WorldWideScience

Sample records for apporaches mapping examples

  1. Object-based Landslide Mapping: Examples, Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölbling, Daniel; Eisank, Clemens; Friedl, Barbara; Chang, Kang-Tsung; Tsai, Tsai-Tsung; Birkefeldt Møller Pedersen, Gro; Betts, Harley; Cigna, Francesca; Chiang, Shou-Hao; Aubrey Robson, Benjamin; Bianchini, Silvia; Füreder, Petra; Albrecht, Florian; Spiekermann, Raphael; Weinke, Elisabeth; Blaschke, Thomas; Phillips, Chris

    2016-04-01

    Over the last decade, object-based image analysis (OBIA) has been increasingly used for mapping landslides that occur after triggering events such as heavy rainfall. The increasing availability and quality of Earth Observation (EO) data in terms of temporal, spatial and spectral resolution allows for comprehensive mapping of landslides at multiple scales. Most often very high resolution (VHR) or high resolution (HR) optical satellite images are used in combination with a digital elevation model (DEM) and its products such as slope and curvature. Semi-automated object-based mapping makes use of various characteristics of image objects that are derived through segmentation. OBIA enables numerous spectral, spatial, contextual and textural image object properties to be applied during an analysis. This is especially useful when mapping complex natural features such as landslides and constitutes an advantage over pixel-based image analysis. However, several drawbacks in the process of object-based landslide mapping have not been overcome yet. The developed classification routines are often rather complex and limited regarding their transferability across areas and sensors. There is still more research needed to further improve present approaches and to fully exploit the capabilities of OBIA for landslide mapping. In this study several examples of object-based landslide mapping from various geographical regions with different characteristics are presented. Examples from the Austrian and Italian Alps are shown, whereby one challenge lies in the detection of small-scale landslides on steep slopes while preventing the classification of false positives with similar spectral properties (construction areas, utilized land, etc.). Further examples feature landslides mapped in Iceland, where the differentiation of landslides from other landscape-altering processes in a highly dynamic volcanic landscape poses a very distinct challenge, and in Norway, which is exposed to multiple

  2. Discriminant and Singularities of Logarithmic Gauss Map, Examples and Application

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    The study of hypersurfaces in a torus leads to the beautiful zoo of amoebas and their contours, whose possible configurations are seen from combinatorial data. There is a deep connection to the logarithmic Gauss map and its critical points. The theory has a lot of applications in many directions. In this report we recall basic notions and results from the theory of amoebas, show some connection to algebraic singularity theory and discuss some consequences from the well known classification of singularities to this subject. Moreover, we have tried to compute some examples using the computer algebra system SINGULAR and discuss different possibilities and their effectivity to compute the critical points. Here we meet an essential obstacle: Relevant examples need real or even rational solutions, which are found only by chance. We have tried to unify different views to that subject.

  3. Performance driven expression mapping based on segmented examples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YING Shuang; ZHANG Qiang; ZHO U Dongsheng

    2012-01-01

    We present a method that combines performance-driven method with segmented 3D blendshape models to animate a face. First we prepare key sample examples and corresponding key target examples. Next we segment the whole face into two regions, for each region we reduce dimensionality of source examples using PAC into abstract space which is defined by truncated PCA eigen- vectors. Then for each example we fix the cardinal base function, which can determine the weight of the target example. Finally, in the animation stage we compute the weight of each example for each frame and add the weighted displacement vectors of each re- gion on the general face model.

  4. An Arabidopsis example of association mapping in structured samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyan Zhao

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A potentially serious disadvantage of association mapping is the fact that marker-trait associations may arise from confounding population structure as well as from linkage to causative polymorphisms. Using genome-wide marker data, we have previously demonstrated that the problem can be severe in a global sample of 95 Arabidopsis thaliana accessions, and that established methods for controlling for population structure are generally insufficient. Here, we use the same sample together with a number of flowering-related phenotypes and data-perturbation simulations to evaluate a wider range of methods for controlling for population structure. We find that, in terms of reducing the false-positive rate while maintaining statistical power, a recently introduced mixed-model approach that takes genome-wide differences in relatedness into account via estimated pairwise kinship coefficients generally performs best. By combining the association results with results from linkage mapping in F2 crosses, we identify one previously known true positive and several promising new associations, but also demonstrate the existence of both false positives and false negatives. Our results illustrate the potential of genome-wide association scans as a tool for dissecting the genetics of natural variation, while at the same time highlighting the pitfalls. The importance of study design is clear; our study is severely under-powered both in terms of sample size and marker density. Our results also provide a striking demonstration of confounding by population structure. While statistical methods can be used to ameliorate this problem, they cannot always be effective and are certainly not a substitute for independent evidence, such as that obtained via crosses or transgenic experiments. Ultimately, association mapping is a powerful tool for identifying a list of candidates that is short enough to permit further genetic study.

  5. Türklerde Zenginlik ve Bereket Algısı ‘Tört Tülük’e Teorik Yaklaşım ve Divanu Lugati’t-Türk’ten Örnekler A theoratical apporach to ‘tört tülük’ which means abundance and wealth at Turks and its examples from Diwanu Lugati’t-Turk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miras KOSIBAYEV

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Each nation has its own unique way of thinking and way of life,language, customs and traditions, values and rules of social features.World view of nations and their own particular characteristics wereimportant in the past and they continue today too. And it is importantto analyse concepts language and world view like an one event notseparately.On the basis of the relationship between language and human, inthis article we will try to explain concept tört tülük which meansabundance and wealth. Tört tülük is a phrase which includes horse,cow, camel and sheep-goat in it. Having all of these four kind of animalssymbolize abudance and richness. These animals for Turks areeverything because of their meet, milk, wool; also Turks used power ofthem, especially camel could pull all house (kiyiz-keçe otağı ‘nomad’stent’ with its materials.Using ‘four’ kinds of animals to symbolize abudance and richnessrelates with world view of Turks. In Türkish (Turkey there are somephrases with ‘four’ like ‘dört başı mamur’, ‘dört dötlük’ which representperfection and completeness.In Divanu Lugati’t-Türk tört tülik did not given as a concept, butwe found many examples with those four animals and products whichthey give.

  6. Aeromagnetic map compilation: procedures for merging and an example from Washington

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    C. Finn

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Rocks in Antarctica and offshore have widely diverse magnetic properties. Consequently, aeromagnetic data collected there can improve knowledge of the geologic, tectonic and geothermal characteristics of the region. Aeromagnetic data can map concealed structures such as faults, folds and dikes, ascertain basin thickness and locate buried volcanic, as well as some intrusive and metamorphic rocks. Gridded, composite data sets allow a view of continental-scale trends that individual data sets do not provide and link widely-separated areas of outcrop and disparate geologic studies. Individual magnetic surveys must be processed so that they match adjacent surveys prior to merging. A consistent representation of the Earth's magnetic field (International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF must be removed from each data set. All data sets need to be analytically continued to the same flight elevation with their datums shifted to match adjacent data. I advocate minimal processing to best represent the individual surveys in the merged compilation. An example of a compilation of aeromagnetic surveys from Washington illustrates the utility of aeromagnetic maps for providing synoptic views of regional tectonic features.

  7. A method to derive vegetation distribution maps for pollen dispersion models using birch as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauling, A; Rotach, M W; Gehrig, R; Clot, B

    2012-09-01

    Detailed knowledge of the spatial distribution of sources is a crucial prerequisite for the application of pollen dispersion models such as, for example, COSMO-ART (COnsortium for Small-scale MOdeling-Aerosols and Reactive Trace gases). However, this input is not available for the allergy-relevant species such as hazel, alder, birch, grass or ragweed. Hence, plant distribution datasets need to be derived from suitable sources. We present an approach to produce such a dataset from existing sources using birch as an example. The basic idea is to construct a birch dataset using a region with good data coverage for calibration and then to extrapolate this relationship to a larger area by using land use classes. We use the Swiss forest inventory (1 km resolution) in combination with a 74-category land use dataset that covers the non-forested areas of Switzerland as well (resolution 100 m). Then we assign birch density categories of 0%, 0.1%, 0.5% and 2.5% to each of the 74 land use categories. The combination of this derived dataset with the birch distribution from the forest inventory yields a fairly accurate birch distribution encompassing entire Switzerland. The land use categories of the Global Land Cover 2000 (GLC2000; Global Land Cover 2000 database, 2003, European Commission, Joint Research Centre; resolution 1 km) are then calibrated with the Swiss dataset in order to derive a Europe-wide birch distribution dataset and aggregated onto the 7 km COSMO-ART grid. This procedure thus assumes that a certain GLC2000 land use category has the same birch density wherever it may occur in Europe. In order to reduce the strict application of this crucial assumption, the birch density distribution as obtained from the previous steps is weighted using the mean Seasonal Pollen Index (SPI; yearly sums of daily pollen concentrations). For future improvement, region-specific birch densities for the GLC2000 categories could be integrated into the mapping procedure.

  8. The e-MapScholar project—an example of interoperability in GIScience education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purves, R. S.; Medyckyj-Scott, D. J.; Mackaness, W. A.

    2005-03-01

    The proliferation of the use of digital spatial data in learning and teaching provides a set of opportunities and challenges for the development of e-learning materials suitable for use by a broad spectrum of disciplines in Higher Education. Effective e-learning materials must both provide engaging materials with which the learner can interact and be relevant to the learners' disciplinary and background knowledge. Interoperability aims to allow sharing of data and materials through the use of common agreements and specifications. Shared learning materials can take advantage of interoperable components to provide customisable components, and must consider issues in sharing data across institutional borders. The e-MapScholar project delivers teaching materials related to spatial data, which are customisable with respect to both context and location. Issues in the provision of such interoperable materials are discussed, including suitable levels of granularity of materials, the provision of tools to facilitate customisation and mechanisms to deliver multiple data sets and the metadata issues related to such materials. The examples shown make extensive use of the OpenGIS consortium specifications in the delivery of spatial data.

  9. Population weighted raster maps can communicate findings of social audits: examples from three continents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell Steven

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maps can portray trends, patterns, and spatial differences that might be overlooked in tabular data and are now widely used in health research. Little has been reported about the process of using maps to communicate epidemiological findings. Method Population weighted raster maps show colour changes over the study area. Similar to the rasters of barometric pressure in a weather map, data are the health occurrence – a peak on the map represents a higher value of the indicator in question. The population relevance of each sentinel site, as determined in the stratified last stage random sample, combines with geography (inverse-distance weighting to provide a population-weighted extension of each colour. This transforms the map to show population space rather than simply geographic space. Results Maps allowed discussion of strategies to reduce violence against women in a context of political sensitivity about quoting summary indicator figures. Time-series maps showed planners how experiences of health services had deteriorated despite a reform programme; where in a country HIV risk behaviours were improving; and how knowledge of an economic development programme quickly fell off across a region. Change maps highlighted where indicators were improving and where they were deteriorating. Maps of potential impact of interventions, based on multivariate modelling, displayed how partial and full implementation of programmes could improve outcomes across a country. Scale depends on context. To support local planning, district maps or local government authority maps of health indicators were more useful than national maps; but multinational maps of outcomes were more useful for regional institutions. Mapping was useful to illustrate in which districts enrolment in religious schools – a rare occurrence - was more prevalent. Conclusions Population weighted raster maps can present social audit findings in an accessible and compelling

  10. Mapping of hazard from rainfall-triggered landslides in developing countries: Examples from Honduras and Micronesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harp, E.L.; Reid, M.E.; McKenna, J.P.; Michael, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Loss of life and property caused by landslides triggered by extreme rainfall events demonstrates the need for landslide-hazard assessment in developing countries where recovery from such events often exceeds the country's resources. Mapping landslide hazards in developing countries where the need for landslide-hazard mitigation is great but the resources are few is a challenging, but not intractable problem. The minimum requirements for constructing a physically based landslide-hazard map from a landslide-triggering storm, using the simple methods we discuss, are: (1) an accurate mapped landslide inventory, (2) a slope map derived from a digital elevation model (DEM) or topographic map, and (3) material strength properties of the slopes involved. Provided that the landslide distribution from a triggering event can be documented and mapped, it is often possible to glean enough topographic and geologic information from existing databases to produce a reliable map that depicts landslide hazards from an extreme event. Most areas of the world have enough topographic information to provide digital elevation models from which to construct slope maps. In the likely event that engineering properties of slope materials are not available, reasonable estimates can be made with detailed field examination by engineering geologists or geotechnical engineers. Resulting landslide hazard maps can be used as tools to guide relocation and redevelopment, or, more likely, temporary relocation efforts during severe storm events such as hurricanes/typhoons to minimize loss of life and property. We illustrate these methods in two case studies of lethal landslides in developing countries: Tegucigalpa, Honduras (during Hurricane Mitch in 1998) and the Chuuk Islands, Micronesia (during Typhoon Chata'an in 2002).

  11. Gridded uncertainty in fossil fuel carbon dioxide emission maps, a CDIAC example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, Robert J.; Boden, Thomas A.; Higdon, David M.

    2016-12-01

    Due to a current lack of physical measurements at appropriate spatial and temporal scales, all current global maps and distributions of fossil fuel carbon dioxide (FFCO2) emissions use one or more proxies to distribute those emissions. These proxies and distribution schemes introduce additional uncertainty into these maps. This paper examines the uncertainty associated with the magnitude of gridded FFCO2 emissions. This uncertainty is gridded at the same spatial and temporal scales as the mass magnitude maps. This gridded uncertainty includes uncertainty contributions from the spatial, temporal, proxy, and magnitude components used to create the magnitude map of FFCO2 emissions. Throughout this process, when assumptions had to be made or expert judgment employed, the general tendency in most cases was toward overestimating or increasing the magnitude of uncertainty. The results of the uncertainty analysis reveal a range of 4-190 %, with an average of 120 % (2σ) for populated and FFCO2-emitting grid spaces over annual timescales. This paper also describes a methodological change specific to the creation of the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) FFCO2 emission maps: the change from a temporally fixed population proxy to a temporally varying population proxy.

  12. Geomorphological map as a tool for visualisation of geodiversity - example from Cave Park Grabovaca (Croatia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzjak, Nenad; Bocic, Neven; Pahernik, Mladen

    2014-05-01

    Cave Park Grabovaca is located near Perusic in Lika region (central Croatia). It was established in 2006 at the area of 5.95 km2 (protection category: significant landscape). The main task is management and protection of Samograd, Medina and Amidzina caves that were declared as geomorphological monuments, and 6 other caves located close to each other. Owing to the central geographic location in Croatian Dinaric karst area, good traffic connections between central Europe and tourist centres of the Adriatic coast, preserved nature and easy accessible karst features typical for the Dinaric Karst, it has good potential to develop as an research, educational and tourist centre. In 2013. Cave Park management and the Department of Geography (University of Zagreb, Faculty of Science) established a core team that started to develop the project of Geoeducational centre (GEC) with following goals: exploration-evaluation-presentation-education. According to the accepted strategy, the first step in the project process is to enlarge the area and change the protection category. During the consultation process team members take into account protection, environmental, local economy, tourism and local population issues and proposed that protected area should be increased to 52,2 km2. This enlargement provides more efficient protection, greater geodiversity and biodiversity by occupying geotope, biotope, and landscape units typical for the whole Lika karst region. The next step was inventorying, evaluation, analysis and visualisation of geological, geomorphological and speleological phenomena. This 2 year task was made in cooperation between Croatian Geomorphological Society, Department of Geography, Speleological Society Karlovac and Caving Club Samobor. The inventory was made using field-work mapping and geotagged photographs, cave mapping and DEM analysis. It resulted in GIS oriented geodatabase consisting of geomorphological forms, processes and cave inventory. From those data

  13. Poverty Mapping Based on First-Order Dominance with an Example from Mozambique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Channing; Hussain, Azhar; Salvucci, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    We explore a novel first-order dominance (FOD) approach to poverty mapping and compare its properties to small-area estimation. The FOD approach uses census data directly, is straightforward to implement, is multidimensional allowing for a broad conception of welfare and accounts rigorously...... for welfare distributions in both levels and trends. An application to Mozambique highlights the value of the approach, including its advantages in the monitoring and evaluation of public expenditures. We conclude that the FOD approach to poverty mapping constitutes a useful addition to the toolkit of policy...

  14. Concept mapping as an approach for expert-guided model building: The example of health literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soellner, Renate; Lenartz, Norbert; Rudinger, Georg

    2017-02-01

    Concept mapping served as the starting point for the aim of capturing the comprehensive structure of the construct of 'health literacy.' Ideas about health literacy were generated by 99 experts and resulted in 105 statements that were subsequently organized by 27 experts in an unstructured card sorting. Multidimensional scaling was applied to the sorting data and a two and three-dimensional solution was computed. The three dimensional solution was used in subsequent cluster analysis and resulted in a concept map of nine "clusters": (1) self-regulation, (2) self-perception, (3) proactive approach to health, (4) basic literacy and numeracy skills, (5) information appraisal, (6) information search, (7) health care system knowledge and acting, (8) communication and cooperation, and (9) beneficial personality traits. Subsequently, this concept map served as a starting point for developing a "qualitative" structural model of health literacy and a questionnaire for the measurement of health literacy. On the basis of questionnaire data, a "quantitative" structural model was created by first applying exploratory factor analyses (EFA) and then cross-validating the model with confirmatory factor analyses (CFA). Concept mapping proved to be a highly valuable tool for the process of model building up to translational research in the "real world".

  15. Principles of soil mapping of a megalopolis with St. Petersburg as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparin, B. F.; Sukhacheva, E. Yu.

    2014-07-01

    For the first time, a soil map of St. Petersburg has been developed on a scale of 1 : 50000 using MicroStation V8i software. The legend to this map contains more than 60 mapping units. The classification of urban soils and information on the soil cover patterns are principally new elements of this legend. New concepts of the urbanized soil space and urbopedocombinations have been suggested for soil mapping of urban territories. The typification of urbopedocombinations in St. Petersburg has been performed on the basis of data on the geometry and composition of the polygons of soils and nonsoil formations. The ratio between the areas of soils and nonsoil formations and their spatial distribution patterns have been used to distinguish between six types of the urbanized soil space. The principles of classification of the soils of urban territories have been specified, and a separate order of pedo-allochthonous soils has been suggested for inclusion into the Classification and Diagnostic System of Russian Soils (2004). Six types of pedo-allochthonous soils have been distinguished on the basis of data on their humus and organic horizons and the character of the underlying mineral substrate.

  16. Making maps of Cosmic Microwave Background polarization for B-mode studies: the POLARBEAR example

    CERN Document Server

    Poletti, Davide; Jeune, Maude Le; Peloton, Julien; Arnold, Kam; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Barron, Darcy; Beckman, Shawn; Borrill, Julian; Chapman, Scott; Chinone, Yuji; Cukierman, Ari; Ducout, Anne; Elleflot, Tucker; Errard, Josquin; Feeney, Stephen; Goeckner-Wald, Neil; Groh, John; Hall, Grantland; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hazumi, Masashi; Hill, Charles; Howe, Logan; Inoue, Yuki; Jaffe, Andrew H; Jeong, Oliver; Katayama, Nobuhiko; Keating, Brian; Keskitalo, Reijo; Kisner, Theodore; Kusaka, Akito; Lee, Adrian T; Leon, David; Linder, Eric; Lowry, Lindsay; Matsuda, Frederick; Navaroli, Martin; Paar, Hans; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Reichardt, Christian L; Ross, Colin; Siritanasak, Praween; Stebor, Nathan; Steinbach, Bryan; Stompor, Radek; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tajima, Osamu; Teply, Grant; Whitehorn, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of cosmic microwave background (CMB) datasets typically requires some filtering of the raw time-ordered data. Filtering is frequently used to minimize the impact of low frequency noise, atmospheric contributions and/or scan synchronous signals on the resulting maps. In this work we explicitly construct a general filtering operator, which can unambiguously remove any set of unwanted modes in the data, and then amend the map-making procedure in order to incorporate and correct for it. We show that such an approach is mathematically equivalent to the solution of a problem in which the sky signal and unwanted modes are estimated simultaneously and the latter are marginalized over. We investigate the conditions under which this amended map-making procedure can render an unbiased estimate of the sky signal in realistic circumstances. We then study the effects of time-domain filtering on the noise correlation structure in the map domain, as well as impact it may have on the performance of the popular pseudo...

  17. Poverty mapping based on first order dominance with an example from Mozambique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Channing; Hussain, Azhar; Salvucci, Vincenzo

    for welfare distributions in both levels and trends. An application to Mozambique highlights the value of the approach, including its advantages in the monitoring and evaluation of public expenditures. We conclude that the FOD approach to poverty mapping constitutes a useful addition to the toolkit of policy...

  18. Spatially quantitative seafloor habitat mapping: example from the northern South Carolina inner continental shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Germán Y.; Gayes, Paul T.; Van Dolah, Robert F.; Schwab, William C.

    2004-03-01

    Naturally occurring hard bottom areas provide the geological substrate that can support diverse assemblages of sessile benthic organisms, which in turn, attract many reef-dwelling fish species. Alternatively, defining the location and extent of bottom sand bodies is relevant for potential nourishment projects as well as to ensure that transient sediment does not affect reef habitats, particularly in sediment-starved continental margins. Furthermore, defining sediment transport pathways documents the effects these mobile bedforms have on proximal reef habitats. Thematic mapping of these substrates is therefore crucial in safeguarding critical habitats and offshore resources of coastal nations. This study presents the results of a spatially quantitative mapping approach based on classification of sidescan-sonar imagery. By using bottom video for image-to-ground control, digital image textural features for pattern recognition, and an artificial neural network for rapid, quantitative, multivariable decision-making, this approach resulted in recognition rates of hard bottom as high as 87%. The recognition of sand bottom was less successful (31%). This approach was applied to a large (686 km 2), high-quality, 2-m resolution sidescan-sonar mosaic of the northern South Carolina inner continental shelf. Results of this analysis indicate that both surficial sand and hard bottoms of variable extent are present over the study area. In total, 59% of the imaged area was covered by hard bottom, while 41% was covered by sand. Qualitative spatial correlation between bottom type and bathymetry appears possible from comparison of our interpretive map and available bathymetry. Hard bottom areas tend to be located on flat, low-lying areas, and sandy bottoms tend to reside on areas of positive relief. Published bio-erosion rates were used to calculate the potential sediment input from the mapped hard bottom areas rendering sediment volumes that may be as high as 0.8 million m 3/yr for

  19. Structural Mapping of Folded Sedimentary Environments from Satellite Images: an Example from Central Asia

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    Leith, W.

    1985-01-01

    In the Tadjik Depression, in Soviet Central Asia, in the absence of existing geologic or topographic maps, an enhanced LANDSAT multispectral scanner image was used in combination with field data to produce a 1:250000 geologic map of the Vakhsh fold-and-thrust belt and adjacent autochthon. Several structural conclusions are reached as a result of this mapping. Deformation of the Cretaceous and Tertiary strata of the fold-and-thrust belt is, in the central Tadjik Depression, conspicuously absent north of a buried basement fault that marks the hinge-zone of the Late Mesozoic passive margin. But, in the eastern half of the depression, thrusting has moved coherent sheets northward, over the block fault, these sheets now lie flat atop the autochthon to the north. The crustal structure inherited from the Mesozoic extensional phase has strongly influenced the Late Cenozoic pattern of deformation, producing the fold-and-thrust belt that is markedly asymmetric. The development of the thrust system has included the progressive overlapping of thrust: the later thrusts apparently formed internal to the older thrusts, and subsequently overrode them.

  20. An exploration in mineral supply chain mapping using tantalum as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Viruet, Yadira; Menzie, W. David; Papp, John F.; Yager, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    This report uses the supply chain of tantalum (Ta) to investigate the complexity of mineral and metal supply chains in general and show how they can be mapped. A supply chain is made up of all the manufacturers, suppliers, information networks, and so forth, that provide the materials and parts that go into making up a final product. The mineral portion of the supply chain begins with mineral material in the ground (the ore deposit); extends through a series of processes that include mining, beneficiation, processing (smelting and refining), semimanufacture, and manufacture; and continues through transformation of the mineral ore into concentrates, refined mineral commodities, intermediate forms (such as metals and alloys), component parts, and, finally, complex products. This study analyses the supply chain of tantalum beginning with minerals in the ground to many of the final goods that contain tantalum.

  1. Targeting trachoma control through risk mapping: the example of Southern Sudan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archie C A Clements

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trachoma is a major cause of blindness in Southern Sudan. Its distribution has only been partially established and many communities in need of intervention have therefore not been identified or targeted. The present study aimed to develop a tool to improve targeting of survey and control activities. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A national trachoma risk map was developed using Bayesian geostatistics models, incorporating trachoma prevalence data from 112 geo-referenced communities surveyed between 2001 and 2009. Logistic regression models were developed using active trachoma (trachomatous inflammation follicular and/or trachomatous inflammation intense in 6345 children aged 1-9 years as the outcome, and incorporating fixed effects for age, long-term average rainfall (interpolated from weather station data and land cover (i.e. vegetation type, derived from satellite remote sensing, as well as geostatistical random effects describing spatial clustering of trachoma. The model predicted the west of the country to be at no or low trachoma risk. Trachoma clusters in the central, northern and eastern areas had a radius of 8 km after accounting for the fixed effects. CONCLUSION: In Southern Sudan, large-scale spatial variation in the risk of active trachoma infection is associated with aridity. Spatial prediction has identified likely high-risk areas to be prioritized for more data collection, potentially to be followed by intervention.

  2. Mapping neurotransmitter networks with PET: an example on serotonin and opioid systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuominen, Lauri; Nummenmaa, Lauri; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Raitakari, Olli; Hietala, Jarmo

    2014-05-01

    All functions of the human brain are consequences of altered activity of specific neural pathways and neurotransmitter systems. Although the knowledge of "system level" connectivity in the brain is increasing rapidly, we lack "molecular level" information on brain networks and connectivity patterns. We introduce novel voxel-based positron emission tomography (PET) methods for studying internal neurotransmitter network structure and intercorrelations of different neurotransmitter systems in the human brain. We chose serotonin transporter and μ-opioid receptor for this analysis because of their functional interaction at the cellular level and similar regional distribution in the brain. Twenty-one healthy subjects underwent two consecutive PET scans using [(11)C]MADAM, a serotonin transporter tracer, and [(11)C]carfentanil, a μ-opioid receptor tracer. First, voxel-by-voxel "intracorrelations" (hub and seed analyses) were used to study the internal structure of opioid and serotonin systems. Second, voxel-level opioid-serotonin intercorrelations (between neurotransmitters) were computed. Regional μ-opioid receptor binding potentials were uniformly correlated throughout the brain. However, our analyses revealed nonuniformity in the serotonin transporter intracorrelations and identified a highly connected local network (midbrain-striatum-thalamus-amygdala). Regionally specific intercorrelations between the opioid and serotonin tracers were found in anteromedial thalamus, amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and left parietal cortex, i.e., in areas relevant for several neuropsychiatric disorders, especially affective disorders. This methodology enables in vivo mapping of connectivity patterns within and between neurotransmitter systems. Quantification of functional neurotransmitter balances may be a useful approach in etiological studies of neuropsychiatric disorders and also in drug development as a biomarker-based rationale for targeted

  3. Geotourist itineraries along the Italian territory: examples of mapping the geoheritage in different geomorphological and historical contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panizza, Valeria; Brandolini, Pierluigi; Laureti, Lamberto; Nesci, Olivia; Russo, Filippo; Savelli, Daniele

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the studies dealing with geomorphosites mapping, many researches were carried out in the last years presenting both applied examples and proposals for tourist fruition. Researchers had to face many different challenges in transferring the knowledge about the geomorphological heritage on maps. The most relevant are those concerning the use of maps for tourist promotion, taking into account the requirements of clearness of representation of landforms and also the need of pointing out possible geomorphological hazards along tourist paths. Within the activity of the Working Group "Geomorphosites and Cultural Landscape" of AIGeo (Italian Association of Physical Geography and Geomorphology), some Italian itineraries, focused on the promotion of the geomorphological heritage by means of geotourist maps, are presented. They have the goal of: promoting landscape through its geomorphological and geological heritage; disseminating geoheritage knowledge focusing its relationships with cultural landscape and human history; assessing geomorphological hazards and possible risk situations The proposed itineraries are localised in different Italian regions and they concern: - the area around the remains of the Roman town of Ostra. The town is placed on the left side of the Misa River (Marche region, Italy), atop a stream terrace dating back to the uppermost Pleistocene-early Holocene. Detailed geomorphological field and remote-sensing mapping started in 2015. The surveying is aimed at focusing the geomorphological evolution as well as at assessing possible geomorphological hazard for both conservation and exploitation scopes. A geotourist trail is proposed with the aim of highlighting and integrating geomorphological and archaeological elements and information. - a geotourist trail along the coastal terraced slopes of Cinque Terre (Liguria, NW Italy): worldwide considered as one of the most outstanding examples of human integration with the natural landscape

  4. Mapping carbon sequestration in forests at the regional scale - a climate biomonitoring approach by example of Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Winfried; Pesch, Roland [University of Vechta, Chair of Landscape Ecology, PO Box. 1553, Vechta (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change recognizes carbon (C) fixation in forests as an important contribution for the reduction of atmospheric pollution in terms of greenhouse gases. Spatial differentiation of C sequestration in forests either at the national or at the regional scale is therefore needed for forest planning purposes. Hence, within the framework of the Forest Focus regulation, the aim of this investigation was to statistically analyse factors influencing the C fixation and to use the corresponding associations in terms of a predictive mapping approach at the regional scale by example of the German federal state North Rhine-Westphalia. The results of the methodical scheme outlined in this article should be compared with an already-published approach applied to the same data which were used in the investigation at hand. Site-specific data on C sequestration in humus, forest trees/dead wood and soil from two forest monitoring networks were intersected with available surface information on topography, soil, climate and forestal growing areas and districts. Next, the association between the C sequestration and the influence factors were examined and modelled by linear regression analyses. The resulting regression equations were applied on the surface data to predicatively map the C sequestration for the entire study area. The computations yielded an estimation of 146.7 mio t C sequestered in the forests of North Rhine-Westphalia corresponding to 168.6 t/ha. The calculated values correspond well to according specifications given by the literature. Furthermore, the results are almost identical to those of another pilot study where a different statistical methodology was applied on the same database. Nevertheless, the underlying regression models contribute only a low degree of explanation to the overall variance of the C fixation. This might mainly be due to data quality aspects and missing influence factors in the analyses. In another

  5. A semi-quantitative technique for mapping potential aquifer productivity on the national scale: example of England and Wales (UK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abesser, Corinna; Lewis, Melinda

    2015-12-01

    The development and validation of aquifer productivity and depth-to-source maps for England and Wales are described. Aquifer productivity maps can provide valuable support for the assessment, planning and management of groundwater and renewable heat energy resources. Aquifer productivity is often mapped using geostatistical interpolation techniques such as kriging, but these techniques tend to be unsuitable for mapping at the national scale due to the high data (and time) demands. A methodology is outlined for mapping aquifer productivity at the national scale using existing national-scale data sets. Pumping test data are used to characterise the potential borehole yields that different geological formations of varying lithologies and ages can provide. Based on this analysis and using expert knowledge, the corresponding map codes on the geological map are assigned to potential productivity classes. The subsurface (concealed) extent of aquifer units is mapped from geophysical data, and together with the attributed geological map, provide the bedrock-aquifer productivity map. Drilling and pumping costs can be an important consideration when evaluating the feasibility of developing a groundwater source. Thus, a map of the approximate depth to source is developed alongside the aquifer productivity map. The maps are validated using independent data sets, and map performance is compared against performance from maps derived by random and uniform attribution. The results show that the maps successfully predict potential productivity and approximate depth to the water source, although utility of the depth-to-source map could be improved by increasing the vertical discretisation at which depth intervals are mapped.

  6. Measures and visualization methods of map projection distortions with the use of “python matplotlib library” as an example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pędzich Paweł

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the author of this article is to show the users of Geographical Information Systems how to present the distortions in a simple way. The intention of the author is also to popularize the knowledge in the scope of map projections and to inform the users of the maps that, despite all the advanced modern tools, an elimination of the problem, connected with the map projections and cartographical distortions occurring in them, has failed so far.

  7. Application of hydrothermal alteration mineral mapping using airborne hyperspectral remote sensing: data taken in the Baixianishan region of Gansu Province as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Sun; Zhao, Yingjun; Zhang, Donghui; Qin, Kai; Tian, Feng

    2016-10-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing, featured by integrated images and spectra, is now a frontier of the remote sensing. Using meticulous spectra, hyperspectral remote sensing technology can depict spectral features of objects in detail and are capable of identifying objects rather than simply discriminating them. This study took the Baixianishan region in Gansu Province as an example, and CASI/SASI airborne hyperspectral data were utilized to extract and map alteration minerals by MTMF mapping method. Six hydrothermal alteration minerals were mapped, which contained limonite, sericite and epidote. In addition, we analyzed the types, combinations and distribution of the alteration minerals and divided three stages of hydrothermal activity. It is considered that the favorable ore-forming elements for gold deposits are middle Hercynian porphyraceous granite, fracture and veined distribution of sericite and limonite. The application of CASI/SASI airborne hyperspectral remote sensing data in the Baixianishan area has achieved ideal results, indicative of their wide application potential in the geological research.

  8. A new approach of mapping soils in the Alps - Challenges of deriving soil information and creating soil maps for sustainable land use. An example from South Tyrol (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruck, Jasmin; Gruber, Fabian E.; Geitner, Clemens

    2015-04-01

    Nowadays sustainable land use management is gaining importance because intensive land use leads to increasing soil degradation. Especially in mountainous regions like the Alps sustainable land use management is important, as topography limits land use. Therefore, a database containing detailed information of soil characteristics is required. However, information of soil properties is far from being comprehensive. The project "ReBo - Terrain classification based on airborne laser scanning data to support soil mapping in the Alps", founded by the Autonomous Province of Bolzano, aims at developing a methodical framework of how to obtain soil data. The approach combines geomorphometric analysis and soil mapping to generate modern soil maps at medium-scale in a time and cost efficient way. In this study the open source GRASS GIS extension module r.geomorphon (Jasciewicz and Stepinski, 2013) is used to derive topographically homogeneous landform units out of high resolution DTMs on scale 1:5.000. Furthermore, for terrain segmentation and classification we additionally use medium-scale data sets (geology, parent material, land use etc.). As the Alps are characterized by a great variety of topography, parent material, wide range of moisture regimes etc. getting reliable soil data is difficult. Additionally, geomorphic activity (debris flow, landslide etc.) leads to natural disturbances. Thus, soil properties are highly diverse and largely scale dependent. Furthermore, getting soil information of anthropogenically influenced soils is an added challenge. Due to intensive cultivation techniques the natural link between the soil forming factors is often repealed. In South Tyrol we find the largest pome producing area in Europe. Normally, the annual precipitation is not enough for intensive orcharding. Thus, irrigation strategies are in use. However, as knowledge about the small scaled heterogeneous soil properties is mostly lacking, overwatering and modifications of the

  9. A method for producing digital probabilistic seismic landslide hazard maps; an example from the Los Angeles, California, area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jibson, Randall W.; Harp, Edwin L.; Michael, John A.

    1998-01-01

    The 1994 Northridge, California, earthquake is the first earthquake for which we have all of the data sets needed to conduct a rigorous regional analysis of seismic slope instability. These data sets include (1) a comprehensive inventory of triggered landslides, (2) about 200 strong-motion records of the mainshock, (3) 1:24,000-scale geologic mapping of the region, (4) extensive data on engineering properties of geologic units, and (5) high-resolution digital elevation models of the topography. All of these data sets have been digitized and rasterized at 10-m grid spacing in the ARC/INFO GIS platform. Combining these data sets in a dynamic model based on Newmark's permanent-deformation (sliding-block) analysis yields estimates of coseismic landslide displacement in each grid cell from the Northridge earthquake. The modeled displacements are then compared with the digital inventory of landslides triggered by the Northridge earthquake to construct a probability curve relating predicted displacement to probability of failure. This probability function can be applied to predict and map the spatial variability in failure probability in any ground-shaking conditions of interest. We anticipate that this mapping procedure will be used to construct seismic landslide hazard maps that will assist in emergency preparedness planning and in making rational decisions regarding development and construction in areas susceptible to seismic slope failure.

  10. Multibeam Mapping of Active Slope Instability Features: Examples from the Fraser River and Squamish River Deltas, British Columbia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, P. R.

    2004-12-01

    Multibeam mapping of the coastal waters of British Columbia has immensly improved our ability to identify and assess submarine landslide and tsunami hazard. This paper will present analysis of high-resolution images of slope instability features from two delta slopes where recent slope failure can be documented through repetitive multibeam mapping and/or comparison with previous single-beam hydrographic soundings. Numerous mass movement features characterize the slope of the Fraser River delta, all the recent features being located at the mouths of distributary channels. Engineering works have maintained the main channel in a fixed position since the 1930's, contributing to over-steepening of the slope and development of a network of submarine channels. Repetitive multibeam mapping shows that recent slope failures have occurred in numerous locations around the main channel lobe, some at the head of a large submarine channel system and others as isolated small failures that form the headwalls of small submarine channels. The scalloped morphology and association with channels, together with volume estimates derived from repetitive multibeam mapping, indicate that these features result from shallow, small volume liquefaction failures. Smaller scale, shallow slides are present on the very shallow water slope area adjacent to the channels, raising the possibility of groundwater seepage as an influence on slope stability. The slide masses from these failures are rapidly transformed into gravity flows that carve the submarine channels. Slides and channels of a similar scale are found at the mouth of a secondary distributary channel and an abandoned distributary channel. The multibeam imagery allows discrimination between recent slide features and relict features, the latter showing infilling or reworking by bottom currents. An area of undulatory seafloor, located on the flank of the main distributary channel lobe, has been cited as a possible creep displacement feature

  11. Thermal mapping as a valuable tool for road weather forecast and winter road maintenance: an example from the Italian Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todeschini, Ilaria; Di Napoli, Claudia; Pretto, Ilaria; Merler, Giacomo; Cavaliere, Roberto; Apolloni, Roberto; Antonacci, Gianluca; Piazza, Andrea; Benedetti, Guido

    2016-08-01

    During the winter period ice is likely to form on roads, making pavement surfaces slippery and increasing accident risk. Road surface temperature (RST) is one of the most important parameters in ice formation. The LIFE+ "CLEANROADS" project aims to forecast RSTs in advance in order to support road maintenance services in the timely and effective preparation of preventive anti-icing measures. This support is provided through a novel MDSS (Maintenance Decision Support System). The final goal of the project is to quantitatively demonstrate that the implemented MDSS is capable to minimize the consumption of chemical anti-icing reagents (e.g. sodium chloride) and the associated environmental (water and air) impact while maintaining the current high levels of road safety. In the CLEAN-ROADS system RSTs have been forecast by applying the numerical model METRo (Model of the Environment and Temperature of Roads) to a network of RWIS (Road Weather Information System) stations installed on a test route in the Adige Valley (Italy). This forecast is however local and does not take into account typical peculiarities along road network, such as the presence of road sections that are particularly prone to ice formation. Thermal mapping, i.e. the acquisition of mobile RST measurements through infrared thermometry, permits to (i) identify and map those sections, and (ii) extend the forecast from a RWIS station to adjacent areas. The processing of thermal mapping signals is however challenging because of random variations in the road surface emissivity. To overcome this we have acquired several thermal mapping traces along the test route during winter seasons 2014-2015 and 2015-2016. We have then defined a "characteristic" thermal fingerprint as a function of all its historical thermal mapping signals, and used it to spatialize local METRo forecasts. Preliminary results suggest the high potential of such a technique for winter road applications.

  12. Determining the Suitability of Different Digital Elevation Models and Satellite Images for Fancy Maps. An Example of Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drachal, J.; Kawel, A. K.

    2016-06-01

    The article describes the possibility of developing an overall map of the selected area on the basis of publicly available data. Such a map would take the form designed by the author with the colors that meets his expectations and a content, which he considers to be appropriate. Among the data available it was considered the use of satellite images of the terrain in real colors and, in the form of shaded relief, digital terrain models with different resolutions of the terrain mesh. Specifically the considered data were: MODIS, Landsat 8, GTOPO-30, SRTM-30, SRTM-1, SRTM-3, ASTER. For the test area the island of Cyprus was chosen because of the importance in tourism, a relatively small area and a clearly defined boundary. In the paper there are shown and discussed various options of the Cyprus terrain image obtained synthetically from variants of Modis, Landsat and digital elevation models of different resolutions.

  13. A geographical information system model for creating bioclimatic maps - examples from a high, mid-latitude city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Marie K; Thorsson, Sofia; Lindqvist, Sven

    2003-03-01

    This paper presents a method for creating large-scale bioclimatic maps with the aid of a geographical information system, GIS. Meteorological data are linked with geographical information about land use, elevation and distance to the coast, in order to generate spatial distributions of physiological equivalent temperature, PET. The model combines an air temperature map and a wind map in order to create different zones for which the thermal component is to be calculated. The advantage of the model presented is that it uses generally available information about land use, altitude and distance to the coast. Further, the model uses a GIS application, which makes it non-static. Compared to most other models, a wide range of observations are used as input. Few biometeorological studies have been performed in high-latitude areas. This paper presents bioclimatic maps for the Göteborg urban area, in Sweden, for the month of July. The results show large variations in PET during a clear, calm day at 1200 hours (Delta T 13.4 degrees C) and during average conditions in July (Delta T 6.8 degrees C), which gives an indication of the magnitude and the spatial variations within high, midlatitude, urban area in summer. The highest PET values were found in the central built-up areas and the lowest PET values in the coastal and green areas. The model generates valuable information for urban planners and decision makers when planning and constructing new areas for outdoor activities etc. This information is also useful in the fields of health and energy.

  14. The creation of digital thematic soil maps at the regional level (with the map of soil carbon pools in the Usa River basin as an example)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastukhov, A. V.; Kaverin, D. A.; Shchanov, V. M.

    2016-09-01

    A digital map of soil carbon pools was created for the forest-tundra ecotone in the Usa River basin with the use of ERDAS Imagine 2014 and ArcGIS 10.2 software. Supervised classification and thematic interpretation of satellite images and digital terrain models with the use of a georeferenced database on soil profiles were applied. Expert assessment of the natural diversity and representativeness of random samples for different soil groups was performed, and the minimal necessary size of the statistical sample was determined.

  15. Sharing our data—An overview of current (2016) USGS policies and practices for publishing data on ScienceBase and an example interactive mapping application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Katherine J.; Bock, Andrew R.; Sando, Roy

    2017-01-05

    This report provides an overview of current (2016) U.S. Geological Survey policies and practices related to publishing data on ScienceBase, and an example interactive mapping application to display those data. ScienceBase is an integrated data sharing platform managed by the U.S. Geological Survey. This report describes resources that U.S. Geological Survey Scientists can use for writing data management plans, formatting data, and creating metadata, as well as for data and metadata review, uploading data and metadata to ScienceBase, and sharing metadata through the U.S. Geological Survey Science Data Catalog. Because data publishing policies and practices are evolving, scientists should consult the resources cited in this paper for definitive policy information.An example is provided where, using the content of a published ScienceBase data release that is associated with an interpretive product, a simple user interface is constructed to demonstrate how the open source capabilities of the R programming language and environment can interact with the properties and objects of the ScienceBase item and be used to generate interactive maps.

  16. A Probabilistic Approach of Hazard Mapping for flow-type phenomena. An example of application at Mt. Etna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongolan, Vena Pearl; Iovine, Giulio; D'Ambrosio, Donato; Rongo, Rocco; Spataro, William

    2014-05-01

    The hazard induced by dangerous flow-type phenomena like lava flows, debris flows and debris avalanches can be usefully assessed by analysing a proper set of simulations of hypothetical events characterized in probability. In particular, to map lava-flow hazard, simulations can be performed by assuming a number of nodes from a regular grid of potential vents, selected to uniformly covering the study area. A probability of occurrence can then be assigned to each simulation, based on statistics of historical events and location of each vent with respect to the volcano. In this study, different hazard scenarios for Mt. Etna (Italy) have been realized, based on computer simulations of lava flows generated by a non-uniform grid of sources. The adopted grid covers the volcano with a variable density of nodes. Five macro-areas can in fact be recognised, in which at higher densities of nodes correspond higher probabilities of vent activation. Moreover, 4 distinct temporal frames have been considered (next 1, 25, 50 and 100 years) and related hazard scenarios have been computed. In addition, the topographic effects of the expected simulation within the considered temporal frames have been analysed, aiming at evaluating hazard trends due to natural morphological changes. Model parameters, e.g. the probability distribution function for vent activation and for types of eruption (distinguished into classes by duration and volume), have been derived by analysing the past 400-years volcanic history at Mt. Etna. Probabilities of vent activation for the 4 considered scenarios have been computed in terms of total number of expected events per each temporal frame. The actual number of events to be simulated per each scenario has been obtained by considering a Poisson distribution, with the number of expected events in that frame being the mean of the obtained probabilities. For each frame, a total of 240 runs have been performed. Each run is made of the set of simulations expected

  17. APPLICATION OF MAP AND FILE INFORMATION VISUALIZATION SYSTEM TO COMPREHENSIVE DIVISION OF NATURAL DISASTERS-Taking the Changjiang Valley as an Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper generalizes the makeup and forming dynamic mechanism of natural disaster systems, principles and methods of comprehensive division of natural disasters, as well as structure, function and up-build routes of map and file information visualization system (MFIVS). Taking the Chang, jiang(Yangtze) Valley as an example, on the basis of revealing up the integrated mechanism on the formations of its natural disasters and its distributing law, there after, the paper relies on the MFIVS technique, adopts two top-down and bottom-up approaches to study a comprehen sive division of natural disasters. It is relatively objective and precise that the required division results include three natural disaster sections and nine natural disaster sub-sections, which can not only provide a scientific basis for utilizing natural resources and controlling natural disaster and environmental degradation, but also be illuminated to a concise, practical and effective technique on comprehensive division.

  18. Geologic Mapping and Paired Geochemical-Paleomagnetic Sampling of Reference Sections in the Grande Ronde Basalt: An Example from the Bingen Section, Columbia River Gorge, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawlan, M.; Hagstrum, J. T.; Wells, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    We have completed comprehensive geochemical (GC) and paleomagnetic (PM) sampling of individual lava flows from eight reference stratigraphic sections in the Grande Ronde Basalt (GRB), Columbia River Basalt Group [Hagstrum et al., 2009, GSA Ann. Mtg, Portland (abst); Hagstrum et al., 2010, AGU Fall Mtg, San Francisco (abst)]. These sections, distributed across the Columbia Plateau and eastern Columbia River Gorge, contain as many as 30 flows, are up to 670 m thick, span upper magneto-stratigraphic zones R2 and N2, and, in some locations, also contain one or more N1 flows. In concert with GC and PM sampling, we have carried out detailed geologic mapping of these sections, typically at a scale of 1:3,000 to 1:5,000, using GPS, digital imagery from the National Aerial Imagery Program (NAIP), and compilation in GIS. GRB member and informal unit names of Reidel et al. [1989, GSA Sp. Paper 239] generally have been adopted, although two new units are identified and named within the N2 zone. Notably, a distinctive PM direction for intercalated lavas of several lower N2 units indicates coeval eruption of compositionally distinct units; this result contrasts with the scenario of serial stratigraphic succession of GRB units proposed by Reidel et al. [1989]. Our objectives in the mapping include: Confirming the integrity of the stratigraphic sequences by documenting flow contacts and intraflow horizons (changes in joint patterns or vesicularity); assessing fault displacements; and, establishing precisely located samples in geologic context such that selected sites can be unambiguously reoccupied. A geologic map and GC-PM data for the Bingen section, along the north side of the Columbia River, are presented as an example of our GRB reference section mapping and sampling. One of our thicker sections (670 m) along which 30 flows are mapped, the Bingen section spans 7 km along WA State Hwy 14, from near the Hood River Bridge ESE to Locke Lake. This section cuts obliquely through a

  19. Maximal Frequent Itemset Generation Using Segmentation Apporach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Rajalakshmi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Finding frequent itemsets in a data source is a fundamental operation behind Association Rule Mining.Generally, many algorithms use either the bottom-up or top-down approaches for finding these frequentitemsets. When the length of frequent itemsets to be found is large, the traditional algorithms find all thefrequent itemsets from 1-length to n-length, which is a difficult process. This problem can be solved bymining only the Maximal Frequent Itemsets (MFS. Maximal Frequent Itemsets are frequent itemsets whichhave no proper frequent superset. Thus, the generation of only maximal frequent itemsets reduces thenumber of itemsets and also time needed for the generation of all frequent itemsets as each maximal itemsetof length m implies the presence of 2m-2 frequent itemsets. Furthermore, mining only maximal frequentitemset is sufficient in many data mining applications like minimal key discovery and theory extraction. Inthis paper, we suggest a novel method for finding the maximal frequent itemset from huge data sourcesusing the concept of segmentation of data source and prioritization of segments. Empirical evaluationshows that this method outperforms various other known methods.

  20. DNA microarray-based solid-phase PCR on copoly (DMA-NAS-MAPS) silicon coated slides: An example of relevant clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damin, Francesco; Galbiati, Silvia; Ferrari, Maurizio; Chiari, Marcella

    2016-04-15

    In a previous study we developed a highly sensitive DNA microarray for the detection of common KRAS oncogenic mutations, which has been proven to be highly specific in assigning the correct genotype without any enrichment strategy even in the presence of minority mutated alleles. However, in this approach, the need of a spotter for the deposition of the purified PCR products on the substrates and the purification step of the conventional PCR are serious drawbacks. To overcome these limitations we have introduced the solid-phase polymerase chain reaction (SP-PCR) to form the array of PCR products starting from the oligonucleotide primers. This work was possible thanks to the great thermal stability of the copoly (DMA-NAS-MAPS) coating which withstands PCR thermal cycling temperatures. As an example of the application of this platform we performed the analysis of six common mutations in the codon 12 of KRAS gene (G12A, G12C, G12D, G12R, G12S, and G12V). In conclusion solid-phase PCR, combined with dual-color hybridization, allows mutation analysis in a shorter time span and is more suitable for automation.

  1. Description and validation of an automated methodology for mapping mineralogy, vegetation, and hydrothermal alteration type from ASTER satellite imagery with examples from the San Juan Mountains, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, Barnaby W.

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of airborne spectroscopic, or "hyperspectral," remote sensing for geoenvironmental watershed evaluations and deposit-scale mapping of exposed mineral deposits has been demonstrated. However, the acquisition, processing, and analysis of such airborne data at regional and national scales can be time and cost prohibitive. The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) sensor carried by the NASA Earth Observing System Terra satellite was designed for mineral mapping and the acquired data can be efficiently used to generate uniform mineral maps over very large areas. Multispectral remote sensing data acquired by the ASTER sensor were analyzed to identify and map minerals, mineral groups, hydrothermal alteration types, and vegetation groups in the western San Juan Mountains, Colorado, including the Silverton and Lake City calderas. This mapping was performed in support of multidisciplinary studies involving the predictive modeling of surface water geochemistry at watershed and regional scales. Detailed maps of minerals, vegetation groups, and water were produced from an ASTER scene using spectroscopic, expert system-based analysis techniques which have been previously described. New methodologies are presented for the modeling of hydrothermal alteration type based on the Boolean combination of the detailed mineral maps, and for the entirely automated mapping of alteration types, mineral groups, and green vegetation. Results of these methodologies are compared with the more detailed maps and with previously published mineral mapping results derived from analysis of high-resolution spectroscopic data acquired by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) sensor. Such comparisons are also presented for other mineralized and (or) altered areas including the Goldfield and Cuprite mining districts, Nevada and the central Marysvale volcanic field, Wah Wah Mountains, and San Francisco Mountains, Utah. The automated

  2. Noisy data and distribution maps: the example of Phylan semicostatus Mulsant and Rey, 1854 (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae from Serra de Tramuntana (Mallorca, Western Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmer, M.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Distribution maps are key tools for environmental management and biogeographic analyses. However, success in predicting spatial distribution is limited when using noisy presence/absence data sets. Both false absences and presences can be related with local departures from equilibrium (for example, temporary extinctions or unsuccessful colonisations. Moreover, false absences can arise from limited sampling effort. Here we explore an analytical strategy to get additional information on the presence/absence pattern of one target species from the presence/absence of all other species in the community. The logic is simple: the target species should display higher probability of presence at a site if a sample from this site is faunistically very close to the samples from other sites where the species occurs. Therefore, we first model presence/absence of the target species as a function of between-sample faunistic similarity. Second, the observed data for the target species are readjusted as a function of the expected probability of presence: current presences at sites with extreme low probability of presence are interpreted as unstable presences, and are recoded as absences. Seemingly, absences at sites with high probability of presence are interpreted as false absences, and are recoded as presences. In the experimental case presented herein, the recoding procedure is based on the presence/absence of 174 species, covering a broad taxonomic scope (snails, beetles, spiders and isopods. 1 km2 distribution maps of presence/absence of the endemic beetle Phylan semicostatus were modelled from these recoded data. Mapping is done using GARP based on four environmental explanatory variables. These maps seem to be more stable and less prone to fail in predicting presence than those derived directly from the observed data.

    Los mapas de distribución son herramientas clave para la gestión medioambiental y los análisis biogeogr

  3. Groundwater potentiality mapping of hard-rock terrain in arid regions using geospatial modelling: example from Wadi Feiran basin, South Sinai, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnous, Mohamed O.

    2016-09-01

    Identifying a good site for groundwater exploitation in hard-rock terrains is a challenging task. In Sinai, Egypt, groundwater is the only source of water for local inhabitants. Interpretation of satellite data for delineation of lithological units and weathered zones, and for mapping of lineament density and their trends, provides a valuable aid for the location of groundwater promising areas. Complex deformational histories of the wide range of lithological formations add to the difficulty. Groundwater prospect mapping is a systematic approach that considers the major controlling factors which influence the aquifer and quality of groundwater. The presented study aims to delineate, identify, model and map groundwater potential zones in arid South Sinai using remote sensing data and a geographic information system (GIS) to prepare various hydromorphogeological thematic maps such as maps of slope, drainage density, lithology, landforms, structural lineaments, rainfall intensity and plan curvature. The controlling-factor thematic maps are each allocated a fixed score and weight, computed by using a linear equation approach. Furthermore, each weighted thematic map is statistically computed to yield a groundwater potential zone map of the study area. The groundwater potential zones thus obtained were divided into five categories (very poor, poor, moderate, good and very good) and were validated using the relation between the zone and the spatial distribution of productive wells and of previous geophysical investigations from a literature review. The results show the groundwater potential zones in the study area, and create awareness for better planning and management of groundwater resources.

  4. An objective method for mapping hazardous flow deposits from the stratigraphic record of stratovolcanoes: a case example from Montagne Pelée

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, M. L.; Wadge, G.; Curnow, R. N.

    2001-06-01

    A method is described that enables a variety of maps, which indicate the probabilities of deposition, to be constructed in a reproducible manner from the stratigraphie information typically available at well-studied stratovoicanoes. These maps can then be used as a basis for hazard assessment. The sampling of the deposits of previous eruptions is subject to uncertainties due to erosion, sectoral deposition and non-exposure. A model-based, iterative algorithm is used to compensate for the incomplete sampling. For each site, the available evidence from the other sites is used to estimate the probability of deposition for missing deposits. A geographical information system (GIS)-based method that uses Thiessen polygons to represent the presence or absence of deposits, together with simple cartographic rules based on depositional processes, then defines the extent of deposition. The combined operation of these two techniques is presented for Montagne Pelée in Martinique, using the amended stratigraphic record of Smith and Roobol (1990) for the past 6000 years. Three types of maps are created: maps for individual depositional events (the 1902 block-and-ash flow and surge deposits are used to verify the technique); maps for different deposit types aggregated over 6000 years of activity; and scenario maps which, in Montagne Pelée’s case, recognise that during the next Peléean or Plinian eruption a variety of hazards will have to be confronted.

  5. APPLICATION OF LiDAR DATE TO ASSESS THE LANDSLIDE SUSCEPTIBILITY MAP USING WEIGHTS OF EVIDENCE METHOD – AN EXAMPLE FROM PODHALE REGION (SOUTHERN POLAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kamiński

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Podhale is a region in southern Poland, which is the northernmost part of the Central Carpathian Mountains. It is characterized by the presence of a large number of landslides that threaten the local infrastructure. In an article presents application of LiDAR data and geostatistical methods to assess landslides susceptibility map. Landslide inventory map were performed using LiDAR data and field work. The Weights of Evidence method was applied to assess landslides susceptibility map. Used factors for modeling: slope gradient, slope aspect, elevation, drainage density, faults density, lithology and curvature. All maps were subdivided into different classes. Then were converted to grid format in the ArcGIS 10.0. The conditional independence test was carried out to determine factors that are conditionally independent of each other with landslides. As a result, chi-square test for further GIS analysis used only five factors: slope gradient, slope aspect, elevation, drainage density and lithology. The final prediction results, it is concluded that the susceptibility map gives useful information both on present instability of the area and its possible future evolution in agreement with the morphological evolution of the area.

  6. Application of LiDAR Date to Assess the Landslide Susceptibility Map Using Weights of Evidence Method - AN Example from Podhale Region (southern Poland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiński, Mirosław

    2016-06-01

    Podhale is a region in southern Poland, which is the northernmost part of the Central Carpathian Mountains. It is characterized by the presence of a large number of landslides that threaten the local infrastructure. In an article presents application of LiDAR data and geostatistical methods to assess landslides susceptibility map. Landslide inventory map were performed using LiDAR data and field work. The Weights of Evidence method was applied to assess landslides susceptibility map. Used factors for modeling: slope gradient, slope aspect, elevation, drainage density, faults density, lithology and curvature. All maps were subdivided into different classes. Then were converted to grid format in the ArcGIS 10.0. The conditional independence test was carried out to determine factors that are conditionally independent of each other with landslides. As a result, chi-square test for further GIS analysis used only five factors: slope gradient, slope aspect, elevation, drainage density and lithology. The final prediction results, it is concluded that the susceptibility map gives useful information both on present instability of the area and its possible future evolution in agreement with the morphological evolution of the area.

  7. Structure and contents of a new geomorphological GIS database linked to a geomorphological map — With an example from Liden, central Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsson, Marcus; Seijmonsbergen, Arie C.; Kolstrup, Else

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents the structure and contents of a standardised geomorphological GIS database that stores comprehensive scientific geomorphological data and constitutes the basis for processing and extracting spatial thematic data. The geodatabase contains spatial information on morphography/morphometry, hydrography, lithology, genesis, processes and age. A unique characteristic of the GIS geodatabase is that it is constructed in parallel with a new comprehensive geomorphological mapping system designed with GIS applications in mind. This close coupling enables easy digitalisation of the information from the geomorphological map into the GIS database for use in both scientific and practical applications. The selected platform, in which the geomorphological vector, raster and tabular data are stored, is the ESRI Personal geodatabase. Additional data such as an image of the original geomorphological map, DEMs or aerial orthographic images are also included in the database. The structure of the geomorphological database presented in this paper is exemplified for a study site around Liden, central Sweden.

  8. Two independent methods for mapping the grounding line of an outlet glacier – example from the Astrolabe Glacier, Terre Adélie, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Le Meur

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The grounding line is a key element acting on the dynamics of coastal outlet glaciers. Knowing its position accurately is fundamental for both modelling the glacier dynamics and establishing a benchmark to which one can later refer in case of change. Here we map the grounding line of the Astrolabe Glacier in East Antarctica (66°41´ S; 140°05´ E, using hydrostatic and tidal methods. The first method is based on new surface and ice thickness data from which the line of buoyant flotation is found. We compare this hydrostatic map with kinematic GPS measurements of the tidal response of the ice surface. By detecting the transitions where the ice starts to move vertically in response to the tidal forcing we find control points for the grounding line position along GPS profiles. %If it can be shown that the long-term viscous mechanical behaviour of the ice slab validates the hydrostatic approach, mapping the grounding line from the ice supper surface displacements conversely requires correcting for the rigid elastic slab effect that dominates at tidal frequencies. With the help of a 2-dimensional elastic plate model, rigid elastic deviations are computed and applied to these control points. Once the extent of the grounding zone, the kinematic approach is consistent with the hydrostatic map. These two approaches lead us to propose a grounding line for the Astrolabe Glacier that significantly deviates from those obtained so far from satellite imagery.

  9. Affective Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salovaara-Moring, Inka

    of environmental knowledge production. It uses InfoAmazonia, the databased platform on Amazon rainforests, as an example of affective geo-visualization within information mapping that enhances embodiment in the experience of the information. Amazonia is defined as a digitally created affective (map)space within...

  10. Inferring coastal processes from regional-scale mapping of {sup 222}Radon and salinity: examples from the Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stieglitz, Thomas C., E-mail: thomas.stieglitz@jcu.edu.a [AIMS-JCU, Townsville (Australia); Australian Institute of Marine Science, PMB NO 3, Townsville QLD 4810 (Australia); School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville QLD 4811 (Australia); Cook, Peter G., E-mail: peter.g.cook@csiro.a [CSIRO Land and Water, Private Bag 2, Glen Osmond SA 5064 (Australia); Burnett, William C., E-mail: wburnett@mailer.fsu.ed [Department of Oceanography, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    The radon isotope {sup 222}Rn and salinity in coastal surface water were mapped on regional scales, to improve the understanding of coastal processes and their spatial variability. Radon was measured with a surface-towed, continuously recording multi-detector setup on a moving vessel. Numerous processes and locations of land-ocean interaction along the Central Great Barrier Reef coastline were identified and interpreted based on the data collected. These included riverine fluxes, terrestrially-derived fresh submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) and the tidal pumping of seawater through mangrove forests. Based on variations in the relationship of the tracers radon and salinity, some aspects of regional freshwater inputs to the coastal zone and to estuaries could be assessed. Concurrent mapping of radon and salinity allowed an efficient qualitative assessment of land-ocean interaction on various spatial and temporal scales, indicating that such surveys on coastal scales can be a useful tool to obtain an overview of SGD locations and processes.

  11. Large-scale mapping of submarine geohazard-related features: example from the Italian Project MAGIC (Marine Geohazards along the Italian Coasts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridente, Domenico; Bosman, Alessandro; Casalbore, Daniele; Sposato, Andrea; Chiocci, Francesco L.

    2010-05-01

    In very recent times, the impact of catastrophic tsunami at global (Indonesia, 2004) and local scale (Stromboli, 2002) has made evident the necessity of knowing the worldwide distribution of submarine geological structures responsible for their generation, with particular reference to seismogenic faults, volcanic activity, submarine and coastal landslides. More in general, marine geohazard derives from a vast variety of geological processes owing to the recent/modern seafloor morpho-dynamics, in the framework of the long-term tectono-sedimentary evolution of continental margins. The capability to identify and characterize marine geohazards significantly improved because of the recent developments in seafloor imaging and mapping techniques. As a consequence, many research projects specifically designed for defining marine geohazard relative to human activity and infrastructures can be conceived based on extensive (regional-scale) seafloor mapping. In this view, the Italian Civil Protection Department promoted the national project MAGIC (Marine Geohazards along the Italian Coasts), aimed at acquiring multibeam morpho-bathymetry along the most geologically active margins of Italy; the acquired dataset will then be the basis for interpreting geomorphic features and identifying potential geohazard. Marine geohazards, and their related potential risk have to be defined at different scales and level of detail and accuracy. As a starting point, geohazard mapping relies on the reconnaissance of the geohazard-related geological features, and is essentially regarded as the detection of their presence/absence and state of activity/non-activity; this reconnaissance issues is achieved through the interpretation of the morpho-tectonic and sedimentary dynamics shaping continental margins at diverse temporal and spatial scales. We discuss some general aspects of geohazard reconnaissance and cartographic criteria relative to regional scale multibeam mapping, based on the experience

  12. Network analysis of sediment cascades derived from a digital geomorphological map - an example from the Gradenbach catchment (Schober Mountains, Austrian Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, Joachim; Heckmann, Tobias; Schrott, Lothar

    2013-04-01

    A detailed geomorphological map of the Gradenbach catchment (32 km², Schober Mountains, Austrian Alps) is presented that focuses on the sediment transfer system. Data were acquired in the field and by the interpretation of orthophotos, LIDAR data and derivatives (slope, curvature, aspect, shaded relief). The resulting digital geomorphological map contains polygon representations of landforms together with their morphometric parameters and an assessment of recent geomorphic activity. Special attention was paid to landform coupling, i.e. an additional table was constructed that indicates recently observable coupling between specific landforms (based on their ID in the database). From these data, we can obtain sediment cascades as a succession of coupled landforms along which sediment transfer occurs through the activity of various geomorphic processes. Based on this digital landform inventory the sediment transfer system is analysed using graph theory. As a rather new approach in geomorphology (already established within several disciplines; e.g. hydrology, biogeography), graph theory provides a promising framework for connectivity analysis in geomorphologic systems and powerful tools to visualise and analyse catchment-wide sediment transfer networks. Since the concept is arbitrarily scalable it can be applied to discrete land surface units (e.g. mapped landforms) or to continuous surface data (e.g. grid cells). In combination with geomorphological mapping, the concept allows for the (abstracted) visualisation of complex coupling relationships between multiple sediment storage landforms. Graph networks can be analysed at the level of nodes (e.g. the number of incoming and/or outgoing edges and their character as sediment source, sink or link), edges (e.g. importance within the network as conveyors of sediment from different sources), pathways (e.g. edge sequences leading to the catchment outlet or to storage landforms; these can be termed sediment cascades), or the

  13. Use of stereoscopic satellite imagery for 3D mapping of bedrock structure in West Antarctica: An example from the northern Ford Ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, A.; Siddoway, C. S.; Porter, C.; Gottfried, M.

    2012-12-01

    In coastal West Antarctica, crustal-scale faults have been minimally mapped using traditional ground-based methods but regional scale structures are inferred mainly on the basis of low resolution potential fields data from airborne geophysical surveys (15 km flightline spacing). We use a new approach to detailed mapping of faults, shear zones, and intrusive relationships using panchromatic and multispectral imagery draped upon a digital elevation model (DEM). Our work focuses on the Fosdick Mountains, a culmination of lower middle crustal rocks exhumed at c. 100 Ma by dextral oblique detachment faulting. Ground truth exists for extensive areas visited during field studies in 2005-2011, providing a basis for spectral analysis of 8-band WorldView-02 imagery for detailed mapping of complex granite- migmatite relationships on the north side of the Fosdick range. A primary aim is the creation of a 3D geological map using the results of spectral analysis merged with a DEM computed from a stereographic pair of high resolution panchromatic images (sequential scenes, acquired 45 seconds apart). DEMs were computed using ERDAS Imagine™ LPS eATE, refined by MATLAB-based interpolation scripts to remove artifacts in the terrain model according to procedures developed by the Polar Geospatial Center (U. Minnesota). Orthorectified satellite imagery that covers the area of the DEMs was subjected to principal component analysis in ESRI ArcGIS™ 10.1, then the different rock types were identified using various combinations of spectral bands in order to map the geology of rock exposures that could not be accessed directly from the ground. Renderings in 3D of the satellite scenes draped upon the DEMs were created using Global Mapper™. The 3D perspective views reveal structural and geological features that are not observed in either the DEM nor the satellite imagery alone. The detailed map is crucial for an ongoing petrological / geochemical investigation of Cretaceous crustal

  14. Automated mapping of mineral groups and green vegetation from Landsat Thematic Mapper imagery with an example from the San Juan Mountains, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, Barnaby W.

    2013-01-01

    Multispectral satellite data acquired by the ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) and Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (TM) sensors are being used to populate an online Geographic Information System (GIS) of the spatial occurrence of mineral groups and green vegetation across the western conterminous United States and Alaska. These geospatial data are supporting U.S. Geological Survey national-scale mineral deposit database development and other mineral resource and geoenvironmental research as a means of characterizing mineral exposures related to mined and unmined hydrothermally altered rocks and mine waste. This report introduces a new methodology for the automated analysis of Landsat TM data that has been applied to more than 180 scenes covering the western United States. A map of mineral groups and green vegetation produced using this new methodology that covers the western San Juan Mountains, Colorado, and the Four Corners Region is presented. The map is provided as a layered GeoPDF and in GIS-ready digital format. TM data analysis results from other well-studied and mineralogically characterized areas with strong hydrothermal alteration and (or) supergene weathering of near-surface sulfide minerals are also shown and compared with results derived from ASTER data analysis.

  15. Mapping and analysis of geological fractures extracted by remote sensing on Landsat TM images, example of the Imilchil-Tounfite area (Central High Atlas, Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. El Alaoui El Moujahid

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of remote sensing, in this research, can be summarized in mapping and statistical studies of lineaments on the satellites images of the Jurassic outcrops in the Imilchil-Tounfite area, Central High Atlas of Morocco. This is to apply various manual techniques for extracting lineaments from Landsat TM image. Analytical techniques used in this work are: the principal component analysis (PCA applied to selective bands of the visible and infrared, which allows creating new images with better visual interpretation. Directional filters N0°, N45°, N90°, and N135° with a 5.5 matrix were used to enhance lineaments in the corresponding perpendicular directions, and therefore to obtain a good discrimination of those structures. Preliminary results highlight a dominant geological fracturing trending ENE/WSW with 52% of the total lineaments, a second fracture trending is WNW/ESE at 23%, a third fracture series trending NE/SW with 20% and finally, a minor series of fractures trending NW/SE with 5% of the total lineaments. Distribution and statistical relationship, between fractures and the affected surface on the one hand and the fracture length on the other hand, shows a network of well-structured fractures. The final lineament map constitutes a contribution to complete the geology and assisting the mining and hydrogeological prospection, in the Imilchil-Tounfite area.

  16. Aerospace Example

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is a textbook, created example for illustration purposes. The System takes inputs of Pt, Ps, and Alt, and calculates the Mach number using the Rayleigh Pitot...

  17. A New Method of Providing Communities With High-Resolution Maps of Present and Future Inundation Pathways: Two Examples From Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrelli, M.; Mague, S. T.; Smith, T. L.

    2015-12-01

    A new method of mapping storm-tide (inundation) pathways and linking those data with tidal elevations in real-time for local managers is being developed. Separate, ongoing studies in two coastal towns in Massachusetts have demonstrated the strengths of this method. High-resolution lidar datasets are imported into 3D data visualization software and water levels are raised incrementally from the highest spring tide of the year to the storm of record +1 m. This range was identified to include 'nuisance flooding' as well as present and future inundation pathways not yet observed by local authorities caused by storms superimposed on projected sea level rise. Potential storm-tide pathways are identified using Lidar data but are then verified with extensive fieldwork using RTK-GPS instruments (tested vertical accuracy of 4.9 cm at 95%) to overcome the vertical uncertainty associated with Lidar data. The fieldwork serves two purposes, first is to field check the lidar data with the highest resolution instrument available and, second to verify and document the presence or absence of a storm-tide pathway. Having developed the map of storm tide pathways within a GIS environment referenced to a geodetic datum (NAVD88), a tide gauge or staff is installed in the town's harbor or other sheltered coastal area and the elevations of all storm tide pathways are then referenced to the local tidal datum. The benefit here is three-fold. First, local officials can use the high-resolution data set that is tied to a local tidal datum to autonomously monitor predicted storm surges and be prepared for inundation at sites prior to flooding. Second, storm-tide pathways that have heretofore never been inundated can be identified and steps can be taken to remove or minimize flooding hazards. Finally, identification of present and future storm tide pathways can be used to prioritize and budget proactive solutions in response to increases in chronic, nuisance and more frequent flooding associated

  18. WRF Environment Assessment in Guangzhou City with an Extracted Land-use Map from the Remote Sensing Data in 2000 as an Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Li; YeHao Song; Akashi Mochida; Tsubasa Okaze

    2014-01-01

    Mesoscale urban environment forecast combined with WRF is a current frontier in international academic. Taking Guangzhou as an example, the new land⁃use model presented by the present authors, the existing USGS and MODIS models in WRF were firstly compared to the remote sensing model in this article. The comparison result shows that the land⁃use model presented by the authors has the highest similarity with the remote sensing data. Secondly, the new land⁃use model was used to replace the defaulted land⁃use data in WRF for simulation. By comparing this simulation results with the WRF results using the defaulted USGS and MODIS model, it was showed that the geographic models have a great impact on the mesoscale environment forecast result. Also, the geographic information model presented in this article shows the best accuracy when comparing with the observation data. Results in this study are going to be an important reference in the contemporary international forefront of mesoscale urban environment studies by WRF.

  19. Participatory maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salovaara-Moring, Inka

    looks at computer-assisted cartography as part of environmental knowledge production. It uses InfoAmazonia, the databased platform on Amazon rainforests, as an example of affective geo-visualization within information mapping that enhances embodiment in the experience of the information. Amazonia...

  20. -Deformed nonlinear maps

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ramaswamy Jaganathan; Sudeshna Sinha

    2005-03-01

    Motivated by studies on -deformed physical systems related to quantum group structures, and by the elements of Tsallis statistical mechanics, the concept of -deformed nonlinear maps is introduced. As a specific example, a -deformation procedure is applied to the logistic map. Compared to the canonical logistic map, the resulting family of -logistic maps is shown to have a wider spectrum of interesting behaviours, including the co-existence of attractors – a phenomenon rare in one-dimensional maps.

  1. Mental Mapping: A Classroom Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Les

    1978-01-01

    Examines potential uses of mental maps in the classroom by reviewing research efforts, providing an example of the differences between mental maps of two student groups, and suggesting how to use mental maps in the geography curriculum. Mental mapping (or cognitive mapping) refers to individuals' processes of collecting, storing, and retrieving…

  2. Fast computation of voxel-level brain connectivity maps from resting-state functional MRI using l₁-norm as approximation of Pearson's temporal correlation: proof-of-concept and example vector hardware implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minati, Ludovico; Zacà, Domenico; D'Incerti, Ludovico; Jovicich, Jorge

    2014-09-01

    An outstanding issue in graph-based analysis of resting-state functional MRI is choice of network nodes. Individual consideration of entire brain voxels may represent a less biased approach than parcellating the cortex according to pre-determined atlases, but entails establishing connectedness for 1(9)-1(11) links, with often prohibitive computational cost. Using a representative Human Connectome Project dataset, we show that, following appropriate time-series normalization, it may be possible to accelerate connectivity determination replacing Pearson correlation with l1-norm. Even though the adjacency matrices derived from correlation coefficients and l1-norms are not identical, their similarity is high. Further, we describe and provide in full an example vector hardware implementation of l1-norm on an array of 4096 zero instruction-set processors. Calculation times <1000 s are attainable, removing the major deterrent to voxel-based resting-sate network mapping and revealing fine-grained node degree heterogeneity. L1-norm should be given consideration as a substitute for correlation in very high-density resting-state functional connectivity analyses.

  3. Lying with Maps

    OpenAIRE

    Monmonier, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Darrell Huff’s How to Lie with Statistics was the inspiration for How to Lie with Maps, in which the author showed that geometric distortion and graphic generalization of data are unavoidable elements of cartographic representation. New examples of how ill-conceived or deliberately contrived statistical maps can greatly distort geographic reality demonstrate that lying with maps is a special case of lying with statistics. Issues addressed include the effects of map scale on geometry and featu...

  4. Slip distributions on active normal faults measured from LiDAR and field mapping of geomorphic offsets: an example from L'Aquila, Italy, and implications for modelling seismic moment release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Maxwell; Roberts, Gerald P.; McCaffrey, Ken; Cowie, Patience A.; Faure Walker, Joanna P.; Papanikolaou, Ioannis; Phillips, Richard J.; Michetti, Alessandro Maria; Vittori, Eutizio; Gregory, Laura; Wedmore, Luke; Watson, Zoë K.

    2015-05-01

    Surface slip distributions for an active normal fault in central Italy have been measured using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), in order to assess the impact of changes in fault orientation and kinematics when modelling subsurface slip distributions that control seismic moment release. The southeastern segment of the surface trace of the Campo Felice active normal fault near the city of L'Aquila was mapped and surveyed using techniques from structural geology and using TLS to define the vertical and horizontal offsets of geomorphic slopes since the last glacial maximum (15 ± 3 ka). The fault geometry and kinematics measured from 43 sites and throw/heave measurements from geomorphic offsets seen on 250 scarp profiles were analysed using a modification of the Kostrov equations to calculate the magnitudes and directions of horizontal principal strain-rates. The map trace of the studied fault is linear, except where a prominent bend has formed to link across a former left-stepping relay-zone. The dip of the fault and slip direction are constant across the bend. Throw-rates since 15 ± 3 ka decrease linearly from the fault centre to the tip, except in the location of the prominent bend where higher throw rates are recorded. Vertical coseismic offsets for two palaeo earthquake ruptures seen as fresh strips of rock at the base of the bedrock scarp also increase within the prominent bend. The principal strain-rate, calculated by combining strike, dip, slip-direction and post 15 ± 3 ka throw rate, decreases linearly from the fault centre towards the tip; the strain-rate does not increase across the prominent fault bend. The above shows that changes in fault strike, whilst having no effect on the principal horizontal strain-rate, can produce local maxima in throw-rates during single earthquakes that persist over the timescale of multiple earthquakes (15 ± 3 ka). Detailed geomorphological and structural characterisation of active faults is therefore a critical

  5. Mapping with Drupal

    CERN Document Server

    Palazzolo, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Build beautiful interactive maps on your Drupal website, and tell engaging visual stories with your data. This concise guide shows you how to create custom geographical maps from top to bottom, using Drupal 7 tools and out-of-the-box modules. You'll learn how mapping works in Drupal, with examples on how to use intuitive interfaces to map local events, businesses, groups, and other custom data. Although building maps with Drupal can be tricky, this book helps you navigate the system's complexities for creating sophisticated maps that match your site design. Get the knowledge and tools you ne

  6. From reactive to proactive apporach of interactive leadership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard

    2010-01-01

    In order to enhance a constructive approach to technological and organisational development it seems important to involve employees proactively. The chapter discribe and analyse different approaches to do that and analyse the impacts on organisational change...

  7. "Small talk" - a new apporach to optimised cheese quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gori, Klaus; Jespersen, Lene

    Aim The aim with this project is to achieve knowledge of how microbial communication (quorum sensing) influences growth of starter cultures and pathogenic bacteria e.g. Listeria monocytogenes. With time it may be expected that knowledge of how microorganisms communicate can be used actively...... to control the growth of both starter cultures and pathogenic bacteria....

  8. Developing spatial organizations : A design bases research apporach (part 1)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lekanne Deprez, F.R.E.; Tissen, R.J.

    2011-01-01

    In this research paper Spatial Organizational Theory is applied to the actual practice of organizations. A new way of organizational design is presented and tested, using design based research methodology. Three core organizational design steps (Dimensioning, Orientating and Formatting) are applied

  9. A systematic apporach to service oriented product development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzen, Detlef

    Throughout the last years, manufacturing industry has experienced a trend towards a higher level of operational integration with their customers, i.e. manufacturers differentiate their offer from competitors by combining physical and software products with service plans and service support...... operations. This integration of manufacturing and service business holds a number of potential advantages, such as optimised operational performance and improved insights into use phase processes. To realise these potential advantages, products and service operations must fit to and support each other, which...... calls for an integrated approach to their development. The integrated development of solution concepts spanning products, service delivery systems and matching delivery business models is the theme of this thesis. A design based approach - service oriented product development - is proposed...

  10. DEXRABEPRAZOLE: A NEW EMERGING APPORACH IN TREATMENT OF GIT DISORDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhandari Aakanksha

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Dexrabeprazole [R(+ rabeprazole] is a novel proton-pump inhibitor which is used in treatment of acid peptic diseases, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD maintenance therapy, erosive esophagitis, short-term treatment of active duodenal and zollinger-ellison syndrome and treatment of H.Pylori-induced ulcers. This review explains superiority of dexrabeprazole (at half the recommended rabeprazole dose over rabeprazole in terms of favourable pharmacokinetics, more efficacy, longer half-life, better healing of esophagitis, and fastly symptom control.

  11. Mapping with the Masses: Google Map Maker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfund, J.

    2008-12-01

    After some 15,000 years of map making, which saw the innovations of cardinal directions, map projections for a spherical earth, and GIS analysis, many parts of the world still appear as the "Dark Continent" on modern maps. Google Map Maker intends to shine a light on these areas by tapping into the power of the GeoWeb. Google Map Maker is a website which allows you to collaborate with others on one unified map to add, edit, locate, describe, and moderate map features, such as roads, cities, businesses, parks, schools and more, for certain regions of the world using Google Maps imagery. In this session, we will show some examples of how people are mapping with this powerful tool as well as what they are doing with the data. With Google Map Maker, you can become a citizen cartographer and join the global network of users helping to improve the quality of maps and local information in your region of interest. You are invited to map the world with us!

  12. Structure Depiction of GIS Interchangeable Files for Polygon Layersand Transform Programming—With an Example from ARC/INFO to MapInfo Formats%GIS域状图层可交换文件的C++编程转换—以ARC/INFO向MapInfo转换为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    甄计国

    2001-01-01

    Polygon layers are basic objects in GIS process and manipulation.With automatic functions of some GIS for topological manipulating, in huge amount and complex formats they were created with strict and complete attributes. Now, they are badly needed in routine workload applications on desktop systems. To share this kind of information, it is inevitable for transform programming between GISs or between GIS and non-GIS. This article is aimed at the transforming of interchange files, with an example from ARC/INFO to MapInfo formats. File and data structures are depicted, issues consideration, flow chart methodology and main section for programming are listed, therefore it is consolidated the application of the polygon layers in routine workload on desktop systems like spreadsheet and other database visualization.%域状图是GIS处理或操作的基本对象之一,大量复杂的域状图层靠具备拓扑运算功能的GIS自动生成,编码严谨、标注完备,是单机和网络上数据分析可视化应用急需的信息源。为了信息共享,不同GIS平台之间,GIS与非GIS应用软件之间常进行可交换文件的格式转换。以ARC/INFO向MapInfo文件转换为例,通过简析它们相应的文件结构,简介了C++环境下的数据转换编程思路、流程、相关的数据结构和解决方法,为日常办公电子表格应用中的区域状图层或图件自动插入奠定了基础。

  13. Mapping Mutations on Phylogenies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    This chapter provides a short review of recent methodologies developed for mapping mutations on phylogenies. Mapping of mutations, or character changes in general, using the maximum parsimony principle has been one of the most powerful tools in phylogenetics, and it has been used in a variety...... of different applications, for example, in the detection of correlated evolution and to identify selection acting on DNA sequences. However, many uses of parsimony mappings have been criticized because they focus on only one of many possible mappings and/or because they do not incorporate statistical...... uncertainty in the mapping. Recently developed probabilistic methods can incorporate statistical uncertainty in the character mappings. In these methods, focus is on a probability distribution of mutational mappings instead of a single estimate of the mutational mapping....

  14. “同一个地质”计划的地质图空间数据网络共享研究——以中国1:100万MapGIS格式的地质图数据为例%Research on Sharing of Geological Map Spacial Data Network under the “OneGeology” Project:Taking China 1 ∶ 1M Geological Map Data in MapGIS Format as an Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩坤英; 庞健峰; 逯永光; 丁孝忠; 范本贤; 剧远景; 王震洋

    2011-01-01

    “同一个地质”(OneGeology)计划是一项旨在建立全球大约1∶100万比例尺的地质图数据库,使地质图数据可以在互联网上共享的国际合作计划.“OneGeology”计划是一个基于WebGIS技术的分布式系统,每个提供数据的组织者在自己的Web服务器上管理数据,“OneGeology”门户网站和每台Web服务器进行联接并可以显示这些信息.本文以构建中国1 ∶ 100万地质图网络地图服务(WMS)为例,研究了MapGIS格式的数据实现WMS网络地图服务的方法、流程.对此,本文选择了开源软件MapServer WebGIS平台和Apache Web服务器实现WMS服务.MapServer可以发布Shape文件,因此需要将MapGIS文件转换为ArcGIS的Shape文件.由于系统库不能跨平台使用,必须在ArcGIS平台下建立中国1∶100地质图系统库,系统库包括Point(点)、Line(线)、Polygon(面)三种符号类型,并根据属性信息重新对空间图形数据进行符号化.MapServer通过Mapfile配置文件定制网络服务,该配置文件是地质图数据发布的核心内容,文件内容包括地图服务的数据源、数据输出格式、符号化方式、元数据信息等,采用文本方式存储.最后,通过在“OneGeology”门户网站注册,提供网络地质图服务.%"OneGeology" is an international cooperative project which makes it accessible to share the geological map database on the internet aiming at creating a global geological map database at the scale about 1:1000 000. "OneGeology" system is a distributional system based on WebGIS technology. Every data provider can manage their data on their own Web server. The "OneGeology" portal accesses all of distributed web servers and displays the information. In this article, we took setting up of China 1:1000 000 geological map Web Map Service (WMS) as an examlpe, and implemented the methods and flow of WMS based on the research on MapGIS formate data. There are multi-methods to implement WMS. We used open

  15. GIS-mapping of environmental assessment of the territories in the region of intense activity for the oil and gas complex for achievement the goals of the Sustainable Development (on the example of Russia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yermolaev, Oleg

    2014-05-01

    The uniform system of complex scientific-reference ecological-geographical should act as a base for the maintenance of the Sustainable Development (SD) concept in the territories of the Russian Federation subjects or certain regions. In this case, the assessment of the ecological situation in the regions can be solved by the conjugation of the two interrelated system - the mapping and the geoinformational. The report discusses the methodological aspects of the Atlas-mapping for the purposes of SD in the regions of Russia. The Republic of Tatarstan viewed as a model territory where a large-scale oil-gas complex "Tatneft" PLC works. The company functions for more than 60 years. Oil fields occupy an area of more than 38 000 km2; placed in its territory about 40 000 oil wells, more than 55 000 km of pipelines; more than 3 billion tons of oil was extracted. Methods for to the structure and requirements for the Atlas's content were outlined. The approaches to mapping of "an ecological dominant" of SD conceptually substantiated following the pattern of a large region of Russia. Several trends of thematically mapping were suggested to be distinguished in the Atlas's structure: • The background history of oil-fields mine working; • The nature preservation technologies while oil extracting; • The assessment of natural conditions of a humans vital activity; • Unfavorable and dangerous natural processes and phenomena; • The anthropogenic effect and environmental surroundings change; • The social-economical processes and phenomena. • The medical-ecological and geochemical processes and phenomena; Within these groups the other numerous groups can distinguished. The maps of unfavorable and dangerous processes and phenomena subdivided in accordance with the types of processes - of endogenous and exogenous origin. Among the maps of the anthropogenic effects on the natural surroundings one can differentiate the maps of the influence on different nature's spheres

  16. Spectral Conditions for Positive Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chruściński, Dariusz; Kossakowski, Andrzej

    2009-09-01

    We provide partial classification of positive linear maps in matrix algebras which is based on a family of spectral conditions. This construction generalizes the celebrated Choi example of a map which is positive but not completely positive. It is shown how the spectral conditions enable one to construct linear maps on tensor products of matrix algebras which are positive but only on a convex subset of separable elements. Such maps provide basic tools to study quantum entanglement in multipartite systems.

  17. Constructing positive maps in matrix algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chruściński, D.; Kossakowski, A.

    2011-10-01

    We analyze several classes of positive maps in infinite dimensional matrix algebras. Such maps provide basic tools for studying quantum entanglement infinite dimensional Hilbert spaces. Instead of presenting the most general approach to the problem we concentrate on specific examples. We stress that there is no general construction of positive maps. We show how to generalize well known maps in low dimensional algebras: Choi map in M3(C) and Robertson map in M4(C).

  18. Mapping Resilience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carruth, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Resilience theory is a growing discipline with great relevance for the discipline of planning, particularly in fields like energy planning that face great uncertainty and rapidly transforming contexts. Building on the work of the Stockholm Resilience Centre, this paper begins by outlining...... the relationship between resilience and energy planning, suggesting that planning in, and with, time is a core necessity in this domain. It then reviews four examples of graphically mapping with time, highlighting some of the key challenges, before tentatively proposing a graphical language to be employed...... by planners when aiming to construct resilient energy plans. It concludes that a graphical language has the potential to be a significant tool, flexibly facilitating cross-disciplinary communication and decision-making, while emphasising that its role is to support imaginative, resilient planning rather than...

  19. Mapping variations in weight percent silica measured from multispectral thermal infrared imagery - Examples from the Hiller Mountains, Nevada, USA and Tres Virgenes-La Reforma, Baja California Sur, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, S.J.; Dmochowski, J.E.; Howard, K.A.; Rowan, L.C.; Karlstrom, K.E.; Stock, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Remotely sensed multispectral thermal infrared (8-13 ??m) images are increasingly being used to map variations in surface silicate mineralogy. These studies utilize the shift to longer wavelengths in the main spectral feature in minerals in this wavelength region (reststrahlen band) as the mineralogy changes from felsic to mafic. An approach is described for determining the amount of this shift and then using the shift with a reference curve, derived from laboratory data, to remotely determine the weight percent SiO2 of the surface. The approach has broad applicability to many study areas and can also be fine-tuned to give greater accuracy in a particular study area if field samples are available. The approach was assessed using airborne multispectral thermal infrared images from the Hiller Mountains, Nevada, USA and the Tres Virgenes-La Reforma, Baja California Sur, Mexico. Results indicate the general approach slightly overestimates the weight percent SiO2 of low silica rocks (e.g. basalt) and underestimates the weight percent SiO2 of high silica rocks (e.g. granite). Fine tuning the general approach with measurements from field samples provided good results for both areas with errors in the recovered weight percent SiO2 of a few percent. The map units identified by these techniques and traditional mapping at the Hiller Mountains demonstrate the continuity of the crystalline rocks from the Hiller Mountains southward to the White Hills supporting the idea that these ranges represent an essentially continuous footwall block below a regional detachment. Results from the Baja California data verify the most recent volcanism to be basaltic-andesite. ?? 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. 基于Global Mapper的地貌晕渲制图——以西安幅(I-49)为例%Methodology of Automatic Relief Shading Map Making Based on Global Mapper——Taking Xi'an Region (I-49) as an Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林松; 程维明; 乔玉良

    2009-01-01

    地貌晕渲图自动制图是以计算机软、硬件为基础,对DEM 数据实现的一种三维立体可视化表达.本文从地貌晕渲的基本理论出发,以我国1: 100万标准分幅的西安幅(I-49)为例,采用Global Mapper软件实现了计算机地貌晕渲自动制作的全过程,主要内容包括:计算机地貌晕渲关键技术的实现,地貌晕渲效果与参数设置之间的关系,Global Mapper软件中各种参数设置的合理性分析,使用分层设色的办法对晕渲图进行色彩的设计,并利用PHOTOSHOP软件对结果进行整饰等.该方法可实现地貌晕渲图的自动制图.%Based on mapping software such as Global Mapper, ERDAS and MicroDEM etc., the relief shading maps can be automatically made by means of DEM data. In accordance with the basic theory of relief shading, taking Xi'an region (sheet number I-49, national standard division range 1: 1 000 000 geomorphologic maps) as an example, this paper presents the whole process of making relief shading using Global Mapper in computer. The key technology of relief shading is the main study content. The relationship between the effect of relief shading and the parameters is analyzed, and the rationality of various parameters setting in the Global Mapper is illustrated. The setting of light direction, environmental lighting and vertical exaggeration coefficient should perfectly represent not only the combination of the whole effect, but also the partial texture of the geomorphologic shading map. Therefore, the basic rules of relief shading map production and the geomorphology features of the study area before relief shading designing should be understood. In order to make colorful relief shading map, the elevation of the study area must be classified according to regional geomorphology features, and the color value of every levels is completed by hierarchical color design. Either evident regularity, or color and abundance of regional geomorphology were reflected in the

  1. Making maps a visual guide to map design for GIS

    CERN Document Server

    Krygier, John

    2011-01-01

    Acclaimed for its innovative use of visual material, this book is engaging, clear, and compelling-exactly how an effective map should be. Nearly every page is organized around maps and other figures (many in full color) that illustrate all aspects of map making, including instructive examples of both good and poor design choices. The book covers everything from locating and processing data to making decisions about layout, symbols, color, and type. Readers are invited to think critically about both the technical features and social significance of maps as they learn to create better maps of t

  2. Example based painting generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Yan-wen; YU Jin-hui; XU Xiao-dong; WANG Jin; PENG Qun-sheng

    2006-01-01

    We present an approach for generating paintings on photographic images with the style encoded by the example paintings and adopt representative brushes extracted from the example paintings as the painting primitives. Our system first divides the given photographic image into several regions on which we synthesize a grounding layer with texture patches extracted from the example paintings. Then, we paint those regions using brushes stochastically chosen from the brush library, with further brush color and shape perturbations. The brush direction is determined by a direction field either constructed by a convenient user interactive manner or synthesized from the examples. Our approach offers flexible and intuitive user control over the painting process and style.

  3. Strengthening Adaptation to Extreme Climate Events in Southwestern Amazonia: an Example from the Trinational Acre River Basin in the Madre de Dios/Peru - Acre/Brazil - Pando/Bolivia (MAP) Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, I. F.

    2015-12-01

    Southwestern Amazonia, where Bolivia, Brazil and Peru meet, faces numerous challenges to the sustainable utilization of land and water resources as the region experiences rapid population and economic growth, expanding agriculture, transportation and energy sectors, along with frequent flooding and droughts. It is also predicted to be one of the most susceptible areas for climate change in the coming decade. The Acre River Basin, one of the few trinational basins in Amazonia, lies at the center of the Madre de Dios Region (Peru), Acre State (Brazil) and Pando Department (Bolivia) or MAP Region. It covers approximately 7,500 km2 and its inhabitants range from indigenous groups avoiding contact with industrial society to more than 60,000 dwellers of a binational urban center. The basin incorporates most the challenges facing the region and this paper discusses steps underway to address the basin's vulnerability to climate-related threats. A trinational group of professionals used GIS databases and local knowledge to classify these threats and possible societal responses. To prioritize threats and to propose responses, this group adapted a method proposed by the Queensland Climate Change Centre of Excellence of Australia to develop climate risk matrices for assessing impacts, adaptation, risk and vulnerability. The three priority climate variables were prolonged and more frequent droughts, more intense flooding, and more days with temperatures > 35oC. The final matrix proposed two areas of concentration - 1) Reduce the vulnerability of communities to hydro-meteorological extreme events and 2) Protect and restore ecosystems that maintain critical water-related resources with actions in public policy, capacity-building, and immediate activities. These results are being incorporated into the Amazon Project of the Global Environment Fund of the United Nations Environment Program, administered by the Amazon Cooperation Treaty Organization (ACTO).

  4. Concept Maps in Introductory Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witmer, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Concept maps are tools for organizing thoughts on the main ideas in a course. I present an example of a concept map that was created through the work of students in an introductory class and discuss major topics in statistics and relationships among them.

  5. Genetic Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fact Sheets Fact Sheets En Español: Mapeo Genético Genetic Mapping What is genetic mapping? How do researchers create ... genetic map? What are genetic markers? What is genetic mapping? Among the main goals of the Human Genome ...

  6. Symplectic maps for accelerator lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warnock, R.L.; Ruth, R.; Gabella, W.

    1988-05-01

    We describe a method for numerical construction of a symplectic map for particle propagation in a general accelerator lattice. The generating function of the map is obtained by integrating the Hamilton-Jacobi equation as an initial-value problem on a finite time interval. Given the generating function, the map is put in explicit form by means of a Fourier inversion technique. We give an example which suggests that the method has promise. 9 refs., 9 figs.

  7. Concept Maps

    OpenAIRE

    Schwendimann, Beat Adrian

    2014-01-01

    A concept map is a node-link diagram showing the semantic relationships among concepts. The technique for constructing concept maps is called "concept mapping". A concept map consists of nodes, arrows as linking lines, and linking phrases that describe the relationship between nodes. Two nodes connected with a labeled arrow are called a proposition. Concept maps are versatile graphic organizers that can represent many different forms of relationships between concepts. The relationship between...

  8. Regression analysis by example

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Samprit

    2012-01-01

    Praise for the Fourth Edition: ""This book is . . . an excellent source of examples for regression analysis. It has been and still is readily readable and understandable."" -Journal of the American Statistical Association Regression analysis is a conceptually simple method for investigating relationships among variables. Carrying out a successful application of regression analysis, however, requires a balance of theoretical results, empirical rules, and subjective judgment. Regression Analysis by Example, Fifth Edition has been expanded

  9. The role of national regulations in RPAS-based mapping projects in the monitoring of natural hazards that could involve infrastructures: the example of the Val Venosta Railway (Northern Italy - Bolzano).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolfo, Luca; Busnardo, Enrico; Castellarin, Nicola; Canella, Claudio; Canella, Federico; Stabile, Marco; Curci, Francesco; Petrillo, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    Italy has adopted National Regulations for the use of RPAS in its country's airspace in December 2013, issued by the Italian Civil Aviation Authority (ENAC). Despite the issued regulations, over the past months an increasing number of unauthorized and unsafe operations have been performed and the attention to safety is growing quickly in the public opinion. For this reason "Critical Operations" is permitted only to those RPAS Operators which have received special authorization by ENAC after a very demanding Aeronautical procedure. According to the Regulations, the flight close to-over urban areas, industrial plants, highways and railways, implies that only authorized RPAS Operators may perform such activities. An example of a "Critical" operation were the RPAS flights performed along the Venosta railway line to evaluate the current situation of two areas affected by geological instability and laid the basis for a future high accurate monitoring. The Venosta Valley is located in the western part of South Tyrol (Norhtern Italy). The valley possesses some unique features compared to the entire Alps, the particularly dry climate and the presence of huge alluvional fans, which give rise to different levels of altitude in the valley. From geological point of view, the Venosta Valley is characterized by the presence of the Austroalpine domain. In particular, there are two different geological units in this area: (i) the crystalline schists of the basement, which includes paragneiss, gneiss, granitoid pegmatites, garnet micaschists, quartzites and phyllites. (ii) The Mesozoic coverage divided into various complexes with successions of phyllites, volcanics and magmatiti. The railway line that runs through the Venosta Valley (Merano - Malles) unfolds along a path of 59,8 kilometers and covers an altitude difference of about 700 meters. In particular, three tunnels characterized the first section, including the M. Giuseppe tunnel, which required extensive consolidations both

  10. 无人机在正射影像图制作中的应用--以罗格生态科技园为例%The Application of UAV in the Production of Orthophoto Map-With Luoge Eco-technology Industrial Park as an Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈凌; 陈雅娜

    2015-01-01

    采用无人机进行航空摄影,可以使正射影像图的制作,获得良好的时间效益与经济效益。本文以罗格生态科技园无人机影像制作为例,从航空摄影、像控点测量、空中三角测量到最后的影像制作,阐述了无人机在正射影像图制作中的应用。%Adopting UAV to aerial photography, can make the production of Orthophoto Map, for the good time efficiency and economic benefits. In this paper, with UAV image production of Luoge Eco-technology Industrial Park as an example, expounds the application of UAV in the production of Orthophoto Map, from aerial photography, photo-control-point survey, aerotriangulation and image production.

  11. A Map Enters the Conversation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Anders Kristian

    Over the past decade STS scholars have been engaged in a continuous dialogue about the performativity of their methods and the interventions of their research practices. A frequently posed question is how STS can make a difference to its fields of study, what John Law has called its different...... 'modes of mattering'. In this paper I explore what difference digital cartography can make to STS practice. I draw on three examples from my own work where digitally mediated maps have entered the conversation and made critical, often surprising, differences to the research process. In my first example...... the map is brought along as an ethnographic device on a piece of fieldwork, in my second example it serves as the central collaborative object in a participatory design project, and in my third example the map becomes the object of contestation as it finds itself centre stage in the controversy...

  12. Code query by example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaucouleur, Sebastien

    2011-02-01

    We introduce code query by example for customisation of evolvable software products in general and of enterprise resource planning systems (ERPs) in particular. The concept is based on an initial empirical study on practices around ERP systems. We motivate our design choices based on those empirical results, and we show how the proposed solution helps with respect to the infamous upgrade problem: the conflict between the need for customisation and the need for upgrade of ERP systems. We further show how code query by example can be used as a form of lightweight static analysis, to detect automatically potential defects in large software products. Code query by example as a form of lightweight static analysis is particularly interesting in the context of ERP systems: it is often the case that programmers working in this field are not computer science specialists but more of domain experts. Hence, they require a simple language to express custom rules.

  13. Conformal Mapping for Multiple Terminals

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Weimin; Wang, Qiang; Ren, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Conformal mapping is an important mathematical tool in many physical and engineering fields, especially in electrostatics, fluid mechanics, classical mechanics, and transformation optics. However in the existing textbooks and literatures, it is only adopted to solve the problems which have only two terminals. Two terminals with electric potential differences, pressure difference, optical path difference, etc., can be mapped conformally onto a solvable structure, e.g., a rectangle, where the two terminals are mapped onto two opposite edges of the rectangle. Here we show a conformal mapping method for multiple terminals, which is more common in practical applications. Through accurate analysis of the boundary conditions, additional terminals or boundaries are folded in the inner of the mapped rectangle. Then the solution will not be influenced. The method is described in several typical situations and two application examples are detailed. The first example is an electrostatic actuator with three electrodes. A ...

  14. Einstein manifolds in Ashtekar variables explicit examples

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, L N; Chang, Lay Nam; Soo, Chopin

    1992-01-01

    We show that all solutions to the vacuum Einstein field equations may be mapped to instanton configurations of the Ashtekar variables. These solutions are characterized by properties of the moduli space of the instantons. We exhibit explicit forms of these configurations for several well-known solutions, and indicate a systematic way to get new ones. Some interesting examples of these new solutions are described.

  15. Arithmetic Procedures are Induced from Examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-08-13

    concrete numerals (eg. coins. Dienes blocks, poker chips. Montessori rods etc Analogy is included as a third hypothesis even though it is not particularly...collections of coins. Diennes blocks. Montessori rods and so forth. This is a mapping between two kinds of numerals. and not two procedures Later. this...of procedures are ubiquitous in adult life . Examples are cookbooks, user guides, repair shop manuals and office procedure manuals. In using procedure

  16. Map Projection

    CERN Document Server

    Ghaderpour, Ebrahim

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce some known map projections from a model of the Earth to a flat sheet of paper or map and derive the plotting equations for these projections. The first fundamental form and the Gaussian fundamental quantities are defined and applied to obtain the plotting equations and distortions in length, shape and size for some of these map projections.

  17. Learning Bing maps API

    CERN Document Server

    Sinani, Artan

    2013-01-01

    This is a practical, hands-on guide with illustrative examples, which will help you explore the vast universe of Bing maps.If you are a developer who wants to learn how to exploit the numerous features of Bing Maps then this book is ideal for you. It can also be useful for more experienced developers who wish to explore other areas of the APIs. It is assumed that you have some knowledge of JavaScript, HTML, and CSS. For some chapters a working knowledge of .Net and Visual Studio is also needed.

  18. Ramada, A Successful Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正>After entry into the WTO, China’s hotels are being challenged by the global economy and overseas counterparts. They should seek creation and development to fight against the fierce competition. Ramada Pudong Hotel, managed by the Shanghai Airport Group Civil Aviation Property Company Ltd, has become a successful example in creative management.

  19. Infrared design examples

    CERN Document Server

    Wolfe, William L

    1999-01-01

    This tutorial covers infrared design examples in considerable detail, building on principles presented in an earlier text, 'Introduction to Infrared System Design' (SPIE PRESS Vol. TT24). The text explores a range of problems illustrating several design issues, with applications in military, industry, aeronautics, space, and medicine, among others.

  20. Topographic mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) produced its first topographic map in 1879, the same year it was established. Today, more than 100 years and millions of map copies later, topographic mapping is still a central activity for the USGS. The topographic map remains an indispensable tool for government, science, industry, and leisure. Much has changed since early topographers traveled the unsettled West and carefully plotted the first USGS maps by hand. Advances in survey techniques, instrumentation, and design and printing technologies, as well as the use of aerial photography and satellite data, have dramatically improved mapping coverage, accuracy, and efficiency. Yet cartography, the art and science of mapping, may never before have undergone change more profound than today.

  1. Example based style classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welnicka, Katarzyna; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas; Aanæs, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    We address the problem of analysis of families of shapes which can be classified according to two categories: the main one corresponding usually to the coarse shape which we call the function and the more subtle one which we call the style. The style and the function both contribute to the overall...... shape which makes the general analysis and retrieval of such shapes more challenging. Also there is no single way of defining the style as this depends much on the context of the family of shapes used for the analysis. That is why the definition needs to be given through the examples. The straight...... this similarity should be reflected across different functions. We show the usability of our methods first on the example of a number of chess sets which our method helps sort. Next, we investigate the problem of finding a replacement for a missing tooth given a database of teeth....

  2. Neutrosophic Examples in Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Yuhua

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Neutrosophy can be widely applied in physics and the like. For example, one of the reasons for 2011 Nobel Prize for physics is "for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the universe through observations of distant supernovae", but according to neutrosophy, there exist seven or nine states of accelerating expansion and contraction and the neutrosophic state in the universe. Another two examples are "a revision to Gödel's incompleteness theorem by neutrosophy" and "six neutral (neutrosophic fundamental interactions". In addition, the "partial and temporary unified theory so far" is discussed (including "partial and temporary unified electromagnetic theory so far", "partial and temporary unified gravitational theory so far", "partial and temporary unified theory of four fundamental interactions so far", and "partial and temporary unified theory of natural science so far".

  3. The Structure-Mapping Engine: Algorithm and Examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-07-01

    08540 Ann Arbor. MI 48109 Dr Sherrie Gott AFHRL MODJ Dr Wayne Harvey Ms Julia S Hough BrooKs AFB TX 78235 SRI International Lawrence Eribaum Associates...Performance Lanoratory Department of Psychology Catholic University of Evanston IL 60201 Amer~ca Dr Wayne Gray Wasnington. DC 20064 Army Research Institute...22333 Norcross, GA 30092 Dr Sylvia A S Shafto Department of Computer Science Dr Lynne Recer Dr David Rumelhart Towson State University Department of

  4. Intercreativity: Mapping Online Activism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meikle, Graham

    How do activists use the Internet? This article maps a wide range of activist practice and research by applying and developing Tim Berners-Lee's concept of ‘intercreativity' (1999). It identifies four dimensions of Net activism: intercreative texts, tactics, strategies and networks. It develops these through examples of manifestations of Net activism around one cluster of issues: support campaigns for refugees and asylum seekers.

  5. Bipartite depolarizing maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lami, Ludovico; Huber, Marcus

    2016-09-01

    We introduce a 3-parameter class of maps (1) acting on a bipartite system which are a natural generalisation of the depolarizing channel (and include it as a special case). Then, we find the exact regions of the parameter space that alternatively determine a positive, completely positive, entanglement-breaking, or entanglement-annihilating map. This model displays a much richer behaviour than the one shown by a simple depolarizing channel, yet it stays exactly solvable. As an example of this richness, positive partial transposition but not entanglement-breaking maps is found in Theorem 2. A simple example of a positive yet indecomposable map is provided (see the Remark at the end of Section IV). The study of the entanglement-annihilating property is fully addressed by Theorem 7. Finally, we apply our results to solve the problem of the entanglement annihilation caused in a bipartite system by a tensor product of local depolarizing channels. In this context, a conjecture posed in the work of Filippov [J. Russ. Laser Res. 35, 484 (2014)] is affirmatively answered, and the gaps that the imperfect bounds of Filippov and Ziman [Phys. Rev. A 88, 032316 (2013)] left open are closed. To arrive at this result, we furthermore show how the Hadamard product between quantum states can be implemented via local operations.

  6. Mapping Deeply

    OpenAIRE

    Denis Wood

    2015-01-01

    This is a description of an avant la lettre deep mapping project carried out by a geographer and a number of landscape architecture students in the early 1980s. Although humanists seem to take the “mapping” in deep mapping more metaphorically than cartographically, in this neighborhood mapping project, the mapmaking was taken literally, with the goal of producing an atlas of the neighborhood. In this, the neighborhood was construed as a transformer, turning the stuff of the world (gas, wate...

  7. Procedure and Program Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britz, Dieter

    Here some modules, procedures and whole programs are described, that may be useful to the reader, as they have been, to the author. They are all in Fortran 90/95 and start with a generally useful module, that will be used in most procedures and programs in the examples, and another module useful for programs using a Rosenbrock variant. The source texts (except for the two modules) are not reproduced here, but can be downloaded from the web site www.springerlink.com/openurl.asp?genre=issue &issn=1616-6361&volume=666 (the two lines form one contiguous URL!).

  8. A network of topographic numerosity maps in human association cortex.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harvey, Ben M.; Dumoulin, Serge O.

    2017-01-01

    Sensory and motor cortices each contain multiple topographic maps with the structure of sensory organs (such as the retina or cochlea) mapped onto the cortical surface. These sensory maps are hierarchically organized. For example, visual field maps contain neurons that represent increasingly large p

  9. Spectral conditions for positive maps and entanglement witnesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chruściński, Dariusz; Kossakowski, Andrzej

    2011-03-01

    We provide partial classification of entanglement witnesses and positive maps which is based on a family of spectral conditions. Interestingly many well known examples of positive maps (e.g. transposition, reduction map, the family of Choi maps) belong to the class constructed via spectral conditions.

  10. Twistted ξ-(α,β expansive mappings in metric spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Nagpal

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce a pair of twisted ζ-(α,β expansive mappings in metric spaces and prove fixed point theorems for these mappings. Some examples are also provided to support our main results.

  11. Weak monotonicity inequality and partial regularity for harmonic maps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈尧天; 严树森

    1999-01-01

    The notion of locally weak monotonicity inequality for weakly harmonic maps is introduced and various results on this class of maps are obtained. For example, the locally weak monotonicity inequality is nearly equivalent to the ε-regularity.

  12. Collection Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbour, Denise

    2002-01-01

    Explains collection mapping for library media collections. Discusses purposes for creating collection maps, including helping with selection and weeding decisions, showing how the collection supports the curriculum, and making budget decisions; and methods of data collection, including evaluating a collaboratively taught unit with the classroom…

  13. Causal mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard

    2006-01-01

    The lecture note explains how to use the causal mapping method as well as the theoretical framework aoosciated to the method......The lecture note explains how to use the causal mapping method as well as the theoretical framework aoosciated to the method...

  14. Coordinate systems and map projections

    CERN Document Server

    Maling, DH

    1992-01-01

    A revised and expanded new edition of the definitive English work on map projections. The revisions take into account the huge advances in geometrical geodesy which have occurred since the early years of satellite geodesy. The detailed configuration of the geoid resulting from the GEOS and SEASAT altimetry measurements are now taken into consideration. Additionally, the chapter on computation of map projections is updated bearing in mind the availability of pocket calculators and microcomputers. Analytical derivation of some map projections including examples of pseudocylindrical and polyconic

  15. CALS Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collin, Ib; Nielsen, Povl Holm; Larsen, Michael Holm

    1998-01-01

    To enhance the industrial applications of CALS, CALS Center Danmark has developed a cost efficient and transparent assessment, CALS Mapping, to uncover the potential of CALS - primarily dedicated to small and medium sized enterprises. The idea behind CALS Mapping is that the CALS State...... enterprise is, when applied in a given organisation modified with respect to the industry regarded, hence irrelevant measure parameters are eliminated to avoid redundancy. This assessment of CALS Mapping, quantify the CALS potential of an organisation with the purpose of providing decision support to the top...

  16. Computer-assisted methods for the construction, compilation and display of geoscientific maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabert, Gottfried

    The paper reviews modern methods for map construction, compilation and display on the basis of current applications at the Geological Surveys of the Federal Republic of Germany and Lower Saxony. The graphical representation of geoscientific data, for example mapping and exploration results, is generally done in the traditional way of analog maps. Different possibilities to produce digital maps exist: map construction directly from geological field data, digitization of existing maps, especially manuscript maps, conversion of remotely sensed data into raster or vector maps.

  17. Mapping VADEMECUM

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    The work plan for the implementation of the Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution under the UN Economic Commission for Europe (UN ECE) includes the production of maps of critical loads, critical levels, and exceedances as a basis for developing potential abatement strategies for sulphur and nitrogen. This Vademecum is designed to provide guidance to those responsible for calculating and mapping critical loads, critical levels, and exceedances on a national or regional scale. Th...

  18. Mapping of transport sensitive areas - Task 3.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Münier, Bernd

    and retrieval of data available for pan European mapping exercises revealed a considerable number of high resolution maps suitable for production of map examples. The results have been documented as a spreadsheet, containing essential sets of metadata. Furthermore, it could be realised that the number....... Finally, the visual quality of many of the map examples found is not satisfying, and this has indeed to be an area of concern, as it greatly influences the communicative value of maps. The potential for miss-interpretation by the reader or manipulation is obvious, and the map producer as well...

  19. Mapping your competitive position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aveni, Richard A

    2007-11-01

    A price-benefit positioning map helps you see, through your customers' eyes, how your product compares with all its competitors in a market. You can draw such a map quickly and objectively, without having to resort to costly, time-consuming consumer surveys or subjective estimates of the excellence of your product and the shortcomings of all the others. Creating a positioning map involves three steps: First, define your market to include everything your customers might consider to be your product's competitors or substitutes. Second, track the price your customers actually pay (wholesale or retail? bundled or unbundled?) and identify what your customers see as your offering's primary benefit. This is done through regression analysis, determining which of the product's attributes (as described objectively by rating services, government agencies, R&D departments, and the like) explains most of the variance in its price. Third, draw the map by plotting on a graph the position of every product in the market you've selected according to its price and its level of primary benefit, and draw a line that runs through the middle of the points. What you get is a picture of the competitive landscape of your market, where all the products above the line command a price premium owing to some secondary benefit customers value, and all those below the line are positioned to earn market share through lower prices and reduced secondary benefits. Using examples as varied as Harley-Davidson motorcycles, Motorola cell phones, and the New York restaurant market, Tuck professor D'Aveni demonstrates some of the many ways the maps can be used: to locate unoccupied or less-crowded spaces in highly competitive markets, for instance, or to identify opportunities created through changes in the relationship between the primary benefit and prices. The maps even allow companies to anticipate--and counter-- rivals' strategies. R eprint RO711G

  20. 图文信息可视化系统(MFIVS)在山区综合区划中的应用——以湖南怀化市为例%APPLIED STUDY ON MAP AND FILE INFORMATION VISIBILITY SYSTEM (MFIVS) IN THE COMPREHENSIVE REGIONALIZATION OF MOUNTAIN AREA—TAKING HUAIHUA CITY OF HUNAN PROVINCE AS AN EXAMPLE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨开凤; 胡宝清; 李旭; 张洪恩

    2000-01-01

    Comprehensive division of the mountainous area, in allusion to the characteristics of abundant resources and frail ecosystemin the mountain area, make it in both accord with rationality of eco-environment and favor of development of society and economy. In object county or city order,Map and file information visibility system may make information mapificative and data visible by utilizing computer, GIS and database etc. technique. Taking the mountainous area Huaihua City as an example, being guided by regional difference law and mountain system theory, and on basis of the principles comprising of relative consistency (of eeological environment and territorial reeources, social-economic, and regional comprehensive development direction, i. e . comprehensive valuation of PRED system), limiattion period, integrating area macrostructure with regional types and regionalconjugation, the paper adopts two bottom-up and tpo-down contrivance approaches, relies on the advanced measure-map and file information visibility system(MFIVS) etc., selects appropriate index system, and carries through integrate evaluation and clustering division. Comprehensive division of bottom-up approach adopts quantitative index-comprehensive evaluation index system. That is to say, in the light of the principles including integrating resources-environment with social-economy, combining spatial span with temporal limitation, uniting systematicness with dynamicness, linking integration with concision and holding relative integrity of district division to design index system (five grades and 52 single factors ), introduce the method of integrating ameliorated 3-grade IAHP and experientially estimating means to confirm the weights of various grades indexes, impose undimensionification-model of single index data-effect function to compute values of single indexes and composite indexes. According to these, it is taken that three comprehensive evaluations include system clustering analysis, gray

  1. Physical Parameter Eclipse Mapping

    CERN Document Server

    Vrielmann, S

    2000-01-01

    The tomographic method "Physical Parameter Eclipse Mapping" is a tool to reconstruct spatial distributions of physical parameters (like temperatures and surface densities) in accretion discs of cataclysmic variables. After summarizing the method, we apply it to multi-colour eclipse light curves of various dwarf novae and nova-likes like VZ Scl, IP Peg in outburst, UU Aqr, V2051 Oph and HT Cas in order to derive the temperatures (and surface densities) in the disc, the white dwarf temperature, the disc size, the effective temperatures and the viscosities. The results allows us to establish or refine a physical model for the accretion disc. Our maps of HT Cas and V2051 Oph, for example, indicate that the (quiescent) disc must be structured into a cool, optically thick inner disc sandwiched by hot, optically thin chromospheres. In addition, the disc of HT Cas must be patchy with a covering factor of about 40% caused by magnetic activity in the disc.

  2. Measuring Social Capital Change Using Ripple Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Barbara; Johannes, Elaine M.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides a detailed description of how to implement a ripple mapping activity to assess youth program effects on community capital and concludes with examples from Maine and Kansas. The maps lead to group reflection on project outcomes and further research and evaluation questions for group members. The results from five Maine…

  3. Closed forms and multi-moment maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Thomas Bruun; Swann, Andrew Francis

    2013-01-01

    We extend the notion of multi-moment map to geometries defined by closed forms of arbitrary degree. We give fundamental existence and uniqueness results and discuss a number of essential examples, including geometries related to special holonomy. For forms of degree four, multi-moment maps are gu...

  4. Collecting Data to Construct an Isoline Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohrengel, C. Frederick, II.; Larson, Paul R.

    2017-01-01

    National Geography Standard 1 requires that students learn:"How to use maps and other geographic representations, geospatial technologies, and spatial thinking to understand and communicate information" (Heffron and Downs 2012). These concepts have real-world applicability. For example, elevation contour maps are common in many…

  5. New tools for investigating positive maps in matrix algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Zwolak, Justyna Pytel

    2012-01-01

    We provide a novel tool which may be used to construct new examples of positive maps in matrix algebras (or, equivalently, entanglement witnesses). It turns out that this can be used to prove positivity of several well known maps (such as reduction map, generalized reduction, Robertson map, and many others). Furthermore, we use it to construct a new family of linear maps and prove that they are positive, indecomposable and (nd)optimal.

  6. Mapping Deeply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Wood

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This is a description of an avant la lettre deep mapping project carried out by a geographer and a number of landscape architecture students in the early 1980s. Although humanists seem to take the “mapping” in deep mapping more metaphorically than cartographically, in this neighborhood mapping project, the mapmaking was taken literally, with the goal of producing an atlas of the neighborhood. In this, the neighborhood was construed as a transformer, turning the stuff of the world (gas, water, electricity into the stuff of individual lives (sidewalk graffiti, wind chimes, barking dogs, and vice versa. Maps in the central transformer section of the atlas were to have charted this process in action, as in one showing the route of an individual newspaper into the neighborhood, then through the neighborhood to a home, and finally, as trash, out of the neighborhood in a garbage truck; though few of these had been completed when the project concluded in 1986. Resurrected in 1998 in an episode on Ira Glass’ This American Life, the atlas was finally published, as Everything Sings: Maps for a Narrative Atlas, in 2010 (and an expanded edition in 2013.

  7. The power of example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liliana Gheorghian, Mariana

    2014-05-01

    beginning of the XXI century" with the participation of several schools in the country in 2009 and 2011. The papers presented were diverse and gave examples of various teaching experiences and scientific information. Topics by the teachers: The impact of tourism on the environment, Tornadoes, Natural science and environmental education in school, Air Pollution and health, Ecological education of children from primary school, The effects of electromagnetic radiation, Formation of an ecological mentality using chemistry, Why should we protect water, Environmental education, Education for the future, SOS Nature, Science in the twenty-first century, etc. Topics by students: Nature- the palace of thermal phenomena, Life depends on heat, Water Mysteries, Global Heating, The Mysterious universe, etc. In March 2013 our school hosted an interesting exchange of ideas on environmental issues between our students and those from Bulgaria, Poland and Turkey, during a symposium of the Comenius multilateral project "Conserving Nature". In order to present the results of protecting nature in their communities, two projects "Citizen" qualified in the Program Civitas in the autumn of 2013. "The Battle" continues both in nature and in classrooms, in order to preserve the environment.

  8. Contextualising Archaeological Information Through Interactive Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Johnson

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Many web sites use maps delivered as non-interactive images. With the development of web-enabled mapping, new methods of presenting and contextualising archaeological and historical data are becoming available. However, most current examples are static views of contemporary framework data or specific time slices, and do not provide interactivity relating to the time dimension, which is so important to archaeology and related disciplines. In this article I look at some of the advantages of time-enabled interactive mapping and map animation in providing educational experiences to museum visitors and the web-browsing public. These will be illustrated through three example applications of the TimeMap methodology developed at the University of Sydney Archaeological Computing Laboratory: 1. the Sydney TimeMap kiosk at the Museum of Sydney; 2. an embedded Java mapping applet developed for MacquarieNet, a major Australian online educational encyclopaedia; and 3. the metadata clearinghouse mapping applet developed for the Electronic Cultural Atlas Initiative, Berkeley. In each of these examples, a wide range of resources are delivered through a time-enabled map interface which accesses live database data rather than pre-structured curated presentations of data. This flexibility brings its own challenges in providing intuitive pathways and appropriate levels of detail in response to free-ranging user enquiries. The paper outlines some of the approaches I have adopted to resolve these issues.

  9. Mapping (USPTO) Patent Data using Overlays to Google Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Leydesdorff, Loet

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes a technique to use patent information available online (at the US Patent and Trademark Office) for the generation of Google Maps that indicate both the quantity and quality of patents granted at the city level. The resulting maps are relevant for technological innovation policies and R&D management because the US market can be considered as the leading market for patenting and patent competition. Quantitative data is made available by the mapping routines for more detailed statistical analysis, and the non-parametric statistics for significance testing are specified. The new mapping approach is explored for the cases of the emerging technologies of "RNA interference" and "nanotechnology" as specific examples. Perspectives for further developments of this technique (other databases and network analysis of co-inventions) are specified.

  10. Cognitive maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minder, Bettina; Laursen, Linda Nhu; Lassen, Astrid Heidemann

    2014-01-01

    . Conceptual clustering is used to analyse and order information according to concepts or variables from within the data. The cognitive maps identified are validated through the comments of some of the same experts. The study presents three cognitive maps and respective world-views explaining how the design...... and innovation field are related and under which dimensions they differ. The paper draws preliminary conclusions on the implications of the different world- views on the innovation process. With the growing importance of the design approach in innovation e.g. design thinking, a clear conception...

  11. Scarring for Quantum Maps with Simple Spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Kelmer, Dubi

    2008-01-01

    We previously introduced a family of symplectic maps of the torus whose quantization exhibits scarring on invariant co-isotropic submanifolds. The purpose of this note is to show that in contrast to other examples, where failure of Quantum Unique Ergodicity is attributed to high multiplicities in the spectrum, for these examples the spectrum is (generically) simple.

  12. Mole Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crippen, Kent J.; Curtright, Robert D.; Brooks, David W.

    2000-01-01

    The abstract nature of the mole and its applications to problem solving make learning the concept difficult for students, and teaching the concept challenging for teachers. Presents activities that use concept maps and graphing calculators as tools for solving mole problems. (ASK)

  13. Projective mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehlholm, Christian; Brockhoff, Per B.; Bredie, Wender Laurentius Petrus

    2012-01-01

    Projective Mapping (Risvik et.al., 1994) and its Napping (Pagès, 2003) variations have become increasingly popular in the sensory field for rapid collection of spontaneous product perceptions. It has been applied in variations which sometimes are caused by the purpose of the analysis and sometime...

  14. Introduction: The Power of Example

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højer, Lars; Bandak, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    the persuasive and evocative power – positive and negative – of ‘examples’ in social and academic life while also proposing exemplification as a distinct anthropological way of theorizing. Such theorizing points to a ‘lateral’ rethinking of the relation between the particular and the general. Our central...... argument is that examples highlight the precarious tension between the example as ‘example’ and the example as ‘exemplar’. All contributions to this special issue, in one way or another, explore this tension between the unruliness of examples and the stability-enhancing power of exemplarity...

  15. Characterization and solvability of quasipolynomial symplectic mappings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Bermejo, Benito [ESCET (Edificio Departamental II), Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Calle Tulipan S/N, 28933-Mostoles-Madrid (Spain); Brenig, Leon [Service de Physique Theorique et Mathematique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Campus Plaine, CP 231, Boulevard du Triomphe, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2004-02-13

    Quasipolynomial (or QP) mappings constitute a wide generalization of the well-known Lotka-Volterra mappings, of importance in different fields such as population dynamics, physics, chemistry or economy. In addition, QP mappings are a natural discrete-time analogue of the continuous QP systems, which have been extensively used in different pure and applied domains. After presenting the basic definitions and properties of QP mappings in a previous paper, the purpose of this work is to focus on their characterization by considering the existence of symplectic QP mappings. In what follows such QP symplectic maps are completely characterized. Moreover, use of the QP formalism can be made in order to demonstrate that all QP symplectic mappings have an analytical solution that is explicitly and generally constructed. Examples are given.

  16. Prime power polynomial maps over finite fields

    CERN Document Server

    Berson, Joost

    2012-01-01

    We consider polynomial maps described by so-called prime power polynomials. These polynomials are defined using a fixed power of a prime number, say q. Considering invertible polynomial maps of this type over a characteristic zero field, we will only obtain (up to permutation of the variables) triangular maps, which are the most basic examples of polynomial automorphisms. However, over the finite field F_q automorphisms of this type have (in general) an entirely different structure. Namely, we will show that the prime power polynomial maps over F_q are in one-to-one correspondence with matrices having coefficients in a univariate polynomial ring over F_q. Furthermore, composition of polynomial maps translates to matrix multiplication, implying that invertible prime power polynomial maps correspond to invertible matrices. This alternate description of the prime power polynomial automorphism subgroup leads to the solution of many famous conjectures for this kind of polynomials and polynomial maps.

  17. Mining e-Learning Domain Concept Map from Academic Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nian-Shing; Kinshuk; Wei, Chun-Wang; Chen, Hong-Jhe

    2008-01-01

    Recent researches have demonstrated the importance of concept map and its versatile applications especially in e-Learning. For example, while designing adaptive learning materials, designers need to refer to the concept map of a subject domain. Moreover, concept maps can show the whole picture and core knowledge about a subject domain. Research…

  18. Implementing Parallel Google Map-Reduce in Eden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthold, Jost; Dieterle, Mischa; Loogen, Rita

    2009-01-01

    Recent publications have emphasised map-reduce as a general programming model (labelled Google map-reduce), and described existing high-performance implementations for large data sets. We present two parallel implementations for this Google map-reduce skeleton, one following earlier work, and one...... of the Google map-reduce skeleton in usage and performance, and deliver runtime analyses for example applications. Although very flexible, the Google map-reduce skeleton is often too general, and typical examples reveal a better runtime behaviour using alternative skeletons....

  19. Conformal mapping for multiple terminals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weimin; Ma, Wenying; Wang, Qiang; Ren, Hao

    2016-11-01

    Conformal mapping is an important mathematical tool that can be used to solve various physical and engineering problems in many fields, including electrostatics, fluid mechanics, classical mechanics, and transformation optics. It is an accurate and convenient way to solve problems involving two terminals. However, when faced with problems involving three or more terminals, which are more common in practical applications, existing conformal mapping methods apply assumptions or approximations. A general exact method does not exist for a structure with an arbitrary number of terminals. This study presents a conformal mapping method for multiple terminals. Through an accurate analysis of boundary conditions, additional terminals or boundaries are folded into the inner part of a mapped region. The method is applied to several typical situations, and the calculation process is described for two examples of an electrostatic actuator with three electrodes and of a light beam splitter with three ports. Compared with previously reported results, the solutions for the two examples based on our method are more precise and general. The proposed method is helpful in promoting the application of conformal mapping in analysis of practical problems.

  20. MAPPING INNOVATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Christian Langhoff; Koch, Christian

    2011-01-01

    By adopting a theoretical framework from strategic niche management research (SNM) this paper presents an analysis of the innovation system of the Danish Construction industry. The analysis shows a multifaceted landscape of innovation around an existing regime, built around existing ways of working...... and developed over generations. The regime is challenged from various niches and the socio-technical landscape through trends as globalization. Three niches (Lean Construction, BIM and System Deliveries) are subject to a detailed analysis showing partly incompatible rationales and various degrees of innovation...... potential. The paper further discusses how existing policymaking operates in a number of tensions one being between government and governance. Based on the concepts from SNM the paper introduces an innovation map in order to support the development of meta-governance policymaking. By mapping some...

  1. Mapping filmmaking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilje, Øystein; Frølunde, Lisbeth; Lindstrand, Fredrik

    2010-01-01

    This chapter concerns mapping patterns in regards to how young filmmakers (age 15 – 20) in the Scandinavian countries learn about filmmaking. To uncover the patterns, we present portraits of four young filmmakers who participated in the Scandinavian research project Making a filmmaker. The focus ...... is on their learning practices and how they create ‘learning paths’ in relation to resources in diverse learning contexts, whether formal, non-formal and informal contexts.......This chapter concerns mapping patterns in regards to how young filmmakers (age 15 – 20) in the Scandinavian countries learn about filmmaking. To uncover the patterns, we present portraits of four young filmmakers who participated in the Scandinavian research project Making a filmmaker. The focus...

  2. Harvesting geographic features from heterogeneous raster maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Yao-Yi

    2010-11-01

    Raster maps offer a great deal of geospatial information and are easily accessible compared to other geospatial data. However, harvesting geographic features locked in heterogeneous raster maps to obtain the geospatial information is challenging. This is because of the varying image quality of raster maps (e.g., scanned maps with poor image quality and computer-generated maps with good image quality), the overlapping geographic features in maps, and the typical lack of metadata (e.g., map geocoordinates, map source, and original vector data). Previous work on map processing is typically limited to a specific type of map and often relies on intensive manual work. In contrast, this thesis investigates a general approach that does not rely on any prior knowledge and requires minimal user effort to process heterogeneous raster maps. This approach includes automatic and supervised techniques to process raster maps for separating individual layers of geographic features from the maps and recognizing geographic features in the separated layers (i.e., detecting road intersections, generating and vectorizing road geometry, and recognizing text labels). The automatic technique eliminates user intervention by exploiting common map properties of how road lines and text labels are drawn in raster maps. For example, the road lines are elongated linear objects and the characters are small connected-objects. The supervised technique utilizes labels of road and text areas to handle complex raster maps, or maps with poor image quality, and can process a variety of raster maps with minimal user input. The results show that the general approach can handle raster maps with varying map complexity, color usage, and image quality. By matching extracted road intersections to another geospatial dataset, we can identify the geocoordinates of a raster map and further align the raster map, separated feature layers from the map, and recognized features from the layers with the geospatial

  3. QTL IciMapping: Integrated software for genetic linkage map construction and quantitative trait locus mapping in biparental populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Meng

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available QTL IciMapping is freely available public software capable of building high-density linkage maps and mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL in biparental populations. Eight functionalities are integrated in this software package: (1 BIN: binning of redundant markers; (2 MAP: construction of linkage maps in biparental populations; (3 CMP: consensus map construction from multiple linkage maps sharing common markers; (4 SDL: mapping of segregation distortion loci; (5 BIP: mapping of additive, dominant, and digenic epistasis genes; (6 MET: QTL-by-environment interaction analysis; (7 CSL: mapping of additive and digenic epistasis genes with chromosome segment substitution lines; and (8 NAM: QTL mapping in NAM populations. Input files can be arranged in plain text, MS Excel 2003, or MS Excel 2007 formats. Output files have the same prefix name as the input but with different extensions. As examples, there are two output files in BIN, one for summarizing the identified bin groups and deleted markers in each bin, and the other for using the MAP functionality. Eight output files are generated by MAP, including summary of the completed linkage maps, Mendelian ratio test of individual markers, estimates of recombination frequencies, LOD scores, and genetic distances, and the input files for using the BIP, SDL, and MET functionalities. More than 30 output files are generated by BIP, including results at all scanning positions, identified QTL, permutation tests, and detection powers for up to six mapping methods. Three supplementary tools have also been developed to display completed genetic linkage maps, to estimate recombination frequency between two loci, and to perform analysis of variance for multi-environmental trials.

  4. QTL IciMapping:Integrated software for genetic linkage map construction and quantitative trait locus mapping in biparental populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei; Meng; Huihui; Li; Luyan; Zhang; Jiankang; Wang

    2015-01-01

    QTL Ici Mapping is freely available public software capable of building high-density linkage maps and mapping quantitative trait loci(QTL) in biparental populations. Eight functionalities are integrated in this software package:(1) BIN: binning of redundant markers;(2) MAP: construction of linkage maps in biparental populations;(3) CMP: consensus map construction from multiple linkage maps sharing common markers;(4) SDL: mapping of segregation distortion loci;(5) BIP: mapping of additive, dominant, and digenic epistasis genes;(6) MET: QTL-by-environment interaction analysis;(7) CSL: mapping of additive and digenic epistasis genes with chromosome segment substitution lines; and(8) NAM: QTL mapping in NAM populations. Input files can be arranged in plain text, MS Excel 2003, or MS Excel 2007 formats. Output files have the same prefix name as the input but with different extensions. As examples, there are two output files in BIN, one for summarizing the identified bin groups and deleted markers in each bin, and the other for using the MAP functionality. Eight output files are generated by MAP, including summary of the completed linkage maps, Mendelian ratio test of individual markers, estimates of recombination frequencies, LOD scores, and genetic distances, and the input files for using the BIP, SDL,and MET functionalities. More than 30 output files are generated by BIP, including results at all scanning positions, identified QTL, permutation tests, and detection powers for up to six mapping methods. Three supplementary tools have also been developed to display completed genetic linkage maps, to estimate recombination frequency between two loci,and to perform analysis of variance for multi-environmental trials.

  5. QTL IciMapping:Integrated software for genetic linkage map construction and quantitative trait locus mapping in biparental populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Meng; Huihui Li; Luyan Zhang; Jiankang Wang

    2015-01-01

    QTL IciMapping is freely available public software capable of building high-density linkage maps and mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) in biparental populations. Eight func-tionalities are integrated in this software package: (1) BIN:binning of redundant markers;(2) MAP: construction of linkage maps in biparental populations; (3) CMP: consensus map construction from multiple linkage maps sharing common markers; (4) SDL: mapping of segregation distortion loci;(5) BIP:mapping of additive, dominant, and digenic epistasis genes;(6) MET:QTL-by-environment interaction analysis;(7) CSL:mapping of additive and digenic epistasis genes with chromosome segment substitution lines; and (8) NAM: QTL mapping in NAM populations. Input files can be arranged in plain text, MS Excel 2003, or MS Excel 2007 formats. Output files have the same prefix name as the input but with different extensions. As examples, there are two output files in BIN, one for summarizing the identified bin groups and deleted markers in each bin, and the other for using the MAP functionality. Eight output files are generated by MAP, including summary of the completed linkage maps, Mendelian ratio test of individual markers, estimates of recombination frequencies, LOD scores, and genetic distances, and the input files for using the BIP, SDL, and MET functionalities. More than 30 output files are generated by BIP, including results at all scanning positions, identified QTL, permutation tests, and detection powers for up to six mapping methods. Three supplementary tools have also been developed to display completed genetic linkage maps, to estimate recombination frequency between two loci, and to perform analysis of variance for multi-environmental trials.

  6. An Unusual Apporach to the Elementary Qualitative Physics Course: Introduction to Space Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, E. Neal

    1975-01-01

    Describes a course, without laboratory, using rudimentary algebra and covering such topics as gravitation, orbital mechanics, atomic structure, geomagnetism, electromagnetic spectrum, theory of relativity, extraterrestrial life, and interstellar travel. (GH)

  7. New Examples of Flux Vacua

    CERN Document Server

    Maxfield, Travis; Robbins, Daniel; Sethi, Savdeep

    2013-01-01

    Type IIB toroidal orientifolds are among the earliest examples of flux vacua. By applying T-duality, we construct the first examples of massive IIA flux vacua with Minkowski space-times, along with new examples of type IIA flux vacua. The backgrounds are surprisingly simple with no four-form flux at all. They serve as illustrations of the ingredients needed to build type IIA and massive IIA solutions with scale separation. To check that these backgrounds are actually solutions, we formulate the complete set of type II supergravity equations of motion in a very useful form that treats the R-R fields democratically.

  8. Enhancements to Demilitarization Process Maps Program (ProMap)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-14

    request) 3. Supplemental Information 3.1 Technical Achievements – Summary for Annual Report (includes all work todate ) TASK 1 - Completion and...requests data from MIDAS. A test system was set up and demonstrated in ProMap. It starts by the user requesting the part number, as shown in Fig. 5...based on Part Data from MIDAS (example) This task is complete and can be implemented as soon as Argonne National Labs sets up a web service to

  9. Online Exhibits & Concept Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douma, M.

    2009-12-01

    Presenting the complexity of geosciences to the public via the Internet poses a number of challenges. For example, utilizing various - and sometimes redundant - Web 2.0 tools can quickly devour limited time. Do you tweet? Do you write press releases? Do you create an exhibit or concept map? The presentation will provide participants with a context for utilizing Web 2.0 tools by briefly highlighting methods of online scientific communication across several dimensions. It will address issues of: * breadth and depth (e.g. from narrow topics to well-rounded views), * presentation methods (e.g. from text to multimedia, from momentary to enduring), * sources and audiences (e.g. for experts or for the public, content developed by producers to that developed by users), * content display (e.g. from linear to non-linear, from instructive to entertaining), * barriers to entry (e.g. from an incumbent advantage to neophyte accessible, from amateur to professional), * cost and reach (e.g. from cheap to expensive), and * impact (e.g. the amount learned, from anonymity to brand awareness). Against this backdrop, the presentation will provide an overview of two methods of online information dissemination, exhibits and concept maps, using the WebExhibits online museum (www.webexhibits.org) and SpicyNodes information visualization tool (www.spicynodes.org) as examples, with tips on how geoscientists can use either to communicate their science. Richly interactive online exhibits can serve to engage a large audience, appeal to visitors with multiple learning styles, prompt exploration and discovery, and present a topic’s breadth and depth. WebExhibits, which was among the first online museums, delivers interactive information, virtual experiments, and hands-on activities to the public. While large, multidisciplinary exhibits on topics like “Color Vision and Art” or “Calendars Through the Ages” require teams of scholars, user interface experts, professional writers and editors

  10. More 'mapping' in brain mapping: statistical comparison of effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jernigan, Terry Lynne; Gamst, Anthony C.; Fennema-Notestine, Christine

    2003-01-01

    The term 'mapping' in the context of brain imaging conveys to most the concept of localization; that is, a brain map is meant to reveal a relationship between some condition or parameter and specific sites within the brain. However, in reality, conventional voxel-based maps of brain function......, or for that matter of brain structure, are generally constructed using analyses that yield no basis for inferences regarding the spatial nonuniformity of the effects. In the normal analysis path for functional images, for example, there is nowhere a statistical comparison of the observed effect in any voxel relative...... to that in any other voxel. Under these circumstances, strictly speaking, the presence of significant activation serves as a legitimate basis only for inferences about the brain as a unit. In their discussion of results, investigators rarely are content to confirm the brain's role, and instead generally prefer...

  11. A Learning Design Worked Example

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorissen, Pierre; Tattersall, Colin

    2005-01-01

    Gorissen, P. & Tattersall, C. (2005). A Learning Design Worked Example. In: Koper, R. & Tattersall, C., Learning Design: A Handbook on Modelling and Delivering Networked Education and Training (pp. 3-20). Berlin-Heidelberg: Springer Verlag.

  12. Melnikov's approximation dominance Some examples

    CERN Document Server

    Gallavotti, G; Mastropietro, V

    1998-01-01

    We continue a previous paper to show that Mel'nikov's first order formula for part of the separatrix splitting of a pendulum under fast quasi periodic forcing holds, in special examples, as an asymptotic formula in the forcing rapidity.

  13. An Integrated Map of Soybean Physical Map and Genetic Map

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Zhaoming; LI Hui; WU Qiong; SUN Yanan; LIU Chunyan; HU Guohua; CHEN Qingshan

    2009-01-01

    Soybean is a major crop in the world, and it is a main source of plant proteins and oil. A lot of soybean genetic maps and physical maps have been constructed, but there are no integrated map between soybean physical map and genetic map. In this study, soybean genome sequence data, released by JGI (US Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute), had been downloaded. With the software Blast 2.2.16, a total of 161 super sequences were mapped on the soybean public genetic map to construct an integrated map. The length of these super sequences accounted for 73.08% of all the genome sequence. This integrated map could be used for gene cloning, gene mining, and comparative genome of legume.

  14. Mapping of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed M. Arafat

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Land cover map of North Sinai was produced based on the FAO-Land Cover Classification System (LCCS of 2004. The standard FAO classification scheme provides a standardized system of classification that can be used to analyze spatial and temporal land cover variability in the study area. This approach also has the advantage of facilitating the integration of Sinai land cover mapping products to be included with the regional and global land cover datasets. The total study area is covering a total area of 20,310.4 km2 (203,104 hectare. The landscape classification was based on SPOT4 data acquired in 2011 using combined multispectral bands of 20 m spatial resolution. Geographic Information System (GIS was used to manipulate the attributed layers of classification in order to reach the maximum possible accuracy. GIS was also used to include all necessary information. The identified vegetative land cover classes of the study area are irrigated herbaceous crops, irrigated tree crops and rain fed tree crops. The non-vegetated land covers in the study area include bare rock, bare soils (stony, very stony and salt crusts, loose and shifting sands and sand dunes. The water bodies were classified as artificial perennial water bodies (fish ponds and irrigated canals and natural perennial water bodies as lakes (standing. The artificial surfaces include linear and non-linear features.

  15. Effective Mind Maps in E-learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Kedaj

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the role of mind maps in creating well-structured e-learning materials and courses, which has become very important with increasing influence of new technologies and alternative study modes. The basic principles of mind mapping are described, including structural components of mind maps, and examples of practical use cases. Based on the identified lack of existing methodical frameworks for creating interactive mind maps for e-learning, we present a set of rules and metrics, which can help to identify points of ineffectiveness, and eliminate redundancies. This framework for creating effective mind maps and its implications are described in details with help of illustrative figures and textual description. The maps that has been created in accordance with this methodology are clear and comprehensible.

  16. Optogenetic mapping of brain circuitry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, George J.; Berglund, Ken; Gill, Harin; Hoffmann, Carolin; Katarya, Malvika; Kim, Jinsook; Kudolo, John; Lee, Li M.; Lee, Molly; Lo, Daniel; Nakajima, Ryuichi; Park, Min Yoon; Tan, Gregory; Tang, Yanxia; Teo, Peggy; Tsuda, Sachiko; Wen, Lei; Yoon, Su-In

    2012-10-01

    Studies of the brain promise to be revolutionized by new experimental strategies that harness the combined power of optical techniques and genetics. We have mapped the circuitry of the mouse brain by using both optogenetic actuators that control neuronal activity and optogenetic sensors that detect neuronal activity. Using the light-activated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2, to locally photostimulate neurons allows high-speed mapping of local and long-range circuitry. For example, with this approach we have mapped local circuits in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and many other brain regions. Using the fluorescent sensor for chloride ions, Clomeleon, allows imaging of the spatial and temporal dimensions of inhibitory circuits in the brain. This approach allows imaging of both conventional "phasic" synaptic inhibition as well as unconventional "tonic" inhibition. The combined use of light to both control and monitor neural activity creates unprecedented opportunities to explore brain function, screen pharmaceutical agents, and potentially to use light to ameliorate psychiatric and neurological disorders.

  17. Symplectic maps from cluster algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Fordy, Allan

    2011-01-01

    We consider nonlinear recurrences generated from the iteration of maps that arise from cluster algebras. More precisely, starting from a skew-symmetric integer matrix, or its corresponding %associated quiver, one can define a set of mutation operations, as well as a set of associated cluster mutations that are applied to a set of affine coordinates (the cluster variables). Fordy and Marsh recently provided a complete classification of all such quivers that have a certain periodicity property under sequences of mutations. This periodicity implies that a suitable sequence of cluster mutations is precisely equivalent to iteration of a nonlinear recurrence relation. Here we explain briefly how to introduce a % symplectic structure in this setting, which is preserved by a corresponding birational map (possibly on a space of lower dimension). We give examples of both integrable and non-integrable maps that arise from this construction. We use algebraic entropy as an approach to classifying integrable cases. The deg...

  18. The World Karst Aquifer Mapping project: concept, mapping procedure and map of Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhao; Auler, Augusto S.; Bakalowicz, Michel; Drew, David; Griger, Franziska; Hartmann, Jens; Jiang, Guanghui; Moosdorf, Nils; Richts, Andrea; Stevanovic, Zoran; Veni, George; Goldscheider, Nico

    2017-01-01

    Karst aquifers contribute substantially to freshwater supplies in many regions of the world, but are vulnerable to contamination and difficult to manage because of their unique hydrogeological characteristics. Many karst systems are hydraulically connected over wide areas and require transboundary exploration, protection and management. In order to obtain a better global overview of karst aquifers, to create a basis for sustainable international water-resources management, and to increase the awareness in the public and among decision makers, the World Karst Aquifer Mapping (WOKAM) project was established. The goal is to create a world map and database of karst aquifers, as a further development of earlier maps. This paper presents the basic concepts and the detailed mapping procedure, using France as an example to illustrate the step-by-step workflow, which includes generalization, differentiation of continuous and discontinuous carbonate and evaporite rock areas, and the identification of non-exposed karst aquifers. The map also shows selected caves and karst springs, which are collected in an associated global database. The draft karst aquifer map of Europe shows that 21.6% of the European land surface is characterized by the presence of (continuous or discontinuous) carbonate rocks; about 13.8% of the land surface is carbonate rock outcrop.

  19. Components of dynamic digital maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condit, Christopher D.

    1999-05-01

    The core of a dynamic digital map (DDM) is a program created to display a digital geologic map and its associated data set as a single integrated package. This DDM program core is authored using a high-level object oriented graphical programming environment, SuperCard, a Macintosh `xTalk' language. Some of the major philosophical underpinnings relevant to the job of creating DDMs in this programming environment include taking advantage of specific object's attributes, how to organize data structure effectively for this job and keeping applicable code as transportable (generalized) as possible between objects. The core components of DDMs are parts of a SuperCard `template' or map display `container' into which the various externally created digital pieces (e.g. CAD produced geologic maps, spread sheet data, digital images, text files, movies) can be inserted for integrated display and digital publication. Components of DDMs consist of windows, cards within these windows, card fields (text and data containers) and a menu structure. The paper discusses each of these major components and how they fit into a DDM and gives examples of each topic in programs whose components demonstrate the concept. These programs are available from Web (see Appendix A); readers can refer to them as they examine these examples.

  20. How detailed should earthquake hazard maps be: comparing the performance of Japan's maps to uniform, randomized, and smoothed maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Edward; Stein, Seth; Spencer, Bruce; Liu, Mian

    2016-04-01

    Earthquake hazard maps forecast future shaking via assumptions about where, when, and how large future earthquakes will be. These assumptions involve the known earthquake history, models of fault geometry and motion, and geodetic data. Maps are made more detailed as additional data and more complicated models become available. However, the extent to which this process produces better forecasts of shaking is unknown. We explore this issue by comparing how well a 510-year-long record of earthquake shaking in Japan is described by the Japanese national hazard (JNH) maps, uniform maps, and randomized maps. Surprisingly, as measured by the metric implicit in the JNH maps, i.e. that during the chosen time interval the predicted shaking should be exceeded only at a specific fraction of the sites, both uniform and randomized maps do better than the actual maps. However, using as a metric the squared misfit between maximum observed shaking and that predicted, the JNH maps do better than uniform or randomized maps. Similarly, by the squared misfit metric, map performance improves up to a ~75-150 km smoothing window, and then decreases with further smoothing. Because the maps were made by using other data and models to try to predict future earthquake shaking, rather than by fitting past shaking data, these results are probably not an artifact of hindcasting rather than forecasting. They suggest that hazard models and the resulting maps can be over-parameterized, in that including too high a level of detail to describe past earthquakes may lower the maps' ability to forecast what will occur in the future. For example in Nepal, where GPS data show no significant variation in coupling between areas that have had recent large earthquakes and those that have not, past earthquakes likely do not show which parts are more at risk, and the entire area can be regarded as equally hazardous.

  1. Use of concept maps in teaching pedagogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Bendl

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the concept mapping method. The method has not yet received much attention in educational publications in the Czech language. The authorsdescribe principles, functions, advantages and limitations of this method and discuss its use in different areas. Use of concept mapping in educational situations is demonstratedon concept maps made by students of Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Education during a course on „Authority in Education“. At the beginning of the course, studentslearned about the concept mapping method and created their first concept map with key concept „teacher authority“. During the course, they studied authority in educationand discussed about their first concept maps with the teacher and other students. At the end of the course, the students tried to improve their maps. The concept map helpedthe students to represent the complexity of the studied issue very clearly. The students said that they were going to use concept mapping in their further study and classworkwith children. The authors show the problematic aspects of creating the maps and also examples of (inappropriately chosen concepts and (cross-links between them.

  2. Extinction Maps in the WFAU Archives

    CERN Document Server

    Cross, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    A brief set of notes about the database design for 3D maps of dust extinction in the WFAU Archives, which support data from UKIRT-WFCAM, VISTA and VST. The notes also detail typical use cases, such as getting colour-excesses, extinction-corrections, spectral energy distributions and colour-magnitude diagrams and demonstrate the SQL queries to return data, along with examples from VVV DR2 with bulge extinction maps from Chen et al. (2013).

  3. Programming MapReduce with Scalding

    CERN Document Server

    Chalkiopoulos, Antonios

    2014-01-01

    This book is an easy-to-understand, practical guide to designing, testing, and implementing complex MapReduce applications in Scala using the Scalding framework. It is packed with examples featuring log-processing, ad-targeting, and machine learning. This book is for developers who are willing to discover how to effectively develop MapReduce applications. Prior knowledge of Hadoop or Scala is not required; however, investing some time on those topics would certainly be beneficial.

  4. How Wigner functions transform under symplectic maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dragt, A.J. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Center for Theoretical Physics; Habib, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Theoretical Div.

    1998-05-16

    It is shown that, while Wigner and Liouville functions transform in an identical way under linear symplectic maps, in general they do not transform identically for nonlinear symplectic maps. Instead there are quantum corrections whose {Dirac_h} {r_arrow} 0 limit may be very complicated. Examples of the behavior of Wigner functions in the {Dirac_h} {r_arrow} 0 limit are given in order to examine to what extent the corresponding Liouville densities are recovered.

  5. Explicit Mapping of Acoustic Regimes For Wind Instruments

    CERN Document Server

    Missoum, Samy; Doc, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a methodology to map the various acoustic regimes of wind instruments. The maps can be generated in a multi-dimensional space consisting of design, control parameters, and initial conditions. The bound- aries of the maps are obtained explicitly in terms of the parameters using a support vector machine (SVM) classifier as well as a dedicated adaptive sam- pling scheme. The approach is demonstrated on a simplified clarinet model for which several maps are generated based on different criteria. Examples of computation of the probability of occurrence of a specific acoustic regime are also provided. In addition, the approach is demonstrated on a design optimization example for optimal intonation.

  6. Closed forms and multi-moment maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Thomas Bruun; Swann, Andrew Francis

    We extend the notion of multi-moment map to geometries defined by closed forms of arbitrary degree. We give fundamental existence and uniqueness results and discuss a number of essential examples, including geometries related to special holonomy. For forms of degree four, multi-moment maps...... are guaranteed to exist and are unique when the symmetry group is (3, 4)-trivial, meaning that the group is connected and the third and fourth Lie algebra Betti numbers vanish. We give a structural description of some classes of (3, 4)-trivial algebras and provide a number of examples....

  7. From Utterance to Example Sentence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Jette Hedegaard

    2010-01-01

    for use in the dictionary consists of 11 stages in the DTS dictionary project. Special focus will be on the stage in the process where the sentence is judged suitable for dictionary use. A set of guidelines for what makes up a good example sentence has been developed for the DTS dictionary project...

  8. Human Mind Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Tom

    2016-01-01

    When students generate mind maps, or concept maps, the maps are usually on paper, computer screens, or a blackboard. Human Mind Maps require few resources and little preparation. The main requirements are space where students can move around and a little creativity and imagination. Mind maps can be used for a variety of purposes, and Human Mind…

  9. Animation of Mapped Photo Collections for Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Hideyuki; Arikawa, Masatoshi

    Our research goal is to facilitate the sharing of stories with digital photographs. Some map websites now collect stories associated with peoples' relationships to places. Users map collections of places and include their intangible emotional associations with each location along with photographs, videos, etc. Though this framework of mapping stories is important, it is not sufficiently expressive to communicate stories in a narrative fashion. For example, when the number of the mapped collections of places is particularly large, it is neither easy for viewers to interpret the map nor is it easy for the creator to express a story as a series of events in the real world. This is because each narrative, in the form of a sequence of textual narratives, a sequence of photographs, a movie, or audio is mapped to just one point. As a result, it is up to the viewer to decide which points on the map must be read, and in what order. The conventional framework is fairly suitable for mapping and expressing fragments or snapshots of a whole story and not for conveying the whole story as a narrative using the entire map as the setting. We therefore propose a new framework, Spatial Slideshow, for mapping personal photo collections and representing them as stories such as route guidances, sightseeing guidances, historical topics, fieldwork records, personal diaries, and so on. It is a fusion of personal photo mapping and photo storytelling. Each story is conveyed through a sequence of mapped photographs, presented as a synchronized animation of a map and an enhanced photo slideshow. The main technical novelty of this paper is a method for creating three-dimensional animations of photographs that induce the visual effect of motion from photo to photo. We believe that the proposed framework may have considerable significance in facilitating the grassroots development of spatial content driven by visual communication concerning real-world locations or events.

  10. Variable Sampling Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeffrey, S.; Aronstein, David L.; Dean, Bruce H.; Lyon, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    The performance of an optical system (for example, a telescope) is limited by the misalignments and manufacturing imperfections of the optical elements in the system. The impact of these misalignments and imperfections can be quantified by the phase variations imparted on light traveling through the system. Phase retrieval is a methodology for determining these variations. Phase retrieval uses images taken with the optical system and using a light source of known shape and characteristics. Unlike interferometric methods, which require an optical reference for comparison, and unlike Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors that require special optical hardware at the optical system's exit pupil, phase retrieval is an in situ, image-based method for determining the phase variations of light at the system s exit pupil. Phase retrieval can be used both as an optical metrology tool (during fabrication of optical surfaces and assembly of optical systems) and as a sensor used in active, closed-loop control of an optical system, to optimize performance. One class of phase-retrieval algorithms is the iterative transform algorithm (ITA). ITAs estimate the phase variations by iteratively enforcing known constraints in the exit pupil and at the detector, determined from modeled or measured data. The Variable Sampling Mapping (VSM) technique is a new method for enforcing these constraints in ITAs. VSM is an open framework for addressing a wide range of issues that have previously been considered detrimental to high-accuracy phase retrieval, including undersampled images, broadband illumination, images taken at or near best focus, chromatic aberrations, jitter or vibration of the optical system or detector, and dead or noisy detector pixels. The VSM is a model-to-data mapping procedure. In VSM, fully sampled electric fields at multiple wavelengths are modeled inside the phase-retrieval algorithm, and then these fields are mapped to intensities on the light detector, using the properties

  11. Lunar Map Catalog

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lunar Map Catalog includes various maps of the moon's surface, including Apollo landing sites; earthside, farside, and polar charts; photography index maps; zone...

  12. ShakeMap

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — ShakeMap is a product of the USGS Earthquake Hazards Program in conjunction with the regional seismic networks. ShakeMaps provide near-real-time maps of ground...

  13. Mapping: A Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Paul M.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the history of cartography. Describes the contributions of Strabo and Ptolemy in early maps. Identifies the work of Gerhard Mercator as the most important advancement in mapping. Discusses present mapping standards from history. (CW)

  14. Blackhole formula and example relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Philip

    Black hole formula 1) Second dimension (x,y) f(x)=y Energy E=m*c2 2) Third dimension (x,y,z) really x=y=z Black hole formula Root(c2)=c=Root(E/m) As mass go the velocity of light, mass become black hole so there are energy as multiply by mass. Example relativity When E=m*c2 1) Root(c2)=c=Root(E/m) 2) 3*c*Root(c2)=3*c*Root(E/m)=3*c2 From 1) to 2) as an example, As velocity is faster, mass increased. It means when velocity is increased, sec(time) is slower, and m(distance) is increased. The number is good to study physics.

  15. Elementary examples of adiabatic invariance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, F.S. (Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA (USA) Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (USA))

    1990-04-01

    Simple classical one-dimensional systems subject to adiabatic (gradual) perturbations are examined. The first examples are well known: the adiabatic invariance of the product {ital E}{tau} of energy {ital E} and period {tau} for the simple pendulum and for the simple harmonic oscillator. Next, the adiabatic invariants of the vertical bouncer are found---a ball bouncing elastically from the floor of a rising elevator having slowly varying velocity and acceleration. These examples lead to consideration of adiabatic invariance for one-dimensional systems with potentials of the form {ital V}={ital ax}{sup {ital n}}, with {ital a}={ital a}({ital t}) slowly varying in time. Then, the horizontal bouncer is considered---a mass sliding on a smooth floor, bouncing back and forth between two impenetrable walls, one of which is slowly moving. This example is generalized to a particle in a bound state of a general potential with one slowly moving turning point.'' Finally, circular motion of a charged particle in a magnetic field slowly varying in time under three different configurations is considered: (a) a free particle in a uniform field; (b) a free particle in a nonuniform betatron'' field; and (c) a particle constrained to a circular orbit in a uniform field.

  16. Programming language fundamentals by example

    CERN Document Server

    Stevenson, DE

    2006-01-01

    A WORD ABOUT USING THIS TEXT Expectations for the Student and InstructorOpening Comments Possible Semester Course Detailed Semester Plan Milestone Maps INTRODUCTION TO THE PROBLEM Memorandum From the President Background SOL Primitive Data and Primitive Operations Primitive Data OperationsControl Structures ExpressionsInput File Structures and File Scope Derived Types Scope and Persistence Type System Primitive Functions and Arguments Built-in Values, Functions and Pseudo-Functions Type Conversions Part 1. Milestones GENERAL INFORMATION General Information on Milestones Milestone Report Genera

  17. HapMap and mapping genes for cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musunuru, Kiran; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2008-10-01

    A key goal of biomedical science is to understand why individuals differ in their susceptibility to disease. Family history is among the established risk factors for most forms of cardiovascular disease, in part because inherited DNA sequence variants play a causal role in disease susceptibility. Consequently, the search for these variants has intensified over the past decade. One class of DNA sequence variants takes the form of single nucleotide changes(single nucleotide polymorphisms, or SNPs), usually with two variants or alleles for each SNP. SNPs are scattered throughout the 23 pairs of chromosomes of the human genome, and roughly 11 million common polymorphisms (ie,those > 1% frequency) are estimated to exist. A combination of SNP alleles along a chromosome is termed a haplotype. The International Haplotype Map Project was designed to create a public genome-wide database of common SNPs and, consequently, enable systematic studies of most common SNPs for their potential role in human disease. We review the following: (1) the concept of linkage disequilibrium orallelic association, (2) the HapMap project, and (3) several examples of the utility of HapMap data in genetic mapping for cardiovascular disease phenotypes.

  18. Using concept maps in a nurse internship program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilcher, Jobeth W

    2009-01-01

    Concept maps are visual representations of how information is interrelated. This innovative educational tool encourages participants to focus on the whole picture and not just on limited parts. This article provides an example of how concept maps were used for assessing knowledge and critical thinking of inexperienced nurses during a specialty internship program. Concept maps were used as a pretest to document baseline knowledge before participants attended the internship program. After completion of didactic training and several weeks of clinical training, concept map posttesting measured knowledge gained during the program. Concept maps provided an authentic assessment of knowledge before and after a specialty internship program.

  19. Integral quantizations with two basic examples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergeron, H., E-mail: herve.bergeron@u-psud.fr [Univ Paris-Sud, ISMO, UMR 8214, 91405 Orsay (France); Gazeau, J.P., E-mail: gazeau@apc.univ-paris7.fr [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rua Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180 - Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); APC, UMR 7164, Univ Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 75205 Paris (France)

    2014-05-15

    The paper concerns integral quantization, a procedure based on operator-valued measure and resolution of the identity. We insist on covariance properties in the important case where group representation theory is involved. We also insist on the inherent probabilistic aspects of this classical–quantum map. The approach includes and generalizes coherent state quantization. Two applications based on group representation are carried out. The first one concerns the Weyl–Heisenberg group and the euclidean plane viewed as the corresponding phase space. We show that a world of quantizations exist, which yield the canonical commutation rule and the usual quantum spectrum of the harmonic oscillator. The second one concerns the affine group of the real line and gives rise to an interesting regularization of the dilation origin in the half-plane viewed as the corresponding phase space. -- Highlights: •Original approach to quantization based on (positive) operator-valued measures. •Includes Berezin–Klauder–Toeplitz and Weyl–Wigner quantizations. •Infinitely many such quantizations produce canonical commutation rule. •Set of objects to be quantized is enlarged in order to include singular functions or distributions. •Are given illuminating examples like quantum angle and affine or wavelet quantization.

  20. Topic Maps Based Project Knowledge Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Xiaofan; Zhou Liang; Zhang Lei; Li Lingzhi; Ding Qiulin

    2006-01-01

    Based on topic maps, a preprocessing scheme using similarity comparision is presented and applied in knowledge management.Topic and occurrence-oriented merging algorithm is also introduced to implement knowledge integration for the sub-system. An Omnigator-supported example from an aeroaustic institute is utilised to validate the preprocessing method and the result indicates it can speed up the research schedule.

  1. Visualization of neural networks using saliency maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Niels J.S.; Kjems, Ulrik; Hansen, Lars Kai

    1995-01-01

    The saliency map is proposed as a new method for understanding and visualizing the nonlinearities embedded in feedforward neural networks, with emphasis on the ill-posed case, where the dimensionality of the input-field by far exceeds the number of examples. Several levels of approximations...

  2. 自然灾害风险地图中的制图综合研究——以点状承灾体为例%Study of Cartographic Generalization on Natural Disaster Risk Mapping Taking Point Hazard-affected Bodies as an Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘东华; 王静爱; 贾慧聪; 赵金涛

    2011-01-01

    Automatic cartographic generalization is a complex decision-making process of expressing objective law of geography, and is also the automatic cartographic generalization hot and tough issues. With little research on cartographic generalization of disaster risk mapping at home and abroad, while it has a more important practical significance for our country which has a vast territory, complicated hazard-formative environment, various kinds of disasters and vulnerable society and economy. To improve the expression accuracy and effectivity of hazard-affected body in high-risk areas of multi-scale disaster risk maps, based on disaster risk theory, under geographic laws, using data mining and spatial analysis technology,the map generalization problems of point hazard-affected body in the conversion process was discussed. Combining the hazard-affected body itself and its property characteristics in disaster systems, the types of cartographic generalization of point hazard-affected body in disaster maps were summed up, that are generalizations according to its importance, speciality,neighborhood, condition, integrity and randomness. For each generalization type, the possible disaster scenario assumptions and mapping generalization approach were given, as well as technical realization and visualization expression. The results show that, based on the above 6 types mapping generalization of point hazard-affected body, data redundancy problems during process of the scaling conversion was solved, and the spatial distribution of hazard-affected body in high-risk areas in special hazard-formative environment was exactly got. This study may provide theory and technical support for regional disaster risk identification, risk prevention and management, thus provide the scientific basis for regional disaster prevention and mitigation.%为提高多尺度灾害风险地图表达中高风险区承灾体的准确、有效、快速识别,基于灾害风险理论,运用地理学规律,

  3. Carbon. Examples of Property Realization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Kossko

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Examples of realization of carbon properties in formation of section near-surface boundaries defining the mechanism of oxidizing (normal wear are presented. Synthesis of strengt hening diamond- lonsdaleite -carbene «frame» and graphite with function of solid lubricant on a friction surface in high-desperse carbon environment is reviewed. Prospects of carbon ap placation in implementation of the concept of electronics on one element, and also use of thin-film structures of amorphous carbon – metal for data recording are discussed.

  4. Compression Maps and Stable Relations

    CERN Document Server

    Price, Kenneth L

    2011-01-01

    Balanced relations were defined by G. Abrams to extend the convolution product used in the construction of incidence rings. We define stable relations,which form a class between balanced relations and preorders. We also define a compression map to be a surjective function between two sets which preserves order, preserves off-diagonal relations, and has the additional property every transitive triple is the image of a transitive triple. We show a compression map preserves the balanced and stable properties but the compression of a preorder may be stable and not transitive. We also cover an example of a stable relation which is not the compression of a preorder. In our main theorem we provide necessary and sufficient conditions for a finite stable relation to be the compression of a preorder.

  5. PARALLEL SELF-ORGANIZING MAP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    A new self-organizing map, parallel self-organizing map (PSOM), was proposed for information parallel processing purpose. In this model, there are two separate layers of neurons connected together,the number of neurons in both layer and connections between them is equal to the number of total elements of input signals, the weight updating is managed through a sequence of operations among some unitary transformation and operation matrixes, so the conventional repeated learning procedure was modified to learn just once and an algorithm was developed to realize this new learning method. With a typical classification example, the performance of PSOM demonstrated convergence results similar to Kohonen's model. Theoretic analysis and proofs also showed some interesting properties of PSOM. As it was pointed out, the contribution of such a network may not be so significant, but its parallel mode may be interesting for quantum computation.

  6. Spatial Mapping as a Method for Observing Classroom Art Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Frank D.

    1985-01-01

    Spatial mapping is a category system for directly observing instruction in art classrooms. A rationale for studying the spatial dimensions of teaching is presented, how to train observers is explained, procedures involved in a mapping episode are described, methods for analyzing data are suggested, and examples of instruments are presented.…

  7. Reviewing Resources on Self-Determination: A Map for Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browder, Diane M.; Wood, Wendy M.; Test, David W.; Karvonen, Meagan; Algozinne, Bob

    2001-01-01

    This article provides a map for teachers of students with or without disabilities to use in searching the self-determination literature for usable ideas. The map includes two primary paths: the first leads through the conceptual literature and the second through the intervention literature. Pitfalls are identified and examples illustrate uses in…

  8. Beyond data collection in digital mapping: interpretation, sketching and thought process elements in geological map making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Hannah; Bond, Clare; Butler, Rob

    2016-04-01

    Geological mapping techniques have advanced significantly in recent years from paper fieldslips to Toughbook, smartphone and tablet mapping; but how do the methods used to create a geological map affect the thought processes that result in the final map interpretation? Geological maps have many key roles in the field of geosciences including understanding geological processes and geometries in 3D, interpreting geological histories and understanding stratigraphic relationships in 2D and 3D. Here we consider the impact of the methods used to create a map on the thought processes that result in the final geological map interpretation. As mapping technology has advanced in recent years, the way in which we produce geological maps has also changed. Traditional geological mapping is undertaken using paper fieldslips, pencils and compass clinometers. The map interpretation evolves through time as data is collected. This interpretive process that results in the final geological map is often supported by recording in a field notebook, observations, ideas and alternative geological models explored with the use of sketches and evolutionary diagrams. In combination the field map and notebook can be used to challenge the map interpretation and consider its uncertainties. These uncertainties and the balance of data to interpretation are often lost in the creation of published 'fair' copy geological maps. The advent of Toughbooks, smartphones and tablets in the production of geological maps has changed the process of map creation. Digital data collection, particularly through the use of inbuilt gyrometers in phones and tablets, has changed smartphones into geological mapping tools that can be used to collect lots of geological data quickly. With GPS functionality this data is also geospatially located, assuming good GPS connectivity, and can be linked to georeferenced infield photography. In contrast line drawing, for example for lithological boundary interpretation and sketching

  9. Mapping the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse, Grace

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how her fourth graders made ceramic heart maps. The impetus for this project came from reading "My Map Book" by Sara Fanelli. This book is a collection of quirky, hand-drawn and collaged maps that diagram a child's world. There are maps of her stomach, her day, her family, and her heart, among others. The…

  10. Integrable four-dimensional symplectic maps of standard type

    CERN Document Server

    McLachlan, R I

    1993-01-01

    We search for rational, four-dimensional maps of standard type (x_{n+1} - 2x_n + x_{n-1} = eps f(x,eps)) possessing one or two polynomial integrals. There are no non-trivial maps corresponding to cubic oscillators, but we find a four-parameter family of such maps corresponding to quartic oscillators. This seems to be the only such example.

  11. Analysis and Use of MapReduce for Recommender Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Vezočnik, Melanija

    2014-01-01

    MapReduce is a programming model for developing scalable parallel applications for processing large data sets, an execution framework that supports the programming model and coordinates the execution of programs and an implementation of the programming model and the execution framework. The goal of the thesis is to analyse MapReduce and to use it on two examples of recommender systems. The goal is achieved by developing the computation with MapReduce successfully. At first the programming mod...

  12. USGS Map Indices Overlay Map Service from The National Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS Map Indices service from The National Map (TNM) consists of 1x1 Degree, 30x60 Minute (100K), 15 Minute (63K), 7.5 Minute (24K), and 3.75 Minute grid...

  13. California State Waters Map Series Data Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Nadine E.

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California's State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps and associated data layers through the collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. CSMP has divided coastal California into 110 map blocks (fig. 1), each to be published individually as USGS Scientific Investigations Maps (SIMs) at a scale of 1:24,000. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology. This CSMP data catalog contains much of the data used to prepare the SIMs in the California State Waters Map Series. Other data that were used to prepare the maps were compiled from previously published sources (for example, onshore geology) and, thus, are not included herein.

  14. Google Maps: You Are Here

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Mikael

    2008-01-01

    Librarians use online mapping services such as Google Maps, MapQuest, Yahoo Maps, and others to check traffic conditions, find local businesses, and provide directions. However, few libraries are using one of Google Maps most outstanding applications, My Maps, for the creation of enhanced and interactive multimedia maps. My Maps is a simple and…

  15. VEGETATION MAPPING IN WETLANDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. PEDROTTI

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The current work examines the main aspects of wetland vegetation mapping, which can be summarized as analysis of the ecological-vegetational (ecotone gradients; vegetation complexes; relationships between vegetation distribution and geomorphology; vegetation of the hydrographic basin lo which the wetland in question belongs; vegetation monitoring with help of four vegetation maps: phytosociological map of the real and potential vegetation, map of vegetation dynamical tendencies, map of vegetation series.

  16. Web Mapping Using Logo on Map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximing Hou

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The newly proposed Logo on Map (LoM system consists of three modules: picture extraction module (PEM, logo matching module (LMM and web mapping module (WMM. Since the first two modules were covered in our previous paper, the third module WMM is described here to present a complete LoM system. Current research is focused on geo-location distribution of brands on Google Maps. Pictures taken by ordinary people are extracted using Picture Extraction Module (PEM. The pictures containing relevant logos are obtained via Logo Matching Module (LMM. Brand distributions are overlaid on Google Maps. In this paper, GPS and brands are briefly described, and the implementation of Web Mapping Module (WMM based on Google Maps API is detailed. Then several experiments are carried out on the selected top brands. Finally the LMM-pictures are mapped on the Google Maps and the geographical distributions of the brands are visualised. Brand uniqueness is discussed and conclusion is drawn that with unique brand names web mapping can visually reflect the real economic activities of a company in the world.

  17. Statics learning from engineering examples

    CERN Document Server

    Emri, Igor

    2016-01-01

    This textbook introduces and explains the basic concepts on which statics is based utilizing real engineering examples. The authors emphasize the learning process by showing a real problem, analyzing it, simplifying it, and developing a way to solve it. This feature teaches students intuitive thinking in solving real engineering problems using the fundamentals of Newton’s laws. This book also: · Stresses representation of physical reality in ways that allow students to solve problems and obtain meaningful results · Emphasizes identification of important features of the structure that should be included in a model and which features may be omitted · Facilitates students' understanding and mastery of the "flow of thinking" practiced by professional engineers.

  18. Mapping the human genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantor, Charles R.

    1989-06-01

    The following pages aim to lay a foundation for understanding the excitement surrounding the ''human genome project,'' as well as to convey a flavor of the ongoing efforts and plans at the Human Genome Center at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Our own work, of course, is only part of a broad international effort that will dramatically enhance our understanding of human molecular genetics before the end of this century. In this country, the bulk of the effort will be carried out under the auspices of the Department of Energy and the National Institutes of Health, but significant contributions have already been made both by nonprofit private foundations and by private corporation. The respective roles of the DOE and the NIH are being coordinated by an inter-agency committee, the aims of which are to emphasize the strengths of each agency, to facilitate cooperation, and to avoid unnecessary duplication of effort. The NIH, for example, will continue its crucial work in medical genetics and in mapping the genomes of nonhuman species. The DOE, on the other hand, has unique experience in managing large projects, and its national laboratories are repositories of expertise in physics, engineering, and computer science, as well as the life sciences. The tools and techniques the project will ultimately rely on are thus likely to be developed in multidisciplinary efforts at laboratories like LBL. Accordingly, we at LBL take great pride in this enterprise -- an enterprise that will eventually transform our understanding of ourselves.

  19. Several Methods for the Simplification of DWG Files —Exampled with 1∶2 000 topographic map of Zengcheng City%谈DWG文件精简的几种方法——以增城市1∶2000地形图精简为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢卫民; 黄悦

    2011-01-01

    用户在使用AutoCAD时可能会发现图面实体比较简单,图形文件(DWG文件)却很大,影响文件的调用、存盘和备份.本文针对该问题,以增城市1:2 000地形图精简为例,提出一系列方法帮助DWG文件精简.%Users may find that when using AutoCAD to draw simple entities, the graphic files (DWG files) can be huge,which affects the use, save and backup of the file. In this paper, a series of methods can be helpful to simplify the DWG files by simplifying a 1∶2 000 topographic map of Zengebeng City.

  20. Conception and realization of a living map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taladoire, Gilles; Lille, Didier

    1998-05-01

    Our objective is to obtain a 'living map' in which the traditional elements of a map are not static but can evolve in real time and interact. We therefore developed a system with a graphic interface allowing simulations to be constructed and both natural and man-induced phenomena to be monitored in real time. For this system, we coupled an expert system and an image processing system specialized in Remote Sensing. These two components accept many kind of data (aerial photographs, satellite pictures, maps, digital elevation models, . . .) and interact in real time. The system is built with four levels and uses an object methodology. It works according to the semantic wealth of the handled objects. The hierarchy of handled graphic objects essentially includes the geo- referenced objects and the 'maps' objects. Our prototype uses the object-oriented expert system of Gensym 'G2' and the graphic visualization system developed by Latical, 'Visiter.' An example will be presented.

  1. Mapping in the cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, Michael P

    2014-01-01

    This engaging text provides a solid introduction to mapmaking in the era of cloud computing. It takes students through both the concepts and technology of modern cartography, geographic information systems (GIS), and Web-based mapping. Conceptual chapters delve into the meaning of maps and how they are developed, covering such topics as map layers, GIS tools, mobile mapping, and map animation. Methods chapters take a learn-by-doing approach to help students master application programming interfaces and build other technical skills for creating maps and making them available on the Internet. Th

  2. Coded MapReduce

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Songze; Maddah-Ali, Mohammad Ali; Avestimehr, A. Salman

    2015-01-01

    MapReduce is a commonly used framework for executing data-intensive jobs on distributed server clusters. We introduce a variant implementation of MapReduce, namely "Coded MapReduce", to substantially reduce the inter-server communication load for the shuffling phase of MapReduce, and thus accelerating its execution. The proposed Coded MapReduce exploits the repetitive mapping of data blocks at different servers to create coding opportunities in the shuffling phase to exchange (key,value) pair...

  3. Some Semi - Equivelar Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Upadhyay, Ashish K; Maity, Dipendu

    2011-01-01

    Semi-Equivelar maps are generalizations of Archimedean Solids (as are equivelar maps of the Platonic solids) to the surfaces other than $2-$Sphere. We classify some semi equivelar maps on surface of Euler characteristic -1 and show that none of these are vertex transitive. We establish existence of 12-covered triangulations for this surface. We further construct double cover of these maps to show existence of semi-equivelar maps on the surface of double torus. We also construct several semi-equivelar maps on the surfaces of Euler characteristics -8 and -10 and on non-orientable surface of Euler characteristics -2.

  4. Parabolic-like maps

    CERN Document Server

    Lomonaco, Luciana Luna Anna

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we introduce the notion of parabolic-like mapping, which is an object similar to a polynomial-like mapping, but with a parabolic external class, i.e. an external map with a parabolic fixed point. We prove a straightening theorem for parabolic-like maps, which states that any parabolic-like map of degree 2 is hybrid conjugate to a member of the family Per_1(1), and this member is unique (up to holomorphic conjugacy) if the filled Julia set of the parabolic-like map is connected.

  5. Logistics Distribution Center Location Optimizatio Model An Example Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lingling

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes and investigates the situation of the today’s site of distribution centers .Then taking SF Express for an example ,In the light of minimize the total expense ,the location models for single distribution centers is established with the corresponding resolutions given .After that ,The location of the single distribution center of SF Express ,the starting point of which is Zhengzhou Railway Station ,can be determined with the help of distance-testing function of 360 map to conclude its coordinate and then determine its exact service spot .This paper will test the feasibility of above models by the chosen cases with the application of LINGO software.

  6. Concept Mapping Using Cmap Tools to Enhance Meaningful Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañas, Alberto J.; Novak, Joseph D.

    Concept maps are graphical tools that have been used in all facets of education and training for organizing and representing knowledge. When learners build concept maps, meaningful learning is facilitated. Computer-based concept mapping software such as CmapTools have further extended the use of concept mapping and greatly enhanced the potential of the tool, facilitating the implementation of a concept map-centered learning environment. In this chapter, we briefly present concept mapping and its theoretical foundation, and illustrate how it can lead to an improved learning environment when it is combined with CmapTools and the Internet. We present the nationwide “Proyecto Conéctate al Conocimiento” in Panama as an example of how concept mapping, together with technology, can be adopted by hundreds of schools as a means to enhance meaningful learning.

  7. Positivity of linear maps under tensor powers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller-Hermes, Alexander, E-mail: muellerh@ma.tum.de; Wolf, Michael M., E-mail: m.wolf@tum.de [Zentrum Mathematik, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Reeb, David, E-mail: reeb.qit@gmail.com [Zentrum Mathematik, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Institute for Theoretical Physics, Leibniz Universität Hannover, 30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    We investigate linear maps between matrix algebras that remain positive under tensor powers, i.e., under tensoring with n copies of themselves. Completely positive and completely co-positive maps are trivial examples of this kind. We show that for every n ∈ ℕ, there exist non-trivial maps with this property and that for two-dimensional Hilbert spaces there is no non-trivial map for which this holds for all n. For higher dimensions, we reduce the existence question of such non-trivial “tensor-stable positive maps” to a one-parameter family of maps and show that an affirmative answer would imply the existence of non-positive partial transpose bound entanglement. As an application, we show that any tensor-stable positive map that is not completely positive yields an upper bound on the quantum channel capacity, which for the transposition map gives the well-known cb-norm bound. We, furthermore, show that the latter is an upper bound even for the local operations and classical communications-assisted quantum capacity, and that moreover it is a strong converse rate for this task.

  8. Effects of Worked Examples, Example-Problem Pairs, and Problem-Example Pairs Compared to Problem Solving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Gog, Tamara; Kester, Liesbeth; Paas, Fred

    2010-01-01

    Van Gog, T., Kester, L., & Paas, F. (2010, August). Effects of worked examples, example-problem pairs, and problem-example pairs compared to problem solving. Paper presented at the Biannual EARLI SIG meeting of Instructional design and Learning and instruction with computers, Ulm, Germany.

  9. Example Elaboration as a Neglected Instructional Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girill, T R

    2001-07-18

    Over the last decade an unfolding cognitive-psychology research program on how learners use examples to develop effective problem solving expertise has yielded well-established empirical findings. Chi et al., Renkl, Reimann, and Neubert (in various papers) have confirmed statistically significant differences in how good and poor learners inferentially elaborate (self explain) example steps as they study. Such example elaboration is highly relevant to software documentation and training, yet largely neglected in the current literature. This paper summarizes the neglected research on example use and puts its neglect in a disciplinary perspective. The author then shows that differences in support for example elaboration in commercial software documentation reveal previously over looked usability issues. These issues involve example summaries, using goals and goal structures to reinforce example elaborations, and prompting readers to recognize the role of example parts. Secondly, I show how these same example elaboration techniques can build cognitive maturity among underperforming high school students who study technical writing. Principle based elaborations, condition elaborations, and role recognition of example steps all have their place in innovative, high school level, technical writing exercises, and all promote far transfer problem solving. Finally, I use these studies to clarify the constructivist debate over what writers and readers contribute to text meaning. I argue that writers can influence how readers elaborate on examples, and that because of the great empirical differences in example study effectiveness (and reader choices) writers should do what they can (through within text design features) to encourage readers to elaborate examples in the most successful ways. Example elaboration is a uniquely effective way to learn from worked technical examples. This paper summarizes years of research that clarifies example elaboration. I then show how example

  10. BEST PROXIMITY POINT THEOREMS FOR SINGLE- AND SET-VALUED NON-SELF MAPPINGS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Moosa GABELEH

    2014-01-01

    We study the existence of best proximity points for single-valued non-self map-pings. Also, we prove a best proximity point theorem for set-valued non-self mappings in metric spaces with an appropriate geometric property. Examples are given to support the usability of our results.

  11. MapBook

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Beginning with the systematic mapping of the lunar surface more than three decades ago, this database contains over 1600 maps of the planets and satellites of the...

  12. NGS Survey Control Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NGS Survey Control Map provides a map of the US which allows you to find and display geodetic survey control points stored in the database of the National...

  13. Letter of Map Revision

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  14. NAIP Status Maps Gallery

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — NAIP Status Maps Gallery. These maps illustrate what aerial imagery collection is planned, whats been collected, when it is available and how it is available. These...

  15. Mapping Medicare Disparities Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CMS Office of Minority Health has designed an interactive map, the Mapping Medicare Disparities Tool, to identify areas of disparities between subgroups of...

  16. Improving wetland mapping techniques

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Mapping wetland extent, structure and invasives using radar imagery. Acquiring optical, thermal, LIDAR, and RADAR images and analysis for improved wetland mapping,...

  17. Recovery Action Mapping Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Recovery Action Mapping Tool is a web map that allows users to visually interact with and query actions that were developed to recover species listed under the...

  18. Invariants for Parallel Mapping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Yajun; WU Jiye; FAN Qinshan; HUANG Kezhi

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyzes the geometric quantities that remain unchanged during parallel mapping (i.e., mapping from a reference curved surface to a parallel surface with identical normal direction). The second gradient operator, the second class of integral theorems, the Gauss-curvature-based integral theorems, and the core property of parallel mapping are used to derive a series of parallel mapping invadants or geometri-cally conserved quantities. These include not only local mapping invadants but also global mapping invari-ants found to exist both in a curved surface and along curves on the curved surface. The parallel mapping invadants are used to identify important transformations between the reference surface and parallel surfaces. These mapping invadants and transformations have potential applications in geometry, physics, biome-chanics, and mechanics in which various dynamic processes occur along or between parallel surfaces.

  19. Simple Perturbation Example for Quantum Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodfriend, P. L.

    1985-01-01

    Presents a simple example that illustrates various aspects of the Rayleigh-Schrodinger perturbation theory. The example is a particularly good one because it is straightforward and can be compared with both the exact solution and with experimental data. (JN)

  20. Transformations of maps to investigate clusters of disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvin, S.; Merrill, D.; Sacks, S.; Wong, L.; Bedell, L.; Schulman, J.

    1984-10-01

    A procedure is presented to display and analyze epidemiologic data with the use of density-equalized maps. The algorithm for generating these maps is discussed in terms of several simple examples. Two specific methods for statistically analyzing these maps are given in detail, followed by an application of maps and methods to six sets of age-, race-, sex-, site-specific cancer incidence data. The data were obtained from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) project for San Francisco city/county (1978-1981) and combined with 1980 US Census data. 20 references, 15 figures, 2 tables.

  1. Evaluation of Educational Atlas Maps in Terms of Cartographic Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugdayci, Ilkay; Oztug Bildirici, I.

    2016-10-01

    Nowadays, many specialists in geography recommend the usage of digital maps and atlases. But in educational system, especially in Turkey, a traditional cartography based on paper maps is used more than the digital ones. This report considers the deficiencies of current atlas maps that are used in the education of geography and social studies in terms of cartographic design. About 22 atlases has been investigated for the study. Several examples are given from these school atlases and some proposals are introduced about designing children maps.

  2. Invariant sets for discontinuous parabolic area-preserving torus maps

    CERN Document Server

    Ashwin, P; Nishikawa, T; Zyczkowski, K; Ashwin, Peter; Fu, Xin-Chu; Nishikawa, Takashi; Zyczkowski, Karol

    1999-01-01

    We analyze a class of piecewise linear parabolic maps on the torus, namely those obtained by considering a linear map with double eigenvalue one and taking modulo one in both components. We show that within this two parameter family of maps, the set of noninvertible maps is open and dense. For certain cases (where the entries in the matrix are rational) we show that the maximal invariant set has positive Lebesgue measure and give bounds on the measure. For certain examples we find expressions for the measure of the invariant set.

  3. Method for Stereo Mapping Based on Objectarx and Pipeline Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, F.; Chen, T.; Lin, Z.; Yang, Y.

    2012-07-01

    Stereo mapping is an important way to acquire 4D production. Based on the development of the stereo mapping and the characteristics of ObjectARX and pipeline technology, a new stereo mapping scheme which can realize the interaction between the AutoCAD and digital photogrammetry system is offered by ObjectARX and pipeline technology. An experiment is made in order to make sure the feasibility with the example of the software MAP-AT (Modern Aerial Photogrammetry Automatic Triangulation), the experimental results show that this scheme is feasible and it has very important meaning for the realization of the acquisition and edit integration.

  4. Curriculum Mapping. Focus On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molineaux, Rebecca

    2008-01-01

    This "Focus On" discusses curriculum mapping, a process that allows educators to align the curriculum both within and across grades and to ensure that the curriculum is in line with school, local, and state standards. It outlines the steps of the curriculum mapping process from planning the mapping initiative to creating and editing curriculum…

  5. Reading Angles in Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izard, Véronique; O'Donnell, Evan; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2014-01-01

    Preschool children can navigate by simple geometric maps of the environment, but the nature of the geometric relations they use in map reading remains unclear. Here, children were tested specifically on their sensitivity to angle. Forty-eight children (age 47:15-53:30 months) were presented with fragments of geometric maps, in which angle sections…

  6. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Olsen, Ole Fogh; Sporring, Jon

    2006-01-01

    . To address this problem we introduce a novel photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way we preserve the important illumination features......, while eliminating noise. We call our method diffusion based photon mapping....

  7. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Fogh Olsen, Ole; Sporring, Jon

    2007-01-01

    . To address this problem we introduce a novel photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way we preserve the important illumination features......, while eliminating noise. We call our method diffusion based photon mapping....

  8. Mapping a Changing World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltman, Joseph P.

    1992-01-01

    Addresses the importance of maps for instruction in both history and geography. Suggests that maps have gotten recent attention because of the rapid political changes occurring in Europe and the quincentenary of Columbus' voyage. Discusses different map projections and the importance of media and satellite display of real pictures of the world.…

  9. Two Maps and Worldwide Ipod Interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machete, Reason L.

    2011-11-01

    There is often a desire to determine if the dynamics of interest are chaotic or not. Since positive Lyapunov exponents are a signature for chaos, they are often used to determine this. Reliable estimates of Lyapunov exponents should demonstrate evidence of convergence; but literature abounds in which this evidence lacks. This paper presents two maps through which it highlights the importance of providing evidence of convergence of Lyapunov exponent estimates. Worldwide ipod interest is then used as a practical example and the results bear semblance to both maps.

  10. Mapping changes – from changing perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Bo Nissen

    , the DigDag project (Digital atlas of the Danish historical-administrative geography) has established a uniform research infrastructure: a digital cartographical skeleton for thematic mapping and analysis. This research infrastructure, available at www.digdag.dk, currently contains more than 70,000 GIS......Changes in administrative structures over time has profound implications for the organisation of topographically ordered research data. One example could be the numerous changes in the municipal structure in Denmark the last 150 years. Mapping the huge amount of changes over the past 350 years...

  11. Mapping the climate: guidance on appropriate techniques to map climate variables and their uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, N. R.; Hartley, A.; Hemming, D.

    2012-02-01

    Maps are a crucial asset in communicating climate science to a diverse audience, and there is a wealth of software available to analyse and visualise climate information. However, this availability makes it easy to create poor maps as users often lack an underlying cartographic knowledge. Unlike traditional cartography, where many known standards allow maps to be interpreted easily, there is no standard mapping approach used to represent uncertainty (in climate or other information). Consequently, a wide range of techniques have been applied for this purpose, and users may spend unnecessary time trying to understand the mapping approach rather than interpreting the information presented. Furthermore, communicating and visualising uncertainties in climate data and climate change projections, using for example ensemble based approaches, presents additional challenges for mapping that require careful consideration. The aim of this paper is to provide background information and guidance on suitable techniques for mapping climate variables, including uncertainty. We assess a range of existing and novel techniques for mapping variables and uncertainties, comparing "intrinsic" approaches that use colour in much the same way as conventional thematic maps with "extrinsic" approaches that incorporate additional geometry such as points or features. Using cartographic knowledge and lessons learned from mapping in different disciplines we propose the following 6 general mapping guidelines to develop a suitable mapping technique that represents both magnitude and uncertainty in climate data: text-indent:1em;">- use a sensible sequential or diverging colour scheme; text-indent:1em;">- use appropriate colour symbolism if it is applicable; text-indent:1em;">- ensure the map is usable by colour blind people; text-indent:1em;">- use a data classification scheme that does not misrepresent the data; text-indent:1em;">- use a map projection that does not distort the data text-indent:1em

  12. Smart "geomorphological" map browsing - a tale about geomorphological maps and the internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geilhausen, M.; Otto, J.-C.

    2012-04-01

    With the digital production of geomorphological maps, the dissemination of research outputs now extends beyond simple paper products. Internet technologies can contribute to both, the dissemination of geomorphological maps and access to geomorphologic data and help to make geomorphological knowledge available to a greater public. Indeed, many national geological surveys employ end-to-end digital workflows from data capture in the field to final map production and dissemination. This paper deals with the potential of web mapping applications and interactive, portable georeferenced PDF maps for the distribution of geomorphological information. Web mapping applications such as Google Maps have become very popular and widespread and increased the interest and access to mapping. They link the Internet with GIS technology and are a common way of presenting dynamic maps online. The GIS processing is performed online and maps are visualised in interactive web viewers characterised by different capabilities such as zooming, panning or adding further thematic layers, with the map refreshed after each task. Depending on the system architecture and the components used, advanced symbology, map overlays from different applications and sources and their integration into a Desktop GIS are possible. This interoperability is achieved through the use of international open standards that include mechanisms for the integration and visualisation of information from multiple sources. The portable document format (PDF) is commonly used for printing and is a standard format that can be processed by many graphic software and printers without loss of information. A GeoPDF enables the sharing of geospatial maps and data in PDF documents. Multiple, independent map frames with individual spatial reference systems are possible within a GeoPDF, for example, for map overlays or insets. Geospatial functionality of a GeoPDF includes scalable map display, layer visibility control, access to attribute

  13. Transition risk method and example

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, R.E. [Westinghouse Electric Company, Monroeville PA (United States); Farkas, S.E. [Hudson Global Resources (United States)

    2004-07-01

    ). The transition example presented herein covers a simple shutdown and restart stemming from an indeterminate-quality problem. That is, all equipment is functional and available to the plant operators. (authors)

  14. A genetic map of Peromyscus with chromosomal assignment of linkage groups (a Peromyscus genetic map).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney-Hunt, Jane; Lewandowski, Adrienne; Glenn, Travis C; Glenn, Julie L; Tsyusko, Olga V; O'Neill, Rachel J; Brown, Judy; Ramsdell, Clifton M; Nguyen, Quang; Phan, Tony; Shorter, Kimberly R; Dewey, Michael J; Szalai, Gabor; Vrana, Paul B; Felder, Michael R

    2014-04-01

    The rodent genus Peromyscus is the most numerous and species-rich mammalian group in North America. The naturally occurring diversity within this genus allows opportunities to investigate the genetic basis of adaptation, monogamy, behavioral and physiological phenotypes, growth control, genomic imprinting, and disease processes. Increased genomic resources including a high quality genetic map are needed to capitalize on these opportunities. We produced interspecific hybrids between the prairie deer mouse (P. maniculatus bairdii) and the oldfield mouse (P. polionotus) and scored meiotic recombination events in backcross progeny. A genetic map was constructed by genotyping of backcross progeny at 185 gene-based and 155 microsatellite markers representing all autosomes and the X-chromosome. Comparison of the constructed genetic map with the molecular maps of Mus and Rattus and consideration of previous results from interspecific reciprocal whole chromosome painting allowed most linkage groups to be unambiguously assigned to specific Peromyscus chromosomes. Based on genomic comparisons, this Peromyscus genetic map covers ~83% of the Rattus genome and 79% of the Mus genome. This map supports previous results that the Peromyscus genome is more similar to Rattus than Mus. For example, coverage of the 20 Rattus autosomes and the X-chromosome is accomplished with only 28 segments of the Peromyscus map, but coverage of the 19 Mus autosomes and the X-chromosome requires 40 chromosomal segments of the Peromyscus map. Furthermore, a single Peromyscus linkage group corresponds to about 91% of the rat and only 76% of the mouse X-chromosomes.

  15. Thematic Working Map in GIS Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stjepan Husnjak

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Planning of sustainable development and land use requires a lot of reliable and good quality information, which serves as the basis for timely and adequate decision-making. One of the most important forms of information are various maps. Until recently, preparing of such data was, no doubt, a rather complex. At present thanks to first of all, the GIS technology it is possible to develop corresponding geographic information systems with databases which then allow comparatively simple preparing of necessary thematic maps.The paper first presents the method of developing the Geographic and Land Information System(GIZIS of the Karlovacka County which, although developed for the purpose of agricultural development, may also be used in ecology, environment protection, physical planning, water management and for soil conservation and regulation. Several examples illustrate the possibilities of preparing of specialized maps. The basic data for developing of the geographic and land information system were the data of the Basic Soil Maps and topographic maps of the Republic ofCroatia at the scale of 1:50 000 or 1:25 000, and the data from other studies made for the purpose of agricultural development in the area. These data, together with the results of processing and analysis this data, by digitalization, generalization and interpolation, were incorporated into an integrated database of the geographic and land information system by using Microstation, AutoCad, ArcInfo, ArcWiew and Access software and the corresponding hardware. GIZIS database consists of two parts. The first part includes the data referring to polygons - pedological contours, and the other part the data on pedological profiles. The base is organized in a way that enable prepare different thematic maps, but it can be also used in digital form allowing simple and easy access by the ArcWiew program package to all information, either by the base search or by putting questions. The data

  16. Evaluating OO example programs for CS1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Börstler, Jürgen; Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Bennedsen, Jens

    2008-01-01

    that might affect the teaching and learning of object-oriented programming. Furthermore, we present an evaluation instrument for example programs and report on initial experiences of its application to a selection of examples from popular introductory programming textbooks.......Example programs play an important role in learning to program. They work as templates, guidelines, and inspiration for learners when developing their own programs. It is therefore important to provide learners with high quality examples. In this paper, we discuss properties of example programs...

  17. Time Series Analysis and Forecasting by Example

    CERN Document Server

    Bisgaard, Soren

    2011-01-01

    An intuition-based approach enables you to master time series analysis with ease Time Series Analysis and Forecasting by Example provides the fundamental techniques in time series analysis using various examples. By introducing necessary theory through examples that showcase the discussed topics, the authors successfully help readers develop an intuitive understanding of seemingly complicated time series models and their implications. The book presents methodologies for time series analysis in a simplified, example-based approach. Using graphics, the authors discuss each presented example in

  18. Cosmopolitan linkage disequilibrium maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibson Jane

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Linkage maps have been invaluable for the positional cloning of many genes involved in severe human diseases. Standard genetic linkage maps have been constructed for this purpose from the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain and other panels, and have been widely used. Now that attention has shifted towards identifying genes predisposing to common disorders using linkage disequilibrium (LD and maps of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, it is of interest to consider a standard LD map which is somewhat analogous to the corresponding map for linkage. We have constructed and evaluated a cosmopolitan LD map by combining samples from a small number of populations using published data from a 10-megabase region on chromosome 20. In support of a pilot study, which examined a number of small genomic regions with a lower density of markers, we have found that a cosmopolitan map, which serves all populations when appropriately scaled, recovers 91 to 95 per cent of the information within population-specific maps. Recombination hot spots appear to have a dominant role in shaping patterns of LD. The success of the cosmopolitan map might be attributed to the co-localisation of hot spots in all populations. Although there must be finer scale differences between populations due to other processes (mutation, drift, selection, the results suggest that a whole-genome standard LD map would indeed be a useful resource for disease gene mapping.

  19. Teaching, Designing, and Organizing: Concept Mapping for Librarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April Colosimo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Concept maps are graphical representations of relationships among concepts that can be an effective tool for teaching, designing, and organizing information in a variety of library settings. First, concept mapping can be used wherever training or formal teaching occurs as a visual aid to explain complex ideas. They can also help learners articulate their understanding of a subject area when they create their own concept maps. When using concept mapping as a teaching tool, students may have a more meaningful learning experience when they add information to a concept map that is based on their current knowledge. Next, concept maps are an effective design tool for librarians who are planning projects. They can also serve as a reference point for project implementation and evaluation. The same is true for the design of courses, presentations, and library workshops. A concept map based on the content of a course, for example, is valuable when selecting learning outcomes and strategies for teaching and assessment. Finally, concept mapping can used as a method for capturing tacit or institutional knowledge through the creation and organization of ideas and resources. Librarians can collaborate on concept maps with each other or with non-librarian colleagues to facilitate communication. Resulting maps can be published online and link to documentation and relevant resources. This paper provides an overview of the literature related to concept mapping in libraries. Concrete applications and examples of concept mapping for teaching and learning, designing, and organizing in library settings are then elaborated. The authors draw from their own success and experience with different concept mapping methods and software programs.

  20. Thematic Working Map in GIS Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stjepan Husnjak

    2003-03-01

    The third example of the use of GIZIS is in physical planning, where the land classification map was made, defining soils of classes 1 through 5, which are protected by the law from being used for non-agricultural purposes. Such soils comprise the area of 189 057.0 ha, which is 56.79 percent of the total area. Thus, these soils must be paid proper attention and protected from uncontrolled and unjustified use for purposes other than agriculture. Other examples of the use of GIZIS is in land conservation and development. The specialized map was made showing the requirements for liming, which allows determining the distribution and areas of soils that require this agrotechnical measure.

  1. Using knowledge maps applied to open learning to foster thinking skills

    OpenAIRE

    Okada, Alexandra

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss the conceptual framework and principles to guide knowledge mapping to foster critical and creative thinking in open content environments. We introduce knowledge mapping techniques and tools and present examples of knowledge maps applied to open learning. Then we present some principles to develop thinking skills, highlighting the importance of mapping techniques to organise knowledge. At the end of this paper, we discuss important issues required to foster...

  2. On palaeogeographic map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng-Zhao Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The palaeogeographic map is a graphic representation of physical geographical characteristics in geological history periods and human history periods. It is the most important result of palaeogeographic study. The author, as the Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Palaeogeography, Chinese Edition and English Edition, aimed at the problems of the articles submitted to and published in the Journal of Palaeogeography in recent years and the relevant papers and books of others, and integrated with his practice of palaeogeographic study and mapping, wrote this paper. The content mainly includes the data of palaeogeographic mapping, the problems of palaeogeographic mapping method, the “Single factor analysis and multifactor comprehensive mapping method —— Methodology of quantitative lithofacies palaeogeography”, i.e., the “4 steps mapping method”, the nomenclature of each palaeogeographic unit in palaeogeographic map, the explanation of each palaeogeographic unit in palaeogeographic map, the explanation of significance of palaeogeographic map and palaeogeographic article, the evaluative standards of palaeogeographic map and palaeogeographic article, and the self-evaluation. Criticisms and corrections are welcome.

  3. Combining rough set theory and instance selection in ontology mapping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Pengfei; Wang Yinglin; Zhang Shensheng

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a novel ontology mapping approach based on rough set theory and instance selection.In this approach the construction approach of a rough set-based inference instance base in which the instance selection (involving similarity distance, clustering set and redundancy degree) and discernibility matrix-based feature reduction are introduced respectively; and an ontology mapping approach based on multi-dimensional attribute value joint distribution is proposed.The core of this mapping approach is the overlapping of the inference instance space.Only valuable instances and important attributes can be selected into the ontology mapping based on the multi-dimensional attribute value joint distribution, so the sequenfly mapping efficiency is improved.The time complexity of the discernibility matrix-based method and the accuracy of the mapping approach are evaluated by an application example and a series of analyses and comparisons.

  4. Function representation with circle inversion map systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreland, Bryson; Kunze, Herb

    2017-01-01

    The fractals literature develops the now well-known concept of local iterated function systems (using affine maps) with grey-level maps (LIFSM) as an approach to function representation in terms of the associated fixed point of the so-called fractal transform. While originally explored as a method to achieve signal (and 2-D image) compression, more recent work has explored various aspects of signal and image processing using this machinery. In this paper, we develop a similar framework for function representation using circle inversion map systems. Given a circle C with centre õ and radius r, inversion with respect to C transforms the point p˜ to the point p˜', such that p˜ and p˜' lie on the same radial half-line from õ and d(õ, p˜)d(õ, p˜') = r2, where d is Euclidean distance. We demonstrate the results with an example.

  5. Functional mapping of ontogeny in flowering plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiyang; Tong, Chunfa; Pang, Xiaoming; Wang, Zhong; Guo, Yunqian; Du, Fang; Wu, Rongling

    2012-05-01

    All organisms face the problem of how to perform a sequence of developmental changes and transitions during ontogeny. We revise functional mapping, a statistical model originally derived to map genes that determine developmental dynamics, to take into account the entire process of ontogenetic growth from embryo to adult and from the vegetative to reproductive phase. The revised model provides a framework that reconciles the genetic architecture of development at different stages and elucidates a comprehensive picture of the genetic control mechanisms of growth that change gradually from a simple to a more complex level. We use an annual flowering plant, as an example, to demonstrate our model by which to map genes and their interactions involved in embryo and postembryonic growth. The model provides a useful tool to study the genetic control of ontogenetic growth in flowering plants and any other organisms through proper modifications based on their biological characteristics.

  6. The Ebstorf Map: tradition and contents of a medieval picture of the world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pischke, G.

    2014-07-01

    The Ebstorf Map (Wilke, 2001; Kugler, 2007; Wolf, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2009a, b), the largest medieval map of the world whose original has been lost, is not only a geographical map. In the Middle Ages, a map contained mystic, historical and religious motifs. Of central importance is Jesus Christ, who, in the Ebstorf Map, is part of the earth. The Ebstorf Map contains the knowledge of the time of its creation; it can be used for example as an atlas, as a chronicle of the world, or as an illustrated Bible.

  7. Map Projection Transitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedjeljko Frančula

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Map Projection Transitions is a very successful web application about map projections. The web page (http://www.jasondavies.com/maps/transition pre­sents a world map with graticule and country borders in the oblique Aitoff projection, with the South Pole. The map is not static, but animated. The South Pole moves toward the bottom and Earth rotates around its poles. The animation lasts five seconds, after which the projection changes and movement continues for five seconds, after which the projection changes again. Names of projections appear in a separate window. There are a total of 56 projections. The South Pole eventually becomes invisible and the North Pole appears at the top. Various parts of Earth appear in the center of the map by rotating around the poles.

  8. Chaos control by using Motor Maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Paolo; Fortuna, Luigi; Frasca, Mattia

    2002-09-01

    In this paper a new method for chaos control is proposed, consisting of an unsupervised neural network, namely a Motor Map. In particular a feedback entrainment scheme is adopted: a chaotic system with a given parameter set generates the reference trajectory for another chaotic system with different parameters to be controlled: the Motor Map is required to provide the appropriate time-varying gain value for the feedback signal. The state of the controlled system is considered as input to the Motor Map. Particular efforts have been paid to the feasibility of the implementation. Indeed, the simulations performed have been oriented to design a Motor Map suitable for an hardware realization, thus some restrictive hypotheses, such as for example a low number of neurons, have been assumed. A huge number of simulations has been carried out by considering as system to be controlled a Double Scroll Chua Attractor as well as other chaotic attractors. Several reference trajectories have also been considered: a limit cycle generated by a Chua's circuit with different parameters values, a double scroll Chua attractor, a chaotic attractor of the family of the Chua's circuit attractors. In all the simulations instead of controlling the whole state space, only two state variables have been fed back. Good results in terms of settling time (namely, the period in which the map learns the control task) and steady state errors have been obtained with a few neurons. The Motor Map based adaptive controller offers high performances, specially in the case when the reference trajectory is switched into another one. In this case, a specialization of the neurons constituting the Motor Map is observed: while a group of neurons learns the appropriate control law for a reference trajectory, another group specializes itself to control the system when the other trajectory is used as a reference. A discrete components electronic realization of the Motor Map is presented and experimental results

  9. Multi-moment maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swann, Andrew Francis; Madsen, Thomas Bruun

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a notion of moment map adapted to actions of Lie groups that preserve a closed three-form. We show existence of our multi-moment maps in many circumstances, including mild topological assumptions on the underlying manifold. Such maps are also shown to exist for all groups whose secon......-torus symmetry in terms of tri-symplectic geometry of four-manifolds. (C) 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved....

  10. Classification of Lipschitz mappings

    CERN Document Server

    Piasecki, Lukasz

    2013-01-01

    The Lipschitz Condition Nonlinear spectral radius Uniformly lipschitzian mappings Basic Facts on Banach Spaces Convexity The operator norm Dual spaces, reexivity, the weak, and weak* topologiesMean Lipschitz Condition Nonexpansive and mean nonexpansive mappings in Banach spaces General case On the Lipschitz Constants for Iterates of Mean Lipschitzian Mappings A bound for Lipschitz constants of iterates A bound for the constant k∞(T)Moving averages in Bana

  11. Obesity Prevalence Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Adult Obesity Prevalence Maps Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Obesity Prevalence in 2015 Varies Across States and Territories ...

  12. Similarity transformations of MAPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersen Allan T.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce the notion of similar Markovian Arrival Processes (MAPs and show that the event stationary point processes related to two similar MAPs are stochastically equivalent. This holds true for the time stationary point processes too. We show that several well known stochastical equivalences as e.g. that between the H 2 renewal process and the Interrupted Poisson Process (IPP can be expressed by the similarity transformations of MAPs. In the appendix the valid region of similarity transformations for two-state MAPs is characterized.

  13. GIS cartography a guide to effective map design

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, Gretchen N

    2014-01-01

    IntroductionOn Design ExperienceConstructive CriticismWhat Is a Geoprofessional?Tick-Tock Goes the ClockWhy Good Design MattersAudienceHow to Use This BookSkipping the How-Tos to Get Straight to the Good StuffRelative Map ScalesEndnotesCreative InspirationYou Can Be CreativeDoingSeeingAn Example of How to SeeApplying All of This to Your MapSummary and Final ProddingCreative MapsA Few Places to Start Seeing Art from Your DesktopEndnotesExerciseLayout DesignAll Together NowLayout ChecklistElement Details and ExamplesStyleContextArrangementEmphasis Maps and WireframesSimplicity versus ComplexityM

  14. Dynamic Programming: An Introduction by Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zietz, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    The author introduces some basic dynamic programming techniques, using examples, with the help of the computer algebra system "Maple". The emphasis is on building confidence and intuition for the solution of dynamic problems in economics. To integrate the material better, the same examples are used to introduce different techniques. One covers the…

  15. Pathological Examples Using the TI-85.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruthirds, John; Dodd, Fred

    1997-01-01

    Provides pathological examples for which graphing calculators sometimes give surprising, misleading, or incorrect results. Investigates some of the more interesting of these examples encountered while using the TI-85 in a variety of undergraduate courses including calculus and matrix theory. (DDR)

  16. Visual categorization with negative examples for free

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, X.; Snoek, C.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Automatic visual categorization is critically dependent on labeled examples for supervised learning. As an alternative to traditional expert labeling, social-tagged multimedia is becoming a novel yet subjective and inaccurate source of learning examples. Different from existing work focusing on coll

  17. New examples of small Polish structures

    OpenAIRE

    Dobrowolski, Jan

    2013-01-01

    We answer some questions from a paper of Krupi\\'nski by giving suitable examples of small Polish structures. First, we present a class of small Polish group structures without generic elements. Next, we construct a first example of a small non-zero-dimensional Polish $G$-group.

  18. On Generalizations of Connes-Moscovici Characteristic Map

    CERN Document Server

    Hassanzadeh, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we generalize the Connes-Moscovici characteristic map for cyclic cohomology of extended version of Hopf algebras called x-Hopf algebras. To do this, we define a pairing for cyclic cohomology of module algebras and module coalgebras under the symmetry of a x-Hopf algebra. We introduce more examples of similar generalized characteristic maps for quantum algebraic torus and enveloping algebras

  19. Linear Algebraic Method for Non-Linear Map Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu,L.; Nash, B.

    2009-05-04

    We present a newly developed method to analyze some non-linear dynamics problems such as the Henon map using a matrix analysis method from linear algebra. Choosing the Henon map as an example, we analyze the spectral structure, the tune-amplitude dependence, the variation of tune and amplitude during the particle motion, etc., using the method of Jordan decomposition which is widely used in conventional linear algebra.

  20. Occupancy Grid Map Merging Using Feature Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Gonzalez, “Toward a unified bayesian approach to hybrid metric-topological SLAM,” IEEE Transactions on Robotics , 24(2), April 2008, 259-270. [14] G...Risetti, C. Stachniss, and W. Burgard, “Improved Techniques for grid mapping with Rao-Blackwellized Particle Filter,” IEEE Transactions on Robotics , 23

  1. On circle map coupled map lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, E

    2002-01-01

    Circle map in one and two dimensions is studied. Both its stability, synchronization using bounded control and persistence is discussed. This work is expected to be applicable in ecology where spatial effects are known to be important. Also it will be relevant to systems where delay effects are not negligible.

  2. A guide to commonly used map projections prepared for use in HyperCard, 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpha, Tau Rho; Vigil, Joe F.; Buchholz, Lauren

    1988-01-01

    This guide briefly describes and illustrates the characteristics of 17 map projections commonly used to present thematic data. By means of simple sketches of the basic grid system of longitude and latitude known as the Earth's graticule, the guide shows examples of the following categories of map projections: planes (azimuthal), cones, cylinders, and miscellaneous. The text gives examples of thematic maps published by the U.S. Geological Survey that use various projections. The guide was created as a HyperCard "stack" for use only on the Macintosh family of computers. The guide consists of descriptive material only and does not contain a program for creating map projections.

  3. Acoustic mapping velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muste, M.; Baranya, S.; Tsubaki, R.; Kim, D.; Ho, H.; Tsai, H.; Law, D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of sediment dynamics in rivers is of great importance for various practical purposes. Despite its high relevance in riverine environment processes, the monitoring of sediment rates remains a major and challenging task for both suspended and bed load estimation. While the measurement of suspended load is currently an active area of testing with nonintrusive technologies (optical and acoustic), bed load measurement does not mark a similar progress. This paper describes an innovative combination of measurement techniques and analysis protocols that establishes the proof-of-concept for a promising technique, labeled herein Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The technique estimates bed load rates in rivers developing bed forms using a nonintrusive measurements approach. The raw information for AMV is collected with acoustic multibeam technology that in turn provides maps of the bathymetry over longitudinal swaths. As long as the acoustic maps can be acquired relatively quickly and the repetition rate for the mapping is commensurate with the movement of the bed forms, successive acoustic maps capture the progression of the bed form movement. Two-dimensional velocity maps associated with the bed form migration are obtained by implementing algorithms typically used in particle image velocimetry to acoustic maps converted in gray-level images. Furthermore, use of the obtained acoustic and velocity maps in conjunction with analytical formulations (e.g., Exner equation) enables estimation of multidirectional bed load rates over the whole imaged area. This paper presents a validation study of the AMV technique using a set of laboratory experiments.

  4. BenMAP Downloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Download the current and legacy versions of the BenMAP program. Download configuration and aggregation/pooling/valuation files to estimate benefits. BenMAP-CE is free and open source software, and the source code is available upon request.

  5. Statistical air quality mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kassteele, van de J.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis handles statistical mapping of air quality data. Policy makers require more and more detailed air quality information to take measures to improve air quality. Besides, researchers need detailed air quality information to assess health effects. Accurate and spatially highly resolved maps

  6. Quaternionic versus complex maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asorey, M [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad de Zaragoza 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Scolarici, G [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita del Salento and INFN, Sezione di Lecce, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Solombrino, L [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita del Salento and INFN, Sezione di Lecce, I-73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2007-11-15

    We discuss the relation between completely positive quaternionic maps and the corresponding complex maps obtained via projection operation. In order to illustrate this formalism, we reobtain the (complex) qubit subdynamics of maximally entangled Bell states, as complex projection of unitary dynamics between quaternionic pure states.

  7. Pore size distribution mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Strange, John H.; J. Beau W. WEBBER; Schmidt, S.D.

    1996-01-01

    Pore size distribution mapping has been demonstrated using NMR cryoporometry\\ud in the presence of a magnetic field gradient, This novel method is extendable to 2D and 3D mapping. It offers a unique nondestructive method of obtaining full pore-size distributions in the range 3 to 100 nm at any point within a bulk sample. \\ud

  8. MUTYH Associated Polyposis (MAP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Marie Louise Mølgaard; Bisgaard, M L

    2008-01-01

    MUTYH Associated Polyposis (MAP), a Polyposis predisposition caused by biallelic mutations in the Base Excision Repair (BER) gene MUTYH, confers a marked risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). The MAP phenotype is difficult to distinguish from other hereditary CRC syndromes. Especially from Familial...

  9. Simplifying Massive Contour Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arge, Lars; Deleuran, Lasse Kosetski; Mølhave, Thomas;

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple, efficient and practical algorithm for constructing and subsequently simplifying contour maps from massive high-resolution DEMs, under some practically realistic assumptions on the DEM and contours.......We present a simple, efficient and practical algorithm for constructing and subsequently simplifying contour maps from massive high-resolution DEMs, under some practically realistic assumptions on the DEM and contours....

  10. Map-A-Planet

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Map-A-Planet website allows users to create and download custom image maps of planets and satellites from a variety of missions in an easy to use web interface

  11. Android Mapping Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdalwhab Bakheet

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Location-aware and mapping applications have gone f rom a desirable feature to an essential part of any smart phone. Whether a user is checking into a social network, looking for a pharmacy in the middle of the night, or located in somewhere and needs help, the key is always the same: location. In this project, an Android mapping application is developed. The application is able to display the map of the whole world while online or, display a pre-downloaded map while offline, track the user’s location, display a compass to determine north, send the user’s location to others in case of emergency using SMS, receive and interpret received location from the message, display it on the map, and notify the user by the reception of the location. The application was developed using agile methodol ogy. It, met its objectives and successfully passed 91% of the final system test, recording that some limitations were discovered, the application needs further testing and can be implem ented for particular company or university using their own maps or editing the maps in OSM (op en street maps.

  12. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Sporring, Jon; Fogh Olsen, Ole

    2008-01-01

    . To address this problem, we introduce a photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way, we preserve important illumination features, while...

  13. The Modern Geomorphological Map

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seijmonsbergen, A.C.; Switzer, A.; Kennedy, D.M.

    2013-01-01

    Classical geomorphological maps are representations of the spatial distribution of landforms, materials and of the processes responsible for their formation, in a single paper map. They contain a wealth of information that is generally documented with the aid of symbol and color legends. Uniformity

  14. Generating Topographic Map Data from Classification Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Höhle

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of classification results as topographic map data requires cartographic enhancement and checking of the geometric accuracy. Urban areas are of special interest. The conversion of the classification result into topographic map data of high thematic and geometric quality is subject of this contribution. After reviewing the existing literature on this topic, a methodology is presented. The extraction of point clouds belonging to line segments is solved by the Hough transform. The mathematics for deriving polygons of orthogonal, parallel and general line segments by least squares adjustment is presented. A unique solution for polylines, where the Hough parameters are optimized, is also given. By means of two data sets land cover maps of six classes were produced and then enhanced by the proposed method. The classification used the decision tree method applying a variety of attributes including object heights derived from imagery. The cartographic enhancement is carried out with two different levels of quality. The user’s accuracies for the classes “impervious surface” and “building” were above 85% in the “Level 1” map of Example 1. The geometric accuracy of building corners at the “Level 2” maps is assessed by means of reference data derived from ortho-images. The obtained root mean square errors (RMSE of the generated coordinates (x, y were RMSEx = 1.2 m and RMSEy = 0.7 m (Example 1 and RMSEx = 0.8 m and RMSEy = 1.0 m (Example 2 using 31 and 62 check points, respectively. All processing for Level 1 (raster data could be carried out with a high degree of automation. Level 2 maps (vector data were compiled for the classes “building” and “road and parking lot”. For urban areas with numerous classes and of large size, universal algorithms are necessary to produce vector data fully automatically. The recent progress in sensors and machine learning methods will support the generation of topographic map data of high

  15. Geologic map of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kenneth L.; Skinner, James A.; Dohm, James M.; Irwin, Rossman P.; Kolb, Eric J.; Fortezzo, Corey M.; Platz, Thomas; Michael, Gregory G.; Hare, Trent M.

    2014-01-01

    This global geologic map of Mars, which records the distribution of geologic units and landforms on the planet's surface through time, is based on unprecedented variety, quality, and quantity of remotely sensed data acquired since the Viking Orbiters. These data have provided morphologic, topographic, spectral, thermophysical, radar sounding, and other observations for integration, analysis, and interpretation in support of geologic mapping. In particular, the precise topographic mapping now available has enabled consistent morphologic portrayal of the surface for global mapping (whereas previously used visual-range image bases were less effective, because they combined morphologic and albedo information and, locally, atmospheric haze). Also, thermal infrared image bases used for this map tended to be less affected by atmospheric haze and thus are reliable for analysis of surface morphology and texture at even higher resolution than the topographic products.

  16. Bodily maps of emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nummenmaa, Lauri; Glerean, Enrico; Hari, Riitta; Hietanen, Jari K

    2014-01-14

    Emotions are often felt in the body, and somatosensory feedback has been proposed to trigger conscious emotional experiences. Here we reveal maps of bodily sensations associated with different emotions using a unique topographical self-report method. In five experiments, participants (n = 701) were shown two silhouettes of bodies alongside emotional words, stories, movies, or facial expressions. They were asked to color the bodily regions whose activity they felt increasing or decreasing while viewing each stimulus. Different emotions were consistently associated with statistically separable bodily sensation maps across experiments. These maps were concordant across West European and East Asian samples. Statistical classifiers distinguished emotion-specific activation maps accurately, confirming independence of topographies across emotions. We propose that emotions are represented in the somatosensory system as culturally universal categorical somatotopic maps. Perception of these emotion-triggered bodily changes may play a key role in generating consciously felt emotions.

  17. Iconicity as structure mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmorey, Karen

    2014-09-19

    Linguistic and psycholinguistic evidence is presented to support the use of structure-mapping theory as a framework for understanding effects of iconicity on sign language grammar and processing. The existence of structured mappings between phonological form and semantic mental representations has been shown to explain the nature of metaphor and pronominal anaphora in sign languages. With respect to processing, it is argued that psycholinguistic effects of iconicity may only be observed when the task specifically taps into such structured mappings. In addition, language acquisition effects may only be observed when the relevant cognitive abilities are in place (e.g. the ability to make structural comparisons) and when the relevant conceptual knowledge has been acquired (i.e. information key to processing the iconic mapping). Finally, it is suggested that iconicity is better understood as a structured mapping between two mental representations than as a link between linguistic form and human experience.

  18. SYSTEM FOR AUTOMATIC GENERALIZATION OF TOPOGRAPHIC MAPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Hao-wen; LI Zhi-lin; AI Ting-hua

    2006-01-01

    With the construction of spatial data infrastructure, automated topographic map generalization becomes an indispensable component in the community of cartography and geographic information science. This paper describes a topographic map generalization system recently developed by the authors. The system has the following characteristics: 1) taking advantage of three levels of automation, i.e. fully automated generalization, batch generalization,and interactive generalization, to undertake two types of processes, i.e. intelligent inference process and repetitive operation process in generalization; 2) making use of two kinds of sources for generalizing rule library, i.e. written specifications and cartographers' experiences, to define a six-element structure to describe the rules; 3) employing a hierarchical structure for map databases, logically and physically; 4) employing a grid indexing technique and undo/redo operation to improve database retrieval and object generalization efficiency. Two examples of topographic map generalization are given to demonstrate the system. It reveals that the system works well. In fact, this system has been used for a number of projects and it has been found that a great improvement in efficiency compared with traditional map generalization process can be achieved.

  19. Completely bounded norms of right module maps

    CERN Document Server

    Levene, Rupert H

    2011-01-01

    It is well-known that if T is a D_m-D_n bimodule map on the m by n complex matrices, then T is a Schur multiplier and $\\|T\\|_{cb}=\\|T\\|$. If n=2 and T is merely assumed to be a right D_2-module map, then we show that $\\|T\\|_{cb}=\\|T\\|$. However, this property fails if m>1 and n>2. For m>1 and n=3,4 or $n\\geq m^2$, we give examples of maps T attaining the supremum C(m,n)=\\sup \\|T\\|_{cb} taken over the contractive, right D_n-module maps on M_{m,n}, and we show that C(m,n) grows with m and n. As a consequence, if H is an infinite-dimensional Hilbert space and D is a masa in B(H), then there is a bounded right D-module map on the compact operators which is not completely bounded.

  20. The "covariation method" for estimating the parameters of the standard Dynamic energy Budget model I: Philosophy and apporach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lika, K.; Kearney, M.R.; Freitas, V.; Veer, van der H.W.; Meer, van der J.; Wijsman, J.W.M.; Pecquerie, L.; Kooijman, S.A.L.M.

    2011-01-01

    The Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) theory for metabolic organisation captures the processes of development, growth, maintenance, reproduction and ageing for any kind of organism throughout its life-cycle. However, the application of DEB theory is challenging because the state variables and parameters a

  1. Custom map projections for regional groundwater models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuniansky, Eve L.

    2017-01-01

    For regional groundwater flow models (areas greater than 100,000 km2), improper choice of map projection parameters can result in model error for boundary conditions dependent on area (recharge or evapotranspiration simulated by application of a rate using cell area from model discretization) and length (rivers simulated with head-dependent flux boundary). Smaller model areas can use local map coordinates, such as State Plane (United States) or Universal Transverse Mercator (correct zone) without introducing large errors. Map projections vary in order to preserve one or more of the following properties: area, shape, distance (length), or direction. Numerous map projections are developed for different purposes as all four properties cannot be preserved simultaneously. Preservation of area and length are most critical for groundwater models. The Albers equal-area conic projection with custom standard parallels, selected by dividing the length north to south by 6 and selecting standard parallels 1/6th above or below the southern and northern extent, preserves both area and length for continental areas in mid latitudes oriented east-west. Custom map projection parameters can also minimize area and length error in non-ideal projections. Additionally, one must also use consistent vertical and horizontal datums for all geographic data. The generalized polygon for the Floridan aquifer system study area (306,247.59 km2) is used to provide quantitative examples of the effect of map projections on length and area with different projections and parameter choices. Use of improper map projection is one model construction problem easily avoided.

  2. nowCOAST's Map Service for Political Map Overlays

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Map Information: This nowCOAST map service provides map overlays depicting the boundaries of U.S. states, territories, counties and townships/county subdivisions,...

  3. nowCOAST's Map Service for Transportation Map Overlays

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Map Information: This nowCOAST map service provides maps depicting the locations of major world airport runways, major U.S. seaports, and latitude/longitude grid...

  4. Quantum cosmology of (loop) quantum gravity condensates: An example

    CERN Document Server

    Gielen, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Spatially homogeneous universes can be described in (loop) quantum gravity as condensates of elementary excitations of space. Their treatment is easiest in the second-quantised group field theory formalism which allows the adaptation of techniques from the description of Bose-Einstein condensates in condensed matter physics. Dynamical equations for the states can be derived directly from the underlying quantum gravity dynamics. The analogue of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation defines an anisotropic quantum cosmology model, in which the condensate wavefunction becomes a quantum cosmology wavefunction on minisuperspace. To illustrate this general formalism, we give a mapping of the gauge-invariant geometric data for a tetrahedron to a minisuperspace of homogeneous anisotropic 3-metrics. We then study an example for which we give the resulting quantum cosmology model in the general anisotropic case and derive the general analytical solution for isotropic universes. We discuss the interpretation of these solutions a...

  5. Some Examples of Photogrammetry for the Characterization of Rock Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonon, Fulvio

    2015-04-01

    The presentation starts by briefly describing the basic elements of close-range photogrammetry, which are then used to understand its limitations, its accuracy, and its differences with respect to the LiDAR. Examples of applications will follow: • Baseline model accurate to 1.5 cm for a sub-vertical slope (800 m wide and 450 m high) in a narrow canyon in Colorado. • 3-D model for a 2.6 km long, 300 m high slope in Northern Italy. Its use for fracture mapping and analysis, and the determination of unstable blocks. • Monitoring of a by-pass tunnel in a Hydroelectric Power Scheme in California, where a major shear zone creates water seepage and movements

  6. Effectiveness of cartographic presentation methods applied within small-scale thematic maps in the press and on the Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korycka-Skorupa Jolanta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The author discuss effectiveness of cartographic presentations. The article includes opinions of cartographers regarding effectiveness, readability and efficiency of a map. It reminds the principles of map graphic design in order to verify them using examples of small-scale thematic maps.

  7. Mapping of Nature Risks and Disasters for Educational Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Temenoujka Bandrova

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents definitions of nature risks and disasters. Mapping of risk processes is discussed in the direction of educational purposes. International organizations publish information brochures about how to teach children correct behaviour and preparation for natural disasters. Questions such as "What do you do in case of an emergency" are discussed. Standards and technologies related to emergency management are considered. Some examples of maps and methods of mapping for young and older students are presented, and a proposal for the National Strategy in the field of education is created on the basis of them.Ključne riječi 

  8. HTML5 web application development by example

    CERN Document Server

    Gustafson, JM

    2013-01-01

    The best way to learn anything is by doing. The author uses a friendly tone and fun examples to ensure that you learn the basics of application development. Once you have read this book, you should have the necessary skills to build your own applications.If you have no experience but want to learn how to create applications in HTML5, this book is the only help you'll need. Using practical examples, HTML5 Web Application Development by Example will develop your knowledge and confidence in application development.

  9. Recommendations for the user-specific enhancement of flood maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Meyer

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The European Union Floods Directive requires the establishment of flood maps for high risk areas in all European member states by 2013. However, the current practice of flood mapping in Europe still shows some deficits. Firstly, flood maps are frequently seen as an information tool rather than a communication tool. This means that, for example, local stocks of knowledge are not incorporated. Secondly, the contents of flood maps often do not match the requirements of the end-users. Finally, flood maps are often designed and visualised in a way that cannot be easily understood by residents at risk and/or that is not suitable for the respective needs of public authorities in risk and event management. The RISK MAP project examined how end-user participation in the mapping process may be used to overcome these barriers and enhance the communicative power of flood maps, fundamentally increasing their effectiveness.

    Based on empirical findings from a participatory approach that incorporated interviews, workshops and eye-tracking tests, conducted in five European case studies, this paper outlines recommendations for user-specific enhancements of flood maps. More specific, recommendations are given with regard to (1 appropriate stakeholder participation processes, which allow incorporating local knowledge and preferences, (2 the improvement of the contents of flood maps by considering user-specific needs and (3 the improvement of the visualisation of risk maps in order to produce user-friendly and understandable risk maps for the user groups concerned. Furthermore, "idealised" maps for different user groups are presented: for strategic planning, emergency management and the public.

  10. Maps and civilization cartography in culture and society

    CERN Document Server

    Thrower, Norman J W

    2008-01-01

    In this concise introduction to the history of cartography, Norman J. W. Thrower charts the intimate links between maps and history from antiquity to the present day. A wealth of illustrations, including the oldest known map and contemporary examples made using Geographical Information Systems (GIS), illuminate the many ways in which various human cultures have interpreted spatial relationships.The third edition of Maps and Civilization incorporates numerous revisions, features new material throughout the book, and includes a new alphabetized bibliography. Praise for previous editions of Maps and Civilization:"A marvelous compendium of map lore. Anyone truly interested in the development of cartography will want to have his or her own copy to annotate, underline, and index for handy referencing."-L. M. Sebert, Geomatica

  11. Regional Ionosphere Mapping with Kriging and B-spline Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grynyshyna-Poliuga, O.; Stanislawska, I. M.

    2013-12-01

    This work demonstrates the concept and practical examples of mapping of regional ionosphere, based on GPS observations from the EGNOS Ranging and Integrity Monitoring Stations (RIMS) network and permanent stations near to them. Interpolation/prediction techniques, such as kriging (KR) and the cubic B-spline, which are suitable for handling multi-scale phenomena and unevenly distributed data, were used to create total electron content (TEC) maps. Their computational efficiency (especially the B-spline) and the ability to handle undersampled data (especially kriging) are particularly attractive. The data sets have been collect into seasonal bins representing June, December solstices and equinox (March, September). TEC maps have a spatial resolution of 2.50 and 2.50 in latitude and longitude, respectively, and a 15-minutes temporal resolution. The time series of the TEC maps can be used to derive average monthly maps describing major ionospheric trends as a function of time, season, and spatial location.

  12. Fractional standard map

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelman, Mark, E-mail: edelman@cims.nyu.ed [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer St., New York, NY 10012 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Stern College at Yeshiva University, 245 Lexington Avenue, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Tarasov, Vasily E. [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer St., New York, NY 10012 (United States)] [Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2009-12-28

    Properties of the phase space of the standard map with memory are investigated. This map was obtained from a kicked fractional differential equation. Depending on the value of the map parameter and the fractional order of the derivative in the original differential equation, this nonlinear dynamical system demonstrates attractors (fixed points, stable periodic trajectories, slow converging and slow diverging trajectories, ballistic trajectories, and fractal-like structures) and/or chaotic trajectories. At least one type of fractal-like sticky attractors in the chaotic sea was observed.

  13. Map: Geospatial paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikonović Vesna

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available There are different definitions of map. There is no one which is accepted in whole world or at least from the most cartographers. In the paper it will be given several definitions which are, at the best way, (according to the author’s opinion reflecting essence of map as a model of reality. Map as a universal meaning of researching can’t serve only for representing particular geospace (spatial system or some its element, or to give only clear view about geographical dispersion of objects, phenomena and processes, but have to make possible studying the patterns of that dispersion, as well as their mutual connections and conditions.

  14. The Problem of Map Illiteracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, James D.

    1985-01-01

    Describes an approach to eliminating "map illiteracy" in college students. Map illiteracy is defined as the inability to read and draw meaning from simple maps used in history texts and teaching. (JDH)

  15. Northern Hemisphere Synoptic Weather Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Daily Series of Synoptic Weather Maps. Part I consists of plotted and analyzed daily maps of sea-level and 500-mb maps for 0300, 0400, 1200, 1230, 1300, and 1500...

  16. The use of interactive graphical maps for browsing medical/health Internet information resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boulos Maged

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As online information portals accumulate metadata descriptions of Web resources, it becomes necessary to develop effective ways for visualising and navigating the resultant huge metadata repositories as well as the different semantic relationships and attributes of described Web resources. Graphical maps provide a good method to visualise, understand and navigate a world that is too large and complex to be seen directly like the Web. Several examples of maps designed as a navigational aid for Web resources are presented in this review with an emphasis on maps of medical and health-related resources. The latter include HealthCyberMap maps http://healthcybermap.semanticweb.org/, which can be classified as conceptual information space maps, and the very abstract and geometric Visual Net maps of PubMed http://map.net (for demos. Information resources can be also organised and navigated based on their geographic attributes. Some of the maps presented in this review use a Kohonen Self-Organising Map algorithm, and only HealthCyberMap uses a Geographic Information System to classify Web resource data and render the maps. Maps based on familiar metaphors taken from users' everyday life are much easier to understand. Associative and pictorial map icons that enable instant recognition and comprehension are preferred to geometric ones and are key to successful maps for browsing medical/health Internet information resources.

  17. When greediness fails: examples from stochastic scheduling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uetz, Marc

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present examples for the sometimes surprisingly different behavior of deterministic and stochastic scheduling problems. In particular, it demonstrates some seemingly counterintuitive properties of optimal scheduling policies for stochastic machine scheduling problems.

  18. Mapping Ontario’s Wind Turbines: Challenges and Limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya Christidis

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite rapid and vast development of wind turbines across the Canadian province of Ontario, there is no map available indicating the location of each wind turbine. A map of this nature is crucial for health and environmental risk research and has many applications in other fields. Research examining health and wind turbines is limited by the available maps showing the nearest community to a wind farm as opposed to each unique wind turbine. Data from provincial-level organizations, developers, and municipalities were collected using government development approval documents, planning documents, and data given directly from municipalities and developers. Wind turbines were mapped using Google Earth, coordinate lists, shapefiles, and translating data from other maps. In total, 1,420 wind turbines were mapped from 56 wind farms. The limitations of each data source and mapping method are discussed. There are numerous challenges in creating a map of this nature, for example incorrect inclusion of wind farms and inaccuracies in wind turbine locations. The resultant map is the first of its kind to be discussed in the literature, can be used for a variety of health and environmental risk studies to assess dose-response, wind turbine density, visibility, and to create sound and vibration models.

  19. WalkThrough Example Procedures for MAMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruggiero, Christy E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gaschen, Brian Keith [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bloch, Jeffrey Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-15

    This documentation is a growing set of walk through examples of analyses using the MAMA V2.0 software. It does not cover all the features or possibilities with the MAMA software, but will address using many of the basic analysis tools to quantify particle size and shape in an image. This document will continue to evolve as additional procedures and examples are added. The starting assumption is that the MAMA software has been successfully installed.

  20. MAMA Software Features: Visual Examples of Quantification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruggiero, Christy E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Porter, Reid B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-05-20

    This document shows examples of the results from quantifying objects of certain sizes and types in the software. It is intended to give users a better feel for some of the quantification calculations, and, more importantly, to help users understand the challenges with using a small set of ‘shape’ quantification calculations for objects that can vary widely in shapes and features. We will add more examples to this in the coming year.

  1. Rule Set Transferability for Object-Based Feature Extraction: An Example for Cirque Mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anders, N.S.; Seijmonsbergen, A.C.; Bouten, W.

    2015-01-01

    Cirques are complex landforms resulting from glacial erosion and can be used to estimate Equilibrium Line Altitudes and infer climate history. Automated extraction of cirques may help research on glacial geomorphology and climate change. Our objective was to test the transferability of an object-bas

  2. Poverty mapping based on first order dominance with an example from Mozambique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Channing; Hussain, Azhar; Salvucci, Vincenzo;

    2016-01-01

    The serotonin-transporter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) is one of the most extensively investigated candidates to be involved in gene-environment interaction associated with depression. Nevertheless, the interaction remains controversial. In an original study, we tested the hypothesis that...

  3. Using Concept Maps to Show "Connections" in Measurement: An Example from the Australian Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshman, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Within the "Australian Curriculum: Mathematics" the Understanding proficiency strand states, "Students build understanding when they connect related ideas, when they represent concepts in different ways, when they identify commonalities and differences between aspects of content, when they describe their thinking mathematically and…

  4. Three-Dimensional Geothermal Fairway Mapping: Examples From the Western Great Basin, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siler, Drew L [Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, University of Nevada, Reno; Faulds, James E [Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, University of Nevada, Reno

    2013-09-29

    Elevated permeability along fault systems provides pathways for circulation of geothermal fluids. Accurate location of such fluid flow pathways in the subsurface is crucial to future geothermal development in order to both accurately assess resource potential and mitigate drilling costs by increasing drilling success rates. Employing a variety of surface and subsurface data sets, we present detailed 3D geologic analyses of two Great Basin geothermal systems, the actively producing Brady’s geothermal system and a ‘greenfield’ geothermal prospect at Astor Pass, Nevada. 3D modeling provides the framework for quantitative structural analyses. We combine 3D slip and dilation tendency analysis along fault zones and calculations of fault intersection density in the two geothermal systems with the locations of lithologies capable of supporting dense, interconnected fracture networks. The collocation of these permeability promoting characteristics with elevated heat represent geothermal ‘fairways’, areas with ideal conditions for geothermal fluid flow. Location of geothermal fairways at high resolution in 3D space can help to mitigate the costs of geothermal exploration by providing discrete drilling targets and data-based evaluations of reservoir potential.

  5. Co-word maps of biotechnology: an example of cognitive scientometrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rip, A.; Courtial, J.-P.

    1984-01-01

    To analyse developments of scientific fields, scientometrics provides useful tools, provided one is prepared to take the content of scientific articles into account. Such cognitive scientometrics is illustrated by using as data a ten-year period of articles from a biotechnology core journal. After c

  6. Common fixed points for generalized contractive mappings in cone metric spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassen Aydi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to establish coincidence point and common fixed point results for four maps satisfying generalized weak contractions in cone metric spaces. Also, an example is given to illustrate our results.

  7. Complete Quasiconvex Mappings in Polydisc

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Tai-shun; ZHANG Wen-jun

    2006-01-01

    In this paper,a class of biholomorphic mappings called complete quasiconvex mappings is introduced and studied in bounded convex Reinhardt domains of Cn.Through a detailed analysis of the analytic characterization for this class of mappings,it is shown that this class of mappings contains the convex mappings and is also a subset of the class of starlike mappings.In the special case of the polydisc,a decomposition theorem is established for the complete quasiconvex mappings,which in turn is used to derive an improved sufficient condition for the convex mappings.

  8. Mapping posthumanism: an exchange

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: posthumanism in question Noel Castree, Catherine Nash Mapping posthumanism Neil Badmington Modalities of posthumanism Bruce Braun Humanising posthumanism Jonathan Murdoch Humanism's excess: some thoughts on the 'post-human/ist' agenda Sarah Whatmore Organisors: Noel Castree, Catherine Nash

  9. Daily Weather Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Several different government offices have published the Daily weather maps over its history. The publication has also gone by different names over time. The U.S....

  10. Minidoka - Invasive Species Mapping

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Locate and map, via the use of GPS, Rush skeletonweed on the refuge. Located areas then entered into GIS to allow refuge staff to pin point locations and treat this...

  11. FLOODPLAIN MAPPING, Bandera, TEXAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  12. TOXMAP®: Environmental Health Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — TOXMAP® is a Geographic Information System (GIS) that uses maps of the United States and Canada to help users visually explore data primarily from the EPA's Toxics...

  13. USGS map quadrangles

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — USGS map quandrangle boundaries with names and unique identifiers for the 1:24,000 (7.5 minute) quadrangles. Additional attributes provide unique identifiers and...

  14. BaseMap

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The goal of this project is to provide a convenient base map that can be used as a starting point for CA projects. It's simple, but designed to work at a number of...

  15. Public Waters Inventory Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This theme is a scanned and rectified version of the Minnesota DNR - Division of Waters "Public Waters Inventory" (PWI) maps. DNR Waters utilizes a small scale...

  16. The CPD Maps System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — CPD Maps includes data on the locations of existing CDBG, HOME, public housing and other HUD-funded community assets, so that users can view past investments...

  17. Map of physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    Based on bibliometric data from information-services provider Thomson Reuters, this map reveals "core areas" of physics, shown as coloured circular nodes, and the relationship between these subdisciplines, shown as lines.

  18. MAPPING IN MICRONESIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Randle W.; Swinnerton, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey has recently completed a series of new topographic maps of Micronesia in cooperation with the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, the Federal agency administering the islands. Monocolor 1:10,000-scale manuscripts were compiled, from which 1:25,000-scale metric quadrangles were derived with symbology consistent with USGS quadrangle mapping. The publication of these new maps coincides with the impending political changes resulting from self-determination referendums held in Micronesia. Local sources have helped considerably with field logistics and resolution of geographic name controversies. Technical aspects of this project included development of tropical feature symbology, location of cadastral subdivisions and associated boundaries and mapping of many outlying coral reefs.

  19. NOS Bathymetric Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This collection of bathymetric contour maps which represent the seafloor topography includes over 400 individual titles and covers US offshore areas including Hawaii...

  20. Marketplace Enrollment Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The maps show the distribution of consumers in a state who enrolled in marketplace plans through federally facilitated, partnership, and supported state-based...

  1. Programming with Hierarchical Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørbæk, Peter

    This report desribes the hierarchical maps used as a central data structure in the Corundum framework. We describe its most prominent features, ague for its usefulness and briefly describe some of the software prototypes implemented using the technology....

  2. National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) National Coastal Mapping Program (NCMP) is designed to provide high-resolution elevation and imagery data along U.S....

  3. PDS Planetary Maps API

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We are developing a set of NASA Extensions to the Google Maps API—and soon to other frameworks such as OpenLayers as well—that will make these platforms more useful...

  4. Haz-Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Haz-Map is an occupational health database designed for health and safety professionals and for consumers seeking information about the adverse effects of workplace...

  5. MetaMap

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — MetaMap is a highly configurable application developed by the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications at the National Library of Medicine (NLM) to...

  6. Mapping urban geology of the city of Girona, Catalonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilà, Miquel; Torrades, Pau; Pi, Roser; Monleon, Ona

    2016-04-01

    lines of the top of the pre-Quaternary basement surface. The most representative complementary maps are the quaternary map, the subsurface bedrock map and the isopach map of thickness of superficial deposits (Quaternary and anthropogenic). The map sheets also include charts and tables of relevant physic-chemical parameters of the geological materials, harmonized downhole lithological columns from selected boreholes, stratigraphic columns, and, photographs and figures illustrating the geology of the mapped area and how urbanization has changed the natural environment. The development of systematic urban geological mapping projects, such as the example of Girona's case, which provides valuable resources to address targeted studies related to urban planning, geoengineering works, soil pollution and other important environmental issues that society should deal with in the future.

  7. Irreversible quantum baker map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łoziński, Artur; Pakoński, Prot; Zyczkowski, Karol

    2002-12-01

    We propose a generalization of the model of classical baker map on the torus, in which the images of two parts of the phase space do overlap. This transformation is irreversible and cannot be quantized by means of a unitary Floquet operator. A corresponding quantum system is constructed as a completely positive map acting in the space of density matrices. We investigate spectral properties of this superoperator and their link with the increase of the entropy of initially pure states.

  8. Maps and (no) Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest, Etienne

    As the title suggests, I examine the role of maps in accelerator theory, conveniently leaving simulation out of the picture for lack of time and space. This is really a primer on the map-based "Courant Snyder" theory as independently proposed by Dragt's group (author included) and Turchetti's group at Bologna. Quite obviously it is viewed here from the author's own perspective and prejudices.

  9. Olympic Maps Available

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Beijing is publishing a set of Olympic maps covering everything from the location of sporting venues to the city’s history As soon as Zhou Liyi hopped off the train from Shanghai to Beijing, he hurried to Wangfujing Xinhua Book Store,one of the largest of its kind in Beijing,to buy an Olympic map. Zhou is a Shanghai resident who came to Beijing on business and plans to return as a

  10. Wind Resource Maps (Postcard)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative provides high-resolution wind maps and estimates of the wind resource potential that would be possible from development of the available windy land areas after excluding areas unlikely to be developed. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to Wind Powering America's online wind energy resource maps.

  11. Irreversible Quantum Baker Map

    CERN Document Server

    Lozinski, A; Zyczkowski, K; Lozinski, Artur; Pakonski, Prot; Zyczkowski, Karol

    2002-01-01

    We propose a generalization of the model of classical baker map on the torus, in which the images of two parts of the phase space do overlap. This transformation is irreversible and cannot be quantized by means of a unitary Floquet operator. A corresponding quantum system is constructed as a completely positive map acting in the space of density matrices. We investigate spectral properties of this super-operator and their link with the increase of the entropy of initially pure states.

  12. OGC Web Services standards by example : the European Seismic Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frobert, L.; Kamb, L.; Trani, L.; Spinuso, A.; Bossu, R.; Van Eck, T.

    2011-12-01

    NERIES (2006-2010) was an Integrated Infrastructure Initiative (I3) project in the Sixth Framework Program (FP6) of the European Commission (EC), aiming at networking the European seismic networks, improving access to data, allowing access to specific seismic infrastructures and pursuing targeted research developing the next generation of tools for improved service and data analysis. During this project, a web portal was developed using web services to access data and a Visual Web Applications to display them. However these web services were not conform to any standard, making them difficult to consume by any new user interface. Therefore, for the NERA project, the follow-up of NERIES, we have proposed the use of web services standards to access our data. We have decided to use standards defined by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC). The OGC defines standards for the Web service interfaces to access geo-tagged data. The events and seismic stations are also geo-tagged making these web services suitable for our purpose. Using standard web services gives us the opportunity to distribute our data across all conformant consumers to these standards through various programming languages and applications We have implemented a preliminary version of web services conforming to the Web Map Service (WMS) and Web Feature Service (WFS) standard to access our catalog of seismic events (nearly 200 000 events). To visualize them we have made four examples demo on our web site using different technologies (Adobe Flash, JavaScript, Java with Nasa World Wind and UDig a desktop GIS application). In the future we hope to implement other OGC Web services standard like : - Sensor Observation Service (SOS) to provide seismic waveform records; - Web Notification Service (WNS); - Catalog Service for the Web (CSW) to provide a search engine of all our web services; - Web Processing Service (WPS) to process data between different services. The power of the use of OGC standards is the easy

  13. Interactive Metro Map Editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Shuen; Peng, Wan-Yu

    2016-02-01

    Manual editing of a metro map is essential because many aesthetic and readability demands in map generation cannot be achieved by using a fully automatic method. In addition, a metro map should be updated when new metro lines are developed in a city. Considering that manually designing a metro map is time-consuming and requires expert skills, we present an interactive editing system that considers human knowledge and adjusts the layout to make it consistent with user expectations. In other words, only a few stations are controlled and the remaining stations are relocated by our system. Our system supports both curvilinear and octilinear layouts when creating metro maps. It solves an optimization problem, in which even spaces, route straightness, and maximum included angles at junctions are considered to obtain a curvilinear result. The system then rotates each edge to extend either vertically, horizontally, or diagonally while approximating the station positions provided by users to generate an octilinear layout. Experimental results, quantitative and qualitative evaluations, and user studies show that our editing system is easy to use and allows even non-professionals to design a metro map.

  14. Mars synthetic topographic mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S.S.C.

    1978-01-01

    Topographic contour maps of Mars are compiled by the synthesis of data acquired from various scientific experiments of the Mariner 9 mission, including S-band radio-occulation, the ultraviolet spectrometer (UVS), the infrared radiometer (IRR), the infrared interferometer spectrometer (IRIS) and television imagery, as well as Earth-based radar information collected at Goldstone, Haystack, and Arecibo Observatories. The entire planet is mapped at scales of 1:25,000,000 and 1:25,000,000 using Mercator, Lambert, and polar stereographic map projections. For the computation of map projections, a biaxial spheroid figure is adopted. The semimajor and semiminor axes are 3393.4 and 3375.7 km, respectively, with a polar flattening of 0.0052. For the computation of elevations, a topographic datum is defined by a gravity field described in terms of spherical harmonics of fourth order and fourth degree combined with a 6.1-mbar occulation pressure surface. This areoid can be approximated by a triaxial ellipsoid with semimajor axes of A = 3394.6 km and B = 3393.3 km and a semiminor axis of C = 3376.3 km. The semimajor axis A intersects the Martian surface at longitude 105??W. The dynamic flattening of Mars is 0.00525. The contour intercal of the maps is 1 km. For some prominent features where overlapping pictures from Mariner 9 are available, local contour maps at relatively larger scales were also compiled by photogrammetric methods on stereo plotters. ?? 1978.

  15. Creating Heliophysics Concept Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, N. A.; Peticolas, L. M.; Paglierani, R.; Mendez, B. J.

    2011-12-01

    The Center for Science Education at University of California Berkeley's Space Sciences Laboratory is creating concept maps for Heliophysics and would like to get input from scientists. The purpose of this effort is to identify key concepts related to Heliophysics and map their progression to show how students' understanding of Heliophysics might develop from Kindergarten through higher education. These maps are meant to tie into the AAAS Project 2061 Benchmarks for Scientific Literacy and National Science Education Standards. It is hoped that the results of this effort will be useful for curriculum designers developing Heliophysics-related curriculum materials and classroom teachers using Heliophysics materials. The need for concept maps was identified as a result of product analysis undertaken by the NASA Heliophysics Forum Team. The NASA Science Education and Public Outreach Forums have as two of their goals to improve the characterization of the contents of the Science Mission Directorate and Public Outreach (SMD E/PO) portfolio (Objective 2.1) and assist SMD in addressing gaps in the portfolio of SMD E/PO products and project activities (Objective 2.2). An important part of this effort is receiving feedback from solar scientists regarding the inclusion of key concepts and their progression in the maps. This session will introduce the draft concept maps and elicit feedback from scientists.

  16. Decision-tree induction from self-mapping space based on web

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Shu-yu; ZHU Zhong-ying

    2007-01-01

    An improved decision tree method for web information retrieval with self-mapping attributes is proposed. The self-mapping tree has a value of self-mapping attribute in its internal node, and information based on dissimilarity between a pair of mapping sequences. This method selects self-mapping which exists between data by exhaustive search based on relation and attribute information. Experimental results confirm that the improved method constructs comprehensive and accurate decision tree. Moreover, an example shows that the selfmapping decision tree is promising for data mining and knowledge discovery.

  17. Orientation precision of TEM-based orientation mapping techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morawiec, A., E-mail: nmmorawi@cyf-kr.edu.pl [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kraków (Poland); Bouzy, E. [Laboratoire d' Etude des Microstructures et de Mécanique des Matériaux, Université de Metz, Metz (France); Paul, H. [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kraków (Poland); Fundenberger, J.J. [Laboratoire d' Etude des Microstructures et de Mécanique des Matériaux, Université de Metz, Metz (France)

    2014-01-15

    Automatic orientation mapping is an important addition to standard capabilities of conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as it facilitates investigation of crystalline materials. A number of different such mapping systems have been implemented. One of their crucial characteristics is the orientation resolution. The precision in determination of orientations and misorientations reached in practice by TEM-based automatic mapping systems is the main subject of the paper. The analysis is focused on two methods: first, using spot diffraction patterns and ‘template matching’, and second, using Kikuchi patterns and detection of reflections. In simple terms, for typical mapping conditions, their precisions in orientation determination with the confidence of 95% are, respectively, 1.1° and 0.3°. The results are illustrated by example maps of cellular structure in deformed Al, the case for which high orientation sensitivity matters. For more direct comparison, a novel approach to mapping is used: the same patterns are solved by each of the two methods. Proceeding from a classification of the mapping systems, the obtained results may serve as indicators of precisions of other TEM-based orientation mapping methods. The findings are of significance for selection of methods adequate to investigated materials. - Highlights: • Classification of the existing TEM-based orientation mapping systems. • Reliable data on orientation precision in TEM-based orientation maps. • Orientation precisions in spot and Kikuchi based maps estimated to be 1.1° and 0.3°. • New method of mapping by using spot and Kikuchi components of the same patterns.

  18. Development of base maps' role in soil mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Brad; Brevik, Eric

    2014-05-01

    One of the ultimate goals of soil science is the production of accurate soil maps, but historically these thematic maps have relied upon base maps for positional reference and later for parameters that help predict soil properties. This presentation reviews the history of base maps and the dependence of soil mapping on them. The availability of geographic technology for producing these base maps has constrained and directed the geographic study of soil. A lack of accurate methods for determining location limited early geographic description of soils to narratives. The availability of accurate topographic maps in the late 18th century, fueled by governments' interests in documenting national boundaries and popular interest in world atlases, provided the first base maps for soil geographers. These soil maps primarily used the topographic maps as a spatial reference onto which the thematic details were drawn. Due to the late start of a systematic topographic survey in the United States, early Soil Survey maps depended upon plat maps for spatial reference. The adoption of aerial photographs in the process of soil mapping increased the role of base maps as predictive parameters. In the current geospatial revolution, global positioning systems and geographic information systems have nearly replaced the need for base maps to provide spatial reference. Today, base maps are more likely to be used as parameters in landscape models for predicting the spatial distribution of soil properties and classes. As model parameters for digital soil maps, base maps constitute the library of predictive variables and constrain the supported resolution of the soil map. This change in the relationship between base maps and the soil map is a paradigm shift that affects fundamental definitions of geography, such as scale, resolution, and detectable features. These concepts are the essential tools used to study the spatial characteristics of Earth Systems.

  19. Conformal mappings and CR mappings on the Engel group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU QingYan; WANG Wei

    2009-01-01

    We show that conformal mappings between the Engel groups are CR or anti-CR mappings.This reduces the determination of conformal mappings to a problem in the theory of several complex analysis. The result about the group of CR automorphisms is used to determine the identity component of the group of conformal mappings on the Engel group.

  20. Conformal mappings and CR mappings on the Engel group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    We show that conformal mappings between the Engel groups are CR or anti-CR mappings. This reduces the determination of conformal mappings to a problem in the theory of several complex analysis.The result about the group of CR automorphisms is used to determine the identity component of the group of conformal mappings on the Engel group.

  1. Geologic Mapping of Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yingst, R. A.; Mest, S. C.; Berman, D. C.; Garry, W. B.; Williams, D. A.; Buczkowski, D.; Jaumann, R.; Pieters, C. M.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Frigeri, A.; Le Corre, L.; Preusker, F.; Raymond, C. A.; Reddy, V.; Russell, C. T.; Roatsch, T.; Schenk, P. M.

    2014-01-01

    We report on a preliminary global geologic map of Vesta, based on data from the Dawn spacecraft's High- Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO) and informed by Low-Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO) data. This map is part of an iterative mapping effort; the geologic map has been refined with each improvement in resolution. Vesta has a heavily-cratered surface, with large craters evident in numerous locations. The south pole is dominated by an impact structure identified before Dawn's arrival. Two large impact structures have been resolved: the younger, larger Rheasilvia structure, and the older, more degraded Veneneia structure. The surface is also characterized by a system of deep, globe-girdling equatorial troughs and ridges, as well as an older system of troughs and ridges to the north. Troughs and ridges are also evident cutting across, and spiraling arcuately from, the Rheasilvia central mound. However, no volcanic features have been unequivocally identified. Vesta can be divided very broadly into three terrains: heavily-cratered terrain; ridge-and-trough terrain (equatorial and northern); and terrain associated with the Rheasilvia crater. Localized features include bright and dark material and ejecta (some defined specifically by color); lobate deposits; and mass-wasting materials. No obvious volcanic features are evident. Stratigraphy of Vesta's geologic units suggests a history in which formation of a primary crust was followed by the formation of impact craters, including Veneneia and the associated Saturnalia Fossae unit. Formation of Rheasilvia followed, along with associated structural deformation that shaped the Divalia Fossae ridge-and-trough unit at the equator. Subsequent impacts and mass wasting events subdued impact craters, rims and portions of ridge-and-trough sets, and formed slumps and landslides, especially within crater floors and along crater rims and scarps. Subsequent to the formation of Rheasilvia, discontinuous low-albedo deposits formed or were

  2. Geologic mapping of Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yingst, R. A.; Mest, S. C.; Berman, D. C.; Garry, W. B.; Williams, D. A.; Buczkowski, D.; Jaumann, R.; Pieters, C. M.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Frigeri, A.; Le Corre, L.; Preusker, F.; Raymond, C. A.; Reddy, V.; Russell, C. T.; Roatsch, T.; Schenk, P. M.

    2014-11-01

    We report on a preliminary global geologic map of Vesta, based on data from the Dawn spacecraft's High-Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO) and informed by Low-Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO) data. This map is part of an iterative mapping effort; the geologic map has been refined with each improvement in resolution. Vesta has a heavily-cratered surface, with large craters evident in numerous locations. The south pole is dominated by an impact structure identified before Dawn's arrival. Two large impact structures have been resolved: the younger, larger Rheasilvia structure, and the older, more degraded Veneneia structure. The surface is also characterized by a system of deep, globe-girdling equatorial troughs and ridges, as well as an older system of troughs and ridges to the north. Troughs and ridges are also evident cutting across, and spiraling arcuately from, the Rheasilvia central mound. However, no volcanic features have been unequivocally identified. Vesta can be divided very broadly into three terrains: heavily-cratered terrain; ridge-and-trough terrain (equatorial and northern); and terrain associated with the Rheasilvia crater. Localized features include bright and dark material and ejecta (some defined specifically by color); lobate deposits; and mass-wasting materials. No obvious volcanic features are evident. Stratigraphy of Vesta's geologic units suggests a history in which formation of a primary crust was followed by the formation of impact craters, including Veneneia and the associated Saturnalia Fossae unit. Formation of Rheasilvia followed, along with associated structural deformation that shaped the Divalia Fossae ridge-and-trough unit at the equator. Subsequent impacts and mass wasting events subdued impact craters, rims and portions of ridge-and-trough sets, and formed slumps and landslides, especially within crater floors and along crater rims and scarps. Subsequent to the formation of Rheasilvia, discontinuous low-albedo deposits formed or were

  3. Quantum dynamical semigroups and non-decomposable positive maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benatti, Fabio; Floreanini, Roberto; Piani, Marco

    2004-06-07

    We study dynamical semigroups of positive, but not completely positive maps on finite-dimensional bipartite systems and analyze properties of their generators in relation to non-decomposability and bound-entanglement. An example of non-decomposable semigroup leading to a (4x4)-dimensional bound-entangled density matrix is explicitly obtained.

  4. Progressive Coding of Palette Images and Digital Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Søren; Salinas, J. Martin

    2002-01-01

    for the images with more colors. For street maps the 2D PPM is slightly better. The PPM based resolution progressive coding provides a better result than coding the resolution layers as individual images. Compared to GIF the resolution progressive 2D PPM's coding efficiency is significantly better. An example...

  5. Optimal entanglement witnesses from generalized reduction and Robertson maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chruscinski, Dariusz; Pytel, Justyna, E-mail: darch@fizyka.umk.pl [Institute of Physics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5/7, 87-100 Torun (Poland)

    2011-04-22

    We provide a generalization of the reduction and Robertson positive maps in matrix algebras. They give rise to a new class of optimal entanglement witnesses. Their structural physical approximation is analyzed. As a byproduct we provide new examples of PPT (positive partial transpose) entangled states.

  6. Optimal entanglement witnesses from generalized reduction and Robertson maps

    CERN Document Server

    Chruściński, Dariusz

    2010-01-01

    We provide a generalization of the reduction and Robertson positive maps in matrix algebras. They give rise to a new class of optimal entanglement witnesses. Their structural physical approximations is analyzed. As a byproduct we provide a new examples of PPT (Positive Partial Transpose) entangled states.

  7. Optimal entanglement witnesses from generalized reduction and Robertson maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chruściński, Dariusz; Pytel, Justyna

    2011-04-01

    We provide a generalization of the reduction and Robertson positive maps in matrix algebras. They give rise to a new class of optimal entanglement witnesses. Their structural physical approximation is analyzed. As a byproduct we provide new examples of PPT (positive partial transpose) entangled states.

  8. Examples from Astronomy for High School Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieterich, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    A formal course in physics is increasingly becoming a standard requirement in the high school curriculum. With that dissemination comes the challenge of reaching and motivating a population that is more diverse in their academic abilities and intrinsic motivation. The abstract nature of pure physics is often made more accessible when motivated by examples from everyday life, and providing copious mathematical as well as conceptual examples has become standard practice in high school physics textbooks. Astronomy is a naturally captivating subject and astronomical examples are often successful in capturing the curiosity of high school students as well as the general population. This project seeks to diversify the range of pedagogical materials available to the high school physics instructor by compiling and publishing specific examples where an astronomical concept can be used to motivate the physics curriculum. This collection of examples will consist of both short problems suitable for daily homework assignments as well as longer project style activities. Collaborations are encouraged and inquiries should be directed to sdieterich at carnegiescience dot edu.This work is funded by the NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowship Program through NSF grant AST-1400680.

  9. Analysis for Producing a Facsimile of the Cadastral Map of Varaždin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Husak

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates and suggests methods for producing a facsimile of the 1 860 cadastral map of Varaždin. The methods used to produce the map, the coordinate systems, map contents, usage, maintenance and damage are described. Three samples from the map that display the elements of damage noted were researched, and the possibility of replacing damaged sections with undamaged sections using digital methods investigated. The sources available were the original cadastral colour map of Varaždin, along with the line art cadastral map and field cadastral sketches. The original colour and line art maps were scanned using the DeSkan Express scanning system for large formats. A flatbed UMAX Mirage II A3 scanner was used for scanning the field cadastral map. For the research image-processing, Adobe Photoshop CE 7.0 software was used, although it was primarily designed for processing photographs. The colour separation method was rejected from the start, since the map was made by hand. The paper discusses the possibility of copying and inserting missing parts from additional map sources, changing the colour of the paper to white or another colour, removing the map content added in red ink and lead pencil, and so on. The discussion is based on actual examples from the digital image. The conclusion suggests image-processing methods for achieving optimal results in producing a facsimile of the Varaždin cadastral map.Keywords: facsimile; cadastral map; map content; scanning; digital image processing

  10. Atlas of knowledge anyone can map

    CERN Document Server

    Börner, Katy

    2015-01-01

    Maps of physical spaces locate us in the world and help us navigate unfamiliar routes. Maps of topical spaces help us visualize the extent and structure of our collective knowledge; they reveal bursts of activity, pathways of ideas, and borders that beg to be crossed. This book, from the author of Atlas of Science, describes the power of topical maps, providing readers with principles for visualizing knowledge and offering as examples forty large-scale and more than 100 small-scale full-color maps. Today, data literacy is becoming as important as language literacy. Well-designed visualizations can rescue us from a sea of data, helping us to make sense of information, connect ideas, and make better decisions in real time. In Atlas of Knowledge, leading visualization expert Katy Borner makes the case for a systems science approach to science and technology studies and explains different types and levels of analysis. Drawing on fifteen years of teaching and tool development, she introduces a theoretical framewor...

  11. Conformal mapping and convergence of Krylov iterations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driscoll, T.A.; Trefethen, L.N. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Connections between conformal mapping and matrix iterations have been known for many years. The idea underlying these connections is as follows. Suppose the spectrum of a matrix or operator A is contained in a Jordan region E in the complex plane with 0 not an element of E. Let {phi}(z) denote a conformal map of the exterior of E onto the exterior of the unit disk, with {phi}{infinity} = {infinity}. Then 1/{vert_bar}{phi}(0){vert_bar} is an upper bound for the optimal asymptotic convergence factor of any Krylov subspace iteration. This idea can be made precise in various ways, depending on the matrix iterations, on whether A is finite or infinite dimensional, and on what bounds are assumed on the non-normality of A. This paper explores these connections for a variety of matrix examples, making use of a new MATLAB Schwarz-Christoffel Mapping Toolbox developed by the first author. Unlike the earlier Fortran Schwarz-Christoffel package SCPACK, the new toolbox computes exterior as well as interior Schwarz-Christoffel maps, making it easy to experiment with spectra that are not necessarily symmetric about an axis.

  12. Mapping interfacial excess in atom probe data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felfer, Peter, E-mail: peter.felfer@sydney.edu.au [School of Aerospace Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney (Australia); Scherrer, Barbara [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney (Australia); Eidgenossische Technische Hochschule Zürich (Switzerland); Demeulemeester, Jelle [Imec vzw, Kapeldreef 75, Heverlee 3001 (Belgium); Vandervorst, Wilfried [Imec vzw, Kapeldreef 75, Heverlee 3001 (Belgium); Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Cairney, Julie M. [School of Aerospace Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney (Australia)

    2015-12-15

    Using modern wide-angle atom probes, it is possible to acquire atomic scale 3D data containing 1000 s of nm{sup 2} of interfaces. It is therefore possible to probe the distribution of segregated species across these interfaces. Here, we present techniques that allow the production of models for interfacial excess (IE) mapping and discuss the underlying considerations and sampling statistics. We also show, how the same principles can be used to achieve thickness mapping of thin films. We demonstrate the effectiveness on example applications, including the analysis of segregation to a phase boundary in stainless steel, segregation to a metal–ceramic interface and the assessment of thickness variations of the gate oxide in a fin-FET. - Highlights: • Using computational geometry, interfacial excess can be mapped for various features in APT. • Suitable analysis models can be created by combining manual modelling and mesh generation algorithms. • Thin film thickness can be mapped with high accuracy using this technique.

  13. Biharmonic Maps and Laguerre Minimal Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Abu Muhanna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A Laguerre surface is known to be minimal if and only if its corresponding isotropic map is biharmonic. For every Laguerre surface Φ is its associated surface Ψ=1+u2Φ, where u lies in the unit disk. In this paper, the projection of the surface Ψ associated to a Laguerre minimal surface is shown to be biharmonic. A complete characterization of Ψ is obtained under the assumption that the corresponding isotropic map of the Laguerre minimal surface is harmonic. A sufficient and necessary condition is also derived for Ψ to be a graph. Estimates of the Gaussian curvature to the Laguerre minimal surface are obtained, and several illustrative examples are given.

  14. SVAMP: Sequence variation analysis, maps and phylogeny

    KAUST Repository

    Naeem, Raeece

    2014-04-03

    Summary: SVAMP is a stand-alone desktop application to visualize genomic variants (in variant call format) in the context of geographical metadata. Users of SVAMP are able to generate phylogenetic trees and perform principal coordinate analysis in real time from variant call format (VCF) and associated metadata files. Allele frequency map, geographical map of isolates, Tajima\\'s D metric, single nucleotide polymorphism density, GC and variation density are also available for visualization in real time. We demonstrate the utility of SVAMP in tracking a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus outbreak from published next-generation sequencing data across 15 countries. We also demonstrate the scalability and accuracy of our software on 245 Plasmodium falciparum malaria isolates from three continents. Availability and implementation: The Qt/C++ software code, binaries, user manual and example datasets are available at http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/svamp. © The Author 2014.

  15. Mapping moveout approximations in TI media

    KAUST Repository

    Stovas, Alexey

    2013-11-21

    Moveout approximations play a very important role in seismic modeling, inversion, and scanning for parameters in complex media. We developed a scheme to map one-way moveout approximations for transversely isotropic media with a vertical axis of symmetry (VTI), which is widely available, to the tilted case (TTI) by introducing the effective tilt angle. As a result, we obtained highly accurate TTI moveout equations analogous with their VTI counterparts. Our analysis showed that the most accurate approximation is obtained from the mapping of generalized approximation. The new moveout approximations allow for, as the examples demonstrate, accurate description of moveout in the TTI case even for vertical heterogeneity. The proposed moveout approximations can be easily used for inversion in a layered TTI medium because the parameters of these approximations explicitly depend on corresponding effective parameters in a layered VTI medium.

  16. Words and Maps: Developmental Changes in Mental Models of Spatial Information Acquired from Descriptions and Depictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uttal, David H.; Fisher, Joan A.; Taylor, Holly A.

    2006-01-01

    People acquire spatial information from many sources, including maps, verbal descriptions, and navigating in the environment. The different sources present spatial information in different ways. For example, maps can show many spatial relations simultaneously, but in a description, each spatial relation must be presented sequentially. The present…

  17. Fixed Point Theorems for Hybrid Rational Geraghty Contractive Mappings in Ordered b-Metric Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Zabihi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce the new notion of a hybrid rational Geraghty contractive mapping and investigate the existence of fixed point and coincidence point for such mappings in ordered b-metric spaces. We also provide an example to illustrate the results presented herein. Finally, we establish an existence theorem for a solution of an integral equation.

  18. Prevention among immigrants: the example of Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spallek Jacob

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A large and increasing part of the European population has a history of migration. Germany, for example, is home to about 15 million people with migrant background, which amounts to 19% of its population. Migrants may have differences in their lifestyle, health beliefs and risk factors compared to the autochthonous populations. Discussion As for example studies on children's participation in routine prevention activities have shown, these differences can have a relevant impact on the access of migrants to the health care system and are likely to lower their participation in prevention programs compared to the autochthonous population. To increase the uptake of prevention programs, barriers to access must be identified and approaches to reduce them must be developed. Summary Taking the example of Germany, a need exists for prevention programs that include (migrant sensitive and specifically address (migrant specific migrants. These should be of sufficient scale, evidence-based, sustainable and evaluated at regular intervals.

  19. Killer "Killer Examples" for Design Patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caspersen, Michael Edelgaard; Alphonce, Carl; Decker, Adrienne

    2007-01-01

    Giving students an appreciation of the benefits of using design patterns and an ability to use them effectively in developing code presents several interesting pedagogical challenges. This paper discusses pedagogical lessons learned at the "Killer Examples" for Design Patterns and Objects First s...... series of workshops held at the Object Oriented Programming, Systems, Languages and Applications (OOPSLA) conference over the past four years. It also showcases three "killer examples" which can be used to support the teaching of design patterns.......Giving students an appreciation of the benefits of using design patterns and an ability to use them effectively in developing code presents several interesting pedagogical challenges. This paper discusses pedagogical lessons learned at the "Killer Examples" for Design Patterns and Objects First...

  20. A New Method for Local Dependence Map and Its Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu H. ÜÇER

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This work introduces a new method to construct local dependence map based on the estimate for the linear local dependence function H(x,y, which is generalization of Pearson correlation coefficient. The new local dependence map demonstrates a practical tool for local dependence structure between two random variables. The analysis of theoretical concepts is verified by an application based on real datasets in endocrinology. Material and Methods: The method, local dependence map, requires the estimation new local dependence function which is based on regression concepts. After this local dependence function must be converted with local permutation tests in local dependence map which make the local dependence function more interpretable by identifying the regions of positive, negative and zero local dependence. Results: Based on the proposed method and we give two examples based on the real data C-peptide, insulin and TSH, FT3, FT4 from endocrinology in order to show the advantageous of the current dependence maps. They show interesting local dependence features on the other hand overall correlation coefficient is not much informative. Conclusion: Scalar dependence measures such as correlation coefficient are often used as a measure of dependence for data in medical and biological science. However, they cannot reflect the complex dependence structure of two variables. Hence we are now concerned exclusively with the statistical aspects of the dependence structure in dependence maps that will be constructed for the dataset. In this work a new method to construct local dependence map based on the regression concept for the linear local dependence function H(x,y, which is generalization of Pearson correlation coefficient, is established. The proposed new local dependence map is devoted to two examples based on the real data C-peptide, insulin and TSH, FT3, FT4 from endocrinology in order to illustrate the usefulness of the current dependence

  1. Target-specific digital soil mapping supporting terroir mapping in Tokaj Wine Region, Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takács, Katalin; Szabó, József; Laborczi, Annamária; Szatmári, Gábor; László, Péter; Koós, Sándor; Bakacsi, Zsófia; Pásztor, László

    2016-04-01

    delineation. The spatial extension was performed by two, different methods which are widely applied in digital soil mapping. Regression kriging was used for creating continuous soil property maps, category type soil maps were compiled by classification trees method. Accuracy assessment was also provided for all of the soil map products. Our poster will present the summary of the project workflow - the design of sampling strategy, field survey, digital soil mapping process - and some examples of the resulting soil property maps indicating their applicability in terroir delineation. Acknowledgement: The authors are grateful to the Tokaj Kereskedöház Ltd. which has been supporting the project for the survey of the state of vineyards. Digital soil mapping was partly supported by the Hungarian National Scientific Research Foundation (OTKA, Grant No. K105167).

  2. Learning Inverse Rig Mappings by Nonlinear Regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Daniel; Saito, Jun; Komura, Taku

    2016-11-11

    We present a framework to design inverse rig-functions - functions that map low level representations of a character's pose such as joint positions or surface geometry to the representation used by animators called the animation rig. Animators design scenes using an animation rig, a framework widely adopted in animation production which allows animators to design character poses and geometry via intuitive parameters and interfaces. Yet most state-of-the-art computer animation techniques control characters through raw, low level representations such as joint angles, joint positions, or vertex coordinates. This difference often stops the adoption of state-of-the-art techniques in animation production. Our framework solves this issue by learning a mapping between the low level representations of the pose and the animation rig. We use nonlinear regression techniques, learning from example animation sequences designed by the animators. When new motions are provided in the skeleton space, the learned mapping is used to estimate the rig controls that reproduce such a motion. We introduce two nonlinear functions for producing such a mapping: Gaussian process regression and feedforward neural networks. The appropriate solution depends on the nature of the rig and the amount of data available for training. We show our framework applied to various examples including articulated biped characters, quadruped characters, facial animation rigs, and deformable characters. With our system, animators have the freedom to apply any motion synthesis algorithm to arbitrary rigging and animation pipelines for immediate editing. This greatly improves the productivity of 3D animation, while retaining the flexibility and creativity of artistic input.

  3. Maps, immersions and permutations

    CERN Document Server

    Coquereaux, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We consider the problem of counting and of listing topologically inequivalent "planar" {4-valent} maps with a single component and a given number n of vertices. This enables us to count and to tabulate immersions of a circle in a sphere (spherical curves), extending results by Arnold and followers. Different options where the circle and/or the sphere are/is oriented are considered in turn, following Arnold's classification of the different types of symmetries. We also consider the case of bicolourable and bicoloured maps or immersions, where faces are bicoloured. Our method extends to immersions of a circle in a higher genus Riemann surface. There the bicolourability is no longer automatic and has to be assumed. We thus have two separate countings in non zero genus, that of bicolourable maps and that of general maps. We use a classical method of encoding maps in terms of permutations, on which the constraints of "one-componentness" and of a given genus may be applied. Depending on the orientation issue and on...

  4. Web Interactive Campus Map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marylene S. Eder

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Interactive campus map is a web based application that can be accessed through a web browser. With the Google Map Application Programming Interface availability of the overlay function has been taken advantage to create custom map functionalities. Collection of building points were gathered for routing and to create polygons which serves as a representation of each building. The previous campus map provides a static visual representation of the campus. It uses legends building name and its corresponding building number in providing information. Due to its limited capabilities it became a realization to the researchers to create an interactive campus map.Storing data about the building room and staff information and university events and campus guide are among the primary features that this study has to offer. Interactive Web-based Campus Information System is intended in providing a Campus Information System.It is open to constant updates user-friendly for both trained and untrained users and capable of responding to all needs of users and carrying out analyses. Based on the data gathered through questionnaires researchers analyzed the results of the test survey and proved that the system is user friendly deliver information to users and the important features that the students expect.

  5. Introduction to "Mapping Vietnameseness"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hue-Tam Ho Tai

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Vietnam and China are currently engaged in a map war, with each country using ancient maps to buttress its claims to territorial sovereignty over some uninhabited islands in the South China Sea (in Chinese terminology, also known as the Eastern Sea (in Vietnamese. But what do maps in fact represent? What is meant by “territory”? How are territorial limits conceived? These questions were raised in a May 2015 workshop inspired by Thongchai Winichakul’s Siam Mapped: A History of the Geo-Body of a Nation (1994, a groundbreaking book that traces the transformation of Thai geographical consciousness as a result of Siam’s encounter with Western powers in the nineteenth century. While many of Thongchai’s insights apply to the Vietnamese case, as the first of the three articles included in this special issue of Cross-Currents shows, some of the 2015 workshop participants’ conclusions departed from his, especially regarding the formation of a Vietnamese geographical consciousness before the colonial period.[i] This is true of the other two papers, which focus specifically on the construction of borders and the associated production of maps in the nineteenth century before French colonial conquest... Notes 1 Thanks are due to the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Change in Gottingen, Germany, for its gracious hosting and generous funding of the conference, together with the Asia Center of Harvard University.

  6. Active learning techniques for librarians practical examples

    CERN Document Server

    Walsh, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    A practical work outlining the theory and practice of using active learning techniques in library settings. It explains the theory of active learning and argues for its importance in our teaching and is illustrated using a large number of examples of techniques that can be easily transferred and used in teaching library and information skills to a range of learners within all library sectors. These practical examples recognise that for most of us involved in teaching library and information skills the one off session is the norm, so we need techniques that allow us to quickly grab and hold our

  7. Multiple factor analysis by example using R

    CERN Document Server

    Pagès, Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    Multiple factor analysis (MFA) enables users to analyze tables of individuals and variables in which the variables are structured into quantitative, qualitative, or mixed groups. Written by the co-developer of this methodology, Multiple Factor Analysis by Example Using R brings together the theoretical and methodological aspects of MFA. It also includes examples of applications and details of how to implement MFA using an R package (FactoMineR).The first two chapters cover the basic factorial analysis methods of principal component analysis (PCA) and multiple correspondence analysis (MCA). The

  8. Worked examples in engineering field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Fuller, A J Baden

    1976-01-01

    Worked Examples in Engineering Field Theory is a product of a lecture course given by the author to first-year students in the Department of Engineering in the University of Leicester. The book presents a summary of field theory together with a large number of worked examples and solutions to all problems given in the author's other book, Engineering Field Theory. The 14 chapters of this book are organized into two parts. Part I focuses on the concept of flux including electric flux. This part also tackles the application of the theory in gravitation, ideal fluid flow, and magnetism. Part II d

  9. Eclipse plugin development by example beginner's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Blewitt, Alex

    2013-01-01

    A Beginner's Guide following the ""by Example"" approach. There will be 5-8 major examples that will be used in the book to develop advanced plugins with the Eclipse IDE.This book is for Java developers who are familiar with Eclipse as a Java IDE and are interested in learning how to develop plug-ins for Eclipse. No prior knowledge of Eclipse plug-in development or OSGi is necessary, although you are expected to know how to create, run, and debug Java programs in Eclipse.

  10. Tutorial examples for uncertainty quantification methods.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Bord, Sarah [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2015-08-01

    This report details the work accomplished during my 2015 SULI summer internship at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, CA. During this internship, I worked on multiple tasks with the common goal of making uncertainty quantification (UQ) methods more accessible to the general scientific community. As part of my work, I created a comprehensive numerical integration example to incorporate into the user manual of a UQ software package. Further, I developed examples involving heat transfer through a window to incorporate into tutorial lectures that serve as an introduction to UQ methods.

  11. REST-MapReduce: An Integrated Interface but Differentiated Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Hyuk Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the fast deployment of cloud computing, MapReduce architectures are becoming the major technologies for mobile cloud computing. The concept of MapReduce was first introduced as a novel programming model and implementation for a large set of computing devices. In this research, we propose a novel concept of REST-MapReduce, enabling users to use only the REST interface without using the MapReduce architecture. This approach provides a higher level of abstraction by integration of the two types of access interface, REST API and MapReduce. The motivation of this research stems from the slower response time for accessing simple RDBMS on Hadoop than direct access to RDMBS. This is because there is overhead to job scheduling, initiating, starting, tracking, and management during MapReduce-based parallel execution. Therefore, we provide a good performance for REST Open API service and for MapReduce, respectively. This is very useful for constructing REST Open API services on Hadoop hosting services, for example, Amazon AWS (Macdonald, 2005 or IBM Smart Cloud. For evaluating performance of our REST-MapReduce framework, we conducted experiments with Jersey REST web server and Hadoop. Experimental result shows that our approach outperforms conventional approaches.

  12. Working towards a clearer and more helpful hazard map: investigating the influence of hazard map design on hazard communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M. A.; Lindsay, J. M.; Gaillard, J.

    2015-12-01

    Globally, geological hazards are communicated using maps. In traditional hazard mapping practice, scientists analyse data about a hazard, and then display the results on a map for stakeholder and public use. However, this one-way, top-down approach to hazard communication is not necessarily effective or reliable. The messages which people take away will be dependent on the way in which they read, interpret, and understand the map, a facet of hazard communication which has been relatively unexplored. Decades of cartographic studies suggest that variables in the visual representation of data on maps, such as colour and symbology, can have a powerful effect on how people understand map content. In practice, however, there is little guidance or consistency in how hazard information is expressed and represented on maps. Accordingly, decisions are often made based on subjective preference, rather than research-backed principles. Here we present the results of a study in which we explore how hazard map design features can influence hazard map interpretation, and we propose a number of considerations for hazard map design. A series of hazard maps were generated, with each one showing the same probabilistic volcanic ashfall dataset, but using different verbal and visual variables (e.g., different colour schemes, data classifications, probabilistic formats). Following a short pilot study, these maps were used in an online survey of 110 stakeholders and scientists in New Zealand. Participants answered 30 open-ended and multiple choice questions about ashfall hazard based on the different maps. Results suggest that hazard map design can have a significant influence on the messages readers take away. For example, diverging colour schemes were associated with concepts of "risk" and decision-making more than sequential schemes, and participants made more precise estimates of hazard with isarithmic data classifications compared to binned or gradational shading. Based on such

  13. A new method for comprehensive division of mountainous area: taking Huaihua City as an example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes principles and measures of comprehensivedivision of mountainous areas, as well as clarifies meaning, structure, function and path established for the map and file information visibility system (MFIVS). And then, taking Huaihua City of Hunan Province as an example, and based on the MFIVS means, concrete attempts on regionalization are carried out. The result is relatively objective and accurate, which illuminates that the method is a comprehensive one with the characteristics of concision, applicability and effectiveness.

  14. A random map implementation of implicit filters

    CERN Document Server

    Morzfeld, Matthias; Atkins, Ethan; Chorin, Alexandre J

    2011-01-01

    Implicit particle filters for data assimilation generate high-probability samples by representing each particle location as a separate function of a common reference variable. This representation requires that a certain underdetermined equation be solved for each particle and at each time an observation becomes available. We present a new implementation of implicit filters in which we find the solution of the equation via a random map. As examples, we assimilate data for a stochastically driven Lorenz system with sparse observations and for a stochastic Kuramoto-Sivashinski equation with observations that are sparse in both space and time.

  15. Offshore wind mapping Mediterranean area using SAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calaudi, Rosamaria; Arena, Felice; Badger, Merete;

    2013-01-01

    Satellite observations of the ocean surface, for example from Synthetic Aperture Radars (SAR), provide information about the spatial wind variability over large areas. This is of special interest in the Mediterranean Sea, where spatial wind information is only provided by sparse buoys, often...... with long periods of missing data. Here, we focus on evaluating the use of SAR for offshore wind mapping. Preliminary results from the analysis of SAR-based ocean winds in Mediterranean areas show interesting large scale wind flow features consistent with results from previous studies using numerical models...

  16. Mapping PUNITY to UniNet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU GuoFu(周国富); YUAN ChongYi(袁崇义)

    2003-01-01

    To solve the problems of the interleaving assumption and the single resource inPUNITY (Petri net and UNITY) and Petri net respectively, this paper proposes a set of mappingrules from PUNITY to UniNet. Based on these rules, problems of one field can be transformed toproblems of the other field and powerful tools of Petri net and UNITY can be used. The papergives a sketch of the mapping rules and applies the rules to an example. Meanwhile, the mappingrules can help computer to translate PUNITY to UniNet easily.

  17. Immune Genetic Learning of Fuzzy Cognitive Map

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Chun-mei; HE Yue; TANG Bing-yong

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a hybrid methodology of automatically constructing fuzzy cognitive map (FCM). The method uses immune genetic algorithm to learn the connection matrix of FCM. In the algorithm, the DNA coding method is used and an immune operator based on immune mechanism is constructed. The characteristics of the system and the experts' knowledge are abstracted as vaccine for restraining the degenerative phenomena during evolution so as to improve the algorithmic efficiency. Finally, an illustrative example is provided, and its results suggest that the method is capable of automatically generating FCM model.

  18. Ergodicity of polygonal slap maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Magno, Gianluigi; Lopes Dias, João; Duarte, Pedro; Gaivão, José Pedro

    2014-08-01

    Polygonal slap maps are piecewise affine expanding maps of the interval obtained by projecting the sides of a polygon along their normals onto the perimeter of the polygon. These maps arise in the study of polygonal billiards with non-specular reflection laws. We study the absolutely continuous invariant probabilities (acips) of the slap maps for several polygons, including regular polygons and triangles. We also present a general method for constructing polygons with slap maps with more than one ergodic acip.

  19. The World Stress Map

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Knowledge of the stress field in the Earth's crust is a key issue for the understanding of geodynamic processes,seismic hazard assessment, and stability of underground openings such as waste disposals, tunnels, mines or wells, and reservoir management. The World Stress Map project is a collaborative project of academia,industry and governmental organizations that aims to understand the states and sources of tectonic stresses in the Earth's crust. We present the Worm Stress Map at 1:46,000,000 scale as a result of more than two decades of international collaboration. The map reveals that the first-order pattern of stress is of plate-wide scale, indicating that plate boundary forces are the major control of the stress orientations and the tectonic regime.

  20. Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Data: An Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikka, Anjoo; And Others

    Methodology from an ongoing research study to validate teaching techniques for deaf and blind students provides an example of the ways that several types of quantitative and qualitative data can be combined in analysis. Four teacher and student pairs were selected. The students were between 14 and 21 years old, had both auditory and visual…

  1. Examples for Application of Hegu (LI 4)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Linchao

    2006-01-01

    @@ Hegu (LI 4), a source point of Large Intestine Channel for clearing intestine and regulating stomach and spleen, can be clinically used to treat stomachache, diarrhea, vomiting, hiccup and constipation caused by dysfunction of the spleen,stomach and intestine with good curative effect.Examples are taken as follows:

  2. Returnable containers: an example of reverse logistics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.G. Kroon (Leo); G.M.C. Vrijens

    1996-01-01

    textabstractConsiders the application of returnable containers as an example of reverse logistics. A returnable container is a type of secondary packaging that can be used several times in the same form, in contrast with traditional cardboard boxes. For this equipment to be used, a system for the re

  3. Student activation: Considerations and successful examples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjerbæk Søtoft, Lene

    My development project focuses on student activitation. I incorporated various types of activation into two courses, which I have been teaching in the autumn 2012. Three practical examples are presented below, which I found has been very successfull in my courses. Additionally, I present some of my...

  4. Data Management in Ordinary English: Examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Charles H.

    The use of a system for on-line conversation in ordinary English grammatical patterns is illustrated by a number of examples showing how data bases of diverse content and structure may be described, interrogated, and modified. It is suggested that a system composed of a user extendable subset of English, a natural language compiler to translate…

  5. Students' Views of Example Generation Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Sinead; O'Shea, Ann; Pfeiffer, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    We report here on students' views of example generation tasks assigned to them in two first year undergraduate Calculus courses. The design and use of such tasks was undertaken as part of a project which aimed to afford students opportunities to develop their thinking skills and their conceptual understanding. In interviews with 10 students, we…

  6. Selected critical examples of scientometric publication analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingwersen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    of authors, institutions or countries per publication indexed by Web of Science. Methodology: The paper uses examples from earlier research evaluation studies and cases based on online data to describe issues, problematic details, pitfalls and how to overcome them in publication analysis with respect...

  7. Mapping the Frozen Void

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suutarinen, Aleksi; Fraser, Helen

    2013-07-01

    Reactions on the surfaces of dust grains play a vital role in the overall chemistry of interstellar matter. These grains become covered by icy layers, which are the largest molecular reservoir in the interstellar medium. Given this, it is surprising that the effect ice has on the overall chain of reactions is poorly characterized. One step on the path of gaining better understanding here is to develop methods of figuring out how much ice is present in these clouds, the links between ice components, and synergy between the ices and gas phase molecules. We do this by examining the absorption spectra of ices on lines of sight towards several stars behind clouds of interstellar matter. From these we can reconstruct spatial maps of the ice distribution on scales of as little as 1000 AU, as a test of the chemical variation within a cloud. By overlapping the ice data with other maps of the same region (gas emission, temperature, density etc) we create combined maps to reveal the astrochemistry of star-forming regions and pre-stellar cores. In this poster we present the continuing results of our ice mapping programme, using data from the AKARI satellite, specifically in slitless spectroscopy observations in the NIR. In this region the key ice features encompass H2O, CO and CO2. The maps illustrate the power of our dedicated AKARI data reduction pipeline, and the novelty of our observing programme. We also detail the next steps' in our ice mapping research. The method is being expanded to include the full 10'x10' AKARI field of view, taking account of image distortion induced by the dispersing optics. These maps are then combined with exiting gas-phase observations and SCUBA maps. The latest attempts at this are shown here. What is clear already is that it is difficult to predict ice abundances from factors such as extinction or gas density alone, and that ice formation and evolution can vary hugely over even very small astronomical scales.

  8. Graphene Conductance Uniformity Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buron, Jonas Christian Due; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth; Bøggild, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a combination of micro four-point probe (M4PP) and non-contact terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) measurements for centimeter scale quantitative mapping of the sheet conductance of large area chemical vapor deposited graphene films. Dual configuration M4PP measurements......, demonstrated on graphene for the first time, provide valuable statistical insight into the influence of microscale defects on the conductance, while THz-TDS has potential as a fast, non-contact metrology method for mapping of the spatially averaged nanoscopic conductance on wafer-scale graphene with scan times......, dominating the microscale conductance of the investigated graphene film....

  9. Some examples of geomorphodiversity in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panizza, Mario

    2014-05-01

    The concept of geomorphodiversity (Panizza, 2009) is presented: "the critical and specific assessment of the geomorphological features of a territory, by comparing them in a way both extrinsic (comparison of the geomorphological characteristics with those from other territories) and intrinsic (comparison of the geomorphological characteristics with other areas within the territory itself) and taking into account the level of their scientific quality, the scale of investigation and the purpose of the research". A first example concerns the Dolomites: they have been included in the UNESCO World Heritage List because of their exceptional beauty and unique landscape, together with their scientific importance from the geological and geomorphological point of view. They are of international significance for geomorphodiversity, as the classic site for the development of mountains in dolomite limestone and present a wide range of landforms related to erosion, tectonics and glaciation. They represent a kind of high altitude, open air laboratory of geomorphological heritage of exceptional global value, among the most extraordinary and accessible in the world and ideal for researching, teaching, understanding and developing Earth Science theories. The second example concerns the Emilia-Romagna Apennines, candidate for enrolment in the List of European Geoparks: they show a multifaceted and complex image from the international and regional geomorphological (extrinsic and intrinsic geomorphodiversity) point of view and are an educational example for illustrating morphotectonic evolution, stratigraphic and sedimentological sequences and morpholithological peculiarities connected with gypsum karst and clay mass wasting phenomena. The third example concerns the Vesuvius, one of the National Italian Parks: it shows an extrinsic geomorphodiversity mainly referred to the type of eruptions, with some exemplary processes inserted in international volcanic nomenclature; it makes up an

  10. Data mining theories, algorithms, and examples

    CERN Document Server

    Ye, Nong

    2013-01-01

    AN OVERVIEW OF DATA MINING METHODOLOGIESIntroduction to data mining methodologiesMETHODOLOGIES FOR MINING CLASSIFICATION AND PREDICTION PATTERNSRegression modelsBayes classifiersDecision treesMulti-layer feedforward artificial neural networksSupport vector machinesSupervised clusteringMETHODOLOGIES FOR MINING CLUSTERING AND ASSOCIATION PATTERNSHierarchical clusteringPartitional clusteringSelf-organized mapProbability distribution estimationAssociation rulesBayesian networksMETHODOLOGIES FOR MINING DATA REDUCTION PATTERNSPrincipal components analysisMulti-dimensional scalingLatent variable anal

  11. Comparing the effects of worked examples and modeling examples on learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerheide, Vincent; Loyens, Sofie M M; Van Gog, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    Example-based learning is an effective instructional strategy for students with low prior knowledge, and is increasingly being used in online learning environments. However, examples can take many different forms and little is known about whether and how form affects learning outcomes. Therefore, th

  12. The Facilities Management Value Map

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker

    2008-01-01

    The paper is based on research from 21 cases studies on Facilities Management (FM) in the Nordic countries. The work also relates to a working group on “Highlighting the Added Value of FM” under Nordic FM. The aim has been to establish a conceptual framework to discuss, understand and explain the...... and the main stakeholder that benefits from the added value of FM. The framework will be presented together with an illustrative example from practice of how FM can create added value.......The paper is based on research from 21 cases studies on Facilities Management (FM) in the Nordic countries. The work also relates to a working group on “Highlighting the Added Value of FM” under Nordic FM. The aim has been to establish a conceptual framework to discuss, understand and explain...... the ways FM can create added value. The method has found inspiration in the strategic mapping from balanced score card methodology. The result is identification of the main resources, processes and products/deliveries in FM, the principal ways FM creates impacts on the core business as well as society...

  13. GLOBAL MAPPING PROJECT – APPLICATIONS AND DEVELOPMENT OF VERSION 2 DATASET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ubukawa

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The Global Mapping Project aims to develop basic geospatial information of the whole land area of the globe, named Global Map, through the cooperation of National Mapping Organizations (NMOs around the world. The Global Map data can be a base of global geospatial infrastructure and is composed of eight layers: Boundaries, Drainage, Transportation, Population Centers, Elevation, Land Use, Land Cover and Vegetation. The Global Map Version 1 was released in 2008, and the Version 2 will be released in 2013 as the data are to be updated every five years. In 2009, the International Steering Committee for Global Mapping (ISCGM adopted new Specifications to develop the Global Map Version 2 with a change of its format so that it is compatible with the international standards, namely ISO 19136 and ISO 19115. With the support of the secretariat of ISCGM, the project participating countries are accelerating their data development toward the completion of the global coverage in 2013, while some countries have already released their Global Map version 2 datasets since 2010. Global Map data are available from the Internet free of charge for non-commercial purposes, which can be used to predict, assess, prepare for and cope with global issues by combining with other spatial data. There are a lot of Global Map applications in various fields, and further utilization of Global Map is expected. This paper summarises the activities toward the development of the Global Map Version 2 as well as some examples of the Global Map applications in various fields.

  14. On the structure of positive maps. II. Low dimensional matrix algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Władysław A.; Tylec, Tomasz I.

    2013-07-01

    We use a new idea that emerged in the examination of exposed positive maps between matrix algebras to investigate in more detail the differences and similarities between unital positive maps on M2 ({C}) and M3({C}). Our main tool stems from classical Grothendieck theorem on tensor product of Banach spaces and is an older and more general version of Choi-Jamiołkowski isomorphism between positive maps and block positive Choi matrices. It takes into account the correct topology on the latter set that is induced by the uniform topology on positive maps. In this setting, we show that in M2({C}) case a large class of nice positive maps can be generated from the small set of maps represented by self-adjoint unitaries, 2Px with x maximally entangled vector and p⊗ {1} with p rank 1 projector. We indicate problems with passing this result to M3({C}) case. Among similarities, in both M2({C}) and M3({C}) cases any unital positive map represented by self-adjoint unitary is unitarily equivalent to the transposition map. Consequently, we obtain a large family of exposed maps. Furthermore, for M3({C}) there appear new non-trivial class of maps represented by Choi matrices with square equal to a projector. We examine this case. We also investigate a convex structure of the Choi map, the first example of non-decomposable map. As a result the nature of the Choi map will be explained.

  15. The use of value stream mapping to introduction of organizational innovation in industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Wolniak

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Organizational innovation is an important activity affecting the productivity of the organization. This paper presents a method of lean management – the method of value stream mapping. On the basis of the literature we shows the main features of the method. For example, a sample of industrial companies is an example of applying this method in the field of organizational innovation. This paper presents the current state map and a map of the future by focusing on the effects of the method.

  16. Comparison between detailed digital and conventional soil maps of an area with complex geology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osmar Bazaglia Filho

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Since different pedologists will draw different soil maps of a same area, it is important to compare the differences between mapping by specialists and mapping techniques, as for example currently intensively discussed Digital Soil Mapping. Four detailed soil maps (scale 1:10.000 of a 182-ha sugarcane farm in the county of Rafard, São Paulo State, Brazil, were compared. The area has a large variation of soil formation factors. The maps were drawn independently by four soil scientists and compared with a fifth map obtained by a digital soil mapping technique. All pedologists were given the same set of information. As many field expeditions and soil pits as required by each surveyor were provided to define the mapping units (MUs. For the Digital Soil Map (DSM, spectral data were extracted from Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM imagery as well as six terrain attributes from the topographic map of the area. These data were summarized by principal component analysis to generate the map designs of groups through Fuzzy K-means clustering. Field observations were made to identify the soils in the MUs and classify them according to the Brazilian Soil Classification System (BSCS. To compare the conventional and digital (DSM soil maps, they were crossed pairwise to generate confusion matrices that were mapped. The categorical analysis at each classification level of the BSCS showed that the agreement between the maps decreased towards the lower levels of classification and the great influence of the surveyor on both the mapping and definition of MUs in the soil map. The average correspondence between the conventional and DSM maps was similar. Therefore, the method used to obtain the DSM yielded similar results to those obtained by the conventional technique, while providing additional information about the landscape of each soil, useful for applications in future surveys of similar areas.

  17. Convergence of the natural approximations of piecewise monotone interval maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydn, Nicolai

    2004-06-01

    We consider piecewise monotone interval mappings which are topologically mixing and satisfy the Markov property. It has previously been shown that the invariant densities of the natural approximations converge exponentially fast in uniform pointwise topology to the invariant density of the given map provided its derivative is piecewise Lipshitz continuous. We provide an example of a map which is Lipshitz continuous and for which the densities converge in the bounded variation norm at a logarithmic rate. This shows that in general one cannot expect exponential convergence in the bounded variation norm. Here we prove that if the derivative of the interval map is Holder continuous and its variation is well approximable (gamma-uniform variation for gamma>0), then the densities converge exponentially fast in the norm.

  18. Design of ontology mapping framework and improvement of similarity computation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Ontology heterogeneity is the primary obstacle for interoperation of ontologies.Ontology mapping is the best way to solve this problem.The key of ontology mapping is the similarity computation.At present,the method of similarity computation is imperfect.And the computation quantity is high.To solve these problems,an ontology-mapping framework with a kind of hybrid architecture is put forward.with an improvement in the method of similarity computation.Different areas have different local ontologies.Two ontologies are taken as examples,to explain the specific mapping framework and improved method of similarity computation.These two ontologies are about classes and teachers in a university.The experimental results show that using this framework and improved method can increase the accuracy of computation to a certain extent.Otherwise,the quantity of computation can be decreased.

  19. Quantitative susceptibility mapping: current status and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haacke, E Mark; Liu, Saifeng; Buch, Sagar; Zheng, Weili; Wu, Dongmei; Ye, Yongquan

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) is a new technique for quantifying magnetic susceptibility. It has already found various applications in quantifying in vivo iron content, calcifications and changes in venous oxygen saturation. The accuracy of susceptibility mapping is dependent on several factors. In this review, we evaluate the entire process of QSM from data acquisition to individual data processing steps. We also show preliminary results of several new concepts introduced in this review in an attempt to improve the quality and accuracy for certain steps. The uncertainties in estimating susceptibility differences using susceptibility maps, phase images, and T2* maps are analyzed and compared. Finally, example clinical applications are presented. We conclude that QSM holds great promise in quantifying iron and becoming a standard clinical tool.

  20. Discrete Integrable Systems and Poisson Algebras From Cluster Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordy, Allan P.; Hone, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    We consider nonlinear recurrences generated from cluster mutations applied to quivers that have the property of being cluster mutation-periodic with period 1. Such quivers were completely classified by Fordy and Marsh, who characterised them in terms of the skew-symmetric matrix that defines the quiver. The associated nonlinear recurrences are equivalent to birational maps, and we explain how these maps can be endowed with an invariant Poisson bracket and/or presymplectic structure. Upon applying the algebraic entropy test, we are led to a series of conjectures which imply that the entropy of the cluster maps can be determined from their tropical analogues, which leads to a sharp classification result. Only four special families of these maps should have zero entropy. These families are examined in detail, with many explicit examples given, and we show how they lead to discrete dynamics that is integrable in the Liouville-Arnold sense.

  1. Geologic Maps as the Foundation of Mineral-Hazards Maps in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, C. T.; Churchill, R. K.; Downey, C. I.; Clinkenbeard, J. P.; Fonseca, M. C.

    2010-12-01

    The basic geologic map is essential to the development of products that help planners, engineers, government officials, and the general public make decisions concerning natural hazards. Such maps are the primary foundation that the California Geological Survey (CGS) uses to prepare maps that show potential for mineral-hazards. Examples of clients that request these maps are the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) and California Department of Public Health (CDPH). Largely because of their non-catastrophic nature, mineral hazards have received much less public attention compared to earthquakes, landslides, volcanic eruptions, and floods. Nonetheless, mineral hazards can be a major concern locally when considering human health and safety and potential contamination of the environment by human activities such as disposal of earth materials. To address some of these concerns, the CGS has focused its mineral-hazards maps on naturally occurring asbestos (NOA), radon, and various potentially toxic metals as well as certain artificial features such as mines and oil and gas wells. The maps range in scope from statewide to counties and Caltrans districts to segments of selected highways. To develop the hazard maps, the CGS begins with traditional paper and digital versions of basic geologic maps, which are obtained from many sources such as its own files, the USGS, USDA Forest Service, California Department of Water Resources, and counties. For each study area, these maps present many challenges of compilation related to vintage, scale, definition of units, and edge-matching across map boundaries. The result of each CGS compilation is a digital geologic layer that is subsequently reinterpreted and transformed into new digital layers (e.g., lithologic) that focus on the geochemical and mineralogical properties of the area’s earth materials and structures. These intermediate layers are then integrated with other technical data to derive final digital layers

  2. Incorporating DEM uncertainty in coastal inundation mapping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier X Leon

    Full Text Available Coastal managers require reliable spatial data on the extent and timing of potential coastal inundation, particularly in a changing climate. Most sea level rise (SLR vulnerability assessments are undertaken using the easily implemented bathtub approach, where areas adjacent to the sea and below a given elevation are mapped using a deterministic line dividing potentially inundated from dry areas. This method only requires elevation data usually in the form of a digital elevation model (DEM. However, inherent errors in the DEM and spatial analysis of the bathtub model propagate into the inundation mapping. The aim of this study was to assess the impacts of spatially variable and spatially correlated elevation errors in high-spatial resolution DEMs for mapping coastal inundation. Elevation errors were best modelled using regression-kriging. This geostatistical model takes the spatial correlation in elevation errors into account, which has a significant impact on analyses that include spatial interactions, such as inundation modelling. The spatial variability of elevation errors was partially explained by land cover and terrain variables. Elevation errors were simulated using sequential Gaussian simulation, a Monte Carlo probabilistic approach. 1,000 error simulations were added to the original DEM and reclassified using a hydrologically correct bathtub method. The probability of inundation to a scenario combining a 1 in 100 year storm event over a 1 m SLR was calculated by counting the proportion of times from the 1,000 simulations that a location was inundated. This probabilistic approach can be used in a risk-aversive decision making process by planning for scenarios with different probabilities of occurrence. For example, results showed that when considering a 1% probability exceedance, the inundated area was approximately 11% larger than mapped using the deterministic bathtub approach. The probabilistic approach provides visually intuitive maps

  3. Galactic Plane Infrared Polarization Survey (GPIPS) - Example Science Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavel, Michael D.; Clemens, D. P.; Pinnick, A. F.; Moreau, J. M.; Marchwinski, R.; Bartlett, M.; Taylor, B.

    2011-05-01

    With the initial public release of GPIPS data for 400 fields, a wide range of new scientific studies is made possible. This talk will highlight some examples, so as to motivate broad use of this rich data set. Combining the GPIPS/PHOTCAT data products with 2MASS and UKIDSS will enable studies for NIR stellar variability and proper motion, as well as help resolve 2MASS source ambiguities and improve cluster photometry. The GPIPS/POLCAT polarization data catalogs enables mapping magnetic fields across a wide range of extinction, from Av = 1 to 20 mag or more, permitting tracing the field from the edges of molecular clouds to close to the most extincted cloud cores. In addition to assessing the roles played by the magnetic field in helping to order cool clouds and the star formation conditions within them through evaluating the mean field directions, POLCAT data may be analyzed with the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method to develop resolved magnetic field strength maps across fields. Also, comparisons of structure functions of cool cloud velocities and column densities may be compared to magnetic field structure functions to ascertain the relative importance of magnetohydrodynamic vs pure hydrodynamic turbulence. Finally, comparisons of the magnetic properties in the hot ISM, traced through Faraday rotation and synchrotron radiation, may be compared to the field properties in the cool ISM, atomic and molecular clouds, over the same lines of sight to gain an understanding of the coupling of the field across these vastly different ISM components. Supported by NSF grants AST 06-07500 and AST 09-07790.

  4. Assessing tsunami vulnerability, an example from Herakleio, Crete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papathoma, M.; Dominey-Howes, D.; Zong, Y.; Smith, D.

    Recent tsunami have caused massive loss of life, destruction of coastal infrastructures and disruption to economic activity. To date, tsunami hazard studies have concentrated on determining the frequency and magnitude of events and in the production of simplistic flood maps. In general, such maps appear to have assumed a uniform vulnerability of population, infrastructure and business. In reality however, a complex set of factors interact to produce a pattern of vulnerability that varies spatially and temporally. A new vulnerability assessment approach is described, that incorporates multiple factors (e.g. parameters relating to the natural and built environments and socio-demographics) that contribute to tsunami vulnerability. The new methodology is applied on a coastal segment in Greece and, in particular, in Crete, westof the city of Herakleio. The results are presented within a Geographic Information System (GIS). The application of GIS ensures the approach is novel for tsunami studies, since it permits interrogation of the primary database by several different end-users. For example, the GIS may be used: (1) to determine immediate post-tsunami disaster response needs by the emergency services; (2) to preplan tsunami mitigation measures by disaster planners; (3) as a tool for local planning by the municipal authorities or; (4) as a basis for catastrophe modelling by insurance companies. We show that population density varies markedly with the time of the year and that 30% of buildings within the inundation zone are only single story thus increasing the vulnerability of their occupants. Within the high inundation depth zone, 11% of buildings are identified as in need of reinforcement and this figure rises to 50% within the medium inundation depth zone. 10% of businesses are located within the high inundation depth zone and these may need to consider their level of insurance cover to protect against primary building damage, contents loss and business interruption

  5. Mapping Global Citizenship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    The demand to cultivate global citizenship is frequently invoked as central to colleges' and universities' internationalization efforts. However, the term "global citizenship" remains undertheorized in the context of U.S. higher education. This article maps and engages three common global citizenship positions--entrepreneurial, liberal…

  6. STOCHASTIC FLOWS OF MAPPINGS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the stochastic flow of mappings generated by a Feller convolution semigroup on a compact metric space is studied. This kind of flow is the generalization of superprocesses of stochastic flows and stochastic diffeomorphism induced by the strong solutions of stochastic differential equations.

  7. eMAPS

    CERN Document Server

    Human Resources Department

    2005-01-01

    Starting with the 2005 performance appraisal and advancement exercise (MAPS), the paper version of the annual appraisal report has been replaced by an electronic EDH version - eMAPS (see Weekly Bulletin 48/2004). As announced in Weekly Bulletin 2/2005, information sessions to explain the features of eMAPS using EDH have been arranged as follows: 18 January 2005: Main Auditorium (500-1-001) from 14:00 to 15:30. 20 January 2005: AB Auditorium II (864-1-D02) from 14:00 to 15:30. 24 January 2005: AT Auditorium (30-7-018) from 10:00 to 11:30. The changeover to an electronic appraisal report is designed to reduce the administrative workload involving, e.g. photocopying, tracing and filing paper copies, while allowing staff members and their hierarchy access to the report form at the appropriate times. There is no change in the procedure for the annual interview and the advancement exercise, though Administrative Circular No 26 (Rev. 5) has been updated to take account of the introduction of eMAPS. The content...

  8. Photogrammetry and Digital Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Poul

    1998-01-01

    Technical tour to Lithuania, Poland and Estonia for 13 technical staff and managers of State Land Service, HQ, Latvia. Focus on technical aspects and management of geographical data for map production and administration. Visits to state and local government organisations and newly established pri...

  9. 2004 Alaska Lidar Mapping

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data sets are generated using the OPTECH ALTM 70 kHz LIDAR system mounted onboard AeroMap's twin-engine Cessna 320 aircraft. Classified data sets such as this...

  10. Map of the Moon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG YUANKAI

    2010-01-01

    @@ China has finished the full map of the Moon based on data obtained by its lunar probe Chang'e l,said Ouyang Ziyuan,chief scientist of China's lunar exploration program and an academician at the Chinese Academy of Sciences(CAS),at a press conference about the scientific achievements made by Chang'e1 on July 16,2010.

  11. Bisimulation from Open Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joyal, André; Nielsen, Mogens; Winskel, Glynn

    1996-01-01

    and van Glabeek and Goltz. A tie-up with open maps in a (pre)topos, as they appear in the work of Joyal and Moerdijk, brings to light a new model, presheaves on categories of pomsets, into which the usual category of labelled event structures embeds fully and faithfully. As an indication of its promise...

  12. Bisimulation and open maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joyal, André; Nielsen, Mogens; Winskel, Glynn

    1993-01-01

    ), and Goltz and van Glabeek (1989). A tie-up with open maps in a (pre)topos brings to light a promising new model, presheaves on categories of pomsets, into which the usual category of labeled event structures embeds fully and faithfully. As an indication of its promise, this new presheaf model has refinement...

  13. Personal Food System Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilsey, David; Dover, Sally

    2014-01-01

    Personal food system mapping is a practical means to engage community participants and educators in individualized and shared learning about food systems, decisions, and behaviors. Moreover, it is a useful approach for introducing the food system concept, which is somewhat abstract. We developed the approach to capture diversity of personal food…

  14. Covariance mapping techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasinski, Leszek J.

    2016-08-01

    Recent technological advances in the generation of intense femtosecond pulses have made covariance mapping an attractive analytical technique. The laser pulses available are so intense that often thousands of ionisation and Coulomb explosion events will occur within each pulse. To understand the physics of these processes the photoelectrons and photoions need to be correlated, and covariance mapping is well suited for operating at the high counting rates of these laser sources. Partial covariance is particularly useful in experiments with x-ray free electron lasers, because it is capable of suppressing pulse fluctuation effects. A variety of covariance mapping methods is described: simple, partial (single- and multi-parameter), sliced, contingent and multi-dimensional. The relationship to coincidence techniques is discussed. Covariance mapping has been used in many areas of science and technology: inner-shell excitation and Auger decay, multiphoton and multielectron ionisation, time-of-flight and angle-resolved spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, stimulated Raman scattering, directional gamma ray sensing, welding diagnostics and brain connectivity studies (connectomics). This review gives practical advice for implementing the technique and interpreting the results, including its limitations and instrumental constraints. It also summarises recent theoretical studies, highlights unsolved problems and outlines a personal view on the most promising research directions.

  15. Mapping the Literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boulus-Rødje, Nina

    2012-01-01

    As the utilization of various e-voting technologies has notably increased in the past few years, so has the amount of publications on experiences with these technologies. This article, will, therefore map the literature while highlighting some of the important topics discussed within the field of e...

  16. Enridged Contour Maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, Jarke J. van; Telea, Alexandru

    2001-01-01

    The visualization of scalar functions of two variables is a classic and ubiquitous application. We present a new method to visualize such data. The method is based on a non-linear mapping of the function to a height field, followed by visualization as a shaded mountain landscape. The method is easy

  17. Genetic Algoritm Eclipse Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halevin, A. V.

    In this paper we analyse capabilities of eclipse mapping technique, based on genetic algorithm optimization. To model of accretion disk we used the "fire-flies" conception. This model allows us to reconstruct the distribution of radiating medium in the disk using less number of free parameters than in other methods. Test models show that we can achieve good approximation without optimizing techniques.

  18. The Power of Maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Patricia

    1998-01-01

    American Indians and other Native peoples are using maps to chart their resources, fight for their land, and remember their history. Describes the efforts of the Zuni Pueblo in the Southwest; the Gitxsan Nation (Canada); the Kuna, Embera, and Wounaan tribes (Panama); and the Mayas (Belize). A sidebar lists Geographic Information Systems (GIS)…

  19. Comparative wear mapping techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alcock, J.; Sørensen, Ole Toft; Jensen, S.

    1996-01-01

    Pin surfaces were analysed by laser profilometry. Two roughness parameters, R(a) and the fractal dimension, were investigated as a first step towards methods of quantitative wear mechanism mapping. Both parameters were analysed for their relationship to the severity and prevalence of a mechanism....

  20. Comparative wear mapping techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alcock, J.; Sørensen, Ole Toft; Jensen, S.

    1996-01-01

    Pin-on-disc tests of tungsten carbide pins against silicon carbide discs were performed and wear rate, mechanism and friction maps constructed. Correlations were observed between the wear mode and the friction of the pin-disc interface, and between the qualitative incidence of disruptive wear...

  1. Mapping digital media: Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Waal, M.; Leurdijk, A.; Nordeman, L.; Poell, T.

    2012-01-01

    The Mapping Digital Media project examines the global opportunities and risks created by the transition from traditional to digital media. Covering 60 countries, the project examines how these changes affect the core democratic service that any media system should provide: news about political, econ

  2. Generalized Smooth Transition Map Between Tent and Logistic Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed, Wafaa S.; Fahmy, Hossam A. H.; Rezk, Ahmed A.; Radwan, Ahmed G.

    There is a continuous demand on novel chaotic generators to be employed in various modeling and pseudo-random number generation applications. This paper proposes a new chaotic map which is a general form for one-dimensional discrete-time maps employing the power function with the tent and logistic maps as special cases. The proposed map uses extra parameters to provide responses that fit multiple applications for which conventional maps were not enough. The proposed generalization covers also maps whose iterative relations are not based on polynomials, i.e. with fractional powers. We introduce a framework for analyzing the proposed map mathematically and predicting its behavior for various combinations of its parameters. In addition, we present and explain the transition map which results in intermediate responses as the parameters vary from their values corresponding to tent map to those corresponding to logistic map case. We study the properties of the proposed map including graph of the map equation, general bifurcation diagram and its key-points, output sequences, and maximum Lyapunov exponent. We present further explorations such as effects of scaling, system response with respect to the new parameters, and operating ranges other than transition region. Finally, a stream cipher system based on the generalized transition map validates its utility for image encryption applications. The system allows the construction of more efficient encryption keys which enhances its sensitivity and other cryptographic properties.

  3. Cosmic Microwave Background Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkhodanov, O. V.; Doroshkevich, A. G.

    2012-03-01

    The last decade of research in cosmology was connected with the ambitious experiments including space and ground base observations. Among the most impressive results of these investigations are the measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation like WMAP* and Planck. Exactly from the CMB studies, we have started the epoch of the precision cosmology when generally the values of cosmological parameters have been known and present research is devoted to improvement of the precision. These achievements are connected with both the creation of the new facilities in millimeter and submillimeter astronomy (e.g., satellites, receivers, antennas, computers) and development of the methods for the CMB data analysis. Actually, the process of data analysis contains several technical stages including 1. Registration of time-ordered data (TOD) 2. Pixelization of the CMB data - map preparation 3. Component separation 4. Map statistics analysis 5. Map - spherical harmonics transformation 6. C(l)-spectrum calculation and spectrum statistics analysis 7. Cosmological parameters estimation Starting from the cosmic background explorer (COBE) experiment using the so-called Quadrilateralized Sky Cube Projection (see [1-3]), the problem of the whole sky CMB pixelization has attracted great interest and many such schemes were developed. Let us note however that accurate pixelization of the CMB data on the sphere is very important but not the final step of analysis. Usually, the next step implies the determination of the coefficients of the spherical harmonic decomposition of the CMB signal for both anisotropy and polarization. This means that some of the pixelization schemes provide a very accurate map but are inconvenient for further decomposition. This also means that the choice of suitable pixelization schemes depends upon the general goals of the investigation. In this review, we consider several of the most popular sky map pixelization schemes and link them with the

  4. Developments of VLBI synthesis mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dongrong; Wan, Tongshan

    1992-12-01

    The authors review the developments of VLBI synthesis mapping. First they give a brief history of VLBI techniques and a summary of some technical parameters frequently used in VLBI synthesis mapping. They then mention problems, namely, (u,v) coverage, correction of errors in visibility data, image quality, GFF (Global Fringe Fitting), field of view, etc. The new developments which are presented include the improvements of (u,v) coverage and angular resolution, Mk III GFF, phase reference mapping, wide field mapping, difference mapping, the potential of space VLBI mapping, mosaicing and non-linear deconvolution.

  5. Fuzzy Clustering - Principles, Methods and Examples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroszynski, Uri; Zhou, Jianjun

    1998-01-01

    One of the most remarkable advances in the field of identification and control of systems -in particular mechanical systems- whose behaviour can not be described by means of the usual mathematical models, has been achieved by the application of methods of fuzzy theory.In the framework of a study...... about identification of "black-box" properties by analysis of system input/output data sets, we have prepared an introductory note on the principles and the most popular data classification methods used in fuzzy modeling. This introductory note also includes some examples that illustrate the use...... of the methods. The examples were solved by hand and served as a test bench for exploration of the MATLAB capabilities included in the Fuzzy Control Toolbox. The fuzzy clustering methods described include Fuzzy c-means (FCM), Fuzzy c-lines (FCL) and Fuzzy c-elliptotypes (FCE)....

  6. Material and process selection using product examples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenau, Torben Anker

    2002-01-01

    that designers often limit their selection of materials and processes to a few well-known ones. Designers need to expand the solution space by considering more materials and processes. But they have to be convinced that the materials and processes are likely candidates that are worth investing time in exploring...... a search engine, and through hyperlinks can relevant materials and processes be explored. Realising that designers are very sensitive to user interfaces do all descriptions of materials, processes and products include graphical descriptions, i.e. pictures or computer graphics.......The objective of the paper is to suggest a different procedure for selecting materials and processes within the product development work. The procedure includes using product examples in order to increase the number of alternative materials and processes that is considered. Product examples can...

  7. Material and process selection using product examples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenau, Torben Anker

    2001-01-01

    that designers often limit their selection of materials and processes to a few well-known ones. Designers need to expand the solution space by considering more materials and processes. But they have to be convinced that the materials and processes are likely candidates that are worth investing time in exploring...... a search engine, and through hyperlinks can relevant materials and processes be explored. Realising that designers are very sensitive to user interfaces do all descriptions of materials, processes and products include graphical descriptions, i.e. pictures or computer graphics.......The objective of the paper is to suggest a different procedure for selecting materials and processes within the product development work. The procedure includes using product examples in order to increase the number of alternative materials and processes that is considered. Product examples can...

  8. USGS Imagery Only Base Map Service from The National Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — USGS Imagery Only is a tile cache base map of orthoimagery in The National Map visible to the 1:18,000 scale. Orthoimagery data are typically high resolution images...

  9. Mapping Future Education and Training: Group Concept Mapping Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoyanov, Slavi; Hoogveld, Bert; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Stoyanov, S., Hoogveld, A. W. M., & Kirschner, P. A. (2010). Mapping Future Education and Training: Group Concept Mapping Study. Heerlen, The Netherlands: Open University of the Netherlands; EU Forlic project.

  10. Habitat--Offshore of Point Reyes Map Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the habitat map of the seafloor of the Offshore of Point Reyes map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  11. Contours Offshore of Point Reyes Map Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetric contours for several seafloor maps of the Offshore of Point Reyes map area, California. The vector data file is...

  12. Bathymetry Offshore of Point Reyes Map Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of the Offshore of Point Reyes map area, California. Raster data file is included in...

  13. Bathymetry Hillshade Offshore of Point Reyes Map Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of the Offshore of Point Reyes map area, California. Raster data file is included in...

  14. Selected critical examples of scientometric publication analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingwersen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    of authors, institutions or countries per publication indexed by Web of Science. Methodology: The paper uses examples from earlier research evaluation studies and cases based on online data to describe issues, problematic details, pitfalls and how to overcome them in publication analysis with respect...... to analytic tool application, calculation, presentation and interpretation. Results: By means of different kinds of analysis and presentation, the paper provides insight into scientometrics in the context of informetric analysis, selected cases of research productivity, publication patterns and research...

  15. Smoothing point data into maps using SAS/GRAPH (trade name) software. Forest Service research note

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chojnacky, D.C.; Rubey, M.E.

    1996-01-01

    Point of plot data are commonly available for mapping forest landscapes. Because such data are sampled, mapping a complete coverage usually requires some type of interpolation between plots. SAS/GRAPH software includes the G3GRID procedure for interpolating or smoothing this type of data to map with G3D or GCONTOUR procedures. However, the smoothing process in G3GRID is not easily controlled, nor can it be used to display missing data within rectangular grid maps. These shortcomings motivated development of SAS code that prepares point data for display in mapping units. This code links well with the rest of the SAS system to allow for powerful, easily controlled data analysis within mapping units. Examples are given for mapping forest vegetation with the GMAP procedure.

  16. Query by image example: The CANDID approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, P.M.; Cannon, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Computer Research and Applications Group; Hush, D.R. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1995-02-01

    CANDID (Comparison Algorithm for Navigating Digital Image Databases) was developed to enable content-based retrieval of digital imagery from large databases using a query-by-example methodology. A user provides an example image to the system, and images in the database that are similar to that example are retrieved. The development of CANDID was inspired by the N-gram approach to document fingerprinting, where a ``global signature`` is computed for every document in a database and these signatures are compared to one another to determine the similarity between any two documents. CANDID computes a global signature for every image in a database, where the signature is derived from various image features such as localized texture, shape, or color information. A distance between probability density functions of feature vectors is then used to compare signatures. In this paper, the authors present CANDID and highlight two results from their current research: subtracting a ``background`` signature from every signature in a database in an attempt to improve system performance when using inner-product similarity measures, and visualizing the contribution of individual pixels in the matching process. These ideas are applicable to any histogram-based comparison technique.

  17. Bedrock geologic map of Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliffe, Nicholas M.; Stanley, Rolfe S.; Gale, Marjorie H.; Thompson, Peter J.; Walsh, Gregory J.; With contributions by Hatch, Norman L.; Rankin, Douglas W.; Doolan, Barry L.; Kim, Jonathan; Mehrtens, Charlotte J.; Aleinikoff, John N.; McHone, J. Gregory; Cartography by Masonic, Linda M.

    2011-01-01

    The Bedrock Geologic Map of Vermont is the result of a cooperative agreement between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the State of Vermont. The State's complex geology spans 1.4 billion years of Earth's history. The new map comes 50 years after the most recent map of the State by Charles G. Doll and others in 1961 and a full 150 years since the publication of the first geologic map of Vermont by Edward Hitchcock and others in 1861. At a scale of 1:100,000, the map shows an uncommon level of detail for State geologic maps. Mapped rock units are primarily based on lithology, or rock type, to facilitate derivative studies in multiple disciplines. The 1961 map was compiled from 1:62,500-scale or smaller maps. The current map was created to integrate more detailed (1:12,000- to 1:24,000-scale) modern and older (1:62,500-scale) mapping with the theory of plate tectonics to provide a framework for geologic, tectonic, economic, hydrogeologic, and environmental characterization of the bedrock of Vermont. The printed map consists of three oversize sheets (52 x 76 inches). Sheets 1 and 2 show the southern and northern halves of Vermont, respectively, and can be trimmed and joined so that the entire State can be displayed as a single entity. These sheets also include 10 cross sections and a geologic structure map. Sheet 3 on the front consists of descriptions of 486 map units, a correlation of map units, and references cited. Sheet 3 on the back features a list of the 195 sources of geologic map data keyed to an index map of 7.5-minute quadrangles in Vermont, as well as a table identifying ages of rocks dated by uranium-lead zircon geochronology.

  18. An Adaptive Non-Linear Map and Its Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Xuefeng

    2006-01-01

    A novel adaptive non-linear mapping (ANLM),integrating an adaptive mapping error (AME) with a chaosgenetic algorithm (CGA) including chaotic variable, was proposed to overcome the deficiencies of non-linear mapping (NLM). The value of AME weight factor is determined according to the relative deviation square of distance between the two mapping points and the corresponding original objects distance. The larger the relative deviation square between two distances is, the larger the value of the corresponding weight factor is. Due to chaotic mapping operator, the evolutional process of CGA makes the individuals of subgenerations distributed ergodically in the defined space and circumvents the premature of the individuals of subgenerations. The comparison results demonstrated that the whole performance of CGA is better than that of traditional genetic algorithm. Furthermore, a typical example of mapping eight-dimensional olive oil samples onto two-dimensional plane was employed to verify the effectiveness of ANLM. The results showed that the topology-preserving map obtained by ANLM can well represent the classification of original objects and is much better than that obtained by NLM.

  19. A Bayesian Algorithm for Functional Mapping of Dynamic Complex Traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongling Wu

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Functional mapping of dynamic traits measured in a longitudinal study was originally derived within the maximum likelihood (ML context and implemented with the EM algorithm. Although ML-based functional mapping possesses many favorable statistical properties in parameter estimation, it may be computationally intractable for analyzing longitudinal data with high dimensions and high measurement errors. In this article, we derive a general functional mapping framework for quantitative trait locus mapping of dynamic traits within the Bayesian paradigm. Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques were implemented for functional mapping to estimate biologically and statistically sensible parameters that model the structures of time-dependent genetic effects and covariance matrix. The Bayesian approach is useful to handle difficulties in constructing confidence intervals as well as the identifiability problem, enhancing the statistical inference of functional mapping. We have undertaken simulation studies to investigate the statistical behavior of Bayesian-based functional mapping and used a real example with F2 mice to validate the utilization and usefulness of the model.

  20. Mapping or Tracing? Rethinking Curriculum Mapping in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chia-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Curriculum mapping has been emphasized in recent curriculum innovations in higher education in the drive for global competitiveness. This paper begins by providing an outline of current discourses of curriculum mapping in higher education. Curriculum mapping is frequently associated with outcome-based learning and work readiness, and guiding the…

  1. Spectral hole burning: examples from photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purchase, Robin; Völker, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    The optical spectra of photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes usually show broad absorption bands, often consisting of a number of overlapping, "hidden" bands belonging to different species. Spectral hole burning is an ideal technique to unravel the optical and dynamic properties of such hidden species. Here, the principles of spectral hole burning (HB) and the experimental set-up used in its continuous wave (CW) and time-resolved versions are described. Examples from photosynthesis studied with hole burning, obtained in our laboratory, are then presented. These examples have been classified into three groups according to the parameters that were measured: (1) hole widths as a function of temperature, (2) hole widths as a function of delay time and (3) hole depths as a function of wavelength. Two examples from light-harvesting (LH) 2 complexes of purple bacteria are given within the first group: (a) the determination of energy-transfer times from the chromophores in the B800 ring to the B850 ring, and (b) optical dephasing in the B850 absorption band. One example from photosystem II (PSII) sub-core complexes of higher plants is given within the second group: it shows that the size of the complex determines the amount of spectral diffusion measured. Within the third group, two examples from (green) plants and purple bacteria have been chosen for: (a) the identification of "traps" for energy transfer in PSII sub-core complexes of green plants, and (b) the uncovering of the lowest k = 0 exciton-state distribution within the B850 band of LH2 complexes of purple bacteria. The results prove the potential of spectral hole burning measurements for getting quantitative insight into dynamic processes in photosynthetic systems at low temperature, in particular, when individual bands are hidden within broad absorption bands. Because of its high-resolution wavelength selectivity, HB is a technique that is complementary to ultrafast pump-probe methods. In this review, we have

  2. Constructing a Graphic Organizer in the Classroom: Introductory Students' Perception of Achievement Using a Decision Map to Solve Aqueous Acid-Base Equilibria Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMeo, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Common examples of graphic organizers include flow diagrams, concept maps, and decision trees. The author has created a novel type of graphic organizer called a decision map. A decision map is a directional heuristic that helps learners solve problems within a generic framework. It incorporates questions that the user must answer and contains…

  3. The mappings of degree 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The maps of the form f( x = ∑ i=1 n a i ⋅x⋅ b i , called 1-degree maps, are introduced and investigated. For noncommutative algebras and modules over them 1-degree maps give an analogy of linear maps and differentials. Under some conditions on the algebra 𝒜 , contractibility of the group of 1-degree isomorphisms is proved for the module l 2 ( 𝒜 . It is shown that these conditions are fulfilled for the algebra of linear maps of a finite-dimensional linear space. The notion of 1-degree map gives a possibility to define a nonlinear Fredholm map of l 2 ( 𝒜 and a Fredholm manifold modelled by l 2 ( 𝒜 . 1-degree maps are also applied to some problems of Markov chains.

  4. North America Synoptic Weather Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Series of Synoptic Weather Maps. Maps contains a surface analysis comprised of plotted weather station observations, isobars indicating low and high-pressure...

  5. NEPR Benthic Habitat Map 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This benthic habitat map was created from a semi-automated habitat mapping process, using a combination of bathymetry, satellite imagery, aerial imagery and...

  6. NEPR Geographic Zone Map 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This geographic zone map was created by interpreting satellite and aerial imagery, seafloor topography (bathymetry model), and the new NEPR Benthic Habitat Map...

  7. Knowledge Map of Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nenonen, Suvi; Jensen, Per Anker; Lindahl, Göran

    2014-01-01

    in creating an inventory of knowledge (i.e. the knowledge base) and developing/improving the processes of knowledge sharing in research, education and practice. Theory Knowledge mapping is discussed in terms of knowledge management. The research is connected to knowledge mapping in the facilities management......Purpose This paper aims to draft a knowledge map of the fragmented and multidisciplinary research of and relevant to FM. Facilities management knowledge map is a tool for presenting what relevant data and knowledge, a.k.a. knowledge, resides in different disciplines. Knowledge mapping is a step...... profession, research and education. The knowledge map aims to contrast perspectives on how to map interdisciplinary research. Design/methodology/approach The Knowledge map is based on classification of 83 articles, including volume 2013 of Facilities (40 articles) and of Journal of Facilities Management (21...

  8. Topographic Map Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-12

    from the main canyon.) landmarks such as buildings, for example, and their bear- ing [Arkin at al., 1987, Fennema at al., 1988). Another ’ Related Work...1989. pages 17-82. MIT Press, 1979. [ Fennema et aL, 1988] C. L. Fennema , Jr., E. M. Rise- [Levine at al., 1984] M. Levine, I. Marchon, and G. Han- man

  9. Controllability of open quantum systems with Kraus-map dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Rong; Pechen, Alexander; Brif, Constantin; Rabitz, Herschel [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2007-05-25

    This paper presents a constructive proof of complete kinematic state controllability of finite-dimensional open quantum systems whose dynamics are represented by Kraus maps. For any pair of states (pure or mixed) on the Hilbert space of the system, we explicitly show how to construct a Kraus map that transforms one state into another. Moreover, we prove by construction the existence of a Kraus map that transforms all initial states into a predefined target state (such a process may be used, for example, in quantum information dilution). Thus, in sharp contrast to unitary control, Kraus-map dynamics allows for the design of controls which are robust to variations in the initial state of the system. The capabilities of non-unitary control for population transfer between pure states illustrated for an example of a two-level system by constructing a family of non-unitary Kraus maps to transform one pure state into another. The problem of dynamic state controllability of open quantum systems (i.e., controllability of state-to-state transformations, given a set of available dynamical resources such as coherent controls, incoherent interactions with the environment, and measurements) is also discussed.

  10. Examples to Keep the Passion for the Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Raga, María; Palencia Coto, Covadonga; Cerdà, Artemi

    2014-05-01

    It is said that the beasts can smell fear. The translation to education is that students know when our vocation is really teaching or when you are teaching as a result of the sequence of events like a side effect of an investigating vocation path. But to become a good teacher, you need to love teaching!!! Education work requires a dynamic appeal by the students. It should be entertaining, motivating, interactive and dynamic. In this session I will present several tips and examples to get attention on your geology sessions: 1. The teacher should maintain a high interest in the subject of your work. Motivation is contagious!!!!If you show passion the other will feel it. 2. Change the attitude of students. Some activities can help you to do that like asking for the preparation of an experiment, and analyzing the results. Some examples will be shown. 3. Arouse the curiosity of the students. Some strategies could be asking questions in novel, controversial or inconsistent ways, asking conceptual conflicts and paradox that looks not expected from what is studied or 4. Use some tools to get the attention of the students. Examples of these tools can be Google Maps and Google Earth (teaching them to design routes and marking studies), Google drive (to create documents online in a team and file sharing), Google plus (to hang interesting news). 5. Examine students each week. Although it will be laborious, their work and learning will be more gradual. 6. Increase levels of competition among peers. 7. Relate what you know with what you learn. It is very important to be aware of the basis on which pupils, through prior knowledge test match. 8. Feel competent. Teacher's confidence is vital when teaching a class. You must be aware of our weaknesses and humble, but our nerves should help us to improve the quality of our classes. 9. Individualized teaching and learning. Numerous psychological and sociological studies suggest that the existence of social networks contribute to the

  11. UAV-MAPPING – A USER REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Mayr

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on first hand experiences in operating an unmanned airborne system (UAS for mapping purposes in the environment of a mapping company. Recently, a multitude of activities in UAVs is visible, and there is growing interest in the commercial, industrial, and academic mapping user communities and not only in those. As an introduction, the major components of an UAS are identified. The paper focuses on a 1.1kg UAV which is integrated and gets applied on a day-to-day basis as part of an UAS in standard aerial imaging tasks for more than two years already. We present the unmanned airborne vehicle in some detail as well as the overall system components such as autopilot, ground station, flight mission planning and control, and first level image processing. The paper continues with reporting on experiences gained in setting up constraints such a system needs to fulfill. Further on, operational aspects with emphasis on unattended flight mission mode are presented. Various examples show the applicability of UAS in geospatial tasks, proofing that UAS are capable delivering reliably e.g. orthomosaics, digital surface models and more. Some remarks on achieved accuracies give an idea on obtainable qualities. A discussion about safety features puts some light on important matters when entering unmanned flying activities and rounds up this paper. Conclusions summarize the state of the art of an operational UAS from the point of the view of the author.

  12. Semantic maps as metrics on meanings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Cysouw

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available By using the world?s linguistic diversity, the study of meaning can be transformed from an introspective inquiry into a subject of empirical investigation. For this to be possible, the notion of meaning has to be operationalized by defining the meaning of an expression as the collection of all contexts in which the expression can be used. Under this definition, meaning can be empirically investigated by sampling contexts. A semantic map is a technique to show the relations between such sampled contextual occurrences. Or, formulated more technically, a semantic map is a visualization of a metric on contexts sampled to represent a domain of meaning. Or, put more succinctly, a semantic map is a metric on meaning. To establish such a metric, a notion of (dissimilarity is needed. The similarity between two meanings can be empirically investigated by looking at their encoding in many different languages. The more similar these encodings, in language after language, the more similar the contexts. So, to investigate the similarity between two contextualized meanings, only judgments about the similarity between expressions within the structure of individual languages are needed. As an example of this approach, data on cross-linguistic variation in inchoative/causative alternations from Haspelmath (1993 is reanalyzed.

  13. Mapping Deviant Democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seeberg, Michael

    2014-01-01

    A number of countries have emerged as stable (though minimalist) democracies despite low levels of modernization, lack of democratic neighbouring countries and other factors consistently related to democratic stability in the literature. The study of these deviant democracies is a promising new...... research field but it is afflicted by a notable problem, viz. the lack of a consensus as to which countries are actually instances of deviant democracy. The present article attempts to solve this problem by carrying out a comprehensive mapping of deviant democracies. First, I review the existing literature...... to provide an overview of the cases most often identified as deviant democracies. Second, I use a large-N analysis to systematically map deviant democracies. The analysis includes 159 countries covering the time period 1993–2008. The analysis points to 12 cases that merits further attention, viz...

  14. Mapping the Gendered City

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almahmood, Mohammed Abdulrahman M; Scharnhorst, Eric; Carstensen, Trine Agervig;

    2017-01-01

    Walking is a mode of perceiving the city which also contributes to health and social benefits. This paper studies the influence of the socio-cultural aspects on the practice of walking and the meaning of walkscapes in Riyadh, one of the most auto-dependent and gender-segregated cities on the Arab...... Peninsula, where socio-cultural values and restrictions regulate men and women’s use and access to public spaces. The methodology used is a combination of movement tracking data using GPS technology and map-based workshops where participants can reflect on their walking behaviour and spatial preferences....... The results of mapping where the respondents walk show a city consisting of gender-specific walkscapes. Indoor environments, such as shopping malls, function as ‘urban shelters’ for women, so they use such spaces for walking. On the other hand, young men mainly walk in urban streets, which provide greater...

  15. Conformal Complementarity Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Barbón, José L F

    2013-01-01

    We study quantum cosmological models for certain classes of bang/crunch singularities, using the duality between expanding bubbles in AdS with a FRW interior cosmology and perturbed CFTs on de Sitter space-time. It is pointed out that horizon complementarity in the AdS bulk geometries is realized as a conformal transformation in the dual deformed CFT. The quantum version of this map is described in full detail in a toy model involving conformal quantum mechanics. In this system the complementarity map acts as an exact duality between eternal and apocalyptic Hamiltonian evolutions. We calculate the commutation relation between the Hamiltonians corresponding to the different frames. It vanishes only on scale invariant states.

  16. MAPS Appraisal Report Form

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2005-01-01

    As announced in Weekly Bulletin 48/2004, from now onwards, the paper MAPS appraisal report form has been replaced by an electronic form, which is available via EDH (on the EDH desktop under Other Tasks / HR & Training) No changes have been made to the contents of the form. Practical information will be available on the web page http://cern.ch/ais/projs/forms/maps/info.htm, and information meetings will be held on the following dates: 18 January 2005: MAIN AUDITORIUM (500-1-001) from 14:00 to 15:30. 20 January 2005: AB AUDITORIUM II (864-1-D02) from14:00 to 15:30. 24 January 2005: AT AUDITORIUM (30-7-018) from 10:00 to 11:30. Human Resources Department Tel. 73566

  17. Graphene mobility mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buron, Jonas Christian Due; Pizzocchero, Filippo; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2015-01-01

    Carrier mobility and chemical doping level are essential figures of merit for graphene, and large-scale characterization of these properties and their uniformity is a prerequisite for commercialization of graphene for electronics and electrodes. However, existing mapping techniques cannot directly...... assess these vital parameters in a non-destructive way. By deconvoluting carrier mobility and density from non-contact terahertz spectroscopic measurements of conductance in graphene samples with terahertz-transparent backgates, we are able to present maps of the spatial variation of both quantities over...... graphene indicates dominance by charged scatterers. Unexpectedly, significant variations in mobility rather than doping are the cause of large conductance inhomogeneities, highlighting the importance of statistical approaches when assessing large-area graphene transport properties....

  18. The influence of mapped hazards on risk beliefs: a proximity-based modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severtson, Dolores J; Burt, James E

    2012-02-01

    Interview findings suggest perceived proximity to mapped hazards influences risk beliefs when people view environmental hazard maps. For dot maps, four attributes of mapped hazards influenced beliefs: hazard value, proximity, prevalence, and dot patterns. In order to quantify the collective influence of these attributes for viewers' perceived or actual map locations, we present a model to estimate proximity-based hazard or risk (PBH) and share study results that indicate how modeled PBH and map attributes influenced risk beliefs. The randomized survey study among 447 university students assessed risk beliefs for 24 dot maps that systematically varied by the four attributes. Maps depicted water test results for a fictitious hazardous substance in private residential wells and included a designated "you live here" location. Of the nine variables that assessed risk beliefs, the numerical susceptibility variable was most consistently and strongly related to map attributes and PBH. Hazard value, location in or out of a clustered dot pattern, and distance had the largest effects on susceptibility. Sometimes, hazard value interacted with other attributes, for example, distance had stronger effects on susceptibility for larger than smaller hazard values. For all combined maps, PBH explained about the same amount of variance in susceptibility as did attributes. Modeled PBH may have utility for studying the influence of proximity to mapped hazards on risk beliefs, protective behavior, and other dependent variables. Further work is needed to examine these influences for more realistic maps and representative study samples.

  19. Two conceptual models of displacement transfer and examples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN; Shuwei; WANG; Xin; YANG; Shufeng; HE; Dengfa; ZHAO; W

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents two conceptual models of displacement transfer, reverse symmetry model and infinitely equal division model, based on the fault-bend folding theory. If the fault shape is held constant in the trend, then the distribution of slip magnitude, geometry of imbricate structures and its axial surface map all display reverse symmetry on the process of displacement transfer, as called reverse symmetry model in this paper. However, if the ramp height of thrust fault decreases gradually along its strike, the displacement is postulated to be equally and infinitely divided to every thrust that is formed subsequently, this kinematic process is described using infinitely equal division model. In both models, displacement transfer is characterized by the regular changes of imbricate thrusting in the trend. Geometric analysis indicates that the displacement transfer grads can be estimated using the tangent of deflective angle of hinterland structures. Displacement transfer is often responsible for the distortion and branching of the surface anticlines, especially in the region where the multi-level detachment structures is developed. We also present some examples from the frontal structures of the Southern Tianshan fold-and-thrust belt, Xinjiang, China. Displacement transfer between deep imbricate thrusts in the middle segment of Qiulitag anticline zone causes the Kuqatawu and Southern Qiulitag deep anticlines left-lateral echelon. The region, where these two deep anticlines overlap, is characterized by duplex structures, and extends about 18 km. The shallow anticline is migrated southward displaying obvious "S" form in this area.

  20. Map of the Moon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    China releases data about the Moon collected its first lunar probe China has finished the full map of the Moon based on data obtained by its lunar probe Chang ’e 1,said Ouyang Ziyuan,chief scientist of China’s lunar exploration program and an academician at the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS),at a press conference about the scientific achievements made by Chang’e 1 on July 16,2010.

  1. Mapping the Literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boulus-Rødje, Nina

    2012-01-01

    As the utilization of various e-voting technologies has notably increased in the past few years, so has the amount of publications on experiences with these technologies. This article, will, therefore map the literature while highlighting some of the important topics discussed within the field of......-voting. Particular attention will be paid to non-technical dimensions, including socio-cultural, organizational and political dimensions of these implementations....

  2. Beyond Fast Mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Carey, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Since the seminal 1957 studies of word learning by Roger Brown, most experimental studies of lexical acquisition have concerned fast mapping: the process through which a new lexical entry is established, and through which representations of the linguistic context of a newly heard word interact with representations of its nonlinguistic context to fix an initial partial meaning. Here I focus on the subsequent extended process through which the adult meaning is approximated. Two factors lead to ...

  3. Mapping Yeast Transcriptional Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Timothy R; de Boer, Carl G.

    2013-01-01

    The term “transcriptional network” refers to the mechanism(s) that underlies coordinated expression of genes, typically involving transcription factors (TFs) binding to the promoters of multiple genes, and individual genes controlled by multiple TFs. A multitude of studies in the last two decades have aimed to map and characterize transcriptional networks in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We review the methodologies and accomplishments of these studies, as well as challenges we now face....

  4. Mapping the EEZ

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    De, S.; Shashikumar, K.

    on the processes leading to the formation of the continental margins of India. The ongoing EEZ project is a small initiative not only for ocean development but also for the economic and social benefit of the country. Shri Sutirtha De and Shri K. Shashikumar... The National Institute of Oceanography (NIO), Goa is trying to map the entire Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of the country, which will be a boon for defense, communication, navigation, and oceanographic research OCEANOGRAPHY - the scientific study...

  5. The grief map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, L. H. A.

    2014-12-01

    Grieving is a natural human reaction to a significant loss. According to a psychiatric model, this process is characterized by a typical sequence of psychological changes. Here, I propose a discrete-time dynamical system, called the grief map, in order to represent the grieving process. The corresponding bifurcation diagram, which exhibits stationary, periodic, and chaotic behavior, is related to the stages of this sorrowful journey occurring during about 12 months post-loss.

  6. Mapping yeast transcriptional networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Timothy R; de Boer, Carl G

    2013-09-01

    The term "transcriptional network" refers to the mechanism(s) that underlies coordinated expression of genes, typically involving transcription factors (TFs) binding to the promoters of multiple genes, and individual genes controlled by multiple TFs. A multitude of studies in the last two decades have aimed to map and characterize transcriptional networks in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We review the methodologies and accomplishments of these studies, as well as challenges we now face. For most yeast TFs, data have been collected on their sequence preferences, in vivo promoter occupancy, and gene expression profiles in deletion mutants. These systematic studies have led to the identification of new regulators of numerous cellular functions and shed light on the overall organization of yeast gene regulation. However, many yeast TFs appear to be inactive under standard laboratory growth conditions, and many of the available data were collected using techniques that have since been improved. Perhaps as a consequence, comprehensive and accurate mapping among TF sequence preferences, promoter binding, and gene expression remains an open challenge. We propose that the time is ripe for renewed systematic efforts toward a complete mapping of yeast transcriptional regulatory mechanisms.

  7. Mapping Israel/Palestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Leuenberger

    2012-01-01

    studies and the sociology of knowledge in order to analyze the social context of map-making and the content and structure of maps. The focus is on how and why British, American, and Arab online news outlets depict the contested territories of Israel and the Palestinian Territories in often varied and inconsistent ways. Certain online news sources have been accused of political biases concerning the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, which arguably translates into particular maps and map layers being included in news stories. Rather than they are being a direct and pre-determined link between map-choice and politics, however, I argue that map-making can be understood as a form of ‘situated’ practice. In other words, the newsroom brings together various actors, materials, technologies and resources that enable and constrain certain activities. It is therefore local cultures, social and interactional contingencies, and institutional and political circumstances that impact map-making and explain how and why maps may converge with or diverge from politics at any given time and place. At the same time, the choice of certain maps and map layers in terms of their focus, content, design, and detail is inevitably selective and can hereby become politically meaningful. It is thus the various textual and visual signifiers and the contextual information included in a map that can become politics by other means. Moreover, the types and sources of news stories and their maps are also co-determined by power politics, the structural inequities between the state of Israel and a Palestinian state-in-the-making, and their respective ease of access to public relations infrastructures that can reach the public at large.

  8. Arabidopsis MAP Kinase 4 regulates gene expression via transcription factor release in the nucleus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiu, Jin-Long; Fiil, Berthe Katrine; Petersen, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Plant and animal perception of microbes through pathogen surveillance proteins leads to MAP kinase signalling and the expression of defence genes. However, little is known about how plant MAP kinases regulate specific gene expression. We report that, in the absence of pathogens, Arabidopsis MAP...... supported by the suppression of PAD3 expression in mpk4-wrky33 double mutant backgrounds. Our data establish direct links between MPK4 and innate immunity and provide an example of how a plant MAP kinase can regulate gene expression by releasing transcription factors in the nucleus upon activation....

  9. Influence of Adoptment of Geocentric 3D Coordinate System on Chinese Existent Maps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Junyong; DANG Yamin

    2005-01-01

    If a geocentric 3D coordinate system is adopted in China to replace 2D non-geocentric coordinate system, the coordinates of the surface points will be changed accordingly.The influences on the current maps of China, especially the topographic maps, are discussed due to the replacement of the coordinate systems.Taking the replacement of Xi'an 80 coordinate system by GRS80 for a numerical example, this paper analyzes the changes of latitude, longitude, Gauss plane coordinates of the surface points, as well as the orientation and the length changes between the points on the map, including the changes of map border lines and sheet corner points.

  10. ESTIMAP: A GIS-BASED MODEL TO MAP ECOSYSTEM SERVICES IN THE EUROPEAN UNION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zulian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Policies of the European Union which affect the use or protection of natural resources increasingly need spatial data on the supply, the flow and the demand of ecosystem services. The model ESTIMAP was developed to this purpose. ESTIMAP departs from land cover and land use maps to which it adds other spatial information with the objective to map various ecosystem services. This study introduces the ESTIMAP map as tool to support the mapping and modelling of ecosystem services at European scale. Examples are provided for three regulating ecosystem services, air quality regulation, coastal protection, and pollination and one cultural ecosystem services, recreation. 

  11. Normal family of quasimeromorphic mappings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN; Daochun(孙道椿); YANG; Lo(杨乐)

    2003-01-01

    The more general quasimeromorphic mappings are studied with the geometric method. The necessary and sufficient conditions for the normality of the family of quasimeromorphic mappings are discussed. We proved two inequalities on the covering surface and obtained some normal criteria on quasimeromorphic mappings with them. Obviously, these criteria hold for meromorphic functions.

  12. Usability engineering for mobile maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looije, R.; Brake, G.M. te; Neerincx, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    because interaction with these maps can be laborious the applications are often hard to use. Therefore, the usability of maps on mobile devices must be improved. In this paper we review the research that has been done to solve technical, environmental, and social challenges of mobile map use. We wil

  13. Hazard Maps in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, John A.

    1988-01-01

    Emphasizes the use of geophysical hazard maps and illustrates how they can be used in the classroom from kindergarten to college level. Depicts ways that hazard maps of floods, landslides, earthquakes, volcanoes, and multi-hazards can be integrated into classroom instruction. Tells how maps may be obtained. (SLM)

  14. Classical and molecular genetic mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brief history of classical genetic mapping in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] is described. Detailed descriptions are given of the development of molecular genetic linkage maps based upon various types of DNA markers Like many plant and animal species, the first molecular map of soybean was bas...

  15. ON RANDOM ITERATED FUNCTION SYSTEMS WITH GREYSCALE MAPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Demers

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In the theory of Iterated Function Systems (IFSs it is known that one can find an IFS with greyscale maps (IFSM to approximate any target signal or image with arbitrary precision, and a systematic approach for doing so was described. In this paper, we extend these ideas to the framework of random IFSM operators. We consider the situation where one has many noisy observations of a particular target signal and show that the greyscale map parameters for each individual observation inherit the noise distribution of the observation. We provide illustrative examples.

  16. Mapping Arctic sea ice from the Earth Resources Technology Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, J. C. (Principal Investigator); Bowley, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Methods of detecting ice and for distinguishing between ice and clouds are discussed, and examples of ERTS-1 data showing ice distributions in northern Hudson Bay, M'Clure Strait, the eastern Beaufort Sea, and the Greenland Sea are presented. The results of the initial analysis of ERTS-1 data indicate that the locations of ice edges and ice concentrations can be accurately mapped, and that considerable information on ice type can be derived through use of the various spectral bands. Ice features as small as 80 to 100 m width can be mapped.

  17. Generalized multidirectional fuzzy map model of the logistics system networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Chun-Rong; Liu, Ming-Yuan; Li, Yan; He, Yue M.

    1997-07-01

    By conducting [0, 1] treatment to time consuming of logistics system network key links, and regarding the time consumed by manufacture, inspection, storage, assembling, packing and market as a kind of existent extent of the joint and the time consumed by materials handling, transportation and logistics information as the connection strength between joints in a generalized multi-directional fuzzy map, a generalized multi-directional fuzzy map model of logistics system networks is built. The mutual flow among network joints and the special form of generalized fuzzy matrix is analyzed. Finally, an example of model building is given.

  18. C*-algebras associated with reversible extensions of logistic maps

    CERN Document Server

    Kwasniewski, B K

    2010-01-01

    A construction of reversible extensions of dynamical systems which applies to arbitrary mappings (not necessarily with open range) is presented. It is based on calculating the maximal ideal space of C*-algebras that extends endomorphisms to partial automorphisms via partial isometric representations, and involves a newfound set of "parameters" (the role of parameters play chosen sets or ideals). Additionally, it is characterised as a universal object. As model examples, we give a thorough description of reversible extensions of logistic maps, and a classification of systems associated with compression of unitaries generating homeomorphisms of the circle.

  19. C*-algebras associated with reversible extensions of logistic maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwaśniewski, Bartosz K.

    2012-10-01

    The construction of reversible extensions of dynamical systems presented in a previous paper by the author and A.V. Lebedev is enhanced, so that it applies to arbitrary mappings (not necessarily with open range). It is based on calculating the maximal ideal space of C*-algebras that extends endomorphisms to partial automorphisms via partial isometric representations, and involves a new set of 'parameters' (the role of parameters is played by chosen sets or ideals). As model examples, we give a thorough description of reversible extensions of logistic maps and a classification of systems associated with compression of unitaries generating homeomorphisms of the circle. Bibliography: 34 titles.

  20. Field mapping of EEG by unbiased polynomial interpolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashida, H; Tatsuno, J; Okamoto, J; Maru, E

    1984-06-01

    The technique for field mapping of EEG using interpolation by an unbiased estimator of two-dimensional isotropic higher-order polynomial is developed. Assuming that the observed EEG contains noise, this method permits free positioning of the electrodes and does not reveal artificial oscillations as large as those of the Gibbs' phenomenon as in the case of the widely used Fourier interpolation. In the example of RMS (root mean square) amplitude at anesthesia, the onset of the fast activities began to appear clearly in the frontal and occipital area. By this method, not only RMS amplitude, but also instantaneous amplitude, such as visual evoked potential and somatosensory evoked potential, can be mapped.

  1. Developing nurses' critical thinking skills with concept mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrario, Catherine G

    2004-01-01

    Observations and research in educational and practice settings suggest new nurses are not using critical thinking skills. Teaching strategies traditionally focused on linear modes of thinking--no longer as helpful in today's complex and crisis-driven contexts. Concept mapping has promise of promoting higher levels of thinking and may develop critical thinking--and decision-making skills--in less time and without intensive oversight by staff instructors. A case example is used to demonstrate the design of a concept map.

  2. Delta Shell: Integrated Modeling by Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donchyts, G.; Jagers, B.; Baart, F.; Geer, P. V.

    2011-12-01

    We present the integrated modeling environment Delta Shell. It supports the full workflow of integrated environmental modeling: setup, configuration, simulation, analysis and reporting of results. Many components of the environment can be reused independently, allowing development of scientific, geospatial and other applications focused on data analysis, editing, visualization and storage. One of the unique features is that the Delta Shell environment integrates models from many different fields, such as hydrodynamics, hydrology, morphology, ecology, water quality, geospatial and decision support systems. This integration is possible due to flexible general data types, lightweight model coupling framework, the plugin system and the inclusion of a number of high quality open source components. Here we will use the open source morphological model XBeach as an example showing how to integrate models into the Delta Shell environment. Integration of XBeach adds a graphical interface which can be used to make testing coastal safety for complicated coastal areas easier. By using this example, we give an overview of the modeling framework and its possibilities. To increase the usability, the model is integrated with a coastal profile data set covering the whole coast of the Netherlands. This gives the end user a system to easily use the model for scanning the safety of the Dutch coast. The reuse of the components of the environment individually or combined is encouraged. They are available as separate components and have minimal or no dependencies on other components. This includes libraries to work with scientific multidimensional data, geospatial data (in particular geospatial coverages: values of some quantities defined on a spatial domain), editors, visualisation of time-dependent data and the modeling framework (projects, data linking, workflow management, model integration). Most components and the XBeach example are available as open source.

  3. Almost Hadamard matrices: general theory and examples

    CERN Document Server

    Banica, Teodor; Zyczkowski, Karol

    2012-01-01

    We develop a general theory of "almost Hadamard matrices". These are by definition the matrices $H\\in M_N(\\mathbb R)$ having the property that $U=H/\\sqrt{N}$ is orthogonal, and is a local maximum of the 1-norm on O(N). Our study includes a detailed discussion of the circulant case ($H_{ij}=\\gamma_{j-i}$) and of the two-entry case ($H_{ij}\\in\\{x,y\\}$), with the construction of several families of examples, and some 1-norm computations.

  4. Applied orienting response research: some examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremayne, P; Barry, R J

    1990-01-01

    The development of orienting response (OR) theory has not been accompanied by many applications of the concept--most research still appears to be lab-based and "pure," rather than "applied." We present some examples from our own work in which the OR perspective has been applied in a wider context. These cover the exploration of processing deficits in autistic children, aspects of the "repression" of anxiety in elite athletes, and the locus of alcohol effects. Such applications of the OR concept in real-life situations seem a logical and, indeed, necessary step in the evolution of this area of psychophysiology.

  5. OpenCL programming by example

    CERN Document Server

    Banger, Ravishekhar

    2013-01-01

    This book follows an example-driven, simplified, and practical approach to using OpenCL for general purpose GPU programming.If you are a beginner in parallel programming and would like to quickly accelerate your algorithms using OpenCL, this book is perfect for you! You will find the diverse topics and case studies in this book interesting and informative. You will only require a good knowledge of C programming for this book, and an understanding of parallel implementations will be useful, but not necessary.

  6. Continuum modeling an approach through practical examples

    CERN Document Server

    Muntean, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    This book develops continuum modeling skills and approaches the topic from three sides: (1) derivation of global integral laws together with the associated local differential equations, (2) design of constitutive laws and (3) modeling boundary processes. The focus of this presentation lies on many practical examples covering aspects such as coupled flow, diffusion and reaction in porous media or microwave heating of a pizza, as well as traffic issues in bacterial colonies and energy harvesting from geothermal wells. The target audience comprises primarily graduate students in pure and applied mathematics as well as working practitioners in engineering who are faced by nonstandard rheological topics like those typically arising in the food industry.

  7. Physics Education in Virtual Reality: An Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Kaufmann

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an immersive virtual reality (VR application for physics education. It utilizes a recent physics engine developed for the PC gaming market to simulate physical experiments correctly and accurately. Students are enabled to actively build their own experiments and study them. A variety of tools are provided to analyze forces, mass, paths and other properties of objects before, during and after experiments. Innovative teaching content is presented thatexploits the strengths of the 3D virtual environment. Physics Playground serves as an example of how current technologies can be combined to deliver a new quality in physics education.

  8. Geologic map of Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David A.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.; Crown, David A.; Yff, Jessica A.; Jaeger, Windy L.; Schenk, Paul M.; Geissler, Paul E.; Becker, Tammy L.

    2011-01-01

    Io, discovered by Galileo Galilei on January 7–13, 1610, is the innermost of the four Galilean satellites of the planet Jupiter (Galilei, 1610). It is the most volcanically active object in the Solar System, as recognized by observations from six National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) spacecraft: Voyager 1 (March 1979), Voyager 2 (July 1979), Hubble Space Telescope (1990–present), Galileo (1996–2001), Cassini (December 2000), and New Horizons (February 2007). The lack of impact craters on Io in any spacecraft images at any resolution attests to the high resurfacing rate (1 cm/yr) and the dominant role of active volcanism in shaping its surface. High-temperature hot spots detected by the Galileo Solid-State Imager (SSI), Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS), and Photopolarimeter-Radiometer (PPR) usually correlate with darkest materials on the surface, suggesting active volcanism. The Voyager flybys obtained complete coverage of Io's subjovian hemisphere at 500 m/pixel to 2 km/pixel, and most of the rest of the satellite at 5–20 km/pixel. Repeated Galileo flybys obtained complementary coverage of Io's antijovian hemisphere at 5 m/pixel to 1.4 km/pixel. Thus, the Voyager and Galileo data sets were merged to enable the characterization of the whole surface of the satellite at a consistent resolution. The United States Geological Survey (USGS) produced a set of four global mosaics of Io in visible wavelengths at a spatial resolution of 1 km/pixel, released in February 2006, which we have used as base maps for this new global geologic map. Much has been learned about Io's volcanism, tectonics, degradation, and interior since the Voyager flybys, primarily during and following the Galileo Mission at Jupiter (December 1995–September 2003), and the results have been summarized in books published after the end of the Galileo Mission. Our mapping incorporates this new understanding to assist in map unit definition and to provide a global synthesis

  9. Geologic mapping of Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeley, R.; Figueredo, P.H.; Williams, D.A.; Chuang, F.C.; Klemaszewski, J.E.; Kadel, S.D.; Prockter, L.M.; Pappalardo, R.T.; Head, J. W.; Collins, G.C.; Spaun, N.A.; Sullivan, R.J.; Moore, Johnnie N.; Senske, D.A.; Tufts, B.R.; Johnson, T.V.; Belton, M.J.S.; Tanaka, K.L.

    2000-01-01

    Galileo data enable the major geological units, structures, and surface features to be identified on Europa. These include five primary units (plains, chaos, band, ridge, and crater materials) and their subunits, along with various tectonic structures such as faults. Plains units are the most widespread. Ridged plains material spans a wide range of geological ages, including the oldest recognizable features on Europa, and appears to represent a style of tectonic resurfacing, rather than cryovolcanism. Smooth plains material typically embays other terrains and units, possibly as a type of fluid emplacement, and is among the youngest material units observed. At global scales, plains are typically mapped as undifferentiated plains material, although in some areas differences can be discerned in the near infrared which might be related to differences in ice grain size. Chaos material is composed of plains and other preexisting materials that have been severely disrupted by inferred internal activity; chaos is characterized by blocks of icy material set in a hummocky matrix. Band material is arrayed in linear, curvilinear, wedge-shaped, or cuspate zones with contrasting albedo and surface textures with respect to the surrounding terrain. Bilateral symmetry observed in some bands and the relationships with the surrounding units suggest that band material forms by the lithosphere fracturing, spreading apart, and infilling with material derived from the subsurface. Ridge material is mapped as a unit on local and some regional maps but shown with symbols at global scales. Ridge material includes single ridges, doublet ridges, and ridge complexes. Ridge materials are considered to represent tectonic processes, possibly accompanied by the extrusion or intrusion of subsurface materials, such as diapirs. The tectonic processes might be related to tidal flexing of the icy lithosphere on diurnal or longer timescales. Crater materials include various interior (smooth central

  10. Hybrid optical acoustic seafloor mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, Gabrielle

    The oceanographic research and industrial communities have a persistent demand for detailed three dimensional sea floor maps which convey both shape and texture. Such data products are used for archeology, geology, ship inspection, biology, and habitat classification. There are a variety of sensing modalities and processing techniques available to produce these maps and each have their own potential benefits and related challenges. Multibeam sonar and stereo vision are such two sensors with complementary strengths making them ideally suited for data fusion. Data fusion approaches however, have seen only limited application to underwater mapping and there are no established methods for creating hybrid, 3D reconstructions from two underwater sensing modalities. This thesis develops a processing pipeline to synthesize hybrid maps from multi-modal survey data. It is helpful to think of this processing pipeline as having two distinct phases: Navigation Refinement and Map Construction. This thesis extends existing work in underwater navigation refinement by incorporating methods which increase measurement consistency between both multibeam and camera. The result is a self consistent 3D point cloud comprised of camera and multibeam measurements. In map construction phase, a subset of the multi-modal point cloud retaining the best characteristics of each sensor is selected to be part of the final map. To quantify the desired traits of a map several characteristics of a useful map are distilled into specific criteria. The different ways that hybrid maps can address these criteria provides justification for producing them as an alternative to current methodologies. The processing pipeline implements multi-modal data fusion and outlier rejection with emphasis on different aspects of map fidelity. The resulting point cloud is evaluated in terms of how well it addresses the map criteria. The final hybrid maps retain the strengths of both sensors and show significant improvement

  11. Scoping of flood hazard mapping needs for Somerset County, Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Robert W.; Schalk, Charles W.

    2006-01-01

    s. However, in the ensuing 20-30 years, development has occurred in many of the watersheds, and the characteristics of the watersheds have changed with time. Therefore, many of the older studies may not depict current conditions nor accurately estimate risk in terms of flood heights. The following is the scope of work as defined in the FEMA/USGS Statement of Work: Task 1: Collect data from a variety of sources including community surveys, other Federal and State Agencies, National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) State Coordinators, Community Assistance Visits (CAVs) and FEMA archives. Lists of mapping needs will be obtained from the MNUSS database, community surveys, and CAVs, if available. FEMA archives will be inventoried for effective FIRM panels, FIS reports, and other flood-hazard data or existing study data. Best available base map information, topographic data, flood-hazard data, and hydrologic and hydraulic data will be identified. Data from the Maine Floodplain Management Program database also will be utilized. Task 2: Contact communities in Somerset County to notify them that FEMA and the State have selected them for a map update, and that a project scope will be developed with their input. Topics to be reviewed with the communities include (1) Purpose of the Flood Map Project (for example, the update needs that have prompted the map update); (2) The community's mapping needs; (3) The community's available mapping, hydrologic, hydraulic, and flooding information; (4) target schedule for completing the project; and (5) The community's engineering, planning, and geographic information system (GIS) capabilities. On the basis of the collected information from Task 1 and community contacts/meetings in Task 2, the USGS will develop a Draft Project Scope for the identified mapping needs of the communities in Somerset County. The following items will be addressed in the Draft Project Scope: review of available information, determine if and ho

  12. Image processing for optical mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, Prabu; Gupta, Aditya

    2015-01-01

    Optical Mapping is an established single-molecule, whole-genome analysis system, which has been used to gain a comprehensive understanding of genomic structure and to study structural variation of complex genomes. A critical component of Optical Mapping system is the image processing module, which extracts single molecule restriction maps from image datasets of immobilized, restriction digested and fluorescently stained large DNA molecules. In this review, we describe robust and efficient image processing techniques to process these massive datasets and extract accurate restriction maps in the presence of noise, ambiguity and confounding artifacts. We also highlight a few applications of the Optical Mapping system.

  13. Mapping the human protein interactome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daniel Figeys

    2008-01-01

    Interactions are the essence of all biomolecules because they cannot fulfill their roles without interacting with other molecules. Hence, mapping the interactions of biomolecules can be useful for understanding their roles and functions. Furthermore, the development of molecular based systems biology requires an understanding of the biomolecular interactions. In recent years, the mapping of protein-protein interactions in different species has been reported, but few reports have focused on the large-scale mapping of protein-protein interactions in human. Here, we review the developments in protein interaction mapping and we discuss issues and strategies for the mapping of the human protein interactome.

  14. Mapping the space of genomic signatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lila Kari

    Full Text Available We propose a computational method to measure and visualize interrelationships among any number of DNA sequences allowing, for example, the examination of hundreds or thousands of complete mitochondrial genomes. An "image distance" is computed for each pair of graphical representations of DNA sequences, and the distances are visualized as a Molecular Distance Map: Each point on the map represents a DNA sequence, and the spatial proximity between any two points reflects the degree of structural similarity between the corresponding sequences. The graphical representation of DNA sequences utilized, Chaos Game Representation (CGR, is genome- and species-specific and can thus act as a genomic signature. Consequently, Molecular Distance Maps could inform species identification, taxonomic classifications and, to a certain extent, evolutionary history. The image distance employed, Structural Dissimilarity Index (DSSIM, implicitly compares the occurrences of oligomers of length up to k (herein k = 9 in DNA sequences. We computed DSSIM distances for more than 5 million pairs of complete mitochondrial genomes, and used Multi-Dimensional Scaling (MDS to obtain Molecular Distance Maps that visually display the sequence relatedness in various subsets, at different taxonomic levels. This general-purpose method does not require DNA sequence alignment and can thus be used to compare similar or vastly different DNA sequences, genomic or computer-generated, of the same or different lengths. We illustrate potential uses of this approach by applying it to several taxonomic subsets: phylum Vertebrata, (superkingdom Protista, classes Amphibia-Insecta-Mammalia, class Amphibia, and order Primates. This analysis of an extensive dataset confirms that the oligomer composition of full mtDNA sequences can be a source of taxonomic information. This method also correctly finds the mtDNA sequences most closely related to that of the anatomically modern human (the Neanderthal

  15. The customer-centered innovation map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettencourt, Lance A; Ulwick, Anthony W

    2008-05-01

    We all know that people "hire" products and services to get a job done. Surgeons hire scalpels to dissect soft tissue. Janitors hire soap dispensers and paper towels to remove grime from their hands. To find ways to innovate, it's critical to deconstruct the job the customer is trying to get done from beginning to end, to gain a complete view of all the points at which a customer might desire more help from a product or service. A methodology called job mapping helps companies analyze the biggest drawbacks of the products and services customers currently use and discover opportunities for innovation. It involves breaking down the task the customer wants to accomplish into the eight universal steps of a job: (1) defining the objectives, (2) locating the necessary inputs, (3) preparing the physical environment, (4) confirming that everything is ready, (5) executing the task, (6) monitoring its progress, (7) making modifications as necessary, and (8) concluding the job. Job mapping differs substantively from process mapping in that the goal is to identify what customers are trying to get done at every step, not what they are doing currently. For example, when an anesthesiologist checks a monitor during a surgical procedure, the action taken is just a means to the end. Detecting a change in patient vital signs is the job the doctor is trying to get done. Within each of the discrete steps lie multiple opportunities for making the job simpler, easier, or faster. By mapping out every step of the job and locating those opportunities, companies can discover new ways to differentiate their offerings.

  16. Mapping Seabird Sensitivity to Offshore Wind Farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Gareth; Trinder, Mark; Furness, Bob; Banks, Alex N.; Caldow, Richard W. G.; Hume, Duncan

    2014-01-01

    We present a Geographic Information System (GIS) tool, SeaMaST (Seabird Mapping and Sensitivity Tool), to provide evidence on the use of sea areas by seabirds and inshore waterbirds in English territorial waters, mapping their relative sensitivity to offshore wind farms. SeaMaST is a freely available evidence source for use by all connected to the offshore wind industry and will assist statutory agencies in assessing potential risks to seabird populations from planned developments. Data were compiled from offshore boat and aerial observer surveys spanning the period 1979–2012. The data were analysed using distance analysis and Density Surface Modelling to produce predicted bird densities across a grid covering English territorial waters at a resolution of 3 km×3 km. Coefficients of Variation were estimated for each grid cell density, as an indication of confidence in predictions. Offshore wind farm sensitivity scores were compiled for seabird species using English territorial waters. The comparative risks to each species of collision with turbines and displacement from operational turbines were reviewed and scored separately, and the scores were multiplied by the bird density estimates to produce relative sensitivity maps. The sensitivity maps reflected well the amassed distributions of the most sensitive species. SeaMaST is an important new tool for assessing potential impacts on seabird populations from offshore development at a time when multiple large areas of development are proposed which overlap with many seabird species’ ranges. It will inform marine spatial planning as well as identifying priority areas of sea usage by marine birds. Example SeaMaST outputs are presented. PMID:25210739

  17. Mapping seabird sensitivity to offshore wind farms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth Bradbury

    Full Text Available We present a Geographic Information System (GIS tool, SeaMaST (Seabird Mapping and Sensitivity Tool, to provide evidence on the use of sea areas by seabirds and inshore waterbirds in English territorial waters, mapping their relative sensitivity to offshore wind farms. SeaMaST is a freely available evidence source for use by all connected to the offshore wind industry and will assist statutory agencies in assessing potential risks to seabird populations from planned developments. Data were compiled from offshore boat and aerial observer surveys spanning the period 1979-2012. The data were analysed using distance analysis and Density Surface Modelling to produce predicted bird densities across a grid covering English territorial waters at a resolution of 3 km×3 km. Coefficients of Variation were estimated for each grid cell density, as an indication of confidence in predictions. Offshore wind farm sensitivity scores were compiled for seabird species using English territorial waters. The comparative risks to each species of collision with turbines and displacement from operational turbines were reviewed and scored separately, and the scores were multiplied by the bird density estimates to produce relative sensitivity maps. The sensitivity maps reflected well the amassed distributions of the most sensitive species. SeaMaST is an important new tool for assessing potential impacts on seabird populations from offshore development at a time when multiple large areas of development are proposed which overlap with many seabird species' ranges. It will inform marine spatial planning as well as identifying priority areas of sea usage by marine birds. Example SeaMaST outputs are presented.

  18. APPLICATION OF SPOT-6 AND THE UAV AERIAL TECHNOLOGY IN QUATERNARY GEOLOGY AND TECTONIC MAPPING:TAKING THE 1∶50000 MAPPING PILOT OF THE HULESITAI AREA, INNER MONGOLIA AS AN EXAMPLE%SPOT-6与无人机航测技术在第四纪地质及活动构造填图中的应用--以内蒙古1∶50000呼勒斯太苏木等四幅填图试点为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶梦旎; 张绪教; 叶培盛; 傅连珍; 吴泽群; 贾丽云; 何祥丽

    2016-01-01

    Through choosing the SPOT-6 data, on the basis of pre-proceeding images of the Hulesitai area, Inner Mongolia, including Ortho-rectification, registration and sharpness, we initially established Quaternary strata and the neotectonic activity symbols for remote sensing interpretation of mapping area according to the image characteristics of different geological bodies and field investigation. Combined with field geological survey, we investigated and analyzed the origin and distribution of sediments, the geomorphological features and zoning, active tectonic movement etc. in the study area. And through the UAV aerial flight data in 2015, we identified the neotectonics, active tectonics and initially determine the activity characteristics. The study show that high precision of remote sensing technology and UAV technology in Quaternary geological mapping in plain area has unique advantages, which is contributed to the rapid identification of Quaternary sedimentary types and the relative timing, and determine precisely the spatial position of the main fracture and the activity characteristics in the area. It increases the efficiency of mapping work and makes up for the limitations of surface survey.%选择SPOT-6数据,对内蒙古呼勒斯太苏木等四幅图的SPOT-6遥感影像进行正射校正、配准及信息的数字增强处理后,根据不同地质体影像特征、野外实地调查,初步建立了填图区第四纪地层及新构造活动的解译标志,并结合野外地质调查,对研究区沉积物的成因类型和分布范围、地貌特征及分区、活动构造运动等进行了调查验证;利用2015年飞行的无人机航测数据,对区内新构造、活动构造进行了识别及活动性质的初步判断。研究结果表明,高精度遥感技术及无人机技术在平原区第四纪地质填图中具有独特优势,有助于快速识别第四纪沉积成因类型与相对时序及准确厘定区域主要活动断裂空间

  19. Radon mapping strategies in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, V; Ringer, W; Wurm, G; Friedmann, H

    2015-11-01

    According to current European and international recommendations (e.g. by IAEA, WHO and European Union), countries shall identify high radon areas. In Austria, this task was initiated already in the early 1990s, which yielded the first Austrian Radon Potential Map. This map is still in use, updated with recent indoor radon data in 2012. The map is based on radon gas measurements in randomly selected dwellings, normalised to a standard situation. To meet the current (legal) requirements, uncertainties in the existing Austrian radon map should be reduced. A new indoor radon survey with a different sampling strategy was started, and possible mapping methods are studied and tested. In this paper, the methodology for the existing map as well as the planned strategies to improve this map is discussed.

  20. Yield Mapping in Salix; Skoerdekartering av salix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Christoffer; Gilbertsson, Mikael; Rogstrand, Gustav; Thylen, Lars

    2004-09-01

    The most common species for energy forest production is willow. Willow is able to produce a large amount of biomass in a short period of time. Growing willow has a potential to render a good financial result for the farmer if cultivated on fields with the right conditions and plenty of water. Under the right conditions growing willow can give the farmer a net income of 3,000 SEK (about 430 USD) per hectare and year, which is something that common cereal crops cannot compete with. However, this is not the common case since willow is often grown as a substitute crop on fields where cereal crop yield is low. The aim of this study was to reveal if it is possible to measure yield variability in willow, and if it is possible to describe the reasons for yield variation both within the field but also between different fields. Yield mapping has been used in conventional farming for about a decade. The principles for yield mapping are to continuously measure the yield while registering location by the use of GPS when harvesting the field. The collected data is then used to search for spatial variations within the field, and to try to understand the reasons for this variation. Since there is currently no commercial equipment for yield mapping in willow, a yield mapping system had to be developed within this project. The new system was installed on a Claas Jaguar harvester. The principle for yield mapping on the Claas Jaguar harvester is to measure the distance between the feeding rollers. This distance is correlated to the flow through the harvester. The speed and position of the machine was registered using GPS. Knowing the working width of the harvester this information was used to calculate the yield. All collected data was stored on a PDA computer. Soil samples were also collected from the yield mapped fields. This was to be able to test yield against both physical and chemical soil parameters. The result shows that it is possible to measure spatial variations of yield in