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Sample records for approach demonstrates brain

  1. A novel extended Granger Causal Model approach demonstrates brain hemispheric differences during face recognition learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Ge

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Two main approaches in exploring causal relationships in biological systems using time-series data are the application of Dynamic Causal model (DCM and Granger Causal model (GCM. These have been extensively applied to brain imaging data and are also readily applicable to a wide range of temporal changes involving genes, proteins or metabolic pathways. However, these two approaches have always been considered to be radically different from each other and therefore used independently. Here we present a novel approach which is an extension of Granger Causal model and also shares the features of the bilinear approximation of Dynamic Causal model. We have first tested the efficacy of the extended GCM by applying it extensively in toy models in both time and frequency domains and then applied it to local field potential recording data collected from in vivo multi-electrode array experiments. We demonstrate face discrimination learning-induced changes in inter- and intra-hemispheric connectivity and in the hemispheric predominance of theta and gamma frequency oscillations in sheep inferotemporal cortex. The results provide the first evidence for connectivity changes between and within left and right inferotemporal cortexes as a result of face recognition learning.

  2. Combined approach to demonstrate acetylcholinesterase activity changes in the rat brain following tabun intoxication and its treatment.

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    Bajgar, Jiri; Hajek, Petr; Kassa, Jiri; Slizova, Dasa; Krs, Otakar; Karasova, Jana Zdarova; Fusek, Josef; Capek, Lukas; Voicu, Victor A

    2012-01-01

    Reactivation effects of K203 and currently available oximes (obidoxime, HI-6) in combination with atropine on acetylcholinesterase activities in the brain parts of rats poisoned with tabun were studied. The activity was determined by quantitative histochemical and biochemical methods correlating between them very well. The tabun-induced changes in acetylcholinsterase activity as well as in reactivation potency of reactivators used were different in various parts of the brain. Pontomedullar area seems to be important for observed changes following tabun intoxication and its treatment. From the oximes studied, the reactivation effect of K203 was comparable with obidoxime; HI-6 was ineffective. Combination of bio- and histochemical methods allow fine differentiation among the action of different oximes following tabun poisoning.

  3. Demonstration: A smartphone 3D functional brain scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlhut, Carsten; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Larsen, Jakob Eg

    We demonstrate a fully portable 3D real-time functional brain scanner consisting of a wireless 14-channel ‘Neuroheadset‘ (Emotiv EPOC) and a Nokia N900 smartphone. The novelty of our system is the ability to perform real-time functional brain imaging on a smartphone device, including stimulus...... delivery, data acquisition, logging, brain state decoding, and 3D visualization of the cortical EEG sources. Custom-made software realized in Qt has been implemented on the phone, which allow for either the phone to process the EEG data locally or transmit it to a server when more advanced machine learning......, tablet computers, and netbooks) that are based on Linux operating systems....

  4. Demonstrating capacity-approaching FSO communications

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    Fitz, Michael P.; Halford, Thomas R.; Kose, Cenk; Cromwell, Jonathan; Gordon, Steven

    2014-06-01

    Atmospheric turbulence causes the receive signal intensity on free space optical (FSO) communication links to vary over time. Scintillation fades can stymie connectivity for milliseconds at a time. To approach the information-theoretic limits of communication in such time-varying channels, it necessary to either code across extremely long blocks of data - thereby inducing unacceptable delays - or to vary the code rate according to the instantaneous channel conditions. We describe the design, hardware implementation, and system performance of an FSO modem that employs low-density parity-check (LDPC) coding in an incremental redundancy (IR) hybrid automatic repeat request (HARQ) protocol. Independent tests performed by the U.S. Government demonstrate that our protocol effectively adapts the LDPC code rate to match the instantaneous channel conditions. For links with fixed throughput, this translates to the longest possible range in the presence of optical scintillation; for links with fixed range, this translates to the highest possible average throughput. By leveraging an LDPC that is amenable to low-complexity, high-throughput implementation in hardware, our modem is able to provide throughputs in excess of 850 Mbps on links with ranges greater than 15 kilometers.

  5. Demonstration of endogenous imipramine like material in rat brain

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    Rehavi, M.; Ventura, I.; Sarne, Y.

    1985-02-18

    The extraction and partial purification of an endogenous imipramine-like material from rat brain is described. The endogenous factor obtained after gel filtration and silica chromatography inhibits (/sup 3/H) imipramine specific binding and mimics the inhibitory effect of imipramine on (/sup 3/H) serotonin uptake in both brain and platelet preparations. The effects of the endogenous material are dose-dependent and it inhibits (/sup 3/H) imipramine binding in a competitive fashion. The factor is unevenly distributed in the brain with high concentration in the hypothalamus and low concentration in the cerebellum.

  6. Brain and lung involvement of mycosis fungoides demonstrated by radionuclide imaging

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    Kim, E.E.; DeLand, F.H.; Maruyama, Y.

    1979-03-01

    A patient with advanced mycosis fungoides developed neurologic and respiratory symptoms and signs following multiple courses of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Various repeated diagnostic procedures - including cranial computerized tomography and fiberoptic bronchoscopy with transbronchial lung biopsy - failed to demonstrate an unusual involvement of the brain and lungs by myocosis fungoides. Radionuclide brain imaging and gallium imaging of the lungs demonstrated diffuse lesions confirmed at autopsy.

  7. A Fault Sample Simulation Approach for Virtual Testability Demonstration Test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yong; QIU Jing; LIU Guanjun; YANG Peng

    2012-01-01

    Virtual testability demonstration test has many advantages,such as low cost,high efficiency,low risk and few restrictions.It brings new requirements to the fault sample generation.A fault sample simulation approach for virtual testability demonstration test based on stochastic process theory is proposed.First,the similarities and differences of fault sample generation between physical testability demonstration test and virtual testability demonstration test are discussed.Second,it is pointed out that the fault occurrence process subject to perfect repair is renewal process.Third,the interarrival time distribution function of the next fault event is given.Steps and flowcharts of fault sample generation are introduced.The number of faults and their occurrence time are obtained by statistical simulation.Finally,experiments are carried out on a stable tracking platform.Because a variety of types of life distributions and maintenance modes are considered and some assumptions are removed,the sample size and structure of fault sample simulation results are more similar to the actual results and more reasonable.The proposed method can effectively guide the fault injection in virtual testability demonstration test.

  8. Approach of Complex Networks for the Determination of Brain Death

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    Sun, Wei-Gang; Cao, Jian-Ting; Wang, Ru-Bin

    2011-06-01

    In clinical practice, brain death is the irreversible end of all brain activity. Compared to current statistical methods for the determination of brain death, we focus on the approach of complex networks for real-world electroencephalography in its determination. Brain functional networks constructed by correlation analysis are derived, and statistical network quantities used for distinguishing the patients in coma or brain death state, such as average strength, clustering coefficient and average path length, are calculated. Numerical results show that the values of network quantities of patients in coma state are larger than those of patients in brain death state. Our findings might provide valuable insights on the determination of brain death.

  9. Demonstration of brain noise on human EEG signals in perception of bistable images

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    Grubov, Vadim V.; Runnova, Anastasiya E.; Kurovskaya, Maria K.; Pavlov, Alexey N.; Koronovskii, Alexey A.; Hramov, Alexander E.

    2016-03-01

    In this report we studied human brain activity in the case of bistable visual perception. We proposed a new approach for quantitative characterization of this activity based on analysis of EEG oscillatory patterns and evoked potentials. Accordingly to theoretical background, obtained experimental EEG data and results of its analysis we studied a characteristics of brain activity during decision-making. Also we have shown that decisionmaking process has the special patterns on the EEG data.

  10. Shifting gears: seeking new approaches for mind/brain mechanisms.

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    Gazzaniga, Michael S

    2013-01-01

    Using an autobiographical approach, I review several animal and human split-brain studies that have led me to change my long-term view on how best to understand mind/brain interactions. Overall, the view is consistent with the idea that complex neural systems, like other complex information processing systems, are highly modular. At the same time, how the modules come to interact and produce unitary goals is unknown. Here, I review the importance of self-cueing in that process of producing unitary goals from disparate functions. The role of self-cueing is demonstrably evident in the human neurologic patient and especially in patients with hemispheric disconnection. When viewed in the context of modularity, it may provide insights into how a highly parallel and distributed brain locally coordinates its activities to produce an apparent unitary output. Capturing and understanding how this is achieved will require shifting gears away from standard linear models and adopting a more dynamical systems view of brain function.

  11. The human functional brain network demonstrates structural and dynamical resilience to targeted attack.

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    Karen E Joyce

    Full Text Available In recent years, the field of network science has enabled researchers to represent the highly complex interactions in the brain in an approachable yet quantitative manner. One exciting finding since the advent of brain network research was that the brain network can withstand extensive damage, even to highly connected regions. However, these highly connected nodes may not be the most critical regions of the brain network, and it is unclear how the network dynamics are impacted by removal of these key nodes. This work seeks to further investigate the resilience of the human functional brain network. Network attack experiments were conducted on voxel-wise functional brain networks and region-of-interest (ROI networks of 5 healthy volunteers. Networks were attacked at key nodes using several criteria for assessing node importance, and the impact on network structure and dynamics was evaluated. The findings presented here echo previous findings that the functional human brain network is highly resilient to targeted attacks, both in terms of network structure and dynamics.

  12. The human functional brain network demonstrates structural and dynamical resilience to targeted attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Karen E; Hayasaka, Satoru; Laurienti, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the field of network science has enabled researchers to represent the highly complex interactions in the brain in an approachable yet quantitative manner. One exciting finding since the advent of brain network research was that the brain network can withstand extensive damage, even to highly connected regions. However, these highly connected nodes may not be the most critical regions of the brain network, and it is unclear how the network dynamics are impacted by removal of these key nodes. This work seeks to further investigate the resilience of the human functional brain network. Network attack experiments were conducted on voxel-wise functional brain networks and region-of-interest (ROI) networks of 5 healthy volunteers. Networks were attacked at key nodes using several criteria for assessing node importance, and the impact on network structure and dynamics was evaluated. The findings presented here echo previous findings that the functional human brain network is highly resilient to targeted attacks, both in terms of network structure and dynamics.

  13. Approach of Complex Networks for the Determination of Brain Death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Wei-Gang; CAO Jian-Ting; WANG Ru-Bin

    2011-01-01

    In clinical practice, brain death is the irreversible end of all brain activity. Compared to current statistical methods for the determination of brain death, we focus on the approach of complex networks for real-world electroencephalography in its determination. Brain functional networks constructed by correlation analysis are derived, and statistical network quantities used for distinguishing the patients in coma or brain death state, such as average strength, clustering coefficient and average path length, are calculated. Numerical results show that the values of network quantities of patients in coma state are larger than those of patients in brain death state. Our Sndings might provide valuable insights on the determination of brain death.%@@ In clinical practice, brain death is the irreversible end of all brain activity.Compared to current statistical methods for the determination of brain death, we focus on the approach of complex networks for real-world electroencephalography in its determination.Brain functional networks constructed by correlation analysis axe derived, and statistical network quantities used for distinguishing the patients in coma or brain death state, such as average strength, clustering coefficient and average path length, are calculated.Numerical results show that the values of network quantities of patients in coma state are larger than those of patients in brain death state.Our findings might provide valuable insights on the determination of brain death.

  14. Traumatic brain injury: Changing concepts and approaches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrew Maas

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) represents a huge global medical and public health problem across all ages and in all populations.In this review,we discussed the changing concepts and approaches.Globally,the incidence is increasing and in high income countries epidemiologic patterns are changing with consequences for prevention campaigns.TBI should not be viewed as an event,but as a progressive and chronic disease with lifetime consequences.In the clinical field,precision approaches to treatment are being developed,which require more accurate disease phenotyping.Recent advances in genomics,neuroimaging and biomarker development offer great opportunities to develop improved phenotyping and better disease characterization.In clinical research,randomized controlled clinical trials are being complemented by large data collections in broad TBI populations in comparative effectiveness designs.Global collaborations are being developed among funding agencies,research organizations and researchers.Only by combining efforts and collaboration will we be able to advance the field by providing long-needed evidence to support practice recommendations and to improve treatment.

  15. Human brain mapping: Experimental and computational approaches

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    Wood, C.C.; George, J.S.; Schmidt, D.M.; Aine, C.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Sanders, J. [Albuquerque VA Medical Center, NM (US); Belliveau, J. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (US)

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This program developed project combined Los Alamos' and collaborators' strengths in noninvasive brain imaging and high performance computing to develop potential contributions to the multi-agency Human Brain Project led by the National Institute of Mental Health. The experimental component of the project emphasized the optimization of spatial and temporal resolution of functional brain imaging by combining: (a) structural MRI measurements of brain anatomy; (b) functional MRI measurements of blood flow and oxygenation; and (c) MEG measurements of time-resolved neuronal population currents. The computational component of the project emphasized development of a high-resolution 3-D volumetric model of the brain based on anatomical MRI, in which structural and functional information from multiple imaging modalities can be integrated into a single computational framework for modeling, visualization, and database representation.

  16. A probabilistic approach to delineating functional brain regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalbitzer, Jan; Svarer, Claus; Frokjaer, Vibe G

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a reliable observer-independent approach to delineating volumes of interest (VOIs) for functional brain regions that are not identifiable on structural MR images. The case is made for the raphe nuclei, a collection of nuclei situated in the brain stem known......-independent, reliable approach to delineating regions that can be identified only by functional imaging, here exemplified by the raphe nuclei. This approach can be used in future studies to create functional VOI maps based on neuroreceptor fingerprints retrieved through in vivo brain imaging Udgivelsesdato: 2009/6...

  17. A novel pattern mining approach for identifying cognitive activity in EEG based functional brain networks.

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    Thilaga, M; Vijayalakshmi, R; Nadarajan, R; Nandagopal, D

    2016-06-01

    The complex nature of neuronal interactions of the human brain has posed many challenges to the research community. To explore the underlying mechanisms of neuronal activity of cohesive brain regions during different cognitive activities, many innovative mathematical and computational models are required. This paper presents a novel Common Functional Pattern Mining approach to demonstrate the similar patterns of interactions due to common behavior of certain brain regions. The electrode sites of EEG-based functional brain network are modeled as a set of transactions and node-based complex network measures as itemsets. These itemsets are transformed into a graph data structure called Functional Pattern Graph. By mining this Functional Pattern Graph, the common functional patterns due to specific brain functioning can be identified. The empirical analyses show the efficiency of the proposed approach in identifying the extent to which the electrode sites (transactions) are similar during various cognitive load states.

  18. MEDICAL BRAIN DRAIN - A THEORETICAL APPROACH

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    Boncea Irina

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Medical brain drain is defined as the migration of health personnel from developing countries to developed countries and between industrialized nations in search for better opportunities. This phenomenon became a global growing concern due to its impact on both the donor and the destination countries. This article aims to present the main theoretical contributions starting from 1950 until today and the historical evolution, in the attempt of correlating the particular case of medical brain drain with the theory and evolution of the brain drain in general. This article raises questions and offers answers, identifies the main issues and looks for possible solutions in order to reduce the emigration of medical doctors. Factors of influence include push (low level of income, poor working conditions, the absence of job openings and social recognition, oppressive political climate and pull (better remuneration and working conditions, prospects for career development, job satisfaction, security factors. Developing countries are confronting with the loss of their most valuable intellectuals and the investment in their education, at the benefit of developed nations. An ethical debate arises as the disparities between countries increases, industrialized nations filling in the gaps in health systems with professionals from countries already facing shortages. However, recent literature emphasizes the possibility of a “beneficial brain drain” through education incentives offered by the emigration prospects. Other sources of “brain gain” for donor country are the remittances, the scientific networks and return migration. Measures to stem the medical brain drain involve the common effort and collaboration between developing and developed countries and international organizations. Measures adopted by donor countries include higher salaries, better working conditions, security, career opportunities, incentives to stimulate return migration. Destination

  19. An evolutionary computation approach to examine functional brain plasticity

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    Arnab eRoy

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available One common research goal in systems neurosciences is to understand how the functional relationship between a pair of regions of interest (ROIs evolves over time. Examining neural connectivity in this way is well-suited for the study of developmental processes, learning, and even in recovery or treatment designs in response to injury. For most fMRI based studies, the strength of the functional relationship between two ROIs is defined as the correlation between the average signal representing each region. The drawback to this approach is that much information is lost due to averaging heterogeneous voxels, and therefore, the functional relationship between a ROI-pair that evolve at a spatial scale much finer than the ROIs remain undetected. To address this shortcoming, we introduce a novel evolutionary computation (EC based voxel-level procedure to examine functional plasticity between an investigator defined ROI-pair by simultaneously using subject-specific BOLD-fMRI data collected from two sessions seperated by finite duration of time. This data-driven procedure detects a sub-region composed of spatially connected voxels from each ROI (a so-called sub-regional-pair such that the pair shows a significant gain/loss of functional relationship strength across the two time points. The procedure is recursive and iteratively finds all statistically significant sub-regional-pairs within the ROIs. Using this approach, we examine functional plasticity between the default mode network (DMN and the executive control network (ECN during recovery from traumatic brain injury (TBI; the study includes 14 TBI and 12 healthy control subjects. We demonstrate that the EC based procedure is able to detect functional plasticity where a traditional averaging based approach fails. The subject-specific plasticity estimates obtained using the EC-procedure are highly consistent across multiple runs. Group-level analyses using these plasticity estimates showed an increase in

  20. A Mixed Approach for Modeling Blood Flow in Brain Microcirculation

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    Peyrounette, M.; Sylvie, L.; Davit, Y.; Quintard, M.

    2014-12-01

    We have previously demonstrated [1] that the vascular system of the healthy human brain cortex is a superposition of two structural components, each corresponding to a different spatial scale. At small-scale, the vascular network has a capillary structure, which is homogeneous and space-filling over a cut-off length. At larger scale, veins and arteries conform to a quasi-fractal branched structure. This structural duality is consistent with the functional duality of the vasculature, i.e. distribution and exchange. From a modeling perspective, this can be viewed as the superposition of: (a) a continuum model describing slow transport in the small-scale capillary network, characterized by a representative elementary volume and effective properties; and (b) a discrete network approach [2] describing fast transport in the arterial and venous network, which cannot be homogenized because of its fractal nature. This problematic is analogous to modeling problems encountered in geological media, e.g, in petroleum engineering, where fast conducting channels (wells or fractures) are embedded in a porous medium (reservoir rock). An efficient method to reduce the computational cost of fractures/continuum simulations is to use relatively large grid blocks for the continuum model. However, this also makes it difficult to accurately couple both structural components. In this work, we solve this issue by adapting the "well model" concept used in petroleum engineering [3] to brain specific 3-D situations. We obtain a unique linear system of equations describing the discrete network, the continuum and the well model coupling. Results are presented for realistic geometries and compared with a non-homogenized small-scale network model of an idealized periodic capillary network of known permeability. [1] Lorthois & Cassot, J. Theor. Biol. 262, 614-633, 2010. [2] Lorthois et al., Neuroimage 54 : 1031-1042, 2011. [3] Peaceman, SPE J. 18, 183-194, 1978.

  1. Holistic approach of Brain-Mind interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AK Datta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We live in three worlds – worlds 1, 2 and 3 with reciprocal interactions which make us perfect human beings. World 1 is the word of physical objects; it comprises the whole of cosmos of matter and energy enriched with nature’s contribution of flora and fauna, and all artefacts made by mankind in the form of books, machines, tools, arts and music. World 2 deals with the states of consciousness and subjective perceptions at three levels of human brain in succession: (a outer sense provided by all our sense organs that gives rise to the development of (b inner sense in the form of our emotions, memories, imagination and planning for the future; (c finally at the core of world 2 there develops a sense of consciousness for self or ego. World 3 is created by man with the development of language of communication that uniquely relates to man. It is the world which is completely unknown to animals. All our means of communication and intellectual efforts are coded in books, the artistic and technological treasures are stored in the museum, and every artifact coded by man is preserved in the world 3. It is the world of civilization and culture. Education is the means whereby each human being is immersed in the world 3 throughout life, participating in the heritage of mankind and so becoming fully human. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v10i1.12768 Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2014, Vol.10(1; 43-48

  2. Advanced neuroprotection for brain ischemia: an alternative approach to minimize stroke damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuso, Maria Irene; Montaner, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of research on neuroprotectants in the fight against ischemic stroke, no successful results have been obtained and new alternative approaches are urgently needed. Translation of effective candidate drugs in experimental studies to patients has systematically failed. However, some of those treatments or neuroprotectant diets which demonstrated only beneficial effects if given before (but not after) ischemia induction and discarded for conventional neuroprotection, could be rescued in order to apply an 'advanced neuroprotection strategy' (ADNES). Herein, the authors discuss how re-profiling those neuroprotective candidate drugs and diets with the best potential, some of which are mentioned in this article as an ADNES, may be a good approach for developing successful treatments that protect the brain against ischemic damage. This novel approach would try to protect the brain of patients who are at high risk of suffering a stroke, before damage occurs, in order to minimize brain injury by having the neuroprotectant drug or diet 'on board' if unfortunately stroke occurs.

  3. The impact of initiation: Early onset marijuana smokers demonstrate altered Stroop performance and brain activation

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    K.A. Sagar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Marijuana (MJ use is on the rise, particularly among teens and emerging adults. This poses serious public health concern, given the potential deleterious effects of MJ on the developing brain. We examined 50 chronic MJ smokers divided into early onset (regular MJ use prior to age 16; n = 24 and late onset (age 16 or later; n = 26, and 34 healthy control participants (HCs. All completed a modified Stroop Color Word Test during fMRI. Results demonstrated that MJ smokers exhibited significantly poorer performance on the Interference subtest of the Stroop, as well as altered patterns of activation in the cingulate cortex relative to HCs. Further, early onset MJ smokers exhibited significantly poorer performance relative to both HCs and late onset smokers. Additionally, earlier age of MJ onset as well as increased frequency and magnitude (grams/week of MJ use were predictive of poorer Stroop performance. fMRI results revealed that while late onset smokers demonstrated a more similar pattern of activation to the control group, a different pattern was evident in the early onset group. These findings underscore the importance of assessing age of onset and patterns of MJ use and support the need for widespread education and intervention efforts among youth.

  4. Human brain asymmetry in microstructural connectivity demonstrated by diffusional kurtosis imaging.

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    Lee, Chu-Yu; Tabesh, Ali; Nesland, Travis; Jensen, Jens H; Helpern, Joseph A; Spampinato, Maria V; Bonilha, Leonardo

    2014-11-07

    Structural asymmetry of whole brain white matter (WM) pathways, i.e., the connectome, has been demonstrated using fiber tractography based on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). However, DTI-based tractography fails to resolve axonal fiber bundles that intersect within an imaging voxel, and therefore may not fully characterize the extent of asymmetry. The goal of this study was to assess structural asymmetry with tractography based on diffusional kurtosis imaging (DKI), which improves upon DTI-based tractography by delineating intravoxel crossing fibers. DKI images were obtained from 42 healthy subjects. By using automatic segmentation, gray matter (GM) was parcellated into anatomically defined regions of interest (ROIs). WM pathways were reconstructed with both DKI- and DTI-based tractography. The connectivity between the ROIs was quantified with the streamlines connecting the ROIs. The asymmetry index (AI) was utilized to quantify hemispheric differences in the connectivity of cortical ROIs and of links interconnecting cortical ROIs. Our results demonstrated that leftward asymmetrical ROIs and links were observed in frontal, parietal, temporal lobes, and insula. Rightward asymmetrical ROI and links were observed in superior frontal lobe, cingulate cortex, fusiform, putamen, and medial temporal lobe. Interestingly, these observed structural asymmetries were incompletely identified with DTI-based tractography. These results suggest that DKI-based tractography can improve the identification of asymmetrical connectivity patterns, thereby serving as an additional tool in the evaluation of the structural bases of functional lateralization.

  5. Surprise responses in the human brain demonstrate statistical learning under high concurrent cognitive demand

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    Garrido, Marta Isabel; Teng, Chee Leong James; Taylor, Jeremy Alexander; Rowe, Elise Genevieve; Mattingley, Jason Brett

    2016-06-01

    The ability to learn about regularities in the environment and to make predictions about future events is fundamental for adaptive behaviour. We have previously shown that people can implicitly encode statistical regularities and detect violations therein, as reflected in neuronal responses to unpredictable events that carry a unique prediction error signature. In the real world, however, learning about regularities will often occur in the context of competing cognitive demands. Here we asked whether learning of statistical regularities is modulated by concurrent cognitive load. We compared electroencephalographic metrics associated with responses to pure-tone sounds with frequencies sampled from narrow or wide Gaussian distributions. We showed that outliers evoked a larger response than those in the centre of the stimulus distribution (i.e., an effect of surprise) and that this difference was greater for physically identical outliers in the narrow than in the broad distribution. These results demonstrate an early neurophysiological marker of the brain's ability to implicitly encode complex statistical structure in the environment. Moreover, we manipulated concurrent cognitive load by having participants perform a visual working memory task while listening to these streams of sounds. We again observed greater prediction error responses in the narrower distribution under both low and high cognitive load. Furthermore, there was no reliable reduction in prediction error magnitude under high-relative to low-cognitive load. Our findings suggest that statistical learning is not a capacity limited process, and that it proceeds automatically even when cognitive resources are taxed by concurrent demands.

  6. A social identity approach to acquired brain injury (ABI)

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    peer-reviewed The central argument put forward in this thesis is that, in the context of acquired brain injury (ABI) social identity matters. The first article is a theoretical paper which reviews an emerging literature that is trying to draw together social psychology and neuropsychology in the study of ABI. This article argues that the social identity approach is an appropriate vehicle for such integration and introduces the concept of identity sub-types based on belonging and based on p...

  7. A Multimodal Approach for Determining Brain Networks by Jointly Modeling Functional and Structural Connectivity

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    Wenqiong eXue

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent innovations in neuroimaging technology have provided opportunities for researchers to investigate connectivity in the human brain by examining the anatomical circuitry as well as functional relationships between brain regions. Existing statistical approaches for connectivity generally examine resting-state or task-related functional connectivity (FC between brain regions or separately examine structural linkages. As a means to determine brain networks, we present a unified Bayesian framework for analyzing FC utilizing the knowledge of associated structural connections, which extends an approach by Patel et al.(2006a that considers only functional data. We introduce an FC measure that rests upon assessments of functional coherence between regional brain activity identified from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data. Our structural connectivity (SC information is drawn from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI data, which is used to quantify probabilities of SC between brain regions. We formulate a prior distribution for FC that depends upon the probability of SC between brain regions, with this dependence adhering to structural-functional links revealed by our fMRI and DTI data. We further characterize the functional hierarchy of functionally connected brain regions by defining an ascendancy measure that compares the marginal probabilities of elevated activity between regions. In addition, we describe topological properties of the network, which is composed of connected region pairs, by performing graph theoretic analyses. We demonstrate the use of our Bayesian model using fMRI and DTI data from a study of auditory processing. We further illustrate the advantages of our method by comparisons to methods that only incorporate functional information.

  8. Biophysical modeling of high field diffusion MRI demonstrates micro-structural aberration in chronic mild stress rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Ahmad Raza; Chuhutin, Andrey; Wiborg, Ove

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Depression is one of the leading causes of disability worldwide. Immense heterogeneity in symptoms of depression causes difficulty in diagnosis, and to date, there are no established biomarkers or imaging methods to examine depression. Unpredictable chronic mild stress (CMS) induced...... anhedonia is considered to be a realistic model of depression in studies of animal subjects. Stereological and neuronal tracing techniques have demonstrated persistent remodeling of microstructure in hippocampus, prefrontal cortex and amygdala of CMS brains. Recent developments in diffusion MRI (d...... changes in CMS rat brains and these parameters might have value in clinical diagnosis of depression and for evaluation of treatment efficacy....

  9. Multi-modal approach for investigating brain and behavior changes in an animal model of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Meghan E; Huang, Wei; Sicard, Kenneth M; Bratane, Bernt T; Sikoglu, Elif M; Zhang, Nanyin; Fisher, Marc; King, Jean A

    2013-06-01

    Use of novel approaches in imaging modalities is needed for enhancing diagnostic and therapeutic outcomes of persons with a traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study explored the feasibility of using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in conjunction with behavioral measures to target dynamic changes in specific neural circuitries in an animal model of TBI. Wistar rats were randomly assigned to one of two groups (traumatic brain injury/sham operation). TBI rats were subjected to the closed head injury (CHI) model. Any observable motor deficits and cognitive deficits associated with the injury were measured using beam walk and Morris water maze tests, respectively. fMRI was performed to assess the underlying post-traumatic cerebral anatomy and function in acute (24 hours after the injury) and chronic (7 and 21 days after the injury) phases. Beam walk test results detected no significant differences in motor deficits between groups. The Morris water maze test indicated that cognitive deficits persisted for the first week after injury and, to a large extent, resolved thereafter. Resting state functional connectivity (rsFC) analysis detected initially diminished connectivity between cortical areas involved in cognition for the TBI group; however, the connectivity patterns normalized at 1 week and remained so at the 3 weeks post-injury time point. Taken together, we have demonstrated an objective in vivo marker for mapping functional brain changes correlated with injury-associated cognitive behavior deficits and offer an animal model for testing potential therapeutic interventions options.

  10. Art Therapy for Individuals with Traumatic Brain Injury: A Comprehensive Neurorehabilitation-Informed Approach to Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Tori

    2016-01-01

    I describe an approach to art therapy treatment for survivors of traumatic brain injury developed at a rehabilitation facility for adults that serves inpatient, outpatient, and long-term residential clients. This approach is based on a review of the literature on traumatic brain injury, comprehensive neurorehabilitation, brain plasticity, and art…

  11. Combinatorial approaches for the identification of brain drug delivery targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutz, Charles C; Zhang, Xiaobin; Shusta, Eric V

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) represents a large obstacle for the treatment of central nervous system diseases. Targeting endogenous nutrient transporters that transcytose the BBB is one promising approach to selectively and noninvasively deliver a drug payload to the brain. The main limitations of the currently employed transcytosing receptors are their ubiquitous expression in the peripheral vasculature and the inherent low levels of transcytosis mediated by such systems. In this review, approaches designed to increase the repertoire of transcytosing receptors which can be targeted for the purpose of drug delivery are discussed. In particular, combinatorial protein libraries can be screened on BBB cells in vitro or in vivo to isolate targeting peptides or antibodies that can trigger transcytosis. Once these targeting reagents are discovered, the cognate BBB transcytosis system can be identified using techniques such as expression cloning or immunoprecipitation coupled with mass spectrometry. Continued technological advances in BBB genomics and proteomics, membrane protein manipulation, and in vitro BBB technology promise to further advance the capability to identify and optimize peptides and antibodies capable of mediating drug transport across the BBB.

  12. Towards a parts-based approach to sub-cortical brain structure parsing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagneja, Digvijay; Xiong, Caiming; Corso, Jason J.

    2011-03-01

    The automatic localization and segmentation, or parsing, of neuroanatomical brain structures is a key step in many neuroscience tasks. However, the inherent variability in these brain structures and their appearance continues to challenge medical image processing methods. The state of the art primarily relies upon local voxelbased morphometry, Markov random field, and probabilistic atlas based approaches, which limits the ability to explicitly capture the parts-based structure inherent in the brain. We propose a method that defines a principled parts-based representation of the sub-cortical brain structures. Our method is based on the pictorial structures model and jointly models the appearance of each part as well as the layout of the parts as a whole. Inference is cast as a maximum a posteriori problem and solved in a steepest-descent manner. Experimental results on a 28-case data set demonstrate high accuracy of our method and substantiate our claim that there is significant promise in a parts-based approach to modeling medical imaging structures.

  13. Disseminated tuberculomas in spinal cord and brain demonstrated by MRI with gadolinium-DTPA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, W.C. (Dept. of Radiology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China)); Cheng, T.Y. (Section of Neurology, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China)); Lee, S.K. (Dept. of Radiology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China)); Ho, Y.J. (Dept. of Radiology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China)); Lee, K.R. (Inst. of Life Science, National Tsing-Hua Univ. (Taiwan, Province of China))

    1993-03-01

    Intramedullary tuberculoma is rare, and there has been no report of concurrent intramedullary and intracerebral tuberculomas. We report a 30-year-old man with miliary tuberculosis of the lung. He suffered sudden paraplegia due to tuberculomas in the thoracic spinal cord and MRI showed more tuberculomas in the cervical spinal cord, brain stem, and cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres. The tuberculomas were isointense on the T1-weighted images, and hyperintense on the T2-weighted images; there was marked enhancement with intravenous gadolinium-DTPA. All the tuberculomas were very small 1 year after antituberculous chemotherapy. (orig.)

  14. Biophysical modeling of high field diffusion MRI demonstrates micro-structural aberration in chronic mild stress rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Ahmad Raza; Chuhutin, Andrey; Wiborg, Ove; Kroenke, Christopher D; Nyengaard, Jens R; Hansen, Brian; Jespersen, Sune Nørhøj

    2016-11-15

    Depression is one of the leading causes of disability worldwide. Immense heterogeneity in symptoms of depression causes difficulty in diagnosis, and to date, there are no established biomarkers or imaging methods to examine depression. Unpredictable chronic mild stress (CMS) induced anhedonia is considered to be a realistic model of depression in studies of animal subjects. Stereological and neuronal tracing techniques have demonstrated persistent remodeling of microstructure in hippocampus, prefrontal cortex and amygdala of CMS brains. Recent developments in diffusion MRI (d-MRI) analyses, such as neurite density and diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI), are able to capture microstructural changes and are considered to be robust tools in preclinical and clinical imaging. The present study utilized d-MRI analyzed with a neurite density model and the DKI framework to investigate microstructure in the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, caudate putamen and amygdala regions of CMS rat brains by comparison to brains from normal controls. To validate findings of CMS induced microstructural alteration, histology was performed to determine neurite, nuclear and astrocyte density. d-MRI based neurite density and tensor-based mean kurtosis (MKT) were significantly higher, while mean diffusivity (MD), extracellular diffusivity (Deff) and intra-neurite diffusivity(DL) were significantly lower in the amygdala of CMS rat brains. Deff was also significantly lower in the hippocampus and caudate putamen in stressed groups. Histological neurite density corroborated the d-MRI findings in the amygdala and reductions in nuclear and astrocyte density further buttressed the d-MRI results. The present study demonstrated that the d-MRI based neurite density and MKT can reveal specific microstructural changes in CMS rat brains and these parameters might have value in clinical diagnosis of depression and for evaluation of treatment efficacy.

  15. The Effect of Group Works and Demonstrative Experiments Based on Conceptual Change Approach: Photosynthesis and Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibik, Ayse Sert; Diken, Emine Hatun; Darcin, Emine Selcen

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the use of group works and demonstration experiments based on conceptual change approach in the elimination of misconception about the subject of photosynthesis and respiration in plants in pre-service science teachers. This study was conducted with 78 pre-service science teachers including…

  16. Selectionist and evolutionary approaches to brain function: a critical appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrisantha Thomas Fernando

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We consider approaches to brain dynamics and function that have been claimed to be Darwinian. These include Edelman’s theory of neuronal group selection, Changeux’s theory of synaptic selection and selective stabilization of pre-representations, Seung’s Darwinian synapse, Loewenstein’s synaptic melioration, Adam’s selfish synapse and Calvin’s replicating activity patterns. Except for the last two, the proposed mechanisms are selectionist but not truly Darwinian, because no replicators with information transfer to copies and hereditary variation can be identified in them. All of them fit, however, a generalized selectionist framework conforming to the picture of Price’s covariance formulation, which deliberately was not specific even to selection in biology, and therefore does not imply an algorithmic picture of biological evolution. Bayesian models and reinforcement learning are formally in agreement with selection dynamics. A classification of search algorithms is shown to include Darwinian replicators (evolutionary units with multiplication, heredity and variability as the most powerful mechanism in a sparsely occupied search space. Examples of why parallel competitive search with information transfer among the units is efficient are given. Finally, we review our recent attempts to construct and analyze simple models of true Darwinian evolutionary units in the brain in terms of connectivity and activity copying of neuronal groups. Although none of the proposed neuronal replicators include miraculous mechanisms, their identification remains a challenge but also a great promise.

  17. Hierarchical brain networks active in approach and avoidance goal pursuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Martin Spielberg

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Effective approach/avoidance goal pursuit is critical for attaining long-term health and well-being. Research on the neural correlates of key goal pursuit processes (e.g., motivation has long been of interest, with lateralization in prefrontal cortex being a particularly fruitful target of investigation. However, this literature has often been limited by a lack of spatial specificity and has not delineated the precise aspects of approach/avoidance motivation involved. Additionally, the relationships among brain regions (i.e., network connectivity vital to goal pursuit remain largely unexplored. Specificity in location, process, and network relationship is vital for moving beyond gross characterizations of function and identifying the precise cortical mechanisms involved in motivation. The present paper integrates research using more spatially specific methodologies (e.g., functional magnetic resonance imaging with the rich psychological literature on approach/avoidance to propose an integrative network model that takes advantage of the strengths of each of these literatures.

  18. A Practical Approach for Demonstrating Environmental Sustainability and Stewardship through a Net Ecosystem Service Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Rockel

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The increasing pressure on the earth’s resources due to population growth requires that development and resource use be managed to maintain a sustainable environment so as to preserve or enhance human well-being. A practical approach for demonstrating the environmental sustainability of an action (e.g., green business practice through ecosystem service analysis is presented. The overarching premise of the approach is that human well-being is directly related to changes in ecosystems and associated services. The approach evaluates the net change in ecosystem services, and hence human well-being, and is termed a net ecosystem service analysis (NESA. Using this approach, if a net positive change in ecosystem services relative to the baseline condition occurs for an action, that action would be considered potentially sustainable. In addition, if an action creates net ecosystem service value above the baseline condition, it would be considered to embody environmental stewardship. Established ecological and human use quantification methods are incorporated into the analysis. In addition, to demonstrate potential sustainability, the approach must also consider the need to satisfy intergenerational equity objectives. The use of a practical approach from which private business and government representatives can make decisions regarding environmental sustainability and stewardship will provide for improved decision-making based on quantifiable metrics.

  19. Comparative Evaluation for Brain Structural Connectivity Approaches: Towards Integrative Neuroinformatics Tool for Epilepsy Clinical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sheng; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Ghosh, Kaushik; Lacuey-Lecumberri, Nuria; Lhatoo, Samden D.; Sahoo, Satya S.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in brain fiber tractography algorithms and diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data collection techniques are providing new approaches to study brain white matter connectivity, which play an important role in complex neurological disorders such as epilepsy. Epilepsy affects approximately 50 million persons worldwide and it is often described as a disorder of the cortical network organization. There is growing recognition of the need to better understand the role of brain structural networks in the onset and propagation of seizures in epilepsy using high resolution non-invasive imaging technologies. In this paper, we perform a comparative evaluation of two techniques to compute structural connectivity, namely probabilistic fiber tractography and statistics derived from fractional anisotropy (FA), using diffusion MRI data from a patient with rare case of medically intractable insular epilepsy. The results of our evaluation demonstrate that probabilistic fiber tractography provides a more accurate map of structural connectivity and may help address inherent complexities of neural fiber layout in the brain, such as fiber crossings. This work provides an initial result towards building an integrative informatics tool for neuroscience that can be used to accurately characterize the role of fiber tract connectivity in neurological disorders such as epilepsy. PMID:27570685

  20. Functional improvement after carotid endarterectomy: demonstrated by gait analysis and acetazolamide stress brain perfusion SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. S.; Kim, G. E.; Yoo, J. Y.; Kim, D. G.; Moon, D. H. [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    Scientific documentation of neurologic improvement following carotid endarterectomy (CEA) has not been established. The purpose of this prospective study is to investigate whether CEA performed for the internal carotid artery flow lesion improves gait and cerebrovascular hemodynamic status in patients with gait disturbance. We prospectively performed pre- and postCEA gait analysis and acetazolamide stress brain perfusion SPECT (Acz-SPECT) with Tc-99m ECD in 91 patients (M/F: 81/10, mean age: 64.1 y) who had gait disturbance before receiving CEA. Gait performance was assessed using a Vicon 370 motion analyzer. The gait improvement after CEA was correlated to cerebrovascular hemodynamic change as well as symptom duration. 12 hemiparetic stroke patients (M/F=9/3, mean age: 51 y) who did not receive CEA as a control underwent gait analysis twice in a week interval to evaluate whether repeat testing of gait performance shows learning effect. Of 91 patients, 73 (80%) patients showed gait improvement (change of gait speed > 10%) and 42 (46%) showed marked improvement (change of gait speed > 20%), but no improvement was observed in control group at repeat test. Post-operative cerebrovascular hemodynamic improvement was noted in 49 (54%) of 91 patients. There was marked gait improvement in patients group with cerebrovascular hemodynamic improvement compared to no change group (p<0.05). Marked gait improvement and cerebrovascular hemodynamic improvement were noted in 53% and 61% of the patient who had less than 3 month history of symptom compared to 31% and 24% of the patients who had longer than 3 months, respectively (p<0.05). Marked gait improvement was obtained in patients who had improvement of cerebrovascular hemodynamic status on Acz-SPECT after CEA. These results suggest functional improvement such as gait can result from the improved perfusion of misery perfusion area, which is viable for a longer period compared to literatures previously reported.

  1. The dynamic dielectric at a brain functional site and an EM wave approach to functional brain imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X P; Xia, Q; Qu, D; Wu, T C; Yang, D G; Hao, W D; Jiang, X; Li, X M

    2014-11-04

    Functional brain imaging has tremendous applications. The existing methods for functional brain imaging include functional Magnetic Resonant Imaging (fMRI), scalp electroencephalography (EEG), implanted EEG, magnetoencephalography (MEG) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET), which have been widely and successfully applied to various brain imaging studies. To develop a new method for functional brain imaging, here we show that the dielectric at a brain functional site has a dynamic nature, varying with local neuronal activation as the permittivity of the dielectric varies with the ion concentration of the extracellular fluid surrounding neurons in activation. Therefore, the neuronal activation can be sensed by a radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic (EM) wave propagating through the site as the phase change of the EM wave varies with the permittivity. Such a dynamic nature of the dielectric at a brain functional site provides the basis for an RF EM wave approach to detecting and imaging neuronal activation at brain functional sites, leading to an RF EM wave approach to functional brain imaging.

  2. Demonstration of aluminum in amyloid fibers in the cores of senile plaques in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumoto, Sakae; Kakimi, Shigeo; Ohsaki, Akihiro; Ishikawa, Akira

    2009-11-01

    Aluminum (Al) exposure has been reported to be a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (senile dementia of Alzheimer type), although the role of Al in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease remains controversial. We examined the presence of Al in the Alzheimer's brain using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy combined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM-EDX). TEM-EDX analysis allows simultaneous imaging of subcellular structures with high spatial resolution and analysis of small quantities of elements contained in the same subcellular structures. We identified senile plaques by observation using TEM and detected Al in amyloid fibers in the cores of senile plaques located in the hippocampus and the temporal lobe by EDX. Phosphorus and calcium were also present in the amyloid fibers. No Al could be detected in the extracellular space in senile plaques or in the cytoplasm of nerve cells. In this study, we demonstrated colocalization of Al and beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptides in amyloid fibers in the cores of senile plaques. The results support the following possibilities in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease: Al could be involved in the aggregation of Abeta peptides to form toxic fibrils; Al might induce Abeta peptides into the beta-sheet structure; and Al might facilitate iron-mediated oxidative reactions, which cause severe damage to brain tissues.

  3. Demonstration of an Axial PET concept for brain and small animal imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Beltrame, P; Clinthorne, N; Meddi, F; Kagan, H; Braem, A; Pauss, F; Djambazov, L; Lustermann, W; Weilhammer, P; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Dissertori, G; Renker, D; Schneider, T; Schinzel, D; De Leo, R; Bolle, E; Fanti, V; Rafecas, M; Rudge, A; Stapnes, S; Casella, C; Chesi, E; Seguinot, J; Solevi, P; Joram, C; Oliver, J F

    2011-01-01

    Standard Positron Emission Tomography (PET) cameras need to reach a compromise between spatial resolution and sensitivity. To overcome this limitation we developed a novel concept of PET. Our AX-PET demonstrator is made of LYSO crystals aligned along the z coordinate (patient's axis) and WLS strips orthogonally placed with respect to the crystals. This concept offers full 3D localization of the photon interaction inside the camera. Thus the spatial resolution and the sensitivity can be simultaneously improved and the reconstruction of Compton interactions inside the detector is also possible. Moreover, by means of G-APDs for reading out the photons, both from LYSO and WLS, the detector is insensitive to magnetic fields and it is then suitable to be used in a combined PET/MRI apparatus. A complete Monte Carlo simulation and dedicated reconstruction software have been developed. The two final modules, each composed of 48 crystals and 156 WLS strips, have been built and fully characterized in a dedicated test se...

  4. An ICA with reference approach in identification of genetic variation and associated brain networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyu eLiu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available To address the statistical challenges associated with genome-wide association studies, we present an independent component analysis (ICA with reference approach to target a specific genetic variation and associated brain networks. First, a small set of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are empirically chosen to reflect a feature of interest and these SNPs are used as a reference when applying ICA to a full genomic SNP array. After extracting the genetic component maximally representing the characteristics of the reference, we test its association with brain networks in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data. The method was evaluated on both real and simulated datasets. Simulation demonstrates that ICA with reference can extract a specific genetic factor, even when the variance accounted for by such a factor is so small that a regular ICA fails. Our real data application from 48 schizophrenia patients and 40 healthy controls include 300K SNPs and fMRI images in an auditory oddball task. Using SNPs with allelic frequency difference in two groups as a reference, we extracted a genetic component that maximally differentiates patients from controls (p<4×10-17, and discovered a brain functional network that was significantly associated with this genetic component (p<1×10-4. The regions in the functional network mainly locate in the thalamus, anterior and posterior cingulate gyri. The contributing SNPs in the genetic factor mainly fall into two clusters centered at chromosome 7q21 and chromosome 5q35. The findings from the schizophrenia application are in concordance with previous knowledge about brain regions and gene function. All together, the results suggest that the ICA with reference can be particularly useful to explore the whole genome to find a specific factor of interest and further study its effect on brain.

  5. Pharmacological manipulation of brain glycogenolysis as a therapeutic approach to cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li; Sun, Hongbin

    2010-10-01

    Brain ischemia resulting from multiple disease states including cardiac arrest, stroke and traumatic brain injury, is a leading cause of death and disability. Despite significant resources dedicated to developing pharmacological interventions, few effective therapeutic options are currently available. The basic consequence of cerebral ischemia, characterized by energy failure and subsequent brain metabolic abnormalities, enables the protective effects by pharmacological manipulation of brain metabolism. We present here the important roles of brain glycogen metabolism and propose inhibition of glycogenolysis as a therapeutic approach to cerebral ischemia.

  6. Antibodies to the α1-adrenergic receptor cause vascular impairments in rat brain as demonstrated by magnetic resonance angiography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Karczewski

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Circulating agonistic autoantibodies acting at G protein-coupled receptors have been associated with numerous sever pathologies in humans. Antibodies directed predominantly against the α(1-adrenergig receptor were detected in patients suffering from widespread diseases such as hypertension and type 2 diabetes. Their deleterious action has been demonstrated for peripheral organs. We postulate that antibodies to the α(1-adrenergig receptor are relevant pathomolecules in diseases of the central nervous system associated with vascular impairments. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a rat model we studied the long-term action of antibodies against the α(1-adrenergig receptor either induced by immunization with a receptor peptide or applied by intravenous injection. The vasculature in the rat brains was investigated by time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography using a 9.4 Tesla small animal MR imaging system. Visual examination of maximum-intensity-projections (MIPs of brain angiographs revealed the development of vascular defects in antibody- exposed animals between three and eight months of treatment. Relative vascular areas were derived from representative MIP image sections by grayscale analysis and used to form an index of vascular circulation. Animals exposed to the action of α(1-adrenergig receptor antibodies showed significantly reduced vascular areas (p<0.05. Calculated index values indicated attenuated blood flow in both antibody-treated cohorts compared to their respective controls reaching with (relative units ± standard error, n = 10 0.839 ± 0.026 versus 0.919 ± 0.026 statistical significance (p<0.05 for peptide-immunized rats. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We present evidence that antibodies to the α(1-adrenergig receptor cause cerebrovascular impairments in the rat. Our findings suggest the pathological significance of these antibodies in pathologies of the human central nervous system linked to impairments of

  7. BRAIN-BASED APPROACH TO TEACHING TURKISH AS A MOTHER LANGUAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilginer ONAN

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The study which is based on brain-based approach to teaching as a mother language consists of two main parts. In the first part of the study, education systems having been performed in the world until the appearance of brain-based approach have been mentioned. In this context, the behavioural and cognitive approaches have been emphasized; constructıvıst approach developed in the brain-based approach was mentioned. In this way, reasons and conditions producing the understanding of brain-based approach have been determined. In the second part of the study, points to consider when performing the brainbased approach at teaching Turkish as mother language have been discussed. In this context, some points such as question as a balance tool during learning process, detailing process, limited process power of short-term memory, functions of episodic and semantical memories during mental preparation, communication environment and feeling of trust in learning process, cognitive function examples about the subject in learning process, process of data processing, graphic editors and images, functions of the right brain hemisphere and metaphor language's impact on learning process have been emphasized. Turkish courses have significant tools which can form basis for application of the brain-based approach strategy. Different types of text are the leading of these tools. Texts with different type characteristics as a teaching material are considered as significant tools in order to turn Turkish courses into a brain compatible process.

  8. MR Guidance, Monitoring and Control of Brain HIFU Therapy in Small Animals: In Vivo Demonstration in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrat, B.; Pernot, M.; Dervishi, E.; Souilah, A.; Seilhean, D.; Marie, Y.; Boch, A. L.; Aubry, J. F.; Fink, M.; Tanter, M.

    2010-03-01

    In the framework of HIFU transcranial brain therapy, it is mandatory to develop techniques capable of assessing the focusing quality and location before the treatment. Monitoring heat deposition in real time and verifying the extension of the treated area are also important steps. In this study, an imaging protocol is proposed to:1/ locate the US radiation force induced displacement in tissues and quantify the acoustic pressure at focus prior to HIFU; 2/ monitor the temperature rise during HIFU; and 3/ assess the changes in elasticity in the treated area. A 7T MRI scanner was equipped with a home-made stereotactic frame for rats and a US focused transducer working at 1.5 MHz. Such a tool is key for the evaluation of the biological effects of HIFU on brain tissue and tumors. The proposed protocol was successfully tested on 12 rats with and without injected tumors. The accurate localization of the focal point prior to HIFU was demonstrated in vivo. Furthermore, the pressure estimation in situ allowed to accurately simulate the heat deposition at focus and to plan the treatment (electrical power, duration). The temperature measurements were in good accordance with the predicted curves. The elasticity maps showed significant changes after treatment in some cases.

  9. Transmastoid approach to otogenic brain abscess: 14 years experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V R Borade

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Objectives of this study were to review our experience in on otogenic brain abscess and its management by transmastoid drainage and compare the results. Materials and Methods: All patients with brain abscess secondary to CSOM presenting to our department from January 1997 to December 2010 were included in this study. All patients subjected to clinical, neurological, opthalmological examination and CT scan was done as an imaging modality. All patients managed by radical mastoidectomy or modified radical mastoidectomy and transmastoid drainage of brain abscess as neurosurgical facility not available. Results: Seventy-two patients in whom brain abscess secondary to chronic suppurative otitis media was diagnosed and has been treated since 1997 are presented. 85% of patients were below 20 years of age. More than 50% patients presented with more than one complication of chronic suppurative otitis media. 85% of patients were having extensive cholesteatoma and 15% patients were having extensive granulations in middle ear and mastoid air cells. 83% patients were having cerebellar abscess while 17% patients were having temporal lobe abscess. 80% of the pus culture was sterile while in 20% patients various microorganisms such as Proteus spp., Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus spp., and Streptococcus spp were cultured. Overall mortality in this series was 4.4%. Conclusion: In diagnosis of otogenic brain abscess CT scan with constrast is of immense help. Transmastoid drainage of brain abscess is a safe and effective method that can be performed by otologists in cases of otogenic brain abscess.

  10. Demonstration of a semi-autonomous hybrid brain-machine interface using human intracranial EEG, eye tracking, and computer vision to control a robotic upper limb prosthetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, David P; Hotson, Guy; Katyal, Kapil D; Wester, Brock A; Fifer, Matthew S; McGee, Timothy G; Harris, Andrew; Johannes, Matthew S; Vogelstein, R Jacob; Ravitz, Alan D; Anderson, William S; Thakor, Nitish V; Crone, Nathan E

    2014-07-01

    To increase the ability of brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) to control advanced prostheses such as the modular prosthetic limb (MPL), we are developing a novel system: the Hybrid Augmented Reality Multimodal Operation Neural Integration Environment (HARMONIE). This system utilizes hybrid input, supervisory control, and intelligent robotics to allow users to identify an object (via eye tracking and computer vision) and initiate (via brain-control) a semi-autonomous reach-grasp-and-drop of the object by the MPL. Sequential iterations of HARMONIE were tested in two pilot subjects implanted with electrocorticographic (ECoG) and depth electrodes within motor areas. The subjects performed the complex task in 71.4% (20/28) and 67.7% (21/31) of trials after minimal training. Balanced accuracy for detecting movements was 91.1% and 92.9%, significantly greater than chance accuracies (p system improvements implemented for the second subject. Our hybrid-BMI design prevented all but one baseline false positive from initiating the system. The novel approach demonstrated in this proof-of-principle study, using hybrid input, supervisory control, and intelligent robotics, addresses limitations of current BMIs.

  11. Comparison of marine spatial planning methods in Madagascar demonstrates value of alternative approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allnutt, Thomas F; McClanahan, Timothy R; Andréfouët, Serge; Baker, Merrill; Lagabrielle, Erwann; McClennen, Caleb; Rakotomanjaka, Andry J M; Tianarisoa, Tantely F; Watson, Reg; Kremen, Claire

    2012-01-01

    The Government of Madagascar plans to increase marine protected area coverage by over one million hectares. To assist this process, we compare four methods for marine spatial planning of Madagascar's west coast. Input data for each method was drawn from the same variables: fishing pressure, exposure to climate change, and biodiversity (habitats, species distributions, biological richness, and biodiversity value). The first method compares visual color classifications of primary variables, the second uses binary combinations of these variables to produce a categorical classification of management actions, the third is a target-based optimization using Marxan, and the fourth is conservation ranking with Zonation. We present results from each method, and compare the latter three approaches for spatial coverage, biodiversity representation, fishing cost and persistence probability. All results included large areas in the north, central, and southern parts of western Madagascar. Achieving 30% representation targets with Marxan required twice the fish catch loss than the categorical method. The categorical classification and Zonation do not consider targets for conservation features. However, when we reduced Marxan targets to 16.3%, matching the representation level of the "strict protection" class of the categorical result, the methods show similar catch losses. The management category portfolio has complete coverage, and presents several management recommendations including strict protection. Zonation produces rapid conservation rankings across large, diverse datasets. Marxan is useful for identifying strict protected areas that meet representation targets, and minimize exposure probabilities for conservation features at low economic cost. We show that methods based on Zonation and a simple combination of variables can produce results comparable to Marxan for species representation and catch losses, demonstrating the value of comparing alternative approaches during

  12. Comparison of marine spatial planning methods in Madagascar demonstrates value of alternative approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas F Allnutt

    Full Text Available The Government of Madagascar plans to increase marine protected area coverage by over one million hectares. To assist this process, we compare four methods for marine spatial planning of Madagascar's west coast. Input data for each method was drawn from the same variables: fishing pressure, exposure to climate change, and biodiversity (habitats, species distributions, biological richness, and biodiversity value. The first method compares visual color classifications of primary variables, the second uses binary combinations of these variables to produce a categorical classification of management actions, the third is a target-based optimization using Marxan, and the fourth is conservation ranking with Zonation. We present results from each method, and compare the latter three approaches for spatial coverage, biodiversity representation, fishing cost and persistence probability. All results included large areas in the north, central, and southern parts of western Madagascar. Achieving 30% representation targets with Marxan required twice the fish catch loss than the categorical method. The categorical classification and Zonation do not consider targets for conservation features. However, when we reduced Marxan targets to 16.3%, matching the representation level of the "strict protection" class of the categorical result, the methods show similar catch losses. The management category portfolio has complete coverage, and presents several management recommendations including strict protection. Zonation produces rapid conservation rankings across large, diverse datasets. Marxan is useful for identifying strict protected areas that meet representation targets, and minimize exposure probabilities for conservation features at low economic cost. We show that methods based on Zonation and a simple combination of variables can produce results comparable to Marxan for species representation and catch losses, demonstrating the value of comparing alternative

  13. SLN approach for nose-to-brain delivery of alprazolam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Alok Pratap; Saraf, Shailendra K; Saraf, Shubhini A

    2012-12-01

    In the present study, alprazolam-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles were prepared and characterized. They were evaluated for their efficiency in nose-to-brain targeting and biodistribution in a suitable animal model after intranasal delivery. Solid lipid nanoparticles may offer an improvement to nose-to-brain drug delivery since they are able to protect the encapsulated drug from biological and/or chemical degradation. The distribution of the drug to different organs was recorded through biodistribution studies in male Wistar rats and gamma scintigraphy imaging in New Zealand rabbits by tagging the formulation with radioactive substance (99m)Tc. The radioactivity count of various organs was taken as a function of the drug concentration. The study reveals that alprazolam can be rapidly transferred to the brain via intranasal route, bypassing the blood-brain barrier and a direct nose-to-brain transfer. The enhanced rate and extent of transport may help in reducing the dose and dosing frequency, thereby providing ease for ambulatory patients.

  14. Efficient Variational Approach to Multimodal Registration of Anatomical and Functional Intra-Patient Tumorous Brain Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legaz-Aparicio, Alvar-Ginés; Verdú-Monedero, Rafael; Larrey-Ruiz, Jorge; Morales-Sánchez, Juan; López-Mir, Fernando; Naranjo, Valery; Bernabéu, Ángela

    2016-11-29

    This paper addresses the functional localization of intra-patient images of the brain. Functional images of the brain (fMRI and PET) provide information about brain function and metabolism whereas anatomical images (MRI and CT) supply the localization of structures with high spatial resolution. The goal is to find the geometric correspondence between functional and anatomical images in order to complement and fuse the information provided by each imaging modality. The proposed approach is based on a variational formulation of the image registration problem in the frequency domain. It has been implemented as a C/C[Formula: see text] library which is invoked from a GUI. This interface is routinely used in the clinical setting by physicians for research purposes (Inscanner, Alicante, Spain), and may be used as well for diagnosis and surgical planning. The registration of anatomic and functional intra-patient images of the brain makes it possible to obtain a geometric correspondence which allows for the localization of the functional processes that occur in the brain. Through 18 clinical experiments, it has been demonstrated how the proposed approach outperforms popular state-of-the-art registration methods in terms of efficiency, information theory-based measures (such as mutual information) and actual registration error (distance in space of corresponding landmarks).

  15. Potential new approaches for the development of brain imaging agents for single-photon applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Srivastava, P.C.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes new strategies for the brain-specific delivery of radionuclides that can be used to evaluate regional cerebral perfusion by single photon imaging techniques. A description of several examples of interesting new strategies that have recently been reported is presented. A new approach at this institution for the brain-specific delivery of radioiodinated iodophenylalkyl-substituted dihyronicotinamide systems is described which shows good brain uptake and retention in preliminary studies in rats. Following transport into the brain these agents appear to undergo facile intracerebral oxidation to the quaternized analogues which do not recross the intact blood-brain barrier and so are effectively trapped in the brain. 49 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  16. INTRANASAL LIPOSOMES : AN APPROACH FOR DRUG DELIVERY TO BRAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Jatin B. Trivedi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Targeting drug molecules to brain is one of the most challenging research areas in pharmaceuticalsciences. Drugs that are effective against diseases in the CNS and reach the brain via the bloodcompartment must pass the BBB. The blood-brain barrier (BBB represents an insurmountable obstaclefor a large number of drugs, including antibiotics, anti-neoplastic agents, and a variety of central nervoussystem (CNS-active drugs. Therefore, various strategies have been proposed to improve the delivery ofdifferent drugs to this tissue which includes liposomes, colloidal drug carriers, micelles, chimericpeptide technology, intranasal and olfactory route of administration and nano technology. The discoveryof liposome or lipid vesicle emerged from self forming enclosed lipid bi-layer upon hydration; liposomedrug delivery systems have played a significant role in formulation of potent drug to improvetherapeutics Liposomes have been investigated as carriers of various pharmacologically active agentssuch as antineoplastic, antimicrobial drugs, chelating agents, steroids, vaccines, and genetic materials.Liposomes provide an efficient drug delivery system because they can alter the pharmacokinetics andpharmacodynamics of the entrapped drugs. Liposomes have been widely used for brain delivery in vivo.Nowadays, the nasal route for systemic drug delivery has gained great interest. It provides severaladvantages over other routes of drug administrations, which includes rapid absorption, avoids intestinaland hepatic presystemic disposition and high potential for drug transfer to the CSF. Moreover, the nasalroute is a potential alternative route for systemic availability of drugs restricted to intravenousadministration, viz. peptide and protein drugs and vaccines. As well, intranasal route has also beensuccessfully exploited for bypassing the blood brain barrier [BBB] and subsequently delivering drugmolecules to central nervous system [CNS].

  17. Summary of high field diffusion MRI and microscopy data demonstrate microstructural aberration in chronic mild stress rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Ahmad Raza; Chuhutin, Andrey; Wiborg, Ove

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This data article describes a large, high resolution diffusion MRI data set from fixed rat brain acquired at high field strength. The rat brain samples consist of21adult rat brain hemispheres from animals exposed to chronic mild stress (anhedonic and resilient) and controls. Histology from...... amygdala of the same brain hemispheres is also included with three different stains: DiI and Hoechst stained microscopic images (confocal microscopy) andALDH1L1 antibody based immunohistochemistry.These stains may be used to evaluate neurite density (DiI), nuclear density (Hoechst) and astrocytic density...

  18. Structured assessment approach: Version I. Applied demonstration of output results. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parziale, A.A.; Sacks, 1.J.

    1979-10-01

    A methodology, the Structured Assessment Approach, has been developed for the assessment of the effectiveness of material control and accounting (MC and A) safeguards systems at nuclear fuel cycle facilities. This methodology has been refined into a computational tool, the SAA Version 1 computational package, that was used first to analyze a hypothetical fuel cycle facility (HFCF) and used more recently to assess operational nuclear plants. The Version 1 analysis package is designed to analyze safeguards systems that prevent the diversion of special nuclear material (SNM) from nuclear fuel cycle facilities and to provide assurance that diversion has not occurred. This report is the third volume, Applied Demonstration of Output Results, of a four-volume document. It presents the outputs for each of the four levels of the SAA Version 1 computational package. Two types of outputs are discussed: detailed output findings and summary output tables. The summary output tables are used to aggregate the detailed output findings in a condensed form for NRC analyst consumption. Specific output results are presented for an HFCF, which is described in Volume II.

  19. Determinants of brain cell metabolic phenotypes and energy substrate utilization unraveled with a modeling approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aitana Neves

    Full Text Available Although all brain cells bear in principle a comparable potential in terms of energetics, in reality they exhibit different metabolic profiles. The specific biochemical characteristics explaining such disparities and their relative importance are largely unknown. Using a modeling approach, we show that modifying the kinetic parameters of pyruvate dehydrogenase and mitochondrial NADH shuttling within a realistic interval can yield a striking switch in lactate flux direction. In this context, cells having essentially an oxidative profile exhibit pronounced extracellular lactate uptake and consumption. However, they can be turned into cells with prominent aerobic glycolysis by selectively reducing the aforementioned parameters. In the case of primarily oxidative cells, we also examined the role of glycolysis and lactate transport in providing pyruvate to mitochondria in order to sustain oxidative phosphorylation. The results show that changes in lactate transport capacity and extracellular lactate concentration within the range described experimentally can sustain enhanced oxidative metabolism upon activation. Such a demonstration provides key elements to understand why certain brain cell types constitutively adopt a particular metabolic profile and how specific features can be altered under different physiological and pathological conditions in order to face evolving energy demands.

  20. A hybrid hierarchical approach for brain tissue segmentation by combining brain atlas and least square support vector machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasiri, Keyvan; Kazemi, Kamran; Dehghani, Mohammad Javad; Helfroush, Mohammad Sadegh

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we present a new semi-automatic brain tissue segmentation method based on a hybrid hierarchical approach that combines a brain atlas as a priori information and a least-square support vector machine (LS-SVM). The method consists of three steps. In the first two steps, the skull is removed and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is extracted. These two steps are performed using the toolbox FMRIB's automated segmentation tool integrated in the FSL software (FSL-FAST) developed in Oxford Centre for functional MRI of the brain (FMRIB). Then, in the third step, the LS-SVM is used to segment grey matter (GM) and white matter (WM). The training samples for LS-SVM are selected from the registered brain atlas. The voxel intensities and spatial positions are selected as the two feature groups for training and test. SVM as a powerful discriminator is able to handle nonlinear classification problems; however, it cannot provide posterior probability. Thus, we use a sigmoid function to map the SVM output into probabilities. The proposed method is used to segment CSF, GM and WM from the simulated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using Brainweb MRI simulator and real data provided by Internet Brain Segmentation Repository. The semi-automatically segmented brain tissues were evaluated by comparing to the corresponding ground truth. The Dice and Jaccard similarity coefficients, sensitivity and specificity were calculated for the quantitative validation of the results. The quantitative results show that the proposed method segments brain tissues accurately with respect to corresponding ground truth.

  1. Return Migration After Brain Drain: An Agent Based Simulation Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Biondo, A E; Rapisarda, A

    2012-01-01

    The Brain Drain phenomenon is particularly heterogeneous and is characterized by peculiar specifications. It influences the economic fundamentals of both the country of origin and the host one in terms of human capital accumulation. Here, the brain drain is considered from a microeconomic perspective: more precisely we focus on the individual rational decision to return, referring it to the social capital owned by the worker. The presented model, restricted to the case of academic personnel, compares utility levels to justify agent's migration conduct and to simulate several scenarios with a NetLogo agent based model. In particular, we developed a simulation framework based on two fundamental individual features, i.e. risk aversion and initial expectation, which characterize the dynamics of different agents according to the random evolution of their personal social networks. Our main result is that, according to the value of risk aversion and initial expectation, the probability of return migration depends on...

  2. [Global brain metastases management strategy: a multidisciplinary-based approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Métellus, P; Tallet, A; Dhermain, F; Reyns, N; Carpentier, A; Spano, J-P; Azria, D; Noël, G; Barlési, F; Taillibert, S; Le Rhun, É

    2015-02-01

    Brain metastases management has evolved over the last fifteen years and may use varying strategies, including more or less aggressive treatments, sometimes combined, leading to an improvement in patient's survival and quality of life. The therapeutic decision is subject to a multidisciplinary analysis, taking into account established prognostic factors including patient's general condition, extracerebral disease status and clinical and radiological presentation of lesions. In this article, we propose a management strategy based on the state of current knowledge and available therapeutic resources.

  3. Confirming the diversity of the brain after normalization: an approach based on identity authentication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanglin Chen

    Full Text Available During the development of neuroimaging, numerous analyses were performed to identify population differences, such as studies on age, gender, and diseases. Researchers first normalized the brain image and then identified features that represent key differences between groups. In these studies, the question of whether normalization (a pre-processing step widely used in neuroimaging studies reduces the diversity of brains was largely ignored. There are a few studies that identify the differences between individuals after normalization. In the current study, we analyzed brain diversity on an individual level, both qualitatively and quantitatively. The main idea was to utilize brain images for identity authentication. First, the brain images were normalized and registered. Then, a pixel-level matching method was developed to compute the identity difference between different images for matching. Finally, by analyzing the performance of the proposed brain recognition strategy, the individual differences in brain images were evaluated. Experimental results on a 150-subject database showed that the proposed approach could achieve a 100% identification ratio, which indicated distinct differences between individuals after normalization. Thus, the results proved that after the normalization stage, brain images retain their main distinguishing information and features. Based on this result, we suggest that diversity (individual differences should be considered when conducting group analysis, and that this approach may facilitate group pattern classification.

  4. A study of brain networks associated with swallowing using graph-theoretical approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Luan

    Full Text Available Functional connectivity between brain regions during swallowing tasks is still not well understood. Understanding these complex interactions is of great interest from both a scientific and a clinical perspective. In this study, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was utilized to study brain functional networks during voluntary saliva swallowing in twenty-two adult healthy subjects (all females, [Formula: see text] years of age. To construct these functional connections, we computed mean partial correlation matrices over ninety brain regions for each participant. Two regions were determined to be functionally connected if their correlation was above a certain threshold. These correlation matrices were then analyzed using graph-theoretical approaches. In particular, we considered several network measures for the whole brain and for swallowing-related brain regions. The results have shown that significant pairwise functional connections were, mostly, either local and intra-hemispheric or symmetrically inter-hemispheric. Furthermore, we showed that all human brain functional network, although varying in some degree, had typical small-world properties as compared to regular networks and random networks. These properties allow information transfer within the network at a relatively high efficiency. Swallowing-related brain regions also had higher values for some of the network measures in comparison to when these measures were calculated for the whole brain. The current results warrant further investigation of graph-theoretical approaches as a potential tool for understanding the neural basis of dysphagia.

  5. Brain 3M--A New Approach to Learning about Brain, Behavior, and Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Chaby, Lauren E.; Legault, Jennifer; Braithwaite, Victoria A.

    2015-01-01

    By combining emerging technologies with cognitive and education theories, we are capitalizing on recent findings from adaptive exploration and embodied learning research to address significant gaps in the education of brain sciences for school children and college level students. Through the development of virtual learning tools in combination…

  6. Demonstrating a small utility approach to demand-side program implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    The US DOE awarded a grant to the Burlington Electric Department (B.E.D.) to test a demand-side management (DSM) demonstration program designed to quickly save a significant amount of power with little disruption to the utility's customers or its normal operations. B.E.D. is a small municipal utility located in northern Vermont, with a lengthy history of successful DSM involvement. In our grant application, we proposed to develop a replicable program and approach to DSM that might be useful to other small utilities and to write a report to enable such replication. We believe that this DSM program and/or individual program components are replicable. This report is designed to allow other utilities interested in DSM to replicate this program or specific program design features to meet their DSM goals. We also wanted to use the opportunity of this grant to test the waters of residential heating fuel-switching. We hoped to test the application of one fuel-switching technology, and to benefit from the lessons learned in developing a full-scale DSM program for this end- use. To this end the pilot effort has been very successful. In the pilot pressure we installed direct-vent gas fired space heaters sized as supplemental heating units in 44 residences heated solely by electric resistance heat. We installed the gas space heating units at no cost to the owners or residents. We surveyed participating customers. The results of those surveys are included in this report and preliminary estimates of winter peak capacity load reductions are also noted in this report.

  7. Gamma ray tracking with the AGATA demonstrator. A novel approach for in-beam spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkenbach, Benedikt

    2014-04-11

    PRISMA. The γ-rays were detected with the AGATA demonstrator consisting of five AGATA triple cluster detectors. An additional micro channel plate detector for particle detection was mounted inside the scattering chamber in order to request kinematic coincidences. The analysis procedures for the two complex sub-detectors AGATA and PRISMA were extended and adapted to the specific requirements of this new approach for actinide spectroscopy. First the complex analysis of the magnetic spectrometer PRISMA and solutions for unexpected detector behaviour like time drifts and aberration corrections are described. As a result the individual isotopes of elements from Barium to Tellurium were identified confirming the very high quality of the PRISMA spectrometer and its design parameters. The analysis of the γ-ray spectra comprised a detailed PSA and GRT analysis of the AGATA demonstrator. This analysis included also data analysis developments for the AGATA collaboration. The data of the AGATA demonstrator, the PRISMA spectrometer and the ancillary detectors were merged to obtain background free Doppler corrected spectra for the beam- and target-like reaction products. The simultaneous Doppler correction for beam and target-like ions included an elaborate optimization procedure for unobservable experimental parameters. The γ-ray spectra for the individual isotopes is consistent with the isotope identification of the PRISMA analysis. For the beam like particles γ-ray spectra of the isotopes {sup 128-139}Xe are presented and discussed. For the target like nuclei γ-ray spectra of the isotopes {sup 236-240}U are deduced. By gating on the remaining excitation energy after the multi-nucleon transfer reaction the neutron evaporation and fission of the excited actinide nuclei were suppressed. Coincidences between AGATA and PRISMA were exploited for the first time together with the particle coincidence between beam- and target-like nuclei. These triple coincidences allowed further

  8. Educational games for brain health: revealing their unexplored potential through a neurocognitive approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick eFissler

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Educational games link the motivational nature of games with learning of knowledge and skills. Here, we go beyond effects on these learning outcomes. We review two lines of evidence which indicate the currently unexplored potential of educational games to promote brain health: First, gaming with specific neurocognitive demands (e.g., executive control, and second, educational learning experiences (e.g., studying foreign languages improve brain health markers. These markers include cognitive ability, brain function, and brain structure. As educational games allow the combination of specific neurocognitive demands with educational learning experiences, they seem to be optimally suited for promoting brain health. We propose a neurocognitive approach to reveal this unexplored potential of educational games in future research.

  9. Educational games for brain health: revealing their unexplored potential through a neurocognitive approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fissler, Patrick; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana; Schrader, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Educational games link the motivational nature of games with learning of knowledge and skills. Here, we go beyond effects on these learning outcomes. We review two lines of evidence which indicate the currently unexplored potential of educational games to promote brain health: First, gaming with specific neurocognitive demands (e.g., executive control), and second, educational learning experiences (e.g., studying foreign languages) improve brain health markers. These markers include cognitive ability, brain function, and brain structure. As educational games allow the combination of specific neurocognitive demands with educational learning experiences, they seem to be optimally suited for promoting brain health. We propose a neurocognitive approach to reveal this unexplored potential of educational games in future research.

  10. Spatiotemporal Psychopathology II: How does a psychopathology of the brain's resting state look like? Spatiotemporal approach and the history of psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northoff, Georg

    2016-01-15

    Psychopathology as the investigation and classification of experience, behavior and symptoms in psychiatric patients is an old discipline that ranges back to the end of the 19th century. Since then different approaches to psychopathology have been suggested. Recent investigations showing abnormalities in the brain on different levels raise the question how the gap between brain and psyche, between neural abnormalities and alteration in experience and behavior can be bridged. Historical approaches like descriptive (Jaspers) and structural (Minkoswki) psychopathology as well as the more current phenomenological psychopathology (Paarnas, Fuchs, Sass, Stanghellini) remain on the side of the psyche giving detailed description of the phenomenal level of experience while leaving open the link to the brain. In contrast, the recently introduced Research Domain Classification (RDoC) aims at explicitly linking brain and psyche by starting from so-called 'neuro-behavioral constructs'. How does Spatiotemporal Psychopathology, as demonstrated in the first paper on depression, stand in relation to these approaches? In a nutshell, Spatiotemporal Psychopathology aims to bridge the gap between brain and psyche. Specifically, as demonstrated in depression in the first paper, the focus is on the spatiotemporal features of the brain's intrinsic activity and how they are transformed into corresponding spatiotemporal features in experience on the phenomenal level and behavioral changes, which can well account for the symptoms in these patients. This second paper focuses on some of the theoretical background assumptions in Spatiotemporal Psychopathology by directly comparing it to descriptive, structural, and phenomenological psychopathology as well as to RDoC.

  11. Neurobehavioral and self-awareness changes after traumatic brain injury: Towards new multidimensional approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnould, A; Dromer, E; Rochat, L; Van der Linden, M; Azouvi, P

    2016-02-01

    Neurobehavioral and self-awareness changes are frequently observed following traumatic brain injury (TBI). These disturbances have been related to negative consequences on functional outcomes, caregiver distress and social reintegration, representing therefore a challenge for clinical research. Some studies have recently been conducted to specifically explore apathetic and impulsive manifestations, as well as self-awareness impairments in patients with TBI. These findings underlined the heterogeneity of clinical manifestations for each behavioral disturbance and the diversity of psychological processes involved. In this context, new multidimensional approaches taking into account the various processes at play have been proposed to better understand and apprehend the complexity and dynamic nature of these problematic behaviors. In addition, the involvement of social and environmental factors as well as premorbid personality traits have increasingly been addressed. These new multidimensional frameworks have the potential to ensure targeted and effective rehabilitation by allowing a better identification and therefore consideration of the various mechanisms involved in the onset of problematic behaviors. In this context, the main objective of this position paper was to demonstrate the interest of multidimensional approaches in the understanding and rehabilitation of problematic behaviors in patients with TBI.

  12. The Three-Dimensional Architecture of the Internal Capsule of the Human Brain Demonstrated by Fiber Dissection Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Goga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The fiber dissection technique involves peeling away white matter fiber tracts of the brain to display its three-dimensional anatomic arrangement. The intricate three-dimensional configuration and structure of the internal capsule (IC is not well defined. By using the fiber dissection technique, our aim was to expose and study the IC to achieve a clearer conception of its configuration and relationships with neighboring white matter fibers and central nuclei. The lateral and medial aspects of the temporal lobes of twenty, previously frozen, formalin-fixed human brains were dissected under the operating microscope using the fiber dissection technique.

  13. Flexibility and practicality graz brain-computer interface approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Reinhold; Müller-Putz, Gernot R; Pfurtscheller, Gert

    2009-01-01

    "Graz brain-computer interface (BCI)" transforms changes in oscillatory electroencephalogram (EEG) activity into control signals for external devices and feedback. Steady-state evoked potentials (SSEPs) and event-related desynchronization (ERD) are employed to encode user messages. User-specific setup and training are important issues for robust and reliable classification. Furthermore, in order to implement small and thus affordable systems, focus is put on the minimization of the number of EEG sensors. The system also supports the self-paced operation mode, that is, users have on-demand access to the system at any time and can autonomously initiate communication. Flexibility, usability, and practicality are essential to increase user acceptance. Here, we illustrate the possibilities offered by now from EEG-based communication. Results of several studies with able-bodied and disabled individuals performed inside the laboratory and in real-world environments are presented; their characteristics are shown and open issues are mentioned. The applications include the control of neuroprostheses and spelling devices, the interaction with Virtual Reality, and the operation of off-the-shelf software such as Google Earth.

  14. Astrocytes, Synapses and Brain Function: A Computational Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadkarni, Suhita

    2006-03-01

    Modulation of synaptic reliability is one of the leading mechanisms involved in long- term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) and therefore has implications in information processing in the brain. A recently discovered mechanism for modulating synaptic reliability critically involves recruitments of astrocytes - star- shaped cells that outnumber the neurons in most parts of the central nervous system. Astrocytes until recently were thought to be subordinate cells merely participating in supporting neuronal functions. New evidence, however, made available by advances in imaging technology has changed the way we envision the role of these cells in synaptic transmission and as modulator of neuronal excitability. We put forward a novel mathematical framework based on the biophysics of the bidirectional neuron-astrocyte interactions that quantitatively accounts for two distinct experimental manifestation of recruitment of astrocytes in synaptic transmission: a) transformation of a low fidelity synapse transforms into a high fidelity synapse and b) enhanced postsynaptic spontaneous currents when astrocytes are activated. Such a framework is not only useful for modeling neuronal dynamics in a realistic environment but also provides a conceptual basis for interpreting experiments. Based on this modeling framework, we explore the role of astrocytes for neuronal network behavior such as synchrony and correlations and compare with experimental data from cultured networks.

  15. Photo-Ionization of Noble Gases: A Demonstration of Hybrid Coupled Channels Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Pramod Majety

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present here an application of the recently developed hybrid coupled channels approach to study photo-ionization of noble gas atoms: Neon and Argon. We first compute multi-photon ionization rates and cross-sections for these inert gas atoms with our approach and compare them with reliable data available from R-matrix Floquet theory. The good agreement between coupled channels and R-matrix Floquet theory show that our method treats multi-electron systems on par with the well established R-matrix theory. We then apply the time dependent surface flux (tSURFF method with our approach to compute total and angle resolved photo-electron spectra from Argon with linearly and circularly polarized 12 nm wavelength laser fields, a typical wavelength available from Free Electron Lasers (FELs.

  16. A low-cost approach to the exploration of Mars through a robotic technology demonstrator mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellery, Alex; Richter, Lutz; Parnell, John; Baker, Adam

    2003-11-01

    We present a proposed robotic mission to Mars - Vanguard - for the Aurora Arrow programme which combines an extensive technology demonstrator with a high scientific return. The novel aspect of this technology demonstrator is the demonstration of "water mining" capabilities for in-situ resource utilisation in conjunction with high-value astrobiological investigation within a low mass lander package of 70 kg. The basic architecture comprises a small lander, a micro-rover and a number of ground-penetrating moles. This basic architecture offers the possibility of testing a wide variety of generic technologies associated with space systems and planetary exploration. The architecture provides for the demonstration of specific technologies associated with planetary surface exploration, and with the Aurora programme specifically. Technology demonstration of in-situ resource utilisation will be a necessary precursor to any future human mission to Mars. Furthermore, its modest mass overhead allows the reuse of the already built Mars Express bus, making it a very low cost option.

  17. Demonstration of a geostatistical approach to physically consistent downscaling of climate modeling simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Jha, Sanjeev Kumar

    2013-01-01

    A downscaling approach based on multiple-point geostatistics (MPS) is presented. The key concept underlying MPS is to sample spatial patterns from within training images, which can then be used in characterizing the relationship between different variables across multiple scales. The approach is used here to downscale climate variables including skin surface temperature (TSK), soil moisture (SMOIS), and latent heat flux (LH). The performance of the approach is assessed by applying it to data derived from a regional climate model of the Murray-Darling basin in southeast Australia, using model outputs at two spatial resolutions of 50 and 10 km. The data used in this study cover the period from 1985 to 2006, with 1985 to 2005 used for generating the training images that define the relationships of the variables across the different spatial scales. Subsequently, the spatial distributions for the variables in the year 2006 are determined at 10 km resolution using the 50 km resolution data as input. The MPS geostatistical downscaling approach reproduces the spatial distribution of TSK, SMOIS, and LH at 10 km resolution with the correct spatial patterns over different seasons, while providing uncertainty estimates through the use of multiple realizations. The technique has the potential to not only bridge issues of spatial resolution in regional and global climate model simulations but also in feature sharpening in remote sensing applications through image fusion, filling gaps in spatial data, evaluating downscaled variables with available remote sensing images, and aggregating/disaggregating hydrological and groundwater variables for catchment studies.

  18. A Novel Laboratory Approach for the Demonstration of Hemodynamic Principles: The Arterial Blood Flow Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djelic, Marina; Mazic, Sanja; Zikic, Dejan

    2013-01-01

    In the frame of a laboratory training course for medicine students, a new approach for laboratory exercises has been applied to teach the phenomena of circulation. The exercise program included measurements of radial artery blood flow waveform for different age groups using a noninvasive optical sensor. Arterial wave reflection was identified by…

  19. A Demonstration of a Systematic Item-Reduction Approach Using Structural Equation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larwin, Karen; Harvey, Milton

    2012-01-01

    Establishing model parsimony is an important component of structural equation modeling (SEM). Unfortunately, little attention has been given to developing systematic procedures to accomplish this goal. To this end, the current study introduces an innovative application of the jackknife approach first presented in Rensvold and Cheung (1999). Unlike…

  20. Adaptive Sampling approach to environmental site characterization at Joliet Army Ammunition Plant: Phase 2 demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bujewski, G.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Restoration Technologies Dept.; Johnson, R.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Adaptive sampling programs provide real opportunities to save considerable time and money when characterizing hazardous waste sites. This Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) project demonstrated two decision-support technologies, SitePlanner{trademark} and Plume{trademark}, that can facilitate the design and deployment of an adaptive sampling program. A demonstration took place at Joliet Army Ammunition Plant (JAAP), and was unique in that it was tightly coupled with ongoing Army characterization work at the facility, with close scrutiny by both state and federal regulators. The demonstration was conducted in partnership with the Army Environmental Center`s (AEC) Installation Restoration Program and AEC`s Technology Development Program. AEC supported researchers from Tufts University who demonstrated innovative field analytical techniques for the analysis of TNT and DNT. SitePlanner{trademark} is an object-oriented database specifically designed for site characterization that provides an effective way to compile, integrate, manage and display site characterization data as it is being generated. Plume{trademark} uses a combination of Bayesian analysis and geostatistics to provide technical staff with the ability to quantitatively merge soft and hard information for an estimate of the extent of contamination. Plume{trademark} provides an estimate of contamination extent, measures the uncertainty associated with the estimate, determines the value of additional sampling, and locates additional samples so that their value is maximized.

  1. Neuromolecular computing: a new approach to human brain evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, R; Price, H

    1999-09-01

    Evolutionary approaches in human cognitive neurobiology traditionally emphasize macroscopic structures. It may soon be possible to supplement these studies with models of human information-processing of the molecular level. Thin-film, simulation, fluorescence microscopy, and high-resolution X-ray crystallographic studies provide evidence for transiently organized neural membrane molecular systems with possible computational properties. This review article examines evidence for hydrophobic-mismatch molecular interactions within phospholipid microdomains of a neural membrane bilayer. It is proposed that these interactions are a massively parallel algorithm which can rapidly compute near-optimal solutions to complex cognitive and physiological problems. Coupling of microdomain activity to permenant ion movements at ligand-gated and voltage-gated channels permits the conversion of molecular computations into neuron frequency codes. Evidence for microdomain transport of proteins to specific locations within the bilayer suggests that neuromolecular computation may be under some genetic control and thus modifiable by natural selection. A possible experimental approach for examining evolutionary changes in neuromolecular computation is briefly discussed.

  2. Three colossal neurons: a new approach to an old classroom demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Steven R

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests that the key to optimal student learning, regardless of class size, is engaging students in active learning. It is my contention that to truly understand neural processing, one must not only understand the activities of the neuron as a living cell, but also how that cell works within the context of a neural network. The demonstration exercise described herein combines techniques expressed in three previously published articles, with certain modifications, allowing as few as 15 and as many as about 200 students to actively participate in the endeavor. Moreover, test scores from 158 students were examined, showing that students who participated in the demonstration performed significantly better on exam questions than students who did not take part.

  3. Multiple microscopic approaches demonstrate linkage between chromoplast architecture and carotenoid composition in diverse Capsicum annuum fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilcrease, James; Collins, Aaron M; Richins, Richard D; Timlin, Jerilyn A; O'Connell, Mary A

    2013-12-01

    Increased accumulation of specific carotenoids in plastids through plant breeding or genetic engineering requires an understanding of the limitations that storage sites for these compounds may impose on that accumulation. Here, using Capsicum annuum L. fruit, we demonstrate directly the unique sub-organellar accumulation sites of specific carotenoids using live cell hyperspectral confocal Raman microscopy. Further, we show that chromoplasts from specific cultivars vary in shape and size, and these structural variations are associated with carotenoid compositional differences. Live-cell imaging utilizing laser scanning confocal (LSCM) and confocal Raman microscopy, as well as fixed tissue imaging by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), all demonstrated morphological differences with high concordance for the measurements across the multiple imaging modalities. These results reveal additional opportunities for genetic controls on fruit color and carotenoid-based phenotypes.

  4. Demonstration of Normal and Abnormal Fetal Brains Using 3D Printing from In Utero MR Imaging Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, D; Griffiths, P D; Majewski, C

    2016-09-01

    3D printing is a new manufacturing technology that produces high-fidelity models of complex structures from 3D computer-aided design data. Radiology has been particularly quick to embrace the new technology because of the wide access to 3D datasets. Models have been used extensively to assist orthopedic, neurosurgical, and maxillofacial surgical planning. In this report, we describe methods used for 3D printing of the fetal brain by using data from in utero MR imaging.

  5. Brain tissue oxygen amperometry in behaving rats demonstrates functional dissociation of dorsal and ventral hippocampus during spatial processing and anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    McHugh, Stephen B.; Fillenz, Marianne; Lowry, John P; Rawlins, J Nicolas P; Bannerman, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally, the function of the hippocampus (HPC) has been viewed in unitary terms, but there is growing evidence that the HPC is functionally differentiated along its septotemporal axis. Lesion studies in rodents and functional brain imaging in humans suggest a preferential role for the septal HPC in spatial learning and a preferential role for the temporal HPC in anxiety. To better enable cross-species comparison, we present an in vivo amperometric technique that measures changes in brai...

  6. Experimental demonstration of a classical approach for flexible space structure control: NASA CSI testbeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Wie

    1991-01-01

    The results of active control experiments performed for the Mini-Mast truss structure are presented. The primary research objectives were: (1) to develop active structural control concepts and/or techniques; (2) to verify the concept of robust non-minimum-phase compensation for a certain class of non-colocated structural control problems through ground experiments; (3) to verify a 'dipole' concept for persistent disturbance rejection control of flexible structures; and (4) to identify CSI (Control Structure Interaction) issues and areas of emphasis for the next generation of large flexible spacecraft. The classical SISO (Single Input and Single Output) control design approach was employed.

  7. Hierarchical organization of functional connectivity in the mouse brain: a complex network approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardella, Giampiero; Bifone, Angelo; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gozzi, Alessandro; Squartini, Tiziano

    2016-08-01

    This paper represents a contribution to the study of the brain functional connectivity from the perspective of complex networks theory. More specifically, we apply graph theoretical analyses to provide evidence of the modular structure of the mouse brain and to shed light on its hierarchical organization. We propose a novel percolation analysis and we apply our approach to the analysis of a resting-state functional MRI data set from 41 mice. This approach reveals a robust hierarchical structure of modules persistent across different subjects. Importantly, we test this approach against a statistical benchmark (or null model) which constrains only the distributions of empirical correlations. Our results unambiguously show that the hierarchical character of the mouse brain modular structure is not trivially encoded into this lower-order constraint. Finally, we investigate the modular structure of the mouse brain by computing the Minimal Spanning Forest, a technique that identifies subnetworks characterized by the strongest internal correlations. This approach represents a faster alternative to other community detection methods and provides a means to rank modules on the basis of the strength of their internal edges.

  8. Management approach for recurrent brain metastases following upfront radiosurgery may affect risk of subsequent radiation necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Rae, BS

    2016-10-01

    Conclusion: Our results suggest that initial management approach for recurrent brain metastasis after upfront SRS does not affect the rate of RN. However, the risk of RN significantly increases when patients are treated with both repeat SRS and salvage WBRT. Methods to improve prediction of toxicity and optimize patient selection for salvage treatments are needed.

  9. Brain oxygenation patterns during the execution of tool use demonstration, tool use pantomime, and body-part-as-object tool use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmich, Ingo; Holle, Henning; Rein, Robert; Lausberg, Hedda

    2015-04-01

    Divergent findings exist whether left and right hemispheric pre- and postcentral cortices contribute to the production of tool use related hand movements. In order to clarify the neural substrates of tool use demonstrations with tool in hand, tool use pantomimes without tool in hand, and body-part-as-object presentations of tool use (BPO) in a naturalistic mode of execution, we applied functional Near InfraRed Spectroscopy (fNIRS) in twenty-three right-handed participants. Functional NIRS techniques allow for the investigation of brain oxygenation during the execution of complex hand movements with an unlimited movement range. Brain oxygenation patterns were retrieved from 16 channels of measurement above pre- and postcentral cortices of each hemisphere. The results showed that tool use demonstration with tool in hand leads to increased oxygenation as compared to tool use pantomimes in the left hemispheric somatosensory gyrus. Left hand executions of the demonstration of tool use, pantomime of tool use, and BPO of tool use led to increased oxygenation in the premotor and somatosensory cortices of the left hemisphere as compared to right hand executions of either condition. The results indicate that the premotor and somatosensory cortices of the left hemisphere constitute relevant brain structures for tool related hand movement production when using the left hand, whereas the somatosensory cortex of the left hemisphere seems to provide specific mental representations when performing tool use demonstrations with the tool in hand.

  10. Computational Classification Approach to Profile Neuron Subtypes from Brain Activity Mapping Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Zhao, Fang; Lee, Jason; Wang, Dong; Kuang, Hui; Tsien, Joe Z

    2015-07-27

    The analysis of cell type-specific activity patterns during behaviors is important for better understanding of how neural circuits generate cognition, but has not been well explored from in vivo neurophysiological datasets. Here, we describe a computational approach to uncover distinct cell subpopulations from in vivo neural spike datasets. This method, termed "inter-spike-interval classification-analysis" (ISICA), is comprised of four major steps: spike pattern feature-extraction, pre-clustering analysis, clustering classification, and unbiased classification-dimensionality selection. By using two key features of spike dynamic - namely, gamma distribution shape factors and a coefficient of variation of inter-spike interval - we show that this ISICA method provides invariant classification for dopaminergic neurons or CA1 pyramidal cell subtypes regardless of the brain states from which spike data were collected. Moreover, we show that these ISICA-classified neuron subtypes underlie distinct physiological functions. We demonstrate that the uncovered dopaminergic neuron subtypes encoded distinct aspects of fearful experiences such as valence or value, whereas distinct hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells responded differentially to ketamine-induced anesthesia. This ISICA method should be useful to better data mining of large-scale in vivo neural datasets, leading to novel insights into circuit dynamics associated with cognitions.

  11. Implantable Microsystems for Anatomical Rewiring of Cortical Circuitry: A New Approach for Brain Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    reaching, retrieval of small food items, and locomotion demonstrate that deficits persist during the 5-week recovery period following injury. This will...Implantable microsystem; Neuroplasticity ; Rehabilitation; Traumatic brain injury 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER...we have successfully induced TBI in the CFA, sparing the RFA. Behavioral assessments of reaching, retrieval of small food items, and locomotion

  12. OUR APPROACH TOWARDS DEVELOPING A SPECIFIC TUMOR-TARGETED MRI CONTRAST AGENT FOR THE BRAIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GO, KG; BULTE, JWM; DELEY, L; THE, TH; KAMMAN, RL; HULSTAERT, CE; BLAAUW, EH; MA, LD

    1993-01-01

    This review presents various aspects of the technological development, and their assessment in the design of a contrast agent for MRI, tailored to visualise tumours in the brain. First, it was demonstrated that magnetite as a contrast agent exhibited a much stronger relaxivity than gadolinium. The p

  13. ConnectViz: Accelerated Approach for Brain Structural Connectivity Using Delaunay Triangulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeshina, A M; Hashim, R

    2016-03-01

    Stroke is a cardiovascular disease with high mortality and long-term disability in the world. Normal functioning of the brain is dependent on the adequate supply of oxygen and nutrients to the brain complex network through the blood vessels. Stroke, occasionally a hemorrhagic stroke, ischemia or other blood vessel dysfunctions can affect patients during a cerebrovascular incident. Structurally, the left and the right carotid arteries, and the right and the left vertebral arteries are responsible for supplying blood to the brain, scalp and the face. However, a number of impairment in the function of the frontal lobes may occur as a result of any decrease in the flow of the blood through one of the internal carotid arteries. Such impairment commonly results in numbness, weakness or paralysis. Recently, the concepts of brain's wiring representation, the connectome, was introduced. However, construction and visualization of such brain network requires tremendous computation. Consequently, previously proposed approaches have been identified with common problems of high memory consumption and slow execution. Furthermore, interactivity in the previously proposed frameworks for brain network is also an outstanding issue. This study proposes an accelerated approach for brain connectomic visualization based on graph theory paradigm using compute unified device architecture, extending the previously proposed SurLens Visualization and computer aided hepatocellular carcinoma frameworks. The accelerated brain structural connectivity framework was evaluated with stripped brain datasets from the Department of Surgery, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, USA. Significantly, our proposed framework is able to generate and extract points and edges of datasets, displays nodes and edges in the datasets in form of a network and clearly maps data volume to the corresponding brain surface. Moreover, with the framework, surfaces of the dataset were simultaneously displayed with the

  14. Demonstrating a Market-Based Approach to the Reclamation of Mined Lands in West Virginia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodrich-Mahoney, John; Donnelly, Ellen

    2009-12-31

    This project demonstrated that developing environmental credits on private land—including abandoned mined lands—is dependent on a number of factors, some of them beyond the control of the project team. In this project, acid mine drainage (AMD) was successfully remediated through the construction of a passive AMD treatment system. Extensive water quality sampling both before and after the installation of the passive AMD treatment system showed that the system achieved removal efficiencies and pollutant loading reductions for acidity, iron, aluminum and manganese that were consistent with systems of similar size and design. The success of the passive AMD treatment system should have resulted in water credits if the project had not been terminated. Developing carbon sequestration credits, however, was much more complex and was not achieved in this project. The primary challenge that the project team encountered in meeting the full project objectives was the unsuccessful attempt to have the landowner sign a conservation easement for his property. This would have allowed the project team to clear and reforest the site, monitor the progress of the newly planted trees, and eventually realize carbon sequestration credits once the forest was mature. The delays caused by the lack of a conservation easement, as well as other factors, eventually resulted in the reforestation portion of the project being cancelled. The information in this report will help the public make more informed decisions regarding the potential of using water and carbon, and other credits to support the remediation of minded lands through out the United States. The hope is that by using credits that more mined lands with be remediated.

  15. SEGMA: An Automatic SEGMentation Approach for Human Brain MRI Using Sliding Window and Random Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serag, Ahmed; Wilkinson, Alastair G.; Telford, Emma J.; Pataky, Rozalia; Sparrow, Sarah A.; Anblagan, Devasuda; Macnaught, Gillian; Semple, Scott I.; Boardman, James P.

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative volumes from brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquired across the life course may be useful for investigating long term effects of risk and resilience factors for brain development and healthy aging, and for understanding early life determinants of adult brain structure. Therefore, there is an increasing need for automated segmentation tools that can be applied to images acquired at different life stages. We developed an automatic segmentation method for human brain MRI, where a sliding window approach and a multi-class random forest classifier were applied to high-dimensional feature vectors for accurate segmentation. The method performed well on brain MRI data acquired from 179 individuals, analyzed in three age groups: newborns (38–42 weeks gestational age), children and adolescents (4–17 years) and adults (35–71 years). As the method can learn from partially labeled datasets, it can be used to segment large-scale datasets efficiently. It could also be applied to different populations and imaging modalities across the life course. PMID:28163680

  16. Approaches to brain stress testing: BOLD magnetic resonance imaging with computer-controlled delivery of carbon dioxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Alan C Mutch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An impaired vascular response in the brain regionally may indicate reduced vascular reserve and vulnerability to ischemic injury. Changing the carbon dioxide (CO(2 tension in arterial blood is commonly used as a cerebral vasoactive stimulus to assess the cerebral vascular response, changing cerebral blood flow (CBF by up to 5-11 percent/mmHg in normal adults. Here we describe two approaches to generating the CO(2 challenge using a computer-controlled gas blender to administer: i a square wave change in CO(2 and, ii a ramp stimulus, consisting of a continuously graded change in CO(2 over a range. Responses were assessed regionally by blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied 8 patients with known cerebrovascular disease (carotid stenosis or occlusion and 2 healthy subjects. The square wave stimulus was used to study the dynamics of the vascular response, while the ramp stimulus assessed the steady-state response to CO(2. Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR maps were registered by color coding and overlaid on the anatomical scans generated with 3 Tesla MRI to assess the corresponding BOLD signal change/mmHg change in CO(2, voxel-by-voxel. Using a fractal temporal approach, detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA maps of the processed raw BOLD signal per voxel over the same CO(2 range were generated. Regions of BOLD signal decrease with increased CO(2 (coded blue were seen in all of these high-risk patients, indicating regions of impaired CVR. All patients also demonstrated regions of altered signal structure on DFA maps (Hurst exponents less than 0.5; coded blue indicative of anti-persistent noise. While 'blue' CVR maps remained essentially stable over the time of analysis, 'blue' DFA maps improved. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This combined dual stimulus and dual analysis approach may be complementary in identifying vulnerable brain regions and thus constitute a regional as

  17. α2-Null mutant mice have altered levels of neuronal activity in restricted midbrain and limbic brain regions during nicotine withdrawal as demonstrated by cfos expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, Montana; Lotfipour, Shahrdad

    2015-10-15

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are the primary binding sites for nicotine within the brain. Using alpha(α)2 nAChR subunit-null mutant mice, the current study evaluates whether the absence of this gene product during mecamylamine-precipitated nicotine withdrawal eliminates neuronal activity within selective midbrain and limbic brain regions, as determined by the expression of the immediate early gene, cfos. Our results demonstrate that nicotine withdrawal enhances neuronal activity within the interpeduncular nucleus and dorsal hippocampus, which is absent in mice null for α2-containing nAChRs. In contrast, we observe that α2-null mutant mice exhibit a suppression of neuronal activity in the dentate gyrus in mice undergoing nicotine withdrawal. Interestingly, α2-null mutant mice display potentiated neuronal activity specifically within the stratum lacunosum moleculare layer of the hippocampus, independent of nicotine withdrawal. Overall, our findings demonstrate that α2-null mutant mice have altered cfos expression in distinct populations of neurons within selective midbrain and limbic brain structures that mediate baseline and nicotine withdrawal-induced neuronal activity.

  18. Prospective demonstration of brain plasticity after intensive abacus-based mental calculation training: An fMRI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. L.; Wu, T. H.; Cheng, M. C.; Huang, Y. H.; Sheu, C. Y.; Hsieh, J. C.; Lee, J. S.

    2006-12-01

    Abacus-based mental calculation is a unique Chinese culture. The abacus experts can perform complex computations mentally with exceptionally fast speed and high accuracy. However, the neural bases of computation processing are not yet clearly known. This study used a BOLD contrast 3T fMRI system to explore the brain activation differences between abacus experts and non-expert subjects. All the acquired data were analyzed using SPM99 software. From the results, different ways of performing calculations between the two groups were seen. The experts tended to adopt efficient visuospatial/visuomotor strategy (bilateral parietal/frontal network) to process and retrieve all the intermediate and final results on the virtual abacus during calculation. By contrast, coordination of several networks (verbal, visuospatial processing and executive function) was required in the normal group to carry out arithmetic operations. Furthermore, more involvement of the visuomotor imagery processing (right dorsal premotor area) for imagining bead manipulation and low level use of the executive function (frontal-subcortical area) for launching the relatively time-consuming sequentially organized process was noted in the abacus expert group than in the non-expert group. We suggest that these findings may explain why abacus experts can reveal the exceptional computational skills compared to non-experts after intensive training.

  19. Prospective demonstration of brain plasticity after intensive abacus-based mental calculation training: An fMRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.L. [Faculty of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155, Li-Nong St., Section 2, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Wu, T.H. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chung Shan Medical University, 110, Section 1, Chien-Kuo N. Road, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Cheng, M.C. [Faculty of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155, Li-Nong St., Section 2, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Huang, Y.H. [Faculty of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155, Li-Nong St., Section 2, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Sheu, C.Y. [Department of Radiology, Mackay Memorial Hospital, 92, Section 2, Chungshan North Road, Taipei 104, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, J.C. [Integrated Brain Research Unit, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, 201, Section 2, Shih-Pai Road, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Lee, J.S. [Faculty of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155, Li-Nong St., Section 2, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: jslee@ym.edu.tw

    2006-12-20

    Abacus-based mental calculation is a unique Chinese culture. The abacus experts can perform complex computations mentally with exceptionally fast speed and high accuracy. However, the neural bases of computation processing are not yet clearly known. This study used a BOLD contrast 3T fMRI system to explore the brain activation differences between abacus experts and non-expert subjects. All the acquired data were analyzed using SPM99 software. From the results, different ways of performing calculations between the two groups were seen. The experts tended to adopt efficient visuospatial/visuomotor strategy (bilateral parietal/frontal network) to process and retrieve all the intermediate and final results on the virtual abacus during calculation. By contrast, coordination of several networks (verbal, visuospatial processing and executive function) was required in the normal group to carry out arithmetic operations. Furthermore, more involvement of the visuomotor imagery processing (right dorsal premotor area) for imagining bead manipulation and low level use of the executive function (frontal-subcortical area) for launching the relatively time-consuming sequentially organized process was noted in the abacus expert group than in the non-expert group. We suggest that these findings may explain why abacus experts can reveal the exceptional computational skills compared to non-experts after intensive training.

  20. Localization of MEG human brain responses to retinotopic visual stimuli with contrasting source reconstruction approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicmil, Nela; Bridge, Holly; Parker, Andrew J.; Woolrich, Mark W.; Krug, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) allows the physiological recording of human brain activity at high temporal resolution. However, spatial localization of the source of the MEG signal is an ill-posed problem as the signal alone cannot constrain a unique solution and additional prior assumptions must be enforced. An adequate source reconstruction method for investigating the human visual system should place the sources of early visual activity in known locations in the occipital cortex. We localized sources of retinotopic MEG signals from the human brain with contrasting reconstruction approaches (minimum norm, multiple sparse priors, and beamformer) and compared these to the visual retinotopic map obtained with fMRI in the same individuals. When reconstructing brain responses to visual stimuli that differed by angular position, we found reliable localization to the appropriate retinotopic visual field quadrant by a minimum norm approach and by beamforming. Retinotopic map eccentricity in accordance with the fMRI map could not consistently be localized using an annular stimulus with any reconstruction method, but confining eccentricity stimuli to one visual field quadrant resulted in significant improvement with the minimum norm. These results inform the application of source analysis approaches for future MEG studies of the visual system, and indicate some current limits on localization accuracy of MEG signals. PMID:24904268

  1. Localization of MEG human brain responses to retinotopic visual stimuli with contrasting source reconstruction approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nela eCicmil

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetoencephalography (MEG allows the physiological recording of human brain activity at high temporal resolution. However, spatial localization of the source of the MEG signal is an ill-posed problem as the signal alone cannot constrain a unique solution and additional prior assumptions must be enforced. An adequate source reconstruction method for investigating the human visual system should place the sources of early visual activity in known locations in the occipital cortex. We localized sources of retinotopic MEG signals from the human brain with contrasting reconstruction approaches (minimum norm, multiple sparse priors, and beamformer and compared these to the visual retinotopic map obtained with fMRI in the same individuals. When reconstructing brain responses to visual stimuli that differed by angular position, we found reliable localization to the appropriate retinotopic visual field quadrant by a minimum norm approach and by beamforming. Retinotopic map eccentricity in accordance with the fMRI map could not consistently be localized using an annular stimulus with any reconstruction method, but confining eccentricity stimuli to one visual field quadrant resulted in significant improvement with the minimum norm. These results inform the application of source analysis approaches for future MEG studies of the visual system, and indicate some current limits on localization accuracy of MEG signals.

  2. Basic emotion processing and the adolescent brain: Task demands, analytic approaches, and trajectories of changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa B. Del Piero

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Early neuroimaging studies suggested that adolescents show initial development in brain regions linked with emotional reactivity, but slower development in brain structures linked with emotion regulation. However, the increased sophistication of adolescent brain research has made this picture more complex. This review examines functional neuroimaging studies that test for differences in basic emotion processing (reactivity and regulation between adolescents and either children or adults. We delineated different emotional processing demands across the experimental paradigms in the reviewed studies to synthesize the diverse results. The methods for assessing change (i.e., analytical approach and cohort characteristics (e.g., age range were also explored as potential factors influencing study results. Few unifying dimensions were found to successfully distill the results of the reviewed studies. However, this review highlights the potential impact of subtle methodological and analytic differences between studies, need for standardized and theory-driven experimental paradigms, and necessity of analytic approaches that are can adequately test the trajectories of developmental change that have recently been proposed. Recommendations for future research highlight connectivity analyses and non-linear developmental trajectories, which appear to be promising approaches for measuring change across adolescence. Recommendations are made for evaluating gender and biological markers of development beyond chronological age.

  3. Biochemical Markers of Brain Injury: An Integrated Proteomics-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    expressed in brain (Fig. 4C). Our preliminary data have revealed that NCAM is digested by calpain , not caspase (Fig. 5A). We attempted to use N...terminal sequencing to identify the novel 5 cleavage site(s) in NCAM produced by calpain (Fig. 5B). However, after a change in personnel results... calpain target suggesting NCAM-BDP as a potential biomarker for PBBI. -Developed quantitative ELISA assays for four biomarkers and demonstrated the

  4. Disease-Specific Regions Outperform Whole-Brain Approaches in Identifying Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: A Multicentric MRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Karsten; Jech, Robert; Bonnet, Cecilia; Tintěra, Jaroslav; Hanuška, Jaromir; Möller, Harald E.; Fassbender, Klaus; Ludolph, Albert; Kassubek, Jan; Otto, Markus; Růžička, Evžen; Schroeter, Matthias L.

    2017-01-01

    To identify progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), we combined voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and support vector machine (SVM) classification using disease-specific features in multicentric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. Structural brain differences were investigated at four centers between 20 patients with PSP and 20 age-matched healthy controls with T1-weighted MRI at 3T. To pave the way for future application in personalized medicine, we applied SVM classification to identify PSP on an individual level besides group analyses based on VBM. We found a major decline in gray matter density in the brainstem, insula, and striatum, and also in frontomedian regions, which is in line with current literature. Moreover, SVM classification yielded high accuracy rates above 80% for disease identification in imaging data. Focusing analyses on disease-specific regions-of-interest (ROI) led to higher accuracy rates compared to a whole-brain approach. Using a polynomial kernel (instead of a linear kernel) led to an increased sensitivity and a higher specificity of disease detection. Our study supports the application of MRI for individual diagnosis of PSP, if combined with SVM approaches. We demonstrate that SVM classification provides high accuracy rates in multicentric data—a prerequisite for potential application in diagnostic routine. PMID:28326008

  5. A novel approach to delayed-start analyses for demonstrating disease-modifying effects in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Liu-Seifert

    Full Text Available One method for demonstrating disease modification is a delayed-start design, consisting of a placebo-controlled period followed by a delayed-start period wherein all patients receive active treatment. To address methodological issues in previous delayed-start approaches, we propose a new method that is robust across conditions of drug effect, discontinuation rates, and missing data mechanisms. We propose a modeling approach and test procedure to test the hypothesis of noninferiority, comparing the treatment difference at the end of the delayed-start period with that at the end of the placebo-controlled period. We conducted simulations to identify the optimal noninferiority testing procedure to ensure the method was robust across scenarios and assumptions, and to evaluate the appropriate modeling approach for analyzing the delayed-start period. We then applied this methodology to Phase 3 solanezumab clinical trial data for mild Alzheimer's disease patients. Simulation results showed a testing procedure using a proportional noninferiority margin was robust for detecting disease-modifying effects; conditions of high and moderate discontinuations; and with various missing data mechanisms. Using all data from all randomized patients in a single model over both the placebo-controlled and delayed-start study periods demonstrated good statistical performance. In analysis of solanezumab data using this methodology, the noninferiority criterion was met, indicating the treatment difference at the end of the placebo-controlled studies was preserved at the end of the delayed-start period within a pre-defined margin. The proposed noninferiority method for delayed-start analysis controls Type I error rate well and addresses many challenges posed by previous approaches. Delayed-start studies employing the proposed analysis approach could be used to provide evidence of a disease-modifying effect. This method has been communicated with FDA and has been

  6. MR Brain Real Images Segmentation Based Modalities Fusion and Estimation Et Maximization Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ASSAS Ouarda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of acquisition image techniques, more data coming from different sources of image become available. Multi-modality image fusion seeks to combine information from different images to obtain more inferences than can be derived from a single modality. The main aim of this work is to improve cerebral IRM real images segmentation by fusion of modalities (T1, T2 and DP using estimation et maximizatio Approach (EM. The evaluation of adopted approaches was compared using four criteria which are: the standard deviation (STD, entropy of information (IE, the coefficient of correlation (CC and the space frequency (SF. The experimental results on MRI brain real images prove that the adopted scenarios of fusion approaches are more accurate and robust than the standard EM approach

  7. Complete Demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelon, Stephen; Maddocks, Peg

    1986-01-01

    Describes four-step approach to educational demonstration: tell learners they will have to perform; what they should notice; describe each step before doing it; and require memorization of steps. Examples illustrate use of this process to demonstrate a general mental strategy, and industrial design, supervisory, fine motor, and specific…

  8. In Vivo Functional Brain Imaging Approach Based on Bioluminescent Calcium Indicator GFP-aequorin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lark, Arianna R; Kitamoto, Toshihiro; Martin, Jean-René

    2016-01-08

    Functional in vivo imaging has become a powerful approach to study the function and physiology of brain cells and structures of interest. Recently a new method of Ca(2+)-imaging using the bioluminescent reporter GFP-aequorin (GA) has been developed. This new technique relies on the fusion of the GFP and aequorin genes, producing a molecule capable of binding calcium and - with the addition of its cofactor coelenterazine - emitting bright light that can be monitored through a photon collector. Transgenic lines carrying the GFP-aequorin gene have been generated for both mice and Drosophila. In Drosophila, the GFP-aequorin gene has been placed under the control of the GAL4/UAS binary expression system allowing for targeted expression and imaging within the brain. This method has subsequently been shown to be capable of detecting both inward Ca(2+)-transients and Ca(2+)-released from inner stores. Most importantly it allows for a greater duration in continuous recording, imaging at greater depths within the brain, and recording at high temporal resolutions (up to 8.3 msec). Here we present the basic method for using bioluminescent imaging to record and analyze Ca(2+)-activity within the mushroom bodies, a structure central to learning and memory in the fly brain.

  9. Linking Genes and Brain Development of Honeybee Workers: A Whole-Transcriptome Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vleurinck, Christina; Raub, Stephan; Sturgill, David; Oliver, Brian; Beye, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Honeybees live in complex societies whose capabilities far exceed those of the sum of their single members. This social synergism is achieved mainly by the worker bees, which form a female caste. The worker bees display diverse collaborative behaviors and engage in different behavioral tasks, which are controlled by the central nervous system (CNS). The development of the worker brain is determined by the female sex and the worker caste determination signal. Here, we report on genes that are controlled by sex or by caste during differentiation of the worker’s pupal brain. We sequenced and compared transcriptomes from the pupal brains of honeybee workers, queens and drones. We detected 333 genes that are differently expressed and 519 genes that are differentially spliced between the sexes, and 1760 genes that are differentially expressed and 692 genes that are differentially spliced between castes. We further found that 403 genes are differentially regulated by both the sex and caste signals, providing evidence of the integration of both signals through differential gene regulation. In this gene set, we found that the molecular processes of restructuring the cell shape and cell-to-cell signaling are overrepresented. Our approach identified candidate genes that may be involved in brain differentiation that ensures the various social worker behaviors. PMID:27490820

  10. Construction and tests of demonstrator modules for a 3-D axial PET system for brain or small animal imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Chesi, E; Clinthorne, N; Pauss, P; Meddi, F; Beltrame, P; Kagan, H; Braem, A; Casella, C; Djambazov, G; Smith, S; Johnson, I; Lustermann, W; Weilhammer, P; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Dissertori, G; Renker, D; Schneider, T; Schinzel, D; Honscheid, K; De Leo, R; Bolle, E; Fanti, V; Rafecas, M; Cochran, E; Rudge, A; Stapnes, S; Huh, S; Seguinot, J; Solevi, P; Joram, C; Oliver, J F

    2011-01-01

    The design and construction of a PET camera module with high sensitivity, full 3-D spatial reconstruction and very good energy resolution is presented. The basic principle consists of an axial arrangement of long scintillation crystals around the Field Of View (FOV), providing a measurement of the transverse coordinates of the interacting 511 keV gamma ray. On top of each layer of crystals, an array of Wave-Length Shifter (WLS) strips, which collect the light leaving the crystals sideways, is positioned orthogonal to the crystal direction. The signals in the WLS strips allow a precise measurement of the z (axial) co-ordinate of the 511 keV gamma-ray gamma impact. The construction of two modules used for demonstration of the concept is described. First preliminary results on spatial and energy resolution from one full module will be shown. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The development and demonstration of hybrid programmable attitude control electronics. [with adaptable analog/digital design approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L. S.; Kopf, E. H., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    HYPACE provides an adaptable, analog/digital design approach that permits preflight and in-flight accommodation of mission changes, component performance variations, spacecraft changes, etc., through programing. This enabled broad multimission flexibility of application in a cost-effective manner. The HYPACE design, which was demonstrated in breadboard form on a single-axis gas-bearing spacecraft simulation, uses a single control channel to perform the attitude control functions sequentially, thus significantly reducing the number of component parts over hard-wired designs. The success of this effort resulted in the concept being selected for the Mariner/Jupiter/Saturn 1977 spacecraft application.

  12. Homeostatic control of brain function – new approaches to understand epileptogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Detlev eBoison

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal excitability of the brain and ongoing homeostasis depends not only on intrinsic neuronal properties but also on external environmental factors; together these determine the functionality of neuronal networks. Homeostatic factors become critically important during epileptogenesis, a process which involves complex disruption of self-regulatory mechanisms. Here we focus on the bioenergetic homeostatic network regulator adenosine, a purine nucleoside whose availability is regulated largely by astrocytes. Endogenous adenosine affects complex network function through adenosine receptor-mediated pathways, through mitochondrial bioenergetics, and through adenosine receptor-independent epigenetic functions. Accumulating evidence from our laboratories shows that disruption of adenosine homeostasis plays a major role in epileptogenesis. Conversely, we have found that reconstruction of adenosine’s homeostatic functions provides new hope for the prevention of epileptogenesis. We will discuss how adenosine-based therapeutic approaches may interfere with epileptogenesis on an epigenetic level, and how dietary interventions can be used to restore network homeostasis in the brain. We conclude that reconstruction of homeostatic functions in the brain offers a new conceptual advance for the treatment of neurological conditions that goes far beyond current target-centric treatment approaches.

  13. Self-scrubbing coal{sup TM}: An integrated approach to clean air. A proposed Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    This environmental assessment (EA) was prepared by the U.S.Department of Energy (DOE), with compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, Council on Environmental Quality (CE) regulations for implementating NEPA (40 CFR 1500-1508) and DOE regulations for compliance with NEPA (10 CFR 1021), to evaluate the potential environmental impacts associated with a proposed demonstration project to be cost-shared by DOE and Custom Coals International (CCI) under the Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Demonstration Program of DOE`s Office of Fossil Energy. CCI is a Pennsylvania general partnership located in Pittsburgh, PA engaged in the commercialization of advanced coal cleaning technologies. The proposed federal action is for DOE to provide, through a cooperative agreement with CCI, cost-shared funding support for the land acquisition, design, construction and demonstration of an advanced coal cleaning technology project, {open_quotes}Self-Scrubbing Coal: An Integrated Approach to Clean Air.{close_quotes} The proposed demonstration project would take place on the site of the presently inactive Laurel Coal Preparation Plant in Shade Township, Somerset County, PA. A newly constructed, advanced design, coal preparation plant would replace the existing facility. The cleaned coal produced from this new facility would be fired in full-scale test burns at coal-fired electric utilities in Indiana, Ohio and PA as part of this project.

  14. A new approach to predicting environmental transfer of radionuclides to wildlife: A demonstration for freshwater fish and caesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beresford, N.A., E-mail: nab@ceh.ac.uk [NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Av. Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Yankovich, T.L. [Saskatchewan Research Council, Environment and Forestry, 125, 15 Innovation Blvd., Saskatoon, SK S7N 2X8 (Canada); Wood, M.D. [School of Environment and Life Sciences, Room 323, Peel Building, University of Salford, Manchester, M5 4WT (United Kingdom); Fesenko, S. [International Atomic Energy Agency, 1400 Vienna (Austria); Andersson, P. [Strålsäkerhetsnymdigheten, Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, SE-171 16 Stockholm (Sweden); Muikku, M. [STUK, P.O. Box 14, 00881 Helsinki (Finland); Willey, N.J. [Centre for Research in Biosciences, University of the West of England, Coldharbour Lane, Frenchay, Bristol BS16 1QY (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-01

    The application of the concentration ratio (CR) to predict radionuclide activity concentrations in wildlife from those in soil or water has become the widely accepted approach for environmental assessments. Recently both the ICRP and IAEA have produced compilations of CR values for application in environmental assessment. However, the CR approach has many limitations, most notably, that the transfer of most radionuclides is largely determined by site-specific factors (e.g. water or soil chemistry). Furthermore, there are few, if any, CR values for many radionuclide-organism combinations. In this paper, we propose an alternative approach and, as an example, demonstrate and test this for caesium and freshwater fish. Using a Residual Maximum Likelihood (REML) mixed-model regression we analysed a dataset comprising 597 entries for 53 freshwater fish species from 67 sites. The REML analysis generated a mean value for each species on a common scale after REML adjustment taking account of the effect of the inter-site variation. Using an independent dataset, we subsequently test the hypothesis that the REML model outputs can be used to predict radionuclide, in this case radiocaesium, activity concentrations in unknown species from the results of a species which has been sampled at a specific site. The outputs of the REML analysis accurately predicted {sup 137}Cs activity concentrations in different species of fish from 27 Finnish lakes; these data had not been used in our initial analyses. We recommend that this alternative approach be further investigated for other radionuclides and ecosystems. - Highlights: • An alternative approach to estimating radionuclide transfer to wildlife is presented. • Analysed a dataset comprising 53 freshwater fish species collected from 67 sites. • Residual Maximum Likelihood mixed model regression is used. • Model output takes account of the effect of inter-site variation. • Successfully predicted {sup 137}Cs concentrations in

  15. Treat the brain and treat the periphery: toward a holistic approach to major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiao; Zhang, Xueli; Wang, Guangji; Hao, Haiping

    2015-05-01

    The limited medication for major depressive disorder (MDD) against an ever-rising disease burden presents an urgent need for therapeutic innovations. During recent years, studies looking at the systems regulation of mental health and disease have shown a remarkably powerful control of MDD by systemic signals. Meanwhile, the identification of a host of targets outside the brain opens the way to treat MDD by targeting systemic signals. We examine these emerging findings and consider the implications for current thinking regarding MDD pathogenesis and treatment. We highlight the opportunities and challenges of a periphery-targeting strategy and propose its incorporation into a holistic approach.

  16. Affect and the brain's functional organization: a resting-state connectivity approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane S Rohr

    Full Text Available The question of how affective processing is organized in the brain is still a matter of controversial discussions. Based on previous initial evidence, several suggestions have been put forward regarding the involved brain areas: (a right-lateralized dominance in emotional processing, (b hemispheric dominance according to positive or negative valence, (c one network for all emotional processing and (d region-specific discrete emotion matching. We examined these hypotheses by investigating intrinsic functional connectivity patterns that covary with results of the Positive and Negative Affective Schedule (PANAS from 65 participants. This approach has the advantage of being able to test connectivity rather than activation, and not requiring a potentially confounding task. Voxelwise functional connectivity from 200 regions-of-interest covering the whole brain was assessed. Positive and negative affect covaried with functional connectivity involving a shared set of regions, including the medial prefrontal cortex, the anterior cingulate, the visual cortex and the cerebellum. In addition, each affective domain had unique connectivity patterns, and the lateralization index showed a right hemispheric dominance for negative affect. Therefore, our results suggest a predominantly right-hemispheric network with affect-specific elements as the underlying organization of emotional processes.

  17. Comparison of 2 approaches for determining the natural history risk of brain arteriovenous malformation rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Helen; McCulloch, Charles E; Johnston, S Claiborne; Lawton, Michael T; Sidney, Stephen; Young, William L

    2010-06-15

    Estimating risk of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) for patients with unruptured brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in the natural course is essential for assessing risks and benefits of treatment. Traditionally, the survival period starts at the time of diagnosis and ends at ICH, but most patients are quickly censored because of treatment. Alternatively, a survival period from birth to first ICH, censoring at the date of diagnosis, has been proposed. The authors quantitatively compared these 2 timelines using survival analysis in 1,581 Northern California brain AVM patients (2000-2007). Time-shift analysis of the birth-to-diagnosis timeline and maximum pseudolikelihood identified the point at which the 2 survival curves overlapped; the 95% confidence interval was determined using bootstrapping. Annual ICH rates per 100 patient-years were similar for both the birth-to-diagnosis (1.27, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.18, 1.36) and the diagnosis-to-ICH (1.17, 95% CI: 0.89, 1.53) timelines, despite differences in curve morphology. Shifting the birth-to-diagnosis timeline an optimal amount (10.3 years, 95% CI: 3.3, 17.4) resulted in similar ICH survival curves (P = 0.979). These results suggest that the unconventional birth-to-diagnosis approach can be used to analyze risk factors for natural history risk in unruptured brain AVM patients, providing greater statistical power. The data also suggest a biologic change around age 10 years influencing ICH rate.

  18. Brain response pattern identification of fMRI data using a particle swarm optimization-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xinpei; Chou, Chun-An; Sayama, Hiroki; Chaovalitwongse, Wanpracha Art

    2016-09-01

    Many neuroscience studies have been devoted to understand brain neural responses correlating to cognition using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In contrast to univariate analysis to identify response patterns, it is shown that multi-voxel pattern analysis (MVPA) of fMRI data becomes a relatively effective approach using machine learning techniques in the recent literature. MVPA can be considered as a multi-objective pattern classification problem with the aim to optimize response patterns, in which informative voxels interacting with each other are selected, achieving high classification accuracy associated with cognitive stimulus conditions. To solve the problem, we propose a feature interaction detection framework, integrating hierarchical heterogeneous particle swarm optimization and support vector machines, for voxel selection in MVPA. In the proposed approach, we first select the most informative voxels and then identify a response pattern based on the connectivity of the selected voxels. The effectiveness of the proposed approach was examined for the Haxby's dataset of object-level representations. The computational results demonstrated higher classification accuracy by the extracted response patterns, compared to state-of-the-art feature selection algorithms, such as forward selection and backward selection.

  19. What Is the Optimal Treatment of Large Brain Metastases? An Argument for a Multidisciplinary Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Clara Y.H.; Chang, Steven D. [Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States); Gibbs, Iris C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States); Adler, John R.; Harsh, Griffith R. [Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States); Atalar, Banu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Acibadem University School of Medicine, Istanbul (Turkey); Lieberson, Robert E. [Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States); Soltys, Scott G., E-mail: sgsoltys@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Single-modality treatment of large brain metastases (>2 cm) with whole-brain irradiation, stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) alone, or surgery alone is not effective, with local failure (LF) rates of 50% to 90%. Our goal was to improve local control (LC) by using multimodality therapy of surgery and adjuvant SRS targeting the resection cavity. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 97 patients with brain metastases >2 cm in diameter treated with surgery and cavity SRS. Local and distant brain failure (DF) rates were analyzed with competing risk analysis, with death as a competing risk. The overall survival rate was calculated by the Kaplain-Meier product-limit method. Results: The median imaging follow-up duration for all patients was 10 months (range, 1-80 months). The 12-month cumulative incidence rates of LF, with death as a competing risk, were 9.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.5%-16.1%), and the median time to LF was 6 months (range, 3-17 months). The 12-month cumulative incidence rate of DF, with death as a competing risk, was 53% (95% CI, 43%-63%). The median survival time for all patients was 15.6 months. The median survival times for recursive partitioning analysis classes 1, 2, and 3 were 33.8, 13.7, and 9.0 months, respectively (p = 0.022). On multivariate analysis, Karnofsky Performance Status ({>=}80 vs. <80; hazard ratio 0.54; 95% CI 0.31-0.94; p = 0.029) and maximum preoperative tumor diameter (hazard ratio 1.41; 95% CI 1.08-1.85; p = 0.013) were associated with survival. Five patients (5%) required intervention for Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.02 grade 2 and 3 toxicity. Conclusion: Surgery and adjuvant resection cavity SRS yields excellent LC of large brain metastases. Compared with other multimodality treatment options, this approach allows patients to avoid or delay whole-brain irradiation without compromising LC.

  20. Developing a Performance Brain Training™ approach for baseball: a process analysis with descriptive data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherlin, Leslie H; Larson, Noel C; Sherlin, Rebecca M

    2013-03-01

    Neurofeedback may be useful for improving sports performance but few studies have examined this potential. Here we present data of five development players from a major league baseball team. The aims were to evaluate the feasibility of conducting sessions within a professional organization, assess changes in quantitative electroencephalograph (QEEG), NeuroPerformance Profile™, and report qualitative self-report data before and after brain training. The EEG was recorded with 19 electrodes for 20 min of baseline conditions and approximately 21 min of a continuous performance test. The fast Fourier transform analysis provided average cross-spectral matrices for bands delta (1-3.5 Hz), theta (4-7.5 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz), low beta (13-16 Hz), beta 1 (13-21 Hz), beta 2 (22-32 Hz), and gamma (32-45 Hz) from the pre and post intervention evaluations in the baseline condition of eyes open. The continuous performance test metrics included the errors of omission, errors of commission, response time and response time variability. The 9 scales of the NeuroPerformance Profile™ were examined. The QEEG data, CPT data and NeuroPerformance Profile™ data were all compared between the pre and post 15 sessions of brain training using a within subject paired t test design corrected for multiple comparisons using false discovery rate method. Following brain training, comparative QEEG, CPT and NeuroPerformance Profile™ analyses illustrated significant differences. The QEEG findings of all participants illustrated significant changes within the training parameters but also across other frequency bands and electrode sites. Overall, the positive findings in both objective and subjective measures suggest further inquiry into the utility of brain training for performance enhancement with the specific application of sport is warranted. Particularly QEEG and CPT gains were noted in the areas that correspond to client self-report data demonstrating improvement in attention, decreased

  1. Theoretical approaches to holistic biological features: Pattern formation, neural networks and the brain-mind relation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alfred Gierer

    2002-06-01

    The topic of this article is the relation between bottom-up and top-down, reductionist and ``holistic” approaches to the solution of basic biological problems. While there is no doubt that the laws of physics apply to all events in space and time, including the domains of life, understanding biology depends not only on elucidating the role of the molecules involved, but, to an increasing extent, on systems theoretical approaches in diverse fields of the life sciences. Examples discussed in this article are the generation of spatial patterns in development by the interplay of autocatalysis and lateral inhibition; the evolution of integrating capabilities of the human brain, such as cognition-based empathy; and both neurobiological and epistemological aspects of scientific theories of consciousness and the mind.

  2. Imaging MALDI MS of Dosed Brain Tissues Utilizing an Alternative Analyte Pre-extraction Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiason, Cristine M.; Shahidi-Latham, Sheerin K.

    2015-06-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) imaging mass spectrometry has been adopted in the pharmaceutical industry as a useful tool to detect xenobiotic distribution within tissues. A unique sample preparation approach for MALDI imaging has been described here for the extraction and detection of cobimetinib and clozapine, which were previously undetectable in mouse and rat brain using a single matrix application step. Employing a combination of a buffer wash and a cyclohexane pre-extraction step prior to standard matrix application, the xenobiotics were successfully extracted and detected with an 8 to 20-fold gain in sensitivity. This alternative approach for sample preparation could serve as an advantageous option when encountering difficult to detect analytes.

  3. Wide-field optical mapping of neural activity and brain haemodynamics: considerations and novel approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ying; Shaik, Mohammed A.; Kozberg, Mariel G.; Thibodeaux, David N.; Zhao, Hanzhi T.; Yu, Hang

    2016-01-01

    Although modern techniques such as two-photon microscopy can now provide cellular-level three-dimensional imaging of the intact living brain, the speed and fields of view of these techniques remain limited. Conversely, two-dimensional wide-field optical mapping (WFOM), a simpler technique that uses a camera to observe large areas of the exposed cortex under visible light, can detect changes in both neural activity and haemodynamics at very high speeds. Although WFOM may not provide single-neuron or capillary-level resolution, it is an attractive and accessible approach to imaging large areas of the brain in awake, behaving mammals at speeds fast enough to observe widespread neural firing events, as well as their dynamic coupling to haemodynamics. Although such wide-field optical imaging techniques have a long history, the advent of genetically encoded fluorophores that can report neural activity with high sensitivity, as well as modern technologies such as light emitting diodes and sensitive and high-speed digital cameras have driven renewed interest in WFOM. To facilitate the wider adoption and standardization of WFOM approaches for neuroscience and neurovascular coupling research, we provide here an overview of the basic principles of WFOM, considerations for implementation of wide-field fluorescence imaging of neural activity, spectroscopic analysis and interpretation of results. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience’. PMID:27574312

  4. A Novel Multiparametric Approach to 3D Quantitative MRI of the Brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Palma

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance properties of tissues can be quantified in several respects: relaxation processes, density of imaged nuclei, magnetism of environmental molecules, etc. In this paper, we propose a new comprehensive approach to obtain 3D high resolution quantitative maps of arbitrary body districts, mainly focusing on the brain. The theory presented makes it possible to map longitudinal (R1, pure transverse (R2 and free induction decay ([Formula: see text] rates, along with proton density (PD and magnetic susceptibility (χ, from a set of fast acquisition sequences in steady-state that are highly insensitive to flow phenomena. A novel denoising scheme is described and applied to the acquired datasets to enhance the signal to noise ratio of the derived maps and an information theory approach compensates for biases from radio frequency (RF inhomogeneities, if no direct measure of the RF field is available. Finally, the results obtained on sample brain scans of healthy controls and multiple sclerosis patients are presented and discussed.

  5. Intensity-Curvature Measurement Approaches for the Diagnosis of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Ciulla

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This research presents signal-image post-processing techniques called Intensity-Curvature Measurement Approaches with application to the diagnosis of human brain tumors detected through Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI. Post-processing of the MRI of the human brain encompasses the following model functions: (i bivariate cubic polynomial, (ii bivariate cubic Lagrange polynomial, (iii monovariate sinc, and (iv bivariate linear. The following Intensity-Curvature Measurement Approaches were used: (i classic-curvature, (ii signal resilient to interpolation, (iii intensity-curvature measure and (iv intensity-curvature functional. The results revealed that the classic-curvature, the signal resilient to interpolation and the intensity-curvature functional are able to add additional information useful to the diagnosis carried out with MRI. The contribution to the MRI diagnosis of our study are: (i the enhanced gray level scale of the tumor mass and the well-behaved representation of the tumor provided through the signal resilient to interpolation, and (ii the visually perceptible third dimension perpendicular to the image plane provided through the classic-curvature and the intensity-curvature functional.

  6. Intensity-Curvature Measurement Approaches for the Diagnosis of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciulla, Carlo; Veljanovski, Dimitar; Rechkoska Shikoska, Ustijana; Risteski, Filip A.

    2015-01-01

    This research presents signal-image post-processing techniques called Intensity-Curvature Measurement Approaches with application to the diagnosis of human brain tumors detected through Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Post-processing of the MRI of the human brain encompasses the following model functions: (i) bivariate cubic polynomial, (ii) bivariate cubic Lagrange polynomial, (iii) monovariate sinc, and (iv) bivariate linear. The following Intensity-Curvature Measurement Approaches were used: (i) classic-curvature, (ii) signal resilient to interpolation, (iii) intensity-curvature measure and (iv) intensity-curvature functional. The results revealed that the classic-curvature, the signal resilient to interpolation and the intensity-curvature functional are able to add additional information useful to the diagnosis carried out with MRI. The contribution to the MRI diagnosis of our study are: (i) the enhanced gray level scale of the tumor mass and the well-behaved representation of the tumor provided through the signal resilient to interpolation, and (ii) the visually perceptible third dimension perpendicular to the image plane provided through the classic-curvature and the intensity-curvature functional. PMID:26644943

  7. Transcriptomic Modification in the Cerebral Cortex following Noninvasive Brain Stimulation: RNA-Sequencing Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Holmes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS has been shown to modulate neuroplasticity. Beneficial effects are observed in patients with psychiatric disorders and enhancement of brain performance in healthy individuals has been observed following tDCS. However, few studies have attempted to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of tDCS in the brain. This study was conducted to assess the impact of tDCS on gene expression within the rat cerebral cortex. Anodal tDCS was applied at 3 different intensities followed by RNA-sequencing and analysis. In each current intensity, approximately 1,000 genes demonstrated statistically significant differences compared to the sham group. A variety of functional pathways, biological processes, and molecular categories were found to be modified by tDCS. The impact of tDCS on gene expression was dependent on current intensity. Results show that inflammatory pathways, antidepressant-related pathways (GTP signaling, calcium ion binding, and transmembrane/signal peptide pathways, and receptor signaling pathways (serotonergic, adrenergic, GABAergic, dopaminergic, and glutamate were most affected. Of the gene expression profiles induced by tDCS, some changes were observed across multiple current intensities while other changes were unique to a single stimulation intensity. This study demonstrates that tDCS can modify the expression profile of various genes in the cerebral cortex and that these tDCS-induced alterations are dependent on the current intensity applied.

  8. A discriminative model-constrained EM approach to 3D MRI brain tissue classification and intensity non-uniformity correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wels, Michael; Hornegger, Joachim [Pattern Recognition Lab, Department of Computer Science, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martensstr. 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Zheng Yefeng; Comaniciu, Dorin [Corporate Research and Technologies, Siemens Corporate Technology, 755 College Road East, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Huber, Martin, E-mail: michael.wels@informatik.uni-erlangen.de [Corporate Research and Technologies, Siemens Corporate Technology, Guenther-Scharowsky-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2011-06-07

    We describe a fully automated method for tissue classification, which is the segmentation into cerebral gray matter (GM), cerebral white matter (WM), and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), and intensity non-uniformity (INU) correction in brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) volumes. It combines supervised MRI modality-specific discriminative modeling and unsupervised statistical expectation maximization (EM) segmentation into an integrated Bayesian framework. While both the parametric observation models and the non-parametrically modeled INUs are estimated via EM during segmentation itself, a Markov random field (MRF) prior model regularizes segmentation and parameter estimation. Firstly, the regularization takes into account knowledge about spatial and appearance-related homogeneity of segments in terms of pairwise clique potentials of adjacent voxels. Secondly and more importantly, patient-specific knowledge about the global spatial distribution of brain tissue is incorporated into the segmentation process via unary clique potentials. They are based on a strong discriminative model provided by a probabilistic boosting tree (PBT) for classifying image voxels. It relies on the surrounding context and alignment-based features derived from a probabilistic anatomical atlas. The context considered is encoded by 3D Haar-like features of reduced INU sensitivity. Alignment is carried out fully automatically by means of an affine registration algorithm minimizing cross-correlation. Both types of features do not immediately use the observed intensities provided by the MRI modality but instead rely on specifically transformed features, which are less sensitive to MRI artifacts. Detailed quantitative evaluations on standard phantom scans and standard real-world data show the accuracy and robustness of the proposed method. They also demonstrate relative superiority in comparison to other state-of-the-art approaches to this kind of computational task: our method achieves average

  9. Comparative genetic approaches to the evolution of human brain and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallender, Eric J

    2011-01-01

    With advances in genomic technologies, the amount of genetic data available to scientists today is vast. Genomes are now available or planned for 14 different primate species and complete resequencing of numerous human individuals from numerous populations is underway. Moreover, high-throughput deep sequencing is quickly making whole genome efforts within the reach of single laboratories allowing for unprecedented studies. Comparative genetic approaches to the identification of the underlying basis of human brain, behavior, and cognitive ability are moving to the forefront. Two approaches predominate: inter-species divergence comparisons and intra-species polymorphism studies. These methodological differences are useful for different time scales of evolution and necessarily focus on different evolutionary events in the history of primate and hominin evolution. Inter-species divergence is more useful in studying large scale primate, or hominoid, evolution whereas intra-species polymorphism can be more illuminating of recent hominin evolution. These differences in methodological utility also extend to studies of differing genetic substrates; current divergence studies focus primarily on protein evolution whereas polymorphism studies are substrate ambivalent. Some of the issues inherent in these studies can be ameliorated by current sequencing capabilities whereas others remain intractable. New avenues are also being opened that allow for the incorporation of novel substrates and approaches. In the post-genomic era, the study of human evolution, specifically as it relates to the brain, is becoming more complete focusing increasingly on the totality of the system and better conceptualizing the entirety of the genetic changes that have lead to the human phenotype today.

  10. Cognitive training approaches to remediate attention and executive dysfunction after traumatic brain injury: A single-case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dymowski, Alicia Rhian; Ponsford, Jennie Louise; Willmott, Catherine

    2016-10-01

    Attentional deficits are common following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and interfere with daily functioning. This study employed a single-case design to examine the effects of individualised strategy training on attention beyond the effects of computerised training using Attention Process Training 3 (APT-3), and to examine the participants' subjective experience of these approaches. An ABCA (baseline, APT-3, strategy training, follow-up) design was repeated across three participants with severe TBI. Outcomes were measured on alternate versions of the oral Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT) and cancellation tasks; generalisation with the Test of Everyday Attention (TEA) and self and significant other (SO) ratings on the Rating Scale of Attentional Behaviour (RSAB); and participant experiences with semi-structured interviews. Planned Tau-U analyses revealed improvements in speed of processing on the SDMT and the automatic condition of the cancellation task after APT-3 and at follow-up, but with most improvement after strategy training. Limited generalisation was evident on TEA subtests and self-RSAB ratings. SO-RSAB ratings were mixed after APT-3, but demonstrated improvement after strategy training. Variability in attentional deficits and everyday attentional requirements between patients required individualised goals and approaches to rehabilitation. This study highlights the need for individualised rehabilitation of attention to improve everyday functioning after TBI.

  11. Algorithmic design of a noise-resistant and efficient closed-loop deep brain stimulation system: A computational approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamintziou, Sofia D.; Custódio, Ana Luísa; Piallat, Brigitte; Polosan, Mircea; Chabardès, Stéphan; Stathis, Pantelis G.; Tagaris, George A.; Sakas, Damianos E.; Polychronaki, Georgia E.; Tsirogiannis, George L.; David, Olivier; Nikita, Konstantina S.

    2017-01-01

    Advances in the field of closed-loop neuromodulation call for analysis and modeling approaches capable of confronting challenges related to the complex neuronal response to stimulation and the presence of strong internal and measurement noise in neural recordings. Here we elaborate on the algorithmic aspects of a noise-resistant closed-loop subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation system for advanced Parkinson’s disease and treatment-refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder, ensuring remarkable performance in terms of both efficiency and selectivity of stimulation, as well as in terms of computational speed. First, we propose an efficient method drawn from dynamical systems theory, for the reliable assessment of significant nonlinear coupling between beta and high-frequency subthalamic neuronal activity, as a biomarker for feedback control. Further, we present a model-based strategy through which optimal parameters of stimulation for minimum energy desynchronizing control of neuronal activity are being identified. The strategy integrates stochastic modeling and derivative-free optimization of neural dynamics based on quadratic modeling. On the basis of numerical simulations, we demonstrate the potential of the presented modeling approach to identify, at a relatively low computational cost, stimulation settings potentially associated with a significantly higher degree of efficiency and selectivity compared with stimulation settings determined post-operatively. Our data reinforce the hypothesis that model-based control strategies are crucial for the design of novel stimulation protocols at the backstage of clinical applications. PMID:28222198

  12. Drug-induced trafficking of p-glycoprotein in human brain capillary endothelial cells as demonstrated by exposure to mitomycin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noack, Andreas; Noack, Sandra; Hoffmann, Andrea; Maalouf, Katia; Buettner, Manuela; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Romero, Ignacio A; Weksler, Babette; Alms, Dana; Römermann, Kerstin; Naim, Hassan Y; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp; ABCB1/MDR1) is a major efflux transporter at the blood-brain barrier (BBB), restricting the penetration of various compounds. In other tissues, trafficking of Pgp from subcellular stores to the cell surface has been demonstrated and may constitute a rapid way of the cell to respond to toxic compounds by functional membrane insertion of the transporter. It is not known whether drug-induced Pgp trafficking also occurs in brain capillary endothelial cells that form the BBB. In this study, trafficking of Pgp was investigated in human brain capillary endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3) that were stably transfected with a doxycycline-inducible MDR1-EGFP fusion plasmid. In the presence of doxycycline, these cells exhibited a 15-fold increase in Pgp-EGFP fusion protein expression, which was associated with an increased efflux of the Pgp substrate rhodamine 123 (Rho123). The chemotherapeutic agent mitomycin C (MMC) was used to study drug-induced trafficking of Pgp. Confocal fluorescence microscopy of single hCMEC/D3-MDR1-EGFP cells revealed that Pgp redistribution from intracellular pools to the cell surface occurred within 2 h of MMC exposure. Pgp-EGFP exhibited a punctuate pattern at the cell surface compatible with concentrated regions of the fusion protein in membrane microdomains, i.e., lipid rafts, which was confirmed by Western blot analysis of biotinylated cell surface proteins in Lubrol-resistant membranes. MMC exposure also increased the functionality of Pgp as assessed in three functional assays with Pgp substrates (Rho123, eFluxx-ID Gold, calcein-AM). However, this increase occurred with some delay after the increased Pgp expression and coincided with the release of Pgp from the Lubrol-resistant membrane complexes. Disrupting rafts by depleting the membrane of cholesterol increased the functionality of Pgp. Our data present the first direct evidence of drug-induced Pgp trafficking at the human BBB and indicate that Pgp has to be released from lipid

  13. A novel landscape genetic approach demonstrates the effects of human disturbance on the Udzungwa red colobus monkey (Procolobus gordonorum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Lopez, M J; Barelli, C; Rovero, F; Hodges, K; Roos, C; Peterman, W E; Ting, N

    2016-02-01

    A comprehensive understanding of how human disturbance affects tropical forest ecosystems is critical for the mitigation of future losses in global biodiversity. Although many genetic studies of tropical forest fragmentation have been conducted to provide insight into this issue, relatively few have incorporated landscape data to explicitly test the effects of human disturbance on genetic differentiation among populations. In this study, we use a newly developed landscape genetic approach that relies on a genetic algorithm to simultaneously optimize resistance surfaces to investigate the effects of human disturbance in the Udzungwa Mountains of Tanzania, which is an important part of a universally recognized biodiversity hotspot. Our study species is the endangered Udzungwa red colobus monkey (Procolobus gordonorum), which is endemic to the Udzungwa Mountains and a known indicator species that thrives in large and well-protected blocks of old growth forest. Population genetic analyses identified significant population structure among Udzungwa red colobus inhabiting different forest blocks, and Bayesian cluster analyses identified hierarchical structure. Our new method for creating composite landscape resistance models found that the combination of fire density on the landscape and distance to the nearest village best explains the genetic structure observed. These results demonstrate the effects that human activities are having in an area of high global conservation priority and suggest that this ecosystem is in a precarious state. Our study also illustrates the ability of our novel landscape genetic method to detect the impacts of relatively recent landscape features on a long-lived species.

  14. A data-driven approach for evaluating multi-modal therapy in traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haefeli, Jenny; Ferguson, Adam R.; Bingham, Deborah; Orr, Adrienne; Won, Seok Joon; Lam, Tina I.; Shi, Jian; Hawley, Sarah; Liu, Jialing; Swanson, Raymond A.; Massa, Stephen M.

    2017-01-01

    Combination therapies targeting multiple recovery mechanisms have the potential for additive or synergistic effects, but experimental design and analyses of multimodal therapeutic trials are challenging. To address this problem, we developed a data-driven approach to integrate and analyze raw source data from separate pre-clinical studies and evaluated interactions between four treatments following traumatic brain injury. Histologic and behavioral outcomes were measured in 202 rats treated with combinations of an anti-inflammatory agent (minocycline), a neurotrophic agent (LM11A-31), and physical therapy consisting of assisted exercise with or without botulinum toxin-induced limb constraint. Data was curated and analyzed in a linked workflow involving non-linear principal component analysis followed by hypothesis testing with a linear mixed model. Results revealed significant benefits of the neurotrophic agent LM11A-31 on learning and memory outcomes after traumatic brain injury. In addition, modulations of LM11A-31 effects by co-administration of minocycline and by the type of physical therapy applied reached statistical significance. These results suggest a combinatorial effect of drug and physical therapy interventions that was not evident by univariate analysis. The study designs and analytic techniques applied here form a structured, unbiased, internally validated workflow that may be applied to other combinatorial studies, both in animals and humans. PMID:28205533

  15. Deep brain stimulation: a paradigm shifting approach to treat Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick eHickey

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson disease (PD is a chronic and progressive movement disorder classically characterized by slowed voluntary movements, resting tremor, muscle rigidity, and impaired gait and balance. Medical treatment is highly successful early on, though the majority of people experience significant complications in later stages. In advanced PD, when medications no longer adequately control motor symptoms, deep brain stimulation (DBS offers a powerful therapeutic alternative. DBS involves the surgical implantation of one or more electrodes into specific areas of the brain, which modulate or disrupt abnormal patterns of neural signaling within the targeted region. Outcomes are often dramatic following DBS, with improvements in motor function and reductions motor complications having been repeatedly demonstrated. Given such robust responses, emerging indications for DBS are being investigated. In parallel with expansions of therapeutic scope, advancements within the areas of neurosurgical technique and the precision of stimulation delivery have recently broadened as well. This review focuses on the revolutionary addition of DBS to the therapeutic armamentarium for PD, and summarizes the technological advancements in the areas of neuroimaging and biomedical engineering intended to improve targeting, programming and overall management.

  16. Teaching entrepreneurship students the practice of innovation: A brain-based guided experience approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Jean Degen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-8077.2013v15n37p92This paper presents a new method for teaching entrepreneurship students to practice innovation and to create high-impact business opportunities.  The teaching method is based on the guided experience learning model that was developed by Caine et al. (2009 to develop the executive functions in the brains of learners, and on the innovation framework that was introduced by Verganti (2009.  The cognitive perspective of creativity, as explained by Weisberg (2006, is used to show how the practice of innovation can be learned.  The model used for the creative process is based on research by Wallas (1926, and on recent neurological findings on the deliberate and spontaneous pathways to creativity (Carson, 2010.  The concept of effectual process (SARASVATHY, 2008 provides an approach to the validation of the students’ radical innovation ideas.

  17. Approach and withdrawal motivation in schizophrenia: an examination of frontal brain asymmetric activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William P Horan

    Full Text Available Although motivational disturbances are common in schizophrenia, their neurophysiological and psychological basis is poorly understood. This electroencephalography (EEG study examined the well-established motivational direction model of asymmetric frontal brain activity in schizophrenia. According to this model, relative left frontal activity in the resting EEG reflects enhanced approach motivation tendencies, whereas relative right frontal activity reflects enhanced withdrawal motivation tendencies. Twenty-five schizophrenia outpatients and 25 healthy controls completed resting EEG assessments of frontal asymmetry in the alpha frequency band (8-12 Hz, as well as a self-report measure of behavioral activation and inhibition system (BIS/BAS sensitivity. Patients showed an atypical pattern of differences from controls. On the EEG measure patients failed to show the left lateralized activity that was present in controls, suggesting diminished approach motivation. On the self-report measure, patients reported higher BIS sensitivity than controls, which is typically interpreted as heightened withdrawal motivation. EEG asymmetry scores did not significantly correlate with BIS/BAS scores or with clinical symptom ratings among patients. The overall pattern suggests a motivational disturbance in schizophrenia characterized by elements of both diminished approach and elevated withdrawal tendencies.

  18. Approaching dysphoric mood: state-effects of mindfulness meditation on frontal brain asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keune, Philipp M; Bostanov, Vladimir; Hautzinger, Martin; Kotchoubey, Boris

    2013-04-01

    Meditation-based interventions reduce the relapse risk in recurrently depressed patients. Randomized trials utilizing neurophysiologic outcome measures, however, have yielded inconsistent results with regard to a prophylactic effect. Although frontal brain asymmetry, assessed through electroencephalographic (EEG) alpha activity (8-13 Hz), is indicative of approach vs. withdrawal-related response dispositions and represents a vulnerability marker of depression, clinical trials have provided mixed results as to whether meditation has beneficial effects on alpha asymmetry. Inconsistencies might have arisen since such trials relied on resting-state recordings, instead of active paradigms under challenge, as suggested by contemporary notions of alpha asymmetry. We examined two groups of remitted, recurrently depressed females. In a "mindfulness support group", EEG was recorded during neutral rest, and rest following a negative mood induction. Subsequently, participants received initial meditation instructions. EEG was then obtained during an active period of guided mindfulness meditation and rest following the active period. In a "rumination challenge group", EEG was obtained during the same resting conditions, whereas in the active period, initial meditation instructions were followed by a rumination challenge. A significant shift in mid-frontal asymmetry, yielding a pattern indicative of approach motivation, was observed in the mindfulness support group, specifically during the meditation period. This indicates that mindfulness meditation may have a transient beneficial effect, which enables patients to take an approach-related motivational stance, particularly under circumstances of risk.

  19. Communicating Climate Science to Kids and Adults Through Citizen Science, Hands-On Demonstrations, and a Personal Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, L.; Braasch, G.

    2008-12-01

    There is a demonstrated need to increase the amount of formal and non-formal science education and to raise the level of climate literacy for children and adults. Scientists and technical leaders are more and more being called on to speak in non-academic settings ranging from grade schools to assemblies and seminars for the general public. This abstract describes some effective ways to teach and talk about climate change science in a way that engenders hope and empowerment while explaining scientific facts and research methods to non-scientists. Citizen participation in Science People's interest and learning increases when offered chances to do what scientists do. Relating science to their daily lives and showing the adventure of science can greatly increase communication. Citizen participation in science works because data collection stimulates experiential and cognitive ways of learning. Learn what programs for citizen science are available in your area. For instance, GLOBE and Budburst tie into the research of Smithsonian scientists who determined that the cherry blossoms and 40 other species of plants were blooming earlier due to climate warming. Hands-on Outdoor Activities Information enters the human brain through many different neural pathways and the more avenues that information comes in on, the more likely people are to retain that knowledge for their lifetimes. For instance, kids knowledge of how ice cores tell us about the earth's ancient history will be reinforced through making ice cores in the classroom. Gary Braasch's photographs from the children's book How We Know What We Know About Our Changing Climate: Scientists and Kids Explore Global Warming and from his adult book Earth Under Fire: How Global Warming is Changing the World will illustrate the presentation. . Making the Message Personal to the Audience. Reaching people through things they care about, their family lives, work or school and telling personal stories helps reach people. The videos

  20. Phase-dependent modulation as a novel approach for therapeutic brain stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin eAzodi-Avval

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Closed-loop paradigms provide us with the opportunity to optimize stimulation protocols for perturbation of pathological oscillatory activity in brain-related disorders. In this vein, spiking activity of motor cortex neurons and beta activity of local field potentials in the subthalamic nucleus have both been used independently of each other as neuronal signals to trigger deep brain stimulation for alleviating Parkinsonism. These approaches were superior to the standard continuous high-frequency stimulation protocols used in daily practice. However, they achieved their effects by bursts of stimulation that were applied at high-frequency as well, i.e. independent of the phase information in the stimulated region. In this context, we propose that, by timing stimulation pulses relative to the ongoing oscillation, an alternative approach, namely the targeted perturbation of pathological rhythms, could be obtained.In this modeling study, we first captured the underlying dynamics of neuronal oscillations in the human subthalamic nucleus by phased coupled neuronal oscillators. We then quantified the nature of the interaction between these coupled oscillators by obtaining a physiologically informed phase response curve from local field potentials. Reconstruction of the phase response curve predicted the sensitivity of the phase oscillator to external stimuli, revealing phase intervals that optimally maximized the degree of perturbation. We conclude that our specifically timed intervention based on the coupled oscillator concept will enable us to identify personalized ways of delivering stimulation pulses in closed-loop paradigms triggered by the phase of pathological oscillations. This will pave the way for novel physiological insights and substantial clinical benefits. In addition, this precisely phased modulation may be capable of modifying the effective interactions between oscillators in an entirely new manner.

  1. Anticipation-related brain connectivity in bipolar and unipolar depression: a graph theory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manelis, Anna; Almeida, Jorge R C; Stiffler, Richelle; Lockovich, Jeanette C; Aslam, Haris A; Phillips, Mary L

    2016-09-01

    Bipolar disorder is often misdiagnosed as major depressive disorder, which leads to inadequate treatment. Depressed individuals versus healthy control subjects, show increased expectation of negative outcomes. Due to increased impulsivity and risk for mania, however, depressed individuals with bipolar disorder may differ from those with major depressive disorder in neural mechanisms underlying anticipation processes. Graph theory methods for neuroimaging data analysis allow the identification of connectivity between multiple brain regions without prior model specification, and may help to identify neurobiological markers differentiating these disorders, thereby facilitating development of better therapeutic interventions. This study aimed to compare brain connectivity among regions involved in win/loss anticipation in depressed individuals with bipolar disorder (BDD) versus depressed individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) versus healthy control subjects using graph theory methods. The study was conducted at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and included 31 BDD, 39 MDD, and 36 healthy control subjects. Participants were scanned while performing a number guessing reward task that included the periods of win and loss anticipation. We first identified the anticipatory network across all 106 participants by contrasting brain activation during all anticipation periods (win anticipation + loss anticipation) versus baseline, and win anticipation versus loss anticipation. Brain connectivity within the identified network was determined using the Independent Multiple sample Greedy Equivalence Search (IMaGES) and Linear non-Gaussian Orientation, Fixed Structure (LOFS) algorithms. Density of connections (the number of connections in the network), path length, and the global connectivity direction ('top-down' versus 'bottom-up') were compared across groups (BDD/MDD/healthy control subjects) and conditions (win/loss anticipation). These analyses showed that

  2. Spinal projections from the lower brain stem in the cat as demonstrated by the horseradish peroxidase technique. II. Projections from the dorsolateral pontine tegmentum and raphe nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohyama, M; Sakai, K; Touret, M; Salvert, D; Jouvet, M

    1979-11-02

    The descending projections to the spinal cord arising from the dorsolateral pontine tegmentum and brain stem raphe nuclei have been investigated by means of the horseradish peroxidase (HRP) technique. Particular attention was taken to clarify the cells of origin and the funicular trajectory of these spinal projections. After injections of HRP into the spinal cord, a significant of HRP labeled neurons were observed in the following dorsolateral pontine tegmental structures: (1) an area ventral to the nucleus cuneiformis; (2) principal locus coeruleus; (3) locus coeruleus a; (4) locuse subcoeruleus; (5) Kölliker-Fuse nucleus; and (6) nucleus parabrachialis lateralis. As a rule, the projections are ipsilateral and descendaphe-spinal projections, we have demonstrated that the nucleus raphe dorsalis also sends axons to the cervical segment of the spinal cord. Furthermore, in accord with previous reports, HRP labeled cells were also identified in the nucleus raphe magnus, pallidus and obscurus, but not in the nucleus raphe centralis superior and pontis. On the whole the present study further clarified the organization of spinal projections from the dorsolateral pons and raphe nuclei and provided some additional anatomical data for the physiology of the tegmentospinal and raphe-spinal projections.

  3. An approach to the symbolic representation of brain arteriovenous malformations for management and treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlowski, Piotr; Noble, Alison [University of Oxford, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Department of Engineering Science, Oxford (United Kingdom); Mahmud, Imran; Kamran, Mudassar; Byrne, James V. [University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, Oxford (United Kingdom); Summers, Paul [University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, Oxford (United Kingdom); University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Department of Biomedical, Metabolic and Neural Sciences, Modena (Italy); Ventikos, Yiannis [University College London, Department of Mechanical Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-15

    There is currently no standardised approach to arteriovenous malformation (AVM) reporting. Existing AVM classification systems focuses on angioarchitectural features and omit haemodynamic, anatomical and topological parameters intuitively used by therapists. We introduce a symbolic vocabulary to represent the state of an AVM of the brain at different stages of treatment. The vocabulary encompasses the main anatomic and haemodynamic features of interest in treatment planning and provides shorthand symbols to represent the interventions themselves in a schematic representation. The method was presented to 50 neuroradiologists from14 countries during a workshop and graded 7.34 ± 1.92 out of ten for its usefulness as means of standardising and facilitating communication between clinicians and allowing comparisons between AVM cases. Feedback from the survey was used to revise the method and improve its completeness. For an AVM test case, participants were asked to produce a conventional written report and subsequently a diagrammatic report. The two required, on average, 6.19 ± 2.05 and 5.09 ± 3.01 min, respectively. Eighteen participants said that producing the diagram changed the way they thought about the AVM test case. Introduced into routine practice, the diagrams would represent a step towards a standardised approach to AVM reporting with consequent benefits for comparative analysis and communication as well as for identifying best treatment strategies. (orig.)

  4. Neuropsychiatric disturbances associated with traumatic brain injury: a practical approach to evaluation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Vani; Koliatsos, Vassilis; Ahmed, Faizi; Lyketsos, Constantine; Kortte, Kathleen

    2015-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes a wide variety of neuropsychiatric disturbances associated with great functional impairments and low quality of life. These disturbances include disorders of mood, behavior, and cognition, and changes in personality. The diagnosis of specific neuropsychiatric disturbances can be difficult because there is significant symptom overlap. Systematic clinical evaluations are necessary to make the diagnosis and formulate a treatment plan that often requires a multipronged approach. Management of TBI-associated neuropsychiatric disorders should always include nonpharmacological interventions, including education, family involvement, supportive and behavioral psychotherapies, and cognitive rehabilitation. Pharmacological treatments include antidepressants, anticonvulsants, antipsychotics, dopaminergic agents, and cholinesterase inhibitors. However, evidence-based treatments are extremely limited, and management relies on clinical empiricism and resemblance of TBI neuropsychiatric symptom profiles with those of idiopathic psychiatric disorders. Although the understanding of TBI-associated neuropsychiatric disorders has improved in the last decade, further research is needed including prospective, longitudinal studies to explore biomarkers that will assist with management and prognosis as well as randomized-controlled studies to validate pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatments. The current review summarizes the available literature in support of a structured, systematic evaluation approach and treatment options as well as recommendations for further research directions.

  5. Automated Brain Tumor Segmentation on MR Images Based on Neutrosophic Set Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Mohan J; Krishnaveni V; Yanhui Huo

    2015-01-01

    Brain tumor segmentation for MR images is a difficult and challenging task due to variation in type, size, location and shape of tumors. This paper presents an efficient and fully automatic brain tumor segmentation technique. This proposed technique includes non local preprocessing, fuzzy intensification to enhance the quality of the MR images, k - means clustering method for brain tumor segmentation.

  6. A white matter lesion-filling approach to improve brain tissue volume measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi Valverde

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis white matter (WM lesions can affect brain tissue volume measurements of voxel-wise segmentation methods if these lesions are included in the segmentation process. Several authors have presented different techniques to improve brain tissue volume estimations by filling WM lesions before segmentation with intensities similar to those of WM. Here, we propose a new method to refill WM lesions, where contrary to similar approaches, lesion voxel intensities are replaced by random values of a normal distribution generated from the mean WM signal intensity of each two-dimensional slice. We test the performance of our method by estimating the deviation in tissue volume between a set of 30 T1-w 1.5 T and 30 T1-w 3 T images of healthy subjects and the same images where: WM lesions have been previously registered and afterwards replaced their voxel intensities to those between gray matter (GM and WM tissue. Tissue volume is computed independently using FAST and SPM8. When compared with the state-of-the-art methods, on 1.5 T data our method yields the lowest deviation in WM between original and filled images, independently of the segmentation method used. It also performs the lowest differences in GM when FAST is used and equals to the best method when SPM8 is employed. On 3 T data, our method also outperforms the state-of-the-art methods when FAST is used while performs similar to the best method when SPM8 is used. The proposed technique is currently available to researchers as a stand-alone program and as an SPM extension.

  7. Cryotherapy of the brain - a new methodical basic approach; Kryotherapie am Hirn - ein neuer methodischer Ansatz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruender, W. [Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Biophysik, Univ. Leipzig (Germany); Goldammer, A.; Vitzthum, H.E. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Neurochirurgie, Univ. Leipzig (Germany); Schober, R. [Selbstaendige Abt. fuer Neuropathologie am Inst. fuer Pathologie, Univ. Leipzig (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Cryodestruction of tissue is influenced by cooling and thawing rates, absolute tissue temperature, number of freeze-thaw cycles, and type of tissue. However, under clinical conditions a MRT visualization of the temperature distribution during cryo-procedures is not possible. Thus, the extent of necrotic areas within the cryo-influenced regions are not precisely predictable. This limitation is particularly relevant for the application of cryoablation in the brain. The present paper proposes the concept of a local, cryo-induced ischemic necrosis. The basic concept is that the MRT-observable and surgically well-manageable frozen region is ischemic. This cryo-induced ischemia causes a necrosis. The extent of the necrotic region is exclusively determined by the ischemia tolerance of the tissue. The effectiveness of this method is demonstrated on sheep brain in vivo. Compared to the freeze-thaw method, histological examinations show a sharper demarcation between regions of necrosis and healthy tissue. In conclusion, the method of MR-controlled local, cryo-induced ischemia enables an exact definition of the region of necrosis in the brain. (orig.) [German] Die Kryodestruktion von Gewebe ist abhaengig von den Abkuehl- und Taugeschwindigkeiten, von der absoluten Gewebetemperatur, der Anzahl der Gefrier-Tau-Zyklen sowie vom Gewebetyp. Da es unter klinischen Bedingungen nicht moeglich ist, waehrend einer kryochirurgischen Intervention die Temperaturverteilung im Gewebe unter MRT-Kontrolle zu verfolgen, ist der Grad der Gewebedestruktion innerhalb des kaeltebeeinflussten Gebiets nicht sicher voraussagbar. Dies jedoch ist speziell fuer die Anwendung im Hirn wesentlich. In der vorliegenden Arbeit wird das Konzept der lokalen, kaelteinduzierten ischaemischen Nekrose vorgestellt: Dabei erfolgt eine Abkuehlung des intrazerebralen Zielbereichs bis zum Einfrieren des Gewebes. Es resultiert eine im MRT-Bild als signalfreie Zone sichtbare und damit intraoperativ gut zu steuernde

  8. On the Complexity of Brain Disorders: A symptom-based approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. Moustafa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mounting evidence shows that brain disorders involve multiple and different neural dysfunctions, including regional brain damage, change to cell structure, chemical imbalance, and/or connectivity loss among different brain regions. Understanding the complexity of brain disorders can help us map these neural dysfunctions to different symptom clusters as well as understand subcategories of different brain disorders. Here, we discuss data on the mapping of symptom clusters to different neural dysfunctions using examples from brain disorders such as major depressive disorder, Parkinson’s disease, schizophrenia, PTSD and Alzheimer’s disease. In addition, we discuss data on the similarities of symptoms in different disorders. Importantly, computational modeling work may be able to shed light on plausible links between various symptoms and neural damage in brain disorders.

  9. Aorta Balloon Occlusion in Trauma: Three Cases Demonstrating Multidisciplinary Approach Already on Patient’s Arrival to the Emergency Room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hörer, Tal M., E-mail: tal.horer@orebroll.se [Örebro University, Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Örebro University Hospital (Sweden); Hebron, Dan [Hillel Yaffe Medical Center, Department of Radiology (Israel); Swaid, Forat [Bnai-Zion Medical Center, Department of General Surgery (Israel); Korin, Alexander [Hillel Yaffe Medical Center, Trauma Unit (Israel); Galili, Offer [Hillel Yaffe Medical Center, Department of Vascular Surgery (Israel); Alfici, Ricardo [Hillel Yaffe Medical Center, Surgical Division (Israel); Kessel, Boris [Hillel Yaffe Medical Center, Trauma Unit (Israel)

    2016-02-15

    PurposeTo describe the usage of aortic balloon occlusion (ABO), based on a multidisciplinary approach in severe trauma patients, emphasizing the role of the interventional radiologist in primary trauma care.MethodsWe briefly discuss the relevant literature, the technical aspects of ABO in trauma, and a multidisciplinary approach to the bleeding trauma patient. We describe three severely injured trauma patients for whom ABO was part of initial trauma management.ResultsThree severely injured multi-trauma patients were treated by ABO as a bridge to surgery and embolization. The procedures were performed by an interventional radiologist in the early stages of trauma management.ConclusionsThe interventional radiologist and the multidisciplinary team approach can be activated already on severe trauma patient arrival. ABO usage and other endovascular methods are becoming more widely spread, and can be used early in trauma management, without delay, thus justifying the early activation of this multidisciplinary approach.

  10. The Demonstration Test Catchment Approach to Land and Water Management in the river Eden Watershed, UK. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonczyk, J.; Quinn, P. F.; Haygarth, P.; Reaney, S.; Wilkinson, M.; Burke, S.; McGonigle, D.; Harris, B.

    2010-12-01

    The Demonstration Test Catchment (DTC) initiative is a five year project to address pollution issues in catchments. The initiative will study the wider environmental problems suffered by catchments which are under intense farming pressures and potential climate change impacts. The UK Department for Food, Agriculture and Rural Affairs (Defra) in partnership with the Environment Agency for England and Wales (EA) have funded this initiative to answer key policy concerns in catchments. The first key step has been the establishment of a ‘research platform’ at three catchments in the UK (The Eden, Wensum and Hampshire Avon) whereby funding of 9.3 million dollars has gone into funding new equipment and pollution sampling regimes have been established. Within each catchment between three and four, 8-10km2 sub-catchments have been established. The experimental design and thinking for DTCs will be explained fully in this paper. The next phase of the project will install an extensive suite of land management and pollution mitigation interventions. In parallel to this monitoring work, a full knowledge exchange package will seek to engage with farmers, the rural community and understand the governance regime at the broader catchment scale. There is also a need for a modelling component to upscale the findings to the whole of the UK. Whilst this is an ambitious goal, there is a very basic commitment of working with rural communities to come up with real solutions that will help underpin effective policy making for the future. The research platform covers a multi-scale approach to the monitoring strategy that will allow local grouping of mitigation measures to be studied local in terms of impact and propagated to the catchment scale. Even with high level of funding, the DTC can only fully instrument a catchment of 8-10km2. Beyond this scale, the EA and the standard catchment monitoring will continue as normal. The focus here is to prove that mitigation can be achieved within

  11. Experimental Study Comparing a Traditional Approach to Performance Appraisal Training to a Whole-Brain Training Method at C.B. Fleet Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selden, Sally; Sherrier, Tom; Wooters, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of a new approach to performance appraisal training. Motivated by split-brain theory and existing studies of cognitive information processing and performance appraisals, this exploratory study examined the effects of a whole-brain approach to training managers for implementing performance…

  12. A demonstration of the necessity and feasibility of using a clumsy decision analytic approach on wicked environmental problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Cynthia; Cimorelli, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Because controversy, conflict, and lawsuits frequently characterize US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) decisions, it is important that USEPA decision makers understand how to evaluate and then make decisions that have simultaneously science-based, social, and political implications. Air quality management is one category of multidimensional decision making at USEPA. The Philadelphia, Pennsylvania metropolitan area experiences unhealthy levels of ozone, fine particulate matter, and air toxics. Many ozone precursors are precursors for particulate matter and certain air toxics. Additionally, some precursors for particulate matter are air toxics. However, air quality management practices have typically evaluated these problems separately. This approach has led to the development of independent (and potentially counterproductive) implementation strategies. This is a methods article about the necessity and feasibility of using a clumsy approach on wicked problems, using an example case study. Air quality management in Philadelphia is a wicked problem. Wicked problems are those where stakeholders define or view the problem differently, there are many different ways to describe the problem (i.e., different dimensions or levels of abstraction), no efficient or optimal solutions exist, and they are often complicated by moral, political, or professional dimensions. The USEPA has developed the multicriteria integrated resource assessment (MIRA) decision analytic approach that engages stakeholder participation through transparency, transdisciplinary learning, and the explicit use of value sets; in other words, a clumsy approach. MIRA's approach to handling technical indicators, expert judgment, and stakeholder values makes it a potentially effective method for tackling wicked environmental problems.

  13. A novel approach for locating mice brain regions of Cryptococcus neoformans CNS invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunting He

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this study was to locate the brain regions where Cryptococcus interact with brain cells and invade into brain. After 7 days of intratracheal inocula-tion of GFP-tagged Cryptococcus neoformans strains H99, serial cryosections (10 μm from 3 C57 BL/6 J mice brains were imaged with immunofluorescence microscopy. GFP-tagged H99 were found in some brain regions such as primary motor cortex-secondary motor cortex, caudate putamen, stratum lucidum of hippocampus, field CA1 of hippocampus, dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus, lateral posterior thalamic nucleus, laterorostral part, lateral posterior thalamic nucleus, mediorostral part, retrosplenial agranular cortex, lateral area of secondary visual cortex, and lacunosum molecular layer of the hippocampus. The results will be very useful for further exploring the mechanism of C. neoformans infection of brain.

  14. Computing the blood brain barrier (BBB) diffusion coefficient: A molecular dynamics approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamloo, Amir; Pedram, Maysam Z.; Heidari, Hossein; Alasty, Aria

    2016-07-01

    Various physical and biological aspects of the Blood Brain Barrier (BBB) structure still remain unfolded. Therefore, among the several mechanisms of drug delivery, only a few have succeeded in breaching this barrier, one of which is the use of Magnetic Nanoparticles (MNPs). However, a quantitative characterization of the BBB permeability is desirable to find an optimal magnetic force-field. In the present study, a molecular model of the BBB is introduced that precisely represents the interactions between MNPs and the membranes of Endothelial Cells (ECs) that form the BBB. Steered Molecular Dynamics (SMD) simulations of the BBB crossing phenomenon have been carried out. Mathematical modeling of the BBB as an input-output system has been considered from a system dynamics modeling viewpoint, enabling us to analyze the BBB behavior based on a robust model. From this model, the force profile required to overcome the barrier has been extracted for a single NP from the SMD simulations at a range of velocities. Using this data a transfer function model has been obtained and the diffusion coefficient is evaluated. This study is a novel approach to bridge the gap between nanoscale models and microscale models of the BBB. The characteristic diffusion coefficient has the nano-scale molecular effects inherent, furthermore reducing the computational costs of a nano-scale simulation model and enabling much more complex studies to be conducted.

  15. The emergence of mind and brain: an evolutionary, computational, and philosophical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainzer, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Modern philosophy of mind cannot be understood without recent developments in computer science, artificial intelligence (AI), robotics, neuroscience, biology, linguistics, and psychology. Classical philosophy of formal languages as well as symbolic AI assume that all kinds of knowledge must explicitly be represented by formal or programming languages. This assumption is limited by recent insights into the biology of evolution and developmental psychology of the human organism. Most of our knowledge is implicit and unconscious. It is not formally represented, but embodied knowledge, which is learnt by doing and understood by bodily interacting with changing environments. That is true not only for low-level skills, but even for high-level domains of categorization, language, and abstract thinking. The embodied mind is considered an emergent capacity of the brain as a self-organizing complex system. Actually, self-organization has been a successful strategy of evolution to handle the increasing complexity of the world. Genetic programs are not sufficient and cannot prepare the organism for all kinds of complex situations in the future. Self-organization and emergence are fundamental concepts in the theory of complex dynamical systems. They are also applied in organic computing as a recent research field of computer science. Therefore, cognitive science, AI, and robotics try to model the embodied mind in an artificial evolution. The paper analyzes these approaches in the interdisciplinary framework of complex dynamical systems and discusses their philosophical impact.

  16. New approaches to the study of human brain networks underlying spatial attention and related processes

    OpenAIRE

    Driver, Jon; Blankenburg, Felix; Bestmann, Sven; Ruff, Christian C.

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive processes, such as spatial attention, are thought to rely on extended networks in the human brain. Both clinical data from lesioned patients and fMRI data acquired when healthy subjects perform particular cognitive tasks typically implicate a wide expanse of potentially contributing areas, rather than just a single brain area. Conversely, evidence from more targeted interventions, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) or invasive microstimulation of the brain, or selective...

  17. Brain fag syndrome: a culture-bound syndrome that may be approaching extinction

    OpenAIRE

    Ayonrinde, Oyedeji A.; Obuaya, Chiedu; Adeyemi, Solomon Olusola

    2015-01-01

    Aims and method To explore the current salience of ‘brain fag’ as a nosological, diagnostic and clinical construct in modern West African psychiatry. A semi-structured questionnaire and vignette based on classical symptoms of brain fag syndrome were used to explore current knowledge, explanatory models and practice among Nigerian psychiatrists. Results Of 102 psychiatrists who responded, 98% recognised the term ‘brain fag syndrome’ and most recognised the scenario presented. However, only 22%...

  18. Intraoperative functional MRI as a new approach to monitor deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesselmann, Volker; Sorger, Bettina; Girnus, Ralf; Lasek, Kathrin; Schulte, Oliver; Krug, Barbara; Lackner, Klaus [Department of Radiology, University of Cologne, Joseph-Stelzmann-Strasse 9, 50924, Cologne (Germany); Maarouf, Mohammad; Sturm, Volker [Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, University of Cologne, Joseph-Stelzmann-Strasse 9, 50924, Cologne (Germany); Wedekind, Christoph [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Cologne, Joseph-Stelzmann-Strasse 9, 50924, Cologne (Germany); Bunke, Juergen [Philips Medical Systems, Hamburg (Germany)

    2004-04-01

    This article deals with technical aspects of intraoperative functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for monitoring the effect of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in a patient with Parkinson's disease. Under motor activation, therapeutic high-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus was accompanied by an activation decrease in the contralateral primary sensorimotor cortex and the ipsilateral cerebellum. Furthermore, an activation increase in the contralateral basal ganglia and insula region were detected. These findings demonstrate that fMRI constitutes a promising clinical application for investigating brain activity changes induced by DBS. (orig.)

  19. A Methodological Demonstration of Set-theoretical Approach to Social Media Maturity Models Using Necessary Condition Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lasrado, Lester Allan; Vatrapu, Ravi; Andersen, Kim Normann

    2016-01-01

    Despite being widely accepted and applied across research domains, maturity models have been criticized for lacking academic rigor, especially methodologically rigorous and empirically grounded or tested maturity models are quite rare. Attempting to close this gap, we adopt a set-theoretic approach...

  20. Brain emotional learning based Brain Computer Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolreza Asadi Ghanbari

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A brain computer interface (BCI enables direct communication between a brain and a computer translating brain activity into computer commands using preprocessing, feature extraction and classification operations. Classification is crucial as it has a substantial effect on the BCI speed and bit rate. Recent developments of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs bring forward some challenging problems to the machine learning community, of which classification of time-varying electrophysiological signals is a crucial one. Constructing adaptive classifiers is a promising approach to deal with this problem. In this paper, we introduce adaptive classifiers for classify electroencephalogram (EEG signals. The adaptive classifier is brain emotional learning based adaptive classifier (BELBAC, which is based on emotional learning process. The main purpose of this research is to use a structural model based on the limbic system of mammalian brain, for decision making and control engineering applications. We have adopted a network model developed by Moren and Balkenius, as a computational model that mimics amygdala, orbitofrontal cortex, thalamus, sensory input cortex and generally, those parts of the brain thought responsible for processing emotions. The developed method was compared with other methods used for EEG signals classification (support vector machine (SVM and two different neural network types (MLP, PNN. The result analysis demonstrated an efficiency of the proposed approach.

  1. Single-subject-based whole-brain MEG slow-wave imaging approach for detecting abnormality in patients with mild traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Xiong Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a leading cause of sustained impairment in military and civilian populations. However, mild TBI (mTBI can be difficult to detect using conventional MRI or CT. Injured brain tissues in mTBI patients generate abnormal slow-waves (1–4 Hz that can be measured and localized by resting-state magnetoencephalography (MEG. In this study, we develop a voxel-based whole-brain MEG slow-wave imaging approach for detecting abnormality in patients with mTBI on a single-subject basis. A normative database of resting-state MEG source magnitude images (1–4 Hz from 79 healthy control subjects was established for all brain voxels. The high-resolution MEG source magnitude images were obtained by our recent Fast-VESTAL method. In 84 mTBI patients with persistent post-concussive symptoms (36 from blasts, and 48 from non-blast causes, our method detected abnormalities at the positive detection rates of 84.5%, 86.1%, and 83.3% for the combined (blast-induced plus with non-blast causes, blast, and non-blast mTBI groups, respectively. We found that prefrontal, posterior parietal, inferior temporal, hippocampus, and cerebella areas were particularly vulnerable to head trauma. The result also showed that MEG slow-wave generation in prefrontal areas positively correlated with personality change, trouble concentrating, affective lability, and depression symptoms. Discussion is provided regarding the neuronal mechanisms of MEG slow-wave generation due to deafferentation caused by axonal injury and/or blockages/limitations of cholinergic transmission in TBI. This study provides an effective way for using MEG slow-wave source imaging to localize affected areas and supports MEG as a tool for assisting the diagnosis of mTBI.

  2. Development of Nonviral Vectors Targeting the Brain as a Therapeutic Approach For Parkinson's Disease and Other Brain Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Hayate; Menon, Sindhu A; Al-Mansoori, Karima M; Al-Wandi, Abdelmojib; Majbour, Nour K; Ardah, Mustafa T; Varghese, Shiji; Vaikath, Nishant N; Haque, M Emdadul; Azzouz, Mimoun; El-Agnaf, Omar Ma

    2016-04-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a debilitating neurodegenerative disease characterized by tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, and postural instability, for which there is no effective treatment available till date. Here, we report the development of nonviral vectors specific for neuronal cells that can deliver short interfering RNA (siRNA) against the α-synuclein gene (SNCA), and prevent PD-like symptoms both in vitro and in vivo. These vectors not only help siRNA duplexes cross the blood-brain barrier in mice, but also stabilize these siRNAs leading to a sustainable 60-90% knockdown of α-synuclein protein. Mice treated with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine rapidly develop PD-like symptoms which were significantly alleviated when SNCA was knocked down using our vectors. Together, our data not only confirm the central role of α-synuclein in the onset of PD, but also provide a proof of principle that these nonviral vectors can be used as novel tools to design effective strategies to combat central nervous system diseases.

  3. Chasing tics in the human brain: development of open, scheduled and closed loop responsive approaches to deep brain stimulation for tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Leonardo; Martinez-Ramirez, Daniel; Rossi, Peter J; Peng, Zhongxing; Gunduz, Aysegul; Okun, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    Tourette syndrome is a childhood-onset disorder characterized by a combination of motor and vocal tics, often associated with psychiatric comorbidities including attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Despite an onset early in life, half of patients may present symptoms in adulthood, with variable degrees of severity. In select cases, the syndrome may lead to significant physical and social impairment, and a worrisome risk for self injury. Evolving research has provided evidence supporting the idea that the pathophysiology of Tourette syndrome is directly related to a disrupted circuit involving the cortex and subcortical structures, including the basal ganglia, nucleus accumbens, and the amygdala. There has also been a notion that a dysfunctional group of neurons in the putamen contributes to an abnormal facilitation of competing motor responses in basal ganglia structures ultimately underpinning the generation of tics. Surgical therapies for Tourette syndrome have been reserved for a small group of patients not responding to behavioral and pharmacological therapies, and these therapies have been directed at modulating the underlying pathophysiology. Lesion therapy as well as deep brain stimulation has been observed to suppress tics in at least some of these cases. In this article, we will review the clinical aspects of Tourette syndrome, as well as the evolution of surgical approaches and we will discuss the evidence and clinical responses to deep brain stimulation in various brain targets. We will also discuss ongoing research and future directions as well as approaches for open, scheduled and closed loop feedback-driven electrical stimulation for the treatment of Tourette syndrome.

  4. Computing the blood brain barrier (BBB) diffusion coefficient: A molecular dynamics approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamloo, Amir, E-mail: shamloo@sharif.edu; Pedram, Maysam Z.; Heidari, Hossein; Alasty, Aria, E-mail: aalasti@sharif.edu

    2016-07-15

    Various physical and biological aspects of the Blood Brain Barrier (BBB) structure still remain unfolded. Therefore, among the several mechanisms of drug delivery, only a few have succeeded in breaching this barrier, one of which is the use of Magnetic Nanoparticles (MNPs). However, a quantitative characterization of the BBB permeability is desirable to find an optimal magnetic force-field. In the present study, a molecular model of the BBB is introduced that precisely represents the interactions between MNPs and the membranes of Endothelial Cells (ECs) that form the BBB. Steered Molecular Dynamics (SMD) simulations of the BBB crossing phenomenon have been carried out. Mathematical modeling of the BBB as an input-output system has been considered from a system dynamics modeling viewpoint, enabling us to analyze the BBB behavior based on a robust model. From this model, the force profile required to overcome the barrier has been extracted for a single NP from the SMD simulations at a range of velocities. Using this data a transfer function model has been obtained and the diffusion coefficient is evaluated. This study is a novel approach to bridge the gap between nanoscale models and microscale models of the BBB. The characteristic diffusion coefficient has the nano-scale molecular effects inherent, furthermore reducing the computational costs of a nano-scale simulation model and enabling much more complex studies to be conducted. - Highlights: • Molecular dynamics simulation of crossing nano-particles through the BBB membrane at different velocities. • Recording the position of nano-particle and the membrane-NP interaction force profile. • Identification of a frequency domain model for the membrane. • Calculating the diffusion coefficient based on MD simulation and identified model. • Obtaining a relation between continuum medium and discrete medium.

  5. Spatial Downscaling of TRMM Precipitation Product Using a Combined Multifractal and Regression Approach: Demonstration for South China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanghua Xu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The lack of high spatial resolution precipitation data, which are crucial for the modeling and managing of hydrological systems, has triggered many attempts at spatial downscaling. The essence of downscaling lies in extracting extra information from a dataset through some scale-invariant characteristics related to the process of interest. While most studies utilize only one source of information, here we propose an approach that integrates two independent information sources, which are characterized by self-similar and relationship with other geo-referenced factors, respectively. This approach is applied to 16 years (1998–2013 of TRMM 3B43 monthly precipitation data in an orographic and monsoon influenced region in South China. Elevation, latitude, and longitude are used as predictive variables in the regression model, while self-similarity is characterized by multifractals and modeled by a log-normal multiplicative random cascade. The original 0.25° precipitation field was downscaled to the 0.01° scale. The result was validated with rain gauge data. Good consistency was achieved on coefficient of determination, bias, and root mean square error. This study contributes to the current precipitation downscaling methodology and is helpful for hydrology and water resources management, especially in areas with insufficient ground gauges.

  6. Impact Findings from the Head Start CARES Demonstration: National Evaluation of Three Approaches to Improving Preschoolers' Social and Emotional Competence. Executive Summary. OPRE Report 2014-44

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Pamela; Mattera, Shira K.; Castells, Nina; Bangser, Michael; Bierman, Karen; Raver, Cybele

    2014-01-01

    Low-income preschool children face risks to their social-emotional development that can affect them later on. Although there are promising approaches to promoting preschoolers' social-emotional skills, the evidence base is limited, particularly on their effectiveness when implemented at scale. The Head Start CARES demonstration evaluated the…

  7. Gadolinium released from MR contrast agents is deposited in brain tumors: in situ demonstration using scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Daniel; Davis, Richard L.; Crawford, Judith A.; Abraham, Jerrold L. (Dept. of Pathology, SUNY Upstate Medical Univ., Syracuse, NY (United States)), e-mail: abrahamj@upstate.edu

    2010-12-15

    Background: Gadolinium (Gd)-containing MRI contrast agents (GdCA) are widely used in studies of brain tumors, and a number of reports suggest that under certain conditions, such as renal failure, Gd may be released from GdCA into patient's tissues. Whether this may happen in abnormal tissues in the absence of renal failure has not been studied. Purpose: To test the hypothesis that the local retention of GdCA resulting from brain tumor-associated alterations in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) may result in the deposition of Gd released from the GdCA, depending on stability. Material and Methods: In this retrospective study, 30 selected brain tumor biopsies from 28 patients (taken before and after an institutional switch from a less stable to an intermediate stable GdCA) were searched for Gd-containing deposits using scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). Relevant histories and laboratory results were obtained through institutional electronic records. Associations between the presence of deposits and other variables were tested for statistical significance using the two-tailed Fisher's exact test. Results: Insoluble deposits containing Gd associated with phosphorus and calcium were found in seven biopsies from five patients. These deposits were found in patients with estimated GFRs above 53 ml/min, and were detected more often in those receiving GdCA before the switch from a less stable to an intermediate stable GdCA (P = 0.04), and may be more frequent in patients receiving more than one contrast-enhanced MR scan (P = 0.15). Conclusion: Gd-containing deposits are present in brain tumors following contrast-enhanced MR scans in patients without severe renal disease. Further studies are needed to assess the clinical importance of the deposits we observed and to determine whether they are also found in other conditions that alter the integrity of the BBB

  8. An Optimized Clustering Approach for Automated Detection of White Matter Lesions in MRI Brain Images

    OpenAIRE

    Anitha, M.; P. Tamije Selvy

    2012-01-01

    Settings White Matter lesions (WMLs) are small areas of dead cells found in parts of the brain. In general, it is difficult for medical experts to accurately quantify the WMLs due to decreased contrast between White Matter (WM) and Grey Matter (GM). The aim of this paper is to
    automatically detect the White Matter Lesions which is present in the brains of elderly people. WML detection process includes the following stages: 1. Image preprocessing, 2. Clustering (Fuzzy c-means cluste...

  9. AN ARTIFICIAL FISH SWARM OPTIMIZED FUZZY MRI IMAGE SEGMENTATION APPROACH FOR IMPROVING IDENTIFICATION OF BRAIN TUMOUR

    OpenAIRE

    Jagadeesan, R; S.N. Sivanandam

    2013-01-01

    In image processing, it is difficult to detect the abnormalities in brain especially in MRI brain images. Also the tumor segmentation from MRI image data is an important; however it is time consumingwhile carried out by medical specialists. A lot of methods have been proposed to solve MR images problems, quite difficult to develop an automated recognition system which could process on a large information of patient and provide a correct estimation. Hence enhanced k-means and fuzzy c-means wit...

  10. A correlative optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy approach to locating nanoparticles in brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempen, Paul J; Kircher, Moritz F; de la Zerda, Adam; Zavaleta, Cristina L; Jokerst, Jesse V; Mellinghoff, Ingo K; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Sinclair, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The growing use of nanoparticles in biomedical applications, including cancer diagnosis and treatment, demands the capability to exactly locate them within complex biological systems. In this work a correlative optical and scanning electron microscopy technique was developed to locate and observe multi-modal gold core nanoparticle accumulation in brain tumor models. Entire brain sections from mice containing orthotopic brain tumors injected intravenously with nanoparticles were imaged using both optical microscopy to identify the brain tumor, and scanning electron microscopy to identify the individual nanoparticles. Gold-based nanoparticles were readily identified in the scanning electron microscope using backscattered electron imaging as bright spots against a darker background. This information was then correlated to determine the exact location of the nanoparticles within the brain tissue. The nanoparticles were located only in areas that contained tumor cells, and not in the surrounding healthy brain tissue. This correlative technique provides a powerful method to relate the macro- and micro-scale features visible in light microscopy with the nanoscale features resolvable in scanning electron microscopy.

  11. Curved reformat of the paediatric brain MRI into a 'flat-earth map' - standardised method for demonstrating cortical surface atrophy resulting from hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Ewan; Andronikou, Savvas; Vedajallam, Schadie; Chacko, Anith; Thai, Ngoc Jade

    2016-09-01

    Hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy is optimally imaged with brain MRI in the neonatal period. However neuroimaging is often also performed later in childhood (e.g., when parents seek compensation in cases of alleged birth asphyxia). We describe a standardised technique for creating two curved reconstructions of the cortical surface to show the characteristic surface changes of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy in children imaged after the neonatal period. The technique was applied for 10 cases of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy and also for age-matched healthy children to assess the visibility of characteristic features of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. In the abnormal brains, fissural or sulcal widening was seen in all cases and ulegyria was identifiable in 7/10. These images could be used as a visual aid for communicating MRI findings to clinicians and other interested parties.

  12. ErbB4 in laminated brain structures: a neurodevelopmental approach to schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Gustavo Perez-Garcia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The susceptibility genes for schizophrenia Neuregulin-1 (NRG1 and ErbB4 have critical functions during brain development and in the adult. Alterations in the ErbB4 signaling pathway cause a variety of neurodevelopmental defects including deficiencies in neuronal migration, synaptic plasticity and myelination. I have used the ErbB4-/- HER4heart KO mice to study the neurodevelopmental insults associated to deficiencies in the NRG1-ErbB4 signaling pathway and their potential implication with brain disorders such as schizophrenia, a chronic psychiatric disease affecting 1% of the population worldwide. ErbB4 deletion results in an array of neurodevelopmental deficits that are consistent with a schizophrenic model. First, similar defects appear in multiple brain structures, from the cortex to the cerebellum. Second, these defects affect multiple aspects of brain development, from deficits in neuronal migration to impairments in excitatory/inhibitory systems, including reductions in brain volume, cortical and cerebellar heteropias, alterations in number and distribution of specific subpopulations of interneurons, deficiencies in the astrocytic and oligodendrocytic lineages, and additional insults in major brain structures. This suggests that alterations in specific neurodevelopmental genes that play similar functions in multiple neuroanatomical structures might account for some of the symptomatology observed in schizophrenic patients, such as defects in cognition. ErbB4 mutation uncovers flaws in brain development that are compatible with a neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia, and it establishes a comprehensive model to study the basis of the disorder before symptoms are detected in the adult.

  13. ErbB4 in Laminated Brain Structures: A Neurodevelopmental Approach to Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Garcia, Carlos G.

    2015-01-01

    The susceptibility genes for schizophrenia Neuregulin-1 (NRG1) and ErbB4 have critical functions during brain development and in the adult. Alterations in the ErbB4 signaling pathway cause a variety of neurodevelopmental defects including deficiencies in neuronal migration, synaptic plasticity, and myelination. I have used the ErbB4-/- HER4heart KO mice to study the neurodevelopmental insults associated to deficiencies in the NRG1-ErbB4 signaling pathway and their potential implication with brain disorders such as schizophrenia, a chronic psychiatric disease affecting 1% of the population worldwide. ErbB4 deletion results in an array of neurodevelopmental deficits that are consistent with a schizophrenic model. First, similar defects appear in multiple brain structures, from the cortex to the cerebellum. Second, these defects affect multiple aspects of brain development, from deficits in neuronal migration to impairments in excitatory/inhibitory systems, including reductions in brain volume, cortical and cerebellar heterotopias, alterations in number and distribution of specific subpopulations of interneurons, deficiencies in the astrocytic and oligodendrocytic lineages, and additional insults in major brain structures. This suggests that alterations in specific neurodevelopmental genes that play similar functions in multiple neuroanatomical structures might account for some of the symptomatology observed in schizophrenic patients, such as defects in cognition. ErbB4 mutation uncovers flaws in brain development that are compatible with a neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia, and it establishes a comprehensive model to study the basis of the disorder before symptoms are detected in the adult. PMID:26733804

  14. Organotypic slice cultures from rat brain tissue: a new approach for Naegleria fowleri CNS infection in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianinazzi, C; Schild, M; Müller, N; Leib, S L; Simon, F; Nuñez, S; Joss, P; Gottstein, B

    2005-12-01

    The free-living amoeba Naegleria fowleri is the aetiological agent of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), a disease leading to death in the vast majority of cases. In patients suffering from PAM, and in corresponding animal models, the brain undergoes a massive inflammatory response, followed by haemorrhage and severe tissue necrosis. Both, in vivo and in vitro models are currently being used to study PAM infection. However, animal models may pose ethical issues, are dependent upon availability of specific infrastructural facilities, and are time-consuming and costly. Conversely, cell cultures lack the complex organ-specific morphology found in vivo, and thus, findings obtained in vitro do not necessarily reflect the situation in vivo. The present study reports infection of organotypic slice cultures from rat brain with N. fowleri and compares the findings in this culture system with in vivo infection in a rat model of PAM, that proved complementary to that of mice. We found that brain morphology, as present in vivo, is well retained in organotypic slice cultures, and that infection time-course including tissue damage parallels the observations in vivo in the rat. Therefore, organotypic slice cultures from rat brain offer a new in vitro approach to study N. fowleri infection in the context of PAM.

  15. Automated Brain Image classification using Neural Network Approach and Abnormality Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.Muthu Krishnammal

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Image segmentation of surgical images plays an important role in diagnosis and analysis the anatomical structure of human body. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI helps in obtaining a structural image of internal parts of the body. This paper aims at developing an automatic support system for stage classification using learning machine and to detect brain Tumor by fuzzy clustering methods to detect the brain Tumor in its early stages and to analyze anatomical structures. The three stages involved are: feature extraction using GLCM and the tumor classification using PNN-RBF network and segmentation using SFCM. Here fast discrete curvelet transformation is used to analyze texture of an image which be used as a base for a Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD system .The Probabilistic Neural Network with radial basis function is employed to implement an automated Brain Tumor classification. It classifies the stage of Brain Tumor that is benign, malignant or normal automatically. Then the segmentation of the brain abnormality using Spatial FCM and the severity of the tumor is analysed using the number of tumor cells in the detected abnormal region.The proposed method reports promising results in terms of training performance and classification accuracies.

  16. Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport- Demonstration of Approach and Results on Used Fuel Performance Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adkins, Harold [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Geelhood, Ken [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Koeppel, Brian [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Coleman, Justin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bignell, John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Flores, Gregg [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wang, Jy-An [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sanborn, Scott [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Spears, Robert [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Klymyshyn, Nick [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-09-30

    This document addresses Oak Ridge National Laboratory milestone M2FT-13OR0822015 Demonstration of Approach and Results on Used Nuclear Fuel Performance Characterization. This report provides results of the initial demonstration of the modeling capability developed to perform preliminary deterministic evaluations of moderate-to-high burnup used nuclear fuel (UNF) mechanical performance under normal conditions of storage (NCS) and normal conditions of transport (NCT) conditions. This report also provides results from the sensitivity studies that have been performed. Finally, discussion on the long-term goals and objectives of this initiative are provided.

  17. Neural Decoding and “Inner” Psychophysics: A Distance-to-Bound Approach for Linking Mind, Brain, and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, J. Brendan; Carlson, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental challenge for cognitive neuroscience is characterizing how the primitives of psychological theory are neurally implemented. Attempts to meet this challenge are a manifestation of what Fechner called “inner” psychophysics: the theory of the precise mapping between mental quantities and the brain. In his own time, inner psychophysics remained an unrealized ambition for Fechner. We suggest that, today, multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA), or neural “decoding,” methods provide a promising starting point for developing an inner psychophysics. A cornerstone of these methods are simple linear classifiers applied to neural activity in high-dimensional activation spaces. We describe an approach to inner psychophysics based on the shared architecture of linear classifiers and observers under decision boundary models such as signal detection theory. Under this approach, distance from a decision boundary through activation space, as estimated by linear classifiers, can be used to predict reaction time in accordance with signal detection theory, and distance-to-bound models of reaction time. Our “neural distance-to-bound” approach is potentially quite general, and simple to implement. Furthermore, our recent work on visual object recognition suggests it is empirically viable. We believe the approach constitutes an important step along the path to an inner psychophysics that links mind, brain, and behavior. PMID:27199652

  18. A supervised clustering approach for fMRI-based inference of brain states

    CERN Document Server

    Michel, Vincent; Varoquaux, Gaël; Eger, Evelyn; Keribin, Christine; Thirion, Bertrand; 10.1016/j.patcog.2011.04.006

    2011-01-01

    We propose a method that combines signals from many brain regions observed in functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to predict the subject's behavior during a scanning session. Such predictions suffer from the huge number of brain regions sampled on the voxel grid of standard fMRI data sets: the curse of dimensionality. Dimensionality reduction is thus needed, but it is often performed using a univariate feature selection procedure, that handles neither the spatial structure of the images, nor the multivariate nature of the signal. By introducing a hierarchical clustering of the brain volume that incorporates connectivity constraints, we reduce the span of the possible spatial configurations to a single tree of nested regions tailored to the signal. We then prune the tree in a supervised setting, hence the name supervised clustering, in order to extract a parcellation (division of the volume) such that parcel-based signal averages best predict the target information. Dimensionality reduction is thus ac...

  19. Combining non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation with neuroimaging and electrophysiology: Current approaches and future perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, Til Ole; Karabanov, Anke; Hartwigsen, Gesa

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation (NTBS) techniques such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial current stimulation (TCS) are important tools in human systems and cognitive neuroscience because they are able to reveal the relevance of certain brain structures...... are technically demanding. We argue that the benefit from this combination is twofold. Firstly, neuroimaging and electrophysiology can inform subsequent NTBS, providing the required information to optimize where, when, and how to stimulate the brain. Information can be achieved both before and during the NTBS...... experiment, requiring consecutive and concurrent applications, respectively. Secondly, neuroimaging and electrophysiology can provide the readout for neural changes induced by NTBS. Again, using either concurrent or consecutive applications, both "online" NTBS effects immediately following the stimulation...

  20. Histaminergic system in brain disorders: lessons from the translational approach and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baronio, Diego; Gonchoroski, Taylor; Castro, Kamila; Zanatta, Geancarlo; Gottfried, Carmem; Riesgo, Rudimar

    2014-01-01

    Histamine and its receptors were first described as part of immune and gastrointestinal systems, but their presence in the central nervous system and importance in behavior are gaining more attention. The histaminergic system modulates different processes including wakefulness, feeding, and learning and memory consolidation. Histamine receptors (H1R, H2R, H3R, and H4R) belong to the rhodopsin-like family of G protein-coupled receptors, present constitutive activity, and are subjected to inverse agonist action. The involvement of the histaminergic system in brain disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, sleep disorders, drug dependence, and Parkinson's disease, is largely studied. Data obtained from preclinical studies point antagonists of histamine receptors as promising alternatives to treat brain disorders. Thus, clinical trials are currently ongoing to assess the effects of these drugs on humans. This review summarizes the role of histaminergic system in brain disorders, as well as the effects of different histamine antagonists on animal models and humans.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging based volumetry: a primary approach to unravelling the brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Xiaoqi; Lü Su; Li Dongming; Gong Qiyong

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging based volumetry is recognized as an important technique for studying the brain. In this review, two principle volumetric methods using high resolution MR images were introduced, namely the Cavalieri method and the voxel based morphometry (VBM). The Cavalieri method represents a manual technique that allows the volume of brain structures to be estimated efficiently with no systematic error or sampling bias, whereby the VBM represents an automated image analysis which involves the use of statistical parametric mapping of the MR imaging data. Both methods have been refined and applied extensively in recent neuroscience research. The present paper aims to describe the development of methodologies and also to update the knowledge of their applications in studying the normal and diseased brain.

  2. Biochemical Markers of Brain Injury: An Integrated Proteomics-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-01

    cortex (ipsilateral cortex) with a 5-mm-diameter aluminum impactor tip (housed in a pneumatic cylin- der) at a velocity of 3.5 m/sec with a 1.6-mm com...over the cortex. Brain trauma was produced by impacting the right cortex (ipsilateral cortex) with a 5-mm diameter aluminum impactor tip (housed in a...gene expression in the brain as a function of the clinical progression of Alzheimer disease. Arch. Neurol. 60, 369–376. Raff M. C., Barres B. A., Burne

  3. A Semi-Automatic Graph-Based Approach for Determining the Boundary of Eloquent Fiber Bundles in the Human Brain

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, Miriam H A; Kuhnt, Daniela; Barbieri, Sebastiano; Klein, Jan; Hahn, Horst K; Freisleben, Bernd; Nimsky, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) allows estimating the position, orientation and dimension of bundles of nerve pathways. This non-invasive imaging technique takes advantage of the diffusion of water molecules and determines the diffusion coefficients for every voxel of the data set. The identification of the diffusion coefficients and the derivation of information about fiber bundles is of major interest for planning and performing neurosurgical interventions. To minimize the risk of neural deficits during brain surgery as tumor resection (e.g. glioma), the segmentation and integration of the results in the operating room is of prime importance. In this contribution, a robust and efficient graph-based approach for segmentating tubular fiber bundles in the human brain is presented. To define a cost function, the fractional anisotropy (FA) is used, derived from the DTI data, but this value may differ from patient to patient. Besides manually definining seed regions describing the structure of interest, additional...

  4. An empirical approach to estimate near-infra-red photon propagation and optically induced drug release in brain tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu Verleker, Akshay; Fang, Qianqian; Choi, Mi-Ran; Clare, Susan; Stantz, Keith M.

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an alternate empirical approach to estimate near-infra-red (NIR) photon propagation and quantify optically induced drug release in brain metastasis, without relying on computationally expensive Monte Carlo techniques (gold standard). Targeted drug delivery with optically induced drug release is a noninvasive means to treat cancers and metastasis. This study is part of a larger project to treat brain metastasis by delivering lapatinib-drug-nanocomplexes and activating NIR-induced drug release. The empirical model was developed using a weighted approach to estimate photon scattering in tissues and calibrated using a GPU based 3D Monte Carlo. The empirical model was developed and tested against Monte Carlo in optical brain phantoms for pencil beams (width 1mm) and broad beams (width 10mm). The empirical algorithm was tested against the Monte Carlo for different albedos along with diffusion equation and in simulated brain phantoms resembling white-matter (μs'=8.25mm-1, μa=0.005mm-1) and gray-matter (μs'=2.45mm-1, μa=0.035mm-1) at wavelength 800nm. The goodness of fit between the two models was determined using coefficient of determination (R-squared analysis). Preliminary results show the Empirical algorithm matches Monte Carlo simulated fluence over a wide range of albedo (0.7 to 0.99), while the diffusion equation fails for lower albedo. The photon fluence generated by empirical code matched the Monte Carlo in homogeneous phantoms (R2=0.99). While GPU based Monte Carlo achieved 300X acceleration compared to earlier CPU based models, the empirical code is 700X faster than the Monte Carlo for a typical super-Gaussian laser beam.

  5. An Optimized Clustering Approach for Automated Detection of White Matter Lesions in MRI Brain Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Anitha

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Settings White Matter lesions (WMLs are small areas of dead cells found in parts of the brain. In general, it is difficult for medical experts to accurately quantify the WMLs due to decreased contrast between White Matter (WM and Grey Matter (GM. The aim of this paper is to
    automatically detect the White Matter Lesions which is present in the brains of elderly people. WML detection process includes the following stages: 1. Image preprocessing, 2. Clustering (Fuzzy c-means clustering, Geostatistical Possibilistic clustering and Geostatistical Fuzzy clustering and 3.Optimization using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO. The proposed system is tested on a database of 208 MRI images. GFCM yields high sensitivity of 89%, specificity of 94% and overall accuracy of 93% over FCM and GPC. The clustered brain images are then subjected to Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO. The optimized result obtained from GFCM-PSO provides sensitivity of 90%, specificity of 94% and accuracy of 95%. The detection results reveals that GFCM and GFCMPSO better localizes the large regions of lesions and gives less false positive rate when compared to GPC and GPC-PSO which captures the largest loads of WMLs only in the upper ventral horns of the brain.

  6. Brain-computer interface using P300 and virtual reality: A gaming approach for treating ADHD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohani, Darius Adam; Sørensen, Helge Bjarup Dissing; Puthusserypady, Sadasivan

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel brain-computer interface (BCI) system aiming at the rehabilitation of attention-deficit/hyperactive disorder in children. It uses the P300 potential in a series of feedback games to improve the subjects' attention. We applied a support vector machine (SVM) using temporal...

  7. Multimodal Approach to Testing the Acute Effects of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    2013). Decreased connectivity in resting-state MEG may persist for years after mTBI ( Castellanos et al., 2011), but the abnormally reduced...of rehabilitation medicine, 36(0), 28-60. [4]   Castellanos , N.P. (2011). Principles of recovery from traumatic brain injury: Reorganization of

  8. A Simulation-based Approach for Improving Utilization of Thrombolysis in Acute Brain Infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lahr, M. M. H.; van der Zee, D. J.; Luijckx, G. J.; Vroomen, Patrick; Buskens, E.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is the most effective treatment in acute brain infarction. However, estimated worldwide treatment rates are <10%, with many barriers hampering broad implementation. Organization and resource-intense randomized controlled trials cannot add

  9. Neuromorphological and wiring pattern alterations effects on brain function: a mixed experimental and computational approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linus Manubens-Gil

    2015-04-01

    In addition, the study of fixed intact brains (by means of the state of the art CLARITY technique brings us closer to biologically and medically relevant situations, allowing not only to confirm whether the functional links in neuronal cultures are also present in vivo, but also enabling the introduction of functional information (like behavioral studies and functional imaging and another layer of structural alterations such as brain region morphology, neuronal density, and long-range connectivity. Taking together the experimental information from these systems we want to feed self-developed computational models that allow us to understand what are the fundamental characteristics of the observed connectivity patterns and the impact of each of the alterations on neuronal network function. These models will also provide a framework able to account for the emergent properties that bridge the gap between spontaneous electrical activity arousal/transmission and higher order information processing and memory storage capacities in the brain. As an additional part of the project we are now working on the application of the clearing, labeling and imaging protocols to human biopsy samples. Our aim is to obtain neuronal architecture and connectivity information from focal cortical dysplasia microcircuits using samples from intractable temporal lobe epilepsy patients that undergo deep-brain electrode recording diagnosis and posterior surgical extraction of the tissue. Our computational models can allow us to discern the contributions of the observed abnormalities to neuronal hyperactivity and epileptic seizure generation.

  10. Determinants of Psychosocial Difficulties Experienced by Persons with Brain Disorders: Towards a 'Horizontal Epidemiology' Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Sabariego

    Full Text Available Persons with brain disorders experience significant psychosocial difficulties (PSD in daily life, e.g. problems with managing daily routine or emotional lability, and the level of the PSD depends on social, physical and political environments, and psychologic-personal determinants. Our objective is to determine a brief set of environmental and psychologic-personal factors that are shared determinants of PSD among persons with different brain disorders.Cross-sectional study, convenience sample of persons with either dementia, stroke, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, migraine, depression, schizophrenia, substance dependence or Parkinson's disease. Random forest regression and classical linear regression were used in the analyses.722 subjects were interviewed in four European countries. The brief set of determinants encompasses presence of comorbidities, health status appraisal, stressful life events, personality changes, adaptation, self-esteem, self-worth, built environment, weather, and health problems in the family.The identified brief set of common determinants of PSD can be used to support the implementation of cross-cutting interventions, social actions and policy tools to lower PSD experienced by persons with brain disorders. This set complements a recently proposed reliable and valid direct metric of PSD for brain disorders called PARADISE24.

  11. AN ARTIFICIAL FISH SWARM OPTIMIZED FUZZY MRI IMAGE SEGMENTATION APPROACH FOR IMPROVING IDENTIFICATION OF BRAIN TUMOUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.Jagadeesan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In image processing, it is difficult to detect the abnormalities in brain especially in MRI brain images. Also the tumor segmentation from MRI image data is an important; however it is time consumingwhile carried out by medical specialists. A lot of methods have been proposed to solve MR images problems, quite difficult to develop an automated recognition system which could process on a large information of patient and provide a correct estimation. Hence enhanced k-means and fuzzy c-means with firefly algorithm for a segmentation of brain magnetic resonance images were developed. Thisalgorithm is based on maximum measure of the distance function which is found for cluster center detection process using the Mahalanobis concept. Particularly the firefly algorithm is implemented tooptimize the Fuzzy C-means membership function for better accuracy segmentation process. At the same time the convergence criteria is fixed for the efficient clustering method. The Firefly algorithmparameters are set fixed and they do not adjust by the time. As well Firefly algorithm does not memorize any history of better situation for each firefly and this reasons they travel in any case of it, and they miss their situations. So there is a need of better algorithm that could provide even better solution than the firefly algorithm. To attain this requirement as a proposed work the Artificial Fish Swarm Algorithm to optimize the fuzzy membership function. During surveying of the previous literature, it has been found out that no work has been done in segmentation of brain tumor using AFSA based clustering. In AFSA, artificial fishes for next movement act completely independent from past and next movement is justrelated to current position of artificial fish and its other companions which lead to select best initial centers for the MRI brain tumor segmentation. Experimental results show that presented method has an acceptable performance than the previous method.

  12. Genetic architecture supports mosaic brain evolution and independent brain-body size regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; Rosen, Glenn D; Williams, Robert W

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian brain consists of distinct parts that fulfil different functions. Finlay and Darlington have argued that evolution of the mammalian brain is constrained by developmental programs, suggesting that different brain parts are not free to respond individually to selection and evolve independent of other parts or overall brain size. However, comparisons among mammals with matched brain weights often reveal greater differences in brain part size, arguing against strong developmental constraints. Here we test these hypotheses using a quantitative genetic approach involving over 10,000 mice. We identify independent loci for size variation in seven key parts of the brain, and observe that brain parts show low or no phenotypic correlation, as is predicted by a mosaic scenario. We also demonstrate that variation in brain size is independently regulated from body size. The allometric relations seen at higher phylogenetic levels are thus unlikely to be the product of strong developmental constraints.

  13. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Robert; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Procedures for two demonstrations are provided. The solubility of ammonia gas in water is demonstrated by introducing water into a closed can filled with the gas, collapsing the can. The second demonstration relates scale of standard reduction potentials to observed behavior of metals in reactions with hydrogen to produce hydrogen gas. (Author/JN)

  14. Towards a new analytical approach to the challenges of communication difficulties and aquired brain damage in everyday practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemmensen, Charlotte Marie Bisgaard

    of ethnomethodology? I draw on Roy Harris’ integrational linguistics’ approach (1998; 2009) to communication and communication abilities as I investigate how agreement on a micro-level is accomplished through participation and initiatives in interactions (Goodwin, 2003). I examine excerpts from a study I have been...... in ‘integration’ and ‘understanding’ as a performing of activities. Goodwin, C. (2003). Conversational frameworks for the accomplishment of meaning in aphasia. In: Goodwin, C. (ed.), Conversation and brain damage (90-116). Oxford. Oxford University Press. Harris, R. (1998). Introduction to integrational...

  15. [Drainage of the Frontal Sinus to Cure Epidural and Brain Abscesses Developed after Surgery via Anterior Interhemispheric Approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bando, Kazuhiko; Ebisutani, Daizo

    2015-08-01

    We report a woman whose anterior communicating artery (AcomA) aneurysm was clipped via an anterior interhemispheric approach when she was 49 years old. At the age of 51, she presented with a subcutaneous abscess and osteomyelitis, so the cranioplastic bone was removed. Six months later, she underwent cranioplasty using hydroxyapatite. Her subcutaneous abscess recurred and the epidural abscess and hydroxyapatite were removed 11 years later after the first operation. The patient underwent observation therapy for the next 4 years, as the dura was ossified. She presented with frontal swelling 15 years after aneurysmal clipping, and neither abscess puncture nor the administration of antibacterial drugs was curative. The patient also complained of chill, thirst, and tremor, and developed disorientation 25 days later. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed extension of the epidural and subcutaneous abscesses to a frontal brain abscess. After consulting an otolaryngologist, we performed frontal drainage into the nasal cavity. After making a bicoronal skin incision, the subcutaneous, epidural, and intracapsular brain abscesses were removed while taking care not to damage the capsules. A silicone T-tube was placed in the bifrontal epidural cavity (previous frontal sinus), and its tip was inserted into the nasal cavity through the nasofrontal duct for abscess drainage. After 3 months, the tube was removed. A CT scan acquired 10 years later showed no brain abscess, perifocal edema, or epidural and subcutaneous abscesses.

  16. Mild traumatic brain injury: a neuropsychiatric approach to diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common occurrence in the United States, with an estimated incidence exceeding 1 million injuries per year. Cognitive, emotional, behavioral, and physical impairments are common sequelae of TBI and may, in a significant minority of patients, persist well into the late period following injury. The etiology of these symptoms in individuals with mild TBI is controversial, with hypotheses of postconcussive symptom formation variously ascribing greater or lesser we...

  17. Immune endocrinological evaluation in patients with severe vascular acquired brain injuries: therapeutical approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amico, Angelo Paolo; Terlizzi, Annamaria; Annamaria, Terlizzi; Megna, Marisa; Marisa, Megna; Megna, Gianfranco; Gianfranco, Megna; Damiani, Sabino; Sabino, Damiani

    2013-06-01

    It is known that in severe acquired brain injuries there is process of neuroinflammation, with the activation of a local and general stress response. In our study we considered six patients with disorders of consciousness (five in vegetative state and one in minimal consciousness state) in subacute phase, which had both a clinical assessment and a functional imaging (fMRI): in all these patients we analised blood levels of osteopontin (OPN), a cytokin involved in neuroinflammation but also in neurorepair with a still discussed role. Besides we studied the lymphocyte subsets and blood levels of some hormones (ADH, ACTH, PRL, GH, TSH, fT3, fT4). We found a positive correlation between the levels of serum osteopontin (higher than normal in all subjects) and the severity of the brain injury, especially for prognosis: actually, the patient with the lowest level has emerged from minimal consciousness state, while the one with the highest level has died a few days after the evaluation. The lymphocyte subset was altered, with a general increase of CD4+/CD3+ ratio, but without a so strict correlation with clinical severity; the only hormone with a significant increase in the worse patients was prolactin. In fMRI we detected some responses to visual and acoustic stimuli also in vegetative states, which had no clinical response to this kind of stimulation but generally have had a better prognosis. So we conclude that osteopontin could be a good marker of neuroinflammation and relate to a worse prognosis of brain injuries; the lymphocyte alterations in these disorders are not clear, but we suspect an unbalance of CD4 towards Th2; PRL is the best endocrinological marker of brain injury severity; fMRI surely plays an important role in the detection of subclinical responses and in prognostic stratification, that is still to define with more studies and statistical analysis.

  18. An Integrated Neuroscience and Engineering Approach to Classifying Human Brain-States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-22

    that it is difficult to target common patterns of brain activity, or to recycle data across subjects as a way to, for example, cut down the 20-30...some previous work in the BCI field focused on transfer learning, which is the general procedure of recycling data across subjects to reduce or...scheme (Fries, 2005; Snyder & Raichle, 2012). DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for public release. Positron emission tomography ( PET ) and functional

  19. A fragment-based approach for the in silico prediction of blood-brain barrier permeation

    OpenAIRE

    Moda, Tiago L.; Carrara, Alexandre E.; Andricopulo, Adriano Defini

    2012-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeation is an essential property for drugs that act in the central nervous system (CNS) for the treatment of human diseases, such as epilepsy, depression, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson disease, schizophrenia, among others. In the present work, quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) studies were conducted for the development and validation of in silico models for the prediction of BBB permeation. The data set used has substantial chemical diversity an...

  20. A novel approach to quantify different iron forms in ex-vivo human brain tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pravin; Bulk, Marjolein; Webb, Andrew; van der Weerd, Louise; Oosterkamp, Tjerk H.; Huber, Martina; Bossoni, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel combination of methods to study the physical properties of ferric ions and iron-oxide nanoparticles in post-mortem human brain, based on the combination of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and SQUID magnetometry. By means of EPR, we derive the concentration of the low molecular weight iron pool, as well as the product of its electron spin relaxation times. Additionally, by SQUID magnetometry we identify iron mineralization products ascribable to a magnetite/maghemite phase and a ferrihydrite (ferritin) phase. We further derive the concentration of magnetite/maghemite and of ferritin nanoparticles. To test out the new combined methodology, we studied brain tissue of an Alzheimer’s patient and a healthy control. Finally, we estimate that the size of the magnetite/maghemite nanoparticles, whose magnetic moments are blocked at room temperature, exceeds 40–50 nm, which is not compatible with the ferritin protein, the core of which is typically 6–8 nm. We believe that this methodology could be beneficial in the study of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s Disease which are characterized by abnormal iron accumulation in the brain. PMID:27941952

  1. Evaluating effects of methylphenidate on brain activity in cocaine addiction: a machine-learning approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rish, Irina; Bashivan, Pouya; Cecchi, Guillermo A.; Goldstein, Rita Z.

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate effects of methylphenidate on brain activity in individuals with cocaine use disorder (CUD) using functional MRI (fMRI). Methylphenidate hydrochloride (MPH) is an indirect dopamine agonist commonly used for treating attention deficit/hyperactivity disorders; it was also shown to have some positive effects on CUD subjects, such as improved stop signal reaction times associated with better control/inhibition,1 as well as normalized task-related brain activity2 and resting-state functional connectivity in specific areas.3 While prior fMRI studies of MPH in CUDs have focused on mass-univariate statistical hypothesis testing, this paper evaluates multivariate, whole-brain effects of MPH as captured by the generalization (prediction) accuracy of different classification techniques applied to features extracted from resting-state functional networks (e.g., node degrees). Our multivariate predictive results based on resting-state data from3 suggest that MPH tends to normalize network properties such as voxel degrees in CUD subjects, thus providing additional evidence for potential benefits of MPH in treating cocaine addiction.

  2. A novel approach to quantify different iron forms in ex-vivo human brain tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pravin; Bulk, Marjolein; Webb, Andrew; van der Weerd, Louise; Oosterkamp, Tjerk H.; Huber, Martina; Bossoni, Lucia

    2016-12-01

    We propose a novel combination of methods to study the physical properties of ferric ions and iron-oxide nanoparticles in post-mortem human brain, based on the combination of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and SQUID magnetometry. By means of EPR, we derive the concentration of the low molecular weight iron pool, as well as the product of its electron spin relaxation times. Additionally, by SQUID magnetometry we identify iron mineralization products ascribable to a magnetite/maghemite phase and a ferrihydrite (ferritin) phase. We further derive the concentration of magnetite/maghemite and of ferritin nanoparticles. To test out the new combined methodology, we studied brain tissue of an Alzheimer’s patient and a healthy control. Finally, we estimate that the size of the magnetite/maghemite nanoparticles, whose magnetic moments are blocked at room temperature, exceeds 40-50 nm, which is not compatible with the ferritin protein, the core of which is typically 6-8 nm. We believe that this methodology could be beneficial in the study of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s Disease which are characterized by abnormal iron accumulation in the brain.

  3. PLATO: data-oriented approach to collaborative large-scale brain system modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannon, Takayuki; Inagaki, Keiichiro; Kamiji, Nilton L; Makimura, Kouji; Usui, Shiro

    2011-11-01

    The brain is a complex information processing system, which can be divided into sub-systems, such as the sensory organs, functional areas in the cortex, and motor control systems. In this sense, most of the mathematical models developed in the field of neuroscience have mainly targeted a specific sub-system. In order to understand the details of the brain as a whole, such sub-system models need to be integrated toward the development of a neurophysiologically plausible large-scale system model. In the present work, we propose a model integration library where models can be connected by means of a common data format. Here, the common data format should be portable so that models written in any programming language, computer architecture, and operating system can be connected. Moreover, the library should be simple so that models can be adapted to use the common data format without requiring any detailed knowledge on its use. Using this library, we have successfully connected existing models reproducing certain features of the visual system, toward the development of a large-scale visual system model. This library will enable users to reuse and integrate existing and newly developed models toward the development and simulation of a large-scale brain system model. The resulting model can also be executed on high performance computers using Message Passing Interface (MPI).

  4. Functional genomics of the brain: uncovering networks in the CNS using a systems approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopka, Genevieve

    2011-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is undoubtedly the most complex human organ system in terms of its diverse functions, cellular composition, and connections. Attempts to capture this diversity experimentally were the foundation on which the field of neurobiology was built. Until now though, techniques were either painstakingly slow or insufficient in capturing this heterogeneity. In addition, the combination of multiple layers of information needed for a complete picture of neuronal diversity from the epigenome to the proteome requires an even more complex compilation of data. In this era of high-throughput genomics though, the ability to isolate and profile neurons and brain tissue has increased tremendously and now requires less effort. Both microarrays and next-generation sequencing have identified neuronal transcriptomes and signaling networks involved in normal brain development, as well as in disease. However, the expertise needed to organize and prioritize the resultant data remains substantial. A combination of supervised organization and unsupervised analyses are needed to fully appreciate the underlying structure in these datasets. When utilized effectively, these analyses have yielded striking insights into a number of fundamental questions in neuroscience on topics ranging from the evolution of the human brain to neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. Future studies will incorporate these analyses with behavioral and physiological data from patients to more efficiently move toward personalized therapeutics.

  5. Role of Antioxidants in Neonatal Hypoxic–Ischemic Brain Injury: New Therapeutic Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteaga, Olatz; Álvarez, Antonia; Revuelta, Miren; Santaolalla, Francisco; Urtasun, Andoni; Hilario, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxic–ischemic brain damage is an alarming health and economic problem in spite of the advances in neonatal care. It can cause mortality or detrimental neurological disorders such as cerebral palsy, motor impairment and cognitive deficits in neonates. When hypoxia–ischemia occurs, a multi-faceted cascade of events starts out, which can eventually cause cell death. Lower levels of oxygen due to reduced blood supply increase the production of reactive oxygen species, which leads to oxidative stress, a higher concentration of free cytosolic calcium and impaired mitochondrial function, triggering the activation of apoptotic pathways, DNA fragmentation and cell death. The high incidence of this type of lesion in newborns can be partly attributed to the fact that the developing brain is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress. Since antioxidants can safely interact with free radicals and terminate that chain reaction before vital molecules are damaged, exogenous antioxidant therapy may have the potential to diminish cellular damage caused by hypoxia–ischemia. In this review, we focus on the neuroprotective effects of antioxidant treatments against perinatal hypoxic–ischemic brain injury, in the light of the most recent advances. PMID:28134843

  6. Role of Antioxidants in Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury: New Therapeutic Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteaga, Olatz; Álvarez, Antonia; Revuelta, Miren; Santaolalla, Francisco; Urtasun, Andoni; Hilario, Enrique

    2017-01-28

    Hypoxic-ischemic brain damage is an alarming health and economic problem in spite of the advances in neonatal care. It can cause mortality or detrimental neurological disorders such as cerebral palsy, motor impairment and cognitive deficits in neonates. When hypoxia-ischemia occurs, a multi-faceted cascade of events starts out, which can eventually cause cell death. Lower levels of oxygen due to reduced blood supply increase the production of reactive oxygen species, which leads to oxidative stress, a higher concentration of free cytosolic calcium and impaired mitochondrial function, triggering the activation of apoptotic pathways, DNA fragmentation and cell death. The high incidence of this type of lesion in newborns can be partly attributed to the fact that the developing brain is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress. Since antioxidants can safely interact with free radicals and terminate that chain reaction before vital molecules are damaged, exogenous antioxidant therapy may have the potential to diminish cellular damage caused by hypoxia-ischemia. In this review, we focus on the neuroprotective effects of antioxidant treatments against perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, in the light of the most recent advances.

  7. A Unified Approach to Diffusion Direction Sensitive Slice Registration and 3-D DTI Reconstruction From Moving Fetal Brain Anatomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mads Fogtmann; Seshamani, Sharmishtaa; Kroenke, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to 3-D diffusion tensor image (DTI) reconstruction from multi-slice diffusion weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging acquisitions of the moving fetal brain. Motion scatters the slice measurements in the spatial and spherical diffusion domain with respect...... to the underlying anatomy. Previous image registration techniques have been described to estimate the between slice fetal head motion, allowing the reconstruction of 3D a diffusion estimate on a regular grid using interpolation. We propose Approach to Unified Diffusion Sensitive Slice Alignment and Reconstruction...... (AUDiSSAR) that explicitly formulates a process for diffusion direction sensitive DW-slice-to-DTI-volume alignment. This also incorporates image resolution modeling to iteratively deconvolve the effects of the imaging point spread function using the multiple views provided by thick slices acquired...

  8. Regional brain metabolite abnormalities in inherited prion disease and asymptomatic gene carriers demonstrated in vivo by quantitative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldman, A.D.; Cordery, R.J.; Godbolt, A.; Rossor, M.N. [University College London, Dementia Research Group, Department of Neurodegenerative Disease, Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom); Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, Division of Neuroscience and Psychological Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, London (United Kingdom); MacManus, D.G. [University College London, NMR Research Unit, Department of Clinical Neurology, Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom); Collinge, J. [University College London, MRC Prion Unit, Department of Neurodegenerative Disease, Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom)

    2006-06-15

    Inherited prion diseases are caused by mutations in the gene which codes for prion protein (PrP), leading to proliferation of abnormal PrP isomers in the brain and neurodegeneration; they include Gerstmann-Straeussler-Scheinker disease (GSS), fatal familial insomnia (FFI) and familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (fCJD). We studied two patients with symptomatic inherited prion disease (P102L) and two pre-symptomatic P102L gene carriers using quantitative magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Short echo time spectra were acquired from the thalamus, caudate region and frontal white matter, metabolite levels and ratios were measured and z-scores calculated for individual patients relative to age-matched normal controls. MRS data were compared with structural magnetic resonance imaging. One fCJD case had generalised atrophy and showed increased levels of myo-inositol (MI) in the thalamus (z=3.7). The other had decreased levels of N-acetylaspartate (z=4) and diffuse signal abnormality in the frontal white matter. Both asymptomatic gene carriers had normal imaging, but increased frontal white matter MI (z=4.3, 4.1), and one also had increased MI in the caudate (z=5.3). Isolated MI abnormalities in asymptomatic gene carriers are a novel finding and may reflect early glial proliferation, prior to significant neuronal damage. MRS provides potential non-invasive surrogate markers of early disease and progression in inherited prion disease. (orig.)

  9. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two laboratory demonstrations in chemistry. One uses dry ice, freon, and freezer bags to demonstrate volume changes, vapor-liquid equilibrium, a simulation of a rain forest, and vaporization. The other uses the clock reaction technique to illustrate fast reactions and kinetic problems in releasing carbon dioxide during respiration. (TW)

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Outlines a simple, inexpensive way of demonstrating electroplating using the reaction between nickel ions and copper metal. Explains how to conduct a demonstration of the electrolysis of water by using a colored Na2SO4 solution as the electrolyte so that students can observe the pH changes. (TW)

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses a supplement to the "water to rose" demonstration in which a pink color is produced. Also discusses blood buffer demonstrations, including hydrolysis of sodium bicarbonate, simulated blood buffer, metabolic acidosis, natural compensation of metabolic acidosis, metabolic alkalosis, acidosis treatment, and alkalosis treatment. Procedures…

  12. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Free radical chlorination of methane is used in organic chemistry to introduce free radical/chain reactions. In spite of its common occurrence, demonstrations of the reaction are uncommon. Therefore, such a demonstration is provided, including background information, preparation of reactants/reaction vessel, introduction of reactants, irradiation,…

  13. Awareness of deficits in traumatic brain injury: a multidimensional approach to assessing metacognitive knowledge and online-awareness.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Keeffe, Fiadhnait

    2007-01-01

    Recent models of impaired awareness in brain injury draw a distinction between metacognitive knowledge of difficulties and online awareness of errors (emergent and anticipatory). We examined performance of 31 Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) participants and 31 healthy controls using a three-strand approach to assessing awareness. Metacognitive knowledge was assessed with an awareness interview and discrepancy scores on three questionnaires--Patient Competency Rating Scale, Frontal Systems Behavioral Scale and the Cognitive Failures Questionnaire. Online Emergent Awareness was assessed using an online error-monitoring task while participants performed tasks of sustained attention. Online anticipatory awareness was examined using prediction performance on two cognitive tasks. Results indicated that the TBI Low Self-Awareness (SA) group and High SA group did not differ in terms of severity, chronicity or standard neuropsychological tasks but those with Low SA were more likely to exhibit disinhibition, interpersonal problems and more difficulties in total competency. Sustained attention abilities were associated with both types of online awareness (emergent and anticipatory). There was a strong relationship between online emergent and online anticipatory awareness. Metacognitive knowledge did not correlate with the other two measures. This study highlights the necessity in adopting a multidimensional approach to assessing the multifaceted phenomenon of awareness of deficits.

  14. A Bayesian approach to the creation of a study-customized neonatal brain atlas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yajing; Chang, Linda; Ceritoglu, Can; Skranes, Jon; Ernst, Thomas; Mori, Susumu; Miller, Michael I; Oishi, Kenichi

    2014-11-01

    Atlas-based image analysis (ABA), in which an anatomical "parcellation map" is used for parcel-by-parcel image quantification, is widely used to analyze anatomical and functional changes related to brain development, aging, and various diseases. The parcellation maps are often created based on common MRI templates, which allow users to transform the template to target images, or vice versa, to perform parcel-by-parcel statistics, and report the scientific findings based on common anatomical parcels. The use of a study-specific template, which represents the anatomical features of the study population better than common templates, is preferable for accurate anatomical labeling; however, the creation of a parcellation map for a study-specific template is extremely labor intensive, and the definitions of anatomical boundaries are not necessarily compatible with those of the common template. In this study, we employed a volume-based template estimation (VTE) method to create a neonatal brain template customized to a study population, while keeping the anatomical parcellation identical to that of a common MRI atlas. The VTE was used to morph the standardized parcellation map of the JHU-neonate-SS atlas to capture the anatomical features of a study population. The resultant "study-customized" T1-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) template, with three-dimensional anatomical parcellation that defined 122 brain regions, was compared with the JHU-neonate-SS atlas, in terms of the registration accuracy. A pronounced increase in the accuracy of cortical parcellation and superior tensor alignment were observed when the customized template was used. With the customized atlas-based analysis, the fractional anisotropy (FA) detected closely approximated the manual measurements. This tool provides a solution for achieving normalization-based measurements with increased accuracy, while reporting scientific findings in a consistent framework.

  15. The military's approach to traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Geoffrey S. F.; Grimes, Jamie; Ecklund, James M.

    2014-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) are common conditions. In Iraq and Afghanistan, explosive blast related TBI became prominent among US service members but the vast majority of TBI was still due to typical causes such as falls and sporting events. PTS has long been a focus of the US military mental health providers. Combat Stress Teams have been integral to forward deployed units since the beginning of the Global War on Terror. Military medical management of disease and injury follows standard of care clinical practice guidelines (CPG) established by civilian counterparts. However, when civilian CPGs do not exist or are not applicable to the military environment, new practice standards are created. Such is the case for mild TBI. In 2009, the VA-DoD CPG for management of mild TBI/concussion was published and a system-wide clinical care program for mild TBI/concussion was introduced. This was the first large scale effort on an entire medical care system to address all severities of TBI in a comprehensive organized way. In 2010, the VA-DoD CPG for management of PTSD was published. Nevertheless, both TBI and PTS are still incompletely understood. Investment in terms of money and effort has been committed by the DoD to their study. The Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, National Intrepid Center of Excellence and the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury are prominent examples of this effort. These are just beginnings, a work in progress ready to leverage advances made scientifically and always striving to provide the very best care to its military beneficiaries.

  16. An efficient approach of EEG feature extraction and classification for brain computer interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Ting; Yan Guozheng; Yang Banghua

    2009-01-01

    In the study of brain-computer interfaces, a method of feature extraction and classification used for two kinds of imaginations is proposed. It considers Euclidean distance between mean traces recorded from the channels with two kinds of imaginations as a feature, and determines imagination classes using threshold value. It analyzed the background of experiment and theoretical foundation referring to the data sets of BCI 2003, and compared the classification precision with the best result of the competition. The result shows that the method has a high precision and is advantageous for being applied to practical systems.

  17. {sup 1}H MR spectroscopy of human brain tumours: a practical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callot, Virginie [Centre de Resonance Magnetique Biologique et Medicale (CRMBM), UMR 6612, CNRS - Universite de la Mediterranee, 27 Boulevard Jean Moulin, 13385 Marseille Cedex 05 (France)], E-mail: virginie.callot@univmed.fr; Galanaud, Damien [Centre de Resonance Magnetique Biologique et Medicale (CRMBM), UMR 6612, CNRS - Universite de la Mediterranee, 27 Boulevard Jean Moulin, 13385 Marseille Cedex 05 (France); Departement de Neuroradiologie, Hopital La Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); Le Fur, Yann; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Cozzone, Patrick J. [Centre de Resonance Magnetique Biologique et Medicale (CRMBM), UMR 6612, CNRS - Universite de la Mediterranee, 27 Boulevard Jean Moulin, 13385 Marseille Cedex 05 (France)

    2008-08-15

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is proposed in addition to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to help in the characterization of brain tumours by detecting metabolic alterations that may be indicative of the tumour class. MRS can be routinely performed on clinical magnets, within a reasonable acquisition time and if performed under adequate conditions, MRS is reproducible and thus can be used for longitudinal follow-up of treatment. MRS can also be performed in clinical practice to guide the neurosurgeon into the most aggressive part of the lesions or to avoid unnecessary surgery, which may furthermore decrease the risk of surgical morbidity.

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L.

    1990-01-01

    Included are three demonstrations that include the phase change of ice when under pressure, viscoelasticity and colloid systems, and flame tests for metal ions. The materials, procedures, probable results, and applications to real life situations are included. (KR)

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Presents three demonstrations suitable for undergraduate chemistry classes. Focuses on experiments with calcium carbide, the induction by iron of the oxidation of iodide by dichromate, and the classical iodine clock reaction. (ML)

  20. Brain aging and Parkinson's disease: New therapeutic approaches using drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Nogales, C; Garbayo, E; Carmona-Abellán, M M; Luquin, M R; Blanco-Prieto, M J

    2016-02-01

    The etiology and pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) is unknown, aging being the strongest risk factor for brain degeneration. Understanding PD pathogenesis and how aging increases the risk of disease would aid the development of therapies able to slow or prevent the progression of this neurodegenerative disorder. In this review we provide an overview of the most promising therapeutic targets and strategies to delay the loss of dopaminergic neurons observed both in PD and aging. Among them, handling alpha-synuclein toxicity, enhancing proteasome and lysosome clearance, ameliorating mitochondrial disruptions and modifying the glial environment are so far the most promising candidates. These new and conventional drugs may present problems related to their labile nature and to the difficulties in reaching the brain. Thus, we highlight the latest types of drug delivery system (DDS)-based strategies for PD treatment, including DDS for local and systemic drug delivery. Finally, the ongoing challenges for the discovery of new targets and the opportunities for DDS-based therapies to improve and efficacious PD therapy will be discussed.

  1. Sixty minutes of what? A developing brain perspective for activating children with an integrative exercise approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myer, Gregory D; Faigenbaum, Avery D; Edwards, Nicholas M; Clark, Joseph F; Best, Thomas M; Sallis, Robert E

    2015-12-01

    Current recommendations for physical activity in children overlook the critical importance of motor skill acquisition early in life. Instead, they focus on the quantitative aspects of physical activity (eg, accumulate 60 min of daily moderate to vigorous physical activity) and selected health-related components of physical fitness (eg, aerobic fitness, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility and body composition). This focus on exercise quantity in youth may limit considerations of qualitative aspects of programme design which include (1) skill development, (2) socialisation and (3) enjoyment of exercise. The timing of brain development and associated neuroplasticity for motor skill learning makes the preadolescence period a critical time to develop and reinforce fundamental movement skills in boys and girls. Children who do not participate regularly in structured motor skill-enriched activities during physical education classes or diverse youth sports programmes may never reach their genetic potential for motor skill control which underlies sustainable physical fitness later in life. The goals of this review are twofold: (1) challenge current dogma that is currently focused on the quantitative rather than qualitative aspects of physical activity recommendations for youth and (2) synthesise the latest evidence regarding the brain and motor control that will provide the foundation for integrative exercise programming that provide a framework sustainable activity for life.

  2. Brain transplants. A new approach to the therapy of neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulipan, N

    1988-05-01

    There is now a wealth of experimental evidence to suggest that transplantation to the brain may ameliorate a variety of neurologic and endocrine disorders. Many unanswered questions remain. Chief among these questions are the duration of any salutary effects and the potential long-term risks to the host CNS. Answers to these questions will only come with carefully controlled long-term clinical studies. Given the high incidence and devastating nature of many of these diseases, such studies will have enormous scientific and social impact. Regardless of the outcome, there is the potential for a greater understanding of the pathologic mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative diseases and, thus, the possibility that definitive therapies will be found as a result.

  3. Brain-computer interface using P300 and virtual reality: a gaming approach for treating ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohani, Darius Adam; Sorensen, Helge B D; Puthusserypady, Sadasivan

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel brain-computer interface (BCI) system aiming at the rehabilitation of attention-deficit/hyperactive disorder in children. It uses the P300 potential in a series of feedback games to improve the subjects' attention. We applied a support vector machine (SVM) using temporal and template-based features to detect these P300 responses. In an experimental setup using five subjects, an average error below 30% was achieved. To make it more challenging the BCI system has been embedded inside an immersive 3D virtual reality (VR) classroom with simulated distractions, which was created by combining a low-cost infrared camera and an "off-axis perspective projection" algorithm. This system is intended for kids by operating with four electrodes, as well as a non-intrusive VR setting. With the promising results, and considering the simplicity of the scheme, we hope to encourage future studies to adapt the techniques presented in this study.

  4. The nasal delivery of nanoencapsulated statins – an approach for brain delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clementino A

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Adryana Clementino,1,2 Mellissa Batger,3 Gabriela Garrastazu,2,3 Michele Pozzoli,3 Elena Del Favero,4 Valeria Rondelli,4 Bianca Gutfilen,5 Thiago Barboza,5 Maria B Sukkar,3 Sergio A L Souza,5 Laura Cantù,4 Fabio Sonvico1,3 1Department of Pharmacy, University of Parma, Parma, Italy; 2National Council for Scientific and Technological Development – CNPq, Brasilia, Brazil; 3Graduate School of Health – Pharmacy, University of Technology Sydney, Ultimo, NSW, Australia; 4Department of Medical Biotechnologies and Translational Medicine, LITA, University of Milan, Segrate, Italy; 5Laboratório de Marcação de Células e Moléculas, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Purpose: Along with their cholesterol-lowering effect, statins have shown a wide range of pleiotropic effects potentially beneficial to neurodegenerative diseases. However, such effects are extremely elusive via the conventional oral administration. The purpose of the present study was to prepare and characterize the physicochemical properties and the in vivo biodistribution of simvastatin-loaded lecithin/chitosan nanoparticles (SVT-LCNs suitable for nasal administration in view of an improved delivery of the statins to the brain. Materials and methods: Chitosan, lecithin, and different oil excipients were used to prepare nanocapsules loaded with simvastatin. Particle size distribution, surface charge, structure, simvastatin loading and release, and interaction with mucus of nanoparticles were determined. The nanoparticle nasal toxicity was evaluated in vitro using RPMI 2651 nasal cell lines. Finally, in vivo biodistribution was assessed by gamma scintigraphy via Tc99m labeling of the particles. Results: Among the different types of nanoparticles produced, the SVT-LCN_MaiLab showed the most ideal physicochemical characteristics, with small diameter (200 nm, positive surface charge (+48 mV and high encapsulation

  5. Tumor metabolism, the ketogenic diet and β-hydroxybutyrate: novel approaches to adjuvant brain tumor therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C. Woolf

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Malignant brain tumors are devastating despite aggressive treatments such as surgical resection, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The average life expectancy of patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma is approximately ~18 months. It is clear that increased survival of brain tumor patients requires the design of new therapeutic modalities, especially those that enhance currently available treatments and/or limit tumor growth. One novel therapeutic arena is the metabolic dysregulation that results in an increased need for glucose in tumor cells. This phenomenon suggests that a reduction in tumor growth could be achieved by decreasing glucose availability, which can be accomplished through pharmacological means or through the use of a high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD. The KD, as the name implies, also provides increased blood ketones to support the energy needs of normal tissues. Preclinical work from a number of laboratories has shown that the KD does indeed reduce tumor growth in vivo. In addition, the KD has been shown to reduce angiogenesis, inflammation, peri-tumoral edema, migration and invasion. Furthermore, this diet can enhance the activity of radiation and chemotherapy in a mouse model of glioma, thus increasing survival. Additional studies in vitro have indicated that increasing ketones such as β-hydroxybutyrate in the absence of glucose reduction can also inhibit cell growth and potentiate the effects of chemotherapy and radiation. Thus, while we are only beginning to understand the pluripotent mechanisms through which the KD affects tumor growth and response to conventional therapies, the emerging data provide strong support for the use of a KD in the treatment of malignant gliomas. This has led to a limited number of clinical trials investigating the use of a KD in patients with primary and recurrent glioma.

  6. Tumor Metabolism, the Ketogenic Diet and β-Hydroxybutyrate: Novel Approaches to Adjuvant Brain Tumor Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Eric C.; Syed, Nelofer; Scheck, Adrienne C.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant brain tumors are devastating despite aggressive treatments such as surgical resection, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The average life expectancy of patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma is approximately ~18 months. It is clear that increased survival of brain tumor patients requires the design of new therapeutic modalities, especially those that enhance currently available treatments and/or limit tumor growth. One novel therapeutic arena is the metabolic dysregulation that results in an increased need for glucose in tumor cells. This phenomenon suggests that a reduction in tumor growth could be achieved by decreasing glucose availability, which can be accomplished through pharmacological means or through the use of a high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD). The KD, as the name implies, also provides increased blood ketones to support the energy needs of normal tissues. Preclinical work from a number of laboratories has shown that the KD does indeed reduce tumor growth in vivo. In addition, the KD has been shown to reduce angiogenesis, inflammation, peri-tumoral edema, migration and invasion. Furthermore, this diet can enhance the activity of radiation and chemotherapy in a mouse model of glioma, thus increasing survival. Additional studies in vitro have indicated that increasing ketones such as β-hydroxybutyrate (βHB) in the absence of glucose reduction can also inhibit cell growth and potentiate the effects of chemotherapy and radiation. Thus, while we are only beginning to understand the pluripotent mechanisms through which the KD affects tumor growth and response to conventional therapies, the emerging data provide strong support for the use of a KD in the treatment of malignant gliomas. This has led to a limited number of clinical trials investigating the use of a KD in patients with primary and recurrent glioma. PMID:27899882

  7. Brain lateralization and self-reported symptoms of ADHD in a population sample of adults: A dimensional approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh M. H. Mohamed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Many clinical studies reported a compromised brain lateralization in patients with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD without being conclusive about whether the deficit existed in the left or right hemisphere. It is well-recognized that studying ADHD dimensionally is more controlled for comorbid problems and medication effects, and provides more accurate assessment of the symptoms. Therefore, the present study applied the dimensional approach to test the relationship between brain lateralization and self-reported ADHD symptoms in a population sample. Eighty-five right-handed university students filled in the Conners’ Adult ADHD Rating Scales and performed a lateralization reaction time task. The task consists of two matching conditions: one condition requires nominal identification for letters tapping left hemisphere specialization (Letter Name-Identity condition and the other one requires physical and visuospatial identification for shapes tapping right hemisphere specialization (Shape Physical-Identity condition. The letters or shapes to be matched are presented in left or right visual field of a fixation cross. For both task conditions, brain lateralization was indexed as the difference in mean reaction time between left and right visual field. Linear regression analyses, controlled for mood symptoms reported by a depression, anxiety and stress scale, showed no relationship between the variables. These findings from a population sample of adults do not support the dimensionality of lateralized information processing deficit in ADHD symptomatology. However, group comparison analyses showed that subjects with high level of inattention symptoms close to or above the clinical cut-off had a reduced right hemisphere processing in the Shape Physical-Identity condition.

  8. ICT Demonstration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tine Wirenfeldt; Bay, Gina

    In this demonstration we present and discuss two interrelated on-line learning resources aimed at supporting international students at Danish universities in building study skills (the Study Metro) and avoiding plagiarism (Stopplagiarism). We emphasize the necessity of designing online learning r...

  9. Tested Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations to illustrate characteristics of substances. Outlines a method to detect the changes in pH levels during the electrolysis of water. Uses water pistols, one filled with methane gas and the other filled with water, to illustrate the differences in these two substances. (TW)

  10. The Impact of Previous Physical Training on Redox Signaling after Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats: A Behavioral and Neurochemical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Fiorin, Fernando; de Oliveira Ferreira, Ana P; Ribeiro, Leandro R; Silva, Luiz F A; de Castro, Mauro R T; da Silva, Luís R H; da Silveira, Mauro E P; Zemolin, Ana P P; Dobrachinski, Fernando; Marchesan de Oliveira, Sara; Franco, Jeferson L; Soares, Félix A; Furian, Ana F; Oliveira, Mauro S; Fighera, Michele R; Freire Royes, Luiz F

    2016-07-15

    Throughout the world, traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the major causes of disability, which can include deficits in motor function and memory, as well as acquired epilepsy. Although some studies have shown the beneficial effects of physical exercise after TBI, the prophylactic effects are poorly understood. In the current study, we demonstrated that TBI induced by fluid percussion injury (FPI) in adult male Wistar rats caused early motor impairment (24 h), learning deficit (15 days), spontaneous epileptiform events (SEE), and hilar cell loss in the hippocampus (35 days) after TBI. The hippocampal alterations in the redox status, which were characterized by dichlorofluorescein diacetate oxidation and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity inhibition, led to the impairment of protein function (Na(+), K(+)-adenosine triphosphatase [ATPase] activity inhibition) and glutamate uptake inhibition 24 h after neuronal injury. The molecular adaptations elicited by previous swim training protected against the glutamate uptake inhibition, oxidative stress, and inhibition of selected targets for free radicals (e.g., Na(+), K(+)-ATPase) 24 h after neuronal injury. Our data indicate that this protocol of exercise protected against FPI-induced motor impairment, learning deficits, and SEE. In addition, the enhancement of the hippocampal phosphorylated nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (P-Nrf2)/Nrf2, heat shock protein 70, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor immune content in the trained injured rats suggests that protein expression modulation associated with an antioxidant defense elicited by previous physical exercise can prevent toxicity induced by TBI, which is characterized by cell loss in the dentate gyrus hilus at 35 days after TBI. Therefore, this report suggests that previous physical exercise can decrease lesion progression in this model of brain damage.

  11. Temporal Genetic Modifications after Controlled Cortical Impact—Understanding Traumatic Brain Injury through a Systematic Network Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Hao Wong

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a primary injury caused by external physical force and also a secondary injury caused by biological processes such as metabolic, cellular, and other molecular events that eventually lead to brain cell death, tissue and nerve damage, and atrophy. It is a common disease process (as opposed to an event that causes disabilities and high death rates. In order to treat all the repercussions of this injury, treatment becomes increasingly complex and difficult throughout the evolution of a TBI. Using high-throughput microarray data, we developed a systems biology approach to explore potential molecular mechanisms at four time points post-TBI (4, 8, 24, and 72 h, using a controlled cortical impact (CCI model. We identified 27, 50, 48, and 59 significant proteins as network biomarkers at these four time points, respectively. We present their network structures to illustrate the protein–protein interactions (PPIs. We also identified UBC (Ubiquitin C, SUMO1, CDKN1A (cyclindependent kinase inhibitor 1A, and MYC as the core network biomarkers at the four time points, respectively. Using the functional analytical tool MetaCore™, we explored regulatory mechanisms and biological processes and conducted a statistical analysis of the four networks. The analytical results support some recent findings regarding TBI and provide additional guidance and directions for future research.

  12. An innovative approach to the treatment of Gaucher disease and possibly other metabolic disorders of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Roscoe O; Yang, Chunzhang; Zhuang, Zhengping

    2013-05-01

    The extraordinary benefit of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) on the systemic manifestations of Gaucher disease was demonstrated in 1991. Since that time, investigators have devoted substantial effort to improve the delivery of enzymes to the brain because many hereditary metabolic disorders are characterized by extensive central nervous system involvement. Because the required supplemental enzyme is too large to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), ERT for central nervous system involvement was out of the question at that time. Several innovative strategies that have been reported to overcome this impediment are discussed. Recent investigations have provided additional insight concerning the pathogenesis of enzyme deficiency disorders. For many years it was presumed that alterations of the amino acid sequence of enzymes such as glucocerebrosidase reduced the catalytic activity of the enzyme. It has recently been shown that the decrease of glucocerebrosidase activity was the result of a quantitative loss of the amount of this enzyme. Significant increases of its activity were obtained with small molecule inhibitors of histone deacetylase that cross the BBB. The effect of such materials on neuronopathic Gaucher disease and other CNS metabolic disorders is discussed.

  13. Estimating the need for palliative radiotherapy for brain metastasis: a benchmarking approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, W; Jarvis, C; Mackillop, W J

    2015-02-01

    Palliative radiotherapy (PRT) is useful in the management of many patients with brain metastases, but the need for this treatment in the general cancer population is unknown. The objective of this study was to estimate the appropriate rate of use of PRT for brain metastases (PRT.Br). Ontario's population-based cancer registry was used to identify patients who died of cancer. Radiotherapy records from all the province's radiotherapy centres were linked to Ontario's cancer registry to identify patients who received PRT.Br in the last 2 years of life. Multivariate analysis was used to identify social and health system-related barriers to the use of PRT.Br and to identify a subpopulation of patients with unimpeded access to PRT.Br. The rate of use of PRT.Br was measured in this benchmark subpopulation. The benchmark rate was standardised to the case mix of the overall cancer population. The study population included 231,397 patients who died of cancer in Ontario between 1998 and 2007. Overall, 13,944 patients received at least one course of PRT.Br in the last 2 years of life (6.0%). Multivariate analysis showed that the use of PRT.Br was strongly associated with: the availability of radiotherapy at the diagnosing hospital; the socioeconomic status of the community where the patient lived; and the distance from his/her home to the nearest radiotherapy centre. The benchmark subpopulation was defined as patients diagnosed in a hospital with radiotherapy facilities on site and who resided in a high income community, within 50 km of the nearest radiotherapy centre. The standardised benchmark rate of PRT.Br was 8.0% (95% confidence interval 7.5%, 8.5%). The overall shortfall between the actual rate and the benchmark was 25%, but varied by primary cancer site: lung, 27.6%; melanoma, 19.4%; breast, 13.9%. The magnitude of the shortfall in the use of PRT.Br varied widely across the province. At least 8.0% of patients who die of cancer require PRT.Br at least once in the last 2

  14. Longitudinal Changes in Behavioral Approach System Sensitivity and Brain Structures Involved in Reward Processing during Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urosevic, Snezana; Collins, Paul; Muetzel, Ryan; Lim, Kelvin; Luciana, Monica

    2012-01-01

    Adolescence is a period of radical normative changes and increased risk for substance use, mood disorders, and physical injury. Researchers have proposed that increases in reward sensitivity (i.e., sensitivity of the behavioral approach system [BAS]) and/or increases in reactivity to all emotional stimuli (i.e., reward and threat sensitivities)…

  15. Engineered HA hydrogel for stem cell transplantation in the brain: Biocompatibility data using a design of experiment approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nih, Lina R; Moshayedi, Pouria; Llorente, Irene L; Berg, Andrew R; Cinkornpumin, Jessica; Lowry, William E; Segura, Tatiana; Carmichael, S Thomas

    2017-02-01

    This article presents data related to the research article "Systematic optimization of an engineered hydrogel allows for selective control of human neural stem cell survival and differentiation after transplantation in the stroke brain" (P. Moshayedi, L.R. Nih, I.L. Llorente, A.R. Berg, J. Cinkornpumin, W.E. Lowry et al., 2016) [1] and focuses on the biocompatibility aspects of the hydrogel, including its stiffness and the inflammatory response of the transplanted organ. We have developed an injectable hyaluronic acid (HA)-based hydrogel for stem cell culture and transplantation, to promote brain tissue repair after stroke. This 3D biomaterial was engineered to bind bioactive signals such as adhesive motifs, as well as releasing growth factors while supporting cell growth and tissue infiltration. We used a Design of Experiment approach to create a complex matrix environment in vitro by keeping the hydrogel platform and cell type constant across conditions while systematically varying peptide motifs and growth factors. The optimized HA hydrogel promoted survival of encapsulated human induced pluripotent stem cell derived-neural progenitor cells (iPS-NPCs) after transplantation into the stroke cavity and differentially tuned transplanted cell fate through the promotion of glial, neuronal or immature/progenitor states. The highlights of this article include: (1) Data of cell and bioactive signals addition on the hydrogel mechanical properties and growth factor diffusion, (2) the use of a design of Experiment (DOE) approach (M.W. 2 Weible and T. Chan-Ling, 2007) [2] to select multi-factorial experimental conditions, and (3) Inflammatory response and cell survival after transplantation.

  16. P300-based brain-computer interface for environmental control: an asynchronous approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloise, F.; Schettini, F.; Aricò, P.; Leotta, F.; Salinari, S.; Mattia, D.; Babiloni, F.; Cincotti, F.

    2011-04-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) systems allow people with severe motor disabilities to communicate and interact with the external world. The P300 potential is one of the most used control signals for EEG-based BCIs. Classic P300-based BCIs work in a synchronous mode; the synchronous control assumes that the user is constantly attending to the stimulation, and the number of stimulation sequences is fixed a priori. This issue is an obstacle for the use of these systems in everyday life; users will be engaged in a continuous control state, their distractions will cause misclassification and the speed of selection will not take into account users' current psychophysical condition. An efficient BCI system should be able to understand the user's intentions from the ongoing EEG instead. Also, it has to refrain from making a selection when the user is engaged in a different activity and it should increase or decrease its speed of selection depending on the current user's state. We addressed these issues by introducing an asynchronous BCI and tested its capabilities for effective environmental monitoring, involving 11 volunteers in three recording sessions. Results show that this BCI system can increase the bit rate during control periods while the system is proved to be very efficient in avoiding false negatives when the users are engaged in other tasks.

  17. A 3D learning playground for potential attention training in ADHD: A brain computer interface approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Abdulla; Puthusserypady, Sadasivan

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel brain-computer-interface (BCI) system that could potentially be used for enhancing the attention ability of subjects with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). It employs the steady state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) paradigm. The developed system consists of a 3D classroom environment with active 3D distractions and 2D games executed on the blackboard. The system is concealed as a game (with stages of varying difficulty) with an underlying story to motivate the subjects. It was tested on eleven healthy subjects and the results undeniably establish that by moving to a higher stage in the game where the 2D environment is changed to 3D along with the added 3D distractions, the difficulty level in keeping attention on the main task increases for the subjects. Results also show a mean accuracy of 92.26 ± 7.97% and a mean average selection time of 3.07 ± 1.09 seconds.

  18. A reductionist approach to the analysis of learning in brain-computer interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danziger, Zachary

    2014-04-01

    The complexity and scale of brain-computer interface (BCI) studies limit our ability to investigate how humans learn to use BCI systems. It also limits our capacity to develop adaptive algorithms needed to assist users with their control. Adaptive algorithm development is forced offline and typically uses static data sets. But this is a poor substitute for the online, dynamic environment where algorithms are ultimately deployed and interact with an adapting user. This work evaluates a paradigm that simulates the control problem faced by human subjects when controlling a BCI, but which avoids the many complications associated with full-scale BCI studies. Biological learners can be studied in a reductionist way as they solve BCI-like control problems, and machine learning algorithms can be developed and tested in closed loop with the subjects before being translated to full BCIs. The method is to map 19 joint angles of the hand (representing neural signals) to the position of a 2D cursor which must be piloted to displayed targets (a typical BCI task). An investigation is presented on how closely the joint angle method emulates BCI systems; a novel learning algorithm is evaluated, and a performance difference between genders is discussed.

  19. Minimal brain dysfunction/specific learning disability: a clinical approach for the primary physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, H B

    1976-05-01

    Minimal brain dysfunction is a neurodevelopmental disorder which can be found in nearly 20% of school children. It is characterized by evidences of immaturity involving control of activity, emotions, and behavior, and by specific learning disabilities involving the communicating skills needed in reading, writing, and mathematics. The prime deficits in the classroom are an inability to maintain attention and concentration and an inability to skillfully blend the auditory and visual functions essential in language performance. Medical evaluation will reveal many of the "soft signs" of neurologic involvement, and educational appraisal will indicate a wide scatter in testing scores with a marked discrepancy between evaluated potential and actual classroom achievement. Remedial efforts directed at early detection, relief from pressure and unjust punishment or ridicule from parents and teachers, and adjustment of the educational environment with consideration of the child's individual talents, combined with the judicious use of medications to prolong attention span and improve neurodevelopmental maturity, hold promise of improving the lot of most involved children. There are valid indications that expansion of such programs can do much to prevent these youngsters from developing severe personality maladjustment and delinquent behavior, as well as emotional illness in later life.

  20. Temporary deep brain stimulation in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome: A feasible approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekaj, Edvin; Saleh, Christian; Porta, Mauro; Servello, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome (GTS) is a complex neuropsychiatric disorder, characterized by chronic motor and vocal tics, associated in 50–90% of cases with psychiatric comorbidities. Patients with moderate and severe clinical picture are treated with psychotherapy and pharmacological therapy. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is reserved for pharmacological refractory GTS patients. As GTS tends to improve with time and potentially resolves in the second decade of life, the major concern of DBS in GTS is the age at which the patient undergoes surgical procedure. Some authors suggest performing DBS after 18 years, others after 25 years of age. Case Description: We present a 25-year-old patient with GTS, who was aged 17 years and was treated with thalamic DBS. DBS resulted in progressive and sustained improvement of tics and co-morbidities. After 6 years of DBS treatment, it was noted that the clinical improvement was maintained also in OFF stimulation setting, so it was decided to keep it off. After 2 years in off-setting and stable clinical picture the entire DBS device was removed. Six months after DBS device removal the patient remained symptom-free. Conclusions: DBS is a therapeutic option reserved for severe and refractory GTS cases. In our opinion DBS might be considered as a temporary application in GTS. PMID:26290773

  1. Brain mapping in a patient with congenital blindness – a case for multimodal approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarod L Roland

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in basic neuroscience research across a wide range of methodologies have contributed significantly to our understanding of human cortical electrophysiology and functional brain imaging. Translation of this research into clinical neurosurgery has opened doors for advanced mapping of functionality that previously was prohibitively difficult, if not impossible. Here we present the case of a unique individual with congenital blindness and medically refractory epilepsy who underwent neurosurgical treatment of her seizures. Pre-operative evaluation presented the challenge of accurately and robustly mapping the cerebral cortex for an individual with a high probability of significant cortical re-organization. Additionally, a blind individual has unique priorities in one’s ability to read Braille by touch and sense the environment primarily by sound than the non-vision impaired person. For these reasons we employed additional measures to map sensory, motor, speech, language, and auditory perception by employing a number of cortical electrophysiologic mapping and functional magnetic resonance imaging methods. Our data show promising results in the application of these adjunctive methods in the pre-operative mapping of otherwise difficult to localize, and highly variable, functional cortical areas.

  2. In vivo functional calcium imaging of induced or spontaneous activity in the fly brain using a GFP-apoaequorin-based bioluminescent approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minocci, Daiana; Carbognin, Elena; Murmu, Meena Sriti; Martin, Jean-René

    2013-07-01

    Different optical imaging techniques have been developed to study neuronal activity with the goal of deciphering the neural code underlying neurophysiological functions. Because of several constraints inherent in these techniques as well as difficulties interpreting the results, the majority of these studies have been dedicated more to sensory modalities than to the spontaneous activity of the central brain. Recently, a novel bioluminescence approach based on GFP-aequorin (GA) (GFP: Green fluorescent Protein), has been developed, allowing us to functionally record in-vivo neuronal activity. Taking advantage of the particular characteristics of GA, which does not require light excitation, we report that we can record induced and/or the spontaneous Ca(2+)-activity continuously over long periods. Targeting GA to the mushrooms-bodies (MBs), a structure implicated in learning/memory and sleep, we have shown that GA is sensitive enough to detect odor-induced Ca(2+)-activity in Kenyon cells (KCs). It has been possible to reveal two particular peaks of spontaneous activity during overnight recording in the MBs. Other peaks of spontaneous activity have been recorded in flies expressing GA pan-neurally. Similarly, expression in the glial cells has revealed that these cells exhibit a cell-autonomous Ca(2+)-activity. These results demonstrate that bioluminescence imaging is a useful tool for studying Ca(2+)-activity in neuronal and/or glial cells and for functional mapping of the neurophysiological processes in the fly brain. These findings provide a framework for investigating the biological meaning of spontaneous neuronal activity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 12th European Symposium on Calcium.

  3. Computational Classification Approach to Profile Neuron Subtypes from Brain Activity Mapping Data

    OpenAIRE

    Meng Li; Fang Zhao; Jason Lee; Dong Wang; Hui Kuang; Joe Z Tsien

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of cell type-specific activity patterns during behaviors is important for better understanding of how neural circuits generate cognition, but has not been well explored from in vivo neurophysiological datasets. Here, we describe a computational approach to uncover distinct cell subpopulations from in vivo neural spike datasets. This method, termed “inter-spike-interval classification-analysis” (ISICA), is comprised of four major steps: spike pattern feature-extraction, pre-cluste...

  4. Air pollution and detrimental effects on children’s brain. The need for a multidisciplinary approach to the issue complexity and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian eCalderón-Garcidueñas

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Millions of children in polluted cities are showing brain detrimental effects. Urban children exhibit brain structural and volumetric abnormalities, systemic inflammation, olfactory, auditory, vestibular and cognitive deficits v low-pollution controls. Neuroinflammation and blood-brain-barrier breakdown target the olfactory bulb, prefrontal cortex and brainstem, but are diffusely present throughout the brain. Urban adolescent Apolipoprotein E4 carriers significantly accelerate Alzheimer pathology. Neurocognitive effects of air pollution are permanent, apparent across all populations, and potentially clinically relevant as early evidence of evolving neurodegenerative changes. The diffuse nature of the neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration forces to employ a weight of evidence approach incorporating current clinical, cognitive, neurophysiological, radiological and epidemiological research. Pediatric air pollution research requires extensive multidisciplinary collaborations to accomplish a critical goal: to protect exposed children through multidimensional interventions having both broad impact and reach. Protecting children and teens from neural effects of air pollution should be of pressing importance for public health.

  5. A neuroscience approach to optimizing brain resources for human performance in extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulus, Martin P; Potterat, Eric G; Taylor, Marcus K; Van Orden, Karl F; Bauman, James; Momen, Nausheen; Padilla, Genieleah A; Swain, Judith L

    2009-07-01

    Extreme environments requiring optimal cognitive and behavioral performance occur in a wide variety of situations ranging from complex combat operations to elite athletic competitions. Although a large literature characterizes psychological and other aspects of individual differences in performances in extreme environments, virtually nothing is known about the underlying neural basis for these differences. This review summarizes the cognitive, emotional, and behavioral consequences of exposure to extreme environments, discusses predictors of performance, and builds a case for the use of neuroscience approaches to quantify and understand optimal cognitive and behavioral performance. Extreme environments are defined as an external context that exposes individuals to demanding psychological and/or physical conditions, and which may have profound effects on cognitive and behavioral performance. Examples of these types of environments include combat situations, Olympic-level competition, and expeditions in extreme cold, at high altitudes, or in space. Optimal performance is defined as the degree to which individuals achieve a desired outcome when completing goal-oriented tasks. It is hypothesized that individual variability with respect to optimal performance in extreme environments depends on a well "contextualized" internal body state that is associated with an appropriate potential to act. This hypothesis can be translated into an experimental approach that may be useful for quantifying the degree to which individuals are particularly suited to performing optimally in demanding environments.

  6. GASIS demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidas, E.H. [Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    1995-04-01

    A prototype of the GASIS database and retrieval software has been developed and is the subject of this poster session and computer demonstration. The prototype consists of test or preliminary versions of the GASIS Reservoir Data System and Source Directory datasets and the software for query and retrieval. The prototype reservoir database covers the Rocky Mountain region and contains the full GASIS data matrix (all GASIS data elements) that will eventually be included on the CD-ROM. It is populated for development purposes primarily by the information included in the Rocky Mountain Gas Atlas. The software has been developed specifically for GASIS using Foxpro for Windows. The application is an executable file that does not require Foxpro to run. The reservoir database software includes query and retrieval, screen display, report generation, and data export functions. Basic queries by state, basin, or field name will be assisted by scrolling selection lists. A detailed query screen will allow record selection on the basis of any data field, such as depth, cumulative production, or geological age. Logical operators can be applied to any-numeric data element or combination of elements. Screen display includes a {open_quotes}browse{close_quotes} display with one record per row and a detailed single record display. Datasets can be exported in standard formats for manipulation with other software packages. The Source Directory software will allow record retrieval by database type or subject area.

  7. Innovative new technologies to identify and treat traumatic brain injuries: crossover technologies and approaches between military and civilian applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doarn, Charles R; McVeigh, Francis; Poropatich, Ronald

    2010-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has become the signature injury of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom. The use of improvised explosive devices has seen an exponential increase in both Iraq and Afghanistan. In previous conflicts prior to Iraq, survivability of such an injury was far less. Today, technological improvements in trauma care have increased an injured warfighter's chance of survival. A reduction in severe TBI has been achieved but an increase in mild or moderate TBI has been observed. The consequences of this kind of injury can be both physical and mental and can often be hidden or even misdiagnosed. The U.S. Army is interested in pursuing technological solutions for early detection and treatment of TBI to reduce its lasting impact on the warfighter. Such technological breakthroughs have benefit beyond the military, as TBI is a high probable event in nonmilitary settings as well. To gauge what technologies or methods are currently available, the U.S. Army's Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center partnered with the American Telemedicine Association to organize and conduct a discipline-specific symposium entitled "Innovative New Technologies to Identify and Treat Traumatic Brain Injuries: Crossover Technologies and Approaches Between Military and Civilian Applications." This symposium was held in Palm Springs, CA, in September 2009. The purpose of the meeting was to provide a unique opportunity for leaders from disparate organizations involved in telemedicine and related other activities to meet and explore opportunities to collaborate in new partnership models. The meeting was designed to help Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center identify opportunities to expand strategic operations and form new alliances. This report summarizes this symposium while raising awareness for collaboration into better ways of adapting and adopting technologies to address this growing health issue.

  8. A fully Bayesian approach to the parcel-based detection-estimation of brain activity in fMRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makni, S. [Univ Oxford, John Radcliffe Hosp, Oxford Ctr Funct Magnet Resonance Imaging Brain, Oxford OX3 9DU (United Kingdom); Idier, J. [IRCCyN CNRS, Nantes (France); Vincent, T.; Ciuciu, P. [CEA, NeuroSpin, Gif Sur Yvette (France); Vincent, T.; Dehaene-Lambertz, G.; Ciuciu, P. [Inst Imagerie Neurofonctionnelle, IFR 49, Paris (France); Thirion, B. [INRIA Futurs, Orsay (France); Dehaene-Lambertz, G. [INSERM, NeuroSpin, U562, Gif Sur Yvette (France)

    2008-07-01

    Within-subject analysis in fMRI essentially addresses two problems, i. e., the detection of activated brain regions in response to an experimental task and the estimation of the underlying dynamics, also known as the characterisation of Hemodynamic response function (HRF). So far, both issues have been treated sequentially while it is known that the HRF model has a dramatic impact on the localisation of activations and that the HRF shape may vary from one region to another. In this paper, we conciliate both issues in a region-based joint detection-estimation framework that we develop in the Bayesian formalism. Instead of considering function basis to account for spatial variability, spatially adaptive General Linear Models are built upon region-based non-parametric estimation of brain dynamics. Regions are first identified as functionally homogeneous parcels in the mask of the grey matter using a specific procedure [Thirion, B., Flandin, G., Pinel, P., Roche, A., Ciuciu, P., Poline, J.B., August 2006. Dealing with the shortcomings of spatial normalization: Multi-subject parcellation of fMRI datasets. Hum. Brain Mapp. 27 (8), 678-693.]. Then, in each parcel, prior information is embedded to constrain this estimation. Detection is achieved by modelling activating, deactivating and non-activating voxels through mixture models within each parcel. From the posterior distribution, we infer upon the model parameters using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques. Bayesian model comparison allows us to emphasize on artificial datasets first that inhomogeneous gamma-Gaussian mixture models outperform Gaussian mixtures in terms of sensitivity/specificity trade-off and second that it is worthwhile modelling serial correlation through an AR(1) noise process at low signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio. Our approach is then validated on an fMRI experiment that studies habituation to auditory sentence repetition. This phenomenon is clearly recovered as well as the hierarchical temporal

  9. Are Epileptic Seizures Quakes of the Brain? An Approach by Means of Nonextensive Tsallis Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Eftaxias, K; Athanasopoulou, L; Kalimeri, M; Potirakis, S M; Balasis, G

    2011-01-01

    The field of study of complex systems holds that the dynamics of complex systems are founded on universal principles that may used to describe a great variety of scientific and technological approaches of different types of natural, artificial, and social systems. Authors have suggested that earthquake dynamics and neurodynamics can be analyzed within similar mathematical frameworks, a claim further supported by recent evidence. The purpose of this paper is to suggest a shift in emphasis from the large to the small in the search for a dynamical analogy between seizure and earthquake. Our analyses focus on a single epileptic seizure generation and the activation of a single fault (earthquake) and not on the statistics of sequences of different seizures and earthquakes. A central property of the epileptic seizure / earthquake generation is the occurrence of coherent large-scale collective behaviour with very rich structure, resulting from repeated nonlinear interactions among the constituents of the system, res...

  10. Contraction of Information on Brain Wave Fluctuations by Information Geometrical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Hidetoshi

    2005-08-01

    We will first propose a method of EEG signal identification with the use of the stochastic complex Ginzburg-Landau (CGL) equation having complex coefficients with the aid of the method of information geometrical approach to determine the system parameters. After the contracting information on the natures of fluctuations of amplitude and phase in the EEG signals on human scalp, we combine the information with other information such as complex measures like Higuchi's fractal dimension and multi-scale entropies. A new theory of unification of the information is also proposed. To exhibit the potentiality of our new method, we show the result of application of the theory and method to practical EEG data from elderly sound and demented people.

  11. The Dutch Linguistic Intraoperative Protocol: a valid linguistic approach to awake brain surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Witte, E; Satoer, D; Robert, E; Colle, H; Verheyen, S; Visch-Brink, E; Mariën, P

    2015-01-01

    Intraoperative direct electrical stimulation (DES) is increasingly used in patients operated on for tumours in eloquent areas. Although a positive impact of DES on postoperative linguistic outcome is generally advocated, information about the neurolinguistic methods applied in awake surgery is scarce. We developed for the first time a standardised Dutch linguistic test battery (measuring phonology, semantics, syntax) to reliably identify the critical language zones in detail. A normative study was carried out in a control group of 250 native Dutch-speaking healthy adults. In addition, the clinical application of the Dutch Linguistic Intraoperative Protocol (DuLIP) was demonstrated by means of anatomo-functional models and five case studies. A set of DuLIP tests was selected for each patient depending on the tumour location and degree of linguistic impairment. DuLIP is a valid test battery for pre-, intraoperative and postoperative language testing and facilitates intraoperative mapping of eloquent language regions that are variably located.

  12. A Time-Frequency Approach to Feature Extraction for a Brain-Computer Interface with a Comparative Analysis of Performance Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. McGinnity

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an investigation into a time-frequency (TF method for extracting features from the electroencephalogram (EEG recorded from subjects performing imagination of left- and right-hand movements. The feature extraction procedure (FEP extracts frequency domain information to form features whilst time-frequency resolution is attained by localising the fast Fourier transformations (FFTs of the signals to specific windows localised in time. All features are extracted at the rate of the signal sampling interval from a main feature extraction (FE window through which all data passes. Subject-specific frequency bands are selected for optimal feature extraction and intraclass variations are reduced by smoothing the spectra for each signal by an interpolation (IP process. The TF features are classified using linear discriminant analysis (LDA. The FE window has potential advantages for the FEP to be applied in an online brain-computer interface (BCI. The approach achieves good performance when quantified by classification accuracy (CA rate, information transfer (IT rate, and mutual information (MI. The information that these performance measures provide about a BCI system is analysed and the importance of this is demonstrated through the results.

  13. Zebrafish and medaka: model organisms for a comparative developmental approach of brain asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signore, Iskra A; Guerrero, Néstor; Loosli, Felix; Colombo, Alicia; Villalón, Aldo; Wittbrodt, Joachim; Concha, Miguel L

    2009-04-12

    Comparison between related species is a successful approach to uncover conserved and divergent principles of development. Here, we studied the pattern of epithalamic asymmetry in zebrafish (Danio rerio) and medaka (Oryzias latipes), two related teleost species with 115-200 Myr of independent evolution. We found that these species share a strikingly conserved overall pattern of asymmetry in the parapineal-habenular-interpeduncular system. Nodal signalling exhibits comparable spatial and temporal asymmetric expressions in the presumptive epithalamus preceding the development of morphological asymmetries. Neuroanatomical asymmetries consist of left-sided asymmetric positioning and connectivity of the parapineal organ, enlargement of neuropil in the left habenula compared with the right habenula and segregation of left-right habenular efferents along the dorsoventral axis of the interpeduncular nucleus. Despite the overall conservation of asymmetry, we observed heterotopic changes in the topology of parapineal efferent connectivity, heterochronic shifts in the timing of developmental events underlying the establishment of asymmetry and divergent degrees of canalization of embryo laterality. We offer new tools for developmental time comparison among species and propose, for each of these transformations, novel hypotheses of ontogenic mechanisms that explain interspecies variations that can be tested experimentally. Together, these findings highlight the usefulness of zebrafish and medaka as comparative models to study the developmental mechanisms of epithalamic asymmetry in vertebrates.

  14. Combining small-volume metabolomic and transcriptomic approaches for assessing brain chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knolhoff, Ann M; Nautiyal, Katherine M; Nemes, Peter; Kalachikov, Sergey; Morozova, Irina; Silver, Rae; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2013-03-19

    The integration of disparate data types provides a more complete picture of complex biological systems. Here we combine small-volume metabolomic and transcriptomic platforms to determine subtle chemical changes and to link metabolites and genes to biochemical pathways. Capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS) and whole-genome gene expression arrays, aided by integrative pathway analysis, were utilized to survey metabolomic/transcriptomic hippocampal neurochemistry. We measured changes in individual hippocampi from the mast cell mutant mouse strain, C57BL/6 Kit(W-sh/W-sh). These mice have a naturally occurring mutation in the white spotting locus that causes reduced c-Kit receptor expression and an inability of mast cells to differentiate from their hematopoietic progenitors. Compared with their littermates, the mast cell-deficient mice have profound deficits in spatial learning, memory, and neurogenesis. A total of 18 distinct metabolites were identified in the hippocampus that discriminated between the C57BL/6 Kit(W-sh/W-sh) and control mice. The combined analysis of metabolite and gene expression changes revealed a number of altered pathways. Importantly, results from both platforms indicated that multiple pathways are impacted, including amino acid metabolism, increasing the confidence in each approach. Because the CE-MS and expression profiling are both amenable to small-volume analysis, this integrated analysis is applicable to a range of volume-limited biological systems.

  15. Neuroproteomics and Systems Biology Approach to Identify Temporal Biomarker Changes Post Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firas H Kobeissy

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI represents a critical health problem of which diagnosis, management and treatment remain challenging. TBI is a contributing factor in approximately 1/3 of all injury-related deaths in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC estimate that 1.7 million TBI people suffer a TBI in the United States annually. Efforts continue to focus on elucidating the complex molecular mechanisms underlying TBI pathophysiology and defining sensitive and specific biomarkers that can aid in improving patient management and care. Recently, the area of neuroproteomics-systems biology is proving to be a prominent tool in biomarker discovery for central nervous system (CNS injury and other neurological diseases. In this work, we employed the controlled cortical impact (CCI model of experimental TBI in rat model to assess the temporal-global proteome changes after acute (1 day and for the first time, subacute (7 days, post-injury time frame using the established CAX-PAGE LC-MS/MS platform for protein separation combined with discrete systems biology analyses to identify temporal biomarker changes related to this rat TBI model. Rather than focusing on any one individual molecular entities, we used in silico systems biology approach to understand the global dynamics that govern proteins that are differentially altered post-injury. In addition, gene ontology analysis of the proteomic data was conducted in order to categorize the proteins by molecular function, biological process, and cellular localization. Results show alterations in several proteins related to inflammatory responses and oxidative stress in both acute (1 day and subacute (7 days periods post TBI. Moreover, results suggest a differential upregulation of neuroprotective proteins at 7-days post-CCI involved in cellular functions such as neurite growth, regeneration, and axonal guidance. Our study is amongst the first to assess temporal neuroproteome

  16. Design, synthesis and evaluation of redox radiopharmaceuticals: a potential new approach for the development of brain imaging agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, P.C.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The fabrication and complete evaluation are described of a dihydropyridine in equilibrium pyridinium salt type redox system for the delivery of radioiodinated agents to the brain. The pivotal intermediate, N-succinimidyl (1-methylpyridinium iodide)-3-carboxylate was prepared by condensation of nicotinic acid and N-hydroxysuccinimide in the presence of dicyclohexylcarbodimide, followed by quaternization of III with methyl iodide. Tissue distribution studies of /sup 125/I-labeled 4-iodoaniline and the redox agents were performed in rats. (/sup 125/I)Iodoaniline initially showed moderate (0.58% dose/gm) brain uptake with subsequent release of the radioactivity from the brain. (/sup 125/I)Iodoaniline, when coupled to a dihydropyridine carrier showed higher uptake and retention in the brain. The (/sup 125/I)iodophenylethyl analogue showed uptake and retention in the brain to be very similar. Apparently the lipophilic agents cross the blood-brain barrier and are oxidized (quaternized) within the brain. The blood-brain barrier then prevents their release resulting in high uptake and retention in the brain and high brain:blood ratios. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Brain spontaneous fluctuations in sensorimotor regions were directly related to eyes open and eyes closed: evidences from a machine learning approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishan eLiang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated that the difference between resting-state brain activations depends on whether the subject was eyes open (EO or eyes closed (EC. However, whether the spontaneous fluctuations are directly related to these two different resting states are still largely unclear. In the present study, we acquired resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data from 24 healthy subjects (11 males, 20.17 ± 2.74 years under the EO and EC states. The amplitude of the spontaneous brain activity in low-frequency band was subsequently investigated by using the metric of fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (fALFF for each subject under each state. A support vector machine (SVM analysis was then applied to evaluate whether the category of resting states could be determined from the brain spontaneous fluctuations. We demonstrated that these two resting states could be decoded from the identified pattern of brain spontaneous fluctuations, predominantly based on fALFF in the sensorimotor module. Specifically, we observed prominent relationships between increased fALFF for EC and decreased fALFF for EO in sensorimotor regions. Overall, the present results indicate that a SVM performs well in the discrimination between the brain spontaneous fluctuations of distinct resting states and provide new insight into the neural substrate of the resting states during EC and EO.

  18. A Hybrid Approach by Integrating Brain Storm Optimization Algorithm with Grey Neural Network for Stock Index Forecasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanqiu Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stock index forecasting is an important tool for both the investors and the government organizations. However, due to the inherent large volatility, high noise, and nonlinearity of the stock index, stock index forecasting has been a challenging task for a long time. This paper aims to develop a novel hybrid stock index forecasting model named BSO-GNN based on the brain storm optimization (BSO approach and the grey neural network (GNN model by taking full advantage of the grey model in dealing with data with small samples and the neural network in handling nonlinear fitting problems. Moreover, the new developed BSO-GNN, which initializes the parameters in grey neural network with the BSO algorithm, has great capability in overcoming the deficiencies of the traditional GNN model with randomly initialized parameters through solving the local optimum and low forecasting accuracy problems. The performance of the proposed BSO-GNN model is evaluated under the normalization and nonnormalization preprocessing situations. Experimental results from the Shanghai Stock Exchange (SSE Composite Index, the Shenzhen Composite Index, and the HuShen 300 Index opening price forecasting show that the proposed BSO-GNN model is effective and robust in the stock index forecasting and superior to the individual GNN model.

  19. A semi-supervised support vector machine approach for parameter setting in motor imagery-based brain computer interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jinyi; Yu, Zhuliang

    2010-01-01

    Parameter setting plays an important role for improving the performance of a brain computer interface (BCI). Currently, parameters (e.g. channels and frequency band) are often manually selected. It is time-consuming and not easy to obtain an optimal combination of parameters for a BCI. In this paper, motor imagery-based BCIs are considered, in which channels and frequency band are key parameters. First, a semi-supervised support vector machine algorithm is proposed for automatically selecting a set of channels with given frequency band. Next, this algorithm is extended for joint channel-frequency selection. In this approach, both training data with labels and test data without labels are used for training a classifier. Hence it can be used in small training data case. Finally, our algorithms are applied to a BCI competition data set. Our data analysis results show that these algorithms are effective for selection of frequency band and channels when the training data set is small. PMID:21886673

  20. Engineered HA hydrogel for stem cell transplantation in the brain: Biocompatibility data using a design of experiment approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina R. Nih

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This article presents data related to the research article “Systematic optimization of an engineered hydrogel allows for selective control of human neural stem cell survival and differentiation after transplantation in the stroke brain” (P. Moshayedi, L.R. Nih, I.L. Llorente, A.R. Berg, J. Cinkornpumin, W.E. Lowry et al., 2016 [1] and focuses on the biocompatibility aspects of the hydrogel, including its stiffness and the inflammatory response of the transplanted organ. We have developed an injectable hyaluronic acid (HA-based hydrogel for stem cell culture and transplantation, to promote brain tissue repair after stroke. This 3D biomaterial was engineered to bind bioactive signals such as adhesive motifs, as well as releasing growth factors while supporting cell growth and tissue infiltration. We used a Design of Experiment approach to create a complex matrix environment in vitro by keeping the hydrogel platform and cell type constant across conditions while systematically varying peptide motifs and growth factors. The optimized HA hydrogel promoted survival of encapsulated human induced pluripotent stem cell derived-neural progenitor cells (iPS-NPCs after transplantation into the stroke cavity and differentially tuned transplanted cell fate through the promotion of glial, neuronal or immature/progenitor states. The highlights of this article include: (1 Data of cell and bioactive signals addition on the hydrogel mechanical properties and growth factor diffusion, (2 the use of a design of Experiment (DOE approach (M.W. 2 Weible and T. Chan-Ling, 2007 [2] to select multi-factorial experimental conditions, and (3 Inflammatory response and cell survival after transplantation.

  1. Studies of the biogenic amine transporters. V. Demonstration of two binding sites for the cocaine analog [125I]RTI-55 associated with the 5-HT transporter in rat brain membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverthorn, M L; Dersch, C M; Baumann, M H; Cadet, J L; Partilla, J S; Rice, K C; Carroll, F I; Becketts, K M; Brockington, A; Rothman, R B

    1995-04-01

    Earlier work characterized the binding of the high-affinity cocaine analog 3 beta-(4-125iodophenyl)-tropane-2-carboxylic acid methyl ester ([125I]RTI-55) to membranes prepared from rat caudate. That investigation demonstrated that [125I]RTI-55-labeled serotonin (5-HT) transporters in addition to dopamine (DA) transporters and resolved [125I]RTI-55 binding to 5-HT transporters into two distinct components. In the present study, we characterized [125I]RTI-55 binding to membranes prepared from whole rat brain minus caudate. The first series of experiments established that [125I]RTI-55 labels both DA and 5-HT transporters and that 50 nM paroxetine and either 1000 nM 1-[2-(diphenylmethoxy)ethyl]-4-(3-phenylpropyl)homopiperazine (LR1111) or 500 nM (RTI-120) could be used to block [125I]RTI-55 binding to the 5-HT and DA transporters, thereby generating selective assay conditions for the DA and 5-HT transporters, respectively. Selective lesioning of dopaminergic and serotonergic neurons with intracerebroventricular 6-hydroxydopamine and 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine selectively decreased [125I]RTI-55 binding to DA and 5-HT transporters, respectively, thereby confirming the selectivity of the assay conditions. The ligand-selectivity pattern of the whole brain minus caudate 5-HT transporter correlated significantly with that of the caudate 5-HT transporter, although there were some striking differences for selected test agents. Additional experiments resolved [125I]RTI-55 binding to the 5-HT transporter into two components. A ligand-selectivity analysis of the two components failed to identify a highly selective test agent. In summary, the major findings of the present study are that [125I]RTI-55 labels both DA and 5-HT transporters in membranes prepared from whole brain minus caudate, that 50 nM paroxetine and either 1000 nM LR1111 or 500 nM RTI-120 can be used as a blocking agent to generate selective assay conditions for the DA and 5-HT transporters, respectively, and that [125

  2. Cell Mediated Photothermal Therapy of Brain Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschberg, Henry; Madsen, Steen J

    2017-03-01

    Gold based nanoparticles with strong near infra-red (NIR) absorption are ideally suited for photothermal therapy (PTT) of brain tumors. The goal of PTT is to induce rapid heating in tumor tissues while minimizing thermal diffusion to normal brain. PTT efficacy is sensitively dependent on both nanoparticle concentration and distribution in tumor tissues. Nanoparticle delivery via passive approaches such as the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect is unlikely to achieve sufficient nanoparticle concentrations throughout tumor volumes required for effective PTT. A simple approach for improving tumor biodsitribution of nanoparticles is the use of cellular delivery vehicles. Specifically, this review focuses on the use of monocytes/macrophages (Mo/Ma) as gold nanoparticle delivery vectors for PTT of brain tumors. Although the efficacy of this delivery approach has been demonstrated in both in vitro and animal PTT studies, its clinical potential for the treatment of brain tumors remains uncertain.

  3. Optimization of saturation-recovery dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI acquisition protocol: monte carlo simulation approach demonstrated with gadolinium MR renography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jeff L; Conlin, Chris C; Carlston, Kristi; Xie, Luke; Kim, Daniel; Morrell, Glen; Morton, Kathryn; Lee, Vivian S

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI is widely used for the measurement of tissue perfusion and to assess organ function. MR renography, which is acquired using a DCE sequence, can measure renal perfusion, filtration and concentrating ability. Optimization of the DCE acquisition protocol is important for the minimization of the error propagation from the acquired signals to the estimated parameters, thus improving the precision of the parameters. Critical to the optimization of contrast-enhanced T1 -weighted protocols is the balance of the T1 -shortening effect across the range of gadolinium (Gd) contrast concentration in the tissue of interest. In this study, we demonstrate a Monte Carlo simulation approach for the optimization of DCE MRI, in which a saturation-recovery T1 -weighted gradient echo sequence is simulated and the impact of injected dose (D) and time delay (TD, for saturation recovery) is tested. The results show that high D and/or high TD cause saturation of the peak arterial signals and lead to an overestimation of renal plasma flow (RPF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). However, the use of low TD (e.g. 100 ms) and low D leads to similar errors in RPF and GFR, because of the Rician bias in the pre-contrast arterial signals. Our patient study including 22 human subjects compared TD values of 100 and 300 ms after the injection of 4 mL of Gd contrast for MR renography. At TD = 100 ms, we computed an RPF value of 157.2 ± 51.7 mL/min and a GFR of 33.3 ± 11.6 mL/min. These results were all significantly higher than the parameter estimates at TD = 300 ms: RPF = 143.4 ± 48.8 mL/min (p = 0.0006) and GFR = 30.2 ± 11.5 mL/min (p = 0.0015). In conclusion, appropriate optimization of the DCE MRI protocol using simulation can effectively improve the precision and, potentially, the accuracy of the measured parameters. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Disorganization of Equilibrium Directional Interactions in the Brain Motor Network of Parkinson's disease: New Insight of Resting State Analysis Using Granger Causality and Graphical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Mahdieh; Mahloojifar, Ali

    2013-04-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurological disorder characterized by tremor, rigidity, and slowness of movements. Particular changes related to various pathological attacks in PD could result in causal interactions of the brain network from resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) data. In this paper, we aimed to disclose the network structure of the directed influences over the brain using multivariate Granger causality analysis and graph theory in patients with PD as compared with control group. rs-fMRI at rest from 10 PD patients and 10 controls were analyzed. Topological properties of the networks showed that information flow in PD is smaller than that in healthy individuals. We found that there is a balanced local network in healthy control group, including positive pair-wise cross connections between caudate and cerebellum and reciprocal connections between motor cortex and caudate in the left and right hemispheres. The results showed that this local network is disrupted in PD due to disturbance of the interactions in the motor networks. These findings suggested alteration of the functional organization of the brain in the resting state that affects the information transmission from and to other brain regions related to both primary dysfunctions and higher-level cognition impairments in PD. Furthermore, we showed that regions with high degree values could be detected as betweenness centrality nodes. Our results demonstrate that properties of small-world connectivity could also recognize and quantify the characteristics of directed influence brain networks in PD.

  5. An SPM8-Based Approach for Attenuation Correction Combining Segmentation and Nonrigid Template Formation: Application to Simultaneous PET/MR Brain Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Hansen, Adam E; Förster, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    . The method was validated on 16 new subjects with brain tumors (n = 12) or mild cognitive impairment (n = 4) who underwent CT and PET/MR scans. The μ maps and corresponding reconstructed PET images were compared with those obtained using the gold standard CT-based approach and the Dixon-based method available...... coregistered using a diffeomorphic approach. A similar procedure was used to coregister the anatomic MR data for a new subject to the template. Finally, the CT-like images obtained by applying the inverse transformations were converted to linear attenuation coefficients to be used for AC of PET data...... on the Biograph mMR scanner. Relative change (RC) images were generated in each case, and voxel- and region-of-interest-based analyses were performed. RESULTS: The leave-one-out cross-validation analysis of the data from the 15 atlas-generation subjects showed small errors in brain linear attenuation coefficients...

  6. Approaching the biology of human parental attachment: brain imaging, oxytocin and coordinated assessments of mothers and fathers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, J E; Kim, P; Spicer, J; Ho, S S; Dayton, C J; Elmadih, A; Abel, K M

    2014-09-11

    Brain networks that govern parental response to infant signals have been studied with imaging techniques over the last 15 years. The complex interaction of thoughts and behaviors required for sensitive parenting enables the formation of each individual's first social bonds and critically shapes development. This review concentrates on magnetic resonance imaging experiments which directly examine the brain systems involved in parental responses to infant cues. First, we introduce themes in the literature on parental brain circuits studied to date. Next, we present a thorough chronological review of state-of-the-art fMRI studies that probe the parental brain with a range of baby audio and visual stimuli. We also highlight the putative role of oxytocin and effects of psychopathology, as well as the most recent work on the paternal brain. Taken together, a new model emerges in which we propose that cortico-limbic networks interact to support parental brain responses to infants. These include circuitry for arousal/salience/motivation/reward, reflexive/instrumental caring, emotion response/regulation and integrative/complex cognitive processing. Maternal sensitivity and the quality of caregiving behavior are likely determined by the responsiveness of these circuits during early parent-infant experiences. The function of these circuits is modifiable by current and early-life experiences, hormonal and other factors. Severe deviation from the range of normal function in these systems is particularly associated with (maternal) mental illnesses - commonly, depression and anxiety, but also schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Finally, we discuss the limits and extent to which brain imaging may broaden our understanding of the parental brain given our current model. Developments in the understanding of the parental brain may have profound implications for long-term outcomes in families across risk, resilience and possible interventions. This article is part of a Special Issue

  7. A Systems Approach Implicates a Brain Mitochondrial Oxidative Homeostasis Co-expression Network in Genetic Vulnerability to Alcohol Withdrawal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Nicole A. R.; Denmark, DeAunne L.; Kozell, Laura B.; Buck, Kari J.

    2017-01-01

    Genetic factors significantly affect vulnerability to alcohol dependence (alcoholism). We previously identified quantitative trait loci on distal mouse chromosome 1 with large effects on predisposition to alcohol physiological dependence and associated withdrawal following both chronic and acute alcohol exposure in mice (Alcdp1 and Alcw1, respectively). We fine-mapped these loci to a 1.1–1.7 Mb interval syntenic with human 1q23.2-23.3. Alcw1/Alcdp1 interval genes show remarkable genetic variation among mice derived from the C57BL/6J and DBA/2J strains, the two most widely studied genetic animal models for alcohol-related traits. Here, we report the creation of a novel recombinant Alcw1/Alcdp1 congenic model (R2) in which the Alcw1/Alcdp1 interval from a donor C57BL/6J strain is introgressed onto a uniform, inbred DBA/2J genetic background. As expected, R2 mice demonstrate significantly less severe alcohol withdrawal compared to wild-type littermates. Additionally, comparing R2 and background strain animals, as well as reciprocal congenic (R8) and appropriate background strain animals, we assessed Alcw1/Alcdp1 dependent brain gene expression using microarray and quantitative PCR analyses. To our knowledge this includes the first Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis using reciprocal congenic models. Importantly, this allows detection of co-expression patterns limited to one or common to both genetic backgrounds with high or low predisposition to alcohol withdrawal severity. The gene expression patterns (modules) in common contain genes related to oxidative phosphorylation, building upon human and animal model studies that implicate involvement of oxidative phosphorylation in alcohol use disorders (AUDs). Finally, we demonstrate that administration of N-acetylcysteine, an FDA-approved antioxidant, significantly reduces symptoms of alcohol withdrawal (convulsions) in mice, thus validating a phenotypic role for this network. Taken together, these studies

  8. Rehabilitation of awareness of deficits in patients with traumatic brain injury applying a user-friendly computerised intervention approach

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Morgan, Dr Jacinta

    2010-01-01

    Objective : Awareness of errors is an important prerequisite in rehabilitation. Few studies have investigated rehabilitation of error awareness following acquired brain injury. Pilot research has shown that receiving feedback about errors during a computerised task of sustained attention improves performance in patients who have sustained a traumatic brain injury. In this study, a computer-based intervention training programme aimed at improving error awareness was developed. \\r\

  9. Reversing cognitive-motor impairments in Parkinson's disease patients using a computational modelling approach to deep brain stimulation programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankemolle, Anneke M M; Wu, Jennifer; Noecker, Angela M; Voelcker-Rehage, Claudia; Ho, Jason C; Vitek, Jerrold L; McIntyre, Cameron C; Alberts, Jay L

    2010-03-01

    Deep brain stimulation in the subthalamic nucleus is an effective and safe surgical procedure that has been shown to reduce the motor dysfunction of patients with advanced Parkinson's disease. Bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation, however, has been associated with declines in cognitive and cognitive-motor functioning. It has been hypothesized that spread of current to nonmotor areas of the subthalamic nucleus may be responsible for declines in cognitive and cognitive-motor functioning. The aim of this study was to assess the cognitive-motor performance in advanced Parkinson's disease patients with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation parameters determined clinically (Clinical) to settings derived from a patient-specific computational model (Model). Data were collected from 10 patients with advanced Parkinson's disease bilaterally implanted with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation systems. These patients were assessed off medication and under three deep brain stimulation conditions: Off, Clinical or Model based stimulation. Clinical stimulation parameters had been determined based on clinical evaluations and were stable for at least 6 months prior to study participation. Model-based parameters were selected to minimize the spread of current to nonmotor portions of the subthalamic nucleus using Cicerone Deep Brain Stimulation software. For each stimulation condition, participants performed a working memory (n-back task) and motor task (force tracking) under single- and dual-task settings. During the dual-task, participants performed the n-back and force-tracking tasks simultaneously. Clinical and Model parameters were equally effective in improving the Unified Parkinson's disease Rating Scale III scores relative to Off deep brain stimulation scores. Single-task working memory declines, in the 2-back condition, were significantly less under Model compared with Clinical deep brain stimulation settings. Under dual-task conditions, force

  10. The hunt for brain Aβ oligomers by peripherally circulating multi-functional nanoparticles: Potential therapeutic approach for Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Simona; Minniti, Stefania; Gregori, Maria; Sancini, Giulio; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Ordóñez-Gutiérrez, Lara; Wandosell, Francisco; Salmona, Mario; Re, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    We previously showed the ability of liposomes bi-functionalized with phosphatidic acid and an ApoE-derived peptide (mApoE-PA-LIP) to reduce brain Aβ in transgenic Alzheimer mice. Herein we investigated the efficacy of mApoE-PA-LIP to withdraw Aβ peptide in different aggregation forms from the brain, using a transwell cellular model of the blood-brain barrier and APP/PS1 mice. The spontaneous efflux of Aβ oligomers (Aβo), but not of Aβ fibrils, from the 'brain' side of the transwell was strongly enhanced (5-fold) in presence of mApoE-PA-LIP in the 'blood' compartment. This effect is due to a withdrawal of Aβo exerted by peripheral mApoE-PA-LIP by sink effect, because, when present in the brain side, they did not act as Aβo carrier and limit the oligomer efflux. In vivo peripheral administration of mApoE-PA-LIP significantly increased the plasma Aβ level, suggesting that Aβ-binding particles exploiting the sink effect can be used as a therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer disease. From the Clinical Editor: Alzheimer disease (AD) at present is an incurable disease, which is thought to be caused by an accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides in the brain. Many strategies in combating this disease have been focused on either the prevention or dissolving these peptides. In this article, the authors showed the ability of liposomes bi-functionalized with phosphatidic acid and with an ApoE- derived peptide to withdraw amyloid peptides from the brain. The data would help the future design of more novel treatment for Alzheimer disease.

  11. Effects of Perfluorooctanoic Acid on Metabolic Profiles in Brain and Liver of Mouse Revealed by a High-throughput Targeted Metabolomics Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Nanyang; Wei, Si; Li, Meiying; Yang, Jingping; Li, Kan; Jin, Ling; Xie, Yuwei; Giesy, John P.; Zhang, Xiaowei; Yu, Hongxia

    2016-04-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), a perfluoroalkyl acid, can result in hepatotoxicity and neurobehavioral effects in animals. The metabolome, which serves as a connection among transcriptome, proteome and toxic effects, provides pathway-based insights into effects of PFOA. Since understanding of changes in the metabolic profile during hepatotoxicity and neurotoxicity were still incomplete, a high-throughput targeted metabolomics approach (278 metabolites) was used to investigate effects of exposure to PFOA for 28 d on brain and liver of male Balb/c mice. Results of multivariate statistical analysis indicated that PFOA caused alterations in metabolic pathways in exposed individuals. Pathway analysis suggested that PFOA affected metabolism of amino acids, lipids, carbohydrates and energetics. Ten and 18 metabolites were identified as potential unique biomarkers of exposure to PFOA in brain and liver, respectively. In brain, PFOA affected concentrations of neurotransmitters, including serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, and glutamate in brain, which provides novel insights into mechanisms of PFOA-induced neurobehavioral effects. In liver, profiles of lipids revealed involvement of β-oxidation and biosynthesis of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids in PFOA-induced hepatotoxicity, while alterations in metabolism of arachidonic acid suggesting potential of PFOA to cause inflammation response in liver. These results provide insight into the mechanism and biomarkers for PFOA-induced effects.

  12. Neuron-glia interaction as a possible glue to translate the mind-brain gap: A novel multi-dimensional approach toward psychology and psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro A. Kato

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Neurons and synapses have long been the dominant focus of neuroscience, thus the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders has come to be understood within the neuronal doctrine. However, the majority of cells in the brain are not neurons but glial cells including astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and microglia. Traditionally, neuroscientists regarded glial functions as simply providing physical support and maintenance for neurons. Thus, in this limited role glia had been long ignored. Recently, glial functions have been gradually investigated, and increasing evidence has suggested that glial cells perform important roles in various brain functions. Digging up the glial functions and further understanding of these crucial cells, and the interaction between neurons and glia may shed new light on clarifying many unknown aspects including the mind-brain gap, and conscious-unconscious relationships. We briefly review the current situation of glial research in the field, and propose a novel translational research with a multi-dimensional model, combining various experimental approaches such as animal studies, in vitro & in vivo neuron-glia studies, a variety of human brain imaging investigations, and psychometric assessments.

  13. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS - electroencephalography (EEG based brain-state dependent electrotherapy (BSDE: A computational approach based on excitation-inhibition balance hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snigdha Dagar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the leading cause of severe chronic disability and the second cause of death worldwide with 15 million new cases and 50 million stroke survivors. The post stroke chronic disability may be ameliorated with early neuro rehabilitation where non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS techniques can be used as an adjuvant treatment to hasten the effects. However, the heterogeneity in the lesioned brain will require individualized NIBS intervention where innovative neuroimaging technologies of portable electroencephalography (EEG and functional-near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS can be leveraged for Brain State Dependent Electrotherapy (BSDE. In this hypothesis and theory article, we propose a computational approach based on excitation-inhibition (E-I balance hypothesis to objectively quantify the post stroke individual brain state using online fNIRS-EEG joint imaging. One of the key events that occurs following Stroke is the imbalance in local excitation-inhibition (that is the ratio of Glutamate/GABA which may be targeted with NIBS using a computational pipeline that includes individual forward models to predict current flow patterns through the lesioned brain or brain target region. The current flow will polarize the neurons which can be captured with excitation-inhibition based brain models. Furthermore, E-I balance hypothesis can be used to find the consequences of cellular polarization on neuronal information processing which can then be implicated in changes in function. We first review evidence that shows how this local imbalance between excitation-inhibition leading to functional dysfunction can be restored in targeted sites with NIBS (Motor Cortex, Somatosensory Cortex resulting in large scale plastic reorganization over the cortex, and probably facilitating recovery of functions. Secondly, we show evidence how BSDE based on inhibition–excitation balance hypothesis may target a specific brain site or network as an adjuvant treatment

  14. Demonstration of melatonin in amphibia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerdonk, F.C.G. van de

    1967-01-01

    The presence of melatonin in the amphibian epiphysis has been ascertained earlier by several indirect methods, demonstrating the synthesizing enzyme or precursors of the compound. This communication describes the presence of melatonin in amphibian brain in a direct way, using dextran gel chromatogra

  15. Controlling a Rehabilitation Robot with Brain-Machine Interface: An approach based on Independent Component Analysis and Multiple Kernel Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hung Liu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Patients suffering from severe motor disabilities usually require assistance from other people when doing rehabilitation exercises, which causes the rehabilitation process to be time-consuming and inconvenient. Therefore, we propose an automatic feature extraction method for a brain-machine interface that allows patients to control a robot using their own brain waves. A brain–machine interface (BMI based on the P300 event-related potential (ERP, called Brain Controlled Rehabilitation System (BCRS, was developed to detect the intentions of patients. Using the BCRS, patients can communicate with the robot through their brain waves. However, deciding how to obtain an automatically extracted, useful EEG signal is a difficult and important problem for BMI research. In this paper, Independent Component Analysis – Multiple Kernel Learning (ICA-MKL is used to directly extract a useful signal and build the classification mode for BCRS. The results reveal that this method is useful for automatically extracting the P300 signal and the accuracy is better than MKL. In additional, the same method can be extended into any motor imaginary area and the accuracy of ICA-MKL for brain imaginary data is also good to removing eye-blink artifacts and the accuracy performance is also good.

  16. Brain adaptation to stressful stimuli: a new perspective on potential therapeutic approaches based on BDNF and NMDA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Ann M; Popolo, Margherita; Pan, Hongna; Blondeau, Nicolas; Lipsky, Robert H

    2008-10-01

    A variety of sublethal or stressful stimuli induce a phenomenon in the brain known as tolerance, an adaptive response that protects the brain against the same stress, or against a different stress (cross-tolerance). Understanding the molecular mechanisms of brain preconditioning holds promise in developing innovative therapies to prevent and treat neurodegenerative disorders, particularly ischemic stroke. Many of the detailed steps involved in tolerance and cross-tolerance are unknown. It is also likely that different stressors differentially regulate sets of genes, transcription factors, and signal transduction pathways that depend upon the molecules that are released in response to the stressor, activation of particular receptors, and the surrounding milieu. The focus of this review is to highlight a few examples of stimuli that induce tolerance: 1) cortical spreading depression; 2) 3-nitropropionic acid; and 3) 2-deoxy-D-glucose. We will summarize by discussing one pathway where intracellular mediators may converge to upregulate intrinsic neuronal survival pathways to promote survival by resisting damage. This mechanism, activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and its integral relationship with brain-derived neurotrophic factor, may be a critical and general mechanism developed in brain to respond to stressful stimuli.

  17. Analysis of a human brain transcriptome map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greene Jonathan R

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome wide transcriptome maps can provide tools to identify candidate genes that are over-expressed or silenced in certain disease tissue and increase our understanding of the structure and organization of the genome. Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs from the public dbEST and proprietary Incyte LifeSeq databases were used to derive a transcript map in conjunction with the working draft assembly of the human genome sequence. Results Examination of ESTs derived from brain tissues (excluding brain tumor tissues suggests that these genes are distributed on chromosomes in a non-random fashion. Some regions on the genome are dense with brain-enriched genes while some regions lack brain-enriched genes, suggesting a significant correlation between distribution of genes along the chromosome and tissue type. ESTs from brain tumor tissues have also been mapped to the human genome working draft. We reveal that some regions enriched in brain genes show a significant decrease in gene expression in brain tumors, and, conversely that some regions lacking in brain genes show an increased level of gene expression in brain tumors. Conclusions This report demonstrates a novel approach for tissue specific transcriptome mapping using EST-based quantitative assessment.

  18. A multi-platform metabolomics approach demonstrates changes in energy metabolism and the transsulfuration pathway in Chironomus tepperi following exposure to zinc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Sara M., E-mail: hoskins@unimelb.edu.au [Centre for Aquatic Pollution, Identification and Management (CAPIM), School of BioSciences, Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, The University of Melbourne, 30 Flemington Road, Parkville, 3052 (Australia); Tull, Dedreia L., E-mail: dedreia@unimelb.edu.au [Metabolomics Australia, Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, 30 Flemington Road, Parkville, 3052 (Australia); Jeppe, Katherine J., E-mail: k.jeppe@unimelb.edu.au [Centre for Aquatic Pollution, Identification and Management (CAPIM), School of BioSciences, Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, The University of Melbourne, 30 Flemington Road, Parkville, 3052 (Australia); Centre for Aquatic Pollution, Identification and Management (CAPIM), School of BioSciences, The University of Melbourne, 3010 (Australia); De Souza, David P., E-mail: desouzad@unimelb.edu.au [Metabolomics Australia, Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, 30 Flemington Road, Parkville, 3052 (Australia); Dayalan, Saravanan, E-mail: sdayalan@unimelb.edu.au [Metabolomics Australia, Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, 30 Flemington Road, Parkville, 3052 (Australia); Pettigrove, Vincent J., E-mail: vpet@unimelb.edu.au [Centre for Aquatic Pollution, Identification and Management (CAPIM), School of BioSciences, The University of Melbourne, 3010 (Australia); McConville, Malcolm J., E-mail: malcolmm@unimelb.edu.au [Metabolomics Australia, Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, 30 Flemington Road, Parkville, 3052 (Australia); Hoffmann, Ary A., E-mail: ary@unimelb.edu.au [Centre for Aquatic Pollution, Identification and Management (CAPIM), School of BioSciences, Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, The University of Melbourne, 30 Flemington Road, Parkville, 3052 (Australia); School of BioSciences, Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, The University of Melbourne, 30 Flemington Road, Parkville, 3052 (Australia)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • An integrated metabolomics approach was applied to examine zinc exposure in midges. • Changes in carbohydrate and energy metabolism were observed using GC–MS. • Transsulfuration pathway is affected by zinc exposure. • Heavy metals other than zinc affect the transsulfuration pathways differently. - Abstract: Measuring biological responses in resident biota is a commonly used approach to monitoring polluted habitats. The challenge is to choose sensitive and, ideally, stressor-specific endpoints that reflect the responses of the ecosystem. Metabolomics is a potentially useful approach for identifying sensitive and consistent responses since it provides a holistic view to understanding the effects of exposure to chemicals upon the physiological functioning of organisms. In this study, we exposed the aquatic non-biting midge, Chironomus tepperi, to two concentrations of zinc chloride and measured global changes in polar metabolite levels using an untargeted gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) analysis and a targeted liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC–MS) analysis of amine-containing metabolites. These data were correlated with changes in the expression of a number of target genes. Zinc exposure resulted in a reduction in levels of intermediates in carbohydrate metabolism (i.e., glucose 6-phosphate, fructose 6-phosphate and disaccharides) and an increase in a number of TCA cycle intermediates. Zinc exposure also resulted in decreases in concentrations of the amine containing metabolites, lanthionine, methionine and cystathionine, and an increase in metallothionein gene expression. Methionine and cystathionine are intermediates in the transsulfuration pathway which is involved in the conversion of methionine to cysteine. These responses provide an understanding of the pathways affected by zinc toxicity, and how these effects are different to other heavy metals such as cadmium and copper. The use of complementary

  19. Brain-Actuated Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Millán, José del R.; Renkens, F.; Mouriño, J.; Gerstner, W.

    2004-01-01

    Over the last years evidence has accumulated that shows the possibility to analyze human brain activity on-line and translate brain states into actions such as selecting a letter from a virtual keyboard or moving a robotics device. These initial results have been obtained with either invasive approaches (requiring surgical implantation of electrodes) or synchronous protocols (where brain signals are time-locked to external cues). In this paper we describe a portable noninvasive brain-computer...

  20. Participatory approach for integrated development and management of North African marginal zones: demonstrative plan to fight desertification in Morocco and Tunisia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Mulas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A demonstrative and participatory development project on desertification mitigation and rural development has been launched in Northern Africa under SMAP Programme (Short and Medium-term priority environmental Action Programme financed by the European Union. The project, which title is Demonstration Project on Strategies to Combat Desertification in Arid Lands with Direct Involvement of Local Agro-pastoral Communities in North Africa, is carried out in sensitive regions of Morocco and Tunisia with the coordination of the Nucleo Ricerca sulla Desertificazione (NRD, Desertification Research Center of the University of Sassari (Italy and the partnership of Morocco and Tunisia Agriculture Ministries. The areas concerned are located in regions characterised by rural poverty, food dependency and land abandoning where urgent measures are needed to promote optimisation of resource availability and management for a sustainable development. The project involves direct desertification mitigation by vegetation cover restoration, with drought resistant perennial forage species (Opuntia ficus-indica, Atriplex nummularia and Acacia saligna in highly degraded rangelands in order to mitigate desertification processes while improving rangelands productivity; and adopts measures for local population technical capacities building through training sessions related to all project activities, and making it a concrete demonstration supported by the direct involvement of local communities. Successful actions already carried out in this field by the participants of the project as well as by other Mediterranean countries, has been taken into account, re-elaborated and exploited, thus promoting south/south co-operation and exchange of knowledge. Participation of all actors and especially of local communities is the key point in all phases of the project and is strengthened by means of dissemination and sensitisation campaigns and by training courses. At the end of the

  1. Selection of independent components representing event-related brain potentials: A data-driven approach for greater objectivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessel, J.R.; Ullsperger, M.

    2011-01-01

    Following the development of increasingly precise measurement instruments and fine-grain analysis tools for electroencephalographic (EEG) data, analysis of single-trial event-related EEG has considerably widened the utility of this non-invasive method to investigate brain activity. Recently, indepen

  2. Brain lateralization and self-reported symptoms of ADHD in a population sample of adults : A dimensional approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohamed, Saleh M.H.; Börger, N.A.; Geuze, Reint H.; van der Meere, Jaap J.

    2015-01-01

    Many clinical studies reported a compromised brain lateralization in patients with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) without being conclusive about whether the deficit existed in the left or right hemisphere. It is well-recognized that studying ADHD dimensionally is more controlled for

  3. Brain lateralization and self-reported symptoms of ADHD in non-clinical adults : A dimensional approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohamed, Saleh M. H.; Borger, Norbertus; Geuze, Reint; van der Meere, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Many clinical studies reported a compromised Brain Lateralization (BL) in patients with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). However, the question remains whether the deficit is in the left or right hemisphere. It is well-recognized that research on patients is vulnerable to comorbiditie

  4. Edible Astronomy Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubowich, Donald A.

    2007-12-01

    Astronomy demonstrations with edible ingredients are an effective way to increase student interest and knowledge of astronomical concepts. This approach has been successful with all age groups from elementary school through college students - and the students remember these demonstrations after they are presented. In this poster I describe edible demonstrations I have created to simulate the expansion of the universe (using big-bang chocolate chip cookies); differentiation during the formation of the Earth and planets (using chocolate or chocolate milk with marshmallows, cereal, candy pieces or nuts); and radioactivity/radioactive dating (using popcorn). Other possible demonstrations include: plate tectonics (crackers with peanut butter and jelly); convection (miso soup or hot chocolate); mud flows on Mars (melted chocolate poured over angel food cake); formation of the Galactic disk (pizza); formation of spiral arms (coffee with cream); the curvature of Space (Pringles); constellations patterns with chocolate chips and chocolate chip cookies; planet shaped cookies; star shaped cookies with different colored frostings; coffee or chocolate milk measurement of solar radiation; Oreo cookie lunar phases. Sometimes the students eat the results of the astronomical demonstrations. These demonstrations are an effective teaching tool and can be adapted for cultural, culinary, and ethnic differences among the students.

  5. Thermo-energetic design of machine tools a systemic approach to solve the conflict between power efficiency, accuracy and productivity demonstrated at the example of machining production

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    The approach to the solution within the CRC/TR 96 financed by the German Research Foundation DFG aims at measures that will allow manufacturing accuracy to be maintained under thermally unstable conditions with increased productivity, without an additional demand for energy for tempering. The challenge of research in the CRC/TR 96 derives from the attempt to satisfy the conflicting goals of reducing energy consumption and increasing accuracy and productivity in machining. In the current research performed in 19 subprojects within the scope of the CRC/TR 96, correction and compensation solutions that influence the thermo-elastic machine tool behaviour efficiently and are oriented along the thermo-elastic functional chain are explored and implemented. As part of this general objective, the following issues must be researched and engineered in an interdisciplinary setting and brought together into useful overall solutions:   1.  Providing the modelling fundamentals to calculate the heat fluxes and the resulti...

  6. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  7. Brain Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  8. A Genetic-Based Feature Selection Approach in the Identification of Left/Right Hand Motor Imagery for a Brain-Computer Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaacoub, Charles; Mhanna, Georges; Rihana, Sandy

    2017-01-01

    Electroencephalography is a non-invasive measure of the brain electrical activity generated by millions of neurons. Feature extraction in electroencephalography analysis is a core issue that may lead to accurate brain mental state classification. This paper presents a new feature selection method that improves left/right hand movement identification of a motor imagery brain-computer interface, based on genetic algorithms and artificial neural networks used as classifiers. Raw electroencephalography signals are first preprocessed using appropriate filtering. Feature extraction is carried out afterwards, based on spectral and temporal signal components, and thus a feature vector is constructed. As various features might be inaccurate and mislead the classifier, thus degrading the overall system performance, the proposed approach identifies a subset of features from a large feature space, such that the classifier error rate is reduced. Experimental results show that the proposed method is able to reduce the number of features to as low as 0.5% (i.e., the number of ignored features can reach 99.5%) while improving the accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and precision of the classifier. PMID:28124985

  9. Endoscopic Endonasal Transethmoidal Approach for the Management of a Traumatic Brain Abscess and Reconstruction of the Accompanying Anterior Skull Base Defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanriover, Necmettin; Kucukyuruk, Baris; Erdi, Fatih; Kafadar, Ali Metin; Gazioğlu, Nurperi

    2015-09-01

    Skull base endoscopy in the treatment of brain abscesses has been rarely published. Moreover, endoscopic endonasal transethmoidal approach (EETA) for the treatment of brain abscess following a head trauma has been reported only in a few case reports. We report the management of a patient of intracerebral abscess and reconstruction of the accompanying anterior skull base defect through an EETA.Thirty-year-old male with a frontal lobe abscess due to a penetrating skull base trauma was operated via EETA. After drainage of the abscess, dural and bony defects were repaired to prevent any recurrence. Postoperative radiological imaging revealed prominent decrease in abscess size. The patient did not need any further surgical intervention, and antibiotherapy was adequate.EETA is safe and effective in the management of brain abscesses. Skull base endoscopy provides direct visualization of the abscess cavity through a minimal invasive route, facilitates wide exposure of surrounding neurovascular structures within the operative field, and enables concurrent closure of the skull base defect.

  10. Comparative proteome approach demonstrates that platelet-derived growth factor C and D efficiently induce proliferation while maintaining multipotency of hMSCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sotoca, Ana M., E-mail: a.sotoca@science.ru.nl [Department of Cell and Applied Biology, Radboud University, Heijendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Roelofs-Hendriks, Jose [Department of Cell and Applied Biology, Radboud University, Heijendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Boeren, Sjef [Laboratory of Biochemistry, Wageningen University, Dreijenlaan 3, 6703 HA Wageningen (Netherlands); Kraan, Peter M. van der [Department of Rheumatology Research and Advanced Therapeutics, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Vervoort, Jacques [Laboratory of Biochemistry, Wageningen University, Dreijenlaan 3, 6703 HA Wageningen (Netherlands); Zoelen, Everardus J.J. van; Piek, Ester [Department of Cell and Applied Biology, Radboud University, Heijendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2013-10-15

    This is the first study that comprehensively describes the effects of the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) isoforms C and D during in vitro expansion of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Our results show that PDGFs can enhance proliferation of hMSCs without affecting their multipotency. It is of great value to culture and expand hMSCs in a safe and effective manner without losing their multipotency for manipulation and further development of cell-based therapies. Moreover, differential effects of PDGF isoforms have been observed on lineage-specific differentiation induced by BMP2 and Vitamin D3. Based on label-free LC-based quantitative proteomics approach we have furthermore identified specific pathways induced by PDGFs during the proliferation process, showing the importance of bioinformatics tools to study cell function. - Highlights: • PDGFs (C and D) significantly increased the number of multipotent undifferentiated hMSCs. • Enhanced proliferation did not impair the ability to undergo lineage-specific differentiation. • Proteomic analysis confirmed the overall signatures of the ‘intact’ cells.

  11. Optimal Magnetic Field for Crossing Super-Para-Magnetic Nanoparticles through the Brain Blood Barrier: A Computational Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maysam Z. Pedram

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper scrutinizes the magnetic field effect to deliver the superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPMNs through the Blood Brain Barrier (BBB. Herein we study the interaction between the nanoparticle (NP and BBB membrane using Molecular Dynamic (MD techniques. The MD model is used to enhance our understanding of the dynamic behavior of SPMNs crossing the endothelial cells in the presence of a gradient magnetic field. Actuation of NPs under weak magnetic field offers the great advantage of a non-invasive drug delivery without the risk of causing injury to the brain. Furthermore, a weak magnetic portable stimulator can be developed using low complexity prototyping techniques. Based on MD simulation results in this paper, SPMNs can cross the cell membrane while experiencing very weak mechanical forces in the range of pN. This study also derives guidelines for the design of the SPMNs dedicated to crossing the BBB using external magnetic fields.

  12. What the human eye tells the brain: a new approach toward a hardware-based modeling of mental functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauinger, N.

    2007-09-01

    A better understanding of intelligent information processing in human vision can be reached through a closer look at the macro- and micro-hardware available in the hierarchy of cortical processors along the main visual pathway connecting the retina, the CGL (corpus geniculatum laterale) and area V1 (cortical visual area 17). The building of the eye is driven by the brain and the engineering of the main visual pathway back to V1 seems to be driven by the eyes. The human eye offers to the brain much more intelligent information about the outer visible world than a camera producing flat 2D images on a CCD. Intelligent processing of visual information in human vision - a strong cooperation between eyes and brain - relays on axes related symmetry operations relevant for navigation in 4D spectral space-times, on a hierarchy of dynamically balanced equilibrium states, on diffractive-optical transformation of the Visible into RGB space, on range mapping based on RGB data (monocular and binocular 3D vision), on illuminant-adaptive optical correlations of local onto global RGB data (color constancy performances) and on invariant fourier-optical log-polar processing of image data (generic object classification; identification of objects). These performances are more compatible with optical processing of modern diffractive-optical sensors and interference-optical correlators than with cameras. The R+D project NAMIROS (Nano- and Micro-3D gratings for Optical Sensors) [8], coordinated by an interdisciplinary team of specialists at Corrsys 3D Sensors AG, describes the roadmap towards a technical realization of outstanding high-tech performances corresponding to human eye-brain co-processing.

  13. Differentiation in boron distribution in adult male and female rats' normal brain: A BNCT approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodarzi, Samereh, E-mail: samere.g@gmail.com [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, PO Box 19395-1943, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Pazirandeh, Ali, E-mail: paziran@yahoo.com [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, PO Box 19395-1943, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jameie, Seyed Behnamedin, E-mail: behnamjameie@tums.ac.ir [Basic Science Department, Faculty of Allied Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Baghban Khojasteh, Nasrin, E-mail: khojasteh_n@yahoo.com [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, PO Box 19395-1943, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    Boron distribution in adult male and female rats' normal brain after boron carrier injection (0.005 g Boric Acid+0.005 g Borax+10 ml distilled water, pH: 7.4) was studied in this research. Coronal sections of control and trial animal tissue samples were irradiated with thermal neutrons. Using alpha autoradiography, significant differences in boron concentration were seen in forebrain, midbrain and hindbrain sections of male and female animal groups with the highest value, four hours after boron compound injection. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Boron distribution in male and female rats' normal brain was studied in this research. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Coronal sections of animal tissue samples were irradiated with thermal neutrons. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alpha and Lithium tracks were counted using alpha autoradiography. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different boron concentration was seen in brain sections of male and female rats. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The highest boron concentration was seen in 4 h after boron compound injection.

  14. Resolving the neural dynamics of visual and auditory scene processing in the human brain: a methodological approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Santani

    2017-01-01

    In natural environments, visual and auditory stimulation elicit responses across a large set of brain regions in a fraction of a second, yielding representations of the multimodal scene and its properties. The rapid and complex neural dynamics underlying visual and auditory information processing pose major challenges to human cognitive neuroscience. Brain signals measured non-invasively are inherently noisy, the format of neural representations is unknown, and transformations between representations are complex and often nonlinear. Further, no single non-invasive brain measurement technique provides a spatio-temporally integrated view. In this opinion piece, we argue that progress can be made by a concerted effort based on three pillars of recent methodological development: (i) sensitive analysis techniques such as decoding and cross-classification, (ii) complex computational modelling using models such as deep neural networks, and (iii) integration across imaging methods (magnetoencephalography/electroencephalography, functional magnetic resonance imaging) and models, e.g. using representational similarity analysis. We showcase two recent efforts that have been undertaken in this spirit and provide novel results about visual and auditory scene analysis. Finally, we discuss the limits of this perspective and sketch a concrete roadmap for future research. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Auditory and visual scene analysis’. PMID:28044019

  15. Stage-Specific Changes in the Water, Na+, Cl- and K+ Contents of Organelles during Apoptosis, Demonstrated by a Targeted Cryo Correlative Analytical Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédérique Nolin

    Full Text Available Many studies have demonstrated changes in the levels of several ions during apoptosis, but a few recent studies have reported conflicting results concerning the changes in water content in apoptotic cells. We used a correlative light and cryo-scanning transmission electron microscopy method to quantify water and ion/element contents simultaneously at a nanoscale resolution in the various compartments of cells, from the onset to the end of apoptosis. We used stably transfected HeLa cells producing H2B-GFP to identify the stages of apoptosis in cells and for a targeted elemental analysis within condensed chromatin, nucleoplasm, mitochondria and the cytosol. We found that the compartments of apoptotic cells contained, on average, 10% more water than control cells. During mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, we observed a strong increase in the Na+ and Cl- contents of the mitochondria and a strong decrease in mitochondrial K+ content. During the first step in apoptotic volume decrease (AVD, Na+ and Cl- levels decreased in all cell compartments, but remained higher than those in control cells. Conversely, during the second step of AVD, Na+ and Cl- levels increased considerably in the nucleus and mitochondria. During these two steps of AVD, K+ content decreased steadily in all cell compartments. We also determined in vivo ion status during caspase-3 activity and chromatin condensation. Finally, we found that actinomycin D-tolerant cells had water and K+ contents similar to those of cells entering apoptosis but lower Na+ and Cl- contents than both cells entering apoptosis and control cells.

  16. Stage-Specific Changes in the Water, Na+, Cl- and K+ Contents of Organelles during Apoptosis, Demonstrated by a Targeted Cryo Correlative Analytical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolin, Frédérique; Michel, Jean; Wortham, Laurence; Tchelidze, Pavel; Banchet, Vincent; Lalun, Nathalie; Terryn, Christine; Ploton, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated changes in the levels of several ions during apoptosis, but a few recent studies have reported conflicting results concerning the changes in water content in apoptotic cells. We used a correlative light and cryo-scanning transmission electron microscopy method to quantify water and ion/element contents simultaneously at a nanoscale resolution in the various compartments of cells, from the onset to the end of apoptosis. We used stably transfected HeLa cells producing H2B-GFP to identify the stages of apoptosis in cells and for a targeted elemental analysis within condensed chromatin, nucleoplasm, mitochondria and the cytosol. We found that the compartments of apoptotic cells contained, on average, 10% more water than control cells. During mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, we observed a strong increase in the Na+ and Cl- contents of the mitochondria and a strong decrease in mitochondrial K+ content. During the first step in apoptotic volume decrease (AVD), Na+ and Cl- levels decreased in all cell compartments, but remained higher than those in control cells. Conversely, during the second step of AVD, Na+ and Cl- levels increased considerably in the nucleus and mitochondria. During these two steps of AVD, K+ content decreased steadily in all cell compartments. We also determined in vivo ion status during caspase-3 activity and chromatin condensation. Finally, we found that actinomycin D-tolerant cells had water and K+ contents similar to those of cells entering apoptosis but lower Na+ and Cl- contents than both cells entering apoptosis and control cells.

  17. Quantum Brain?

    CERN Document Server

    Mershin, A; Skoulakis, E M C

    2000-01-01

    In order to create a novel model of memory and brain function, we focus our approach on the sub-molecular (electron), molecular (tubulin) and macromolecular (microtubule) components of the neural cytoskeleton. Due to their size and geometry, these systems may be approached using the principles of quantum physics. We identify quantum-physics derived mechanisms conceivably underlying the integrated yet differentiated aspects of memory encoding/recall as well as the molecular basis of the engram. We treat the tubulin molecule as the fundamental computation unit (qubit) in a quantum-computational network that consists of microtubules (MTs), networks of MTs and ultimately entire neurons and neural networks. We derive experimentally testable predictions of our quantum brain hypothesis and perform experiments on these.

  18. Supervised learning for neural manifold using spatiotemporal brain activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Po-Chih; Chen, Yong-Sheng; Chen, Li-Fen

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Determining the means by which perceived stimuli are compactly represented in the human brain is a difficult task. This study aimed to develop techniques for the construction of the neural manifold as a representation of visual stimuli. Approach. We propose a supervised locally linear embedding method to construct the embedded manifold from brain activity, taking into account similarities between corresponding stimuli. In our experiments, photographic portraits were used as visual stimuli and brain activity was calculated from magnetoencephalographic data using a source localization method. Main results. The results of 10 × 10-fold cross-validation revealed a strong correlation between manifolds of brain activity and the orientation of faces in the presented images, suggesting that high-level information related to image content can be revealed in the brain responses represented in the manifold. Significance. Our experiments demonstrate that the proposed method is applicable to investigation into the inherent patterns of brain activity.

  19. Passive damping technology demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Robert E.; Spencer, Susan M.; Austin, Eric M.; Johnson, Conor D.

    1995-05-01

    A Hughes Space Company study was undertaken to (1) acquire the analytical capability to design effective passive damping treatments and to predict the damped dynamic performance with reasonable accuracy; (2) demonstrate reasonable test and analysis agreement for both baseline and damped baseline hardware; and (3) achieve a 75% reduction in peak transmissibility and 50% reduction in rms random vibration response. Hughes Space Company teamed with CSA Engineering to learn how to apply passive damping technology to their products successfully in a cost-effective manner. Existing hardware was selected for the demonstration because (1) previous designs were lightly damped and had difficulty in vibration test; (2) multiple damping concepts could be investigated; (3) the finite element model, hardware, and test fixture would be available; and (4) damping devices could be easily implemented. Bracket, strut, and sandwich panel damping treatments that met the performance goals were developed by analysis. The baseline, baseline with damped bracket, and baseline with damped strut designs were built and tested. The test results were in reasonable agreement with the analytical predictions and demonstrated that the desired reduction in dynamic response could be achieved. Having successfully demonstrated this approach, it can now be used with confidence for future designs as a means for reducing weight and enhancing reliability.

  20. Brain herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... herniation; Uncal herniation; Subfalcine herniation; Tonsillar herniation; Herniation - brain ... Brain herniation occurs when something inside the skull produces pressure that moves brain tissues. This is most ...

  1. Reconstructing cetacean brain evolution using computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Lori; Uhen, Mark D; Pyenson, Nicholas D; Frohlich, Bruno

    2003-05-01

    Until recently, there have been relatively few studies of brain mass and morphology in fossil cetaceans (dolphins, whales, and porpoises) because of difficulty accessing the matrix that fills the endocranial cavity of fossil cetacean skulls. As a result, our knowledge about cetacean brain evolution has been quite limited. By applying the noninvasive technique of computed tomography (CT) to visualize, measure, and reconstruct the endocranial morphology of fossil cetacean skulls, we can gain vastly more information at an unprecedented rate about cetacean brain evolution. Here, we discuss our method and demonstrate it with several examples from our fossil cetacean database. This approach will provide new insights into the little-known evolutionary history of cetacean brain evolution.

  2. Statistical epistasis and progressive brain change in schizophrenia: an approach for examining the relationships between multiple genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, N C; Wilcox, M A; Ho, B-C; Epping, E; Ziebell, S; Zeien, E; Weiss, B; Wassink, T

    2012-11-01

    Although schizophrenia is generally considered to occur as a consequence of multiple genes that interact with one another, very few methods have been developed to model epistasis. Phenotype definition has also been a major challenge for research on the genetics of schizophrenia. In this report, we use novel statistical techniques to address the high dimensionality of genomic data, and we apply a refinement in phenotype definition by basing it on the occurrence of brain changes during the early course of the illness, as measured by repeated magnetic resonance scans (i.e., an 'intermediate phenotype.') The method combines a machine-learning algorithm, the ensemble method using stochastic gradient boosting, with traditional general linear model statistics. We began with 14 genes that are relevant to schizophrenia, based on association studies or their role in neurodevelopment, and then used statistical techniques to reduce them to five genes and 17 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that had a significant statistical interaction: five for PDE4B, four for RELN, four for ERBB4, three for DISC1 and one for NRG1. Five of the SNPs involved in these interactions replicate previous research in that, these five SNPs have previously been identified as schizophrenia vulnerability markers or implicate cognitive processes relevant to schizophrenia. This ability to replicate previous work suggests that our method has potential for detecting a meaningful epistatic relationship among the genes that influence brain abnormalities in schizophrenia.

  3. Curved reformat of the paediatric brain MRI into a 'flat-earth map' - standardised method for demonstrating cortical surface atrophy resulting from hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Ewan [Bristol Royal Hospital for Children, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Bristol (United Kingdom); Andronikou, Savvas [Bristol Royal Hospital for Children, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Bristol (United Kingdom); University of Bristol, CRICBristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Vedajallam, Schadie; Chacko, Anith; Thai, Ngoc Jade [University of Bristol, CRICBristol, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-15

    Hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy is optimally imaged with brain MRI in the neonatal period. However neuroimaging is often also performed later in childhood (e.g., when parents seek compensation in cases of alleged birth asphyxia). We describe a standardised technique for creating two curved reconstructions of the cortical surface to show the characteristic surface changes of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy in children imaged after the neonatal period. The technique was applied for 10 cases of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy and also for age-matched healthy children to assess the visibility of characteristic features of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. In the abnormal brains, fissural or sulcal widening was seen in all cases and ulegyria was identifiable in 7/10. These images could be used as a visual aid for communicating MRI findings to clinicians and other interested parties. (orig.)

  4. Neural substrate expansion for the restoration of brain function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Chiao Isaac Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Restoring neurological and cognitive function in individuals who have suffered brain damage is one of the principal objectives of modern translational neuroscience. Electrical stimulation approaches, such as deep-brain stimulation, have achieved the most clinical success, but they ultimately may be limited by the computational capacity of the residual cerebral circuitry. An alternative strategy is brain substrate expansion, in which the computational capacity of the brain is augmented through the addition of new processing units and the reconstitution of network connectivity. This latter approach has been explored to some degree using both biological and electronic means but thus far has not demonstrated the ability to reestablish the function of large-scale neuronal networks. In this review, we contend that fulfilling the potential of brain substrate expansion will require a significant shift from current methods that emphasize direct manipulations of the brain (e.g., injections of cellular suspensions and the implantation of multi-electrode arrays to the generation of more sophisticated neural tissues and neural-electric hybrids in vitro that are subsequently transplanted into the brain. Drawing from neural tissue engineering, stem cell biology, and neural interface technologies, this strategy makes greater use of the manifold techniques available in the laboratory to create biocompatible constructs that recapitulate brain architecture and thus are more easily recognized and utilized by brain networks.

  5. In vitro inhibition of protease-activated receptors 1, 2 and 4 demonstrates that these receptors are not involved in an Acanthamoeba castellanii keratitis isolate-mediated disruption of the human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Junaid; Naeem, Komal; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2014-11-01

    Granulomatous amoebic encephalitis is a rare but serious human disease leading almost always to death. The pathophysiology of amoebic encephalitis is better understood, while events leading to the constitution of brain infection are largely unknown. Traversal of the blood-brain barrier is a key step in amoebae invasion of the central nervous system and facilitated by amoebic extracellular proteases. By using specific inhibitors of protease-activated receptors 1, 2 and 4, here we studied the role of these host receptors in Acanthamoeba castellanii-mediated damage to human brain microvasculature endothelial cells (HBMEC), which constitute the blood-brain barrier. The primary HBMEC were incubated with A. castellanii-conditioned medium in the presence or absence of FR-171113 (selective inhibitor of protease-activated receptor 1), FSLLRY-NH2 (inhibitor of protease-activated receptor 2), and tcY-NH2 (inhibitor of protease-activated receptor 4). The HBMEC monolayer disruptions were assessed by microscopy using Eosin staining, while host cell cytotoxicity was determined by measuring the release of cytoplasmic lactate dehydrogenase. Zymographic assays were performed to determine the effects of inhibitors of protease-activated receptors on the extracellular proteolytic activities of A. castellanii. A. castellanii-conditioned medium produced severe HBMEC monolayer disruptions within 60 min. The selective inhibitors of protease-activated receptors tested did not affect HBMEC monolayer disruptions. On the contrary, pre-treatment of A. castellanii-conditioned medium with phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, a serine protease inhibitor, or heating for 10 min at 95°C abolished HBMEC monolayer disruptions. Additionally, inhibitors of protease-activated receptors tested, failed to block A. castellanii-mediated HBMEC cytotoxicity and did not affect extracellular proteolytic activities of A. castellanii. Protease-activated receptors 1, 2 and 4 do not appear to play a role in A. castellanii

  6. Saguenay Youth Study: A multi-generational approach to studying virtual trajectories of the brain and cardio-metabolic health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Paus

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an overview of the Saguenay Youth Study (SYS and its parental arm. The overarching goal of this effort is to develop trans-generational models of developmental cascades contributing to the emergence of common chronic disorders, such as depression, addictions, dementia and cardio-metabolic diseases. Over the past 10 years, we have acquired detailed brain and cardio-metabolic phenotypes, and genome-wide genotypes, in 1029 adolescents recruited in a population with a known genetic founder effect. At present, we are extending this dataset to acquire comparable phenotypes and genotypes in the biological parents of these individuals. After providing conceptual background for this work (transactions across time, systems and organs, we describe briefly the tools employed in the adolescent arm of this cohort and highlight some of the initial accomplishments. We then outline in detail the phenotyping protocol used to acquire comparable data in the parents.

  7. In Vitro Blood-Brain Barrier Models-An Overview of Established Models and New Microfluidic Approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolff, Anette; Antfolk, Maria; Brodin, Birger;

    2015-01-01

    The societal need for new central nervous system (CNS) medicines is substantial, because of the global increase in life expectancy and the accompanying increase in age-related CNS diseases. Low blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability has been one of the major causes of failure for new CNS drug...... candidates. There has therefore been a great interest in cell models, which mimic BBB permeation properties. In this review, we present an overview of the performance of monocultured, cocultured, and triple-cultured primary cells and immortalized cell lines, including key parameters such as transendothelial......-of-the-art models and it was noted that, although they show great promise, these systems have not yet reached beyond the proof-of-concept stage. In general, it was found that there were large variations in experimental protocols, BBB phenotype markers, and paracellular flux markers used. It is the author's opinion...

  8. Differentiation of solitary brain metastasis from glioblastoma multiforme: a predictive multiparametric approach using combined MR diffusion and perfusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Adam Herman; Moser, Franklin G.; Maya, Marcel [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Department of Medical Imaging, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Erly, William; Nael, Kambiz [University of Arizona Medical Center, Department of Medical Imaging, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Solitary brain metastasis (MET) and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) can appear similar on conventional MRI. The purpose of this study was to identify magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion and diffusion-weighted biomarkers that can differentiate MET from GBM. In this retrospective study, patients were included if they met the following criteria: underwent resection of a solitary enhancing brain tumor and had preoperative 3.0 T MRI encompassing diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE), and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion. Using co-registered images, voxel-based fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), K{sup trans}, and relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) values were obtained in the enhancing tumor and non-enhancing peritumoral T2 hyperintense region (NET2). Data were analyzed by logistic regression and analysis of variance. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to determine the optimal parameter/s and threshold for predicting of GBM vs. MET. Twenty-three patients (14 M, age 32-78 years old) met our inclusion criteria. Pathology revealed 13 GBMs and 10 METs. In the enhancing tumor, rCBV, K{sup trans}, and FA were higher in GBM, whereas MD was lower, neither without statistical significance. In the NET2, rCBV was significantly higher (p = 0.05) in GBM, but MD was significantly lower (p < 0.01) in GBM. FA and K{sup trans} were higher in GBM, though not reaching significance. The best discriminative power was obtained in NET2 from a combination of rCBV, FA, and MD, resulting in an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.98. The combination of MR diffusion and perfusion matrices in NET2 can help differentiate GBM over solitary MET with diagnostic accuracy of 98 %. (orig.)

  9. Robust whole-brain segmentation: application to traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledig, Christian; Heckemann, Rolf A; Hammers, Alexander; Lopez, Juan Carlos; Newcombe, Virginia F J; Makropoulos, Antonios; Lötjönen, Jyrki; Menon, David K; Rueckert, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    We propose a framework for the robust and fully-automatic segmentation of magnetic resonance (MR) brain images called "Multi-Atlas Label Propagation with Expectation-Maximisation based refinement" (MALP-EM). The presented approach is based on a robust registration approach (MAPER), highly performant label fusion (joint label fusion) and intensity-based label refinement using EM. We further adapt this framework to be applicable for the segmentation of brain images with gross changes in anatomy. We propose to account for consistent registration errors by relaxing anatomical priors obtained by multi-atlas propagation and a weighting scheme to locally combine anatomical atlas priors and intensity-refined posterior probabilities. The method is evaluated on a benchmark dataset used in a recent MICCAI segmentation challenge. In this context we show that MALP-EM is competitive for the segmentation of MR brain scans of healthy adults when compared to state-of-the-art automatic labelling techniques. To demonstrate the versatility of the proposed approach, we employed MALP-EM to segment 125 MR brain images into 134 regions from subjects who had sustained traumatic brain injury (TBI). We employ a protocol to assess segmentation quality if no manual reference labels are available. Based on this protocol, three independent, blinded raters confirmed on 13 MR brain scans with pathology that MALP-EM is superior to established label fusion techniques. We visually confirm the robustness of our segmentation approach on the full cohort and investigate the potential of derived symmetry-based imaging biomarkers that correlate with and predict clinically relevant variables in TBI such as the Marshall Classification (MC) or Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS). Specifically, we show that we are able to stratify TBI patients with favourable outcomes from non-favourable outcomes with 64.7% accuracy using acute-phase MR images and 66.8% accuracy using follow-up MR images. Furthermore, we are able to

  10. IGCC technology and demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palonen, J. [A. Ahlstrom Corporation, Karhula (Finland). Hans Ahlstrom Lab.; Lundqvist, R.G. [A. Ahlstrom Corporation, Helsinki (Finland); Staahl, K. [Sydkraft AB, Malmoe (Sweden)

    1996-12-31

    Future energy production will be performed by advanced technologies that are more efficient, more environmentally friendly and less expensive than current technologies. Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants have been proposed as one of these systems. Utilising biofuels in future energy production will also be emphasised since this lowers substantially carbon dioxide emissions into the atmosphere due to the fact that biomass is a renewable form of energy. Combining advanced technology and biomass utilisation is for this reason something that should and will be encouraged. A. Ahlstrom Corporation of Finland and Sydkraft AB of Sweden have as one part of company strategies adopted this approach for the future. The companies have joined their resources in developing a biomass-based IGCC system with the gasification part based on pressurised circulating fluidized-bed technology. With this kind of technology electrical efficiency can be substantially increased compared to conventional power plants. As a first concrete step, a decision has been made to build a demonstration plant. This plant, located in Vaernamo, Sweden, has already been built and is now in commissioning and demonstration stage. The system comprises a fuel drying plant, a pressurised CFB gasifier with gas cooling and cleaning, a gas turbine, a waste heat recovery unit and a steam turbine. The plant is the first in the world where the integration of a pressurised gasifier with a gas turbine will be realised utilising a low calorific gas produced from biomass. The capacity of the Vaernamo plant is 6 MW of electricity and 9 MW of district heating. Technology development is in progress for design of plants of sizes from 20 to 120 MWe. The paper describes the Bioflow IGCC system, the Vaernamo demonstration plant and experiences from the commissioning and demonstration stages. (orig.)

  11. Magnetic micelles for DNA delivery to rat brains after mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Mahasweta; Wang, Chunyan; Bedi, Raminder; Mohapatra, Shyam S; Mohapatra, Subhra

    2014-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes significant mortality, long term disability and psychological symptoms. Gene therapy is a promising approach for treatment of different pathological conditions. Here we tested chitosan and polyethyleneimine (PEI)-coated magnetic micelles (CP-mag micelles or CPMMs), a potential MRI contrast agent, to deliver a reporter DNA to the brain after mild TBI (mTBI). CPMM-tomato plasmid (ptd) conjugate expressing a red-fluorescent protein (RFP) was administered intranasally immediately after mTBI or sham surgery in male SD rats. Evans blue extravasation following mTBI suggested CPMM-ptd entry into the brain via the compromised blood-brain barrier. Magnetofection increased the concentration of CPMMs in the brain. RFP expression was observed in the brain (cortex and hippocampus), lung and liver 48 h after mTBI. CPMM did not evoke any inflammatory response by themselves and were excreted from the body. These results indicate the possibility of using intranasally administered CPMM as a theranostic vehicle for mTBI. From the clinical editor: In this study, chitosan and PEI-coated magnetic micelles (CPMM) were demonstrated as potentially useful vehicles in traumatic brain injury in a rodent model. Magnetofection increased the concentration of CPMMs in the brain and, after intranasal delivery, CPMM did not evoke any inflammatory response and were excreted from the body.

  12. The Selfish Brain: Stress and Eating Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achim ePeters

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The brain occupies a special hierarchical position in human energy metabolism. If cerebral homeostasis is threatened, the brain behaves in a "selfish" manner by competing for energy resources with the body. Here we present a logistic approach, which is based on the principles of supply and demand known from economics. In this "cerebral supply chain" model, the brain constitutes the final consumer. In order to illustrate the operating mode of the cerebral supply chain, we take experimental data which allow to assess the supply, demand and need of the brain under conditions of psychosocial stress. The experimental results show that the brain under conditions of psychosocial stress actively demands energy from the body, in order to cover its increased energy needs. The data demonstrate that the stressed brain uses a mechanism referred to as "cerebral insulin suppression" to limit glucose fluxes into peripheral tissue (muscle, fat and to enhance cerebral glucose supply. Furthermore psychosocial stress elicits a marked increase in eating behavior in the post-stress phase. Subjects ingested more carbohydrates without any preference for sweet ingredients. These experimentally observed changes of cerebral demand, supply and need are integrated into a logistic framework describing the supply chain of the selfish brain.

  13. The selfish brain: stress and eating behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Achim; Kubera, Britta; Hubold, Christian; Langemann, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    The brain occupies a special hierarchical position in human energy metabolism. If cerebral homeostasis is threatened, the brain behaves in a "selfish" manner by competing for energy resources with the body. Here we present a logistic approach, which is based on the principles of supply and demand known from economics. In this "cerebral supply chain" model, the brain constitutes the final consumer. In order to illustrate the operating mode of the cerebral supply chain, we take experimental data which allow assessing the supply, demand and need of the brain under conditions of psychosocial stress. The experimental results show that the brain under conditions of psychosocial stress actively demands energy from the body, in order to cover its increased energy needs. The data demonstrate that the stressed brain uses a mechanism referred to as "cerebral insulin suppression" to limit glucose fluxes into peripheral tissue (muscle, fat) and to enhance cerebral glucose supply. Furthermore psychosocial stress elicits a marked increase in eating behavior in the post-stress phase. Subjects ingested more carbohydrates without any preference for sweet ingredients. These experimentally observed changes of cerebral demand, supply and need are integrated into a logistic framework describing the supply chain of the selfish brain.

  14. Structural Graphical Lasso for Learning Mouse Brain Connectivity

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Sen

    2015-01-01

    Investigations into brain connectivity aim to recover networks of brain regions connected by anatomical tracts or by functional associations. The inference of brain networks has recently attracted much interest due to the increasing availability of high-resolution brain imaging data. Sparse inverse covariance estimation with lasso and group lasso penalty has been demonstrated to be a powerful approach to discover brain networks. Motivated by the hierarchical structure of the brain networks, we consider the problem of estimating a graphical model with tree-structural regularization in this paper. The regularization encourages the graphical model to exhibit a brain-like structure. Specifically, in this hierarchical structure, hundreds of thousands of voxels serve as the leaf nodes of the tree. A node in the intermediate layer represents a region formed by voxels in the subtree rooted at that node. The whole brain is considered as the root of the tree. We propose to apply the tree-structural regularized graphical model to estimate the mouse brain network. However, the dimensionality of whole-brain data, usually on the order of hundreds of thousands, poses significant computational challenges. Efficient algorithms that are capable of estimating networks from high-dimensional data are highly desired. To address the computational challenge, we develop a screening rule which can quickly identify many zero blocks in the estimated graphical model, thereby dramatically reducing the computational cost of solving the proposed model. It is based on a novel insight on the relationship between screening and the so-called proximal operator that we first establish in this paper. We perform experiments on both synthetic data and real data from the Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas; results demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed approach.

  15. An efficient Volumetric Arc Therapy treatment planning approach for hippocampal-avoidance whole-brain radiation therapy (HA-WBRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Jin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Bender, Edward [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Kuo, Hsiang-Chi; Basavatia, Amar; Hong, Linda; Bodner, William; Garg, Madhur K.; Kalnicki, Shalom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Tomé, Wolfgang A., E-mail: wtome@montefiore.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-10-01

    An efficient and simple class solution is proposed for hippocampal-avoidance whole-brain radiation therapy (HA-WBRT) planning using the Volumetric Arc Therapy (VMAT) delivery technique following the NRG Oncology protocol NRG-CC001 treatment planning guidelines. The whole-brain planning target volume (PTV) was subdivided into subplanning volumes that lie in plane and out of plane with the hippocampal-avoidance volume. To further improve VMAT treatment plans, a partial-field dual-arc technique was developed. Both the arcs were allowed to overlap on the in-plane subtarget volume, and in addition, one arc covered the superior out-of-plane sub-PTV, while the other covered the inferior out-of-plane subtarget volume. For all plans (n = 20), the NRG-CC001 protocol dose-volume criteria were met. Mean values of volumes for the hippocampus and the hippocampal-avoidance volume were 4.1 cm{sup 3} ± 1.0 cm{sup 3} and 28.52 cm{sup 3} ± 3.22 cm{sup 3}, respectively. For the PTV, the average values of D{sub 2%} and D{sub 98%} were 36.1 Gy ± 0.8 Gy and 26.2 Gy ± 0.6 Gy, respectively. The hippocampus D{sub 100%} mean value was 8.5 Gy ± 0.2 Gy and the maximum dose was 15.7 Gy ± 0.3 Gy. The corresponding plan quality indices were 0.30 ± 0.01 (homogeneity index), 0.94 ± 0.01 (target conformality), and 0.75 ± 0.02 (confirmation number). The median total monitor unit (MU) per fraction was 806 MU (interquartile range [IQR]: 792 to 818 MU) and the average beam total delivery time was 121.2 seconds (IQR: 120.6 to 121.35 seconds). All plans passed the gamma evaluation using the 5-mm, 4% criteria, with γ > 1 of not more than 9.1% data points for all fields. An efficient and simple planning class solution for HA-WBRT using VMAT has been developed that allows all protocol constraints of NRG-CC001 to be met.

  16. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the brain How different parts of the brain communicate and work with each other How changes in the brain ...

  17. Brain Fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Kumar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain Fingerprinting is a scientific technique to determine whether or not specific information is stored in an individual's brain by measuring a electrical brain wave response to Word, phrases, or picture that are presented on computer screen. Brain Fingerprinting is a controversial forensic science technique that uses electroencephalography (EEG to determine whether specific information is stored in a subject's brain.

  18. Brain Fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ravi kumar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain Fingerprinting is a scientific technique to determine whether or not specific information is stored in an individual's brain by measuring a electrical brain wave response to Word, phrases, or picture that are presented on computer screen. Brain Fingerprinting is a controversial forensic science technique that uses electroencephalograph y (EEG to determine whether specific information is stored in a subject's brain

  19. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  20. Self-Consistent MUSIC: An approach to the localization of true brain interactions from EEG/MEG data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazi, Forooz; Ewald, Arne; Nolte, Guido

    2015-05-15

    MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) is a standard localization method which is based on the idea of dividing the vector space of the data into two subspaces: signal subspace and noise subspace. The brain, divided into several grid points, is scanned entirely and the grid point with the maximum consistency with the signal subspace is considered as the source location. In one of the MUSIC variants called Recursively Applied and Projected MUSIC (RAP-MUSIC), multiple iterations are proposed in order to decrease the location estimation uncertainties introduced by subspace estimation errors. In this paper, we suggest a new method called Self-Consistent MUSIC (SC-MUSIC) which extends RAP-MUSIC to a self-consistent algorithm. This method, SC-MUSIC, is based on the idea that the presence of several sources has a bias on the localization of each source. This bias can be reduced by projecting out all other sources mutually rather than iteratively. While the new method is applicable in all situations when MUSIC is applicable we will study here the localization of interacting sources using the imaginary part of the cross-spectrum due to the robustness of this measure to the artifacts of volume conduction. For an odd number of sources this matrix is rank deficient similar to covariance matrices of fully correlated sources. In such cases MUSIC and RAP-MUSIC fail completely while the new method accurately localizes all sources. We present results of the method using simulations of odd and even number of interacting sources in the presence of different noise levels. We compare the method with three other source localization methods: RAP-MUSIC, dipole fit and MOCA (combined with minimum norm estimate) through simulations. SC-MUSIC shows substantial improvement in the localization accuracy compared to these methods. We also show results for real MEG data of a single subject in the resting state. Four sources are localized in the sensorimotor area at f=11Hz which is the expected

  1. Structural insights from GRP78-NF-κB binding interactions: a computational approach to understand a possible neuroprotective pathway in brain injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Marco Fidel; Torrente, Daniel; Cabezas, Ricardo; Morales, Ludis; García-Segura, Luis Miguel; Gonzalez, Janneth; Barreto, George E

    2014-03-21

    GRP78 participates in multiple functions in the cell during normal and pathological conditions, controlling calcium homeostasis, protein folding and Unfolded Protein Response. GRP78 is located in the endoplasmic reticulum, but it can change its location under stress, hypoxic and apoptotic conditions. NF-κB represents the keystone of the inflammatory process and regulates the transcription of several genes related with apoptosis, differentiation, and cell growth. The possible relationship between GRP78-NF-κB could support and explain several mechanisms that may regulate a variety of cell functions, especially following brain injuries. Although several reports show interactions between NF-κB and Heat Shock Proteins family members, there is a lack of information on how GRP78 may be interacting with NF-κB, and possibly regulating its downstream activation. Therefore, we assessed the computational predictions of the GRP78 (Chain A) and NF-κB complex (IkB alpha and p65) protein-protein interactions. The interaction interface of the docking model showed that the amino acids ASN 47, GLU 215, GLY 403 of GRP78 and THR 54, ASN 182 and HIS 184 of NF-κB are key residues involved in the docking. The electrostatic field between GRP78-NF-κB interfaces and Molecular Dynamic simulations support the possible interaction between the proteins. In conclusion, this work shed some light in the possible GRP78-NF-κB complex indicating key residues in this crosstalk, which may be used as an input for better drug design strategy targeting NF-κB downstream signaling as a new therapeutic approach following brain injuries.

  2. Analysis of the cerebral transcriptome in mice subjected to traumatic brain injury: importance of IL-6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quintana, Albert; Giralt, Mercedes; Molinero, Amalia

    2007-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is one of the leading causes of incapacity and death among young people. Injury to the brain elicits a potent inflammatory response, comprising recruitment of inflammatory cells, reactive astrogliosis and activation of brain macrophages. Under the influence of presumably...... such as microarrays. The combination of these modern techniques with the comparison of normal and genetically modified mice boosts the significance of the results obtained. With this approach, we have demonstrated that a cytokine such as interleukin-6 is one of the key players in the response of the brain to injury....

  3. Brain components

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can make complex movements without thinking. The brain stem connects the brain with the spinal cord and is composed of ... structures: the midbrain, pons, and medulla oblongata. The brain stem provides us with automatic functions that are necessary ...

  4. Brain surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... cut depends on where the problem in the brain is located. The surgeon creates a hole in ...

  5. Brain Malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most brain malformations begin long before a baby is born. Something damages the developing nervous system or causes it ... medicines, infections, or radiation during pregnancy interferes with brain development. Parts of the brain may be missing, ...

  6. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic ... that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues both help to direct this ...

  7. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can lead to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits ... tailored treatments, and possibly prevention of such illnesses. The Working Brain Neurotransmitters Everything we do relies on ...

  8. Novel approach for independent control of brain hypothermia and systemic normothermia: cerebral selective deep hypothermia for refractory cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chih-Hsien; Lin, Yu-Ting; Chou, Heng-Wen; Wang, Yi-Chih; Hwang, Joey-Jen; Gilbert, John R; Chen, Yih-Sharng

    2017-01-01

    A 38-year-old man was found unconscious, alone in the driver's seat of his car. The emergency medical team identified his condition as pulseless ventricular tachycardia. Defibrillation was attempted but failed. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was started in the emergency room 52 min after the estimated arrest following the extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) protocol in our center. The initial prognosis under the standard protocol was ECMO and CSDH circuits demonstrated independent control of cerebral and core temperatures. Nasal temperature was lowered to below 30°C for 12 hours while core was maintained at normothermia. The patient was discharged without significant neurological deficit 32 days after the initial arrest. PMID:28108436

  9. Cognitive state monitoring and the design of adaptive instruction in digital environments: lessons learned from cognitive workload assessment using a passive brain-computer interface approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerjets, Peter; Walter, Carina; Rosenstiel, Wolfgang; Bogdan, Martin; Zander, Thorsten O

    2014-01-01

    According to Cognitive Load Theory (CLT), one of the crucial factors for successful learning is the type and amount of working-memory load (WML) learners experience while studying instructional materials. Optimal learning conditions are characterized by providing challenges for learners without inducing cognitive over- or underload. Thus, presenting instruction in a way that WML is constantly held within an optimal range with regard to learners' working-memory capacity might be a good method to provide these optimal conditions. The current paper elaborates how digital learning environments, which achieve this goal can be developed by combining approaches from Cognitive Psychology, Neuroscience, and Computer Science. One of the biggest obstacles that needs to be overcome is the lack of an unobtrusive method of continuously assessing learners' WML in real-time. We propose to solve this problem by applying passive Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) approaches to realistic learning scenarios in digital environments. In this paper we discuss the methodological and theoretical prospects and pitfalls of this approach based on results from the literature and from our own research. We present a strategy on how several inherent challenges of applying BCIs to WML and learning can be met by refining the psychological constructs behind WML, by exploring their neural signatures, by using these insights for sophisticated task designs, and by optimizing algorithms for analyzing electroencephalography (EEG) data. Based on this strategy we applied machine-learning algorithms for cross-task classifications of different levels of WML to tasks that involve studying realistic instructional materials. We obtained very promising results that yield several recommendations for future work.

  10. Brain MRI in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, F.J.A.; Goraj, B.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this review article, conventional brain MRI and advanced MRI techniques in Parkinson`s disease (PD) are discussed, with emphasis on clinical relevance. Conventional brain MRI sequences generally demonstrate limited abnormalities specific for PD and in clinical practice brain MRI is mainly used to

  11. A unified probabilistic approach to improve spelling in an event-related potential-based brain-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindermans, Pieter-Jan; Verschore, Hannes; Schrauwen, Benjamin

    2013-10-01

    In recent years, in an attempt to maximize performance, machine learning approaches for event-related potential (ERP) spelling have become more and more complex. In this paper, we have taken a step back as we wanted to improve the performance without building an overly complex model, that cannot be used by the community. Our research resulted in a unified probabilistic model for ERP spelling, which is based on only three assumptions and incorporates language information. On top of that, the probabilistic nature of our classifier yields a natural dynamic stopping strategy. Furthermore, our method uses the same parameters across 25 subjects from three different datasets. We show that our classifier, when enhanced with language models and dynamic stopping, improves the spelling speed and accuracy drastically. Additionally, we would like to point out that as our model is entirely probabilistic, it can easily be used as the foundation for complex systems in future work. All our experiments are executed on publicly available datasets to allow for future comparison with similar techniques.

  12. Predictivity Approach for Quantitative Structure-Property Models. Application for Blood-Brain Barrier Permeation of Diverse Drug-Like Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorana D. Bolboacă

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the present research was to present a predictivity statistical approach applied on structure-based prediction models. The approach was applied to the domain of blood-brain barrier (BBB permeation of diverse drug-like compounds. For this purpose, 15 statistical parameters and associated 95% confidence intervals computed on a 2 × 2 contingency table were defined as measures of predictivity for binary quantitative structure-property models. The predictivity approach was applied on a set of compounds comprised of 437 diverse molecules, 122 with measured BBB permeability and 315 classified as active or inactive. A training set of 81 compounds (~2/3 of 122 compounds assigned randomly was used to identify the model and a test set of 41 compounds was used as the internal validation set. The molecular descriptor family on vertices cutting was the computation tool used to generate and calculate structural descriptors for all compounds. The identified model was assessed using the predictivity approach and compared to one model previously reported. The best-identified classification model proved to have an accuracy of 69% in the training set (95%CI [58.53–78.37] and of 73% in the test set (95%CI [58.32–84.77]. The predictive accuracy obtained on the external set proved to be of 73% (95%CI [67.58–77.39]. The classification model proved to have better abilities in the classification of inactive compounds (specificity of ~74% [59.20–85.15] compared to abilities in the classification of active compounds (sensitivity of ~64% [48.47–77.70] in the training and external sets. The overall accuracy of the previously reported model seems not to be statistically significantly better compared to the identified model (~81% [71.45–87.80] in the training set, ~93% [78.12–98.17] in the test set and ~79% [70.19–86.58] in the external set. In conclusion, our predictivity approach allowed us to characterize the model obtained on the investigated

  13. Bidirectional coupling between astrocytes and neurons mediates learning and dynamic coordination in the brain: a multiple modeling approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J Wade

    Full Text Available In recent years research suggests that astrocyte networks, in addition to nutrient and waste processing functions, regulate both structural and synaptic plasticity. To understand the biological mechanisms that underpin such plasticity requires the development of cell level models that capture the mutual interaction between astrocytes and neurons. This paper presents a detailed model of bidirectional signaling between astrocytes and neurons (the astrocyte-neuron model or AN model which yields new insights into the computational role of astrocyte-neuronal coupling. From a set of modeling studies we demonstrate two significant findings. Firstly, that spatial signaling via astrocytes can relay a "learning signal" to remote synaptic sites. Results show that slow inward currents cause synchronized postsynaptic activity in remote neurons and subsequently allow Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity based learning to occur at the associated synapses. Secondly, that bidirectional communication between neurons and astrocytes underpins dynamic coordination between neuron clusters. Although our composite AN model is presently applied to simplified neural structures and limited to coordination between localized neurons, the principle (which embodies structural, functional and dynamic complexity, and the modeling strategy may be extended to coordination among remote neuron clusters.

  14. LIMB Demonstration Project Extension and Coolside Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goots, T.R.; DePero, M.J.; Nolan, P.S.

    1992-11-10

    This report presents results from the limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension. LIMB is a furnace sorbent injection technology designed for the reduction of sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) and nitrogen oxides (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired utility boilers. The testing was conducted on the 105 Mwe, coal-fired, Unit 4 boiler at Ohio Edison's Edgewater Station in Lorain, Ohio. In addition to the LIMB Extension activities, the overall project included demonstration of the Coolside process for S0[sub 2] removal for which a separate report has been issued. The primary purpose of the DOE LIMB Extension testing, was to demonstrate the generic applicability of LIMB technology. The program sought to characterize the S0[sub 2] emissions that result when various calcium-based sorbents are injected into the furnace, while burning coals having sulfur content ranging from 1.6 to 3.8 weight percent. The four sorbents used included calcitic limestone, dolomitic hydrated lime, calcitic hydrated lime, and calcitic hydrated lime with a small amount of added calcium lignosulfonate. The results include those obtained for the various coal/sorbent combinations and the effects of the LIMB process on boiler and plant operations.

  15. Imaging brain plasticity after trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhifeng Kou; Armin Iraji

    2014-01-01

    The brain is highly plastic after stroke or epilepsy;however, there is a paucity of brain plasticity investigation after traumatic brain injury (TBI). This mini review summarizes the most recent evidence of brain plasticity in human TBI patients from the perspective of advanced magnetic resonance imaging. Similar to other forms of acquired brain injury, TBI patients also demonstrat-ed both structural reorganization as well as functional compensation by the recruitment of other brain regions. However, the large scale brain network alterations after TBI are still unknown, and the ifeld is still short of proper means on how to guide the choice of TBI rehabilitation or treat-ment plan to promote brain plasticity. The authors also point out the new direction of brain plas-ticity investigation.

  16. A 2D-QSPR approach to predict blood-brain barrier penetration of drugs acting on the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Malta de Sá

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Drugs acting on the central nervous system (CNS have to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB in order to perform their pharmacological actions. Passive BBB diffusion can be partially expressed by the blood/brain partition coefficient (logBB. As the experimental evaluation of logBB is time and cost consuming, theoretical methods such as quantitative structure-property relationships (QSPR can be useful to predict logBB values. In this study, a 2D-QSPR approach was applied to a set of 28 drugs acting on the CNS, using the logBB property as biological data. The best QSPR model [n = 21, r = 0.94 (r² = 0.88, s = 0.28, and Q² = 0.82] presented three molecular descriptors: calculated n-octanol/water partition coefficient (ClogP, polar surface area (PSA, and polarizability (α. Six out of the seven compounds from the test set were well predicted, which corresponds to good external predictability (85.7%. These findings can be helpful to guide future approaches regarding those molecular descriptors which must be considered for estimating the logBB property, and also for predicting the BBB crossing ability for molecules structurally related to the investigated set.Fármacos que atuam no sistema nervoso central (SNC devem atravessar a barreira hematoencefálica (BHE para exercerem suas ações farmacológicas. A difusão passiva através da BHE pode ser parcialmente expressa pelo coeficiente de partição entre os compartimentos encefálico e sanguíneo (logBB, brain/blood partition coefficient. Considerando-se que a avaliação experimental de logBB é dispendiosa e demorada, métodos teóricos como estudos das relações entre estrutura química e propriedade (QSPR, Quantitative Structure-Property Relationships podem ser utilizados na previsão dos valores de logBB. Neste estudo, uma abordagem de QSPR-2D foi aplicada a um conjunto de 28 moléculas com ação central, usando logBB como propriedade biológica. O melhor modelo de QSPR [n = 21, r = 0,94 (r

  17. Recovery after Brain Injury: Mechanisms and Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randolph J. Nudo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The past 20 years have represented an important period in the development of principles underlying neuroplasticity, especially as they apply to recovery from neurological injury. It is now generally accepted that acquired brain injuries, such as occur in stroke or trauma, initiate a cascade of regenerative events that last for at least several weeks, if not months. Many investigators have pointed out striking parallels between post-injury plasticity and the molecular and cellular events that take place during normal brain development. As evidence for the principles and mechanisms underlying post-injury neuroplasticity has been gleaned from both animal models and human populations, novel approaches to therapeutic intervention have been proposed. One important theme has persisted as the sophistication of clinicians and scientists in their knowledge of neuroplasticity mechanisms has grown: Behavioral experience is the most potent modulator of brain plasticity. While there is substantial evidence for this principle in normal, healthy brains, the injured brain is particularly malleable. Based on the quantity and quality of motor experience, the brain can be reshaped after injury in either adaptive or maladaptive ways. This paper reviews selected studies that have demonstrated the neurophysiological and neuroanatomical changes that are triggered by motor experience, by injury, and the interaction of these processes. In addition, recent studies using new and elegant techniques are providing novel perspectives on the events that take place in the injured brain, providing a real-time window into post-injury plasticity. These new approaches are likely to accelerate the pace of basic research, and provide a wealth of opportunities to translate basic principles into therapeutic methodologies.

  18. Anatomy of the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Menu Brain Tumor Information Brain Anatomy Brain Structure Neuron Anatomy Brain Tumor Symptoms Diagnosis Types of Tumors Risk Factors ... form Brain Tumor Information Brain Anatomy Brain Structure Neuron Anatomy Brain Tumor Symptoms Diagnosis Types of Tumors Risk Factors ...

  19. Dynamic causal modelling of brain-behaviour relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigoux, L; Daunizeau, J

    2015-08-15

    In this work, we expose a mathematical treatment of brain-behaviour relationships, which we coin behavioural Dynamic Causal Modelling or bDCM. This approach aims at decomposing the brain's transformation of stimuli into behavioural outcomes, in terms of the relative contribution of brain regions and their connections. In brief, bDCM places the brain at the interplay between stimulus and behaviour: behavioural outcomes arise from coordinated activity in (hidden) neural networks, whose dynamics are driven by experimental inputs. Estimating neural parameters that control network connectivity and plasticity effectively performs a neurobiologically-constrained approximation to the brain's input-outcome transform. In other words, neuroimaging data essentially serves to enforce the realism of bDCM's decomposition of input-output relationships. In addition, post-hoc artificial lesions analyses allow us to predict induced behavioural deficits and quantify the importance of network features for funnelling input-output relationships. This is important, because this enables one to bridge the gap with neuropsychological studies of brain-damaged patients. We demonstrate the face validity of the approach using Monte-Carlo simulations, and its predictive validity using empirical fMRI/behavioural data from an inhibitory control task. Lastly, we discuss promising applications of this work, including the assessment of functional degeneracy (in the healthy brain) and the prediction of functional recovery after lesions (in neurological patients).

  20. The POSEIDON Demonstrator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laar, P.J.L.J. van de

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter, we discuss the Poseidon demonstrator: a demonstrator that integrates the individual research results of all partners of the Poseidon project. After describing how the Poseidon demonstrator was built, deployed, and operated, we will not only show many results obtained from the demons

  1. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Doris, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Details two demonstrations for use with an overhead projector in a chemistry lecture. Includes "A Very Rapidly Growing Silicate Crystal" and "A Colorful Demonstration to Simulate Orbital Hybridization." The materials and directions for each demonstration are included as well as a brief explanation of the essential learning involved. (CW)

  2. Strategy Guideline. Demonstration Home

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, A.; Savage, C.

    2012-12-01

    This guideline will provide a general overview of the different kinds of demonstration home projects, a basic understanding of the different roles and responsibilities involved in the successful completion of a demonstration home, and an introduction into some of the lessons learned from actual demonstration home projects. Also, this guideline will specifically look at the communication methods employed during demonstration home projects. And lastly, we will focus on how to best create a communication plan for including an energy efficient message in a demonstration home project and carry that message to successful completion.

  3. Strategy Guideline: Demonstration Home

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, C.; Hunt, A.

    2012-12-01

    This guideline will provide a general overview of the different kinds of demonstration home projects, a basic understanding of the different roles and responsibilities involved in the successful completion of a demonstration home, and an introduction into some of the lessons learned from actual demonstration home projects. Also, this guideline will specifically look at the communication methods employed during demonstration home projects. And lastly, we will focus on how to best create a communication plan for including an energy efficient message in a demonstration home project and carry that message to successful completion.

  4. 经外侧裂脑池开放减压治疗额颞对冲性脑挫裂伤%Opening cistern combined decompression by transsylvian surgical approach in treatment of severe bump contusion and laceration of brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾昭明; 郭予大; 邵强; 陈秋明; 冯志铁; 吴分浪

    2008-01-01

    Objective To summarize the clinical effects of opening cistern combined decompression of severe bump contusion and laceration of brain by transsylvian surgical approach. Methods Clinical data from 31 cases with severe bump contusion and laceration of brain in the decompression treatment combined with open-ing parasellar and basal cisterns by transsylvian surgical approach was analyzed retrospectively. Results Post- operative did not show visible brain edema in severe bump contusion and laceration of brain,2 cases died of brain exhaustion,2 cases died of severe complications. The Glasgow Outcome Score (COS) was determined at 3-6 months of follow-up for other 27 cases:20 cases had a good recovery,5 cases had moderate disability,2 cases were in a vegetative state. Conclusion Opening cistern combined decompression of severe bump contusion and laceration of brain by transsylvian surgical approach could alleviate secondary brain edema and improve the clin- ical effect for severe bump contusion and laceration of brain.%目的 总结经外侧裂脑池开放在对冲性脑挫裂伤减压术中的应用效果.方法 对31例额颞对冲性脑挫裂伤术中经外侧裂入路施行鞍旁脑池和基底池开放的患者进行临床资料的进行回顾性分析.结果 术后动态复查头颅CT,全部患者额颞脑挫裂伤区域未见明显脑水肿现象,2例死于脑功能衰竭,2例死于严重并发症.其余随访3~6个月,按GOS评分,良好20例,中残5例,植物状生存2例.结论 额颞对冲性脑挫裂伤术中经外侧裂施行鞍旁脑池和基底池开放减压可减轻继发性脑水肿,提高临床效果.

  5. Demonstration of Cauchy: Understanding Algebraic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.L. Costa

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: In this study we present some considerations about the End of Course Work undergraduate Full Degree in Mathematics / UFMT, drafted in 2011, and by taking title "A story about Cauchy and Euler's theorem on polyhedra" that gave birth to our research project Master of Education, begun in 2012, on the approaches of Euler's theorem on polyhedra in mathematics textbooks. At work in 2011 presented some considerations about the history of Euler's theorem for polyhedra which focus the demonstration presented by Cauchy (1789-1857, who tries to generalize it, relying on assumptions not observable in Euclidean geometry. Therefore, we seek the accessible literature on the history of mathematics; relate some aspects of the demonstration Cauchy with historical events on the development of mathematics in the nineteenth century, which allowed the acceptance of such a demonstration by mathematicians of his time.Keywords: History of Mathematics. Euler's Theorem on Polyhedra. Demonstration of Cauchy.

  6. Tracking White Matter Fiber in Human Brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANGNing; ZHANGJun; EricSCarlson

    2004-01-01

    A new approach for noninvasively tracing brain white matter fiber tracts is presented using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) data. This technique is based on successive anisotropic diffusion simulations over the human brain, which are utilized to construct three dimensional diffusion fronts. The fiber pathways are determined by evaluating the distance and orientation from fronts to their corresponding diffusion seeds. Real DT-MRI data are used to demonstrate the tracking scheme. It is shown that several major white matter fiber pathways can be reproduced noninvasively, with the tract branching being allowed. Since the diffusion simulation,which is a truly physical phenomenon reflecting the underlying architecture of cerebral tissues, makes full use of the entire diffusion tensor data, the proposed approach is expected to enhance robustness and reliability of the DT-MRI based fiber tracking techniques in white matter fiber reconstruction.

  7. Whole-brain activity mapping onto a zebrafish brain atlas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randlett, Owen; Wee, Caroline L; Naumann, Eva A; Nnaemeka, Onyeka; Schoppik, David; Fitzgerald, James E; Portugues, Ruben; Lacoste, Alix M B; Riegler, Clemens; Engert, Florian; Schier, Alexander F

    2015-11-01

    In order to localize the neural circuits involved in generating behaviors, it is necessary to assign activity onto anatomical maps of the nervous system. Using brain registration across hundreds of larval zebrafish, we have built an expandable open-source atlas containing molecular labels and definitions of anatomical regions, the Z-Brain. Using this platform and immunohistochemical detection of phosphorylated extracellular signal–regulated kinase (ERK) as a readout of neural activity, we have developed a system to create and contextualize whole-brain maps of stimulus- and behavior-dependent neural activity. This mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP)-mapping assay is technically simple, and data analysis is completely automated. Because MAP-mapping is performed on freely swimming fish, it is applicable to studies of nearly any stimulus or behavior. Here we demonstrate our high-throughput approach using pharmacological, visual and noxious stimuli, as well as hunting and feeding. The resultant maps outline hundreds of areas associated with behaviors.

  8. Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The U.S. Department of Energy Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides a collaborative, shared infrastructure to...

  9. Lutein and Brain Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Erdman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Lutein is one of the most prevalent carotenoids in nature and in the human diet. Together with zeaxanthin, it is highly concentrated as macular pigment in the foveal retina of primates, attenuating blue light exposure, providing protection from photo-oxidation and enhancing visual performance. Recently, interest in lutein has expanded beyond the retina to its possible contributions to brain development and function. Only primates accumulate lutein within the brain, but little is known about its distribution or physiological role. Our team has begun to utilize the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta model to study the uptake and bio-localization of lutein in the brain. Our overall goal has been to assess the association of lutein localization with brain function. In this review, we will first cover the evolution of the non-human primate model for lutein and brain studies, discuss prior association studies of lutein with retina and brain function, and review approaches that can be used to localize brain lutein. We also describe our approach to the biosynthesis of 13C-lutein, which will allow investigation of lutein flux, localization, metabolism and pharmacokinetics. Lastly, we describe potential future research opportunities.

  10. The modulatory effect of adaptive deep brain stimulation on beta bursts in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinkhauser, Gerd; Pogosyan, Alek; Little, Simon; Beudel, Martijn; Herz, Damian M; Tan, Huiling; Brown, Peter

    2017-02-13

    Adaptive deep brain stimulation uses feedback about the state of neural circuits to control stimulation rather than delivering fixed stimulation all the time, as currently performed. In patients with Parkinson's disease, elevations in beta activity (13-35 Hz) in the subthalamic nucleus have been demonstrated to correlate with clinical impairment and have provided the basis for feedback control in trials of adaptive deep brain stimulation. These pilot studies have suggested that adaptive deep brain stimulation may potentially be more effective, efficient and selective than conventional deep brain stimulation, implying mechanistic differences between the two approaches. Here we test the hypothesis that such differences arise through differential effects on the temporal dynamics of beta activity. The latter is not constantly increased in Parkinson's disease, but comes in bursts of different durations and amplitudes. We demonstrate that the amplitude of beta activity in the subthalamic nucleus increases in proportion to burst duration, consistent with progressively increasing synchronization. Effective adaptive deep brain stimulation truncated long beta bursts shifting the distribution of burst duration away from long duration with large amplitude towards short duration, lower amplitude bursts. Critically, bursts with shorter duration are negatively and bursts with longer duration positively correlated with the motor impairment off stimulation. Conventional deep brain stimulation did not change the distribution of burst durations. Although both adaptive and conventional deep brain stimulation suppressed mean beta activity amplitude compared to the unstimulated state, this was achieved by a selective effect on burst duration during adaptive deep brain stimulation, whereas conventional deep brain stimulation globally suppressed beta activity. We posit that the relatively selective effect of adaptive deep brain stimulation provides a rationale for why this approach could

  11. Statistical approach of measurement of signal to noise ratio in according to change pulse sequence on brain MRI meningioma and cyst images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eul Kyu [Inje Paik University Hospital Jeo-dong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kwan Woo [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hoi Woun [The Baekseok Culture University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Seo Goo [The Soonchunhyang University, Asan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki Won [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gang-dong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Son, Soon Yong [The Wonkwang Health Science University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Min, Jung Whan; Son, Jin Hyun [The Shingu University, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to needed basis of measure MRI CAD development for signal to noise ratio (SNR) by pulse sequence analysis from region of interest (ROI) in brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast. We examined images of brain MRI contrast enhancement of 117 patients, from January 2005 to December 2015 in a University-affiliated hospital, Seoul, Korea. Diagnosed as one of two brain diseases such as meningioma and cysts SNR for each patient's image of brain MRI were calculated by using Image J. Differences of SNR among two brain diseases were tested by SPSS Statistics21 ANOVA test for there was statistical significance (p < 0.05). We have analysis socio-demographical variables, SNR according to sequence disease, 95% confidence according to SNR of sequence and difference in a mean of SNR. Meningioma results, with the quality of distributions in the order of T1CE, T2 and T1, FLAIR. Cysts results, with the quality of distributions in the order of T2 and T1, T1CE and FLAIR. SNR of MRI sequences of the brain would be useful to classify disease. Therefore, this study will contribute to evaluate brain diseases, and be a fundamental to enhancing the accuracy of CAD development.

  12. Kinetics and Catalysis Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, John L.; Britten, Jerald A.

    1984-01-01

    Eleven videotaped kinetics and catalysis demonstrations are described. Demonstrations include the clock reaction, oscillating reaction, hydrogen oxidation in air, hydrogen-oxygen explosion, acid-base properties of solids, high- and low-temperature zeolite reactivity, copper catalysis of ammonia oxidation and sodium peroxide decomposition, ammonia…

  13. Toy Demonstrator's "VISIT" Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenstein, Phyllis

    The role of the toy demonstrator in a home-based, mother-involved intervention effort (Verbal Interaction Project) is presented in this handbook for staff members. It is believed that the prerequisites for functioning in the toy demonstrator's role are a sense of responsibility, patience with the children and their mothers, and willingness to be…

  14. Better Ira Remsen Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalby, David K.; Maynard, James H.; Moore, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Many versions of the classic Ira Remsen experience involving copper and concentrated nitric acid have been used as lecture demonstrations. Remsen's original reminiscence from 150 years ago is included in the Supporting Information, and his biography can be found on the Internet. This article presents a new version that makes the demonstration more…

  15. Levitation Kits Demonstrate Superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthy, Ward

    1987-01-01

    Describes the "Project 1-2-3" levitation kit used to demonstrate superconductivity. Summarizes the materials included in the kit. Discusses the effect demonstrated and gives details on how to obtain kits. Gives an overview of the documentation that is included. (CW)

  16. Brain iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moos, Torben

    2002-11-01

    transferrin were, however, restricted to areas situated in close proximity to the ventricular and pial surfaces. In particular, transferrin injected into the ventricles was never observed in regions distant from the CSF. It was concluded that choroid plexus-derived transferrin is not likely to play a significant role for binding and transporting iron in the brain interstitium. Transferrin secretion from oligodendrocytes probably plays the key role in this process. In the third part of the thesis, the uptake of iron by neurons devoid of projections beyond the blood-brain barrier and glia is addressed. Given the fact that the demonstration of plasma proteins in brain sections can be hampered by several methodological factors, a mapping of the cellular distribution of transferrin in the brain was performed employing extensive use of tissue-processing and staining protocols. In order to aid in the understanding of cellular iron uptake in the intact brain, attempts were made to identify iron, transferrin, and transferrin receptors at the light microscopic level. Consistent with the widespread distribution of transferrin receptors in neurons, the ligand transferrin was also found in neurons throughout the CNS. When examined at high resolution, transferrin was found to be distributed to the cytoplasm of neurons, exhibiting a dotted appearance, which is probably consistent with a distribution in the endosomallysosomal system. In contrast to the consistent presence of transferrin receptors on neurons, it was not possible to detect transferrin receptors on glial cells. Related to these observations, the presence of non-transferrin-bound iron in the brain suggests that glial cells may take it up by a mechanism that does not involve the transferrin receptor. The widespread distribution of ferritin in glial cells clearly indicates that the glial cells acquire iron. Dietary iron-overload did not change the distribution of transferrin receptors or ferritin in the brain. By contrast, iron

  17. Neuroimaging in nuclear medicine: drug addicted brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Yong-An; Kim, Dae-Jin [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-02-15

    Addiction to illicit drugs in one of today's most important social issues. Most addictive drugs lead to irreversible parenchymal changes in the human brain. Neuroimaging data bring to light the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of the abused drugs, and demonstrate that addiction is a disease of the brain. Continuous researches better illustrate the neurochemical alterations in brain function, and attempt to discover the links to consequent behavioral changes. Newer hypotheses and theories follow the numerous results, and more rational methods of approaching therapy are being developed. Substance abuse is on the rise in Korea, and social interest in the matter as well. On the other hand, diagnosis and treatment of drug addiction is still very difficult, because how the abused substance acts in the brain, or how it leads to behavioral problems in not widely known. Therefore, understanding the mechanism of drug addiction can improve the process of diagnosing addict patients, planning therapy, and predicting the prognosis . Neuroimaging approaches by nuclear medicine methods are expected to objectively judge behavioral and neurochemical changes, and response to treatment. In addition, as genes associated with addictive behavior are discovered, functional nuclear medicine images will aid in the assessment of individuals. Reviewing published literature on neuroimaging regarding nuclear medicine is expected to be of assistance to the management of drug addict patients. What's more, means of applying nuclear medicine to the care of drug addict patients should be investigated further.

  18. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have been linked to many mental disorders, including autism , obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and depression . Brain ... studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as they grow ...

  19. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of ... but sometimes give rise to disabilities or diseases. neural circuit —A network of neurons and their interconnections. ...

  20. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ... depression experience when starting treatment. Gene Studies Advanced technologies are also making it faster, easier, and more ...

  1. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... blues" from time to time. In contrast, major depression is a serious disorder that lasts for weeks. ...

  2. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions of cells in the body, the results can affect many ... unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function of conducting ...

  3. Brain Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    The brain is the control center of the body. It controls thoughts, memory, speech, and movement. It regulates the function of many organs. When the brain is healthy, it works quickly and automatically. However, ...

  4. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... their final destination. Chemical signals from other cells guide neurons in forming various brain structures. Neighboring neurons ...

  5. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions ... the basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function ...

  6. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works ... early brain development. It may also assist in learning and memory. Problems in making or using glutamate ...

  7. Comparative genomics of brain size evolution

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Which genetic changes took place during mammalian, primate and human evolution to build a larger brain? To answer this question, one has to correlate genetic changes with brain size changes across a phylogeny. Such a comparative genomics approach provides unique information to better understand brain evolution and brain development. However, its statistical power is limited for example due to the limited number of species, the presumably complex genetics of brain size evolution and the large ...

  8. Nanoparticle mediated P-glycoprotein silencing for improved drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier: a siRNA-chitosan approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jostein Malmo

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier (BBB, composed of tightly organized endothelial cells, limits the availability of drugs to therapeutic targets in the central nervous system. The barrier is maintained by membrane bound efflux pumps efficiently transporting specific xenobiotics back into the blood. The efflux pump P-glycoprotein (P-gp, expressed at high levels in brain endothelial cells, has several drug substrates. Consequently, siRNA mediated silencing of the P-gp gene is one possible strategy how to improve the delivery of drugs to the brain. Herein, we investigated the potential of siRNA-chitosan nanoparticles in silencing P-gp in a BBB model. We show that the transfection of rat brain endothelial cells mediated effective knockdown of P-gp with subsequent decrease in P-gp substrate efflux. This resulted in increased cellular delivery and efficacy of the model drug doxorubicin.

  9. Methanol Cannon Demonstrations Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolson, David A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes two variations on the traditional methanol cannon demonstration. The first variation is a chain reaction using real metal chains. The second example involves using easily available components to produce sequential explosions that can be musical in nature. (AIM)

  10. TENCompetence tool demonstration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluijfhout, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Kluijfhout, E. (2009). TENCompetence tool demonstration. Presented at Zorgacademie Parkstad (Health Academy Parkstad), Limburg Leisure Academy, Life Long Learning Limburg and a number of regional educational institutions. May, 18, 2009, Heerlen, The Netherlands: Open University of the Netherlands, T

  11. Land Management Research Demonstration

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In 2002, Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge became one of the first Land Management and Research Demonstration (LMRD) sites. These sites are intended to serve as...

  12. Disorganization of Equilibrium Directional Interactions in the Brain Motor Network of Parkinson's disease: New Insight of Resting State Analysis Using Granger Causality and Graphical Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Ghasemi, Mahdieh; Mahloojifar, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurological disorder characterized by tremor, rigidity, and slowness of movements. Particular changes related to various pathological attacks in PD could result in causal interactions of the brain network from resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) data. In this paper, we aimed to disclose the network structure of the directed influences over the brain using multivariate Granger causality analysis and graph theory in patients w...

  13. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit ... final destination. Chemical signals from other cells guide neurons in forming various brain structures. Neighboring neurons make connections with each other ...

  14. Brain Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain aneurysm is an abnormal bulge or "ballooning" in the wall of an artery in the brain. They are sometimes called berry aneurysms because they ... often the size of a small berry. Most brain aneurysms produce no symptoms until they become large, ...

  15. The Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubel, David H.

    1979-01-01

    This article on the brain is part of an entire issue about neurobiology and the question of how the human brain works. The brain as an intricate tissue composed of cells is discussed based on the current knowledge and understanding of its composition and structure. (SA)

  16. Pancreaticopleural fistula : CT demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahm, Jin Kyeung [Chuncheon Medical Center, ChunChon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-03-01

    In patients with chronic pancreatitis, the pancreaticopleural fistula is known to cause recurrent exudative or hemorrhagic pleural effusions. These are often large in volume and require treatment, unlike the effusions in acute pancreatitis. Diagnosis can be made either by the finding of elevated pleural fluid amylase level or, using imaging studies, by the direct demonstration of the fistulous tract. We report two cases of pancreaticopleural fistula demonstrated by computed tomography.

  17. Education Payload Operation - Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Education Payload Operation - Demonstrations (EPO-Demos) are recorded video education demonstrations performed on the International Space Station (ISS) by crewmembers using hardware already onboard the ISS. EPO-Demos are videotaped, edited, and used to enhance existing NASA education resources and programs for educators and students in grades K-12. EPO-Demos are designed to support the NASA mission to inspire the next generation of explorers.

  18. Contextualizing aquired brain damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Charlotte Marie Bisgaard

    2014-01-01

    Contextualizing aquired brain damage Traditional approaches study ’communicational problems’ often in a discourse of disabledness or deficitness. With an ontology of communcation as something unique and a presupposed uniqueness of each one of us, how could an integrational approach (Integrational...... for people with aquired brain injuries will be presented and comparatively discussed in a traditional versus an integrational perspective. Preliminary results and considerations on ”methods” and ”participation” from this study will be presented along with an overview of the project's empirical data....

  19. Brain Fingerprinting Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ms.J.R.Rajput

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain Fingerprinting is a new computer-based technology to identify the perpetrator of a crime accurately and scientifically by measuring brain-wave responses to crime-relevant words or pictures presented on a computer screen. Brain Fingerprinting has proven 100% accurate in over 120 tests, including tests on FBI agents, tests for a US intelligence agency and for the US Navy, and tests on real-life situations including felony crimes. Brain fingerprinting is based on finding that the brain generates a unique brain wave pattern when a person encounters a familiar stimulus Use of functional magnetic resonance imaging in lie detection derives from studies suggesting that persons asked to lie show different patterns of brain activity than they do when being truthful. Issues related to the use of such evidence in courts are discussed. The author concludes that neither approach is currently supported by enough data regarding its accuracy in detecting deception to warrant use in court. In the field of criminology, a new lie detector has been developed in the United States of America. This is called “brain fingerprinting”. This invention is supposed to be the best lie detector available as on date and is said to detect even smooth criminals who pass the polygraph test (the conventional lie detector test with ease. The new method employs brain waves, which are useful in detecting whether the person subjected to the test, remembers finer details of the crime. Even if the person willingly suppresses the necessary information, the brain wave is sure to trap him, according to the experts, who are very excited about the new kid on the block.

  20. Orientation selective deep brain stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehto, Lauri J.; Slopsema, Julia P.; Johnson, Matthew D.; Shatillo, Artem; Teplitzky, Benjamin A.; Utecht, Lynn; Adriany, Gregor; Mangia, Silvia; Sierra, Alejandra; Low, Walter C.; Gröhn, Olli; Michaeli, Shalom

    2017-02-01

    Objective. Target selectivity of deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy is critical, as the precise locus and pattern of the stimulation dictates the degree to which desired treatment responses are achieved and adverse side effects are avoided. There is a clear clinical need to improve DBS technology beyond currently available stimulation steering and shaping approaches. We introduce orientation selective neural stimulation as a concept to increase the specificity of target selection in DBS. Approach. This concept, which involves orienting the electric field along an axonal pathway, was tested in the corpus callosum of the rat brain by freely controlling the direction of the electric field on a plane using a three-electrode bundle, and monitoring the response of the neurons using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Computational models were developed to further analyze axonal excitability for varied electric field orientation. Main results. Our results demonstrated that the strongest fMRI response was observed when the electric field was oriented parallel to the axons, while almost no response was detected with the perpendicular orientation of the electric field relative to the primary fiber tract. These results were confirmed by computational models of the experimental paradigm quantifying the activation of radially distributed axons while varying the primary direction of the electric field. Significance. The described strategies identify a new course for selective neuromodulation paradigms in DBS based on axonal fiber orientation.

  1. Solar renovation demonstration projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruun Joergensen, O. [ed.

    1998-10-01

    In the framework of the IEA SHC Programme, a Task on building renovation was initiated, `Task 20, Solar Energy in Building Renovation`. In a part of the task, Subtask C `Design of Solar Renovation Projects`, different solar renovation demonstration projects were developed. The objective of Subtask C was to demonstrate the application of advanced solar renovation concepts on real buildings. This report documents 16 different solar renovation demonstration projects including the design processes of the projects. The projects include the renovation of houses, schools, laboratories, and factories. Several solar techniques were used: building integrated solar collectors, glazed balconies, ventilated solar walls, transparent insulation, second skin facades, daylight elements and photovoltaic systems. These techniques are used in several simple as well as more complex system designs. (au)

  2. Thermodynamic laws apply to brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerian, Alen J

    2010-02-01

    Thermodynamic laws and complex system dynamics govern brain function. Thus, any change in brain homeostasis by an alteration in brain temperature, neurotransmission or content may cause region-specific brain dysfunction. This is the premise for the Salerian Theory of Brain built upon a new paradigm for neuropsychiatric disorders: the governing influence of neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, thermodynamic laws. The principles of region-specific brain function thermodynamics are reviewed. The clinical and supporting evidence including the paradoxical effects of various agents that alter brain homeostasis is demonstrated.

  3. Gigashot Optical Laser Demonstrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deri, R. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-10-13

    The Gigashot Optical Laser Demonstrator (GOLD) project has demonstrated a novel optical amplifier for high energy pulsed lasers operating at high repetition rates. The amplifier stores enough pump energy to support >10 J of laser output, and employs conduction cooling for thermal management to avoid the need for expensive and bulky high-pressure helium subsystems. A prototype amplifier was fabricated, pumped with diode light at 885 nm, and characterized. Experimental results show that the amplifier provides sufficient small-signal gain and sufficiently low wavefront and birefringence impairments to prove useful in laser systems, at repetition rates up to 60 Hz.

  4. Demonstrating Supernova Remnant Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, Denis A.; Williams, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    We have created a software tool to calculate at display supernova remnant evolution which includes all stages from early ejecta dominated phase to late-time merging with the interstellar medium. The software was created using Python, and can be distributed as Python code, or as an executable file. The purpose of the software is to demonstrate the different phases and transitions that a supernova remnant undergoes, and will be used in upper level undergraduate astrophysics courses as a teaching tool. The usage of the software and its graphical user interface will be demonstrated.

  5. Demonstrating marketing accountability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombeski, William R; Britt, Jason; Taylor, Jan; Riggs, Karen; Wray, Tanya; Adkins, Wanda; Springate, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    Pressure on health care marketers to demonstrate effectiveness of their strategies and show their contribution to organizational goals is growing. A seven-tiered model based on the concepts of structure (having the right people, systems), process (doing the right things in the right way), and outcomes (results) is discussed. Examples of measures for each tier are provided and the benefits of using the model as a tool for measuring, organizing, tracking, and communicating appropriate information are provided. The model also provides a framework for helping management understand marketing's value and can serve as a vehicle for demonstrating marketing accountability.

  6. A comparative expression analysis of gene transcripts in brain tissue of non-transgenic and GH-transgenic zebrafish (Danio rerio using a DDRT-PCR approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda A. Alves-Costa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The presence of higher level of exogenous growth hormone (GH in transgenic animals could lead to several physiological alterations. A GH transgenic zebrafish (Danio rerio line was compared to nontransgenic (NT samples of the species through a DDRT-PCR approach, with the goal of identifying candidate differentially expressed transcripts in brain tissues that could be involved in GH overexpression. Densitometric analyses of two selected amplification products, p300 and ADCY2, pointed to a significant lower gene expression in the transgenic zebrafish (104.02 ± 57.71; 224.10 ± 91.73 when compared to NT samples (249.75 ± 30.08; 342.95 ± 65.19. The present data indicate that p300 and ADCY2 are involved in a regulation system for GH when high circulating levels of this hormone are found in zebrafishes.A presença de níveis mais elevados do hormônio de crescimento (GH em animais transgênicos poderia levar a várias alterações fisiológicas. Uma linhagem transgênica de paulistinha (Danio rerio para o GH foi comparada com amostras não transgênicas (NT desta espécie, através de uma abordagem de DDRT-PCR, com o objetivo de identificar transcritos candidatos diferencialmente expressos em tecido cerebral que poderiam estar envolvidos na superexpressão de GH. Análises densitométricas de dois produtos de amplificação selecionados, p300 e ADCY2, apontaram uma expressão gênica significativamente menor nas amostras transgênicas de paulistinha (104.02 ± 57.71; 224.10 ± 91.73, quando comparadas com as amostras NT (249.75 ± 30.08; 342.95±65.19. Os presentes dados indicam que p300 e ADCY2 estão envolvidos em um sistema de regulação do GH, quando altos níveis circulantes desse hormônio são encontrados em paulistinha.

  7. Training brain networks and states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yi-Yuan; Posner, Michael I

    2014-07-01

    Brain training refers to practices that alter the brain in a way that improves cognition, and performance in domains beyond those involved in the training. We argue that brain training includes network training through repetitive practice that exercises specific brain networks and state training, which changes the brain state in a way that influences many networks. This opinion article considers two widely used methods - working memory training (WMT) and meditation training (MT) - to demonstrate the similarities and differences between network and state training. These two forms of training involve different areas of the brain and different forms of generalization. We propose a distinction between network and state training methods to improve understanding of the most effective brain training.

  8. Monty Roberts’ public demonstrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loftus, Loni; Marks, Kelly; Jones-McVey, Rosie; Gonzales, Jose L.; Fowler, Veronica L.

    2016-01-01

    Effective training of horses relies on the trainer’s awareness of learning theory and equine ethology, and should be undertaken with skill and time. Some trainers, such as Monty Roberts, share their methods through the medium of public demonstrations. This paper describes the opportunistic analys

  9. Calculus Demonstrations Using MATLAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Peter K.; Harman, Chris

    2002-01-01

    The note discusses ways in which technology can be used in the calculus learning process. In particular, five MATLAB programs are detailed for use by instructors or students that demonstrate important concepts in introductory calculus: Newton's method, differentiation and integration. Two of the programs are animated. The programs and the…

  10. Demonstrating the Gas Laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holko, David A.

    1982-01-01

    Presents a complete computer program demonstrating the relationship between volume/pressure for Boyle's Law, volume/temperature for Charles' Law, and volume/moles of gas for Avagadro's Law. The programing reinforces students' application of gas laws and equates a simulated moving piston to theoretical values derived using the ideal gas law.…

  11. PHARUS ASAR demonstrator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, A.J.E.; Bree, R.J.P. van; Calkoen, C.J.; Dekker, R.J.; Otten, M.P.G.; Rossum, W.L. van

    2001-01-01

    PHARUS is a polarimetric phased array C-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), designed and built for airborne use. Advanced SAR (ASAR) data in image and alternating polarization mode have been simulated with PHARUS to demonstrate the use of Envisat for a number of typical SAR applications that are no

  12. Arctic Craft Demonstration Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    it received a lot of attention from the local population. Demonstration personnel, both Coast Guard and contractors, were asked to be receptive to...www.uscg.mil/top/missions/ . Counter-Drug Interdiction and Alien Migrant Interdiction operations are currently not included. In the non-Polar regions

  13. Polarized Light: Three Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goehmann, Ruth; Welty, Scott

    1984-01-01

    Describes three demonstrations used in the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry polarized light show. The procedures employed are suitable for the classroom by using smaller polarizers and an overhead projector. Topic areas include properties of cellophane tape, nondisappearing arrows, and rope through a picket fence. (JN)

  14. Non-invasive delivery of stealth, brain-penetrating nanoparticles across the blood-brain barrier using MRI-guided focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nance, Elizabeth; Timbie, Kelsie; Miller, G Wilson; Song, Ji; Louttit, Cameron; Klibanov, Alexander L; Shih, Ting-Yu; Swaminathan, Ganesh; Tamargo, Rafael J; Woodworth, Graeme F; Hanes, Justin; Price, Richard J

    2014-09-10

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) presents a significant obstacle for the treatment of many central nervous system (CNS) disorders, including invasive brain tumors, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and stroke. Therapeutics must be capable of bypassing the BBB and also penetrate the brain parenchyma to achieve a desired effect within the brain. In this study, we test the unique combination of a non-invasive approach to BBB permeabilization with a therapeutically relevant polymeric nanoparticle platform capable of rapidly penetrating within the brain microenvironment. MR-guided focused ultrasound (FUS) with intravascular microbubbles (MBs) is able to locally and reversibly disrupt the BBB with submillimeter spatial accuracy. Densely poly(ethylene-co-glycol) (PEG) coated, brain-penetrating nanoparticles (BPNs) are long-circulating and diffuse 10-fold slower in normal rat brain tissue compared to diffusion in water. Following intravenous administration of model and biodegradable BPNs in normal healthy rats, we demonstrate safe, pressure-dependent delivery of 60nm BPNs to the brain parenchyma in regions where the BBB is disrupted by FUS and MBs. Delivery of BPNs with MR-guided FUS has the potential to improve efficacy of treatments for many CNS diseases, while reducing systemic side effects by providing sustained, well-dispersed drug delivery into select regions of the brain.

  15. Brains are not just neurons. Comment on “Toward a computational framework for cognitive biology: Unifying approaches from cognitive neuroscience and comparative cognition” by Fitch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Ludwig

    2014-09-01

    This comment addresses the first component of Fitch's framework: the computational power of single neurons [3]. Although I agree that traditional models of neural computation have vastly underestimated the computational power of single neurons, I am hesitant to follow him completely. The exclusive focus on neurons is likely to underestimate the importance of other cells in the brain. In the last years, two such cell types have received appropriate attention by neuroscientists: interneurons and glia. Interneurons are small, tightly packed cells involved in the control of information processing in learning and memory. Rather than transmitting externally (like motor or sensory neurons), these neurons process information within internal circuits of the brain (therefore also called 'relay neurons'). Some specialized interneuron subtypes temporally regulate the flow of information in a given cortical circuit during relevant behavioral events [4]. In the human brain approx. 100 billion interneurons control information processing and are implicated in disorders such as epilepsy and Parkinson's.

  16. The Silent Guardian Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Control Category A biothreat pathogens: B. anthracis (three regions), Variola major virus (two regions), Ebola virus (one region), Lassa fever virus...Lin, and D.A. Stenger Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering introduction During the winter months, runny noses, fevers , and other flu...present clinically with similar symptoms. One approach to surveillance for a bioattack is to monitor for unusual outbreaks of flu-like symptoms

  17. Blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD)-based techniques for the quantification of brain hemodynamic and metabolic properties - theoretical models and experimental approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A; Sukstanskii, Alexander L; He, Xiang

    2013-08-01

    The quantitative evaluation of brain hemodynamics and metabolism, particularly the relationship between brain function and oxygen utilization, is important for the understanding of normal human brain operation, as well as the pathophysiology of neurological disorders. It can also be of great importance for the evaluation of hypoxia within tumors of the brain and other organs. A fundamental discovery by Ogawa and coworkers of the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast opened up the possibility to use this effect to study brain hemodynamic and metabolic properties by means of MRI measurements. Such measurements require the development of theoretical models connecting the MRI signal to brain structure and function, and the design of experimental techniques allowing MR measurements to be made of the salient features of theoretical models. In this review, we discuss several such theoretical models and experimental methods for the quantification of brain hemodynamic and metabolic properties. The review's main focus is on methods for the evaluation of the oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) based on the measurement of the blood oxygenation level. A combination of the measurement of OEF and the cerebral blood flow (CBF) allows an evaluation to be made of the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO2 ). We first consider in detail the magnetic properties of blood - magnetic susceptibility, MR relaxation and theoretical models of the intravascular contribution to the MR signal under different experimental conditions. We then describe a 'through-space' effect - the influence of inhomogeneous magnetic fields, created in the extravascular space by intravascular deoxygenated blood, on the formation of the MR signal. Further, we describe several experimental techniques taking advantage of these theoretical models. Some of these techniques - MR susceptometry and T2 -based quantification of OEF - utilize the intravascular MR signal. Another technique

  18. Nucla CFB Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-01

    This report documents Colorado-Ute Electric Association's Nucla Circulating Atmospheric Fluidized-Bed Combustion (AFBC) demonstration project. It describes the plant equipment and system design for the first US utility-size circulating AFBC boiler and its support systems. Included are equipment and system descriptions, design/background information and appendices with an equipment list and selected information plus process flow and instrumentation drawings. The purpose of this report is to share the information gathered during the Nucla circulating AFBC demonstration project and present it so that the general public can evaluate the technical feasibility and cost effectiveness of replacing pulverized or stoker-fired boiler units with circulating fluidized-bed boiler units. (VC)

  19. Pilot Scale Advanced Fogging Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demmer, Rick L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Fox, Don T. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Archiblad, Kip E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Experiments in 2006 developed a useful fog solution using three different chemical constituents. Optimization of the fog recipe and use of commercially available equipment were identified as needs that had not been addressed. During 2012 development work it was noted that low concentrations of the components hampered coverage and drying in the United Kingdom’s National Nuclear Laboratory’s testing much more so than was evident in the 2006 tests. In fiscal year 2014 the Idaho National Laboratory undertook a systematic optimization of the fogging formulation and conducted a non-radioactive, pilot scale demonstration using commercially available fogging equipment. While not as sophisticated as the equipment used in earlier testing, the new approach is much less expensive and readily available for smaller scale operations. Pilot scale testing was important to validate new equipment of an appropriate scale, optimize the chemistry of the fogging solution, and to realize the conceptual approach.

  20. The Majorana Demonstrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguayo, Estanislao; Fast, James E.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Keillor, Martin E.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Kouzes, Richard T.; LaFerriere, Brian D.; Merriman, Jason H.; Orrell, John L.; Overman, Nicole R.; Avignone, Frank T.; Back, Henning O.; Combs, Dustin C.; Leviner, L.; Young, A.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Konovalov, S.; Vanyushin, I.; Yumatov, Vladimir; Bergevin, M.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Detwiler, Jason A.; Loach, J. C.; Martin, R. D.; Poon, Alan; Prior, Gersende; Vetter, Kai; Bertrand, F.; Cooper, R. J.; Radford, D. C.; Varner, R. L.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Boswell, M.; Elliott, S.; Gehman, Victor M.; Hime, Andrew; Kidd, M. F.; LaRoque, B. H.; Rielage, Keith; Ronquest, M. C.; Steele, David; Brudanin, V.; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Gusey, K.; Kochetov, Oleg; Shirchenko, M.; Timkin, V.; Yakushev, E.; Busch, Matthew; Esterline, James H.; Tornow, Werner; Christofferson, Cabot-Ann; Horton, Mark; Howard, S.; Sobolev, V.; Collar, J. I.; Fields, N.; Creswick, R.; Doe, Peter J.; Johnson, R. A.; Knecht, A.; Leon, Jonathan D.; Marino, Michael G.; Miller, M. L.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Schubert, Alexis G.; Wolfe, B. A.; Efremenko, Yuri; Ejiri, H.; Hazama, R.; Nomachi, Masaharu; Shima, T.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, Florian; Giovanetti, G. K.; Green, M.; Henning, Reyco; Howe, M. A.; MacMullin, S.; Phillips, D.; Snavely, Kyle J.; Strain, J.; Vorren, Kris R.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Keller, C.; Mei, Dong-Ming; Perumpilly, Gopakumar; Thomas, K.; Zhang, C.; Hallin, A. L.; Keeter, K.; Mizouni, Leila; Wilkerson, J. F.

    2011-09-03

    A brief review of the history and neutrino physics of double beta decay is given. A description of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR research and development program, including background reduction techniques, is presented in some detail. The application of point contact (PC) detectors to the experiment is discussed, including the effectiveness of pulse shape analysis. The predicted sensitivity of a PC detector array enriched to 86% to 76Ge is given.

  1. The Majorana Demonstrator

    CERN Document Server

    Aguayo, E; Hoppe, E W; Keillor, M E; Kephart, J D; Kouzes, R T; LaFerriere, B D; Merriman, J; Orrell, J L; Overman, N R; Avignone, F T; Back, H O; Combs, D C; Leviner, L E; Young, A R; Barabash, A S; Konovalov, S I; Vanyushin, I; Yumatov, V; Bergevin, M; Chan, Y-D; Detwiler, J A; Loach, J C; Martin, R D; Poon, A W P; Prior, G; Vetter, K; Bertrand, F E; Cooper, R J; Radford, D C; Varner, R L; Yu, C -H; Boswell, M; Elliott, S R; Gehman, V M; Hime, A; Kidd, M F; LaRoque, B H; Rielage, K; Ronquest, M C; Steele, D; Brudanin, V; Egorov, V; Gusey, K; Kochetov, O; Shirchenko, M; Timkin, V; Yakushev, E; Busch, M; Esterline, J; Tornow, W; Christofferson, C D; Horton, M; Howard, S; Sobolev, V; Collar, J I; Fields, N; Creswick, R J; Doe, P J; Johnson, R A; Knecht, A; Leon, J; Marino, M G; Miller, M L; Robertson, R G H; Schubert, A G; Wolfe, B A; Efremenko, Yu; Ejiri, H; Hazama, R; Nomachi, M; Shima, T; Finnerty, P; Fraenkle, F M; Giovanetti, G K; Green, M P; Henning, R; Howe, M A; MacMullin, S; Phillips, D G; Snavely, K J; Strain, J; Vorren, K; Guiseppe, V E; Keller, C; Mei, D -M; Perumpilly, G; Thomas, K; Zhang, C; Hallin, A L; Keeter, K J; Mizouni, L; Wilkerson, J F

    2011-01-01

    A brief review of the history and neutrino physics of double beta decay is given. A description of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR research and development program including background reduction techniques is presented in some detail. The application of point contact (PC) detectors to the experiment is discussed, including the effectiveness of pulse shape analysis. The predicted sensitivity of a PC detector array enriched to 86% in 76Ge is given.

  2. Thyroid, brain and mood modulation in affective disorder: insights from molecular research and functional brain imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, M; London, E D; Silverman, D H; Rasgon, N; Kirchheiner, J; Whybrow, P C

    2003-11-01

    The efficacy resulting from adjunctive use of supraphysiological doses of levothyroxine has emerged as a promising approach to therapy and prophylaxis for refractory mood disorders. Most patients with mood disorders who receive treatment with supraphysiological doses of levothyroxine have normal peripheral thyroid hormone levels, and also respond differently to the hormone and tolerate it better than healthy individuals and patients with primary thyroid diseases. Progress in molecular and functional brain imaging techniques has provided a new understanding of these phenomena, illuminating the relationship between thyroid function, mood modulation and behavior. Thyroid hormones are widely distributed in the brain and have a multitude of effects on the central nervous system. Notably many of the limbic system structures where thyroid hormone receptors are prevalent have been implicated in the pathogenesis of mood disorders. The influence of the thyroid system on neurotransmitters (particularly serotonin and norepinephrine), which putatively play a major role in the regulation of mood and behavior, may contribute to the mechanisms of mood modulation. Recent functional brain imaging studies using positron emission tomography (PET) with [ (18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose demonstrated that thyroid hormone treatment with levothyroxine affects regional brain metabolism in patients with hypothyroidism and bipolar disorder. Theses studies confirm that thyroid hormones are active in modulating metabolic function in the mature adult brain, and provide intriging neuroanatomic clues that may guide future research.

  3. Older but still fluent? Insights from the intrinsically active baseline configuration of the aging brain using a data driven graph-theoretical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Angela M; Mérillat, Susan; Jäncke, Lutz

    2016-02-15

    A major part of our knowledge about the functioning of the aging brain comes from task-induced activation paradigms. However, the aging brain's intrinsic functional organization may be already a limiting factor for the outcome of an actual behavior. In order to get a better understanding of how this functional baseline configuration of the aging brain may affect cognitive performance, we analyzed task-free fMRI data of older 186 participants (mean age=70.4, 97 female) and their performance data in verbal fluency: First, we conducted an intrinsic connectivity contrast analysis (ICC) for the purpose of evaluating the brain regions whose degree of connectedness was significantly correlated with fluency performance. Secondly, using connectivity analyses we investigated how the clusters from the ICC functionally related to the other major resting-state networks. Apart from the importance of intact fronto-parietal long-range connections, the preserved capacity of the DMN for a finely attuned interaction with the executive-control network and the language network seems to be crucial for successful verbal fluency performance in older people. We provide further evidence that the right frontal regions might be more prominently affected by age-related decline.

  4. Aging, the metabolic syndrome, and ischemic stroke: redefining the approach for studying the blood-brain barrier in a complex neurological disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Logsdon, Aric F; Turner, Ryan C; Rosen, Charles L; Huber, Jason D

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) has many important functions in maintaining the brain's immune-privileged status. Endothelial cells, astrocytes, and pericytes have important roles in preserving vasculature integrity. As we age, cell senescence can contribute to BBB compromise. The compromised BBB allows an influx of inflammatory cytokines to enter the brain. These cytokines lead to neuronal and glial damage. Ultimately, the functional changes within the brain can cause age-related disease. One of the most prominent age-related diseases is ischemic stroke. Stroke is the largest cause of disability and is third largest cause of mortality in the United States. The biggest risk factors for stroke, besides age, are results of the metabolic syndrome. The metabolic syndrome, if unchecked, quickly advances to outcomes that include diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and obesity. The contribution from these comorbidities to BBB compromise is great. Some of the common molecular pathways activated include: endoplasmic reticulum stress, reactive oxygen species formation, and glutamate excitotoxicity. In this chapter, we examine how age-related changes to cells within the central nervous system interact with comorbidities. We then look at how comorbidities lead to increased risk for stroke through BBB disruption. Finally, we discuss key molecular pathways of interest with a focus on therapeutic targets that warrant further investigation.

  5. NAVAJO ELECTRIFICATION DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry W. Battiest

    2008-06-11

    The Navajo Electrification Demonstration Project (NEDP) is a multi-year project which addresses the electricity needs of the unserved and underserved Navajo Nation, the largest American Indian tribe in the United States. The program serves to cumulatively provide off-grid electricty for families living away from the electricty infrastructure, line extensions for unserved families living nearby (less than 1/2 mile away from) the electricity, and, under the current project called NEDP-4, the construction of a substation to increase the capacity and improve the quality of service into the central core region of the Navajo Nation.

  6. Learning From Demonstration?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian; Bertelsen, Niels Haldor

    2014-01-01

    , and micro combined heat and power using hydrogen. Using sociological and business economic theories of innovation, the paper discusses how early movers of innovation tend to obtain only partial success when demonstrating their products and often feel obstructed by minor details. The empirical work...... encompasses both an evaluation of the design and Construction process as well as a post-occupancy evaluation. Process experiences include the use of a multidisciplinary competence group and performance measurement. The commencement of the project was enthusiastic, but it was forced into more traditional forms...

  7. PFBC Utility Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-11-01

    This report provides a summary of activities by American Electric Power Service Corporation during the first budget period of the PFBC Utility Demonstration Project. In April 1990, AEP signed a Cooperative Agreement with the US Department of Energy to repower the Philip Sporn Plant, Units 3 4 in New Haven, West Virginia, with a 330 KW PFBC plant. The purpose of the program was to demonstrate and verify PFBC in a full-scale commercial plant. The technical and cost baselines of the Cooperative Agreement were based on a preliminary engineering and design and a cost estimate developed by AEP subsequent to AEP's proposal submittal in May 1988, and prior to the signing of the Cooperative Agreement. The Statement of Work in the first budget period of the Cooperative Agreement included a task to develop a preliminary design and cost estimate for erecting a Greenfield plant and to conduct a comparison with the repowering option. The comparative assessment of the options concluded that erecting a Greenfield plant rather than repowering the existing Sporn Plant could be the technically and economically superior alternative. The Greenfield plant would have a capacity of 340 MW. The ten additional MW output is due to the ability to better match the steam cycle to the PFBC system with a new balance of plant design. In addition to this study, the conceptual design of the Sporn Repowering led to several items which warranted optimization studies with the goal to develop a more cost effective design.

  8. Smart Grid Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Craig [National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, Arlington, VA (United States); Carroll, Paul [National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, Arlington, VA (United States); Bell, Abigail [National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, Arlington, VA (United States)

    2015-03-11

    The National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) organized the NRECA-U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Smart Grid Demonstration Project (DE-OE0000222) to install and study a broad range of advanced smart grid technologies in a demonstration that spanned 23 electric cooperatives in 12 states. More than 205,444 pieces of electronic equipment and more than 100,000 minor items (bracket, labels, mounting hardware, fiber optic cable, etc.) were installed to upgrade and enhance the efficiency, reliability, and resiliency of the power networks at the participating co-ops. The objective of this project was to build a path for other electric utilities, and particularly electrical cooperatives, to adopt emerging smart grid technology when it can improve utility operations, thus advancing the co-ops’ familiarity and comfort with such technology. Specifically, the project executed multiple subprojects employing a range of emerging smart grid technologies to test their cost-effectiveness and, where the technology demonstrated value, provided case studies that will enable other electric utilities—particularly electric cooperatives— to use these technologies. NRECA structured the project according to the following three areas: Demonstration of smart grid technology; Advancement of standards to enable the interoperability of components; and Improvement of grid cyber security. We termed these three areas Technology Deployment Study, Interoperability, and Cyber Security. Although the deployment of technology and studying the demonstration projects at coops accounted for the largest portion of the project budget by far, we see our accomplishments in each of the areas as critical to advancing the smart grid. All project deliverables have been published. Technology Deployment Study: The deliverable was a set of 11 single-topic technical reports in areas related to the listed technologies. Each of these reports has already been submitted to DOE, distributed to co-ops, and

  9. Leveraging Human Brain Activity to Improve Object Classification

    OpenAIRE

    Fong, Ruth Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Today, most object detection algorithms differ drastically from how humans tackle visual problems. In this thesis, I present a new paradigm for improving machine vision algorithms by designing them to better mimic how humans approach these tasks. Specifically, I demonstrate how human brain activity from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can be leveraged to improve object classification. Inspired by the graduated manner in which humans learn, I present a novel algorithm that sim...

  10. The Albanian Brain Drain phenomena and the Brain Gain strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arta Musaraj

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Qualitative human resources remain one of the main problem of Eastern Europe and in particular Western Balkan countries. After 20 years of deep economic, political and social transformation, those countries are facing the problem of the highly qualified human resources they lost in these two decades, while in most of cases there is no a real measurement of the weight and impact these phenomena of Brain Drain has in the quality of the work force. Most of them are trying to set up and apply Brain Gain strategies at a national level. The paper aims to analyze and evaluate the influence that the missing of a previous qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the Phenomena of Brain Drain in Albania, has in the successful application of the Brain Gain strategy. The research objective will be fulfilled by analyzing the evolution of the Brain Drain phenomena, by an introduction of the Albanian characteristic and shape of  Brain Drain from 1990, by analyzing the Brain Gain strategy applied in the country comparing it to a successful application. The paper analyzes factors and variables which may affect the successful application of Brain Gain in Albania while  evidences the importance of stakeholder approach in objectives and aims of Brain Gain program and strategy and the use of the  Balance Scorecard as a strategic management system in “brain gain” strategy set up and application in the case of Albania and those of other countries of the region as well.

  11. Jennings Demonstration PLant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russ Heissner

    2010-08-31

    Verenium operated a demonstration plant with a capacity to produce 1.4 million gallons of cellulosic ethanol from agricultural resiues for about two years. During this time, the plant was able to evaluate the technical issues in producing ethanol from three different cellulosic feedstocks, sugar cane bagasse, energy cane, and sorghum. The project was intended to develop a better understanding of the operating parameters that would inform a commercial sized operation. Issues related to feedstock variability, use of hydrolytic enzymes, and the viability of fermentative organisms were evaluated. Considerable success was achieved with pretreatment processes and use of enzymes but challenges were encountered with feedstock variability and fermentation systems. Limited amounts of cellulosic ethanol were produced.

  12. Morphology-driven automatic segmentation of MR images of the neonatal brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Laura; Lisowski, Radoslaw; Faundez, Tamara; Hüppi, Petra S; Lazeyras, François; Kocher, Michel

    2012-12-01

    The segmentation of MR images of the neonatal brain is an essential step in the study and evaluation of infant brain development. State-of-the-art methods for adult brain MRI segmentation are not applicable to the neonatal brain, due to large differences in structure and tissue properties between newborn and adult brains. Existing newborn brain MRI segmentation methods either rely on manual interaction or require the use of atlases or templates, which unavoidably introduces a bias of the results towards the population that was used to derive the atlases. We propose a different approach for the segmentation of neonatal brain MRI, based on the infusion of high-level brain morphology knowledge, regarding relative tissue location, connectivity and structure. Our method does not require manual interaction, or the use of an atlas, and the generality of its priors makes it applicable to different neonatal populations, while avoiding atlas-related bias. The proposed algorithm segments the brain both globally (intracranial cavity, cerebellum, brainstem and the two hemispheres) and at tissue level (cortical and subcortical gray matter, myelinated and unmyelinated white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid). We validate our algorithm through visual inspection by medical experts, as well as by quantitative comparisons that demonstrate good agreement with expert manual segmentations. The algorithm's robustness is verified by testing on variable quality images acquired on different machines, and on subjects with variable anatomy (enlarged ventricles, preterm- vs. term-born).

  13. Brain Autopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... why a family should consider arranging for a brain autopsy upon the death of their loved one. To get a definitive ... study of tissue removed from the body after death. Examination of the whole brain is important in understanding FTD because the patterns ...

  14. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of ... to slow or stop them from progressing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is another important research tool in understanding ...

  15. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and are working to compare that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues both help to direct ... comparing such children to those with normal brain development may help scientists to pinpoint when and where mental disorders begin and perhaps how to slow or stop ...

  16. Optogenetic mapping of brain circuitry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, George J.; Berglund, Ken; Gill, Harin; Hoffmann, Carolin; Katarya, Malvika; Kim, Jinsook; Kudolo, John; Lee, Li M.; Lee, Molly; Lo, Daniel; Nakajima, Ryuichi; Park, Min Yoon; Tan, Gregory; Tang, Yanxia; Teo, Peggy; Tsuda, Sachiko; Wen, Lei; Yoon, Su-In

    2012-10-01

    Studies of the brain promise to be revolutionized by new experimental strategies that harness the combined power of optical techniques and genetics. We have mapped the circuitry of the mouse brain by using both optogenetic actuators that control neuronal activity and optogenetic sensors that detect neuronal activity. Using the light-activated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2, to locally photostimulate neurons allows high-speed mapping of local and long-range circuitry. For example, with this approach we have mapped local circuits in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and many other brain regions. Using the fluorescent sensor for chloride ions, Clomeleon, allows imaging of the spatial and temporal dimensions of inhibitory circuits in the brain. This approach allows imaging of both conventional "phasic" synaptic inhibition as well as unconventional "tonic" inhibition. The combined use of light to both control and monitor neural activity creates unprecedented opportunities to explore brain function, screen pharmaceutical agents, and potentially to use light to ameliorate psychiatric and neurological disorders.

  17. Brain peroxisomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trompier, D; Vejux, A; Zarrouk, A; Gondcaille, C; Geillon, F; Nury, T; Savary, S; Lizard, G

    2014-03-01

    Peroxisomes are essential organelles in higher eukaryotes as they play a major role in numerous metabolic pathways and redox homeostasis. Some peroxisomal abnormalities, which are often not compatible with life or normal development, were identified in severe demyelinating and neurodegenerative brain diseases. The metabolic roles of peroxisomes, especially in the brain, are described and human brain peroxisomal disorders resulting from a peroxisome biogenesis or a single peroxisomal enzyme defect are listed. The brain abnormalities encountered in these disorders (demyelination, oxidative stress, inflammation, cell death, neuronal migration, differentiation) are described and their pathogenesis are discussed. Finally, the contribution of peroxisomal dysfunctions to the alterations of brain functions during aging and to the development of Alzheimer's disease is considered.

  18. Therapeutic Approach of a High Functioning Individual With Traumatic Brain Injury and Subsequent Emotional Volatility With Features of Pathological Laughter and Crying With Dextromethorphan/Quinidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Baran, Dynela; Johnson, Thomas M; Wagner, Joyce; Shen, Joann; Geers, Michelle

    2016-03-01

    Pathological laughing and crying, or pseudobulbar affect (PBA), has been described in patients with neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, stroke, and traumatic brain injury (TBI) since the 19th century (Schiffer 2005). The syndrome is characterized by inappropriate episodes of laughing or crying after minor stimuli. It was first coined a disinhibition of cortical control by Kinnier Wilson in 1924. It was observed in brain disease and seen with mild TBI. It can impair social and occupational function and is largely underrecognized in clinical settings. PBA is usually treated with antidepressants and dopaminergic agents. In this case we treated a military recruit with TBI with Nuedexta-a dextromethorphan/Quinidine derivative with a subsequent decrease in his episodes.

  19. Brain, body and culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertz, Armin W.

    2010-01-01

    This essay sketches out a biocultural theory of religion which is based on an expanded view of cognition that is anchored in brain and body (embrained and embodied), deeply dependent on culture (enculturated) and extended and distributed beyond the borders of individual brains. Such an approach...... uniquely accommodates contemporary cultural and neurobiological sciences. Since the challenge that the study of religion faces, in my opinion, is at the interstices of these sciences, I have tried to develop a theory of religion which acknowledges the fact. My hope is that the theory can be of use...

  20. Tidd PFBC demonstration project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrocco, M. [American Electric Power, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The Tidd project was one of the first joint government-industry ventures to be approved by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in its Clean Coal Technology Program. In March 1987, DOE signed an agreement with the Ohio Power Company, a subsidiary of American Electric Power, to refurbish the then-idle Tidd plant on the banks of the Ohio River with advanced pressurized fluidized bed technology. Testing ended after 49 months of operation, 100 individual tests, and the generation of more than 500,000 megawatt-hours of electricity. The demonstration plant has met its objectives. The project showed that more than 95 percent of sulfur dioxide pollutants could be removed inside the advanced boiler using the advanced combustion technology, giving future power plants an attractive alternative to expensive, add-on scrubber technology. In addition to its sulfur removal effectiveness, the plant`s sustained periods of steady-state operation boosted its availability significantly above design projections, heightening confidence that pressurized fluidized bed technology will be a reliable, baseload technology for future power plants. The technology also controlled the release of nitrogen oxides to levels well below the allowable limits set by federal air quality standards. It also produced a dry waste product that is much easier to handle than wastes from conventional power plants and will likely have commercial value when produced by future power plants.

  1. Nuclear power demonstrating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basmajian, V. V.; Haldeman, C. W.

    1980-08-12

    Apparatus for demonstrating the operation of a closed loop nuclear steam electric generating plant includes a transparent boiler assembly having immersion heating elements, which may be quartz lamps or stainless steel encased resistive immersion heating units with a quartz iodide lamp providing a source of visible radiation when using the encased immersion heating units. A variable voltage autotransformer is geared to a support rod for simulated reactor control rods for controlling the energy delivered to the heating elements and arranged so that when the voltage is high, the rods are withdrawn from the boiler to produce increased heating and illumination proportional to rod position, thereby simulating nuclear reaction. A relief valve, steam outlet pipe and water inlet pipe are connected to the boiler with a small stainless steel resistive heating element in the steam outlet pipe providing superheat. This heater is connected in series with a rheostat mounted on the front panel to provide superheat adjustments and an interlock switch that prevents the superheater from being energized when the steam valve is off with with no flow through the superheater. A heavy blue plastic radiation shield surrounds the boiler inside a bell jar.

  2. A moderate metal-binding hydrazone meets the criteria for a bioinorganic approach towards Parkinson's disease: Therapeutic potential, blood-brain barrier crossing evaluation and preliminary toxicological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukierman, Daphne Schneider; Pinheiro, Ana Beatriz; Castiñeiras-Filho, Sergio L P; da Silva, Anastácia Sá P; Miotto, Marco C; De Falco, Anna; de P Ribeiro, Thales; Maisonette, Silvia; da Cunha, Alessandra L M C; Hauser-Davis, Rachel A; Landeira-Fernandez, J; Aucélio, Ricardo Q; Outeiro, Tiago F; Pereira, Marcos D; Fernández, Claudio O; Rey, Nicolás A

    2017-02-22

    Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases share similar amyloidogenic mechanisms, in which metal ions might play an important role. In this last neuropathy, misfolding and aggregation of α-synuclein (α-Syn) are crucial pathological events. A moderate metal-binding compound, namely, 8-hydroxyquinoline-2-carboxaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (INHHQ), which was previously reported as a potential 'Metal-Protein Attenuating Compound' for Alzheimer's treatment, is well-tolerated by healthy Wistar rats and does not alter their major organ weights, as well as the tissues' reduced glutathione and biometal levels, at a concentration of 200mgkg(-1). INHHQ definitively crosses the blood-brain barrier and can be detected in the brain of rats so late as 24h after intraperitoneal administration. After 48h, brain clearance is complete. INHHQ is able to disrupt, in vitro, anomalous copper-α-Syn interactions, through a mechanism probably involving metal ions sequestering. This compound is non-toxic to H4 (human neuroglioma) cells and partially inhibits intracellular α-Syn oligomerization. INHHQ, thus, shows definite potential as a therapeutic agent against Parkinson's as well.

  3. Identification of nose-to-brain homing peptide through phage display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiao-Mei; Chen, Yong-Ping; Xu, Wen-Rui; Yang, Wen-Jun; Wen, Long-Ping

    2009-02-01

    Brain delivery of drug molecules through the nasal passage represents a viable approach for bypassing the blood-brain barrier (BBB) but remains a major challenge due to lack of efficient homing carriers. To screen for potential peptides with the ability to transport into the brain via the nasal passage, we applied a C7C phage peptide display library (Ph.D.-C7C) intra-nasally to anesthetized rats and recovered phage from the brain tissue 45 min after phage administration. After three rounds of panning, 10 positive phage clones were selected and sequenced. Clone7, which exhibited highest translocation efficiency, was chosen for further studies. After nasal administration, Clone7 entered the brain within 30 min and exhibited translocation efficiency about 50-fold higher than a random phage. A 11-amino acid synthetic peptide derived from the displayed sequence of Clone7 (ACTTPHAWLCG) efficiently inhibited the nasal-brain translocation of Clone7. Both phage recovery results and fluorescent microscopy images revealed the presence of many more Clone7 phage in the brain than in the liver, kidney and other internal organs after the nasal administration, suggesting that Clone7 bypassed the BBB and entered brain directly. Furthermore, both Clone7 and the ACTTPHAWLCG peptide were found to be heavily distributed along the olfactory nerve after the nasal administration, further suggesting a direct passage route into the brain via the olfactory region. These results demonstrated the feasibility of using the in vivo phage display approach for selecting peptides with the nose-to-brain homing capability and may have implications for the development of novel targeting carriers useful for brain delivery.

  4. Resting-state brain organization revealed by functional covariance networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqiang Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brain network studies using techniques of intrinsic connectivity network based on fMRI time series (TS-ICN and structural covariance network (SCN have mapped out functional and structural organization of human brain at respective time scales. However, there lacks a meso-time-scale network to bridge the ICN and SCN and get insights of brain functional organization. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We proposed a functional covariance network (FCN method by measuring the covariance of amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF in BOLD signals across subjects, and compared the patterns of ALFF-FCNs with the TS-ICNs and SCNs by mapping the brain networks of default network, task-positive network and sensory networks. We demonstrated large overlap among FCNs, ICNs and SCNs and modular nature in FCNs and ICNs by using conjunctional analysis. Most interestingly, FCN analysis showed a network dichotomy consisting of anti-correlated high-level cognitive system and low-level perceptive system, which is a novel finding different from the ICN dichotomy consisting of the default-mode network and the task-positive network. CONCLUSION: The current study proposed an ALFF-FCN approach to measure the interregional correlation of brain activity responding to short periods of state, and revealed novel organization patterns of resting-state brain activity from an intermediate time scale.

  5. Driving and driven architectures of directed small-world human brain functional networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaogan Yan

    Full Text Available Recently, increasing attention has been focused on the investigation of the human brain connectome that describes the patterns of structural and functional connectivity networks of the human brain. Many studies of the human connectome have demonstrated that the brain network follows a small-world topology with an intrinsically cohesive modular structure and includes several network hubs in the medial parietal regions. However, most of these studies have only focused on undirected connections between regions in which the directions of information flow are not taken into account. How the brain regions causally influence each other and how the directed network of human brain is topologically organized remain largely unknown. Here, we applied linear multivariate Granger causality analysis (GCA and graph theoretical approaches to a resting-state functional MRI dataset with a large cohort of young healthy participants (n = 86 to explore connectivity patterns of the population-based whole-brain functional directed network. This directed brain network exhibited prominent small-world properties, which obviously improved previous results of functional MRI studies showing weak small-world properties in the directed brain networks in terms of a kernel-based GCA and individual analysis. This brain network also showed significant modular structures associated with 5 well known subsystems: fronto-parietal, visual, paralimbic/limbic, subcortical and primary systems. Importantly, we identified several driving hubs predominantly located in the components of the attentional network (e.g., the inferior frontal gyrus, supplementary motor area, insula and fusiform gyrus and several driven hubs predominantly located in the components of the default mode network (e.g., the precuneus, posterior cingulate gyrus, medial prefrontal cortex and inferior parietal lobule. Further split-half analyses indicated that our results were highly reproducible between two

  6. Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy Following Surgical Resection or Radiosurgery Plus Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients With Synchronous Solitary Brain Metastasis: A Curative Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parlak, Cem, E-mail: cemparlak@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baskent University, Adana Medical Faculty, Adana (Turkey); Mertsoylu, Hüseyin [Department of Medical Oncology, Baskent University, Adana Medical Faculty, Adana (Turkey); Güler, Ozan Cem; Onal, Cem; Topkan, Erkan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baskent University, Adana Medical Faculty, Adana (Turkey)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose/Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of definitive thoracic chemoradiation therapy following surgery or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) on the outcomes of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with synchronous solitary brain metastasis (SSBM). Methods and Materials: A total of 63 NSCLC patients with SSBM were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were staged using positron emission tomography-computed tomography in addition to conventional staging tools. Thoracic radiation therapy (TRT) with a total dose of 66 Gy in 2 Gy fractions was delivered along with 2 cycles of cisplatin-based chemotherapy following either surgery plus 30 Gy of WBRT (n=33) or SRS plus 30 Gy of WBRT (n=30) for BM. Results: Overall, the treatment was well tolerated. All patients received planned TRT, and 57 patients (90.5%) were also able to receive 2 cycles of chemotherapy. At a median follow-up of 25.3 months (7.1-52.1 months), the median months of overall, locoregional progression-free, neurological progression-free, and progression-free survival were 28.6, 17.7, 26.4, and 14.6, respectively. Both univariate and multivariate analyses revealed that patients with a T1-T2 thoracic disease burden (P=.001), a nodal stage of N0-N1 (P=.003), and no weight loss (P=.008) exhibited superior survival. Conclusions: In the present series, surgical and radiosurgical treatments directed toward SSBM in NSCLC patients were equally effective. The similarities between the present survival outcomes and those reported in other studies for locally advanced NSCLC patients indicate the potentially curative role of definitive chemoradiation therapy for highly selected patients with SSBM.

  7. Research on polychaete annelid osmoregulatory peptide(s) by immunocytochemical and physiological approaches. Computer reconstruction of the brain and evidence for a role of angiotensin-like molecules in Nereis (Hediste) diversicolor OF Müller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fewou, J; Dhainaut-Courtois, N

    1995-01-01

    Immunohistochemical and physiological studies were carried out on Nereis (Hediste) diversicolor OF Müller in order to obtain evidence concerning the neuroendocrine control of polychaete osmoregulation. The occurrence in this animal of peptides immunologically related to mammalian angiotensin II and I (AII and AI) and oxytocin (OT) was demonstrated in the brain and the ventral nerve cord (VNC) perikarya and nerve fibres as well as in a few peripheral structures (peripheral nerves, epithelial cells, nuchal organ, intestine and nephridia). The exact localization of immunoreactive cells was achieved by serial sections of brain and ventral nerve cord followed by a three-dimensional reconstruction of brain ganglionic nuclei using the CATIA ('Conception Assistée Tridimensionnelle Inter Active') Dassault system program. Injections of polyclonal antisera against AII or OT provoked a partial inhibition of the increase in body weight in Nereis exposed to hypo-osmotic medium. The effect of a-AII seemed more pronounced than that of a-OT. In a subsequent test, injections of synthetic AII and AII-amide (peptide recently isolated from an achaete (Salzet et al (1995) J Biol Chem 270, 1575-1582) enhanced the increase in body weight and, therefore, strengthened the hypothesis of the neuroendocrine control of Nereis osmoregulation. The antidiuretic effect of both synthetic peptides in this study was indicative of the exact role of Nereis endogenous molecule(s). AII was less potent than its amidated form. If AI-like can easily be struck off the list of putative endogenous osmoregulatory factors, the role of OT-like substance in Nereis osmoregulation, which is partially demonstrated in this study, needs to be clarified by further physiological experiments using injection of synthetic peptide(s) or endogenous substance(s). All these results are discussed and compared to those recently obtained in an achaete annelid (Salzet et al (1993) Brain Res 631, 247-255; Salzet et al (1993) Brain

  8. Data-driven forward model inference for EEG brain imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sofie Therese; Hauberg, Søren; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is a flexible and accessible tool with excellent temporal resolution but with a spatial resolution hampered by volume conduction. Reconstruction of the cortical sources of measured EEG activity partly alleviates this problem and effectively turns EEG into a brain......-of-concept study, we show that, even when anatomical knowledge is unavailable, a suitable forward model can be estimated directly from the EEG. We propose a data-driven approach that provides a low-dimensional parametrization of head geometry and compartment conductivities, built using a corpus of forward models....... Combined with only a recorded EEG signal, we are able to estimate both the brain sources and a person-specific forward model by optimizing this parametrization. We thus not only solve an inverse problem, but also optimize over its specification. Our work demonstrates that personalized EEG brain imaging...

  9. Joint Modelling of Structural and Functional Brain Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kasper Winther; Herlau, Tue; Mørup, Morten

    Functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging have become the most important noninvasive windows to the human brain. A major challenge in the analysis of brain networks is to establish the similarities and dissimilarities between functional and structural connectivity. We formulate a non...... significant structures that are consistently shared across subjects and data splits. This provides an unsupervised approach for modeling of structure-function relations in the brain and provides a general framework for multimodal integration.......-parametric Bayesian network model which allows for joint modelling and integration of multiple networks. We demonstrate the model’s ability to detect vertices that share structure across networks jointly in functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion MRI (dMRI) data. Using two fMRI and dMRI scans per subject, we establish...

  10. Monkey brain cortex imaging by photoacoustic tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xinmai; Wang, Lihong V.

    2008-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is applied to image the brain cortex of a monkey through the intact scalp and skull ex vivo. The reconstructed PAT image shows the major blood vessels on the monkey brain cortex. For comparison, the brain cortex is imaged without the scalp, and then imaged again without the scalp and skull. Ultrasound attenuation through the skull is also measured at various incidence angles. This study demonstrates that PAT of the brain cortex is capable of surviving the ultras...

  11. Brain radiation - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation - brain - discharge; Cancer-brain radiation; Lymphoma - brain radiation; Leukemia - brain radiation ... Decadron) while you are getting radiation to the brain. It may make you hungrier, cause leg swelling ...

  12. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  13. Solid microparticles based on chitosan or methyl-β-cyclodextrin: a first formulative approach to increase the nose-to-brain transport of deferoxamine mesylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassu, Giovanna; Soddu, Elena; Cossu, Massimo; Brundu, Antonio; Cerri, Guido; Marchetti, Nicola; Ferraro, Luca; Regan, Raymond F; Giunchedi, Paolo; Gavini, Elisabetta; Dalpiaz, Alessandro

    2015-03-10

    We propose the formulation and characterization of solid microparticles as nasal drug delivery systems able to increase the nose-to-brain transport of deferoxamine mesylate (DFO), a neuroprotector unable to cross the blood brain barrier and inducing negative peripheral impacts. Spherical chitosan chloride and methyl-β-cyclodextrin microparticles loaded with DFO (DCH and MCD, respectively) were obtained by spray drying. Their volume-surface diameters ranged from 1.77 ± 0.06 μm (DCH) to 3.47 ± 0.05 μm (MCD); the aerodynamic diameters were about 1.1 μm and their drug content was about 30%. In comparison with DCH, MCD enhanced the in vitro DFO permeation across lipophilic membranes, similarly as shown by ex vivo permeation studies across porcine nasal mucosa. Moreover, MCD were able to promote the DFO permeation across monolayers of PC 12 cells (neuron-like), but like DCH, it did not modify the DFO permeation pattern across Caco-2 monolayers (epithelial-like). Nasal administration to rats of 200 μg DFO encapsulated in the microparticles resulted in its uptake into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with peak values ranging from 3.83 ± 0.68 μg/mL (DCH) to 14.37 ± 1.69 μg/mL (MCD) 30 min after insufflation of microparticles. No drug CSF uptake was detected after nasal administration of a DFO water solution. The DFO systemic absolute bioavailabilities obtained by DCH and MCD nasal administration were 6% and 15%, respectively. Chitosan chloride and methyl-β-cyclodextrins appear therefore suitable to formulate solid microparticles able to promote the nose to brain uptake of DFO and to limit its systemic exposure.

  14. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... highly developed area at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ... Higher Death Rate Among Youth with Psychosis Delayed Walking Link ...

  15. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the brain, which is linked to thought and emotion. It is also linked to reward systems in ... or-flight response and is also involved in emotions and memory. anterior cingulate cortex —Is involved in ...

  16. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Some people who develop a mental illness may recover completely; others may have repeated episodes of illness ... in early detection, more tailored treatments, and possibly prevention of such illnesses. The Working Brain Neurotransmitters Everything ...

  17. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that contains codes to make proteins and other important body chemicals. DNA also includes information to control ... cells required for normal function and plays an important role during early brain development. It may also ...

  18. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the cell from its surrounding environment and controls what enters and leaves the cell, and responds ... via axons) to form brain circuits. These circuits control specific body functions such as sleep and speech. ...

  19. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in early detection, more tailored treatments, and possibly prevention of such illnesses. The Working Brain Neurotransmitters Everything ... can cause tremors or symptoms found in Parkinson's disease. Serotonin —helps control many functions, such as mood, ...

  20. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Offices and Divisions Careers@NIMH Advisory Boards and Groups Staff Directories Getting to NIMH National Institutes of ... electrical signals. The brain begins as a small group of cells in the outer layer of a ...

  1. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... These circuits control specific body functions such as sleep and speech. The brain continues maturing well into ... factors that can affect our bodies, such as sleep, diet, or stress. These factors may act alone ...

  2. Brain Network Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kasper Winther

    Three main topics are presented in this thesis. The first and largest topic concerns network modelling of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI). In particular nonparametric Bayesian methods are used to model brain networks derived from resting state f...... for their ability to reproduce node clustering and predict unseen data. Comparing the models on whole brain networks, BCD and IRM showed better reproducibility and predictability than IDM, suggesting that resting state networks exhibit community structure. This also points to the importance of using models, which...... allow for complex interactions between all pairs of clusters. In addition, it is demonstrated how the IRM can be used for segmenting brain structures into functionally coherent clusters. A new nonparametric Bayesian network model is presented. The model builds upon the IRM and can be used to infer...

  3. Convergence of linkage, gene expression and association data demonstrates the influence of the RAR-related orphan receptor alpha (RORA) gene on neovascular AMD: A systems biology based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Alexandra C.; Morrison, Margaux A.; Ji, Fei; Xu, Haiyan; Reinecke, James B.; Adams, Scott M.; Arneberg, Trevor M.; Janssian, Maria; Lee, Joo-Eun; Yuan, Yang; Schaumberg, Debra A.; Kotoula, Maria G.; Tsironi, Evangeline E.; Tsiloulis, Aristoteles N.; Chatzoulis, Dimitrios Z.; Miller, Joan W.; Kim, Ivana K.; Hageman, Gregory H.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Haider, Neena B.; DeAngelis, Margaret M.

    2009-01-01

    To identify novel genes and pathways associated with AMD, we performed microarray gene expression and linkage analysis which implicated the candidate gene, retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor alpha (RORA, 15q). Subsequent genotyping of 159 RORA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a family-based cohort, followed by replication in an unrelated case-control cohort, demonstrated that SNPs and haplotypes located in intron 1 were significantly associated with neovascular AMD risk in both cohorts. This is the first report demonstrating a possible role for RORA, a receptor for cholesterol, in the pathophysiology of AMD. Moreover, we found a significant interaction between RORA and the ARMS2/HTRA1 locus suggesting a novel pathway underlying AMD pathophysiology. PMID:19786043

  4. The Edgewater Coolside process demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCoy, D.C.; Scandrol, R.O.; Statnick, R.M.; Stouffer, M.R.; Winschel, R.A.; Withum, J.A.; Wu, M.M.; Yoon, H. [CONSOL, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1992-02-01

    The Edgewater Coolside process demonstration met the program objectives which were to determine Coolside SO{sub 2} removal performance, establish short-term process operability, and evaluate the economics of the process versus a limestone wet scrubber. On a flue gas produced from the combustion of 3% sulfur coal, the Coolside process achieved 70% SO{sub 2} removal using commercially-available hydrated lime as the sorbent. The operating conditions were Ca/S mol ratio 2.0, Na/Ca mol ratio 0.2, and 20{degree}F approach to adiabatic saturation temperature ({del}T). During tests using fresh plus recycle sorbent, the recycle sorbent exhibited significant capacity for additional SO{sub 2} removal. The longest steady state operation was eleven days at nominally Ca/S = 2, Na/Ca = 0.22, {del}T = 20--22{degree}F, and 70% SO{sub 2} removal. The operability results achieved during the demonstration indicate that with the recommended process modifications, which are discussed in the Coolside process economic analysis, the process could be designed as a reliable system for utility application. Based on the demonstration program, the Coolside process capital cost for a hypothetical commercial installation was minimized. The optimization consisted of a single, large humidifier, no spare air compressor, no isolation dampers, and a 15 day on-site hydrated lime storage. The levelized costs of the Coolside and the wet limestone scrubbing processes were compared. The Coolside process is generally economically competitive with wet scrubbing for coals containing up to 2.5% sulfur and plants under 350 MWe. Site-specific factors such as plant capacity factor, SO{sub 2} emission limit, remaining plant life, retrofit difficulty, and delivered sorbent cost affect the scrubber-Coolside process economic comparison.

  5. The Edgewater Coolside process demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCoy, D.C.; Scandrol, R.O.; Statnick, R.M.; Stouffer, M.R.; Winschel, R.A.; Withum, J.A.; Wu, M.M.; Yoon, H. (CONSOL, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States))

    1992-02-01

    The Edgewater Coolside process demonstration met the program objectives which were to determine Coolside SO[sub 2] removal performance, establish short-term process operability, and evaluate the economics of the process versus a limestone wet scrubber. On a flue gas produced from the combustion of 3% sulfur coal, the Coolside process achieved 70% SO[sub 2] removal using commercially-available hydrated lime as the sorbent. The operating conditions were Ca/S mol ratio 2.0, Na/Ca mol ratio 0.2, and 20[degree]F approach to adiabatic saturation temperature ([del]T). During tests using fresh plus recycle sorbent, the recycle sorbent exhibited significant capacity for additional SO[sub 2] removal. The longest steady state operation was eleven days at nominally Ca/S = 2, Na/Ca = 0.22, [del]T = 20--22[degree]F, and 70% SO[sub 2] removal. The operability results achieved during the demonstration indicate that with the recommended process modifications, which are discussed in the Coolside process economic analysis, the process could be designed as a reliable system for utility application. Based on the demonstration program, the Coolside process capital cost for a hypothetical commercial installation was minimized. The optimization consisted of a single, large humidifier, no spare air compressor, no isolation dampers, and a 15 day on-site hydrated lime storage. The levelized costs of the Coolside and the wet limestone scrubbing processes were compared. The Coolside process is generally economically competitive with wet scrubbing for coals containing up to 2.5% sulfur and plants under 350 MWe. Site-specific factors such as plant capacity factor, SO[sub 2] emission limit, remaining plant life, retrofit difficulty, and delivered sorbent cost affect the scrubber-Coolside process economic comparison.

  6. Thinking about the brain

    CERN Document Server

    Bialek, W

    2002-01-01

    We all are fascinated by the phenomena of intelligent behavior, as generated both by our own brains and by the brains of other animals. As physicists we would like to understand if there are some general principles that govern the structure and dynamics of the neural circuits that underlie these phenomena. At the molecular level there is an extraordinary universality, but these mechanisms are surprisingly complex. This raises the question of how the brain selects from these diverse mechanisms and adapts to compute "the right thing" in each context. One approach is to ask what problems the brain really solves. There are several examples - from the ability of the visual system to count photons on a dark night to our gestalt recognition of statistical tendencies toward symmetry in random patterns - where the performance of the system in fact approaches some fundamental physical or statistical limits. This suggests that some sort of optimization principles may be at work, and there are examples where these princi...

  7. Pediatric brain death determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Mudit; Ashwal, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    Clinical guidelines for the determination of brain death in children were first published in 1987. These guidelines were revised in 2011 under the auspices of the Society of Critical Care Medicine, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the Child Neurology Society, and provide the minimum standards that must be satisfied before brain death can be declared in infants and children. After achieving physiologic stability and exclusion of confounders, two examinations including apnea testing separated by an observation period (24 hours for term newborns up to 30 days of age, and 12 hours for infants and children from 31 days up to 18 years) are required to establish brain death. Apnea testing should demonstrate a final arterial PaCO2 20 mm Hg above the baseline and ≥ 60 mm Hg with no respiratory effort during the testing period. Ancillary studies (electroencephalogram and radionuclide cerebral blood flow) are not required to establish brain death and are not a substitute for the neurologic examination. The committee concluded that ancillary studies may be used (1) when components of the examination or apnea testing cannot be completed, (2) if uncertainty about components of the neurologic examination exists, (3) if a medication effect may be present, or (4) to reduce the interexamination observation period. When ancillary studies are used, a second clinical examination and apnea test should still be performed and components that can be completed must remain consistent with brain death.

  8. Brain Network Analysis from High-Resolution EEG Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vico Fallani, Fabrizio; Babiloni, Fabio

    Over the last decade, there has been a growing interest in the detection of the functional connectivity in the brain from different neuroelectromagnetic and hemodynamic signals recorded by several neuro-imaging devices such as the functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) scanner, electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) apparatus. Many methods have been proposed and discussed in the literature with the aim of estimating the functional relationships among different cerebral structures. However, the necessity of an objective comprehension of the network composed by the functional links of different brain regions is assuming an essential role in the Neuroscience. Consequently, there is a wide interest in the development and validation of mathematical tools that are appropriate to spot significant features that could describe concisely the structure of the estimated cerebral networks. The extraction of salient characteristics from brain connectivity patterns is an open challenging topic, since often the estimated cerebral networks have a relative large size and complex structure. Recently, it was realized that the functional connectivity networks estimated from actual brain-imaging technologies (MEG, fMRI and EEG) can be analyzed by means of the graph theory. Since a graph is a mathematical representation of a network, which is essentially reduced to nodes and connections between them, the use of a theoretical graph approach seems relevant and useful as firstly demonstrated on a set of anatomical brain networks. In those studies, the authors have employed two characteristic measures, the average shortest path L and the clustering index C, to extract respectively the global and local properties of the network structure. They have found that anatomical brain networks exhibit many local connections (i.e. a high C) and few random long distance connections (i.e. a low L). These values identify a particular model that interpolate between a regular

  9. Coupling on-line preconcentration by ion-exchange with ETAAS. A novel flow injection approach based on the use of a renewable microcolumn as demonstrated for the determination of nickel in environmental and biological samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jianhua; Hansen, Elo Harald

    2000-01-01

    A novel way of exploiting flow injection/sequential injection (FIA/SIA) on-line ion-exchange preconcentration with detection by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) is described and demonstrated for the determination of trace-levels of nickel. Based on the use of a renewable...... microcolumn incorporated within an integrated micro FI-system, the column is loaded with a defined volume of small beads of an SP Sephadex C-25 cation-exchange resin and subsequently exposed to a metered amount of sample solution. However, instead of eluting the retained analyte from the organic ion-exchange...

  10. The scalable mammalian brain: Emergent distributions of glia and neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jehee, J.F.M.; Murre, J.M.J.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that two characteristic properties of mammalian brains emerge when scaling-up modular, cortical structures. Firstly, the glia-to-neuron ratio is not constant across brains of different sizes: large mammalian brains have more glia per neuron than smaller brains. Our anal

  11. Contextualizing aquired brain damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Charlotte Marie Bisgaard

    Contextualizing aquired brain damage Traditional approaches study ’communicational problems’ often in a discourse of disabledness or deficitness. With an ontology of communcation as something unique and a presupposed uniqueness of each one of us, how could an integrational approach (Integrational...... Linguistics) help facilitate a new methodological perspective on the study of problems in interpersonal communication and could such a research contribute to develop a methodology that studied ”howabledness” (a term borrowed from Pirkko Raudaskoski) rather than disabledness? A study on ”inclusion” at a centre...... for people with aquired brain injuries will be presented and comparatively discussed in a traditional versus an integrational perspective. Preliminary results and considerations on ”methods” and ”participation” from this study will be presented along with an overview of the project's empirical data....

  12. Brain parenchymal damage in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder - A multimodal MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pache, F.; Paul, F. [Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine and Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, NeuroCure Clinical Research Center and Experimental and Clinical Research Center, Berlin (Germany); Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany); Zimmermann, H.; Lacheta, A.; Papazoglou, S.; Kuchling, J.; Wuerfel, J.; Brandt, A.U. [Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine and Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, NeuroCure Clinical Research Center and Experimental and Clinical Research Center, Berlin (Germany); Finke, C. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany); Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Berlin (Germany); Hamm, B. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Ruprecht, K. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany); Scheel, M. [Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine and Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, NeuroCure Clinical Research Center and Experimental and Clinical Research Center, Berlin (Germany); Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    To investigate different brain regions for grey (GM) and white matter (WM) damage in a well-defined cohort of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) patients and compare advanced MRI techniques (VBM, Subcortical and cortical analyses (Freesurfer), and DTI) for their ability to detect damage in NMOSD. We analyzed 21 NMOSD patients and 21 age and gender matched control subjects. VBM (GW/WM) and DTI whole brain (TBSS) analyses were performed at different statistical thresholds to reflect different statistical approaches in previous studies. In an automated atlas-based approach, Freesurfer and DTI results were compared between NMOSD and controls. DTI TBSS and DTI atlas based analysis demonstrated microstructural impairment only within the optic radiation or in regions associated with the optic radiation (posterior thalamic radiation p < 0.001, 6.9 % reduction of fractional anisotropy). VBM demonstrated widespread brain GM and WM reduction, but only at exploratory statistical thresholds, with no differences remaining after correction for multiple comparisons. Freesurfer analysis demonstrated no group differences. NMOSD specific parenchymal brain damage is predominantly located in the optic radiation, likely due to a secondary degeneration caused by ON. In comparison, DTI appears to be the most reliable and sensitive technique for brain damage detection in NMOSD. (orig.)

  13. Criticality in large-scale brain FMRI dynamics unveiled by a novel point process analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliazucchi, Enzo; Balenzuela, Pablo; Fraiman, Daniel; Chialvo, Dante R

    2012-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) techniques have contributed significantly to our understanding of brain function. Current methods are based on the analysis of gradual and continuous changes in the brain blood oxygenated level dependent (BOLD) signal. Departing from that approach, recent work has shown that equivalent results can be obtained by inspecting only the relatively large amplitude BOLD signal peaks, suggesting that relevant information can be condensed in discrete events. This idea is further explored here to demonstrate how brain dynamics at resting state can be captured just by the timing and location of such events, i.e., in terms of a spatiotemporal point process. The method allows, for the first time, to define a theoretical framework in terms of an order and control parameter derived from fMRI data, where the dynamical regime can be interpreted as one corresponding to a system close to the critical point of a second order phase transition. The analysis demonstrates that the resting brain spends most of the time near the critical point of such transition and exhibits avalanches of activity ruled by the same dynamical and statistical properties described previously for neuronal events at smaller scales. Given the demonstrated functional relevance of the resting state brain dynamics, its representation as a discrete process might facilitate large-scale analysis of brain function both in health and disease.

  14. Demonstration projects : learning by experience : the Seabird Island demonstration project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2009-10-15

    project demonstrated both the successes and the challenges of designing sustainable housing that relies on complex approaches to achieving high performance. In general, the energy efficient integrated space and water heater and the relatively efficient building envelope contributed most to the energy efficiency of the houses. 1 fig.

  15. A maximum mutual information approach for constructing a 1D continuous control signal at a self-paced brain-computer interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haihong; Guan, Cuntai

    2010-10-01

    This paper addresses an important issue in a self-paced brain-computer interface (BCI): constructing subject-specific continuous control signal. To this end, we propose an alternative to the conventional regression/classification-based mechanism for building the transformation from EEG features into a univariate control signal. Based on information theory, the mechanism formulates the optimum transformation as maximizing the mutual information between the control signal and the mental state. We introduce a non-parametric mutual information estimate for general output distribution, and then develop a gradient-based algorithm to optimize the transformation using training data. We conduct an offline simulation study using motor imagery data from the BCI Competition IV Data Set I. The results show that the learning algorithm converged quickly, and the proposed method yielded significantly higher BCI performance than the conventional mechanism.

  16. Synthetic biology and therapeutic strategies for the degenerating brain: Synthetic biology approaches can transform classical cell and gene therapies, to provide new cures for neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustín-Pavón, Carmen; Isalan, Mark

    2014-10-01

    Synthetic biology is an emerging engineering discipline that attempts to design and rewire biological components, so as to achieve new functions in a robust and predictable manner. The new tools and strategies provided by synthetic biology have the potential to improve therapeutics for neurodegenerative diseases. In particular, synthetic biology will help design small molecules, proteins, gene networks, and vectors to target disease-related genes. Ultimately, new intelligent delivery systems will provide targeted and sustained therapeutic benefits. New treatments will arise from combining 'protect and repair' strategies: the use of drug treatments, the promotion of neurotrophic factor synthesis, and gene targeting. Going beyond RNAi and artificial transcription factors, site-specific genome modification is likely to play an increasing role, especially with newly available gene editing tools such as CRISPR/Cas9 systems. Taken together, these advances will help develop safe and long-term therapies for many brain diseases in human patients.

  17. MRI of brain disease in veterinary patients part 1: Basic principles and congenital brain disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Silke; Adams, William H

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly being used in the diagnosis of central nervous system disorders in veterinary patients and is quickly becoming the imaging modality of choice in evaluation of brain and intracranial disease. This article provides an overview of the basic principles of MRI, a description of sequences and their applications in brain imaging, and an approach to interpretation of brain MRI. A detailed discussion of imaging findings in general intracranial disorders including hydrocephalus, vasogenic edema, brain herniation, and seizure-associated changes, and the MR diagnosis of congenital brain disorders is provided. MRI evaluation of acquired brain disorders is described in a second companion article.

  18. Brain death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijdicks, Eelco F M

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of brain death should be based on a simple premise. If every possible confounder has been excluded and all possible treatments have been tried or considered, irreversible loss of brain function is clinically recognized as the absence of brainstem reflexes, verified apnea, loss of vascular tone, invariant heart rate, and, eventually, cardiac standstill. This condition cannot be reversed - not even partly - by medical or surgical intervention, and thus is final. Many countries in the world have introduced laws that acknowledge that a patient can be declared brain-dead by neurologic standards. The U.S. law differs substantially from all other brain death legislation in the world because the U.S. law does not spell out details of the neurologic examination. Evidence-based practice guidelines serve as a standard. In this chapter, I discuss the history of development of the criteria, the current clinical examination, and some of the ethical and legal issues that have emerged. Generally, the concept of brain death has been accepted by all major religions. But patients' families may have different ideas and are mostly influenced by cultural attitudes, traditional customs, and personal beliefs. Suggestions are offered to support these families.

  19. Brain tumor survivors speak out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson-Green, Bonnie

    2009-01-01

    Although progress has been made in the treatment of childhood brain tumors,work remains to understand the complexities of disease, treatment, and contextual factors that underlie individual differences in outcome. A combination of both an idiographic approach (incorporating observations made by adult survivors of childhood brain tumors) and a nomothetic approach (reviewing the literature for brain tumor survivors as well as childhood cancer survivors) is presented. Six areas of concern are reviewed from both an idiographic and nomothetic perspective, including social/emotional adjustment, insurance, neurocognitive late effects, sexuality and relationships, employment, and where survivors accessed information about their disease and treatment and possible late effects. Guidelines to assist health care professionals working with childhood brain tumor survivors are offered with the goal of improving psychosocial and neurocognitive outcomes in this population.

  20. Contrast adaptive total p-norm variation minimization approach to CT reconstruction for artifact reduction in reduced-view brain perfusion CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang-Won; Kim, Jong-Hyo

    2011-03-01

    Perfusion CT (PCT) examinations are getting more frequently used for diagnosis of acute brain diseases such as hemorrhage and infarction, because the functional map images it produces such as regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV), and mean transit time (MTT) may provide critical information in the emergency work-up of patient care. However, a typical PCT scans the same slices several tens of times after injection of contrast agent, which leads to much increased radiation dose and is inevitability of growing concern for radiation-induced cancer risk. Reducing the number of views in projection in combination of TV minimization reconstruction technique is being regarded as an option for radiation reduction. However, reconstruction artifacts due to insufficient number of X-ray projections become problematic especially when high contrast enhancement signals are present or patient's motion occurred. In this study, we present a novel reconstruction technique using contrast-adaptive TpV minimization that can reduce reconstruction artifacts effectively by using different p-norms in high contrast and low contrast objects. In the proposed method, high contrast components are first reconstructed using thresholded projection data and low p-norm total variation to reflect sparseness in both projection and reconstruction spaces. Next, projection data are modified to contain only low contrast objects by creating projection data of reconstructed high contrast components and subtracting them from original projection data. Then, the low contrast projection data are reconstructed by using relatively high p-norm TV minimization technique, and are combined with the reconstructed high contrast component images to produce final reconstructed images. The proposed algorithm was applied to numerical phantom and a clinical data set of brain PCT exam, and the resultant images were compared with those using filtered back projection (FBP) and conventional TV

  1. Lymphoreticular cells in human brain tumours and in normal brain.

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation, using various rosetting assays of cell suspensions prepared by mechanical disaggregation or collagenase digestion, demonstrated lymphoreticular cells in human normal brain (cerebral cortex and cerebellum) and in malignant brain tumours. The study revealed T and B lymphocytes and their subsets (bearing receptors for Fc(IgG) and C3) in 5/14 glioma suspensions, comprising less than 15% of the cell population. Between 20-60% of cells in tumour suspensions morphologicall...

  2. Brain computer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah N. Abdulkader

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Brain computer interface technology represents a highly growing field of research with application systems. Its contributions in medical fields range from prevention to neuronal rehabilitation for serious injuries. Mind reading and remote communication have their unique fingerprint in numerous fields such as educational, self-regulation, production, marketing, security as well as games and entertainment. It creates a mutual understanding between users and the surrounding systems. This paper shows the application areas that could benefit from brain waves in facilitating or achieving their goals. We also discuss major usability and technical challenges that face brain signals utilization in various components of BCI system. Different solutions that aim to limit and decrease their effects have also been reviewed.

  3. Contaminant analysis automation demonstration proposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodson, M.G.; Schur, A.; Heubach, J.G.

    1993-10-01

    The nation-wide and global need for environmental restoration and waste remediation (ER&WR) presents significant challenges to the analytical chemistry laboratory. The expansion of ER&WR programs forces an increase in the volume of samples processed and the demand for analysis data. To handle this expanding volume, productivity must be increased. However. The need for significantly increased productivity, faces contaminant analysis process which is costly in time, labor, equipment, and safety protection. Laboratory automation offers a cost effective approach to meeting current and future contaminant analytical laboratory needs. The proposed demonstration will present a proof-of-concept automated laboratory conducting varied sample preparations. This automated process also highlights a graphical user interface that provides supervisory, control and monitoring of the automated process. The demonstration provides affirming answers to the following questions about laboratory automation: Can preparation of contaminants be successfully automated?; Can a full-scale working proof-of-concept automated laboratory be developed that is capable of preparing contaminant and hazardous chemical samples?; Can the automated processes be seamlessly integrated and controlled?; Can the automated laboratory be customized through readily convertible design? and Can automated sample preparation concepts be extended to the other phases of the sample analysis process? To fully reap the benefits of automation, four human factors areas should be studied and the outputs used to increase the efficiency of laboratory automation. These areas include: (1) laboratory configuration, (2) procedures, (3) receptacles and fixtures, and (4) human-computer interface for the full automated system and complex laboratory information management systems.

  4. Murine cytomegalovirus infection of neural stem cells alters neurogenesis in the developing brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manohar B Mutnal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV brain infection causes serious neuro-developmental sequelae including: mental retardation, cerebral palsy, and sensorineural hearing loss. But, the mechanisms of injury and pathogenesis to the fetal brain are not completely understood. The present study addresses potential pathogenic mechanisms by which this virus injures the CNS using a neonatal mouse model that mirrors congenital brain infection. This investigation focused on, analysis of cell types infected with mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV and the pattern of injury to the developing brain. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used our MCMV infection model and a multi-color flow cytometry approach to quantify the effect of viral infection on the developing brain, identifying specific target cells and the consequent effect on neurogenesis. In this study, we show that neural stem cells (NSCs and neuronal precursor cells are the principal target cells for MCMV in the developing brain. In addition, viral infection was demonstrated to cause a loss of NSCs expressing CD133 and nestin. We also showed that infection of neonates leads to subsequent abnormal brain development as indicated by loss of CD24(hi cells that incorporated BrdU. This neonatal brain infection was also associated with altered expression of Oct4, a multipotency marker; as well as down regulation of the neurotrophins BDNF and NT3, which are essential to regulate the birth and differentiation of neurons during normal brain development. Finally, we report decreased expression of doublecortin, a marker to identify young neurons, following viral brain infection. CONCLUSIONS: MCMV brain infection of newborn mice causes significant loss of NSCs, decreased proliferation of neuronal precursor cells, and marked loss of young neurons.

  5. Traumatic brain injury and reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Erin D; Stern, Yaakov

    2015-01-01

    The potential role of brain and cognitive reserve in traumatic brain injury (TBI) is reviewed. Brain reserve capacity (BRC) refers to preinjury quantitative measures such as brain size that relate to outcome. Higher BRC implies threshold differences when clinical deficits will become apparent after injury, where those individuals with higher BRC require more pathology to reach that threshold. Cognitive reserve (CR) refers to how flexibly and efficiently the individual makes use of available brain resources. The CR model suggests the brain actively attempts to cope with brain damage by using pre-existing cognitive processing approaches or by enlisting compensatory approaches. Standard proxies for CR include education and IQ although this has expanded to include literacy, occupational attainment, engagement in leisure activities, and the integrity of social networks. Most research on BRC and CR has taken place in aging and degenerative disease but these concepts likely apply to the effects of TBI, especially with regards to recovery. Since high rates of TBI occur in those under age 35, both CR and BRC factors likely relate to how the individual copes with TBI over the lifespan. These factors may be particularly relevant to the relationship of developing dementia in the individual who has sustained a TBI earlier in life.

  6. Neuropsychological findings in personality disorders: A. R. Luria’s approach

    OpenAIRE

    Pluzhnikov I.V.; Kaleda V.G.

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of information concerning the features of cognitive processes in personality disorders, as well as the brain mechanisms of the pathogenesis of these diseases. Luria’s neuropsychological approach demonstrated its heuristicity in estimating the cognitive status of patients with mental disorders and can be employed to identify the brain bases of non-psychotic mental disorders (including personality disorders). The objective of this research is to study the features of neuroco...

  7. Brain-inspired Stochastic Models and Implementations

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Shedivat, Maruan

    2015-05-12

    One of the approaches to building artificial intelligence (AI) is to decipher the princi- ples of the brain function and to employ similar mechanisms for solving cognitive tasks, such as visual perception or natural language understanding, using machines. The recent breakthrough, named deep learning, demonstrated that large multi-layer networks of arti- ficial neural-like computing units attain remarkable performance on some of these tasks. Nevertheless, such artificial networks remain to be very loosely inspired by the brain, which rich structures and mechanisms may further suggest new algorithms or even new paradigms of computation. In this thesis, we explore brain-inspired probabilistic mechanisms, such as neural and synaptic stochasticity, in the context of generative models. The two questions we ask here are: (i) what kind of models can describe a neural learning system built of stochastic components? and (ii) how can we implement such systems e ̆ciently? To give specific answers, we consider two well known models and the corresponding neural architectures: the Naive Bayes model implemented with a winner-take-all spiking neural network and the Boltzmann machine implemented in a spiking or non-spiking fashion. We propose and analyze an e ̆cient neuromorphic implementation of the stochastic neu- ral firing mechanism and study the e ̄ects of synaptic unreliability on learning generative energy-based models implemented with neural networks.

  8. Metabolic management of brain cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfried, Thomas N; Kiebish, Michael A; Marsh, Jeremy; Shelton, Laura M; Huysentruyt, Leanne C; Mukherjee, Purna

    2011-06-01

    Malignant brain tumors are a significant health problem in children and adults. Conventional therapeutic approaches have been largely unsuccessful in providing long-term management. As primarily a metabolic disease, malignant brain cancer can be managed through changes in metabolic environment. In contrast to normal neurons and glia, which readily transition to ketone bodies (β-hydroxybutyrate) for energy under reduced glucose, malignant brain tumors are strongly dependent on glycolysis for energy. The transition from glucose to ketone bodies as a major energy source is an evolutionary conserved adaptation to food deprivation that permits the survival of normal cells during extreme shifts in nutritional environment. Only those cells with a flexible genome and normal mitochondria can effectively transition from one energy state to another. Mutations restrict genomic and metabolic flexibility thus making tumor cells more vulnerable to energy stress than normal cells. We propose an alternative approach to brain cancer management that exploits the metabolic flexibility of normal cells at the expense of the genetically defective and metabolically challenged tumor cells. This approach to brain cancer management is supported from recent studies in mice and humans treated with calorie restriction and the ketogenic diet. Issues of implementation and use protocols are presented for the metabolic management of brain cancer.

  9. Tumor Microenvironment in the Brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorger, Mihaela [Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Leeds, St. James’s University Hospital, Beckett Street, Leeds, LS9 7TF (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-22

    In addition to malignant cancer cells, tumors contain a variety of different stromal cells that constitute the tumor microenvironment. Some of these cell types provide crucial support for tumor growth, while others have been suggested to actually inhibit tumor progression. The composition of tumor microenvironment varies depending on the tumor site. The brain in particular consists of numerous specialized cell types such as microglia, astrocytes, and brain endothelial cells. In addition to these brain-resident cells, primary and metastatic brain tumors have also been shown to be infiltrated by different populations of bone marrow-derived cells. The role of different cell types that constitute tumor microenvironment in the progression of brain malignancies is only poorly understood. Tumor microenvironment has been shown to be a promising therapeutic target and diagnostic marker in extracranial malignancies. A better understanding of tumor microenvironment in the brain would therefore be expected to contribute to the development of improved therapies for brain tumors that are urgently required due to a poor availability of treatments for these malignancies. This review summarizes some of the known interactions between brain tumors and different stromal cells, and also discusses potential therapeutic approaches within this context.

  10. Multimodal neuromonitoring for traumatic brain injury: A shift towards individualized therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarenko, Serge; Griesdale, Donald E; Gooderham, Peter; Sekhon, Mypinder S

    2016-04-01

    Multimodal neuromonitoring in the management of traumatic brain injury (TBI) enables clinicians to make individualized management decisions to prevent secondary ischemic brain injury. Traditionally, neuromonitoring in TBI patients has consisted of a combination of clinical examination, neuroimaging and intracranial pressure monitoring. Unfortunately, each of these modalities has its limitations and although pragmatic, this simplistic approach has failed to demonstrate improved outcomes, likely owing to an inability to consider the underlying heterogeneity of various injury patterns. As neurocritical care has evolved, so has our understanding of underlying disease pathophysiology and patient specific considerations. Recent additions to the multimodal neuromonitoring platform include measures of cerebrovascular autoregulation, brain tissue oxygenation, microdialysis and continuous electroencephalography. The implementation of neurocritical care teams to manage patients with advanced brain injury has led to improved outcomes. Herein, we present a narrative review of the recent advances in multimodal neuromonitoring and highlight the utility of dedicated neurocritical care.

  11. Current status and future role of brain PET/MRI in clinical and research settings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, P.; Barthel, H.; Sabri, O. [University Hospital Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Drzezga, A. [University Hospital Cologne, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Koeln (Germany)

    2015-01-09

    Hybrid PET/MRI systematically offers a complementary combination of two modalities that has often proven itself superior to the single modality approach in the diagnostic work-up of many neurological and psychiatric diseases. Emerging PET tracers, technical advances in multiparametric MRI and obvious workflow advantages may lead to a significant improvement in the diagnosis of dementia disorders, neurooncological diseases, epilepsy and neurovascular diseases using PET/MRI. Moreover, simultaneous PET/MRI is well suited to complex studies of brain function in which fast fluctuations of brain signals (e.g. related to task processing or in response to pharmacological interventions) need to be monitored on multiple levels. Initial simultaneous studies have already demonstrated that these complementary measures of brain function can provide new insights into the functional and structural organization of the brain. (orig.)

  12. Brain plasticity and aerobic fitness

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Regular aerobic exercise has a wide range of positive effects on health and cognition. Exercise has been demonstrated to provide a particularly powerful and replicable method of triggering a wide range of structural changes within both human and animal brains. However, the details and mechanisms of these changes remain poorly understood. This thesis undertakes a comprehensive examination of the relationship between brain plasticity and aerobic exercise. A large, longitudinal experiment ...

  13. The Optimizing Patient Transfers, Impacting Medical Quality, andImproving Symptoms:Transforming Institutional Care approach: preliminary data from the implementation of a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services nursing facility demonstration project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unroe, Kathleen T; Nazir, Arif; Holtz, Laura R; Maurer, Helen; Miller, Ellen; Hickman, Susan E; La Mantia, Michael A; Bennett, Merih; Arling, Greg; Sachs, Greg A

    2015-01-01

    The Optimizing Patient Transfers, Impacting Medical Quality, and Improving Symptoms: Transforming Institutional Care (OPTIMISTIC) project aims to reduce avoidable hospitalizations of long-stay residents enrolled in 19 central Indiana nursing facilities. This clinical demonstration project, funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Innovations Center, places a registered nurse in each nursing facility to implement an evidence-based quality improvement program with clinical support from nurse practitioners. A description of the model is presented, and early implementation experiences during the first year of the project are reported. Important elements include better medical care through implementation of Interventions to Reduce Acute Care Transfers tools and chronic care management, enhanced transitional care, and better palliative care with a focus on systematic advance care planning. There were 4,035 long-stay residents in 19 facilities enrolled in OPTIMISTIC between February 2013 and January 2014. Root-cause analyses were performed for all 910 acute transfers of these long stay residents. Of these transfers, the project RN evaluated 29% as avoidable (57% were not avoidable and 15% were missing), and opportunities for quality improvement were identified in 54% of transfers. Lessons learned in early implementation included defining new clinical roles, integrating into nursing facility culture, managing competing facility priorities, communicating with multiple stakeholders, and developing a system for collecting and managing data. The success of the overall initiative will be measured primarily according to reduction in avoidable hospitalizations of long-stay nursing facility residents.

  14. Development and evaluation of vinpocetine inclusion complex for brain targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaojiao Ding

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to prepare vinpocetine (VIN inclusion complex and evaluate its brain targeting effect after intranasal administration. In the present study, VIN inclusion complex was prepared in order to increase its solubility. Stability constant (Kc was used for host selection. Factors influencing properties of the inclusion complex was investigated. Formation of the inclusion complex was identified by solubility study and DSC analysis. The brain targeting effect of the complex after intranasal administration was studied in rats. It was demonstrated that properties of the inclusion complex was mainly influenced by cyclodextrin type, organic acids type, system pH and host/guest molar ratio. Multiple component complexes can be formed by the addition of citric acid, with solubility improved for more than 23 times. Furthermore, In vivo study revealed that after intranasal administration, the absolute bioavailability of vinpocetine inclusion complex was 88%. Compared with intravenous injection, significant brain targeting effect was achieved after intranasal delivery, with brain targeting index 1.67. In conclusion, by intranasal administration of VIN inclusion complex, a fast onset of action and good brain targeting effect can be achieved. Intranasal route is a promising approach for the treatment of CNS diseases.

  15. An alternative approach to estimation of the brain perfusion index for measurement of cerebral blood flow using technetium-99m compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murase, Kenya; Mochizuki, Teruhito; Ikezoe, Junpei [Dept. of Radiology, Ehime University School of Medicine, Shitsukawa, Shigenobu-cho (Japan); Inoue, Takeshi; Fujioka, Hiroyoshi; Ishimaru, Yoshihiro; Akamune, Akihisa [Dept. of Radiology, Matsuyama Shimin Hospital, Ohte-machi, Matsuyama, Ehime (Japan); Yamamoto, Yuji [Department of Neurosurgery, Matsuyama Shimin Hospital, Ohte-machi, Matsuyama, Ehime (Japan)

    1999-10-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) has been quantified non-invasively using the brain perfusion index (BPI) determined from radionuclide angiographic data generated by technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime ({sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO) or technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer ({sup 99m}Tc-ECD). The BPI is generally calculated using graphical analysis (GA). In the present study, BPI was measured using spectral analysis (SA), and its usefulness evaluated in comparison with GA. The BPI was calculated from the sum of spectral data obtained by SA. We applied this method to radionuclide angiographic data collected from the bilateral brain hemispheres of 20 patients with various brain diseases using {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO and from those of 20 patients using {sup 99m}Tc-ECD. We also measured BPI using GA. The BPI values obtained by SA (BPI{sup S}) (x) and by GA (BPI{sup G}) (y) correlated closely (y=0.708x+0.038, r=0.945 for {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO and y=0.559x+0.093, r=0.931 for {sup 99m}Tc-ECD). However, the BPI{sup G} values were underestimated by 22.9%{+-}6.6% (mean{+-}SD) for {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO and by 27.9%{+-}7.5% for {sup 99m}Tc-ECD as compared with the BPI{sup S} values. The extent of underestimation tended to increase with increasing BPI{sup S} values. These findings were considered to be a result of the BPI{sup G} values being affected by the first-pass extraction fraction of the tracer. We also compared the BPI{sup S} and BPI{sup G} values with those of CBF measured using N-isopropyl-p-[{sup 123}I]iodoamphetamine (CBF{sup IMP}) in 16 patients (six for {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO and ten for {sup 99m}Tc-ECD). Although both BPI{sup S} and BPI{sup G} values correlated significantly with the CBF{sup IMP} values, the correlation coefficient in BPI{sup S} was always better than that in BPI{sup G} (r=0.869 for {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO and r=0.929 for {sup 99m}Tc-ECD in BPI{sup S}, r=0.629 for {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO and r=0.856 for {sup 99m}Tc-ECD in BPI{sup G}). These results suggest that SA can provide a more

  16. Emerging roles for brain drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 enzymes in neuropsychiatric conditions and responses to drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toselli, Francesca; Dodd, Peter R; Gillam, Elizabeth M J

    2016-08-01

    P450s in the human brain were originally considered unlikely to contribute significantly to the clearance of drugs and other xenobiotic chemicals, since their overall expression was a small fraction of that found in the liver. However, it is now recognized that P450s play substantial roles in the metabolism of both exogenous and endogenous chemicals in the brain, but in a highly cell type- and region-specific manner, in line with the greater functional heterogeneity of the brain compared to the liver. Studies of brain P450 expression and the characterization of the catalytic activity of specific forms expressed as recombinant enzymes have suggested possible roles for xenobiotic-metabolizing P450s in the brain. It is now possible to confirm these roles through the use of intracerebroventricular administration of selective P450 inhibitors in animal models, coupled with brain sampling techniques to measure drug concentrations in vivo, and modern neuroimaging techniques. The purpose of this review is to discuss the evidence behind the functional importance of P450s from the "xenobiotic-metabolizing" families, CYP1, CYP2 and CYP3 in the brain. Approaches used to define the quantitative and qualitative significance of these P450s in determining tissue-specific levels of xenobiotics in brain will be considered. Finally, the possible roles of these enzymes in brain biochemistry will be examined in light of the demonstrated activity of these enzymes in vitro and the association of particular P450 forms with disease states.

  17. [{sup 11}C]-(R)PK11195 tracer kinetics in the brain of glioma patients and a comparison of two referencing approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Zhangjie; Herholz, Karl; Gerhard, Alexander; Jackson, Alan; Hinz, Rainer [University of Manchester, Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, Manchester (United Kingdom); Roncaroli, Federico [Imperial College London, ' ' John Fulcher' ' Neuro-Oncology Lab, London (United Kingdom); Du Plessis, Daniel [Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Neuropathology Unit, Salford (United Kingdom); Turkheimer, Federico [King' s College London, Centre for Neuroimaging, Institute of Psychiatry, London (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-15

    Translocator protein (TSPO) is a biomarker of neuroinflammation that can be imaged by PET using [{sup 11}C]-(R)PK11195. We sought to characterize the [{sup 11}C]-(R)PK11195 kinetics in gliomas of different histotypes and grades, and to compare two reference tissue input functions (supervised cluster analysis versus cerebellar grey matter) for the estimation of [{sup 11}C]-(R)PK11195 binding in gliomas and surrounding brain structures. Twenty-three glioma patients and ten age-matched controls underwent structural MRI and dynamic [{sup 11}C]-(R)PK11195 PET scans. Tissue time-activity curves (TACs) were extracted from tumour regions as well as grey matter (GM) and white matter (WM) of the brains. Parametric maps of binding potential (BP{sub ND}) were generated with the simplified reference tissue model using the two input functions, and were compared with each other. TSPO expression was assessed in tumour tissue sections by immunohistochemistry. Three types of regional kinetics were observed in individual tumour TACs: GM-like kinetics (n = 6, clearance of the tracer similar to that in cerebellar GM), WM-like kinetics (n = 8, clearance of the tracer similar to that in cerebral WM) and a form of mixed kinetics (n = 9, intermediate rate of clearance). Such kinetic patterns differed between low-grade astrocytomas (WM-like kinetics) and oligodendrogliomas (GM-like and mixed kinetics), but were independent of tumour grade. There was good agreement between parametric maps of BP{sub ND} derived from the two input functions in all controls and 10 of 23 glioma patients. In 13 of the 23 patients, BP{sub ND} values derived from the supervised cluster input were systematically smaller than those using the cerebellar input. Immunohistochemistry confirmed that TSPO expression increased with tumour grade. The three types of [{sup 11}C]-(R)PK11195 kinetics in gliomas are determined in part by tracer delivery, and indicated that kinetic analysis is a valuable tool in the study of

  18. Silicon Brains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefflinger, Bernd

    Beyond the digital neural networks of Chap. 16, the more radical mapping of brain-like structures and processes into VLSI substrates has been pioneered by Carver Mead more than 30 years ago [1]. The basic idea was to exploit the massive parallelism of such circuits and to create low-power and fault-tolerant information-processing systems. Neuromorphic engineering has recently seen a revival with the availability of deep-submicron CMOS technology, which allows for the construction of very-large-scale mixed-signal systems combining local analog processing in neuronal cells with binary signalling via action potentials. Modern implementations are able to reach the complexity-scale of large functional units of the human brain, and they feature the ability to learn by plasticity mechanisms found in neuroscience. Combined with high-performance programmable logic and elaborate software tools, such systems are currently evolving into user-configurable non-von-Neumann computing systems, which can be used to implement and test novel computational paradigms. The chapter introduces basic properties of biological brains with up to 200 Billion neurons and their 1014 synapses, where action on a synapse takes ˜10 ms and involves an energy of ˜10 fJ. We outline 10x programs on neuromorphic electronic systems in Europe and the USA, which are intended to integrate 108 neurons and 1012 synapses, the level of a cat's brain, in a volume of 1 L and with a power dissipation design an intelligent technical response.

  19. Robot brains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babuska, R.

    2011-01-01

    The brain hosts complex networks of neurons that are responsible for behavior in humans and animals that we generally call intelligent. I is not easy to give an exact definition of intelligence – for the purpose of this talk it will suffice to say that we refer to intelligence as a collection of cap

  20. Clinical and diagnostic approach to patients with hypopituitarism due to traumatic brain injury (TBI), subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and ischemic stroke (IS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamouzis, Ioannis; Pagano, Loredana; Prodam, Flavia; Mele, Chiara; Zavattaro, Marco; Busti, Arianna; Marzullo, Paolo; Aimaretti, Gianluca

    2016-06-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction attributable to traumatic brain injury (TBI), aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and ischemic stroke (IS) has been lately highlighted. The diagnosis of TBI-induced-hypopituitarism, defined as a deficient secretion of one or more pituitary hormones, is made similarly to the diagnosis of classical hypopituitarism because of hypothalamic/pituitary diseases. Hypopituitarism is believed to contribute to TBI-associated morbidity and to functional and cognitive final outcome, and quality-of-life impairment. Each pituitary hormone must be tested separately, since there is a variable pattern of hormone deficiency among patients with TBI-induced-hypopituitarism. Similarly, the SAH and IS may lead to pituitary dysfunction although the literature in this field is limited. The drive to diagnose hypopituitarism is the suspect that the secretion of one/more pituitary hormone may be subnormal. This suspicion can be based upon the knowledge that the patient has an appropriate clinical context in which hypopituitarism can be present, or a symptom known as caused by hypopituitarism. Hypopituitarism should be diagnosed as a combination of low peripheral and inappropriately normal/low pituitary hormones although their basal evaluation may be not distinctive due to pulsatile, circadian, or situational secretion of some hormones. Evaluation of the somatotroph and corticotroph axes require dynamic stimulation test (ITT for both axes, GHRH + arginine test for somatotroph axis) in order to clearly separate normal from deficient responses.

  1. Magnetoencephalography in the study of brain dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzella, Vittorio; Marzetti, Laura; Della Penna, Stefania; de Pasquale, Francesco; Zappasodi, Filippo; Romani, Gian Luca

    2014-01-01

    To progress toward understanding of the mechanisms underlying the functional organization of the human brain, either a bottom-up or a top-down approach may be adopted. The former starts from the study of the detailed functioning of a small number of neuronal assemblies, while the latter tries to decode brain functioning by considering the brain as a whole. This review discusses the top-down approach and the use of magnetoencephalography (MEG) to describe global brain properties. The main idea behind this approach is that the concurrence of several areas is required for the brain to instantiate a specific behavior/functioning. A central issue is therefore the study of brain functional connectivity and the concept of brain networks as ensembles of distant brain areas that preferentially exchange information. Importantly, the human brain is a dynamic device, and MEG is ideally suited to investigate phenomena on behaviorally relevant timescales, also offering the possibility of capturing behaviorally-related brain connectivity dynamics.

  2. Neurobiology: Language By, In, Through and Across the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Ralph-Axel

    Language has come to be commonly understood as something accomplished by the brain. Much scientific investigation has consequently focused in looking for language in the brain. Although it may sound intuitive, this approach suggests that language is an object located inside another object. This spatial metaphor has generated important insights into the brain sites important for language, from nineteenth century studies of brain-damaged patients to more recent and refined evidence from brain imaging.

  3. Brain tumor - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children; Neuroglioma - children; Oligodendroglioma - children; Meningioma - children; Cancer - brain tumor (children) ... The cause of primary brain tumors is unknown. Primary brain tumors may ... (spread to nearby areas) Cancerous (malignant) Brain tumors ...

  4. Understanding Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Know About Brain Tumors . What is a Brain Tumor? A brain tumor is an abnormal growth
 ... Tumors” from Frankly Speaking Frankly Speaking About Cancer: Brain Tumors Download the full book Questions to ask ...

  5. Brain Tumors (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Brain Tumors KidsHealth > For Parents > Brain Tumors Print A ... radiation therapy or chemotherapy, or both. Types of Brain Tumors There are many different types of brain ...

  6. Brain and Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Brain and Nervous System KidsHealth > For Parents > Brain and Nervous System Print ... brain is quite the juggler. Anatomy of the Nervous System If you think of the brain as a ...

  7. Topological isomorphisms of human brain and financial market networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra E Vértes

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Although metaphorical and conceptual connections between the human brain and the financial markets have often been drawn, rigorous physical or mathematical underpinnings of this analogy remain largely unexplored. Here, we apply a statistical and graph theoretic approach to the study of two datasets - the timeseries of 90 stocks from the New York Stock Exchange over a three-year period, and the fMRI-derived timeseries acquired from 90 brain regions over the course of a 10 min-long functional MRI scan of resting brain function in healthy volunteers. Despite the many obvious substantive differences between these two datasets, graphical analysis demonstrated striking commonalities in terms of global network topological properties. Both the human brain and the market networks were non-random, small-world, modular, hierarchical systems with fat-tailed degree distributions indicating the presence of highly connected hubs. These properties could not be trivially explained by the univariate time series statistics of stock price returns. This degree of topological isomorphism suggests that brains and markets can be regarded broadly as members of the same family of networks. The two systems, however, were not topologically identical. The financial market was more efficient and more modular - more highly optimised for information processing - than the brain networks; but also less robust to systemic disintegration as a result of hub deletion. We conclude that the conceptual connections between brains and markets are not merely metaphorical; rather these two information processing systems can be rigorously compared in the same mathematical language and turn out often to share important topological properties in common to some degree. There will be interesting scientific arbitrage opportunities in further work at the graph theoretically-mediated interface between systems neuroscience and the statistical physics of financial markets.

  8. Topological isomorphisms of human brain and financial market networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vértes, Petra E; Nicol, Ruth M; Chapman, Sandra C; Watkins, Nicholas W; Robertson, Duncan A; Bullmore, Edward T

    2011-01-01

    Although metaphorical and conceptual connections between the human brain and the financial markets have often been drawn, rigorous physical or mathematical underpinnings of this analogy remain largely unexplored. Here, we apply a statistical and graph theoretic approach to the study of two datasets - the time series of 90 stocks from the New York stock exchange over a 3-year period, and the fMRI-derived time series acquired from 90 brain regions over the course of a 10-min-long functional MRI scan of resting brain function in healthy volunteers. Despite the many obvious substantive differences between these two datasets, graphical analysis demonstrated striking commonalities in terms of global network topological properties. Both the human brain and the market networks were non-random, small-world, modular, hierarchical systems with fat-tailed degree distributions indicating the presence of highly connected hubs. These properties could not be trivially explained by the univariate time series statistics of stock price returns. This degree of topological isomorphism suggests that brains and markets can be regarded broadly as members of the same family of networks. The two systems, however, were not topologically identical. The financial market was more efficient and more modular - more highly optimized for information processing - than the brain networks; but also less robust to systemic disintegration as a result of hub deletion. We conclude that the conceptual connections between brains and markets are not merely metaphorical; rather these two information processing systems can be rigorously compared in the same mathematical language and turn out often to share important topological properties in common to some degree. There will be interesting scientific arbitrage opportunities in further work at the graph-theoretically mediated interface between systems neuroscience and the statistical physics of financial markets.

  9. Application of a global proteomic approach to archival precursor lesions: deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 and tissue transglutaminase 2 are upregulated in pancreatic cancer precursors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheung, Wang; Darfler, Marlene M; Alvarez, Hector;

    2008-01-01

    of invasive cancer. Biomarker discovery in precursor lesions has been hampered by the ready availability of fresh specimens, and limited yields of proteins suitable for large scale screening. METHODS: We utilized Liquid Tissue, a novel technique for protein extraction from archival formalin-fixed material...... their overexpression in IPMNs. CONCLUSION: Global proteomics analysis using the Liquid Tissue workflow is a feasible approach for unbiased biomarker discovery in limited archival material, particularly applicable to precursor lesions of cancer....

  10. ORNL fusion power demonstration study: interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STeiner, D.; Bettis, E. S.; Huxford, T. J.

    1977-03-01

    The purpose of the ORNL Fusion Power Demonstration Study (Demo study) is to develop a plan for demonstrating, in this century, the commercial feasibility of fusion power based on the tokamak concept. The two-year study was initiated in FY 1976, and this interim report summarizes the results for FY 1976. Major results include: (1) the outline of a three-phase plan for demonstrating the commercial feasibility of tokamak fusion power in this century; (2) a parametric analysis of tokamak costs which provides the economic basis for the demonstration plan; and (3) a critical evaluation of the technological directions, design approaches, and plasma characteristics which serve as the technical basis for the demonstration plan.

  11. Mobile Brain/Body Imaging (MoBI) of Physical Interaction with Dynamically Moving Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungnickel, Evelyn; Gramann, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The non-invasive recording and analysis of human brain activity during active movements in natural working conditions is a central challenge in Neuroergonomics research. Existing brain imaging approaches do not allow for an investigation of brain dynamics during active behavior because their sensors cannot follow the movement of the signal source. However, movements that require the operator to react fast and to adapt to a dynamically changing environment occur frequently in working environments like assembly-line work, construction trade, health care, but also outside the working environment like in team sports. Overcoming the restrictions of existing imaging methods would allow for deeper insights into neurocognitive processes at workplaces that require physical interactions and thus could help to adapt work settings to the user. To investigate the brain dynamics accompanying rapid volatile movements we used a visual oddball paradigm where participants had to react to color changes either with a simple button press or by physically pointing towards a moving target. Using a mobile brain/body imaging approach (MoBI) including independent component analysis (ICA) with subsequent backprojection of cluster activity allowed for systematically describing the contribution of brain and non-brain sources to the sensor signal. The results demonstrate that visual event-related potentials (ERPs) can be analyzed for simple button presses and physical pointing responses and that it is possible to quantify the contribution of brain processes, muscle activity and eye movements to the signal recorded at the sensor level even for fast volatile arm movements with strong jerks. Using MoBI in naturalistic working environments can thus help to analyze brain dynamics in natural working conditions and help improving unhealthy or inefficient work settings. PMID:27445747

  12. Rapid Energy Modeling Workflow Demonstration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    BIM Building Information Model BLCC building life cycle costs BPA Building Performance Analysis CAD computer assisted...utilizes information on operations, geometry, orientation, weather, and materials, generating Three-Dimensional (3D) Building Information Models ( BIM ...executed a demonstration of Rapid Energy Modeling (REM) workflows that employed building information modeling ( BIM ) approaches and

  13. Extracellular Nucleotides in Exercise: Possible Effect on Brain Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Tom

    1979-01-01

    A review of experiments which demonstrate the release of ATP from skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle, and active brain tissue. Effects of exogenously applied ATP to brain tissue are discussed in relation to whole body exercise. (Author/SA)

  14. Results of early cranial decompression as an initial approach for damage control therapy in severe traumatic brain injury in a hospital with limited resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José D Charry

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI is a disease that generates significant mortality and disability in Latin America, and specifically in Colombia. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the 12-month clinical outcome in patients with sTBI managed with an early cranial decompression (ECD as the main procedure for damage control (DC therapy, performed in a University Hospital in Colombia over a 4-year period. Materials and Methods: A database of 106 patients who received the ECD procedure, and were managed according to the strategy for DC in neurotrauma, was analyzed. Variables were evaluated, and the patient outcome was determined according to the Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS at 12 months postinjury. This was used to generate a dichotomous variable with “favorable” (GOS of 4 or 5 or “unfavorable” (GOS of 1–3 outcomes; analysis of variance was performed with the Chi-square, Wilcoxon–Mann–Whitney and Fisher tests. Results: An overall survival rate of 74.6% was observed for the procedure, At 12 months postsurgery, a favorable clinical outcome (GOS 4–5 was found in 70 patients (66.1%, Unfavorable outcomes in patients were associated with the following factors: Closed trauma, an Injury Severity Score >16 , obliterated basal cisterns, subdural hematoma as the main injury seen on the admission computed tomography, and nonreactive pupils observed in the emergency department. Conclusion: Twelve months outcome of patients with sTBI managed with ECD in a neuromonitoring limited resource University Hospital in Colombia shows an important survival rate with favorable clinical outcome measure with GOS.

  15. A developmental approach to homology and brain evolution Un enfoque embriológico a la homología y la evolución cerebral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FRANCISCO ABOITIZ

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Although homology is central to evolutionary interpretations, establishing it has become a highly disputed issue in some instances. Here I argüe for a developmental understanding of evolution, where modifications of the developmental programs are a key source of evolutionary novelty. Although this perspective is not new, in comparative neurobiology it has remained controversial. Specifically, the evolutionary origin of the mammalian neocortex has been a particularly debated point. I propose a perspective that could help reconcile a long standing controversy: either the mammalian neocortex corresponds as a whole to the dorsal hemisphere of reptiles and birds, or alternatively its lateral aspect corresponds to the lateral cerebral hemisphere and is partly homologous to the dorsal ventricular ridge (DVR, a brain mass that receives the bulk of sensory input in reptiles and birds. Genetic and embryonic evidence strongly favor a dorsal origin for the whole neocortex, while the DVR derives from the lateral hemisphere. Nevertheless, the phylogenetically new elements of both the neocortex and the avian DVR derive largely from intermediate progenitor cells located in the embryonic subventricular zone (SVZ, a zone of late proliferating activity located deep to the ventral, the lateral and the dorsal hemisphere. I suggest that, despite originating in different embryonic regions (lateral vs. dorsal hemisphere, the evolutionary new cellular elements in both the avian brain and in the mammalian neocortex derive from the activation of a similar genetic pathway, possibly activated by the gene Pax-6, that induces the late proliferation of embryonic neural progenitors. This pathway can be ancestral to amniotes, reflecting genetic homology. In mammals and birds independently, this precursor proliferative activity differentiated into an SVZ, recruiting neuronal precursors from different parts of the cerebral hemisphere in each group, to contribute to brain

  16. Linking brain imaging signals to visual perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welchman, Andrew E; Kourtzi, Zoe

    2013-11-01

    The rapid advances in brain imaging technology over the past 20 years are affording new insights into cortical processing hierarchies in the human brain. These new data provide a complementary front in seeking to understand the links between perceptual and physiological states. Here we review some of the challenges associated with incorporating brain imaging data into such "linking hypotheses," highlighting some of the considerations needed in brain imaging data acquisition and analysis. We discuss work that has sought to link human brain imaging signals to existing electrophysiological data and opened up new opportunities in studying the neural basis of complex perceptual judgments. We consider a range of approaches when using human functional magnetic resonance imaging to identify brain circuits whose activity changes in a similar manner to perceptual judgments and illustrate these approaches by discussing work that has studied the neural basis of 3D perception and perceptual learning. Finally, we describe approaches that have sought to understand the information content of brain imaging data using machine learning and work that has integrated multimodal data to overcome the limitations associated with individual brain imaging approaches. Together these approaches provide an important route in seeking to understand the links between physiological and psychological states.

  17. The Creative Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Ned

    1982-01-01

    Outlines the differences between left-brain and right-brain functioning and between left-brain and right-brain dominant individuals, and concludes that creativity uses both halves of the brain. Discusses how both students and curriculum can become more "whole-brained." (Author/JM)

  18. Brain and Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Term(s): Teens / Drug Facts / Brain and Addiction Brain and Addiction Print Your Brain Your brain is who you are. It’s what ... solve problems, and make decisions. How Does Your Brain Communicate? The brain is a complex communications network ...

  19. Kynurenine pathway metabolism and the microbiota-gut-brain axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, P J; Cryan, J F; Dinan, T G; Clarke, G

    2017-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that the gut microbiota influences not only gastrointestinal physiology but also central nervous system (CNS) function by modulating signalling pathways of the microbiota-gut-brain axis. Understanding the neurobiological mechanisms underpinning the influence exerted by the gut microbiota on brain function and behaviour has become a key research priority. Microbial regulation of tryptophan metabolism has become a focal point in this regard, with dual emphasis on the regulation of serotonin synthesis and the control of kynurenine pathway metabolism. Here, we focus in detail on the latter pathway and begin by outlining the structural and functional dynamics of the gut microbiota and the signalling pathways of the brain-gut axis. We summarise preclinical and clinical investigations demonstrating that the gut microbiota influences CNS physiology, anxiety, depression, social behaviour, cognition and visceral pain. Pertinent studies are drawn from neurogastroenterology demonstrating the importance of tryptophan and its metabolites in CNS and gastrointestinal function. We outline how kynurenine pathway metabolism may be regulated by microbial control of neuroendocrine function and components of the immune system. Finally, preclinical evidence demonstrating direct and indirect mechanisms by which the gut microbiota can regulate tryptophan availability for kynurenine pathway metabolism, with downstream effects on CNS function, is reviewed. Targeting the gut microbiota represents a tractable target to modulate kynurenine pathway metabolism. Efforts to develop this approach will markedly increase our understanding of how the gut microbiota shapes brain and behaviour and provide new insights towards successful translation of microbiota-gut-brain axis research from bench to bedside. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Kynurenine Pathway in Health and Disease'.

  20. Brain evolution and human neuropsychology: the inferential brain hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koscik, Timothy R; Tranel, Daniel

    2012-05-01

    Collaboration between human neuropsychology and comparative neuroscience has generated invaluable contributions to our understanding of human brain evolution and function. Further cross-talk between these disciplines has the potential to continue to revolutionize these fields. Modern neuroimaging methods could be applied in a comparative context, yielding exciting new data with the potential of providing insight into brain evolution. Conversely, incorporating an evolutionary base into the theoretical perspectives from which we approach human neuropsychology could lead to novel hypotheses and testable predictions. In the spirit of these objectives, we present here a new theoretical proposal, the Inferential Brain Hypothesis, whereby the human brain is thought to be characterized by a shift from perceptual processing to inferential computation, particularly within the social realm. This shift is believed to be a driving force for the evolution of the large human cortex. (JINS, 2012, 18, 394-401).