articulate, and is mainly expressed in clinical situations as professional approaches. Due to retirement, hospitals in Scandinavia will soon face a substantial decrease in the number of senior specialist doctors, and it has been discussed whether healthcare will suffer an immense loss of experienced-based knowledge when this senior group leaves the organization. Both senior specialists and junior colleagues are often involved in clinical education, but the way in which these two groups vary in professional approaches and contributions to clinical education has not been so well described. Cognitive psychology has contributed to the understanding of how experience may influence professional approaches, but such studies have not included the effect of differences in position and responsibilities that junior and senior doctors hold in clinical healthcare. In the light of the discussion above, it is essential to describe the professional approaches of senior doctors in relation to those of their junior colleagues. This study therefore aims to describe and compare the professional approaches of junior and senior doctors when making clinical judgements. Methods Critical incident technique was used in interviews with nine senior doctors and nine junior doctors in internal medicine. The interviews were subjected to qualitative content analysis. Result Senior and junior doctors expressed a variety of professional approaches in clinical judgement as follows: use of theoretical knowledge, use of prior experience of cases and courses of events, use of ethical and moral values, meeting and communicating with the patient, focusing on available information, relying on their own ability, getting support and guidance from others and being directed by the

  9. Introducing the improved Heaviside approach to partial fraction decomposition to undergraduate students: results and implications from a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Yiu-Kwong

    2012-10-01

    Partial fraction decomposition is a useful technique often taught at senior secondary or undergraduate levels to handle integrations, inverse Laplace transforms or linear ordinary differential equations, etc. In recent years, an improved Heaviside's approach to partial fraction decomposition was introduced and developed by the author. An important feature of this approach is that there is no need to solve a system of linear equations or to use differentiations to find the unknown coefficients of the partial fractions. In order to study its potential application in mathematics education at the undergraduate level, a pilot study of tryout at the Hong Kong Institute of Education has been conducted. The data are collected via quizzes, questionnaires and face-to-face interviews. In this article, the results and implications will be discussed. In general, according to the responses and feedbacks from the instructors and students concerned, the improved Heaviside approach is suitable to be introduced at the undergraduate level, as an alternative to the method of undetermined coefficients described in common undergraduate mathematics textbooks.

  10. Outcomes and Implications of One Teacher's Approach to Context-Based Science in the Middle Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Donna; Winner, Evan; Ginns, Ian

    2011-01-01

    In Australia, there is a crisis in science education with students becoming disengaged with canonical science in the middle years of schooling. One recent initiative that aims to improve student interest and motivation without diminishing conceptual understanding is the context-based approach. Contextual units that connect the canonical science…

  11. Psychological Contracts and Their Implications for Commitment: A Feature-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnis, Kate J.; Meyer, John P.; Feldman, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Two studies were conducted to examine the link between employee perceptions of the psychological contract and their affective and normative commitments to the organization. The authors adapt a new approach to the study of psychological contracts by developing a generalizable measure of "contract features" (e.g., scope; time frame). In Study 1…

  12. An Interpersonal Psychotherapy Approach to Counseling Student Athletes: Clinical Implications of Athletic Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heird, Emily Benton; Steinfeldt, Jesse A.

    2013-01-01

    Research has shown that disruptive circumstances in an athlete's career (temporary injury, permanent injury, retirement) can pose significant difficulties, especially if the athlete has developed a salient athletic identity at the expense of a multidimensional self-concept. The authors present an interpersonal psychotherapy approach to case…

  13. Students' Conceptions of Nothingness and Their Implications for a Competency-Driven Approach to the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegler, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Competency has been the buzzword of higher education for at least a decade. The reasonable approach of describing what students should be able to do after completing coursework, however, falls short of the fact that mathematics, like any subject matter, contains inherent difficulties for students. Students usually need assistance in overcoming…

  14. Connections between Modes of Thinking and Learning Approaches: Implications for Education and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Önen, Emine

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine connections between modes of thinking and approaches to learning. Participants were 1490 students attending to 9 high schools located in Ankara. The Style of Learning and Thinking-Youth Form and Revised Version of Learning Process Questionnaire were administered to these students. The connections between modes of…

  15. Disorders of Sex Development in Indonesia: Natural course and the implications of a stepwise multidisciplinary approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.Z. Juniarto (Achmad)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This thesis elaborates the stepwise diagnostic procedure in DSD patients using a multidiscipline approach to obtain the diagnosis of these patients which includes clinical assessment, hormonal, genetic, and pathological investigations, so that it is beneficial as the ba

  16. Economic approach to assess the forest carbon implications of biomass energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigneault, Adam; Sohngen, Brent; Sedjo, Roger

    2012-06-01

    There is widespread concern that biomass energy policy that promotes forests as a supply source will cause net carbon emissions. Most of the analyses that have been done to date, however, are biological, ignoring the effects of market adaptations through substitution, net imports, and timber investments. This paper uses a dynamic model of forest and land use management to estimate the impact of United States energy policies that emphasize the utilization of forest biomass on global timber production and carbon stocks over the next 50 years. We show that when market factors are included in the analysis, expanded demand for biomass energy increases timber prices and harvests, but reduces net global carbon emissions because higher wood prices lead to new investments in forest stocks. Estimates are sensitive to assumptions about whether harvest residues and new forestland can be used for biomass energy and the demand for biomass. Restricting biomass energy to being sourced only from roundwood on existing forestland can transform the policy from a net sink to a net source of emissions. These results illustrate the importance of capturing market adjustments and a large geographic scope when measuring the carbon implications of biomass energy policies. PMID:22515911

  17. A Systems Approach Identifies Networks and Genes Linking Sleep and Stress: Implications for Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Jiang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Sleep dysfunction and stress susceptibility are comorbid complex traits that often precede and predispose patients to a variety of neuropsychiatric diseases. Here, we demonstrate multilevel organizations of genetic landscape, candidate genes, and molecular networks associated with 328 stress and sleep traits in a chronically stressed population of 338 (C57BL/6J × A/J F2 mice. We constructed striatal gene co-expression networks, revealing functionally and cell-type-specific gene co-regulations important for stress and sleep. Using a composite ranking system, we identified network modules most relevant for 15 independent phenotypic categories, highlighting a mitochondria/synaptic module that links sleep and stress. The key network regulators of this module are overrepresented with genes implicated in neuropsychiatric diseases. Our work suggests that the interplay among sleep, stress, and neuropathology emerges from genetic influences on gene expression and their collective organization through complex molecular networks, providing a framework for interrogating the mechanisms underlying sleep, stress susceptibility, and related neuropsychiatric disorders.

  18. IMPLICATIONS OF MULT-SENSORY APPROACH FOR CHILD L2 VOCABULARY ACQUISITION

    OpenAIRE

    Zawodniak, Joanna

    2001-01-01

    Teaching a foreign language to young learners requires of the teacher a special ability to involve them in a variety of activities explicitly accommodating their need for whole-person enjoyment and implicitly fostering their L2 knowledge. This complex pedagogic task is likely to be achieved with reliance on the multi-sensory approach which is recommended by the European Co-operation Programs as an alternative L2 teaching trend encompassing universal, proactive qualities and educational div...

  19. Review of Family Business Definitions: Cluster Approach and Implications of Heterogeneous Application for Family Business Research

    OpenAIRE

    Henrik Harms

    2014-01-01

    This review article displays several attempts to define family businesses as well as a systematization approach to get new insights about the relationship between family business definitions and their application under different conditions such as legal framework, culture or regional understanding of family. Potential explanations for the ambiguity of what is meant by family firms are revealed by reviewing 267 journal articles. A consensus about the object of investigation would result in a d...

  20. AN EXTENDED APPROACH TO E-INCLUSION AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR ROMANIA

    OpenAIRE

    Viorel Nita

    2011-01-01

    Depending on the existing social patterns and trends, development of information society creates new opportunities and risks and restructures the established areas of public policy. For example, e-inclusion becomes more and more today's predominant form of social inclusion. Despite the diversity of approaches developed, its intrinsic multi-dimension nature and the challenges posed by the continuous evolution of global digital technologies and networks make e-inclusion a problematic scientific...

  1. Challenges and implications of global modeling approaches that are alternatives to using constant plant functional types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodegom, P. V.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years a number of approaches have been developed to provide alternatives to the use of plant functional types (PFTs) with constant vegetation characteristics for simulating vegetation responses to climate changes. In this presentation, an overview of those approaches and their challenges is given. Some new approaches aim at removing PFTs altogether by determining the combination of vegetation characteristics that would fit local conditions best. Others describe the variation in traits within PFTs as a function of environmental drivers, based on community assembly principles. In the first approach, after an equilibrium has been established, vegetation composition and its functional attributes can change by allowing the emergence of a new type that is more fit. In the latter case, changes in vegetation attributes in space and time as assumed to be the result intraspecific variation, genetic adaptation and species turnover, without quantifying their respective importance. Hence, it is assumed that -by whatever mechanism- the community as a whole responds without major time lags to changes in environmental drivers. Recently, we showed that intraspecific variation is highly species- and trait-specific and that none of the current hypotheses on drivers of this variation seems to hold. Also genetic adaptation varies considerably among species and it is uncertain whether it will be fast enough to cope with climate change. Species turnover within a community is especially fast in herbaceous communities, but much slower in forest communities. Hence, it seems that assumptions made may not hold for forested ecosystems, but solutions to deal with this do not yet exist. Even despite the fact that responsiveness of vegetation to environmental change may be overestimated, we showed that -upon implementation of trait-environment relationships- major changes in global vegetation distribution are projected, to similar extents as to those without such responsiveness.

  2. Predicting future protection of respirator users: Statistical approaches and practical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chengcheng; Harber, Philip; Su, Jing

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a statistical approach for predicting a respirator user's fit factor in the future based upon results from initial tests. A statistical prediction model was developed based upon joint distribution of multiple fit factor measurements over time obtained from linear mixed effect models. The model accounts for within-subject correlation as well as short-term (within one day) and longer-term variability. As an example of applying this approach, model parameters were estimated from a research study in which volunteers were trained by three different modalities to use one of two types of respirators. They underwent two quantitative fit tests at the initial session and two on the same day approximately six months later. The fitted models demonstrated correlation and gave the estimated distribution of future fit test results conditional on past results for an individual worker. This approach can be applied to establishing a criterion value for passing an initial fit test to provide reasonable likelihood that a worker will be adequately protected in the future; and to optimizing the repeat fit factor test intervals individually for each user for cost-effective testing. PMID:26771896

  3. Determination of hemispheric emotional valence in individual subjects: A new approach with research and therapeutic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polcari Ann

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Much has been theorized about the emotional properties of the hemispheres. Our review of the dominant hypotheses put forth by Schore, Joseph, Davidson, and Harmon-Jones on hemispheric emotional valences (HEV shows that none are supported by robust data. Instead, we propose that individual's hemispheres are organized to have differing HEVs that can be lateralized in either direction. Methods Probe auditory evoked potentials (AEP recorded during a neutral and an upsetting memory were used to assess HEV in 28 (20 F right-handed subjects who were either victims of childhood maltreatment (N = 12 or healthy controls. In a sub-population, we determined HEV by emotional response to lateral visual field stimulation (LVFS, in which vision is limited to one, then the other hemifield. We compare a number of morphometric and functional brain measures between individuals who have right-negative versus left-negative HEV. Results Using AEPs to determine HEV, we found 62% of controls and 67% of maltreated subjects had right negative HEV. There was a strong interaction between HEV-laterality and gender, which together accounted for 60% of individual variability in total grey matter volume (GMV. HEV-laterality was associated with differences in hippocampal volume, amygdala/hippocampal ratios, and measures of verbal, visual and global memory. HEV-laterality was associated also with different constellations of symptoms comparing maltreated subjects to controls. Emotional response to LVFS provided a convenient and complementary measure of HEV-laterality that correlated significantly with the HEVs determined by AEPs. Conclusion Our findings suggest that HEV-laterality, like handedness or gender, is an important individual difference with significant implications for brain and behavioral research, and for guiding lateralized treatments such as rTMS.

  4. The refugee crisis in Africa and implications for health and disease: a political ecology approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalipeni, E; Oppong, J

    1998-06-01

    Political violence in civil war and ethnic conflicts has generated millions of refugees across the African continent with unbelievable pictures of suffering and unnecessary death. Using a political ecology framework, this paper examines the geographies of exile and refugee movements and the associated implications for re-emerging and newly emerging infectious diseases in great detail. It examines how the political ecologic circumstances underlying the refugee crisis influences health services delivery and the problems of disease and health in refugee camps. It has four main themes, namely, an examination of the geography of the refugee crisis: the disruption of health services due to political ecologic forces that produce refugees; the breeding of disease in refugee camps due to the prevailing desperation and destitution; and the creation of an optimal environment for emergence and spread of disease due to the chaotic nature of war and violence that produces refugees. We argue in this paper that there is great potential of something more virulent than cholera and Ebola emerging and taking a big toll before being identified and controlled. We conclude by noting that once such a disease is out in the public rapid diffusion despite political boundaries is likely, a fact that has a direct bearing on global health. The extensive evidence presented in this paper of the overriding role of political factors in the refugee health problem calls for political reform and peace accords, engagement and empowerment of Pan-African organizations, foreign policy changes by Western governments and greater vigilance of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in the allocation and distribution of relief aid. PMID:9672401

  5. The implications of a feelings-based approach to fish welfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huntingford, Felicity; Adams, Colin; Braithwaite, Victoria A.;

    2007-01-01

    The welfare of fish is a topic of increasing debate touching on a number of complex scientific and ethical issues and constructive dialogue between groups with differing approaches to the topic requires mutual understanding from both perspectives. In a recent review aimed at stimulating debate on...... this topic, Arlinghaus et al. (2007) explore the question of fish welfare in the particular context of recreational angling, by means of a critique of a review of fish welfare in general written by ourselves (Huntingford et al. 2006). We entirely agree with the desirability of debate on this topic and...

  6. The Demand for Wine in Australia Using a Systems Approach: Industry Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Hui-Shung (Christie); Griffith, Garry; Bettington, Nicholas

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study is to explain the factors determining the demand for wine in Australia, based on a systems approach where wine demand is modelled as part of the broader demand for alcoholic drinks (beer, wine and spirits). Time series data on retail price indexes and apparent per capita consumption of alcoholic beverages for Australia for the period 1975/76 to 1998/99 are used for econometric estimation of an Almost Ideal Demand System. The results show that the demand for beer an...

  7. Hearing Impaired Education of the Department of Education in Region X, Philippines: Its Approaches and Implication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Mirabeau B. Undalok

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available One way to attain improvement of the educational programs of the hearing impaired is by conducting survey and assessment of the status of the hearing impaired education of the Department of Education in Region X, Philippines. The Special Education (SpEd teachers play a vital role for the pupils of the hearing impaired children as they are viewed as linchpins in the learning process of the children. This cannot be attained without the different approaches on hearing impaired education. Survey -questionnaires were used to gather information needed. Data were analyzed using the descriptive statistics such as weighted mean and standard deviation. The ANOVA test was used to determine the significance of the hearing impaired education of the Department of Education in Region X. Anchored on the findings, the following conclusions are made about different educational approaches should be given priority by the SPED teachers is further enhance the lifelong learning skills of the pupils. It helps them for their learning process and acquiring language skills. There should be an advocacy on the hearing impaired education program to the public and stakeholders.

  8. Help Seeking Attitudes Among Cambodian and Laotian Refugees: Implications for Public Mental Health Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thikeo, Manivone; Florin, Paul; Ng, Chee

    2015-12-01

    This is a pilot study of demographic and acculturation factors in relation to attitudes toward seeking psychological help among Lao and Cambodian refugees and immigrants in the United States of America. Cambodian and Laotian American adults in the United States of America were approached to complete help-seeking attitudes and acculturation scales. T test and hierarchical multiple regression analyses were used to analyze the relationships between the demographic and acculturation variables, and attitudes toward seeking psychological help. Out of 270 target subjects approached there were 108 respondents. Of the demographic variables, gender was associated with favorable attitudes towards psychological help-seeking. As expected, women were significantly more likely than men to recognize the need for help, to seek psychological help, to be more open to discussing mental health problems, and have more confidence in professional services. Acculturation was more powerfully associated with help- seeking attitudes than any of the demographic variables. In hierarchical multiple regression, acculturation contributed significant unique variance over and beyond the entire set of demographic variables to openness to discussing problems and having confidence in professional help. The findings of this pilot study suggest that there are significant barriers to seeking psychological help among Lao and Cambodian Americans. Attention to the issues of gender and levels of acculturation may improve access. PMID:25672994

  9. Millennials considered: A new generation, new approaches, and implications for nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardue, Karen T; Morgan, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    A new generation is pursuing degrees in nursing. These students, 18 to 24 years old, aptly called Millennials, are technologically competent and described as optimistic and group oriented. Their propensity for multitasking, reliance on electronics, and need for immediate feedback often perplex and frustrate faculty and challenge customary approaches to teaching and learning. They often express doubt regarding their academic readiness for college. This article explores the authors' experiences with freshmen students of the Millennial generation and shares insights for working successfully with this cohort of learners. The authors assert that by developing strong partnerships with students, faculty may be able to bridge the generational gap to promote mutual understanding, personal growth, and academic success. PMID:18459621

  10. Neurodevelopmental disorders: theoretical approaches and its implications for education and rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luísa Bissoto

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The neurodevelopmental disorders, mainly those genetics ones, are argued with the aim to analyze the human development conceptions that underlie these, and its impact for understanding who is the individual that carries this disorder. Methodologically, epistemological presupposition from “classical” neuropsychology and from “neuroconstructivist” neuropsychology had been compared. As results of this parallel had been considered relevant: a. the role of the individual surrounding, b. the question concerning the plasticity and dynamical character of development and c. the formal developmental process, from prenatal to postnatal period. The concluding comments claims that the Neuroconstructivist approaches allow conceiving the developmental process within genetics neurodevelopmental disorders not as a “fault” but as a differentiated and particular one. That should be understood in the Educational and Rehabilitation settings not as a nosological category but as a specific way of an individual acting while looking for a mode of being-in-the-world.

  11. Adolescent Maternal Lifecourse Outcomes: Implications from an Integrated Mental Health Services Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth S. Russell

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Family intervention literature on adolescent parenting describes the pathways between outcomes for adolescent mothers and their children and the contexts of the pregnancy itself (e.g., poverty, low or no prenatal care, lower educational attainment. The aim of these descriptions is often to inform intervention designs that promote adaptive functioning for the child, the mother, and the dyad. Mental health services are an important component of many of these interventions; these services may be delivered by a clinician within the organization providing the intervention, or the organization may connect mothers with external mental health services in their communities. Using in-house clinicians rather than external providers may be beneficial by decreasing the high attrition rates common to this population. Although this service delivery approach is theoretically appealing, it has not been subject to rigorous empirical evaluation. In the current randomized study, we examine outcomes for teenage mothers based on two service delivery methods: Integrated Mental Health Services (IMHS and the Standard of Care (SoC which outsources clients’ mental health needs through community referrals. Information about the effectiveness of service delivery strategies can help program providers make decisions about how best to allocate limited funds to provide effective services.

  12. NON-TERRITORIAL AUTONOMY IN RUSSIA: PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS OF THEORETICAL APPROACHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana RUDNEVA

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the theoretical possibility to use non-territorial autonomy as a mechanism through which ethnic groups can fulfil their right to selfdetermination along with other minority rights, not many states have been willing to put theory into practice. The article offers an explanation why wider applicability of NTA is problematic by arguing that the theory itself is not yet polished enough to be implemented. The study includes examination of both theoretical approaches and empirical data from a case study of an attempt to establish NTAs in the Russian Federation. The findings suggest that inconsistencies and unclarities in the theory do correlate with practical flaws of NTAs, which allows to suggest that when the theory is tested empirically, the reality reveals all the flaws of the theory. The results indicate that the concept of NTA needs further refinement and development to make it more practice-oriented and applicable. As the problem of minority rights is still to be dealt with, we also propose a model of global union of NTAs where each ethnic group is represented by a non-governmental organisation, which seems to be more applicable than the others, alongside a number of other mechanisms that are even more essential and universal and focus on defending basic human rights

  13. A Vector Approach to Regression Analysis and Its Implications to Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAdams, H.T.

    2001-02-14

    An alternative approach is presented for the regression of response data on predictor variables that are not logically or physically separable. The methodology is demonstrated by its application to a data set of heavy-duty diesel emissions. Because of the covariance of fuel properties, it is found advantageous to redefine the predictor variables as vectors, in which the original fuel properties are components, rather than as scalars each involving only a single fuel property. The fuel property vectors are defined in such a way that they are mathematically independent and statistically uncorrelated. Because the available data set does not allow definitive separation of vehicle and fuel effects, and because test fuels used in several of the studies may be unrealistically contrived to break the association of fuel variables, the data set is not considered adequate for development of a full-fledged emission model. Nevertheless, the data clearly show that only a few basic patterns of fuel-property variation affect emissions and that the number of these patterns is considerably less than the number of variables initially thought to be involved. These basic patterns, referred to as ''eigenfuels,'' may reflect blending practice in accordance with their relative weighting in specific circumstances. The methodology is believed to be widely applicable in a variety of contexts. It promises an end to the threat of collinearity and the frustration of attempting, often unrealistically, to separate variables that are inseparable.

  14. Ecological implications of eddy retention in the open ocean: a Lagrangian approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The repartition of tracers in the ocean’s upper layer on the scale of a few tens of kilometres is largely determined by the horizontal transport induced by surface currents. Here we consider surface currents detected from satellite altimetry (Jason and Envisat missions) and we study how surface waters may be trapped by mesoscale eddies through a semi-Lagrangian diagnostic which combines the Lyapunov approach with Eulerian techniques. Such a diagnostic identifies the regions of the ocean’s upper layer with different retention times that appear to influence the behaviour of a tagged marine predator (an elephant seal) along a foraging trip. The comparison between predator trajectory and eddy retention time suggests that water trapping by mesoscale eddies, derived from satellite altimetry, may be an important factor for monitoring hotspots of trophic interactions in the open ocean. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical devoted to ‘Lyapunov analysis: from dynamical systems theory to applications’. (paper)

  15. Care concept in medical and nursing students’ descriptions – Philosophical approach and implications for medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Dobrowolska

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available [b]introduction.[/b] Care is seen as something that is peculiar to the medical sciences but its meaning and status for physicians and nurses differs. objectives. The aim of this research was to learn how nursing and medical students understand and define care, and how their definition and views on their practice of caring change as they advance through their studies. [b]material and methods[/b]. The study was conducted among two groups of students: before and after their first practicum (n=102. Analysis of the students’ answers was carried out using Colaizzi’s phenomenological descriptive methodology, which means that a qualitative approach was used. [b]results[/b]. The qualitative analysis shows that the medical and nursing students define care in the same way, using 9 main categories: compassion, commitment, competence, confidence, conscience, communication, patience, courage and support. The nursing students viewed their caring to be within both practical and emotional dimensions and this was a core feature of their identity as nurses. Medical students, on the other hand, viewed the practical dimension of care as an additional activity. All the students in the study underlined the importance of having time to care and showed that, for them, ‘time’ in this context has a moral meaning. What was interesting to the research team centered on the initial attitudes to ‘caring’ from both medical and nursing students. [b]conclusions[/b]. We found that students of both nursing and medicine do not begin their studies with different attitudes and concepts of care. However, after their initial exposure to practical placements a process begins which forges different identities around the concept of care. This implies trends in the division of professional roles during their initial education.

  16. Late Quaternary cave bears and brown bears in Europe: implications for distribution, chronology, and extinction based on a multidisciplinary approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacher, Martina

    2010-05-01

    Cave bear remains are one of the most numerous fossils found in European caves. Despite their frequency of occurrence, many aspects of cave bear palaeontology still remain poorly understood. New methodological approaches and ongoing studies led to controversial results and discussion about its taxonomy, palaeoecology, and final extinction. Are we dealing with one single or several species of cave bears? Was cave bear exclusively vegetarian or after all more omnivorous? Did he go extinct before or after the Late Glacial Maximum? Was cave bear restricted to Europe or did he also occur in Asia? Late Pleistocene brown bears, on the other hand, are often rare and little is known about the possible co-occurrence of cave and brown bears during the Late Pleistocene. Based on direct radiocarbon dates the distribution pattern of both, cave and brown bears is reconstructed during the Late Pleistocene in Europe. In addition, the reasons for the achieved pattern will be tested leading to the main question - why did cave bear become extinct while brown bears survived until today? To answer this question palaeobiological data of Late Pleistocene cave and brown bears will be tested against results from isotope analyses, while aDNA data may contribute to the question of distinct local population or even species of bears. The current state of evidence will be presented and on the basis of resulting pattern implications for further multi-disciplinary studies will be discussed.

  17. Land Use and Land Cover Change, Urban Heat Island Phenomenon, and Health Implications: A Remote Sensing Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, C. P.; Quattrochi, Dale A.

    2003-01-01

    Land use and land cover maps of Atlanta Metropolitan Area in Georgia were produced from Landsat MSS and TM images for 1973,1979,1983,1987,1992, and 1997, spanning a period of 25 years. Dramatic changes in land use and land cover have occurred with loss of forest and cropland to urban use. In particular, low-density urban use, which includes largely residential use, has increased by over 119% between 1973 and 1997. These land use and land cover changes have drastically altered the land surface characteristics. An analysis of Landsat images revealed an increase in surface temperature and a decline in NDVI from 1973 to 1997. These changes have forced the development of a significant urban heat island effect and an increase in ground level ozone production to such an extent, that Atlanta has violated EPA's ozone level standard in recent years. The urban heat island initiated precipitation events that were identified between 1996 and 2000 tended to occur near high-density urban areas but outside the I-285 loop that traverses around the Central Business District, i.e. not in the inner city area, but some in close proximity to the highways. The health implications were investigated by comparing the spatial patterns of volatile organic compounds (VOC) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions, the two ingredients that form ozone by reacting with sunlight, with those of rates of cardiovascular and chronic lower respiratory diseases. A clear core-periphery pattern was revealed for both VOC and NOx emissions, but the spatial pattern was more random in the cases of rates of cardiovascular and chronic lower respiratory diseases. Clearly, factors other than ozone pollution were involved in explaining the rates of these diseases. Further research is therefore needed to understand the health geography and its relationship to land use and land cover change as well as urban heat island effect. This paper illustrates the usefulness of a remote sensing approach for this purpose.

  18. Risk implications of renewable support instruments: Comparative analysis of feed-in tariffs and premiums using a mean–variance approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different support instruments for renewable energy expose investors differently to market risks. This has implications on the attractiveness of investment. We use mean–variance portfolio analysis to identify the risk implications of two support instruments: feed-in tariffs and feed-in premiums. Using cash flow analysis, Monte Carlo simulations and mean–variance analysis, we quantify risk-return relationships for an exemplary offshore wind park in a simplified setting. We show that feed-in tariffs systematically require lower direct support levels than feed-in premiums while providing the same attractiveness for investment, because they expose investors to less market risk. These risk implications should be considered when designing policy schemes. - Highlights: • Mean–variance portfolio approach to analyse risk implications of policy instruments. • We show that feed-in tariffs require lower support levels than feed-in premiums. • This systematic effect stems from the lower exposure of investors to market risk. • We created a stochastic model for an exemplary offshore wind park in West Denmark. • We quantify risk-return, Sharpe Ratios and differences in required support levels

  19. Energy and economic implications of agricultural technologies: an approach based on the technical options for the operations of crop production.

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, A; Reddy N

    1985-01-01

    ILO pub-WEP pub. Working paper on the energy and economic implications of the choice of technology for agricultural technology, based on an analysis of rice production - develops a mathematical model with which comparisons of crop yields, power consumption, labour demand, fixed capital costs, etc. Are made; compares traditional cultivation techniques, the use of high yielding seeds, the application of fertilizers, insecticides and herbicides, and three levels of agricultural mechanization. Bi...

  20. Examination of The BBC's Approach to Managing Ethics and The Implications for A Future Code of Ethics

    OpenAIRE

    Bowett, Natascha Karen

    2005-01-01

    This study attempts to draw on academic literature surrounding the media and business ethics to examine ethical issues, the management of those issues and the implications of a code of ethics for a media organisation like the BBC. Qualitative interviewing was used to provide the research data to compare and contrast with the literature discussed. With reference to the case study, it is concluded that ethics are important to the BBC. In addition, that a robust cultural climate of an organi...

  1. Nutrition and health in infancy and childhood : an epidemiological approach to the assessment of dietary habits, their determinants and implications

    OpenAIRE

    Persson, Lars Åke

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to describe the distribution of feeding habits and dietary habits of Swedish children of different ages, to search for determinants of the observed distributions and to analyse some possible implications of those habits regarding health and growth. The present results emanate from a longitudinal study of feeding, growth and development of 312 infants and from a cross-sectional study on the dietary habits of 738 children aged 4,8 and 13 years. The dietary assessement ...

  2. Faculty Approaches to Assessing Critical Thinking in the Humanities and the Natural and Social Sciences: Implications for General Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Mark C.; Labig, Chalmer E., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    An analysis of interviews, focus-group discussions, assessment instruments, and assignment prompts revealed that within general education, faculty assessed critical thinking as faceted using methods and criteria that varied epistemically across disciplines. Faculty approaches were misaligned with discipline-general institutional approaches.…

  3. An Analysis of the Costs, Benefits, and Implications of Different Approaches to Capturing the Value of Renewable Energy Tax Incentives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolinger, Mark

    2014-04-09

    This report compares the relative costs, benefits, and implications of capturing the value of renewable energy tax benefits in these three different ways – applying them against outside income , carrying them forward in time until they can be fully absorbed internally, or monetizing them through third-party tax equity investors – to see which method is most competitive under various scenarios. It finds that under current law and late-2013 market conditions, monetization makes sense for all but the most tax-efficient project sponsors. In other words, for most project sponsors, bringing in third-party tax equity currently provides net benefits to a project.

  4. The differentiation and prognostic implication of the solitary colonic polyp and the polyposis syndromes: A radiologic, histologic, and pathologic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The differential diagnosis of the solitary colonic polyp and the implications and prognostic significance of the solitary colonic polyp and the polyposis syndromes are frequently confusing because of imprecise and overlapping terminology. Such confusion may lead to misdiagnosis or overdiagnosis and improper patient treatment and surveillance. In the first part of this course, basic terms are defined to acquaint all participants with current common ground. The most frequently occurring solitary polyps (e.g., the colonic adenoma, hyperplastic polyp, Peutz-Jeghers hamartoma, juvenile hamartoma, and inflammatory polyp) are illustrated in detail with radiologic-histologic-pathologic correlation. The prognostic significance of each type of lesion and a scheme for proper colonic surveillance is discussed. In the second part of the session, there is a thorough discussion of multiple colonic polyps and the polyposis syndromes. Radiologic-pathologic correlation are used to illustrate these entities, and therapeutic and diagnostic implications are thoroughly covered. The differential diagnosis of the polyposis syndromes, including lymphoid abnormalities, pneumatosis intestinalis, and colitis cystica profunda, are mentioned. The participant should expect to gain a full understanding of the solitary and multiple colonic polyp states and algorithms for prognosis and treatment

  5. The Implication and Application of Communicative Approach to Designing and Adapting ELT Materials for Chinese College Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张靓

    2009-01-01

    The Communicative approach is a main stream in current ELT classroom.This approach mainly aims at developing leamers'communicative competences to equip them to be,proficient in real life communication in English.The communicative approach influences the belief of language learning,teaching,methodology and inevitably the syllabus and also ELT materials.However.communicative materials are not quite suitable for Chinese learners all the time,cause it can not meet the some specific expectations and competences of Chinese learners and teachers.Thus,adaptation is needed to make materials more.workable and help learners to develop their language proficiency.This essay will first introduce the communicative approach and materials briefly and then analyses the reasons of adaptation according to the specific context of Chinese college learners.

  6. The Implication and Application of Communicative Approach to Designing and Adapting ELT Materials for Chinese College Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张靓

    2009-01-01

    The Communicative approach is a main stream in current ELT classroom.This approach mainly aims at developing learners'communicative competences to equip them to be proficient in real life communication in English.The communicative approach influences the belief of language learning,teaching,methodology and inevitably the syllabus and also ELT materials.However,communicative materials are not quite suitable for Chinese learners all the time,cause it can not meet the some specific expectations and competences of Chinese learners and teachers.Thus,adaptation is needed to make materials more workable and help learners to develop their language proficiency.This essay will first introduce the communicative approach and materials briefly and then analyses the reasons of adaptation according to the specific context of Chinese college learners.

  7. First dose in children: physiological insights into pharmacokinetic scaling approaches and their implications in paediatric drug development

    OpenAIRE

    Strougo, Ashley; Eissing, Thomas; Yassen, Ashraf; Willmann, Stefan; Danhof, Meindert; Freijer, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Dose selection for “first in children” trials often relies on scaling of the pharmacokinetics from adults to children. Commonly used approaches are physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling (PBPK) and allometric scaling (AS) in combination with maturation of clearance for early life. In this investigation, a comparison of the two approaches was performed to provide insight into the physiological meaning of AS maturation functions and their interchangeability. The analysis focused on the ...

  8. A multi-dimensional approach for describing internal bleeding in an artery: implications for Doppler ultrasound guiding HIFU hemostasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Di; Zhang Dong; Guo Xiasheng; Gong Xiufen [Institute of Acoustics, Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics (Nanjing University), Ministry of Education, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Fei Xingbo [Beijing Yuande Biomedical Company, Beijing 100176 (China)], E-mail: dzhang@nju.edu.cn

    2008-09-21

    Doppler ultrasound has shown promise in detecting and localizing internal bleeding. A mathematical approach was developed to describe the internal bleeding of the injured artery surrounded by tissue. This approach consisted of a two-dimensional (2D) model describing the injured vessel and a one-dimensional model (1D) mimicking the downstream of the vessel system. The validity of this approach was confirmed by both the numerical simulation and in vivo measurement of a normal porcine femoral artery. Furthermore, the artery was injured using a 16-gauge needle to model a penetrating injury. The velocity waveform at the puncture site was modeled and compared with those at the upstream and downstream of the artery. The results demonstrated that there was a significant increase in magnitude and a phase lag for the peak systolic velocity at the injury site. These results were qualitatively in agreement with the in vivo experiment. Flow turbulence indicated by this approach was also observed in a color Doppler image in the form of a checkered color pattern. This approach might be useful for quantitative internal bleeding detection and localization. Also, the phase lag of the peak systolic velocity was indicated to be potential in the application of internal bleeding detection.

  9. A multi-dimensional approach for describing internal bleeding in an artery: implications for Doppler ultrasound guiding HIFU hemostasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doppler ultrasound has shown promise in detecting and localizing internal bleeding. A mathematical approach was developed to describe the internal bleeding of the injured artery surrounded by tissue. This approach consisted of a two-dimensional (2D) model describing the injured vessel and a one-dimensional model (1D) mimicking the downstream of the vessel system. The validity of this approach was confirmed by both the numerical simulation and in vivo measurement of a normal porcine femoral artery. Furthermore, the artery was injured using a 16-gauge needle to model a penetrating injury. The velocity waveform at the puncture site was modeled and compared with those at the upstream and downstream of the artery. The results demonstrated that there was a significant increase in magnitude and a phase lag for the peak systolic velocity at the injury site. These results were qualitatively in agreement with the in vivo experiment. Flow turbulence indicated by this approach was also observed in a color Doppler image in the form of a checkered color pattern. This approach might be useful for quantitative internal bleeding detection and localization. Also, the phase lag of the peak systolic velocity was indicated to be potential in the application of internal bleeding detection

  10. Time-dependent variational approach in terms of squeezed coherent states: Implication to semi-classical approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsue, Yasuhiko

    1994-01-01

    A general framework for time-dependent variational approach in terms of squeezed coherent states is constructed with the aim of describing quantal systems by means of classical mechanics including higher order quantal effects with the aid of canonicity conditions developed in the time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory. The Maslov phase occurring in a semi-classical quantization rule is investigated in this framework. In the limit of a semi-classical approximation in this approach, it is definitely shown that the Maslov phase has a geometric nature analogous to the Berry phase. It is also indicated that this squeezed coherent state approach is a possible way to go beyond the usual WKB approximation.

  11. Comparison of household consumption and regional production approaches to assess urban energy use and implications for policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assessment of urban energy use may proceed by a number of methods. Here we derive an energy account from local statistics, and compare them with an input output (IO) analysis as applied to Melbourne, Australia. These approaches highlight different aspects of urban energy use and comparable outputs are presented together to assess consistency, to identify complementarities and discuss the insight each approach brings to understanding urban energy. The IO method captures the direct and embodied primary energy requirements of local household expenditure (235.8 GJ/capita/year) while the regional assessment more directly accounts for local production activity (258.1 GJ/capita/year). The parity of these results is unexpected for a developed city with a strong tertiary sector. Sectoral detail reveals differences between the primary energy required by Melbourne's economic structure and that ultimately required through the full supply chain relating to household expenditure. This is accompanied by an IO analysis of the geography of Melbourne's 'energy catchment'. It is suggested that the IO consumption and regional production approaches have particular relevance to policies aimed at consumption behaviour and economic (re)structuring, respectively. Their complementarity further suggests that a combined analysis would be valuable in understanding urban energy futures and economic transitions elsewhere. - Highlights: → We compare an IO approach and a regional assessment of an urban energy use case. → Unusually, regional assessment of the primary energy use exceeds that from IO. → Sectoral and geographical detail reveals the urban consumption/production character. → We discuss the relative merits and policy utility of the different methods. → A combined approach is recommended for urban energy and economic transitions.

  12. Capturing the implications of land use change in Brazil through environmental assessment: Time for a strategic approach?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazil is experiencing a surge in planting of sugar cane crops driven by internal markets and external policy drivers for biofuels. The current expectation is for the expansion of these crops to continue. This creates concern over the extent to which the full implications of large scale land use change are currently being considered by decision-makers. Using the State of Sao Paulo as a case study (as it accounts for the majority of sugar cane grown in Brazil), a comparison was made of the impacts identified in Environmental Impact Statements (EISs) and Preliminary Environmental Reports (PERs), which have to be submitted for approval of most new sugar cane activities, with significant impacts known to be associated with sugar cane activities derived from literature review. The results from a review of 32 EISs and PERs (30% of the population) indicated that whilst some impacts were well covered by the sample (water and soil pollution, and air emissions) energy balance and Green House Gas emissions and food security had very limited consideration, and water resources, residues, labour conditions and social responsibility were only partially covered. Environmental Impact Assessment is constrained by its environmental advocacy role and its application to the project level only. This study highlights its limitations in the context of assessment of land use change which demands more strategic consideration.

  13. Passenger transport modal split based on budgets and implication for energy consumption: Approach and application in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transport will be the strongest growing energy demand sector in the future, especially in developing countries like China, and it needs more attention. The evolution of transport structure is very important in the dynamic of transport development, and therefore worth emphasis. In this study, a modal split model maximizing spatial welfare and constrained by travel money budget and time budget is developed. This approach differs from the general econometric-based approach used in most existing macro transport studies and deals with the cost and speed of transport modes as important variables explicitly. The model is then applied to China's transport sector together with sensitivity test despite many data problems. The decomposition of energy consumption generated from bottom-up model based on this modal split identified the importance of modal split and turnover expansion in the next 30 years, which should be a stronger area of focus in transportation studies

  14. Passenger transport modal split based on budgets and implication for energy consumption: Approach and application in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transport will be the strongest growing energy demand sector in the future, especially in developing countries like China, and it needs more attention. The evolution of transport structure is very important in the dynamic of transport development, and therefore worth emphasis. In this study, a modal split model maximizing spatial welfare and constrained by travel money budget and time budget is developed. This approach differs from the general econometric-based approach used in most existing macro transport studies and deals with the cost and speed of transport modes as important variables explicitly. The model is then applied to China's transport sector together with sensitivity test despite many data problems. The decomposition of energy consumption generated from bottom-up model based on this modal split identified the importance of modal split and turnover expansion in the next 30 years, which should be a stronger area of focus in transportation studies. (author)

  15. Carbon exchange in Western Siberian watershed mires and implication for the greenhouse effect : A spatial temporal modeling approach

    OpenAIRE

    Borren, W.

    2007-01-01

    The vast watershed mires of Western Siberia formed a significant sink of carbon during the Holocene. Because of their large area these mires might play an important role in the carbon exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. However, estimation of the Holocene and future carbon balance of whole Western Siberian mires is hampered by the lack of spatially resolved models. The main objective was to assess the carbon exchange fluxes of the mires using a 3-D dynamic approach. Th...

  16. Economic and environment implications of incorporating CO2 abatement policy measures into the Indian power system. A modelling approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Indian power system is dominated by coal based capacity (64% of the total capacity). India has a large potential of hydro and renewable energy sources, but the absence of an appropriate national policy to develop cleaner technologies leads to adverse impacts of electricity generation on the environment. The power sector is the single largest contributor of CO2 in India. If the current expansion of power generation based on coal continues, the Indian power system, which is expected to grow at 6-7% per year in order to fulfill the rising demand, will pose a serious threat to the environment in the coming years. The paper examines the economic and environmental implications of introducing measures for the reduction of CO2 emission, such as an accelerated development of the hydro potential, and a larger penetration of renewable energy and clean coal technologies for the future expansion of the domestic power system. A mathematical model was developed in the framework of linear programming, to derive the optimal way of capacity expansion for the Indian power system, together with a study of the costs and emissions under different scenarios. The business-as-usual scenario extrapolates the past trend to the future development of the power system, with possible improvements such as the use of imported gas and coal for power generation. Other scenarios assume the introduction of CO2 abatement measures. The study has been performed for a time horizon of 20 years, beginning with 1991/1992. Finally, the paper gives some recommendations regarding policies that would lead the country to environmentally begin power development. (author). 5 figs, 2 tabs

  17. Carbon exchange in Western Siberian watershed mires and implication for the greenhouse effect. A spatial temporal modeling approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borren, W.

    2007-01-19

    The vast watershed mires of Western Siberia formed a significant sink of carbon during the Holocene. Because of their large area these mires might play an important role in the carbon exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. However, estimation of the Holocene and future carbon balance of whole Western Siberian mires is hampered by the lack of spatially resolved models. The main objective was to assess the carbon exchange fluxes of the mires using a 3-D dynamic approach. These exchange fluxes comprise the sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) by peat growth, the emission of methane (CH4) by anaerobic peat decay and the emission of CO2 by aerobic peat decay. From the detailed analysis of peat cores from different sites in the southern taiga of Western Siberia, it emerged that Holocene peat growth and carbon accumulation had different trends, caused by variations in vegetation succession. These differences were strongly influenced by the position in the landscape. Therefore, the effect of climatic change on mire development varied spatially. The indirect effects of climate change through local hydrology appeared to be more important than direct influences of changes in precipitation and temperature. Mire development is closely connected to hydrological dynamics. In the thesis a 3-D dynamic modeling approach is described that makes use of groundwater modeling. In successive timesteps peat growth and decay as well as mire type distribution were calculated, depending on hydrological conditions. The model was forced with a paleo-precipitation record to include variable climatic input. The model results show the Holocene development of a watershed mire from a few small spots to a contiguous mire landscape. As hydrology is the major limiting factor, the mire development is most sensitive to precipitation and evapotranspiration. Under unchanged conditions the mire will grow further, eventually reaching its maximum peat thickness around 11400 yr A.D. Under

  18. Ways of Walking: Understanding Walking's Implications for the Design of Handheld Technology Via a Humanistic Ethnographic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Eslambolchilar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It seems logical to argue that mobile computing technologies are intended for use "on-the-go." However, on closer inspection, the use of mobile technologies pose a number of challenges for users who are mobile, particularly moving around on foot. In engaging with such mobile technologies and their envisaged development, we argue that interaction designers must increasingly consider a multitude of perspectives that relate to walking in order to frame design problems appropriately. In this paper, we consider a number of perspectives on walking, and we discuss how these may inspire the design of mobile technologies. Drawing on insights from non-representational theory, we develop a partial vocabulary with which to engage with qualities of pedestrian mobility, and we outline how taking more mindful approaches to walking may enrich and inform the design space of handheld technologies

  19. Carbon exchange in Western Siberian watershed mires and implication for the greenhouse effect. A spatial temporal modeling approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vast watershed mires of Western Siberia formed a significant sink of carbon during the Holocene. Because of their large area these mires might play an important role in the carbon exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. However, estimation of the Holocene and future carbon balance of whole Western Siberian mires is hampered by the lack of spatially resolved models. The main objective was to assess the carbon exchange fluxes of the mires using a 3-D dynamic approach. These exchange fluxes comprise the sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) by peat growth, the emission of methane (CH4) by anaerobic peat decay and the emission of CO2 by aerobic peat decay. From the detailed analysis of peat cores from different sites in the southern taiga of Western Siberia, it emerged that Holocene peat growth and carbon accumulation had different trends, caused by variations in vegetation succession. These differences were strongly influenced by the position in the landscape. Therefore, the effect of climatic change on mire development varied spatially. The indirect effects of climate change through local hydrology appeared to be more important than direct influences of changes in precipitation and temperature. Mire development is closely connected to hydrological dynamics. In the thesis a 3-D dynamic modeling approach is described that makes use of groundwater modeling. In successive timesteps peat growth and decay as well as mire type distribution were calculated, depending on hydrological conditions. The model was forced with a paleo-precipitation record to include variable climatic input. The model results show the Holocene development of a watershed mire from a few small spots to a contiguous mire landscape. As hydrology is the major limiting factor, the mire development is most sensitive to precipitation and evapotranspiration. Under unchanged conditions the mire will grow further, eventually reaching its maximum peat thickness around 11400 yr A.D. Under

  20. Locating causes of accidents in the social organisation of building workers and some wider implications: An approach from Cultural Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper overviews and re-interprets accident causation in the British Building and Construction Industry (BCI), chosen because its accident rate is high. The paper, a preliminary report of ongoing work, suggests why incidences vary widely between different sites and workgroups. Explanation appears to lie not in variant technical complexity but variant social organisation. Four archetypal forms of organisation are identified derived from Cultural Theory via social anthropology that avoid personality explanations, and focus on micro social organisation. Different kinds of micro social organisation are known to differentially influence attitudes to authority and risk-taking, views of time, filtering of information and deviance. This approach focuses on the social side of socio-technical systems when most commentators over-emphasise the technical and it is also appropriate to more technologically complex industries. The paper concludes with a plea to collect accident statistics with emphasis on micro social components and offers a method - LISTORG - to order the social dimensions involved. (author)

  1. A new approach to cosmogenic corrections in 40Ar/39Ar chronometry: Implications for the ages of Martian meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassata, W. S.; Borg, L. E.

    2016-08-01

    Anomalously old 40Ar/39Ar ages are commonly obtained from Shergottites and are generally attributed to uncertainties regarding the isotopic composition of the trapped component and/or the presence of excess 40Ar. Old ages can also be obtained if inaccurate corrections for cosmogenic 36Ar are applied. Current methods for making the cosmogenic correction require simplifying assumptions regarding the spatial homogeneity of target elements for cosmogenic production and the distribution of cosmogenic nuclides relative to trapped and reactor-derived Ar isotopes. To mitigate uncertainties arising from these assumptions, a new cosmogenic correction approach utilizing the exposure age determined on an un-irradiated aliquot and step-wise production rate estimates that account for spatial variations in Ca and K is described. Data obtained from NWA 4468 and an unofficial pairing of NWA 2975, which yield anomalously old ages when corrected for cosmogenic 36Ar using conventional techniques, are used to illustrate the efficacy of this new approach. For these samples, anomalous age determinations are rectified solely by the improved cosmogenic correction technique described herein. Ages of 188 ± 17 and 184 ± 17 Ma are obtained for NWA 4468 and NWA 2975, respectively, both of which are indistinguishable from ages obtained by other radioisotopic systems. For other Shergottites that have multiple trapped components, have experienced diffusive loss of Ar, or contain excess Ar, more accurate cosmogenic corrections may aid in the interpretation of anomalous ages. The trapped 40Ar/36Ar ratios inferred from inverse isochron diagrams obtained from NWA 4468 and NWA 2975 are significantly lower than the Martian atmospheric value, and may represent upper mantle or crustal components.

  2. Analysis on the International Trends in Safe Management of Very Low Level Waste Based upon Graded Approach and Their Implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, International Atomic Energy Agency and major leading countries in radioactive waste management tend to subdivide the categories of radioactive waste based upon risk-graded approach. In this context, the category of very low level waste has been newly introduced, or optimized management options for this kind of waste have been pursued in many countries. The application of engineered surface landfill type facilities dedicated to dispose of very low level waste has been gradually expanded, and it was analyzed that their design concept of isolation has been much advanced than those of the old fashioned surface trench-type disposal facilities for low and intermediate level waste, which were usually constructed in 1960's. In addition, the management options for very low level waste in major leading countries are varied depending upon and interfaced with the affecting factors such as: national framework for clearance, legal and practical availability of low and intermediate level waste repository and/or non-nuclear waste landfill, public acceptance toward alternative waste management options, and so forth. In this regard, it was concluded that optimized long-term management options for very low level waste in Korea should be also established in a timely manner through comprehensive review and discussions, in preparation of decommissioning of large nuclear facilities in the future, and be implemented in a systematic manner under the framework of national policy and management plan for radioactive waste management

  3. Distribution of elements among minerals of a single (muscovite- biotite granite sample – an optimal approach and general implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janoušek Vojtěch

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The petrography and mineral chemistry of the coarse-grained, weakly porphyritic (muscovite- biotite Říčany granite (Variscan Central Bohemian Plutonic Complex, Bohemian Massif were studied in order to assess the distribution of major and trace elements among its minerals, with consequences for granite petrogenesis and availability of geochemical species during supergene processes. It is demonstrated that chemistry-based approaches are the best suited for modal analyses of granites, especially methods taking into account compositions of whole-rock samples as well as their mineral constituents, such as constrained least-squares algorithm. They smooth out any local variations (mineral zoning, presence of phenocrysts, schlieren… and are robust in respect to the presence of phenocrysts or fabrics. The study confirms the notion that the accessory phases play a key role in incorporation of many elements during crystallization of granitic magmas. Especially the REE seem of little value in petrogenetic modelling, unless the role of accessories is properly assessed and saturation models for apatite, zircon, monazite±rutile carefully considered. At the same time, the presence of several P-, Zr- and LREE-bearing phases may have some important consequences for saturation thermometry of apatite, zircon and monazite.

  4. Turbulence vs Self-organized criticality: A hybrid approach, with implications for substorm dynamics of the magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovanov, Alexander

    Plasmas in astrophysics, cosmical geophysics, and laboratory plasmas are often found in far-from-equilibrium dynamical state usually described as ``turbulence". It has been argued and discussed in the literature that the typical signatures of turbulent systems including power-law power spectral density and the scale-free statistics of fluctuating observable quantities can more or less successfully be reproduced by complex systems in the state of self-organized criticality (SOC). An obvious distinction between the theoretical concepts of turbulence and SOC has not been obtained, though (for the challenges that lie ahead, and current scientific debate, see the recently announced book on ``Self-Organized Criticality Systems" - available in open access from Open Academic Press, http://www.openacademicpress.de/). Here we discuss these issues further and show that the behavior crucially depends on the type of boundary conditions, feedback mechanisms, and the role of nonlinearity. We then apply this approach to the dynamics of Earth's geomagnetic tail and propose a hybrid model of ``turbulent" current sheet, which explicitly takes into account the self-organization processes taking place. The model yields the slope of magnetic fluctuation spectra in the near-Earth stretched magnetotail prior to the substorm below the characteristic frequency turnover scales posed by convection. A comparison between the model theoretical predictions and the available data of in situ satellite observations is given.

  5. An integrated approach to taphonomy and faunal change in the Shungura formation (Ethiopia) and its implication for hominid evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemseged, Zeresenay

    2003-04-01

    Environmental and faunal changes through time have been recorded for many African Plio-Pleistocene sites. Fossil evidence suggests that there is a continuous, if not uniform, transformation of the fauna and flora from the Pliocene through the end of Pleistocene. However, discerning major biotic turnovers and linking them to global and regional climatic changes have been complicated by many factors, notably taphonomy and discontinuity of the fossil evidence, notwithstanding the considerable work of some researchers (e.g., Vrba, E.S., 1988. Late Pliocene climatic events and hominid evolution, in: Grine, F. (Ed.), Evolutionary History of the "Robust" Australopithecines. De Gruyter, New York, pp. 405-426, Vrba, E.S., 1995. The fossil record of African (Mammalia, Bovidae) in relation to human evolution and paleoclimate, in: Vrba, E.S., Denton, G.H., Partridge, T.C., Burkle, L.H. (Eds.), Paleoclimate and Evolution, with Emphasis on Human Origins. Yale University Press, New Haven, pp. 385-424). A sample of over 22,000 fossils collected by the French Omo Expedition, from the Shungura Formation of Ethiopia, was analyzed using an integrated approach to investigate taphonomic and faunal change patterns. The following results are obtained: (1) Univariate and multivariate studies support continuous faunal change from Member A through Member G of the Shungura sequence; (2) Correspondence analysis (CA) on extant bovids in African game parks shows that bovid tribes and genera are generally characterized by habitat specificity; (3) Taphonomic studies demonstrate that the relative abundance of different skeletal elements varies according to depositional environment; (4) CA on 73 localities of the Shungura Formation and 19 mammalian taxa points to a major faunal change around the base of Member G dated to ca. 2.3 Ma. This transformation is characterized by a change to open and edaphic grassland as a dominant type of environment; (5) This major faunal change correlates in time with

  6. Implications of elevated CO2 on pelagic carbon fluxes in an Arctic mesocosm study – an elemental mass balance approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Czerny

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies on the impacts of ocean acidification on pelagic communities have identified changes in carbon to nutrient dynamics with related shifts in elemental stoichiometry. In principle, mesocosm experiments provide the opportunity of determining temporal dynamics of all relevant carbon and nutrient pools and, thus, calculating elemental budgets. In practice, attempts to budget mesocosm enclosures are often hampered by uncertainties in some of the measured pools and fluxes, in particular due to uncertainties in constraining air–sea gas exchange, particle sinking, and wall growth. In an Arctic mesocosm study on ocean acidification applying KOSMOS (Kiel Off-Shore Mesocosms for future Ocean Simulation, all relevant element pools and fluxes of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus were measured, using an improved experimental design intended to narrow down the mentioned uncertainties. Water-column concentrations of particulate and dissolved organic and inorganic matter were determined daily. New approaches for quantitative estimates of material sinking to the bottom of the mesocosms and gas exchange in 48 h temporal resolution as well as estimates of wall growth were developed to close the gaps in element budgets. However, losses elements from the budgets into a sum of insufficiently determined pools were detected, and are principally unavoidable in mesocosm investigation. The comparison of variability patterns of all single measured datasets revealed analytic precision to be the main issue in determination of budgets. Uncertainties in dissolved organic carbon (DOC, nitrogen (DON and particulate organic phosphorus (POP were much higher than the summed error in determination of the same elements in all other pools. With estimates provided for all other major elemental pools, mass balance calculations could be used to infer the temporal development of DOC, DON and POP pools. Future elevated pCO2 was found to enhance net autotrophic community carbon

  7. Quantitative Integration of High-Resolution Hydrogeophysical Data: A Novel Approach to Monte-Carlo-Type Conditional Stochastic Simulations and Implications for Hydrological Predictions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baptiste Dafflon; James Irving; Klaus Holliger

    2009-01-01

    dataset collected at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site. Finally, we compare the performance of our data integration approach to that of more conventional methods with regard to the prediction of flow and transport phenomena in highly heterogeneous media and discuss the Implications arising.

  8. The Conversion of Paroxysmal or Initial Onset Atrial Fibrillation with Oral Ranolazine: Implications for a New "Pill-In-Pocket" Approach in Structural Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David K. Murdock

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The "Pill-in-Pocket" (PIP is an approach to atrial fibrillation (AF where oral anti-arrhythmics at 75% to 100% of the normal daily dose, given as a single dose, is used to convert recent-onset AF. Pro-arrhythmic risk has limited this approach to patients without structural heart disease (SHD. Ranolazine is an anti-anginal agent, which inhibits the abnormal late Na+ channel current resulting in decreased Na+/Ca++ overload. This inhibits after-depolarizations and reduces pulmonary vein firing, which have been implicated in the initiation and propagation of AF. Ranolazine increases atrial refractoriness and has no known pro-arrhythmic affects. Ranolazine is routinely given to patients with SHD. The ability of Ranolazine to terminate AF in man has not been described but if useful could be a safer PIP agent with application in the presence or absence of SHD. We describe our experience using oral Ranolazine to convert new or recurrent AF. Method: 2000 mg of ranolazine was administered to 35 patients with new (16 patients or recurrent (19 patients AF of at least 3 but not greater than 48 hours duration. Clinical features, echocardiographic data, and SHD were noted. Success was defined as restoring sinus rhythm within 6 hours of Ranolazine. Results: All but 4 patients had some form of SHD. Twenty-five patients were in the hospital, 5 were in the office, and 5 were at home at the time Ranolazine was administered. Twenty-five of 35 patients converted to sinus rhythm. No pro-arrhythmic effects, hemodynamic instability, adverse rate effects, or perceived intolerance were noted. The 71% conversion rate was comparable to other reported PIP protocols and much higher than reported placebo conversion rates. Conclusion: High dose oral Ranolazine shows utility as a possible safe agent to convert new or recurrent AF. Larger placebo-controlled studies would appear to be warranted.

  9. Positive approach: Implications for the relation between number theory and geometry, including connection to Santilli mathematics, from Fibonacci reconstitution of natural numbers and of prime numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansen, Stein E., E-mail: stein.johansen@svt.ntnu.no [Institute for Basic Research, Division of Physics, Palm Harbor, Florida, USA and Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Department of Social Anthropology, Trondheim (Norway)

    2014-12-10

    The paper recapitulates some key elements in previously published results concerning exact and complete reconstitution of the field of natural numbers, both as ordinal and as cardinal numbers, from systematic unfoldment of the Fibonacci algorithm. By this natural numbers emerge as Fibonacci 'atoms' and 'molecules' consistent with the notion of Zeckendorf sums. Here, the sub-set of prime numbers appears not as the primary numbers, but as an epistructure from a deeper Fibonacci constitution, and is thus targeted from a 'positive approach'. In the Fibonacci reconstitution of number theory natural numbers show a double geometrical aspect: partly as extension in space and partly as position in a successive structuring of space. More specifically, the natural numbers are shown to be distributed by a concise 5:3 code structured from the Fibonacci algorithm via Pascal's triangle. The paper discusses possible implications for the more general relation between number theory and geometry, as well as more specifically in relation to hadronic mathematics, initiated by R.M. Santilli, and also briefly to some other recent science linking number theory more directly to geometry and natural systems.

  10. Positive approach: Implications for the relation between number theory and geometry, including connection to Santilli mathematics, from Fibonacci reconstitution of natural numbers and of prime numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper recapitulates some key elements in previously published results concerning exact and complete reconstitution of the field of natural numbers, both as ordinal and as cardinal numbers, from systematic unfoldment of the Fibonacci algorithm. By this natural numbers emerge as Fibonacci 'atoms' and 'molecules' consistent with the notion of Zeckendorf sums. Here, the sub-set of prime numbers appears not as the primary numbers, but as an epistructure from a deeper Fibonacci constitution, and is thus targeted from a 'positive approach'. In the Fibonacci reconstitution of number theory natural numbers show a double geometrical aspect: partly as extension in space and partly as position in a successive structuring of space. More specifically, the natural numbers are shown to be distributed by a concise 5:3 code structured from the Fibonacci algorithm via Pascal's triangle. The paper discusses possible implications for the more general relation between number theory and geometry, as well as more specifically in relation to hadronic mathematics, initiated by R.M. Santilli, and also briefly to some other recent science linking number theory more directly to geometry and natural systems

  11. Intestinal parasitic infections in schoolchildren in different settings of Côte d’Ivoire: effect of diagnostic approach and implications for control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coulibaly Jean T

    2012-07-01

    the peri-urban (28% and urban setting (18%. Conclusions More sensitive diagnostic tools or rigorous sampling approaches are needed to select endemicity settings with high fidelity. The observed small-scale heterogeneity of helminths and intestinal protozoan infections has important implications for control.

  12. Risk implications of renewable support instruments: Comparative analysis of feed-in tariffs and premiums using a mean-variance approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kitzing, Lena

    2014-01-01

    Different support instruments for renewable energy expose investors differently to market risks. This has implications on the attractiveness of investment. We use mean-variance portfolio analysis to identify the risk implications of two support instruments: feed-in tariffs and feed-in premiums....... Using cash flow analysis, Monte Carlo simulations and mean-variance analysis, we quantify risk-return relationships for an exemplary offshore wind park in a simplified setting. We show that feedin tariffs systematically require lower direct support levels than feed-in premiums while providing the same...... attractiveness for investment, because they expose investors to less market risk. These risk implications should be considered when designing policy schemes....

  13. Intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy: evaluation of a new delivery approach and the policy implications for malaria control in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbonye, Anthony K; Bygbjerg, Ib; Magnussen, Pascal

    2007-01-01

    through traditional birth attendants (TBAs), drug-shop vendors (DSVs), community reproductive health workers (CRHWs) and adolescent peer mobilisers (APMs); and compared this approach with IPT at health units. We evaluated this approach to assess user perceptions, its acceptability and sustainability...

  14. The Use Of Oral Ranolazine To Convert New Or Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation: A Review Of Experience With Implications For Possible "Pill In The Pocket" Approach To Atrial Fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia requiring treatment. High dose oral anti-arrhythmics may cardiovert some paroxysmal AF. This "pill in pocket" approach has allowed patients to treat themselves on an as needed basis. Pro-arrhythmic concerns have limited the usefulness of this approach to patients without structural heart disease. Ranolazine is an anti-anginal agent, which inhibits abnormal late Na+ channel currents in cardiomyocytes and decreases sodium-calcium...

  15. The Conversion of Paroxysmal or Initial Onset Atrial Fibrillation with Oral Ranolazine: Implications for a New "Pill-In-Pocket" Approach in Structural Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    David K. Murdock; James A. Reiffel; Jeff Kaliebe; German Larrain

    2010-01-01

    Background: The "Pill-in-Pocket" (PIP) is an approach to atrial fibrillation (AF) where oral anti-arrhythmics at 75% to 100% of the normal daily dose, given as a single dose, is used to convert recent-onset AF. Pro-arrhythmic risk has limited this approach to patients without structural heart disease (SHD). Ranolazine is an anti-anginal agent, which inhibits the abnormal late Na+ channel current resulting in decreased Na+/Ca++ overload. This inhibits after-depolarizations and reduces pulmonar...

  16. Services and investment in the EU-South Korea free-trade area: implications of a new approach for GATS V agreements and for bilateral investment treaties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Mathis; E. Laurenza

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on the services and investment features of the recently concluded free trade agreement between the European Union and its Member States, of the one part, and the Republic of Korea, of the other part. This agreement is an early example of a new scheduling approach adopted by the Eu

  17. The Challenges of Using the Communicative Approach (CA) in the Teaching of English as a Second Language (ESL) in Zimbabwe: Implications for ESL Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutekwa, Anias

    2013-01-01

    This article examines studies done on the use of the CA locally, in addition to insights from studies done abroad, as well as critically examining the nature of the CA and the language situation in Zimbabwe, to identify and discuss the main challenges associated with the use of this approach to the teaching of ESL in Zimbabwe and its implications…

  18. The Ethical Implications of Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Pace, Larry A.

    1999-01-01

    Total Quality Management (TQM) has been described as an ideology, a corporate culture change phenomenon, a set of "hard" techniques, a set of "soft" skills, and as a pragmatic approach to business survival. Each of these descriptions has implicit ethical ramifications. Although TQM clearly has ethical implications, the direct connection between TQM and ethics has largely been unexplored. In this paper, I examine TQM from four ethical perspectives and show the ethical implications of each pers...

  19. A Hierarchical Multiple-Level Approach to the Assessment of Interpersonal Relatedness and Self-Definition: Implications for Research, Clinical Practice, and DSM Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyten, Patrick; Blatt, Sidney J

    2016-01-01

    Extant research suggests there is considerable overlap between so-called 2-polarities models of personality development; that is, models that propose that personality development evolves through a dialectic synergistic interaction between 2 key developmental tasks across the life span-the development of self-definition on the one hand and of relatedness on the other. These models have attracted considerable research attention and play a central role in DSM planning. This article provides a researcher- and clinician-friendly guide to the assessment of these personality theories. We argue that current theoretical models focus on issues of relatedness and self-definition at different hierarchically organized levels of analysis; that is (a) at the level of broad personality features, (b) at the motivational level (i.e., the motivational processes underlying the development of these dimensions), and (c) at the level of underlying internal working models or cognitive affective schemas, and the specific interpersonal features and problems in which they are expressed. Implications for further research and DSM planning are outlined. PMID:26538327

  20. A noninvasive isotopic approach to estimate the bone lead contribution to blood in children: Implications for assessing the efficacy of lead abatement

    OpenAIRE

    Gwiazda, Roberto H; C. Campbell; Smith, D.

    2005-01-01

    Lead hazard control measures to reduce children's exposure to household lead sources often result in only limited reductions in blood lead levels. This may be due to incomplete remediation of lead sources and/or to the remobilization of lead stores from bone, which may act as an endogenous lead source that buffers reductions in blood lead levels. Here we present a noninvasive isotopic approach to estimate the magnitude of the bone lead contribution to blood in children following household lea...

  1. The Neoproterozoic-Cambrian Paraguay Belt, central Brazil: Part I - New structural data and a new approach on the regional implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Luiz José Homem D'el-Rey; Walde, Detlef Hans-Gerd; Saldanha, Davi Oliveira

    2016-04-01

    Together with the Araguaia and Brasília belts, the Paraguay belt forms in central Brazil, the Tocantins Province that is one of the largest orogens of western Gondwana. The Corumbá area occupies the site where the northern and southern parts of the Paraguay belt form, together with the Chiquitos-Tucavaca aulacogen (stretching E-W in the adjacent Bolivian territory) an R-R-R basin system opened-filled in the ~ 700/650-540 Ma interval within the Amazon-Rio Apa paleo-continent. The sedimentary (volcanic) rocks of the Jacadigo and Corumbá Groups found around the Corumbá city record part of the Neoproterozoic-Cambrian passive margin precursor of the Paraguay belt. Our pioneer structural analysis reveals that these rocks experienced progressive deformation (phases D1-D2-D3) and low-grade metamorphism during the Brasiliano Cycle (540-513 Ma). The crystalline basement was also involved, according to structural data and K-Ar ages in the literature. The paleo-passive margin was thickened during the D1-D2 deformation and was lately shortened (D3) in two orthogonal directions, SE-NW (D3P) and SW-NE (D3T). Developed co-axially and verging to NW, D1-D2-D3P structures record the closure of the basin precursor of the Paraguay belt, whereas D3T structures seem related to the inversion of the aulacogen. Although the tectonic transport to NW, as observed in the Corumbá area, matches the reported transport of Paraguay belt's supracrustal rocks towards the eastern margin of the Rio Apa block and Araguaia belt's rocks towards the Amazon craton, the transport direction is opposite in other parts of the Paraguay belt. Our comprehensive discussion of these facts brings to light profound regional implications.

  2. Federal technology transfer requirements :a focused study of principal agencies approaches with implications for the Department of Homeland Security.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koker, Denise; Micheau, Jill M.

    2006-07-01

    This report provides relevant information and analysis to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) that will assist DHS in determining how to meet the requirements of federal technology transfer legislation. These legal requirements are grouped into five categories: (1) establishing an Office of Research and Technology Applications, or providing the functions thereof; (2) information management; (3) enabling agreements with non-federal partners; (4) royalty sharing; and (5) invention ownership/obligations. These five categories provide the organizing framework for this study, which benchmarks other federal agencies/laboratories engaged in technology transfer/transition Four key agencies--the Department of Health & Human Services (HHS), the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the Department of Energy (DOE), and the Department of Defense (DoD)--and several of their laboratories have been surveyed. An analysis of DHS's mission needs for commercializing R&D compared to those agencies/laboratories is presented with implications and next steps for DHS's consideration. Federal technology transfer legislation, requirements, and practices have evolved over the decades as agencies and laboratories have grown more knowledgeable and sophisticated in their efforts to conduct technology transfer and as needs and opinions in the federal sector have changed with regards to what is appropriate. The need to address requirements in a fairly thorough manner has, therefore, resulted in a lengthy paper. There are two ways to find summary information. Each chapter concludes with a summary, and there is an overall ''Summary and Next Steps'' chapter on pages 57-60. For those readers who are unable to read the entire document, we recommend referring to these pages.

  3. Characterizing the emission implications of future natural gas production and use in the U.S. and Rocky Mountain region: A scenario-based energy system modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Jeffrey

    The recent increase in U.S. natural gas production made possible through advancements in extraction techniques including hydraulic fracturing has transformed the U.S. energy supply landscape while raising questions regarding the balance of environmental impacts associated with natural gas production and use. Impact areas at issue include emissions of methane and criteria pollutants from natural gas production, alongside changes in emissions from increased use of natural gas in place of coal for electricity generation. In the Rocky Mountain region, these impact areas have been subject to additional scrutiny due to the high level of regional oil and gas production activity and concerns over its links to air quality. Here, the MARKAL (MArket ALlocation) least-cost energy system optimization model in conjunction with the EPA-MARKAL nine-region database has been used to characterize future regional and national emissions of CO 2, CH4, VOC, and NOx attributed to natural gas production and use in several sectors of the economy. The analysis is informed by comparing and contrasting a base case, business-as-usual scenario with scenarios featuring variations in future natural gas supply characteristics, constraints affecting the electricity generation mix, carbon emission reduction strategies and increased demand for natural gas in the transportation sector. Emission trends and their associated sensitivities are identified and contrasted between the Rocky Mountain region and the U.S. as a whole. The modeling results of this study illustrate the resilience of the short term greenhouse gas emission benefits associated with fuel switching from coal to gas in the electric sector, but also call attention to the long term implications of increasing natural gas production and use for emissions of methane and VOCs, especially in the Rocky Mountain region. This analysis can help to inform the broader discussion of the potential environmental impacts of future natural gas production

  4. Assessing the implications on performance when aligning customer lifetime value calculations with religious faith groups and afterlifetime values - a Socratic elenchus approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollensen, Svend; Wilson, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Customer Lifetime Value (CLV) is an established relationship marketing-centric approach to evaluating performance based upon the significance of a customer, and what resources should be allocated towards maintaining relations – beyond short-term transactional views. The conceptual argument...... presented in this paper contributes one very simple, yet significant argument, which is both transactional and relational. Namely, a large portion of humanity believes in a life beyond current existence – the Afterlife. Therefore, death in the psyche of such a person does not terminate benefit seeking......, and there is value in the afterlife. The aim here is to refine value-based calculations, drawing from varying religious perspectives: reincarnation, heaven, and enlightenment, amongst others. A particular focus has been given to Islamic schools of thought and practices, as a test case and in response to market...

  5. Risky behaviours among young people living with HIV attending care and treatment clinics in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania: implications for prevention with a positive approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisa Mhalu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Prevention with a positive approach has been advocated as one of the main strategies to reduce new instances of HIV infection. Risky sexual behaviours among people living with HIV/AIDS are the cornerstone for this approach. Understanding the extent to which infected individuals practice risky behaviours is fundamental in designing appropriate population-specific interventions. With the HIV infection transmission rates remaining high among young people in sub-Saharan Africa, continued prevention among them remains a priority. This study therefore seeks to describe the magnitude and determinants of risky sexual behaviours among young people living with HIV. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted between June and July 2010 in selected Care and Treatment Clinics (CTCs in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania. A total of 282 HIV-positive patients aged 15–24 were interviewed about their sexual behaviours using a questionnaire. Results: Prevalence of unprotected sex was 40.0% among young males and 37.5% among young females (p<0.001. Multiple sexual partnerships were reported by 10.6% of males and 15.9% of females (p<0.005. More than 50% of the participants did not know about the HIV status of their sexual partners. A large proportion of participants had minimal knowledge of transmission (46.7% males vs. 60.4% females and prevention (65.3% males vs. 73.4% females of sexually transmitted infections (STIs. Independent predictors of condom use included non-use of alcohol [adjusted odds ratio (AOR, 0.40 95% confidence interval (CI; 0.17–0.84] and younger age (15–19 years (AOR, 2.76, 95% CI: 1.05–7.27. Being on antiretroviral therapy (AOR, 0.38, 95% CI: 0.17–0.85 and not knowing partners’ HIV sero-status (AOR, 2.62, 95% CI: 1.14–5.10 predicted the practice of multiple sexual partnership. Conclusions: Unprotected sex and multiple sexual partnerships were prevalent among young people living with HIV. Less knowledge on STI and lack of HIV

  6. Toward an ecosystem approach to fisheries in the Mediterranean Sea: Multi-gear/multi-species implications from an ecosystem model of the Greek Ionian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutopoulos, Dimitrios K.; Libralato, Simone; Solidoro, Cosimo; Stergiou, Konstantinos I.

    2013-03-01

    A mass-balance food web model was developed for the Greek Ionian Sea ecosystem, including 39 functional groups and 6 fisheries at depths between 50 and 1100 m during the 1990s. The study area is among the most oligotrophic in the Mediterranean, having a complex food web structure, high numbers of energy pathways, trophic levels and functional groups and high rates of matter cycling, all of which are indicative of a mature system. To separate the effects of discards and landings, analyses and indicators were estimated through two models with the same parameterization: one included all catches and the other only landings. The primary production required to sustain the fisheries was low, and approximately half of it was used for sustaining by-catches and discards. Discards have greater impacts than landings on the flows and energy necessary to support the fisheries. Although fishing mortality by each gear type was moderate, the cumulative fishing impact estimated from all gears combined exceeded safe limits, thus enhancing the benefits of moving toward a multi-gear/multi-species approach to fisheries. This study is a first step toward quantifying discards in a multispecies/multigear system and considering the uncertainties in quantifying discard quantities, especially for low trophic levels.

  7. Complementing data-driven and physically-based approaches for predictive morphologic modeling: Results and implication from the Red River Basin, Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, R. J.; Bernardi, D.; Bizzi, S.; Castelletti, A.; Soncini-Sessa, R.

    2013-12-01

    sediment balance over an extended time-horizon (>15 yrs.), upstream impoundments induce a much more rapid adaptation (1-5 yrs.). The applicability of the ANN as predictive model was evaluated by comparing its results with a traditional, 1D bed evolution model. The next decade's morphologic evolution under an ensemble of scenarios, considering uncertainties in climatic change, socio-economic development and upstream reservoir release policies was derived from both models. The ANN greatly outperforms the 1D model in computational requirements and presents a powerful tool for effective assessment of scenario ensembles and quantification of uncertainties in river hydro-morphology. In contrast, the processes-based model provides detailed, spatio-temporally distributed outputs and validation of the ANN's results for selected scenarios. We conclude that the application of both approaches constitutes a mutually enriching strategy for modern, quantitative catchment management. We argue that physically based modeling can have specific spatial and temporal constrains (e.g. in terms of identifying key drivers and associated temporal and spatial domains) and that linking physically-based with data-driven approaches largely increases the potential for including hydro-morphology into basin-scale water resource management.

  8. [Exploring an optimal approach to the use of oral hypoglycemic agents based on CGM results: implications for combination therapy with oral hypoglycemic agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yutaka

    2011-08-01

    In the treatment of type 2 diabetes aimed at prevention of cardiovascular events impacting the prognosis of affected patients, it is critically important not only to lower HbAlc values but to find a way to improve postprandial hyperglycemia without causing hypoglycemia thus minimizing drastic glycemic variations or to maintain favorable glycemic control with daily glycemic variations in mind. In other words, it is no longer adequate to emphasize quantitative reductions in HbAlc as in conventional therapeutic approaches but qualitative glycemic control that takes daily glycemic variations into account is becoming of increasing importance to the management of type 2 diabetes. On the other hand, the 6 oral hypoglycemic agent (OHA) classes currently available for clinical use, i.e., biguanides (BGs), thiazolidinediones (TZDs), alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, sulfonylureas (SUs), fast-acting insulin secretagogues (glinides) and DPP-4 inhibitors, appear to vary from class to class or even from agent from agent within a class in regard to their impact on daily glycemic variations. In our CMG-based study of their impact on glycemic variations, it was demonstrated that BGs and TZDs improve hyperglycemia during nighttime and before breakfast more effectively than they do postprandial glycemic excursions; that, of the insulin secretagogues, glinides reduce daily glycemic variations as do alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, while SUs do not affect them very much; and that DPP-4 inhibitors lower not only mean glucose levels which are deemed equivalent to HbAlc values but also narrow the range of glycemic variations. Thus, OHAs can be broadly classified into those that primarily reduce 24-hour mean glucose levels as equivalent to HbAlc values and those that primarily narrow the range of glycemic variations. Therefore, with either of these agents as monotherapy, it is next to impossible to achieve reductions in HbAlc with a narrow range of glycemic variations, and combination therapy

  9. Cost-effectiveness analysis of rapid diagnostic test, microscopy and syndromic approach in the diagnosis of malaria in Nigeria: implications for scaling-up deployment of ACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onwujekwe Obinna E

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diagnosis and treatment of malaria is often based on syndromic presentation (presumptive treatment and microscopic examination of blood films. Treatment based on syndromic approach has been found to be costly, and contributes to the development of drug resistance, while microscopic diagnosis of malaria is time-consuming and labour-intensive. Also, there is lack of trained microscopists and reliable equipment especially in rural areas of Nigeria. However, although rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs have improved the ease of appropriate diagnosis of malaria diagnosis, the cost-effectiveness of RDTs in case management of malaria has not been evaluated in Nigeria. The study hence compares the cost-effectiveness of RDT versus syndromic diagnosis and microscopy. Methods A total of 638 patients with fever, clinically diagnosed as malaria (presumptive malaria by health workers, were selected for examination with both RDT and microscopy. Patients positive on RDT received artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT and febrile patients negative on RDT received an antibiotic treatment. Using a decision tree model for a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 patients, the diagnostic alternatives considered were presumptive treatment (base strategy, RDT and microscopy. Costs were based on a consumer and provider perspective while the outcome measure was deaths averted. Information on costs and malaria epidemiology were locally generated, and along with available data on effectiveness of diagnostic tests, adherence level to drugs for treatment, and drug efficacy levels, cost-effectiveness estimates were computed using TreeAge programme. Results were reported based on costs and effects per strategy, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. Results The cost-effectiveness analysis at 43.1% prevalence level showed an incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER of 221 per deaths averted between RDT and presumptive treatment, while microscopy is dominated

  10. Error Analysis and Its Implication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔蕾

    2007-01-01

    Error analysis is the important theory and approach for exploring the mental process of language learner in SLA. Its major contribution is pointing out that intralingual errors are the main reason of the errors during language learning. Researchers' exploration and description of the errors will not only promote the bidirectional study of Error Analysis as both theory and approach, but also give the implication to second language learning.

  11. Social impact evaluation : Some implications of the specific decisional context approach for anticipatory project assessment with special reference to available alternatives and to techniques of evaluating the social impacts of the anticipated effects of such alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, L. H.

    1972-01-01

    The implications are explored of the specific decision context approach to anticipatory project assessment. More specifically, it is hypothesized that with respect to any given effect of a proposed project or action (mobility, job opportunities, air pollution, population distribution, etc.) such effect will likely differ in probability and/or magnitude from one decisional context to another; that the social desirability or undesirability of a given effect is a function (will differ with) each specific decisional context; that therefore the social impact of such effect will in all likelihood differ with each specific decisional context; and that the social significance of even the dame social impact of a given effect will vary from one decisional context to another when such social impact interacts with (competes with or reinforces) the social impacts of other effects. It also follows from this analysis that the respective roles of scientific method (demonstrable data) and adversarial system will not only differ with each specific decisional context but with each alternative course of action available to the decisional entity in each specific context.

  12. 甘孜州赛马体育运动实现教育功能途径分析%The Approaches to Realize the Educational Implication of Horse-racing in Garze Prefecture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘进彬; 胡玖英

    2014-01-01

    采用文献资料、调查等研究方法,从民间的社会活动角度对甘孜州赛马体育运动实现教育功能途径进行分析。认为赛马在甘孜州地区所处的角色就是教育之于体育的一个缩影。从社会生活经验、生活模式、行为规范、集体主义思想、艺术和审美情趣等方面阐述了它对族群社会成员的“教化”作用,提出了立足于时代社会的现实需要,保障和拓展其生存和成长的社会空间,倡导维护或传承文化的自觉意识,才是赛马体育运动实现教育功能途径的重要思路。%According to the documents , and survey , this article analyzes the approaches of how to real-ize the educational implication of horse -racing, one of traditional minorities'sports in Garze Prefecture . Then, it argues that horse -racing, as a miniature of traditional minority education , can cultivate the members of the group in these aspects such as social experience , life mode , behavioral norm , collectiv-ism, and aesthetic value , etc.And these educational functions can be realized in line with the social need, expanding more living space , and cultivating the consciousness to protect and inherit their tradi-tional culture .

  13. 甘孜州赛马体育运动实现教育功能途径分析%The Approaches to Realize the Educational Implication of Horse-racing in Garze Prefecture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘进彬; 胡玖英

    2014-01-01

    According to the documents , and survey , this article analyzes the approaches of how to real-ize the educational implication of horse -racing, one of traditional minorities'sports in Garze Prefecture . Then, it argues that horse -racing, as a miniature of traditional minority education , can cultivate the members of the group in these aspects such as social experience , life mode , behavioral norm , collectiv-ism, and aesthetic value , etc.And these educational functions can be realized in line with the social need, expanding more living space , and cultivating the consciousness to protect and inherit their tradi-tional culture .%采用文献资料、调查等研究方法,从民间的社会活动角度对甘孜州赛马体育运动实现教育功能途径进行分析。认为赛马在甘孜州地区所处的角色就是教育之于体育的一个缩影。从社会生活经验、生活模式、行为规范、集体主义思想、艺术和审美情趣等方面阐述了它对族群社会成员的“教化”作用,提出了立足于时代社会的现实需要,保障和拓展其生存和成长的社会空间,倡导维护或传承文化的自觉意识,才是赛马体育运动实现教育功能途径的重要思路。

  14. Quantum histories and their implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Classical mechanics and standard Copenhagen quantum mechanics respect subspace implications. For example, if a particle is confined in a particular region R of space, then in these theories we can deduce that it is confined in regions containing R. However, subspace implications are generally violated by versions of quantum theory that assign probabilities to histories, such as the consistent histories approach. I define here a new criterion, ordered consistency, which refines the criterion of consistency and has the property that inferences made by ordered consistent sets do not violate subspace relations. This raises the question: do the operators defining our observations form an ordered consistent history? If so, ordered consistency defines a version of quantum theory with greater predictive power than the consistent histories formalism. If not, and our observations are defined by a non-ordered consistent quantum history, then subspace implications are not generally valid. (orig.)

  15. Transnational Education: Current Developments and Policy Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jianxin

    2009-01-01

    Ever since the transnational education trend took off since the 1980s, transnational education has come to bearing political, economic and cultural implications. Different approaches have been formulated to achieve specific policy objectives by both importing and exporting countries. Such approaches demonstrate a four dimensional composition,…

  16. Testing Implication of Probabilistic Dependencies

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Michael S. K. M.

    2013-01-01

    Axiomatization has been widely used for testing logical implications. This paper suggests a non-axiomatic method, the chase, to test if a new dependency follows from a given set of probabilistic dependencies. Although the chase computation may require exponential time in some cases, this technique is a powerful tool for establishing nontrivial theoretical results. More importantly, this approach provides valuable insight into the intriguing connection between relational databases and probabil...

  17. APPROACHES TO CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

    OpenAIRE

    Hines, Christine A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the question ?what is corporate governance?? It examines dominant theoretical approaches to the subject, and reviews influential legislative attempts to address the area in the United States as well as the United Kingdom. Inconsistencies between theoretical approaches to the subject and practical frameworks will be discussed, along with the implications of current frameworks in the US and UK. It will be concluded that legislative reform ought to address the dynamic nature ...

  18. Education System Reform in China after 1978: Some Practical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Miantao

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to provide an overview of education system reform in China since 1978, and its practical implications. Design/methodology/approach: Data were collected from literature review and interview. An overview of education system reform and its practical implications was found through data analysis. Findings: There has been two…

  19. Common Pediatric Disabilities: Medical Aspects and Educational Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Janet Siantz; Colson, Steven

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents definitions of common pediatric disabilities and information about incidence, causes, diagnosis, common characteristics, complications with educational implications, and multidisciplinary intervention approaches. It covers the following conditions: attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, fragile…

  20. Sociocultural approach to textbook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pešić Jelena M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present an overview of textbook research at the Institute of psychology, intended to postulate socio-cultural approach to textbook. Shifting the textbook from classical pedagogical-psychological context into the broader and more inspiring cultural context, has led to the conceptualization of textbook as a cultural-supportive system of individual development. We consider firstly, the theoretical background of this conception, founded in Vygotskian idea of cultural mediation of development and then, its operationalization through the concept of cultural-supportive tools. The transfer from theory to practice is presented through the most important practical implications, such as defining the genre specificities of textbook and principles of educational design of textbooks. As a distinctive issue, we also consider the way this approach to textbook (theoretical articulation, analytical concepts, and practical implications contributes to development of socio-cultural paradigm in psychology.

  1. Cultural Approaches to Parenting

    OpenAIRE

    Bornstein, Marc H.

    2012-01-01

    This article first introduces some main ideas behind culture and parenting and next addresses philosophical rationales and methodological considerations central to cultural approaches to parenting, including a brief account of a cross-cultural study of parenting. It then focuses on universals, specifics, and distinctions between form (behavior) and function (meaning) in parenting as embedded in culture. The article concludes by pointing to social policy implications as well as future directio...

  2. Ethological Approach to Delayed Language Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Gerald J.

    1975-01-01

    The ethological approach to language acquisition (which focuses on the nature of the child's interaction with the environment) is described, and implications for the language development of mentally retarded and autistic children are discussed. (CL)

  3. Human resource management implications of new forms of organizing

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez-Runde, Carlos; Whittington, Richard; Quintanilla, Javier

    2000-01-01

    Adopting a process view, we explore the personnel (HRM) implications of new forms of organizing (NFOs). We review the characteristics of NFOs and explain how they require a renewed HRM approach. We illustrate the HRM approach with preliminary results from a European comparative study, and comment on the challenges ahead.

  4. Acercamiento a las implicaciones existentes entre alimentación, calidad de vida y hábitos de vida saludables en la actualidad (Approaching existing implications between food, quality of life and healthy lifestyles today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muñoz-Sánchez, Víctor

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: En el presente artículo se realiza una revisión bibliográfica sobre el concepto de calidad de vida. En este recorrido bibliográfico se muestran las distintas corrientes teóricas que han influido en el desarrollo del concepto de calidad de vida así como la estrecha vinculación del concepto con diferentes modelos económicos y productivos. También se revisan sus implicaciones con la salud y en lo referente los hábitos de alimentación y vida saludable. En segundo lugar, se describe y reflexiona sobre los principales resultados de los trabajos de investigación contenidos en el presente monográfico. Por último se ofrecen conclusiones sobre el impacto del cambio de modelo productivo y de valores así como el de la actual situación estructural de crisis sobre; las condiciones de producción de productos de Denominación de Origen Protegida, las transformaciones del sistema alimentario español, los hábitos saludables de vida y alimentación de las personas mayores, los problemas de distribución de productos alimentarios en zonas rurales y la influencia de la actual socialización en hábitos de consumo alimentario en la distorsión de la autopercepción de la imagen del consumidor. // Abstract: In this article a literature review on the concept of quality of life takes place. In this bibliographic tour the different theoretical currents that have influenced the development of the concept of quality of life and the close relationship of the concept with different economic and productive models shown. Health implications are also reviewed and regarding the eating habits and healthy life. Second, it describes and reflects on the main results of the research contained in this monograph. Finally conclusions are offered on the impact of changing production model and values and the current structural crisis on the conditions of production of Protected Designation of Origin, the transformations of Spanish food system, healthy habits of

  5. Shopper marketing implications on communication strategies and actions

    OpenAIRE

    Silveira, Paulo Duarte; Marreiros, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Comunicação apresentada em 15th IAMB Conference, Lisboa Shopper marketing is an international recent concept and approach to marketing. Since shopper marketing is in the early stages of development, it is also an emerging research field, and consequently questions and challenges acrossall the marketing-mix variables are emerging. This paper addressesshopper marketing implications on one of those variables – communication.Specifically, the purpose of this paper is to study the implications ...

  6. Manpower Implications of Mechanization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cargill, B. F.

    The fruit and vegetable industry is on the road to total mechanization. The scientific and social communities need to collaborate as technological innovations influence manpower development and utilization. An awareness of the implications of technological advancement and manpower problems is required so that the U. S. fruit and vegetable grower…

  7. T heoretical Implications and Practical Approach of Teacher-Development-Based Teaching Reflection%基于教师发展的教学反思:理论意蕴与实践路径

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴银银

    2014-01-01

    Teaching reflection is an effective way to improve the quality of teaching and promote the professional development of teachers . It is also a learning method to improve teachers'professional quality as well as teaching practice . It reflects teachers' spirit of inquiry and may activate teachers' practical wisdom . As for the practical approach of teaching reflection , both experiential and theoretical reflection should be conducted at different stages of teaching at different levels . Reflection must be combined with action , and should be made both individually and collectively . On in this way can the deviation in theoretical ponderings and deficiency in practice be avoided .%教学反思是提高教学质量,促进教师专业发展的有效途径;是一种用来提高教师自身的专业素养,改进教学实践的学习方式;是积极探究心态的表现,能够激活教师的实践智慧。在具体的实践路径上,要把不同阶段的教学反思、不同水平的教学反思、感性与理性的教学反思、反思与行动、个人反思与共同体反思结合起来,以纠正对教师的教学反思在理论认识上的偏差和实践中的不足。

  8. Diagnosis of Photochemical Ozone Production Rates and Limiting Factors based on Observation-based Modeling Approach over East Asia: Impact of Radical Chemistry Mechanism and Ozone-Control Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaya, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Growth of tropospheric ozone, causing health and climate impacts, is concerned over East Asia, because emissions of precursors have dramatically increased. Photochemical production rates of ozone and limiting factors, primarily studied for urban locations, have been poorly assessed within a perspective of regional-scale air pollution over East Asia. We performed comprehensive observations of ozone precursors at several locations with regional representativeness and made such assessment based on the observation-based modeling approach. Here, diagnosis at Fukue Island (32.75°N, 128.68°E) remotely located in western Japan (May 2009) is highlighted, where the highest 10% of hourly ozone concentrations reached 72‒118 ppb during May influenced by Asian continental outflow. The average in-situ ozone production rate was estimated to be 6.8 ppb per day, suggesting that in-travel production was still active, while larger buildup must have occurred beforehand. Information on the chemical status of the air mass arriving in Japan is important, because it affects how further ozone production occurs after precursor addition from Japanese domestic emissions. The main limiting factor of ozone production was usually NOx, suggesting that domestic NOx emission control is important in reducing further ozone production and the incidence of warning issuance (>120 ppb). VOCs also increased the ozone production rate, and occasionally (14% of time) became dominant. This analysis implies that the VOC reduction legislation recently enacted should be effective. The uncertainty in the radical chemistry mechanism governing ozone production had a non-negligible impact, but the main conclusion relevant to policy was not altered. When chain termination was augmented by HO2-H2O + NO/NO2 reactions and by heterogeneous loss of HO2 on aerosol particle surfaces, the daily ozone production rate decreased by <24%, and the fraction of hours when the VOC-limited condition occurred varied from 14% to 13

  9. Combined imaging approach to neuroendocrine tumors using somatostatin receptor scintigraphy with 99mTc-HYNIC TOC SPECT/CT and 18F FDG PET/CT-implications for targeted peptide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A combined imaging approach using FDG PET (GLUT expression) and SRS (somatostatin Receptor expression) is necessary in order to stratify patients of NET's, for appropriate treatment planning. Aim: 1) To study the variable expression of somatostatin and GLUT receptors in pathologically proven neuroendocrine tumors at primary and metastatic sites. 2) To identify the subgroups and suitability for peptide therapy. Materials and Methods: 72 patients (age - 18-72 years) with a known diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumor were prospectively studied. SRS using 99mTc- HYNIC TOC SPECT/CT and GLUT imaging with FDG PET/CT study were performed in all the patients. The SPECT and PET results were interpreted independently by 2 nuclear medicine physicians and the corresponding studies were compared lesion by lesion for the final analysis. The findings were validated using available histological, imaging and follow up findings. Results: 49 patients had positive findings on both SRS and FDG PET/CT studies.12 patients showed a positive SRS study and negative FDG PET study. 11 patients had a positive FDG PET study and a negative SRS study. A total of 120 lesions were detected on SRS and 131 lesions detected on FDG PET.14 patients had solitary lesions on both the modalities. Neither FDG PET nor SRS added any incremental value in identifying additional sites in patients with solitary lesions. Conclusion: 1) 68% of the patients showed variable expression of somatostatin and GLUT receptors and thus were unsuitable for standalone radio peptide therapy and thus necessitated a combination therapy. The aim would be to control progression or palliation. 2) Only 29% of the patients showed lone somatostatin expression who could benefit from standalone somatostatin or radio peptide therapy with a curative intent

  10. THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPLICATIONS OF AGRICULTURE

    OpenAIRE

    Bromley, Daniel W.

    1996-01-01

    There are three general classes of environmental implications from agriculture: (1) amenity implications; (2) habitat implications; and (3) ecological implications. Environmental "benefits" or "costs" from agriculture require a prior specification of the norm against which the status quo is to be compared. Agriculture is no longer simply an activity that produces commodities for local, regional, national, or international markets. Indeed, in the OECD countries, commodity abundance, not commod...

  11. A multi-proxy approach to tracing a regressive event at Ferguson's Gulf, Lake Turkana, Kenya: Implications for modern analogues to assist in interpretations of the Plio-Pleistocene record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Catherine; Feibel, Craig; Wright, James; Mortlock, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Located in the East African Rift Valley, the Turkana Basin has long been central to our understanding of how early hominins evolved. In particular, there is great curiosity as to the relationship between the paleoenvironment/paleoclimate conditions and evolution. Historical records aid in the interpretation of Plio-Pleistocene sediments by creating the opportunity to ground truth assumptions through the use of modern analogues. This project uses high-resolution, multi-proxy records from a series of short cores spanning the Little Ice Age to the modern, to suggest one possible model for how regressive events are recorded in lacustrine sequences. Because Lake Turkana is hydrologically closed, changes in lake level affect the water chemistry and thereby the ecosystems that depend upon it. Ferguson's Gulf is a 13 km2, shallow embayment located on the western shore of Lake Turkana. The gulf is connected to the rest of the lake by a narrow mouth on its northern end which is ~1 m deep. Therefore, relatively minor drops in lake level have the potential to restrict flow from Lake Turkana into Ferguson's Gulf, creating localized evaporative water chemistry which effects the suitability of this area for sustaining various benthic populations. Six short cores collected in 2011 and 2012 were picked for ostracods at 1-5 cm intervals to study the changes in assemblages and total abundances through time. An age model, generated using radiocarbon dating of ostracods, demonstrated that the record extending into the Little Ice Age (1550-1850 AD), a period when wetter conditions prevailed within the Turkana Basin. The ostracod faunal results were compared with sedimentology/stratigraphy, XRF data, and stable isotope analysis on ostracod shells for a multiproxy approach to reconstructing hydrologic conditions during the past ~500 years. The Ferguson's Gulf record can be subdivided into three bins based on the ostracod assemblages. The lowest third of the core shows high ostracod total

  12. Teacher's experiences in PBL: implications for practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Anabela C.; Sousa, Rui M.; Fernandes, Sandra; Cardoso, Elisabete; Carvalho, Maria Alice; Figueiredo, Jorge; Pereira, Rui M. S.

    2016-03-01

    Project-Based Learning (PBL) has been implemented in the first year of the Industrial Engineering and Management programme at the University of Minho, Portugal, since 2004/2005. The purpose of this paper is to analyse and discuss teachers' experiences in PBL in this programme and to explore its implications for student learning and for teaching practices in higher education. For data collection, the research method used was written narratives to these teachers, at the end of the PBL semester. Findings suggest that teachers express a positive view of PBL as a learning approach. They identify student motivation and engagement, along with a better understanding of the application of concepts in real-life situations, as important outcomes of the project for students. Besides this, teachers also highlight the importance of the development of transversal skills by students throughout the project. Recommendations for future work and implications for practice will also be discussed.

  13. Implications of social structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brask, Josefine Bohr

    Social systems in nature are characterised by heterogeneous social structures. The pattern of social interactions or associations between individuals within populations (i.e. their social network) is typically non-random. Such structuring may have important implications for the expression and...... four separate studies. In the first study, we propose a simple framework that may be used as a base when studying the link between social structure and fitness. We furthermore review current evidence for fitness effects of social structure, and find good support for such effects. In the second study...... evolution of behaviour, and for individual fitness. In this thesis I investigated implications of social structure for fitness and behaviour, with focus on three main areas: social structure & fitness, social structure & communication, and social structure & cooperation. These areas were investigated in...

  14. Logic, Algebra and Implication

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cintula, Petr; Noguera, Carles

    Rio de Janeiro : ECEME - Escola de Comando e Estado -Maior do Exército, 2013 - (Béziau, J.; Buchsbaum, A.; Costa-Leite, A.; Altair, A.). s. 34-35 [UniLog 2013. World Congress and School on Universal Logic /4./. 29.03.2013-07.04.2013, Rio de Janeiro] Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : abstract algebraic logic * consequence relations * weakly implicative logics Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  15. Re-thinking the store image study approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kåre

    2001-01-01

    markets for example in Eastern Europe and Southeast Asia. The rele-vance of the approach was tested on the food retail sector in two Chinese cities. Two clusters with differ-ent images were identified and profiled. Implications for future research and managerial implications are developed....

  16. Public health implications of altered puberty timing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golub, M.S.; Collman, G.W.; Foster, P.M.;

    2008-01-01

    . Altered timing of puberty also has implications for behavioral disorders. For example, an early maturation is associated with a greater incidence of conduct and behavior disorders during adolescence. Finally, altered puberty timing is considered an adverse effect in reproductive toxicity risk assessment...... for chemicals. Recent US legislation has mandated improved chemical testing approaches for protecting children's health and screening for endocrine-disrupting agents, which has led to changes in the US Environmental Protection Agency's risk assessment and toxicity testing guidelines to include puberty......-related assessments and to the validation of pubertal male and female rat assays for endocrine screening Udgivelsesdato: 2008/2...

  17. Geriatric neuropsychology: implications for front line clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamora, Christina Weyer; Ruff, Ronald M; Connor, Bonnie B

    2008-01-01

    Consistent with the aging population, neuropsychologists are being asked with increased frequency to evaluate older adults. These assessments are often complicated by medical and psychiatric co-morbidities, polypharmacy, and complex psychosocial and legal issues that are frequently encountered in this population. The aim of this review article is to address the challenges neuropsychologists and other frontline clinicians often confront when evaluating older individuals. Specifically, we review psychiatric and medical co-morbidities, testing accommodations, diagnostic versus descriptive testing approaches, normative issues, polypharmacy, and reimbursement rates. Finally, future implications are discussed for advancing the neuropsychologist's role in evaluating and treating older individuals. PMID:18957725

  18. Policy Preference Functions: The Implications of Recent Developments

    OpenAIRE

    Cramon-Taubadel, Stephan von

    1997-01-01

    The policy preference function (PPF) approach continues to be the subject of considerable interest in agricultural economics. Recent work has added sophistication and strengthened the approach's theoretical underpinnings. In this paper, several implications of this recent work are considered. First, the distinction between the PPF and the surplus transformation curve (STC) is stressed. Estimated PPF weights are derived from what we know about the STC. We actually know very little about the PP...

  19. The Implications of Feyerabend's Epistemological Approach for Educational Research Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadikolaei, Elham Shirvani; Sajjadi, Seyed Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Epistemology is defined as theory of knowledge and the ways of achieving it. Epistemology is research questions of the possibility of knowledge and the riddle of knowledge. Epistemology and methodology despite being interconnected are inseparable and are not reducible from each other. In addition, their relationship is direct, meaning that…

  20. Suitability and managerial implications of a Master Surgical Scheduling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. van Oostrum (Jeroen); E. Bredenhoff (Eelco); E.W. Hans (Erwin)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAbstract: Operating room (OR) planning and scheduling is a popular and challenging subject within the operational research applied to health services research (ORAHS). However, the impact in practice is very limited. The organization and culture of a hospital and the inherent characteris

  1. Aortic stiffness: pathophysiology, clinical implications, and approach to treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Sethi S; Rivera O.; Oliveros R; Chilton R

    2014-01-01

    Salil Sethi, Oscar Rivera, Rene Oliveros, Robert Chilton University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX, USA Abstract: Aortic stiffness is a hallmark of aging, and classic cardiovascular risk factors play a role in accelerating this process. Current changes in medicine, which focus on preventive care, have led to a growing interest in noninvasive evaluation of aortic stiffness. Aortic stiffness has emerged as a good tool for further risk stratification because it has been linked ...

  2. A Social Constructionist Approach to Disability: Implications for Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiou, Dimitris; Kauffman, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Proponents of a social model of disability derive their arguments from social constructionism. They combine different disabling conditions under one term: disability. Subsequently, they apply the specific viewpoint of the disability rights social movement of people with physical disabilities to other conditions such as intellectual disabilities,…

  3. Financial Implications of Implementing an E-Learning Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Kunal

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to outline the financial implications, while deploying information and communication technologies for implementing e-learning, and to elucidate them, while implementing an e-learning project in a conventional university environment. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is a descriptive account of the various cost factors…

  4. Systems biology approach to bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Romy; Wu, Cindy H.; Hazen, Terry C.

    2012-06-01

    Bioremediation has historically been approached as a ‘black box’ in terms of our fundamental understanding. Thus it succeeds and fails, seldom without a complete understanding of why. Systems biology is an integrated research approach to study complex biological systems, by investigating interactions and networks at the molecular, cellular, community, and ecosystem level. The knowledge of these interactions within individual components is fundamental to understanding the dynamics of the ecosystem under investigation. Finally, understanding and modeling functional microbial community structure and stress responses in environments at all levels have tremendous implications for our fundamental understanding of hydrobiogeochemical processes and the potential for making bioremediation breakthroughs and illuminating the ‘black box’.

  5. Foreign Policy Implication by Bush and Obama Administration towards Middle East

    OpenAIRE

    Uddin, S. M. Anowar; Mariera, John Omonywa

    2009-01-01

    The rationale of this paper is to analyze and assess the implication of foreign policy towards Middle East after September 11. Confrontational and co operational approaches adopted by the former and current U.S presidents Bush and Obama respectively, it is critical for all to understand that either way, the role the United States has played and will play cannot be underrated. Both approached seems to attract negative and positive implications both at home and in the Middle East. How the forei...

  6. Implications at the local level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A view is presented of the policy and political implications for local government, as well as the more detailed implications for local government of the management and transportation of radioactive wastes. Headings: public debate; policy framework; radioactive wastes (low- intermediate-, and high-level); sea dumping; nuclear waste transport. (U.K.)

  7. Implications of recent MINER$\

    CERN Document Server

    Wolcott, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Among the most important tasks of neutrino oscillation experiments is correctly estimating the parent neutrino energy from the by-products of their interactions. Large uncertainties in our current understanding of such processes can significantly hamper this effort. We explore several recent measurements made using the \\mnv{} detector in the few-GeV NuMI muon neutrino beam at Fermilab: the differential cross-section vs. $Q^2$ for charged-current quasi-elastic scattering, the differential cross-sections vs. pion angle and pion kinetic energy for resonant single charged pion production, and the differential cross-sections vs. pion angle and kinetic energy for coherent pion production. We furthermore discuss their implications for energy reconstruction in oscillation measurements.

  8. The estrogen hypothesis of schizophrenia implicates glucose metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Line; Hansen, Thomas; Jakobsen, Klaus D;

    2008-01-01

    . We undertook these challenges by using an established clinical paradigm, the estrogen hypothesis of schizophrenia, as the criterion to select candidates among the numerous genes experimentally implicated in schizophrenia. Bioinformatic tools were used to build and priorities the signaling networks...... implicated by the candidate genes resulting from the estrogen selection. We identified ten candidate genes using this approach that are all active in glucose metabolism and particularly in the glycolysis. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that variants of the glycolytic genes are associated with schizophrenia...

  9. Comprehensive Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Vaz, Norberto

    2010-01-01

    Dada a complexidade dos conflitos e crises, muitos governos e organizações estão, actualmente, num processo de desenvolvimento de conceitos e abordagens à gestão de crises. Não há nenhuma definição comummente aceite para a Comprehensive Approach. O presente trabalho faz uma abordagem ao desenvolvimento do termo, descrevendo e analisando a adopção da Comprehensive Approach a nível multilateral. Actores multinacionais como a ONU, a OTAN e a UE estão a desenvolver novos conceitos para uma apr...

  10. Neutrino Experiments and Their Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Balantekin, A. B.

    2004-01-01

    Recent developments in solar, reactor, and accelerator neutrino physics are reviewed. Implications for neutrino physics, solar physics, nuclear two-body physics, and r-process nucleosynthesis are briefly discussed.

  11. Capability approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Rosendal; Kjeldsen, Christian Christrup

    Lærebogen er den første samlede danske præsentation af den af Amartya Sen og Martha Nussbaum udviklede Capability Approach. Bogen indeholder en præsentation og diskussion af Sen og Nussbaums teoretiske platform. I bogen indgår eksempler fra såvel uddannelse/uddannelsespolitik, pædagogik og omsorg....

  12. Narrative approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelter, Reinhard

    -creation between coach and coachee. The conceptual framework will be tested by presenting central results of a research project. The ideas discussed in this chapter expand upon earlier concepts of the narrative approach (mainly formulated by White in 2007) by integrating ideas from phenomenology and experiential...

  13. Accounting Implications of Corporate Diversification

    OpenAIRE

    Raphael Amit; Joshua Livnat; Paul Zarowin

    1991-01-01

    This study investigates the direct effects of corporate diversification on accounting reports, and the implications of these effects for accounting research. The study shows that firms which diversify into unrelated areas of business devote a larger proportion of their capital investments to acquisitions and are, therefore, characterized by smaller differences between replacement-cost and historical-cost values of assets than undiversified firms. The implications of these findings, as well as...

  14. Curriculum Approaches in Language Teaching: Forward, Central, and Backward Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Jack C.

    2013-01-01

    The development and implementation of language teaching programs can be approached in several different ways, each of which has different implications for curriculum design. Three curriculum approaches are described and compared. Each differs with respect to when issues related to input, process, and outcomes, are addressed. Forward design starts…

  15. A Multilingual Approach: Conclusions and Future Perspectives--Afterword

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorter, Durk; Cenoz, Jasone

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes the individual contributions to this special issue and discusses the advantages and implications of adopting a multilingual approach. The advantages include the possibility of examining language practices in context and providing insights about the way languages are acquired and used. This multilingual approach also opens…

  16. A Transactional Approach to Competency-Based Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buktenica, Norman A.; And Others

    Rationale, application for training, and implications for practice are presented for a school psychology training approach that is part of a broader Transactional-Ecological Psychology (TEP) Training Program. The TEP provides an innovative and unified approach to training in the areas traditionally called clinical, community, counseling and school…

  17. Prescription drug abuse: problem, policies, and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Janice

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an overview on prescription drug abuse and highlights a number of related legislative bills introduced during the 112th Congress in response to this growing epidemic. Prescription drug abuse has emerged as the nation's fastest growing drug problem. Although prescription drugs have been used effectively and appropriately for decades, deaths from prescription pain medicine in particular have reached epidemic proportions. Bills related to prescription drug abuse introduced during the 112th Congress focus on strengthening provider and consumer education, tracking and monitoring prescription drug abuse, improving data collection on drug overdose fatalities, combating fraud and abuse in Medicare and Medicaid programs, reclassifying drugs to make them more difficult to prescribe and obtain, and enforcing stricter penalties for individuals who operate scam pain clinics and sell pain pills illegitimately. This article underscores the importance of a multifaceted approach to combating prescription drug abuse and concludes with implications for nursing. PMID:23245611

  18. Researching Lean: Methodological implications of loose definitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brännmark, Mikael; Langstrand, Jostein; Johansson, Stina;

    2012-01-01

    practices seem to overlap with other popular management concepts, such as High Performance Work Systems, World Class Manufacturing and Total Quality Management. This confusion, combined with different methodological and theoretical traditions, has led to much debate and contradictory conclusions regarding...... Lean. The purpose of the paper is to illustrate some key methodological issues that need to be considered in future Lean research to allow increased understanding of Lean effects for different stakeholders, primarily meaning the customer, employer and employees. Design/methodology/approach – The paper...... operationalized, which makes it very difficult to study through a priori definitions. Practical implications/recommendations – The large variation in interpretations of Lean complicates metaanalyses regarding potential impact of Lean on the primary stakeholders of an organization, i.e. the customer, employees and...

  19. Waste management implications of concentrating slimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anticipated increase in demand for sand-size tailings from the uranium industry suggests that the fine-grained or 'slime' fraction will require special attention for disposal. The Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) required information on the behaviour and environmental significance of the fine-grained tailings fraction in disposal facilities. Beak Consultants and Golder Associates were contracted to review the significant characteristics of slimes disposal and prepare a report on the physical and chemical characteristics of fine-grained tailings (Phase 1). This report (Phase 2) presents a summary of disposal and management practices for slimes and outlines potential concerns related to these practices. The report also presents an approach to disposal planning and the implications of available and potential management techniques. Experience with the disposal of uranium slimes is scarce and, therefore, relevant information was borrowed from the other mining sectors to predict the consequences of various disposal scenarios

  20. Safety implications of self-managed teams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lardner, R.

    1999-08-01

    This report traces the history of self-management and the reasons for the introduction of self-management. The Health and Safety Executive's approach to management of safety, literature on self-managing teams and safety, and published examples of self-managing teams in the petrochemical industry are discussed. Diagnosing the suitability for self-management, and best practice in implementation are considered, four UK case studies involving the BP Chemicals plant in Baglan Bay, the Shell Exploration and Production Cada Platforms, Industrial Colours Limited, and Amec Process and Energy at Great Yarmouth are given. The research undertaken at BP Oil's Grangemouth refinery on safety implications of self-managed teams is reviewed.

  1. Public health implications of altered puberty timing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golub, Mari S; Collman, Gwen W; Foster, Paul M D;

    2008-01-01

    sexual debut, potential sexual abuse, and psychosocial difficulties. Altered puberty timing is also of concern for the development of reproductive tract cancers later in life. For example, an early age of menarche is a risk factor for breast cancer. A low age at male puberty is associated....... Altered timing of puberty also has implications for behavioral disorders. For example, an early maturation is associated with a greater incidence of conduct and behavior disorders during adolescence. Finally, altered puberty timing is considered an adverse effect in reproductive toxicity risk assessment...... for chemicals. Recent US legislation has mandated improved chemical testing approaches for protecting children's health and screening for endocrine-disrupting agents, which has led to changes in the US Environmental Protection Agency's risk assessment and toxicity testing guidelines to include puberty...

  2. The Real and Financial Implications of Corporate Hedging

    OpenAIRE

    Murillo Campello; Chen Lin; Yue Ma; Hong Zou

    2011-01-01

    We study the implications of hedging for corporate financing and investment. We do so using an extensive, hand-collected data set on corporate hedging activities. Hedging can lower the odds of negative realizations, thereby reducing the expected costs of financial distress. In theory, this should ease a firm's access to credit. Using a tax-based instrumental variable approach, we show that hedgers pay lower interest spreads and are less likely to have capital expenditure restrictions in their...

  3. Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES): implications for anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) has recently evolved as a novel approach for abdominal surgery with great potential to further improve the advantages of laparoscopy over laparotomy. The first patients undergoing NOTES cholecystectomy or appendectomy reported no or only minimal pain, required no narcotic analgesics, and were discharged early from the hospital and immediately resumed daily activities. If this is confirmed by randomized controlled clinical trials, what are the potential implications for anesthesia? PMID:20948698

  4. The implications of migration theory for distributive justice

    OpenAIRE

    Sager, Alex

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the implications of empirical theories of migration for normative accounts of migration and distributive justice. It examines neo-classical economics, world-systems theory, dual labor market theory, and feminist approaches to migration and contends that neo-classical economic theory in isolation provides an inadequate understanding of migration. Other theories provide a fuller account of how national and global economic, political, and social institutions cause and shape m...

  5. Uncultivable bacteria: Implications and recent trends towards identification

    OpenAIRE

    Bhattacharya S.; Vijayalakshmi N; Parija S

    2002-01-01

    Diseases due to uncultivable bacteria could represent emerging infectious diseases. However, the growing importance of these pathogens remains ill understood and undefined. Non-culture based approaches, especially molecular genetic methods are evolving as the most important tool in our understanding of these enigmatic pathogens. This article attempts to discuss the scientific implications of the evolution of uncultivable bacteria, review the recent trends in identification, and highlight thei...

  6. Imaging of lung cancer: Implications on staging and management

    OpenAIRE

    Purandare, Nilendu C; Venkatesh Rangarajan

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths. Accurate assessment of disease extent is important in deciding the optimal treatment approach. To play an important role in the multidisciplinary management of lung cancer patients, it is necessary that the radiologist understands the principles of staging and the implications of radiological findings on the various staging descriptors and eventual treatment decisions.

  7. Imaging of lung cancer: Implications on staging and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilendu C Purandare

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths. Accurate assessment of disease extent is important in deciding the optimal treatment approach. To play an important role in the multidisciplinary management of lung cancer patients, it is necessary that the radiologist understands the principles of staging and the implications of radiological findings on the various staging descriptors and eventual treatment decisions.

  8. Practices and Policies of Clinical Exome Sequencing Providers: Analysis and Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Jamal, Seema M.; Yu, Joon-Ho; Chong, Jessica X.; Dent., Karin M.; Conta, Jessie H.; Tabor, Holly K.; Bamshad, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Exome and whole genome sequencing (ES/WGS) offer potential advantages over traditional approaches to diagnostic genetic testing. Consequently, use of ES/WGS in clinical settings is rapidly becoming commonplace. Yet there are myriad moral, ethical, and perhaps legal implications attached to the use of ES and health care professionals and institutions will need to consider these implications in the context of the varied practices and policies of ES service providers. We developed “core elements...

  9. Clinical implications of genomic alterations in the tumour and circulation of pancreatic cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sausen, Mark; Phallen, Jillian; Adleff, Vilmos;

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma has the worst mortality of any solid cancer. In this study, to evaluate the clinical implications of genomic alterations in this tumour type, we perform whole-exome analyses of 24 tumours, targeted genomic analyses of 77 tumours, and use non-invasive approaches to examine...... imaging. These observations provide genetic predictors of outcome in pancreatic cancer and have implications for new avenues of therapeutic intervention....

  10. THE COMPLEXITY OF THE IMPLICATIONS OF GLOBALIZATION IN THE CONTEXT OF THE CURRENT GLOBAL ECONOMY

    OpenAIRE

    CREŢOIU, Raluca Ionela

    2014-01-01

    Globalization represents a controversial phenomenon both because of its complexity and because of the various implications it has on the global economy. Globalization will act simultaneously on many levels, its effects being correlated with the diversity of the angles from which this phenomenon can be approached from – economic, social, politic, cultural, philosophic etc. The article represents an incursion into the issue regarding the implications and effects of globalization grouped in seve...

  11. A Psychoanalytic Approach to Fieldwork

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Ramvi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on what both psychoanalysis and anthropology have in common: the emphasis on the researcher’s own experience. An ethnographic fieldwork will be used to illustrate how a psychoanalytical approach unfolds the material when studying conditions for learning from experience among teachers in two Norwegian junior high schools, and also the strong methodological implications of this approach. The researcher’s struggle to remain open is elaborated. Here “openness” is regarded as something more than a principle for research practice. It is a way to relate both to oneself and the other, to emotions as well as actions, to the inner as well as the external world.

  12. Mind, Matter and the Implicate Order The Implicate Order Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Pylkkänen, Paavo T I

    2007-01-01

    Proposes that Bohm's alternative interpretation of quantum theory resolves the paradoxes such as Schrodinger's cat, and the EPR paradox. This work uses Bohm's concepts of "implicate order", "active information" and "soma-significance" as tools to tackle several well-known problems in the philosophy of mind.

  13. Pedagogical approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund Larsen, Lea

    particular needs, which teachers must be aware of and deal with. Secondly, I propose a combination of adult learners’ characteristics with ‘teaching orientations’, as a basis for further research on teachers of adults’ professional development. Some of the competencies that teachers need can be taught in......This paper is a part of an on-going qualitative empirical research project: “Teachers of adults as learners. A study on teachers’ experiences in practice”. Data is collected at a Danish Adult Education Centre. The aim of the study is to understand teachers’ learning experiences. The research...... questions are: How (much) and what do teachers learn from experience? And how do teachers of adults develop their pedagogical approach? I examine the field of adult learners from the teachers’ perspective. Firstly, I identify some of the commonly described characteristics of adults as learners and their...

  14. Spinal trauma. An imaging approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnosis of trauma to the spine - where the slightest oversight may have catastrophic results - requires a thorough grasp of the spectrum of resultant pathology as well as the imaging modalities used in making an accurate diagnosis. In Spinal Trauma, the internationally renowned team of experts provides a comprehensive, cutting-edge exposition of the current vital role of imaging in the diagnosis and treatment of injuries to the axial skeleton. Beginning with a valuable clinical perspective of spinal trauma, the book offers the reader a unique overview of the biomechanics underlying the pathology of cervical trauma. Acute trauma topics include: - Optimization of imaging modalities - Malalignment - signs and significance - Vertebral fractures - detection and implications - Classification of thoraco-lumbar fractures - rationale and relevance - Neurovascular injury. Distilling decades of clinical and teaching expertise, the contributors further discuss the current role of imaging in special focus topics, which include: - The pediatric spine - Sports injuries - The rigid spine - Trauma in the elderly - Vertebral collapse, benign and malignant - Spinal trauma therapy - Vertebral fractures and osteoporosis - Neuropathic spine. All throughout the book, the focus is on understanding the injury, and its implications and complications, through 'an imaging approach'. Lavishly illustrated with hundreds of superb MR images and CT scans, and clear full-color drawings, the authors conclude with a look into the future, defining clinical trends and research directions. Spinal Trauma - with its broad scope, practical imaging approach, and current focus - is designed to enhance confidence and accuracy, making it essential reading for clinicians and radiologists at all levels. (orig.)

  15. Corporate Social Responsibility: Strategic Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Abagail McWilliams; Siegel, Donald S.; Patrick M. Wright

    2005-01-01

    We describe a variety of perspectives on corporate social responsibility (CSR), which we use to develop a framework for consideration of the strategic implications of CSR. Based on this framework, we propose an agenda for additional theoretical and empirical research on CSR. We then review the papers in this special issue and relate them to the proposed agenda.

  16. Policy Implications of Education Informatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Jo Ann; O'Brien, Nancy P.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Context: This concluding article identifies the policy implications of education informatics and explores impacts of current copyright laws, legislative structures, publishing practices, and education organizations. Synthesizing the discussions in the preceding articles, this article highlights the importance of designing information…

  17. Mechanisms of bilirubin toxicity: clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Thor Willy Ruud

    2002-12-01

    The basic mechanism of kernicterus and bilirubin encephalopathy has not been unequivocally determined. Much knowledge has been gained about phenomena that contribute to bilirubin neurotoxicity, and this knowledge has implications for clinical practice. Conditions that impact on blood-brain barrier function, increase brain blood flow, or impact on bilirubin metabolism, including its transport in serum, should be avoided, if possible. Such conditions include drugs and drug stabilizers that compete with bilirubin binding to albumin, or that inhibit P-glycoprotein in the blood-brain barrier, prematurity/immaturity, and clinically significant illness in the infant that involves hemolysis, respiratory and metabolic acidosis, infection, asphyxia, hypoxia and (perhaps) hyperoxia, and hyperosmolality. If these conditions are not avoidable then there should be a more aggressive approach to the treatment of hyperbilirubinemia. The limits of tolerance for hyperbilirubinemia varies among neonates and there are no tools to determine with certainty when a particular infant is approaching the danger zone. Neurological symptoms in a jaundiced infant require extreme vigilance, and, in most cases, immediate intervention. PMID:12516745

  18. On the normative implications of social neuroscience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arleen Salles

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Within the last decades, brain science has been offering new insights into the relationship among diverse psychological processes and the neural correlates of our moral thought and behavior. Despite the distinction between the explanatory/descriptive nature of science and the normative nature of morality, some neuroethicists have claimed that neuroscientific findings have normative implications. In this paper, I identify three interpretations of the claim. The first focuses on neuroscience’s role in explaining the origin of morality and of moral values and how neurobiology is the bases of moral behavior. A second version is about the role that neuroscientific knowledge can play in showing the psychological plausibility of the moral psychology underlying some ethical approaches. Finally, a third version advances that neuroscience could play a role in determining the moral plausibility of some normative approaches. My aim is to delineate each version and highlight the issues raised to suggest that while neuroscience might provide information regarding the nature of moral reasoning, its role in the normative discussion itself is still quite limited.

  19. On branchwise implicative BCI-algebras

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Anwar Chaudhry

    2002-01-01

    We introduce a new class of BCI-algebras, namely the class of branchwise implicative BCI-algebras. This class contains the class of implicative BCK-algebras, the class of weakly implicative BCI-algebras (Chaudhry, 1990), and the class of medial BCI-algebras. We investigate necessary and sufficient conditions for two types of BCI-algebras to be branchwise implicative BCI-algebras.

  20. A dialectical approach to information retrieval

    OpenAIRE

    Thornley, Clare V.; Gibb, Forbes

    2007-01-01

    Purpose:The paper explores the question of whether the often paradoxical and conceptually contradictory discipline of information retrieval (IR) can be understood more clearly when it is analysed from a dialectical perspective. Methodology/Approach:Conceptual analysis and literature review. Findings:A dialectical understanding of meaning can assist in clarifying some aspects of the complex nature of current IR theory. Research Implications:Philosophy has the potential to explore the...

  1. A Bayesian Model for Discovering Typological Implications

    CERN Document Server

    Daumé, Hal

    2009-01-01

    A standard form of analysis for linguistic typology is the universal implication. These implications state facts about the range of extant languages, such as ``if objects come after verbs, then adjectives come after nouns.'' Such implications are typically discovered by painstaking hand analysis over a small sample of languages. We propose a computational model for assisting at this process. Our model is able to discover both well-known implications as well as some novel implications that deserve further study. Moreover, through a careful application of hierarchical analysis, we are able to cope with the well-known sampling problem: languages are not independent.

  2. Towards a heterarchical approach to biology and cognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruni, Luis Emilio; Giorgi, Franco

    2015-01-01

    different scientific disciplines working towards a multilevel integrative perspective of biological and cognitive processes, such as systems and integrative biology and neuroscience, social and cultural neuroscience, social signal transduction and psychoneuroimmunology, for instance. We argue that...... structures and substrates are by necessity organized hierarchically, while communication processes – and their embeddedness – are rather organized heterarchically. Before getting into the implications of the heterarchical approach and its congeniality with the semiotic perspective to biology and cognition...... empirical systemic approaches to biology and integrative neuroscience, and conclude with a reflection on its implications to the understanding of the emergence of pathological conditions in multi-level semiotic systems....

  3. Behavioral momentum. Implications and development from reinforcement theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaud, J J; Gaither, G A

    1996-04-01

    Historical and contemporary theories of reinforcement, as well as the clinical application of reinforcement principles to behavior modification and therapy, are critically analyzed and discussed. A new behavioral approach to studying the allocation of behavior under changed environmental constraints, termed behavioral momentum, is also presented. Whereas traditional behavioral analysis has emphasized the role of response rate as an index of response probability and response strength, more recent studies have addressed the persistence of behavior under altered environmental conditions and reinforcement contingencies. In terms of behavior modification and therapy, issues such as generalizability and relapse prevention have major implications for the type and length of behavioral intervention strategies employed. The behavioral momentum model analyzes operant behavior not only in terms of its response rate but also in relation to its persistence under changed environmental constraints. The authors discuss the applicability of this recent addition to reinforcement theories in context of its implications for behavior modification and therapy. PMID:8934866

  4. Cosmological implications of Heisenberg's principle

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalo, Julio A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this book is to analyze the all important implications of Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle for a finite universe with very large mass-energy content such as ours. The earlier and main contributors to the formulation of Quantum Mechanics are briefly reviewed regarding the formulation of Heisenberg's Principle. After discussing “indeterminacy” versus ”uncertainty”, the universal constants of physics are reviewed and Planck's units are given. Next, a novel set of units, Heisenberg–Lemaitre units, are defined in terms of the large finite mass of the universe. With the help of Heisenberg's principle, the time evolution of the finite zero-point energy for the universe is investigated quantitatively. Next, taking advantage of the rigorous solutions of Einstein's cosmological equation for a flat, open and mixed universe of finite mass, the most recent and accurate data on the “age” (to) and the expansion rate (Ho) of the universe and their implications are reconsidered.

  5. Mobile IPTV: Implications for Education

    OpenAIRE

    Pannee Suanpang

    2013-01-01

    Mobile IPTV (Internet Protocol Television) provides digital content which users watch as a television broadcast via the Internet on a mobile device. This paper presents the development of IPTV, Suan Dusit Internet Broadcasting, (SDIB) to mobile IPTV and discusses the implications for education. Mobile IPTV was developed as a prototype and designed to support users via wireless and mobile networks regardless of the mobile device. The system can be broadcasted through both live and video on dem...

  6. Educational Expenditure: Implications for Equality

    OpenAIRE

    McCoy, Selina; Smyth, Emer

    2003-01-01

    Inequalities in educational outcomes over time are described. Patterns of educational expenditure are outlined, highlighting differences between and within the primary, secondary and tertiary sectors. Recent policy developments are explored which involve targeting spending on "disadvantaged" schools, through special programmes and initiatives. The implications of educational failure for labour market and other outcomes among young people in particular and the adult population in general are d...

  7. Occupational fatigue: Implications for aviation

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Teresa Cristina Clímaco Monteiro d'

    2011-01-01

    Occupational fatigue has been considered a major contribution to decreases in well-being and performance in a variety of industries. The objective of the chapter is to review the main issues associated with occupational fatigue and to consider the implications for the globalized aviation industry. Fatigue management in aviation has been associated with rostering practices, countermeasures and the development of international regulations. Recently research has proposed that p...

  8. Policy Implications of Ageing Sexualities

    OpenAIRE

    Heaphy, B; Yip, A.K.T.

    2006-01-01

    This article aims to open up debate on the policy implications of ageing sexualities. The article begins by discussing the heteronormative perspective that frames current discourse on older people’s needs and citizenship. It then presents data from an empirical study to highlight the concerns that older lesbians and gay men have about housing, health and social service provision, work and job security, and relationship recognition. The article illustrates how the heterosexual assumption...

  9. A Restorative Justice Approach to Empathy Development in Sex Offenders: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseman, Christopher P.; Ritchie, Martin; Laux, John M.

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe an exploratory study in sex offender treatment using a restorative justice approach to examine the shame, guilt, and empathy development of convicted sexual offenders. Implications for clinical practice and future research are highlighted. (Contains 3 tables.)

  10. Primary prevention of posttraumatic stress disorder:drugs and implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joachim C Burbiel

    2015-01-01

    Because posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a highly debilitating condition, prevention is an important research topic. This article reviews possible prevention approaches that involve the administration of drugs before the traumatic event takes place. The considered approaches include drugs that address the sympathetic nervous system, drugs interfere with the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, narcotics and other psychoactive drugs, as well as modulators of protein synthesis. Furthermore, some thoughts on potential ethical implications of the use of drugs for the primary prevention of PTDS are presented. While there are many barriers to overcome in this field of study, this paper concludes with a call for additional research, as there are currently no approaches that are well-suited for regular daily use.

  11. Theranostic Implications of Nanotechnology in Multiple Sclerosis: A Future Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Vikram Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis is a multifactorial disease with several pathogenic mechanisms and pathways. Successful MS management and medical care requires early accurate diagnosis along with specific treatment protocols based upon multifunctional nanotechnology approach. This paper highlights advances in nanotechnology that have enabled the clinician to target the brain and CNS in patient with multiple sclerosis with nanoparticles having therapeutic and imaging components. The multipartite theranostic (thera(py + (diagnostics approach puts forth strong implications for medical care and cure in MS. The current nanotheranostics utilize tamed drug vehicles and contain cargo, targeting ligands, and imaging labels for delivery to specific tissues, cells, or subcellular components. A brief overview of nonsurgical nanorepair advances as future perspective is also described. Considering the potential inflammatory triggers in MS pathogenesis, a multifunctional nanotechnology approach will be needed for the prognosis.

  12. Anxious uncertainty and reactive approach motivation (RAM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Ian; Nash, Kyle; Mann, Nikki; Phills, Curtis E

    2010-07-01

    In 4 experiments anxious uncertainty threats caused reactive approach motivation (RAM). In Studies 1 and 2, academic anxious uncertainty threats caused RAM as assessed by behavioral neuroscience and implicit measures of approach motivation. In Study 3 the effect of a relational anxious uncertainty threat on approach-motivated personal projects in participants' everyday lives was mediated by the idealism of those projects. In Study 4 the effect of a different relational anxious uncertainty threat on implicit approach motivation was heightened by manipulated salience of personal ideals. Results suggest a RAM account for idealistic and ideological reactions in the threat and defense literature. Speculative implications are suggested for understanding diverse social and clinical phenomena ranging from worldview defense, prejudice, and meaning making to narcissism, hypomania, and aggression. PMID:20565191

  13. Definitions of fuel poverty: Implications for policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper outlines why the definition of fuel poverty is important in policy formulation and describes how the Government's current definitions evolved from the original concept. It discusses the determination of income and fuel costs and the possibilities for a relative and common European measure. It examines problems inherent in assessing fuel costs as a percentage of income and puts forward the arguments for a ‘budget standard’ approach. The paper illustrates how the size of the problem depends on the definition and chosen threshold and suggests advantages for a rating scale. It illustrates how the income composition and thresholds also govern the distribution of the target populations and the relative importance of the main causal factors, and examines the consequent policy implications. It explores the definition of vulnerable households and the importance of severity and questions whether the UK fuel poverty strategy is targeted at households least able to afford their fuel costs (as the name implies) or primarily those at risk from excess winter and summer mortality and morbidity. Finally, after examining the role of supplementary indicators, it looks at the opportunities for changing the definition and comments on the Government review of the definition and targets. - Highlights: ► There are major failings in the existing official definitions of fuel poverty. ► expressing fuel costs as a percentage of income is a poor indicator of fuel poverty. ► A budget standard approach provides a more consistent, meaningful and fairer measure. ► The scale and nature of the problem changes dramatically with different definitions. ► The definition is crucial to the mix of policies and allocation of resources required.

  14. Microsporogenesis of Cycas and its systematic implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-Fen ZHANG; Hai-Bo OUYANG; Jin-Yan DU; Shou-Zhou ZHANG; Yong LI; Hong WU

    2012-01-01

    Taxonomists are divided over the infrageneric classification and species delimitation within the genus Cycas.The division is largely determined by whether a broad or narrow species concept is adopted,the latter approach being based on apparently minor morphological differences.It is well known that cytokinesis in the cells of pollen provides important evidence for plant taxonomy,particularly at the higher taxonomic level.Here we present the first broad comparison of the cytokinesis of male meiosis in five species of Cycas.A comparative analysis of microsporogenesis in Cycas was carried out using conventional microscopy,semi-thin sectioning,histochemistry,and fluorescence microscopy with a focus on the cytokinesis of meiosis in the pollen of dividing cells.Our observations confirmed that,contrary to previous reports,the cytokinesis in male meiosis of five species in Cycas is simultaneous at the end of second meiosis.The basic model of microsporogenesis and its systematic implications in Cycas is discussed based both on previous reports and our new results.

  15. Framework and implications of virtual neurorobotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite decades of societal investment in artificial learning systems, truly “intelligent” systems have yet to be realized. These traditional models are based on input-output pattern optimization and/or cognitive production rule modeling. One response has been social robotics, using the interaction of human and robot to capture important cognitive dynamics such as cooperation and emotion; to date, these systems still incorporate traditional learning algorithms. More recently, investigators are focusing on the core assumptions of the brain “algorithm” itself—trying to replicate uniquely “neuromorphic” dynamics such as action potential spiking and synaptic learning. Only now are large-scale neuromorphic models becoming feasible, due to the availability of powerful supercomputers and an expanding supply of parameters derived from research into the brain’s interdependent electrophysiological, metabolomic and genomic networks. Personal computer technology has also led to the acceptance of computer-generated humanoid images, or “avatars”, to represent intelligent actors in virtual realities. In a recent paper, we proposed a method of virtual neurorobotics (VNR in which the approaches above (social-emotional robotics, neuromorphic brain architectures, and virtual reality projection are hybridized to rapidly forward-engineer and develop increasingly complex, intrinsically intelligent systems. In this paper, we synthesize our research and related work in the field and provide a framework for VNR, with wider implications for research and practical applications.

  16. Big Data: Implications for Health System Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Laura B; Rogers, Joseph W; Hertig, John B; Weber, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    Big Data refers to datasets that are so large and complex that traditional methods and hardware for collecting, sharing, and analyzing them are not possible. Big Data that is accurate leads to more confident decision making, improved operational efficiency, and reduced costs. The rapid growth of health care information results in Big Data around health services, treatments, and outcomes, and Big Data can be used to analyze the benefit of health system pharmacy services. The goal of this article is to provide a perspective on how Big Data can be applied to health system pharmacy. It will define Big Data, describe the impact of Big Data on population health, review specific implications of Big Data in health system pharmacy, and describe an approach for pharmacy leaders to effectively use Big Data. A few strategies involved in managing Big Data in health system pharmacy include identifying potential opportunities for Big Data, prioritizing those opportunities, protecting privacy concerns, promoting data transparency, and communicating outcomes. As health care information expands in its content and becomes more integrated, Big Data can enhance the development of patient-centered pharmacy services. PMID:27559194

  17. Support mechanisms and risk: Implications on the Nordic electricity system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kitzing, Lena; Ravn, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Investments in renewable energy projects, such as offshore wind parks, are very much dependent on financial support. The type of policy instrument chosen for such support determines investors' exposure to market risk, and thus influences which rate of return they expect to achieve. We make a...... stochastic analysis for the Nordic electricity system by conducting simulations with the energy system model Balmorel and by applying the mean-standard deviation approach of modern portfolio theory to quantify risk implications of policy instruments for an exemplary offshore wind park. The analysis reveals...

  18. International and Cultural Implications on Internationalization Analysis of Multinational Firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José G. Vargas-Hernández

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aims to analyze some of the institutional and cultural implications on internationalization analysis of multinational firms. The analysis begins questioning what the main institutional and cultural variables are considered in the involvement of internationalization of multinational firms. To answer this question, a literature review types approach in areas like internationalization of multinational firms based on institutional and cultural frameworks is followed. Secondly, these institutional and cultural variables are analyzed to integrate findings. Finally, the paper argues the need to design a better institutional and cultural balance among the development of a glocal-regional transformation, convergence and governance.

  19. On the Correctness of Quantum Raychaudhuri Equation and its Implications

    CERN Document Server

    Lashin, E I

    2016-01-01

    Regardless of the problems associated with the Bohmian interpretation of quantum mechanics, we carefully examine the approach of quantum Raychaudhuri equation (QRE) based on quantal (Bohmian) trajectories. We find that the whole procedure is full of problematic points, on both physical relevancy and mathematical correctness. In particular, we illustrate the problems associated with the technical derivation of QRE, as well as its invalid physical implications. Thus, all claims concerning the inevitability of focusing and the formation of conjugate points, including the singularity evading, are, to us, not valid.

  20. Energy and IAQ Implications of Residential Ventilation Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, William [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluates the energy, humidity and indoor air quality (IAQ) implications of residential ventilation cooling in all U.S. IECC climate zones. A computer modeling approach was adopted, using an advanced residential building simulation tool with airflow, energy and humidity models. An economizer (large supply fan) was simulated to provide ventilation cooling while outdoor air temperatures were lower than indoor air temperatures (typically at night). The simulations were performed for a full year using one-minute time steps to allow for scheduling of ventilation systems and to account for interactions between ventilation and heating/cooling systems.

  1. Practical implications of 'postmodern philosophy'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savić Mile V.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the implications of the discourse about postmodernity. Postmodernity is analyzed as a complex discursive figure. Within the discourse about postmodernity three levels are distinguished: the postmodern condition, postmodernism, and reflection of the postmodern condition. Special attention is paid to globalization and the problem of the enforcement of modern projects in East-European societies, particularly Serbia. These societies are termed object-societies, while their modification of modernity is called eastmodernity. The author's answer to the complexity of the postmodern condition is a conception of the politics of subsistence.

  2. Female genital cutting: nursing implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenstein, Rachel A

    2014-01-01

    Female genital cutting (FGC) is a practice that affects millions of girls and women worldwide. This deeply rooted practice has cultural, religious, and psychosexual meaning to its practitioners, but it also carries long-term physical and mental complications. Decried as a human rights violation, nonetheless this practice is still carried out today. Nurses are in a unique position to contact and educate women who have been cut or are at risk for mutilation. To advocate for these women, a thorough understanding of the practice of FGC, its cultural overtones, religious implications, and psychosexual effects is needed. PMID:23835896

  3. Pharmacogenomics and migraine: possible implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, P.; Brosen, K.

    2008-01-01

    Pharmacogenomics is the science about how inherited factors influence the effects of drugs. Drug response is always a result of mutually interacting genes with important modifications from environmental and constitutional factors. Based on the genetic variability of pharmacokinetic and in some...... cases pharmacodynamic variability we mention possible implications for the acute and preventive treatment of migraine. Pharmacogenomics will most likely in the future be one part of our therapeutic armamentarium and will provide a stronger scientific basis for optimizing drug therapy on the basis of...

  4. Networking activism: implications for Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelis Vatikiotis

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The outbreak of December 2008 against police brutality through a wave of demonstrations and street protests in Athens, which was strongly advocated by protest activities and practices across the world, addresses several issues in relation to the transformative potentials of mediated collective action. The paper critically evaluates different accounts of December events, probing then into thevery networking of that movement. From this perspective, it points out another aspect of the local-global interplay in protest culture along new mediating practices (beyond the creation of transnational publics, that of the implications of transnational networking for local social activism and identification, addressing relevant questions in the Greek context.

  5. Children under Five and Digital Technologies: Implications for Early Years Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaiologou, Ioanna

    2016-01-01

    This project aimed to investigate the types of digital technologies children under the age of five are using at home and assess the possible implications for early years pedagogy. The research, carried out between 2010 and 2012, was based in four European countries: England, Greece, Malta and Luxemburg. A mixed methods approach was employed to…

  6. Analytical Implications of Using Practice Theory in Workplace Information Literacy Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moring, Camilla; Lloyd, Annemaree

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This paper considers practice theory and the analytical implications of using this theoretical approach in information literacy research. More precisely the aim of the paper is to discuss the translation of practice theoretical assumptions into strategies that frame the analytical focus and interest when researching workplace…

  7. Occupational Training Families. Their Implications for FE. An FEU Occasional Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ron

    This occasional paper appraises the implications of occupational training families (OTF) for further education (FE) in Great Britain. In the early sections, the document sketches the background of OTFs and appraises the advantages and disadvantages of the concept. In so doing, four possible approaches to helping young people acquire flexibility,…

  8. "Learning to Listen": Boys' Gender Narratives--Implications for Theory and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to critically investigate year 6 and year 9 boys' constructions of masculinity in the light of theories of inclusive masculinity and to consider the implications of the findings for critical masculinities scholarship in educational research. Design/methodology/approach: Qualitative data was collected through…

  9. Veterinary Homeopathy: The Implications of Its History for Unorthodox Veterinary Concepts and Veterinary Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulter, Dwight B.

    1979-01-01

    The history of veterinary homeopathy, its future and implications are discussed. The need for investigation into the validity of both allopathic and homeopathic claims is stressed and it is suggested that maintenance of quality is the key factor in any approach. (BH)

  10. How do local stakeholders respond to the uncertain implications of an innovative flood infrastructure project?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Hoek, Ronald; Brugnach, Marcela; Hoekstra, Arjen

    2013-04-01

    In the 20th century, flood management was dominated by rigid structures - such as dikes and dams - which intend to strictly regulate and control water systems. Although the application of these rigid structures has been successful in the recent past, their negative implications for ecosystems and natural processes is often not properly taken into account. Therefore, flood management practices are currently moving towards more nature-inclusive approaches. Building with Nature (BwN) is such a new approach of nature-inclusive flood management in the Netherlands, which aims to utilize natural dynamics (e.g., wind and currents) and natural materials (e.g., sediment and vegetation) for the realization of effective flood infrastructure, while providing opportunities for nature development. However, the natural dynamics driving a project based on BwN design principles are inherently unpredictable. Furthermore, our factual knowledge base regarding the socio-ecological system in which the BwN initiative is implemented is incomplete. Moreover, in recent years, it is increasingly aimed for by decision-makers to involve local stakeholders in the development of promising flood management initiatives. These stakeholders and other actors involved can have diverging views regarding the project, can perceive unanticipated implications and could choose unforeseen action paths. In short, while a project based on BwN design principles - like any human intervention - definitely has implications for the socio-ecological system, both the extent to which these particular implications will occur and the response of stakeholders are highly uncertain. In this paper, we study the Safety Buffer Oyster Dam case - a BwN pilot project - and address the interplay between the project's implications, the uncertainties regarding these implications and the action paths chosen by the local stakeholders and project team. We determine how the implications of the Safety Buffer project are viewed by local

  11. Entrepreneurship Education: Implications for Teacher Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouws, E.

    2002-01-01

    Explores the implications of South Africa's national Entrepreneurship Education curriculum for teacher training, and suggests some guidelines for compiling a relevant curriculum for teacher training. (EV)

  12. Productivity Measurement in Manufacturing and the Expenditure Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjerning, Bertel; Sørensen, Anders

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies conversion factors based on the expenditure approach and evaluates the appropriateness for international comparisons of output levels in manufacturing. We apply a consistency check based on the insight that relative productivity levels should be invariant to the choice of base...... conclusion is insensitive to the applied method for developing conversion factors. The implication is that we cannot measure relative productivity levels in manufacturing across countries using the expenditure approach....

  13. Evolutionary Theories in Environmental and Resource Economics: Approaches and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Bergh, van den, E.; Gowdy, J.

    1998-01-01

    Recent advances in evolutionary theory have important implications for environmental economics. A short overview is offered of evolutionarythinking in economics. Subsequently, major concepts and approaches inevolutionary biology and evolutionary economics are presented andcompared. Attention is devoted, among others, to Darwinian selection,punctuated equilibrium, sorting mechanisms, Lamarckian evolution,coevolution and self-organization. Basic features of evolution, such assustained change, i...

  14. Focus Groups: A Practical and Applied Research Approach for Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Victoria E.; Shoffner, Marie F.

    2007-01-01

    Focus groups are becoming a popular research approach that counselors can use as an efficient, practical, and applied method of gathering information to better serve clients. In this article, the authors describe focus groups and their potential usefulness to professional counselors and researchers. Practical implications related to the use of…

  15. Block 3, People in Cities: An Ecological Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, John

    An Open University course text, People in Cities--An Ecological Approach (Block 3), is presented. Three sections of the block are: the ecology of urban life, socialization and some implications for the urban child, and the compensatory debate. Some of the adaptive processes and ways in which failures of adaptation are distributed in different…

  16. Alexithymia in eating disorders: therapeutic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinna, Federica; Sanna, Lucia; Carpiniello, Bernardo

    2015-01-01

    A high percentage of individuals affected by eating disorders (ED) achieve incomplete recovery following treatment. In an attempt to improve treatment outcome, it is crucial that predictors of outcome are identified, and personalized care approaches established in line with new treatment targets, thus facilitating patient access to evidence-based treatments. Among the psychological factors proposed as predictors of outcome in ED, alexithymia is of outstanding interest. The objective of this paper is to undertake a systematic review of the literature relating to alexithymia, specifically in terms of the implications for treatment of ED. In particular, issues concerning the role of alexithymia as a predictor of outcome and as a factor to be taken into account in the choice of treatment will be addressed. The effect of treatments on alexithymia will also be considered. A search of all relevant literature published in English using PubMed, PsycINFO, and Scopus databases was carried out on the basis of the following keywords: alexithymia, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, eating disorders, and treatment; no time limits were imposed. Despite the clinical relevance of alexithymia, the number of studies published on the above cited aspects is somewhat limited, and these studies are largely heterogeneous and feature significant methodological weaknesses. Overall, data currently available mostly correlate higher levels of alexithymia with a less favorable outcome in ED. Accordingly, alexithymia is seen as a relevant treatment target with the aim of achieving recovery of these patients. Treatments focusing on improving alexithymic traits, and specifically those targeting emotions, seem to show greater efficacy, although alexithymia levels often remain high even after specific treatment. Further investigations are needed to overcome the methodological limitations of previous studies, to understand the actual impact of alexithymia on ED outcome, and to allow more precise

  17. People management implications of virtual workplace arrangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ortlepp

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors that led to an organisation implementing a particular form of virtual workplace arrangement, namely, home-based work. The benefits and disadvantages associated with this form of work arrangement are explored from both the managers' and home-based employees' perspectives. Design/Methodology/Approach: Given the exploratory nature of the empirical study on which this paper is based, a qualitative research design was adopted so as to ensure that the data collection process was dynamic and probing in nature. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were therefore used as instruments for data collection. Findings: The research findings indicate that virtual work arrangements such as home-based work arrangements have advantages for both employers and employees. For instance, reduction of costs associated with office space and facilities, decrease in absenteeism rates, increased employee job satisfaction and improvements in employees' general quality of life. However, a number of negative experiences related to this form of virtual work arrangement are also evident, for example, feelings of isolation as well as stress related to the inability to have firm boundaries between work and family responsibilities. Implications: Based on the insights gained from the findings in the empirical study, a number of areas that need to be given specific attention when organisations are introducing virtual workplace arrangements of this nature are identified. Recommendations made in this article are important for human resource management specialists as well as core business policy makers considering different forms of organisational design. Originality/Value: Maximising the quality of production and service provided has become the prime objective in most organisations in the 21st century. Technology has made it possible for some jobs to be performed at any place at any time and has facilitated the

  18. Alexithymia in eating disorders: therapeutic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinna F

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Federica Pinna, Lucia Sanna, Bernardo Carpiniello Department of Public Health, Clinical and Molecular Medicine - Unit of Psychiatry, University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy Abstract: A high percentage of individuals affected by eating disorders (ED achieve incomplete recovery following treatment. In an attempt to improve treatment outcome, it is crucial that predictors of outcome are identified, and personalized care approaches established in line with new treatment targets, thus facilitating patient access to evidence-based treatments. Among the psychological factors proposed as predictors of outcome in ED, alexithymia is of outstanding interest. The objective of this paper is to undertake a systematic review of the literature relating to alexithymia, specifically in terms of the implications for treatment of ED. In particular, issues concerning the role of alexithymia as a predictor of outcome and as a factor to be taken into account in the choice of treatment will be addressed. The effect of treatments on alexithymia will also be considered. A search of all relevant literature published in English using PubMed, PsycINFO, and Scopus databases was carried out on the basis of the following keywords: alexithymia, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, eating disorders, and treatment; no time limits were imposed. Despite the clinical relevance of alexithymia, the number of studies published on the above cited aspects is somewhat limited, and these studies are largely heterogeneous and feature significant methodological weaknesses. Overall, data currently available mostly correlate higher levels of alexithymia with a less favorable outcome in ED. Accordingly, alexithymia is seen as a relevant treatment target with the aim of achieving recovery of these patients. Treatments focusing on improving alexithymic traits, and specifically those targeting emotions, seem to show greater efficacy, although alexithymia levels often remain high even after specific

  19. An integral approach to substance abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amodia, Diana S; Cano, Carol; Eliason, Michele J

    2005-12-01

    There is a pressing need in the substance abuse field for more comprehensive models of etiology and treatment that address the complex issues of addiction, including the biological, social, cultural, spiritual and developmental needs of individuals and groups. This article presents a theoretical framework for an integral approach to substance abuse that expands on the existing biopsychosocial model. One contribution of the model is an integrated approach to spirituality from a cross-cultural perspective. This integral approach examines substance abuse etiology and treatment from a four-quadrant perspective adapted from the work of Ken Wilber, and incorporates concepts from integrative medicine and transpersonal psychology/psychiatry. Implications of the model are explored. PMID:16480163

  20. Autonomic response to approachability characteristics, approach behavior, and social functioning in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvinen, Anna; Ng, Rowena; Bellugi, Ursula

    2015-11-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurogenetic disorder that is saliently characterized by a unique social phenotype, most notably associated with a dramatically increased affinity and approachability toward unfamiliar people. Despite a recent proliferation of studies into the social profile of WS, the underpinnings of the pro-social predisposition are poorly understood. To this end, the present study was aimed at elucidating approach behavior of individuals with WS contrasted with typical development (TD) by employing a multidimensional design combining measures of autonomic arousal, social functioning, and two levels of approach evaluations. Given previous evidence suggesting that approach behaviors of individuals with WS are driven by a desire for social closeness, approachability tendencies were probed across two levels of social interaction: talking versus befriending. The main results indicated that while overall level of approachability did not differ between groups, an important qualitative between-group difference emerged across the two social interaction contexts: whereas individuals with WS demonstrated a similar willingness to approach strangers across both experimental conditions, TD individuals were significantly more willing to talk to than to befriend strangers. In WS, high approachability to positive faces across both social interaction levels was further associated with more normal social functioning. A novel finding linked autonomic responses with willingness to befriend negative faces in the WS group: elevated autonomic responsivity was associated with increased affiliation to negative face stimuli, which may represent an autonomic correlate of approach behavior in WS. Implications for underlying organization of the social brain are discussed. PMID:26459097

  1. Rationales for public policy intervention from a systems of innovation approach: the case of VINNOVA

    OpenAIRE

    Chaminade , Cristina; Edquist, Charles

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the implications of the adoption of the National Innovation Systems approach for innovation policy. It starts by positioning the 'systemic' approach against other theoretical approaches, such as neoclassical theories. The authors argue that the adoption of one or the other frameworks leads to different criteria for intervention. The main rationales for public intervention under each approach are then discussed. We make a distinction between classic market failures (ground...

  2. The Black-Litterman Model : mathematical and behavioral finance approaches towards its use in practice

    OpenAIRE

    Mankert, Charlotta

    2006-01-01

    The financial portfolio model often referred to as the Black-Litterman model is analyzed using two approaches; a mathematical and a behavioral finance approach. After a detailed description of its framework, the Black-Litterman model is derived mathematically using a sampling theoretical approach. This approach generates a new interpretation of the model and gives an interpretable formula for the mystical parameter τ, the weight-on-views. Secondly, implications are drawn from research results...

  3. Habermasian knowledge interests: epistemological implications for health sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granero-Molina, José; Fernández-Sola, Cayetano; Muñoz Terrón, José María; Aranda Torres, Cayetano

    2015-04-01

    The Habermasian concept of 'interest' has had a profound effect on the characterization of scientific disciplines. Going beyond issues unrelated to the theory itself, intra-theoretical interest characterizes the specific ways of approaching any science-related discipline, defining research topics and methodologies. This approach was developed by Jürgen Habermas in relation to empirical-analytical sciences, historical-hermeneutics sciences, and critical sciences; however, he did not make any specific references to health sciences. This article aims to contribute to shaping a general epistemological framework for health sciences, as well as its specific implications for the medical and nursing areas, via an analysis of the basic knowledge interests developed by Habermas. PMID:25644235

  4. Zero-based budgeting: implications for social services?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, G L

    1977-01-01

    It is now fact that there is a commitment to the implementation of Zero-Based Budgeting (ZBB) at the federal level. In all likelihood, the adoption of the zero-based approach will have unique implications for the administration and administrators of social service agencies. The following article explores the impetus behind budgetary reform, with a primary focus on the current appeal of ZBB. The author strongly suggests that there are similarities between the now passé Planning, Programming, and Budgeting System and ZBB that permit inferences about any implementation difficulties that ZBB may experience. It is further suggested that ZBB will present social workers with situations and opportunities that will severely challenge many on their current approaches to social service administration. PMID:10308609

  5. Fantastic filters of lattice implication algebras

    OpenAIRE

    Young Bae Jun

    2000-01-01

    The notion of a fantastic filter in a lattice implication algebra is introduced, and the relations among filter, positive implicative filter, and fantastic filter are given. We investigate an equivalent condition for a filter to be fantastic, and state an extension property for fantastic filter.

  6. A Hierarchy of (Fuzzy) Implicational Logics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cintula, Petr; Noguera i Clofent, C.

    Prague : Filosofia, 2008. s. 18-20. [ Logica 2008. 16.06.2008-20.06.2008, Hejnice] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : abstract algebraic logic * fuzzy logic * weakly implicative logics * generalized implication Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  7. Ophthalmic implications of seasonal affective disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is presented with a discussion of its standard treatment of phototherapy. A number of ophthalmic implications related to SAD are proposed. These implications relate to both the condition and the phototherapy used in its treatment, especially the use of full spectrum light which contains ultraviolet and near ultraviolet radiation. 12 references

  8. Policy implications of greenhouse warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppock, Rob

    1992-03-01

    A study panel of the National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and Institute of Medicine recently issued the report Policy Implications of Greenhouse Warming. That report examined relevant scientific knowldeg and evidence about the potential of greenhouse warming, and assayed actions that could slow the onset of warming (mitigation policies) or help human and natural systems of plants and animals adapt to climatic changes (adaptation policies). The panel found that, even given the considerable uncertainties knowledge of the relevant phenomena, greenhouse warming poses a threat sufficient to merit prompt action. People in this country could probably adapt to the changes likely to accompany greenhouse warming. The costs, however, could be substantial. Investment in mitigation acts as insurance protection against the great uncertainties and the possibility of dramatic surprises. The panel found mitigation options that could reduce U.S. emissions by an estimated 10 to 40 percent at modest cost.

  9. MARKETING IMPLICATION IN WINE ECONOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ştefan MATEI

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The wine, a very complex product in viticulture, has proved its tremendous importance not only to the individual but rational nutrition and increasing national income of a country cultivators (evidenced by the upward trend of the share of crop production horticulture and viticulture in the global economy agricultural. More interesting is, given the continued growth in the number of scientific publications and their quality (at least since the 1980s - where "wine" is the centerpiece of these studies - we can not but be witnessing a growing interest more to this "potion" and found that the growing popularity of wine in the science reveals the emergence of a new academic field, ie "wine economy" (or wine-economy. This study aims to make a foray into "wine economy" and to outline some of the implications of marketing in this area.

  10. On the Product and Factorization of Lattice Implication Algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦克云; 宋振明; 等

    1993-01-01

    In this paper,the concepts of product and factorization of lattice implication algebra are proposed,the relation between lattice implication product algebra and its factors and some properties of lattice implication product algebras are discussed.

  11. The estrogen hypothesis of schizophrenia implicates glucose metabolism: association study in three independent samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Line; Hansen, Thomas; Jakobsen, Klaus D.;

    2008-01-01

    feasible task. We undertook these challenges by using an established clinical paradigm, the estrogen hypothesis of schizophrenia, as the criterion to select candidates among the numerous genes experimentally implicated in schizophrenia. Bioinformatic tools were used to build and priorities the signaling...... networks implicated by the candidate genes resulting from the estrogen selection. We identified ten candidate genes using this approach that are all active in glucose metabolism and particularly in the glycolysis. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that variants of the glycolytic genes are associated with...

  12. Consumerism and consumer complexity: implications for university teaching and teaching evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Wendy A

    2013-07-01

    A contemporary issue is the effects of a corporate production metaphor and consumerism on university education. Efforts by universities to attract students and teaching strategies aimed at 'adult learners' tend to treat student consumers as a homogeneous group with similar expectations. In this paper, I argue that consumer groups are not uniform. I use Dagevos' theoretical approach to categorize consumers as calculating, traditional, unique, and responsible. Based on the characteristics of consumers occupying these categories, I describe the implications of the varying consumer expectations for teaching. I also consider the implications for evaluation of teaching and call for research taking consumer types into account when evaluating teaching. PMID:23582877

  13. Re-examination of Electroweak Symmetry Breaking in Supersymmetry and Implications for Light Superpartners

    CERN Document Server

    Kane, G L; Nelson, B D; Wang, L T; Nelson, Brent D.; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2003-01-01

    We examine arguments that could avoid light superpartners as an implication of supersymmetric radiative electroweak symmetry breaking. We argue that, from the point of view of string theory and standard approaches to generating the mu-term, cancellations among parameters are not a generic feature. While the coefficients relating the Z-mass to parameters in the soft supersymmetry breaking Lagrangian can be made smaller, these same mechanisms lead to lighter superpartner masses at the electroweak scale. Consequently we strengthen the implication that gluinos, neutralinos, and charginos are light and likely to be produced at the Fermilab Tevatron and a linear collider.

  14. Propulsion System Choices and Their Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, Claude R., II; Levack, Daniel J. H.; Rhodes, Russell, E.; Robinson, John W.

    2010-01-01

    In defining a space vehicle architecture, the propulsion system and related subsystem choices will have a major influence on achieving the goals and objectives desired. There are many alternatives and the choices made must produce a system that meets the performance requirements, but at the same time also provide the greatest opportunity of reaching all of the required objectives. Recognizing the above, the SPST Functional Requirements subteam has drawn on the knowledge, expertise, and experience of its members, to develop insight that wiIJ effectively aid the architectural concept developer in making the appropriate choices consistent with the architecture goals. This data not only identifies many selected choices, but also, more importantly, presents the collective assessment of this subteam on the "pros" and the "cons" of these choices. The propulsion system choices with their pros and cons are presented in five major groups. A. System Integration Approach. Focused on the requirement for safety, reliability, dependability, maintainability, and low cost. B. Non-Chemical Propulsion. Focused on choice of propulsion type. C. Chemical Propulsion. Focused on propellant choice implications. D. Functional Integration. Focused on the degree of integration of the many propulsive and closely associated functions, and on the choice of the engine combustion power cycle. E. Thermal Management. Focused on propellant tank insulation and integration. Each of these groups is further broken down into subgroups, and at that level the consensus pros and cons are presented. The intended use of this paper is to provide a resource of focused material for architectural concept developers to use in designing new advanced systems including college design classes. It is also a possible source of input material for developing a model for designing and analyzing advanced concepts to help identify focused technology needs and their priorities.

  15. Discovering indigenous science: Implications for science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snively, Gloria; Corsiglia, John

    2001-01-01

    Indigenous science relates to both the science knowledge of long-resident, usually oral culture peoples, as well as the science knowledge of all peoples who as participants in culture are affected by the worldview and relativist interests of their home communities. This article explores aspects of multicultural science and pedagogy and describes a rich and well-documented branch of indigenous science known to biologists and ecologists as traditional ecological knowledge (TEK). Although TEK has been generally inaccessible, educators can now use a burgeoning science-based TEK literature that documents numerous examples of time-proven, ecologically relevant, and cost effective indigenous science. Disputes regarding the universality of the standard scientific account are of critical importance for science educators because the definition of science is a de facto gatekeeping device for determining what can be included in a school science curriculum and what cannot. When Western modern science (WMS) is defined as universal it does displace revelation-based knowledge (i.e., creation science); however, it also displaces pragmatic local indigenous knowledge that does not conform with formal aspects of the standard account. Thus, in most science classrooms around the globe, Western modern science has been taught at the expense of indigenous knowledge. However, because WMS has been implicated in many of the world's ecological disasters, and because the traditional wisdom component of TEK is particularly rich in time-tested approaches that foster sustainability and environmental integrity, it is possible that the universalist gatekeeper can be seen as increasingly problematic and even counter productive. This paper describes many examples from Canada and around the world of indigenous people's contributions to science, environmental understanding, and sustainability. The authors argue the view that Western or modern science is just one of many sciences that need to be

  16. Widening economic & social disparities: implications for India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurian, N J

    2007-10-01

    India is often characterized as an emerging economic super power. The huge demographic dividend, the high quality engineering and management talent, the powerful Indian diaspora and the emerging Indian transnational--kneeling the optimism. In contrast, there is another profile of India which is rather gloomy. This is the country with the largest number of the poor, illiterates and unemployed in the world. High infant mortality, morbidity and widespread anaemia among women and children continue. India suffers from acute economic and social disparities. This article addresses four dimensions of such disparities, viz. regional, rural-urban, social, and gender. There is empirical evidence to indicate that during the last two decades all these disparities have been increasing. As a result of economic reforms, the southern and western States experienced accelerated economic and social development as compared to northern and eastern States. This has led to widening gap in income, poverty and other indicators of development between the two regions. Rural-urban divide also widened in the wake of reforms. While large and medium cities experience unprecedented economic prosperity, the rural areas experience economic stagnation. As a result, there is widespread agrarian distress which results in farmers' suicide and rural unrest. Socially backward sections, especially scheduled castes and tribes (SCs and STs) have gained little from the new prosperity which rewards disproportionately those with assets, skills and higher education. STs have often been victims of development as a result of displacement. The gender gap in social and economic status, traditionally more in India as compared to other societies; has further widened by the economic reforms and globalization. The approach paper to the Eleventh Plan stresses the importance of more inclusive economic growth. It emphasizes the need for bridging the divides discussed in this article. Unless these are achieved in a time

  17. An ecosystem approach to malaria control in an urban setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrasquilla Gabriel

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a research project aimed at strengthening local government and the community for a sustainable malaria control strategy. The project began with a baseline diagnosis of malaria prevalence, a KAP survey, entomology, and health services delivery, after which an epidemiological study was performed to identify risk factors associated with malaria, thereafter used to plan intervention measures. A program evaluation was conducted five years later. By using an ecosystem approach to reanalyze data, this paper discusses how malaria arises from a complex interaction of cultural, economic, ecological, social, and individual factors. Intervention measures require an intersectorial and transdisciplinary approach that does not exist at the moment. Health sector leadership is limited, and there is no true community participation. Implications for research, including the use of qualitative and quantitative methods, study design, and complexity of data analysis are discussed. Finally, implications for malaria control are discussed, stressing the differences between the ecosystem and integrated disease control approaches.

  18. Disease: H00153 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available linked and associated with the gene encoding upstream transcription factor 1 (USF1) and characterized by elevated level...s of serum total cholesterol, triglycerides, or both. Inherited metabolic disease USF1 [HSA:7391

  19. Mining TCGA data using Boolean implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subarna Sinha

    Full Text Available Boolean implications (if-then rules provide a conceptually simple, uniform and highly scalable way to find associations between pairs of random variables. In this paper, we propose to use Boolean implications to find relationships between variables of different data types (mutation, copy number alteration, DNA methylation and gene expression from the glioblastoma (GBM and ovarian serous cystadenoma (OV data sets from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA. We find hundreds of thousands of Boolean implications from these data sets. A direct comparison of the relationships found by Boolean implications and those found by commonly used methods for mining associations show that existing methods would miss relationships found by Boolean implications. Furthermore, many relationships exposed by Boolean implications reflect important aspects of cancer biology. Examples of our findings include cis relationships between copy number alteration, DNA methylation and expression of genes, a new hierarchy of mutations and recurrent copy number alterations, loss-of-heterozygosity of well-known tumor suppressors, and the hypermethylation phenotype associated with IDH1 mutations in GBM. The Boolean implication results used in the paper can be accessed at http://crookneck.stanford.edu/microarray/TCGANetworks/.

  20. Data, Methods, and Theoretical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannagan, Rebecca J.; Schneider, Monica C.; Greenlee, Jill S.

    2012-01-01

    Within the subfields of political psychology and the study of gender, the introduction of new data collection efforts, methodologies, and theoretical approaches are transforming our understandings of these two fields and the places at which they intersect. In this article we present an overview of the research that was presented at a National…

  1. El Enfoque Bilingüe en la Educación de Sordos: sus implicancias para la enseñanza y aprendizaje de la lengua escrita O Enfoque Bilíngue na Educação de Surdos: implicações para o ensino e aprendizagem da língua escrita The Bilingual Approach to Deaf Education: implications for teaching and learning written language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Rosa Lissi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se revisan algunos antecedentes sobre el enfoque bilingüe en la educación de sordos, se describe específicamente cómo ha sido implementado en Suecia, y se hace referencia a la incorporación de este enfoque en la educación de sordos en Chile. Posteriormente, se analiza la forma en que la Lengua de Señas puede ser usada para enseñar la lengua escrita en contextos educativos bilingües, a través del análisis de ejemplos tomados de clases para niños de primer ciclo básico en una escuela de sordos. Finalmente, se enfatizan las implicancias del modelo bilingüe para el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje de la lengua escrita en la educación de sordos y se discuten algunas consideraciones para seguir avanzando en este ámbito en el contexto educacional chileno.Revisam-se alguns antecedentes sobre o enfoque bilíngue na educação de surdos, descreve-se, mais especificamente, como foi sua implementação na Suécia e faz-se referência à incorporação de este enfoque à educação de surdos no Chile. A seguir, analisa-se a forma em que a Língua de Sinais pode ser usada para ensinar a língua escrita em contextos educativos bilíngues, por meio de análises de exemplos retirados de aulas para crianças de primeiro ano do Ensino Fundamental em uma escola para surdos. Finalmente, enfatizam-se as implicações do modelo bilíngue para o processo ensino-aprendizagem da língua escrita na educação de surdos e discutem-se algumas considerações para continuar com os avanços nesse âmbito, no contexto educacional chileno.This article reviews the background of the bilingual approach in deaf education, it describes more specifically how it has been implemented in Sweden, and it refers to the incorporation of this approach in deaf education in Chile. Further on, it analyzes the way in which Sign Language can be used to teach written language in bilingual education contexts, using examples from primary education classes for

  2. APPROACHES TO SOCIAL ANXIETY

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZTÜRK, Abdülkadir

    2014-01-01

    The communication process that influences human lives is negatively affected by social anxiety. There have been many studies conducted and perspectives introduced about social anxiety. The purpose of this study is to explain social anxiety through examining approaches regarding social anxiety and investigate the sufficiency of those approaches. In this study, approaches about social anxiety are categorized in five groups. These categories are biological approach, psychological approach, cult...

  3. Implications of increased ethanol production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The implications of increased ethanol production in Canada, assuming a 10% market penetration of a 10% ethanol/gasoline blend, are evaluated. Issues considered in the analysis include the provision of new markets for agricultural products, environmental sustainability, energy security, contribution to global warming, potential government cost (subsidies), alternative options to ethanol, energy efficiency, impacts on soil and water of ethanol crop production, and acceptance by fuel marketers. An economic analysis confirms that ethanol production from a stand-alone plant is not economic at current energy values. However, integration of ethanol production with a feedlot lowers the break-even price of ethanol by about 35 cents/l, and even further reductions could be achieved as technology to utilize lignocellulosic feedstock is commercialized. Ethanol production could have a positive impact on farm income, increasing cash receipts to grain farmers up to $53 million. The environmental impact of ethanol production from grain would be similar to that from crop production in general. Some concerns about ethanol/gasoline blends from the fuel industry have been reduced as those blends are now becoming recommended in some automotive warranties. However, the concerns of the larger fuel distributors are a serious constraint on an expansion of ethanol use. The economics of ethanol use could be improved by extending the federal excise tax exemption now available for pure alcohol fuels to the alcohol portion of alcohol/gasoline blends. 9 refs., 10 tabs

  4. Green buildings: Implications for acousticians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Michael R.

    2005-04-01

    This presentation will deal with the practical implications of green design protocols of the US Green Building Council on interior acoustics of buildings. Three areas of particular consequence to acousticians will be discussed. Ventilation Systems: reduced energy consumption goals dictate reliance on natural cooling and ventilation using ambient air when possible. The consequent large openings in the building envelope to bring fresh air into rooms, and similar sized openings to transfer the mixed air out, can severely compromise the noise isolation of the rooms concerned. Radiant Cooling: the heavy concrete floors of buildings can be used as a thermal flywheel to lessen the cooling load, which forces the concrete ceilings to be exposed to the occupied rooms for heat transfer, and strictly limits the application of acoustical absorption on the ceilings. This challenges the room acoustics design. Green Materials: the LEED protocols require the elimination of potentially harmful finishes, including fibrous materials which may impact air quality or contribute to health problems. Since the backbone of sound absorption is glass and mineral fibres, this further challenges provision of superior room acoustics. Examples and commentary will be provided based on current and recent projects.

  5. National and international social implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Every new technology since slash-and-burn has required new social institutions to go along with it, and nuclear technology is no exception. There is, therefore, a need to go beyond decisionmaking among alternative peaceful proliferation schemes. There is a need also to look at the needs for new national and/or transnational institutions that will have to accompany any proliferations in area. There are five social implications that bear on the need to develop new social institutions. First is the issue of Great Power relations, in an era of nuclear proliferation. Second is the conflict between nationalism and internationalism. The third is the issue of the military and diplomatic strategies of small nations, particularly small nations on the threshold of nuclear capacity, and the question of military versus civilian rule in those nations. Fourth, and possibly the most important is the role of multinational corporations in nuclear regulation, and fifth, the question of secrecy and how that bears on power values of primacy in democratic states

  6. Implications of Donald Macdonald's report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chairman of the session debating the implications of the Macdonald report identified three important aspects of utility restructuring: equity, efficiency and sustainability. Dr. Jan Carr, a member of the Macdonald Committee, predicted that the continental energy market will likely demand a much larger number of smaller energy transactions, and the value in having inherently low-cost generation located close to load centres, and/or close to the US border. Douglas Hall, Vice President of RBC Dominion Securities criticized the Macdonald Committee for leaving 70 per cent of Hydro's generating capacity in public hands. He favored transferring all assets to the private sector, and questioned the Committee's assumption that the utility could be broken down into four components that would share overhead and still compete against each other. John Murphy, President of the Power Workers Union stated that the Union was not ideologically opposed to competition in the electricity industry, but he questioned the Committee's assumption that competition would promote efficient supply of power at the least cost to the economy. Tony Jennings, Chief Executive of the Municipal Electric Association tackled a series of myths about municipal electric utilities, and IPPSO Counsel Jay Sheppard emphasized the need for making sure that the entity buying the power in the short term is truly independent and is not doing incestuous deals with its friends at Ontario Hydro Generation (one of the four components of the proposed, restructured Corporation) , because otherwise competition will not work

  7. Health implications of hydropower development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydropower development had been neglected in many countries during the past few decades, but the situation dramatically changed during the 1970s owing to the constantly increasing costs of electricity generation by fossil-fuel and nuclear power plants. Currently, hydroelectric generation accounts for approximately 23% of total global electricity supply. Much of the hydropower potential in developing countries of Africa, Asia and Latin America still remains to be exploited. Like any other source of energy, hydropower development has several health impacts. Conceptually, health implications of hydropower development can be divided into two broad categories: short-term and long-term problems. Short-term health impacts occur during the planning, construction and immediate post-construction phases, whereas long-term impacts stem from the presence of large man-made lakes, development of extensive canal systems, alteration of the ecosystem of the area, and changing socio-economic conditions. Longer-term impacts are further classified into two categories: introduction of new diseases and/or intensification of existing ones due to the improvements of the habitats of disease-carrying vectors, and health problems arising from resettlement of the people whose homes and land-holdings are inundated by the reservoirs. All these impacts are discussed in detail. Health impacts of hydropower developments have not yet been studied extensively. It is often implicitly assumed that health impacts of major dams are minor compared with other social and environmental impacts. Future studies could possibly reverse this assumption. (author)

  8. Climatic implications of ice microphysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liou, K.N. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Based on aircraft measurements of mid-latitude cirrus clouds, ice crystal size distribution and ice water content (IWC) are shown to be dependent on temperature. This dependence is also evident from the theoretical consideration of ice crystal growth. Using simple models of the diffusion and accretion growth of ice particles, the computed mean ice crystal size and IWC compare reasonably well with the measured mean values. The temperature dependence of ice crystal size and IWC has important climatic implications in that the temperature field perturbed by external radiative forcings, such as greenhouse warming, can alter the composition of ice crystal clouds. Through radiative transfer, ice microphysics can in turn affect the temperature field. Higher IWC would increase cloud solar albedo and infrared emissivity, while for a given IWC, larger crystals would reduce cloud albedo and emissivity. The competing effects produced by greenhouse temperature perturbations via ice micro-physics and radiation interactions and feedbacks are assessed by a one-dimensional radiative-convective climate model that includes an advanced radiation parameterization program. 3 figs.

  9. Implications of zero economic growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurow, L.C.

    1977-01-01

    The consequences of a zero economic growth (ZEG) policy are examined to see what limits to growth, some of which already exist, are desirable and what changes in our institutions are required to impose a no-growth policy. Past periods of zero or negative growth have increased unemployment, raised employability standards, and increased income-distribution inequalities with a subsequent lowering of the living standard. Zero population growth would offset this somewhat by freeing the capital now spent on education and career training and using it to raise per capita living standards if a work-sharing and unemployment-payment system were devised. Undesirable social implications would be felt both if a lack of employment opportunities reduced competition and consumption habits or if it led to intensive competition. Advocates of ZEG propose to restrain only those areas using nonrenewable resources and causing pollution of the environment, while expanding the service areas. The service sector (e.g., transportation and utilities) is also polluting and uses nonrenewable resources, however, pointing up their failure to account for indirect consumption. Many undeveloped countries already have ZEG but would not be content for the U.S. to halt growth opportunities. ZEG would be difficult to enforce and would do nothing to promote pollution control. (DCK)

  10. Predictive implications of Gompertz's law

    CERN Document Server

    Richmond, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Gompertz's law tells us that for humans above the age of 35 the death rate increases exponentially with a doubling time of about 10 years. Here, we show that the same law continues to hold even for ages over 100. Beyond 106 there is so far no statistical evidence available because the number of survivors is too small even in the largest nations. However assuming that Gompertz's law continues to hold beyond 106, we conclude that the mortality rate becomes equal to 1 at age 120 (meaning that there are 1,000 deaths in a population of one thousand). In other words, the upper bound of human life is near 120. The existence of this fixed-point has interesting implications. It allows us to predict the form of the relationship between death rates at age 35 and the doubling time of Gompertz's law. In order to test this prediction, we first carry out a transversal analysis for a sample of countries comprising both industrialized and developing nations. As further confirmation, we also develop a longitudinal analysis usi...

  11. Predictive implications of Gompertz's law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Peter; Roehner, Bertrand M.

    2016-04-01

    Gompertz's law tells us that for humans above the age of 35 the death rate increases exponentially with a doubling time of about 10 years. Here, we show that the same law continues to hold up to age 106. At that age the death rate is about 50%. Beyond 106 there is so far no convincing statistical evidence available because the number of survivors are too small even in large nations. However, assuming that Gompertz's law continues to hold beyond 106, we conclude that the mortality rate becomes equal to 1 at age 120 (meaning that there are 1000 deaths in a population of one thousand). In other words, the upper bound of human life is near 120. The existence of this fixed-point has interesting implications. It allows us to predict the form of the relationship between death rates at age 35 and the doubling time of Gompertz's law. In order to test this prediction, we first carry out a transversal analysis for a sample of countries comprising both industrialized and developing nations. As further confirmation, we also develop a longitudinal analysis using historical data over a time period of almost two centuries. Another prediction arising from this fixed-point model, is that, above a given population threshold, the lifespan of the oldest persons is independent of the size of their national community. This prediction is also supported by empirical evidence.

  12. 效用、基本善與能力發展―論「平等」的多元視野及其教育蘊義 Utility, Primary Goods, and the Capabilities Approach: Multiple Perspectives on “Equality” and Their Educational Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    王俊斌 Chun-Ping Wang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available 本文之目的係在Sen〈什麼樣的平等?〉一文的基礎上,藉由效益論、正義論與能力取向理論等相關文獻之分析,深入探究「效益平等」、「總體效用平等」、「Rawls的基本善平等」,以及「基本能力平等」等四種不同觀點之內涵及其侷限性。相較於能力取向理論在福利經濟學與倫理學領域已累積的大量文獻,能力取向理論之教育應用研究卻仍極為有限。因此,本文最後嘗試提出「平等」的多元思維取向,期待能夠為未來教育公平議題研究提供更妥適的倫理學基礎。 This essay, based on the foundations laid out by Amartya Sen in his article “Equality of what?” as well as other related literature and studies on utilitarianism, theory of justice, and the capabilities approach, delved into the contents and limitations of four different “equality” viewpoints which encompassed “utilitarian equality,” “total utility equality,” the “Rawlsian equality of primary goods,” and the “basic capability equality.” A large amount of research had been previously conducted on the application of the capabilities approach to welfare economics and ethics, but research on the educational applications of the capabilities approach remained comparatively sparse. To address this problem, this essay proposes in its concluding section multiple perspectives on “equality” and attempted to provide an ethical foundation that would better suite the discussions of educational equality in the future.

  13. Tuberous sclerosis - clinical manifestations and genetic implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-five patients with tuberous sclerosis have been studied with regard to their clinical manifestations, radiological features and genetic background. The practical implications of the condition in southern Africa are reviewed with reference to the literature

  14. A behaviorological thanatology: Foundations and implications

    OpenAIRE

    Fraley, Lawrence E.

    1998-01-01

    Foundation principles supporting a behaviorological thanatology are reviewed, including concepts of life, person, death, value, right, ethic, and body/person distinctions. These natural science foundations are contrasted with traditional foundations, and their respective implications are speculatively explored.

  15. Corporate Language and Implications for Organizational Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zølner, Mette

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores empirically implications of language use for MNCs’ learning from subsidiaries. Drawing on sociolinguistic literature, the article argues that while employing a single corporate language facilitates quick and direct communication of explicit knowledge, such a language design is...

  16. Marketing Strategy: Concepts And Implication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tohir Akramov

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In today's very competitive marketplace a strategy that insures a consistent approach to offering your product or service in a way that will outsell the competition is critical. However, in concert with defining the marketing strategy you must also have a well defined methodology for the day to day process of implementing it. This research studies contemporary strategy concepts and the methods of its implementation, which is very needed in Uzbek economy.

  17. The economic implications of carbon cycle uncertainty

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Steven J.; Edmonds, James A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the implications of uncertainty in the carbon cycle for the cost of stabilizing carbon dioxideconcentrations. Using a state of the art integrated assessment model, we find that uncertainty in our understanding of thecarbon cycle has significant implications for the costs of a climate stabilization policy, with cost differences denominatedin trillions of dollars. Uncertainty in the carbon cycle is equivalent to a change in concentration target of up to 100 ppmv.The impact o...

  18. [Name Withheld]: Anonymity and Its Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Weicher, Maureen

    2006-01-01

    Anonymity allows the individual to have a voice without having a name. Since the word “anonymous” entered the English language with the advent of the printing press, the implications of being anonymous - and its lexical offspring “anonymity” - have shifted with time, place, and circumstance. What are the perceived effects of being anonymous/anonymity on the individual and on society? In this paper, I will explore some of the shifting meanings and implications of this concept, first as i...

  19. Vague Congruences and Quotient Lattice Implication Algebras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Qin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to further develop the congruence theory on lattice implication algebras. Firstly, we introduce the notions of vague similarity relations based on vague relations and vague congruence relations. Secondly, the equivalent characterizations of vague congruence relations are investigated. Thirdly, the relation between the set of vague filters and the set of vague congruences is studied. Finally, we construct a new lattice implication algebra induced by a vague congruence, and the homomorphism theorem is given.

  20. Knowledge Sharing and Implications to Employee Engagement

    OpenAIRE

    Abrar

    2011-01-01

    The objectives to be achieved in this research was to determine the application of knowledge sharing on the lecturers in Economics Faculty UNPAD, and knowing whether the lecturers are engaged or not, and determining the implications of knowledge sharing in employee engagement. This is an empirical study using description and verification methods with two variables. The implications of knowledge sharing to employee engagement includes the conditions of application of knowledge sharing, and the...

  1. Streamflow disaggregation: a nonlinear deterministic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sivakumar

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This study introduces a nonlinear deterministic approach for streamflow disaggregation. According to this approach, the streamflow transformation process from one scale to another is treated as a nonlinear deterministic process, rather than a stochastic process as generally assumed. The approach follows two important steps: (1 reconstruction of the scalar (streamflow series in a multi-dimensional phase-space for representing the transformation dynamics; and (2 use of a local approximation (nearest neighbor method for disaggregation. The approach is employed for streamflow disaggregation in the Mississippi River basin, USA. Data of successively doubled resolutions between daily and 16 days (i.e. daily, 2-day, 4-day, 8-day, and 16-day are studied, and disaggregations are attempted only between successive resolutions (i.e. 2-day to daily, 4-day to 2-day, 8-day to 4-day, and 16-day to 8-day. Comparisons between the disaggregated values and the actual values reveal excellent agreements for all the cases studied, indicating the suitability of the approach for streamflow disaggregation. A further insight into the results reveals that the best results are, in general, achieved for low embedding dimensions (2 or 3 and small number of neighbors (less than 50, suggesting possible presence of nonlinear determinism in the underlying transformation process. A decrease in accuracy with increasing disaggregation scale is also observed, a possible implication of the existence of a scaling regime in streamflow.

  2. Economic and policy implications of pandemic influenza.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Braeton J.; Starks, Shirley J.; Loose, Verne W.; Brown, Theresa Jean; Warren, Drake E.; Vargas, Vanessa N.

    2010-03-01

    Pandemic influenza has become a serious global health concern; in response, governments around the world have allocated increasing funds to containment of public health threats from this disease. Pandemic influenza is also recognized to have serious economic implications, causing illness and absence that reduces worker productivity and economic output and, through mortality, robs nations of their most valuable assets - human resources. This paper reports two studies that investigate both the short- and long-term economic implications of a pandemic flu outbreak. Policy makers can use the growing number of economic impact estimates to decide how much to spend to combat the pandemic influenza outbreaks. Experts recognize that pandemic influenza has serious global economic implications. The illness causes absenteeism, reduced worker productivity, and therefore reduced economic output. This, combined with the associated mortality rate, robs nations of valuable human resources. Policy makers can use economic impact estimates to decide how much to spend to combat the pandemic influenza outbreaks. In this paper economists examine two studies which investigate both the short- and long-term economic implications of a pandemic influenza outbreak. Resulting policy implications are also discussed. The research uses the Regional Economic Modeling, Inc. (REMI) Policy Insight + Model. This model provides a dynamic, regional, North America Industrial Classification System (NAICS) industry-structured framework for forecasting. It is supported by a population dynamics model that is well-adapted to investigating macro-economic implications of pandemic influenza, including possible demand side effects. The studies reported in this paper exercise all of these capabilities.

  3. EDUCATION OF HUMAN RECOURSES MANAGERS: COMPETENCE APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balganova Elena Vladimirovna

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to study the competence approach using in the field of human resources management in higher vocational education and to prove the necessity of special courses introduction which helps bachelor to form professional important competences in the course of academic activity. Methodology: theoretical analysis of psychology and pedagogical literature on a subject of competence and structural and content analysis of the Federal state high educational standard in "Human recourses Management", empirical research of backgrounds and students readiness to develop professional skills with the help of complex psychological and pedagogical methods. Results: in the article an overview of attitudes, concepts of competence approach and relationship of concepts model are provided. The results of testing of the implementation the special courses in the professional training of HR managers, that has led to the students' psychological competence increase, a reflective position forming that will be the basis of their professional development and a successful career. Practical implications: higher education system.

  4. An integrated approach to energy efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nodelman, J. R.; Bertschi, L. [EPCOR Utilities Inc., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Ciona, C. [Calgary Univ., Dept. of Environmental Design, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    1999-08-01

    Development of the EnVest Alberta Program by EPCOR, following the lackluster performance of the energy efficiency program provided by the Utility over the past decade, is described as an illustration of how successful energy efficiency programs can be and achieve significant market penetration. Central to the successful development of the EnVest Alberta program was tackling a number of myths that inhibit the development of effective energy efficiency programs, integrating the lessons learned from the previous limited success approach into the daily life of the Utility and adopting an approach that was highly sensitive to customer needs. The paper describes the implications of these myths on the development of an effective energy efficiency program and potential district energy projects. As the success of the EnVest Alberta Program demonstrates, flexibility, good relationships and a secure understanding of customer needs are key ingredients for any energy efficiency or sustainable development program undertaken by utility companies.

  5. On the ALARP approach to risk management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is an increasing trend by regulatory authorities for the introduction of the as low as reasonably practicable (ALARP) approach in dealing with risk management of proposed or existing complex hazardous systems. For these, decisions about acceptability or tolerability of risks and consequences can have very significant financial, economic and other consequences for the proponents. Conversely, there may be very significant social and socio-economic implications. ALARP as a guide to achieving a satisfactory outcome has a certain intuitive appeal for the practical management of industrial and other risks. However, as suggested herein, there are a number of areas of concern about the validity of this approach. These include representativeness, morality, philosophy, political reality and practicality. An important, and in some respects fundamental, difficulty is that the risk acceptance criteria are not fully open to public scrutiny and can appear to be settled by negotiation

  6. On the ALARP approach to risk management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melchers, R.E

    2001-02-01

    There is an increasing trend by regulatory authorities for the introduction of the as low as reasonably practicable (ALARP) approach in dealing with risk management of proposed or existing complex hazardous systems. For these, decisions about acceptability or tolerability of risks and consequences can have very significant financial, economic and other consequences for the proponents. Conversely, there may be very significant social and socio-economic implications. ALARP as a guide to achieving a satisfactory outcome has a certain intuitive appeal for the practical management of industrial and other risks. However, as suggested herein, there are a number of areas of concern about the validity of this approach. These include representativeness, morality, philosophy, political reality and practicality. An important, and in some respects fundamental, difficulty is that the risk acceptance criteria are not fully open to public scrutiny and can appear to be settled by negotiation.

  7. Understanding the adaptive approach to thermal comfort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humphreys, M.A. [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Centre for the Study of Christianity and Culture; Nicol, J.F. [Oxford Brookes Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Architecture

    1998-10-01

    This paper explains the adaptive approach to thermal comfort, and an adaptive model for thermal comfort is presented. The model is an example of a complex adaptive system (Casti 1996) whose equilibria are determined by the restrictions acting upon it. People`s adaptive actions are generally effective in securing comfort, which occurs at a wide variety of indoor temperatures. These comfort temperatures depend upon the circumstances in which people live, such as the climate and the heating or cooling regime. The temperatures may be estimated from the mean outdoor temperature and the availability of a heating or cooling plant. The evaluation of the parameters of the adaptive model requires cross-sectional surveys to establish current norms and sequential surveys (with and without intervention) to evaluate the rapidity of people`s adaptive actions. Standards for thermal comfort will need revision in the light of the adaptive approach. Implications of the adaptive model for the HVAC industry are noted.

  8. Modelling of pesticide emissions for Life Cycle Inventory analysis: Model development, applications and implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dijkman, Teunis Johannes

    good emission inventories. Recent LCA studies of agricultural products that take toxicity impacts into account show that pesticide emissions considerably contribute to toxicity impacts. At the same time, such conclusions are derived using a simplified approach to quantify pesticide emissions...... and freshwater ecotoxicity impacts obtained with two inventory approaches were compared. The first approach was PestLCI 2.0, the second is the currently prevalent approach (the Ecoinvent approach), which assumes that 100% of the applied mass is emitted to agricultural soil. For both impact categories...... implications for the comparison of toxicity impacts between conventional and organic agriculture. However, the difference in pesticide use and the corresponding environmental impacts is only one of the many aspects that are relevant to assess when discussing sustainability of both types of agriculture...

  9. Life Span Developmental Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Eryılmaz, Ali

    2011-01-01

    The Life Span Developmental Approach examines development of individuals which occurs from birth to death. Life span developmental approach is a multi-disciplinary approach related with disciplines like psychology, psychiatry, sociology, anthropology and geriatrics that indicates the fact that development is not completed in adulthood, it continues during the life course. Development is a complex process that consists of dying and death. This approach carefully investigates the development of...

  10. Annual Research Review: Categories versus Dimensions in the Classification and Conceptualisation of Child and Adolescent Mental Disorders--Implications of Recent Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coghill, David; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J. S.

    2012-01-01

    The question of whether child and adolescent mental disorders are best classified using dimensional or categorical approaches is a contentious one that has equally profound implications for clinical practice and scientific enquiry. Here, we explore this issue in the context of the forth coming publication of the DSM-5 and ICD-11 approaches to…

  11. Holistic Approaches to Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinkmeyer, Don; Dinkmeyer, Don, Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The holistic approach to health includes a spectrum of concepts that have an important influence on our health. Elementary school counselors must recognize this previously neglected need for a holistic approach. Stress, relaxation response, biofeedback, and the orthomolecular approach are discussed. (Author/BEF)

  12. New approaches to treating pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolkerstorfer, Andrea; Handler, Norbert; Buschmann, Helmut

    2016-02-15

    Pain is the most common reason for patients seeking medical care resulting in an estimated world market for analgesics of more than USD 50billion. Pain is a highly complex, heterogeneous and dynamic process characterized by specific patterns of phenotypic sensory neuronal change. Current treatment options for pain include opioids and non-opioid analgesics, acetaminophen and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and other drug classes such as antidepressants and anticonvulsants and a combination thereof. Novel approaches are focusing on the optimization of side-effect profiles of opioid based analgesics, the improvement of selectivity for specific opioid receptors, or by addressing molecular gateways implicated in pain. Promising candidates in development target various types of voltage-gated ion channels and receptors for capsaicin and analogs. Currently, after decades of pain research it has to be stated that the assessment, prevention and treatment of pain in industrialized countries as well as in low-income and middle-income countries are neither adequate nor equitable. Further research is needed so that specifically chronic pain control can be improved and individualized. PMID:26774577

  13. Antisense approaches in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Kim N; Gleave, Martin E

    2004-06-01

    Patients with hormone refractory prostate cancer have limited treatment options and new therapies are urgently needed. Advances in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms implicated in prostate cancer progression have identified many potential therapeutic gene targets that are involved in apoptosis, growth factors, cell signalling and the androgen receptor (AR). Antisense oligonucleotides are short sequences of synthetic modified DNA that are designed to be complimentary to a selected gene's mRNA and thereby specifically inhibit expression of that gene. The antisense approach continues to hold promise as a therapeutic modality to target genes involved in cancer progression, especially those in which the gene products are not amenable to small molecule inhibition or antibodies. The current status and future direction of a number of antisense oligonucleotides targeting several genes, including BCL-2, BCL-XL, clusterin, the inhibitors of apoptosis (IAP) family, MDM2, protein kinase C-alpha, c-raf, insulin-like growth factor binding proteins and the AR, that have potential clinical use in prostate cancer are reviewed. PMID:15174974

  14. Ideology and community social psychology: theoretical considerations and practical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro, Marisela

    2002-08-01

    This paper addresses the importance of the concept of ideology in community work. The implications of a Marxist approach to ideology in community practice are analyzed in terms of the concepts of problematization (P. Freire, 1979) and consciousness-raising (J. Barreiro, 1976), illustrating the point with some examples. The traditional Marxist perspective is also examined in relation to the perspectives of social constructionism (I. Ibáñez, 1996), cultural studies (A. McRobbie, 1992), post-Marxism (E. Laclau & C. Mouffe, 1985), and feminism (D. Haraway, 1991). It is argued that the concepts of hegemony and habitus (P. Bourdieu, 1985) can be useful to community social psychology theory and practice. A "situated perspective"--in which it is possible to dialogue from different "subject positions," and articulate transformation and political action--is argued. The implications of this shifting in the concept of ideology by means of theoretical developments outside social communitypsychology can help to define the external (outside) agent's position in community practice. PMID:12125780

  15. Genes and gene networks implicated in aggression related behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malki, Karim; Pain, Oliver; Du Rietz, Ebba; Tosto, Maria Grazia; Paya-Cano, Jose; Sandnabba, Kenneth N; de Boer, Sietse; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Sluyter, Frans

    2014-10-01

    Aggressive behaviour is a major cause of mortality and morbidity. Despite of moderate heritability estimates, progress in identifying the genetic factors underlying aggressive behaviour has been limited. There are currently three genetic mouse models of high and low aggression created using selective breeding. This is the first study to offer a global transcriptomic characterization of the prefrontal cortex across all three genetic mouse models of aggression. A systems biology approach has been applied to transcriptomic data across the three pairs of selected inbred mouse strains (Turku Aggressive (TA) and Turku Non-Aggressive (TNA), Short Attack Latency (SAL) and Long Attack Latency (LAL) mice and North Carolina Aggressive (NC900) and North Carolina Non-Aggressive (NC100)), providing novel insight into the neurobiological mechanisms and genetics underlying aggression. First, weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) was performed to identify modules of highly correlated genes associated with aggression. Probe sets belonging to gene modules uncovered by WGCNA were carried forward for network analysis using ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA). The RankProd non-parametric algorithm was then used to statistically evaluate expression differences across the genes belonging to modules significantly associated with aggression. IPA uncovered two pathways, involving NF-kB and MAPKs. The secondary RankProd analysis yielded 14 differentially expressed genes, some of which have previously been implicated in pathways associated with aggressive behaviour, such as Adrbk2. The results highlighted plausible candidate genes and gene networks implicated in aggression-related behaviour. PMID:25142712

  16. Causes and implications of the correlation between forest productivity and tree mortality rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Nathan L.; van Mantgem, Philip J.; Bunn, Andrew G.; Bruner, Howard; Harmon, Mark E.; O'Connell, Kari B.; Urban, Dean L.; Franklin, Jerry F.

    2011-01-01

    At global and regional scales, tree mortality rates are positively correlated with forest net primary productivity (NPP). Yet causes of the correlation are unknown, in spite of potentially profound implications for our understanding of environmental controls of forest structure and dynamics and, more generally, our understanding of broad-scale environmental controls of population dynamics and ecosystem processes. Here we seek to shed light on the causes of geographic patterns in tree mortality rates, and we consider some implications of the positive correlation between mortality rates and NPP. To reach these ends, we present seven hypotheses potentially explaining the correlation, develop an approach to help distinguish among the hypotheses, and apply the approach in a case study comparing a tropical and temperate forest.

  17. A critical review of principal traffic noise models: Strategies and implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents an exhaustive comparison of principal traffic noise models adopted in recent years in developed nations. The comparison is drawn on the basis of technical attributes including source modelling and sound propagation algorithms. Although the characterization of source in terms of rolling and propulsion noise in conjunction with advanced numerical methods for sound propagation has significantly reduced the uncertainty in traffic noise predictions, the approach followed is quite complex and requires specialized mathematical skills for predictions which is sometimes quite cumbersome for town planners. Also, it is sometimes difficult to follow the best approach when a variety of solutions have been proposed. This paper critically reviews all these aspects pertaining to the recent models developed and adapted in some countries and also discusses the strategies followed and implications of these models. - Highlights: • Principal traffic noise models developed are reviewed. • Sound propagation algorithms used in traffic noise models are compared. • Implications of models are discussed

  18. A critical review of principal traffic noise models: Strategies and implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garg, Naveen, E-mail: ngarg@mail.nplindia.ernet.in [Apex Level Standards and Industrial Metrology Division, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi 110012 (India); Department of Mechanical, Production and Industrial Engineering, Delhi Technological University, Delhi 110042 (India); Maji, Sagar [Department of Mechanical, Production and Industrial Engineering, Delhi Technological University, Delhi 110042 (India)

    2014-04-01

    The paper presents an exhaustive comparison of principal traffic noise models adopted in recent years in developed nations. The comparison is drawn on the basis of technical attributes including source modelling and sound propagation algorithms. Although the characterization of source in terms of rolling and propulsion noise in conjunction with advanced numerical methods for sound propagation has significantly reduced the uncertainty in traffic noise predictions, the approach followed is quite complex and requires specialized mathematical skills for predictions which is sometimes quite cumbersome for town planners. Also, it is sometimes difficult to follow the best approach when a variety of solutions have been proposed. This paper critically reviews all these aspects pertaining to the recent models developed and adapted in some countries and also discusses the strategies followed and implications of these models. - Highlights: • Principal traffic noise models developed are reviewed. • Sound propagation algorithms used in traffic noise models are compared. • Implications of models are discussed.

  19. Policy implications for familial searching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Joyce

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the United States, several states have made policy decisions regarding whether and how to use familial searching of the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS database in criminal investigations. Familial searching pushes DNA typing beyond merely identifying individuals to detecting genetic relatedness, an application previously reserved for missing persons identifications and custody battles. The intentional search of CODIS for partial matches to an item of evidence offers law enforcement agencies a powerful tool for developing investigative leads, apprehending criminals, revitalizing cold cases and exonerating wrongfully convicted individuals. As familial searching involves a range of logistical, social, ethical and legal considerations, states are now grappling with policy options for implementing familial searching to balance crime fighting with its potential impact on society. When developing policies for familial searching, legislators should take into account the impact of familial searching on select populations and the need to minimize personal intrusion on relatives of individuals in the DNA database. This review describes the approaches used to narrow a suspect pool from a partial match search of CODIS and summarizes the economic, ethical, logistical and political challenges of implementing familial searching. We examine particular US state policies and the policy options adopted to address these issues. The aim of this review is to provide objective background information on the controversial approach of familial searching to inform policy decisions in this area. Herein we highlight key policy options and recommendations regarding effective utilization of familial searching that minimize harm to and afford maximum protection of US citizens.

  20. Mass Customization's implication on after-sales services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddsson, Gudmundur Valur; Christensen, Tim Teglgaard; Hvam, Lars

    2007-01-01

    concept has been introduced when it comes to after sales services. As mass customisation also generates customized products, the implications on after sale services like installation, training, routine maintenance, emergency repair, parts supply and software services are comparable to customised service......In many years’ service operations management literature has been focusing on advocating for customized service products for customers. The problem is that every customized product should be supported by a unique service operation. To increase the problem these services are often characterised by...... products. This research points out that service operations management should consider a new approach to services. It is suggested to include embedded configuration systems in product design and to modularise the service product assortment. The article points out that the solution basically incorporates...

  1. Practice implications and recommendations for managing codeine misuse and dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergin, Michael; Norman, Ian; Foley, Michelle; Harris, Richard; Rapca, Anna; Rich, Eileen; Van Hout, Marie-Claire

    2015-12-01

    Codeine, a weak opiate, requires increased pharmacovigilance relating to availability, heterogeneous nature of misuse, dependence and associated harm. A scoping review of literature on codeine was conducted using Arksey & O'Malley's framework (1). Databases searched included PubMed, EBSCO Host, Science Direct, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Cochrane library and Medline from 1994 to 2014. Follow-up search strategies involved hand searching and searching of pharmaceutical, health, medical and drug related websites. Initial zscreening identified 3,105 articles with 475 meeting the inclusion criteria. Eight broad categories organised the literature, data charting and qualitative synthesis. This paper presents implications for practice and makes recommendations to address these issues. Themes identified relate to raising public and practitioner awareness, risk management, dispensing practices and monitoring and surveillance of codeine. Evidence to inform law enforcement, drug surveillance, public health initiatives, harm reduction approaches, pharmacy, clinical and treatment practices is warranted. PMID:26677894

  2. INTONATION:IMPLICATION AND APPLICATION IN TEFL IN CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper stresses the significant pedagogical function ofintonation in spoken English.It also provides a brief review onits current application in teaching English as a foreign language(TEFL)in China.Effective intonation teaching not only has aneffect on facilitating an acquisition of"intelligiblepronunciation"but also has an underlying implication formaking a"whole-person learner involvement"in learningprocess.This paper outlines an approach practiced in Chinatoday.It is based on the basic nuclear tone patterns proposed byQuirk and others in order to promote oral English teachingthrough intonation awareness training.With the learners’attention transferred from segmental sound or meaning tosuprasegmental tone(intonation),the melodic feature of thelanguage is most salient,which greatly motivates the learner’sinterest,involvement and autonomy,therefore,accelerating anacquisition of oral communicative competence.

  3. Future perspectives and potential implications of cardiac myocyte apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haunstetter, A; Izumo, S

    2000-02-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of apoptosis has gained increasing interest in the cardiovascular research community. Apoptotic myocyte loss has been detected in different cardiac disease states such as ischemic heart disease and congestive heart failure. In addition, some evidence for the molecular mechanisms in cardiac myocyte apoptosis has been evolving, although at present the implications thereof for clinical cardiac disease are not known in most of the cases. Based on these new insights, it is the intention of this article to highlight some topics in apoptosis research that might be of particular interest to define the future role and potentials of new therapeutic approaches aimed at preventing myocyte apoptosis. PMID:10728403

  4. States of fragility: stabilisation and its implications for humanitarian action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinson, Sarah; Elhawary, Samir; Muggah, Robert

    2010-10-01

    This paper explores the evolution of international stabilisation agendas and their significance for humanitarian action. Stabilisation includes a combination of military, humanitarian, political and economic activities to control, contain and manage areas affected by armed conflict and complex emergencies. Encompassing narrow security objectives and broader peace-building efforts, stabilisation is both a conservative and potentially transformative, comprehensive and long-term agenda. The open-ended approach allows for widely varying interpretations and applications in different circumstances and by different actors with an assortment of implications for humanitarian action. The relationship between the two is highly uncertain and contentious, due not only to the controversies surrounding stabilisation policies, but also to deep-seated ambiguities at the heart of humanitarianism. While humanitarian actors are preoccupied with the growing involvement of the military in the humanitarian sphere, the paper argues that it is trends in the humanitarian-political interface that represent the more fundamental dilemma. PMID:20846346

  5. Support mechanisms and risk: Implications on the Nordic electricity system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kitzing, Lena; Ravn, Hans

    2013-01-01

    stochastic analysis for the Nordic electricity system by conducting simulations with the energy system model Balmorel and by applying the mean-standard deviation approach of modern portfolio theory to quantify risk implications of policy instruments for an exemplary offshore wind park. The analysis reveals......Investments in renewable energy projects, such as offshore wind parks, are very much dependent on financial support. The type of policy instrument chosen for such support determines investors' exposure to market risk, and thus influences which rate of return they expect to achieve. We make a...... that the two support policy schemes Feed-in Tariffs and Feed-in Premiums provide different risk-return relationships. In the investigated case, a Feed-in Premium scheme would require a 13% higher support level, because of a 6% higher exposure of investors to market risk. Our findings can help when...

  6. IMPLICATIONS OF THE CURRENT EXPOSURE DRAFT ON AUDIT REPORTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Silviu CORDOȘ

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The regulatory changes come as a response to perceived deficiencies in the postfinancial crisis, and their goal is to improve users' perception of the usefulness and quality of the audit report. The article approaches the subject of these proposals to revise the standards and their implications for the audit report. The article is divided into five parts: the first part the authors present a brief introduction to the subject matter; the second part presents the research methodology; the third part the authors present a review of the literature research; the fourth section presents an analysis of the responses of EU respondents to the Exposure Draft issued by the IAASB in July 2013 and the last part the authors present research findings, limitations and perspectives.

  7. Customer value elasticity, equi-value curves and value vectors: implications for customer behaviour and strategic marketing.

    OpenAIRE

    BRENNAN, ROSS

    2009-01-01

    The analysis presented in the paper uses algebraic and geometric methods to explore the implications of the two different specifications of the customer's value equation, the ratio approach and the subtractive approach, for customer behaviour and strategic marketing decisions. Three key concepts are defined and investigated for each specification of the customer's value equation: customer value elasticity, equi-value curves (or "iso-values"), and value vectors. Customer value elasticity measu...

  8. A qualitative investigation of the perceptions of female dog-bite victims and implications for the prevention of dog bites

    OpenAIRE

    Westgarth, Carri; Watkins, Francine

    2015-01-01

    Preventing dog bites is an increasingly important public health and political issue with implications for both human and animal health and welfare. Expert opinion is that most bites are preventable. Intervention materials have been designed to educate people on how to assess the body language of dogs, evaluate risk, and take appropriate action. The effectiveness of this approach is rarely evaluated and the incidence of dog bites is thought to be increasing. Is the traditional approach to dog ...

  9. Contemporary Issues in Building Collapse and Its Implications for Sustainable Development

    OpenAIRE

    Rotimi, James O.; Windapo, Abimbola O.

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines contemporary issues in building collapse and its implications for sustainable development in Nigeria. It explores whether the approach to construction by industry stakeholders is in line with the principles of sustainable development following the spate of building collapses in Nigeria. The rationale for the investigation stems from the view by scholars that construction industry stakeholders’ do not seem to consider the future in their current activities. The study establ...

  10. From realism to instrumentalism - and back? Methodological implications of changes in the epistemology of economics

    OpenAIRE

    Gräbner, Claudius

    2016-01-01

    We identify epistemological shifts in economics throughout the 20th century and discuss their methodological implications. After the realist research program of the Cowles commission and Lucas' rational expectations approach, several economists became dissatisfied with economic theory and initiated a shift towards instrumentalism. Recently, this movement has come under critique and a return to a realist epistemology focusing on identifying economic mechanisms is suggested. Such epi...

  11. A model of educational outcomes at local authority level, with implications for local expenditure needs

    OpenAIRE

    G Bramley

    1989-01-01

    In this paper a model is presented of the determinants of selected outcomes of secondary education at local authority level in England. The purpose is to quantify the relative effects of different types of influence, particularly policy variables and socioeconomic environmental variables. This model is used to assess the feasibility and implications of applying an approach which involves an explicit goal of equalizing outcomes to the assessment of local expenditure needs. It is found that suc...

  12. ISSUES ABOUT THE EVALUATION OF THE FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS AND TAX IMPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Camelia-Catalina, MIHALCIUC; Anișoara, APETRI; Teodora, OLENIUC

    2014-01-01

    Accounting assessment is a process with tax implications on accounting figures. In fact, when it comes to evaluation, we need to clarify exactly what is being refered to: it s about the individual assessment of an asset or liability, or about the global assessment of a business. So, in a narrower approach, in accounting we are particularly interested in the individual assessment of assets and liabilities. In the evaluation, the concept of value is the primary element, accounting, especially a...

  13. AN APROACH OF LOCAL FINANCIAL AUTONOMY AND IMPLICATION OVER SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IN THE KNOWLEDGE SOCIETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena CIGU

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Local governments play an important role in sustainable development processes based on their administrative and financial autonomy. Policies and programs undertaken to assure sustainable development by local governments produce benefits for persistence of the knowledge society. This paper will try to highlight the implication of local financial autonomy over sustainable development of local communities in a knowledge society, based especially on local financial autonomy theory approach.

  14. Human capital formation in Europe at the regional level – implications for economic growth

    OpenAIRE

    Hippe, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    This thesis highlights the formation of human capital in the European regions and its implications for economic growth. It is characterised by its combined regional, long-term and European approach. To this end, I refer to Unified Growth Theory and New Economic Geography as the most important recent theoretical contributions and construct an unparalleled new and large database on regional human capital and other economic factors from numerous diverse sources. For the empirical analysis, spati...

  15. The Multi-Fibre Agreement Phase-Out: Efficiency Implications of Textile Firms in India

    OpenAIRE

    Gopalan, Sasidaran; K.R., Shanmugam

    2009-01-01

    This paper empirically investigates the implications of unshackling of the global textile trade, following the complete phasing out of the Multi-Fibre Agreement (MFA) in 2005, on the efficiency of firms in the Indian textiles industry. By employing Stochastic Coefficients Frontier Approach, it estimates the overall and input specific efficiency values for 215 sample firms during 1993-94 to 2005-06. Results of the paper show that the average efficiency declined over the years, indi...

  16. Aspects of poriferan (Suberites domuncula) apoptosis and innate immune system and evolutionary implications

    OpenAIRE

    Luthringer, Berengere

    2009-01-01

    Survivin, a unique member of the family of inhibitors of apoptosis (IAP) proteins, orchestrates intracellular pathways during cell division and apoptosis. Its central regulatory function in vertebrate molecular pathways as mitotic regulator and inhibitor of apoptotic cell death has major implications for tumor cell proliferation and viability, and has inspired several approaches that target survivin for cancer therapy. Analyses in early-branching Metazoa so far propose an exclusive role of su...

  17. From professional ethics to ethics in professional life : implications for learning, teaching and study.

    OpenAIRE

    Banks, S

    2009-01-01

    This short piece offers some reflections on features of the traditional professional ethics literature, focusing on codes, conduct and rational decision-making in difficult cases. It is argued that this kind of approach offers a rather artificial, abstract and narrow conception of ethics. Consideration is then given to what might be the implications for learning and teaching of shifting emphasis towards a more embedded conception of ethics in professional life, with a focus on the commitment ...

  18. Sustainable development from an Islamic Perspective: meaning implications and policy concerns

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan, Zubair

    2006-01-01

    Abstract This paper examines the debate on the meaning of sustainable development and the policy implications of different approaches from an Islamic perspective. It integrates mainstream and Islamic positions on the subject and argues that to whatever definition of sustainable development one might subscribe, eventually, each ends in an environmental concern. This paper attempts to show that the continuous increase in output of goods and services worldwide imposes a trade off between materia...

  19. Teaching-service integration: implications and roles in experiences of Undergraduate Courses in Nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Cavalcanti de Farias Brehmer; Flávia Regina de Souza Ramos

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed at understanding the implications of the teaching-service integration to nursing education from the perspective of teachers, students and professionals in Primary Healthcare as well as identifying the roles of teachers and professionals who follow practical experiences in education. This is a case study of qualitative approach carried out in five undergraduate courses in Nursing in the state of Santa Catarina. A total of 22 teachers and 14 professionals were interviewed and fi...

  20. Resource and Climate Implications of Landfill Mining A Case Study of Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Frändegård, Per; Krook, Joakim; Svensson, Niclas; Eklund, Mats

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzes the amount of material deposited in Swedish municipal solid waste landfills, how much is extractable and recyclable, and what the resource and climate implications are if landfill mining coupled with resource recovery were to be implemented in Sweden. The analysis is based on two scenarios with different conventional separation technologies, one scenario using a mobile separation plant and the other using a more advanced stationary separation plant. Further, the approach u...

  1. BIOETHICS METHODS IN THE ETHICAL, LEGAL, AND SOCIAL IMPLICATIONS OF THE HUMAN GENOME PROJECT LITERATURE

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Rebecca; Morrissey, Clair

    2013-01-01

    While bioethics as a field has concerned itself with methodological issues since the early years, there has been no systematic examination of how ethics is incorporated into research on the Ethical, Legal and Social Implications (ELSI) of the Human Genome Project. Yet ELSI research may bear a particular burden of investigating and substantiating its methods given public funding, an explicitly cross-disciplinary approach, and the perceived significance of adequate responsiveness to advances in...

  2. Job Enrichment: Evaluation with Implications for Air Force Job Redesign. Interim Report, 1 January 1975-30 April 1977.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Thomas W.; Zumbro, Patrick A.

    The main text of this report consists of a review and evaluation of job enrichment as an approach to job redesign, with implications for Air Force research and application. In addition, two appendixes are included: the first, a supplemental historical discussion; the second, a ninety-six-item annotated bibliography. Specific objectives are to…

  3. Paid Educational Leave and Self-Directed Learning: Implications for Legislation on the Learning Leave Scheme in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jeong Rok; Park, Cho Hyun; Jo, Sung Jun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purposes of this study are to explore paid educational leave (PEL), self-directed learning (SDL) and the relationship between them; and to identify the implications for legislation on the learning leave scheme in South Korea. Design/Methodology/Approach: The research method of the study is a literature review. Articles were identified…

  4. Lignin biodegradation and industrial implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam B Fisher

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lignocellulose, which comprises the cell walls of plants, is the Earth’s most abundant renewable source of convertible biomass. However, in order to access the fermentable sugars of the cellulose and hemicellulose fraction, the extremely recalcitrant lignin heteropolymer must be hydrolyzed and removed—usually by harsh, costly thermochemical pretreatments. Biological processes for depolymerizing and metabolizing lignin present an opportunity to improve the overall economics of the lignocellulosic biorefinery by facilitating pretreatment, improving downstream cellulosic fermentations or even producing a valuable effluent stream of aromatic compounds for creating value-added products. In the following review we discuss background on lignin, the enzymology of lignin degradation, and characterized catabolic pathways for metabolizing the by-products of lignin degradation. To conclude we survey advances in approaches to identify novel lignin degrading phenotypes and applications of these phenotypes in the lignocellulosic bioprocess.

  5. The policy implications of the different interpretations of the cost-effectiveness of renewable electricity support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cost-effectiveness of support for renewable electricity is a main criterion to assess the success of policy instruments, together with effectiveness. The costs of support are also a source of significant concern for governments all over the world. However, significant confusion exists in the literature on the cost-effectiveness of public support for renewable electricity. While some authors define the concept of cost-effectiveness as that which complies with the equimarginality principle, many others, including documents from relevant organisations (European Commission, International Energy Agency, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) define it as “the lowest costs of support”, generally equating it with the minimisation of consumer costs. The aim of this paper is to clarify the differences between both approaches and their policy implications regarding the choice of instruments and design elements. It is shown that they partly overlap and that their policy implications clearly differ, leading to very different policy prescriptions. While the former favours technology neutral instruments and design elements, the “minimisation of consumer costs” approach favours instruments and design elements which adjust support levels to the costs of the technologies. - Highlights: • Significant confusion exists in the literature on the cost-effectiveness of public support for renewable electricity. • Clarify the differences between two main approaches to cost-effectiveness. • Policy implications clearly differ, leading to very different policy prescriptions

  6. Effective self-regulating teams: a generative psychological approach

    OpenAIRE

    Millward, LJ; Banks, AP; Riga, K

    2010-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to describe and defend a generative model for understanding effective self-regulating teams from a distinctively psychological perspective that has implications for both research and practice. Design/methodology/approach – The paper complements Hackman's work on the critical conditions for effecting “self-regulated” teamwork with an understanding of team psychology, as the basis for evolving a propositional model of effective teamwork. Findings – Assumin...

  7. Preventing running injuries. Practical approach for family doctors.

    OpenAIRE

    Johnston CA; Taunton JE; Lloyd-Smith DR; McKenzie DC

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present a practical approach for preventing running injuries. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Much of the research on running injuries is in the form of expert opinion and comparison trials. Recent systematic reviews have summarized research in orthotics, stretching before running, and interventions to prevent soft tissue injuries. MAIN MESSAGE: The most common factors implicated in running injuries are errors in training methods, inappropriate training surfaces and running shoes, malalign...

  8. Neuroimaging of Semantic Processing in Schizophrenia: A Parametric Priming Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Han, S Duke; Wible, Cynthia G.

    2009-01-01

    The use of fMRI and other neuroimaging techniques in the study of cognitive language processes in psychiatric and non-psychiatric conditions has led at times to discrepant findings. Many issues complicate the study of language, especially in psychiatric populations. For example, the use of subtractive designs can produce misleading results. We propose and advocate for a semantic priming parametric approach to the study of semantic processing using fMRI methodology. Implications of this parame...

  9. Esophageal tissue engineering: A new approach for esophageal replacement

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    A number of congenital and acquired disorders require esophageal tissue replacement. Various surgical techniques, such as gastric and colonic interposition, are standards of treatment, but frequently complicated by stenosis and other problems. Regenerative medicine approaches facilitate the use of biological constructs to replace or regenerate normal tissue function. We review the literature of esophageal tissue engineering, discuss its implications, compare the methodologies that have been e...

  10. Research & market strategy: how choice of drug discovery approach can affect market position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sams-Dodd, Frank

    2007-04-01

    In principal, drug discovery approaches can be grouped into target- and function-based, with the respective aims of developing either a target-selective drug or a drug that produces a specific biological effect irrespective of its mode of action. Most analyses of drug discovery approaches focus on productivity, whereas the strategic implications of the choice of drug discovery approach on market position and ability to maintain market exclusivity are rarely considered. However, a comparison of approaches from the perspective of market position indicates that the functional approach is superior for the development of novel, innovative treatments. PMID:17395091

  11. Portfolio Management: An investigation of the implications of measurement errors in stock prices on the creation, management and evaluation of stock portfolios, using stochastic simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Dikaios Tserkezos; Eleni Thanou Thanou

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the implications of measurement errors in the daily published stock prices on the creation and management of efficient portfolios. Using stochastic simulation techniques and the Markowitz Mean Variance approach in the creation of the weights of the various stocks of a portfolio, we conclude that measurement errors have significant implications on the efficiency of the management of a stock portfolio.

  12. Evaluating six soft approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lene Sørensen

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper introduces and evaluates six soft approaches used in strategy development and planning. We take a planner’s perspective on discussing the concepts of strategy development and planning. This means that we see strategy development and planning as learning processes based on Ackoff’s interactive planning principles to be supported by soft approaches in carrying out the principles in action. These six soft approaches are suitable for supporting various steps of the strategy development and planning process. These are the SWOT analysis, the Future Workshop, the Scenario methodology, Strategic Option Development and Analysis, Strategic Choice Approach and Soft Systems Methodology. Evaluations of each methodology are carried out using a conceptual framework in which the organisation, the result, the process and the technology of the specific approach are taken into consideration. Using such a conceptual framework for evaluations of soft approaches increases the understanding of them, their transparency, and their usability in practice.

  13. Mitochondrial biogenesis: pharmacological approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Organelle biogenesis is concomitant to organelle inheritance during cell division. It is necessary that organelles double their size and divide to give rise to two identical daughter cells. Mitochondrial biogenesis occurs by growth and division of pre-existing organelles and is temporally coordinated with cell cycle events [1]. However, mitochondrial biogenesis is not only produced in association with cell division. It can be produced in response to an oxidative stimulus, to an increase in the energy requirements of the cells, to exercise training, to electrical stimulation, to hormones, during development, in certain mitochondrial diseases, etc. [2]. Mitochondrial biogenesis is therefore defined as the process via which cells increase their individual mitochondrial mass [3]. Recent discoveries have raised attention to mitochondrial biogenesis as a potential target to treat diseases which up to date do not have an efficient cure. Mitochondria, as the major ROS producer and the major antioxidant producer exert a crucial role within the cell mediating processes such as apoptosis, detoxification, Ca2+ buffering, etc. This pivotal role makes mitochondria a potential target to treat a great variety of diseases. Mitochondrial biogenesis can be pharmacologically manipulated. This issue tries to cover a number of approaches to treat several diseases through triggering mitochondrial biogenesis. It contains recent discoveries in this novel field, focusing on advanced mitochondrial therapies to chronic and degenerative diseases, mitochondrial diseases, lifespan extension, mitohormesis, intracellular signaling, new pharmacological targets and natural therapies. It contributes to the field by covering and gathering the scarcely reported pharmacological approaches in the novel and promising field of mitochondrial biogenesis. There are several diseases that have a mitochondrial origin such as chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) and the Kearns- Sayre syndrome (KSS

  14. RESEARCH APPROACH: AN OVERVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Vijay Kumar Grover

    2015-01-01

    The paper attempts to explain different possible research approaches to pursue a research project. It starts with three important components of a research approach amelyphilosophical world view, research design, and research methods. Research approaches are classified on the basis of work of Guba (1990), which puts it in to the categories of post positivism, constructivism, transformative and pragmatism. Further paper explains salient features and principals of these four world views. ...

  15. The sustainable livelihoods approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oelofse, Myles; Jensen, Henning Høgh

    2008-01-01

    food chain has on producers and their families, an analysis was conducted of the use of the Sustainable Livelihoods Approach (SLA). The SLA provides a holistic and integrative approach which researchers can use as the overriding frame for their research. The application of the approach is recommended...... as it enables us to maintain important elements of the sustainability vision, yet emphasises that a number of assets influence farmers' livelihoods and it maintains the focus on salience, legitimacy, and credibility in the research....

  16. Evaluating six soft approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lene Tolstrup; Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui

    2008-01-01

    The paper introduces and evaluates six soft approaches used in strategy development and planning. We take a planner's perspective on discussing the concepts of strategy development and planning. This means that we see strategy development and planning as learning processes based on Ackoff......, Strategic Option Development and Analysis, Strategic Choice Approach and Soft Systems Methodology. Evaluations of each methodology are carried out using a conceptual framework in which the organisation, the result, the process and the technology of the specific approach are taken into consideration. Using...... such a conceptual framework for evaluations of soft approaches increases the understanding of them, their transparency, and their usability in practice....

  17. Evaluating six soft approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lene Tolstrup; Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui

    2008-01-01

    's interactive planning principles to be supported by soft approaches in carrying out the principles in action. These six soft approaches are suitable forsupporting various steps of the strategy development and planning process. These are the SWOT analysis, the Future Workshop, the Scenario methodology......, Strategic Option Development and Analysis, Strategic Choice Approach and Soft Systems Methodology. Evaluations of each methodology are carried out using a conceptual framework in which the organisation, the result, the process and the technology of the specific approach are taken into consideration. Using...

  18. Evaluating Six Soft Approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lene Tolstrup; Valqui Vidal, René Victor

    2008-01-01

    's interactive planning principles to be supported by soft approaches in carrying out the principles in action. These six soft approaches are suitable forsupporting various steps of the strategy development and planning process. These are the SWOT analysis, the Future Workshop, the Scenario methodology......, Strategic Option Development and Analysis, Strategic Choice Approach and Soft Systems Methodology. Evaluations of each methodology are carried out using a conceptual framework in which the organisation, the result, the process and the technology of the specific approach are taken into consideration. Using...

  19. Evaluating six soft approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lene; Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui

    2006-01-01

    ’s interactive planning principles to be supported by soft approaches in carrying out the principles in action. These six soft approaches are suitable for supporting various steps of the strategy development and planning process. These are the SWOT analysis, the Future Workshop, the Scenario methodology......, Strategic Option Development and Analysis, Strategic Choice Approach and Soft Systems Methodology. Evaluations of each methodology are carried out using a conceptual framework in which the organisation, the result, the process and the technology of the specific approach are taken into consideration. Using...

  20. Stress and Syllable Structure in English: Approaches to Phonological Variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    San Duanmu

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available We use phonological variation to refer to alternative forms that are available in a language, such as different syllable structures or word stress patterns in English. We discuss several approaches to such variations and argue for a new approach, in which all alternative forms observe a set of inviolable constraints. In particular, we propose that all English words observe four constraints: (a a foot must be disyllabic, (b stressed syllables must be heavy, (c heavy syllables must have stress, and (d the maximal syllable is CVX. We discuss the implications of our proposal for Optimality Theory and for the analysis of linguistic variation in general.

  1. Neuroimaging of Semantic Processing in Schizophrenia: A Parametric Priming Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, S. Duke; Wible, Cynthia G.

    2009-01-01

    The use of fMRI and other neuroimaging techniques in the study of cognitive language processes in psychiatric and non-psychiatric conditions has led at times to discrepant findings. Many issues complicate the study of language, especially in psychiatric populations. For example, the use of subtractive designs can produce misleading results. We propose and advocate for a semantic priming parametric approach to the study of semantic processing using fMRI methodology. Implications of this parametric approach are discussed in view of current functional neuroimaging research investigating the semantic processing disturbance of schizophrenia. PMID:19765623

  2. Gene Trapping Uncovers Gender-Specific Mechanisms for Upstream Stimulatory Factors 1 and 2 in Angiotensinogen Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Sungmi; Liu, Xuebo; Davis, Deborah R.; Sigmund, Curt D.

    2012-01-01

    A single-nucleotide polymorphism (C/A) located within an E-box at the −20 position of the human angiotensinogen (AGT) promoter may regulate transcriptional activation through differential recruitment of the transcription factors Upstream Stimulatory Factor (USF) 1 and 2. To study the contribution of USF1 on AGT gene expression, mice carrying a (−20C) human AGT transgene were bred with mice harboring a USF1 gene trap allele designed to knock down USF1 expression. USF1 mRNA was reduced relative...

  3. A new approach for the analysis of functionally graded beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mirzababaee

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: It is the intention of the present study to develope a new beam theory for the analysis of functionallygraded compopsite beams to overcome the shortcomings present in the existing beam theories.Design/methodology/approach: Within the displacement field of a first-order shear deformation theory and byusing the Hamilton principle the governing equations of motion are obtained for both the new and the existingbeam theories. The beams are assumed to have isotropic, two-constituent material distribution through thethickness.Findings: It is found that the procedure used is simple and straightforward and similar to the one used in thedevelopment of shear deformation plate and shell theories. It is analytically showed that the new approach yieldsidentical results as those obtained by using the existing first-order shear deformation theory.Research limitations/implications: The new approach can be adopted in developing higher-order sheardeformation and layerwise theories. It is believed that the new approach has advantage with respect to theexisting beam theories especially for developing beam layerwise theories.Practical implications: The new shear deformation beam theory can be used to develop a new beam elementfor analysis of practical composite beam structures.Originality/value: The paper introduces an approach to develop a new theory for modeling composite beams.The resulting equations of motion may be solved analytically or by using finite element method.

  4. A Comparison on the Audiolingual Approach and the Communicative Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    代海娜

    2015-01-01

    Audiolingual approach and communicative approach are two important approaches in language teaching.In this paper,some differences and both advantages and diadvantages will be discussed.Thus,to conduct the important usage of approachs in language teaching.

  5. Modular Approach for Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyne, Mudasser F.

    2010-01-01

    It is hard to define a single set of ethics that will cover an entire computer users community. In this paper, the issue is addressed in reference to code of ethics implemented by various professionals, institutes and organizations. The paper presents a higher level model using hierarchical approach. The code developed using this approach could be…

  6. INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACH TO TEACHING

    OpenAIRE

    N.A. Sevryuk

    2014-01-01

    Educational transformation in Russia allows using new methods in teaching and learning. One of which is the interdisciplinary approach. The article describes the definition of the interdisciplinary approach, shows the reasons why to teach with it, and explains the advantages of using it and how it helps students advance their thinking, cognitive development and other abilities. It also gives some interdisciplinary examples.

  7. The Strategies Instructional Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshler, Donald D.; Lenz, B. Keith

    1989-01-01

    The strategies instructional approach developed at the University of Kansas Institute for Research in Learning Disabilities is described. The approach teaches students strategies in the academic, social, motivational, and executive functioning areas that will enable students to meet content learning demands and modifies instructional environments…

  8. Complementary Health Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... back pain, neck pain, and joint pain or stiffness. NIH Research and Information on Complementary Health Approaches The lead agency at NIH for scientific research on complementary health approaches is the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH). You can ...

  9. The Geodynamic Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steenfelt, Jørgen S.; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    1996-01-01

    The Danish National lecture: The Geodynamic approach - problem or possibility? - mirrors the authors involvement in projects and research focusing on the impact of the geodynamic approach. The lecture discusses the why and how of some of the geotechnical anomalies and the differences in traditional...

  10. The TLC Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welker, William A.

    2002-01-01

    Notes how the author has developed the Teaching and Learning Cues (TLC) approach, an offspring of textbook organizational patterns instruction that stresses the significance of certain words and phrases in reading. Concludes that with the TLC approach, students learn to appreciate the important role cue words and phrases play in understanding…

  11. Approaches to understand culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard; Rauner, Felix

    1996-01-01

    Different approaches to understand the concept ofculture are presented and evaluated. The author'sconcept of culture is defined. Different aspectsof the concept are discussed.......Different approaches to understand the concept ofculture are presented and evaluated. The author'sconcept of culture is defined. Different aspectsof the concept are discussed....

  12. Partnership Strategies: Pro-active and Pre-active Approach in Conflict Management in International Joint Ventures

    OpenAIRE

    Huu Le Nguyen

    2011-01-01

    Due to the differences in national and organizational cultures, and in motives of entering partnership conflictsbetween partners in international joint ventures (IJVs) often arise. Failure to handle conflicts often leads totermination of the IJVs. This paper builds up comprehensive model for handling conflicts between partners inboth approaches: proactive and reactive approaches. The paper concludes with offering implications for bothmanagers and opportunities for further studies.

  13. Motivation modulates the effect of approach on implicit preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zogmaister, Cristina; Perugini, Marco; Richetin, Juliette

    2016-08-01

    With three studies, we investigated whether motivational states can modulate the formation of implicit preferences. In Study 1, participants played a video game in which they repeatedly approached one of two similar beverages, while disregarding the other. A subsequent implicit preference for the target beverage emerged, which increased with participants' thirst. In Study 2, participants approached one brand of potato chips while avoiding the other: Conceptually replicating the moderation observed in Study 1, the implicit preference for the approached brand increased with the number of hours from last food intake. In Study 3, we experimentally manipulated hunger, and the moderation effect emerged again, with hungry participants displaying a higher implicit preference for the approached brand, as compared to satiated participants. In the three studies, the moderation effect was not paralleled in explicit preferences although the latter were affected by the preference inducing manipulation. Theoretical implications and open questions are discussed. PMID:25948057

  14. Survey of the agent-based approach to intelligent manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Madejski

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Summary of the state-of-the-art of the Distributed Artificial Intelligence applied to Intelligent Manufacturing. Main applications are presented along with different technologies applied in these areas.Design/methodology/approach: Intelligent Manufacturing area was split into many segments, which require different approach to intelligent problem solving. Multiagent systems negotiation needs were analysed and cooperation issues in the form of clustering, cloning, and learning were analysed in search for the relevant tools.Findings: Detailed review of the approach to development of the agent based Intelligent Manufacturing from the fundamental considerations to the latest hands-on developments.Research limitations/implications: Many presented technologies call for detailed study before they can be implemented in practice.Originality/value: Thorough review of the Distributed Artificial Intelligence approach to current agile manufacturing needs. Key technologies are pointed out along with the main areas in which they can be implemented, and which require further research.

  15. Subtleties of Hidden Quantifiers in Implication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipman, Barbara A.

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical conjectures and theorems are most often of the form P(x) ? Q(x), meaning ?x,P(x) ? Q(x). The hidden quantifier ?x is crucial in understanding the implication as a statement with a truth value. Here P(x) and Q(x) alone are only predicates, without truth values, since they contain unquantified variables. But standard textbook…

  16. Teacher's Experiences in PBL: Implications for Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Anabela C.; Sousa, Rui M.; Fernandes, Sandra; Cardoso, Elisabete; Carvalho, Maria Alice; Figueiredo, Jorge; Pereira, Rui M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Project-Based Learning (PBL) has been implemented in the first year of the Industrial Engineering and Management programme at the University of Minho, Portugal, since 2004/2005. The purpose of this paper is to analyse and discuss teachers' experiences in PBL in this programme and to explore its implications for student learning and for teaching…

  17. Policy Implications of Social Justice in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Barry

    2009-01-01

    This article analyzes the implications of a particular conception of social justice in education for the policies that have led to significant political controversies in contemporary communities in the United States. Many of these controversies have arisen from the collision between the increasingly multicultural reality in those communities and…

  18. Genetic Counseling: Implications for Community Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodenhorn, Nancy; Lawson, Gerard

    2003-01-01

    Special issue of the "Journal of Health Psychology" (Vol. 7, No. 2, 2002) was reviewed. Articles covered a variety of qualitative studies conducted using an interpretive phenomenological analysis method to examine the interviews with people who had received genetic testing and counseling. Implications for the broader counseling field were also…

  19. Commentary: Pedagogical Implications of Experimental SNS Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreira, Maria; Potowski, Kim

    2011-01-01

    This special issue of the "Heritage Language Journal", guest edited by Silvina Montrul, unites four papers on different aspects of heritage Spanish speakers' linguistic abilities. In this commentary, we reexamine these important contributions with an eye toward implications for instruction and toward general trends for the field. In particular, we…

  20. Physical implications of dynamical symmetry breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some model-independent physical implications of a class of hypercolorbased theories of dynamical symmetry-breaking are described and discussed. The role which e+e- colliders can play, in distinguishing between such theories and the canonical methodology, is underlined

  1. Clinical Implications of Incomplete Pancreas Divisum

    OpenAIRE

    Terumi Kamisawa; Yuyang Tu; Naoto Egawa; Kouji Tsuruta; Aatsutake Okamoto

    2006-01-01

    Context Incomplete pancreas divisum is a pancreatic anomaly that results in an inadequate communication between the ventral and dorsal pancreatic ducts. Although the relationship between complete pancreas divisum and pancreatitis has been contentious, clinical implications of incomplete pancreas divisum have not been noted. Objective This study was done to investigate the clinical significance of incomplete pancreas divisum. Patients and...

  2. Changing business environment: implications for farming

    OpenAIRE

    Malcolm, Bill

    2011-01-01

    The natural, technological, economic, political and social environment in which farmers farm constantly changes. History has lessons about change in agriculture and about farmers coping with change, though the future is unknowable and thus always surprising. The implication for farm operation is to prepare, do not predict.

  3. Ritalin Update: Implications for Reading Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Robert B., Jr.; Werner, Patrice Holden

    1987-01-01

    Investigates how Ritalin, a powerful stimulant drug frequently prescribed for children exhibiting hyperactive behavior, poor attention span, and/or distractibility, is prescribed for children in educational settings, what doses seem appropriate, and what effect Ritalin has on reading achievement. Discusses the implications of Ritalin research for…

  4. Cult Affiliation and Disaffiliation: Implications for Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Beth; Frye, Ellen M.; Bradley, Loretta J.

    1997-01-01

    Data on cult membership and the characteristics of cults are provided. The process of cult affiliation and its relationship to family dynamics are reviewed. Defection, the processes of disaffiliation (voluntary and involuntary), and clinical symptoms after cult disaffiliation are discussed. Implications and recommendations for counselors are…

  5. Deduction Theorems in Weakly Implicative Logics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cintula, Petr

    Barcelona: Universitat de Barcelona, 2005. s. 19-20. [Algebraic and Topological Methods in Non-Classical Logics /2./. 15.06.2005-18.06.2005, Barcelona] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : deduction theorem * substructural logic * BCI logic * weakly implicative logic Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  6. Biological Implications of Gene-Environment Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Gene-environment interaction (G x E) has been treated as both a statistical phenomenon and a biological reality. It is argued that, although there are important statistical issues that need to be considered, the focus has to be on the biological implications of G x E. Four reports of G x E deriving from the Dunedin longitudinal study are used as…

  7. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: Implications for Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Margaret E.

    This paper provides a discussion of definitions, historical precursors, and prevalence figures for children with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) and highlights relevant medical and behavioral characteristics. It also addresses the educational implications of working with children with FAS in terms of instruction and curriculum. Educators are urged…

  8. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: Research Review and Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesbach, Linda Sue; Polloway, Edward A.

    Research on fetal alcohol syndrome is reviewed, with particular emphasis on the implications of the syndrome for the development of mental retardation and other handicapping conditions. Attention is given to historical aspects; epidemiology; physiological and behavioral characteristics; and concerns related to diagnosis, prevention, and…

  9. Corporal Punishment: Legalities, Realities, and Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinchey, Patricia H.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a quiz that will help readers determine the reliability of their own perceptions relating to corporal punishment in schools. Discusses U.S. Courts and corporal punishment, worldwide and nationwide legality, and the realities of corporal punishment in the United States. Discusses implications for what teachers can do to address corporal…

  10. The nuclear and its psychological implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the 13. to 15. january 1977, the S.F.R.P. has organised at Paris, with the patronage of The National Institute of Health and Medical Research, the French Society of Radiology, a colloquium devoted to the nuclear and its psycho-implications sociological. It is a second edition, realised at the demand of the Antoine Beclere Center. (N.C.)

  11. Brexit: what are the implications for nurses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-29

    The referendum result is in and appears to have caught the nation by surprise. Whatever the fallout from voters' decision to leave the EU, the implications for nursing are likely to be widespread and profound - and could take years to resolve. PMID:27353892

  12. Cultural Implications of Human Resource Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiranpruk, Chaiskran

    A discussion of the cultural effects of economic and, by extension, human resource development in Southeast Asia looks at short- and long-term implications. It is suggested that in the short term, increased competition will affect distribution of wealth, which can promote materialism and corruption. The introduction of labor-saving technology may…

  13. Applications of robust control theory - Educational implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorato, P.; Yedavalli, R. K.

    1992-01-01

    A survey is made of applications of robust control theory to problems of flight control, control of flexible space structures, and engine control which have appeared in recent conferences and journals. An analysis is made of which theoretical techniques are most commonly used and what implications this has for graduate and undergraduate education in aerospace engineering.

  14. Being, Becoming and the Undivided Universe: A Dialogue Between Relational Blockworld and the Implicate Order Concerning the Unification of Relativity and Quantum Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, Michael; Stuckey, W. M.; McDevitt, Timothy

    2013-04-01

    In this paper two different approaches to unification will be compared, Relational Blockworld (RBW) and Hiley's implicate order. Both approaches are monistic in that they attempt to derive matter and spacetime geometry `at once' in an interdependent and background independent fashion from something underneath both quantum theory and relativity. Hiley's monism resides in the implicate order via Clifford algebras and is based on process as fundamental while RBW's monism resides in spacetimematter via path integrals over graphs whereby space, time and matter are co-constructed per a global constraint equation. RBW's monism therefore resides in being (relational blockworld) while that of Hiley's resides in becoming (elementary processes). Regarding the derivation of quantum theory and relativity, the promises and pitfalls of both approaches will be elaborated. Finally, special attention will be paid as to how Hiley's process account might avoid the blockworld implications of relativity and the frozen time problem of canonical quantum gravity.

  15. Narrative Abilities: Advances in Research and Implications for Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreau, Donna

    2008-01-01

    The article discusses the key findings in recent research dealing narrative abilities in children with and without language implications. The implications of research findings for narrative assessment and intervention are discussed.

  16. Approach to Oligometastatic Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Brandon; Gershman, Boris; Karnes, R Jeffrey; Sweeney, Christopher J; Vapiwala, Neha

    2016-01-01

    Oligometastatic prostate cancer has increasingly been recognized as a unique clinical state with therapeutic implications. It has been proposed that patients with oligometastases may have a more indolent course and that outcome may be further improved with metastasis-directed local ablative therapy. In addition, there are differing schools of thoughts regarding whether oligometastases represent isolated lesions-where targeted therapy may render a patient disease free-or whether they coexist with micrometastases, where targeted therapy in addition to systemic therapy is required for maximal clinical impact. As such, the approach to the patient with oligometastatic prostate cancer requires multidisciplinary consideration, with surgery, radiotherapy, and systemic therapy potentially of benefit either singularly or in combination. Indeed, mounting evidence suggests durable disease-free intervals and, in some cases, possibly cure, may be achieved with such a multimodal strategy. However, selecting patients that may benefit most from treatment of oligometastases is an ongoing challenge. Moreover, with the advent of new, highly sensitive imaging technologies, the spectrum based on CT of the abdomen and pelvis and technetium bone scan of localized to oligometastatic to widespread disease has become increasingly blurred. As such, new MRI- and PET-based modalities require validation. As some clinical guidelines advise against routine prostate-specific antigen screening, the possibility of more men presenting with locally advanced or de novo oligometastatic prostate cancer exists; thus, knowing how best to treat these patients may become more relevant at a population level. Ultimately, the arrival of prospective clinical data and better understanding of biology will hopefully further inform how best to treat men with this disease. PMID:27249693

  17. ISSUES ABOUT THE EVALUATION OF THE FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS AND TAX IMPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia-Catalina, MIHALCIUC

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Accounting assessment is a process with tax implications on accounting figures. In fact, when it comes to evaluation, we need to clarify exactly what is being refered to: it s about the individual assessment of an asset or liability, or about the global assessment of a business. So, in a narrower approach, in accounting we are particularly interested in the individual assessment of assets and liabilities. In the evaluation, the concept of value is the primary element, accounting, especially along with the application of the principle of economic prevalence over the juridic, managed to convey the best measure those interested, information about how to create, to mesure and how to comunicate to business partners the value. The tax implication that arise after the evaluation of the individual elements of the asset, influence the result of the exercise by including the expenditure in the total expenses generated by the evaluation. The main asset elements, which following the evaluation generate tax implications are the tangible fixed asset, financial and stocks. Based on this consideration, one of the main objectives of this paper is to highlight the tax implications arising from the evaluation of financial instruments that generate tax liabilities.

  18. Environmental Implications of Dynamic Policies on Food Consumption and Waste Handling in the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Martin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study will review the environmental implications of dynamic policy objectives and instruments outlined in the European Union 7th Framework Programme (EU-FP7 Project DYNAmic policy MIXes for absolute decoupling of EU resource use from economic growth (DYNAMIX to address reductions in food consumption, food waste and a change in waste handling systems. The environmental implications of reductions in protein intake, food waste reductions, food waste management and donations are addressed using a life cycle approach to find the greenhouse gas (GHG emissions, land use and water consumption. Data are provided from the Statistics Division of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAOSTAT food balance sheets for the European Union (EU with a base year of 2010 and life cycle inventory (LCI data from a meta-study of available GHG, land use and water consumption data for major food products. The implications are reviewed using a number of scenarios for the years 2030 and 2050 assuming policy instruments are fully effective. Results indicate that reductions in animal-based protein consumption significantly reduce environmental impacts, followed thereafter by reductions in food waste (assuming this also reduces food consumption. Despite the positive implications the policy mixes may have for targets for decoupling, they are not enough to meet GHG emissions targets for the EU outlined in the DYNAMIX project, although land and water use have no significant change compared to 2010 levels.

  19. Theoretical, regulatory and practical implications of logistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirosław Chaberek

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The logistics has its practical input in creating economical strategies as well as in creating modern economic environment. Processes of planning, designing and functioning of logistic systems must be based both on the theoretical knowledge covering various areas as well as practical experiences to provide the required support.  To provide logistic services in the rational way, it is necessary to learn the complicated set of implications resulting from three areas covering the theoretical knowledge, practical ones as well as the regulation by the law. Methods: The triad of three concepts: theory, practice and regulation is the main area of consideration in relation to tasks of the logistic support provided by any organization for any production process. The aim of this paper focuses on the necessity of taking into account implications among theory, practice and regulation during the process of analyzing, designing and implementation of systems of the logistic support. The lack of awareness of differences between various implications or ignoring them must lead to irrational behaviors. Results: The implications among theory, practice and legislative regulation of logistics presented differently than usually, broaden the logistic knowledge and at the same time provide the tool of the rationalization of logistic services in all kinds of activities. Conclusions: The correct identification of tasks and functions of the logistics leads to the recognition of its subject and tasks and correct identification of implications occurring among theory, practice and regulation. This knowledge is indispensable in the process of creation of projects of logistic services of each activity, both business and non-business one.

  20. Rejoinder--Implications of "Online Display Advertising: Targeting and Obtrusiveness"

    OpenAIRE

    Avi Goldfarb; Catherine Tucker

    2011-01-01

    The commentaries on our work suggest several broader implications of our findings as well as a concern that we understate the size of the effect. In this rejoinder, we discuss our views on the regulatory implications, the implications for firm strategies, and the implications for our understanding of the underlying behavioral processes. We also acknowledge that our original calculation of $464 million in cost savings for industry is conservative. We conclude with a call for "privacy engineeri...

  1. Life Span Developmental Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Eryilmaz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The Life Span Developmental Approach examines development of individuals which occurs from birth to death. Life span developmental approach is a multi-disciplinary approach related with disciplines like psychology, psychiatry, sociology, anthropology and geriatrics that indicates the fact that development is not completed in adulthood, it continues during the life course. Development is a complex process that consists of dying and death. This approach carefully investigates the development of individuals with respect to developmental stages. This developmental approach suggests that scientific disciplines should not explain developmental facts only with age changes. Along with aging, cognitive, biological, and socioemotional development throughout life should also be considered to provide a reasonable and acceptable context, guideposts, and reasonable expectations for the person. There are three important subjects whom life span developmental approach deals with. These are nature vs nurture, continuity vs discontinuity, and change vs stability. Researchers using life span developmental approach gather and produce knowledge on these three most important domains of individual development with their unique scientific methodology.

  2. Immunocontraceptives: New Approaches to Fertility Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiranjeet Kaur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The rapidly increasing global population has bowed the attention of family planning and associated reproductive health programmes in the direction of providing a safe and reliable method which can be used to limit family size. The world population is estimated to exceed a phenomenal 10 billion by the year 2050 A.D., thus presenting a real jeopardy of overpopulation with severe implications for the future. Despite the availability of contraceptive methods, there are over one million elective abortions globally each year due to unintended pregnancies, having devastating impact on reproductive health of women worldwide. This highlights the need for the development of newer and improved contraceptive methods. A novel contraceptive approach that is gaining substantial attention is “immunocontraception” targeting gamete production, gamete outcome, or gamete function. Amongst these, use of sperm antigens (gamete function seems to be an exciting and feasible approach. However, the variability of immune response and time lag to attain titer among vaccinated individuals after active immunization has highlighted the potential relevance of preformed antibodies in this league. This review is an attempt to analyze the current status and progress of immunocontraceptive approaches with respect to their establishment as a future fertility control agent.

  3. WHOLE LANGUAGE APPROACH IN EFL CLASSROOMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Whole language, a relatively new approach emerged in theNorth America about more than thirty years ago, has becomeone of the two major philosophies (Phonics and WholeLanguage) in teaching and learning language. "The future ofwhole language is the future of education." (Goodman, 1992).Whole language is gaining its popularity all over the world andhas found its way into various language settings. It has also beenushered into the field of second language education. Whole lan-guage entails whole learners, whole teachers, whole texts, wholemethods, whole skills and whole environments. This paper at-tempts to introduce its definitions and explore its implications inteaching and learning English as a foreign language (EFL). Italso analyzes its limitations so that instructors, when imple-menting this approach in EFL classrooms, could make necessaryadaptations by taking into consideration the characteristics ofEFL learners, including their linguistic proficiency, sociocultur-al variables, and career orientations, and at the same time makesure that EFL classroom activities reflect wholeness of the majorcomponents underlying this approach.

  4. Student Teachers' Approaches to Teaching Biological Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgerding, Lisa A.; Klein, Vanessa A.; Ghosh, Rajlakshmi; Eibel, Albert

    2015-06-01

    Evolution is fundamental to biology and scientific literacy, but teaching high school evolution is often difficult. Evolution teachers face several challenges including limited content knowledge, personal conflicts with evolution, expectations of resistance, concerns about students' conflicts with religion, and curricular constraints. Evolution teaching can be particularly challenging for student teachers who are just beginning to gain pedagogical knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge related to evolution teaching and who seek approval from university supervisors and cooperating teachers. Science teacher educators need to know how to best support student teachers as they broach the sometimes daunting task of teaching evolution within student teaching placements. This multiple case study report documents how three student teachers approached evolution instruction and what influenced their approaches. Data sources included student teacher interviews, field note observations for 4-5 days of evolution instruction, and evolution instructional artifacts. Data were analyzed using grounded theory approaches to develop individual cases and a cross-case analysis. Seven influences (state exams and standards, cooperating teacher, ideas about teaching and learning, concerns about evolution controversy, personal commitment to evolution, knowledge and preparation for teaching evolution, and own evolution learning experiences) were identified and compared across cases. Implications for science teacher preparation and future research are provided.

  5. Earth's energy imbalance and implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, J.; Sato, M.; Kharecha, P.; von Schuckmann, K.

    2011-09-01

    wavelengths. This added opacity causes the planet's heat radiation to space to arise from higher, colder levels in the atmosphere, thus reducing emission of heat energy to space. The temporary imbalance between the energy absorbed from the sun and heat emission to space, causes the planet to warm until planetary energy balance is restored. The planetary energy imbalance caused by a change of atmospheric composition defines a climate forcing. Climate sensitivity, the eventual global temperature change per unit forcing, is known with good accuracy from Earth's paleoclimate history. However, two fundamental uncertainties limit our ability to predict global temperature change on decadal time scales. First, although climate forcing by human-made greenhouse gases (GHGs) is known accurately, climate forcing caused by changing human-made aerosols is practically unmeasured. Aerosols are fine particles suspended in the air, such as dust, sulfates, and black soot (Ramanathan et al., 2001). Aerosol climate forcing is complex, because aerosols both reflect solar radiation to space (a cooling effect) and absorb solar radiation (a warming effect). In addition, atmospheric aerosols can alter cloud cover and cloud properties. Therefore, precise composition-specific measurements of aerosols and their effects on clouds are needed to assess the aerosol role in climate change. Second, the rate at which Earth's surface temperature approaches a new equilibrium in response to a climate forcing depends on how efficiently heat perturbations are mixed into the deeper ocean. Ocean mixing is complex and not necessarily simulated well by climate models. Empirical data on ocean heat uptake are improving rapidly, but still suffer limitations. We summarize current understanding of this basic physics of global warming and note observations needed to narrow uncertainties. Appropriate measurements can quantify the major factors driving climate change, reveal how much additional global warming is already in the

  6. Revitalizing the setting approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloch, Paul; Toft, Ulla; Reinbach, Helene Christine;

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundThe concept of health promotion rests on aspirations aiming at enabling people to increase control over and improve their health. Health promotion action is facilitated in settings such as schools, homes and work places. As a contribution to the promotion of healthy lifestyles, we have.......DiscussionThe supersetting approach is a further development of the setting approach in which the significance of integrated and coordinated actions together with a participatory approach are emphasised and important principles are specified, all of which contribute to the attainment of synergistic effects and sustainable.......SummaryThe supersetting approach is a relevant and useful conceptual framework for developing intervention-based initiatives for sustainable impact in community health promotion. It strives to attain synergistic effects from activities that are carried out in multiple settings in a coordinated manner. The supersetting...

  7. Expediting systematic reviews: methods and implications of rapid reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciliska Donna

    2010-07-01

    these rapid reviews need to be published in the peer-reviewed literature with an emphasis on articulating methods employed. While one consistent methodological approach may not be optimal or appropriate, it is important that researchers undertaking reviews within the rapid to systematic continuum provide detailed descriptions of methods used and discuss the implications of their chosen methods in terms of potential bias introduced. Further research comparing full systematic reviews with rapid reviews will enhance understanding of the limitations of these methods.

  8. Implications of science and technology on the radiological protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    such as CT scanners, is growing extremely rapidly in all areas of the world, with use often evolving much more quickly than regulations. The ICRP is entering the area of radiological protection of the environment (non-human species), which will require new approaches to science, policy and regulation. To mention only one more area, radiological terrorist acts would pose significant challenges to governments, not only in terms of recovery and stake holder involvement issues, but also in terms of performing mass-screening of potentially irradiated victims. The C.R.P.P.H. study discusses the implications of such applicational challenges in the context of today society, in order to assist governments to be as prepared as possible to address them should they arise. Finally, the study identifies possible collaborative research programmes that could be undertaken under the international umbrella of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. (authors)

  9. Stakeholders: main approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Patrícia Mattos de Barros Schiavoni; Mário César Barreto Moraes; Alice Carneiro de Castro; Jair Nascimento Santos

    2013-01-01

    Every time organizations need adaptations to stay alive. We consider the analysis of their external environment an essential tool in this adaptive process, in particular, know your stakeholders. This article aims to present different approaches to organizational stakeholders, contributing concurrently with academia and companies who choose to analyze and act on its stakeholders, and possibly have a prominent market. We highlight the approach of stakeholder management, Edward Freeman, the mode...

  10. Sustainable fashion: New approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Niinimäki, Kirsi (editor)

    2013-01-01

    This publication is intended to be used as a source of inspiration for designers and companies, and all stakeholders whose interest lies in the area of sustainable fashion. While the strategies for sustainability are complex and approaches are many, this publication presents only a few ways to approach sustainable fashion. I hope the publication offers inspiration on how to make positive change in current practices and how to effect new mindsets, creating transformative fashion. Theoretica...

  11. Theoretical Approaches to Coping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Zyga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dealing with stress requires conscious effort, it cannot be perceived as equal to individual's spontaneous reactions. The intentional management of stress must not be confused withdefense mechanisms. Coping differs from adjustment in that the latter is more general, has a broader meaning and includes diverse ways of facing a difficulty.Aim: An exploration of the definition of the term "coping", the function of the coping process as well as its differentiation from other similar meanings through a literature review.Methodology: Three theoretical approaches of coping are introduced; the psychoanalytic approach; approaching by characteristics; and the Lazarus and Folkman interactive model.Results: The strategic methods of the coping approaches are described and the article ends with a review of the approaches including the functioning of the stress-coping process , the classificationtypes of coping strategies in stress-inducing situations and with a criticism of coping approaches.Conclusions: The comparison of coping in different situations is difficult, if not impossible. The coping process is a slow process, so an individual may select one method of coping under one set ofcircumstances and a different strategy at some other time. Such selection of strategies takes place as the situation changes.

  12. Earth's energy imbalance and implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hansen

    2011-09-01

    such as CO2 makes the atmosphere more opaque at infrared wavelengths. This added opacity causes the planet's heat radiation to space to arise from higher, colder levels in the atmosphere, thus reducing emission of heat energy to space. The temporary imbalance between the energy absorbed from the sun and heat emission to space, causes the planet to warm until planetary energy balance is restored.

    The planetary energy imbalance caused by a change of atmospheric composition defines a climate forcing. Climate sensitivity, the eventual global temperature change per unit forcing, is known with good accuracy from Earth's paleoclimate history. However, two fundamental uncertainties limit our ability to predict global temperature change on decadal time scales.

    First, although climate forcing by human-made greenhouse gases (GHGs is known accurately, climate forcing caused by changing human-made aerosols is practically unmeasured. Aerosols are fine particles suspended in the air, such as dust, sulfates, and black soot (Ramanathan et al., 2001. Aerosol climate forcing is complex, because aerosols both reflect solar radiation to space (a cooling effect and absorb solar radiation (a warming effect. In addition, atmospheric aerosols can alter cloud cover and cloud properties. Therefore, precise composition-specific measurements of aerosols and their effects on clouds are needed to assess the aerosol role in climate change.

    Second, the rate at which Earth's surface temperature approaches a new equilibrium in response to a climate forcing depends on how efficiently heat perturbations are mixed into the deeper ocean. Ocean mixing is complex and not necessarily simulated well by climate models. Empirical data on ocean heat uptake are improving rapidly, but still suffer limitations.

    We summarize current understanding of this basic physics of global warming and note observations needed to narrow uncertainties. Appropriate measurements can

  13. Implications of structural genomics target selection strategies: Pfam5000, whole genome, and random approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandonia, John-Marc; Brenner, Steven E.

    2004-07-14

    The structural genomics project is an international effort to determine the three-dimensional shapes of all important biological macromolecules, with a primary focus on proteins. Target proteins should be selected according to a strategy which is medically and biologically relevant, of good value, and tractable. As an option to consider, we present the Pfam5000 strategy, which involves selecting the 5000 most important families from the Pfam database as sources for targets. We compare the Pfam5000 strategy to several other proposed strategies that would require similar numbers of targets. These include including complete solution of several small to moderately sized bacterial proteomes, partial coverage of the human proteome, and random selection of approximately 5000 targets from sequenced genomes. We measure the impact that successful implementation of these strategies would have upon structural interpretation of the proteins in Swiss-Prot, TrEMBL, and 131 complete proteomes (including 10 of eukaryotes) from the Proteome Analysis database at EBI. Solving the structures of proteins from the 5000 largest Pfam families would allow accurate fold assignment for approximately 68 percent of all prokaryotic proteins (covering 59 percent of residues) and 61 percent of eukaryotic proteins (40 percent of residues). More fine-grained coverage which would allow accurate modeling of these proteins would require an order of magnitude more targets. The Pfam5000 strategy may be modified in several ways, for example to focus on larger families, bacterial sequences, or eukaryotic sequences; as long as secondary consideration is given to large families within Pfam, coverage results vary only slightly. In contrast, focusing structural genomics on a single tractable genome would have only a limited impact in structural knowledge of other proteomes: a significant fraction (about 30-40 percent of the proteins, and 40-60 percent of the residues) of each proteome is classified in small families, which may have little overlap with other species of interest. Random selection of targets from one or more genomes is similar to the Pfam5000 strategy in that proteins from larger families are more likely to be chosen, but substantial effort would be spent on small families.

  14. A stereochemical approach to pyranose ring flexibility: its implications for the conformation of dermatan sulfate.

    OpenAIRE

    Venkataraman, G; Sasisekharan, V; Cooney, C L; Langer, R; Sasisekharan, R.

    1994-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans, such as heparin, heparan sulfate, and dermatan sulfate, are characterized by a disaccharide repeating unit of a uronate and a hexosamine and are increasingly understood to be important physiologically as soluble components of the extracellular matrix. The secondary structure of this class of acidic polysaccharides is believed to play a key role in determining the wide range of biological specificities. Central to the structural diversity of the glycosaminoglycans is the ex...

  15. Fair Value Accounting for Financial Instruments – Conceptual Approach and Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Matis, Dumitru; Bonaci, Carmen Giorgiana

    2008-01-01

    This study complements the growing literature on the value relevance of fair value by examining the validity of the hypothesis that fair value is more informative than historical cost as a financial reporting standard for financial instruments. We therefore compare the relative explanatory power of fair value and historical cost in explaining equity values. In order to reflect fair values’ role in offering the fair view where financial instruments are concerned we briefly reviewed capital mar...

  16. An immanent approach to death: Theological implications of a secular view

    OpenAIRE

    Cornel W. du Toit

    2009-01-01

    The thesis of this article is that contemporary people are increasingly ousting death from their consciousness and focussing instead on the complexities of life in a context of horizontal transcendence. This replaces the Pauline notion that death is the fruit of sin and will be overcome if its real cause, sin, is vanquished through the death and resurrection of Christ. The article shows how religions, the state and civil society have abused human fear of death in the course of history. It exa...

  17. Orofacial pain and jaw function in children and adolescents : epidemiology, biopsychosocial implications and caregivers' approach

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Khotani, Amal

    2016-01-01

    Relying on practitioner knowledge of the diagnosis and treatment of orofacial pain (OFP) and temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in children and adolescents tends to be insufficient for effective dental practice. To improve overall performance, it is crucial to discuss topics related to practitioner competency, including professional knowledge and its associated perspectives. In light of the prevalence of OFP/TMD, insufficient knowledge in this area might result in under-treatmen...

  18. Measuring individuality in habitat use across complex landscapes: approaches, constraints, and implications for assessing resource specialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fodrie, F Joel; Yeager, Lauren A; Grabowski, Jonathan H; Layman, Craig A; Sherwood, Graham D; Kenworthy, Matthew D

    2015-05-01

    Many mobile marine species are presumed to utilize a broad spectrum of habitats, but this seemingly generalist life history may arise from conspecifics specializing on distinct habitat alternatives to exploit foraging, resting/refuge, or reproductive opportunities. We acoustically tagged 34 red drum, and mapped sand, seagrass, marsh, or oyster (across discrete landscape contexts) use by each uniquely coded individual. Using 144,000 acoustic detections, we recorded differences in habitat use among red drum: proportional use of seagrass habitat ranged from 0 to 100%, and use of oyster-bottom types also varied among fish. WIC/TNW and IS metrics (previously applied vis-à-vis diet specialization) consistently indicated that a typical red drum overlapped >70% with population-level niche exploitation. Monte Carlo permutations showed these values were lower than expected had fish drawn from a common habitat-use distribution, but longitudinal comparisons did not provide evidence of temporally consistent individuality, suggesting that differences among individuals were plastic and not reflective of true specialization. Given the range of acoustic detections we captured (from tens to 1,000s per individual), which are substantially larger sample sizes than in many diet studies, we extended our findings by serially reducing or expanding our data in simulations to evaluate sample-size effects. We found that the results of null hypothesis testing for specialization were highly dependent on sample size, with thresholds in the relationship between sample size and associated P-values. These results highlight opportunities and potential caveats in exploring individuality in habitat use. More broadly, exploring individual specialization in fine-scale habitat use suggests that, for mobile marine species, movement behaviors over shorter (≤weeks), but not longer (≥months), timescales may serve as an underlying mechanism for other forms of resource specialization. PMID:25669451

  19. Implications of the Oklo Phenomenon in a Chiral Approach to Nuclear Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been customary to use data from the Oklo natural nuclear reactor to place bounds on the change that has occurred in the electromagnetic fine structure constant α over the last 2 billion years. Alternatively, an analysis could be based on a recently proposed expression for shifts in resonance energies which relates them to changes in both α and the average mq of the u and d current quark masses, and which makes explicit the dependence on mass number A and atomic number Z. (Recent model independent results on hadronic σ -terms suggest sensitivity to the strange quark mass is negligible.) The most sophisticated analysis, to date, of the quark mass term invokes a calculation of the nuclear mean-field within the Walecka model of quantum hadrodynamics. We comment on this study and consider an alternative in which the link to low-energy quantum chromodynamics and its pattern of chiral symmetry-breaking is more readily discernible. Specifically, we investigate the sensitivity to changes in the pion mass Mπ of a single nucleon potential determined by an in-medium chiral perturbation theory (χPT) calculation which includes virtual Δ-excitations. Subject to some reasonable assumptions about low-energy constants, we confirm that the mq-contribution to resonance shifts is enhanced by a factor of 10 or so relative to the α-term and deduce that the Oklo data for Sm imply that |mq(Oklo)−mq(now)|≲10−9 mq(now) . (author)

  20. Economic Implications of Food Demand in Akoko South West, Ondo State, Nigeria: Aids Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Adebisi Temitope Edun; Adamu Haruna

    2013-01-01

    The study examined the socio-economic characteristics of food consuming households, estimated the complete demand functions for some selected common food commodities, their prices and expenditure elasticities in Akoko South West (ASW) local government in Ondo state, Nigeria. The study examined demand analysis for food in ASW, using primary data with the use of questionnaire on some selected food-consuming households within the study area. Data collected were subjected to descriptive statisti...

  1. Implications of a Philippine-US free trade agreement on trade in goods: An indicator approach

    OpenAIRE

    Manzano, George; Martin, Kristine Joy

    2014-01-01

    The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) is a regional free trade agreement (FTA) initiated by the United States (US) and is presently being negotiated among 11 countries. With the Philippines negotiating in many fronts at the global scene, such as its engagement in the ASEAN Economic Community and in the forthcoming European Union-Philippine FTA, among others, the invitation to join the TPP is another opportunity worth studying. Departing from the prevalence of computable general equilibrium mode...

  2. Partnership working in public health : the implications for governance of a systems approach.

    OpenAIRE

    Hunter, D.J.; Perkins, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Most of the research on partnerships has centred on health and social care, and while many of the findings remain relevant, public health partnerships concerned with ‘wicked issues’ give rise to a different and more complex set of issues which merit exploration. The study aimed to identify those factors promoting effective partnership working for health improvement; to assess the extent to which partnership governance and incentive arrangements were commensurate with the complexit...

  3. Concepts of sustainability, motivations for pest management approaches, and implications for communicating change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effective communication with farmers is an essential component of impacting their decision processes and encouraging changes in pest management practices, but requires a system of research and extension management that differs from that to which most biological scientists are accustomed. We present...

  4. Determination of hemispheric emotional valence in individual subjects: A new approach with research and therapeutic implications

    OpenAIRE

    Polcari Ann; Tomoda Akemi; Anderson Carl; Teicher Martin H; Schiffer Fredric; Navalta Carryl P; Andersen Susan L

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Much has been theorized about the emotional properties of the hemispheres. Our review of the dominant hypotheses put forth by Schore, Joseph, Davidson, and Harmon-Jones on hemispheric emotional valences (HEV) shows that none are supported by robust data. Instead, we propose that individual's hemispheres are organized to have differing HEVs that can be lateralized in either direction. Methods Probe auditory evoked potentials (AEP) recorded during a neutral and an upsetting ...

  5. Balancing the direct and indirect approaches implications for ending the violence in southern Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Rodthong, Chaiyo.

    2009-01-01

    Approved for public release, distribution unlimited The instability in the Southern Border Provinces of Thailand resurged on January 4, 2004. The current conflict is more complicated because the government, the insurgency and the population all need to be recognized as players. Of these, the population is the most important actor, especially its interaction with the international community, as stated in the Dr. Gordon McCormick's Counterinsurgency Model. The state and the counter-state are...

  6. Privatisation and water governance in Africa: implications of a rights-based approach

    OpenAIRE

    Olowu, 'Dejo

    2008-01-01

    Early in the post-independence era, the control of water resources in many African states was a task of central planning. Regrettably, water management soon became a miry adventure in most African states largely because of warped planning and implementation. This article examines the phenomenon of private sector involvement in water resources management and seeks to understand the effect of such involvement on the right to water in Africa in the context of the Millennium Develo...

  7. A new approach to iliac bone histomorphometry: implications for biomechanics and cell biology

    OpenAIRE

    Parfitt, A Michael

    2014-01-01

    I devised a method for obtaining information on cancellous bone structure from iliac bone histomorphometry that led to the demonstration that architecture is an important component of bone strength and bone fragility. Furthermore, this method contributed to the recognition of the importance of changes in osteoclast and osteocyte apoptosis in response to estrogen deficiency and replacement.

  8. MAMA MODEL APPROACH: ITS IMPLICATION TO COMMITMENT AND ORGANIZATIONAL CITEZENSHIP BEHAVIOR OF OPERATIONAL HOTEL EMPLOYEE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Bagus Gede Udiyana

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study is to find the existence of MAMA (Motivation, Ability, and Moral Awareness model to the commitment and Organizational Citizenship Behavior (OCB. The subject of the research is the five stars hotels at Nusa Dua Bali. Respondents of this study are the operational employees at the hotels who have Hindu religion with 198 samples. The method of collecting data was simple random sampling method with proportional allocation. Structural Equation Modeling (SEM analysis technique was utilized to analyze the data in this research. This research has found that MAMA model (Motivation, Ability, and Moral Awareness influences OCB. Furthermore this research has found a theory that the main variable which is causing the appearance of organizational citizenship behavior is MAMA (motivation, ability, and moral awareness as an intrinsic behavior, and commitment or organizational citizenship behavior function of MAMA, and commitment or to be formulated as OCB f. Info

  9. Molecular biology in marine science: Scientific questions, technological approaches, and practical implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This report describes molecular techniques that could be invaluable in addressing process-oriented problems in the ocean sciences that have perplexed oceanographers for decades, such as understanding the basis for biogeochemical processes, recruitment processes, upper-ocean dynamics, biological impacts of global warming, and ecological impacts of human activities. The coupling of highly sophisticated methods, such as satellite remote sensing, which permits synoptic monitoring of chemical, physical, and biological parameters over large areas, with the power of modern molecular tools for ``ground truthing`` at small scales could allow scientists to address questions about marine organisms and the ocean in which they live that could not be answered previously. Clearly, the marine sciences are on the threshold of an exciting new frontier of scientific discovery and economic opportunity.

  10. Revisioning Assessment through a Children's Rights Approach: Implications for Policy, Process and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwood, Jannette; Lundy, Laura

    2010-01-01

    The linkage between the impact of assessment and compliance with children's rights is a connection, which although seemingly obvious, is nonetheless rarely made, particularly by governments, which, as signatories to the relevant human rights treaties, have the primary responsibility for ensuring that educational practice is compatible with…

  11. Social impact evaluation: Some implications of the specific decisional context approach for Anticipatory Project Assessment (ARA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, L. H.

    1975-01-01

    An anticipatory project assessment is discussed which is characterized as the capacity to perform, and the disposition to take into account in relevant decisional areas, the following operations: identification of the significant effects which will result from the introduction of a specified project configuration into alternative projected future social environments during the planning, implementation, and operational states; evaluation of such effects in terms of social impacts on affected participants and social value-institutional processes in accord with specified concepts of social justice.

  12. A Discussion of Gunther Schuller's Approach to Conducting: Implications for the Instrumental Music Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, Janice

    2008-01-01

    What professional musicians say and do affects the attitudes and actions of music educators in the classroom. One example comes from influential conductor/composer, Gunther Schuller, who, in his controversial 1997 book, "The Compleat Conductor", defines, espouses, and recommends his own "philosophy of conducting." An examination of his ideas and,…

  13. Governance approaches in European territorial cooperation programmes and the implications of macro-regional strategies.

    OpenAIRE

    van der Zwet, Arno; Mcmaster, Irene; BACHTLER, John

    2012-01-01

    Historically, cooperation across borders was an area of activity dominated by central government actors. However, in the EU some of the earliest institutionalised forms of territorial cooperation are based on bottom-up initiatives involving border municipalities. Current territorial cooperation arrangements continue to be strongly based upon local and regional institutions and actors. Theoretical work on Europeanisation, multi-level governance and new regionalism highlights the increased role...

  14. Bone disease in multiple myeloma and precursor disease: novel diagnostic approaches and implications on clinical management

    OpenAIRE

    Kristinsson, Sigurdur Y.; Minter, Alex R; Korde, Neha; TAN, ESTHER; Landgren, Ola

    2011-01-01

    The manifestations of bone involvement in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) can have devastating clinical effects and increase mortality. Recent studies demonstrate that patients with the precursor conditions smoldering MM (SMM) and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) show evidence of bone disease and increased risk of fractures. The understanding of the pathogenesis of bone disease in MM has expanded in recent years. The traditional skeletal survey will probably be re...

  15. Rehabilitation - a new approach. Part three: the implications of the theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Derick

    2016-01-01

    The last editorial suggested that rehabilitation needed to involve the patient in learning, and depended upon a group of professionals to identify what actions might help the patient, and to undertake or arrange the necessary actions. In many cases there will be both a wide variety of actions needed from a reasonably large number of people and organisations, and the process is likely to be extended over weeks, months or occasionally years. This editorial shows that these features characterise the rehabilitation process as complex and therefore it needs to be managed by a trans-disciplinary team. Some of the characteristics of teamwork are discussed. This leads to a discussion of teams in rehabilitation, showing that there are currently many different types of teams organised around different areas of interest and that a patient might need access to several specialised teams. It is then argued that the complexity of team coordination is best resolved by formal rehabilitation planning meetings, held early in a patient's involvement with rehabilitation; this should increase effectiveness and efficiency. Finally the editorial argues that rehabilitation would be improved by having rehabilitation teams that mirror the existing medical specialities, ensuring that all patients thereby have easy and early access to rehabilitation planning. PMID:26659136

  16. Modeling Approach to Long-Term Energy Demand and Energy Policy Implications for India

    OpenAIRE

    Parikh, J.K.

    1981-01-01

    The energy sector claims nearly 27% of the public sector plan allocations in India. Other developing countries also spend similar proportions of their investments for the energy sector. Efficient management of the energy system and optimal planning for its development could result in substantial savings of plan resources. Therefore, the need for setting up a national energy modeling system was felt for quite some time within the Planning Commission of Government of India. The present study wa...

  17. An iterative two-stage approach to modeling vacant taxi movements : formulations and implications

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Cheuk-pong; 黃卓邦

    2014-01-01

    Taxi services play an important role in transportation systems by providing 24-hour door-to-door services. However, taxis contribute significantly to congestion and air pollution problems, especially when excessive taxis circulate on roads searching for customers. It is thus necessary and important to properly model how taxis navigate on urban road networks in order to establish effective taxi regulation policies to mitigate these problems. Various taxi network models have been developed ...

  18. Economic Implications of Food Demand in Akoko South West, Ondo State, Nigeria: Aids Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adebisi Temitope Edun

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The study examined the socio-economic characteristics of food consuming households, estimated the complete demand functions for some selected common food commodities, their prices and expenditure elasticities in Akoko South West (ASW local government in Ondo state, Nigeria. The study examined demand analysis for food in ASW, using primary data with the use of questionnaire on some selected food-consuming households within the study area. Data collected were subjected to descriptive statistics for estimating demographic variables. The result of the descriptive statistics showed that semolina constituted the largest share of the household total food expenditure, among the low income and rural households but mostly among the married and the medium-size male-headed households who had tertiary-education. The Almost Ideal Demand System results showed that besides being a normal good, price inelastic, and expenditure inelastic, semolina has changed from being a luxury to being a necessity and has become a major food staple in the ASW metropolis. In conclusion, the study discovered that the prices of rice, beans, yam, garri, wheat, yam flour, and semolina were significantly important in the share of household total food budget at constant real income. Finally, the study showed from the result that the importance of semolina in ASW metropolis diet will increase as economic growth continues. This study therefore recommends that effort should be made to boost economic activities of ASW zone. This will increase their income and consequently improve their spending on the nutritious food items. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA

  19. Hypnotic Approaches for Chronic Pain Management: Clinical Implications of Recent Research Findings

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Mark P.; Patterson, David R.

    2014-01-01

    The empirical support for hypnosis for chronic pain management has flourished over the past two decades. Clinical trials show that hypnosis is effective for reducing chronic pain, although outcomes vary between individuals. The findings from these clinical trials also show that hypnotic treatments have a number of positive effects beyond pain control. Neurophysiological studies reveal that hypnotic analgesia has clear effects on brain and spinal-cord functioning that differ as a function of t...

  20. Decision Making Correlates of Depressive Symptoms among African-American Adolescents: Implications for Prevention Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okwumabua, Jebose O.; Duryea, Elias J.; Wong, S. P.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the relationship between depressive symptoms and decision making among a non-clinical sample of low-income African American adolescents. Data from the Children's Depression Inventory and Flinders Adolescent Decision Making Questionnaire indicated that there was a significant correlation between adolescents' self-reported depressive…

  1. Integrated genomic approaches implicate osteoglycin (Ogn) in the regulation of left ventricular mass

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petretto, E.; Sarwar, R.; Grieve, I.; Lu, H.; Kumaran, M. K.; Muckett, P.J.; Mangion, J.; Schroen, B.; Benson, M.; Punjabi, P.P.; Prasad, S.K.; Pennell, D. J.; Kiesewetter, Ch.; Tasheva, E. S.; Corpuz, L. M.; Webb, M.D.; Conrad, G.W.; Kurtz, T. W.; Křen, Vladimír; Fischer, J.; Hubner, N.; Pinto, Y. M.; Pravenec, Michal; Aitman, T. J.; Cook, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 5 (2008), s. 546-552. ISSN 1061-4036 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1P05ME791; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520; GA ČR(CZ) GA301/06/0028; GA ČR(CZ) GA301/08/0166 Grant ostatní: HHMI(US) 55005624; -(XE) LSHG-CT-2005-019015 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Source of funding: N - neverejné zdroje ; R - rámcový projekt EK Keywords : left ventricle mass * osteoglycin * genetical genomics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 30.259, year: 2008

  2. Approaching ADHD as a chronic condition: implications for long-term adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Cleave, Jeanne; Leslie, Laurel K

    2008-08-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common chronic conditions of childhood. Although evidence-based treatments for ADHD, including stimulant medication and behavior modification, have long been established, and guidelines for care of ADHD in primary care settings have been developed, adherence to long-term therapy is poor among youth with ADHD. This article proposes use of the Chronic Care Model for Child Health, the purpose of which is to develop informed, activated patients who will interact with a prepared, proactive health care team. Six "pillars" make up the model: decision support, delivery system design, clinical information systems, family and self-management support, community resources and policies, and health care organizations. Each of these is discussed, and an individual example is described. Adopting the Chronic Care Model for Child Health has the potential to improve the quality of care for ADHD. PMID:18777966

  3. Implication of Green Tea as a Possible Therapeutic Approach for Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado-Coronel, Juan C; Ávila-Rodriguez, Marco; Echeverria, Valentina; Hidalgo, Oscar Alejandro; Gonzalez, Janneth; Aliev, Gjumrakch; Barreto, George E

    2016-01-01

    Green tea is a beverage consumed around the world that is believed to have substantial health benefits such as reducing the risk of cancer, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and neurodegeneration. This beverage is prepared from the leaves (steamed and dried) of the Camellia sinesis plant and contains strong antioxidant and neuroprotective phenolic compounds from which the most important is (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate. Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second more common neurodegenerative disorders, after Alzheimer's disease and is characterized by degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the pars compact of the substantia nigra of the basal ganglia. It has been shown in pre-clinical and clinical studies that green tea may be able to prevent PD, but its optimal dose or a possible mechanism explaining its health benefit in PD has not been properly established. In this review, we discuss the potential role of green tea's phenolic compounds and their therapeutic effectin modulating key signaling pathways in the PD brain. PMID:26831259

  4. Welfare implications of energy and environmental policies: A general equilibrium approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Mohammad Qamar

    Government intervention and implementation of policies can impose a financial and social cost. To achieve a desired goal there could be several different alternative policies or routes, and government would like to choose the one which imposes the least social costs or/and generates greater social benefits. Therefore, applied welfare economics plays a vital role in public decision making. This paper recasts welfare measure such as equivalent variation, in terms of the prices of factors of production rather than product prices. This is made possible by using duality theory within a general equilibrium framework and by deriving alternative forms of indirect utility functions and expenditure functions in factor prices. Not only we are able to recast existing welfare measures in factor prices, we are able to perform a true cost-benefit analysis of government policies using comparative static analysis of different equilibria and breaking up monetary measure of welfare change such as equivalent variation into its components. A further advantage of our research is demonstrated by incorporating externalities and public goods in the utility function. It is interesting that under a general equilibrium framework optimal income tax tends to reduce inequalities. Results show that imposition of taxes at socially optimal rates brings a net gain to the society. It was also seen that even though a pollution tax may reduce GDP, it leads to an increase in the welfare of the society if it is imposed at an optimal rate.

  5. Whole-genome approach implicates CD44 in cellular resistance to carboplatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukla Sunita J

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Carboplatin is a chemotherapeutic agent used in the management of many cancers, yet treatment is limited by resistance and toxicities. To achieve a better understanding of the genetic contribution to carboplatin resistance or toxicities, lymphoblastoid cell lines from 34 large Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain pedigrees were utilised to evaluate interindividual variation in carboplatin cytotoxicity. Significant heritability, ranging from 0.17-0.36 (p = 1 × 10-7 to 9 × 10-4, was found for cell growth inhibition following 72-hour treatment at each carboplatin concentration (10, 20, 40 and 80 μM and IC50 (concentration for 50 per cent cell growth inhibition. Linkage analysis revealed 11 regions with logarithm of odds (LOD scores greater than 1.5. The highest LOD score on chromosome 11 (LOD = 3.36, p = 4.2 × 10-5 encompasses 65 genes within the 1 LOD confidence interval for the carboplatin IC50. We further analysed the IC50 phenotype with a linkage-directed association analysis using 71 unrelated HapMap and Perlegen cell lines and identified 18 single nucleotide polymorphisms within eight genes that were significantly associated with the carboplatin IC50 (p -5; false discovery rate 50 values of the eight associated genes, which identified the most significant correlation between CD44 expression and IC50 (r2 = 0.20; p = 6 × 10-4. The quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction further confirmed a statistically significant difference in CD44 expression levels between carboplatin-resistant and -sensitive cell lines (p = 5.9 × 10-3. Knockdown of CD44 expression through small interfering RNA resulted in increased cellular sensitivity to carboplatin (p CD44 as being important in conferring cellular resistance to carboplatin.

  6. Spatial implications of international trade under the new economic geography approach

    OpenAIRE

    Ramírez Grajeda, Mauricio; de León Arias, Adrián

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, Paul Krugman from Princeton University was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences by the Central Bank of Sweden, for his “analysis of trade patterns and location of economic activity”. In this paper we survey the literature, known as the New Economic Geography (NEG), launched by Krugman (1991). In particular, we focus on four topics: (i) NEG roots, (ii) NEG rationale; (ii) the spatial impact of international trade on global economic imbalances; and (iv) the impact of internatio...

  7. 76 FR 20974 - Implications of Climate Change for Bioassessment Programs and Approaches To Account for Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-14

    ... peer review charge are available primarily via the Internet on NCEA's home page under the Recent... information, and whether you wish to make oral comments). You may also register via the Internet at http://www... document, ``Freshwater Biological Traits Database,'' are available primarily via the Internet on...

  8. An integrative taxonomic approach to assess the status of Corsican bumblebees: implications for conservation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lecocq, T.; Brasero, N.; De Meulemeester, T.; Michez, D.; Dellicour, S.; Lhomme, P.; de Jonghe, R.; Valterová, Irena; Urbanová, Klára; Rasmont, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 3 (2015), s. 236-248. ISSN 1367-9430 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : Bayesian * bumblebees * endemic * evolutionarily significant unit * genetic marker * insular Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.852, year: 2014

  9. Quantitative Approaches to Linguistic Variation in IRC: Implications for Qualitative Research

    OpenAIRE

    Siebenhaar, Beat

    2008-01-01

    Qualitative analysis of code choice, code switching, and language style in Internet Relay Chat (IRC) can shed light on functional-pragmatic aspects of the use of different linguistic varieties. However, in a qualitative analysis, the status of varieties within a channel or for a single chatter can only be guessed at. Moreover, qualitative research on linguistic variation in IRC often fails to generalize its findings due to a restricted database or a restricted view of a database. This article...

  10. Implications of Climate Change for State Bioassessment Programs and Approaches to Account for Effects (Final Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This final report uses biological data collected by four states in wadeable rivers and streams to examine the components of state and tribal bioassessment and biomonitoring programs that may be vulnerable to climate change. The study investigates the potential to identify biologi...

  11. Virus-host Interactions during Hepatitis C Virus Entry - Implications for Pathogenesis and Novel Treatment Approaches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joachim Lupberger; Catherine Schuster; Franζoise Stoll-Keller; Hubert E. Blum; Thomas F. Baumert; Mirjam B. Zeisel; Anita Haberstroh; Eva K. Schnober; Sophie Krieger; Eric Soulier; Christine Thumann; Cathy Royer; Samira Fafi-Kremer

    2008-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a member of the Flaviviridae family and causes acute and chronic hepatitis. Chronic HCV infection may result in severe liver damage including liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The liver is the primary target organ of HCV, and the hepatocyte is its primary target cell. Attachment of the virus to the cell surface followed by viral entry is the first step in a cascade of interactions between the virus and the target cell that is required for successful entry into the cell and initiation of infection. This step is an important determinant of tissue tropism and pathogenesis; it thus represents a major target for antiviral host cell responses, such as antibody-mediated virus neutralization. Following the development of novel cell culture models for HCV infection our understanding of the HCV entry process and mechanisms of virus neutralization has been markedly advanced. In this review we summarize recent developments in the molecular biology of viral entry and its impact on pathogenesis of HCV infection, development of novel preventive and therapeutic antiviral strategies.

  12. Dance as a Treatment Approach with a Multidisabled Child: Implications for School Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasseter, Jan; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes dance therapy with multidisabled children. Presents case study involving girl with cerebral palsy, mental retardation, and emotional problems with goal of helping her adjust to everyday life and function as nearly as possible as a normal individual. Recommends common movements be combined extemporaneously or in cooperation with a…

  13. Migration and its implications for urban development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choguill, C L

    1983-01-01

    Four theoretical concepts frequently found in the migration literature are critically analyzed by applying them to the study of migration and urbanization patterns in Bangladesh. The theoretical concepts considered include the socioeconomic approach, the rural development approach, an approach based on the sexually selective nature of migration flows, and the primary event approach. The restricted validity of these theories for explaining migration patterns in Bangladesh is demonstrated, and a case is made for taking a broader approach to migration analysis. Comments by Jacques Ledent (pp. 82-4), Ingvar Holmberg (pp. 85-8), and Frans J. Willekens (p. 89) are included. PMID:12312867

  14. Epistemological implications of Saussure’s efforts in the formation of the Science of Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naama Medeiros Silva

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to make observations regarding the formation of modern linguistics as a science (the "science of the language", in the context of their historical moment, considering the insertion of the Saussurean project in a specific context of knowledge production, the language studies, with resulting implications and limitations. We consider the Koyré’s notion of modern science, the critique of previous theoretical linguistics in the Pêcheux and what meant to Saussure all of the him proposition/theoretical elaboration. We approach the Saussurean paternity in the foundation of a science of language, pointing out the various implications of him ongoing project, considering the Course of General Linguistics in the present critical appraisal.

  15. Biofuel's energetic paradigm and its implications: A global overview and the Colombian case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last decade biofuels have become a feasible answer given the global need for alternative energy sources. Its increasing demand has been reflected in the expansion of raw materials' crops, with implications in several topics: land use change, ecosystem services relating hydric resources, Greenhouse Gas Emissions (GHG), food security and land property. The objective of this article is a critical analysis of these issues based on a revision of international literature, but also approaching the Colombian case, particularly African oil palm expansion and its social implications. The main results point out that crop expansion will occur in tropical countries. This generates negative impacts that contribute to conflicts around water and land accessibility in regions characterized by their high social and ecosystem vulnerability. Additionally, it is necessary to improve information systems and to refine methodologies and models that allow an adequate evaluation of biofuel production impacts on human well being.

  16. Sleep disorders in Pregnancy: Glycaemic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K V S Hari

    2016-09-01

    Sleep is one of the essential biorhythms of the body that helps in optimum restoration of many body functions. The sleep-wake cycle is determined by the circadian centre and is responsible for the anabolic functions in the body. Infants require about 14 to 18 hours of sleep per day, which reduces gradually to about 8 hours in adults. Urbanization and evolutionary changes have altered the sleep hygiene and shortened the sleep duration. This lead to various sleep disorders like sleep disordered breathing, insomnia and narcolepsy. Sleep disorders lead to adverse cardio-metabolic consequences, including insulin resistance and hyperglycaemia. Pregnancy poses an enormous burden on the homeostasis of the women with alteration in many physiological functions. The sleep disorders during pregnancy lead to adverse foeto-maternal outcomes with long term cardiovascular implications. In this article, I review the pathophysiology of sleep disorders during pregnancy and their glycaemic implications. PMID:27582156

  17. The environmental implications of landfill gas control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper reviews the implications for landfill gas control of the Environmental Protection Bill in relation to proposed, existing and closed sites. If the Bill is enacted in its present form these changes will have far reaching implications on the waste management industry and especially those involved in landfill gas monitoring and control. The paper describes the requirements for the management of landfill gas both on and around landfill sites before, during and after the cessation of waste disposal operations. It describes the duties of Waste Regulation Authorities (WRAs) under the Bill in relation to landfill gas including their duties in relation to closed sites. The paper concludes that when the WRAs fulfill these duties the risk of further incidents occurring with landfill gas will be significantly reduced. (author)

  18. Learning and reconsolidation implicate different synaptic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Meloni, Edward G; Carlezon, William A; Milad, Mohammed R; Pitman, Roger K; Nader, Karim; Bolshakov, Vadim Y

    2013-03-19

    Synaptic mechanisms underlying memory reconsolidation after retrieval are largely unknown. Here we report that synapses in projections to the lateral nucleus of the amygdala implicated in auditory fear conditioning, which are potentiated by learning, enter a labile state after memory reactivation, and must be restabilized through a postsynaptic mechanism implicating the mammalian target of rapamycin kinase-dependent signaling. Fear-conditioning-induced synaptic enhancements were primarily presynaptic in origin. Reconsolidation blockade with rapamycin, inhibiting mammalian target of rapamycin kinase activity, suppressed synaptic potentiation in slices from fear-conditioned rats. Surprisingly, this reduction of synaptic efficacy was mediated by post- but not presynaptic mechanisms. These findings suggest that different plasticity rules may apply to the processes underlying the acquisition of original fear memory and postreactivational stabilization of fear-conditioning-induced synaptic enhancements mediating fear memory reconsolidation. PMID:23487762

  19. Cognitive Variables Implicated In Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moretti, Luciana Sofía

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the creation of gate control theory, the importance of psychological variables in chronic pain has emerged. Thus, the cognitive variables are emphasized in between behaviors, emotions and social factors for the explanation of chronic pain. Considering the gate control theory, cognitive variables modulate the other two dimensions of the chronic pain experience: the motivational-afective dimension and the sensory-discriminative dimension (Camacho Martel & Anarte Ortiz, 2001; Gatchel, Peng, Peters, Fuchs & Turk, 2007. The aim of this work is to review the main cognitive variables implicated in the chronic pain experience. Moreover, empirical evidence that support the importance of these variables is presented. Furthermore, it is discussed the clinical implications and the importance of this area in the local context.

  20. Implications of LHC Searches for Massive Graviton

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Yong

    2012-01-01

    With the latest LHC available results, we consider the generic constraints on massive graviton. Both dijet and dilepton resonance searches are used. The limits on parameter space can be applied to many models. As an illustration, we show the constraints for Randall-Sundrum (RS) model. Implications on massive graviton and the coupling strength are discussed. For $k/M_{pl}=0.1$, $M_G<2.2$ TeV region is excluded at 95% confidence level. We also present some interesting implications on the RS radion with respect to the 125 GeV excess at the LHC. For $k/M_{pl}=0.1$, $\\Lambda_\\phi<13.8$ TeV is excluded where $\\Lambda_\\phi$ is the scale to charactarize the interaction strengh of radion.

  1. A matter of approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jønsson, Jesper Bosse; W. U. Appel, Peter; Chibunda, Raphael

    2009-01-01

    The mercury-based gold extraction processes prevalent within small-scale mining are both efficient and harmful. While ensuring relatively high levels of gold recovery, they cause environmental and health problems for people living within mining settlements. This mercury consumption can be minimized...... by using a simple mercury recycling device known as a retort. While mining legislation in Tanzania dictates the use of retorts for gold recovery, virtually no miners use them, indicating the inadequacy of previous introduction attempts. During action research, retorts were introduced in two mining...... saved money normally spent on purchasing mercury. The findings have implications for the strategies of development interventions targeting mercury-instigated problems within small-scale gold mining....

  2. Social Implications of Neo - Imperialism in India

    OpenAIRE

    Dhas, Albert Christopher; Helen, Mary Jacqueline

    2010-01-01

    The globalisation process, which aimed at integration of economies and global development, is basically a reflection of neo-imperialism ideas. The question addressed in this paper is: what are the social implications of the neo-imperialism (globalisation) process in India, particularly on the social security aspects of the working population? Accordingly, an attempt is made in this paper to examine changes in the social security status of the working population that have been brought ab...

  3. Colon cancer stem cells: implications in carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Sanders, Matthew A.; Majumdar, Adhip P. N.

    2011-01-01

    The cancer stem cell model was described for hematologic malignancies in 1997 and since then evidence has emerged to support it for many solid tumors as well, including colon cancer. This model proposes that certain cells within the tumor mass are pluripotent and capable of self-renewal and have an enhanced ability to initiate distant metastasis. The cancer stem cell model has important implications for cancer treatment, since most current therapies target actively proliferating cells and may...

  4. Societal Aging: Implications for Fiscal Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Auerbach, Alan J

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers implications of population aging for the conduct of fiscal policy, grouping the issues into four areas, focusing on the impact of aging on: (1) the size of government budget imbalances; (2) the composition of government spending and government budget flexibility; (3) the composition of tax collections and the desirability of alternative tax systems; and (4) the effectiveness of fiscal policy as a tool for stabilization. Societal aging puts considerable stress put on publi...

  5. Bioavailability: implications for science/cleanup policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denit, Jeffery; Planicka, J. Gregory

    1998-12-01

    This paper examines the role of bioavailability in risk assessment and cleanup decisions. Bioavailability refers to how chemicals ''behave'' and their ''availability'' to interact with living organisms. Bioavailability has significant implications for exposure risks, cleanup goals, and site costs. Risk to human health and the environment is directly tied to the bioavailability of the chemicals of concern.

  6. The Greek Crisis: Causes and Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Vlamis Prodromos; Kouretas Georgios P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents and critically discusses the origins and causes of the Greek fiscal crisis and its implications for the euro currency as well as the SEE economies. In the aftermath of the 2007-2009 financial crisis the enormous increase in sovereign debt has emerged as an important negative outcome, since public debt was dramatically increased in an effort by the US and the European governments to reduce the accumulated growth of private debt in the years preceding the recent financ...

  7. FEMALE URETHRA – ANATOMO-CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    C. Zanoschi; R. Moldovanu

    2006-01-01

    Urethra represents the last segment of the urinary tract. We present a comprehensive account of the female urethral anatomy, including its component structures, neurovascular supply, relationship to adjacent structures (the vagina, bladder and vestibular glands, and connective tissue supports) and histology. These data are important because the distal segment of the female urethra is implicated in the mechanism of urinary continence (female stress urinary incontinence is thought to result f...

  8. Implications of Theoretical Ideas Regarding Cold Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Abbas, Afsar

    1995-01-01

    A lot of theoretical ideas have been floated to explain the so called cold fusion phenomenon. I look at a large subset of these and study further physical implications of the concepts involved. I suggest that these can be tested by other independent physical means. Because of the significance of these the experimentalists are urged to look for these signatures. The results in turn will be important for a better understanding and hence control of the cold fusion phenomenon.

  9. Radioecological implications of the Par Pond drawdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The drawdown of the Par Pond reservoir created dramatic alterations in this formerly stable lentic ecosystem. In addition, the radiation environment at Par Pond has changed significantly because of the exposure of Cesium 137-contaminated sediments and the appearance of new transport pathways to the terrestrial environment. In response to this situation, SREL was asked to study the radioecological implications of the reservoir drawdown. This report contains the objectives, methods, and results of the SREL study

  10. The remnant CP transformation and its implications

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Canales, Felix

    2016-01-01

    In the context of remnant CP transformations, I briefly discuss a generalized $\\mu-\\tau$ reflection symmetry, where the "Majorana" phases have CP conserving values, which are directly related with the CP parities of neutrino states. Also, one finds that the "Dirac-like" CP violation phase is correlated with the atmospheric mixing angle, giving important phenomenological implications for current and future long baseline oscillation neutrino experiments.

  11. Thalamocortical synchronization and cognition: implications for schizophrenia?

    OpenAIRE

    Uhlhaas, Peter J.; Roux, Frederic; Singer, Wolf

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive deficits are a core dysfunction in schizophrenia. In this issue of Neuron, Parnaudeau et al. (2013) investigated synchronization in thalamocortical pathways in an animal model to address the disconnection between brain regions as a mechanism for working memory impairments in the disorder.implicated dysfunctional neural oscillations in the explanation of cognitive deficits and certain clinical symptoms of schizophrenia. Specifically, we will focus on findings that have examined neura...

  12. Breast cancer heterogeneity: mechanisms, proofs, and implications

    OpenAIRE

    Yi-Hsuan Hsiao, Ming-Chih Chou, Carol Fowler, Jeffrey T. Mason, Yan-gao Man

    2010-01-01

    Human breast cancer represents a group of highly heterogeneous lesions consisting of about 20 morphologically distinct subtypes with substantially different molecular and/or biochemical signatures, clinical courses, and prognoses. This study analyzed the possible correlation between the morphological presentations of breast cancer and two hypothesized models of carcinogenesis, in order to identify the intrinsic mechanism(s) and clinical implications of breast cancer heterogeneity.

  13. Breast cancer heterogeneity: mechanisms, proofs, and implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hsuan Hsiao, Ming-Chih Chou, Carol Fowler, Jeffrey T. Mason, Yan-gao Man

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Human breast cancer represents a group of highly heterogeneous lesions consisting of about 20 morphologically distinct subtypes with substantially different molecular and/or biochemical signatures, clinical courses, and prognoses. This study analyzed the possible correlation between the morphological presentations of breast cancer and two hypothesized models of carcinogenesis, in order to identify the intrinsic mechanism(s and clinical implications of breast cancer heterogeneity.

  14. IT Industry in Bangalore: Some Economic Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Meenakshi RAJEEV

    2012-01-01

    IT industry has shown phenomenal growth in the city of Bangalore which has changed the very nature of the city. Large migration to the city also has created several environmental problems. Because of growth of this industry in selected pockets income inequality in the state is also on the rise which have many adverse social implications. But the sector has been able to generate significant employment and this role needs to be highlighted as educated unemployment can create many adverse econom...

  15. Astrophysical Implications of Higher-Dimensional Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Liko, Tomas; Overduin, James M.; Wesson, Paul S.

    2003-01-01

    We review the implications of modern higher-dimensional theories of gravity for astrophysics and cosmology. In particular, we discuss the latest developments of space-time-matter theory in connection with dark matter, particle dynamics and the cosmological constant, as well as related aspects of quantum theory. There are also more immediate tests of extra dimensions, notably involving perturbations of the cosmic 3K microwave background and the precession of a supercooled gyroscope in Earth or...

  16. Aggregate Implications of Micro Asset Market Segmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Chris Edmond; Pierre-Olivier Weill

    2011-01-01

    This paper develops a consumption-based asset pricing model to explain and quantify the aggregate implications of a frictional financial system, comprised of many financial markets partially integrated with one another. Each of our micro financial market's is inhabited by traders who are specialized in that markets type of asset. We specify exogenously the level of segmentation that ultimately determines how much idiosyncratic risk traders bear in their micro market and derive aggregate asset...

  17. Environment Implications of China's WTO Accession

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Shantong; He Jianwu

    2006-01-01

    China's WTO accession will have important environmental implications. This article aims at providing environmental analysis of the impact of China's accession to the WTO, based on its final offer for WTO accession and a 53-sector, recursive dynamic computable general equilibrium (CGE) model of China. We try to provide some empirical evidences for policy makers to evaluate the effects of China's WTO accession from environmental prospective.

  18. Headquarters Research and Implications for Local Development

    OpenAIRE

    William A. Testa

    2006-01-01

    Drawing from both the professional literature and from a conference held at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago in 2004, the author summarizes findings and draws implications concerning the locational tendencies of stand-alone headquarters operations. In the United States, the geography of large company headquarters is becoming more dispersed toward medium-sized metropolitan areas even as the headquarters needs for urban infrastructure and amenities continue to sharpen. The location of the fi...

  19. ECONOMIC IMPLICATIONS OF INSUFFICIENT HEALTH LITERACY

    OpenAIRE

    Dukić, Nikolina; Arbula Blecich, Andrea; Cerović, Ljerka

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of this paper is to elaborate the importance of health literacy in cost-effective utilization of health care services which influence the efficiency of the entire health care sector. In order to complement the theoretical framework of the economic implications and the circular influence of health literacy on the economy, an empirical analysis was carried out using S–TOFHLA. The results suggest that the patients’ personal characteristics and the accessibil...

  20. On the normative implications of social neuroscience

    OpenAIRE

    Arleen Salles

    2013-01-01

    Within the last decades, brain science has been offering new insights into the relationship among diverse psychological processes and the neural correlates of our moral thought and behavior. Despite the distinction between the explanatory/descriptive nature of science and the normative nature of morality, some neuroethicists have claimed that neuroscientific findings have normative implications. In this paper, I identify three interpretations of the claim. The first focuses on neuroscience’s ...

  1. Objective Definition of Rosette Shape Variation Using a Combined Computer Vision and Data Mining Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Camargo, Anyela; Papadopoulou, Dimitra; Spyropoulou, Zoi; Vlachonasios, Konstantinos; Doonan, John H.; Gay, Alan P.

    2014-01-01

    Computer-vision based measurements of phenotypic variation have implications for crop improvement and food security because they are intrinsically objective. It should be possible therefore to use such approaches to select robust genotypes. However, plants are morphologically complex and identification of meaningful traits from automatically acquired image data is not straightforward. Bespoke algorithms can be designed to capture and/or quantitate specific features but this approach is inflex...

  2. The merit of sectoral approaches in transitioning towards a global carbon market

    OpenAIRE

    Fujiwara, Noriko; GEORGIEV Anton; ALESSI Monica

    2010-01-01

    The term 'sectoral approaches' means different things to different people. There are at least three main models of sectoral approaches: industry-led transnational initiatives linked to the deployment of sector-specific technologies; bottom-up developing country commitments, possibly combined with 'no-lose' targets; and a sectoral Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) or sectoral crediting with implications for carbon finance. There are a number of industry-led transnational initiatives, including...

  3. Research Methods for Non-Representational Approaches of Organizational Complexity. The Dialogical and Mediated Inquiry

    OpenAIRE

    Clot, Yves; Lorino, Philippe; Tricard, Benoît

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the methodological implications of non-representational approaches of organizational complexity. Representational theories focus on the syntactic complexity of systems, whereas organizing processes are predominantly characterized by semantic and pragmatic forms of complexity. After underlining the contribution of non-representational approaches to the study of organizations, the paper warns against the risk of confining the critique of representational frameworks to parado...

  4. What's in a Domain: Understanding How Students Approach Questioning in History and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portnoy, Lindsay Blau; Rabinowitz, Mitchell

    2014-01-01

    How students ask questions as they learn has implications for understanding, retention, and problem solving. The current research investigates the influence of domain, age, and previous experience with content on the ways students approach questioning across history and science texts. In 3 experiments, 3rd-, 8th-, and 10th-grade students in large…

  5. Sampling Practices and Social Spaces: Exploring a Hip-Hop Approach to Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petchauer, Emery

    2010-01-01

    Much more than a musical genre, hip-hop culture exists as an animating force in the lives of many young adults. This article looks beyond the moral concerns often associated with rap music to explore how hip-hop as a larger set of expressions and practices implicates the educational experiences, activities, and approaches for students. The article…

  6. Revisiting the Whole-School Approach to Bullying: Really Looking at the Whole School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Jacques F.; Schneider, Barry H.; Mallet, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    The whole-school approach to bullying prevention is predicated on the assumption that bullying is a systemic problem, and, by implication, that intervention must be directed at the entire school context rather than just at individual bullies and victims. Unfortunately, recent meta-analyses that have looked at various bullying programs from many…

  7. Considering Placement and Educational Approaches for Students Who Are Deaf and Hard of Hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Barbara Casson

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses placement and educational approaches for students with hearing impairments including what the law provides, what students need, what conflicts exist, and implications for practice. The major principles of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (1997 amendments) are summarized. A continuum of placement options is…

  8. THE REPURCHASE OF SHARES - ANOTHER FORM OF REWARDING INVESTORS - A THEORETICAL APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PRISACARIU Maria

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Among the shareholder remuneration policies, in recent years, share repurchases are gaining more and more ground. Like any other phenomenon or financial practice, repurchases lacked no theories to explain their motivation, effects and controversies. This paper proposes a theoretical approach to the subject by summarizing relevant research in order to highlight the motivations behind this decision and its implications.

  9. What Can We Learn from Chaos Theory? An Alternative Approach to Instructional Systems Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yeongmahn

    1993-01-01

    Explains chaos theory; compares a conventional instructional systems design (ISD) approach with chaos theory and dynamic nonlinear systems, including deterministic predictability and indeterministic unpredictability and negative and positive feedback; explores theoretical implications for developing an alternative ISD model; and recommends future…

  10. The TEACH Method: An Interactive Approach for Teaching the Needs-Based Theories Of Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorer, Cleamon, Jr.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an interactive approach for explaining and teaching the Needs-Based Theories of Motivation. The acronym TEACH stands for Theory, Example, Application, Collaboration, and Having Discussion. This method can help business students to better understand and distinguish the implications of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs,…

  11. Assessment of Reading and Learning Disabilities: A Research-Based Intervention-Oriented Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Jack M.; Foorman, Barbara R.; Boudousquie, Amy

    2002-01-01

    Reviews implications of the three primary components of the federal definition of learning disabilities (discrepancy, heterogeneity, and exclusion) for the assessment of children with learning disabilities (LD). Also proposes a rationale and procedures for more efficient approaches to the identification of children as learning disabled that are…

  12. Are Approaches to Learning in Kindergarten Associated with Academic and Social Competence Similarly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razza, Rachel A.; Martin, Anne; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    Background: Approaches to learning (ATL) is a key domain of school readiness with important implications for children's academic trajectories. Interestingly, however, the impact of early ATL on children's social competence has not been examined. Objective: This study examines associations between children's ATL at age 5 and academic achievement…

  13. Algorithmic approach for clandestine localisation and tracking in short-range environments

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Kuwari, Saif; Wolthusen, Stephen D.

    2012-01-01

    Target tracking applications have recently evolved becoming essential intelligence and law enforcement tools. Traditionally, long-range communications, such as cellular networks, have been used for this purpose. Such conventional tracking approach, however, usually suffers from several accuracy implications due to location measurement errors. This is exemplified in densely cluttered and indoor environments where measurements are severely affected by excessive environmental and physical ...

  14. [Gut microbiota: Description, role and pathophysiologic implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landman, C; Quévrain, E

    2016-06-01

    The human gut contains 10(14) bacteria and many other micro-organisms such as Archaea, viruses and fungi. Studying the gut microbiota showed how this entity participates to gut physiology and beyond this to human health, as a real "hidden organ". In this review, we aimed to bring information about gut microbiota, its structure, its roles and its implication in human pathology. After bacterial colonization in infant, intestinal microbial composition is unique for each individual although more than 95% can be assigned to four major phyla. The use of culture independent methods and more recently the development of high throughput sequencing allowed to depict precisely gut microbiota structure and diversity as well as its alteration in diseases. Gut microbiota is implicated in the maturation of the host immune system and in many fundamental metabolic pathways including sugars and proteins fermentation and metabolism of bile acids and xenobiotics. Imbalance of gut microbial populations or dysbiosis has important functional consequences and is implicated in many digestive diseases (inflammatory bowel diseases, colorectal cancer, etc.) but also in obesity and autism. These observations have led to a surge of studies exploring therapeutics which aims to restore gut microbiota equilibrium such as probiotics or fecal microbiota transplantation. But recent research also investigates biological activity of microbial products which could lead to interesting therapeutics leads. PMID:26749318

  15. Investigating Variations in Gameplay: Cognitive Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Sedig

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing interest in creating computer games for learning, problem solving, and other high-level cognitive activities. When investigating whether gameplay is conducive to such activities, gameplay is often studied as a whole. As a result, cognitive implications can be linked to the game but not to its structural elements. Given that gameplay arises from interaction between the player and the game, it is the structural components of interaction that should be investigated to better understand the design of gameplay. Furthermore, minor variations in the components of interaction can have significant cognitive implications. However, such variation has not been studied yet. Thus, to gain a better understanding of how we can study the effect of interaction on the cognitive aspect of gameplay, we conducted an exploratory investigation of two computer games. These games were isomorphic at a deep level and only had one minor difference in the structure of their interaction. Volunteers played these games and discussed the cognitive processes that emerged. In one game, they primarily engaged in planning, but in the other game they primarily engaged in visualizing. This paper discusses the results of our investigation as well as its implications for the design of computer games.

  16. The initial slope of cell survival curves. Its implications in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of the initial slope of the cell survival curves can be approached in 2 ways: a straightforward approach is the direct and acurate measurement of the cell survival at low dose. This method is practically restricted to experiments in vitro; an indirect approach is the determination of the initial slope of the single cell survival curves from the shape of the ''isoeffect curves'' for fractionated irradiations. This method can be applied to ''non-quantitative'' reactions. Implications in radiotherapy of the existence of a significant initial slope are presented with respect to the 3 following problems: importance of the fraction number N for fractionated irradiations with small doses per fraction and differential effect related to fraction number; variation of the total dose as a function of dose rate for low dose rate irradiation; RBE of high LET radiation and RBE/dose relationship

  17. Personal Approaches to Career Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMont, Billie; DeMont, Roger

    1983-01-01

    Identifies four approaches to career planning based on situational leadership theory: the network approach, self-help approach, engineering approach, and mentor approach. Guidelines for the selection of a planning method based on the nature of the work environment and personal preference are discussed. (JAC)

  18. Universal design of workplaces through the use of Poka-Yokes: Case study and implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristóbal Miralles

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Employment plays an important part in many people’s lives beyond merely providing income, since continued participation in work can have many therapeutic benefits for workers defined as disabled. However, disabled workers face a range of barriers to employment, despite legislation intended to improve workplace accessibility emphasizing adaptations to the workplace, which many employers often find difficult and expensive. The Poka-Yoke approach was developed in the manufacturing industry as a way of improving productivity by reducing errors using often very simple adaptations. This paper argues that, as Poka-Yokes are designed to make life easier and improve the performance of workers without impairments, they are closer to the philosophy of Universal Design than to Accessible Design, and offer an easy and inclusive way of making work more accessible for all kind of workers. Design/methodology/approach: This paper provides a case study demonstrating the use of the Poka-Yoke approach in a sheltered work centre for disabled; highlighting how they served to improve accessibility to work by fulfilling Universal Design principles. Findings: Our research allows us to demonstrate the great potential of Poka-yokes for gaining accessibility to the workplace. The real application of this approach, both in sheltered work centres and ordinary companies, can contribute to improve the high unemployment rates of disabled people. Research limitations/implications: The proposal is innovative and was applied in one specific company. Thus, a range of customized Poka-yokes would be desirable for different industrial sectors. Practical implications: Managers of sheltered work centres, and also of ordinary companies, can realize about the great potential of Poka-Yokes as an easy means of gaining flexibility and accessibility. Originality/value: There are very few papers relating lean manufacturing tools and disability. Our approach analyzes the benefits of

  19. Technical approach document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law 95-604 (PL95-604), grants the Secretary of Energy the authority and responsibility to perform such actions as are necessary to minimize radiation health hazards and other environmental hazards caused by inactive uranium mill sites. This Technical Approach Document (TAD) describes the general technical approaches and design criteria adopted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in order to implement remedial action plans (RAPS) and final designs that comply with EPA standards. It does not address the technical approaches necessary for aquifer restoration at processing sites; a guidance document, currently in preparation, will describe aquifer restoration concerns and technical protocols. This document is a second revision to the original document issued in May 1986; the revision has been made in response to changes to the groundwater standards of 40 CFR 192, Subparts A--C, proposed by EPA as draft standards. New sections were added to define the design approaches and designs necessary to comply with the groundwater standards. These new sections are in addition to changes made throughout the document to reflect current procedures, especially in cover design, water resources protection, and alternate site selection; only minor revisions were made to some of the sections. Sections 3.0 is a new section defining the approach taken in the design of disposal cells; Section 4.0 has been revised to include design of vegetated covers; Section 8.0 discusses design approaches necessary for compliance with the groundwater standards; and Section 9.0 is a new section dealing with nonradiological hazardous constituents. 203 refs., 18 figs., 26 tabs.

  20. Technical approach document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law 95-604 (PL95-604), grants the Secretary of Energy the authority and responsibility to perform such actions as are necessary to minimize radiation health hazards and other environmental hazards caused by inactive uranium mill sites. This Technical Approach Document (TAD) describes the general technical approaches and design criteria adopted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in order to implement remedial action plans (RAPS) and final designs that comply with EPA standards. It does not address the technical approaches necessary for aquifer restoration at processing sites; a guidance document, currently in preparation, will describe aquifer restoration concerns and technical protocols. This document is a second revision to the original document issued in May 1986; the revision has been made in response to changes to the groundwater standards of 40 CFR 192, Subparts A--C, proposed by EPA as draft standards. New sections were added to define the design approaches and designs necessary to comply with the groundwater standards. These new sections are in addition to changes made throughout the document to reflect current procedures, especially in cover design, water resources protection, and alternate site selection; only minor revisions were made to some of the sections. Sections 3.0 is a new section defining the approach taken in the design of disposal cells; Section 4.0 has been revised to include design of vegetated covers; Section 8.0 discusses design approaches necessary for compliance with the groundwater standards; and Section 9.0 is a new section dealing with nonradiological hazardous constituents. 203 refs., 18 figs., 26 tabs

  1. Learning approaches and studies of effect of environmental factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirkov Snežana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a presentation of 3P model of learning (Presage-Process-Product, which comprises learning approaches placed in a wider context of the set of variables related to personality, environment, process and outcomes of learning. Three approaches to learning - surface, deep and achievement-oriented - consist of motives and the corresponding learning strategies. There is a discussion of the findings and implications of a great deal of research using the instruments based on this model. We analyzed research findings about the effect of instruction on learning approaches acquired by pupils, and especially students. It is shown how based on learning approach employed by pupils it is possible to draw conclusions about the quality of instruction. Testing the instruments on various samples indicates that the model is applicable in different cultures. Cross-cultural research opened up the problem of relation between memorising and understanding. Further research is necessary, both empirical and theoretical, that is, development of conceptualization of these constructs, and especially their role in education. Perspectives for further research also open up in the direction of studying various factors connected with personality and their relations with learning approaches. The role of learning approaches of teachers in developing the learning approaches of pupils is yet to be examined.

  2. Homogenization approach in engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homogenization is an approach which studies the macrobehavior of a medium by its microproperties. Problems with a microstructure play an essential role in such fields as mechanics, chemistry, physics, and reactor engineering. Attention is concentrated on a simple specific model problem to illustrate results and problems typical of the homogenization approach. Only the diffusion problem is treated here, but some statements are made about the elasticity of composite materials. The differential equation is solved for linear cases with and without boundaries and for the nonlinear case. 3 figures, 1 table

  3. Approaching electrical tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. L. Cosentino

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available A general approach to electrical tomography is here described, based on the distribution of the experimental data to the set of voxels in which the subsoil has been divided. This approach utilizes the sensitivity coefficients as factors of the convolution procedure to execute the back projection of the data, to obtain the 3D pictures of the subsoil. A subsequent probabilistic filtering technique is described to improve the pictures in view of sharp boundary models. Some models are finally presented, mostly regarding cubic buried anomalies as well as pipe-shaped and L-shaped anomalies.

  4. Stratway: A Modular Approach to Strategic Conflict Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, George E.; Butler, Ricky W.; Maddalon, Jeffrey M.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we introduce Stratway, a modular approach to finding long-term strategic resolutions to conflicts between aircraft. The modular approach provides both advantages and disadvantages. Our primary concern is to investigate the implications on the verification of safety-critical properties of a strategic resolution algorithm. By partitioning the problem into verifiable modules much stronger verification claims can be established. Since strategic resolution involves searching for solutions over an enormous state space, Stratway, like most similar algorithms, searches these spaces by applying heuristics, which present especially difficult verification challenges. An advantage of a modular approach is that it makes a clear distinction between the resolution function and the trajectory generation function. This allows the resolution computation to be independent of any particular vehicle. The Stratway algorithm was developed in both Java and C++ and is available through a open source license. Additionally there is a visualization application that is helpful when analyzing and quickly creating conflict scenarios.

  5. Gene therapy and its implications in Periodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Mahale Swapna; Dani Nitin; Ansari Shumaila; Kale Triveni

    2009-01-01

    Gene therapy is a field of Biomedicine. With the advent of gene therapy in dentistry, significant progress has been made in the control of periodontal diseases and reconstruction of dento-alveolar apparatus. Implementation in periodontics include: -As a mode of tissue engineering with three approaches: cell, protein-based and gene delivery approach. -Genetic approach to Biofilm Antibiotic Resistance. Future strategies of gene therapy in preventing periodontal diseases: -Enhances host defense...

  6. Financial Management: An Organic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laux, Judy

    2013-01-01

    Although textbooks present corporate finance using a topical approach, good financial management requires an organic approach that integrates the various assignments financial managers confront every day. Breaking the tasks into meaningful subcategories, the current article offers one approach.

  7. Threat displays for final approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Chad Warren

    During periods of good visibility, airports can conduct Closely Spaced Parallel Approaches (CSPA) and simultaneously operate parallel runways separated by more than 750 feet. When visibility degrades to Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) and pilots must fly exclusively by the instruments, the runway separation required to operate parallel runways increases to 3400 feet or more. For many airports around the country and the world this means the second runway must be closed and the airport operates at half capacity. To alleviate the delays caused by this capacity reduction many airports worldwide are planning to expand and build new runways. The projected cost of the ten largest airport projects in the United States is $8-16 Billion. Perhaps a less expensive solution can be found with innovative technology rather than real estate? This research presents the first ever design, implementation, and characterization of a synthetic vision display and the supporting flight system to attempt to achieve this solution. The display uses 3D graphics and an air to air datalink called Automatic Dependent Surveillance--Broadcast to present the pilot with the information necessary to aviate, navigate and monitor traffic. This thesis also documents the first series of flight experiments to test the applicability of synthetic vision displays to both runway incursion avoidance and CSPA. Finally, utilizing the results from the flight testing in a Monte Carlo analysis, the effect of deploying this display on minimum safe runway separation is calculated. It has been found that the minimum safe runway separation for IMC operation can safely be reduced to 1900 feet. If, in addition, significant changes are made in Air Traffic Control procedures for longitudinal aircraft spacing, the analysis shows that the display system presented herein will allow for runway separation of 1400 feet with no new restrictions on aircraft size or crosswind. Furthermore, with certain restrictions on

  8. Approaches to acceptable risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several alternative approaches to address the question open-quotes How safe is safe enough?close quotes are reviewed and an attempt is made to apply the reasoning behind these approaches to the issue of acceptability of radiation exposures received in space. The approaches to the issue of the acceptability of technological risk described here are primarily analytical, and are drawn from examples in the management of environmental health risks. These include risk-based approaches, in which specific quantitative risk targets determine the acceptability of an activity, and cost-benefit and decision analysis, which generally focus on the estimation and evaluation of risks, benefits and costs, in a framework that balances these factors against each other. These analytical methods tend by their quantitative nature to emphasize the magnitude of risks, costs and alternatives, and to downplay other factors, especially those that are not easily expressed in quantitative terms, that affect acceptance or rejection of risk. Such other factors include the issues of risk perceptions and how and by whom risk decisions are made

  9. Approaches to acceptable risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whipple, C.

    1997-04-30

    Several alternative approaches to address the question {open_quotes}How safe is safe enough?{close_quotes} are reviewed and an attempt is made to apply the reasoning behind these approaches to the issue of acceptability of radiation exposures received in space. The approaches to the issue of the acceptability of technological risk described here are primarily analytical, and are drawn from examples in the management of environmental health risks. These include risk-based approaches, in which specific quantitative risk targets determine the acceptability of an activity, and cost-benefit and decision analysis, which generally focus on the estimation and evaluation of risks, benefits and costs, in a framework that balances these factors against each other. These analytical methods tend by their quantitative nature to emphasize the magnitude of risks, costs and alternatives, and to downplay other factors, especially those that are not easily expressed in quantitative terms, that affect acceptance or rejection of risk. Such other factors include the issues of risk perceptions and how and by whom risk decisions are made.

  10. Salt repository design approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a summary discussion of the approaches that have been and will be taken in design of repository facilities for use with disposal of radioactive wastes in salt formations. Since specific sites have yet to be identified, the discussion is at a general level, supplemented with illustrative examples where appropriate. 5 references, 1 figure

  11. 12th CIFIT Approaches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    CIFIT, standing for China International Fair for Investment and Trade, approved by the State Council of the People’s Republic of China, hold on September 8-11 every year in the city of Xiamen, China. In the year of 2008, the days for the 12th CIFIT approaches closely, a series of preparation have been on the way.

  12. RFID: Dynamic Surveillance Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indraveer Singh

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Most of the modern security and monitoring domain is based upon Camera based Surveillance Architecture. Prison cells, corporate offices, government buildings, stock market, supermarkets etc all the seats utilize this structure in core. Most CCTV systems are used for surveillance which can include security monitoring, spying or for safety monitoring purposes. Although this system has been quite popular being affordable and visually administrable, it is no exception to improvements and up gradation. Thus in this paper we have come up with efficient proposals to upgrade the approach for Camera based Surveillance Architecture for security and Administration. This renewed approach is essentially based upon RFID technology where we are utilizing RFID tags and their readers as basic components. Unlike Camera-based surveillance, RFID-based approach can monitor and administer a quarter not only within some region of visibility but can efficiently do the same for locating the individuality (through Dynamic Surveillance as explained further. This approach emphasizes not only on overcoming the demerits of observation-based supervision, but it presents easier and effective monitoring methodologies using radio waves and their usable features in security and administration for areas with consumer pour out.

  13. Adopting a Pluricentric Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kerckvoorde, Colette

    2012-01-01

    This article argues for a "D-A-CH" approach, which stands for Germany (D), Austria (A), and Switzerland (CH), in language classes from the introductory level on. I begin by tracing the emergence and development of distinct Standard Swiss and Austrian German varieties. I then discuss marketing efforts for Swiss and Austrian German, and…

  14. Sustainability and resilience: toward a systems approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Fiksel

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive systems approach is essential for effective decision making with regard to global sustainability, since industrial, social, and ecological systems are closely linked. Despite efforts to reduce unsustainability, global resource consumption continues to grow. There is an urgent need for a better understanding of the dynamic, adaptive behavior of complex systems and their resilience in the face of disruptions, recognizing that steady-state sustainability models are simplistic. However, assessing the broad impacts of policy and technology choices is a formidable challenge, as exemplified in life-cycle analysis of the implications of alternative energy and mobility technologies. A number of research groups are using dynamic modeling techniques, including biocomplexity, system dynamics, and thermodynamic analysis, to investigate the impacts on ecological and human systems of major shifts such as climate change and the associated policy and technology responses. These techniques can yield at least a partial understanding of dynamic system behavior, enabling a more integrated approach to systems analysis, beneficial intervention, and improvement of resilience. Recommendations are provided for continued research to achieve progress in the dynamic modeling and sustainable management of complex systems.

  15. Gender and physics: a sociological approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendick, Heather

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, I take a sociological approach to understanding the under-representation of gender and physics. I argue that gender is something we do not something that we are. Thus, every aspect of our behaviour, including our engagement (or not) with physics becomes part of our performance of gender. I then use a brief historical analysis and an example from popular culture to show how physics is culturally aligned with masculinity. The impact is that the subject feels more ‘natural’ for men than for women. I end with some of the implications of this for those who want to make physics more accessible to girls and women. (EDITORS NOTE: This paper was given at the Improving Gender Balance (IGB) conference in Cambridge, UK, in March 2015, organised by the Institute of Physics. This conference was for schools and their supporters who were part of the IGB strand of the Stimulating Physics Network, funded by the Department for Education. It aimed to summarise some of the sociological perspectives on girls and physics for the benefit of the teachers attending the conference. We feel that it may be a useful summary for those teachers of physics who are unfamiliar with sociological approaches to gender and the classroom.)

  16. Implication-based fuzzy semiautomaton of a finite group and its properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selva Rathi, M.; Michael Anna Spinneli, J.

    2016-06-01

    Implication-based fuzzy semiautomaton (IBFSA) of a finite group is defined. The ideas of an implication-based fuzzy kernel and implication-based fuzzy subsemiautomaton of an IBFSA over a finite group are developed using the concept of implication-based fuzzy subgroup and implication-based fuzzy normal subgroup. The necessary and sufficient condition for the implication-based fuzzy kernel and implication-based fuzzy subsemiautomaton of an IBFSA and few other results are proved in this paper.

  17. Hyporheic flow and transport processes: mechanisms, models, and biogeochemical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boano, Fulvio; Harvey, Judson W.; Marion, Andrea; Packman, Aaron I.; Revelli, Roberto; Ridolfi, Luca; Anders, Wörman

    2014-01-01

    Fifty years of hyporheic zone research have shown the important role played by the hyporheic zone as an interface between groundwater and surface waters. However, it is only in the last two decades that what began as an empirical science has become a mechanistic science devoted to modeling studies of the complex fluid dynamical and biogeochemical mechanisms occurring in the hyporheic zone. These efforts have led to the picture of surface-subsurface water interactions as regulators of the form and function of fluvial ecosystems. Rather than being isolated systems, surface water bodies continuously interact with the subsurface. Exploration of hyporheic zone processes has led to a new appreciation of their wide reaching consequences for water quality and stream ecology. Modern research aims toward a unified approach, in which processes occurring in the hyporheic zone are key elements for the appreciation, management, and restoration of the whole river environment. In this unifying context, this review summarizes results from modeling studies and field observations about flow and transport processes in the hyporheic zone and describes the theories proposed in hydrology and fluid dynamics developed to quantitatively model and predict the hyporheic transport of water, heat, and dissolved and suspended compounds from sediment grain scale up to the watershed scale. The implications of these processes for stream biogeochemistry and ecology are also discussed."

  18. Nursing workloads in family health: implications for universal access1

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pires, Denise Elvira Pires; Machado, Rosani Ramos; Soratto, Jacks; Scherer, Magda dos Anjos; Gonçalves, Ana Sofia Resque; Trindade, Letícia Lima

    2016-01-01

    Objective to identify the workloads of nursing professionals of the Family Health Strategy, considering its implications for the effectiveness of universal access. Method qualitative study with nursing professionals of the Family Health Strategy of the South, Central West and North regions of Brazil, using methodological triangulation. For the analysis, resources of the Atlas.ti software and Thematic Content Analysis were associated; and the data were interpreted based on the labor process and workloads as theorical approaches. Results the way of working in the Family Health Strategy has predominantly resulted in an increase in the workloads of the nursing professionals, with emphasis on the work overload, excess of demand, problems in the physical infrastructure of the units and failures in the care network, which hinders its effectiveness as a preferred strategy to achieve universal access to health. On the other hand, teamwork, affinity for the work performed, bond with the user, and effectiveness of the assistance contributed to reduce their workloads. Conclusions investments on elements that reduce the nursing workloads, such as changes in working conditions and management, can contribute to the effectiveness of the Family Health Strategy and achieving the goal of universal access to health. PMID:27027679

  19. Medical humanities and their discontents: definitions, critiques, and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Johanna; Coulehan, Jack; Wear, Delese; Montello, Martha

    2009-02-01

    The humanities offer great potential for enhancing professional and humanistic development in medical education. Yet, although many students report benefit from exposure to the humanities in their medical education, they also offer consistent complaints and skepticism. The authors offer a pedagogical definition of the medical humanities, linking it to medicine as a practice profession. They then explore three student critiques of medical humanities curricula: (1) the content critique, examining issues of perceived relevance and intellectual bait-and-switch, (2) the teaching critique, which examines instructor trustworthiness and perceived personal intrusiveness, and (3) the structural/placement critique, or how and when medical humanities appear in the curriculum. Next, ways are suggested to tailor medical humanities to better acknowledge and reframe the needs of medical students. These include ongoing cross-disciplinary reflective practices in which intellectual tools of the humanities are incorporated into educational activities to help students examine and, at times, contest the process, values, and goals of medical practice. This systematic, pervasive reflection will organically lead to meaningful contributions from the medical humanities in three specific areas of great interest to medical educators: professionalism, "narrativity," and educational competencies. Regarding pedagogy, the implications of this approach are an integrated required curriculum and innovative concepts such as "applied humanities scholars." In turn, systematic integration of humanities perspectives and ways of thinking into clinical training will usefully expand the range of metaphors and narratives available to reflect on medical practice and offer possibilities for deepening and strengthening professional education. PMID:19174663

  20. Cognitive responses to hypobaric hypoxia: implications for aviation training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neuhaus C

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Christopher Neuhaus,1,2 Jochen Hinkelbein2,31Department of Anesthesiology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Ruprecht Karls University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, 2Emergency Medicine and Air Rescue Working Group, German Society of Aviation and Space Medicine (DGLRM, Munich, 3Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, GermanyAbstract: The aim of this narrative review is to provide an overview on cognitive responses to hypobaric hypoxia and to show relevant implications for aviation training. A principal element of hypoxia-awareness training is the intentional evocation of hypoxia symptoms during specific training sessions within a safe and controlled environment. Repetitive training should enable pilots to learn and recognize their personal hypoxia symptoms. A time span of 3–6 years is generally considered suitable to refresh knowledge of the more subtle and early symptoms especially. Currently, there are two different technical approaches available to induce hypoxia during training: hypobaric chamber training and reduced-oxygen breathing devices. Hypoxia training for aircrew is extremely important and effective, and the hypoxia symptoms should be emphasized clearly to aircrews. The use of tight-fitting masks, leak checks, and equipment checks should be taught to all aircrew and reinforced regularly. It is noteworthy that there are major differences in the required quality and quantity of hypoxia training for both military and civilian pilots.Keywords: cognitive response, aviation training, pilot, hypoxia, oxygen, loss of consciousness