WorldWideScience

Sample records for apospory-specific genomic region

  1. REEF: searching REgionally Enriched Features in genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Danieli Gian Antonio; Coppe Alessandro; Bortoluzzi Stefania

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background In Eukaryotic genomes, different features including genes are not uniformly distributed. The integration of annotation information and genomic position of functional DNA elements in the Eukaryotic genomes opened the way to test novel hypotheses of higher order genome organization and regulation of expression. Results REEF is a new tool, aimed at identifying genomic regions enriched in specific features, such as a class or group of genes homogeneous for expression and/or fu...

  2. REEF: searching REgionally Enriched Features in genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danieli Gian Antonio

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Eukaryotic genomes, different features including genes are not uniformly distributed. The integration of annotation information and genomic position of functional DNA elements in the Eukaryotic genomes opened the way to test novel hypotheses of higher order genome organization and regulation of expression. Results REEF is a new tool, aimed at identifying genomic regions enriched in specific features, such as a class or group of genes homogeneous for expression and/or functional characteristics. The method for the calculation of local feature enrichment uses test statistic based on the Hypergeometric Distribution applied genome-wide by using a sliding window approach and adopting the False Discovery Rate for controlling multiplicity. REEF software, source code and documentation are freely available at http://telethon.bio.unipd.it/bioinfo/reef/. Conclusion REEF can aid to shed light on the role of organization of specific genomic regions in the determination of their functional role.

  3. REEF: searching REgionally Enriched Features in genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppe, Alessandro; Danieli, Gian Antonio; Bortoluzzi, Stefania

    2006-01-01

    Background In Eukaryotic genomes, different features including genes are not uniformly distributed. The integration of annotation information and genomic position of functional DNA elements in the Eukaryotic genomes opened the way to test novel hypotheses of higher order genome organization and regulation of expression. Results REEF is a new tool, aimed at identifying genomic regions enriched in specific features, such as a class or group of genes homogeneous for expression and/or functional characteristics. The method for the calculation of local feature enrichment uses test statistic based on the Hypergeometric Distribution applied genome-wide by using a sliding window approach and adopting the False Discovery Rate for controlling multiplicity. REEF software, source code and documentation are freely available at . Conclusion REEF can aid to shed light on the role of organization of specific genomic regions in the determination of their functional role. PMID:17042935

  4. Evolution of the apomixis transmitting chromosome in Pennisetum

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    Yamada-Akiyama Hitomi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apomixis is an intriguing trait in plants that results in maternal clones through seed reproduction. Apomixis is an elusive, but potentially revolutionary, trait for plant breeding and hybrid seed production. Recent studies arguing that apomicts are not evolutionary dead ends have generated further interest in the evolution of asexual flowering plants. Results In the present study, we investigate karyotypic variation in a single chromosome responsible for transmitting apomixis, the Apospory-Specific Genomic Region carrier chromosome, in relation to species phylogeny in the genera Pennisetum and Cenchrus. A 1 kb region from the 3' end of the ndhF gene and a 900 bp region from trnL-F were sequenced from 12 apomictic and eight sexual species in the genus Pennisetum and allied genus Cenchrus. An 800 bp region from the Apospory-Specific Genomic Region also was sequenced from the 12 apomicts. Molecular cytological analysis was conducted in sixteen Pennisetum and two Cenchrus species. Our results indicate that the Apospory-Specific Genomic Region is shared by all apomictic species while it is absent from all sexual species or cytotypes. Contrary to our previous observations in Pennisetum squamulatum and Cenchrus ciliaris, retrotransposon sequences of the Opie-2-like family were not closely associated with the Apospory-Specific Genomic Region in all apomictic species, suggesting that they may have been accumulated after the Apospory-Specific Genomic Region originated. Conclusions Given that phylogenetic analysis merged Cenchrus and newly investigated Pennisetum species into a single clade containing a terminal cluster of Cenchrus apomicts, the presumed monophyletic origin of Cenchrus is supported. The Apospory-Specific Genomic Region likely preceded speciation in Cenchrus and its lateral transfer through hybridization and subsequent chromosome repatterning may have contributed to further speciation in the two genera.

  5. Regional regulation of transcription in the chicken genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nie, H.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Bastiaansen, J.W.M.; Megens, H.J.W.C.; Groenen, M.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Over the past years, the relationship between gene transcription and chromosomal location has been studied in a number of different vertebrate genomes. Regional differences in gene expression have been found in several different species. The chicken genome, as the closest sequenced genome

  6. Detection of simple mutations and polymorphisms in large genomic regions

    OpenAIRE

    Sokurenko, Evgeni V.; Tchesnokova, Veronika; Yeung, Anthony T.; Oleykowski, Catherine A.; Trintchina, Elena; Hughes, Kelly T.; Rashid, Rebecca A.; Brint, J. Mark; Moseley, Steve L.; Lory, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a novel technology that makes it possible to detect simple nucleotide polymorphisms directly within a sample of total genomic DNA. It allows, in a single Southern blot experiment, the determination of sequence identity of genomic regions with a combined length of hundreds of kilobases. This technology does not require PCR amplification of the target DNA regions, but exploits preparative size-fractionation of restriction-digested genomic DNA and a newly discovered property of...

  7. GANESH: Software for Customized Annotation of Genome Regions

    OpenAIRE

    Huntley, Derek; Hummerich, Holger; Smedley, Damian; Kittivoravitkul, Sasivimol; McCarthy, Mark; Little, Peter; Sergot, Marek

    2003-01-01

    GANESH is a software package designed to support the genetic analysis of regions of human and other genomes. It provides a set of components that may be assembled to construct a self-updating database of DNA sequence, mapping data, and annotations of possible genome features. Once one or more remote sources of data for the target region have been identified, all sequences for that region are downloaded, assimilated, and subjected to a (configurable) set of standard database-searching an...

  8. Human-mouse comparative genomics: successes and failures to reveal functional regions of the human genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Baroukh, Nadine; Rubin, Edward M.

    2003-05-15

    Deciphering the genetic code embedded within the human genome remains a significant challenge despite the human genome consortium's recent success at defining its linear sequence (Lander et al. 2001; Venter et al. 2001). While useful strategies exist to identify a large percentage of protein encoding regions, efforts to accurately define functional sequences in the remaining {approx}97 percent of the genome lag. Our primary interest has been to utilize the evolutionary relationship and the universal nature of genomic sequence information in vertebrates to reveal functional elements in the human genome. This has been achieved through the combined use of vertebrate comparative genomics to pinpoint highly conserved sequences as candidates for biological activity and transgenic mouse studies to address the functionality of defined human DNA fragments. Accordingly, we describe strategies and insights into functional sequences in the human genome through the use of comparative genomics coupled wit h functional studies in the mouse.

  9. The transcriptionally active regions in the genome of Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Simon; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Jarmer, Hanne Østergaard

    2009-01-01

    The majority of all genes have so far been identified and annotated systematically through in silico gene finding. Here we report the finding of 3662 strand-specific transcriptionally active regions (TARs) in the genome of Bacillus subtilis by the use of tiling arrays. We have measured the genome...

  10. Enhancer scanning to locate regulatory regions in genomic loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Melissa; Gjyshi, Anxhela; Mendoza-Fandiño, Gustavo; Baskin, Rebekah; Carvalho, Renato S; Carvalho, Marcelo A; Woods, Nicholas T; Monteiro, Alvaro N A

    2016-01-01

    This protocol provides a rapid, streamlined and scalable strategy to systematically scan genomic regions for the presence of transcriptional regulatory regions that are active in a specific cell type. It creates genomic tiles spanning a region of interest that are subsequently cloned by recombination into a luciferase reporter vector containing the simian virus 40 promoter. Tiling clones are transfected into specific cell types to test for the presence of transcriptional regulatory regions. The protocol includes testing of different single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) alleles to determine their effect on regulatory activity. This procedure provides a systematic framework for identifying candidate functional SNPs within a locus during functional analysis of genome-wide association studies. This protocol adapts and combines previous well-established molecular biology methods to provide a streamlined strategy, based on automated primer design and recombinational cloning, allowing one to rapidly go from a genomic locus to a set of candidate functional SNPs in 8 weeks. PMID:26658467

  11. Regional regulation of transcription in the chicken genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megens Hendrik-Jan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the past years, the relationship between gene transcription and chromosomal location has been studied in a number of different vertebrate genomes. Regional differences in gene expression have been found in several different species. The chicken genome, as the closest sequenced genome relative to mammals, is an important resource for investigating regional effects on transcription in birds and studying the regional dynamics of chromosome evolution by comparative analysis. Results We used gene expression data to survey eight chicken tissues and create transcriptome maps for all chicken chromosomes. The results reveal the presence of two distinct types of chromosomal regions characterized by clusters of highly or lowly expressed genes. Furthermore, these regions correlate highly with a number of genome characteristics. Regions with clusters of highly expressed genes have higher gene densities, shorter genes, shorter average intron and higher GC content compared to regions with clusters of lowly expressed genes. A comparative analysis between the chicken and human transcriptome maps constructed using similar panels of tissues suggests that the regions with clusters of highly expressed genes are relatively conserved between the two genomes. Conclusions Our results revealed the presence of a higher order organization of the chicken genome that affects gene expression, confirming similar observations in other species. These results will aid in the further understanding of the regional dynamics of chromosome evolution. The microarray data used in this analysis have been submitted to NCBI GEO database under accession number GSE17108. The reviewer access link is: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?token=tjwjpscyceqawjk&acc=GSE17108

  12. Origin of the duplicated regions in the yeast genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piskur, Jure

    2001-01-01

    The genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains several duplicated regions. The recent sequencing results of several yeast species suggest that the duplicated regions found in the modern Saccharomyces species are probably the result of a single gross duplication, as well as a series of sporadic...

  13. Telomere maintenance through recruitment of internal genomic regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Beomseok; Kim, Chuna; Hills, Mark; Sung, Sanghyun; Kim, Hyesook; Kim, Eunkyeong; Lim, Daisy S; Oh, Hyun-Seok; Choi, Rachael Mi Jung; Chun, Jongsik; Shim, Jaegal; Lee, Junho

    2015-01-01

    Cells surviving crisis are often tumorigenic and their telomeres are commonly maintained through the reactivation of telomerase. However, surviving cells occasionally activate a recombination-based mechanism called alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT). Here we establish stably maintained survivors in telomerase-deleted Caenorhabditis elegans that escape from sterility by activating ALT. ALT survivors trans-duplicate an internal genomic region, which is already cis-duplicated to chromosome ends, across the telomeres of all chromosomes. These 'Template for ALT' (TALT) regions consist of a block of genomic DNA flanked by telomere-like sequences, and are different between two genetic background. We establish a model that an ancestral duplication of a donor TALT region to a proximal telomere region forms a genomic reservoir ready to be incorporated into telomeres on ALT activation. PMID:26382656

  14. Dynamic evolution of rht-1 homologous regions in grass genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wu

    Full Text Available Hexaploid bread wheat contains A, B, and D three subgenomes with its well-characterized ancestral genomes existed at diploid and tetraploid levels, making the wheat act as a good model species for studying evolutionary genomic dynamics. Here, we performed intra- and inter-species comparative analyses of wheat and related grass genomes to examine the dynamics of homologous regions surrounding Rht-1, a well-known "green revolution" gene. Our results showed that the divergence of the two A genomes in the Rht-1 region from the diploid and tetraploid species is greater than that from the tetraploid and hexaploid wheat. The divergence of D genome between diploid and hexaploid is lower than those of A genome, suggesting that D genome diverged latter than others. The divergence among the A, B and D subgenomes was larger than that among different ploidy levels for each subgenome which mainly resulted from genomic structural variation of insertions and, perhaps deletions, of the repetitive sequences. Meanwhile, the repetitive sequences caused genome expansion further after the divergence of the three subgenomes. However, several conserved non-coding sequences were identified to be shared among the three subgenomes of wheat, suggesting that they may have played an important role to maintain the homolog of three subgenomes. This is a pilot study on evolutionary dynamics across the wheat ploids, subgenomes and differently related grasses. Our results gained new insights into evolutionary dynamics of Rht-1 region at sequence level as well as the evolution of wheat during the plolyploidization process.

  15. Targeted genome-wide enrichment of functional regions.

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    Periannan Senapathy

    Full Text Available Only a small fraction of large genomes such as that of the human contains the functional regions such as the exons, promoters, and polyA sites. A platform technique for selective enrichment of functional genomic regions will enable several next-generation sequencing applications that include the discovery of causal mutations for disease and drug response. Here, we describe a powerful platform technique, termed "functional genomic fingerprinting" (FGF, for the multiplexed genomewide isolation and analysis of targeted regions such as the exome, promoterome, or exon splice enhancers. The technique employs a fixed part of a uniquely designed Fixed-Randomized primer, while the randomized part contains all the possible sequence permutations. The Fixed-Randomized primers bind with full sequence complementarity at multiple sites where the fixed sequence (such as the splice signals occurs within the genome, and multiplex amplify many regions bounded by the fixed sequences (e.g., exons. Notably, validation of this technique using cardiac myosin binding protein-C (MYBPC3 gene as an example strongly supports the application and efficacy of this method. Further, assisted by genomewide computational analyses of such sequences, the FGF technique may provide a unique platform for high-throughput sample production and analysis of targeted genomic regions by the next-generation sequencing techniques, with powerful applications in discovering disease and drug response genes.

  16. Genome-wide identification of hypoxia-induced enhancer regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Jessica L.; Randel, Melissa A.; Johnson, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a genome-wide method for de novo identification of enhancer regions. This approach enables massively parallel empirical investigation of DNA sequences that mediate transcriptional activation and provides a platform for discovery of regulatory modules capable of driving context-specific gene expression. The method links fragmented genomic DNA to the transcription of randomer molecule identifiers and measures the functional enhancer activity of the library by massively parallel sequencing. We transfected a Drosophila melanogaster library into S2 cells in normoxia and hypoxia, and assayed 4,599,881 genomic DNA fragments in parallel. The locations of the enhancer regions strongly correlate with genes up-regulated after hypoxia and previously described enhancers. Novel enhancer regions were identified and integrated with RNAseq data and transcription factor motifs to describe the hypoxic response on a genome-wide basis as a complex regulatory network involving multiple stress-response pathways. This work provides a novel method for high-throughput assay of enhancer activity and the genome-scale identification of 31 hypoxia-activated enhancers in Drosophila. PMID:26713262

  17. Harnessing genomics to improve health in the Eastern Mediterranean Region - an executive course in genomics policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Tara; Rab, Mohammed Abdur; Singer, Peter A; Daar, Abdallah S

    2005-01-21

    BACKGROUND: While innovations in medicine, science and technology have resulted in improved health and quality of life for many people, the benefits of modern medicine continue to elude millions of people in many parts of the world. To assess the potential of genomics to address health needs in EMR, the World Health Organization's Eastern Mediterranean Regional Office and the University of Toronto Joint Centre for Bioethics jointly organized a Genomics and Public Health Policy Executive Course, held September 20th-23rd, 2003, in Muscat, Oman. The 4-day course was sponsored by WHO-EMRO with additional support from the Canadian Program in Genomics and Global Health. The overall objective of the course was to collectively explore how to best harness genomics to improve health in the region. This article presents the course findings and recommendations for genomics policy in EMR. METHODS: The course brought together senior representatives from academia, biotechnology companies, regulatory bodies, media, voluntary, and legal organizations to engage in discussion. Topics covered included scientific advances in genomics, followed by innovations in business models, public sector perspectives, ethics, legal issues and national innovation systems. RESULTS: A set of recommendations, summarized below, was formulated for the Regional Office, the Member States and for individuals.* Advocacy for genomics and biotechnology for political leadership;* Networking between member states to share information, expertise, training, and regional cooperation in biotechnology; coordination of national surveys for assessment of health biotechnology innovation systems, science capacity, government policies, legislation and regulations, intellectual property policies, private sector activity;* Creation in each member country of an effective National Body on genomics, biotechnology and health to:- formulate national biotechnology strategies- raise biotechnology awareness- encourage teaching and

  18. Harnessing genomics to improve health in the Eastern Mediterranean Region - an executive course in genomics policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Tara; Rab, Mohammed Abdur; Singer, Peter A; Daar, Abdallah S

    2005-01-21

    BACKGROUND: While innovations in medicine, science and technology have resulted in improved health and quality of life for many people, the benefits of modern medicine continue to elude millions of people in many parts of the world. To assess the potential of genomics to address health needs in EMR, the World Health Organization's Eastern Mediterranean Regional Office and the University of Toronto Joint Centre for Bioethics jointly organized a Genomics and Public Health Policy Executive Course, held September 20th-23rd, 2003, in Muscat, Oman. The 4-day course was sponsored by WHO-EMRO with additional support from the Canadian Program in Genomics and Global Health. The overall objective of the course was to collectively explore how to best harness genomics to improve health in the region. This article presents the course findings and recommendations for genomics policy in EMR. METHODS: The course brought together senior representatives from academia, biotechnology companies, regulatory bodies, media, voluntary, and legal organizations to engage in discussion. Topics covered included scientific advances in genomics, followed by innovations in business models, public sector perspectives, ethics, legal issues and national innovation systems. RESULTS: A set of recommendations, summarized below, was formulated for the Regional Office, the Member States and for individuals.* Advocacy for genomics and biotechnology for political leadership;* Networking between member states to share information, expertise, training, and regional cooperation in biotechnology; coordination of national surveys for assessment of health biotechnology innovation systems, science capacity, government policies, legislation and regulations, intellectual property policies, private sector activity;* Creation in each member country of an effective National Body on genomics, biotechnology and health to:- formulate national biotechnology strategies- raise biotechnology awareness- encourage teaching and

  19. Linkage disequilibrium of evolutionarily conserved regions in the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Todd A

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The strong linkage disequilibrium (LD recently found in genic or exonic regions of the human genome demonstrated that LD can be increased by evolutionary mechanisms that select for functionally important loci. This suggests that LD might be stronger in regions conserved among species than in non-conserved regions, since regions exposed to natural selection tend to be conserved. To assess this hypothesis, we used genome-wide polymorphism data from the HapMap project and investigated LD within DNA sequences conserved between the human and mouse genomes. Results Unexpectedly, we observed that LD was significantly weaker in conserved regions than in non-conserved regions. To investigate why, we examined sequence features that may distort the relationship between LD and conserved regions. We found that interspersed repeats, and not other sequence features, were associated with the weak LD tendency in conserved regions. To appropriately understand the relationship between LD and conserved regions, we removed the effect of repetitive elements and found that the high degree of sequence conservation was strongly associated with strong LD in coding regions but not with that in non-coding regions. Conclusion Our work demonstrates that the degree of sequence conservation does not simply increase LD as predicted by the hypothesis. Rather, it implies that purifying selection changes the polymorphic patterns of coding sequences but has little influence on the patterns of functional units such as regulatory elements present in non-coding regions, since the former are generally restricted by the constraint of maintaining a functional protein product across multiple exons while the latter may exist more as individually isolated units.

  20. Differentiation of regions with atypical oligonucleotide composition in bacterial genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reva Oleg N

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complete sequencing of bacterial genomes has become a common technique of present day microbiology. Thereafter, data mining in the complete sequence is an essential step. New in silico methods are needed that rapidly identify the major features of genome organization and facilitate the prediction of the functional class of ORFs. We tested the usefulness of local oligonucleotide usage (OU patterns to recognize and differentiate types of atypical oligonucleotide composition in DNA sequences of bacterial genomes. Results A total of 163 bacterial genomes of eubacteria and archaea published in the NCBI database were analyzed. Local OU patterns exhibit substantial intrachromosomal variation in bacteria. Loci with alternative OU patterns were parts of horizontally acquired gene islands or ancient regions such as genes for ribosomal proteins and RNAs. OU statistical parameters, such as local pattern deviation (D, pattern skew (PS and OU variance (OUV enabled the detection and visualization of gene islands of different functional classes. Conclusion A set of approaches has been designed for the statistical analysis of nucleotide sequences of bacterial genomes. These methods are useful for the visualization and differentiation of regions with atypical oligonucleotide composition prior to or accompanying gene annotation.

  1. Characterization of copy number variation in genomic regions containing STR loci using array comparative genomic hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repnikova, Elena A; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Bailes, Andrea; Weber, Cecilia; Erdman, Linda; McKinney, Aimee; Ramsey, Sarah; Hashimoto, Sayaka; Lamb Thrush, Devon; Astbury, Caroline; Reshmi, Shalini C; Shaffer, Lisa G; Gastier-Foster, Julie M; Pyatt, Robert E

    2013-09-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) loci are commonly used in forensic casework, familial analysis for human identification, and for monitoring hematopoietic cell engraftment after bone marrow transplant. Unexpected genetic variation leading to sequence and length differences in STR loci can complicate STR typing, and presents challenges in casework interpretation. Copy number variation (CNV) is a relatively recently identified form of genetic variation consisting of genomic regions present at variable copy numbers within an individual compared to a reference genome. Large scale population studies have demonstrated that likely all individuals carry multiple regions with CNV of 1kb in size or greater in their genome. To date, no study correlating genomic regions containing STR loci with CNV has been conducted. In this study, we analyzed results from 32,850 samples sent for clinical array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis for the presence of CNV at regions containing the 13 CODIS (Combined DNA Index System) STR, and the Amelogenin X (AMELX) and Amelogenin Y (AMELY) loci. Thirty-two individuals with CNV involving STR loci on chromosomes 2, 4, 7, 11, 12, 13, 16, and 21, and twelve with CNV involving the AMELX/AMELY loci were identified. These results were correlated with data from publicly available databases housing information on CNV identified in normal populations and additional clinical cases. These collective results demonstrate the presence of CNV in regions containing 9 of the 13 CODIS STR and AMELX/Y loci. Further characterization of STR profiles within regions of CNV, additional cataloging of these variants in multiple populations, and contributing such examples to the public domain will provide valuable information for reliable use of these loci.

  2. GRAbB: Selective Assembly of Genomic Regions, a New Niche for Genomic Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brankovics, Balázs; Zhang, Hao; van Diepeningen, Anne D; van der Lee, Theo A J; Waalwijk, Cees; de Hoog, G Sybren

    2016-06-01

    GRAbB (Genomic Region Assembly by Baiting) is a new program that is dedicated to assemble specific genomic regions from NGS data. This approach is especially useful when dealing with multi copy regions, such as mitochondrial genome and the rDNA repeat region, parts of the genome that are often neglected or poorly assembled, although they contain interesting information from phylogenetic or epidemiologic perspectives, but also single copy regions can be assembled. The program is capable of targeting multiple regions within a single run. Furthermore, GRAbB can be used to extract specific loci from NGS data, based on homology, like sequences that are used for barcoding. To make the assembly specific, a known part of the region, such as the sequence of a PCR amplicon or a homologous sequence from a related species must be specified. By assembling only the region of interest, the assembly process is computationally much less demanding and may lead to assemblies of better quality. In this study the different applications and functionalities of the program are demonstrated such as: exhaustive assembly (rDNA region and mitochondrial genome), extracting homologous regions or genes (IGS, RPB1, RPB2 and TEF1a), as well as extracting multiple regions within a single run. The program is also compared with MITObim, which is meant for the exhaustive assembly of a single target based on a similar query sequence. GRAbB is shown to be more efficient than MITObim in terms of speed, memory and disk usage. The other functionalities (handling multiple targets simultaneously and extracting homologous regions) of the new program are not matched by other programs. The program is available with explanatory documentation at https://github.com/b-brankovics/grabb. GRAbB has been tested on Ubuntu (12.04 and 14.04), Fedora (23), CentOS (7.1.1503) and Mac OS X (10.7). Furthermore, GRAbB is available as a docker repository: brankovics/grabb (https://hub.docker.com/r/brankovics/grabb/).

  3. GRAbB: Selective Assembly of Genomic Regions, a New Niche for Genomic Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brankovics, Balázs; Zhang, Hao; van Diepeningen, Anne D; van der Lee, Theo A J; Waalwijk, Cees; de Hoog, G Sybren

    2016-06-01

    GRAbB (Genomic Region Assembly by Baiting) is a new program that is dedicated to assemble specific genomic regions from NGS data. This approach is especially useful when dealing with multi copy regions, such as mitochondrial genome and the rDNA repeat region, parts of the genome that are often neglected or poorly assembled, although they contain interesting information from phylogenetic or epidemiologic perspectives, but also single copy regions can be assembled. The program is capable of targeting multiple regions within a single run. Furthermore, GRAbB can be used to extract specific loci from NGS data, based on homology, like sequences that are used for barcoding. To make the assembly specific, a known part of the region, such as the sequence of a PCR amplicon or a homologous sequence from a related species must be specified. By assembling only the region of interest, the assembly process is computationally much less demanding and may lead to assemblies of better quality. In this study the different applications and functionalities of the program are demonstrated such as: exhaustive assembly (rDNA region and mitochondrial genome), extracting homologous regions or genes (IGS, RPB1, RPB2 and TEF1a), as well as extracting multiple regions within a single run. The program is also compared with MITObim, which is meant for the exhaustive assembly of a single target based on a similar query sequence. GRAbB is shown to be more efficient than MITObim in terms of speed, memory and disk usage. The other functionalities (handling multiple targets simultaneously and extracting homologous regions) of the new program are not matched by other programs. The program is available with explanatory documentation at https://github.com/b-brankovics/grabb. GRAbB has been tested on Ubuntu (12.04 and 14.04), Fedora (23), CentOS (7.1.1503) and Mac OS X (10.7). Furthermore, GRAbB is available as a docker repository: brankovics/grabb (https://hub.docker.com/r/brankovics/grabb/). PMID

  4. GRAbB: Selective Assembly of Genomic Regions, a New Niche for Genomic Research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balázs Brankovics

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available GRAbB (Genomic Region Assembly by Baiting is a new program that is dedicated to assemble specific genomic regions from NGS data. This approach is especially useful when dealing with multi copy regions, such as mitochondrial genome and the rDNA repeat region, parts of the genome that are often neglected or poorly assembled, although they contain interesting information from phylogenetic or epidemiologic perspectives, but also single copy regions can be assembled. The program is capable of targeting multiple regions within a single run. Furthermore, GRAbB can be used to extract specific loci from NGS data, based on homology, like sequences that are used for barcoding. To make the assembly specific, a known part of the region, such as the sequence of a PCR amplicon or a homologous sequence from a related species must be specified. By assembling only the region of interest, the assembly process is computationally much less demanding and may lead to assemblies of better quality. In this study the different applications and functionalities of the program are demonstrated such as: exhaustive assembly (rDNA region and mitochondrial genome, extracting homologous regions or genes (IGS, RPB1, RPB2 and TEF1a, as well as extracting multiple regions within a single run. The program is also compared with MITObim, which is meant for the exhaustive assembly of a single target based on a similar query sequence. GRAbB is shown to be more efficient than MITObim in terms of speed, memory and disk usage. The other functionalities (handling multiple targets simultaneously and extracting homologous regions of the new program are not matched by other programs. The program is available with explanatory documentation at https://github.com/b-brankovics/grabb. GRAbB has been tested on Ubuntu (12.04 and 14.04, Fedora (23, CentOS (7.1.1503 and Mac OS X (10.7. Furthermore, GRAbB is available as a docker repository: brankovics/grabb (https://hub.docker.com/r/brankovics/grabb/.

  5. Nucleolar organizer regions: genomic 'dark matter' requiring illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McStay, Brian

    2016-07-15

    Nucleoli form around tandem arrays of a ribosomal gene repeat, termed nucleolar organizer regions (NORs). During metaphase, active NORs adopt a characteristic undercondensed morphology. Recent evidence indicates that the HMG-box-containing DNA-binding protein UBF (upstream binding factor) is directly responsible for this morphology and provides a mitotic bookmark to ensure rapid nucleolar formation beginning in telophase in human cells. This is likely to be a widely employed strategy, as UBF is present throughout metazoans. In higher eukaryotes, NORs are typically located within regions of chromosomes that form perinucleolar heterochromatin during interphase. Typically, the genomic architecture of NORs and the chromosomal regions within which they lie is very poorly described, yet recent evidence points to a role for context in their function. In Arabidopsis, NOR silencing appears to be controlled by sequences outside the rDNA (ribosomal DNA) array. Translocations reveal a role for context in the expression of the NOR on the X chromosome in Drosophila Recent work has begun on characterizing the genomic architecture of human NORs. A role for distal sequences located in perinucleolar heterochromatin has been inferred, as they exhibit a complex transcriptionally active chromatin structure. Links between rDNA genomic stability and aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are now well established, and indications are emerging that this is important in aging and replicative senescence in higher eukaryotes. This, combined with the fact that rDNA arrays are recombinational hot spots in cancer cells, has focused attention on DNA damage responses in NORs. The introduction of DNA double-strand breaks into rDNA arrays leads to a dramatic reorganization of nucleolar structure. Damaged rDNA repeats move from the nucleolar interior to form caps at the nucleolar periphery, presumably to facilitate repair, suggesting that the chromosomal context of human NORs contributes to their genomic

  6. Nucleolar organizer regions: genomic 'dark matter' requiring illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McStay, Brian

    2016-07-15

    Nucleoli form around tandem arrays of a ribosomal gene repeat, termed nucleolar organizer regions (NORs). During metaphase, active NORs adopt a characteristic undercondensed morphology. Recent evidence indicates that the HMG-box-containing DNA-binding protein UBF (upstream binding factor) is directly responsible for this morphology and provides a mitotic bookmark to ensure rapid nucleolar formation beginning in telophase in human cells. This is likely to be a widely employed strategy, as UBF is present throughout metazoans. In higher eukaryotes, NORs are typically located within regions of chromosomes that form perinucleolar heterochromatin during interphase. Typically, the genomic architecture of NORs and the chromosomal regions within which they lie is very poorly described, yet recent evidence points to a role for context in their function. In Arabidopsis, NOR silencing appears to be controlled by sequences outside the rDNA (ribosomal DNA) array. Translocations reveal a role for context in the expression of the NOR on the X chromosome in Drosophila Recent work has begun on characterizing the genomic architecture of human NORs. A role for distal sequences located in perinucleolar heterochromatin has been inferred, as they exhibit a complex transcriptionally active chromatin structure. Links between rDNA genomic stability and aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are now well established, and indications are emerging that this is important in aging and replicative senescence in higher eukaryotes. This, combined with the fact that rDNA arrays are recombinational hot spots in cancer cells, has focused attention on DNA damage responses in NORs. The introduction of DNA double-strand breaks into rDNA arrays leads to a dramatic reorganization of nucleolar structure. Damaged rDNA repeats move from the nucleolar interior to form caps at the nucleolar periphery, presumably to facilitate repair, suggesting that the chromosomal context of human NORs contributes to their genomic

  7. Forces shaping the fastest evolving regions in the human genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine S Pollard

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Comparative genomics allow us to search the human genome for segments that were extensively changed in the last approximately 5 million years since divergence from our common ancestor with chimpanzee, but are highly conserved in other species and thus are likely to be functional. We found 202 genomic elements that are highly conserved in vertebrates but show evidence of significantly accelerated substitution rates in human. These are mostly in non-coding DNA, often near genes associated with transcription and DNA binding. Resequencing confirmed that the five most accelerated elements are dramatically changed in human but not in other primates, with seven times more substitutions in human than in chimp. The accelerated elements, and in particular the top five, show a strong bias for adenine and thymine to guanine and cytosine nucleotide changes and are disproportionately located in high recombination and high guanine and cytosine content environments near telomeres, suggesting either biased gene conversion or isochore selection. In addition, there is some evidence of directional selection in the regions containing the two most accelerated regions. A combination of evolutionary forces has contributed to accelerated evolution of the fastest evolving elements in the human genome.

  8. Telomere maintenance through recruitment of internal genomic regions

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, Beomseok; Kim, Chuna; Hills, Mark; Sung, Sanghyun; Kim, Hyesook; Kim, Eunkyeong; Lim, Daisy S.; Oh, Hyun-Seok; Choi, Rachael Mi Jung; Chun, Jongsik; Shim, Jaegal; Lee, Junho

    2015-01-01

    Cells surviving crisis are often tumorigenic and their telomeres are commonly maintained through the reactivation of telomerase. However, surviving cells occasionally activate a recombination-based mechanism called alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT). Here we establish stably maintained survivors in telomerase-deleted Caenorhabditis elegans that escape from sterility by activating ALT. ALT survivors trans-duplicate an internal genomic region, which is already cis-duplicated to chromoso...

  9. Genome-wide comparisons of phylogenetic similarities between partial genomic regions and the full-length genome in Hepatitis E virus genotyping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Wang

    Full Text Available Besides the complete genome, different partial genomic sequences of Hepatitis E virus (HEV have been used in genotyping studies, making it difficult to compare the results based on them. No commonly agreed partial region for HEV genotyping has been determined. In this study, we used a statistical method to evaluate the phylogenetic performance of each partial genomic sequence from a genome wide, by comparisons of evolutionary distances between genomic regions and the full-length genomes of 101 HEV isolates to identify short genomic regions that can reproduce HEV genotype assignments based on full-length genomes. Several genomic regions, especially one genomic region at the 3'-terminal of the papain-like cysteine protease domain, were detected to have relatively high phylogenetic correlations with the full-length genome. Phylogenetic analyses confirmed the identical performances between these regions and the full-length genome in genotyping, in which the HEV isolates involved could be divided into reasonable genotypes. This analysis may be of value in developing a partial sequence-based consensus classification of HEV species.

  10. Admixture mapping identifies introgressed genomic regions in North American canids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    vonHoldt, Bridgett M; Kays, Roland; Pollinger, John P; Wayne, Robert K

    2016-06-01

    Hybrid zones typically contain novel gene combinations that can be tested by natural selection in a unique genetic context. Parental haplotypes that increase fitness can introgress beyond the hybrid zone, into the range of parental species. We used the Affymetrix canine SNP genotyping array to identify genomic regions tagged by multiple ancestry informative markers that are more frequent in an admixed population than expected. We surveyed a hybrid zone formed in the last 100 years as coyotes expanded their range into eastern North America. Concomitant with expansion, coyotes hybridized with wolves and some populations became more wolflike, such that coyotes in the northeast have the largest body size of any coyote population. Using a set of 3102 ancestry informative markers, we identified 60 differentially introgressed regions in 44 canines across this admixture zone. These regions are characterized by an excess of exogenous ancestry and, in northeastern coyotes, are enriched for genes affecting body size and skeletal proportions. Further, introgressed wolf-derived alleles have penetrated into Southern US coyote populations. Because no wolves currently exist in this area, these alleles are unlikely to have originated from recent hybridization. Instead, they probably originated from intraspecific gene flow or ancient admixture. We show that grey wolf and coyote admixture has far-reaching effects and, in addition to phenotypically transforming admixed populations, allows for the differential movement of alleles from different parental species to be tested in new genomic backgrounds. PMID:27106273

  11. Powerful methods for detecting introgressed regions from population genomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, Benjamin K; Pease, James B; Besansky, Nora J; Hahn, Matthew W

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the types and functions of genes that are able to cross species boundaries-and those that are not-is an important step in understanding the forces maintaining species as largely independent lineages across the remainder of the genome. With large next-generation sequencing data sets we are now able to ask whether introgression has occurred across the genome, and multiple methods have been proposed to detect the signature of such events. Here, we introduce a new summary statistic that can be used to test for introgression, RNDmin , that makes use of the minimum pairwise sequence distance between two population samples relative to divergence to an outgroup. We find that our method offers a modest increase in power over other, related tests, but that all such tests have high power to detect introgressed loci when migration is recent and strong. RNDmin is robust to variation in the mutation rate, and remains reliable even when estimates of the divergence time between sister species are inaccurate. We apply RNDmin to population genomic data from the African mosquitoes Anopheles quadriannulatus and A. arabiensis, identifying three novel candidate regions for introgression. Interestingly, one of the introgressed loci is on the X chromosome, but outside of an inversion separating these two species. Our results suggest that significant, but rare, sharing of alleles is occurring between species that diverged more than 1 million years ago, and that application of these methods to additional systems are likely to reveal similar results. PMID:26945783

  12. Comparative Genomic Analyses of the Human NPHP1 Locus Reveal Complex Genomic Architecture and Its Regional Evolution in Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bo; Liu, Pengfei; Gupta, Aditya; Beck, Christine R.; Tejomurtula, Anusha; Campbell, Ian M.; Gambin, Tomasz; Simmons, Alexandra D.; Withers, Marjorie A.; Harris, R. Alan; Rogers, Jeffrey; Schwartz, David C.; Lupski, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Many loci in the human genome harbor complex genomic structures that can result in susceptibility to genomic rearrangements leading to various genomic disorders. Nephronophthisis 1 (NPHP1, MIM# 256100) is an autosomal recessive disorder that can be caused by defects of NPHP1; the gene maps within the human 2q13 region where low copy repeats (LCRs) are abundant. Loss of function of NPHP1 is responsible for approximately 85% of the NPHP1 cases—about 80% of such individuals carry a large recurrent homozygous NPHP1 deletion that occurs via nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR) between two flanking directly oriented ~45 kb LCRs. Published data revealed a non-pathogenic inversion polymorphism involving the NPHP1 gene flanked by two inverted ~358 kb LCRs. Using optical mapping and array-comparative genomic hybridization, we identified three potential novel structural variant (SV) haplotypes at the NPHP1 locus that may protect a haploid genome from the NPHP1 deletion. Inter-species comparative genomic analyses among primate genomes revealed massive genomic changes during evolution. The aggregated data suggest that dynamic genomic rearrangements occurred historically within the NPHP1 locus and generated SV haplotypes observed in the human population today, which may confer differential susceptibility to genomic instability and the NPHP1 deletion within a personal genome. Our study documents diverse SV haplotypes at a complex LCR-laden human genomic region. Comparative analyses provide a model for how this complex region arose during primate evolution, and studies among humans suggest that intra-species polymorphism may potentially modulate an individual’s susceptibility to acquiring disease-associated alleles. PMID:26641089

  13. Comparative Genomic Analyses of the Human NPHP1 Locus Reveal Complex Genomic Architecture and Its Regional Evolution in Primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Yuan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Many loci in the human genome harbor complex genomic structures that can result in susceptibility to genomic rearrangements leading to various genomic disorders. Nephronophthisis 1 (NPHP1, MIM# 256100 is an autosomal recessive disorder that can be caused by defects of NPHP1; the gene maps within the human 2q13 region where low copy repeats (LCRs are abundant. Loss of function of NPHP1 is responsible for approximately 85% of the NPHP1 cases-about 80% of such individuals carry a large recurrent homozygous NPHP1 deletion that occurs via nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR between two flanking directly oriented ~45 kb LCRs. Published data revealed a non-pathogenic inversion polymorphism involving the NPHP1 gene flanked by two inverted ~358 kb LCRs. Using optical mapping and array-comparative genomic hybridization, we identified three potential novel structural variant (SV haplotypes at the NPHP1 locus that may protect a haploid genome from the NPHP1 deletion. Inter-species comparative genomic analyses among primate genomes revealed massive genomic changes during evolution. The aggregated data suggest that dynamic genomic rearrangements occurred historically within the NPHP1 locus and generated SV haplotypes observed in the human population today, which may confer differential susceptibility to genomic instability and the NPHP1 deletion within a personal genome. Our study documents diverse SV haplotypes at a complex LCR-laden human genomic region. Comparative analyses provide a model for how this complex region arose during primate evolution, and studies among humans suggest that intra-species polymorphism may potentially modulate an individual's susceptibility to acquiring disease-associated alleles.

  14. Genomic distance entrained clustering and regression modelling highlights interacting genomic regions contributing to proliferation in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dexter Tim J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic copy number changes and regional alterations in epigenetic states have been linked to grade in breast cancer. However, the relative contribution of specific alterations to the pathology of different breast cancer subtypes remains unclear. The heterogeneity and interplay of genomic and epigenetic variations means that large datasets and statistical data mining methods are required to uncover recurrent patterns that are likely to be important in cancer progression. Results We employed ridge regression to model the relationship between regional changes in gene expression and proliferation. Regional features were extracted from tumour gene expression data using a novel clustering method, called genomic distance entrained agglomerative (GDEC clustering. Using gene expression data in this way provides a simple means of integrating the phenotypic effects of both copy number aberrations and alterations in chromatin state. We show that regional metagenes derived from GDEC clustering are representative of recurrent regions of epigenetic regulation or copy number aberrations in breast cancer. Furthermore, detected patterns of genomic alterations are conserved across independent oestrogen receptor positive breast cancer datasets. Sequential competitive metagene selection was used to reveal the relative importance of genomic regions in predicting proliferation rate. The predictive model suggested additive interactions between the most informative regions such as 8p22-12 and 8q13-22. Conclusions Data-mining of large-scale microarray gene expression datasets can reveal regional clusters of co-ordinate gene expression, independent of cause. By correlating these clusters with tumour proliferation we have identified a number of genomic regions that act together to promote proliferation in ER+ breast cancer. Identification of such regions should enable prioritisation of genomic regions for combinatorial functional studies to pinpoint

  15. Regional genome transcriptional response of adult mouse brain to hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Aigang

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since normal brain function depends upon continuous oxygen delivery and short periods of hypoxia can precondition the brain against subsequent ischemia, this study examined the effects of brief hypoxia on the whole genome transcriptional response in adult mouse brain. Result Pronounced changes of gene expression occurred after 3 hours of hypoxia (8% O2 and after 1 hour of re-oxygenation in all brain regions. The hypoxia-responsive genes were predominantly up-regulated in hindbrain and predominantly down-regulated in forebrain - possibly to support hindbrain survival functions at the expense of forebrain cognitive functions. The up-regulated genes had a significant role in cell survival and involved both shared and unshared signaling pathways among different brain regions. Up-regulation of transcriptional signaling including hypoxia inducible factor, insulin growth factor (IGF, the vitamin D3 receptor/retinoid X nuclear receptor, and glucocorticoid signaling was common to many brain regions. However, many of the hypoxia-regulated target genes were specific for one or a few brain regions. Cerebellum, for example, had 1241 transcripts regulated by hypoxia only in cerebellum but not in hippocampus; and, 642 (54% had at least one hepatic nuclear receptor 4A (HNF4A binding site and 381 had at least two HNF4A binding sites in their promoters. The data point to HNF4A as a major hypoxia-responsive transcription factor in cerebellum in addition to its known role in regulating erythropoietin transcription. The genes unique to hindbrain may play critical roles in survival during hypoxia. Conclusion Differences of forebrain and hindbrain hypoxia-responsive genes may relate to suppression of forebrain cognitive functions and activation of hindbrain survival functions, which may coordinately mediate the neuroprotection afforded by hypoxia preconditioning.

  16. Identification of a large genomic region in UV-irradiated human cells which has fewer cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers than most genomic regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Size separation after UV-endonuclease digestion of DNA from UV-irradiated human cells using denaturing conditions fractionates the genome based on cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer content. We have examined the largest molecules available (50-80 kb; about 5% of the DNA) after fractionation and those of average size (5-15 kb) for content of some specific genes. We find that the largest molecules are not a representative sampling of the genome. Three contiguous genes located in a G+C-rich isochore (tyrosine hydroxylase, insulin, insulin-like growth factor II) have concentrations two to three times greater in the largest molecules. This shows that this genomic region has fewer pyrimidine dimers than most other genomic regions. In contrast, the β-actin genomic region, which has a similar G+C content, has an equal concentration in both fractions as do the p53 and β-globin genomic regions, which are A+T-rich. These data show that DNA damage in the form of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers occurs with different probabilities in specific isochores. Part of the reason may be the relative G-C content, but other factors must play a significant role. We also report that the transcriptionally inactive insulin region is repaired at the genome-overall rate in normal cells and is not repaired in xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C cells. (author)

  17. Genome-wide expression profiling of complex regional pain syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Heui Jin

    Full Text Available Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS is a chronic, progressive, and devastating pain syndrome characterized by spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia, allodynia, altered skin temperature, and motor dysfunction. Although previous gene expression profiling studies have been conducted in animal pain models, there genome-wide expression profiling in the whole blood of CRPS patients has not been reported yet. Here, we successfully identified certain pain-related genes through genome-wide expression profiling in the blood from CRPS patients. We found that 80 genes were differentially expressed between 4 CRPS patients (2 CRPS I and 2 CRPS II and 5 controls (cut-off value: 1.5-fold change and p<0.05. Most of those genes were associated with signal transduction, developmental processes, cell structure and motility, and immunity and defense. The expression levels of major histocompatibility complex class I A subtype (HLA-A29.1, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9, alanine aminopeptidase N (ANPEP, l-histidine decarboxylase (HDC, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor 3 receptor (G-CSF3R, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 genes selected from the microarray were confirmed in 24 CRPS patients and 18 controls by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. We focused on the MMP9 gene that, by qRT-PCR, showed a statistically significant difference in expression in CRPS patients compared to controls with the highest relative fold change (4.0±1.23 times and p = 1.4×10(-4. The up-regulation of MMP9 gene in the blood may be related to the pain progression in CRPS patients. Our findings, which offer a valuable contribution to the understanding of the differential gene expression in CRPS may help in the understanding of the pathophysiology of CRPS pain progression.

  18. Forces shaping the fastest evolving regions in the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pollard, Katherine S; Salama, Sofie R; King, Bryan;

    2006-01-01

    Comparative genomics allow us to search the human genome for segments that were extensively changed in the last approximately 5 million years since divergence from our common ancestor with chimpanzee, but are highly conserved in other species and thus are likely to be functional. We found 202 gen...

  19. Harnessing genomics to improve health in the Eastern Mediterranean Region – an executive course in genomics policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singer Peter A

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While innovations in medicine, science and technology have resulted in improved health and quality of life for many people, the benefits of modern medicine continue to elude millions of people in many parts of the world. To assess the potential of genomics to address health needs in EMR, the World Health Organization's Eastern Mediterranean Regional Office and the University of Toronto Joint Centre for Bioethics jointly organized a Genomics and Public Health Policy Executive Course, held September 20th–23rd, 2003, in Muscat, Oman. The 4-day course was sponsored by WHO-EMRO with additional support from the Canadian Program in Genomics and Global Health. The overall objective of the course was to collectively explore how to best harness genomics to improve health in the region. This article presents the course findings and recommendations for genomics policy in EMR. Methods The course brought together senior representatives from academia, biotechnology companies, regulatory bodies, media, voluntary, and legal organizations to engage in discussion. Topics covered included scientific advances in genomics, followed by innovations in business models, public sector perspectives, ethics, legal issues and national innovation systems. Results A set of recommendations, summarized below, was formulated for the Regional Office, the Member States and for individuals. • Advocacy for genomics and biotechnology for political leadership; • Networking between member states to share information, expertise, training, and regional cooperation in biotechnology; coordination of national surveys for assessment of health biotechnology innovation systems, science capacity, government policies, legislation and regulations, intellectual property policies, private sector activity; • Creation in each member country of an effective National Body on genomics, biotechnology and health to: - formulate national biotechnology strategies - raise

  20. Identification of Low-Confidence Regions in the Pig Reference Genome (Sscrofa10.2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warr, Amanda; Robert, Christelle; Hume, David; Archibald, Alan L.; Deeb, Nader; Watson, Mick

    2015-01-01

    Many applications of high throughput sequencing rely on the availability of an accurate reference genome. Variant calling often produces large data sets that cannot be realistically validated and which may contain large numbers of false-positives. Errors in the reference assembly increase the number of false-positives. While resources are available to aid in the filtering of variants from human data, for other species these do not yet exist and strict filtering techniques must be employed which are more likely to exclude true-positives. This work assesses the accuracy of the pig reference genome (Sscrofa10.2) using whole genome sequencing reads from the Duroc sow whose genome the assembly was based on. Indicators of structural variation including high regional coverage, unexpected insert sizes, improper pairing and homozygous variants were used to identify low quality (LQ) regions of the assembly. Low coverage (LC) regions were also identified and analyzed separately. The LQ regions covered 13.85% of the genome, the LC regions covered 26.6% of the genome and combined (LQLC) they covered 33.07% of the genome. Over half of dbSNP variants were located in the LQLC regions. Of copy number variable regions identified in a previous study, 86.3% were located in the LQLC regions. The regions were also enriched for gene predictions from RNA-seq data with 42.98% falling in the LQLC regions. Excluding variants in the LQ, LC, or LQLC from future analyses will help reduce the number of false-positive variant calls. Researchers using WGS data should be aware that the current pig reference genome does not give an accurate representation of the copy number of alleles in the original Duroc sow’s genome. PMID:26640477

  1. Identification of low-confidence regions in the pig reference genome (Sscrofa10.2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda eWarr

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Many applications of high throughput sequencing rely on the availability of an accurate reference genome. Variant calling often produces large data sets that cannot be realistically validated and which may contain large numbers of false-positives. Errors in the reference assembly increase the number of false-positives. While resources are available to aid in the filtering of variants from human data, for other species these do not yet exist and strict filtering techniques must be employed which are more likely to exclude true-positives. This work assesses the accuracy of the pig reference genome (Sscrofa10.2 using whole genome sequencing reads from the Duroc sow whose genome the assembly was based on. Indicators of structural variation including high regional coverage, unexpected insert sizes, improper pairing and homozygous variants were used to identify low quality (LQ regions of the assembly. Low coverage (LC regions were also identified and analyzed separately. The LQ regions covered 13.85% of the genome, the LC regions covered 26.6% of the genome and combined (LQLC they covered 33.07% of the genome. Over half of dbSNP variants were located in the LQLC regions. Of CNVRs identified in a previous study, 86.3% were located in the LQLC regions. The regions were also enriched for gene predictions from RNA-seq data with 42.98% falling in the LQLC regions. Excluding variants in the LQ, LC or LQLC from future analyses will help reduce the number of false-positive variant calls. Researchers using WGS data should be aware that the current pig reference genome does not give an accurate representation of the copy number of alleles in the original Duroc sow’s genome.

  2. Breaking Good: Accounting for Fragility of Genomic Regions in Rearrangement Distance Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biller, Priscila; Guéguen, Laurent; Knibbe, Carole; Tannier, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Models of evolution by genome rearrangements are prone to two types of flaws: One is to ignore the diversity of susceptibility to breakage across genomic regions, and the other is to suppose that susceptibility values are given. Without necessarily supposing their precise localization, we call "solid" the regions that are improbably broken by rearrangements and "fragile" the regions outside solid ones. We propose a model of evolution by inversions where breakage probabilities vary across fragile regions and over time. It contains as a particular case the uniform breakage model on the nucleotidic sequence, where breakage probabilities are proportional to fragile region lengths. This is very different from the frequently used pseudouniform model where all fragile regions have the same probability to break. Estimations of rearrangement distances based on the pseudouniform model completely fail on simulations with the truly uniform model. On pairs of amniote genomes, we show that identifying coding genes with solid regions yields incoherent distance estimations, especially with the pseudouniform model, and to a lesser extent with the truly uniform model. This incoherence is solved when we coestimate the number of fragile regions with the rearrangement distance. The estimated number of fragile regions is surprisingly small, suggesting that a minority of regions are recurrently used by rearrangements. Estimations for several pairs of genomes at different divergence times are in agreement with a slowly evolvable colocalization of active genomic regions in the cell.

  3. Identification and annotation of promoter regions in microbial genome sequences on the basis of DNA stability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vetriselvi Rangannan; Manju Bansal

    2007-08-01

    Analysis of various predicted structural properties of promoter regions in prokaryotic as well as eukaryotic genomes had earlier indicated that they have several common features, such as lower stability, higher curvature and less bendability, when compared with their neighboring regions. Based on the difference in stability between neighboring upstream and downstream regions in the vicinity of experimentally determined transcription start sites, a promoter prediction algorithm has been developed to identify prokaryotic promoter sequences in whole genomes. The average free energy (E) over known promoter sequences and the difference (D) between E and the average free energy over the entire genome (G) are used to search for promoters in the genomic sequences. Using these cutoff values to predict promoter regions across entire Escherichia coli genome, we achieved a reliability of 70% when the predicted promoters were cross verified against the 960 transcription start sites (TSSs) listed in the Ecocyc database. Annotation of the whole E. coli genome for promoter region could be carried out with 49% accuracy. The method is quite general and it can be used to annotate the promoter regions of other prokaryotic genomes.

  4. Detailed analysis of a contiguous 22-Mb region of the maize genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fusheng Wei

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Most of our understanding of plant genome structure and evolution has come from the careful annotation of small (e.g., 100 kb sequenced genomic regions or from automated annotation of complete genome sequences. Here, we sequenced and carefully annotated a contiguous 22 Mb region of maize chromosome 4 using an improved pseudomolecule for annotation. The sequence segment was comprehensively ordered, oriented, and confirmed using the maize optical map. Nearly 84% of the sequence is composed of transposable elements (TEs that are mostly nested within each other, of which most families are low-copy. We identified 544 gene models using multiple levels of evidence, as well as five miRNA genes. Gene fragments, many captured by TEs, are prevalent within this region. Elimination of gene redundancy from a tetraploid maize ancestor that originated a few million years ago is responsible in this region for most disruptions of synteny with sorghum and rice. Consistent with other sub-genomic analyses in maize, small RNA mapping showed that many small RNAs match TEs and that most TEs match small RNAs. These results, performed on approximately 1% of the maize genome, demonstrate the feasibility of refining the B73 RefGen_v1 genome assembly by incorporating optical map, high-resolution genetic map, and comparative genomic data sets. Such improvements, along with those of gene and repeat annotation, will serve to promote future functional genomic and phylogenomic research in maize and other grasses.

  5. Identifying Human Genome-Wide CNV, LOH and UPD by Targeted Sequencing of Selected Regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    Full Text Available Copy-number variations (CNV, loss of heterozygosity (LOH, and uniparental disomy (UPD are large genomic aberrations leading to many common inherited diseases, cancers, and other complex diseases. An integrated tool to identify these aberrations is essential in understanding diseases and in designing clinical interventions. Previous discovery methods based on whole-genome sequencing (WGS require very high depth of coverage on the whole genome scale, and are cost-wise inefficient. Another approach, whole exome genome sequencing (WEGS, is limited to discovering variations within exons. Thus, we are lacking efficient methods to detect genomic aberrations on the whole genome scale using next-generation sequencing technology. Here we present a method to identify genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD for the human genome via selectively sequencing a small portion of genome termed Selected Target Regions (SeTRs. In our experiments, the SeTRs are covered by 99.73%~99.95% with sufficient depth. Our developed bioinformatics pipeline calls genome-wide CNVs with high confidence, revealing 8 credible events of LOH and 3 UPD events larger than 5M from 15 individual samples. We demonstrate that genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD can be detected using a cost-effective SeTRs sequencing approach, and that LOH and UPD can be identified using just a sample grouping technique, without using a matched sample or familial information.

  6. Independent large scale duplications in multiple M. tuberculosis lineages overlapping the same genomic region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Weiner

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of most human tuberculosis, infects one third of the world's population and kills an estimated 1.7 million people a year. With the world-wide emergence of drug resistance, and the finding of more functional genetic diversity than previously expected, there is a renewed interest in understanding the forces driving genome evolution of this important pathogen. Genetic diversity in M. tuberculosis is dominated by single nucleotide polymorphisms and small scale gene deletion, with little or no evidence for large scale genome rearrangements seen in other bacteria. Recently, a single report described a large scale genome duplication that was suggested to be specific to the Beijing lineage. We report here multiple independent large-scale duplications of the same genomic region of M. tuberculosis detected through whole-genome sequencing. The duplications occur in strains belonging to both M. tuberculosis lineage 2 and 4, and are thus not limited to Beijing strains. The duplications occur in both drug-resistant and drug susceptible strains. The duplicated regions also have substantially different boundaries in different strains, indicating different originating duplication events. We further identify a smaller segmental duplication of a different genomic region of a lab strain of H37Rv. The presence of multiple independent duplications of the same genomic region suggests either instability in this region, a selective advantage conferred by the duplication, or both. The identified duplications suggest that large-scale gene duplication may be more common in M. tuberculosis than previously considered.

  7. Annotation of the protein coding regions of the equine genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hestand, Matthew S.; Kalbfleisch, Theodore S.; Coleman, Stephen J.;

    2015-01-01

    Current gene annotation of the horse genome is largely derived from in silico predictions and cross-species alignments. Only a small number of genes are annotated based on equine EST and mRNA sequences. To expand the number of equine genes annotated from equine experimental evidence, we sequenced...

  8. Structured RNAs and synteny regions in the pig genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anthon, Christian; Tafer, Hakim; Havgaard, Jakob H;

    2014-01-01

    Laurasiatheria (pig, cow, dolphin, horse, cat, dog, hedgehog). CONCLUSIONS: We have obtained one of the most comprehensive annotations for structured ncRNAs of a mammalian genome, which is likely to play central roles in both health modelling and production. The core annotation is available in Ensembl 70 and the...

  9. Characterization of the flamenco region of the Drosophila melanogaster genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, V; Prud'homme, N; Kim, A; Bucheton, A; Pélisson, A

    2001-06-01

    The flamenco gene, located at 20A1-3 in the beta-heterochromatin of the Drosophila X chromosome, is a major regulator of the gypsy/mdg4 endogenous retrovirus. As a first step to characterize this gene, approximately 100 kb of genomic DNA flanking a P-element-induced mutation of flamenco was isolated. This DNA is located in a sequencing gap of the Celera Genomics project, i.e., one of those parts of the genome in which the "shotgun" sequence could not be assembled, probably because it contains long stretches of repetitive DNA, especially on the proximal side of the P insertion point. Deficiency mapping indicated that sequences required for the normal flamenco function are located >130 kb proximal to the insertion site. The distal part of the cloned DNA does, nevertheless, contain several unique sequences, including at least four different transcription units. Dip1, the closest one to the P-element insertion point, might be a good candidate for a gypsy regulator, since it putatively encodes a nuclear protein containing two double-stranded RNA-binding domains. However, transgenes containing dip1 genomic DNA were not able to rescue flamenco mutant flies. The possible nature of the missing flamenco sequences is discussed. PMID:11404334

  10. Targeted enrichment of genomic DNA regions for next generation sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, F.; El-Sharawy, A.; Sauer, S.; Van Helvoort, J.; Van der Zaag, P.J.; Franke, A.; Nilsson, M.; Lehrach. H.; Brookes, A.

    2011-01-01

    In this review we discuss the latest targeted enrichment methods, and aspects of their utilization along with second generation sequencing for complex genome analysis. In doing so we provide an overview of issues involved in detecting genetic variation, for which targeted enrichment has become a pow

  11. Structured RNAs and synteny regions in the pig genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anthon, Christian; Tafer, Hakim; Havgaard, Jakob Hull;

    2014-01-01

    for Laurasiatheria (pig, cow, dolphin, horse, cat, dog, hedgehog). CONCLUSIONS: We have obtained one of the most comprehensive annotations for structured ncRNAs of a mammalian genome, which is likely to play central roles in both health modelling and production. The core annotation is available in Ensembl 70...

  12. Estimation of (co)variances for genomic regions of flexible sizes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars P; Janss, Luc; Madsen, Per;

    2012-01-01

    traits such as mammary disease traits in dairy cattle. METHODS: Data on progeny means of six traits related to mastitis resistance in dairy cattle (general mastitis resistance and five pathogen-specific mastitis resistance traits) were analyzed using a bivariate Bayesian SNP-based genomic model......)variances of mastitis resistance traits in dairy cattle using multivariate genomic models......., per chromosome, and in regions of 100 SNP on a chromosome. RESULTS: Genomic proportions of the total variance differed between traits. Genomic correlations were lower than pedigree-based genetic correlations and they were highest between general mastitis and pathogen-specific traits because...

  13. Analysis of two large functionally uncharacterized regions in the Methanopyrus kandleri AV19 genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Juhl; Skovgaard, Marie; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas;

    2003-01-01

    Background: For most sequenced prokaryotic genomes, about a third of the protein coding genes annotated are "orphan proteins", that is, they lack homology to known proteins. These hypothetical genes are typically short and randomly scattered throughout the genome. This trend is seen for most of the...... bacterial and archaeal genomes published to date.Results: In contrast we have found that a large fraction of the genes coding for such orphan proteins in the Methanopyrus kandleri AV19 genome occur within two large regions. These genes have no known homologs except from other M. kandleri genes. However...

  14. A genome-wide analysis of genetic diversity in Trypanosoma cruzi intergenic regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo G Panunzi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trypanosoma cruzi is the causal agent of Chagas Disease. Recently, the genomes of representative strains from two major evolutionary lineages were sequenced, allowing the construction of a detailed genetic diversity map for this important parasite. However this map is focused on coding regions of the genome, leaving a vast space of regulatory regions uncharacterized in terms of their evolutionary conservation and/or divergence. METHODOLOGY: Using data from the hybrid CL Brener and Sylvio X10 genomes (from the TcVI and TcI Discrete Typing Units, respectively, we identified intergenic regions that share a common evolutionary ancestry, and are present in both CL Brener haplotypes (TcII-like and TcIII-like and in the TcI genome; as well as intergenic regions that were conserved in only two of the three genomes/haplotypes analyzed. The genetic diversity in these regions was characterized in terms of the accumulation of indels and nucleotide changes. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Based on this analysis we have identified i a core of highly conserved intergenic regions, which remained essentially unchanged in independently evolving lineages; ii intergenic regions that show high diversity in spite of still retaining their corresponding upstream and downstream coding sequences; iii a number of defined sequence motifs that are shared by a number of unrelated intergenic regions. A fraction of indels explains the diversification of some intergenic regions by the expansion/contraction of microsatellite-like repeats.

  15. Functional constraint and small insertions and deletions in the ENCODE regions of the human genome.

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, TG; Andrew, T.; Cooper, GM; Margulies, EH; Mullikin, JC; Balding, DJ

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We describe the distribution of indels in the 44 Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) regions (about 1% of the human genome) and evaluate the potential contributions of small insertion and deletion polymorphisms (indels) to human genetic variation. We relate indels to known genomic annotation features and measures of evolutionary constraint. RESULTS: Indel rates are observed to be reduced approximately 20-fold to 60-fold in exonic regions, 5-fold to 10-fold in sequence that exhib...

  16. Sequence-Level Population Simulations Over Large Genomic Regions

    OpenAIRE

    Hoggart, Clive J.; Chadeau-Hyam, Marc; Clark, Taane G.; Lampariello, Riccardo; Whittaker, John C; De Iorio, Maria; Balding, David J.

    2007-01-01

    Simulation is an invaluable tool for investigating the effects of various population genetics modeling assumptions on resulting patterns of genetic diversity, and for assessing the performance of statistical techniques, for example those designed to detect and measure the genomic effects of selection. It is also used to investigate the effectiveness of various design options for genetic association studies. Backward-in-time simulation methods are computationally efficient and have become wide...

  17. Analysis of real time PCR amplification efficiencies from three genomic region of dengue virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odreman-Macchioli, María; Vielma, Silvana; Atchley, Daniel; Comach, Guillermo; Ramirez, Alvaro; Pérez, Saberio; Téllez, Luis; Quintero, Beatriz; Hernández, Erick; Muñoz, Maritza; Mendoza, José

    2013-03-01

    Early diagnosis of dengue virus (DENV) infection represents a key factor in preventing clinical complications attributed to the disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the amplification efficiencies of an in-house quantitative real time-PCR (qPCR) assay of DENV, using the non-structural conserved genomic region protein-5 (NS5) versus two genomic regions usually employed for virus detection, the capsid/pre-membrane region (C-prM) and the 3'-noncoding region (3'NC). One-hundred sixty seven acute phase serum samples from febrile patients were used for validation purposes. Results showed that the three genomic regions had similar amplification profiles and correlation coefficients (0.987-0.999). When isolated viruses were used, the NS5 region had the highest qPCR efficiencies for the four serotypes (98-100%). Amplification from acute serum samples showed that 41.1% (67/167) were positive for the universal assay by at least two of the selected genomic regions. The agreement rates between NS5/C-prM and NS5/3'NC regions were 56.7% and 97%, respectively. Amplification concordance values between C-prM/NS5 and NS5/3'NC regions showed a weak (kappa = 0.109; CI 95%) and a moderate (kappa = 0.489; CI 95%) efficiencies in amplification, respectively. Serotyping assay using a singleplex NS5-TaqMan format was much more sensitive than the C-prM/SYBR Green I protocol (76%). External evaluation showed a high sensitivity (100%), specificity (78%) and high agreement between the assays. According to the results, the NS5 genomic region provides the best genomic region for optimal detection and typification of DENV in clinical samples. PMID:23781709

  18. CGHScan: finding variable regions using high-density microarray comparative genomic hybridization data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajashekara Gireesh

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative genomic hybridization can rapidly identify chromosomal regions that vary between organisms and tissues. This technique has been applied to detecting differences between normal and cancerous tissues in eukaryotes as well as genomic variability in microbial strains and species. The density of oligonucleotide probes available on current microarray platforms is particularly well-suited for comparisons of organisms with smaller genomes like bacteria and yeast where an entire genome can be assayed on a single microarray with high resolution. Available methods for analyzing these experiments typically confine analyses to data from pre-defined annotated genome features, such as entire genes. Many of these methods are ill suited for datasets with the number of measurements typical of high-density microarrays. Results We present an algorithm for analyzing microarray hybridization data to aid identification of regions that vary between an unsequenced genome and a sequenced reference genome. The program, CGHScan, uses an iterative random walk approach integrating multi-layered significance testing to detect these regions from comparative genomic hybridization data. The algorithm tolerates a high level of noise in measurements of individual probe intensities and is relatively insensitive to the choice of method for normalizing probe intensity values and identifying probes that differ between samples. When applied to comparative genomic hybridization data from a published experiment, CGHScan identified eight of nine known deletions in a Brucella ovis strain as compared to Brucella melitensis. The same result was obtained using two different normalization methods and two different scores to classify data for individual probes as representing conserved or variable genomic regions. The undetected region is a small (58 base pair deletion that is below the resolution of CGHScan given the array design employed in the study

  19. LD-Spline: Mapping SNPs on genotyping platforms to genomic regions using patterns of linkage disequilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bush William S

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene-centric analysis tools for genome-wide association study data are being developed both to annotate single locus statistics and to prioritize or group single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs prior to analysis. These approaches require knowledge about the relationships between SNPs on a genotyping platform and genes in the human genome. SNPs in the genome can represent broader genomic regions via linkage disequilibrium (LD, and population-specific patterns of LD can be exploited to generate a data-driven map of SNPs to genes. Methods In this study, we implemented LD-Spline, a database routine that defines the genomic boundaries a particular SNP represents using linkage disequilibrium statistics from the International HapMap Project. We compared the LD-Spline haplotype block partitioning approach to that of the four gamete rule and the Gabriel et al. approach using simulated data; in addition, we processed two commonly used genome-wide association study platforms. Results We illustrate that LD-Spline performs comparably to the four-gamete rule and the Gabriel et al. approach; however as a SNP-centric approach LD-Spline has the added benefit of systematically identifying a genomic boundary for each SNP, where the global block partitioning approaches may falter due to sampling variation in LD statistics. Conclusion LD-Spline is an integrated database routine that quickly and effectively defines the genomic region marked by a SNP using linkage disequilibrium, with a SNP-centric block definition algorithm.

  20. An Improved Method for oriT-Directed Cloning and Functionalization of Large Bacterial Genomic Regions

    OpenAIRE

    Kvitko, Brian H.; McMillan, Ian A.; Schweizer, Herbert P.

    2013-01-01

    We have made significant improvements to a broad-host-range system for the cloning and manipulation of large bacterial genomic regions based on site-specific recombination between directly repeated oriT sites during conjugation. Using two suicide capture vectors carrying flanking homology regions, oriT sites are recombined on either side of the target region. Using a broad-host-range conjugation helper plasmid, the region between the oriT sites is conjugated into an Escherichia coli recipient...

  1. Genomic Regions Associated with Sheep Resistance to Gastrointestinal Nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, Magda Vieira; Sonstegard, Tad S; Van Tassell, Curtis

    2016-06-01

    Genetic markers for sheep resistance to gastrointestinal parasites have long been sought by the livestock industry as a way to select more resistant individuals and to help farmers reduce parasite transmission by identifying and removing high egg shedders from the flock. Polymorphisms related to the major histocompatibility complex and interferon (IFN)-γ genes have been the most frequently reported markers associated with infection. Recently, a new picture is emerging from genome-wide studies, showing that not only immune mechanisms are important determinants of host resistance but that gastrointestinal mucus production and hemostasis pathways may also play a role. PMID:27183838

  2. Sequencing the CHO DXB11 genome reveals regional variations in genomic stability and haploidy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaas, Christian Schrøder; Kristensen, Claus; Betenbaugh, Michael J.;

    2015-01-01

    Background: The DHFR negative CHO DXB11 cell line (also known as DUX-B11 and DUKX) was historically the first CHO cell line to be used for large scale production of heterologous proteins and is still used for production of a number of complex proteins.  Results: Here we present the genomic sequen...

  3. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, Fa-Ten.

    1992-08-01

    During the grant period progress has been made in the successful demonstration of regional mapping of microclones derived from microdissection libraries; successful demonstration of the feasibility of converting microclones with short inserts into yeast artificial chromosome clones with very large inserts for high resolution physical mapping of the dissected region; Successful demonstration of the usefulness of region-specific microclones to isolate region-specific cDNA clones as candidate genes to facilitate search for the crucial genes underlying genetic diseases assigned to the dissected region; and the successful construction of four region-specific microdissection libraries for human chromosome 2, including 2q35-q37, 2q33-q35, 2p23-p25 and 2p2l-p23. The 2q35-q37 library has been characterized in detail. The characterization of the other three libraries is in progress. These region-specific microdissection libraries and the unique sequence microclones derived from the libraries will be valuable resources for investigators engaged in high resolution physical mapping and isolation of disease-related genes residing in these chromosomal regions.

  4. CpG islands undermethylation in human genomic regions under selective pressure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Cocozza

    Full Text Available DNA methylation at CpG islands (CGIs is one of the most intensively studied epigenetic mechanisms. It is fundamental for cellular differentiation and control of transcriptional potential. DNA methylation is involved also in several processes that are central to evolutionary biology, including phenotypic plasticity and evolvability. In this study, we explored the relationship between CpG islands methylation and signatures of selective pressure in Homo Sapiens, using a computational biology approach. By analyzing methylation data of 25 cell lines from the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE Consortium, we compared the DNA methylation of CpG islands in genomic regions under selective pressure with the methylation of CpG islands in the remaining part of the genome. To define genomic regions under selective pressure, we used three different methods, each oriented to provide distinct information about selective events. Independently of the method and of the cell type used, we found evidences of undermethylation of CGIs in human genomic regions under selective pressure. Additionally, by analyzing SNP frequency in CpG islands, we demonstrated that CpG islands in regions under selective pressure show lower genetic variation. Our findings suggest that the CpG islands in regions under selective pressure seem to be somehow more "protected" from methylation when compared with other regions of the genome.

  5. Attenuation of Sindbis virus neurovirulence by using defined mutations in nontranslated regions of the genome RNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuhn, R J; Griffin, D E; Zhang, H; Niesters, Hubert G. M.; Strauss, J H

    1992-01-01

    We examined a panel of Sindbis virus mutants containing defined mutations in the 5' nontranslated region of the genome RNA, in the 3' nontranslated region, or in both for their growth in cultured cells and virulence in newborn mice. In cultured cells, these viruses all had defects in RNA synthesis a

  6. Comparative mitochondrial genomics of snakes: extraordinary substitution rate dynamics and functionality of the duplicate control region

    OpenAIRE

    Burbrink Frank T; Austin Christopher C; Castoe Todd A; Jiang Zhi J; Herron Matthew D; McGuire Jimmy A; Parkinson Christopher L; Pollock David D.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The mitochondrial genomes of snakes are characterized by an overall evolutionary rate that appears to be one of the most accelerated among vertebrates. They also possess other unusual features, including short tRNAs and other genes, and a duplicated control region that has been stably maintained since it originated more than 70 million years ago. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of evolutionary dynamics in snake mitochondrial genomes to better understand the basis of t...

  7. The genome landscape of ER{alpha}- and ER{beta}-binding DNA regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yawen; Gao, Hui; Marstrand, Troels Torben;

    2008-01-01

    also regions that are bound by ERalpha only in the presence of ERbeta, as well as regions that are selectively bound by either receptor. Analysis of bound regions shows that regions bound by ERalpha have distinct properties in terms of genome landscape, sequence features, and conservation compared with......-bound regions having a predominance of classical estrogen response elements (EREs) and GC-rich motifs. Differences in the properties of ER bound regions might explain some of the differences in gene expression programs and physiological effects shown by the respective estrogen receptors. Udgivelsesdato: 2008...

  8. Regions of homozygosity in the porcine genome: consequence of demography and the recombination landscape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirte Bosse

    Full Text Available Inbreeding has long been recognized as a primary cause of fitness reduction in both wild and domesticated populations. Consanguineous matings cause inheritance of haplotypes that are identical by descent (IBD and result in homozygous stretches along the genome of the offspring. Size and position of regions of homozygosity (ROHs are expected to correlate with genomic features such as GC content and recombination rate, but also direction of selection. Thus, ROHs should be non-randomly distributed across the genome. Therefore, demographic history may not fully predict the effects of inbreeding. The porcine genome has a relatively heterogeneous distribution of recombination rate, making Sus scrofa an excellent model to study the influence of both recombination landscape and demography on genomic variation. This study utilizes next-generation sequencing data for the analysis of genomic ROH patterns, using a comparative sliding window approach. We present an in-depth study of genomic variation based on three different parameters: nucleotide diversity outside ROHs, the number of ROHs in the genome, and the average ROH size. We identified an abundance of ROHs in all genomes of multiple pigs from commercial breeds and wild populations from Eurasia. Size and number of ROHs are in agreement with known demography of the populations, with population bottlenecks highly increasing ROH occurrence. Nucleotide diversity outside ROHs is high in populations derived from a large ancient population, regardless of current population size. In addition, we show an unequal genomic ROH distribution, with strong correlations of ROH size and abundance with recombination rate and GC content. Global gene content does not correlate with ROH frequency, but some ROH hotspots do contain positive selected genes in commercial lines and wild populations. This study highlights the importance of the influence of demography and recombination on homozygosity in the genome to understand

  9. An improved method for oriT-directed cloning and functionalization of large bacterial genomic regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvitko, Brian H; McMillan, Ian A; Schweizer, Herbert P

    2013-08-01

    We have made significant improvements to a broad-host-range system for the cloning and manipulation of large bacterial genomic regions based on site-specific recombination between directly repeated oriT sites during conjugation. Using two suicide capture vectors carrying flanking homology regions, oriT sites are recombined on either side of the target region. Using a broad-host-range conjugation helper plasmid, the region between the oriT sites is conjugated into an Escherichia coli recipient strain, where it is circularized and maintained as a chimeric mini-F vector. The cloned target region is functionalized in multiple ways to accommodate downstream manipulation. The target region is flanked with Gateway attB sites for recombination into other vectors and by rare 18-bp I-SceI restriction sites for subcloning. The Tn7-functionalized target can also be inserted at a naturally occurring chromosomal attTn7 site(s) or maintained as a broad-host-range plasmid for complementation or heterologous expression studies. We have used the oriTn7 capture technique to clone and complement Burkholderia pseudomallei genomic regions up to 140 kb in size and have created isogenic Burkholderia strains with various combinations of genomic islands. We believe this system will greatly aid the cloning and genetic analysis of genomic islands, biosynthetic gene clusters, and large open reading frames. PMID:23747708

  10. Transcription Restores DNA Repair to Heterochromatin, Determining Regional Mutation Rates in Cancer Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina L. Zheng

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Somatic mutations in cancer are more frequent in heterochromatic and late-replicating regions of the genome. We report that regional disparities in mutation density are virtually abolished within transcriptionally silent genomic regions of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (cSCCs arising in an XPC−/− background. XPC−/− cells lack global genome nucleotide excision repair (GG-NER, thus establishing differential access of DNA repair machinery within chromatin-rich regions of the genome as the primary cause for the regional disparity. Strikingly, we find that increasing levels of transcription reduce mutation prevalence on both strands of gene bodies embedded within H3K9me3-dense regions, and only to those levels observed in H3K9me3-sparse regions, also in an XPC-dependent manner. Therefore, transcription appears to reduce mutation prevalence specifically by relieving the constraints imposed by chromatin structure on DNA repair. We model this relationship among transcription, chromatin state, and DNA repair, revealing a new, personalized determinant of cancer risk.

  11. DNA sequence comparative analysis of the 3pter-p26 region of human genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Chunqing; YANG Huanming; DONG Wei; LI Yan; ZHANG Xiaowei; ZHANG Yilin; ZHANG Haiqing; CHEN Chong; XU Zuyuan; CUI Peng; HU Songnian

    2005-01-01

    Most proterminal regions of human chromosomes are GC-rich and gene-rich. Chromosome 3p is an exception. Its proterminal region is GC-poor, and likely to lose heterozygosity, thus causing a number of fatal diseases. Except one gap left in the telomeric position, the proterminal region of human chromosome 3p has been completely sequenced. The detailed sequence analysis showed: (i) the GC content of this region was 38.5%, being the lowest among all the human proterminal regions; (ii) this region contained 20 known genes and 22 predicted genes, with an average gene size of 97.5 kb. The previously mapped gene Cntn3 was not found in this region, but instead located in the 74 Mb position of human chromosome 3p; (iii) the interspersed repeats of this region were more active than the average level of the whole human genome, especially (TA)n, the content of which was twice the genome average; (iv) this region had a conserved synteny extending from 104.1 Mb to 112.4 Mb on the mouse chromosome 6, which was 8% larger in size, not in accordance with the whole genome comparison, probably because the 3pter-p26 region was more likely to lose neocleitides and its mouse synteny had more active interspersed repeats.

  12. De Novo Identification of Regulatory Regions in Intergenic Spaces of Prokaryotic Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chain, P; Garcia, E; Mcloughlin, K; Ovcharenko, I

    2007-02-20

    This project was begun to implement, test, and experimentally validate the results of a novel algorithm for genome-wide identification of candidate transcription-factor binding sites in prokaryotes. Most techniques used to identify regulatory regions rely on conservation between different genomes or have a predetermined sequence motif(s) to perform a genome-wide search. Therefore, such techniques cannot be used with new genome sequences, where information regarding such motifs has not yet been discovered. This project aimed to apply a de novo search algorithm to identify candidate binding-site motifs in intergenic regions of prokaryotic organisms, initially testing the available genomes of the Yersinia genus. We retrofitted existing nucleotide pattern-matching algorithms, analyzed the candidate sites identified by these algorithms as well as their target genes to screen for meaningful patterns. Using properly annotated prokaryotic genomes, this project aimed to develop a set of procedures to identify candidate intergenic sites important for gene regulation. We planned to demonstrate this in Yersinia pestis, a model biodefense, Category A Select Agent pathogen, and then follow up with experimental evidence that these regions are indeed involved in regulation. The ability to quickly characterize transcription-factor binding sites will help lead to a better understanding of how known virulence pathways are modulated in biodefense-related organisms, and will help our understanding and exploration of regulons--gene regulatory networks--and novel pathways for metabolic processes in environmental microbes.

  13. Comparative genomics provides insight into maize adaptation in temperate regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufford, Matthew B

    2016-01-01

    A new study provides insights into the evolution of maize during its global spread into temperate regions from its origin in coastal Mexico.Please see related Research article: http://genomebiology.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13059-016-1009-x. PMID:27411931

  14. Internal genomic regions mobilized for telomere maintenance in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chuna; Sung, Sanghyun; Lee, Junho

    2016-01-01

    Because DNA polymerase cannot replicate telomeric DNA at linear chromosomal ends, eukaryotes have developed specific telomere maintenance mechanisms (TMMs). A major TMM involves specialized reverse transcriptase, telomerase. However, there also exist various telomerase-independent TMMs (TI-TMMs), which can arise both in pathological conditions (such as cancers) and during evolution. The TI-TMM in cancer cells is called alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT), whose mechanism is not fully understood. We generated stably maintained telomerase-independent survivors from C. elegans telomerase mutants and found that, unlike previously described survivors in worms, these survivors "mobilize" specific internal sequence blocks for telomere lengthening, which we named TALTs (templates for ALT). The cis-duplication of internal genomic TALTs produces "reservoirs" of TALTs, whose trans-duplication occurs at all chromosome ends in the ALT survivors. Our discovery that different TALTs are utilized in different wild isolates provides insight into the molecular events leading to telomere evolution. PMID:27073737

  15. Identification of genomic regions associated with phenotypic variation between dog breeds using selection mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaysse, Amaury; Ratnakumar, Abhirami; Derrien, Thomas;

    2011-01-01

    across the genome in dog breeds are the result of both selection and genetic drift, but extended blocks of homozygosity on a megabase scale appear to be best explained by selection. Further elucidation of the variants under selection will help to uncover the genetic basis of complex traits and disease....... breeds using a newly developed high-density genotyping array consisting of >170,000 evenly spaced SNPs. We first identify 44 genomic regions exhibiting extreme differentiation across multiple breeds. Genetic variation in these regions correlates with variation in several phenotypic traits that vary...... to provide a list of variants that may directly affect these traits. This study provides a catalogue of genomic regions showing extreme reduction in genetic variation or population differentiation in dogs, including many linked to phenotypic variation. The many blocks of reduced haplotype diversity observed...

  16. Specific amplification by PCR of rearranged genomic variable regions of immunoglobulin genes from mouse hybridoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdoz, J; Monath, T P; Kraehenbuhl, J P

    1995-04-01

    We have designed a novel strategy for the isolation of the rearranged genomic fragments encoding the L-VH-D-JH and L-V kappa/lambda-J kappa/lambda regions of mouse immunoglobulin genes. This strategy is based on the PCR amplification of genomic DNA from mouse hybridomas using multiple specific primers chosen in the 5'-untranslated region and in the intron downstream of the rearranged JH/J kappa/lambda sequences. Variable regions with intact coding sequences, including full-length leader peptides (L) can be obtained without previous DNA sequencing. Our strategy is based on a genomic template that produces fragments that do not need to be adapted for recombinant antibody expression, thus facilitating the generation of chimeric and isotype-switched immunoglobulins.

  17. SynFind: Compiling Syntenic Regions across Any Set of Genomes on Demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Haibao; Bomhoff, Matthew D; Briones, Evan; Zhang, Liangsheng; Schnable, James C; Lyons, Eric

    2015-12-01

    The identification of conserved syntenic regions enables discovery of predicted locations for orthologous and homeologous genes, even when no such gene is present. This capability means that synteny-based methods are far more effective than sequence similarity-based methods in identifying true-negatives, a necessity for studying gene loss and gene transposition. However, the identification of syntenic regions requires complex analyses which must be repeated for pairwise comparisons between any two species. Therefore, as the number of published genomes increases, there is a growing demand for scalable, simple-to-use applications to perform comparative genomic analyses that cater to both gene family studies and genome-scale studies. We implemented SynFind, a web-based tool that addresses this need. Given one query genome, SynFind is capable of identifying conserved syntenic regions in any set of target genomes. SynFind is capable of reporting per-gene information, useful for researchers studying specific gene families, as well as genome-wide data sets of syntenic gene and predicted gene locations, critical for researchers focused on large-scale genomic analyses. Inference of syntenic homologs provides the basis for correlation of functional changes around genes of interests between related organisms. Deployed on the CoGe online platform, SynFind is connected to the genomic data from over 15,000 organisms from all domains of life as well as supporting multiple releases of the same organism. SynFind makes use of a powerful job execution framework that promises scalability and reproducibility. SynFind can be accessed at http://genomevolution.org/CoGe/SynFind.pl. A video tutorial of SynFind using Phytophthrora as an example is available at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Agczny9Nyc. PMID:26560340

  18. OcculterCut: A Comprehensive Survey of AT-Rich Regions in Fungal Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Alison C; Oliver, Richard P; Hane, James K

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel method to measure the local GC-content bias in genomes and a survey of published fungal species. The method, enacted as "OcculterCut" (https://sourceforge.net/projects/occultercut, last accessed April 30, 2016), identified species containing distinct AT-rich regions. In most fungal taxa, AT-rich regions are a signature of repeat-induced point mutation (RIP), which targets repetitive DNA and decreases GC-content though the conversion of cytosine to thymine bases. RIP has in turn been identified as a driver of fungal genome evolution, as RIP mutations can also occur in single-copy genes neighboring repeat-rich regions. Over time RIP perpetuates "two speeds" of gene evolution in the GC-equilibrated and AT-rich regions of fungal genomes. In this study, genomes showing evidence of this process are found to be common, particularly among the Pezizomycotina. Further analysis highlighted differences in amino acid composition and putative functions of genes from these regions, supporting the hypothesis that these regions play an important role in fungal evolution. OcculterCut can also be used to identify genes undergoing RIP-assisted diversifying selection, such as small, secreted effector proteins that mediate host-microbe disease interactions. PMID:27289099

  19. Detection of genomic variation by selection of a 9 mb DNA region and high throughput sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey I Nikolaev

    Full Text Available Detection of the rare polymorphisms and causative mutations of genetic diseases in a targeted genomic area has become a major goal in order to understand genomic and phenotypic variability. We have interrogated repeat-masked regions of 8.9 Mb on human chromosomes 21 (7.8 Mb and 7 (1.1 Mb from an individual from the International HapMap Project (NA12872. We have optimized a method of genomic selection for high throughput sequencing. Microarray-based selection and sequencing resulted in 260-fold enrichment, with 41% of reads mapping to the target region. 83% of SNPs in the targeted region had at least 4-fold sequence coverage and 54% at least 15-fold. When assaying HapMap SNPs in NA12872, our sequence genotypes are 91.3% concordant in regions with coverage > or = 4-fold, and 97.9% concordant in regions with coverage > or = 15-fold. About 81% of the SNPs recovered with both thresholds are listed in dbSNP. We observed that regions with low sequence coverage occur in close proximity to low-complexity DNA. Validation experiments using Sanger sequencing were performed for 46 SNPs with 15-20 fold coverage, with a confirmation rate of 96%, suggesting that DNA selection provides an accurate and cost-effective method for identifying rare genomic variants.

  20. Acute hepatitis C in a chronically HIV-infected patient: Evolution of different viral genomic regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Diego Flichman; Veronica Kott; Silvia Sookoian; Rodolfo Campos

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the molecular evolution of different viral genomic regions of HCV in an acute HCV infected patient chronically infected with HIV through a 42-month follow-up.METHODS: Serum samples of a chronically HIV infected patient that seroconverted to anti HCV antibodies were sequenced, from the event of superinfection through a period of 17 months and in a late sample (42nd month). Hypervariable genomic regions of HIV (V3 loop of the gp120) and HCV (HVR-1 on the E2 glycoprotein gene) were studied. In order to analyze genomic regions involved in different biological functions and with the cellular immune response, HCV core and NS5A were also chosen to be sequenced. Amplification of the different regions was done by RT-PCR and directly sequenced. Confirmation of sequences was done on reamplified material. Nucleotide sequences of the different time points were aligned with CLUSTAL W 1.5, and the corresponding amino acid ones were deduced.RESULTS: Hypervariable genomic regions of both viruses (HVR1 and gp120 V3 loop) presented several nonsynonymous changes but, while in the gp120 V3 loop mutations were detected in the sample obtained right after HCV superinfection and maintained throughout, they occurred following a sequential and cumulative pattern in the HVR1. In the NS5A region of HCV, two amino acid changes were detected during the follow-up period, whereas the core region presented several amino acid replacements, once the HCV chronic infection had been established.CONCLUSION: During the HIV-HCV superinfection, each genomic region analyzed shows a different evolutionary pattem.Most of the nucleotide substitutions observed are nonsynonymous and clustered in previously described epitopes,thus suggesting an immune-driven evolutionary process.

  1. Definition of Soybean Genomic Regions That Control Seed Phytoestrogen Amounts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kassem My A.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Soybean seeds contain large amounts of isoflavones or phytoestrogens such as genistein, daidzein, and glycitein that display biological effects when ingested by humans and animals. In seeds, the total amount, and amount of each type, of isoflavone varies by 5 fold between cultivars and locations. Isoflavone content and quality are one key to the biological effects of soy foods, dietary supplements, and nutraceuticals. Previously we had identified 6 loci (QTL controlling isoflavone content using 150 DNA markers. This study aimed to identify and delimit loci underlying heritable variation in isoflavone content with additional DNA markers. We used a recombinant inbred line (RIL population ( n=100 derived from the cross of “Essex” by “Forrest,” two cultivars that contrast for isoflavone content. Seed isoflavone content of each RIL was determined by HPLC and compared against 240 polymorphic microsatellite markers by one-way analysis of variance. Two QTL that underlie seed isoflavone content were newly discovered. The additional markers confirmed and refined the positions of the six QTL already reported. The first new region anchored by the marker BARC-Satt063 was significantly associated with genistein ( P=0.009 , R 2 =29.5% and daidzein ( P=0.007 , R 2 =17.0% . The region is located on linkage group B2 and derived the beneficial allele from Essex. The second new region defined by the marker BARC-Satt129 was significantly associated with total glycitein ( P=0.0005 , R 2 =32.0% . The region is located on linkage group D1a+Q and also derived the beneficial allele from Essex. Jointly the eight loci can explain the heritable variation in isoflavone content. The loci may be used to stabilize seed isoflavone content by selection and to isolate the underlying genes.

  2. Identification of the most informative regions of the mitochondrial genome for phylogenetic and coalescent analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Non, A L; Kitchen, A; Mulligan, C J

    2007-09-01

    Analysis of complete mitochondrial genome sequences is becoming increasingly common in genetic studies. The availability of full genome datasets enables an analysis of the information content distributed throughout the mitochondrial genome in order to optimize the research design of future evolutionary studies. The goal of our study was to identify informative regions of the human mitochondrial genome using two criteria: (1) accurate reconstruction of a phylogeny and (2) consistent estimates of time to most recent common ancestor (TMRCA). We created two series of datasets by deleting individual genes of varied length and by deleting 10 equal-size fragments throughout the coding region. Phylogenies were statistically compared to the full-coding-region tree, while coalescent methods were used to estimate the TMRCA and associated credible intervals. Individual fragments important for maintaining a phylogeny similar to the full-coding-region tree encompassed bp 577-2122 and 11,399-16,023, including all or part of 12S rRNA, 16S rRNA, ND4, ND5, ND6, and cytb. The control region only tree was the most poorly resolved with the majority of the tree manifest as an unresolved polytomy. Coalescent estimates of TMRCA were less sensitive to removal of any particular fragment(s) than reconstruction of a consistent phylogeny. Overall, we discovered that half the genome, i.e., bp 3669-11,398, could be removed with no significant change in the phylogeny (p(AU)=0.077) while still maintaining overlap of TMRCA 95% credible intervals. Thus, sequencing a contiguous fragment from bp 11,399 through the control region to bp 3668 would create a dataset that optimizes the information necessary for phylogenetic and coalescent analyses and also takes advantage of the wealth of data already available on the control region.

  3. Genome-wide analysis of regions similar to promoters of histone genes

    KAUST Repository

    Chowdhary, Rajesh

    2010-05-28

    Background: The purpose of this study is to: i) develop a computational model of promoters of human histone-encoding genes (shortly histone genes), an important class of genes that participate in various critical cellular processes, ii) use the model so developed to identify regions across the human genome that have similar structure as promoters of histone genes; such regions could represent potential genomic regulatory regions, e.g. promoters, of genes that may be coregulated with histone genes, and iii/ identify in this way genes that have high likelihood of being coregulated with the histone genes.Results: We successfully developed a histone promoter model using a comprehensive collection of histone genes. Based on leave-one-out cross-validation test, the model produced good prediction accuracy (94.1% sensitivity, 92.6% specificity, and 92.8% positive predictive value). We used this model to predict across the genome a number of genes that shared similar promoter structures with the histone gene promoters. We thus hypothesize that these predicted genes could be coregulated with histone genes. This hypothesis matches well with the available gene expression, gene ontology, and pathways data. Jointly with promoters of the above-mentioned genes, we found a large number of intergenic regions with similar structure as histone promoters.Conclusions: This study represents one of the most comprehensive computational analyses conducted thus far on a genome-wide scale of promoters of human histone genes. Our analysis suggests a number of other human genes that share a high similarity of promoter structure with the histone genes and thus are highly likely to be coregulated, and consequently coexpressed, with the histone genes. We also found that there are a large number of intergenic regions across the genome with their structures similar to promoters of histone genes. These regions may be promoters of yet unidentified genes, or may represent remote control regions that

  4. Mutational signatures of de-differentiation in functional non-coding regions of melanoma genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen C J Parker

    Full Text Available Much emphasis has been placed on the identification, functional characterization, and therapeutic potential of somatic variants in tumor genomes. However, the majority of somatic variants lie outside coding regions and their role in cancer progression remains to be determined. In order to establish a system to test the functional importance of non-coding somatic variants in cancer, we created a low-passage cell culture of a metastatic melanoma tumor sample. As a foundation for interpreting functional assays, we performed whole-genome sequencing and analysis of this cell culture, the metastatic tumor from which it was derived, and the patient-matched normal genomes. When comparing somatic mutations identified in the cell culture and tissue genomes, we observe concordance at the majority of single nucleotide variants, whereas copy number changes are more variable. To understand the functional impact of non-coding somatic variation, we leveraged functional data generated by the ENCODE Project Consortium. We analyzed regulatory regions derived from multiple different cell types and found that melanocyte-specific regions are among the most depleted for somatic mutation accumulation. Significant depletion in other cell types suggests the metastatic melanoma cells de-differentiated to a more basal regulatory state. Experimental identification of genome-wide regulatory sites in two different melanoma samples supports this observation. Together, these results show that mutation accumulation in metastatic melanoma is nonrandom across the genome and that a de-differentiated regulatory architecture is common among different samples. Our findings enable identification of the underlying genetic components of melanoma and define the differences between a tissue-derived tumor sample and the cell culture created from it. Such information helps establish a broader mechanistic understanding of the linkage between non-coding genomic variations and the cellular

  5. Thousands of corresponding human and mouse genomic regions unalignable in primary sequence contain common RNA structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torarinsson, Elfar; Sawera, Milena; Havgaard, Jakob Hull;

    2006-01-01

    Human and mouse genome sequences contain roughly 100,000 regions that are unalignable in primary sequence and neighbor corresponding alignable regions between both organisms. These pairs are generally assumed to be nonconserved, although the level of structural conservation between these has never...... been investigated. Owing to the limitations in computational methods, comparative genomics has been lacking the ability to compare such nonconserved sequence regions for conserved structural RNA elements. We have investigated the presence of structural RNA elements by conducting a local structural...... overlapped by transfrags than regions that are not overlapped by transfrags. To verify the coexpression between predicted candidates in human and mouse, we conducted expression studies by RT-PCR and Northern blotting on mouse candidates, which overlap with transfrags on human chromosome 20. RT-PCR results...

  6. Molecular genetic analysis of regions of the murine genome associated with radiation-induced mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors are exploiting the large array of radiation-induced mutations to develop both detailed molecular and functional maps of selected small model regions (as opposed to specific genes) within the mouse genome. Through the integrated use of recombinant DNA technology and classical genetic and cytogenetic analysis, they hope to relate the structure and function of these regions to the study of both normal and abnormal mammalian development. Over the years, the germ-line mutagenesis program has generated a valuable array of induced mutations at several specific loci scattered throughout the murine genome. Many of these mutations are multilocus deletions of chromosomal DNA. Genetic analysis of these types of lesions has detected passenger mutations of wide-ranging effect and severity, and has generated gross functional maps of entire chromosomal regions. They have initiated a program to expand the molecular analysis of these types of deletion mutations. This program exploits the deletion mutations and other chromosomal rearrangements to obtain molecular clones of wild-type DNA that map to regions absent in mutants carrying the deletions. These clones will then be used to correlate the resultant molecular/physical map of the chromosomal region with the genetic/functional map in both mutant and wild-type individuals. Such correlations are essential to a strategy for identifying as many of the genes as possible in a particular region of the genome and for ascertaining their role(s) in the normal development of the mouse

  7. Genic regions of a large salamander genome contain long introns and novel genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryant Susan V

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The basis of genome size variation remains an outstanding question because DNA sequence data are lacking for organisms with large genomes. Sixteen BAC clones from the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum: c-value = 32 × 109 bp were isolated and sequenced to characterize the structure of genic regions. Results Annotation of genes within BACs showed that axolotl introns are on average 10× longer than orthologous vertebrate introns and they are predicted to contain more functional elements, including miRNAs and snoRNAs. Loci were discovered within BACs for two novel EST transcripts that are differentially expressed during spinal cord regeneration and skin metamorphosis. Unexpectedly, a third novel gene was also discovered while manually annotating BACs. Analysis of human-axolotl protein-coding sequences suggests there are 2% more lineage specific genes in the axolotl genome than the human genome, but the great majority (86% of genes between axolotl and human are predicted to be 1:1 orthologs. Considering that axolotl genes are on average 5× larger than human genes, the genic component of the salamander genome is estimated to be incredibly large, approximately 2.8 gigabases! Conclusion This study shows that a large salamander genome has a correspondingly large genic component, primarily because genes have incredibly long introns. These intronic sequences may harbor novel coding and non-coding sequences that regulate biological processes that are unique to salamanders.

  8. Evaluation of Apis mellifera syriaca Levant region honeybee conservation using comparative genome hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Nizar Jamal; Batainh, Ahmed; Saini, Deepti; Migdadi, Osama; Aiyaz, Mohamed; Manchiganti, Rushiraj; Krishnamurthy, Venkatesh; Al-Shagour, Banan; Brake, Mohammad; Bourgeois, Lelania; De Guzman, Lilia; Rinderer, Thomas; Hamouri, Zayed Mahoud

    2016-06-01

    Apis mellifera syriaca is the native honeybee subspecies of Jordan and much of the Levant region. It expresses behavioral adaptations to a regional climate with very high temperatures, nectar dearth in summer, attacks of the Oriental wasp and is resistant to Varroa mites. The A. m. syriaca control reference sample (CRS) in this study was originally collected and stored since 2001 from "Wadi Ben Hammad", a remote valley in the southern region of Jordan. Morphometric and mitochondrial DNA markers of these honeybees had shown highest similarity to reference A. m. syriaca samples collected in 1952 by Brother Adam of samples collected from the Middle East. Samples 1-5 were collected from the National Center for Agricultural Research and Extension breeding apiary which was established for the conservation of A. m. syriaca. Our objective was to determine the success of an A. m. syriaca honey bee conservation program using genomic information from an array-based comparative genomic hybridization platform to evaluate genetic similarities to a historic reference collection (CRS). Our results had shown insignificant genomic differences between the current population in the conservation program and the CRS indicated that program is successfully conserving A. m. syriaca. Functional genomic variations were identified which are useful for conservation monitoring and may be useful for breeding programs designed to improve locally adapted strains of A. m. syriaca. PMID:27010806

  9. Analysis of genomic regions of Trichoderma harzianum IOC-3844 related to biomass degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucello, Aline; Sforça, Danilo Augusto; Horta, Maria Augusta Crivelente; dos Santos, Clelton Aparecido; Viana, Américo José Carvalho; Beloti, Lilian Luzia; de Toledo, Marcelo Augusto Szymanski; Vincentz, Michel; Kuroshu, Reginaldo Massanobu; de Souza, Anete Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Trichoderma harzianum IOC-3844 secretes high levels of cellulolytic-active enzymes and is therefore a promising strain for use in biotechnological applications in second-generation bioethanol production. However, the T. harzianum biomass degradation mechanism has not been well explored at the genetic level. The present work investigates six genomic regions (~150 kbp each) in this fungus that are enriched with genes related to biomass conversion. A BAC library consisting of 5,760 clones was constructed, with an average insert length of 90 kbp. The assembled BAC sequences revealed 232 predicted genes, 31.5% of which were related to catabolic pathways, including those involved in biomass degradation. An expression profile analysis based on RNA-Seq data demonstrated that putative regulatory elements, such as membrane transport proteins and transcription factors, are located in the same genomic regions as genes related to carbohydrate metabolism and exhibit similar expression profiles. Thus, we demonstrate a rapid and efficient tool that focuses on specific genomic regions by combining a BAC library with transcriptomic data. This is the first BAC-based structural genomic study of the cellulolytic fungus T. harzianum, and its findings provide new perspectives regarding the use of this species in biomass degradation processes. PMID:25836973

  10. Analysis of genomic regions of Trichoderma harzianum IOC-3844 related to biomass degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Crucello

    Full Text Available Trichoderma harzianum IOC-3844 secretes high levels of cellulolytic-active enzymes and is therefore a promising strain for use in biotechnological applications in second-generation bioethanol production. However, the T. harzianum biomass degradation mechanism has not been well explored at the genetic level. The present work investigates six genomic regions (~150 kbp each in this fungus that are enriched with genes related to biomass conversion. A BAC library consisting of 5,760 clones was constructed, with an average insert length of 90 kbp. The assembled BAC sequences revealed 232 predicted genes, 31.5% of which were related to catabolic pathways, including those involved in biomass degradation. An expression profile analysis based on RNA-Seq data demonstrated that putative regulatory elements, such as membrane transport proteins and transcription factors, are located in the same genomic regions as genes related to carbohydrate metabolism and exhibit similar expression profiles. Thus, we demonstrate a rapid and efficient tool that focuses on specific genomic regions by combining a BAC library with transcriptomic data. This is the first BAC-based structural genomic study of the cellulolytic fungus T. harzianum, and its findings provide new perspectives regarding the use of this species in biomass degradation processes.

  11. Evaluation of Apis mellifera syriaca Levant region honeybee conservation using comparative genome hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Nizar Jamal; Batainh, Ahmed; Saini, Deepti; Migdadi, Osama; Aiyaz, Mohamed; Manchiganti, Rushiraj; Krishnamurthy, Venkatesh; Al-Shagour, Banan; Brake, Mohammad; Bourgeois, Lelania; De Guzman, Lilia; Rinderer, Thomas; Hamouri, Zayed Mahoud

    2016-06-01

    Apis mellifera syriaca is the native honeybee subspecies of Jordan and much of the Levant region. It expresses behavioral adaptations to a regional climate with very high temperatures, nectar dearth in summer, attacks of the Oriental wasp and is resistant to Varroa mites. The A. m. syriaca control reference sample (CRS) in this study was originally collected and stored since 2001 from "Wadi Ben Hammad", a remote valley in the southern region of Jordan. Morphometric and mitochondrial DNA markers of these honeybees had shown highest similarity to reference A. m. syriaca samples collected in 1952 by Brother Adam of samples collected from the Middle East. Samples 1-5 were collected from the National Center for Agricultural Research and Extension breeding apiary which was established for the conservation of A. m. syriaca. Our objective was to determine the success of an A. m. syriaca honey bee conservation program using genomic information from an array-based comparative genomic hybridization platform to evaluate genetic similarities to a historic reference collection (CRS). Our results had shown insignificant genomic differences between the current population in the conservation program and the CRS indicated that program is successfully conserving A. m. syriaca. Functional genomic variations were identified which are useful for conservation monitoring and may be useful for breeding programs designed to improve locally adapted strains of A. m. syriaca.

  12. Sequence based polymorphic (SBP marker technology for targeted genomic regions: its application in generating a molecular map of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahu Binod B

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular markers facilitate both genotype identification, essential for modern animal and plant breeding, and the isolation of genes based on their map positions. Advancements in sequencing technology have made possible the identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs for any genomic regions. Here a sequence based polymorphic (SBP marker technology for generating molecular markers for targeted genomic regions in Arabidopsis is described. Results A ~3X genome coverage sequence of the Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype, Niederzenz (Nd-0 was obtained by applying Illumina's sequencing by synthesis (Solexa technology. Comparison of the Nd-0 genome sequence with the assembled Columbia-0 (Col-0 genome sequence identified putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs throughout the entire genome. Multiple 75 base pair Nd-0 sequence reads containing SNPs and originating from individual genomic DNA molecules were the basis for developing co-dominant SBP markers. SNPs containing Col-0 sequences, supported by transcript sequences or sequences from multiple BAC clones, were compared to the respective Nd-0 sequences to identify possible restriction endonuclease enzyme site variations. Small amplicons, PCR amplified from both ecotypes, were digested with suitable restriction enzymes and resolved on a gel to reveal the sequence based polymorphisms. By applying this technology, 21 SBP markers for the marker poor regions of the Arabidopsis map representing polymorphisms between Col-0 and Nd-0 ecotypes were generated. Conclusions The SBP marker technology described here allowed the development of molecular markers for targeted genomic regions of Arabidopsis. It should facilitate isolation of co-dominant molecular markers for targeted genomic regions of any animal or plant species, whose genomic sequences have been assembled. This technology will particularly facilitate the development of high density molecular marker maps, essential for

  13. Identification of genomic regions associated with female fertility in Danish Jersey using whole genome sequence data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höglund, Johanna; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Lund, Mogens Sandø;

    2015-01-01

    (AIS), 56-day non-return rate (NRR), number of days from first to last insemination (IFL), and number of days between calving and first insemination (ICF). The objective of this study was to identify associations between sequence variants and fertility traits in Jersey cattle based on 1,225 Jersey...... quantitative trait locus regions were re-analyzed using a linear mixed model (animal model) for both FTI and its component traits AIS, NRR, IFL and ICF. The underlying traits were analyzed separately for heifers (first parity cows) and cows (later parity cows) for AIS, NRR, and IFL. Results: In the first step...... 6 QTL were detected for FTI: one QTL on each of BTA7, BTA20, BTA23, BTA25, and two QTL on BTA9 (QTL9–1 and QTL9–2). In the second step, ICF showed association with the QTL regions on BTA7, QTL9–2 QTL2 on BTA9, and BTA25, AIS for cows on BTA20 and BTA23, AIS for heifers on QTL9–2 on BTA9, IFL...

  14. PCR primers for 30 novel gene regions in the nuclear genomes of Lepidoptera

    OpenAIRE

    Wahlberg, Niklas; Peña, Carlos; Ahola,Milla; Wheat, Christopher W; Rota, Jadranka

    2016-01-01

    We report primer pairs for 30 new gene regions in the nuclear genomes of Lepidoptera that can be amplified using a standard PCR protocol. The new primers were tested across diverse Lepidoptera, including nonditrysians and a wide selection of ditrysians. These new gene regions give a total of 11,043 bp of DNA sequence data and they show similar variability to traditionally used nuclear gene regions in studies of Lepidoptera. We feel that a PCR-based approach still has its place in molecular sy...

  15. Structured RNAs in the ENCODE selected regions of the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Washietl, Stefan; Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Korbel, Jan O;

    2007-01-01

    several thousand candidate structures (corresponding to approximately 2.7% of the ENCODE regions). EvoFold has its highest sensitivity in highly conserved and relatively AU-rich regions, while RNAz favors slightly GC-rich regions, resulting in a relatively small overlap between methods. Comparison...... with the GENCODE annotation points to functional RNAs in all genomic contexts, with a slightly increased density in 3'-UTRs. While we estimate a significant false discovery rate of approximately 50%-70% many of the predictions can be further substantiated by additional criteria: 248 loci are predicted by both RNAz...

  16. Tumorigenic poxviruses: genomic organization and DNA sequence of the telomeric region of the Shope fibroma virus genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, C; DeLange, A M; McFadden, G

    1987-09-01

    Shope fibroma virus (SFV), a tumorigenic poxvirus, has a 160-kb linear double-stranded DNA genome and possesses terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) of 12.4 kb. The DNA sequence of the terminal 5.5 kb of the viral genome is presented and together with previously published sequences completes the entire sequence of the SFV TIR. The terminal 400-bp region contains no major open reading frames (ORFs) but does possess five related imperfect palindromes. The remaining 5.1 kb of the sequence contains seven tightly clustered and tandemly oriented ORFs, four larger than 100 amino acids in length (T1, T2, T4, and T5) and three smaller ORFs (T3A, T3B, and T3C). All are transcribed toward the viral hairpin and almost all possess the consensus sequence TTTTTNT near their 3' ends which has been implicated for the transcription termination of vaccinia virus early genes. Searches of the published DNA database revealed no sequences with significant homology with this region of the SFV genome but when the protein database was searched with the translation products of ORFs T1-T5 it was found that the N-terminus of the putative T4 polypeptide is closely related to the signal sequence of the hemagglutinin precursor from influenza A virus, suggesting that the T4 polypeptide may be secreted from SFV-infected cells. Examination of other SFV ORFs shows that T1 and T2 also possess signal-like hydrophobic amino acid stretches close to their N-termini. The protein database search also revealed that the putative T2 protein has significant homology to the insulin family of polypeptides. In terms of sequence repetitions, seven tandemly repeated copies of the hexanucleotide ATTGTT and three flanking regions of dyad symmetry were detected, all in ORF T3C. A search for palindromic sequences also revealed two clusters, one in ORF T3A/B and a second in ORF T2. ORF T2 harbors five short sequence domains, each of which consists of a 6-bp short palindrome and a 10- to 18-bp larger palindrome. The

  17. The Rhodomonas salina mitochondrial genome: bacteria-like operons, compact gene arrangement and complex repeat region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauth, Amy M; Maier, Uwe G; Lang, B Franz; Burger, Gertraud

    2005-01-01

    To gain insight into the mitochondrial genome structure and gene content of a putatively ancestral group of eukaryotes, the cryptophytes, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial DNA of Rhodomonas salina. The 48 063 bp circular-mapping molecule codes for 2 rRNAs, 27 tRNAs and 40 proteins including 23 components of oxidative phosphorylation, 15 ribosomal proteins and two subunits of tat translocase. One potential protein (ORF161) is without assigned function. Only two introns occur in the genome; both are present within cox1 belong to group II and contain RT open reading frames. Primitive genome features include bacteria-like rRNAs and tRNAs, ribosomal protein genes organized in large clusters resembling bacterial operons and the presence of the otherwise rare genes such as rps1 and tatA. The highly compact gene organization contrasts with the presence of a 4.7 kb long, repeat-containing intergenic region. Repeat motifs approximately 40-700 bp long occur up to 31 times, forming a complex repeat structure. Tandem repeats are the major arrangement but the region also includes a large, approximately 3 kb, inverted repeat and several potentially stable approximately 40-80 bp long hairpin structures. We provide evidence that the large repeat region is involved in replication and transcription initiation, predict a promoter motif that occurs in three locations and discuss two likely scenarios of how this highly structured repeat region might have evolved.

  18. A general cloning system to selectively isolate any eukaryotic or prokaryotic genomic region in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barrett J Carl

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transformation-associated recombination (TAR cloning in yeast is a unique method for selective isolation of large chromosomal fragments or entire genes from complex genomes. The technique involves homologous recombination, during yeast spheroplast transformation, between genomic DNA and a TAR vector that has short (~ 60 bp 5' and 3' gene targeting sequences (hooks. Result TAR cloning requires that the cloned DNA fragment carry at least one autonomously replicating sequence (ARS that can function as the origin of replication in yeast, which prevents wide application of the method. In this paper, we describe a novel TAR cloning system that allows isolation of genomic regions lacking yeast ARS-like sequences. ARS is inserted into the TAR vector along with URA3 as a counter-selectable marker. The hooks are placed between the TATA box and the transcription initiation site of URA3. Insertion of any sequence between hooks results in inactivation of URA3 expression. That inactivation confers resistance to 5-fluoroorotic acid, allowing selection of TAR cloning events against background vector recircularization events. Conclusion The new system greatly expands the area of application of TAR cloning by allowing isolation of any chromosomal region from eukaryotic and prokaryotic genomes regardless of the presence of autonomously replicating sequences.

  19. Genomic Regions Associated With Interspecies Communication in Dogs Contain Genes Related to Human Social Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Mia E.; Wright, Dominic; Roth, Lina S. V.; Batakis, Petros; Jensen, Per

    2016-01-01

    Unlike their wolf ancestors, dogs have unique social skills for communicating and cooperating with humans. Previously, significant heritabilities for human-directed social behaviors have been found in laboratory beagles. Here, a Genome-Wide Association Study identified two genomic regions associated with dog’s human-directed social behaviors. We recorded the propensity of laboratory beagles, bred, kept and handled under standardized conditions, to initiate physical interactions with a human during an unsolvable problem-task, and 190 individuals were genotyped with an HD Canine SNP-chip. One genetic marker on chromosome 26 within the SEZ6L gene was significantly associated with time spent close to, and in physical contact with, the human. Two suggestive markers on chromosome 26, located within the ARVCF gene, were also associated with human contact seeking. Strikingly, four additional genes present in the same linkage blocks affect social abilities in humans, e.g., SEZ6L has been associated with autism and COMT affects aggression in adolescents with ADHD. This is, to our knowledge, the first genome-wide study presenting candidate genomic regions for dog sociability and inter-species communication. These results advance our understanding of dog domestication and raise the use of the dog as a novel model system for human social disorders. PMID:27685260

  20. Small tumor virus genomes are integrated near nuclear matrix attachment regions in transformed cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shera, K A; Shera, C A; McDougall, J K

    2001-12-01

    More than 15% of human cancers have a viral etiology. In benign lesions induced by the small DNA tumor viruses, viral genomes are typically maintained extrachromosomally. Malignant progression is often associated with viral integration into host cell chromatin. To study the role of viral integration in tumorigenesis, we analyzed the positions of integrated viral genomes in tumors and tumor cell lines induced by the small oncogenic viruses, including the high-risk human papillomaviruses, hepatitis B virus, simian virus 40, and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1. We show that viral integrations in tumor cells lie near cellular sequences identified as nuclear matrix attachment regions (MARs), while integrations in nonneoplastic cells show no significant correlation with these regions. In mammalian cells, the nuclear matrix functions in gene expression and DNA replication. MARs play varied but poorly understood roles in eukaryotic gene expression. Our results suggest that integrated tumor virus genomes are subject to MAR-mediated transcriptional regulation, providing insight into mechanisms of viral carcinogenesis. Furthermore, the viral oncoproteins serve as invaluable tools for the study of mechanisms controlling cellular growth. Similarly, our demonstration that integrated viral genomes may be subject to MAR-mediated transcriptional effects should facilitate elucidation of fundamental mechanisms regulating eukaryotic gene expression.

  1. Deciphering heterogeneity in pig genome assembly Sscrofa9 by isochore and isochore-like region analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqian Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The isochore, a large DNA sequence with relatively small GC variance, is one of the most important structures in eukaryotic genomes. Although the isochore has been widely studied in humans and other species, little is known about its distribution in pigs. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this paper, we construct a map of long homogeneous genome regions (LHGRs, i.e., isochores and isochore-like regions, in pigs to provide an intuitive version of GC heterogeneity in each chromosome. The LHGR pattern study not only quantifies heterogeneities, but also reveals some primary characteristics of the chromatin organization, including the followings: (1 the majority of LHGRs belong to GC-poor families and are in long length; (2 a high gene density tends to occur with the appearance of GC-rich LHGRs; and (3 the density of LINE repeats decreases with an increase in the GC content of LHGRs. Furthermore, a portion of LHGRs with particular GC ranges (50%-51% and 54%-55% tend to have abnormally high gene densities, suggesting that biased gene conversion (BGC, as well as time- and energy-saving principles, could be of importance to the formation of genome organization. CONCLUSION: This study significantly improves our knowledge of chromatin organization in the pig genome. Correlations between the different biological features (e.g., gene density and repeat density and GC content of LHGRs provide a unique glimpse of in silico gene and repeats prediction.

  2. A hybrid neural network system for prediction and recognition of promoter regions in human genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chuan-bo; LI Tao

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes a high specificity and sensitivity algorithm called PromPredictor for recognizing promoter regions in the human genome. PromPredictor extracts compositional features and CpG islands information from genomic sequence,feeding these features as input for a hybrid neural network system (HNN) and then applies the HNN for prediction. It combines a novel promoter recognition model, coding theory, feature selection and dimensionality reduction with machine learning algorithm.Evaluation on Human chromosome 22 was ~66% in sensitivity and ~48% in specificity. Comparison with two other systems revealed that our method had superior sensitivity and specificity in predicting promoter regions. PromPredictor is written in MATLAB and requires Matlab to run. PromPredictor is freely available at http://www.whtelecom.com/Prompredictor.htm.

  3. New insights into the origin of the B genome of hexaploid wheat: Evolutionary relationships at the SPA genomic region with the S genome of the diploid relative Aegilops speltoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charmet Gilles

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies suggested that the diploid ancestor of the B genome of tetraploid and hexaploid wheat species belongs to the Sitopsis section, having Aegilops speltoides (SS, 2n = 14 as the closest identified relative. However molecular relationships based on genomic sequence comparison, including both coding and non-coding DNA, have never been investigated. In an attempt to clarify these relationships, we compared, in this study, sequences of the Storage Protein Activator (SPA locus region of the S genome of Ae. speltoides (2n = 14 to that of the A, B and D genomes co-resident in the hexaploid wheat species (Triticum aestivum, AABBDD, 2n = 42. Results Four BAC clones, spanning the SPA locus of respectively the A, B, D and S genomes, were isolated and sequenced. Orthologous genomic regions were identified as delimited by shared non-transposable elements and non-coding sequences surrounding the SPA gene and correspond to 35 268, 22 739, 43 397 and 53 919 bp for the A, B, D and S genomes, respectively. Sequence length discrepancies within and outside the SPA orthologous regions are the result of non-shared transposable elements (TE insertions, all of which inserted after the progenitors of the four genomes divergence. Conclusion On the basis of conserved sequence length as well as identity of the shared non-TE regions and the SPA coding sequence, Ae speltoides appears to be more evolutionary related to the B genome of T. aestivum than the A and D genomes. However, the differential insertions of TEs, none of which are conserved between the two genomes led to the conclusion that the S genome of Ae. speltoides has diverged very early from the progenitor of the B genome which remains to be identified.

  4. The SeqWord Genome Browser: an online tool for the identification and visualization of atypical regions of bacterial genomes through oligonucleotide usage

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    Tümmler Burkhard

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data mining in large DNA sequences is a major challenge in microbial genomics and bioinformatics. Oligonucleotide usage (OU patterns provide a wealth of information for large scale sequence analysis and visualization. The purpose of this research was to make OU statistical analysis available as a novel web-based tool for functional genomics and annotation. The tool is also available as a downloadable package. Results The SeqWord Genome Browser (SWGB was developed to visualize the natural compositional variation of DNA sequences. The applet is also used for identification of divergent genomic regions both in annotated sequences of bacterial chromosomes, plasmids, phages and viruses, and in raw DNA sequences prior to annotation by comparing local and global OU patterns. The applet allows fast and reliable identification of clusters of horizontally transferred genomic islands, large multi-domain genes and genes for ribosomal RNA. Within the majority of genomic fragments (also termed genomic core sequence, regions enriched with housekeeping genes, ribosomal proteins and the regions rich in pseudogenes or genetic vestiges may be contrasted. Conclusion The SWGB applet presents a range of comprehensive OU statistical parameters calculated for a range of bacterial species, plasmids and phages. It is available on the Internet at http://www.bi.up.ac.za/SeqWord/mhhapplet.php.

  5. The structure of the Morganella morganii lipopolysaccharide core region and identification of its genomic loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradov, Evgeny; Nash, John H E; Foote, Simon; Young, N Martin

    2015-01-30

    The core region of the lipopolysaccharide of Morganella morganii serotype O:1ab was obtained by hydrolysis of the LPS and studied by 2D NMR, ESI MS, and chemical methods. Its structure was highly homologous to those from the two major members of the same Proteeae tribe, Proteus mirabilis and Providencia alcalifaciens, and analysis of the M. morganii genome disclosed that the loci for its outer core, lipid A and Ara4N moieties are similarly conserved.

  6. Genotyping of infectious laryngotracheitis virus using allelic variations from multiple genomic regions.

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    Choi, Eun-Jung; La, Tae-Min; Choi, In-Soo; Song, Chang-Seon; Park, Seung-Yong; Lee, Joong-Bok; Lee, Sang-Won

    2016-08-01

    Live attenuated vaccines are extensively used worldwide to control the outbreak of infectious laryngotracheitis. Virulent field strains showing close genetic relationship with the infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) vaccines of chicken embryo origin have been detected in the poultry industry. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis, a reliable molecular epidemiological method, of multiple genomic regions was performed. The PCR-RFLP is a time-consuming method that requires considerable amount of intact viral genomic DNA to amplify genomic regions greater than 4 kb. In this study, six variable genomic regions were selected and amplified for sequencing. The multi-allelic PCR-sequence genotyping showed better discrimination power than that of previous PCR-sequencing schemes using single or two target regions. The allelic variation patterns yielded 16 strains of ILTV classified into 14 different genotypes. Three Korean field strains, 550/05/Ko, 0010/05/Ko and 40032/08/Ko, were found to have the same genotype as the commercial vaccine strain, Laryngo Vac (Zoetis, Florham Park, NJ, USA). Three other Korean field strains, 40798/10/Ko, 12/07/Ko, and 30678/14/Ko, showed recombined allelic patterns. The multi-allelic PCR-sequencing method was proved to be an efficient and practical procedure to classify the different strains of ILTV. The method could serve as an alternate diagnostic and differentiating tool for the classification of ILTV, and contribute to understanding of the epidemiology of the disease at a global level. PMID:26956802

  7. Genome-wide chromatin remodeling identified at GC-rich long nucleosome-free regions.

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    Karin Schwarzbauer

    Full Text Available To gain deeper insights into principles of cell biology, it is essential to understand how cells reorganize their genomes by chromatin remodeling. We analyzed chromatin remodeling on next generation sequencing data from resting and activated T cells to determine a whole-genome chromatin remodeling landscape. We consider chromatin remodeling in terms of nucleosome repositioning which can be observed most robustly in long nucleosome-free regions (LNFRs that are occupied by nucleosomes in another cell state. We found that LNFR sequences are either AT-rich or GC-rich, where nucleosome repositioning was observed much more prominently in GC-rich LNFRs - a considerable proportion of them outside promoter regions. Using support vector machines with string kernels, we identified a GC-rich DNA sequence pattern indicating loci of nucleosome repositioning in resting T cells. This pattern appears to be also typical for CpG islands. We found out that nucleosome repositioning in GC-rich LNFRs is indeed associated with CpG islands and with binding sites of the CpG-island-binding ZF-CXXC proteins KDM2A and CFP1. That this association occurs prominently inside and also prominently outside of promoter regions hints at a mechanism governing nucleosome repositioning that acts on a whole-genome scale.

  8. DNA Replication Control Is Linked to Genomic Positioning of Control Regions in Escherichia coli.

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    Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Charbon, Godefroid; Krogfelt, Karen A; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2016-09-01

    Chromosome replication in Escherichia coli is in part controlled by three non-coding genomic sequences, DARS1, DARS2, and datA that modulate the activity of the initiator protein DnaA. The relative distance from oriC to the non-coding regions are conserved among E. coli species, despite large variations in genome size. Here we use a combination of i) site directed translocation of each region to new positions on the bacterial chromosome and ii) random transposon mediated translocation followed by culture evolution, to show genetic evidence for the importance of position. Here we provide evidence that the genomic locations of these regulatory sequences are important for cell cycle control and bacterial fitness. In addition, our work shows that the functionally redundant DARS1 and DARS2 regions play different roles in replication control. DARS1 is mainly involved in maintaining the origin concentration, whether DARS2 is also involved in maintaining single cell synchrony. PMID:27589233

  9. Evidence for widespread degradation of gene control regions in hominid genomes.

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    Peter D Keightley

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Although sequences containing regulatory elements located close to protein-coding genes are often only weakly conserved during evolution, comparisons of rodent genomes have implied that these sequences are subject to some selective constraints. Evolutionary conservation is particularly apparent upstream of coding sequences and in first introns, regions that are enriched for regulatory elements. By comparing the human and chimpanzee genomes, we show here that there is almost no evidence for conservation in these regions in hominids. Furthermore, we show that gene expression is diverging more rapidly in hominids than in murids per unit of neutral sequence divergence. By combining data on polymorphism levels in human noncoding DNA and the corresponding human-chimpanzee divergence, we show that the proportion of adaptive substitutions in these regions in hominids is very low. It therefore seems likely that the lack of conservation and increased rate of gene expression divergence are caused by a reduction in the effectiveness of natural selection against deleterious mutations because of the low effective population sizes of hominids. This has resulted in the accumulation of a large number of deleterious mutations in sequences containing gene control elements and hence a widespread degradation of the genome during the evolution of humans and chimpanzees.

  10. Homologous recombination-mediated cloning and manipulation of genomic DNA regions using Gateway and recombineering systems

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    Kagale Sateesh

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Employing genomic DNA clones to characterise gene attributes has several advantages over the use of cDNA clones, including the presence of native transcription and translation regulatory sequences as well as a representation of the complete repertoire of potential splice variants encoded by the gene. However, working with genomic DNA clones has traditionally been tedious due to their large size relative to cDNA clones and the presence, absence or position of particular restriction enzyme sites that may complicate conventional in vitro cloning procedures. Results To enable efficient cloning and manipulation of genomic DNA fragments for the purposes of gene expression and reporter-gene studies we have combined aspects of the Gateway system and a bacteriophage-based homologous recombination (i.e. recombineering system. To apply the method for characterising plant genes we developed novel Gateway and plant transformation vectors that are of small size and incorporate selectable markers which enable efficient identification of recombinant clones. We demonstrate that the genomic coding region of a gene can be directly cloned into a Gateway Entry vector by recombineering enabling its subsequent transfer to Gateway Expression vectors. We also demonstrate how the coding and regulatory regions of a gene can be directly cloned into a plant transformation vector by recombineering. This construct was then rapidly converted into a novel Gateway Expression vector incorporating cognate 5' and 3' regulatory regions by using recombineering to replace the intervening coding region with the Gateway Destination cassette. Such expression vectors can be applied to characterise gene regulatory regions through development of reporter-gene fusions, using the Gateway Entry clones of GUS and GFP described here, or for ectopic expression of a coding region cloned into a Gateway Entry vector. We exemplify the utility of this approach with the Arabidopsis

  11. Tandem repeat regions within the Burkholderia pseudomallei genome and their application for high resolution genotyping

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    Harvey Steven P

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The facultative, intracellular bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a serious infectious disease of humans and animals. We identified and categorized tandem repeat arrays and their distribution throughout the genome of B. pseudomallei strain K96243 in order to develop a genetic typing method for B. pseudomallei. We then screened 104 of the potentially polymorphic loci across a diverse panel of 31 isolates including B. pseudomallei, B. mallei and B. thailandensis in order to identify loci with varying degrees of polymorphism. A subset of these tandem repeat arrays were subsequently developed into a multiple-locus VNTR analysis to examine 66 B. pseudomallei and 21 B. mallei isolates from around the world, as well as 95 lineages from a serial transfer experiment encompassing ~18,000 generations. Results B. pseudomallei contains a preponderance of tandem repeat loci throughout its genome, many of which are duplicated elsewhere in the genome. The majority of these loci are composed of repeat motif lengths of 6 to 9 bp with 4 to 10 repeat units and are predominately located in intergenic regions of the genome. Across geographically diverse B. pseudomallei and B.mallei isolates, the 32 VNTR loci displayed between 7 and 28 alleles, with Nei's diversity values ranging from 0.47 and 0.94. Mutation rates for these loci are comparable (>10-5 per locus per generation to that of the most diverse tandemly repeated regions found in other less diverse bacteria. Conclusion The frequency, location and duplicate nature of tandemly repeated regions within the B. pseudomallei genome indicate that these tandem repeat regions may play a role in generating and maintaining adaptive genomic variation. Multiple-locus VNTR analysis revealed extensive diversity within the global isolate set containing B. pseudomallei and B. mallei, and it detected genotypic differences within clonal lineages of both species that were

  12. Natural selection among Eurasians at genomic regions associated with HIV-1 control

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    Allison David B

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV susceptibility and pathogenicity exhibit both interindividual and intergroup variability. The etiology of intergroup variability is still poorly understood, and could be partly linked to genetic differences among racial/ethnic groups. These genetic differences may be traceable to different regimes of natural selection in the 60,000 years since the human radiation out of Africa. Here, we examine population differentiation and haplotype patterns at several loci identified through genome-wide association studies on HIV-1 control, as determined by viral-load setpoint, in European and African-American populations. We use genome-wide data from the Human Genome Diversity Project, consisting of 53 world-wide populations, to compare measures of FST and relative extended haplotype homozygosity (REHH at these candidate loci to the rest of the respective chromosome. Results We find that the Europe-Middle East and Europe-South Asia pairwise FST in the most strongly associated region are elevated compared to most pairwise comparisons with the sub-Saharan African group, which exhibit very low FST. We also find genetic signatures of recent positive selection (higher REHH at these associated regions among all groups except for sub-Saharan Africans and Native Americans. This pattern is consistent with one in which genetic differentiation, possibly due to diversifying/positive selection, occurred at these loci among Eurasians. Conclusions These findings are concordant with those from earlier studies suggesting recent evolutionary change at immunity-related genomic regions among Europeans, and shed light on the potential genetic and evolutionary origin of population differences in HIV-1 control.

  13. Sardinians genetic background explained by runs of homozygosity and genomic regions under positive selection.

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    Cornelia Di Gaetano

    Full Text Available The peculiar position of Sardinia in the Mediterranean sea has rendered its population an interesting biogeographical isolate. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic population structure, as well as to estimate Runs of Homozygosity and regions under positive selection, using about 1.2 million single nucleotide polymorphisms genotyped in 1077 Sardinian individuals. Using four different methods--fixation index, inflation factor, principal component analysis and ancestry estimation--we were able to highlight, as expected for a genetic isolate, the high internal homogeneity of the island. Sardinians showed a higher percentage of genome covered by RoHs>0.5 Mb (F(RoH%0.5 when compared to peninsular Italians, with the only exception of the area surrounding Alghero. We furthermore identified 9 genomic regions showing signs of positive selection and, we re-captured many previously inferred signals. Other regions harbor novel candidate genes for positive selection, like TMEM252, or regions containing long non coding RNA. With the present study we confirmed the high genetic homogeneity of Sardinia that may be explained by the shared ancestry combined with the action of evolutionary forces.

  14. Comparative genomic analysis of duplicated homoeologous regions involved in the resistance of Brassica napus to stem canker

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    Berline eFopa Fomeju

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available All crop species are current or ancient polyploids. Following whole genome duplication, structural and functional modifications result in differential gene content or regulation in the duplicated regions, which can play a fundamental role in the diversification of genes underlying complex traits. We have investigated this issue in Brassica napus, a species with a highly duplicated genome, with the aim of studying the structural and functional organization of duplicated regions involved in quantitative resistance to stem canker, a disease caused by the fungal pathogen Leptosphaeria maculans. Genome-wide association analysis on two oilseed rape panels confirmed that duplicated regions of ancestral blocks E, J, R, U and W were involved in resistance to stem canker. The structural analysis of the duplicated genomic regions showed a higher gene density on the A genome than on the C genome and a better collinearity between homoeologous regions than paralogous regions, as overall in the whole B. napus genome. The three ancestral sub-genomes were involved in the resistance to stem canker and the fractionation profile of the duplicated regions corresponded to what was expected from results on the B. napus progenitors. About 60% of the genes identified in these duplicated regions were single-copy genes while less than 5% were retained in all the duplicated copies of a given ancestral block. Genes retained in several copies were mainly involved in response to stress, signaling or transcription regulation. Genes with resistance-associated markers were mainly retained in more than two copies. These results suggested that some genes underlying quantitative resistance to stem canker might be duplicated genes. Genes with a hydrolase activity that were retained in one copy or R-like genes might also account for resistance in some regions. Further analyses need to be conducted to indicate to what extent duplicated genes contribute to the expression of the

  15. High-density linkage mapping and distribution of segregation distortion regions in the oak genome.

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    Bodénès, Catherine; Chancerel, Emilie; Ehrenmann, François; Kremer, Antoine; Plomion, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    We developed the densest single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based linkage genetic map to date for the genus Quercus An 8k gene-based SNP array was used to genotype more than 1,000 full-sibs from two intraspecific and two interspecific full-sib families of Quercus petraea and Quercus robur A high degree of collinearity was observed between the eight parental maps of the two species. A composite map was then established with 4,261 SNP markers spanning 742 cM over the 12 linkage groups (LGs) of the oak genome. Nine genomic regions from six LGs displayed highly significant distortions of segregation. Two main hypotheses concerning the mechanisms underlying segregation distortion are discussed: genetic load vs. reproductive barriers. Our findings suggest a predominance of pre-zygotic to post-zygotic barriers. PMID:27013549

  16. Complete genome sequence of Deltapapillomavirus 4 (bovine papillomavirus 2) from a bovine papillomavirus lesion in Amazon Region, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daudt, Cíntia; da Silva, Flavio RC; Cibulski, Samuel P; Weber, Matheus N; Mayer, Fabiana Q; Varela, Ana Paula M; Roehe, Paulo M; Canal, Cláudio W

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of bovine papillomavirus 2 (BPV2) from Brazilian Amazon Region was determined using multiple-primed rolling circle amplification followed by Illumina sequencing. The genome is 7,947 bp long, with 45.9% GC content. It encodes seven early (E1, E2,E4, E5, E6,E7, and E8) and two late (L1 and L2) genes. The complete genome of a BPV2 can help in future studies since this BPV type is highly reported worldwide although the lack of complete genome sequences available. PMID:27074259

  17. Complete genome sequence of Deltapapillomavirus 4 (bovine papillomavirus 2 from a bovine papillomavirus lesion in Amazon Region, Brazil

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    Cíntia Daudt

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The complete genome sequence of bovine papillomavirus 2 (BPV2 from Brazilian Amazon Region was determined using multiple-primed rolling circle amplification followed by Illumina sequencing. The genome is 7,947 bp long, with 45.9% GC content. It encodes seven early (E1, E2,E4, E5, E6,E7, and E8 and two late (L1 and L2 genes. The complete genome of a BPV2 can help in future studies since this BPV type is highly reported worldwide although the lack of complete genome sequences available.

  18. Genomic study of the critical region of chromosome 21 associated to Down syndrome

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    Julio César Montoya

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Previous reports have identified a region of chromosome 21 known as Down ayndrome critical region (DSCR in which the expression of some genes would modulate the main clinical characteristics of this pathology. In this sense, there is currently limited information on the architecture of the DSCR associated. Objective: To obtain in silico a detailed vision of the chromatin structure associated with the evaluation of genomic covariables contained in public data bases. Methods: Taking as reference the information consigned in the National Center for Biotechnology Information, the Genome Browser from the University of California at Santa Cruz and from the HapMap project, a chromosome walk along 21 Mb of the distal portion of chromosome 21q arm was performed. In this distal portion, the number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP, number of CpG islands, repetitive elements, recombination frequencies, and topographical state of that chromatin were recorded. Results: The frequency of CpG islands and Ref genes increased in the more distal 1.2 Mb DSCR that contrast with those localized near to the centromere. The highest level of recombination calculated for women was registered in the 21q22.12 to 22.3 bands. DSCR 6 and 9 genes showed a high percentage of methylation in CpG islands in DNA from normal and trisomic fibroblasts. The DSCR2 gene exhibited high levels of open chromatin and also methylation in some lysine residues of the histone H3 as relevant characteristics. Conclusion: The existence of a genomic environment characterized by high values of recombination frequencies and CpG methylation in DSCR 6 and 9 and also DSCR2 genes led us to postulate that in non-disjunction detected in Down syndrome, complex genomic, epigenetic and environmental relationships regulate some processes of meiosis.

  19. Origins of the Xylella fastidiosa prophage-like regions and their impact in genome differentiation.

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    Alessandro de Mello Varani

    Full Text Available Xylella fastidiosa is a Gram negative plant pathogen causing many economically important diseases, and analyses of completely sequenced X. fastidiosa genome strains allowed the identification of many prophage-like elements and possibly phage remnants, accounting for up to 15% of the genome composition. To better evaluate the recent evolution of the X. fastidiosa chromosome backbone among distinct pathovars, the number and location of prophage-like regions on two finished genomes (9a5c and Temecula1, and in two candidate molecules (Ann1 and Dixon were assessed. Based on comparative best bidirectional hit analyses, the majority (51% of the predicted genes in the X. fastidiosa prophage-like regions are related to structural phage genes belonging to the Siphoviridae family. Electron micrograph reveals the existence of putative viral particles with similar morphology to lambda phages in the bacterial cell in planta. Moreover, analysis of microarray data indicates that 9a5c strain cultivated under stress conditions presents enhanced expression of phage anti-repressor genes, suggesting switches from lysogenic to lytic cycle of phages under stress-induced situations. Furthermore, virulence-associated proteins and toxins are found within these prophage-like elements, thus suggesting an important role in host adaptation. Finally, clustering analyses of phage integrase genes based on multiple alignment patterns reveal they group in five lineages, all possessing a tyrosine recombinase catalytic domain, and phylogenetically close to other integrases found in phages that are genetic mosaics and able to perform generalized and specialized transduction. Integration sites and tRNA association is also evidenced. In summary, we present comparative and experimental evidence supporting the association and contribution of phage activity on the differentiation of Xylella genomes.

  20. Genomic study of the critical region of chromosome 21 associated to Down syndrome

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    Julio César Montoya

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Previous reports have identified a region of chromosome 21 known as Down ayndrome critical region (DSCR in which the expression of some genes would modulate the main clinical characteristics of this pathology. In this sense, there is currently limited information on the architecture of the DSCR associated.Objective: To obtain in silico a detailed vision of the chromatin structure associated with the evaluation of genomic covariables contained in public data bases.Methods: Taking as reference the information consigned in the National Center for Biotechnology Information, the Genome Browser from the University of California at Santa Cruz and from the HapMap project, a chromosome walk along 21 Mb of the distal portion of chromosome 21q arm was performed. In this distal portion, the number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP, number of CpG islands, repetitive elements, recombination frequencies, and topographical state of that chromatin were recorded.Results: The frequency of CpG islands and Ref genes increased in the more distal 1.2 Mb DSCR that contrast with those localized near to the centromere. The highest level of recombination calculated for women was registered in the 21q22.12 to 22.3 bands. DSCR 6 and 9 genes showed a high percentage of methylation in CpG islands in DNA from normal and trisomic fibroblasts. The DSCR2 gene exhibited high levels of open chromatin and also methylation in some lysine residues of the histone H3 as relevant characteristics.Conclusion: The existence of a genomic environment characterized by high values of recombination frequencies and CpG methylation in DSCR 6 and 9 and also DSCR2 genes led us to postulate that in non-disjunction detected in Down syndrome, complex genomic, epigenetic and environmental relationships regulate some processes of meiosis.

  1. Cooperative and specific binding of Vif to the 5' region of HIV-1 genomic RNA.

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    Henriet, Simon; Richer, Delphine; Bernacchi, Serena; Decroly, Etienne; Vigne, Robert; Ehresmann, Bernard; Ehresmann, Chantal; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Marquet, Roland

    2005-11-18

    The viral infectivity factor (Vif) protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is essential for viral replication in vivo. Packaging of Vif into viral particles is mediated by an interaction with viral genomic RNA and association with viral nucleoprotein complexes. Despite recent findings on the RNA-binding properties of Vif suggesting that Vif could be involved in retroviral assembly, no RNA sequence or structure specificity has been determined so far. To gain further insight into the mechanisms by which Vif might regulate viral replication, we studied the interactions of Vif with HIV-1 genomic RNA in vitro. Using extensive biochemical analysis, we have measured the affinity of recombinant Vif proteins for synthetic RNAs corresponding to various regions of the HIV-1 genome. We found that recombinant Vif proteins bind specifically to HIV-1 viral RNA fragments corresponding to the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR), gag and the 5' part of pol (K(d) between 45 nM and 65 nM). RNA encompassing nucleotides 1-497 or 499-996 of the HIV-1 genomic RNA bind 9+/-2 and 21+/-3 Vif molecules, respectively, and at least some of these proteins bind in a cooperative manner (Hill constant alpha(H) = 2.3). In contrast, RNAs corresponding to other parts of the HIV-1 genome or heterologous RNAs showed poor binding capacity and weak cooperativity (K(d) > 200 nM). Moreover, RNase T1 footprinting revealed a hierarchical binding of Vif, pointing to TAR and the poly(A) stem-loop structures as primary strong affinity targets, and downstream structures as secondary sites with moderate affinity. Taken together, our findings suggest that Vif may assist other proteins to maintain a correct folding of the genomic RNA in order to facilitate its packaging and further steps such as reverse transcription. Interestingly, our results suggest also that Vif could bind the viral RNA in order to protect it from the action of the antiviral factor APOBEC-3G/3F. PMID:16236319

  2. Rapid genome evolution in Pms1 region of rice revealed by comparative sequence analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU JinSheng; FAN YouRong; LIU Nan; SHAN Yan; LI XiangHua; ZHANG QiFa

    2007-01-01

    Pms1, a locus for photoperiod sensitive genic male sterility in rice, was identified and mapped to chromosome 7 in previous studies. Here we report an effort to identify the candidate genes for Pms1 by comparative sequencing of BAC clones from two cultivars Minghui 63 and Nongken 58, the parents for the initial mapping population. Annotation and comparison of the sequences of the two clones resulted in a total of five potential candidates which should be functionally tested. We also conducted comparative analysis of sequences of these two cultivars with two other cultivars, Nipponbare and 93-11,for which sequence data were available in public databases. The analysis revealed large differences in sequence composition among the four genotypes in the Pms1 region primarily due to retroelement activity leading to rapid recent growth and divergence of the genomes. High levels of polymorphism in the forms of indels and SNPs were found both in intra- and inter-subspecific comparisons. Dating analysis using LTRs of the retroelements in this region showed that the substitution rate of LTRs was much higher than reported in the literature. The results provided strong evidence for rapid genomic evolution of this region as a consequence of natural and artificial selection.

  3. Identification and mapping of DNA binding proteins target sequences in long genomic regions by two-dimensional EMSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, Igor P; Akopov, Sergey B; Nikolaev, Lev G; Sverdlov, Eugene D

    2006-07-01

    Specific binding of nuclear proteins, in particular transcription factors, to target DNA sequences is a major mechanism of genome functioning and gene expression regulation in eukaryotes. Therefore, identification and mapping specific protein target sites (PTS) is necessary for understanding genomic regulation. Here we used a novel two-dimensional electrophoretic mobility shift assay (2D-EMSA) procedure for identification and mapping of 52 PTS within a 563-kb human genome region located between the FXYD5 and TZFP genes. The PTS occurred with approximately equal frequency within unique and repetitive genomic regions. PTS belonging to unique sequences tended to group together within gene introns and close to their 5' and 3' ends, whereas PTS located within repeats were evenly distributed between transcribed and intragenic regions. PMID:16869519

  4. Selection for Unequal Densities of Sigma70 Promoter-like Signalsin Different Regions of Large Bacterial Genomes

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    Huerta, Araceli M.; Francino, M. Pilar; Morett, Enrique; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2006-03-01

    The evolutionary processes operating in the DNA regions that participate in the regulation of gene expression are poorly understood. In Escherichia coli, we have established a sequence pattern that distinguishes regulatory from nonregulatory regions. The density of promoter-like sequences, that are recognizable by RNA polymerase and may function as potential promoters, is high within regulatory regions, in contrast to coding regions and regions located between convergently-transcribed genes. Moreover, functional promoter sites identified experimentally are often found in the subregions of highest density of promoter-like signals, even when individual sites with higher binding affinity for RNA polymerase exist elsewhere within the regulatory region. In order to investigate the generality of this pattern, we have used position weight matrices describing the -35 and -10 promoter boxes of E. coli to search for these motifs in 43 additional genomes belonging to most established bacterial phyla, after specific calibration of the matrices according to the base composition of the noncoding regions of each genome. We have found that all bacterial species analyzed contain similar promoter-like motifs, and that, in most cases, these motifs follow the same genomic distribution observed in E. coli. Differential densities between regulatory and nonregulatory regions are detectable in most bacterial genomes, with the exception of those that have experienced evolutionary extreme genome reduction. Thus, the phylogenetic distribution of this pattern mirrors that of genes and other genomic features that require weak selection to be effective in order to persist. On this basis, we suggest that the loss of differential densities in the reduced genomes of host-restricted pathogens and symbionts is the outcome of a process of genome degradation resulting from the decreased efficiency of purifying selection in highly structured small populations. This implies that the differential

  5. A genomic region involved in the formation of adhesin fibers in Bacillus cereus biofilms

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    Joaquín eCaro-Astorga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus is a bacterial pathogen that is responsible for many recurrent disease outbreaks due to food contamination. Spores and biofilms are considered the most important reservoirs of B. cereus in contaminated fresh vegetables and fruits. Biofilms are bacterial communities that are difficult to eradicate from biotic and abiotic surfaces because of their stable and extremely strong extracellular matrix. These extracellular matrixes contain exopolysaccharides, proteins, extracellular DNA, and other minor components. Although B. cereus can form biofilms, the bacterial features governing assembly of the protective extracellular matrix are not known. Using the well-studied bacterium B. subtilis as a model, we identified two genomic loci in B. cereus, which encodes two orthologs of the amyloid-like protein TasA of B. subtilis and a SipW signal peptidase. Deletion of this genomic region in B. cereus inhibited biofilm assembly; notably, mutation of the putative signal peptidase SipW caused the same phenotype. However, mutations in tasA or calY did not completely prevent biofilm formation; strains that were mutated for either of these genes formed phenotypically different surface attached biofilms. Electron microscopy studies revealed that TasA polymerizes to form long and abundant fibers on cell surfaces, whereas CalY does not aggregate similarly. Heterologous expression of this amyloid-like cassette in a B. subtilis strain lacking the factors required for the assembly of TasA amyloid-like fibers revealed i the involvement of this B. cereus genomic region in formation of the air-liquid interphase pellicles and ii the intrinsic ability of TasA to form fibers similar to the amyloid-like fibers produced by its B. subtilis ortholog.

  6. Sequence Analysis of SSR-Flanking Regions Identifies Genome Affinities between Pasture Grass Fungal Endophyte Taxa

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    Eline van Zijll de Jong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal species of the Neotyphodium and Epichloë genera are endophytes of pasture grasses showing complex differences of life-cycle and genetic architecture. Simple sequence repeat (SSR markers have been developed from endophyte-derived expressed sequence tag (EST collections. Although SSR array size polymorphisms are appropriate for phenetic analysis to distinguish between taxa, the capacity to resolve phylogenetic relationships is limited by both homoplasy and heteroploidy effects. In contrast, nonrepetitive sequence regions that flank SSRs have been effectively implemented in this study to demonstrate a common evolutionary origin of grass fungal endophytes. Consistent patterns of relationships between specific taxa were apparent across multiple target loci, confirming previous studies of genome evolution based on variation of individual genes. Evidence was obtained for the definition of endophyte taxa not only through genomic affinities but also by relative gene content. Results were compatible with the current view that some asexual Neotyphodium species arose following interspecific hybridisation between sexual Epichloë ancestors. Phylogenetic analysis of SSR-flanking regions, in combination with the results of previous studies with other EST-derived SSR markers, further permitted characterisation of Neotyphodium isolates that could not be assigned to known taxa on the basis of morphological characteristics.

  7. Inference of haplotypic phase and missing genotypes in polyploid organisms and variable copy number genomic regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balding David J

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The power of haplotype-based methods for association studies, identification of regions under selection, and ancestral inference, is well-established for diploid organisms. For polyploids, however, the difficulty of determining phase has limited such approaches. Polyploidy is common in plants and is also observed in animals. Partial polyploidy is sometimes observed in humans (e.g. trisomy 21; Down's syndrome, and it arises more frequently in some human tissues. Local changes in ploidy, known as copy number variations (CNV, arise throughout the genome. Here we present a method, implemented in the software polyHap, for the inference of haplotype phase and missing observations from polyploid genotypes. PolyHap allows each individual to have a different ploidy, but ploidy cannot vary over the genomic region analysed. It employs a hidden Markov model (HMM and a sampling algorithm to infer haplotypes jointly in multiple individuals and to obtain a measure of uncertainty in its inferences. Results In the simulation study, we combine real haplotype data to create artificial diploid, triploid, and tetraploid genotypes, and use these to demonstrate that polyHap performs well, in terms of both switch error rate in recovering phase and imputation error rate for missing genotypes. To our knowledge, there is no comparable software for phasing a large, densely genotyped region of chromosome from triploids and tetraploids, while for diploids we found polyHap to be more accurate than fastPhase. We also compare the results of polyHap to SATlotyper on an experimentally haplotyped tetraploid dataset of 12 SNPs, and show that polyHap is more accurate. Conclusion With the availability of large SNP data in polyploids and CNV regions, we believe that polyHap, our proposed method for inferring haplotypic phase from genotype data, will be useful in enabling researchers analysing such data to exploit the power of haplotype-based analyses.

  8. Detailed comparative map of human chromosome 19q and related regions of the mouse genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stubbs, L.; Shannon, M.E.; Kim, Joomyeong [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    One of the larger contiguous blocks of mouse-human genomic homology includes the proximal portion of mouse chromosome 7 and the long arm of human chromosome 19. Previous studies have demonstrated the close relationship between the two regions, but have also indicated significant rearrangements in the relative orders of homologous mouse and human genes. Here we present the genetic locations of the homologs of 42 human chromosome 19q markers in the mouse, with an emphasis on genes also included in the human chromosome 19 physical map. Our results demonstrate that despite an overall inversion of sequences relative to the centromere, apparent {open_quotes}transpositions{close_quotes} of three gene-rich segments, and a local inversion of markers mapping near the 19q telomere, gene content, order, and spacing are remarkably well conserved throughout the lengths of these related mouse and humans regions. Although most human 19q markers have remained genetically linked in mouse, one small human segment forms a separate region of homology between human chromosome 19q and mouse chromosome 17. Three of the four rearrangements of mouse versus human 19q sequences involve segments that are located directly adjacent to each other in 19q13.3-q13.4, suggesting either the coincident occurrence of these events or their common association with unstable DNA sequences. These data permit an unusually in-depth examination of this large region of mouse-human genomic homology and provide an important new tool to aid in the mapping of genes and associated phenotypes in both species. 66 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. PacBio SMRT assembly of a complex multi-replicon genome reveals chlorocatechol degradative operon in a region of genome plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricker, N; Shen, S Y; Goordial, J; Jin, S; Fulthorpe, R R

    2016-07-25

    We have sequenced a Burkholderia genome that contains multiple replicons and large repetitive elements that would make it inherently difficult to assemble by short read sequencing technologies. We illustrate how the integrated long read correction algorithms implemented through the PacBio Single Molecule Real-Time (SMRT) sequencing technology successfully provided a de novo assembly that is a reasonable estimate of both the gene content and genome organization without making any further modifications. This assembly is comparable to related organisms assembled by more labour intensive methods. Our assembled genome revealed regions of genome plasticity for further investigation, one of which harbours a chlorocatechol degradative operon highly homologous to those previously identified on globally ubiquitous plasmids. In an ideal world, this assembly would still require experimental validation to confirm gene order and copy number of repeated elements. However, we submit that particularly in instances where a polished genome is not the primary goal of the sequencing project, PacBio SMRT sequencing provides a financially viable option for generating a biologically relevant genome estimate that can be utilized by other researchers for comparative studies. PMID:27063562

  10. Integration of association statistics over genomic regions using Bayesian adaptive regression splines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xiaohua

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the search for genetic determinants of complex disease, two approaches to association analysis are most often employed, testing single loci or testing a small group of loci jointly via haplotypes for their relationship to disease status. It is still debatable which of these approaches is more favourable, and under what conditions. The former has the advantage of simplicity but suffers severely when alleles at the tested loci are not in linkage disequilibrium (LD with liability alleles; the latter should capture more of the signal encoded in LD, but is far from simple. The complexity of haplotype analysis could be especially troublesome for association scans over large genomic regions, which, in fact, is becoming the standard design. For these reasons, the authors have been evaluating statistical methods that bridge the gap between single-locus and haplotype-based tests. In this article, they present one such method, which uses non-parametric regression techniques embodied by Bayesian adaptive regression splines (BARS. For a set of markers falling within a common genomic region and a corresponding set of single-locus association statistics, the BARS procedure integrates these results into a single test by examining the class of smooth curves consistent with the data. The non-parametric BARS procedure generally finds no signal when no liability allele exists in the tested region (ie it achieves the specified size of the test and it is sensitive enough to pick up signals when a liability allele is present. The BARS procedure provides a robust and potentially powerful alternative to classical tests of association, diminishes the multiple testing problem inherent in those tests and can be applied to a wide range of data types, including genotype frequencies estimated from pooled samples.

  11. Quality control parameters on a large dataset of regionally dissected human control brains for whole genome expression studies

    OpenAIRE

    Trabzuni, Daniah; Ryten, Mina; Walker, Robert; Smith, Colin; Imran, Sabaena; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Weale, Michael E; Hardy, John

    2011-01-01

    We are building an open-access database of regional human brain expression designed to allow the genome-wide assessment of genetic variability on expression. Array and RNA sequencing technologies make assessment of genome-wide expression possible. Human brain tissue is a challenging source for this work because it can only be obtained several and variable hours post-mortem and after varying agonal states. These variables alter RNA integrity in a complex manner. In this report, we assess the e...

  12. Poliovirus type 3: molecular cloning of the genome and nucleotide sequence of the region encoding the protease and polymerase proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    Overlapping cDNA clones representing the entire genome of poliovirus type 3 have been prepared in E. coli by two separate methods. Cloning of RNA . cDNA hybrids produced a more comprehensive set of clones with generally larger cDNA inserts than cloning of double - stranded cDNA. A restriction map of the entire genome and the nucleotide sequence of 2003 bases from the 3' terminus, comprising the region encoding the protease and polymerase proteins, are presented.

  13. HYBRIDCHECK: software for the rapid detection, visualization and dating of recombinant regions in genome sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Ben J; van Oosterhout, Cock

    2016-03-01

    HYBRIDCHECK is a software package to visualize the recombination signal in large DNA sequence data set, and it can be used to analyse recombination, genetic introgression, hybridization and horizontal gene transfer. It can scan large (multiple kb) contigs and whole-genome sequences of three or more individuals. HYBRIDCHECK is written in the r software for OS X, Linux and Windows operating systems, and it has a simple graphical user interface. In addition, the r code can be readily incorporated in scripts and analysis pipelines. HYBRIDCHECK implements several ABBA-BABA tests and visualizes the effects of hybridization and the resulting mosaic-like genome structure in high-density graphics. The package also reports the following: (i) the breakpoint positions, (ii) the number of mutations in each introgressed block, (iii) the probability that the identified region is not caused by recombination and (iv) the estimated age of each recombination event. The divergence times between the donor and recombinant sequence are calculated using a JC, K80, F81, HKY or GTR correction, and the dating algorithm is exceedingly fast. By estimating the coalescence time of introgressed blocks, it is possible to distinguish between hybridization and incomplete lineage sorting. HYBRIDCHECK is libré software and it and its manual are free to download from http://ward9250.github.io/HybridCheck/. PMID:26394708

  14. Mapping of the genomic regions controlling seed storability in soybean (Glycine max L.)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hamidreza Dargahi; Patcharin Tanya; Peerasak Srinives

    2014-08-01

    Seed storability is especially important in the tropics due to high temperature and relative humidity of storage environment that cause rapid deterioration of seeds in storage. The objective of this study was to use SSR markers to identify genomic regions associated with quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling seed storability based on relative germination rate in the F2:3 population derived from a cross between vegetable soybean line (MJ0004-6) with poor longevity and landrace cultivar from Myanmar (R18500) with good longevity. The F2:4 seeds harvested in 2011 and 2012 were used to investigate seed storability. The F2 population was genotyped with 148 markers and the genetic map consisted of 128 SSR loci which converged into 38 linkage groups covering 1664.3 cM of soybean genome. Single marker analysis revealed that 13 markers from six linkage groups (C1, D2, E, F, J and L) were associated with seed storability. Composite interval mapping identified a total of three QTLs on linkage groups C1, F and L with phenotypic variance explained ranging from 8.79 to 13.43%. The R18500 alleles increased seed storability at all of the detected QTLs. No common QTLs were found for storability of seeds harvested in 2011 and 2012. This study agreed with previous reports in other crops that genotype by environment interaction plays an important role in expression of seed storability.

  15. QTL mapping of genome regions controlling temephos resistance in larvae of the mosquito Aedes aegypti.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guadalupe Del Carmen Reyes-Solis

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The mosquito Aedes aegypti is the principal vector of dengue and yellow fever flaviviruses. Temephos is an organophosphate insecticide used globally to suppress Ae. aegypti larval populations but resistance has evolved in many locations.Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL controlling temephos survival in Ae. aegypti larvae were mapped in a pair of F3 advanced intercross lines arising from temephos resistant parents from Solidaridad, México and temephos susceptible parents from Iquitos, Peru. Two sets of 200 F3 larvae were exposed to a discriminating dose of temephos and then dead larvae were collected and preserved for DNA isolation every two hours up to 16 hours. Larvae surviving longer than 16 hours were considered resistant. For QTL mapping, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were identified at 23 single copy genes and 26 microsatellite loci of known physical positions in the Ae. aegypti genome. In both reciprocal crosses, Multiple Interval Mapping identified eleven QTL associated with time until death. In the Solidaridad×Iquitos (SLD×Iq cross twelve were associated with survival but in the reciprocal IqxSLD cross, only six QTL were survival associated. Polymorphisms at acetylcholine esterase (AchE loci 1 and 2 were not associated with either resistance phenotype suggesting that target site insensitivity is not an organophosphate resistance mechanism in this region of México.Temephos resistance is under the control of many metabolic genes of small effect and dispersed throughout the Ae. aegypti genome.

  16. Genomic regions associated with ventro-cranial chronic pleuritis in pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kirsten Kørup; Gregersen, Vivi Raundahl; Christensen, Ole Fredslund;

    2011-01-01

    Ventro-cranial chronic pleuritis can be a result of pleuropneumonia and enzootic pneumonia. These diseases cause severe losses in intensive pig production worldwide, but host resistance is difficult to breed for. It could be beneficial to use marker-assisted selection, and a step towards...... of candidate genes, but the causative mutations still need to be identified. Markers closely associated with the resistance traits have a strong potential for use in breeding towards animals with improved characteristics concerning ventro-cranial chronic pleuritis...... this is to identify genomic regions associated with the trait. For this purpose, 7304 pigs from 11 boar families were analysed for associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms and ventro-cranial chronic pleuritis. The pigs were genotyped by the use of the iSelect Custom 7 K porcine SNP Chip. Quantitative...

  17. Novel Altered Region for Biomarker Discovery in Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC Using Whole Genome SNP Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esraa M. Hashem

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available cancer represents one of the greatest medical causes of mortality. The majority of Hepatocellular carcinoma arises from the accumulation of genetic abnormalities, and possibly induced by exterior etiological factors especially HCV and HBV infections. There is a need for new tools to analysis the large sum of data to present relevant genetic changes that may be critical for both understanding how cancers develop and determining how they could ultimately be treated. Gene expression profiling may lead to new biomarkers that may help develop diagnostic accuracy for detecting Hepatocellular carcinoma. In this work, statistical technique (discrete stationary wavelet transform for detection of copy number alternations to analysis high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism array of 30 cell lines on specific chromosomes, which are frequently detected in Hepatocellular carcinoma have been proposed. The results demonstrate the feasibility of whole-genome fine mapping of copy number alternations via high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping, Results revealed that a novel altered chromosomal region is discovered; region amplification (4q22.1 have been detected in 22 out of 30-Hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines (73%. This region strike, AFF1 and DSPP, tumor suppressor genes. This finding has not previously reported to be involved in liver carcinogenesis; it can be used to discover a new HCC biomarker, which helps in a better understanding of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  18. Characterization of the Helicoverpa assulta nucleopolyhedrovirus genome and sequence analysis of the polyhedrin gene region

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Soo-Dong Woo; Jae Young Choi; Yeon Ho Je; Byung Rae Jin

    2006-09-01

    A local strain of Helicoverpa assulta nucleopolyhedrovirus (HasNPV) was isolated from infected H. assulta larvae in Korea. Restriction endonuclease fragment analysis, using 4 restriction enzymes, estimated that the total genome size of HasNPV is about 138 kb. A degenerate polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer set for the polyhedrin gene successfully amplified the partial polyhedrin gene of HasNPV. The sequencing results showed that the about 430 bp PCR product was a fragment of the corresponding polyhedrin gene. Using HasNPV partial predicted polyhedrin to probe the Southern blots, we identified the location of the polyhedrin gene within the 6 kb EcoRI, 15 kb NcoI, 20 kb XhoI, 17 kb BglII and 3 kb ClaI fragments, respectively. The 3 kb ClaI fragment was cloned and the nucleotide sequences of the polyhedrin coding region and its flaking regions were determined. Nucleotide sequence analysis indicated the presence of an open reading frame of 735 nucleotides which could encode 245 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 29 kDa. The nucleotide sequences within the coding region of HasNPV polyhedrin shared 73.7% identity with the polyhedrin gene from Autographa californica NPV but were most closely related to Helicoverpa and Heliothis species NPVs with over 99% sequence identity.

  19. Qualitative, quantitative and structural analysis of non- coding regions of classical swine fever virus genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the pathogen of the swine fever. Understanding of the replication and expression of its genome is the basis for research of the pathogenicity for CSFV and development of antiviral drug. The noncoding regions (NCRs) of CSFV are the main regulatory regions for replication and expression. Qualitative, quantitative and structural analysis of 3′ NCRs and 5′ NCRs was done in order to locate the regulatory region in the NCRs and to character the NCRs. The sites, conserved sequences and structural elements related to the initiation of replication and expression were extracted from 17 3′ NCRs and 56 5′ NCRs. Those cis-elements may be initial recognition sites for replication, binding sites for transcription factors of host cell and interacting sites for initiation of protein synthesis, based on which a mechanism for the replication and expression of CSFV was brought forth. This research offers the direction for further experiment and lays down a basis for the research on hepatitis C virus (HCV), other pestiviruses and plus-strand RNA viruses.

  20. siRNA Targeting the 2Apro Genomic Region Prevents Enterovirus 71 Replication In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Zhenzhen; Shao, Qixiang; Su, Zhaoliang; Wang, Shengjun; Chen, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the most important etiological agent of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) in young children, which is associated with severe neurological complications and has caused significant mortalities in recent HFMD outbreaks in Asia. However, there is no effective antiviral therapy against EV71. In this study, RNA interference (RNAi) was used as an antiviral strategy to inhibit EV71 replication. Three small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting the 2Apro region of the EV71 genome were designed and synthesized. All the siRNAs were transfected individually into rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells, which were then infected with strain EV71-2006-52-9. The cytopathic effects (CPEs) in the infected RD cells, cell viability, viral titer, and viral RNA and protein expression were examined to evaluate the specific viral inhibition by the siRNAs. The results of cytopathogenicity and MTT tests indicated that the RD cells transfected with the three siRNAs showed slight CPEs and significantly high viability. The 50% tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) values demonstrated that the viral titer of the groups treated with three siRNAs were lower than those of the control groups. qRT–PCR and western blotting revealed that the levels of viral RNA and protein in the RD cells treated with the three siRNAs were lower than those in the controls. When RD cells transfected with siRNAs were also infected with strain EV71-2008-43-16, the expression of the VP1 protein was significantly inhibited. The levels of interferon α (IFN-α) and IFN-β did not differ significantly in any group. These results suggest that siRNAs targeting the 2Apro region of the EV71 genome exerted antiviral effects in vitro. PMID:26886455

  1. Differential DNA methylation regions in cytokine and transcription factor genomic loci associate with childhood physical aggression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Provençal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Animal and human studies suggest that inflammation is associated with behavioral disorders including aggression. We have recently shown that physical aggression of boys during childhood is strongly associated with reduced plasma levels of cytokines IL-1α, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10, later in early adulthood. This study tests the hypothesis that there is an association between differential DNA methylation regions in cytokine genes in T cells and monocytes DNA in adult subjects and a trajectory of physical aggression from childhood to adolescence. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We compared the methylation profiles of the entire genomic loci encompassing the IL-1α, IL-6, IL-4, IL-10 and IL-8 and three of their regulatory transcription factors (TF NFkB1, NFAT5 and STAT6 genes in adult males on a chronic physical aggression trajectory (CPA and males with the same background who followed a normal physical aggression trajectory (control group from childhood to adolescence. We used the method of methylated DNA immunoprecipitation with comprehensive cytokine gene loci and TF loci microarray hybridization, statistical analysis and false discovery rate correction. We found differentially methylated regions to associate with CPA in both the cytokine loci as well as in their transcription factors loci analyzed. Some of these differentially methylated regions were located in known regulatory regions whereas others, to our knowledge, were previously unknown as regulatory areas. However, using the ENCODE database, we were able to identify key regulatory elements in many of these regions that indicate that they might be involved in the regulation of cytokine expression. CONCLUSIONS: We provide here the first evidence for an association between differential DNA methylation in cytokines and their regulators in T cells and monocytes and male physical aggression.

  2. Identifying relationships among genomic disease regions: predicting genes at pathogenic SNP associations and rare deletions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Raychaudhuri

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Translating a set of disease regions into insight about pathogenic mechanisms requires not only the ability to identify the key disease genes within them, but also the biological relationships among those key genes. Here we describe a statistical method, Gene Relationships Among Implicated Loci (GRAIL, that takes a list of disease regions and automatically assesses the degree of relatedness of implicated genes using 250,000 PubMed abstracts. We first evaluated GRAIL by assessing its ability to identify subsets of highly related genes in common pathways from validated lipid and height SNP associations from recent genome-wide studies. We then tested GRAIL, by assessing its ability to separate true disease regions from many false positive disease regions in two separate practical applications in human genetics. First, we took 74 nominally associated Crohn's disease SNPs and applied GRAIL to identify a subset of 13 SNPs with highly related genes. Of these, ten convincingly validated in follow-up genotyping; genotyping results for the remaining three were inconclusive. Next, we applied GRAIL to 165 rare deletion events seen in schizophrenia cases (less than one-third of which are contributing to disease risk. We demonstrate that GRAIL is able to identify a subset of 16 deletions containing highly related genes; many of these genes are expressed in the central nervous system and play a role in neuronal synapses. GRAIL offers a statistically robust approach to identifying functionally related genes from across multiple disease regions--that likely represent key disease pathways. An online version of this method is available for public use (http://www.broad.mit.edu/mpg/grail/.

  3. Genome-wide association study identified a narrow chromosome 1 region associated with chicken growth traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Xie

    Full Text Available Chicken growth traits are important economic traits in broilers. A large number of studies are available on finding genetic factors affecting chicken growth. However, most of these studies identified chromosome regions containing putative quantitative trait loci and finding causal mutations is still a challenge. In this genome-wide association study (GWAS, we identified a narrow 1.5 Mb region (173.5-175 Mb of chicken (Gallus gallus chromosome (GGA 1 to be strongly associated with chicken growth using 47,678 SNPs and 489 F2 chickens. The growth traits included aggregate body weight (BW at 0-90 d of age measured weekly, biweekly average daily gains (ADG derived from weekly body weight, and breast muscle weight (BMW, leg muscle weight (LMW and wing weight (WW at 90 d of age. Five SNPs in the 1.5 Mb KPNA3-FOXO1A region at GGA1 had the highest significant effects for all growth traits in this study, including a SNP at 8.9 Kb upstream of FOXO1A for BW at 22-48 d and 70 d, a SNP at 1.9 Kb downstream of FOXO1A for WW, a SNP at 20.9 Kb downstream of ENSGALG00000022732 for ADG at 29-42 d, a SNP in INTS6 for BW at 90 d, and a SNP in KPNA3 for BMW and LMW. The 1.5 Mb KPNA3-FOXO1A region contained two microRNA genes that could bind to messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA of IGF1, FOXO1A and KPNA3. It was further indicated that the 1.5 Mb GGA1 region had the strongest effects on chicken growth during 22-42 d.

  4. Regulation of mitochondrial genome replication by hypoxia: The role of DNA oxidation in D-loop region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastukh, Viktor M; Gorodnya, Olena M; Gillespie, Mark N; Ruchko, Mykhaylo V

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondria of mammalian cells contain multiple copies of mitochondrial (mt) DNA. Although mtDNA copy number can fluctuate dramatically depending on physiological and pathophysiologic conditions, the mechanisms regulating mitochondrial genome replication remain obscure. Hypoxia, like many other physiologic stimuli that promote growth, cell proliferation and mitochondrial biogenesis, uses reactive oxygen species as signaling molecules. Emerging evidence suggests that hypoxia-induced transcription of nuclear genes requires controlled DNA damage and repair in specific sequences in the promoter regions. Whether similar mechanisms are operative in mitochondria is unknown. Here we test the hypothesis that controlled oxidative DNA damage and repair in the D-loop region of the mitochondrial genome are required for mitochondrial DNA replication and transcription in hypoxia. We found that hypoxia had little impact on expression of mitochondrial proteins in pulmonary artery endothelial cells, but elevated mtDNA content. The increase in mtDNA copy number was accompanied by oxidative modifications in the D-loop region of the mitochondrial genome. To investigate the role of this sequence-specific oxidation of mitochondrial genome in mtDNA replication, we overexpressed mitochondria-targeted 8-oxoguanine glycosylase Ogg1 in rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells, enhancing the mtDNA repair capacity of transfected cells. Overexpression of Ogg1 resulted in suppression of hypoxia-induced mtDNA oxidation in the D-loop region and attenuation of hypoxia-induced mtDNA replication. Ogg1 overexpression also reduced binding of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) to both regulatory and coding regions of the mitochondrial genome without altering total abundance of TFAM in either control or hypoxic cells. These observations suggest that oxidative DNA modifications in the D-loop region during hypoxia are important for increased TFAM binding and ensuing replication of the mitochondrial

  5. Ecological effects of cell-level processes: genome size, functional traits and regional abundance of herbaceous plant species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herben, Tomáš; Suda, Jan; Klimešová, Jitka; Mihulka, Stanislav; Říha, Pavel; Šímová, Irena

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Genome size is known to be correlated with a number of phenotypic traits associated with cell sizes and cell-division rates. Genome size was therefore used as a proxy for them in order to assess how common plant traits such as height, specific leaf area and seed size/number predict species regional abundance. In this study it is hypothesized that if there is residual correlation between genome size and abundance after these traits are partialled out, there must be additional ecological effects of cell size and/or cell-division rate. Methods Variation in genome size, plant traits and regional abundance were examined in 436 herbaceous species of central European flora, and relationships were sought for among these variables by correlation and path analysis. Key Results Species regional abundance was weakly but significantly correlated with genome size; the relationship was stronger for annuals (R2 = 0·145) than for perennials (R2 = 0·027). In annuals, genome size was linked to abundance via its effect on seed size, which constrains seed number and hence population growth rate. In perennials, it weakly affected (via height and specific leaf area) competitive ability. These relationships did not change qualitatively after phylogenetic correction. In both annuals and perennials there was an unresolved effect of genome size on abundance. Conclusions The findings indicate that additional predictors of regional abundance should be sought among variables that are linked to cell size and cell-division rate. Signals of these cell-level processes remain identifiable even at the landscape scale, and show deep differences between perennials and annuals. Plant population biology could thus possibly benefit from more systematic use of indicators of cell-level processes. PMID:22628380

  6. An exploration of the sequence of a 2.9-Mb region of the genome of Drosophila melanogaster: The Adh region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashburner, M.; Misra, S.; Roote, J.; Lewis, S.E.; Blazej, R.; Davis, T.; Doyle, C.; Galle, R.; George, R.; Harris, N.; Hartzell, G.; Harvey, D.; Hong, L.; Houston, K.; Hoskins, R.; Johnson, G.; Martin, C.; Moshrefi, A.; Palazzolo, M.; Reese, M.G.; Spradling, A.; Tsang, G.; Wan, K.; Whitelaw, K.; Kimmel, B.; Celniker, S.; Rubin, G.M.

    1999-03-24

    A contiguous sequence of nearly 3 Mb from the genome of Drosophila melanogaster has been sequenced from a series of overlapping P1 and BAC clones. This region covers 69 chromosome polytene bands on chromosome arm 2L, including the genetically well-characterized

  7. oriT-Directed Cloning of Defined Large Regions from Bacterial Genomes: Identification of the Sinorhizobium meliloti pExo Megaplasmid Replicator Region

    OpenAIRE

    Patrick S G Chain; Hernandez-Lucas, Ismael; Golding, Brian; Finan, Turlough M.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a procedure to directly clone large fragments from the genome of the soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti. Specific regions to be cloned are first flanked by parallel copies of an origin of transfer (oriT) together with a plasmid replication origin capable of replicating large clones in Escherichia coli but not in the target organism. Supplying transfer genes in trans specifically transfers the oriT-flanked region, and in this process, site-specific recombination at the ori...

  8. Mapping Association between Long-Range Cis-Regulatory Regions and Their Target Genes Using Comparative Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongin, Emmanuel; Dewar, Ken; Blanchette, Mathieu

    In chordates, long-range cis-regulatory regions are involved in the control of transcription initiation (either as repressors or enhancers). They can be located as far as 1 Mb from the transcription start site of the target gene and can regulate more than one gene. Therefore, proper characterization of functional interactions between long-range cis-regulatory regions and their target genes remains problematic. We present a novel method to predict such interactions based on the analysis of rearrangements between the human and 16 other vertebrate genomes. Our method is based on the assumption that genome rearrangements that would disrupt the functional interaction between a cis-regulatory region and its target gene are likely to be deleterious. Therefore, conservation of synteny through evolution would be an indication of a functional interaction. We use our algorithm to classify a set of 1,406,084 putative associations from the human genome. This genome-wide map of interactions has many potential applications, including the selection of candidate regions prior to in vivo experimental characterization, a better characterization of regulatory regions involved in position effect diseases, and an improved understanding of the mechanisms and importance of long-range regulation.

  9. Selection Under Domestication: Evidence for a Sweep in the Rice Waxy Genomic Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Kenneth M.; Caicedo, Ana L.; Polato, Nicholas; McClung, Anna; McCouch, Susan; Purugganan, Michael D.

    2006-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) was cultivated by Asian Neolithic farmers >11,000 years ago, and different cultures have selected for divergent starch qualities in the rice grain during and after the domestication process. An intron 1 splice donor site mutation of the Waxy gene is responsible for the absence of amylose in glutinous rice varieties. This mutation appears to have also played an important role in the origin of low amylose, nonglutinous temperate japonica rice varieties, which form a primary component of Northeast Asian cuisines. Waxy DNA sequence analyses indicate that the splice donor mutation is prevalent in temperate japonica rice varieties, but rare or absent in tropical japonica, indica, aus, and aromatic varieties. Sequence analysis across a 500-kb genomic region centered on Waxy reveals patterns consistent with a selective sweep in the temperate japonicas associated with the mutation. The size of the selective sweep (>250 kb) indicates very strong selection in this region, with an inferred selection coefficient that is higher than similar estimates from maize domestication genes or wild species. These findings demonstrate that selection pressures associated with crop domestication regimes can exceed by one to two orders of magnitude those observed for genes under even strong selection in natural systems. PMID:16547098

  10. Gametic phase estimation over large genomic regions using an adaptive window approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Excoffier Laurent

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The authors present ELB, an easy to programme and computationally fast algorithm for inferring gametic phase in population samples of multilocus genotypes. Phase updates are made on the basis of a window of neighbouring loci, and the window size varies according to the local level of linkage disequilibrium. Thus, ELB is particularly well suited to problems involving many loci and/or relatively large genomic regions, including those with variable recombination rate. The authors have simulated population samples of single nucleotide polymorphism genotypes with varying levels of recombination and marker density, and find that ELB provides better local estimation of gametic phase than the PHASE or HTYPER programs, while its global accuracy is broadly similar. The relative improvement in local accuracy increases both with increasing recombination and with increasing marker density. Short tandem repeat (STR, or microsatellite simulation studies demonstrate ELB's superiority over PHASE both globally and locally. Missing data are handled by ELB; simulations show that phase recovery is virtually unaffected by up to 2 per cent of missing data, but that phase estimation is noticeably impaired beyond this amount. The authors also applied ELB to datasets obtained from random pairings of 42 human X chromosomes typed at 97 diallelic markers in a 200 kb low-recombination region. Once again, they found ELB to have consistently better local accuracy than PHASE or HTYPER, while its global accuracy was close to the best.

  11. Genome-scale prediction of proteins with long intrinsically disordered regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhenling; Mizianty, Marcin J; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2014-01-01

    Proteins with long disordered regions (LDRs), defined as having 30 or more consecutive disordered residues, are abundant in eukaryotes, and these regions are recognized as a distinct class of biologically functional domains. LDRs facilitate various cellular functions and are important for target selection in structural genomics. Motivated by the lack of methods that directly predict proteins with LDRs, we designed Super-fast predictor of proteins with Long Intrinsically DisordERed regions (SLIDER). SLIDER utilizes logistic regression that takes an empirically chosen set of numerical features, which consider selected physicochemical properties of amino acids, sequence complexity, and amino acid composition, as its inputs. Empirical tests show that SLIDER offers competitive predictive performance combined with low computational cost. It outperforms, by at least a modest margin, a comprehensive set of modern disorder predictors (that can indirectly predict LDRs) and is 16 times faster compared to the best currently available disorder predictor. Utilizing our time-efficient predictor, we characterized abundance and functional roles of proteins with LDRs over 110 eukaryotic proteomes. Similar to related studies, we found that eukaryotes have many (on average 30.3%) proteins with LDRs with majority of proteomes having between 25 and 40%, where higher abundance is characteristic to proteomes that have larger proteins. Our first-of-its-kind large-scale functional analysis shows that these proteins are enriched in a number of cellular functions and processes including certain binding events, regulation of catalytic activities, cellular component organization, biogenesis, biological regulation, and some metabolic and developmental processes. A webserver that implements SLIDER is available at http://biomine.ece.ualberta.ca/SLIDER/.

  12. Phylogenetic placement of Cynomorium in Rosales inferred from sequences of the inverted repeat region of the chloroplast genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Hong ZHANG; Chun-Qi LI; Jian-hua LI

    2009-01-01

    Cynomorium is a herbaceous holoparasite that has been placed in Santalales, Saxifragales, Myrtales, or Sapindales. The inverted repeat (IR) region of the chloroplast genome region is slow evolving and, unlike mitochondrial genes, the chloroplast genome experiences few horizontal gene transfers between the host and parasite. Thus, in the present study, we used sequences of the IR region to test the phylogenetic placements of Cynomorium. Phylogenetic analyses of the chloroplast IR sequences generated largely congruent ordinal relationships with those from previous studies of angiosperm phylogeny based on single or multiple genes. Santalales was closely related to Caryophyllales and asterids. Saxifragales formed a clade where Peridiscus was sister to the remainder of the order, whereas Paeonia was sister to the woody clade of Saxifragales. Cynomorium is not closely related to Santalales, Saxifragales, Myrtales, or Sapindales; instead, it is included in Rosales and sister to Rosaceae. The various placements of the holoparasite on the basis of different regions of the mitochondrial genome may indicate the heterogeneous nature of the genome in the parasite. However, it is unlikely that the placement of Cynomorium in Rosales is the result of chloroplast gene transfer because Cynomorium does not parasitize on rosaceous plants and there is no chloroplast gene transfer between Cynomorium and Nitraria, a confirmed host of Cynomorium and a member of Sapindales.

  13. Genome Sequence of Bacillus anthracis Isolated from an Anthrax Burial Site in Pollino National Park, Basilicata Region (Southern Italy)

    OpenAIRE

    Fasanella, Antonio; Braun, Peter; Grass, Gregor; Hanczaruk, Matthias; Aceti, Angela; Serrecchia, Luigina; Leonzio, Giuseppe; Tolve, Francesco; Georgi, Enrico; Antwerpen, Markus

    2015-01-01

    A Bacillus anthracis strain was isolated from a burial-site in Pollino National Park where a bovine died of anthrax and was buried in 2004. We report the first genome sequence of B. anthracis isolated in the Basilicata region (southern Italy), which is the highest risk area of anthrax infection in Italy.

  14. Representational difference analysis, high-resolution physical mapping, and transcript identification of the zebrafish genomic region for a motor behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tomomi; Mishina, Masayoshi

    2003-08-01

    Zebrafish is one of the best model organisms for investigating gene functions in vertebrates. By 4,5',8-trimethylpsoralen mutagenesis, we isolated a zebrafish mutant, vibrato, with defects in the spontaneous contraction and touch response. Whole genome subtraction between the wild-type and the mutant genomes by representational difference analysis yielded polymorphic markers tightly linked to the vibrato locus. Using these markers, we constructed a high-resolution physical map and localized the vibrato locus within a genomic region of 720 kb. Direct cDNA selection with the contig led to the identification of a novel gene, solo, encoding a protein with SEC14 and spectrin repeat domains. These domains of Solo shared significant amino acid sequence identities with those of mammalian Trio and Karilin. In addition, we found the zebrafish orthologs for mammalian TTN, COL5A2, and CED-6 in the vibrato region. Mapping of these genes localized human chromosomal regions possibly involved in motor disorders. Our results suggest that representational difference analysis provides an efficient way to isolate mutated genomic regions in zebrafish. PMID:12837271

  15. Exploring an Annotated Sequence Assembly of the Perennial Ryegrass Genome for Genomic Regions Enriched for Trait Associated Variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byrne, Stephen; Cericola, Fabio; Janss, Luc;

    2015-01-01

    Perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) is an outbreeding diploid species and one of the most important forage crops used in temperate agriculture. We have developed a draft sequence assembly of the perennial ryegrass genome and annotated it with the aid of RNA-seq data from various genotypes, plant...... components, and treatments. We predicted 39,795 high quality proteins originating from 28,182 genetic loci. We wanted to use the annotated assembly to study if SNPs falling within various annotation classes explain differing proportions of the variance for traits such as heading date and rust resistance...

  16. The Variable Regions of Lactobacillus rhamnosus Genomes Reveal the Dynamic Evolution of Metabolic and Host-Adaptation Repertoires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceapa, Corina; Davids, Mark; Ritari, Jarmo; Lambert, Jolanda; Wels, Michiel; Douillard, François P; Smokvina, Tamara; de Vos, Willem M; Knol, Jan; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus is a diverse Gram-positive species with strains isolated from different ecological niches. Here, we report the genome sequence analysis of 40 diverse strains of L. rhamnosus and their genomic comparison, with a focus on the variable genome. Genomic comparison of 40 L. rhamnosus strains discriminated the conserved genes (core genome) and regions of plasticity involving frequent rearrangements and horizontal transfer (variome). The L. rhamnosus core genome encompasses 2,164 genes, out of 4,711 genes in total (the pan-genome). The accessory genome is dominated by genes encoding carbohydrate transport and metabolism, extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) biosynthesis, bacteriocin production, pili production, the cas system, and the associated clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) loci, and more than 100 transporter functions and mobile genetic elements like phages, plasmid genes, and transposons. A clade distribution based on amino acid differences between core (shared) proteins matched with the clade distribution obtained from the presence-absence of variable genes. The phylogenetic and variome tree overlap indicated that frequent events of gene acquisition and loss dominated the evolutionary segregation of the strains within this species, which is paralleled by evolutionary diversification of core gene functions. The CRISPR-Cas system could have contributed to this evolutionary segregation. Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains contain the genetic and metabolic machinery with strain-specific gene functions required to adapt to a large range of environments. A remarkable congruency of the evolutionary relatedness of the strains' core and variome functions, possibly favoring interspecies genetic exchanges, underlines the importance of gene-acquisition and loss within the L. rhamnosus strain diversification. PMID:27358423

  17. Captured Segment Exchange: A Strategy for Custom Engineering Large Genomic Regions in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Bateman, Jack R.; Palopoli, Michael F.; Dale, Sarah T.; Stauffer, Jennifer E.; Shah, Anita L.; Johnson, Justine E.; Walsh, Conor W.; Flaten, Hanna; Parsons, Christine M.

    2013-01-01

    Site-specific recombinases (SSRs) are valuable tools for manipulating genomes. In Drosophila, thousands of transgenic insertions carrying SSR recognition sites have been distributed throughout the genome by several large-scale projects. Here we describe a method with the potential to use these insertions to make custom alterations to the Drosophila genome in vivo. Specifically, by employing recombineering techniques and a dual recombinase-mediated cassette exchange strategy based on the phiC3...

  18. Molecular analysis of the Adh region of the genome of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, W; Karp, R; McGill, S; Ashburner, M

    1985-12-20

    A small region of the genome of Drosophila melanogaster has been cloned in a series of overlapping phage. A length of 165 X 10(3) base-pairs of contiguous DNA that spans polytene chromosome region 35A4 to 35B1 and includes the structural gene for alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) as well as at least two other genes, outspread (osp) and no-ocelli (noc), has been characterized by mapping chromosome aberrations to the DNA. The relationship between osp and Adh is surprising: of nine osp alleles associated with chromosome breakpoints, five map distal (i.e. 5') to Adh and four map proximal (i.e. 3') to this gene. None affects the expression of Adh. As defined by these and other breakpoints, the osp gene spans at least 52 X 10(3) base-pairs and overlaps the Adh gene. The noc gene, as defined by the mapping of nearly 30 breakpoints, is at least 50 X 10(3) base-pairs in size. Alleles of noc and noc- deletions show either of two kinds of interaction with the recessive lethality of l(2)br29ScoR+1, a lethal that maps immediately distal to noc. One class of noc allele is viable when heterozygous with ScoR+1, while the other class is lethal or semi-lethal. Both classes, however, are homozygous or hemizygous viable. The locations of these two classes of noc allele on the DNA fall into two clusters, with those that are viable with ScoR+1 located proximal to those that are not. The physical boundary between these classes lies at a site just distal to that of the breakpoint of the inversion associated with ScoR+1 itself.

  19. Allelic variation in a willow warbler genomic region is associated with climate clines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith W Larson

    Full Text Available Local adaptation is an important process contributing to population differentiation which can occur in continuous or isolated populations connected by various amounts of gene flow. The willow warbler (Phylloscopus trochilus is one of the most common songbirds in Fennoscandia. It has a continuous breeding distribution where it is found in all forested habitats from sea level to the tree line and therefore constitutes an ideal species for the study of locally adapted genes associated with environmental gradients. Previous studies in this species identified a genetic marker (AFLP-WW1 that showed a steep north-south cline in central Sweden with one allele associated with coastal lowland habitats and the other with mountainous habitats. It was further demonstrated that this marker is embedded in a highly differentiated chromosome region that spans several megabases. In the present study, we sampled 2,355 individuals at 128 sites across all of Fennoscandia to study the geographic and climatic variables associated with the allele frequency distributions of WW1. Our results demonstrate that 1 allele frequency patterns significantly differ between mountain and lowland populations, 2 these allele differences coincide with extreme temperature conditions and the short growing season in the mountains, and milder conditions in coastal areas, and 3 the northern-allele or "altitude variant" of WW1 occurs in willow warblers that occupy mountainous habitat regardless of subspecies. Finally these results suggest that climate may exert selection on the genomic region associated with these alleles and would allow us to develop testable predictions for the distribution of the genetic marker based on climate change scenarios.

  20. Medicago truncatula, an intergenomic vehicle for the map-based cloning of pea (Pisum sativum) genes. Comparative structural genomic studies of the pea Sym2-Nod3 region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gualtieri González-Latorre, G.S.

    2001-01-01

    To determine the usefulness of M. truncatula as intergenomic vehicle for the positional cloning of pea genes it was studied whether these legumes are microsyntenic. These studies were focused on the pea Sym2 and Nod3 genomic regions. The M. truncatula orthologous genomic regions have been cloned and

  1. Natural Variation in a Subtelomeric Region of Arabidopsis: Implications for the Genomic Dynamics of a Chromosome End

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Hui-Fen; Olsen, Kenneth M.; Richards, Eric J.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated genome dynamics at a chromosome end in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana through a study of natural variation in 35 wild accessions. We focused on the single-copy subtelomeric region of chromosome 1 north (∼3.5 kb), which represents the relatively simple organization of subtelomeric regions in this species. PCR fragment-length variation across the subtelomeric region indicated that the 1.4-kb distal region showed elevated structural variation relative to the centromere-proximal region. Examination of nucleotide sequences from this 1.4-kb region revealed diverse DNA rearrangements, including an inversion, several deletions, and an insertion of a retrotransposon LTR. The structures at the deletion and inversion breakpoints are characteristic of simple deletion-associated nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) events. There was strong linkage disequilibrium between the distal subtelomeric region and the proximal telomere, which contains degenerate and variant telomeric repeats. Variation in the proximal telomere was characterized by the expansion and deletion of blocks of repeats. Our sample of accessions documented two independent chromosome-healing events associated with terminal deletions of the subtelomeric region as well as the capture of a scrambled mitochondrial DNA segment in the proximal telomeric array. This natural variation study highlights the variety of genomic events that drive the fluidity of chromosome termini. PMID:16547105

  2. Combination of native and denaturing PAGE for the detection of protein binding regions in long fragments of genomic DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metsis Madis

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a traditional electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA a 32P-labeled double-stranded DNA oligonucleotide or a restriction fragment bound to a protein is separated from the unbound DNA by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE in nondenaturing conditions. An extension of this method uses the large population of fragments derived from long genomic regions (approximately 600 kb for the identification of fragments containing protein binding regions. With this method, genomic DNA is fragmented by restriction enzymes, fragments are amplified by PCR, radiolabeled, incubated with nuclear proteins and the resulting DNA-protein complexes are separated by two-dimensional PAGE. Shifted DNA fragments containing protein binding sites are identified by using additional procedures, i. e. gel elution, PCR amplification, cloning and sequencing. Although the method allows simultaneous analysis of a large population of fragments, it is relatively laborious and can be used to detect only high affinity protein binding sites. Here we propose an alternative and straightforward strategy which is based on a combination of native and denaturing PAGE. This strategy allows the identification of DNA fragments containing low as well as high affinity protein binding regions, derived from genomic DNA ( Results We have combined an EMSA-based selection step with subsequent denaturing PAGE for the localization of protein binding regions in long (up to10 kb fragments of genomic DNA. Our strategy consists of the following steps: digestion of genomic DNA with a 4-cutter restriction enzyme (AluI, BsuRI, TruI, etc, separation of low and high molecular weight fractions of resultant DNA fragments, 32P-labeling with Klenow polymerase, traditional EMSA, gel elution and identification of the shifted bands (or smear by denaturing PAGE. The identification of DNA fragments containing protein binding sites is carried out by running the gel-eluted fragments alongside

  3. Self-Confirmation and Ascertainment of the Candidate Genomic Regions of Complex Trait Loci - A None-Experimental Solution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lishi Wang

    Full Text Available Over the past half century, thousands of quantitative trait loci (QTL have been identified by using animal models and plant populations. However, the none-reliability and imprecision of the genomic regions of these loci have remained the major hurdle for the identification of the causal genes for the correspondent traits. We used a none-experimental strategy of strain number reduction for testing accuracy and ascertainment of the candidate region for QTL. We tested the strategy in over 400 analyses with data from 47 studies. These studies include: 1 studies with recombinant inbred (RI strains of mice. We first tested two previously mapped QTL with well-defined genomic regions; We then tested additional four studies with known QTL regions; and finally we examined the reliability of QTL in 38 sets of data which are produced from relatively large numbers of RI strains, derived from C57BL/6J (B6 X DBA/2J (D2, known as BXD RI mouse strains; 2 studies with RI strains of rats and plants; and 3 studies using F2 populations in mice, rats and plants. In these cases, our method identified the reliability of mapped QTL and localized the candidate genes into the defined genomic regions. Our data also suggests that LRS score produced by permutation tests does not necessarily confirm the reliability of the QTL. Number of strains are not the reliable indicators for the accuracy of QTL either. Our strategy determines the reliability and accuracy of the genomic region of a QTL without any additional experimental study such as congenic breeding.

  4. Self-Confirmation and Ascertainment of the Candidate Genomic Regions of Complex Trait Loci - A None-Experimental Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lishi; Jiao, Yan; Wang, Yongjun; Zhang, Mengchen; Gu, Weikuan

    2016-01-01

    Over the past half century, thousands of quantitative trait loci (QTL) have been identified by using animal models and plant populations. However, the none-reliability and imprecision of the genomic regions of these loci have remained the major hurdle for the identification of the causal genes for the correspondent traits. We used a none-experimental strategy of strain number reduction for testing accuracy and ascertainment of the candidate region for QTL. We tested the strategy in over 400 analyses with data from 47 studies. These studies include: 1) studies with recombinant inbred (RI) strains of mice. We first tested two previously mapped QTL with well-defined genomic regions; We then tested additional four studies with known QTL regions; and finally we examined the reliability of QTL in 38 sets of data which are produced from relatively large numbers of RI strains, derived from C57BL/6J (B6) X DBA/2J (D2), known as BXD RI mouse strains; 2) studies with RI strains of rats and plants; and 3) studies using F2 populations in mice, rats and plants. In these cases, our method identified the reliability of mapped QTL and localized the candidate genes into the defined genomic regions. Our data also suggests that LRS score produced by permutation tests does not necessarily confirm the reliability of the QTL. Number of strains are not the reliable indicators for the accuracy of QTL either. Our strategy determines the reliability and accuracy of the genomic region of a QTL without any additional experimental study such as congenic breeding. PMID:27203862

  5. A genomic region of lactococcal temperate bacteriophage TP901-1 encoding major virion proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Mads G.; Appel, Karen Fuglede; Madsen, Hans Peter Lynge;

    1996-01-01

    Two major structural proteins, MHP (major head protein) and MTP (major tail protein), from the lactococcal temperate phage TP901-1 were sequenced at their amino acid termini, and derived degenerate oligonucleotides were used to locate the corresponding genes in the phage genome. This genomic regi...

  6. The complete genome sequence of a Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever virus isolated from an endemic region in Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedushaj Iusuf

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Balkan region and Kosovo in particular, is a well-known Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF endemic region, with frequent epidemic outbreaks and sporadic cases occurring with a hospitalized case fatality of approximately 30%. Recent analysis of complete genome sequences of diverse CCHF virus strains showed that the genome plasticity of the virus is surprisingly high for an arthropod-borne virus. High levels of nucleotide and amino acid differences, frequent RNA segment reassortment and even RNA recombination have been recently described. This diversity illustrates the need to determine the complete genome sequence of CCHF virus representatives of all geographically distinct endemic areas, particularly in light of the high pathogenicity of the virus and its listing as a potential bioterrorism threat. Here we describe the first complete CCHF virus genome sequence of a virus (strain Kosova Hoti isolated from a hemorrhagic fever case in the Balkans. This virus strain was isolated from a fatal CCHF case, and passaged only twice on Vero E6 cells prior to sequence analysis. The virus total genome was found to be 19.2 kb in length, consisting of a 1672 nucleotide (nt S segment, a 5364 nt M segment and a 12150 nt L segment. Phylogenetic analysis of CCHF virus complete genomes placed the Kosova Hoti strain in the Europe/Turkey group, with highest similarity seen with Russian isolates. The virus M segments are the most diverse with up to 31 and 27% differences seen at the nt and amino acid levels, and even 1.9% amino acid difference found between the Kosova Hoti and another strain from Kosovo (9553-01. This suggests that distinct virus strains can coexist in highly endemic areas.

  7. Identifying selected regions from heterozygosity and divergence using a light-coverage genomic dataset from two human populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taras K Oleksyk

    Full Text Available When a selective sweep occurs in the chromosomal region around a target gene in two populations that have recently separated, it produces three dramatic genomic consequences: 1 decreased multi-locus heterozygosity in the region; 2 elevated or diminished genetic divergence (F(ST of multiple polymorphic variants adjacent to the selected locus between the divergent populations, due to the alternative fixation of alleles; and 3 a consequent regional increase in the variance of F(ST (S(2F(ST for the same clustered variants, due to the increased alternative fixation of alleles in the loci surrounding the selection target. In the first part of our study, to search for potential targets of directional selection, we developed and validated a resampling-based computational approach; we then scanned an array of 31 different-sized moving windows of SNP variants (5-65 SNPs across the human genome in a set of European and African American population samples with 183,997 SNP loci after correcting for the recombination rate variation. The analysis revealed 180 regions of recent selection with very strong evidence in either population or both. In the second part of our study, we compared the newly discovered putative regions to those sites previously postulated in the literature, using methods based on inspecting patterns of linkage disequilibrium, population divergence and other methodologies. The newly found regions were cross-validated with those found in nine other studies that have searched for selection signals. Our study was replicated especially well in those regions confirmed by three or more studies. These validated regions were independently verified, using a combination of different methods and different databases in other studies, and should include fewer false positives. The main strength of our analysis method compared to others is that it does not require dense genotyping and therefore can be used with data from population-based genome SNP scans

  8. Genome Regions Associated with Functional Performance of Soybean Stem Fibers in Polypropylene Thermoplastic Composites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yarmilla Reinprecht

    Full Text Available Plant fibers can be used to produce composite materials for automobile parts, thus reducing plastic used in their manufacture, overall vehicle weight and fuel consumption when they replace mineral fillers and glass fibers. Soybean stem residues are, potentially, significant sources of inexpensive, renewable and biodegradable natural fibers, but are not curretly used for biocomposite production due to the functional properties of their fibers in composites being unknown. The current study was initiated to investigate the effects of plant genotype on the performance characteristics of soybean stem fibers when incorporated into a polypropylene (PP matrix using a selective phenotyping approach. Fibers from 50 lines of a recombinant inbred line population (169 RILs grown in different environments were incorporated into PP at 20% (wt/wt by extrusion. Test samples were injection molded and characterized for their mechanical properties. The performance of stem fibers in the composites was significantly affected by genotype and environment. Fibers from different genotypes had significantly different chemical compositions, thus composites prepared with these fibers displayed different physical properties. This study demonstrates that thermoplastic composites with soybean stem-derived fibers have mechanical properties that are equivalent or better than wheat straw fiber composites currently being used for manufacturing interior automotive parts. The addition of soybean stem residues improved flexural, tensile and impact properties of the composites. Furthermore, by linkage and in silico mapping we identified genomic regions to which quantitative trait loci (QTL for compositional and functional properties of soybean stem fibers in thermoplastic composites, as well as genes for cell wall synthesis, were co-localized. These results may lead to the development of high value uses for soybean stem residue.

  9. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. Final progress report, 1 March 1991--28 February 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, F.T.

    1994-04-01

    The objectives of this grant proposal include (1) development of a chromosome microdissection and PCR-mediated microcloning technology, (2) application of this microtechnology to the construction of region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. During this grant period, the authors have successfully developed this microtechnology and have applied it to the construction of microdissection libraries for the following chromosome regions: a whole chromosome 21 (21E), 2 region-specific libraries for the long arm of chromosome 2, 2q35-q37 (2Q1) and 2q33-q35 (2Q2), and 4 region-specific libraries for the entire short arm of chromosome 2, 2p23-p25 (2P1), 2p21-p23 (2P2), 2p14-p16 (wP3) and 2p11-p13 (2P4). In addition, 20--40 unique sequence microclones have been isolated and characterized for genomic studies. These region-specific libraries and the single-copy microclones from the library have been used as valuable resources for (1) isolating microsatellite probes in linkage analysis to further refine the disease locus; (2) isolating corresponding clones with large inserts, e.g. YAC, BAC, P1, cosmid and phage, to facilitate construction of contigs for high resolution physical mapping; and (3) isolating region-specific cDNA clones for use as candidate genes. These libraries are being deposited in the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) for general distribution.

  10. A systems biology approach to identify intelligence quotient score-related genomic regions, and pathways relevant to potential therapeutic treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Min Zhao; Lei Kong; Hong Qu

    2014-01-01

    Although the intelligence quotient (IQ) is the most popular intelligence test in the world, little is known about the underlying biological mechanisms that lead to the differences in human. To improve our understanding of cognitive processes and identify potential biomarkers, we conducted a comprehensive investigation of 158 IQ-related genes selected from the literature. A genomic distribution analysis demonstrated that IQ-related genes were enriched in seven regions of chromosome 7 and the X...

  11. Evaluation of a Partial Genome Screening of Two Asthma Susceptibility Regions Using Bayesian Network Based Bayesian Multilevel Analysis of Relevance

    OpenAIRE

    Ildikó Ungvári; Gábor Hullám; Péter Antal; Petra Sz Kiszel; András Gézsi; Éva Hadadi; Viktor Virág; Gergely Hajós; András Millinghoffer; Adrienne Nagy; András Kiss; Semsei, Ágnes F.; Gergely Temesi; Béla Melegh; Péter Kisfali

    2012-01-01

    Genetic studies indicate high number of potential factors related to asthma. Based on earlier linkage analyses we selected the 11q13 and 14q22 asthma susceptibility regions, for which we designed a partial genome screening study using 145 SNPs in 1201 individuals (436 asthmatic children and 765 controls). The results were evaluated with traditional frequentist methods and we applied a new statistical method, called bayesian network based bayesian multilevel analysis of relevance (BN-BMLA). Th...

  12. A general cloning system to selectively isolate any eukaryotic or prokaryotic genomic region in yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Barrett J Carl; Ouspenski Ilia; Leem Sun-Hee; Kouprina Natalay; Noskov Vladimir N; Larionov Vladimir

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Background Transformation-associated recombination (TAR) cloning in yeast is a unique method for selective isolation of large chromosomal fragments or entire genes from complex genomes. The technique involves homologous recombination, during yeast spheroplast transformation, between genomic DNA and a TAR vector that has short (~ 60 bp) 5' and 3' gene targeting sequences (hooks). Result TAR cloning requires that the cloned DNA fragment carry at least one autonomously replicating seque...

  13. Homologous recombination-mediated cloning and manipulation of genomic DNA regions using Gateway and recombineering systems

    OpenAIRE

    Kagale Sateesh; Yang Wen; Rozwadowski Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Employing genomic DNA clones to characterise gene attributes has several advantages over the use of cDNA clones, including the presence of native transcription and translation regulatory sequences as well as a representation of the complete repertoire of potential splice variants encoded by the gene. However, working with genomic DNA clones has traditionally been tedious due to their large size relative to cDNA clones and the presence, absence or position of particular res...

  14. Whole-genome resequencing of Hanwoo (Korean cattle) and insight into regions of homozygosity

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kyung-Tai; Chung, Won-Hyong; Lee, Sung-Yeoun; Choi, Jung-Woo; Kim, Jiwoong; Lim, Dajeong; Lee, Seunghwan; Jang, Gul-Won; Kim, Bumsoo; Choy, Yun Ho; Liao, Xiaoping; Stothard, Paul; Moore, Stephen S; Lee, Sang-Heon; Ahn, Sungmin

    2013-01-01

    Background Hanwoo (Korean cattle), which originated from natural crossbreeding between taurine and zebu cattle, migrated to the Korean peninsula through North China. Hanwoo were raised as draft animals until the 1970s without the introduction of foreign germplasm. Since 1979, Hanwoo has been bred as beef cattle. Genetic variation was analyzed by whole-genome deep resequencing of a Hanwoo bull. The Hanwoo genome was compared to that of two other breeds, Black Angus and Holstein, and genes with...

  15. An exploration of the sequence of a 2.9-Mb region of the genome of Drosophila melanogaster: the Adh region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashburner, M; Misra, S; Roote, J; Lewis, S E; Blazej, R; Davis, T; Doyle, C; Galle, R; George, R; Harris, N; Hartzell, G; Harvey, D; Hong, L; Houston, K; Hoskins, R; Johnson, G; Martin, C; Moshrefi, A; Palazzolo, M; Reese, M G; Spradling, A; Tsang, G; Wan, K; Whitelaw, K; Celniker, S

    1999-01-01

    A contiguous sequence of nearly 3 Mb from the genome of Drosophila melanogaster has been sequenced from a series of overlapping P1 and BAC clones. This region covers 69 chromosome polytene bands on chromosome arm 2L, including the genetically well-characterized "Adh region." A computational analysis of the sequence predicts 218 protein-coding genes, 11 tRNAs, and 17 transposable element sequences. At least 38 of the protein-coding genes are arranged in clusters of from 2 to 6 closely related genes, suggesting extensive tandem duplication. The gene density is one protein-coding gene every 13 kb; the transposable element density is one element every 171 kb. Of 73 genes in this region identified by genetic analysis, 49 have been located on the sequence; P-element insertions have been mapped to 43 genes. Ninety-five (44%) of the known and predicted genes match a Drosophila EST, and 144 (66%) have clear similarities to proteins in other organisms. Genes known to have mutant phenotypes are more likely to be represented in cDNA libraries, and far more likely to have products similar to proteins of other organisms, than are genes with no known mutant phenotype. Over 650 chromosome aberration breakpoints map to this chromosome region, and their nonrandom distribution on the genetic map reflects variation in gene spacing on the DNA. This is the first large-scale analysis of the genome of D. melanogaster at the sequence level. In addition to the direct results obtained, this analysis has allowed us to develop and test methods that will be needed to interpret the complete sequence of the genome of this species.Before beginning a Hunt, it is wise to ask someone what you are looking for before you begin looking for it. Milne 1926 PMID:10471707

  16. "Beijing Region" (3pter-D3S3397) of the Human Genome: Complete sequence and analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    The Chinese Human Genome Sequencing Consortium

    2005-01-01

    The goal of the Human Genome Project (HGP) is to determine a complete and high-quality sequence of the human genome. China, as one of the six member states, takes a region between 3pter and D3S3397 of the human chromosome 3 as its share of this historic project, referred as "Beijing Region". The complete sequence of this region comprises of 17.4 megabasepairs (Mb) with an average GC content of 42% and an average recombination rate of 2.14 cM/Mb. Within Beijing Region, 122 known and 20 novel genes are identified, as well as 42607 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Comprehensive analyses also reveal: (i) gene density and GC-content of Beijing Region are in agreement with human cytogenetic maps, i.e. G-minus bands are GC-rich and of a high gene density, whereas G-plus bands are GC-poor and of a relatively low gene density; (ii) the average recombination rate within Beijing Region is relatively high compared with other regions of chromosome 3, with the highest recombination rate of 6.06 cM/Mb in the subtelomeric area; (iii) it is most likely that a large gene, associated with the mammary gland, may reside in the 1.1 Mb gene-poor area near the telomere; (iv) many disease-related genes are genetically mapped to Beijing Region, including those associated with cancers and metabolic syndromes. All make Beijing Region an important target for in-depth molecular investigations with a purpose of medical applications.

  17. Genome-wide genetic diversity and differentially selected regions among Suffolk, Rambouillet, Columbia, Polypay, and Targhee sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lifan; Mousel, Michelle R; Wu, Xiaolin; Michal, Jennifer J; Zhou, Xiang; Ding, Bo; Dodson, Michael V; El-Halawany, Nermin K; Lewis, Gregory S; Jiang, Zhihua

    2013-01-01

    Sheep are among the major economically important livestock species worldwide because the animals produce milk, wool, skin, and meat. In the present study, the Illumina OvineSNP50 BeadChip was used to investigate genetic diversity and genome selection among Suffolk, Rambouillet, Columbia, Polypay, and Targhee sheep breeds from the United States. After quality-control filtering of SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms), we used 48,026 SNPs, including 46,850 SNPs on autosomes that were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and 1,176 SNPs on chromosome × for analysis. Phylogenetic analysis based on all 46,850 SNPs clearly separated Suffolk from Rambouillet, Columbia, Polypay, and Targhee, which was not surprising as Rambouillet contributed to the synthesis of the later three breeds. Based on pair-wise estimates of F(ST), significant genetic differentiation appeared between Suffolk and Rambouillet (F(ST) = 0.1621), while Rambouillet and Targhee had the closest relationship (F(ST) = 0.0681). A scan of the genome revealed 45 and 41 differentially selected regions (DSRs) between Suffolk and Rambouillet and among Rambouillet-related breed populations, respectively. Our data indicated that regions 13 and 24 between Suffolk and Rambouillet might be good candidates for evaluating breed differences. Furthermore, ovine genome v3.1 assembly was used as reference to link functionally known homologous genes to economically important traits covered by these differentially selected regions. In brief, our present study provides a comprehensive genome-wide view on within- and between-breed genetic differentiation, biodiversity, and evolution among Suffolk, Rambouillet, Columbia, Polypay, and Targhee sheep breeds. These results may provide new guidance for the synthesis of new breeds with different breeding objectives.

  18. Genome-wide genetic diversity and differentially selected regions among Suffolk, Rambouillet, Columbia, Polypay, and Targhee sheep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifan Zhang

    Full Text Available Sheep are among the major economically important livestock species worldwide because the animals produce milk, wool, skin, and meat. In the present study, the Illumina OvineSNP50 BeadChip was used to investigate genetic diversity and genome selection among Suffolk, Rambouillet, Columbia, Polypay, and Targhee sheep breeds from the United States. After quality-control filtering of SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms, we used 48,026 SNPs, including 46,850 SNPs on autosomes that were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and 1,176 SNPs on chromosome × for analysis. Phylogenetic analysis based on all 46,850 SNPs clearly separated Suffolk from Rambouillet, Columbia, Polypay, and Targhee, which was not surprising as Rambouillet contributed to the synthesis of the later three breeds. Based on pair-wise estimates of F(ST, significant genetic differentiation appeared between Suffolk and Rambouillet (F(ST = 0.1621, while Rambouillet and Targhee had the closest relationship (F(ST = 0.0681. A scan of the genome revealed 45 and 41 differentially selected regions (DSRs between Suffolk and Rambouillet and among Rambouillet-related breed populations, respectively. Our data indicated that regions 13 and 24 between Suffolk and Rambouillet might be good candidates for evaluating breed differences. Furthermore, ovine genome v3.1 assembly was used as reference to link functionally known homologous genes to economically important traits covered by these differentially selected regions. In brief, our present study provides a comprehensive genome-wide view on within- and between-breed genetic differentiation, biodiversity, and evolution among Suffolk, Rambouillet, Columbia, Polypay, and Targhee sheep breeds. These results may provide new guidance for the synthesis of new breeds with different breeding objectives.

  19. Genetic variation between Schistosoma japonicum lineages from lake and mountainous regions in China revealed by resequencing whole genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Mingbo; Liu, Xiao; Xu, Bin; Huang, Jian; Zheng, Qi; Yang, Zhong; Feng, Zheng; Han, Ze-Guang; Hu, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Schistosoma infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Schistosomiasis japonica is endemic in mainland China along the Yangtze River, typically distributed in two geographical categories of lake and mountainous regions. Study on schistosome genetic diversity is of interest in respect of understanding parasite biology and transmission, and formulating control strategy. Certain genetic variations may be associated with adaptations to different ecological habitats. The aim of this study is to gain insight into Schistosoma japonicum genetic variation, evolutionary origin and associated causes of different geographic lineages through examining homozygous Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) based on resequenced genome data. We collected S. japonicum samples from four sites, three in the lake regions (LR) of mid-east (Guichi and Tonglin in Anhui province, Laogang in Hunan province) and one in mountainous region (MR) (Xichang in Sichuan province) of south-west of China, resequenced their genomes using Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology, and made use of the available database of S. japonicum draft genomic sequence as a reference in genome mapping. A total of 14,575 SNPs from 2059 genes were identified in the four lineages. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed significant genetic variation exhibited between the different geographical lineages, and further revealed that the MR Xichang lineage is phylogenetically closer to LR Guich lineage than to other two LR lineages, and the MR lineage might be evolved from LR lineages. More than two thirds of detected SNPs were nonsynonymous; functional annotation of the SNP-containing genes showed that they are involved mainly in biological processes such as signaling and response to stimuli. Notably, unique nonsynonymous SNP variations were detected in 66 genes of MR lineage, inferring possible genetic adaption to mountainous ecological condition. PMID:27207135

  20. Captured segment exchange: a strategy for custom engineering large genomic regions in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Jack R; Palopoli, Michael F; Dale, Sarah T; Stauffer, Jennifer E; Shah, Anita L; Johnson, Justine E; Walsh, Conor W; Flaten, Hanna; Parsons, Christine M

    2013-02-01

    Site-specific recombinases (SSRs) are valuable tools for manipulating genomes. In Drosophila, thousands of transgenic insertions carrying SSR recognition sites have been distributed throughout the genome by several large-scale projects. Here we describe a method with the potential to use these insertions to make custom alterations to the Drosophila genome in vivo. Specifically, by employing recombineering techniques and a dual recombinase-mediated cassette exchange strategy based on the phiC31 integrase and FLP recombinase, we show that a large genomic segment that lies between two SSR recognition-site insertions can be "captured" as a target cassette and exchanged for a sequence that was engineered in bacterial cells. We demonstrate this approach by targeting a 50-kb segment spanning the tsh gene, replacing the existing segment with corresponding recombineered sequences through simple and efficient manipulations. Given the high density of SSR recognition-site insertions in Drosophila, our method affords a straightforward and highly efficient approach to explore gene function in situ for a substantial portion of the Drosophila genome. PMID:23150604

  1. Genome analysis of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum and subsp. pertenue strains: most of the genetic differences are localized in six regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Mikalová

    Full Text Available The genomes of eight treponemes including T. p. pallidum strains (Nichols, SS14, DAL-1 and Mexico A, T. p. pertenue strains (Samoa D, CDC-2 and Gauthier, and the Fribourg-Blanc isolate, were amplified in 133 overlapping amplicons, and the restriction patterns of these fragments were compared. The approximate sizes of the genomes investigated based on this whole genome fingerprinting (WGF analysis ranged from 1139.3-1140.4 kb, with the estimated genome sequence identity of 99.57-99.98% in the homologous genome regions. Restriction target site analysis, detecting the presence of 1773 individual restriction sites found in the reference Nichols genome, revealed a high genome structure similarity of all strains. The unclassified simian Fribourg-Blanc isolate was more closely related to T. p. pertenue than to T. p. pallidum strains. Most of the genetic differences between T. p. pallidum and T. p. pertenue strains were accumulated in six genomic regions. These genome differences likely contribute to the observed differences in pathogenicity between T. p. pallidum and T. p. pertenue strains. These regions of sequence divergence could be used for the molecular detection and discrimination of syphilis and yaws strains.

  2. Genome wide signatures of positive selection: The comparison of independent samples and the identification of regions associated to traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Merle B

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The goal of genome wide analyses of polymorphisms is to achieve a better understanding of the link between genotype and phenotype. Part of that goal is to understand the selective forces that have operated on a population. Results In this study we compared the signals of selection, identified through population divergence in the Bovine HapMap project, to those found in an independent sample of cattle from Australia. Evidence for population differentiation across the genome, as measured by FST, was highly correlated in the two data sets. Nevertheless, 40% of the variance in FST between the two studies was attributed to the differences in breed composition. Seventy six percent of the variance in FST was attributed to differences in SNP composition and density when the same breeds were compared. The difference between FST of adjacent loci increased rapidly with the increase in distance between SNP, reaching an asymptote after 20 kb. Using 129 SNP that have highly divergent FST values in both data sets, we identified 12 regions that had additive effects on the traits residual feed intake, beef yield or intramuscular fatness measured in the Australian sample. Four of these regions had effects on more than one trait. One of these regions includes the R3HDM1 gene, which is under selection in European humans. Conclusion Firstly, many different populations will be necessary for a full description of selective signatures across the genome, not just a small set of highly divergent populations. Secondly, it is necessary to use the same SNP when comparing the signatures of selection from one study to another. Thirdly, useful signatures of selection can be obtained where many of the groups have only minor genetic differences and may not be clearly separated in a principal component analysis. Fourthly, combining analyses of genome wide selection signatures and genome wide associations to traits helps to define the trait under selection or

  3. Genome analysis of Excretory/Secretory proteins in Taenia solium reveals their Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Sandra; Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Palafox-Fonseca, Hector; Cantu-Robles, Vito Adrian; Soberón, Xavier; Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis; Bobes, Raúl J.; Laclette, Juan P.; Yauner, Luis del Pozo; Ochoa-Leyva, Adrián

    2015-01-01

    Excretory/Secretory (ES) proteins play an important role in the host-parasite interactions. Experimental identification of ES proteins is time-consuming and expensive. Alternative bioinformatics approaches are cost-effective and can be used to prioritize the experimental analysis of therapeutic targets for parasitic diseases. Here we predicted and functionally annotated the ES proteins in T. solium genome using an integration of bioinformatics tools. Additionally, we developed a novel measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of T. solium secretome using sequence length and number of antigenic regions of ES proteins. This measurement was formalized as the Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR) value. AAR value for secretome showed a similar value to that obtained for a set of experimentally determined antigenic proteins and was different to the calculated value for the non-ES proteins of T. solium genome. Furthermore, we calculated the AAR values for known helminth secretomes and they were similar to that obtained for T. solium. The results reveal the utility of AAR value as a novel genomic measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of secretomes. This comprehensive analysis of T. solium secretome provides functional information for future experimental studies, including the identification of novel ES proteins of therapeutic, diagnosis and immunological interest. PMID:25989346

  4. Genome analysis of Excretory/Secretory proteins in Taenia solium reveals their Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Sandra; Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Palafox-Fonseca, Hector; Cantu-Robles, Vito Adrian; Soberón, Xavier; Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis; Bobes, Raúl J; Laclette, Juan P; Yauner, Luis del Pozo; Ochoa-Leyva, Adrián

    2015-05-19

    Excretory/Secretory (ES) proteins play an important role in the host-parasite interactions. Experimental identification of ES proteins is time-consuming and expensive. Alternative bioinformatics approaches are cost-effective and can be used to prioritize the experimental analysis of therapeutic targets for parasitic diseases. Here we predicted and functionally annotated the ES proteins in T. solium genome using an integration of bioinformatics tools. Additionally, we developed a novel measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of T. solium secretome using sequence length and number of antigenic regions of ES proteins. This measurement was formalized as the Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR) value. AAR value for secretome showed a similar value to that obtained for a set of experimentally determined antigenic proteins and was different to the calculated value for the non-ES proteins of T. solium genome. Furthermore, we calculated the AAR values for known helminth secretomes and they were similar to that obtained for T. solium. The results reveal the utility of AAR value as a novel genomic measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of secretomes. This comprehensive analysis of T. solium secretome provides functional information for future experimental studies, including the identification of novel ES proteins of therapeutic, diagnosis and immunological interest.

  5. Development and validation of new SSR markers from expressed regions in the garlic genome

    OpenAIRE

    Meryem Ipek; Nihan Sahin; Ahmet Ipek; Asuman Cansev; Simon, Philipp W

    2015-01-01

    Only a limited number of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers is available for the genome of garlic (Allium sativum L.) despite the fact that SSR markers have become one of the most preferred DNA marker systems. To develop new SSR markers for the garlic genome, garlic expressed sequence tags (ESTs) at the publicly available GarlicEST database were screened for SSR motifs and a total of 132 SSR motifs were identified. Primer pairs were designed for 50 SSR motifs and 24 of these primer pairs we...

  6. Differentially Methylated Genomic Regions in Birth-Weight Discordant Twin Pairs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Mubo; Baumbach, Jan; Vandin, Fabio;

    2016-01-01

    Poor nutrition during critical growth phases may alter the structural and physiologic development of vital organs thus “programming” the susceptibility to adult-onset diseases and disease-related health conditions. Epigenome-wide association studies have been performed in birth-weight discordant...... twin pairs to find evidence for such “programming” effects, but no significant results emerged. We further investigated this issue using a new computational approach: Instead of probing single genomic sites for significant alterations in epigenetic marks, we scan for differentially methylated genomic...

  7. A genome-wide association study identifies genomic regions for virulence in the non-model organism Heterobasidion annosum s.s.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Dalman

    Full Text Available The dense single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP panels needed for genome wide association (GWA studies have hitherto been expensive to establish and use on non-model organisms. To overcome this, we used a next generation sequencing approach to both establish SNPs and to determine genotypes. We conducted a GWA study on a fungal species, analysing the virulence of Heterobasidion annosum s.s., a necrotrophic pathogen, on its hosts Picea abies and Pinus sylvestris. From a set of 33,018 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP in 23 haploid isolates, twelve SNP markers distributed on seven contigs were associated with virulence (P<0.0001. Four of the contigs harbour known virulence genes from other fungal pathogens and the remaining three harbour novel candidate genes. Two contigs link closely to virulence regions recognized previously by QTL mapping in the congeneric hybrid H. irregulare × H. occidentale. Our study demonstrates the efficiency of GWA studies for dissecting important complex traits of small populations of non-model haploid organisms with small genomes.

  8. Characterization of promoter region and genomic structure of the murine and human genes encoding Src like adapter protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratchmarova, I; Sosinowski, T; Weiss, A; Witter, K; Vincenz, C; Pandey, A

    2001-01-10

    Src-like adapter protein (SLAP) was identified as a signaling molecule in a yeast two-hybrid system using the cytoplasmic domain of EphA2, a receptor protein tyrosine kinase (Pandey et al., 1995. Characterization of a novel Src-like adapter protein that associates with the Eck receptor tyrosine kinase. J. Biol. Chem. 270, 19201-19204). It is very similar to members of the Src family of cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases in that it contains very homologous SH3 and SH2 domains (Abram and Courtneidge, 2000. Src family tyrosine kinases and growth factor signaling. Exp. Cell. Res. 254, 1-13.). However, instead of a kinase domain at the C-terminus, it contains a unique C-terminal region. In order to exclude the possibility that an alternative form exists, we have isolated genomic clones containing the murine Slap gene as well as the human SLA gene. The coding regions of murine Slap and human SLA genes contain seven exons and six introns. Absence of any kinase domain in the genomic region confirm its designation as an adapter protein. Additionally, we have cloned and sequenced approximately 2.6 kb of the region 5' to the initiator methionine of the murine Slap gene. When subcloned upstream of a luciferase gene, this fragment increased the transcriptional activity about 6-fold in a human Jurkat T cell line and approximately 52-fold in a murine T cell line indicating that this region contains promoter elements that dictate SLAP expression. We have also cloned the promoter region of the human SLA gene. Since SLAP is transcriptionally regulated by retinoic acid and by activation of B cells, the cloning of its promoter region will permit a detailed analysis of the elements required for its transcriptional regulation.

  9. Integration of multiethnic fine-mapping and genomic annotation to prioritize candidate functional SNPs at prostate cancer susceptibility regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ying; Hazelett, Dennis J; Wiklund, Fredrik; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Stram, Daniel O; Berndt, Sonja I; Wang, Zhaoming; Rand, Kristin A; Hoover, Robert N; Machiela, Mitchell J; Yeager, Merideth; Burdette, Laurie; Chung, Charles C; Hutchinson, Amy; Yu, Kai; Xu, Jianfeng; Travis, Ruth C; Key, Timothy J; Siddiq, Afshan; Canzian, Federico; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kubo, Michiaki; Stanford, Janet L; Kolb, Suzanne; Gapstur, Susan M; Diver, W Ryan; Stevens, Victoria L; Strom, Sara S; Pettaway, Curtis A; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Eeles, Rosalind A; Yeboah, Edward D; Tettey, Yao; Biritwum, Richard B; Adjei, Andrew A; Tay, Evelyn; Truelove, Ann; Niwa, Shelley; Chokkalingam, Anand P; Isaacs, William B; Chen, Constance; Lindstrom, Sara; Le Marchand, Loic; Giovannucci, Edward L; Pomerantz, Mark; Long, Henry; Li, Fugen; Ma, Jing; Stampfer, Meir; John, Esther M; Ingles, Sue A; Kittles, Rick A; Murphy, Adam B; Blot, William J; Signorello, Lisa B; Zheng, Wei; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Nemesure, Barbara; Carpten, John; Leske, M Cristina; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Hennis, Anselm J M; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Hsing, Ann W; Chu, Lisa; Goodman, Phyllis J; Klein, Eric A; Zheng, S Lilly; Witte, John S; Casey, Graham; Riboli, Elio; Li, Qiyuan; Freedman, Matthew L; Hunter, David J; Gronberg, Henrik; Cook, Michael B; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Kraft, Peter; Chanock, Stephen J; Easton, Douglas F; Henderson, Brian E; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Conti, David V; Haiman, Christopher A

    2015-10-01

    Interpretation of biological mechanisms underlying genetic risk associations for prostate cancer is complicated by the relatively large number of risk variants (n = 100) and the thousands of surrogate SNPs in linkage disequilibrium. Here, we combined three distinct approaches: multiethnic fine-mapping, putative functional annotation (based upon epigenetic data and genome-encoded features), and expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analyses, in an attempt to reduce this complexity. We examined 67 risk regions using genotyping and imputation-based fine-mapping in populations of European (cases/controls: 8600/6946), African (cases/controls: 5327/5136), Japanese (cases/controls: 2563/4391) and Latino (cases/controls: 1034/1046) ancestry. Markers at 55 regions passed a region-specific significance threshold (P-value cutoff range: 3.9 × 10(-4)-5.6 × 10(-3)) and in 30 regions we identified markers that were more significantly associated with risk than the previously reported variants in the multiethnic sample. Novel secondary signals (P < 5.0 × 10(-6)) were also detected in two regions (rs13062436/3q21 and rs17181170/3p12). Among 666 variants in the 55 regions with P-values within one order of magnitude of the most-associated marker, 193 variants (29%) in 48 regions overlapped with epigenetic or other putative functional marks. In 11 of the 55 regions, cis-eQTLs were detected with nearby genes. For 12 of the 55 regions (22%), the most significant region-specific, prostate-cancer associated variant represented the strongest candidate functional variant based on our annotations; the number of regions increased to 20 (36%) and 27 (49%) when examining the 2 and 3 most significantly associated variants in each region, respectively. These results have prioritized subsets of candidate variants for downstream functional evaluation.

  10. Integration of multiethnic fine-mapping and genomic annotation to prioritize candidate functional SNPs at prostate cancer susceptibility regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ying; Hazelett, Dennis J.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Stram, Daniel O.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Wang, Zhaoming; Rand, Kristin A.; Hoover, Robert N.; Machiela, Mitchell J.; Yeager, Merideth; Burdette, Laurie; Chung, Charles C.; Hutchinson, Amy; Yu, Kai; Xu, Jianfeng; Travis, Ruth C.; Key, Timothy J.; Siddiq, Afshan; Canzian, Federico; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kubo, Michiaki; Stanford, Janet L.; Kolb, Suzanne; Gapstur, Susan M.; Diver, W. Ryan; Stevens, Victoria L.; Strom, Sara S.; Pettaway, Curtis A.; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Yeboah, Edward D.; Tettey, Yao; Biritwum, Richard B.; Adjei, Andrew A.; Tay, Evelyn; Truelove, Ann; Niwa, Shelley; Chokkalingam, Anand P.; Isaacs, William B.; Chen, Constance; Lindstrom, Sara; Le Marchand, Loic; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Pomerantz, Mark; Long, Henry; Li, Fugen; Ma, Jing; Stampfer, Meir; John, Esther M.; Ingles, Sue A.; Kittles, Rick A.; Murphy, Adam B.; Blot, William J.; Signorello, Lisa B.; Zheng, Wei; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Nemesure, Barbara; Carpten, John; Leske, M. Cristina; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Hennis, Anselm J. M.; Rybicki, Benjamin A.; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Hsing, Ann W.; Chu, Lisa; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Klein, Eric A.; Zheng, S. Lilly; Witte, John S.; Casey, Graham; Riboli, Elio; Li, Qiyuan; Freedman, Matthew L.; Hunter, David J.; Gronberg, Henrik; Cook, Michael B.; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Kraft, Peter; Chanock, Stephen J.; Easton, Douglas F.; Henderson, Brian E.; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Conti, David V.; Haiman, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation of biological mechanisms underlying genetic risk associations for prostate cancer is complicated by the relatively large number of risk variants (n = 100) and the thousands of surrogate SNPs in linkage disequilibrium. Here, we combined three distinct approaches: multiethnic fine-mapping, putative functional annotation (based upon epigenetic data and genome-encoded features), and expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analyses, in an attempt to reduce this complexity. We examined 67 risk regions using genotyping and imputation-based fine-mapping in populations of European (cases/controls: 8600/6946), African (cases/controls: 5327/5136), Japanese (cases/controls: 2563/4391) and Latino (cases/controls: 1034/1046) ancestry. Markers at 55 regions passed a region-specific significance threshold (P-value cutoff range: 3.9 × 10−4–5.6 × 10−3) and in 30 regions we identified markers that were more significantly associated with risk than the previously reported variants in the multiethnic sample. Novel secondary signals (P < 5.0 × 10−6) were also detected in two regions (rs13062436/3q21 and rs17181170/3p12). Among 666 variants in the 55 regions with P-values within one order of magnitude of the most-associated marker, 193 variants (29%) in 48 regions overlapped with epigenetic or other putative functional marks. In 11 of the 55 regions, cis-eQTLs were detected with nearby genes. For 12 of the 55 regions (22%), the most significant region-specific, prostate-cancer associated variant represented the strongest candidate functional variant based on our annotations; the number of regions increased to 20 (36%) and 27 (49%) when examining the 2 and 3 most significantly associated variants in each region, respectively. These results have prioritized subsets of candidate variants for downstream functional evaluation. PMID:26162851

  11. Mapping of 5q35 chromosomal rearrangements within a genomically unstable region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buysse, Karen; Crepel, An; Menten, Björn;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent molecular studies of breakpoints of recurrent chromosome rearrangements revealed the role of genomic architecture in their formation. In particular, segmental duplications representing blocks of >1 kb with >90% sequence homology were shown to mediate non-allelic homologous reco...

  12. Whole genome sequence analyses of Xylella fastidiosa PD strains from different geographical regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genome sequences were determined for two Pierce’s disease (PD) causing Xylella fastidiosa (Xf) strains, one from Florida and one from Taiwan. The Florida strain was ATCC 35879, the type of strain used as a standard reference for related taxonomy research. By contrast, the Taiwan strain used was only...

  13. Development and validation of new SSR markers from expressed regions in the garlic genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limited number of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers is available for the genome of garlic (Allium sativum L.) although SSR markers have become one of the most preferred marker systems because they are typically co-dominant, reproducible, cross species transferable and highly polymorphic. In this ...

  14. The evolution of sex ratio distorter suppression affects a 25 cM genomic region in the butterfly Hypolimnas bolina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A Hornett

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Symbionts that distort their host's sex ratio by favouring the production and survival of females are common in arthropods. Their presence produces intense Fisherian selection to return the sex ratio to parity, typified by the rapid spread of host 'suppressor' loci that restore male survival/development. In this study, we investigated the genomic impact of a selective event of this kind in the butterfly Hypolimnas bolina. Through linkage mapping, we first identified a genomic region that was necessary for males to survive Wolbachia-induced male-killing. We then investigated the genomic impact of the rapid spread of suppression, which converted the Samoan population of this butterfly from a 100:1 female-biased sex ratio in 2001 to a 1:1 sex ratio by 2006. Models of this process revealed the potential for a chromosome-wide effect. To measure the impact of this episode of selection directly, the pattern of genetic variation before and after the spread of suppression was compared. Changes in allele frequencies were observed over a 25 cM region surrounding the suppressor locus, with a reduction in overall diversity observed at loci that co-segregate with the suppressor. These changes exceeded those expected from drift and occurred alongside the generation of linkage disequilibrium. The presence of novel allelic variants in 2006 suggests that the suppressor was likely to have been introduced via immigration rather than through de novo mutation. In addition, further sampling in 2010 indicated that many of the introduced variants were lost or had declined in frequency since 2006. We hypothesize that this loss may have resulted from a period of purifying selection, removing deleterious material that introgressed during the initial sweep. Our observations of the impact of suppression of sex ratio distorting activity reveal a very wide genomic imprint, reflecting its status as one of the strongest selective forces in nature.

  15. Complete mitochondrial genome of the frillneck lizard (Chlamydosaurus kingii, Reptilia; Agamidae), another squamate with two control regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujvari, Beata; Madsen, Thomas

    2008-10-01

    Using PCR, the complete mitochondrial genome was sequenced in three frillneck lizards (Chlamydosaurus kingii). The mitochondria spanned over 16,761bp. As in other vertebrates, two rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes and 13 protein coding genes were identified. However, similar to some other squamate reptiles, two control regions (CRI and CRII) were identified, spanning 801 and 812 bp, respectively. Our results were compared with another Australian member of the family Agamidae, the bearded dragon (Pogana vitticeps). The overall base composition of the light-strand sequence largely mirrored that observed in P vitticeps. Furthermore, similar to P. vitticeps, we observed an insertion 801 bp long between the ND5 and ND6 genes. However, in contrast to P vitticeps we did not observe a conserved sequence block III region. Based on a comparison among the three frillneck lizards, we also present data on the proportion of variable sites within the major mitochondrial regions. PMID:19489141

  16. Isolation of a Genomic Region Affecting Most Components of Metabolic Syndrome in a Chromosome-16 Congenic Rat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šedová, Lucie; Pravenec, Michal; Křenová, Drahomíra; Kazdová, Ludmila; Zídek, Václav; Krupková, Michaela; Liška, František; Křen, Vladimír; Šeda, Ondřej

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a highly prevalent human disease with substantial genomic and environmental components. Previous studies indicate the presence of significant genetic determinants of several features of metabolic syndrome on rat chromosome 16 (RNO16) and the syntenic regions of human genome. We derived the SHR.BN16 congenic strain by introgression of a limited RNO16 region from the Brown Norway congenic strain (BN-Lx) into the genomic background of the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) strain. We compared the morphometric, metabolic, and hemodynamic profiles of adult male SHR and SHR.BN16 rats. We also compared in silico the DNA sequences for the differential segment in the BN-Lx and SHR parental strains. SHR.BN16 congenic rats had significantly lower weight, decreased concentrations of total triglycerides and cholesterol, and improved glucose tolerance compared with SHR rats. The concentrations of insulin, free fatty acids, and adiponectin were comparable between the two strains. SHR.BN16 rats had significantly lower systolic (18–28 mmHg difference) and diastolic (10–15 mmHg difference) blood pressure throughout the experiment (repeated-measures ANOVA, P < 0.001). The differential segment spans approximately 22 Mb of the telomeric part of the short arm of RNO16. The in silico analyses revealed over 1200 DNA variants between the BN-Lx and SHR genomes in the SHR.BN16 differential segment, 44 of which lead to missense mutations, and only eight of which (in Asb14, Il17rd, Itih1, Syt15, Ercc6, RGD1564958, Tmem161a, and Gatad2a genes) are predicted to be damaging to the protein product. Furthermore, a number of genes within the RNO16 differential segment associated with metabolic syndrome components in human studies showed polymorphisms between SHR and BN-Lx (including Lpl, Nrg3, Pbx4, Cilp2, and Stab1). Our novel congenic rat model demonstrates that a limited genomic region on RNO16 in the SHR significantly affects many of the features of metabolic syndrome

  17. Isolation of a Genomic Region Affecting Most Components of Metabolic Syndrome in a Chromosome-16 Congenic Rat Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Šedová

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is a highly prevalent human disease with substantial genomic and environmental components. Previous studies indicate the presence of significant genetic determinants of several features of metabolic syndrome on rat chromosome 16 (RNO16 and the syntenic regions of human genome. We derived the SHR.BN16 congenic strain by introgression of a limited RNO16 region from the Brown Norway congenic strain (BN-Lx into the genomic background of the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR strain. We compared the morphometric, metabolic, and hemodynamic profiles of adult male SHR and SHR.BN16 rats. We also compared in silico the DNA sequences for the differential segment in the BN-Lx and SHR parental strains. SHR.BN16 congenic rats had significantly lower weight, decreased concentrations of total triglycerides and cholesterol, and improved glucose tolerance compared with SHR rats. The concentrations of insulin, free fatty acids, and adiponectin were comparable between the two strains. SHR.BN16 rats had significantly lower systolic (18-28 mmHg difference and diastolic (10-15 mmHg difference blood pressure throughout the experiment (repeated-measures ANOVA, P < 0.001. The differential segment spans approximately 22 Mb of the telomeric part of the short arm of RNO16. The in silico analyses revealed over 1200 DNA variants between the BN-Lx and SHR genomes in the SHR.BN16 differential segment, 44 of which lead to missense mutations, and only eight of which (in Asb14, Il17rd, Itih1, Syt15, Ercc6, RGD1564958, Tmem161a, and Gatad2a genes are predicted to be damaging to the protein product. Furthermore, a number of genes within the RNO16 differential segment associated with metabolic syndrome components in human studies showed polymorphisms between SHR and BN-Lx (including Lpl, Nrg3, Pbx4, Cilp2, and Stab1. Our novel congenic rat model demonstrates that a limited genomic region on RNO16 in the SHR significantly affects many of the features of metabolic

  18. Sequencing of a QTL-rich region of the Theobroma cacao genome using pooled BACs and the identification of trait specific candidate genes

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    Blackmon Barbara P

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background BAC-based physical maps provide for sequencing across an entire genome or a selected sub-genomic region of biological interest. Such a region can be approached with next-generation whole-genome sequencing and assembly as if it were an independent small genome. Using the minimum tiling path as a guide, specific BAC clones representing the prioritized genomic interval are selected, pooled, and used to prepare a sequencing library. Results This pooled BAC approach was taken to sequence and assemble a QTL-rich region, of ~3 Mbp and represented by twenty-seven BACs, on linkage group 5 of the Theobroma cacao cv. Matina 1-6 genome. Using various mixtures of read coverages from paired-end and linear 454 libraries, multiple assemblies of varied quality were generated. Quality was assessed by comparing the assembly of 454 reads with a subset of ten BACs individually sequenced and assembled using Sanger reads. A mixture of reads optimal for assembly was identified. We found, furthermore, that a quality assembly suitable for serving as a reference genome template could be obtained even with a reduced depth of sequencing coverage. Annotation of the resulting assembly revealed several genes potentially responsible for three T. cacao traits: black pod disease resistance, bean shape index, and pod weight. Conclusions Our results, as with other pooled BAC sequencing reports, suggest that pooling portions of a minimum tiling path derived from a BAC-based physical map is an effective method to target sub-genomic regions for sequencing. While we focused on a single QTL region, other QTL regions of importance could be similarly sequenced allowing for biological discovery to take place before a high quality whole-genome assembly is completed.

  19. Genome-wide coexpression of steroid receptors in the mouse brain: Identifying signaling pathways and functionally coordinated regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfouz, Ahmed; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P F; Grefhorst, Aldo; van Weert, Lisa T C M; Mol, Isabel M; Sips, Hetty C M; van den Heuvel, José K; Datson, Nicole A; Visser, Jenny A; Reinders, Marcel J T; Meijer, Onno C

    2016-03-01

    Steroid receptors are pleiotropic transcription factors that coordinate adaptation to different physiological states. An important target organ is the brain, but even though their effects are well studied in specific regions, brain-wide steroid receptor targets and mediators remain largely unknown due to the complexity of the brain. Here, we tested the idea that novel aspects of steroid action can be identified through spatial correlation of steroid receptors with genome-wide mRNA expression across different regions in the mouse brain. First, we observed significant coexpression of six nuclear receptors (NRs) [androgen receptor (Ar), estrogen receptor alpha (Esr1), estrogen receptor beta (Esr2), glucocorticoid receptor (Gr), mineralocorticoid receptor (Mr), and progesterone receptor (Pgr)] with sets of steroid target genes that were identified in single brain regions. These coexpression relationships were also present in distinct other brain regions, suggestive of as yet unidentified coordinate regulation of brain regions by, for example, glucocorticoids and estrogens. Second, coexpression of a set of 62 known NR coregulators and the six steroid receptors in 12 nonoverlapping mouse brain regions revealed selective downstream pathways, such as Pak6 as a mediator for the effects of Ar and Gr on dopaminergic transmission. Third, Magel2 and Irs4 were identified and validated as strongly responsive targets to the estrogen diethylstilbestrol in the mouse hypothalamus. The brain- and genome-wide correlations of mRNA expression levels of six steroid receptors that we provide constitute a rich resource for further predictions and understanding of brain modulation by steroid hormones. PMID:26811448

  20. A 5'-proximal region of the Citrus tristeza virus genome encoding two leader proteases is involved in virus superinfection exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atallah, Osama O; Kang, Sung-Hwan; El-Mohtar, Choaa A; Shilts, Turksen; Bergua, María; Folimonova, Svetlana Y

    2016-02-01

    Superinfection exclusion (SIE), a phenomenon in which a primary virus infection prevents a secondary infection with the same or closely related virus, has been observed with various viruses. Earlier we demonstrated that SIE by Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) requires viral p33 protein. In this work we show that p33 alone is not sufficient for virus exclusion. To define the additional viral components that are involved in this phenomenon, we engineered a hybrid virus in which a 5'-proximal region in the genome of the T36 isolate containing coding sequences for the two leader proteases L1 and L2 has been substituted with a corresponding region from the genome of a heterologous T68-1 isolate. Sequential inoculation of plants pre-infected with the CTV L1L2T68 hybrid with T36 CTV resulted in superinfection with the challenge virus, which indicated that the substitution of the L1-L2 coding region affected SIE ability of the virus.

  1. A 5'-proximal region of the Citrus tristeza virus genome encoding two leader proteases is involved in virus superinfection exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atallah, Osama O; Kang, Sung-Hwan; El-Mohtar, Choaa A; Shilts, Turksen; Bergua, María; Folimonova, Svetlana Y

    2016-02-01

    Superinfection exclusion (SIE), a phenomenon in which a primary virus infection prevents a secondary infection with the same or closely related virus, has been observed with various viruses. Earlier we demonstrated that SIE by Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) requires viral p33 protein. In this work we show that p33 alone is not sufficient for virus exclusion. To define the additional viral components that are involved in this phenomenon, we engineered a hybrid virus in which a 5'-proximal region in the genome of the T36 isolate containing coding sequences for the two leader proteases L1 and L2 has been substituted with a corresponding region from the genome of a heterologous T68-1 isolate. Sequential inoculation of plants pre-infected with the CTV L1L2T68 hybrid with T36 CTV resulted in superinfection with the challenge virus, which indicated that the substitution of the L1-L2 coding region affected SIE ability of the virus. PMID:26748332

  2. swDMR: A Sliding Window Approach to Identify Differentially Methylated Regions Based on Whole Genome Bisulfite Sequencing.

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    Zhen Wang

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is a widespread epigenetic modification that plays an essential role in gene expression through transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodeling. The emergence of whole genome bisulfite sequencing (WGBS represents an important milestone in the detection of DNA methylation. Characterization of differential methylated regions (DMRs is fundamental as well for further functional analysis. In this study, we present swDMR (http://sourceforge.net/projects/swDMR/ for the comprehensive analysis of DMRs from whole genome methylation profiles by a sliding window approach. It is an integrated tool designed for WGBS data, which not only implements accessible statistical methods to perform hypothesis test adapted to two or more samples without replicates, but false discovery rate was also controlled by multiple test correction. Downstream analysis tools were also provided, including cluster, annotation and visualization modules. In summary, based on WGBS data, swDMR can produce abundant information of differential methylated regions. As a convenient and flexible tool, we believe swDMR will bring us closer to unveil the potential functional regions involved in epigenetic regulation.

  3. Multiple recent horizontal transfers of a large genomic region in cheese making fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheeseman, Kevin; Ropars, Jeanne; Renault, Pierre; Dupont, Joëlle; Gouzy, Jérôme; Branca, Antoine; Abraham, Anne-Laure; Ceppi, Maurizio; Conseiller, Emmanuel; Debuchy, Robert; Malagnac, Fabienne; Goarin, Anne; Silar, Philippe; Lacoste, Sandrine; Sallet, Erika; Bensimon, Aaron; Giraud, Tatiana; Brygoo, Yves

    2014-01-01

    While the extent and impact of horizontal transfers in prokaryotes are widely acknowledged, their importance to the eukaryotic kingdom is unclear and thought by many to be anecdotal. Here we report multiple recent transfers of a huge genomic island between Penicillium spp. found in the food environment. Sequencing of the two leading filamentous fungi used in cheese making, P. roqueforti and P. camemberti, and comparison with the penicillin producer P. rubens reveals a 575 kb long genomic island in P. roqueforti--called Wallaby--present as identical fragments at non-homologous loci in P. camemberti and P. rubens. Wallaby is detected in Penicillium collections exclusively in strains from food environments. Wallaby encompasses about 250 predicted genes, some of which are probably involved in competition with microorganisms. The occurrence of multiple recent eukaryotic transfers in the food environment provides strong evidence for the importance of this understudied and probably underestimated phenomenon in eukaryotes.

  4. Mitochondrial genome analyses suggest multiple Trichuris species in humans, baboons, and pigs from different geographical regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hawash, Mohamed B. F.; Andersen, Lee O.; Gasser, Robin B.;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The whipworms Trichuris trichiura and Trichuris suis are two parasitic nematodes of humans and pigs, respectively. Although whipworms in human and non-human primates historically have been referred to as T. trichiura, recent reports suggest that several Trichuris spp. are found...... in primates. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We sequenced and annotated complete mitochondrial genomes of Trichuris recovered from a human in Uganda, an olive baboon in the US, a hamadryas baboon in Denmark, and two pigs from Denmark and Uganda. Comparative analyses using other published mitochondrial genomes...... of Trichuris recovered from a human and a porcine host in China and from a françois' leaf-monkey (China) were performed, including phylogenetic analyses and pairwise genetic and amino acid distances. Genetic and protein distances between human Trichuris in Uganda and China were high (~19% and 15%, respectively...

  5. Identification of Accessory Genome Regions in Poultry Clostridium perfringens Isolates Carrying the netB Plasmid

    OpenAIRE

    Lepp, D.; Gong, J; Songer, J G; Boerlin, P.; Parreira, V. R.; Prescott, J F

    2013-01-01

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) is an economically important disease of poultry caused by certain Clostridium perfringens type A strains. NE pathogenesis involves the NetB toxin, which is encoded on a large conjugative plasmid within a 42-kb pathogenicity locus. Recent multilocus sequence type (MLST) studies have identified two predominant NE-associated clonal groups, suggesting that host genes are also involved in NE pathogenesis. We used microarray comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to assess ...

  6. Genome-wide association study of intraocular pressure identifies the GLCCI1/ICA1 region as a glaucoma susceptibility locus.

    OpenAIRE

    Blue Mountains Eye Study (BMES); Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium; Strange, A; Bellenguez, C; Freeman, C.; Pirinen, M.; Su, Z.; Band, G.; Pearson, R; Vukcevic, D.; Rautanen, A; Spencer, CC; Donnelly, P

    2013-01-01

    To discover quantitative trait loci for intraocular pressure, a major risk factor for glaucoma and the only modifiable one, we performed a genome-wide association study on a discovery cohort of 2175 individuals from Sydney, Australia. We found a novel association between intraocular pressure and a common variant at 7p21 near to GLCCI1 and ICA1. The findings in this region were confirmed through two UK replication cohorts totalling 4866 individuals (rs59072263, P(combined) = 1.10 × 10(-8)). A ...

  7. Transcripcional, functional and virulence analysis of a Pseudomonas Savastanoi pv. savastanoi genomic region shared with other pathogens of woody hosts

    OpenAIRE

    Caballo-Ponce, Eloy; Matas, IM; Ramos, C.

    2014-01-01

    The genome of the olive tree pathogen Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi (Psv) NCPPB3335 (58.1% G+C) encodes a region of about 15 kb, named VR8 (60.4% G+C), which is absent in all sequenced Pseudomonas syringae strains infecting herbaceous plants, but shared with P. syringae pathovars infecting woody hosts. RT-PCR analysis of the VR8 genes revealed the existence of 4 possible operons, of which the antABC and catBCA operons are involved in the degradation of anthranilate and catechol, respe...

  8. Genome-wide association of bipolar disorder suggests an enrichment of replicable associations in regions near genes.

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    Erin N Smith

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Although a highly heritable and disabling disease, bipolar disorder's (BD genetic variants have been challenging to identify. We present new genotype data for 1,190 cases and 401 controls and perform a genome-wide association study including additional samples for a total of 2,191 cases and 1,434 controls. We do not detect genome-wide significant associations for individual loci; however, across all SNPs, we show an association between the power to detect effects calculated from a previous genome-wide association study and evidence for replication (P = 1.5×10(-7. To demonstrate that this result is not likely to be a false positive, we analyze replication rates in a large meta-analysis of height and show that, in a large enough study, associations replicate as a function of power, approaching a linear relationship. Within BD, SNPs near exons exhibit a greater probability of replication, supporting an enrichment of reproducible associations near functional regions of genes. These results indicate that there is likely common genetic variation associated with BD near exons (±10 kb that could be identified in larger studies and, further, provide a framework for assessing the potential for replication when combining results from multiple studies.

  9. Relative effects of mutability and selection on single nucleotide polymorphisms in transcribed regions of the human genome

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    Amos Christopher I

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Motivation Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are the most common type of genetic variation in humans. However, the factors that affect SNP density are poorly understood. The goal of this study was to estimate the relative effects of mutability and selection on SNP density in transcribed regions of human genes. It is important for prediction of the regions that harbor functional polymorphisms. Results We used frequency-validated SNPs resulting from single-nucleotide substitutions. SNPs were subdivided into five functional categories: (i 5' untranslated region (UTR SNPs, (ii 3' UTR SNPs, (iii synonymous SNPs, (iv SNPs producing conservative missense mutations, and (v SNPs producing radical missense mutations. Each of these categories was further subdivided into nine mutational categories on the basis of the single-nucleotide substitution type. Thus, 45 functional/mutational categories were analyzed. The relative mutation rate in each mutational category was estimated on the basis of published data. The proportion of segregating sites (PSSs for each functional/mutational category was estimated by dividing the observed number of SNPs by the number of potential sites in the genome for a given functional/mutational category. By analyzing each functional group separately, we found significant positive correlations between PSSs and relative mutation rates (Spearman's correlation coefficient, at least r = 0.96, df = 9, P P = 0.001, suggesting that selection affects SNP density in transcribed regions of the genome. We used analyses of variance and covariance to estimate the relative effects of selection (functional category and mutability (relative mutation rate on the PSSs and found that approximately 87% of variation in PSS was due to variation in the mutation rate and approximately 13% was due to selection, suggesting that the probability that a site located in a transcribed region of a gene is polymorphic mostly depends on the mutability

  10. Highly conserved gene order and numerous novel repetitive elements in genomic regions linked to wing pattern variation in Heliconius butterflies

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    Halder Georg

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With over 20 parapatric races differing in their warningly colored wing patterns, the butterfly Heliconius erato provides a fascinating example of an adaptive radiation. Together with matching races of its co-mimic Heliconius melpomene, H. erato also represents a textbook case of Müllerian mimicry, a phenomenon where common warning signals are shared amongst noxious organisms. It is of great interest to identify the specific genes that control the mimetic wing patterns of H. erato and H. melpomene. To this end we have undertaken comparative mapping and targeted genomic sequencing in both species. This paper reports on a comparative analysis of genomic sequences linked to color pattern mimicry genes in Heliconius. Results Scoring AFLP polymorphisms in H. erato broods allowed us to survey loci at approximately 362 kb intervals across the genome. With this strategy we were able to identify markers tightly linked to two color pattern genes: D and Cr, which were then used to screen H. erato BAC libraries in order to identify clones for sequencing. Gene density across 600 kb of BAC sequences appeared relatively low, although the number of predicted open reading frames was typical for an insect. We focused analyses on the D- and Cr-linked H. erato BAC sequences and on the Yb-linked H. melpomene BAC sequence. A comparative analysis between homologous regions of H. erato (Cr-linked BAC and H. melpomene (Yb-linked BAC revealed high levels of sequence conservation and microsynteny between the two species. We found that repeated elements constitute 26% and 20% of BAC sequences from H. erato and H. melpomene respectively. The majority of these repetitive sequences appear to be novel, as they showed no significant similarity to any other available insect sequences. We also observed signs of fine scale conservation of gene order between Heliconius and the moth Bombyx mori, suggesting that lepidopteran genome architecture may be conserved

  11. Identification of regions in multiple sequence alignments thermodynamically suitable for targeting by consensus oligonucleotides: application to HIV genome

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    Matveeva Olga V

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computer programs for the generation of multiple sequence alignments such as "Clustal W" allow detection of regions that are most conserved among many sequence variants. However, even for regions that are equally conserved, their potential utility as hybridization targets varies. Mismatches in sequence variants are more disruptive in some duplexes than in others. Additionally, the propensity for self-interactions amongst oligonucleotides targeting conserved regions differs and the structure of target regions themselves can also influence hybridization efficiency. There is a need to develop software that will employ thermodynamic selection criteria for finding optimal hybridization targets in related sequences. Results A new scheme and new software for optimal detection of oligonucleotide hybridization targets common to families of aligned sequences is suggested and applied to aligned sequence variants of the complete HIV-1 genome. The scheme employs sequential filtering procedures with experimentally determined thermodynamic cut off points: 1 creation of a consensus sequence of RNA or DNA from aligned sequence variants with specification of the lengths of fragments to be used as oligonucleotide targets in the analyses; 2 selection of DNA oligonucleotides that have pairing potential, greater than a defined threshold, with all variants of aligned RNA sequences; 3 elimination of DNA oligonucleotides that have self-pairing potentials for intra- and inter-molecular interactions greater than defined thresholds. This scheme has been applied to the HIV-1 genome with experimentally determined thermodynamic cut off points. Theoretically optimal RNA target regions for consensus oligonucleotides were found. They can be further used for improvement of oligo-probe based HIV detection techniques. Conclusions A selection scheme with thermodynamic thresholds and software is presented in this study. The package can be used for any purpose

  12. Development and validation of new SSR markers from expressed regions in the garlic genome

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    Meryem Ipek

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Only a limited number of simple sequence repeat (SSR markers is available for the genome of garlic (Allium sativum L. despite the fact that SSR markers have become one of the most preferred DNA marker systems. To develop new SSR markers for the garlic genome, garlic expressed sequence tags (ESTs at the publicly available GarlicEST database were screened for SSR motifs and a total of 132 SSR motifs were identified. Primer pairs were designed for 50 SSR motifs and 24 of these primer pairs were selected as SSR markers based on their consistent amplification patterns and polymorphisms. In addition, two SSR markers were developed from the sequences of garlic cDNA-AFLP fragments. The use of 26 EST-SSR markers for the assessment of genetic relationship was tested using 31 garlic genotypes. Twenty six EST-SSR markers amplified 130 polymorphic DNA fragments and the number of polymorphic alleles per SSR marker ranged from 2 to 13 with an average of 5 alleles. Observed heterozygosity and polymorphism information content (PIC of the SSR markers were between 0.23 and 0.88, and 0.20 and 0.87, respectively. Twenty one out of the 31 garlic genotypes were analyzed in a previous study using AFLP markers and the garlic genotypes clustered together with AFLP markers were also grouped together with EST-SSR markers demonstrating high concordance between AFLP and EST-SSR marker systems and possible immediate application of EST-SSR markers for fingerprinting of garlic clones. EST-SSR markers could be used in genetic studies such as genetic mapping, association mapping, genetic diversity and comparison of the genomes of Allium species.

  13. Whole genome comparisons suggest random distribution of Mycobacterium ulcerans genotypes in a Buruli ulcer endemic region of Ghana.

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    Anthony S Ablordey

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Efforts to control the spread of Buruli ulcer--an emerging ulcerative skin infection caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans--have been hampered by our poor understanding of reservoirs and transmission. To help address this issue, we compared whole genomes from 18 clinical M. ulcerans isolates from a 30 km2 region within the Asante Akim North District, Ashanti region, Ghana, with 15 other M. ulcerans isolates from elsewhere in Ghana and the surrounding countries of Ivory Coast, Togo, Benin and Nigeria. Contrary to our expectations of finding minor DNA sequence variations among isolates representing a single M. ulcerans circulating genotype, we found instead two distinct genotypes. One genotype was closely related to isolates from neighbouring regions of Amansie West and Densu, consistent with the predicted local endemic clone, but the second genotype (separated by 138 single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs] from other Ghanaian strains most closely matched M. ulcerans from Nigeria, suggesting another introduction of M. ulcerans to Ghana, perhaps from that country. Both the exotic genotype and the local Ghanaian genotype displayed highly restricted intra-strain genetic variation, with less than 50 SNP differences across a 5.2 Mbp core genome within each genotype. Interestingly, there was no discernible spatial clustering of genotypes at the local village scale. Interviews revealed no obvious epidemiological links among BU patients who had been infected with identical M. ulcerans genotypes but lived in geographically separate villages. We conclude that M. ulcerans is spread widely across the region, with multiple genotypes present in any one area. These data give us new perspectives on the behaviour of possible reservoirs and subsequent transmission mechanisms of M. ulcerans. These observations also show for the first time that M. ulcerans can be mobilized, introduced to a new area and then spread within a population. Potential reservoirs of M. ulcerans

  14. DNA-guided establishment of nucleosome patterns within coding regions of a eukaryotic genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beh, Leslie Y; Müller, Manuel M; Muir, Tom W; Kaplan, Noam; Landweber, Laura F

    2015-11-01

    A conserved hallmark of eukaryotic chromatin architecture is the distinctive array of well-positioned nucleosomes downstream from transcription start sites (TSS). Recent studies indicate that trans-acting factors establish this stereotypical array. Here, we present the first genome-wide in vitro and in vivo nucleosome maps for the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila. In contrast with previous studies in yeast, we find that the stereotypical nucleosome array is preserved in the in vitro reconstituted map, which is governed only by the DNA sequence preferences of nucleosomes. Remarkably, this average in vitro pattern arises from the presence of subsets of nucleosomes, rather than the whole array, in individual Tetrahymena genes. Variation in GC content contributes to the positioning of these sequence-directed nucleosomes and affects codon usage and amino acid composition in genes. Given that the AT-rich Tetrahymena genome is intrinsically unfavorable for nucleosome formation, we propose that these "seed" nucleosomes--together with trans-acting factors--may facilitate the establishment of nucleosome arrays within genes in vivo, while minimizing changes to the underlying coding sequences.

  15. Genomic organization of duplicated major histocompatibility complex class I regions in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar

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    Phillips Ruth B

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously identified associations between major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I and resistance towards bacterial and viral pathogens in Atlantic salmon. To evaluate if only MHC or also closely linked genes contributed to the observed resistance we ventured into sequencing of the duplicated MHC class I regions of Atlantic salmon. Results Nine BACs covering more than 500 kb of the two duplicated MHC class I regions of Atlantic salmon were sequenced and the gene organizations characterized. Both regions contained the proteasome components PSMB8, PSMB9, PSMB9-like and PSMB10 in addition to the transporter for antigen processing TAP2, as well as genes for KIFC1, ZBTB22, DAXX, TAPBP, BRD2, COL11A2, RXRB and SLC39A7. The IA region contained the recently reported MHC class I Sasa-ULA locus residing approximately 50 kb upstream of the major Sasa-UBA locus. The duplicated class IB region contained an MHC class I locus resembling the rainbow trout UCA locus, but although transcribed it was a pseudogene. No other MHC class I-like genes were detected in the two duplicated regions. Two allelic BACs spanning the UBA locus had 99.2% identity over 125 kb, while the IA region showed 82.5% identity over 136 kb to the IB region. The Atlantic salmon IB region had an insert of 220 kb in comparison to the IA region containing three chitin synthase genes. Conclusion We have characterized the gene organization of more than 500 kb of the two duplicated MHC class I regions in Atlantic salmon. Although Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout are closely related, the gene organization of their IB region has undergone extensive gene rearrangements. The Atlantic salmon has only one class I UCA pseudogene in the IB region while trout contains the four MHC UCA, UDA, UEA and UFA class I loci. The large differences in gene content and most likely function of the salmon and trout class IB region clearly argues that sequencing of salmon will not

  16. The Genomic Ancestry of Individuals from Different Geographical Regions of Brazil Is More Uniform Than Expected

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Sérgio D. J.; Di Pietro, Giuliano; Fuchshuber-Moraes, Mateus; Genro, Julia Pasqualini; Hutz, Mara H.; Kehdy, Fernanda de Souza Gomes; Kohlrausch, Fabiana; Magno, Luiz Alexandre Viana; Montenegro, Raquel Carvalho; Moraes, Manoel Odorico; de Moraes, Maria Elisabete Amaral; de Moraes, Milene Raiol; Ojopi, Élida B.; Perini, Jamila A.; Racciopi, Clarice; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea Kely Campos; Rios-Santos, Fabrício; Romano-Silva, Marco A.; Sortica, Vinicius A.; Suarez-Kurtz, Guilherme

    2011-01-01

    Based on pre-DNA racial/color methodology, clinical and pharmacological trials have traditionally considered the different geographical regions of Brazil as being very heterogeneous. We wished to ascertain how such diversity of regional color categories correlated with ancestry. Using a panel of 40 validated ancestry-informative insertion-deletion DNA polymorphisms we estimated individually the European, African and Amerindian ancestry components of 934 self-categorized White, Brown or Black Brazilians from the four most populous regions of the Country. We unraveled great ancestral diversity between and within the different regions. Especially, color categories in the northern part of Brazil diverged significantly in their ancestry proportions from their counterparts in the southern part of the Country, indicating that diverse regional semantics were being used in the self-classification as White, Brown or Black. To circumvent these regional subjective differences in color perception, we estimated the general ancestry proportions of each of the four regions in a form independent of color considerations. For that, we multiplied the proportions of a given ancestry in a given color category by the official census information about the proportion of that color category in the specific region, to arrive at a “total ancestry” estimate. Once such a calculation was performed, there emerged a much higher level of uniformity than previously expected. In all regions studied, the European ancestry was predominant, with proportions ranging from 60.6% in the Northeast to 77.7% in the South. We propose that the immigration of six million Europeans to Brazil in the 19th and 20th centuries - a phenomenon described and intended as the “whitening of Brazil” - is in large part responsible for dissipating previous ancestry dissimilarities that reflected region-specific population histories. These findings, of both clinical and sociological importance for Brazil, should also be

  17. Medicago truncatula, an intergenomic vehicle for the map-based cloning of pea (Pisum sativum) genes. Comparative structural genomic studies of the pea Sym2-Nod3 region

    OpenAIRE

    Gualtieri González-Latorre, G.S.

    2001-01-01

    To determine the usefulness of M. truncatula as intergenomic vehicle for the positional cloning of pea genes it was studied whether these legumes are microsyntenic. These studies were focused on the pea Sym2 and Nod3 genomic regions. The M. truncatula orthologous genomic regions have been cloned and it was shown that these regions of the two legumes are microsyntenic. Both Sym2 and Nod3 play a key role in the pea- Rhizobium symbiosis, controlling Nod factor-structure dependent infection and a...

  18. Potential virulence determinants in terminal regions of variola smallpox virus genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massung, R F; Esposito, J J; Liu, L I; Qi, J; Utterback, T R; Knight, J C; Aubin, L; Yuran, T E; Parsons, J M; Loparev, V N

    Smallpox eradication culminated the most successful antimicrobial campaign in medical history. To characterize further the linear double-stranded DNA genome of the aetiological agent of smallpox, we have determined the entire nucleotide sequence of the highly virulent variola major virus, strain Bangladesh-1975 (VAR-BSH; 186,102 base pairs, 33.7% G + C; Genbank accession number, L22579). Here we highlight features of the molecule and focus on a few of the 187 putative proteins that probably contribute to pathogenicity and virus host-range properties. One hundred and fifty proteins were markedly similar to those of vaccinia virus (smallpox vaccine), for which a complete sequence has been reported for strain Copenhagen (VAC-CPN; 191,636 base pairs, 33.3% G + C). The remaining 37 proteins reflected variola-specific sequences or open reading frame divergences for variant proteins, which are often truncated or elongated compared with their vaccinia counterparts.

  19. Mapping codon usage of the translation initiation region in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dou Yong-xi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Porcine reproductive and respitatory syndrome virus (PRRSV is a recently emerged pathogen and severely affects swine populations worldwide. The replication of PRRSV is tightly controlled by viral gene expression and the codon usage of translation initiation region within each gene could potentially regulate the translation rate. Therefore, a better understanding of the codon usage pattern of the initiation translation region would shed light on the regulation of PRRSV gene expression. Results In this study, the codon usage in the translation initiation region and in the whole coding sequence was compared in PRRSV ORF1a and ORFs2-7. To investigate the potential role of codon usage in affecting the translation initiation rate, we established a codon usage model for PRRSV translation initiation region. We observed that some non-preferential codons are preferentially used in the translation initiation region in particular ORFs. Although some positions vary with codons, they intend to use codons with negative CUB. Furthermore, our model of codon usage showed that the conserved pattern of CUB is not directly consensus with the conserved sequence, but shaped under the translation selection. Conclusions The non-variation pattern with negative CUB in the PRRSV translation initiation region scanned by ribosomes is considered the rate-limiting step in the translation process.

  20. A novel mitochondrial genome architecture in thrips (Insecta: Thysanoptera): extreme size asymmetry among chromosomes and possible recent control region duplication

    OpenAIRE

    Dickey, Aaron M.; Kumar, Vivek; Morgan, J. Kent; Jara-Cavieres, Antonella; Robert G Shatters; McKenzie, Cindy L.; Lance S Osborne

    2015-01-01

    Background Multipartite mitochondrial genomes are very rare in animals but have been found previously in two insect orders with highly rearranged genomes, the Phthiraptera (parasitic lice), and the Psocoptera (booklice/barklice). Results We provide the first report of a multipartite mitochondrial genome architecture in a third order with highly rearranged genomes: Thysanoptera (thrips). We sequenced the complete mitochondrial genomes of two divergent members of the Scirtothrips dorsalis crypt...

  1. Isolation of Specific Genomic Regions and Identification of Their Associated Molecules by Engineered DNA-Binding Molecule-Mediated Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (enChIP) Using the CRISPR System and TAL Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Hodaka; Fujita, Toshitsugu

    2015-09-09

    Comprehensive understanding of genome functions requires identification of molecules (proteins, RNAs, genomic regions, etc.) bound to specific genomic regions of interest in vivo. To perform biochemical and molecular biological analysis of specific genomic regions, we developed engineered DNA-binding molecule-mediated chromatin immunoprecipitation (enChIP) to purify genomic regions of interest. In enChIP, specific genomic regions are tagged for biochemical purification using engineered DNA-binding molecules, such as transcription activator-like (TAL) proteins and a catalytically inactive form of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system. enChIP is a comprehensive approach that emphasizes non-biased search using next-generation sequencing (NGS), microarrays, mass spectrometry (MS), and other methods. Moreover, this approach is not restricted to cultured cell lines and can be easily extended to organisms. In this review, we discuss applications of enChIP to elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying genome functions.

  2. Physical mapping of a large plant genome using global high-information-content-fingerprinting: the distal region of the wheat ancestor Aegilops tauschii chromosome 3DS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Frank M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical maps employing libraries of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC clones are essential for comparative genomics and sequencing of large and repetitive genomes such as those of the hexaploid bread wheat. The diploid ancestor of the D-genome of hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum, Aegilops tauschii, is used as a resource for wheat genomics. The barley diploid genome also provides a good model for the Triticeae and T. aestivum since it is only slightly larger than the ancestor wheat D genome. Gene co-linearity between the grasses can be exploited by extrapolating from rice and Brachypodium distachyon to Ae. tauschii or barley, and then to wheat. Results We report the use of Ae. tauschii for the construction of the physical map of a large distal region of chromosome arm 3DS. A physical map of 25.4 Mb was constructed by anchoring BAC clones of Ae. tauschii with 85 EST on the Ae. tauschii and barley genetic maps. The 24 contigs were aligned to the rice and B. distachyon genomic sequences and a high density SNP genetic map of barley. As expected, the mapped region is highly collinear to the orthologous chromosome 1 in rice, chromosome 2 in B. distachyon and chromosome 3H in barley. However, the chromosome scale of the comparative maps presented provides new insights into grass genome organization. The disruptions of the Ae. tauschii-rice and Ae. tauschii-Brachypodium syntenies were identical. We observed chromosomal rearrangements between Ae. tauschii and barley. The comparison of Ae. tauschii physical and genetic maps showed that the recombination rate across the region dropped from 2.19 cM/Mb in the distal region to 0.09 cM/Mb in the proximal region. The size of the gaps between contigs was evaluated by comparing the recombination rate along the map with the local recombination rates calculated on single contigs. Conclusions The physical map reported here is the first physical map using fingerprinting of a complete

  3. Genomic organization of the human PAX 3 gene: DNA sequence analysis of the region disrupted in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macina, R.A.; Galili, N.; Riethman, H.C. [Wistar Inst., Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-03-01

    Mutations in the human PAX3 gene have previously been associated with two distinct diseases, Waardenburg syndrome and alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. In this report the authors establish that the normal human PAX3 gene is encoded by 8 exons. Intron-exon boundary sequences were obtained for PAX 3 exons 5, 6, 7, and 8 and together with previous work provide the complete genomic sequence organization for PAX3. Difficulties in obtaining overlapping genomic clone coverage of PAX3 were circumvented in part by RARE cleavage mapping, which showed that the entire PAX3 gene spans 100 kb of chromosome 2. Sequence analysis of the last intron of PAX3, which contains the previously mapped t(2;13)(q35;q14) translocation breakpoints of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, revealed the presence of a pair of inverted Alu repeats and a pair of inverted (GT){sub n}-rich microsatellite repeats with in a 5k-kb region. This work establishes the complete structure of PAX 3 and will permit high-resolution analyses of this locus for mutations associated with Waardenburg syndrome, alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, and other phenotypes for which PAX3 may be a candidate locus.31 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  4. QTLs Regulating the Contents of Antioxidants, Phenolics, and Flavonoids in Soybean Seeds Share a Common Genomic Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Man-Wah; Muñoz, Nacira B; Wong, Chi-Fai; Wong, Fuk-Ling; Wong, Kwong-Sen; Wong, Johanna Wing-Hang; Qi, Xinpeng; Li, Kwan-Pok; Ng, Ming-Sin; Lam, Hon-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Soybean seeds are a rich source of phenolic compounds, especially isoflavonoids, which are important nutraceuticals. Our study using 14 wild- and 16 cultivated-soybean accessions shows that seeds from cultivated soybeans generally contain lower total antioxidants compared to their wild counterparts, likely an unintended consequence of domestication or human selection. Using a recombinant inbred population resulting from a wild and a cultivated soybean parent and a bin map approach, we have identified an overlapping genomic region containing major quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that regulate the seed contents of total antioxidants, phenolics, and flavonoids. The QTL for seed antioxidant content contains 14 annotated genes based on the Williams 82 reference genome (Gmax1.01). None of these genes encodes functions that are related to the phenylpropanoid pathway of soybean. However, we found three putative Multidrug And Toxic Compound Extrusion (MATE) transporter genes within this QTL and one adjacent to it (GmMATE1-4). Moreover, we have identified non-synonymous changes between GmMATE1 and GmMATE2, and that GmMATE3 encodes an antisense transcript that expresses in pods. Whether the polymorphisms in GmMATE proteins are major determinants of the antioxidant contents, or whether the antisense transcripts of GmMATE3 play important regulatory roles, awaits further functional investigations. PMID:27379137

  5. Microalterations of inherently unstable genomic regions in rat mammary carcinomas as revealed by long oligonucleotide array-based comparative genomic hybridization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adamovic, T.; McAllister, D.; Guryev, V.; Wang, X.; Andrae, J.W.; Cuppen, E.; Jacob, H.; Sugg, S.L.

    2009-01-01

    The presence of copy number variants in normal genomes poses a challenge to identify small genuine somatic copy number changes in high-resolution cancer genome profiling studies due to the use of unpaired reference DNA. Another problem is the well-known rearrangements of immunoglobulin and T-cell re

  6. Microalterations of Inherently Unstable Genomic Regions in Rat Mammary Carcinomas as Revealed by Long Oligonucleotide Array-Based Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adamovic, Tatjana; McAllister, Donna; Guryev, Victor; Wang, Xujing; Andrae, Jaime Wendt; Cuppen, Edwin; Jacob, Howard J.; Sugg, Sonia L.

    2009-01-01

    The presence of copy number variants in normal genomes poses a challenge to identify small genuine somatic copy number changes in high-resolution cancer genome profiling studies due to the use of unpaired reference DNA. Another problem is the well-known rearrangements of immunoglobulin and T-cell re

  7. DNA copy number analysis of fresh and formalin-fixed specimens by shallow whole-genome sequencing with identification and exclusion of problematic regions in the genome assembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheinin, I.; Sie, D.; Bengtsson, H.; Wiel, M.A. van de; Olshen, A.B.; Thuijl, H.F. van; Essen, H.F. van; Eijk, P.P.; Rustenburg, F.; Meijer, G.A.; Reijneveld, J.C.; Wesseling, P.; Pinkel, D.; Albertson, D.G.; Ylstra, B.

    2014-01-01

    Detection of DNA copy number aberrations by shallow whole-genome sequencing (WGS) faces many challenges, including lack of completion and errors in the human reference genome, repetitive sequences, polymorphisms, variable sample quality, and biases in the sequencing procedures. Formalin-fixed paraff

  8. Genome-wide association study reveals regions associated with gestation length in two pig populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, A M; Lopes, M S; Harlizius, B; Bastiaansen, J W M

    2016-04-01

    Reproduction traits, such as gestation length (GLE), play an important role in dam line breeding in pigs. The objective of our study was to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with GLE in two pig populations. Genotypes and deregressed breeding values were available for 2081 Dutch Landrace-based (DL) and 2301 Large White-based (LW) pigs. We identified two QTL regions for GLE, one in each population. For DL, three associated SNPs were detected in one QTL region spanning 0.52 Mbp on Sus scrofa chromosome (SSC) 2. For LW, four associated SNPs were detected in one region of 0.14 Mbp on SSC5. The region on SSC2 contains the heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HBEGF) gene, which promotes embryo implantation and has been described to be involved in embryo survival throughout gestation. The associated SNP can be used for marker-assisted selection in the studied populations, and further studies of the HBEGF gene are warranted to investigate its role in GLE.

  9. Origins of the Moken Sea Gypsies inferred from mitochondrial hypervariable region and whole genome sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancause, Kelsey Needham; Chan, Chim W; Arunotai, Narumon Hinshiranan; Lum, J Koji

    2009-02-01

    The origins of the Moken 'Sea Gypsies,' a group of traditionally boat-dwelling nomadic foragers, remain speculative despite previous examinations from linguistic, sociocultural and genetic perspectives. We explored Moken origin(s) and affinities by comparing whole mitochondrial genome and hypervariable segment I sequences from 12 Moken individuals, sampled from four islands of the Mergui Archipelago, to other mainland Asian, Island Southeast Asian (ISEA) and Oceanic populations. These analyses revealed a major (11/12) and a minor (1/12) haplotype in the population, indicating low mitochondrial diversity likely resulting from historically low population sizes, isolation and consequent genetic drift. Phylogenetic analyses revealed close relationships between the major lineage (MKN1) and ISEA, mainland Asian and aboriginal Malay populations, and of the minor lineage (MKN2) to populations from ISEA. MKN1 belongs to a recently defined subclade of the ancient yet localized M21 haplogroup. MKN2 is not closely related to any previously sampled lineages, but has been tentatively assigned to the basal M46 haplogroup that possibly originated among the original inhabitants of ISEA. Our analyses suggest that MKN1 originated within coastal mainland SEA and dispersed into ISEA and rapidly into the Mergui Archipelago within the past few thousand years as a result of climate change induced population pressure. PMID:19158811

  10. Cloning and genomic nucleotide sequence of the matrix attachment region binding protein from the halotolerant alga Dunaliella salina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng-Ju; Wang, Tian-Yun; Wang, Ya-Feng; Yang, Rui; Li, Zhao-Xi

    2013-07-01

    In our previous study, the sequence of a matrix attachment region binding protein (MBP) cDNA was cloned from the unicellular green alga Dunaliella salina. However, the nucleotide sequence of this gene has not been reported so far. In this paper, the nucleotide sequence of MBP was cloned and characterized, and its gene copy number was determined. The MBP nucleotide sequence is 5641 bp long, and interrupted by 12 introns ranging from 132 to 562 bp. All the introns in the D. salina MBP gene have orthodox splice sites, exhibiting GT at the 5' end and AG at the 3' end. Southern blot analysis showed that MBP only has one copy in the D. salina genome. PMID:22961592

  11. Re-annotation of the physical map of Glycine max for polyploid-like regions by BAC end sequence driven whole genome shotgun read assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shultz Jeffry

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many of the world's most important food crops have either polyploid genomes or homeologous regions derived from segmental shuffling following polyploid formation. The soybean (Glycine max genome has been shown to be composed of approximately four thousand short interspersed homeologous regions with 1, 2 or 4 copies per haploid genome by RFLP analysis, microsatellite anchors to BACs and by contigs formed from BAC fingerprints. Despite these similar regions,, the genome has been sequenced by whole genome shotgun sequence (WGS. Here the aim was to use BAC end sequences (BES derived from three minimum tile paths (MTP to examine the extent and homogeneity of polyploid-like regions within contigs and the extent of correlation between the polyploid-like regions inferred from fingerprinting and the polyploid-like sequences inferred from WGS matches. Results Results show that when sequence divergence was 1–10%, the copy number of homeologous regions could be identified from sequence variation in WGS reads overlapping BES. Homeolog sequence variants (HSVs were single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; 89% and single nucleotide indels (SNIs 10%. Larger indels were rare but present (1%. Simulations that had predicted fingerprints of homeologous regions could be separated when divergence exceeded 2% were shown to be false. We show that a 5–10% sequence divergence is necessary to separate homeologs by fingerprinting. BES compared to WGS traces showed polyploid-like regions with less than 1% sequence divergence exist at 2.3% of the locations assayed. Conclusion The use of HSVs like SNPs and SNIs to characterize BACs wil improve contig building methods. The implications for bioinformatic and functional annotation of polyploid and paleopolyploid genomes show that a combined approach of BAC fingerprint based physical maps, WGS sequence and HSV-based partitioning of BAC clones from homeologous regions to separate contigs will allow reliable de

  12. Genetic and physical mapping of the genomic region spanning CMT4A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othmane, K.B.; Loeb, D.; Roses, A.D. [Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT4) is a severe childhood neuropathy classified into three types: A, B, and C. We previously mapped CMT4A to chromosome 8q13-q21 in four large Tunisian families. Analysis of recombination events suggested the order: cent.-D8S279-(D8S286,D8S164, CMT4A)-D8S84-tel. Families with types B and C were subsequently typed and linkage for these types was excluded for the CMT4A region and other known CMT loci. Recently, the gene for a major peripheral myelin protein (PMP2) was mapped by FISH to chromosome 8q21-q22 and therefore appeared to be a strong candidate gene for CMT4A. We used SSCP analysis, DNA sequencing, FISH and YAC mapping analysis, and demonstrated that PMP2 is not the defect in CMT4A. Using physical mapping data, we sublocalized a new genethon marker (D8S548) to the CMT4A region between D8S286 and D8S164. All affected CMT4A patients were homozygotes for this polymorphic microsatellite as expected from its physical localization. We screened the CEPH megabase YAC library using the closest markers; over 30 YACs were isolated and characterized by PFGE. FISH analysis revealed about 16% chimeras. The YACs span the 8 cM region between D8S279 and PMP2 (mapped distal to D8S84), with a current 1 cM gap between D8S164 and D8S84. We are currently using Alu-PCR and vectorette to develop end clones in order to identify new YACs in the region and further close this gap. Alu-PCR fragments have identified several new microsatellites in the region which can be used for additional mapping of the CMT4A gene.

  13. Genome-wide association studies identifies seven major regions responsible for iron deficiency chlorosis in soybean (Glycine max.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujan Mamidi

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency chlorosis (IDC is a yield limiting problem in soybean (Glycine max (L. Merr production regions with calcareous soils. Genome-wide association study (GWAS was performed using a high density SNP map to discover significant markers, QTL and candidate genes associated with IDC trait variation. A stepwise regression model included eight markers after considering LD between markers, and identified seven major effect QTL on seven chromosomes. Twelve candidate genes known to be associated with iron metabolism mapped near these QTL supporting the polygenic nature of IDC. A non-synonymous substitution with the highest significance in a major QTL region suggests soybean orthologs of FRE1 on Gm03 is a major gene responsible for trait variation. NAS3, a gene that encodes the enzyme nicotianamine synthase which synthesizes the iron chelator nicotianamine also maps to the same QTL region. Disease resistant genes also map to the major QTL, supporting the hypothesis that pathogens compete with the plant for Fe and increase iron deficiency. The markers and the allelic combinations identified here can be further used for marker assisted selection.

  14. Comparative sequence analysis of the Ghd7 orthologous regions revealed movement of Ghd7 in the grass genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Yang

    Full Text Available Ghd7 is an important rice gene that has a major effect on several agronomic traits, including yield. To reveal the origin of Ghd7 and sequence evolution of this locus, we performed a comparative sequence analysis of the Ghd7 orthologous regions from ten diploid Oryza species, Brachypodium distachyon, sorghum and maize. Sequence analysis demonstrated high gene collinearity across the genus Oryza and a disruption of collinearity among non-Oryza species. In particular, Ghd7 was not present in orthologous positions except in Oryza species. The Ghd7 regions were found to have low gene densities and high contents of repetitive elements, and that the sizes of orthologous regions varied tremendously. The large transposable element contents resulted in a high frequency of pseudogenization and gene movement events surrounding the Ghd7 loci. Annotation information and cytological experiments have indicated that Ghd7 is a heterochromatic gene. Ghd7 orthologs were identified in B. distachyon, sorghum and maize by phylogenetic analysis; however, the positions of orthologous genes differed dramatically as a consequence of gene movements in grasses. Rather, we identified sequence remnants of gene movement of Ghd7 mediated by illegitimate recombination in the B. distachyon genome.

  15. Genomic scan of selective sweeps in thin and fat tail sheep breeds for identifying of candidate regions associated with fat deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moradi Mohammad Hossein

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of genomic regions that have been targets of selection for phenotypic traits is one of the most important and challenging areas of research in animal genetics. However, currently there are relatively few genomic regions identified that have been subject to positive selection. In this study, a genome-wide scan using ~50,000 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs was performed in an attempt to identify genomic regions associated with fat deposition in fat-tail breeds. This trait and its modification are very important in those countries grazing these breeds. Results Two independent experiments using either Iranian or Ovine HapMap genotyping data contrasted thin and fat tail breeds. Population differentiation using FST in Iranian thin and fat tail breeds revealed seven genomic regions. Almost all of these regions overlapped with QTLs that had previously been identified as affecting fat and carcass yield traits in beef and dairy cattle. Study of selection sweep signatures using FST in thin and fat tail breeds sampled from the Ovine HapMap project confirmed three of these regions located on Chromosomes 5, 7 and X. We found increased homozygosity in these regions in favour of fat tail breeds on chromosome 5 and X and in favour of thin tail breeds on chromosome 7. Conclusions In this study, we were able to identify three novel regions associated with fat deposition in thin and fat tail sheep breeds. Two of these were associated with an increase of homozygosity in the fat tail breeds which would be consistent with selection for mutations affecting fat tail size several thousand years after domestication.

  16. The strong enhancer element in the immediate early region of the human cytomegalovirus genome

    OpenAIRE

    Boshart, Michael; Weber, Frank; Rüger, Rüdiger; Dorsch-Häsler, Karoline; Jahn, Gerhard; Stoerker, Jay; Schaffner, Walter; Fleckenstein, Bernhard

    1985-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a member of the herpesvirus group, was found to possess a strong transcription enhancer in the immediate early gene region. Co-transfection of enhancerless SV40 DNA with randomly fragmented HCMV DNA yielded two SV40-like recombinant viruses , each containing HCMV DNA fragments that were substituting for the missing SV40 enhancer. The two inserts , 341 and 262 bp in length , are overlapping segments of genuine viral DNA representing ...

  17. Constructing chromosome- and region-specific cosmid maps of the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrano, A V; de Jong, P J; Branscomb, E; Slezak, T; Watkins, B W

    1989-01-01

    A chromosome-specific ordered set of cosmids would be a significant contribution toward understanding human chromosome structure and function. We are developing two parallel approaches for creating an ordered cosmid library of human chromosome 19 and other selected subregions of the human genome. The "bottom up" approach is used to establish sets of overlapping cosmids as islands or "contigs" along the chromosome, while the "top down" approach, using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and yeast cloning, will establish a large-fragment map and close the inevitable gaps remaining from the "bottom up" approach. Source DNA consists of a single homolog of chromosome 19 from a hamster--human hybrid cell and human fragments cloned in yeast artificial chromosomes. We have constructed cosmid libraries in a vector that facilitates cloning small amounts of DNA, allows transcription of the insert termini, and contains unique sites for partial-digest mapping. Computer simulations of cosmid contig building suggest that near-optimal efficiency can be achieved with high-density restriction fragment digest schemes that can detect 20-30% overlap between cosmids. We developed the chemistry and data analysis tools to compare the ordering efficiencies of several cosmid restriction digest fingerprinting strategies. Restriction fragments from a four-cutter digest are labeled with a fluorochrome, separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and detected after laser excitation as they traverse a fixed point in the gel. We have also developed the software to rapidly process the output signal to define and analyze the fragment peaks. Up to three cosmids (or three different digests of the same cosmid) plus a size standard are analyzed simultaneously in a single gel lane.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2698823

  18. RNA interactions in the 5' region of the HIV-1 genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Christian Kroun; Andersen, Ebbe Sloth; Knudsen, Bjarne;

    2004-01-01

    present a secondary structure model for the entire 744 nucleotide fragment, which incorporates previously recognized and novel structural elements. In particular, our data provided strong evidence for a long-distance interaction between the region encompassing the AUG Gag initiation codon and an upstream...... a combination of bioinformatics, enzymatic probing, native gel electrophoresis, and UV-crosslinking experiments. We used a recently developed RNA folding algorithm (Pfold) to predict the common secondary structure of an alignment of 20 divergent HIV-1 sequences. Combining this analysis with biochemical data, we...

  19. Positive selection in the chromosome 16 VKORC1 genomic region has contributed to the variability of anticoagulant response in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blandine Patillon

    Full Text Available VKORC1 (vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1, 16p11.2 is the main genetic determinant of human response to oral anticoagulants of antivitamin K type (AVK. This gene was recently suggested to be a putative target of positive selection in East Asian populations. In this study, we genotyped the HGDP-CEPH Panel for six VKORC1 SNPs and downloaded chromosome 16 genotypes from the HGDP-CEPH database in order to characterize the geographic distribution of footprints of positive selection within and around this locus. A unique VKORC1 haplotype carrying the promoter mutation associated with AVK sensitivity showed especially high frequencies in all the 17 HGDP-CEPH East Asian population samples. VKORC1 and 24 neighboring genes were found to lie in a 505 kb region of strong linkage disequilibrium in these populations. Patterns of allele frequency differentiation and haplotype structure suggest that this genomic region has been submitted to a near complete selective sweep in all East Asian populations and only in this geographic area. The most extreme scores of the different selection tests are found within a smaller 45 kb region that contains VKORC1 and three other genes (BCKDK, MYST1 (KAT8, and PRSS8 with different functions. Because of the strong linkage disequilibrium, it is not possible to determine if VKORC1 or one of the three other genes is the target of this strong positive selection that could explain present-day differences among human populations in AVK dose requirement. Our results show that the extended region surrounding a presumable single target of positive selection should be analyzed for genetic variation in a wide range of genetically diverse populations in order to account for other neighboring and confounding selective events and the hitchhiking effect.

  20. Positive selection in the chromosome 16 VKORC1 genomic region has contributed to the variability of anticoagulant response in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patillon, Blandine; Luisi, Pierre; Blanché, Hélène; Patin, Etienne; Cann, Howard M; Génin, Emmanuelle; Sabbagh, Audrey

    2012-01-01

    VKORC1 (vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1, 16p11.2) is the main genetic determinant of human response to oral anticoagulants of antivitamin K type (AVK). This gene was recently suggested to be a putative target of positive selection in East Asian populations. In this study, we genotyped the HGDP-CEPH Panel for six VKORC1 SNPs and downloaded chromosome 16 genotypes from the HGDP-CEPH database in order to characterize the geographic distribution of footprints of positive selection within and around this locus. A unique VKORC1 haplotype carrying the promoter mutation associated with AVK sensitivity showed especially high frequencies in all the 17 HGDP-CEPH East Asian population samples. VKORC1 and 24 neighboring genes were found to lie in a 505 kb region of strong linkage disequilibrium in these populations. Patterns of allele frequency differentiation and haplotype structure suggest that this genomic region has been submitted to a near complete selective sweep in all East Asian populations and only in this geographic area. The most extreme scores of the different selection tests are found within a smaller 45 kb region that contains VKORC1 and three other genes (BCKDK, MYST1 (KAT8), and PRSS8) with different functions. Because of the strong linkage disequilibrium, it is not possible to determine if VKORC1 or one of the three other genes is the target of this strong positive selection that could explain present-day differences among human populations in AVK dose requirement. Our results show that the extended region surrounding a presumable single target of positive selection should be analyzed for genetic variation in a wide range of genetically diverse populations in order to account for other neighboring and confounding selective events and the hitchhiking effect.

  1. Complete genome sequence of mandarin decline Citrus tristeza virus of the Northeastern Himalayan hill region of India: comparative analyses determine recombinant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Kajal K; Tarafdar, Avijit; Sharma, Susheel K

    2012-03-01

    The complete genome sequence of a mandarin (Citrus reticulata) decline CTV isolate, Kpg3, of the Darjeeling hills of the Northeastern Himalayan region of India is reported for the first time. The complete Kpg3 genome has 19253 nt, and its nucleotide sequence identity ranged from 79% with the Florida CTV isolate T36 to 94% with the Israel isolate VT, whereas its identity to B165, the other Indian isolate, was 89%. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the Kpg3 genome is closely related to isolate VT and distantly to T36 and B165. Recombination analysis indicated that Kpg3 is recombinant and originated through multiple recombination events in which parts of the genome were exchanged between divergent CTV sequences.

  2. Regional mosaic genomic heterogeneity in the elderly and in Alzheimer's disease as a correlate of neuronal vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Thomas; Brückner, Martina K; Lösche, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by fibrillary aggregates of Aβ peptide and tau protein. The distribution of these pathological hallmarks throughout the brain is not random; it follows a predictive pattern that is used for pathological staging. However, most etiopathogenetic concepts, irrespective of whether they focus on Aβ or tau pathology, leave a key question unanswered: what is the explanation for the different vulnerabilities of brain regions in AD? The pattern of regional progression of neurofibrillary degeneration in AD to some extent inversely recapitulates ontogenetic and phylogenetic brain development. Accordingly, degeneration preferentially affects brain areas that have recently been acquired or restructured during anthropoid evolution, which means that the involvement of a neurodevelopmental mechanism is highly likely. Since evolutionary expansion of the neocortex is based on a substantial extension of the mitotic activity of progenitor cells, we propose a conceptual link between neurogenesis in anthropoid primates and a higher risk of accumulating mitotic errors that give rise to genomic aberrations commonly referred to as DNA content variation (DCV). If increased rates of DCV make neurons more vulnerable to AD-related pathology, one might expect there to be a higher rate of DCV in areas that are affected very early during the course of AD, as compared to areas which are hardly affected or are affected only during the most advanced stages. Therefore, in the present study, we comparatively analyzed the DCV in five different cortical areas that are affected during the early stage (entorhinal cortex), the intermediate stage (temporal, frontal, and parietal association cortex), and the late stage (primary sensory occipital cortex) of AD in both normal elderly subjects and AD patients. On average, we observed about 10 % neuronal mosaic DCV in the normal elderly and a two- to threefold increase in DCV in AD patients

  3. A maximum likelihood QTL analysis reveals common genome regions controlling resistance to Salmonella colonization and carrier-state

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    Thanh-Son Tran

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The serovars Enteritidis and Typhimurium of the Gram-negative bacterium Salmonella enterica are significant causes of human food poisoning. Fowl carrying these bacteria often show no clinical disease, with detection only established post-mortem. Increased resistance to the carrier state in commercial poultry could be a way to improve food safety by reducing the spread of these bacteria in poultry flocks. Previous studies identified QTLs for both resistance to carrier state and resistance to Salmonella colonization in the same White Leghorn inbred lines. Until now, none of the QTLs identified was common to the two types of resistance. All these analyses were performed using the F2 inbred or backcross option of the QTLExpress software based on linear regression. In the present study, QTL analysis was achieved using Maximum Likelihood with QTLMap software, in order to test the effect of the QTL analysis method on QTL detection. We analyzed the same phenotypic and genotypic data as those used in previous studies, which were collected on 378 animals genotyped with 480 genome-wide SNP markers. To enrich these data, we added eleven SNP markers located within QTLs controlling resistance to colonization and we looked for potential candidate genes co-localizing with QTLs. Results In our case the QTL analysis method had an important impact on QTL detection. We were able to identify new genomic regions controlling resistance to carrier-state, in particular by testing the existence of two segregating QTLs. But some of the previously identified QTLs were not confirmed. Interestingly, two QTLs were detected on chromosomes 2 and 3, close to the locations of the major QTLs controlling resistance to colonization and to candidate genes involved in the immune response identified in other, independent studies. Conclusions Due to the lack of stability of the QTLs detected, we suggest that interesting regions for further studies are those that were

  4. Sequence analysis of the E3 region and fiber gene of human adenovirus genome type 7h.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajon, A E; Wadell, G

    1996-01-15

    Adenovirus type 7h is currently the predominant virulent genome type of serotype 7 isolated in Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay in association with severe infantile pneumonia. In order to characterize possible molecular determinants of pathogenicity, the nucleotide sequence of a 5904-bp fragment (76 to 93 mu) containing the entire E3 region and the fiber gene of Ad7h was established. The organization of the ORFs within the E3 region was similar to that reported for the prototype strains of Ad7 and Ad3. A comparison of the nucleotide and amino acid sequences of all ORFs revealed a higher homology between Ad7h and Ad7p than between Ad7h and Ad3 for 12.0K and 16.1K, whereas the 15.3K ORF and the adjacent fiber gene were strikingly more homologous to those of Ad3 (99.5 vs 81.1% and 98.2 vs 66.6%, respectively). The equivalent to ORF 7.7K in Ad7p was missing in Ad7h due to a deletion and a mutation affecting the start codon (ATG-->ATT). Although the hemagglutinin of the Ad7h fiber could not be characterized due to its lack of activity on monkey erythrocytes, our results indicate that Ad7h is an intermediate strain 7-3.

  5. Comet-assay and Comet-fish for the detection of individual radiation and toxinesensitivities of genome regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While in different areas of research, the COMET-Assay has become a standard technique, especially in basic research, the combination of COMET-Assay and fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) is a novel technique used only in a few laboratories. This technique, called COMET-FISH, does not only allow to detect fragmented DNA and to measure the degree of DNA damage, but enables to allocate specific genomic loci in individual cells by specific fluorescence labelling. For the quantitative evaluation of the COMET-Assay commercially available systems with integrated image analysis exist. Such systems are completely missing for COMET-FISH up to now. The biochemical parameters of these technique have been optimised so far, that COMET-FISH has been successfully applied in different fields of research under different questions. Thus it has been achieved to use the COMET-FISH technique for the examination of different risk factors on effects of ionising and non-ionising radiation. In this context first studies are presented to access tumour risk factors of nutrition. Also some basic experiments are presented showing the correlation between sensitivity of selected genomic regions towards UV-A irradiation, repair activity and the density of active genes. The results applying the techniques presented here may be correlated for instance to measure nutrition induced changes on radiation sensitivity. The techniques will allow to use them in future also to examine other risk factors. Finally the COMET techniques could contribute to register risk factors on the individual level in order to obtain a better estimate for individual radiation sensitivity. (orig.)

  6. Systematic analysis of enhancer and critical cis-acting RNA elements in the protein-encoding region of the hepatitis C virus genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Derrick; Ren, Songyang; Hu, Stacy; Wang, Wei Gang; Subramanian, Aparna; Contreras, Deisy; Kanagavel, Vidhya; Chung, Eric; Ko, Justine; Amirtham Jacob Appadorai, Ranjit Singh; Sinha, Sanjeev; Jalali, Ziba; Hardy, David W; French, Samuel W; Arumugaswami, Vaithilingaraja

    2013-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) causes chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and liver cancer. cis-acting RNA elements of the HCV genome are critical for translation initiation and replication of the viral genome. We hypothesized that the coding regions of nonstructural proteins harbor enhancer and essential cis-acting replication elements (CRE). In order to experimentally identify new cis RNA elements, we utilized an unbiased approach to introduce synonymous substitutions. The HCV genome coding for nonstructural proteins (nucleotide positions 3872 to 9097) was divided into 17 contiguous segments. The wobble nucleotide positions of each codon were replaced, resulting in 33% to 41% nucleotide changes. The HCV genome containing one of each of 17 mutant segments (S1 to S17) was tested for genome replication and infectivity. We observed that silent mutations in segment 13 (S13) (nucleotides [nt] 7457 to 7786), S14 (nt 7787 to 8113), S15 (nt 8114 to 8440), S16 (nt 8441 to 8767), and S17 (nt 8768 to 9097) resulted in impaired genome replication, suggesting CRE structures are enriched in the NS5B region. Subsequent high-resolution mutational analysis of NS5B (nt 7787 to 9289) using approximately 51-nucleotide contiguous subsegment mutant viruses having synonymous mutations revealed that subsegments SS8195-8245, SS8654-8704, and SS9011-9061 were required for efficient viral growth, suggesting that these regions act as enhancer elements. Covariant nucleotide substitution analysis of a stem-loop, JFH-SL9098, revealed the formation of an extended stem structure, which we designated JFH-SL9074. We have identified new enhancer RNA elements and an extended stem-loop in the NS5B coding region. Genetic modification of enhancer RNA elements can be utilized for designing attenuated HCV vaccine candidates.

  7. A Legionella pneumophila effector protein encoded in a region of genomic plasticity binds to Dot/Icm-modified vacuoles.

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    Shira Ninio

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause a severe pneumonia called Legionnaires' disease. In the environment, L. pneumophila is found in fresh water reservoirs in a large spectrum of environmental conditions, where the bacteria are able to replicate within a variety of protozoan hosts. To survive within eukaryotic cells, L. pneumophila require a type IV secretion system, designated Dot/Icm, that delivers bacterial effector proteins into the host cell cytoplasm. In recent years, a number of Dot/Icm substrate proteins have been identified; however, the function of most of these proteins remains unknown, and it is unclear why the bacterium maintains such a large repertoire of effectors to promote its survival. Here we investigate a region of the L. pneumophila chromosome that displays a high degree of plasticity among four sequenced L. pneumophila strains. Analysis of GC content suggests that several genes encoded in this region were acquired through horizontal gene transfer. Protein translocation studies establish that this region of genomic plasticity encodes for multiple Dot/Icm effectors. Ectopic expression studies in mammalian cells indicate that one of these substrates, a protein called PieA, has unique effector activities. PieA is an effector that can alter lysosome morphology and associates specifically with vacuoles that support L. pneumophila replication. It was determined that the association of PieA with vacuoles containing L. pneumophila requires modifications to the vacuole mediated by other Dot/Icm effectors. Thus, the localization properties of PieA reveal that the Dot/Icm system has the ability to spatially and temporally control the association of an effector with vacuoles containing L. pneumophila through activities mediated by other effector proteins.

  8. The major histocompatibility complex (Mhc class IIB region has greater genomic structural flexibility and diversity in the quail than the chicken

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    Kulski Jerzy K

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The quail and chicken major histocompatibility complex (Mhc genomic regions have a similar overall organization but differ markedly in that the quail has an expanded number of duplicated class I, class IIB, natural killer (NK-receptor-like, lectin-like and BG genes. Therefore, the elucidation of genetic factors that contribute to the greater Mhc diversity in the quail would help to establish it as a model experimental animal in the investigation of avian Mhc associated diseases. Aims and approaches The main aim here was to characterize the genetic and genomic features of the transcribed major quail MhcIIB (CojaIIB region that is located between the Tapasin and BRD2 genes, and to compare our findings to the available information for the chicken MhcIIB (BLB. We used four approaches in the study of the quail MhcIIB region, (1 haplotype analyses with polymorphic loci, (2 cloning and sequencing of the RT-PCR CojaIIB products from individuals with different haplotypes, (3 genomic sequencing of the CojaIIB region from the individuals with the different haplotypes, and (4 phylogenetic and duplication analysis to explain the variability of the region between the quail and the chicken. Results Our results show that the Tapasin-BRD2 segment of the quail Mhc is highly variable in length and in gene transcription intensity and content. Haplotypic sequences were found to vary in length between 4 to 11 kb. Tapasin-BRD2 segments contain one or two major transcribed CojaIIBs that were probably generated by segmental duplications involving c-type lectin-like genes and NK receptor-like genes, gene fusions between two CojaIIBs and transpositions between the major and minor CojaIIB segments. The relative evolutionary speed for generating the MhcIIBs genomic structures from the ancestral BLB2 was estimated to be two times faster in the quail than in the chicken after their separation from a common ancestor. Four types of genomic rearrangement

  9. Comparative genomics reveals a functional thyroid-specific element in the far upstream region of the PAX8 gene

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    De Felice Mario

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The molecular mechanisms leading to a fully differentiated thyrocite are still object of intense study even if it is well known that thyroglobulin, thyroperoxidase, NIS and TSHr are the marker genes of thyroid differentiation. It is also well known that Pax8, TTF-1, Foxe1 and Hhex are the thyroid-enriched transcription factors responsible for the expression of the above genes, thus are responsible for the differentiated thyroid phenotype. In particular, the role of Pax8 in the fully developed thyroid gland was studied in depth and it was established that it plays a key role in thyroid development and differentiation. However, to date the bases for the thyroid-enriched expression of this transcription factor have not been unraveled yet. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a functional thyroid-specific enhancer element located far upstream of the Pax8 gene. Results We hypothesized that regulatory cis-acting elements are conserved among mammalian genes. Comparison of a genomic region extending for about 100 kb at the 5'-flanking region of the mouse and human Pax8 gene revealed several conserved regions that were tested for enhancer activity in thyroid and non-thyroid cells. Using this approach we identified one putative thyroid-specific regulatory element located 84.6 kb upstream of the Pax8 transcription start site. The in silico data were verified by promoter-reporter assays in thyroid and non-thyroid cells. Interestingly, the identified far upstream element manifested a very high transcriptional activity in the thyroid cell line PC Cl3, but showed no activity in HeLa cells. In addition, the data here reported indicate that the thyroid-enriched transcription factor TTF-1 is able to bind in vitro and in vivo the Pax8 far upstream element, and is capable to activate transcription from it. Conclusions Results of this study reveal the presence of a thyroid-specific regulatory element in the 5' upstream

  10. Frequent Loss of Genome Gap Region in 4p16.3 Subtelomere in Early-Onset Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

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    Hirohito Kudo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A small portion of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is familial, but the majority occurs as sporadic disease. Although causative genes are found in some rare forms, the genetic basis for sporadic T2DM is largely unknown. We searched for a copy number abnormality in 100 early-onset Japanese T2DM patients (onset age <35 years by whole-genome screening with a copy number variation BeadChip. Within the 1.3-Mb subtelomeric region on chromosome 4p16.3, we found copy number losses in early-onset T2DM (13 of 100 T2DM versus one of 100 controls. This region surrounds a genome gap, which is rich in multiple low copy repeats. Subsequent region-targeted high-density custom-made oligonucleotide microarray experiments verified the copy number losses and delineated structural changes in the 1.3-Mb region. The results suggested that copy number losses of the genes in the deleted region around the genome gap in 4p16.3 may play significant roles in the etiology of T2DM.

  11. Genomic structure analysis of SNC6, a progesterone-receptor associated protein gene, and cloning and characterization of its 5'-flanking region . 

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the genomic structure of SNC6, a progesterone-receptor associated protein gene and its regulatory elements in its 5'-flanking region. Methods: Genomic sequence from GenBank database (accession number: Z98048) covering the whole SNC6 gene was used to analyze the genomic structure of SNC6 and design primers for PCR amplification of its 5'-flanking region. A 1894 bp fragment of the 5'-flanking region (-1814 to +75) was cloned by PCR using genomic DNA from a healthy donor peripheral blood lymphocyte as template. This fragment, as well as 3 shorter derivative fragments (1423 bp, 632 bp and 416 bp, which correspond to -1344 to +75, -552 to +75 and -337 to +75 respectively), were subcloned into pGL2 series luciferase reporter vectors. These constructs were introduced into colorectal cancer cell line SW620 for transient expression of reporter gene and luciferase activities were measured. Results: The genomic structure analysis showed there are 12 exons for SNC6 gene, which spans 32017 bp (nt71529 to nt39513 in Z98048 sequence). All transfected SW620 cells with the above 5-flanking region-containing constructs showed luciferase activities. The highest luciferase activities were measured in transfected cells with vectors containing 1894 bp fragments, and the lowest luciferase activities were measured in transfected cells with vectors containing 416 bp fragments. Luciferase activities were higher in transfected cells with vectors containing 632 bp fragments than that in transfected cells with vectors containing 1423 bp fragments. Conclusion: The basic transcription-promoting element (promoter) for SNC6 expression resides between 0 to -337, and two transcription-enhancing elements (enhancer) resides between -337 to -552 and -1344 to -1814, whereas one transcription-inhibiting element (silencer) exists between -552 to -1344.

  12. Sequencing of 15,622 gene-bearing BACs clarifies the gene-dense regions of the barley genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) possesses a large and highly repetitive genome of 5.1 Gb that has hindered the development of a complete sequence. In 2012, the International Barley Sequencing Consortium released a resource integrating whole-genome shotgun sequences with a physical and genetic framework....

  13. Combined Analysis of Variation in Core, Accessory and Regulatory Genome Regions Provides a Super-Resolution View into the Evolution of Bacterial Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Alan; Oren, Yaara; Kelly, Darren; Sreecharan, Tristan; Vehkala, Minna; Välimäki, Niko; Prentice, Michael B.; Ashour, Amgad; Avram, Oren; Pupko, Tal; Literak, Ivan; Guenther, Sebastian; Schaufler, Katharina; Wieler, Lothar H.; Zhiyong, Zong; Sheppard, Samuel K.; Corander, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    The use of whole-genome phylogenetic analysis has revolutionized our understanding of the evolution and spread of many important bacterial pathogens due to the high resolution view it provides. However, the majority of such analyses do not consider the potential role of accessory genes when inferring evolutionary trajectories. Moreover, the recently discovered importance of the switching of gene regulatory elements suggests that an exhaustive analysis, combining information from core and accessory genes with regulatory elements could provide unparalleled detail of the evolution of a bacterial population. Here we demonstrate this principle by applying it to a worldwide multi-host sample of the important pathogenic E. coli lineage ST131. Our approach reveals the existence of multiple circulating subtypes of the major drug–resistant clade of ST131 and provides the first ever population level evidence of core genome substitutions in gene regulatory regions associated with the acquisition and maintenance of different accessory genome elements. PMID:27618184

  14. Combined Analysis of Variation in Core, Accessory and Regulatory Genome Regions Provides a Super-Resolution View into the Evolution of Bacterial Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Alan; Oren, Yaara; Kelly, Darren; Pascoe, Ben; Dunn, Steven; Sreecharan, Tristan; Vehkala, Minna; Välimäki, Niko; Prentice, Michael B; Ashour, Amgad; Avram, Oren; Pupko, Tal; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Literak, Ivan; Guenther, Sebastian; Schaufler, Katharina; Wieler, Lothar H; Zhiyong, Zong; Sheppard, Samuel K; McInerney, James O; Corander, Jukka

    2016-09-01

    The use of whole-genome phylogenetic analysis has revolutionized our understanding of the evolution and spread of many important bacterial pathogens due to the high resolution view it provides. However, the majority of such analyses do not consider the potential role of accessory genes when inferring evolutionary trajectories. Moreover, the recently discovered importance of the switching of gene regulatory elements suggests that an exhaustive analysis, combining information from core and accessory genes with regulatory elements could provide unparalleled detail of the evolution of a bacterial population. Here we demonstrate this principle by applying it to a worldwide multi-host sample of the important pathogenic E. coli lineage ST131. Our approach reveals the existence of multiple circulating subtypes of the major drug-resistant clade of ST131 and provides the first ever population level evidence of core genome substitutions in gene regulatory regions associated with the acquisition and maintenance of different accessory genome elements. PMID:27618184

  15. Development of a multiplex RT-PCR assay for the identification of recombination types at different genomic regions of vaccine-derived polioviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriou, T G; Kyriakopoulou, Z; Tsakogiannis, D; Fikatas, A; Gartzonika, C; Levidiotou-Stefanou, S; Markoulatos, P

    2016-08-01

    Polioviruses (PVs) are the causal agents of acute paralytic poliomyelitis. Since the 1960s, poliomyelitis has been effectively controlled by the use of two vaccines containing all three serotypes of PVs, the inactivated poliovirus vaccine and the live attenuated oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). Despite the success of OPV in polio eradication programme, a significant disadvantage was revealed: the emergence of vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP). VAPP is the result of accumulated mutations and putative recombination events located at the genome of attenuated vaccine Sabin strains. In the present study, ten Sabin isolates derived from OPV vaccinees and environmental samples were studied in order to identify recombination types located from VP1 to 3D genomic regions of virus genome. The experimental procedure that was followed was virus RNA extraction, reverse transcription to convert the virus genome into cDNA, PCR and multiplex-PCR using specific designed primers able to localize and identify each recombination following agarose gel electrophoresis. This multiplex RT-PCR assay allows for the immediate detection and identification of multiple recombination types located at the viral genome of OPV derivatives. After the eradication of wild PVs, the remaining sources of poliovirus infection worldwide would be the OPV derivatives. As a consequence, the immediate detection and molecular characterization of recombinant derivatives are important to avoid epidemics due to the circulation of neurovirulent viral strains. PMID:27098645

  16. The evolutionary rates of HCV estimated with subtype 1a and 1b sequences over the ORF length and in different genomic regions.

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    Manqiong Yuan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Considerable progress has been made in the HCV evolutionary analysis, since the software BEAST was released. However, prior information, especially the prior evolutionary rate, which plays a critical role in BEAST analysis, is always difficult to ascertain due to various uncertainties. Providing a proper prior HCV evolutionary rate is thus of great importance. METHODS/RESULTS: 176 full-length sequences of HCV subtype 1a and 144 of 1b were assembled by taking into consideration the balance of the sampling dates and the even dispersion in phylogenetic trees. According to the HCV genomic organization and biological functions, each dataset was partitioned into nine genomic regions and two routinely amplified regions. A uniform prior rate was applied to the BEAST analysis for each region and also the entire ORF. All the obtained posterior rates for 1a are of a magnitude of 10(-3 substitutions/site/year and in a bell-shaped distribution. Significantly lower rates were estimated for 1b and some of the rate distribution curves resulted in a one-sided truncation, particularly under the exponential model. This indicates that some of the rates for subtype 1b are less accurate, so they were adjusted by including more sequences to improve the temporal structure. CONCLUSION: Among the various HCV subtypes and genomic regions, the evolutionary patterns are dissimilar. Therefore, an applied estimation of the HCV epidemic history requires the proper selection of the rate priors, which should match the actual dataset so that they can fit for the subtype, the genomic region and even the length. By referencing the findings here, future evolutionary analysis of the HCV subtype 1a and 1b datasets may become more accurate and hence prove useful for tracing their patterns.

  17. A Comparison of the Molecular Organization of Genomic Regions Associated with Resistance to Common Bacterial Blight in Two Phaseolus vulgaris Genotypes

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    Gregory E. Perry

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to common bacterial blight, caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli, in Phaseolus vulgaris is conditioned by several loci on different chromosomes. Previous studies with OAC-Rex, a CBB-resistant, white bean variety of Mesoamerican origin, identified two resistance loci associated with the molecular markers Pv-CTT001 and SU91, on chromosome 4 and 8, respectively. Resistance to CBB is assumed to be derived from an interspecific cross with Phaseolus acutifolius in the pedigree of OAC-Rex. Our current whole genome sequencing effort with OAC-Rex provided the opportunity to compare its genome in the regions associated with CBB resistance with the v1.0 release of the P. vulgaris line G19833, which is a large seeded bean of Andean origin, and (assumed to be CBB susceptible.. In addition, the genomic regions containing SAP6, a marker associated with P. vulgaris-derived CBB-resistance on chromosome 10, were compared. These analyses indicated that gene content was highly conserved between G19833 and OAC-Rex across the regions examined (>80%. However, fifty-nine genes unique to OAC Rex were identified, with resistance gene homologues making up the largest category (10 genes identified. Two unique genes in OAC-Rex located within the SU91 resistance QTL have homology to P. acutifolius ESTs and may be potential sources of CBB resistance. As the genomic sequence assembly of OAC-Rex is completed, we expect that further comparisons between it and the G19833 genome will lead to a greater understanding of CBB resistance in bean.

  18. The dark matter of the cancer genome: aberrations in regulatory elements, untranslated regions, splice sites, non-coding RNA and synonymous mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diederichs, Sven; Bartsch, Lorenz; Berkmann, Julia C; Fröse, Karin; Heitmann, Jana; Hoppe, Caroline; Iggena, Deetje; Jazmati, Danny; Karschnia, Philipp; Linsenmeier, Miriam; Maulhardt, Thomas; Möhrmann, Lino; Morstein, Johannes; Paffenholz, Stella V; Röpenack, Paula; Rückert, Timo; Sandig, Ludger; Schell, Maximilian; Steinmann, Anna; Voss, Gjendine; Wasmuth, Jacqueline; Weinberger, Maria E; Wullenkord, Ramona

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a disease of the genome caused by oncogene activation and tumor suppressor gene inhibition. Deep sequencing studies including large consortia such as TCGA and ICGC identified numerous tumor-specific mutations not only in protein-coding sequences but also in non-coding sequences. Although 98% of the genome is not translated into proteins, most studies have neglected the information hidden in this "dark matter" of the genome. Malignancy-driving mutations can occur in all genetic elements outside the coding region, namely in enhancer, silencer, insulator, and promoter as well as in 5'-UTR and 3'-UTR Intron or splice site mutations can alter the splicing pattern. Moreover, cancer genomes contain mutations within non-coding RNA, such as microRNA, lncRNA, and lincRNA A synonymous mutation changes the coding region in the DNA and RNA but not the protein sequence. Importantly, oncogenes such as TERT or miR-21 as well as tumor suppressor genes such as TP53/p53, APC, BRCA1, or RB1 can be affected by these alterations. In summary, coding-independent mutations can affect gene regulation from transcription, splicing, mRNA stability to translation, and hence, this largely neglected area needs functional studies to elucidate the mechanisms underlying tumorigenesis. This review will focus on the important role and novel mechanisms of these non-coding or allegedly silent mutations in tumorigenesis. PMID:26992833

  19. The dark matter of the cancer genome: aberrations in regulatory elements, untranslated regions, splice sites, non-coding RNA and synonymous mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diederichs, Sven; Bartsch, Lorenz; Berkmann, Julia C; Fröse, Karin; Heitmann, Jana; Hoppe, Caroline; Iggena, Deetje; Jazmati, Danny; Karschnia, Philipp; Linsenmeier, Miriam; Maulhardt, Thomas; Möhrmann, Lino; Morstein, Johannes; Paffenholz, Stella V; Röpenack, Paula; Rückert, Timo; Sandig, Ludger; Schell, Maximilian; Steinmann, Anna; Voss, Gjendine; Wasmuth, Jacqueline; Weinberger, Maria E; Wullenkord, Ramona

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a disease of the genome caused by oncogene activation and tumor suppressor gene inhibition. Deep sequencing studies including large consortia such as TCGA and ICGC identified numerous tumor-specific mutations not only in protein-coding sequences but also in non-coding sequences. Although 98% of the genome is not translated into proteins, most studies have neglected the information hidden in this "dark matter" of the genome. Malignancy-driving mutations can occur in all genetic elements outside the coding region, namely in enhancer, silencer, insulator, and promoter as well as in 5'-UTR and 3'-UTR Intron or splice site mutations can alter the splicing pattern. Moreover, cancer genomes contain mutations within non-coding RNA, such as microRNA, lncRNA, and lincRNA A synonymous mutation changes the coding region in the DNA and RNA but not the protein sequence. Importantly, oncogenes such as TERT or miR-21 as well as tumor suppressor genes such as TP53/p53, APC, BRCA1, or RB1 can be affected by these alterations. In summary, coding-independent mutations can affect gene regulation from transcription, splicing, mRNA stability to translation, and hence, this largely neglected area needs functional studies to elucidate the mechanisms underlying tumorigenesis. This review will focus on the important role and novel mechanisms of these non-coding or allegedly silent mutations in tumorigenesis.

  20. Genomic androgen receptor-occupied regions with different functions, defined by histone acetylation, coregulators and transcriptional capacity.

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    Li Jia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The androgen receptor (AR is a steroid-activated transcription factor that binds at specific DNA locations and plays a key role in the etiology of prostate cancer. While numerous studies have identified a clear connection between AR binding and expression of target genes for a limited number of loci, high-throughput elucidation of these sites allows for a deeper understanding of the complexities of this process. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have mapped 189 AR occupied regions (ARORs and 1,388 histone H3 acetylation (AcH3 loci to a 3% continuous stretch of human genomic DNA using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP microarray analysis. Of 62 highly reproducible ARORs, 32 (52% were also marked by AcH3. While the number of ARORs detected in prostate cancer cells exceeded the number of nearby DHT-responsive genes, the AcH3 mark defined a subclass of ARORs much more highly associated with such genes -- 12% of the genes flanking AcH3+ARORs were DHT-responsive, compared to only 1% of genes flanking AcH3-ARORs. Most ARORs contained enhancer activities as detected in luciferase reporter assays. Analysis of the AROR sequences, followed by site-directed ChIP, identified binding sites for AR transcriptional coregulators FoxA1, CEBPbeta, NFI and GATA2, which had diverse effects on endogenous AR target gene expression levels in siRNA knockout experiments. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We suggest that only some ARORs function under the given physiological conditions, utilizing diverse mechanisms. This diversity points to differential regulation of gene expression by the same transcription factor related to the chromatin structure.

  1. Evaluation of a partial genome screening of two asthma susceptibility regions using bayesian network based bayesian multilevel analysis of relevance.

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    Ildikó Ungvári

    Full Text Available Genetic studies indicate high number of potential factors related to asthma. Based on earlier linkage analyses we selected the 11q13 and 14q22 asthma susceptibility regions, for which we designed a partial genome screening study using 145 SNPs in 1201 individuals (436 asthmatic children and 765 controls. The results were evaluated with traditional frequentist methods and we applied a new statistical method, called bayesian network based bayesian multilevel analysis of relevance (BN-BMLA. This method uses bayesian network representation to provide detailed characterization of the relevance of factors, such as joint significance, the type of dependency, and multi-target aspects. We estimated posteriors for these relations within the bayesian statistical framework, in order to estimate the posteriors whether a variable is directly relevant or its association is only mediated.With frequentist methods one SNP (rs3751464 in the FRMD6 gene provided evidence for an association with asthma (OR = 1.43(1.2-1.8; p = 3×10(-4. The possible role of the FRMD6 gene in asthma was also confirmed in an animal model and human asthmatics.In the BN-BMLA analysis altogether 5 SNPs in 4 genes were found relevant in connection with asthma phenotype: PRPF19 on chromosome 11, and FRMD6, PTGER2 and PTGDR on chromosome 14. In a subsequent step a partial dataset containing rhinitis and further clinical parameters was used, which allowed the analysis of relevance of SNPs for asthma and multiple targets. These analyses suggested that SNPs in the AHNAK and MS4A2 genes were indirectly associated with asthma. This paper indicates that BN-BMLA explores the relevant factors more comprehensively than traditional statistical methods and extends the scope of strong relevance based methods to include partial relevance, global characterization of relevance and multi-target relevance.

  2. Recombination and evolution of duplicate control regions in the mitochondrial genome of the Asian big-headed turtle, Platysternon megacephalum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenfei Zheng

    Full Text Available Complete mitochondrial (mt genome sequences with duplicate control regions (CRs have been detected in various animal species. In Testudines, duplicate mtCRs have been reported in the mtDNA of the Asian big-headed turtle, Platysternon megacephalum, which has three living subspecies. However, the evolutionary pattern of these CRs remains unclear. In this study, we report the completed sequences of duplicate CRs from 20 individuals belonging to three subspecies of this turtle and discuss the micro-evolutionary analysis of the evolution of duplicate CRs. Genetic distances calculated with MEGA 4.1 using the complete duplicate CR sequences revealed that within turtle subspecies, genetic distances between orthologous copies from different individuals were 0.63% for CR1 and 1.2% for CR2app:addword:respectively, and the average distance between paralogous copies of CR1 and CR2 was 4.8%. Phylogenetic relationships were reconstructed from the CR sequences, excluding the variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs at the 3' end using three methods: neighbor-joining, maximum likelihood algorithm, and Bayesian inference. These data show that any two CRs within individuals were more genetically distant from orthologous genes in different individuals within the same subspecies. This suggests independent evolution of the two mtCRs within each P. megacephalum subspecies. Reconstruction of separate phylogenetic trees using different CR components (TAS, CD, CSB, and VNTRs suggested the role of recombination in the evolution of duplicate CRs. Consequently, recombination events were detected using RDP software with break points at ≈290 bp and ≈1,080 bp. Based on these results, we hypothesize that duplicate CRs in P. megacephalum originated from heterological ancestral recombination of mtDNA. Subsequent recombination could have resulted in homogenization during independent evolutionary events, thus maintaining the functions of duplicate CRs in the mtDNA of P

  3. Spatial Areas of Genotype Probability of Cattle Genomic Variants Involved in the Resistance to East Coast Fever: A Tool to Predict Future Disease-Vulnerable Geographical Regions

    OpenAIRE

    Vajana, Elia; Rochat, Estelle; Colli, Licia; Negrini, Riccardo; Masembe, Charles; Joost, Stéphane; Nextgen, Consortium

    2016-01-01

    East Coast Fever (ECF) is a livestock disease caused by Theileria parva, a protozoan transmitted by the vector tick Rhipicephalus appendiculatus. This disease causes high mortality in cattle populations of Central and Eastern Africa, especially in exotic breeds. Here, we highlight genomic regions likely involved into tolerance/resistance mechanisms against ECF, and we introduce the estimation of their Spatial Area of Genotype Probability (SPAG) to delimit areas where the concerned genotypes a...

  4. Genome-wide candidate regions for selective sweeps revealed through massive parallel sequencing of DNA across ten turkey populations

    OpenAIRE

    Aslam, M.L.; Bastiaansen, J. W. M.; Megens, H.J.W.C.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Blomberg, L.; Groenen, M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The domestic turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) is an important agricultural species that is largely used as a meat-type bird. Characterizing genetic variation in populations of domesticated species and associating these variation patterns with the evolution, domestication, and selective breeding is critical for understanding the dynamics of genomic change in these species. Intense selective breeding and population bottlenecks are expected to leave signatures in the genome of domesticate...

  5. Genome-wide association study of ulcerative colitis identifies three new susceptibility loci, including the HNF4A region.

    OpenAIRE

    CORVIN, AIDEN PETER

    2009-01-01

    PUBLISHED Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a common form of inflammatory bowel disease with a complex aetiology. As part of the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 2, we performed a genome- wide association scan for UC in 2361 cases and 5417 controls. Loci showing evidence of association at P < 1 ? 10 ?5 were followed up by genotyping in an independent set of 2321 cases and 4818 controls. We find genome-wide significant evidence of association at three new loci, each cont...

  6. A microsatellite linkage map for the cultivated strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) suggests extensive regions of homozygosity in the genome that may have resulted from breeding and selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, D J; Passey, T; Surbanovski, N; Lopez Girona, E; Kuchta, P; Davik, J; Harrison, R; Passey, A; Whitehouse, A B; Simpson, D W

    2012-05-01

    The linkage maps of the cultivated strawberry, Fragaria × ananassa (2n = 8x = 56) that have been reported to date have been developed predominantly from AFLPs, along with supplementation with transferrable microsatellite (SSR) markers. For the investigation of the inheritance of morphological characters in the cultivated strawberry and for the development of tools for marker-assisted breeding and selection, it is desirable to populate maps of the genome with an abundance of transferrable molecular markers such as microsatellites (SSRs) and gene-specific markers. Exploiting the recent release of the genome sequence of the diploid F. vesca, and the publication of an extensive number of polymorphic SSR markers for the genus Fragaria, we have extended the linkage map of the 'Redgauntlet' × 'Hapil' (RG × H) mapping population to include a further 330 loci, generated from 160 primer pairs, to create a linkage map for F. × ananassa containing 549 loci, 490 of which are transferrable SSR or gene-specific markers. The map covers 2140.3 cM in the expected 28 linkage groups for an integrated map (where one group is composed of two separate male and female maps), which represents an estimated 91% of the cultivated strawberry genome. Despite the relative saturation of the linkage map on the majority of linkage groups, regions of apparent extensive homozygosity were identified in the genomes of 'Redgauntlet' and 'Hapil' which may be indicative of allele fixation during the breeding and selection of modern F. × ananassa cultivars. The genomes of the octoploid and diploid Fragaria are largely collinear, but through comparison of mapped markers on the RG × H linkage map to their positions on the genome sequence of F. vesca, a number of inversions were identified that may have occurred before the polyploidisation event that led to the evolution of the modern octoploid strawberry species.

  7. Discovering transcription factor binding sites in highly repetitive regions of genomes with multi-read analysis of ChIP-Seq data.

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    Dongjun Chung

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq is rapidly replacing chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with genome-wide tiling array analysis (ChIP-chip as the preferred approach for mapping transcription-factor binding sites and chromatin modifications. The state of the art for analyzing ChIP-seq data relies on using only reads that map uniquely to a relevant reference genome (uni-reads. This can lead to the omission of up to 30% of alignable reads. We describe a general approach for utilizing reads that map to multiple locations on the reference genome (multi-reads. Our approach is based on allocating multi-reads as fractional counts using a weighted alignment scheme. Using human STAT1 and mouse GATA1 ChIP-seq datasets, we illustrate that incorporation of multi-reads significantly increases sequencing depths, leads to detection of novel peaks that are not otherwise identifiable with uni-reads, and improves detection of peaks in mappable regions. We investigate various genome-wide characteristics of peaks detected only by utilization of multi-reads via computational experiments. Overall, peaks from multi-read analysis have similar characteristics to peaks that are identified by uni-reads except that the majority of them reside in segmental duplications. We further validate a number of GATA1 multi-read only peaks by independent quantitative real-time ChIP analysis and identify novel target genes of GATA1. These computational and experimental results establish that multi-reads can be of critical importance for studying transcription factor binding in highly repetitive regions of genomes with ChIP-seq experiments.

  8. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis of neuroblastic tumors reveals clinically relevant epigenetic events and large-scale epigenomic alterations localized to telomeric regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Patrick G; Das, Sudipto; Bryan, Kenneth; Watters, Karen M; Alcock, Leah; Koster, Jan; Versteeg, Rogier; Stallings, Raymond L

    2011-05-15

    The downregulation of specific genes through DNA hypermethylation is a major hallmark of cancer, although the extent and genomic distribution of hypermethylation occurring within cancer genomes is poorly understood. We report on the first genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation alterations in different neuroblastic tumor subtypes and cell lines, revealing higher order organization and clinically relevant alterations of the epigenome. The methylation status of 33,485 discrete loci representing all annotated CpG islands and RefSeq gene promoters was assessed in primary neuroblastic tumors and cell lines. A comparison of genes that were hypermethylated exclusively in the clinically favorable ganglioneuroma/ganglioneuroblastoma tumors revealed that nine genes were associated with poor clinical outcome when overexpressed in the unfavorable neuroblastoma (NB) tumors. Moreover, an integrated DNA methylation and copy number analysis identified 80 genes that were recurrently concomitantly deleted and hypermethylated in NB, with 37 reactivated by 5-aza-deoxycytidine. Lower expression of four of these genes was correlated with poor clinical outcome, further implicating their inactivation in aggressive disease pathogenesis. Analysis of genome-wide hypermethylation patterns revealed 70 recurrent large-scale blocks of contiguously hypermethylated promoters/CpG islands, up to 590 kb in length, with a distribution bias toward telomeric regions. Genome-wide hypermethylation events in neuroblastic tumors are extensive and frequently occur in large-scale blocks with a significant bias toward telomeric regions, indicating that some methylation alterations have occurred in a coordinated manner. Our results indicate that methylation contributes toward the clinicopathological features of neuroblastic tumors, revealing numerous genes associated with poor patient survival in NB.

  9. Frequent loss of genome gap region in 4p16.3 subtelomere in early-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Hirohito; Emi, Mitsuru; Ishigaki, Yasushi; Tsunoda, Uiko; Hinokio, Yoshinori; Ishii, Miho; Sato, Hidenori; Yamada, Tetsuya; Katagiri, Hideki; Oka, Yoshitomo

    2011-01-01

    A small portion of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is familial, but the majority occurs as sporadic disease. Although causative genes are found in some rare forms, the genetic basis for sporadic T2DM is largely unknown. We searched for a copy number abnormality in 100 early-onset Japanese T2DM patients (onset age experiments verified the copy number losses and delineated structural changes in the 1.3-Mb region. The results suggested that copy number losses of the genes in the deleted region around the genome gap in 4p16.3 may play significant roles in the etiology of T2DM.

  10. Adaptation of maize to temperate climates: mid-density genome-wide association genetics and diversity patterns reveal key genomic regions, with a major contribution of the Vgt2 (ZCN8 locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Bouchet

    Full Text Available The migration of maize from tropical to temperate climates was accompanied by a dramatic evolution in flowering time. To gain insight into the genetic architecture of this adaptive trait, we conducted a 50K SNP-based genome-wide association and diversity investigation on a panel of tropical and temperate American and European representatives. Eighteen genomic regions were associated with flowering time. The number of early alleles cumulated along these regions was highly correlated with flowering time. Polymorphism in the vicinity of the ZCN8 gene, which is the closest maize homologue to Arabidopsis major flowering time (FT gene, had the strongest effect. This polymorphism is in the vicinity of the causal factor of Vgt2 QTL. Diversity was lower, whereas differentiation and LD were higher for associated loci compared to the rest of the genome, which is consistent with selection acting on flowering time during maize migration. Selection tests also revealed supplementary loci that were highly differentiated among groups and not associated with flowering time in our panel, whereas they were in other linkage-based studies. This suggests that allele fixation led to a lack of statistical power when structure and relatedness were taken into account in a linear mixed model. Complementary designs and analysis methods are necessary to unravel the architecture of complex traits. Based on linkage disequilibrium (LD estimates corrected for population structure, we concluded that the number of SNPs genotyped should be at least doubled to capture all QTLs contributing to the genetic architecture of polygenic traits in this panel. These results show that maize flowering time is controlled by numerous QTLs of small additive effect and that strong polygenic selection occurred under cool climatic conditions. They should contribute to more efficient genomic predictions of flowering time and facilitate the dissemination of diverse maize genetic resources under a wide

  11. Do highly divergent loci reside in genomic regions affecting reproductive isolation? A test using next-generation sequence data in Timema stick insects

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    Nosil Patrik

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic divergence during speciation with gene flow is heterogeneous across the genome, with some regions exhibiting stronger differentiation than others. Exceptionally differentiated regions are often assumed to experience reduced introgression, i.e., reduced flow of alleles from one population into another because such regions are affected by divergent selection or cause reproductive isolation. In contrast, the remainder of the genome can be homogenized by high introgression. Although many studies have documented variation across the genome in genetic differentiation, there are few tests of this hypothesis that explicitly quantify introgression. Here, we provide such a test using 38,304 SNPs in populations of Timema cristinae stick insects. We quantify whether loci that are highly divergent between geographically separated (‘allopatric’ populations exhibit unusual patterns of introgression in admixed populations. To the extent this is true, highly divergent loci between allopatric populations contribute to reproductive isolation in admixed populations. Results As predicted, we find a substantial association between locus-specific divergence between allopatric populations and locus-specific introgression in admixed populations. However, many loci depart from this relationship, sometimes strongly so. We also report evidence for selection against foreign alleles due to local adaptation. Conclusions Loci that are strongly differentiated between allopatric populations sometimes contribute to reproductive isolation in admixed populations. However, geographic variation in selection and local adaptation, in aspects of genetic architecture (such as organization of genes, recombination rate variation, number and effect size of variants contributing to adaptation, etc., and in stochastic evolutionary processes such as drift can cause strong differentiation of loci that do not always contribute to reproductive isolation. The

  12. Genomic insights into hybridization in a localized region of sympatr y between pewee sister species (Contopus sordidulus × C. virens) and their chromosomal patterns of differentiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joseph D Manthey; and Mark B Robbins

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Great Plains of the United States includes a large number of hybrid and contact zones between bird species. The amount of gene lfow between sister species in these zones ranges from very rare hybridization events to widespread and prevalent introgression. Some of these avian systems have been studied extensively, while others have been indeterminate of whether hybridization exists in areas of sympatry. Using genomic-level approaches allows investigation of genomic patterns of hybridization and gene lfow between species—or lack thereof. Methods: We investigated a narrow zone of sympatry in Nebraska, USA between pewee species (Contopus sordidu-lus and C. virens), for which no hybridization has been conifrmed. We used thousands of single nucleotide polymor-phisms to identify potential hybridization and investigate genomic patterns of differentiation between these two species. Results: We found evidence of multiple hybrid individuals in the contact zone. Little genomic variation was ifxed between species, but a large proportion had differentiated allele frequencies between species. There was a positive relationship between genetic differentiation and chromosome size. Conclusions: We provided the ifrst conclusive evidence of hybridization between C. sordidulus and C. virens, in a region where secondary contact likely occurred due to human disturbance and habitat modiifcation. The genomic patterns of differentiation affrm that these species split in the relatively recent past. Finally, the relationship of chro-mosome size and genetic differentiation may have resulted from differential rates of chromosomal recombination in songbirds and genetic differentiation between species largely due to genetic drift (possibly in concert with selection).

  13. An easy PCR-based genome-walking method for getting the unknown 5’ flanking region of a Scenedesmus sp

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmed Elsayed Gomma; Jin Man Kim; Seung HwanYang; Gyuhwa Chung

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To develop the current single primer PCR-based genome-walking method with Scenedesmus sp. Methods: The unknown 5’ and/or 3’ flanking regions for a specific conserved sequence were optimized and the current single primer PCR-based genome-walking method were developed. Alignment was between the related species of microalga and Scenedesmus sp. For 18S rDNA, we selected the species Scenedesmus sp., Chlorella sp., and Chlamydomonas sp. For the rbcL gene from the chloroplast genome, alignment was done between Scenedesmus sp., and Chlamydomonas sp. Results: Obtaining a small conserved sequence for any gene family is something that can be achieved quite easily. However, identifying the whole gene is often difficult. After investigating and testing, some of the current protocols using to get the unknown 5’ and/or 3’ flanking regions for a specific conserved sequence, we developed the current single primer PCR-based genome-walking method. We performed two consecutive PCR reactions; band extraction and the PCR product were sequenced. We got our results by testing the method on three genes from the total DNA of Scenedesmus sp.; two genes had a fully known sequence in gene bank (18S rDNA and rbcL), but the third one has not yet been identified (rbcS). We designed our primers based on the alignment between the related species and to each other. We also tested two different DNA polymerases Ex Taq and TLA polymerase. Conclusions: Results from our study suggest that Ex Taq is the most suitable polymerase for the current protocol.

  14. The complete mitochondrial genome of the common sea slater, Ligia oceanica (Crustacea, Isopoda bears a novel gene order and unusual control region features

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    Podsiadlowski Lars

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequence data and other characters from mitochondrial genomes (gene translocations, secondary structure of RNA molecules are useful in phylogenetic studies among metazoan animals from population to phylum level. Moreover, the comparison of complete mitochondrial sequences gives valuable information about the evolution of small genomes, e.g. about different mechanisms of gene translocation, gene duplication and gene loss, or concerning nucleotide frequency biases. The Peracarida (gammarids, isopods, etc. comprise about 21,000 species of crustaceans, living in many environments from deep sea floor to arid terrestrial habitats. Ligia oceanica is a terrestrial isopod living at rocky seashores of the european North Sea and Atlantic coastlines. Results The study reveals the first complete mitochondrial DNA sequence from a peracarid crustacean. The mitochondrial genome of Ligia oceanica is a circular double-stranded DNA molecule, with a size of 15,289 bp. It shows several changes in mitochondrial gene order compared to other crustacean species. An overview about mitochondrial gene order of all crustacean taxa yet sequenced is also presented. The largest non-coding part (the putative mitochondrial control region of the mitochondrial genome of Ligia oceanica is unexpectedly not AT-rich compared to the remainder of the genome. It bears two repeat regions (4× 10 bp and 3× 64 bp, and a GC-rich hairpin-like secondary structure. Some of the transfer RNAs show secondary structures which derive from the usual cloverleaf pattern. While some tRNA genes are putative targets for RNA editing, trnR could not be localized at all. Conclusion Gene order is not conserved among Peracarida, not even among isopods. The two isopod species Ligia oceanica and Idotea baltica show a similarly derived gene order, compared to the arthropod ground pattern and to the amphipod Parhyale hawaiiensis, suggesting that most of the translocation events were already

  15. Developmental roles of 21 Drosophila transcription factors are determined by quantitative differences in binding to an overlapping set of thousands of genomic regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacArthur, Stewart; Li, Xiao-Yong; Li, Jingyi; Brown, James B.; Chu, Hou Cheng; Zeng, Lucy; Grondona, Brandi P.; Hechmer, Aaron; Simirenko, Lisa; Keranen, Soile V.E.; Knowles, David W.; Stapleton, Mark; Bickel, Peter; Biggin, Mark D.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2009-05-15

    BACKGROUND: We previously established that six sequence-specific transcription factors that initiate anterior/posterior patterning in Drosophila bind to overlapping sets of thousands of genomic regions in blastoderm embryos. While regions bound at high levels include known and probable functional targets, more poorly bound regions are preferentially associated with housekeeping genes and/or genes not transcribed in the blastoderm, and are frequently found in protein coding sequences or in less conserved non-coding DNA, suggesting that many are likely non-functional. RESULTS: Here we show that an additional 15 transcription factors that regulate other aspects of embryo patterning show a similar quantitative continuum of function and binding to thousands of genomic regions in vivo. Collectively, the 21 regulators show a surprisingly high overlap in the regions they bind given that they belong to 11 DNA binding domain families, specify distinct developmental fates, and can act via different cis-regulatory modules. We demonstrate, however, that quantitative differences in relative levels of binding to shared targets correlate with the known biological and transcriptional regulatory specificities of these factors. CONCLUSIONS: It is likely that the overlap in binding of biochemically and functionally unrelated transcription factors arises from the high concentrations of these proteins in nuclei, which, coupled with their broad DNA binding specificities, directs them to regions of open chromatin. We suggest that most animal transcription factors will be found to show a similar broad overlapping pattern of binding in vivo, with specificity achieved by modulating the amount, rather than the identity, of bound factor.

  16. The lp13.3 genomic region -rs599839- is associated with endothelial dysfunction in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    López-Mejias, Raquel; González-Juanatey, C.; García-Bermúdez, M.; S. Castañeda; Blanco, Ricardo; Miranda-Filloy, J. A.; Llorca, Javier; Martín, J.; González-Gay, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disease associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and high risk of cardiovascular (CV) disease. Since genome-wide association studies demonstrated association between rs599839 polymorphism and coronary artery disease, in the present study we assessed the potential association of this polymorphism with endothelial dysfunction, an early step in atherogenesis. Methods: A total of 128 RA patients without history of CV event...

  17. APPROBATION OF GENOTYPING METHOD OF WINE YEAST (GENUS SACCHAROMYCES) BY THE ANALYSIS OF INTER-DELTA GENOMIC REGION

    OpenAIRE

    Suprun I. I.; Tokmakov S. V.; Ageeva N. M.; Prakh A. V.

    2015-01-01

    The study was performed to genotype some commercial wine yeast strains using the assay of Interdelta genomic sequences. Experimental parameters of PCR to identify were optimized and optimal simplified method of DNA extraction from dried preparations of yeast cultures was define. Proven method showed a high level of resolution and can be used for the analysis of genetic diversity wine yeast in combination with SSR-markers

  18. Rice pseudomolecule-anchored cross-species DNA sequence alignments indicate regional genomic variation in expressed sequence conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Howard

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various methods have been developed to explore inter-genomic relationships among plant species. Here, we present a sequence similarity analysis based upon comparison of transcript-assembly and methylation-filtered databases from five plant species and physically anchored rice coding sequences. Results A comparison of the frequency of sequence alignments, determined by MegaBLAST, between rice coding sequences in TIGR pseudomolecules and annotations vs 4.0 and comprehensive transcript-assembly and methylation-filtered databases from Lolium perenne (ryegrass, Zea mays (maize, Hordeum vulgare (barley, Glycine max (soybean and Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress was undertaken. Each rice pseudomolecule was divided into 10 segments, each containing 10% of the functionally annotated, expressed genes. This indicated a correlation between relative segment position in the rice genome and numbers of alignments with all the queried monocot and dicot plant databases. Colour-coded moving windows of 100 functionally annotated, expressed genes along each pseudomolecule were used to generate 'heat-maps'. These revealed consistent intra- and inter-pseudomolecule variation in the relative concentrations of significant alignments with the tested plant databases. Analysis of the annotations and derived putative expression patterns of rice genes from 'hot-spots' and 'cold-spots' within the heat maps indicated possible functional differences. A similar comparison relating to ancestral duplications of the rice genome indicated that duplications were often associated with 'hot-spots'. Conclusion Physical positions of expressed genes in the rice genome are correlated with the degree of conservation of similar sequences in the transcriptomes of other plant species. This relative conservation is associated with the distribution of different sized gene families and segmentally duplicated loci and may have functional and evolutionary implications.

  19. Nucleotide sequence of the 3'-terminal region of the genome confirms that pea mosaic virus is a strain of bean yellow mosaic potyvirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, X W; Frenkel, M J; Ward, C W; Shukla, D D

    1994-01-01

    The 1,035 nucleotides at the 3'end of the I strain of pea mosaic potyvirus (PMV-I) genomic RNA, encoding the coat protein, have been cloned and sequenced. A comparison of the derived coat protein sequence with those of the bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV) strains, CS, S, D and GDD, indicates that PMV-I is a strain of BYMV. Sequence comparisons and hybridisation studies using the 3'-noncoding region support this classification. The nucleotide and protein sequence data also suggest that PMV-I and BYMV-CS form one subset of BYMV strains while the other three strains form another. PMID:8031241

  20. Z-DNA-forming sites identified by ChIP-Seq are associated with actively transcribed regions in the human genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, So-I.; Ham, Seokjin; Park, Jihwan; Seo, Seong Hye; Lim, Chae Hyun; Jeon, Hyeongrin; Huh, Jounghyun; Roh, Tae-Young

    2016-01-01

    Z-DNA, a left-handed double helical DNA is structurally different from the most abundant B-DNA. Z-DNA has been known to play a significant role in transcription and genome stability but the biological meaning and positions of Z-DNA-forming sites (ZFSs) in the human genome has not been fully explored. To obtain genome-wide map of ZFSs, Zaa with two Z-DNA-binding domains was used for ChIP-Seq analysis. A total of 391 ZFSs were found and their functions were examined in vivo. A large portion of ZFSs was enriched in the promoter regions and contain sequences with high potential to form Z-DNA. Genes containing ZFSs were occupied by RNA polymerase II at the promoters and showed high levels of expression. Moreover, ZFSs were significantly related to active histone marks such as H3K4me3 and H3K9ac. The association of Z-DNA with active transcription was confirmed by the reporter assay system. Overall, our results suggest that Z-DNA formation depends on chromatin structure as well as sequence composition, and is associated with active transcription in human cells. The global information about ZFSs positioning will provide a useful resource for further understanding of DNA structure-dependent transcriptional regulation. PMID:27374614

  1. Application of semi-nested polymerase chain reaction targeting internal transcribed spacer region for rapid detection of panfungal genome directly from ocular specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagyalakshmi R

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The incidence of fungal endophthalmitis has dramatically increased in recent years and rapid detection of fungi using nucleic acid-based amplification techniques is helpful in management. Aim: To evaluate semi-nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR targeting internal transcribed spacer (ITS region for detection of panfungal genome in ocular specimens. Statistical analysis used: Z test for two proportion. Materials and Methods: Standardization of PCR targeting ITS primers was carried out by determining analytical sensitivity and specificity. The sensitivity and specificity of PCR was determined by serial tenfold dilutions of C. albicans (ATCC 24433 DNA and DNA extracts of laboratory isolates of Aspergillus fumigatus , Fusarium lichenicola (4, other fungal and closely related bacterial strains and also human DNA. Semi-nested PCR was applied onto a total of 168 ocular specimens with clinically suspected fungal etiology during 2003-2005. Results and Conclusions: PCR was specific and sensitive to detect 1fg of fungal DNA with ITS primers. PCR detected fungal genome in 90 (53.57% in comparison with the conventional technique, positive in 34 (20.23% by smear examination and in 42 (25% by culture. The increase in clinical sensitivity by 28.57% using PCR was found to be statistically significant { P < 0.001 using Z test for two proportion}. The accuracy of the test was found to be 70.85%. PCR proved to be a rapid diagnostic technique for detection of panfungal genome directly from clinical specimens

  2. Intrinsically disordered region of influenza A NP regulates viral genome packaging via interactions with viral RNA and host PI(4,5)P2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakisaka, Michinori; Yamada, Kazunori; Yamaji-Hasegawa, Akiko; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Aida, Yoko

    2016-09-01

    To be incorporated into progeny virions, the viral genome must be transported to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane (PM) and accumulate there. Some viruses utilize lipid components to assemble at the PM. For example, simian virus 40 (SV40) targets the ganglioside GM1 and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) utilizes phosphatidylinositol (4,5) bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. Recent studies clearly indicate that Rab11-mediated recycling endosomes are required for influenza A virus (IAV) trafficking of vRNPs to the PM but it remains unclear how IAV vRNP localized or accumulate underneath the PM for viral genome incorporation into progeny virions. In this study, we found that the second intrinsically disordered region (IDR2) of NP regulates two binding steps involved in viral genome packaging. First, IDR2 facilitates NP oligomer binding to viral RNA to form vRNP. Secondly, vRNP assemble by interacting with PI(4,5)P2 at the PM via IDR2. These findings suggest that PI(4,5)P2 functions as the determinant of vRNP accumulation at the PM. PMID:27289560

  3. Use of conserved genomic regions and degenerate primers in a PCR-based assay for the detection of members of the genus Caulimovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappu, H R; Druffel, K L

    2009-04-01

    The genus Caulimovirus consists of several distinct virus species with a double-stranded DNA genome that infect diverse plant species. A comparative analysis of the sequences of known Caulimovirus species revealed two regions that are conserved in all Caulimovirus species with the exception of Strawberry vein banding virus. Degenerate primers based on these two regions were designed and tested in a polymerase chain reaction-based assay for broad spectrum detection of members of this genus. Cauliflower mosaic virus, Figwort mosaic virus and three distinct caulimoviruses associated with dahlia (Dahlia variabilis) were used to show the utility of this test in detecting diverse caulimoviruses. The primer pair gave an amplicon of expected size (840bp). Amplicons from each virus were cloned and sequenced to verify their identity. The primer pair and the PCR assay provide approach for the broad spectrum detection of several members of the genus Caulimovirus. PMID:19100290

  4. Physical mapping of black spot disease resistance/susceptibility-related genome regions in Japanese pear (Pyrus pyrifolia) by BAC-FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masashi; Terakami, Shingo; Takada, Norio; Yamamoto, Toshiya

    2016-06-01

    Black spot disease, caused by Alternaria alternata Japanese pear pathotype, is one of the most harmful diseases in Japanese pear cultivation. In the present study, the locations of black spot disease resistance/susceptibility-related genome regions were studied by fluorescence in situ hybridization using BAC clone (BAC-FISH) on Japanese pear (Pyrus pyrifolia (Burm. f.) Nakai) chromosomes. Root tips of self-pollinated seedlings of 'Osa Gold' were used as materials. Chromosome samples were prepared by the enzymatic maceration and air-drying method. The BAC clone adjacent to the black spot disease-related gene was labeled as a probe for FISH analysis. Black spot disease-related genome regions were detected in telomeric positions of two medium size chromosomes. These two sites and six telomeric 18S-5.8S-25S rDNA sites were located on different chromosomes as determined from the results of multi-color FISH. The effectiveness of the physical mapping of useful genes on pear chromosomes achieved by the BAC-FISH method was unequivocally demonstrated. PMID:27436955

  5. Sequence determination of cDNA clones of transcripts from the tumor-associated region of the Marek's disease virus genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, A; Ueda, S; Ishihama, A; Hirai, K

    1992-04-01

    The number of 132-bp tandem direct repeats within the long inverted repeat region of the Marek's disease virus type 1 (MDV1) genome increases concomitantly with the loss of oncogenicity during serial passages in cultured cells. Twelve clones carrying the 132-bp sequence were isolated from a cDNA library constructed from chicken embryo fibroblasts infected with the MDV1 Md5 strain. Through sequence analysis of a cDNA clone and primer extension analysis, the corresponding mRNA was found to be a linear transcript which included the two 132-bp tandem direct repeats. Two open reading frames were found in this transcript. One had a week homology with v-fms. The other should increase its size concomitantly with expansion of the 132-bp tandem direct repeat. PCR analysis of both cDNA clones and RNA gave amplified products which were as large as that produced from the genomic clone, indicating that a majority of mRNA from this region is composed of unspliced transcripts.

  6. The influence of landscape configuration and environment on population genetic structure in a sedentary passerine: insights from loci located in different genomic regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, E S; García-Navas, V; Bueno-Enciso, J; Barrientos, R; Serrano-Davies, E; Cáliz-Campal, C; Sanz, J J; Ortego, J

    2016-01-01

    The study of the factors structuring genetic variation can help to infer the neutral and adaptive processes shaping the demographic and evolutionary trajectories of natural populations. Here, we analyse the role of isolation by distance (IBD), isolation by resistance (IBR, defined by landscape composition) and isolation by environment (IBE, estimated as habitat and elevation dissimilarity) in structuring genetic variation in 25 blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus) populations. We typed 1385 individuals at 26 microsatellite loci classified into two groups by considering whether they are located into genomic regions that are actively (TL; 12 loci) or not (NTL; 14 loci) transcribed to RNA. Population genetic differentiation was mostly detected using the panel of NTL. Landscape genetic analyses showed a pattern of IBD for all loci and the panel of NTL, but genetic differentiation estimated at TL was only explained by IBR models considering high resistance for natural vegetation and low resistance for agricultural lands. Finally, the absence for IBE suggests a lack of divergent selection pressures associated with differences in habitat and elevation. Overall, our study shows that markers located in different genomic regions can yield contrasting inferences on landscape-level patterns of realized gene flow in natural populations.

  7. High abundance of Serine/Threonine-rich regions predicted to be hyper-O-glycosylated in the secretory proteins coded by eight fungal genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González Mario

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background O-glycosylation of secretory proteins has been found to be an important factor in fungal biology and virulence. It consists in the addition of short glycosidic chains to Ser or Thr residues in the protein backbone via O-glycosidic bonds. Secretory proteins in fungi frequently display Ser/Thr rich regions that could be sites of extensive O-glycosylation. We have analyzed in silico the complete sets of putatively secretory proteins coded by eight fungal genomes (Botrytis cinerea, Magnaporthe grisea, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Ustilago maydis, Aspergillus nidulans, Neurospora crassa, Trichoderma reesei, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in search of Ser/Thr-rich regions as well as regions predicted to be highly O-glycosylated by NetOGlyc (http://www.cbs.dtu.dk. Results By comparison with experimental data, NetOGlyc was found to overestimate the number of O-glycosylation sites in fungi by a factor of 1.5, but to be quite reliable in the prediction of highly O-glycosylated regions. About half of secretory proteins have at least one Ser/Thr-rich region, with a Ser/Thr content of at least 40% over an average length of 40 amino acids. Most secretory proteins in filamentous fungi were predicted to be O-glycosylated, sometimes in dozens or even hundreds of sites. Residues predicted to be O-glycosylated have a tendency to be grouped together forming hyper-O-glycosylated regions of varying length. Conclusions About one fourth of secretory fungal proteins were predicted to have at least one hyper-O-glycosylated region, which consists of 45 amino acids on average and displays at least one O-glycosylated Ser or Thr every four residues. These putative highly O-glycosylated regions can be found anywhere along the proteins but have a slight tendency to be at either one of the two ends.

  8. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. Progress report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, Fa-Ten

    1992-08-01

    During the grant period progress has been made in the successful demonstration of regional mapping of microclones derived from microdissection libraries; successful demonstration of the feasibility of converting microclones with short inserts into yeast artificial chromosome clones with very large inserts for high resolution physical mapping of the dissected region; Successful demonstration of the usefulness of region-specific microclones to isolate region-specific cDNA clones as candidate genes to facilitate search for the crucial genes underlying genetic diseases assigned to the dissected region; and the successful construction of four region-specific microdissection libraries for human chromosome 2, including 2q35-q37, 2q33-q35, 2p23-p25 and 2p2l-p23. The 2q35-q37 library has been characterized in detail. The characterization of the other three libraries is in progress. These region-specific microdissection libraries and the unique sequence microclones derived from the libraries will be valuable resources for investigators engaged in high resolution physical mapping and isolation of disease-related genes residing in these chromosomal regions.

  9. Genomic Rearrangements and Functional Diversification of lecA and lecB Lectin-Coding Regions Impacting the Efficacy of Glycomimetics Directed against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukerb, Amine M.; Decor, Aude; Ribun, Sébastien; Tabaroni, Rachel; Rousset, Audric; Commin, Loris; Buff, Samuel; Doléans-Jordheim, Anne; Vidal, Sébastien; Varrot, Annabelle; Imberty, Anne; Cournoyer, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    LecA and LecB tetrameric lectins take part in oligosaccharide-mediated adhesion-processes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Glycomimetics have been designed to block these interactions. The great versatility of P. aeruginosa suggests that the range of application of these glycomimetics could be restricted to genotypes with particular lectin types. The likelihood of having genomic and genetic changes impacting LecA and LecB interactions with glycomimetics such as galactosylated and fucosylated calix[4]arene was investigated over a collection of strains from the main clades of P. aeruginosa. Lectin types were defined, and their ligand specificities were inferred. These analyses showed a loss of lecA among the PA7 clade. Genomic changes impacting lec loci were thus assessed using strains of this clade, and by making comparisons with the PAO1 genome. The lecA regions were found challenged by phage attacks and PAGI-2 (genomic island) integrations. A prophage was linked to the loss of lecA. The lecB regions were found less impacted by such rearrangements but greater lecB than lecA genetic divergences were recorded. Sixteen combinations of LecA and LecB types were observed. Amino acid variations were mapped on PAO1 crystal structures. Most significant changes were observed on LecBPA7, and found close to the fucose binding site. Glycan array analyses were performed with purified LecBPA7. LecBPA7 was found less specific for fucosylated oligosaccharides than LecBPAO1, with a preference for H type 2 rather than type 1, and Lewisa rather than Lewisx. Comparison of the crystal structures of LecBPA7 and LecBPAO1 in complex with Lewisa showed these changes in specificity to have resulted from a modification of the water network between the lectin, galactose and GlcNAc residues. Incidence of these modifications on the interactions with calix[4]arene glycomimetics at the cell level was investigated. An aggregation test was used to establish the efficacy of these ligands. Great variations

  10. Genomic Rearrangements and Functional Diversification of lecA and lecB Lectin-Coding Regions Impacting the Efficacy of Glycomimetics Directed against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukerb, Amine M; Decor, Aude; Ribun, Sébastien; Tabaroni, Rachel; Rousset, Audric; Commin, Loris; Buff, Samuel; Doléans-Jordheim, Anne; Vidal, Sébastien; Varrot, Annabelle; Imberty, Anne; Cournoyer, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    LecA and LecB tetrameric lectins take part in oligosaccharide-mediated adhesion-processes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Glycomimetics have been designed to block these interactions. The great versatility of P. aeruginosa suggests that the range of application of these glycomimetics could be restricted to genotypes with particular lectin types. The likelihood of having genomic and genetic changes impacting LecA and LecB interactions with glycomimetics such as galactosylated and fucosylated calix[4]arene was investigated over a collection of strains from the main clades of P. aeruginosa. Lectin types were defined, and their ligand specificities were inferred. These analyses showed a loss of lecA among the PA7 clade. Genomic changes impacting lec loci were thus assessed using strains of this clade, and by making comparisons with the PAO1 genome. The lecA regions were found challenged by phage attacks and PAGI-2 (genomic island) integrations. A prophage was linked to the loss of lecA. The lecB regions were found less impacted by such rearrangements but greater lecB than lecA genetic divergences were recorded. Sixteen combinations of LecA and LecB types were observed. Amino acid variations were mapped on PAO1 crystal structures. Most significant changes were observed on LecBPA7, and found close to the fucose binding site. Glycan array analyses were performed with purified LecBPA7. LecBPA7 was found less specific for fucosylated oligosaccharides than LecBPAO1, with a preference for H type 2 rather than type 1, and Lewis(a) rather than Lewis(x). Comparison of the crystal structures of LecBPA7 and LecBPAO1 in complex with Lewis(a) showed these changes in specificity to have resulted from a modification of the water network between the lectin, galactose and GlcNAc residues. Incidence of these modifications on the interactions with calix[4]arene glycomimetics at the cell level was investigated. An aggregation test was used to establish the efficacy of these ligands. Great

  11. Genomic rearrangements and functional diversification of lecA and lecB lectin-coding regions impacting the efficacy of glycomimetics directed against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amine M Boukerb

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available LecA and LecB tetrameric lectins take part in oligosaccharide-mediated adhesion-processes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Glycomimetics have been designed to block these interactions. The great versatility of P. aeruginosa suggests that the range of application of these glycomimetics could be restricted to genotypes with particular lectin types. The likelihood of having genomic and genetic changes impacting LecA and LecB interactions with glycomimetics such as galactosylated and fucosylated calix[4]arene was investigated over a collection of strains from the main clades of P. aeruginosa. Lectin types were defined, and their ligand specificities were inferred. These analyses showed a loss of lecA among the PA7 clade. Genomic changes impacting lec loci were thus assessed using strains of this clade, and by making comparisons with the PAO1 genome. The lecA regions were found challenged by phage attacks and PAGI-2 (genomic island integrations. A prophage was linked to the loss of lecA. The lecB regions were found less impacted by such rearrangements but greater lecB than lecA genetic divergences were recorded. Sixteen combinations of LecA and LecB types were observed. Amino acid variations were mapped on PAO1 crystal structures. Most significant changes were observed on LecBPA7, and found close to the fucose binding site. Glycan array analyses were performed with purified LecBPA7. LecBPA7 was found less specific for fucosylated oligosaccharides than LecBPAO1, with a preference for H type 2 rather than type 1, and Lewisa rather than Lewisx. Comparison of the crystal structures of LecBPA7 and LecBPAO1 in complex with Lewisa showed these changes in specificity to have resulted from a modification of the water network between the lectin, galactose and GlcNAc residues. Incidence of these modifications on the interactions with calix[4]arene glycomimetics at the cell level was investigated. An aggregation test was used to establish the efficacy of these ligands

  12. Variations in the G6PC2/ABCB11 genomic region are associated with fasting glucose levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Wei-Min; Erdos, Michael R; Jackson, Anne U;

    2008-01-01

    Identifying the genetic variants that regulate fasting glucose concentrations may further our understanding of the pathogenesis of diabetes. We therefore investigated the association of fasting glucose levels with SNPs in 2 genome-wide scans including a total of 5,088 nondiabetic individuals from...... Finland and Sardinia. We found a significant association between the SNP rs563694 and fasting glucose concentrations (P = 3.5 x 10(-7)). This association was further investigated in an additional 18,436 nondiabetic individuals of mixed European descent from 7 different studies. The combined P value...... for association in these follow-up samples was 6.9 x 10(-26), and combining results from all studies resulted in an overall P value for association of 6.4 x 10(-33). Across these studies, fasting glucose concentrations increased 0.01-0.16 mM with each copy of the major allele, accounting for approximately 1...

  13. Multiple sex-associated regions and a putative sex chromosome in zebrafish revealed by RAD mapping and population genomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Anderson

    Full Text Available Within vertebrates, major sex determining genes can differ among taxa and even within species. In zebrafish (Danio rerio, neither heteromorphic sex chromosomes nor single sex determination genes of large effect, like Sry in mammals, have yet been identified. Furthermore, environmental factors can influence zebrafish sex determination. Although progress has been made in understanding zebrafish gonad differentiation (e.g. the influence of germ cells on gonad fate, the primary genetic basis of zebrafish sex determination remains poorly understood. To identify genetic loci associated with sex, we analyzed F(2 offspring of reciprocal crosses between Oregon *AB and Nadia (NA wild-type zebrafish stocks. Genome-wide linkage analysis, using more than 5,000 sequence-based polymorphic restriction site associated (RAD-tag markers and population genomic analysis of more than 30,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms in our *ABxNA crosses revealed a sex-associated locus on the end of the long arm of chr-4 for both cross families, and an additional locus in the middle of chr-3 in one cross family. Additional sequencing showed that two SNPs in dmrt1 previously suggested to be functional candidates for sex determination in a cross of ABxIndia wild-type zebrafish, are not associated with sex in our AB fish. Our data show that sex determination in zebrafish is polygenic and that different genes may influence sex determination in different strains or that different genes become more important under different environmental conditions. The association of the end of chr-4 with sex is remarkable because, unique in the karyotype, this chromosome arm shares features with known sex chromosomes: it is highly heterochromatic, repetitive, late replicating, and has reduced recombination. Our results reveal that chr-4 has functional and structural properties expected of a sex chromosome.

  14. Quantitative linkage analysis to the autism endophenotype social responsiveness identifies genome-wide significant linkage to two regions on chromosome 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Jennifer K.; Werling, Donna M.; Constantino, John N.; Cantor, Rita M.; Geschwind, Daniel H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is characterized by deficits in social function and the presence of repetitive and restrictive behaviors. Following a previous test of principle, we adopted a quantitative approach to discovering genes contributing to the broader autism phenotype by using social responsiveness as an endophenotype for ASD. Method Linkage analyses using scores from the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) were performed in 590 families from AGRE, a largely multiplex ASD cohort. Regional and genome-wide association analyses were performed to search for common variants contributing to social responsiveness. Results SRS is unimodally distributed in male offspring from multiplex autism families, in contrast with a bimodal distribution observed in females. In correlated analyses differing by SRS respondent, genome-wide significant linkage for social responsiveness was identified at chr8p21.3 (multi-point LOD=4.11; teacher/parent scores) and chr8q24.22 (multi-point LOD=4.54; parent-only scores), respectively. Genome-wide or linkage-directed association analyses did not detect common variants contributing to social responsiveness. Conclusions The sex-differential distributions of SRS in multiplex autism families likely reflect mechanisms contributing to the sex ratio for autism observed in the general population and form a quantitative signature of reduced penetrance of inherited liability to ASD among females. The identification of two strong loci for social responsiveness validates the endophenotype approach for the identification of genetic variants contributing to complex traits such as ASD. While causal mutations have yet to be identified, these findings are consistent with segregation of rare genetic variants influencing social responsiveness and underscore the increasingly recognized role of rare inherited variants in the genetic architecture of ASD. PMID:25727539

  15. ProteinSplit: splitting of multi-domain proteins using prediction of ordered and disordered regions in protein sequences for virtual structural genomics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annotation of protein folds within newly sequenced genomes is the main target for semi-automated protein structure prediction (virtual structural genomics). A large number of automated methods have been developed recently with very good results in the case of single-domain proteins. Unfortunately, most of these automated methods often fail to properly predict the distant homology between a given multi-domain protein query and structural templates. Therefore a multi-domain protein should be split into domains in order to overcome this limitation. ProteinSplit is designed to identify protein domain boundaries using a novel algorithm that predicts disordered regions in protein sequences. The software utilizes various sequence characteristics to assess the local propensity of a protein to be disordered or ordered in terms of local structure stability. These disordered parts of a protein are likely to create interdomain spacers. Because of its speed and portability, the method was successfully applied to several genome-wide fold annotation experiments. The user can run an automated analysis of sets of proteins or perform semi-automated multiple user projects (saving the results on the server). Additionally the sequences of predicted domains can be sent to the Bioinfo.PL Protein Structure Prediction Meta-Server for further protein three-dimensional structure and function prediction. The program is freely accessible as a web service at http://lucjan.bioinfo.pl/proteinsplit together with detailed benchmark results on the critical assessment of a fully automated structure prediction (CAFASP) set of sequences. The source code of the local version of protein domain boundary prediction is available upon request from the authors

  16. Genome sequence of foot-and-mouth disease virus outside the 3A region is also responsible for virus replication in bovine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xueqing; Li, Pinghua; Sun, Pu; Lu, Zengjun; Bao, Huifang; Bai, Xingwen; Fu, Yuanfang; Cao, Yimei; Li, Dong; Chen, Yingli; Qiao, Zilin; Liu, Zaixin

    2016-07-15

    The deletion of residues 93-102 in non-structure protein 3A of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is associated with the inability of FMDV to grow in bovine cells and attenuated virulence in cattle.Whereas, a previously reported FMDV strain O/HKN/21/70 harboring 93-102 deletion in 3A protein grew equally well in bovine and swine cells. This suggests that changes inFMDV genome sequence, in addition to 93-102 deletion in 3A, may also affectthe viral growth phenotype in bovine cellsduring infection and replication.However, it is nuclear that changes in which region (inside or outside of 3A region) influences FMDV growth phenotype in bovine cells.In this study, to determine the region in FMDV genomeaffecting viral growth phenotype in bovine cells, we constructed chimeric FMDVs, rvGZSB-HKN3A and rvHN-HKN3A, by introducing the 3A coding region of O/HKN/21/70 into the context of O/SEA/Mya-98 strain O/GZSB/2011 and O Cathay topotype strain O/HN/CHA/93, respectively, since O/GZSB/2011 containing full-length 3A protein replicated well in bovine and swine cells, and O/HN/CHA/93 harboring 93-102 deletion in 3A protein grew poorly in bovine cells.The chimeric virusesrvGZSB-HKN3A and rvHN-HKN3A displayed growth properties and plaque phenotypes similar to those of the parental virus rvGZSB and rv-HN in BHK-21 and primary fetal porcine kidney (FPK) cells. However, rvHN-HKN3A and rv-HN replicated poorly in primary fetal bovine kidney (FBK) cells with no visible plaques, and rvGZSB-HKN3A exhibited lower growth rate and smaller plaque size phenotypes than those of the parental virus in FBK cells, but similar growth properties and plaque phenotypes to those of the recombinant viruses harboring 93-102 deletion in 3A. These results demonstrate that the difference present in FMDV genome sequence outside the 3A coding region also have influence on FMDV replication ability in bovine cells. PMID:27094491

  17. Organization and expression of genes in the genomic region surrounding the glutamine synthetase gene Gln1 from Lotus japonicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thykjaer, T; Danielsen, D; She, Q;

    1997-01-01

    synthetase gene are found primarily in roots and root nodules, while transcripts of the Krm gene are found in roots, root nodules and leaves. In the region between Gln1 and Krm, the presence of a third gene, Pge1, was suggested by analysis with the Grail exon recognition program. Upstream of the Gln1 gene...

  18. ssODN-mediated knock-in with CRISPR-Cas for large genomic regions in zygotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimi, Kazuto; Kunihiro, Yayoi; Kaneko, Takehito; Nagahora, Hitoshi; Voigt, Birger; Mashimo, Tomoji

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR-Cas system is a powerful tool for generating genetically modified animals; however, targeted knock-in (KI) via homologous recombination remains difficult in zygotes. Here we show efficient gene KI in rats by combining CRISPR-Cas with single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides (ssODNs). First, a 1-kb ssODN co-injected with guide RNA (gRNA) and Cas9 messenger RNA produce GFP-KI at the rat Thy1 locus. Then, two gRNAs with two 80-bp ssODNs direct efficient integration of a 5.5-kb CAG-GFP vector into the Rosa26 locus via ssODN-mediated end joining. This protocol also achieves KI of a 200-kb BAC containing the human SIRPA locus, concomitantly knocking out the rat Sirpa gene. Finally, three gRNAs and two ssODNs replace 58-kb of the rat Cyp2d cluster with a 6.2-kb human CYP2D6 gene. These ssODN-mediated KI protocols can be applied to any target site with any donor vector without the need to construct homology arms, thus simplifying genome engineering in living organisms. PMID:26786405

  19. Inter- and intraspecific genomic variability of the 16S-23S intergenic spacer regions (ISR) in representatives of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yong-Qing; Yang, Yuan; Bao, Jing-Ting; He, Kai-Yu; Li, Hong-Yu

    2007-05-01

    The complete sequences of 32 intergenic spacer regions (ISR) from Acidithiobacillus strains, including 29 field strains isolated from coal, copper, molybdenum mine wastes or sediment of different geoclimatic regions in China, reference strain ATCC19859 and the type strains of the two species were determined. These data, together with other sequences available in the GenBank database, were used to carry out the first detailed assessment of the inter- and intraspecific genomic variability of the ISR sequences and to infer phylogenetic relationships within the genus. The total length of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer regions of the Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strains ranged from 451 to 490 bp, and from 434 to 456 bp, respectively. The degree of intrageneric ISR sequence similarity was higher than the degree of intergeneric similarity, and the overall similarity values of the ISRs varied from 60.49% to 84.71% between representatives of different species of the genus Acidithiobacillus. Sequences from the spacer of the A. thiooxidans and A. ferrooxidans strains ranged from 86.71% to 99.56% and 92.36% to 100% similarity, respectively. All Acidithiobacillus strains were separated into three phylogenetic major clusters and seven phylogenetic groups. ISR may be a potential target for the development of in situ hybridization probe aimed at accurately detecting acidithiobacilli in the various acidic environments.

  20. Evolution of the rpoB-psbZ region in fern plastid genomes: notable structural rearrangements and highly variable intergenic spacers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Ying-Juan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rpoB-psbZ (BZ region of some fern plastid genomes (plastomes has been noted to go through considerable genomic changes. Unraveling its evolutionary dynamics across all fern lineages will lead to clarify the fundamental process shaping fern plastome structure and organization. Results A total of 24 fern BZ sequences were investigated with taxon sampling covering all the extant fern orders. We found that: (i a tree fern Plagiogyria japonica contained a novel gene order that can be generated from either the ancestral Angiopteris type or the derived Adiantum type via a single inversion; (ii the trnY-trnE intergenic spacer (IGS of the filmy fern Vandenboschia radicans was expanded 3-fold due to the tandem 27-bp repeats which showed strong sequence similarity with the anticodon domain of trnY; (iii the trnY-trnE IGSs of two horsetail ferns Equisetum ramosissimum and E. arvense underwent an unprecedented 5-kb long expansion, more than a quarter of which was consisted of a single type of direct repeats also relevant to the trnY anticodon domain; and (iv ycf66 has independently lost at least four times in ferns. Conclusions Our results provided fresh insights into the evolutionary process of fern BZ regions. The intermediate BZ gene order was not detected, supporting that the Adiantum type was generated by two inversions occurring in pairs. The occurrence of Vandenboschia 27-bp repeats represents the first evidence of partial tRNA gene duplication in fern plastomes. Repeats potentially forming a stem-loop structure play major roles in the expansion of the trnY-trnE IGS.

  1. Quantitative trait loci (QTL study identifies novel genomic regions associated to Chiari-like malformation in Griffon Bruxellois dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Lemay

    Full Text Available Chiari-like malformation (CM is a developmental abnormality of the craniocervical junction that is common in the Griffon Bruxellois (GB breed with an estimated prevalence of 65%. This disease is characterized by overcrowding of the neural parenchyma at the craniocervical junction and disturbance of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF flow. The most common clinical sign is pain either as a direct consequence of CM or neuropathic pain as a consequence of secondary syringomyelia. The etiology of CM remains unknown but genetic factors play an important role. To investigate the genetic complexity of the disease, a quantitative trait locus (QTL approach was adopted. A total of 14 quantitative skull and atlas measurements were taken and were tested for association to CM. Six traits were found to be associated to CM and were subjected to a whole-genome association study using the Illumina canine high density bead chip in 74 GB dogs (50 affected and 24 controls. Linear and mixed regression analyses identified associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs on 5 Canis Familiaris Autosomes (CFAs: CFA2, CFA9, CFA12, CFA14 and CFA24. A reconstructed haplotype of 0.53 Mb on CFA2 strongly associated to the height of the cranial fossa (diameter F and an haplotype of 2.5 Mb on CFA14 associated to both the height of the rostral part of the caudal cranial fossa (AE and the height of the brain (FG were significantly associated to CM after 10 000 permutations strengthening their candidacy for this disease (P = 0.0421, P = 0.0094 respectively. The CFA2 QTL harbours the Sall-1 gene which is an excellent candidate since its orthologue in humans is mutated in Townes-Brocks syndrome which has previously been associated to Chiari malformation I. Our study demonstrates the implication of multiple traits in the etiology of CM and has successfully identified two new QTL associated to CM and a potential candidate gene.

  2. The 3' untranslated regions of influenza genomic sequences are 5'PPP-independent ligands for RIG-I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William G Davis

    Full Text Available Retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I is a key regulator of antiviral immunity. RIG-I is generally thought to be activated by ssRNA species containing a 5'-triphosphate (PPP group or by unphosphorylated dsRNA up to ~300 bp in length. However, it is not yet clear how changes in the length, nucleotide sequence, secondary structure, and 5' end modification affect the abilities of these ligands to bind and activate RIG-I. To further investigate these parameters in the context of naturally occurring ligands, we examined RNA sequences derived from the 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTR of the influenza virus NS1 gene segment. As expected, RIG-I-dependent interferon-β (IFN-β induction by sequences from the 5' UTR of the influenza cRNA or its complement (26 nt in length required the presence of a 5'PPP group. In contrast, activation of RIG-I by the 3' UTR cRNA sequence or its complement (172 nt exhibited only a partial 5'PPP-dependence, as capping the 5' end or treatment with CIP showed a modest reduction in RIG-I activation. Furthermore, induction of IFN-β by a smaller, U/A-rich region within the 3' UTR was completely 5'PPP-independent. Our findings demonstrated that RNA sequence, length, and secondary structure all contributed to whether or not the 5'PPP moiety is needed for interferon induction by RIG-I.

  3. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis of neuroblastic tumors reveals clinically relevant epigenetic events and large-scale epigenomic alterations localized to telomeric regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.G. Buckley; S. Das; K. Bryan; K.M. Watters; L. Alcock; J. Koster; R. Versteeg; R.L. Stallings

    2011-01-01

    The downregulation of specific genes through DNA hypermethylation is a major hallmark of cancer, although the extent and genomic distribution of hypermethylation occurring within cancer genomes is poorly understood. We report on the first genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation alterations in differ

  4. Investigating the prehistory of Tungusic peoples of Siberia and the Amur-Ussuri region with complete mtDNA genome sequences and Y-chromosomal markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana T Duggan

    Full Text Available Evenks and Evens, Tungusic-speaking reindeer herders and hunter-gatherers, are spread over a wide area of northern Asia, whereas their linguistic relatives the Udegey, sedentary fishermen and hunter-gatherers, are settled to the south of the lower Amur River. The prehistory and relationships of these Tungusic peoples are as yet poorly investigated, especially with respect to their interactions with neighbouring populations. In this study, we analyse over 500 complete mtDNA genome sequences from nine different Evenk and even subgroups as well as their geographic neighbours from Siberia and their linguistic relatives the Udegey from the Amur-Ussuri region in order to investigate the prehistory of the Tungusic populations. These data are supplemented with analyses of Y-chromosomal haplogroups and STR haplotypes in the Evenks, Evens, and neighbouring Siberian populations. We demonstrate that whereas the North Tungusic Evenks and Evens show evidence of shared ancestry both in the maternal and in the paternal line, this signal has been attenuated by genetic drift and differential gene flow with neighbouring populations, with isolation by distance further shaping the maternal genepool of the Evens. The Udegey, in contrast, appear quite divergent from their linguistic relatives in the maternal line, with a mtDNA haplogroup composition characteristic of populations of the Amur-Ussuri region. Nevertheless, they show affinities with the Evenks, indicating that they might be the result of admixture between local Amur-Ussuri populations and Tungusic populations from the north.

  5. Genome-wide DNA methylation analyses in the brain reveal four differentially methylated regions between humans and non-human primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jinkai

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The highly improved cognitive function is the most significant change in human evolutionary history. Recently, several large-scale studies reported the evolutionary roles of DNA methylation; however, the role of DNA methylation on brain evolution is largely unknown. Results To test if DNA methylation has contributed to the evolution of human brain, with the use of MeDIP-Chip and SEQUENOM MassARRAY, we conducted a genome-wide analysis to identify differentially methylated regions (DMRs in the brain between humans and rhesus macaques. We first identified a total of 150 candidate DMRs by the MeDIP-Chip method, among which 4 DMRs were confirmed by the MassARRAY analysis. All 4 DMRs are within or close to the CpG islands, and a MIR3 repeat element was identified in one DMR, but no repeat sequence was observed in the other 3 DMRs. For the 4 DMR genes, their proteins tend to be conserved and two genes have neural related functions. Bisulfite sequencing and phylogenetic comparison among human, chimpanzee, rhesus macaque and rat suggested several regions of lineage specific DNA methylation, including a human specific hypomethylated region in the promoter of K6IRS2 gene. Conclusions Our study provides a new angle of studying human brain evolution and understanding the evolutionary role of DNA methylation in the central nervous system. The results suggest that the patterns of DNA methylation in the brain are in general similar between humans and non-human primates, and only a few DMRs were identified.

  6. Nucleotide sequence and transcript organization of a region of the vaccinia virus genome which encodes a constitutively expressed gene required for DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseman, N A; Hruby, D E

    1987-05-01

    A vaccinia virus (VV) gene required for DNA replication has been mapped to the left side of the 16-kilobase (kb) VV HindIII D DNA fragment by marker rescue of a DNA- temperature-sensitive mutant, ts17, using cloned fragments of the viral genome. The region of VV DNA containing the ts17 locus (3.6 kb) was sequenced. This nucleotide sequence contains one complete open reading frame (ORF) and two incomplete ORFs reading from left to right. Analysis of this region at early times revealed that transcription from the incomplete upstream ORF terminates coincidentally with the complete ORF encoding the ts17 gene product, which is directly downstream. The predicted proteins encoded by this region correlate well with polypeptides mapped by in vitro translation of hybrid-selected early mRNA. The nucleotide sequences of a 1.3-kb BglII fragment derived from ts17 and from two ts17 revertants were also determined, and the nature of the ts17 mutation was identified. S1 nuclease protection studies were carried out to determine the 5' and 3' ends of the transcripts and to examine the kinetics of expression of the ts17 gene during viral infection. The ts17 transcript is present at both early and late times postinfection, indicating that this gene is constitutively expressed. Surprisingly, the transcriptional start throughout infection occurs at the proposed late regulatory element TAA, which immediately precedes the putative initiation codon ATG. Although the biological activity of the ts17-encoded polypeptide was not identified, it was noted that in ts17-infected cells, expression of a nonlinked VV immediate-early gene (thymidine kinase) was deregulated at the nonpermissive temperature. This result may indicate that the ts17 gene product is functionally required at an early step of the VV replicative cycle.

  7. The possible role of genomic imprinting at HLA-DQ/DR region in the pathogenesis of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, T.; Nemoto, M.; Nishimura, R. [Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is an autoimmune endocrinopathy that often develops with anti glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody (GAD-Ab). Accumulated data indicate that specific alleles with HLA-DQA1{sup *}0301 strongly associate with IDDM so that its susceptible gene is localized at HLA class II DQ/DR region. The mode of transmission, however, remains still unclear. To investigate the possibility of involvement of genomic imprinting at the susceptible gene in IDDM, we conducted pedigree analysis of 16 IDDM probands who are positive for GAD-Ab and their first-degree relatives consisting of 14 mothers, 11 fathers and 11 sibs. The GAD-Ab was measured with RIA (cut off = 5 U/ml), and genotypes of DQA1 and DRB1 loci were determined with PCR-RFLP method. Of the observed 16 families, one had an affected brother who developed IDDM and was positive for GAD-Ab (144 U/ml), but the remaining 15 were simplex families. Except for the affected brother, all relatives appeared to be negative for GAD-Ab. DQA1 genotyping showed that 11 probands were homozygotes of high-risk DQA1{sup *}0301, but the five probands were heterozygous with DQA1{sup *}0301/X who were informative for the parental origin of DQA1{sup *}0301 allele. Pedigree analyses revealed that all DQA1{sup *}0301 alleles of the five affected heterozygotes were transmitted from their mothers. We next analyzed segregation pattern of DQA1-DRB1 haplotypes and found that the affected brother shared the same maternally transmitted allele with the proband. Further haplotype analysis indicated that the informative six unaffected sibs did not share the maternally transmitted DQA1{sup *}0301 alleles with their probands. From the exclusive association with maternally transmitted DQA{sup *}0301 alleles, we propose the hypothesis that maternal transmission of {open_quotes}affected alleles{close_quotes} are required for the development of IDDM with the mechanism of genomic imprinting at the HLA-DQ/DR region.

  8. The database of chromosome imbalance regions and genes resided in lung cancer from Asian and Caucasian identified by array-comparative genomic hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo Fang-Yi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer-related genes show racial differences. Therefore, identification and characterization of DNA copy number alteration regions in different racial groups helps to dissect the mechanism of tumorigenesis. Methods Array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH was analyzed for DNA copy number profile in 40 Asian and 20 Caucasian lung cancer patients. Three methods including MetaCore analysis for disease and pathway correlations, concordance analysis between array-CGH database and the expression array database, and literature search for copy number variation genes were performed to select novel lung cancer candidate genes. Four candidate oncogenes were validated for DNA copy number and mRNA and protein expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR, chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH, reverse transcriptase-qPCR (RT-qPCR, and immunohistochemistry (IHC in more patients. Results We identified 20 chromosomal imbalance regions harboring 459 genes for Caucasian and 17 regions containing 476 genes for Asian lung cancer patients. Seven common chromosomal imbalance regions harboring 117 genes, included gain on 3p13-14, 6p22.1, 9q21.13, 13q14.1, and 17p13.3; and loss on 3p22.2-22.3 and 13q13.3 were found both in Asian and Caucasian patients. Gene validation for four genes including ARHGAP19 (10q24.1 functioning in Rho activity control, FRAT2 (10q24.1 involved in Wnt signaling, PAFAH1B1 (17p13.3 functioning in motility control, and ZNF322A (6p22.1 involved in MAPK signaling was performed using qPCR and RT-qPCR. Mean gene dosage and mRNA expression level of the four candidate genes in tumor tissues were significantly higher than the corresponding normal tissues (PP=0.06. In addition, CISH analysis of patients indicated that copy number amplification indeed occurred for ARHGAP19 and ZNF322A genes in lung cancer patients. IHC analysis of paraffin blocks from Asian Caucasian patients demonstrated that the frequency of

  9. The database of chromosome imbalance regions and genes resided in lung cancer from Asian and Caucasian identified by array-comparative genomic hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer-related genes show racial differences. Therefore, identification and characterization of DNA copy number alteration regions in different racial groups helps to dissect the mechanism of tumorigenesis. Array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) was analyzed for DNA copy number profile in 40 Asian and 20 Caucasian lung cancer patients. Three methods including MetaCore analysis for disease and pathway correlations, concordance analysis between array-CGH database and the expression array database, and literature search for copy number variation genes were performed to select novel lung cancer candidate genes. Four candidate oncogenes were validated for DNA copy number and mRNA and protein expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH), reverse transcriptase-qPCR (RT-qPCR), and immunohistochemistry (IHC) in more patients. We identified 20 chromosomal imbalance regions harboring 459 genes for Caucasian and 17 regions containing 476 genes for Asian lung cancer patients. Seven common chromosomal imbalance regions harboring 117 genes, included gain on 3p13-14, 6p22.1, 9q21.13, 13q14.1, and 17p13.3; and loss on 3p22.2-22.3 and 13q13.3 were found both in Asian and Caucasian patients. Gene validation for four genes including ARHGAP19 (10q24.1) functioning in Rho activity control, FRAT2 (10q24.1) involved in Wnt signaling, PAFAH1B1 (17p13.3) functioning in motility control, and ZNF322A (6p22.1) involved in MAPK signaling was performed using qPCR and RT-qPCR. Mean gene dosage and mRNA expression level of the four candidate genes in tumor tissues were significantly higher than the corresponding normal tissues (P<0.001~P=0.06). In addition, CISH analysis of patients indicated that copy number amplification indeed occurred for ARHGAP19 and ZNF322A genes in lung cancer patients. IHC analysis of paraffin blocks from Asian Caucasian patients demonstrated that the frequency of PAFAH1B1 protein overexpression was 68

  10. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus by the CRISPR/Cas9 system via targeting the conserved regions of the viral genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xing; Hao, Ruidong; Chen, Shuliang; Guo, Deyin; Chen, Yu

    2015-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) remains a global health threat as chronic HBV infection may lead to liver cirrhosis or cancer. Current antiviral therapies with nucleoside analogues can inhibit the replication of HBV, but do not disrupt the already existing HBV covalently closed circular DNA. The newly developed CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated 9) system is a powerful tool to target cellular genome DNA for gene editing. In order to investigate the possibility of using the CRISPR/Cas9 system to disrupt the HBV DNA templates, we designed eight guide RNAs (gRNAs) that targeted the conserved regions of different HBV genotypes, which could significantly inhibit HBV replication both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the HBV-specific gRNA/Cas9 system could inhibit the replication of HBV of different genotypes in cells, and the viral DNA was significantly reduced by a single gRNA/Cas9 system and cleared by a combination of different gRNA/Cas9 systems.

  11. Genome Analysis of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum and subsp. pertenue Strains: Most of the Genetic Differences Are Localized in Six Regions

    OpenAIRE

    Lenka Mikalová; Michal Strouhal; Darina Čejková; Marie Zobaníková; Petra Pospíšilová; Norris, Steven J; Erica Sodergren; Weinstock, George M.; David Šmajs

    2010-01-01

    The genomes of eight treponemes including T. p. pallidum strains (Nichols, SS14, DAL-1 and Mexico A), T. p. pertenue strains (Samoa D, CDC-2 and Gauthier), and the Fribourg-Blanc isolate, were amplified in 133 overlapping amplicons, and the restriction patterns of these fragments were compared. The approximate sizes of the genomes investigated based on this whole genome fingerprinting (WGF) analysis ranged from 1139.3-1140.4 kb, with the estimated genome sequence identity of 99.57-99.98% in t...

  12. Genome-wide association study to identify chromosomal regions associated with antibody response to Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in milk of Dutch Holstein-Friesians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hulzen, K J E; Schopen, G C B; van Arendonk, J A M; Nielen, M; Koets, A P; Schrooten, C; Heuven, H C M

    2012-05-01

    Heritability of susceptibility to Johne's disease in cattle has been shown to vary from 0.041 to 0.159. Although the presence of genetic variation involved in susceptibility to Johne's disease has been demonstrated, the understanding of genes contributing to the genetic variance is far from complete. The objective of this study was to contribute to further understanding of genetic variation involved in susceptibility to Johne's disease by identifying associated chromosomal regions using a genome-wide association approach. Log-transformed ELISA test results of 265,290 individual Holstein-Friesian cows from 3,927 herds from the Netherlands were analyzed to obtain sire estimated breeding values for Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP)-specific antibody response in milk using a sire-maternal grandsire model with fixed effects for parity, year of birth, lactation stage, and herd; a covariate for milk yield on test day; and random effects for sire, maternal grandsire, and error. For 192 sires with estimated breeding values with a minimum reliability of 70%, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing was conducted by a multiple SNP analysis with a random polygenic effect fitting 37,869 SNP simultaneously. Five SNP associated with MAP-specific antibody response in milk were identified distributed over 4 chromosomal regions (chromosome 4, 15, 18, and 28). Thirteen putative SNP associated with MAP-specific antibody response in milk were identified distributed over 10 chromosomes (chromosome 4, 14, 16, 18, 19, 20, 21, 26, 27, and 29). This knowledge contributes to the current understanding of genetic variation involved in Johne's disease susceptibility and facilitates control of Johne's disease and improvement of health status by breeding.

  13. The pathogenicity determinant of Citrus tristeza virus causing the seedling yellows syndrome maps at the 3'-terminal region of the viral genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albiach-Marti, Maria R; Robertson, Cecile; Gowda, Siddarame; Tatineni, Satyanarayana; Belliure, Belén; Garnsey, Stephen M; Folimonova, Svetlana Y; Moreno, Pedro; Dawson, William O

    2010-01-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) (genus Closterovirus, family Closteroviridae) causes some of the more important viral diseases of citrus worldwide. The ability to map disease-inducing determinants of CTV is needed to develop better diagnostic and disease control procedures. A distinctive phenotype of some isolates of CTV is the ability to induce seedling yellows (SY) in sour orange, lemon and grapefruit seedlings. In Florida, the decline isolate of CTV, T36, induces SY, whereas a widely distributed mild isolate, T30, does not. To delimit the viral sequences associated with the SY syndrome, we created a number of T36/T30 hybrids by substituting T30 sequences into different regions of the 3' half of the genome of an infectious cDNA of T36. Eleven T36/T30 hybrids replicated in Nicotiana benthamiana protoplasts. Five of these hybrids formed viable virions that were mechanically transmitted to Citrus macrophylla, a permissive host for CTV. All induced systemic infections, similar to that of the parental T36 clone. Tissues from these C. macrophylla source plants were then used to graft inoculate sour orange and grapefruit seedlings. Inoculation with three of the T30/T36 hybrid constructs induced SY symptoms identical to those of T36; however, two hybrids with T30 substitutions in the p23-3' nontranslated region (NTR) (nucleotides 18 394-19 296) failed to induce SY. Sour orange seedlings infected with a recombinant non-SY p23-3' NTR hybrid also remained symptomless when challenged with the parental virus (T36), demonstrating the potential feasibility of using engineered constructs of CTV to mitigate disease.

  14. Genetically Based Location from Triploid Populations and Gene Ontology of a 3.3-Mb Genome Region Linked to Alternaria Brown Spot Resistance in Citrus Reveal Clusters of Resistance Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca, José; Aleza, Pablo; Vicent, Antonio; Brunel, Dominique; Ollitrault, Patrick; Navarro, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Genetic analysis of phenotypical traits and marker-trait association in polyploid species is generally considered as a challenge. In the present work, different approaches were combined taking advantage of the particular genetic structures of 2n gametes resulting from second division restitution (SDR) to map a genome region linked to Alternaria brown spot (ABS) resistance in triploid citrus progeny. ABS in citrus is a serious disease caused by the tangerine pathotype of the fungus Alternaria alternata. This pathogen produces ACT-toxin, which induces necrotic lesions on fruit and young leaves, defoliation and fruit drop in susceptible genotypes. It is a strong concern for triploid breeding programs aiming to produce seedless mandarin cultivars. The monolocus dominant inheritance of susceptibility, proposed on the basis of diploid population studies, was corroborated in triploid progeny. Bulk segregant analysis coupled with genome scan using a large set of genetically mapped SNP markers and targeted genetic mapping by half tetrad analysis, using SSR and SNP markers, allowed locating a 3.3 Mb genomic region linked to ABS resistance near the centromere of chromosome III. Clusters of resistance genes were identified by gene ontology analysis of this genomic region. Some of these genes are good candidates to control the dominant susceptibility to the ACT-toxin. SSR and SNP markers were developed for efficient early marker-assisted selection of ABS resistant hybrids. PMID:24116149

  15. Genomic sequence analysis of the 238-kb swine segment with a cluster of TRIM and olfactory receptor genes located, but with no class I genes, at the distal end of the SLA class I region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Asako; Shigenari, Atsuko; Kulski, Jerzy K; Renard, Christine; Chardon, Patrick; Shiina, Takashi; Inoko, Hidetoshi

    2005-12-01

    Continuous genomic sequence has been previously determined for the swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) class I region from the TNF gene cluster at the border between the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class III and class I regions to the UBD gene at the telomeric end of the classical class I gene cluster (SLA-1 to SLA-5, SLA-9, SLA-11). To complete the genomic sequence of the entire SLA class I genomic region, we have analyzed the genomic sequences of two BAC clones carrying a continuous 237,633-bp-long segment spanning from the TRIM15 gene to the UBD gene located on the telomeric side of the classical SLA class I gene cluster. Fifteen non-class I genes, including the zinc finger and the tripartite motif (TRIM) ring-finger-related family genes and olfactory receptor genes, were identified in the 238-kilobase (kb) segment, and their location in the segment was similar to their apparent human homologs. In contrast, a human segment (alpha block) spanning about 375 kb from the gene ETF1P1 and from the HLA-J to HLA-F genes was absent from the 238-kb swine segment. We conclude that the gene organization of the MHC non-class I genes located in the telomeric side of the classical SLA class I gene cluster is remarkably similar between the swine and the human segments, although the swine lacks a 375-kb segment corresponding to the human alpha block.

  16. Genetically based location from triploid populations and gene ontology of a 3.3-mb genome region linked to Alternaria brown spot resistance in citrus reveal clusters of resistance genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Cuenca

    Full Text Available Genetic analysis of phenotypical traits and marker-trait association in polyploid species is generally considered as a challenge. In the present work, different approaches were combined taking advantage of the particular genetic structures of 2n gametes resulting from second division restitution (SDR to map a genome region linked to Alternaria brown spot (ABS resistance in triploid citrus progeny. ABS in citrus is a serious disease caused by the tangerine pathotype of the fungus Alternaria alternata. This pathogen produces ACT-toxin, which induces necrotic lesions on fruit and young leaves, defoliation and fruit drop in susceptible genotypes. It is a strong concern for triploid breeding programs aiming to produce seedless mandarin cultivars. The monolocus dominant inheritance of susceptibility, proposed on the basis of diploid population studies, was corroborated in triploid progeny. Bulk segregant analysis coupled with genome scan using a large set of genetically mapped SNP markers and targeted genetic mapping by half tetrad analysis, using SSR and SNP markers, allowed locating a 3.3 Mb genomic region linked to ABS resistance near the centromere of chromosome III. Clusters of resistance genes were identified by gene ontology analysis of this genomic region. Some of these genes are good candidates to control the dominant susceptibility to the ACT-toxin. SSR and SNP markers were developed for efficient early marker-assisted selection of ABS resistant hybrids.

  17. Genetically based location from triploid populations and gene ontology of a 3.3-mb genome region linked to Alternaria brown spot resistance in citrus reveal clusters of resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca, José; Aleza, Pablo; Vicent, Antonio; Brunel, Dominique; Ollitrault, Patrick; Navarro, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Genetic analysis of phenotypical traits and marker-trait association in polyploid species is generally considered as a challenge. In the present work, different approaches were combined taking advantage of the particular genetic structures of 2n gametes resulting from second division restitution (SDR) to map a genome region linked to Alternaria brown spot (ABS) resistance in triploid citrus progeny. ABS in citrus is a serious disease caused by the tangerine pathotype of the fungus Alternaria alternata. This pathogen produces ACT-toxin, which induces necrotic lesions on fruit and young leaves, defoliation and fruit drop in susceptible genotypes. It is a strong concern for triploid breeding programs aiming to produce seedless mandarin cultivars. The monolocus dominant inheritance of susceptibility, proposed on the basis of diploid population studies, was corroborated in triploid progeny. Bulk segregant analysis coupled with genome scan using a large set of genetically mapped SNP markers and targeted genetic mapping by half tetrad analysis, using SSR and SNP markers, allowed locating a 3.3 Mb genomic region linked to ABS resistance near the centromere of chromosome III. Clusters of resistance genes were identified by gene ontology analysis of this genomic region. Some of these genes are good candidates to control the dominant susceptibility to the ACT-toxin. SSR and SNP markers were developed for efficient early marker-assisted selection of ABS resistant hybrids.

  18. Bin mapping of tomato diversity array (DArT) markers to genomic regions of Solanum lycopersicum × Solanum pennellii introgression lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalkwyk, A.; Wenzl, P.; Smit, S.; Lopez-Cobollo, R.; Kilian, A.; Bishop, G.; Hefer, C.; Berger, D.K.

    2012-01-01

    Marker-trait association studies in tomato have progressed rapidly due to the availability of several populations developed between wild species and domesticated tomato. However, in the absence of whole genome sequences for each wild species, molecular marker methods for whole genome comparisons and

  19. Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida strains isolated from Chinese freshwater fish contain a novel genomic island and possible regional-specific mobile genetic elements profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, Meng; Nielsen, Tue K; Leisner, Jørgen J;

    2016-01-01

    variant of the genomic island AsaGEI in BG, designated as AsaGEI2c This is the first report on a GEI of A. salmonicida strain from China. Furthermore, both YK and BG strains contained a Tn7 transposon inserted at the same position in the chromosome. Finally, IS-dependent rearrangements on pAsa5 are deemed...... likely to have occurred, with omission of the resD gene in both strains as well as omission of genes related to the IncF conjugal transfer system in the YK isolate. This study demonstrates that A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida can infect non-salmonids (cyprinids) in addition to salmonids, and that Asa...... of which belonged to the cyprinid family, and the strains showed a difference in virulence. Subsequently, we performed whole genome sequencing of the strains, and comparison of their genomic sequences to the genome of the A449 reference strain revealed various genomic rearrangements, including a new...

  20. QTL analysis of novel genomic regions associated with yield and yield related traits in new plant type based recombinant inbred lines of rice (Oryza sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marathi Balram

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rice is staple food for more than half of the world’s population including two billion Asians, who obtain 60-70% of their energy intake from rice and its derivatives. To meet the growing demand from human population, rice varieties with higher yield potential and greater yield stability need to be developed. The favourable alleles for yield and yield contributing traits are distributed among two subspecies i.e., indica and japonica of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.. Identification of novel favourable alleles in indica/japonica will pave way to marker-assisted mobilization of these alleles in to a genetic background to break genetic barriers to yield. Results A new plant type (NPT based mapping population of 310 recombinant inbred lines (RILs was used to map novel genomic regions and QTL hotspots influencing yield and eleven yield component traits. We identified major quantitative trait loci (QTLs for days to 50% flowering (R2 = 25%, LOD = 14.3, panicles per plant (R2 = 19%, LOD = 9.74, flag leaf length (R2 = 22%, LOD = 3.05, flag leaf width (R2 = 53%, LOD = 46.5, spikelets per panicle (R2 = 16%, LOD = 13.8, filled grains per panicle (R2 = 22%, LOD = 15.3, percent spikelet sterility (R2 = 18%, LOD = 14.24, thousand grain weight (R2 = 25%, LOD = 12.9 and spikelet setting density (R2 = 23%, LOD = 15 expressing over two or more locations by using composite interval mapping. The phenotypic variation (R2 ranged from 8 to 53% for eleven QTLs expressing across all three locations. 19 novel QTLs were contributed by the NPT parent, Pusa1266. 15 QTL hotpots on eight chromosomes were identified for the correlated traits. Six epistatic QTLs effecting five traits at two locations were identified. A marker interval (RM3276-RM5709 on chromosome 4 harboring major QTLs for four traits was identified. Conclusions The present study reveals that favourable alleles for

  1. Association and haplotype analysis of candidate genes in five genomic regions linked to sow maternal infanticide in a white Duroc × Erhualian resource population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Nengshui

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maternal infanticide is an extreme and failed maternal behavior, which is defined as an active attack on piglets using the jaws, resulting in serious or fatal bite wounds. It brings big economic loss to the pig industry and severe problems to piglets' welfare. But little is known about the genetic background of this behavior. Quantitative trait loci (QTL for maternal infanticide were identified in a White Duroc × Erhualian intercross by a non-parametric linkage analysis (NPL in our previous study. In this study, associations of 194 microsatellite markers used in NPL analysis with maternal infanticide behavior were further analyzed by transmission-disequilibrium test (TDT. On this basis, seven genes (ESR2, EAAT2, BDNF, OXTR, 5-HTR2C, DRD1 and GABRA6 at five genomic regions were selected and further analyzed. Associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and haplotypes in each gene with maternal infanticide behavior were evaluated. Results Microsatellite markers on pig chromosome (SSC 2, 13, 15, and X displayed significance at P ESR2 SNPs had nominal evidence for association (P A at EAAT2 g. 233G > A and allele T at DRD1 g.1013C > G > T also showed evidence of overtransmission to infanticidal sows. In the overall tests of association of haplotypes, candidate genes of ESR2, EAAT2 and DRD1 achieved overall significance level (P ESR2, EAAT2 and DRD1 showed higher frequencies to infanticidal sows (P Conclusions From association tests of SNPs and haplotypes, ESR2, EAAT2 and DRD1 showed significant associations with maternal infanticide. This result supported the existence of QTL for maternal infanticide behavior on SSC1, SSC2 and SSC16.

  2. Expansion of a unique region in the Marek's disease virus genome occurs concomitantly with attenuation but is not sufficient to cause attenuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, R F; Reddy, S M; Lupiani, B

    2004-01-01

    Pathogenic Marek's disease viruses (MDVs) have two head-to-tail copies of a 132-bp repeat. As MDV is serially passaged in cell culture, the virus becomes attenuated and the number of copies of the 132-bp repeat increases from 2 to often more than 20 copies. To determine the role of the repeats in attenuation, we used five overlapping cosmid clones that spanned the MDV genome to reconstitute infectious virus (rMd5). By mutating the appropriate cosmids, we generated clones of infectious MDVs that contained zero copies of the 132-bp repeats, rMd5(Delta132); nine copies of the 132-bp repeats, rMd5(9-132); and nine copies of the 132-bp repeats inserted in the reverse orientation, rMd5(rev9-132). After two passages in cell culture, wild-type Md5, rMd5, and rMd5(Delta132) were stable. However, rMd5(9-132) and rMd5(rev9-132) contained a population of viruses that contained from 3 to over 20 copies of the repeats. A major 1.8-kb mRNA, containing two copies of the 132-bp repeat, was present in wild-type Md5 and rMd5 but was not present in rMd5(Delta132), rMd5(9-132), rMd5(rev9-132), or an attenuated MDV. Instead, the RNAs transcribed from the 132-bp repeat region in rMd5(9-132) and rMd5(rev9-132) closely resembled the pattern of RNAs transcribed in attenuated MDVs. When inoculated into susceptible day-old chicks, all viruses produced various lesions. Thus, expansion of the number of copies of 132-bp repeats, which accompanies attenuation, is not sufficient in itself to attenuate pathogenic MDVs.

  3. Did androgen-binding protein paralogs undergo neo- and/or Subfunctionalization as the Abp gene region expanded in the mouse genome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C Karn

    Full Text Available The Androgen-binding protein (Abp region of the mouse genome contains 30 Abpa genes encoding alpha subunits and 34 Abpbg genes encoding betagamma subunits, their products forming dimers composed of an alpha and a betagamma subunit. We endeavored to determine how many Abp genes are expressed as proteins in tears and saliva, and as transcripts in the exocrine glands producing them. Using standard PCR, we amplified Abp transcripts from cDNA libraries of C57BL/6 mice and found fifteen Abp gene transcripts in the lacrimal gland and five in the submandibular gland. Proteomic analyses identified proteins corresponding to eleven of the lacrimal gland transcripts, all of them different from the three salivary ABPs reported previously. Our qPCR results showed that five of the six transcripts that lacked corresponding proteins are expressed at very low levels compared to those transcripts with proteins. We found 1 no overlap in the repertoires of expressed Abp paralogs in lacrimal gland/tears and salivary glands/saliva; 2 substantial sex-limited expression of lacrimal gland/tear expressed-paralogs in males but no sex-limited expression in females; and 3 that the lacrimal gland/tear expressed-paralogs are found exclusively in ancestral clades 1, 2 and 3 of the five clades described previously while the salivary glands/saliva expressed-paralogs are found only in clade 5. The number of instances of extremely low levels of transcription without corresponding protein production in paralogs specific to tears and saliva suggested the role of subfunctionalization, a derived condition wherein genes that may have been expressed highly in both glands ancestrally were down-regulated subsequent to duplication. Thus, evidence for subfunctionalization can be seen in our data and we argue that the partitioning of paralog expression between lacrimal and salivary glands that we report here occurred as the result of adaptive evolution.

  4. Identification and characterization of a highly variable region in mitochondrial genomes of fusarium species and analysis of power generation from microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzah, Haider Mousa

    In the microbial fuel cell (MFC) project, power generation from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was analyzed looking for a novel system for both energy generation and sustainability. The results suggest the possibility of generating electricity from different organic substances, which include agricultural and industrial by-products. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 generates usable electrons at 30°C using both submerged and solid state cultures. In the MFC biocathode experiment, most of the CO2 generated at the anodic chamber was converted into bicarbonate due the activity of carbonic anhydrase (CA) of the Gluconobacter sp.33 strain. These findings demonstrate the possibility of generation of electricity while at the same time allowing the biomimetic sequestration of CO2 using bacterial CA. In the mitochondrial genomes project, the filamentous fungal species Fusarium oxysporum was used as a model. This species causes wilt of several important agricultural crops. A previous study revealed that a highly variable region (HVR) in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of three species of Fusarium contained a large, variable unidentified open reading frame (LV-uORF). Using specific primers for two regions of the LV-uORF, six strains were found to contain the ORF by PCR and database searches identified 18 other strains outside of the Fusarium oxysporum species complex. The LV-uORF was also identified in three isolates of the F. oxysporum species complex. Interestingly, several F. oxysporum isolates lack the LV-uORF and instead contain 13 ORFs in the HVR, nine of which are unidentified. The high GC content and codon usage of the LV-uORF indicate that it did not co-evolve with other mt genes and was horizontally acquired and was introduced to the Fusarium lineage prior to speciation. The nonsynonymous/synonymous (dN/dS) ratio of the LV-uORFs (0.43) suggests it is under purifying selection and the putative polypeptide is predicted to be located in the mitochondrial membrane. Growth assays

  5. Genetically based location from triploid populations and gene ontology of a 3.3-mb genome region linked to alternaria brown spot resistance in citrus reveal clusters of resistance genes

    OpenAIRE

    José Cuenca; Pablo Aleza; Antonio Vicent; Dominique Brunel; Patrick Ollitrault; Luis Navarro

    2013-01-01

    Genetic analysis of phenotypical traits and marker-trait association in polyploid species is generally considered as a challenge. In the present work, different approaches were combined taking advantage of the particular genetic structures of 2n gametes resulting from second division restitution (SDR) to map a genome region linked to Alternaria brown spot (ABS) resistance in triploid citrus progeny. ABS in citrus is a serious disease caused by the tangerine pathotype of the fungus Alternaria ...

  6. Association of Mutations in the Basal Core Promoter and Pre-core Regions of the Hepatitis B Viral Genome and Longitudinal Changes in HBV Level in HBeAg Negative Individuals: Results From a Cohort Study in Northern Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Besharat, Sima; Poustchi, Hossein; Mohamadkhani, Ashraf; Katoonizadeh, Aezam; Moradi, Abdolvahab; Roshandel, Gholamreza; Freedman, Neal David; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although certain HBV mutations are known to affect the expression of Hepatitis e antigen, their association with HBV viral level or clinical outcomes is less clear. Objectives: We evaluated associations between different mutations in the Basal Core promoter (BCP) and Pre-core (PC) regions of HBV genome and subsequent changes in HBV viral DNA level over seven years in a population of untreated HBeAg negative chronic hepatitis B (CHB) participants in Northeast of Iran. Materials and...

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Acinetobacter sp. Strain BMW17, a Cellulolytic and Plant Growth-Promoting Bacterium Isolated from the Rhizospheric Region of Phragmites karka of Chilika Lake, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Samir R; Ray, Lopamudra; Panda, Ananta Narayan; Sahu, Neha; Xess, Sonal S; Jadhao, Sudhir; Suar, Mrutyunjay; Adhya, Tapan Kumar; Rastogi, Gurdeep; Pattnaik, Ajit Kumar; Raina, Vishakha

    2016-01-01

    We report the 3.16 Mb draft genome of Acinetobacter sp. strain BMW17, a Gram-negative bacterium in the class of Gammaproteobacteria, isolated from the rhizospheric region of Phragmites karka, an invasive weed in Chilika Lake, Odisha, India. The strain BMW17(T) is capable of degrading cellulose and is also an efficient plant growth promoter that can be useful for various phytoremedial and commercial applications. PMID:27365343

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Acinetobacter sp. Strain BMW17, a Cellulolytic and Plant Growth-Promoting Bacterium Isolated from the Rhizospheric Region of Phragmites karka of Chilika Lake, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Samir R.; Ray, Lopamudra; Panda, Ananta Narayan; Sahu, Neha; Xess, Sonal S.; Jadhao, Sudhir; Suar, Mrutyunjay; Adhya, Tapan Kumar; Rastogi, Gurdeep; Pattnaik, Ajit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    We report the 3.16 Mb draft genome of Acinetobacter sp. strain BMW17, a Gram-negative bacterium in the class of Gammaproteobacteria, isolated from the rhizospheric region of Phragmites karka, an invasive weed in Chilika Lake, Odisha, India. The strain BMW17T is capable of degrading cellulose and is also an efficient plant growth promoter that can be useful for various phytoremedial and commercial applications. PMID:27365343

  9. High-density linkage mapping in a pine tree reveals a genomic region associated with inbreeding depression and provides clues to the extent and distribution of meiotic recombination

    OpenAIRE

    Chancerel, Emilie; Lamy, Jean-Baptiste; Lesur, Isabelle; Noirot, Céline; Klopp, Christophe; Ehrenmann, François; Boury, Christophe; Provost, Grégoire Le; Label, Philippe; Lalanne, Céline; Léger, Valérie; Salin, Franck; Gion, Jean-Marc; Plomion, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Background[br/] The availability of a large expressed sequence tags (EST) resource and recent advances in high-throughput genotyping technology have made it possible to develop highly multiplexed SNP arrays for multi-objective genetic applications, including the construction of meiotic maps. Such approaches are particularly useful in species with a large genome size, precluding the use of whole-genome shotgun assembly with current technologies.[br/] [br/] Results[br/] In this study, a 12 k-S...

  10. Comparative sequencing of human and chimpanzee MHC class I regions unveils insertions/deletions as the major path to genomic divergence

    OpenAIRE

    Anzai, Tatsuya; Shiina, Takashi; Kimura, Natsuki; Yanagiya, Kazuyo; Kohara, Sakae; Shigenari, Atsuko; Yamagata, Tetsushi; Kulski, Jerzy K.; Naruse, Taeko K.; Fujimori, Yoshifumi; Fukuzumi, Yasuhito; Yamazaki, Masaaki; Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Iwamoto, Chie; Umehara, Yumi

    2003-01-01

    Despite their high degree of genomic similarity, reminiscent of their relatively recent separation from each other (≈6 million years ago), the molecular basis of traits unique to humans vs. their closest relative, the chimpanzee, is largely unknown. This report describes a large-scale single-contig comparison between human and chimpanzee genomes via the sequence analysis of almost one-half of the immunologically critical MHC. This 1,750,601-bp stretch of DNA, which encompasses the entir...

  11. Sugarcane genome sequencing by methylation filtration provides tools for genomic research in the genus Saccharum

    OpenAIRE

    Grativol, Clícia; Regulski, Michael; Bertalan, Marcelo; McCombie, W Richard; da Silva, Felipe Rodrigues; Neto, Adhemar Zerlotini; Vicentini, Renato; Farinelli, Laurent; Hemerly, Adriana Silva; Martienssen, Robert A; Ferreira, Paulo Cavalcanti Gomes

    2014-01-01

    Many economically important crops have large and complex genomes, which hampers sequencing of their genome by standard methods such as WGS. Large tracts of methylated repeats occur at plant genomes interspersed by hypomethylated gene-rich regions. Gene enrichment strategies based on methylation profile offer an alternative to sequencing repetitive genomes. Here, we have applied methyl filtration (MF) with McrBC digestion to enrich for euchromatic regions of sugarcane genome. To verify the eff...

  12. A gene-based high-resolution comparative radiation hybrid map as a framework for genome sequence assembly of a bovine chromosome 6 region associated with QTL for growth, body composition, and milk performance traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Pascal

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of different quantitative trait loci (QTL for various phenotypic traits, including milk production, functional, and conformation traits in dairy cattle as well as growth and body composition traits in meat cattle, have been mapped consistently in the middle region of bovine chromosome 6 (BTA6. Dense genetic and physical maps and, ultimately, a fully annotated genome sequence as well as their mutual connections are required to efficiently identify genes and gene variants responsible for genetic variation of phenotypic traits. A comprehensive high-resolution gene-rich map linking densely spaced bovine markers and genes to the annotated human genome sequence is required as a framework to facilitate this approach for the region on BTA6 carrying the QTL. Results Therefore, we constructed a high-resolution radiation hybrid (RH map for the QTL containing chromosomal region of BTA6. This new RH map with a total of 234 loci including 115 genes and ESTs displays a substantial increase in loci density compared to existing physical BTA6 maps. Screening the available bovine genome sequence resources, a total of 73 loci could be assigned to sequence contigs, which were already identified as specific for BTA6. For 43 loci, corresponding sequence contigs, which were not yet placed on the bovine genome assembly, were identified. In addition, the improved potential of this high-resolution RH map for BTA6 with respect to comparative mapping was demonstrated. Mapping a large number of genes on BTA6 and cross-referencing them with map locations in corresponding syntenic multi-species chromosome segments (human, mouse, rat, dog, chicken achieved a refined accurate alignment of conserved segments and evolutionary breakpoints across the species included. Conclusion The gene-anchored high-resolution RH map (1 locus/300 kb for the targeted region of BTA6 presented here will provide a valuable platform to guide high-quality assembling and

  13. Complete genome sequence of a Chinese isolate of pepper vein yellows virus and evolutionary analysis based on the CP, MP and RdRp coding regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Maoyan; Liu, Xiangning; Li, Xun; Zhang, Deyong; Dai, Liangyin; Tang, Qianjun

    2016-03-01

    The genome sequence of pepper vein yellows virus (PeVYV) (PeVYV-HN, accession number KP326573), isolated from pepper plants (Capsicum annuum L.) grown at the Hunan Vegetables Institute (Changsha, Hunan, China), was determined by deep sequencing of small RNAs. The PeVYV-HN genome consists of 6244 nucleotides, contains six open reading frames (ORFs), and is similar to that of an isolate (AB594828) from Japan. Its genomic organization is similar to that of members of the genus Polerovirus. Sequence analysis revealed that PeVYV-HN shared 92% sequence identity with the Japanese PeVYV genome at both the nucleotide and amino acid levels. Evolutionary analysis based on the coat protein (CP), movement protein (MP), and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) showed that PeVYV could be divided into two major lineages corresponding to their geographical origins. The Asian isolates have a higher population expansion frequency than the African isolates. Negative selection and genetic drift (founder effect) were found to be the potential drivers of the molecular evolution of PeVYV. Moreover, recombination was not the distinct cause of PeVYV evolution. This is the first report of a complete genomic sequence of PeVYV in China. PMID:26620586

  14. 鹿、牛基因组不同区域的微小变异研究%Micro-Variation in Different Regions between Deer and Cattle Genome Sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    巴恒星; 杨福合; 李春义

    2012-01-01

    本研究借助鹿和牛基因组序列,通过同源序列比较的方法研究远缘物种基因组不同区域的微小变异,包括单碱基突变、小片段插入和删除.研究结果验证了基因组功能区的点突变和删除变异相对非功能区是保守的普遍性结论.点突变变异与删除变异在鹿、牛基因组不同区域上表现强的正相关性.比较近缘物种人、黑猩猩基因组点突变变异数据,表明牛、鹿基因组的功能区和非功能区突变速率各自保持大致恒定,符合分子钟理论.%In this study, sika deer genome sequence was used to compare with the cattle reference genome using the methods of homology comparison, which was used to identify the Micro-Variation in different regions between distant species genomes in the past. These Micro-Variations consisted of point mutation variations (SNP) and small nucleotide insertion and deletion variations (Indel). The results verified the general conclusion that the variations of SNP and Indel in the functional regions are more conservative than in the non-functional regions. Also, the results showed a strong positive correlation between the SNP variations and Indel variations among different regions. The variation data between human and chimpanzee are compared with those of this study. The results verified that the mutation rate has kept in consistent in the genome functional regions and non-functional regions respectively. The results validated once again the theory of molecular clock.

  15. Unique and conserved genome regions in Vibrio harveyi and related species in comparison with the shrimp pathogen Vibrio harveyi CAIM 1792

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valles, Iliana Espinoza; Vora, Gary J; Lin, Baochuan;

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio harveyi CAIM 1792 is a marine bacterial strain that causes mortality in farmed shrimp in north-west Mexico, and the identification of virulence genes in this strain is important for understanding its pathogenicity. The aim of this work was to compare the V. harveyi CAIM 1792 genome...

  16. Cancer genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrild, Bodil; Guldberg, Per; Ralfkiær, Elisabeth Methner

    2007-01-01

    Almost all cells in the human body contain a complete copy of the genome with an estimated number of 25,000 genes. The sequences of these genes make up about three percent of the genome and comprise the inherited set of genetic information. The genome also contains information that determines whe...

  17. Annotation of two large contiguous regions from the Haemonchus contortus genome using RNA-seq and comparative analysis with Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roz Laing

    Full Text Available The genomes of numerous parasitic nematodes are currently being sequenced, but their complexity and size, together with high levels of intra-specific sequence variation and a lack of reference genomes, makes their assembly and annotation a challenging task. Haemonchus contortus is an economically significant parasite of livestock that is widely used for basic research as well as for vaccine development and drug discovery. It is one of many medically and economically important parasites within the strongylid nematode group. This group of parasites has the closest phylogenetic relationship with the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans, making comparative analysis a potentially powerful tool for genome annotation and functional studies. To investigate this hypothesis, we sequenced two contiguous fragments from the H. contortus genome and undertook detailed annotation and comparative analysis with C. elegans. The adult H. contortus transcriptome was sequenced using an Illumina platform and RNA-seq was used to annotate a 409 kb overlapping BAC tiling path relating to the X chromosome and a 181 kb BAC insert relating to chromosome I. In total, 40 genes and 12 putative transposable elements were identified. 97.5% of the annotated genes had detectable homologues in C. elegans of which 60% had putative orthologues, significantly higher than previous analyses based on EST analysis. Gene density appears to be less in H. contortus than in C. elegans, with annotated H. contortus genes being an average of two-to-three times larger than their putative C. elegans orthologues due to a greater intron number and size. Synteny appears high but gene order is generally poorly conserved, although areas of conserved microsynteny are apparent. C. elegans operons appear to be partially conserved in H. contortus. Our findings suggest that a combination of RNA-seq and comparative analysis with C. elegans is a powerful approach for the annotation and analysis of strongylid

  18. Yeast genome sequencing:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piskur, Jure; Langkjær, Rikke Breinhold

    2004-01-01

    For decades, unicellular yeasts have been general models to help understand the eukaryotic cell and also our own biology. Recently, over a dozen yeast genomes have been sequenced, providing the basis to resolve several complex biological questions. Analysis of the novel sequence data has shown...... of closely related species helps in gene annotation and to answer how many genes there really are within the genomes. Analysis of non-coding regions among closely related species has provided an example of how to determine novel gene regulatory sequences, which were previously difficult to analyse because...... they are short and degenerate and occupy different positions. Comparative genomics helps to understand the origin of yeasts and points out crucial molecular events in yeast evolutionary history, such as whole-genome duplication and horizontal gene transfer(s). In addition, the accumulating sequence data provide...

  19. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies regions on 7p21 (AHR and 15q24 (CYP1A2 as determinants of habitual caffeine consumption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilyn C Cornelis

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We report the first genome-wide association study of habitual caffeine intake. We included 47,341 individuals of European descent based on five population-based studies within the United States. In a meta-analysis adjusted for age, sex, smoking, and eigenvectors of population variation, two loci achieved genome-wide significance: 7p21 (P = 2.4 × 10(-19, near AHR, and 15q24 (P = 5.2 × 10(-14, between CYP1A1 and CYP1A2. Both the AHR and CYP1A2 genes are biologically plausible candidates as CYP1A2 metabolizes caffeine and AHR regulates CYP1A2.

  20. Genome-wide association study identifies a region on chromosome 11q14.3 associated with late rectal bleeding following radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Rectal bleeding can occur following radiotherapy for prostate cancer and negatively impacts quality of life for cancer survivors. Treatment and clinical factors do not fully predict rectal bleeding, and genetic factors may be important. Materials and methods: A genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed to identify SNPs associated with the development of late rectal bleeding following radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Logistic regression was used to test the association between 614,453 SNPs and rectal bleeding in a discovery cohort (79 cases, 289 controls), and top-ranking SNPs were tested in a replication cohort (108 cases, 673 controls) from four independent sites. Results: rs7120482 and rs17630638, which tag a single locus on chromosome 11q14.3, reached genome-wide significance for association with rectal bleeding (combined p-values 5.4 × 10−8 and 6.9 × 10−7 respectively). Several other SNPs had p-values trending toward genome-wide significance, and a polygenic risk score including these SNPs shows a strong rank-correlation with rectal bleeding (Sommers’ d = 5.0 × 10−12 in the replication cohort). Conclusions: This GWAS identified novel genetic markers of rectal bleeding following prostate radiotherapy. These findings could lead to the development of a predictive assay to identify patients at risk for this adverse treatment outcome so that dose or treatment modality could be modified

  1. Sequencing intractable DNA to close microbial genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Hurt

    Full Text Available Advancement in high throughput DNA sequencing technologies has supported a rapid proliferation of microbial genome sequencing projects, providing the genetic blueprint for in-depth studies. Oftentimes, difficult to sequence regions in microbial genomes are ruled "intractable" resulting in a growing number of genomes with sequence gaps deposited in databases. A procedure was developed to sequence such problematic regions in the "non-contiguous finished" Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 genome (6 intractable gaps and the Desulfovibrio africanus genome (1 intractable gap. The polynucleotides surrounding each gap formed GC rich secondary structures making the regions refractory to amplification and sequencing. Strand-displacing DNA polymerases used in concert with a novel ramped PCR extension cycle supported amplification and closure of all gap regions in both genomes. The developed procedures support accurate gene annotation, and provide a step-wise method that reduces the effort required for genome finishing.

  2. The Saccharomyces Genome Database: Exploring Genome Features and Their Annotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, J Michael

    2015-12-01

    Genomic-scale assays result in data that provide information over the entire genome. Such base pair resolution data cannot be summarized easily except via a graphical viewer. A genome browser is a tool that displays genomic data and experimental results as horizontal tracks. Genome browsers allow searches for a chromosomal coordinate or a feature, such as a gene name, but they do not allow searches by function or upstream binding site. Entry into a genome browser requires that you identify the gene name or chromosomal coordinates for a region of interest. A track provides a representation for genomic results and is displayed as a row of data shown as line segments to indicate regions of the chromosome with a feature. Another type of track presents a graph or wiggle plot that indicates the processed signal intensity computed for a particular experiment or set of experiments. Wiggle plots are typical for genomic assays such as the various next-generation sequencing methods (e.g., chromatin immunoprecipitation [ChIP]-seq or RNA-seq), where it represents a peak of DNA binding, histone modification, or the mapping of an RNA sequence. Here we explore the browser that has been built into the Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD). PMID:26631126

  3. Genome-Wide Analysis in Swine Associates Corneal Graft Rejection with Donor-Recipient Mismatches in Three Novel Histocompatibility Regions and One Locus Homologous to the Mouse H-3 Locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Susan; Pong-Wong, Ricardo; Mitchard, Louisa; Harley, Ross; Archibald, Alan; Dick, Andrew; Bailey, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In rodents, immune responses to minor histocompatibility antigens are the most important drivers of corneal graft rejection. However, this has not been confirmed in humans or in a large animal model and the genetic loci are poorly characterised, even in mice. The gene sequence data now available for a range of relevant species permits the use of genome-wide association (GWA) techniques to identify minor antigens associated with transplant rejection. We have used this technique in a pre-clinical model of corneal transplantation in semi-inbred NIH minipigs and Babraham swine to search for novel minor histocompatibility loci and to determine whether rodent findings have wider applicability. DNA from a cohort of MHC-matched and MHC-mismatched donors and recipients was analysed for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The level of SNP homozygosity for each line was assessed. Genome-wide analysis of the association of SNP disparities with rejection was performed using log-likelihood ratios. Four genomic blocks containing four or more SNPs significantly linked to rejection were identified (on chromosomes 1, 4, 6 and 9), none at the location of the MHC. One block of 36 SNPs spanned a region that exhibits conservation of synteny with the mouse H-3 histocompatibility locus and contains the pig homologue of the mouse Zfp106 gene, which encodes peptide epitopes known to mediate corneal graft rejection. The other three regions are novel minor histocompatibility loci. The results suggest that rejection can be predicted from SNP analysis prior to transplant in this model and that a similar GWA analysis is merited in humans. PMID:27010211

  4. A bias-reducing pathway enrichment analysis of genome-wide association data confirmed association of the MHC region with schizophrenia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jia, Peilin

    2012-02-01

    After the recent successes of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), one key challenge is to identify genetic variants that might have a significant joint effect on complex diseases but have failed to be identified individually due to weak to moderate marginal effect. One popular and effective approach is gene set based analysis, which investigates the joint effect of multiple functionally related genes (eg, pathways). However, a typical gene set analysis method is biased towards long genes, a problem that is especially severe in psychiatric diseases.

  5. Specific binding of Fusarium graminearum Hex1 protein to untranslated regions of the genomic RNA of Fusarium graminearum virus 1 correlates with increased accumulation of both strands of viral RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Moonil; Choi, Hoseong; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2016-02-01

    The HEX1 gene of Fusarium graminearum was previously reported to be required for the efficient accumulation of Fusarium graminearum virus 1 (FgV1) RNA in its host. To investigate the molecular mechanism underlying the production of FgHEX1 and the replication of FgV1 viral RNA, we conducted electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) with recombinant FgHex1 protein and RNA sequences derived from various regions of FgV1 genomic RNA. These analyses demonstrated that FgHex1 and both the 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions of plus-strand FgV1 RNA formed complexes. To determine whether FgHex1 protein affects FgV1 replication, we quantified accumulation viral RNAs in protoplasts and showed that both (+)- and (-)-strands of FgV1 RNAs were increased in the over-expression mutant and decreased in the deletion mutant. These results indicate that the FgHex1 functions in the synthesis of both strands of FgV1 RNA and therefore in FgV1 replication probably by specifically binding to the FgV1 genomic RNA.

  6. Analysis of the sequence diversity of the P1, HC, P3, NIb and CP genomic regions of several yam mosaic potyvirus isolates: implications for the intraspecies molecular diversity of potyviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman-Verdaguer, M E; Goudou-Urbino, C; Dubern, J; Beachy, R N; Fauquet, C

    1997-06-01

    Partial sequences from serologically characterized yam mosaic potyvirus (YMV) isolates were determined in conserved (helper-component proteinase, HC; nuclear inclusion b, NIb) and variable (first protein, P1; third protein, P3; and coat protein, CP) regions of the potyviral genome in order to investigate the intraspecies molecular diversity of YMV. Multiple sequence alignments and pairwise comparisons were used to quantify the sequence polymorphism in these regions. Two levels of diversity were observed among YMV isolates: above 90% nucleotide (nt) sequence identities were found between YMV isolates of the same group (intragroup) regardless of the region considered, whereas identities between isolates from different groups (intergroup) were lower and depended upon the protein chosen. For instance, the average intergroup nt sequence identity between YMV isolates was about 65% in the P1 protein and the N terminus of the CP while there was more than 80% nt identity in the HC, P3 and NIb proteins. Thus P3 appeared to be conserved between YMV isolates even though this region was variable between potyvirus species. Similar analysis of the intraspecies molecular diversity of other potyviruses (potato virus Y, zucchini yellow mosaic virus, plum pox virus, pea seed-borne mosaic virus) led to the same results: (i) two levels of intraspecies molecular diversity were found (intragroup and intergroup); (ii) intraspecies molecular diversity differed from interspecies molecular diversity in the P3, P1 and N-terminal regions. PMID:9191916

  7. Comparative genome research between maize and rice using genomic in situ hybridization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Using the genomic DNAs of maize and rice as probes respectively,the homology of maize and rice genomes was assessed by genomic in situ hybridization. When rice genomic DNAs were hybridized to maize, all chromosomes displayed many multiple discrete regions, while each rice chromosome delineated a single consecutive chromosomal region after they were hybridized with maize genomic DNAs. The results indicate that the genomes of maize and rice share high homology, and confirm the proposal that maize and rice are diverged from a common ancestor.

  8. A Parthenogenesis Gene Candidate and Evidence for Segmental Allopolyploidy in Apomictic Brachiaria decumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, Margaret; Heffelfinger, Christopher; Bernal, Diana; Quintero, Constanza; Zapata, Yeny Patricia; Perez, Juan Guillermo; De Vega, Jose; Miles, John; Dellaporta, Stephen; Tohme, Joe

    2016-07-01

    Apomixis, asexual reproduction through seed, enables breeders to identify and faithfully propagate superior heterozygous genotypes by seed without the disadvantages of vegetative propagation or the expense and complexity of hybrid seed production. The availability of new tools such as genotyping by sequencing and bioinformatics pipelines for species lacking reference genomes now makes the construction of dense maps possible in apomictic species, despite complications including polyploidy, multisomic inheritance, self-incompatibility, and high levels of heterozygosity. In this study, we developed saturated linkage maps for the maternal and paternal genomes of an interspecific Brachiaria ruziziensis (R. Germ. and C. M. Evrard) × B. decumbens Stapf. F1 mapping population in order to identify markers linked to apomixis. High-resolution molecular karyotyping and comparative genomics with Setaria italica (L.) P. Beauv provided conclusive evidence for segmental allopolyploidy in B. decumbens, with strong preferential pairing of homologs across the genome and multisomic segregation relatively more common in chromosome 8. The apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR) was mapped to a region of reduced recombination on B. decumbens chromosome 5. The Pennisetum squamulatum (L.) R.Br. PsASGR-BABY BOOM-like (psASGR-BBML)-specific primer pair p779/p780 was in perfect linkage with the ASGR in the F1 mapping population and diagnostic for reproductive mode in a diversity panel of known sexual and apomict Brachiaria (Trin.) Griseb. and P. maximum Jacq. germplasm accessions and cultivars. These findings indicate that ASGR-BBML gene sequences are highly conserved across the Paniceae and add further support for the postulation of the ASGR-BBML as candidate genes for the apomictic function of parthenogenesis. PMID:27206716

  9. A Parthenogenesis Gene Candidate and Evidence for Segmental Allopolyploidy in Apomictic Brachiaria decumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, Margaret; Heffelfinger, Christopher; Bernal, Diana; Quintero, Constanza; Zapata, Yeny Patricia; Perez, Juan Guillermo; De Vega, Jose; Miles, John; Dellaporta, Stephen; Tohme, Joe

    2016-07-01

    Apomixis, asexual reproduction through seed, enables breeders to identify and faithfully propagate superior heterozygous genotypes by seed without the disadvantages of vegetative propagation or the expense and complexity of hybrid seed production. The availability of new tools such as genotyping by sequencing and bioinformatics pipelines for species lacking reference genomes now makes the construction of dense maps possible in apomictic species, despite complications including polyploidy, multisomic inheritance, self-incompatibility, and high levels of heterozygosity. In this study, we developed saturated linkage maps for the maternal and paternal genomes of an interspecific Brachiaria ruziziensis (R. Germ. and C. M. Evrard) × B. decumbens Stapf. F1 mapping population in order to identify markers linked to apomixis. High-resolution molecular karyotyping and comparative genomics with Setaria italica (L.) P. Beauv provided conclusive evidence for segmental allopolyploidy in B. decumbens, with strong preferential pairing of homologs across the genome and multisomic segregation relatively more common in chromosome 8. The apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR) was mapped to a region of reduced recombination on B. decumbens chromosome 5. The Pennisetum squamulatum (L.) R.Br. PsASGR-BABY BOOM-like (psASGR-BBML)-specific primer pair p779/p780 was in perfect linkage with the ASGR in the F1 mapping population and diagnostic for reproductive mode in a diversity panel of known sexual and apomict Brachiaria (Trin.) Griseb. and P. maximum Jacq. germplasm accessions and cultivars. These findings indicate that ASGR-BBML gene sequences are highly conserved across the Paniceae and add further support for the postulation of the ASGR-BBML as candidate genes for the apomictic function of parthenogenesis.

  10. Organizational heterogeneity of vertebrate genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Frenkel

    Full Text Available Genomes of higher eukaryotes are mosaics of segments with various structural, functional, and evolutionary properties. The availability of whole-genome sequences allows the investigation of their structure as "texts" using different statistical and computational methods. One such method, referred to as Compositional Spectra (CS analysis, is based on scoring the occurrences of fixed-length oligonucleotides (k-mers in the target DNA sequence. CS analysis allows generating species- or region-specific characteristics of the genome, regardless of their length and the presence of coding DNA. In this study, we consider the heterogeneity of vertebrate genomes as a joint effect of regional variation in sequence organization superimposed on the differences in nucleotide composition. We estimated compositional and organizational heterogeneity of genome and chromosome sequences separately and found that both heterogeneity types vary widely among genomes as well as among chromosomes in all investigated taxonomic groups. The high correspondence of heterogeneity scores obtained on three genome fractions, coding, repetitive, and the remaining part of the noncoding DNA (the genome dark matter--GDM allows the assumption that CS-heterogeneity may have functional relevance to genome regulation. Of special interest for such interpretation is the fact that natural GDM sequences display the highest deviation from the corresponding reshuffled sequences.

  11. Domestication genomics: evidence from animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guo-Dong; Xie, Hai-Bing; Peng, Min-Sheng; Irwin, David; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2014-02-01

    Animal domestication has far-reaching significance for human society. The sequenced genomes of domesticated animals provide critical resources for understanding the genetic basis of domestication. Various genomic analyses have shed a new light on the mechanism of artificial selection and have allowed the mapping of genes involved in important domestication traits. Here, we summarize the published genomes of domesticated animals that have been generated over the past decade, as well as their origins, from a phylogenomic point of view. This review provides a general description of the genomic features encountered under a two-stage domestication process. We also introduce recent findings for domestication traits based on results from genome-wide association studies and selective-sweep scans for artificially selected genomic regions. Particular attention is paid to issues relating to the costs of domestication and the convergent evolution of genes between domesticated animals and humans.

  12. A physical map of the human genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McPherson, J.D.; Marra, M.; Hillier, L.; Waterston, R.H.; Chinwalla, A.; Wallis, J.; Sekhon, M.; Wylie, K.; Mardis, E.R.; Wilson, R.K.; Fulton, R.; Kucaba, T.A.; Wagner-McPherson, C.; Barbazuk, W.B.; Gregory, S.G.; Humphray, S.J.; French, L.; Evans, R.S.; Bethel, G.; Whittaker, A.; Holden, J.L.; McCann, O.T.; Dunham, A.; Soderlund, C.; Scott, C.E.; Bentley, D.R.; Schuler, G.; Chen, H.-C.; Jang, W.; Green, E.D.; Idol, J.R.; Maduro, V.V. Braden; Montgomery, K.T.; Lee, E.; Miller, A.; Emerling, S.; Kucherlapati; Gibbs, R.; Scherer, S.; Gorrell, J.H.; Sodergren, E.; Clerc-Blankenburg, K.; Tabor, P.; Naylor, S.; Garcia, D.; de Jong, P.J.; Catanese, J.J.; Nowak, N.; Osoegawa, K.; Qin, S.; Rowen, L.; Madan, A.; Dors, M.; Hood, L.; Trask, B.; Friedman, C.; Massa, H.; Cheung, V.G.; Kirsch, I.R.; Reid, T.; Yonescu, R.; Weissenbach, J.; Bruls, T.; Heilig, R.; Branscomb, E.; Olsen, A.; Doggett, N.; Cheng, J.F.; Hawkins, T.; Myers, R.M.; Shang, J.; Ramirez, L.; Schmutz, J.; Velasquez, O.; Dixon, K.; Stone, N.E.; Cox, D.R.; Haussler, D.; Kent, W.J.; Furey, T.; Rogic, S.; Kennedy, S.; Jones, S.; Rosenthal, A.; Wen, G.; Schilhabel, M.; Gloeckner, G.; Nyakatura, G.; Siebert, R.; Schlegelberger, B.; Korenberg, J.; Chen, X.N.; Fujiyama, A.; Hattori, M.; Toyoda, A.; Yada, T.; Park, H.S.; Sakaki, Y.; Shimizu, N.; Asakawa, S.; Kawasaki, K.; Sasaki, T.; Shintani, A.; Shimizu, A.; Shibuya, K.; Kudoh, J.; Minoshima, S.; Ramser, J.; Seranski, P.; Hoff, C.; Poustka, A.; Reinhardt, R.; Lehrach, H.

    2001-01-01

    The human genome is by far the largest genome to be sequenced, and its size and complexity present many challenges for sequence assembly. The International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium constructed a map of the whole genome to enable the selection of clones for sequencing and for the accurate assembly of the genome sequence. Here we report the construction of the whole-genome bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) map and its integration with previous landmark maps and information from mapping efforts focused on specific chromosomal regions. We also describe the integration of sequence data with the map.

  13. Mauve: Multiple Alignment of Conserved Genomic Sequence With Rearrangements

    OpenAIRE

    Darling, Aaron C.E.; Mau, Bob; Blattner, Frederick R.; Perna, Nicole T.

    2004-01-01

    As genomes evolve, they undergo large-scale evolutionary processes that present a challenge to sequence comparison not posed by short sequences. Recombination causes frequent genome rearrangements, horizontal transfer introduces new sequences into bacterial chromosomes, and deletions remove segments of the genome. Consequently, each genome is a mosaic of unique lineage-specific segments, regions shared with a subset of other genomes and segments conserved among all the genomes under considera...

  14. PredictSNP2: A Unified Platform for Accurately Evaluating SNP Effects by Exploiting the Different Characteristics of Variants in Distinct Genomic Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendl, Jaroslav; Musil, Miloš; Štourač, Jan; Zendulka, Jaroslav; Damborský, Jiří; Brezovský, Jan

    2016-05-01

    An important message taken from human genome sequencing projects is that the human population exhibits approximately 99.9% genetic similarity. Variations in the remaining parts of the genome determine our identity, trace our history and reveal our heritage. The precise delineation of phenotypically causal variants plays a key role in providing accurate personalized diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of inherited diseases. Several computational methods for achieving such delineation have been reported recently. However, their ability to pinpoint potentially deleterious variants is limited by the fact that their mechanisms of prediction do not account for the existence of different categories of variants. Consequently, their output is biased towards the variant categories that are most strongly represented in the variant databases. Moreover, most such methods provide numeric scores but not binary predictions of the deleteriousness of variants or confidence scores that would be more easily understood by users. We have constructed three datasets covering different types of disease-related variants, which were divided across five categories: (i) regulatory, (ii) splicing, (iii) missense, (iv) synonymous, and (v) nonsense variants. These datasets were used to develop category-optimal decision thresholds and to evaluate six tools for variant prioritization: CADD, DANN, FATHMM, FitCons, FunSeq2 and GWAVA. This evaluation revealed some important advantages of the category-based approach. The results obtained with the five best-performing tools were then combined into a consensus score. Additional comparative analyses showed that in the case of missense variations, protein-based predictors perform better than DNA sequence-based predictors. A user-friendly web interface was developed that provides easy access to the five tools' predictions, and their consensus scores, in a user-understandable format tailored to the specific features of different categories of variations. To

  15. Evaluation of genomic island predictors using a comparative genomics approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinkman Fiona SL

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic islands (GIs are clusters of genes in prokaryotic genomes of probable horizontal origin. GIs are disproportionately associated with microbial adaptations of medical or environmental interest. Recently, multiple programs for automated detection of GIs have been developed that utilize sequence composition characteristics, such as G+C ratio and dinucleotide bias. To robustly evaluate the accuracy of such methods, we propose that a dataset of GIs be constructed using criteria that are independent of sequence composition-based analysis approaches. Results We developed a comparative genomics approach (IslandPick that identifies both very probable islands and non-island regions. The approach involves 1 flexible, automated selection of comparative genomes for each query genome, using a distance function that picks appropriate genomes for identification of GIs, 2 identification of regions unique to the query genome, compared with the chosen genomes (positive dataset and 3 identification of regions conserved across all genomes (negative dataset. Using our constructed datasets, we investigated the accuracy of several sequence composition-based GI prediction tools. Conclusion Our results indicate that AlienHunter has the highest recall, but the lowest measured precision, while SIGI-HMM is the most precise method. SIGI-HMM and IslandPath/DIMOB have comparable overall highest accuracy. Our comparative genomics approach, IslandPick, was the most accurate, compared with a curated list of GIs, indicating that we have constructed suitable datasets. This represents the first evaluation, using diverse and, independent datasets that were not artificially constructed, of the accuracy of several sequence composition-based GI predictors. The caveats associated with this analysis and proposals for optimal island prediction are discussed.

  16. Domestication and plant genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Haibao; Sezen, Uzay; Paterson, Andrew H

    2010-04-01

    The techniques of plant improvement have been evolving with the advancement of technology, progressing from crop domestication by Neolithic humans to scientific plant breeding, and now including DNA-based genotyping and genetic engineering. Archeological findings have shown that early human ancestors often unintentionally selected for and finally fixed a few major domestication traits over time. Recent advancement of molecular and genomic tools has enabled scientists to pinpoint changes to specific chromosomal regions and genetic loci that are responsible for dramatic morphological and other transitions that distinguish crops from their wild progenitors. Extensive studies in a multitude of additional crop species, facilitated by rapid progress in sequencing and resequencing(s) of crop genomes, will further our understanding of the genomic impact from both the unusual population history of cultivated plants and millennia of human selection.

  17. Locations of the ets subfamily members net, elk1, and sap1 (ELK3, ELK1, and ELK4) on three homologous regions of the mouse and human genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovane, A; Sobieszczuk, P; Mignon, C; Mattei, M G; Wasylyk, B

    1995-10-10

    Net, Elk1, and Sap1 are related members of the Ets oncoprotein family. We show by in situ hybridization on banded chromosomes with specific cDNA probes that their map positions on mouse and human chromosomes (respectively) are net, 10C-D1 and 12q22-q23 (now called ELK3), sap1, 1E3-G and 1q32 (ELK4), and elk1, XA1-A3 and Xp11.2-p11.1 (ELK1), as well as a second locus 14q32 (ELK2) unique to the human genome. The results for the mouse net, sap1, and elk1 and human ELK3 genes are new. The human elk1 mapping confirms a previous study. The human ELK4 localization agrees with data published during the preparation of the manuscript. Human ELK3 colocalizes with sap2, and we confirm that they are identical. These results firmly establish for the first time that Net, Elk1, and Sap1 are distinct gene products with different chromosomal localizations in both the mouse and the human genomes. Net, Elk1, and Sap1 are conserved and map to homologous regions of the mouse and human chromosomes. PMID:8575773

  18. Locations of the ets subfamily members net, elk1, and sap1 (ELK3, ELK1, and ELK4) on three homologous regions of the mouse and human genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovane, A.; Sobieszczuk, P. [Institut de Genetique et de Biologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire, Illkirch (France); Mignon, C.; Mattei, M.G.; Wasylyk, B. [INSERM, Marseille (France)

    1995-10-10

    Net, Elk1, and Sap1 are related members of the Ets oncoprotein family. We show by in situ hybridization on banded chromosomes with specific cDNA probes that their map positions on mouse and human chromosomes (respectively) are net, 10C-D1 and 12q22-q23 (now called ELK3), sap1, 1E3-G and 1q32 (ELK4), and elk1, XA1-A3 and Xp11.2-p11.1 (ELK1), as well as a second locus 14q32 (ELK2) unique to the human genome. The results for the mouse net, sap1, and elk1 and human ELK3 genes are new. The human elk1 mapping confirms a previous study. The human ELK4 localization agrees with data published during the preparation of the manuscript. Human ELK3 colocalizes with sap2, and we confirm that they are identical. These results firmly establish for the first time that Net, Elk1, and Sap1 are distinct gene products with different chromosomal localizations in both the mouse and the human genomes. Net, Elk1, and Sap1 are conserved and map to homologous regions of the mouse and human chromosomes. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  19. Genomic profiling of papillary renal cell tumours identifies small regions of DNA alterations: a possible role of HNF1B in tumour development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szponar, A.; Yusenko, M.V.; Kuiper, R.P.; Geurts van Kessel, A.H.M.; Kovacs, G.

    2011-01-01

    AIMS: Papillary renal cell tumours (RCT) are characterized by specific trisomies. The aim of this study was to identify small regions of duplication marking putative tumour genes. METHODS AND RESULTS: Full-tiling path bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) array hybridization of 20 papillary RCTs con

  20. The OXA1L gene that controls cytochrome oxidase assembly maps to the 14q11.2 region of the human genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina-Gomes, D.; Viegas-Pequignot, E. [INSERM, Paris (France); Bonnefoy, N.; Dujardin, G. [Universite Paris, Gif sur Yvette (France)] [and others

    1995-11-20

    Cytochrome-c oxidase, the terminal complex of the mitochondrial respiratory chain that transfers electrons from cytochrome c to oxygen, has a critical role in cellular energy metabolism. In eukaryotes, the cytochrome-c oxidase complex is composed of from 7 to 13 subunits (in mammals), and its assembly depends on several nuclear-encoded proteins. The 0XA1 gene, which was first isolated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, encodes a protein essential for cytochrome-c oxidase assembly. The human OXA1-like (OXA1L, previously designated OXA1Hs) cDNA was isolated by functional complementation of an oxa1{sup -} mutation in yeast. The deduced sequences of the two Oxa1 and Oxa1L proteins share 33% identity. Oxygen consumption measurements and cytochrome absorption spectra show that replacement of the yeast protein with the human homolog leads to the correct assembly of cytochrome-c oxidase, suggesting that these proteins play essentially the same role in both organisms. In this report, we have used both somatic cell hybrid mapping and in situ hybridization to localize the OXA1L gene on the human genome. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  1. A genome-wide association study identifies a region at chromosome 12 as a potential susceptibility locus for restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampietro, M. Lourdes; Trompet, Stella; Verschuren, Jeffrey J.W.; Talens, Rudolf P.; Deelen, Joris; Heijmans, Bastiaan T.; de Winter, Robbert J.; Tio, Rene A.; Doevendans, Pieter A.F.M.; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Nabel, Elizabeth G.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Franke, Lude; van den Akker, Erik B.; Westendorp, Rudi G.J.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Kastrati, Adnan; Koch, Werner; Slagboom, P.Eline; de Knijff, Peter; Jukema, J. Wouter

    2011-01-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has become an effective therapy to treat obstructive coronary artery diseases (CAD). However, one of the major drawbacks of PCI is the occurrence of restenosis in 5–25% of all initially treated patients. Restenosis is defined as the re-narrowing of the lumen of the blood vessel, resulting in renewed symptoms and the need for repeated intervention. To identify genetic variants that are associated with restenosis, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was conducted in 295 patients who developed restenosis (cases) and 571 who did not (controls) from the GENetic Determinants of Restenosis (GENDER) study. Analysis of ∼550 000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in GENDER was followed by a replication phase in three independent case–control populations (533 cases and 3067 controls). A potential susceptibility locus for restenosis at chromosome 12, including rs10861032 (Pcombined = 1.11 × 10−7) and rs9804922 (Pcombined = 1.45 × 10−6), was identified in the GWAS and replication phase. In addition, both SNPs were also associated with coronary events (rs10861032, Padditive = 0.005; rs9804922, Padditive = 0.023) in a trial based cohort set of elderly patients with (enhanced risk of) CAD (PROSPER) and all-cause mortality in PROSPER (rs10861032, Padditive = 0.007; rs9804922, Padditive = 0.013) and GENDER (rs10861032, Padditive = 0.005; rs9804922, Padditive = 0.023). Further analysis suggests that this locus could be involved in regulatory functions. PMID:21878436

  2. The genomic landscapes of histone H3-Lys9 modifications of gene promoter regions and expression profiles in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) of nonembryortic origins possess the proliferation and multi-lineage differentiation potentials. It has been established that epigenetic mechanisms could be critical for determining the fate of stem ceils, and MSCs derived from different origins exhibited different expression profiles individually to a certain extent. In this study, ChiP-on-chip was used to generate genome-wide historic H3-Lys9 acetylation and dimethylation profiles at gene promoters in human bone marrow MSCs. We showed that modifications of histone H3-Lys9 at gene promoters correlated well with mRNA expression in human bone marrow MSCs. Functional analysis revealed that many key cellular pathways in human bone marrow MSC self-renewal, such as the canonical signaling pathways,cell cycle pathways and cytokine related pathways may be regulated by H3-Lys9 modifications. These data suggest that gene activation and silencing affected by H3-Lys9 acetylation and dimethylation, respectively, may be essential to the maintenance of human bone marrow MSC self-renewal and multi-potency.

  3. An International Plan to Sequence the Onion Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cost of DNA sequencing continues to decline and, in the near future, it will become reasonable to undertake sequencing of the enormous nuclear genome of onion. We undertook sequencing of expressed and genomic regions of the onion genome to learn about the structure of the onion genome, as well a...

  4. Accounting for discovery bias in genomic prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our objective was to evaluate an approach to mitigating discovery bias in genomic prediction. Accuracy may be improved by placing greater emphasis on regions of the genome expected to be more influential on a trait. Methods emphasizing regions result in a phenomenon known as “discovery bias” if info...

  5. Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus strain Deutsch, whole genome shotgun sequencing project first submission of genome sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    The size and repetitive nature of the Rhipicephalus microplus genome makes obtaining a full genome sequence difficult. Cot filtration/selection techniques were used to reduce the repetitive fraction of the tick genome and enrich for the fraction of DNA with gene-containing regions. The Cot-selected ...

  6. Genomic Feature Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Peter; Edwards, Stefan McKinnon; Rohde, Palle Duun

    Whole-genome sequences and multiple trait phenotypes from large numbers of individuals will soon be available in many populations. Well established statistical modeling approaches enable the genetic analyses of complex trait phenotypes while accounting for a variety of additive and non-additive g...... regions and gene ontologies) that provide better model fit and increase predictive ability of the statistical model for this trait....

  7. Complete discrimination of six individuals based on high-resolution melting of hypervariable regions I and II of the mitochondrial genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gidlöf, Olof; Burvall, Sofia; Edvinsson, Lars;

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of mitochondrial DNA in forensic samples is routinely carried out by direct sequencing of hypervariable regions within the non-coding displacement loop. Although the accuracy and sensitivity of this method cannot be questioned, it is both time-consuming and labor intensive. Finding a way...... to rapidly pre-screen forensic samples-prior to sequencing, to reduce the number of samples that need to be sequenced-would greatly benefit forensic laboratories. Herein, we describe an assay for discrimination of DNA from different individuals based on high-resolution melting analysis of the two...

  8. Interaction between the yeast mitochondrial and nuclear genomes influences the abundance of novel transcripts derived from the spacer region of the nuclear ribosomal DNA repeat.

    OpenAIRE

    Parikh, V S; Conrad-Webb, H; Docherty, R; Butow, R A

    1989-01-01

    We have identified stable transcripts from the so-called nontranscribed spacer region (NTS) of the nuclear ribosomal DNA repeat in certain respiration-deficient strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These RNAs, which are transcribed from the same strand as is the 37S rRNA precursor, are 500 to 800 nucleotides long and extend from the 5' end of the 5S rRNA gene to three major termination sites about 1,780, 1,830, and 1,870 nucleotides from the 3' end of the 26S rRNA gene. A survey of various wi...

  9. Genomic scan for quantitative trait loci of chemical and physical body composition and deposition on pig chromosome X including the pseudoautosomal region of males

    OpenAIRE

    Kalm Ernst; Doeschl-Wilson Andrea; Pérez-Enciso Miguel; Simm Geoff; Duthie Carol-Anne; Knap Pieter W; Roehe Rainer

    2009-01-01

    Abstract A QTL analysis of pig chromosome X (SSCX) was carried out using an approach that accurately takes into account the specific features of sex chromosomes i.e. their heterogeneity, the presence of a pseudoautosomal region and the dosage compensation phenomenon. A three-generation full-sib population of 386 animals was created by crossing Pietrain sires with a crossbred dam line. Phenotypic data on 72 traits were recorded for at least 292 and up to 315 F2 animals including chemical body ...

  10. Analysis of gene order data supports vertical inheritance of the leukotoxin operon and genome rearrangements in the 5' flanking region in genus Mannheimia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jesper; Kuhnert, Peter; Frey, Joachim;

    2007-01-01

    examined the gene order in the 5' flanking region of the leukotoxin operon and found that the 5' flanking gene strings, hslVU-lapB-artJ-lktC and xylAB-lktC, are peculiar to M. haemolytica + M. glucosida and M. granulomatis, respectively, whereas the gene string hslVU-lapB-lktC is present in M. ruminalis......, the supposed sister group of M. haemolytica + M. glucosida, and in the most ancient subclade M. varigena. In M. granulomatis, we found remnants of the gene string hslVU-lapB-lktC in the xylB-lktC intergenic region. CONCLUSIONS: These observations indicate that the gene string hslVU-lapB-lktC is more ancient...... than the hslVU-lapB-artJ-lktC and xylAB-lktC gene strings. The presence of (remnants of) the ancient gene string hslVU-lapB-lktC among any subclades within genus Mannheimia supports that it has been vertically inherited from the last common ancestor of genus Mannheimia to any ancestor of the diverging...

  11. Listeria Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanes, Didier; Sousa, Sandra; Cossart, Pascale

    The opportunistic intracellular foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes has become a paradigm for the study of host-pathogen interactions and bacterial adaptation to mammalian hosts. Analysis of L. monocytogenes infection has provided considerable insight into how bacteria invade cells, move intracellularly, and disseminate in tissues, as well as tools to address fundamental processes in cell biology. Moreover, the vast amount of knowledge that has been gathered through in-depth comparative genomic analyses and in vivo studies makes L. monocytogenes one of the most well-studied bacterial pathogens. This chapter provides an overview of progress in the exploration of genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic data in Listeria spp. to understand genome evolution and diversity, as well as physiological aspects of metabolism used by bacteria when growing in diverse environments, in particular in infected hosts.

  12. PromBase: a web resource for various genomic features and predicted promoters in prokaryotic genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bansal Manju

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As more and more genomes are being sequenced, an overview of their genomic features and annotation of their functional elements, which control the expression of each gene or transcription unit of the genome, is a fundamental challenge in genomics and bioinformatics. Findings Relative stability of DNA sequence has been used to predict promoter regions in 913 microbial genomic sequences with GC-content ranging from 16.6% to 74.9%. Irrespective of the genome GC-content the relative stability based promoter prediction method has already been proven to be robust in terms of recall and precision. The predicted promoter regions for the 913 microbial genomes have been accumulated in a database called PromBase. Promoter search can be carried out in PromBase either by specifying the gene name or the genomic position. Each predicted promoter region has been assigned to a reliability class (low, medium, high, very high and highest based on the difference between its average free energy and the downstream region. The recall and precision values for each class are shown graphically in PromBase. In addition, PromBase provides detailed information about base composition, CDS and CG/TA skews for each genome and various DNA sequence dependent structural properties (average free energy, curvature and bendability in the vicinity of all annotated translation start sites (TLS. Conclusion PromBase is a database, which contains predicted promoter regions and detailed analysis of various genomic features for 913 microbial genomes. PromBase can serve as a valuable resource for comparative genomics study and help the experimentalist to rapidly access detailed information on various genomic features and putative promoter regions in any given genome. This database is freely accessible for academic and non- academic users via the worldwide web http://nucleix.mbu.iisc.ernet.in/prombase/.

  13. Sequence variations of the locus-specific 5' untranslated regions of SLA class I genes and the development of a comprehensive genomic DNA-based high-resolution typing method for SLA-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, H; Le, M T; Lee, H; Choi, M-K; Cho, H-S; Nagasundarapandian, S; Kwon, O-J; Kim, J-H; Seo, K; Park, J-K; Lee, J-H; Ho, C-S; Park, C

    2015-10-01

    The genetic diversity of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules of pigs has not been well characterized. Therefore, the influence of MHC genetic diversity on the immune-related traits of pigs, including disease resistance and other MHC-dependent traits, is not well understood. Here, we attempted to develop an efficient method for systemic analysis of the polymorphisms in the epitope-binding region of swine leukocyte antigens (SLA) class I genes. We performed a comparative analysis of the last 92 bp of the 5' untranslated region (UTR) to the beginning of exon 4 of six SLA classical class I-related genes, SLA-1, -2, -3, -4, -5, and -9, from 36 different sequences. Based on this information, we developed a genomic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing-based comprehensive typing method for SLA-2. We successfully typed SLA-2 from 400 pigs and 8 cell lines, consisting of 9 different pig breeds, and identified 49 SLA-2 alleles, including 31 previously reported alleles and 18 new alleles. We observed differences in the composition of SLA-2 alleles among different breeds. Our method can be used to study other SLA class I loci and to deepen our knowledge of MHC class I genes in pigs.

  14. Cephalopod genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertin, Caroline B.; Bonnaud, Laure; Brown, C. Titus;

    2012-01-01

    The Cephalopod Sequencing Consortium (CephSeq Consortium) was established at a NESCent Catalysis Group Meeting, ``Paths to Cephalopod Genomics-Strategies, Choices, Organization,'' held in Durham, North Carolina, USA on May 24-27, 2012. Twenty-eight participants representing nine countries (Austria...... active in sequencing, assembling and annotating genomes, agreed on a set of cephalopod species of particular importance for initial sequencing and developed strategies and an organization (CephSeq Consortium) to promote this sequencing. The conclusions and recommendations of this meeting are described...

  15. Genome Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sato, Shusei; Andersen, Stig Uggerhøj

    2014-01-01

    The current Lotus japonicus reference genome sequence is based on a hybrid assembly of Sanger TAC/BAC, Sanger shotgun and Illumina shotgun sequencing data generated from the Miyakojima-MG20 accession. It covers nearly all expressed L. japonicus genes and has been annotated mainly based on transcr......The current Lotus japonicus reference genome sequence is based on a hybrid assembly of Sanger TAC/BAC, Sanger shotgun and Illumina shotgun sequencing data generated from the Miyakojima-MG20 accession. It covers nearly all expressed L. japonicus genes and has been annotated mainly based...

  16. Genetic analysis of tumorigenesis: a conserved region in the human and Chinese hamster genomes contains genetically identified tumor-suppressor genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regional chromosome homologies were found in a comparison of human 11p with Chinese hamster 3p. By use of probes that recognize six genes of human 11p (INS, CAT, HBBC, CALC, PTH, and HRAS), the corresponding genes were localized by in situ hybridization on Chinese hamster chromosome 3. INS and CAT were located close to the centromere on 3p, whereas HBBC, CALC, and PTH were at 3q3-4 and HRAS at 3q4. Extensive prior data from chromosome studies of tumorigenic and tumor-derived Chinese hamster cells have suggested the presence of a tumor-suppressor gene on 3p. Two tumor-suppressor genes have been described on human 11p, one linked to CAT and one to INS. The present study raises the possibility that the Chinese hamster suppressor may be closely linked to INS or CAT

  17. 基于柑橘及其近缘属植物DNA条形码的叶绿体编码序列筛选%Screening Potential DNA Barcode Regions of Chloroplast Coding Genome for Citrus and Its Related Genera

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于杰; 闫化学; 鲁振华; 周志钦

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] Four coding regions of chloroplast genome of Citrus and its close relatives were analyzed in an attempt to find suitable DNA barcoding markers for species identification and lay a foundation for further study of non-coding region.[ Method ] Four chloroplast DNA regions (matK, rpoB, rpoC1 and rbcL ) of 59 Citrus accessions were sequenced, the intergeneric,interspecific, intraspecific genetic distances were calculated, and the phylogenetic tree of all the accessions tested was built based on the distance data obtained. [Result] The intergeneric and interspecific sequence variations of matK were the highest among four coding regions tested, and had significant difference from other regions studied. On the contrary, no obvious variations were found in the rpoB and rpoC1 regions. The sequence variation of rbcL was medium among the fragments sequenced. [Conclusion] The matK sequence could be used as potential candidate fragment for future DNA barcoding study of Citrus and its closely related genera.%[目的]通过对柑橘及其近缘属植物叶绿体4种编码序列的测定分析,获得能进行DNA条形编码的特征序列,为进一步研究叶绿体非编码区序列奠定基础.[方法]对柑橘及其近缘属植物59份样品进行matK、rpoB、rpoC1、rbcL测序,序列比对与人工校正,计算属间,种同、种内的遗传距离,比较序列间的差异,建立系统发育树.[结果]4种序列中,matK序列在属间、种间差异最大,与其它序列相比具有显著性差异,rbcL序列次之,而rpoB、rpoC1序列两者间没有显著性差异.[结论]matK序列是柑橘及其近缘属植物DNA条形码的未来研究中一个重要的候选片段.

  18. Ancient genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Der Sarkissian, Clio; Allentoft, Morten Erik; Avila Arcos, Maria del Carmen;

    2015-01-01

    , archaic hominins, ancient pathogens and megafaunal species. Those have revealed important functional and phenotypic information, as well as unexpected adaptation, migration and admixture patterns. As such, the field of aDNA has entered the new era of genomics and has provided valuable information when...

  19. Herbarium genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakker, Freek T.; Lei, Di; Yu, Jiaying;

    2016-01-01

    Herbarium genomics is proving promising as next-generation sequencing approaches are well suited to deal with the usually fragmented nature of archival DNA. We show that routine assembly of partial plastome sequences from herbarium specimens is feasible, from total DNA extracts and with specimens...

  20. Contrasting patterns of population connectivity between regions in a commercially important mollusc Haliotis rubra: integrating population genetics, genomics and marine LiDAR data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, A D; van Rooyen, A; Rašić, G; Ierodiaconou, D A; Gorfine, H K; Day, R; Wong, C; Hoffmann, A A; Weeks, A R

    2016-08-01

    Estimating contemporary genetic structure and population connectivity in marine species is challenging, often compromised by genetic markers that lack adequate sensitivity, and unstructured sampling regimes. We show how these limitations can be overcome via the integration of modern genotyping methods and sampling designs guided by LiDAR and SONAR data sets. Here we explore patterns of gene flow and local genetic structure in a commercially harvested abalone species (Haliotis rubra) from southeastern Australia, where the viability of fishing stocks is believed to be dictated by recruitment from local sources. Using a panel of microsatellite and genomewide SNP markers, we compare allele frequencies across a replicated hierarchical sampling area guided by bathymetric LiDAR imagery. Results indicate high levels of gene flow and no significant genetic structure within or between benthic reef habitats across 1400 km of coastline. These findings differ to those reported for other regions of the fishery indicating that larval supply is likely to be spatially variable, with implications for management and long-term recovery from stock depletion. The study highlights the utility of suitably designed genetic markers and spatially informed sampling strategies for gaining insights into recruitment patterns in benthic marine species, assisting in conservation planning and sustainable management of fisheries. PMID:27322873

  1. Identification of genome regions controlling cotyledon, pod wall/seed coat and pod wall resistance to pea weevil through QTL mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryamanesh, N; Zeng, Y; Byrne, O; Hardie, D C; Al-Subhi, A M; Khan, T; Siddique, K H M; Yan, G

    2013-11-15

    Pea weevil, Bruchus pisorum, is one of the limiting factors for field pea (Pisum sativum) cultivation in the world with pesticide application the only available method for its control. Resistance to pea weevil has been found in an accession of Pisum fulvum but transfer of this resistance to cultivated pea (P. sativum) is limited due to a lack of easy-to-use techniques for screening interspecific breeding populations. To address this problem, an interspecific population was created from a cross between cultivated field pea and P. fulvum (resistance source). Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping was performed to discover the regions associated with resistance to cotyledon, pod wall/seed coat and pod wall resistance. Three major QTLs, located on linkage groups LG2, LG4 and LG5 were found for cotyledon resistance explaining approximately 80 % of the phenotypic variation. Two major QTLs were found for pod wall/seed coat resistance on LG2 and LG5 explaining approximately 70 % of the phenotypic variation. Co-linearity of QTLs for cotyledon and pod wall/seed coat resistance suggested that the mechanism of resistance for these two traits might act through the same pathways. Only one QTL was found for pod wall resistance on LG7 explaining approximately 9 % of the phenotypic variation. This is the first report on the development of QTL markers to probe Pisum germplasm for pea weevil resistance genes. These flanking markers will be useful in accelerating the process of screening when breeding for pea weevil resistance.

  2. High Species C Human Adenovirus Genome Copy Numbers in the Treated Water Supply of a Neotropical Area of the Central-West Region of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Hugo D; Fongaro, Gislaine; Garcíazapata, Marco T A; Melo, Arthur T O; Silveira-Lacerda, Elisângela P; de Faria, Karla M S; Anunciação, Carlos E

    2015-09-01

    There is little information about the presence of human adenovirus (HAdV) in drinking water in Neotropical regions. Thus, the present study sought to conduct quantification and molecular characterization of HAdVs detected in treated water samples from an area of the Cerrado ecoregion of Brazil. Between August and November 2012, samples were collected from four treated water reservoirs and their respective sites along the water distribution network of the city of Goiânia, for a total of 80 samples. All samples were concentrated and analyzed by qPCR, and selected samples were sequenced. Overall, 76.6 (10(0)-10(9) GC mL(-1)) and 37.5% (10(1)-10(8) GC mL(-1)) of samples drawn from reservoirs and their distribution sites, respectively, were positive for virus by qPCR. All samples selected for sequencing were characterized as species C human adenovirus. Such high HAdV counts have in treated water samples. This finding merits special attention, particularly from the sanitation authorities, because the high number of GC mL(-1) may be an indicative of risk to human health.

  3. Classifying Genomic Sequences by Sequence Feature Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Hua Liu; Dian Jiao; Xiao Sun

    2005-01-01

    Traditional sequence analysis depends on sequence alignment. In this study, we analyzed various functional regions of the human genome based on sequence features, including word frequency, dinucleotide relative abundance, and base-base correlation. We analyzed the human chromosome 22 and classified the upstream,exon, intron, downstream, and intergenic regions by principal component analysis and discriminant analysis of these features. The results show that we could classify the functional regions of genome based on sequence feature and discriminant analysis.

  4. Genome cartography: charting the apicomplexan genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissinger, Jessica C; DeBarry, Jeremy

    2011-08-01

    Genes reside in particular genomic contexts that can be mapped at many levels. Historically, 'genetic maps' were used primarily to locate genes. Recent technological advances in the determination of genome sequences have made the analysis and comparison of whole genomes possible and increasingly tractable. What do we see if we shift our focus from gene content (the 'inventory' of genes contained within a genome) to the composition and organization of a genome? This review examines what has been learned about the evolution of the apicomplexan genome as well as the significance and impact of genomic location on our understanding of the eukaryotic genome and parasite biology.

  5. The genome of Eucalyptus grandis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myburg, Alexander A.; Grattapaglia, Dario; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Hellsten, Uffe; Hayes, Richard D.; Grimwood, Jane; Jenkins, Jerry; Lindquist, Erika; Tice, Hope; Bauer, Diane; Goodstein, David M.; Dubchak, Inna; Poliakov, Alexandre; Mizrachi, Eshchar; Kullan, Anand R. K.; Hussey, Steven G.; Pinard, Desre; van der Merwe, Karen; Singh, Pooja; van Jaarsveld, Ida; Silva-Junior, Orzenil B.; Togawa, Roberto C.; Pappas, Marilia R.; Faria, Danielle A.; Sansaloni, Carolina P.; Petroli, Cesar D.; Yang, Xiaohan; Ranjan, Priya; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Ye, Chu-Yu; Li, Ting; Sterck, Lieven; Vanneste, Kevin; Murat, Florent; Soler, Marçal; Clemente, Hélène San; Saidi, Naijib; Cassan-Wang, Hua; Dunand, Christophe; Hefer, Charles A.; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Kersting, Anna R.; Vining, Kelly; Amarasinghe, Vindhya; Ranik, Martin; Naithani, Sushma; Elser, Justin; Boyd, Alexander E.; Liston, Aaron; Spatafora, Joseph W.; Dharmwardhana, Palitha; Raja, Rajani; Sullivan, Christopher; Romanel, Elisson; Alves-Ferreira, Marcio; Külheim, Carsten; Foley, William; Carocha, Victor; Paiva, Jorge; Kudrna, David; Brommonschenkel, Sergio H.; Pasquali, Giancarlo; Byrne, Margaret; Rigault, Philippe; Tibbits, Josquin; Spokevicius, Antanas; Jones, Rebecca C.; Steane, Dorothy A.; Vaillancourt, René E.; Potts, Brad M.; Joubert, Fourie; Barry, Kerrie; Pappas, Georgios J.; Strauss, Steven H.; Jaiswal, Pankaj; Grima-Pettenati, Jacqueline; Salse, Jérôme; Van de Peer, Yves; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Schmutz, Jeremy

    2014-06-11

    Eucalypts are the world s most widely planted hardwood trees. Their broad adaptability, rich species diversity, fast growth and superior multipurpose wood, have made them a global renewable resource of fiber and energy that mitigates human pressures on natural forests. We sequenced and assembled >94% of the 640 Mbp genome of Eucalyptus grandis into its 11 chromosomes. A set of 36,376 protein coding genes were predicted revealing that 34% occur in tandem duplications, the largest proportion found thus far in any plant genome. Eucalypts also show the highest diversity of genes for plant specialized metabolism that act as chemical defence against biotic agents and provide unique pharmaceutical oils. Resequencing of a set of inbred tree genomes revealed regions of strongly conserved heterozygosity, likely hotspots of inbreeding depression. The resequenced genome of the sister species E. globulus underscored the high inter-specific genome colinearity despite substantial genome size variation in the genus. The genome of E. grandis is the first reference for the early diverging Rosid order Myrtales and is placed here basal to the Eurosids. This resource expands knowledge on the unique biology of large woody perennials and provides a powerful tool to accelerate comparative biology, breeding and biotechnology.

  6. Citrus Genomics

    OpenAIRE

    Talon, Manuel; Gmitter, Fred G.Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Citrus is one of the most widespread fruit crops globally, with great economic and health value. It is among the most difficult plants to improve through traditional breeding approaches. Currently, there is risk of devastation by diseases threatening to limit production and future availability to the human population. As technologies rapidly advance in genomic science, they are quickly adapted to address the biological challenges of the citrus plant system and the world's industries. The hist...

  7. The function genomics study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ Genomics is a biology term appeared ten years ago, used to describe the researches of genomic mapping, sequencing, and structure analysis, etc. Genomics, the first journal for publishing papers on genomics research was born in 1986. In the past decade, the concept of genomics has been widely accepted by scientists who are engaging in biology research. Meanwhile, the research scope of genomics has been extended continuously, from simple gene mapping and sequencing to function genomics study. To reflect the change, genomics is divided into two parts now, the structure genomics and the function genomics.

  8. Comparative genetic mapping revealed powdery mildew resistance gene MlWE4 derived from wild emmer is located in same genomic region of Pm36 and Ml3D232 on chromosome 5BL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Dong; WANG Yong; CHEN Yong-xing; LIU Zhi-yong; OUYANG Shu-hong; WANG Li-li; CUI Yu; WU Qiu-hong; LIANG Yong; WANG Zhen-zhong; XIE Jing-zhong; ZHANG De-yun

    2015-01-01

    Powdery mildew, caused by Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici, is one of the most devastating wheat diseases. Wild emmer wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccoides) is a promising source of disease resistance for wheat. A powdery mildew resistance gene conferring resistance to B. graminis f. sp. tritici isolate E09, originating from wild emmer wheat, has been transferred into the hexaploid wheat line WE4 through crossing and backcrossing. Genetic analyses indicated that the powdery mildew resistance was control ed by a single dominant gene, temporarily designated MlWE4. By mean of comparative genomics and bulked segregant analysis, a genetic linkage map of MlWE4 was constructed, and MlWE4 was mapped on the distal region of chromosome arm 5BL. Comparative genetic linkage maps showed that genes MlWE4, Pm36 and Ml3D232 were co-segregated with markers XBD37670 and XBD37680, indicating they are likely the same gene or al eles in the same locus. The co-segregated markers provide a starting point for chromosome landing and map-based cloning of MlWE4, Pm36 and Ml3D232.

  9. Long-term study of an infection with ranaviruses in a group of edible frogs (Pelophylax kl. esculentus) and partial characterization of two viruses based on four genomic regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöhr, Anke C; Hoffmann, Alexandra; Papp, Tibor; Robert, Nadia; Pruvost, Nicolas B M; Reyer, Heinz-Ulrich; Marschang, Rachel E

    2013-08-01

    Several edible frogs (Pelophylax kl. esculentus) collected into a single group from various ponds in Europe died suddenly with reddening of the skin (legs, abdomen) and haemorrhages in the gastrointestinal tract. Ranavirus was detected in some of the dead frogs using PCR, and virus was also isolated in cell culture. Over the following 3 years, another two outbreaks occurred with low to high mortality in between asymptomatic periods. In the first 2 years, the same ranavirus was detected repeatedly, but a new ranavirus was isolated in association with the second mass-mortality event. The two different ranaviruses were characterized based on nucleotide sequences from four genomic regions, namely, major capsid protein, DNA polymerase, ribonucleoside diphosphate reductase alpha and beta subunit genes. The sequences showed slight variations to each other or GenBank entries and both clustered to the Rana esculenta virus (REV-like) clade in the phylogenetic analysis. Furthermore, a quiescent infection was demonstrated in two individuals. By comparing samples taken before and after transport and caging in groups it was possible to identify the pond of origin and a ranavirus was detected for the first time in wild amphibians in Germany. PMID:23535222

  10. Visualization for genomics: the Microbial Genome Viewer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhoven, R.; Enckevort, F.H.J. van; Boekhorst, J.; Molenaar, D.; Siezen, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    SUMMARY: A Web-based visualization tool, the Microbial Genome Viewer, is presented that allows the user to combine complex genomic data in a highly interactive way. This Web tool enables the interactive generation of chromosome wheels and linear genome maps from genome annotation data stored in a My

  11. Unleashing the genome of Brassica rapa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibao eTang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The completion and release of the Brassica rapa genome is of great benefit to researchers of the Brassicas, Arabidopsis, and genome evolution. While its lineage is closely related to the model organism Arabidopsis thaliana, the Brassicas experienced a whole genome triplication subsequent to their divergence. This event contemporaneously created three copies of its ancestral genome, which had diploidized through the process of homeologous gene loss known as fractionation. By the fractionation of homeologous gene content and genetic regulatory binding sites, Brassica’s genome is well placed to use comparative genomic techniques to identify syntenic regions, homeologous gene duplications, and putative regulatory sequences. Here, we use the comparative genomics platform CoGe to perform several different genomic analyses with which to study structural changes of its genome and dynamics of various genetic elements. Starting with whole genome comparisons, the Brassica paleohexaploidy is characterized, syntenic regions with Arabidopsis thaliana are identified, and the TOC1 gene in the circadian rhythm pathway from Arabidopsis thaliana is used to find duplicated orthologs in Brassica rapa. These TOC1 genes are further analyzed to identify conserved noncoding sequences that contain cis-acting regulatory elements and promoter sequences previously implicated in circadian rhythmicity. Each 'cookbook style' analysis includes a step-by-step walkthrough with links to CoGe to quickly reproduce each step of the analytical process.

  12. Scaffolder - software for manual genome scaffolding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barton Michael D

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The assembly of next-generation short-read sequencing data can result in a fragmented non-contiguous set of genomic sequences. Therefore a common step in a genome project is to join neighbouring sequence regions together and fill gaps. This scaffolding step is non-trivial and requires manually editing large blocks of nucleotide sequence. Joining these sequences together also hides the source of each region in the final genome sequence. Taken together these considerations may make reproducing or editing an existing genome scaffold difficult. Methods The software outlined here, “Scaffolder,” is implemented in the Ruby programming language and can be installed via the RubyGems software management system. Genome scaffolds are defined using YAML - a data format which is both human and machine-readable. Command line binaries and extensive documentation are available. Results This software allows a genome build to be defined in terms of the constituent sequences using a relatively simple syntax. This syntax further allows unknown regions to be specified and additional sequence to be used to fill known gaps in the scaffold. Defining the genome construction in a file makes the scaffolding process reproducible and easier to edit compared with large FASTA nucleotide sequences. Conclusions Scaffolder is easy-to-use genome scaffolding software which promotes reproducibility and continuous development in a genome project. Scaffolder can be found at http://next.gs.

  13. Patterns of genome size variation in snapping shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Nicholas W; Hultgren, Kristin; Chak, Solomon Tin Chi; Gregory, T Ryan; Rubenstein, Dustin R

    2016-06-01

    Although crustaceans vary extensively in genome size, little is known about how genome size may affect the ecology and evolution of species in this diverse group, in part due to the lack of large genome size datasets. Here we investigate interspecific, intraspecific, and intracolony variation in genome size in 39 species of Synalpheus shrimps, representing one of the largest genome size datasets for a single genus within crustaceans. We find that genome size ranges approximately 4-fold across Synalpheus with little phylogenetic signal, and is not related to body size. In a subset of these species, genome size is related to chromosome size, but not to chromosome number, suggesting that despite large genomes, these species are not polyploid. Interestingly, there appears to be 35% intraspecific genome size variation in Synalpheus idios among geographic regions, and up to 30% variation in Synalpheus duffyi genome size within the same colony.

  14. Is the pan-genome also a pan-selectome?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussery, David; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    The comparative genomics of prokaryotes has shown the presence of conserved regions containing highly similar genes (the 'core genome') and other regions that vary in gene content (the 'flexible' regions). A significant part of the latter is involved in surface structures that are phage recogniti...

  15. Complete chloroplast genome of Sedum sarmentosum and chloroplast genome evolution in Saxifragales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenpan Dong

    Full Text Available Comparative chloroplast genome analyses are mostly carried out at lower taxonomic levels, such as the family and genus levels. At higher taxonomic levels, chloroplast genomes are generally used to reconstruct phylogenies. However, little attention has been paid to chloroplast genome evolution within orders. Here, we present the chloroplast genome of Sedum sarmentosum and take advantage of several available (or elucidated chloroplast genomes to examine the evolution of chloroplast genomes in Saxifragales. The chloroplast genome of S. sarmentosum is 150,448 bp long and includes 82,212 bp of a large single-copy (LSC region, 16.670 bp of a small single-copy (SSC region, and a pair of 25,783 bp sequences of inverted repeats (IRs.The genome contains 131 unique genes, 18 of which are duplicated within the IRs. Based on a comparative analysis of chloroplast genomes from four representative Saxifragales families, we observed two gene losses and two pseudogenes in Paeonia obovata, and the loss of an intron was detected in the rps16 gene of Penthorum chinense. Comparisons among the 72 common protein-coding genes confirmed that the chloroplast genomes of S. sarmentosum and Paeonia obovata exhibit accelerated sequence evolution. Furthermore, a strong correlation was observed between the rates of genome evolution and genome size. The detected genome size variations are predominantly caused by the length of intergenic spacers, rather than losses of genes and introns, gene pseudogenization or IR expansion or contraction. The genome sizes of these species are negatively correlated with nucleotide substitution rates. Species with shorter duration of the life cycle tend to exhibit shorter chloroplast genomes than those with longer life cycles.

  16. Analysis of intra-genomic GC content homogeneity within prokaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohlin, J; Snipen, L; Hardy, S.P.;

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial genomes possess varying GC content (total guanines (Gs) and cytosines (Cs) per total of the four bases within the genome) but within a given genome, GC content can vary locally along the chromosome, with some regions significantly more or less GC rich than on average. We have examined h...

  17. Recurrent DNA inversion rearrangements in the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flores, Margarita; Morales, Lucía; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia;

    2007-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that reiterated sequences in the human genome are targets for nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR), which facilitates genomic rearrangements. We have used a PCR-based approach to identify breakpoint regions of rearranged structures in the human genome...

  18. Comparative genomic analyses in Asparagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhl, Joseph C; Havey, Michael J; Martin, William J; Cheung, Foo; Yuan, Qiaoping; Landherr, Lena; Hu, Yi; Leebens-Mack, James; Town, Christopher D; Sink, Kenneth C

    2005-12-01

    Garden asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) belongs to the monocot family Asparagaceae in the order Asparagales. Onion (Allium cepa L.) and Asparagus officinalis are 2 of the most economically important plants of the core Asparagales, a well supported monophyletic group within the Asparagales. Coding regions in onion have lower GC contents than the grasses. We compared the GC content of 3374 unique expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from A. officinalis with Lycoris longituba and onion (both members of the core Asparagales), Acorus americanus (sister to all other monocots), the grasses, and Arabidopsis. Although ESTs in A. officinalis and Acorus had a higher average GC content than Arabidopsis, Lycoris, and onion, all were clearly lower than the grasses. The Asparagaceae have the smallest nuclear genomes among all plants in the core Asparagales, which typically have huge genomes. Within the Asparagaceae, European Asparagus species have approximately twice the nuclear DNA of that of southern African Asparagus species. We cloned and sequenced 20 genomic amplicons from European A. officinalis and the southern African species Asparagus plumosus and observed no clear evidence for a recent genome doubling in A. officinalis relative to A. plumosus. These results indicate that members of the genus Asparagus with smaller genomes may be useful genomic models for plants in the core Asparagales. PMID:16391674

  19. Genomic landscape of liposarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanojia, Deepika; Nagata, Yasunobu; Garg, Manoj; Lee, Dhong Hyun; Sato, Aiko; Yoshida, Kenichi; Sato, Yusuke; Sanada, Masashi; Mayakonda, Anand; Bartenhagen, Christoph; Klein, Hans-Ulrich; Doan, Ngan B; Said, Jonathan W; Mohith, S; Gunasekar, Swetha; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Miyano, Satoru; Myklebost, Ola; Yang, Henry; Dugas, Martin; Meza-Zepeda, Leonardo A; Silberman, Allan W; Forscher, Charles; Tyner, Jeffrey W; Ogawa, Seishi; Koeffler, H Phillip

    2015-12-15

    Liposarcoma (LPS) is the most common type of soft tissue sarcoma accounting for 20% of all adult sarcomas. Due to absence of clinically effective treatment options in inoperable situations and resistance to chemotherapeutics, a critical need exists to identify novel therapeutic targets. We analyzed LPS genomic landscape using SNP arrays, whole exome sequencing and targeted exome sequencing to uncover the genomic information for development of specific anti-cancer targets. SNP array analysis indicated known amplified genes (MDM2, CDK4, HMGA2) and important novel genes (UAP1, MIR557, LAMA4, CPM, IGF2, ERBB3, IGF1R). Carboxypeptidase M (CPM), recurrently amplified gene in well-differentiated/de-differentiated LPS was noted as a putative oncogene involved in the EGFR pathway. Notable deletions were found at chromosome 1p (RUNX3, ARID1A), chromosome 11q (ATM, CHEK1) and chromosome 13q14.2 (MIR15A, MIR16-1). Significantly and recurrently mutated genes (false discovery rate < 0.05) included PLEC (27%), MXRA5 (21%), FAT3 (24%), NF1 (20%), MDC1 (10%), TP53 (7%) and CHEK2 (6%). Further, in vitro and in vivo functional studies provided evidence for the tumor suppressor role for Neurofibromin 1 (NF1) gene in different subtypes of LPS. Pathway analysis of recurrent mutations demonstrated signaling through MAPK, JAK-STAT, Wnt, ErbB, axon guidance, apoptosis, DNA damage repair and cell cycle pathways were involved in liposarcomagenesis. Interestingly, we also found mutational and copy number heterogeneity within a primary LPS tumor signifying the importance of multi-region sequencing for cancer-genome guided therapy. In summary, these findings provide insight into the genomic complexity of LPS and highlight potential druggable pathways for targeted therapeutic approach.

  20. The Oxytricha trifallax macronuclear genome: a complex eukaryotic genome with 16,000 tiny chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estienne C Swart

    Full Text Available The macronuclear genome of the ciliate Oxytricha trifallax displays an extreme and unique eukaryotic genome architecture with extensive genomic variation. During sexual genome development, the expressed, somatic macronuclear genome is whittled down to the genic portion of a small fraction (∼5% of its precursor "silent" germline micronuclear genome by a process of "unscrambling" and fragmentation. The tiny macronuclear "nanochromosomes" typically encode single, protein-coding genes (a small portion, 10%, encode 2-8 genes, have minimal noncoding regions, and are differentially amplified to an average of ∼2,000 copies. We report the high-quality genome assembly of ∼16,000 complete nanochromosomes (∼50 Mb haploid genome size that vary from 469 bp to 66 kb long (mean ∼3.2 kb and encode ∼18,500 genes. Alternative DNA fragmentation processes ∼10% of the nanochromosomes into multiple isoforms that usually encode complete genes. Nucleotide diversity in the macronucleus is very high (SNP heterozygosity is ∼4.0%, suggesting that Oxytricha trifallax may have one of the largest known effective population sizes of eukaryotes. Comparison to other ciliates with nonscrambled genomes and long macronuclear chromosomes (on the order of 100 kb suggests several candidate proteins that could be involved in genome rearrangement, including domesticated MULE and IS1595-like DDE transposases. The assembly of the highly fragmented Oxytricha macronuclear genome is the first completed genome with such an unusual architecture. This genome sequence provides tantalizing glimpses into novel molecular biology and evolution. For example, Oxytricha maintains tens of millions of telomeres per cell and has also evolved an intriguing expansion of telomere end-binding proteins. In conjunction with the micronuclear genome in progress, the O. trifallax macronuclear genome will provide an invaluable resource for investigating programmed genome rearrangements, complementing

  1. Genome-wide copy number variation in the bovine genome detected using low coverage sequence of popular beef breeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genomic structural variations are an important source of genetic diversity. Copy number variations (CNVs), gains and losses of large regions of genomic sequence between individuals of a species, are known to be associated with both diseases and phenotypic traits. Deeply sequenced genomes are often u...

  2. The Arabidopsis lyrata genome sequence and the basis of rapid genome size change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Tina T.; Pattyn, Pedro; Bakker, Erica G.; Cao, Jun; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Clark, Richard M.; Fahlgren, Noah; Fawcett, Jeffrey A.; Grimwood, Jane; Gundlach, Heidrun; Haberer, Georg; Hollister, Jesse D.; Ossowski, Stephan; Ottilar, Robert P.; Salamov, Asaf A.; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Spannagl, Manuel; Wang, Xi; Yang, Liang; Nasrallah, Mikhail E.; Bergelson, Joy; Carrington, James C.; Gaut, Brandon S.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Mayer, Klaus F. X.; Van de Peer, Yves; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Nordborg, Magnus; Weigel, Detlef; Guo, Ya-Long

    2011-04-29

    In our manuscript, we present a high-quality genome sequence of the Arabidopsis thaliana relative, Arabidopsis lyrata, produced by dideoxy sequencing. We have performed the usual types of genome analysis (gene annotation, dN/dS studies etc. etc.), but this is relegated to the Supporting Information. Instead, we focus on what was a major motivation for sequencing this genome, namely to understand how A. thaliana lost half its genome in a few million years and lived to tell the tale. The rather surprising conclusion is that there is not a single genomic feature that accounts for the reduced genome, but that every aspect centromeres, intergenic regions, transposable elements, gene family number is affected through hundreds of thousands of cuts. This strongly suggests that overall genome size in itself is what has been under selection, a suggestion that is strongly supported by our demonstration (using population genetics data from A. thaliana) that new deletions seem to be driven to fixation.

  3. Whole Genome Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you want to learn. Search form Search Whole Genome Sequencing You are here Home Testing & Services Testing ... the full story, click here . What is whole genome sequencing? Whole genome sequencing is the mapping out ...

  4. Genomes on ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhill, Julian

    2016-03-01

    This month's Genome Watch discusses the analysis of a Helicobacter pylori genome from the preserved Copper-Age mummy known as the Iceman and how ancient genomes shed light on the history of bacterial pathogens. PMID:26853114

  5. Simple sequence repeats in mycobacterial genomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vattipally B Sreenu; Pankaj Kumar; Javaregowda Nagaraju; Hampapathalu A Nagarajaram

    2007-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) or microsatellites are the repetitive nucleotide sequences of motifs of length 1–6 bp. They are scattered throughout the genomes of all the known organisms ranging from viruses to eukaryotes. Microsatellites undergo mutations in the form of insertions and deletions (INDELS) of their repeat units with some bias towards insertions that lead to microsatellite tract expansion. Although prokaryotic genomes derive some plasticity due to microsatellite mutations they have in-built mechanisms to arrest undue expansions of microsatellites and one such mechanism is constituted by post-replicative DNA repair enzymes MutL, MutH and MutS. The mycobacterial genomes lack these enzymes and as a null hypothesis one could expect these genomes to harbour many long tracts. It is therefore interesting to analyse the mycobacterial genomes for distribution and abundance of microsatellites tracts and to look for potentially polymorphic microsatellites. Available mycobacterial genomes, Mycobacterium avium, M. leprae, M. bovis and the two strains of M. tuberculosis (CDC1551 and H37Rv) were analysed for frequencies and abundance of SSRs. Our analysis revealed that the SSRs are distributed throughout the mycobacterial genomes at an average of 220–230 SSR tracts per kb. All the mycobacterial genomes contain few regions that are conspicuously denser or poorer in microsatellites compared to their expected genome averages. The genomes distinctly show scarcity of long microsatellites despite the absence of a post-replicative DNA repair system. Such severe scarcity of long microsatellites could arise as a result of strong selection pressures operating against long and unstable sequences although influence of GC-content and role of point mutations in arresting microsatellite expansions can not be ruled out. Nonetheless, the long tracts occasionally found in coding as well as non-coding regions may account for limited genome plasticity in these genomes.

  6. Genomic Signals of Reoriented ORFs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Dan Cristea

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex representation of nucleotides is used to convert DNA sequences into complex digital genomic signals. The analysis of the cumulated phase and unwrapped phase of DNA genomic signals reveals large-scale features of eukaryote and prokaryote chromosomes that result from statistical regularities of base and base-pair distributions along DNA strands. By reorienting the chromosome coding regions, a “hidden” linear variation of the cumulated phase has been revealed, along with the conspicuous almost linear variation of the unwrapped phase. A model of chromosome longitudinal structure is inferred on these bases.

  7. Screening synteny blocks in pairwise genome comparisons through integer programming

    OpenAIRE

    Paterson Andrew H; Schnable James C; Pedersen Brent; Lyons Eric; Tang Haibao; Freeling Michael

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background It is difficult to accurately interpret chromosomal correspondences such as true orthology and paralogy due to significant divergence of genomes from a common ancestor. Analyses are particularly problematic among lineages that have repeatedly experienced whole genome duplication (WGD) events. To compare multiple "subgenomes" derived from genome duplications, we need to relax the traditional requirements of "one-to-one" syntenic matchings of genomic regions in order to refl...

  8. Evolutionary genomics of animal personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oers, Kees; Mueller, Jakob C

    2010-12-27

    Research on animal personality can be approached from both a phenotypic and a genetic perspective. While using a phenotypic approach one can measure present selection on personality traits and their combinations. However, this approach cannot reconstruct the historical trajectory that was taken by evolution. Therefore, it is essential for our understanding of the causes and consequences of personality diversity to link phenotypic variation in personality traits with polymorphisms in genomic regions that code for this trait variation. Identifying genes or genome regions that underlie personality traits will open exciting possibilities to study natural selection at the molecular level, gene-gene and gene-environment interactions, pleiotropic effects and how gene expression shapes personality phenotypes. In this paper, we will discuss how genome information revealed by already established approaches and some more recent techniques such as high-throughput sequencing of genomic regions in a large number of individuals can be used to infer micro-evolutionary processes, historical selection and finally the maintenance of personality trait variation. We will do this by reviewing recent advances in molecular genetics of animal personality, but will also use advanced human personality studies as case studies of how molecular information may be used in animal personality research in the near future. PMID:21078651

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Halobacillus sp. Strain KGW1, a Moderately Halophilic and Alkaline Protease-Producing Bacterium Isolated from the Rhizospheric Region of Phragmites karka from Chilika Lake, Odisha, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Ananta Narayan; Mishra, Samir R; Ray, Lopamudra; Sahu, Neha; Acharya, Ankita; Jadhao, Sudhir; Suar, Mrutyunjay; Adhya, Tapan Kumar; Rastogi, Gurdeep; Pattnaik, Ajit Kumar; Raina, Vishakha

    2016-01-01

    Halobacillus sp. strain KGW1 is a moderately halophilic, rod shaped, Gram-positive, yellow pigmented, alkaline protease-producing bacterium isolated from a water sample from Chilika Lake, Odisha, India. Sequencing of bacterial DNA assembled a 3.68-Mb draft genome. The genome annotation analysis showed various gene clusters for tolerance to stress, such as elevated pH, salt concentration, and toxic metals. PMID:27365341

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Halobacillus sp. Strain KGW1, a Moderately Halophilic and Alkaline Protease-Producing Bacterium Isolated from the Rhizospheric Region of Phragmites karka from Chilika Lake, Odisha, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Ananta Narayan; Mishra, Samir R.; Ray, Lopamudra; Sahu, Neha; Acharya, Ankita; Jadhao, Sudhir; Suar, Mrutyunjay; Adhya, Tapan Kumar; Rastogi, Gurdeep; Pattnaik, Ajit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Halobacillus sp. strain KGW1 is a moderately halophilic, rod shaped, Gram-positive, yellow pigmented, alkaline protease-producing bacterium isolated from a water sample from Chilika Lake, Odisha, India. Sequencing of bacterial DNA assembled a 3.68-Mb draft genome. The genome annotation analysis showed various gene clusters for tolerance to stress, such as elevated pH, salt concentration, and toxic metals. PMID:27365341

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Halobacillus sp. Strain KGW1, a Moderately Halophilic and Alkaline Protease-Producing Bacterium Isolated from the Rhizospheric Region of Phragmites karka from Chilika Lake, Odisha, India

    OpenAIRE

    Panda, Ananta Narayan; Mishra, Samir R.; Ray, Lopamudra; Sahu, Neha; Acharya, Ankita; Jadhao, Sudhir; Suar, Mrutyunjay; Adhya, Tapan Kumar; Rastogi, Gurdeep; Pattnaik, Ajit Kumar; Raina, Vishakha

    2016-01-01

    Halobacillus sp. strain KGW1 is a moderately halophilic, rod shaped, Gram-positive, yellow pigmented, alkaline protease-producing bacterium isolated from a water sample from Chilika Lake, Odisha, India. Sequencing of bacterial DNA assembled a 3.68-Mb draft genome. The genome annotation analysis showed various gene clusters for tolerance to stress, such as elevated pH, salt concentration, and toxic metals.

  12. Rodent malaria parasites : genome organization & comparative genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, Taco W.A.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the studies described in this thesis was to investigate the genome organization of rodent malaria parasites (RMPs) and compare the organization and gene content of the genomes of RMPs and the human malaria parasite P. falciparum. The release of the complete genome sequence of P. falciparu

  13. A new database (GCD) on genome composition for eukaryote and prokaryote genome sequences and their initial analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryukov, Kirill; Sumiyama, Kenta; Ikeo, Kazuho; Gojobori, Takashi; Saitou, Naruya

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryote genomes contain many noncoding regions, and they are quite complex. To understand these complexities, we constructed a database, Genome Composition Database, for the whole genome composition statistics for 101 eukaryote genome data, as well as more than 1,000 prokaryote genomes. Frequencies of all possible one to ten oligonucleotides were counted for each genome, and these observed values were compared with expected values computed under observed oligonucleotide frequencies of length 1-4. Deviations from expected values were much larger for eukaryotes than prokaryotes, except for fungal genomes. Mammalian genomes showed the largest deviation among animals. The results of comparison are available online at http://esper.lab.nig.ac.jp/genome-composition-database/.

  14. Funding Opportunity: Genomic Data Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funding Opportunity CCG, Funding Opportunity Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG, Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG RFA, Center for cancer genomics rfa, genomic data analysis network, genomic data analysis network centers,

  15. Enabling functional genomics with genome engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Isaac B; Gersbach, Charles A

    2015-10-01

    Advances in genome engineering technologies have made the precise control over genome sequence and regulation possible across a variety of disciplines. These tools can expand our understanding of fundamental biological processes and create new opportunities for therapeutic designs. The rapid evolution of these methods has also catalyzed a new era of genomics that includes multiple approaches to functionally characterize and manipulate the regulation of genomic information. Here, we review the recent advances of the most widely adopted genome engineering platforms and their application to functional genomics. This includes engineered zinc finger proteins, TALEs/TALENs, and the CRISPR/Cas9 system as nucleases for genome editing, transcription factors for epigenome editing, and other emerging applications. We also present current and potential future applications of these tools, as well as their current limitations and areas for future advances. PMID:26430154

  16. Genome Mapping in Plant Comparative Genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaney, Lindsay; Sharp, Aaron R; Evans, Carrie R; Udall, Joshua A

    2016-09-01

    Genome mapping produces fingerprints of DNA sequences to construct a physical map of the whole genome. It provides contiguous, long-range information that complements and, in some cases, replaces sequencing data. Recent advances in genome-mapping technology will better allow researchers to detect large (>1kbp) structural variations between plant genomes. Some molecular and informatics complications need to be overcome for this novel technology to achieve its full utility. This technology will be useful for understanding phenotype responses due to DNA rearrangements and will yield insights into genome evolution, particularly in polyploids. In this review, we outline recent advances in genome-mapping technology, including the processes required for data collection and analysis, and applications in plant comparative genomics.

  17. A parthenogenesis gene of apomict origin elicits embryo formation from unfertilized eggs in a sexual plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, Joann A; Mookkan, Muruganantham; Huo, Heqiang; Chae, Keun; Ozias-Akins, Peggy

    2015-09-01

    Apomixis is a naturally occurring mode of asexual reproduction in flowering plants that results in seed formation without the involvement of meiosis or fertilization of the egg. Seeds formed on an apomictic plant contain offspring genetically identical to the maternal plant. Apomixis has significant potential for preserving hybrid vigor from one generation to the next in highly productive crop plant genotypes. Apomictic Pennisetum/Cenchrus species, members of the Poaceae (grass) family, reproduce by apospory. Apospory is characterized by apomeiosis, the formation of unreduced embryo sacs derived from nucellar cells of the ovary and, by parthenogenesis, the development of the unreduced egg into an embryo without fertilization. In Pennisetum squamulatum (L.) R.Br., apospory segregates as a single dominant locus, the apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR). In this study, we demonstrate that the PsASGR-BABY BOOM-like (PsASGR-BBML) gene is expressed in egg cells before fertilization and can induce parthenogenesis and the production of haploid offspring in transgenic sexual pearl millet. A reduction of PsASGR-BBML expression in apomictic F1 RNAi transgenic plants results in fewer visible parthenogenetic embryos and a reduction of embryo cell number compared with controls. Our results endorse a key role for PsASGR-BBML in parthenogenesis and a newly discovered role for a member of the BBM-like clade of APETALA 2 transcription factors. Induction of parthenogenesis by PsASGR-BBML will be valuable for installing parthenogenesis to synthesize apomixis in crops and will have further application for haploid induction to rapidly obtain homozygous lines for breeding. PMID:26305939

  18. Exploring Other Genomes: Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, Maura C.

    2001-01-01

    Points out the importance of genomes other than the human genome project and provides information on the identified bacterial genomes Pseudomonas aeuroginosa, Leprosy, Cholera, Meningitis, Tuberculosis, Bubonic Plague, and plant pathogens. Considers the computer's use in genome studies. (Contains 14 references.) (YDS)

  19. The UCSC Genome Browser database: 2015 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbloom, Kate R; Armstrong, Joel; Barber, Galt P; Casper, Jonathan; Clawson, Hiram; Diekhans, Mark; Dreszer, Timothy R; Fujita, Pauline A; Guruvadoo, Luvina; Haeussler, Maximilian; Harte, Rachel A; Heitner, Steve; Hickey, Glenn; Hinrichs, Angie S; Hubley, Robert; Karolchik, Donna; Learned, Katrina; Lee, Brian T; Li, Chin H; Miga, Karen H; Nguyen, Ngan; Paten, Benedict; Raney, Brian J; Smit, Arian F A; Speir, Matthew L; Zweig, Ann S; Haussler, David; Kuhn, Robert M; Kent, W James

    2015-01-01

    Launched in 2001 to showcase the draft human genome assembly, the UCSC Genome Browser database (http://genome.ucsc.edu) and associated tools continue to grow, providing a comprehensive resource of genome assemblies and annotations to scientists and students worldwide. Highlights of the past year include the release of a browser for the first new human genome reference assembly in 4 years in December 2013 (GRCh38, UCSC hg38), a watershed comparative genomics annotation (100-species multiple alignment and conservation) and a novel distribution mechanism for the browser (GBiB: Genome Browser in a Box). We created browsers for new species (Chinese hamster, elephant shark, minke whale), 'mined the web' for DNA sequences and expanded the browser display with stacked color graphs and region highlighting. As our user community increasingly adopts the UCSC track hub and assembly hub representations for sharing large-scale genomic annotation data sets and genome sequencing projects, our menu of public data hubs has tripled. PMID:25428374

  20. Characterization of genetic rearrangements in esophageal squamous carcinoma cell lines by a combination of M-FISH and array-CGH: further confirmation of some split genomic regions in primary tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromosomal and genomic aberrations are common features of human cancers. However, chromosomal numerical and structural aberrations, breakpoints and disrupted genes have yet to be identified in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Using multiplex-fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH) and oligo array-based comparative hybridization (array-CGH), we identified aberrations and breakpoints in six ESCC cell lines. Furthermore, we detected recurrent breakpoints in primary tumors by dual-color FISH. M-FISH and array-CGH results revealed complex numerical and structural aberrations. Frequent gains occurred at 3q26.33-qter, 5p14.1-p11, 7pter-p12.3, 8q24.13-q24.21, 9q31.1-qter, 11p13-p11, 11q11-q13.4, 17q23.3-qter, 18pter-p11, 19 and 20q13.32-qter. Losses were frequent at 18q21.1-qter. Breakpoints that clustered within 1 or 2 Mb were identified, including 9p21.3, 11q13.3-q13.4, 15q25.3 and 3q28. By dual-color FISH, we observed that several recurrent breakpoint regions in cell lines were also present in ESCC tumors. In particular, breakpoints clustered at 11q13.3-q13.4 were identified in 43.3% (58/134) of ESCC tumors. Both 11q13.3-q13.4 splitting and amplification were significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis (LNM) (P = 0.004 and 0.022) and advanced stages (P = 0.004 and 0.039). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that only 11q13.3-q13.4 splitting was an independent predictor for LNM (P = 0.026). The combination of M-FISH and array-CGH helps produce more accurate karyotypes. Our data provide significant, detailed information for appropriate uses of these ESCC cell lines for cytogenetic and molecular biological studies. The aberrations and breakpoints detected in both the cell lines and primary tumors will contribute to identify affected genes involved in the development and progression of ESCC

  1. The lincRNA HOTAIRM1, located in the HOXA genomic region, is expressed in acute myeloid leukemia, impacts prognosis in patients in the intermediate-risk cytogenetic category, and is associated with a distinctive microRNA signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Beyá, Marina; Brunet, Salut; Nomdedéu, Josep; Pratcorona, Marta; Cordeiro, Anna; Gallardo, David; Escoda, Lourdes; Tormo, Mar; Heras, Inmaculada; Ribera, Josep Maria; Duarte, Rafael; de Llano, María Paz Queipo; Bargay, Joan; Sampol, Antonia; Nomdedeu, Mertixell; Risueño, Ruth M.; Hoyos, Montserrat; Sierra, Jorge; Monzo, Mariano; Navarro, Alfons; Esteve, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are deregulated in several tumors, although their role in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is mostly unknown. We have examined the expression of the lncRNA HOX antisense intergenic RNA myeloid 1 (HOTAIRM1) in 241 AML patients. We have correlated HOTAIRM1 expression with a miRNA expression profile. We have also analyzed the prognostic value of HOTAIRM1 expression in 215 intermediate-risk AML (IR-AML) patients. The lowest expression level was observed in acute promyelocytic leukemia (P < 0.001) and the highest in t(6;9) AML (P = 0.005). In 215 IR-AML patients, high HOTAIRM1 expression was independently associated with shorter overall survival (OR:2.04;P = 0.001), shorter leukemia-free survival (OR:2.56; P < 0.001) and a higher cumulative incidence of relapse (OR:1.67; P = 0.046). Moreover, HOTAIRM1 maintained its independent prognostic value within the favorable molecular subgroup (OR: 3.43; P = 0.009). Interestingly, HOTAIRM1 was overexpressed in NPM1-mutated AML (P < 0.001) and within this group retained its prognostic value (OR: 2.21; P = 0.01). Moreover, HOTAIRM1 expression was associated with a specific 33- microRNA signature that included miR-196b (P < 0.001). miR-196b is located in the HOX genomic region and has previously been reported to have an independent prognostic value in AML. miR-196b and HOTAIRM1 in combination as a prognostic factor can classify patients as high-, intermediate-, or low-risk (5-year OS: 24% vs 42% vs 70%; P = 0.004). Determination of HOTAIRM1 level at diagnosis provided relevant prognostic information in IR-AML and allowed refinement of risk stratification based on common molecular markers. The prognostic information provided by HOTAIRM1 was strengthened when combined with miR-196b expression. Furthermore, HOTAIRM1 correlated with a 33-miRNA signature. PMID:26436590

  2. Long- and short-term selective forces on malaria parasite genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Sanne; Braunstein, Alexander; Malsen, Gareth;

    2010-01-01

    a significant impact on malaria control, the selective pressures within Plasmodium genomes are poorly understood, particularly in the non-protein-coding portion of the genome. We use evolutionary methods to describe selective processes in both the coding and non-coding regions of these genomes. Based on genome...

  3. GENOMIC MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Briceño Balcázar

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Until the twilight of the 20th century, genetics was a branch of medicine applied to diseases of rare occurrence. The advent of the human genome sequence and the possibility of studying it at affordable costs for patients and healthcare institutions, has permitted its application in high-priority diseases like cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and Alzheimer’s, among others.There is great potential in predictive and preventive medicine, through studying polymorphic genetic variants associated to risks for different diseases. Currently, clinical laboratories offer studies of over 30,000 variants associated with susceptibilities, to which individuals can access without much difficulty because a medical prescription is not required. These exams permit conducting a specific plan of preventive medicine. For example, upon the possibility of finding a deleterious mutation in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, the patient can prevent the breast cancer by mastectomy or chemoprophylaxis and in the presence of polymorphisms associated to cardiovascular risk preventive action may be undertaken through changes in life style (diet, exercise, etc..Legal aspects are also present in this new conception of medicine. For example, currently there is legislation for medications to indicate on their labels the different responses such medication can offer regarding the genetic variants of the patients, given that similar doses may provoke adverse reactions in an individual, while for another such dosage may be insufficient. This scenario would allow verifying the polymorphisms of drug response prior to administering medications like anticoagulants, hyperlipidemia treatments, or chemotherapy, among others.We must specially mention recessive diseases, produced by the presence of two alleles of a mutated gene, which are inherited from the mother, as well as the father. By studying the mutations, we may learn if a couple is at risk of bearing children with the disease

  4. Genomic Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Briceño Balcázar

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Until the twilight of the 20th century, genetics was a branch of medicine applied to diseases of rare occurrence.  The advent of the human genome sequence and the possibility of studying it at affordable costs for patients and healthcare institutions, has permitted its application in high-priority diseases like cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and Alzheimer’s, among others. There is great potential in predictive and preventive medicine, through studying polymorphic genetic variants associated to risks for different diseases. Currently, clinical laboratories offer studies of over 30,000 variants associated with susceptibilities, to which individuals can access without much difficulty because a medical prescription is not required. These exams permit conducting a specific plan of preventive medicine.  For example, upon the possibility of finding a deleterious mutation in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, the patient can prevent the breast cancer by mastectomy or chemoprophylaxis and in the presence of polymorphisms associated to cardiovascular risk preventive action may be undertaken through changes in life style (diet, exercise, etc.. Legal aspects are also present in this new conception of medicine.  For example, currently there is legislation for medications to indicate on their labels the different responses such medication can offer regarding the genetic variants of the patients, given that similar doses may provoke adverse reactions in an individual, while for another such dosage may be insufficient. This scenario would allow verifying the polymorphisms of drug response prior to administering medications like anticoagulants, hyperlipidemia treatments, or chemotherapy, among others. We must specially mention recessive diseases, produced by the presence of two alleles of a mutated gene, which are inherited from the mother, as well as the father. By studying the mutations, we may learn if a couple is at risk of bearing children with the

  5. Genomes and evolutionary genomics of animals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luting SONG; Wen WANG

    2013-01-01

    Alongside recent advances and booming applications of DNA sequencing technologies,a great number of complete genome sequences for animal species are available to researchers.Hundreds of animals have been involved in whole genome sequencing,and at least 87 non-human animal species' complete or draft genome sequences have been published since 1998.Based on these technological advances and the subsequent accumulation of large quantity of genomic data,evolutionary genomics has become one of the most rapidly advancing disciplines in biology.Scientists now can perform a number of comparative and evolutionary genomic studies for animals,to identify conserved genes or other functional elements among species,genomic elements that confer animals their own specific characteristics and new phenotypes for adaptation.This review deals with the current genomic and evolutionary research on non-human animals,and displays a comprehensive landscape of genomes and the evolutionary genomics of non-human animals.It is very helpful to a better understanding of the biology and evolution of the myriad forms within the animal kingdom [Current Zoology 59 (1):87-98,2013].

  6. Genome Maps, a new generation genome browser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Ignacio; Salavert, Francisco; Sanchez, Rubén; de Maria, Alejandro; Alonso, Roberto; Escobar, Pablo; Bleda, Marta; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2013-01-01

    Genome browsers have gained importance as more genomes and related genomic information become available. However, the increase of information brought about by new generation sequencing technologies is, at the same time, causing a subtle but continuous decrease in the efficiency of conventional genome browsers. Here, we present Genome Maps, a genome browser that implements an innovative model of data transfer and management. The program uses highly efficient technologies from the new HTML5 standard, such as scalable vector graphics, that optimize workloads at both server and client sides and ensure future scalability. Thus, data management and representation are entirely carried out by the browser, without the need of any Java Applet, Flash or other plug-in technology installation. Relevant biological data on genes, transcripts, exons, regulatory features, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, karyotype and so forth, are imported from web services and are available as tracks. In addition, several DAS servers are already included in Genome Maps. As a novelty, this web-based genome browser allows the local upload of huge genomic data files (e.g. VCF or BAM) that can be dynamically visualized in real time at the client side, thus facilitating the management of medical data affected by privacy restrictions. Finally, Genome Maps can easily be integrated in any web application by including only a few lines of code. Genome Maps is an open source collaborative initiative available in the GitHub repository (https://github.com/compbio-bigdata-viz/genome-maps). Genome Maps is available at: http://www.genomemaps.org. PMID:23748955

  7. Genome Maps, a new generation genome browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Ignacio; Salavert, Francisco; Sanchez, Rubén; de Maria, Alejandro; Alonso, Roberto; Escobar, Pablo; Bleda, Marta; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2013-07-01

    Genome browsers have gained importance as more genomes and related genomic information become available. However, the increase of information brought about by new generation sequencing technologies is, at the same time, causing a subtle but continuous decrease in the efficiency of conventional genome browsers. Here, we present Genome Maps, a genome browser that implements an innovative model of data transfer and management. The program uses highly efficient technologies from the new HTML5 standard, such as scalable vector graphics, that optimize workloads at both server and client sides and ensure future scalability. Thus, data management and representation are entirely carried out by the browser, without the need of any Java Applet, Flash or other plug-in technology installation. Relevant biological data on genes, transcripts, exons, regulatory features, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, karyotype and so forth, are imported from web services and are available as tracks. In addition, several DAS servers are already included in Genome Maps. As a novelty, this web-based genome browser allows the local upload of huge genomic data files (e.g. VCF or BAM) that can be dynamically visualized in real time at the client side, thus facilitating the management of medical data affected by privacy restrictions. Finally, Genome Maps can easily be integrated in any web application by including only a few lines of code. Genome Maps is an open source collaborative initiative available in the GitHub repository (https://github.com/compbio-bigdata-viz/genome-maps). Genome Maps is available at: http://www.genomemaps.org. PMID:23748955

  8. Genome Maps, a new generation genome browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Ignacio; Salavert, Francisco; Sanchez, Rubén; de Maria, Alejandro; Alonso, Roberto; Escobar, Pablo; Bleda, Marta; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2013-07-01

    Genome browsers have gained importance as more genomes and related genomic information become available. However, the increase of information brought about by new generation sequencing technologies is, at the same time, causing a subtle but continuous decrease in the efficiency of conventional genome browsers. Here, we present Genome Maps, a genome browser that implements an innovative model of data transfer and management. The program uses highly efficient technologies from the new HTML5 standard, such as scalable vector graphics, that optimize workloads at both server and client sides and ensure future scalability. Thus, data management and representation are entirely carried out by the browser, without the need of any Java Applet, Flash or other plug-in technology installation. Relevant biological data on genes, transcripts, exons, regulatory features, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, karyotype and so forth, are imported from web services and are available as tracks. In addition, several DAS servers are already included in Genome Maps. As a novelty, this web-based genome browser allows the local upload of huge genomic data files (e.g. VCF or BAM) that can be dynamically visualized in real time at the client side, thus facilitating the management of medical data affected by privacy restrictions. Finally, Genome Maps can easily be integrated in any web application by including only a few lines of code. Genome Maps is an open source collaborative initiative available in the GitHub repository (https://github.com/compbio-bigdata-viz/genome-maps). Genome Maps is available at: http://www.genomemaps.org.

  9. Rapid detection of structural variation in a human genome using nanochannel-based genome mapping technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Hongzhi; Hastie, Alex R.; Cao, Dandan;

    2014-01-01

    mutations; however, none of the current detection methods are comprehensive, and currently available methodologies are incapable of providing sufficient resolution and unambiguous information across complex regions in the human genome. To address these challenges, we applied a high-throughput, cost...... fosmid data. Of the remaining 270 SVs, 260 are insertions and 213 overlap known SVs in the Database of Genomic Variants. Overall, 609 out of 666 (90%) variants were supported by experimental orthogonal methods or historical evidence in public databases. At the same time, genome mapping also provides...... mapping technology as a comprehensive and cost-effective method for detecting structural variation and studying complex regions in the human genome, as well as deciphering viral integration into the host genome....

  10. Genomic alterations detected by comparative genomic hybridization in ovarian endometriomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.C. Veiga-Castelli

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Endometriosis is a complex and multifactorial disease. Chromosomal imbalance screening in endometriotic tissue can be used to detect hot-spot regions in the search for a possible genetic marker for endometriosis. The objective of the present study was to detect chromosomal imbalances by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH in ectopic tissue samples from ovarian endometriomas and eutopic tissue from the same patients. We evaluated 10 ovarian endometriotic tissues and 10 eutopic endometrial tissues by metaphase CGH. CGH was prepared with normal and test DNA enzymatically digested, ligated to adaptors and amplified by PCR. A second PCR was performed for DNA labeling. Equal amounts of both normal and test-labeled DNA were hybridized in human normal metaphases. The Isis FISH Imaging System V 5.0 software was used for chromosome analysis. In both eutopic and ectopic groups, 4/10 samples presented chromosomal alterations, mainly chromosomal gains. CGH identified 11q12.3-q13.1, 17p11.1-p12, 17q25.3-qter, and 19p as critical regions. Genomic imbalances in 11q, 17p, 17q, and 19p were detected in normal eutopic and/or ectopic endometrium from women with ovarian endometriosis. These regions contain genes such as POLR2G, MXRA7 and UBA52 involved in biological processes that may lead to the establishment and maintenance of endometriotic implants. This genomic imbalance may affect genes in which dysregulation impacts both eutopic and ectopic endometrium.

  11. Building the sequence map of the human pan-genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ruiqiang; Li, Yingrui; Zheng, Hancheng;

    2010-01-01

    Here we integrate the de novo assembly of an Asian and an African genome with the NCBI reference human genome, as a step toward constructing the human pan-genome. We identified approximately 5 Mb of novel sequences not present in the reference genome in each of these assemblies. Most novel...... analysis of predicted genes indicated that the novel sequences contain potentially functional coding regions. We estimate that a complete human pan-genome would contain approximately 19-40 Mb of novel sequence not present in the extant reference genome. The extensive amount of novel sequence contributing...... to the genetic variation of the pan-genome indicates the importance of using complete genome sequencing and de novo assembly....

  12. A computational approach for identifying pathogenicity islands in prokaryotic genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh Tae Kwang

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pathogenicity islands (PAIs, distinct genomic segments of pathogens encoding virulence factors, represent a subgroup of genomic islands (GIs that have been acquired by horizontal gene transfer event. Up to now, computational approaches for identifying PAIs have been focused on the detection of genomic regions which only differ from the rest of the genome in their base composition and codon usage. These approaches often lead to the identification of genomic islands, rather than PAIs. Results We present a computational method for detecting potential PAIs in complete prokaryotic genomes by combining sequence similarities and abnormalities in genomic composition. We first collected 207 GenBank accessions containing either part or all of the reported PAI loci. In sequenced genomes, strips of PAI-homologs were defined based on the proximity of the homologs of genes in the same PAI accession. An algorithm reminiscent of sequence-assembly procedure was then devised to merge overlapping or adjacent genomic strips into a large genomic region. Among the defined genomic regions, PAI-like regions were identified by the presence of homolog(s of virulence genes. Also, GIs were postulated by calculating G+C content anomalies and codon usage bias. Of 148 prokaryotic genomes examined, 23 pathogenic and 6 non-pathogenic bacteria contained 77 candidate PAIs that partly or entirely overlap GIs. Conclusion Supporting the validity of our method, included in the list of candidate PAIs were thirty four PAIs previously identified from genome sequencing papers. Furthermore, in some instances, our method was able to detect entire PAIs for those only partial sequences are available. Our method was proven to be an efficient method for demarcating the potential PAIs in our study. Also, the function(s and origin(s of a candidate PAI can be inferred by investigating the PAI queries comprising it. Identification and analysis of potential PAIs in prokaryotic

  13. Identification of probable genomic packaging signal sequence from SARS—CoV genome by bioinformatics analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QINLei; XIONGBin; LUOCheng; GUOZong-Ming; HAOPei; SUJiong; NANPeng; FENGYing; SHIYi-Xiang; YUXiao-Jing; LUOXiao-Min; CHENKai-Xian; SHENXu; SHENJian-Hua; ZOUJian-Ping; ZHAOGuo-Ping; SHITie-Liu; HEWei-Zhong; ZHONGYang; JIANGHua-Liang; LIYi-Xue

    2003-01-01

    AIM:To predict the probable genomic packaging signal of SARS-CoV by bioinformatics analysis. The derived packaging signal may be used to design antisense RNA and RNA interfere (RANi) drugs treating SARS. methods: Based on the studies about the genomic packaging signals of MHV and BCoV, especially the information about primary and secondary structures, the putative genomic packaging signal of SARS_CoV were analyzed by using bioinformatic tools. Multi-alignment for the genomic sequences was performed among SARS-CoV,MHV,BCoV, PEDV and HCoV 229E. Secondary structures of RNA sequences were also predicted for the identification fo the possible genomic packaging signals. Meanwhile, the N and M proteins of all five viruses were analyzed to study the evolutionary relationship with genomic packaging signals. RESULTS: The putative genomic packaging signal of SARS-CoV locates at the 3′ end of ORF1b near that of MHV and BCoV, where is the most variable region of this gene. The RNA secondary structure of SARS-CoV genomic packaging signal is very similar to that of MHV and BCoV. The same result was also obtained in studying the genomic packaging signals of PEDV and HCoV 229E. Further more, the genomic sequence multi-alignment indicated that the locations of packaging signals of SARS-CoV, PEDV, and HCoV overlaped each other. It seems that the mutation rate of packaging signal sequences is much higher than the N protein, while only subtle variations for the M protein. CONCLUSIONS: The probable genomic packaging signal of SARS-CoV is analogous to that of MHV and BCoV, with the corresponding secondary RNA structure locating at the similar region of ORF1b. The positions where genomic packaging signals exist have suffered rounds of mutations, which may influence the primary structures of the N and M proteins consequently.

  14. PSAT: A web tool to compare genomic neighborhoods of multiple prokaryotic genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasnick Michael

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The conservation of gene order among prokaryotic genomes can provide valuable insight into gene function, protein interactions, or events by which genomes have evolved. Although some tools are available for visualizing and comparing the order of genes between genomes of study, few support an efficient and organized analysis between large numbers of genomes. The Prokaryotic Sequence homology Analysis Tool (PSAT is a web tool for comparing gene neighborhoods among multiple prokaryotic genomes. Results PSAT utilizes a database that is preloaded with gene annotation, BLAST hit results, and gene-clustering scores designed to help identify regions of conserved gene order. Researchers use the PSAT web interface to find a gene of interest in a reference genome and efficiently retrieve the sequence homologs found in other bacterial genomes. The tool generates a graphic of the genomic neighborhood surrounding the selected gene and the corresponding regions for its homologs in each comparison genome. Homologs in each region are color coded to assist users with analyzing gene order among various genomes. In contrast to common comparative analysis methods that filter sequence homolog data based on alignment score cutoffs, PSAT leverages gene context information for homologs, including those with weak alignment scores, enabling a more sensitive analysis. Features for constraining or ordering results are designed to help researchers browse results from large numbers of comparison genomes in an organized manner. PSAT has been demonstrated to be useful for helping to identify gene orthologs and potential functional gene clusters, and detecting genome modifications that may result in loss of function. Conclusion PSAT allows researchers to investigate the order of genes within local genomic neighborhoods of multiple genomes. A PSAT web server for public use is available for performing analyses on a growing set of reference genomes through any

  15. Competition between influenza A virus genome segments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivy Widjaja

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV contains a segmented negative-strand RNA genome. How IAV balances the replication and transcription of its multiple genome segments is not understood. We developed a dual competition assay based on the co-transfection of firefly or Gaussia luciferase-encoding genome segments together with plasmids encoding IAV polymerase subunits and nucleoprotein. At limiting amounts of polymerase subunits, expression of the firefly luciferase segment was negatively affected by the presence of its Gaussia luciferase counterpart, indicative of competition between reporter genome segments. This competition could be relieved by increasing or decreasing the relative amounts of firefly or Gaussia reporter segment, respectively. The balance between the luciferase expression levels was also affected by the identity of the untranslated regions (UTRs as well as segment length. In general it appeared that genome segments displaying inherent higher expression levels were more efficient competitors of another segment. When natural genome segments were tested for their ability to suppress reporter gene expression, shorter genome segments generally reduced firefly luciferase expression to a larger extent, with the M and NS segments having the largest effect. The balance between different reporter segments was most dramatically affected by the introduction of UTR panhandle-stabilizing mutations. Furthermore, only reporter genome segments carrying these mutations were able to efficiently compete with the natural genome segments in infected cells. Our data indicate that IAV genome segments compete for available polymerases. Competition is affected by segment length, coding region, and UTRs. This competition is probably most apparent early during infection, when limiting amounts of polymerases are present, and may contribute to the regulation of segment-specific replication and transcription.

  16. The South Asian genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C Chambers

    Full Text Available The genetic sequence variation of people from the Indian subcontinent who comprise one-quarter of the world's population, is not well described. We carried out whole genome sequencing of 168 South Asians, along with whole-exome sequencing of 147 South Asians to provide deeper characterisation of coding regions. We identify 12,962,155 autosomal sequence variants, including 2,946,861 new SNPs and 312,738 novel indels. This catalogue of SNPs and indels amongst South Asians provides the first comprehensive map of genetic variation in this major human population, and reveals evidence for selective pressures on genes involved in skin biology, metabolism, infection and immunity. Our results will accelerate the search for the genetic variants underlying susceptibility to disorders such as type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease which are highly prevalent amongst South Asians.

  17. Genomic Encyclopedia of Fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-08-10

    Genomes of fungi relevant to energy and environment are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts), and explores fungal diversity by means of genome sequencing and analysis. Over 150 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such parts suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here.

  18. JGI Fungal Genomics Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2011-03-14

    Genomes of energy and environment fungi are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts), and explores fungal diversity by means of genome sequencing and analysis. Over 50 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such 'parts' suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here

  19. Genome structure of cottontail rabbit herpesvirus.

    OpenAIRE

    Cebrian, J; Berthelot, N; Laithier, M

    1989-01-01

    The genome structure of a herpesvirus isolated from primary cultures of kidney cells from the cottontail rabbit Sylvilagus floridanus was elucidated by using electron microscopy and restriction enzyme analysis. The genome, which was about 150 kilobase pairs long and which had an average G + C composition of 45%, consisted of two regions with unique base sequences (54 and 47 kilobase pairs) enclosed by reiterations of a 925-base-pair sequence with a variable copy number. The internal repeats w...

  20. Multiple Whole Genome Alignments Without a Reference Organism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubchak, Inna; Poliakov, Alexander; Kislyuk, Andrey; Brudno, Michael

    2009-01-16

    Multiple sequence alignments have become one of the most commonly used resources in genomics research. Most algorithms for multiple alignment of whole genomes rely either on a reference genome, against which all of the other sequences are laid out, or require a one-to-one mapping between the nucleotides of the genomes, preventing the alignment of recently duplicated regions. Both approaches have drawbacks for whole-genome comparisons. In this paper we present a novel symmetric alignment algorithm. The resulting alignments not only represent all of the genomes equally well, but also include all relevant duplications that occurred since the divergence from the last common ancestor. Our algorithm, implemented as a part of the VISTA Genome Pipeline (VGP), was used to align seven vertebrate and sixDrosophila genomes. The resulting whole-genome alignments demonstrate a higher sensitivity and specificity than the pairwise alignments previously available through the VGP and have higher exon alignment accuracy than comparable public whole-genome alignments. Of the multiple alignment methods tested, ours performed the best at aligning genes from multigene families?perhaps the most challenging test for whole-genome alignments. Our whole-genome multiple alignments are available through the VISTA Browser at http://genome.lbl.gov/vista/index.shtml.

  1. Fungal biology: compiling genomes and exploiting them

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labbe, Jessy L [ORNL; Uehling, Jessie K [ORNL; Payen, Thibaut [INRA; Plett, Jonathan [University of Western Sydney, Australia

    2014-01-01

    The last 10 years have seen the cost of sequencing complete genomes decrease at an incredible speed. This has led to an increase in the number of genomes sequenced in all the fungal tree of life as well as a wide variety of plant genomes. The increase in sequencing has permitted us to study the evolution of organisms on a genomic scale. A number of talks during the conference discussed the importance of transposable elements (TEs) that are present in almost all species of fungi. These TEs represent an especially large percentage of genomic space in fungi that interact with plants. Thierry Rouxel (INRA, Nancy, France) showed the link between speciation in the Leptosphaeria complex and the expansion of TE families. For example in the Leptosphaeria complex, one species associated with oilseed rape has experienced a recent and massive burst of movement by a few TE families. The alterations caused by these TEs took place in discrete regions of the genome leading to shuffling of the genomic landscape and the appearance of genes specific to the species, such as effectors useful for the interactions with a particular plant (Rouxel et al., 2011). Other presentations showed the importance of TEs in affecting genome organization. For example, in Amanita different species appear to have been invaded by different TE families (Veneault-Fourrey & Martin, 2011).

  2. Burkholderia pseudomallei genome plasticity associated with genomic island variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Currie Bart J

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei is a soil-dwelling saprophyte and the cause of melioidosis. Horizontal gene transfer contributes to the genetic diversity of this pathogen and may be an important determinant of virulence potential. The genome contains genomic island (GI regions that encode a broad array of functions. Although there is some evidence for the variable distribution of genomic islands in B. pseudomallei isolates, little is known about the extent of variation between related strains or their association with disease or environmental survival. Results Five islands from B. pseudomallei strain K96243 were chosen as representatives of different types of genomic islands present in this strain, and their presence investigated in other B. pseudomallei. In silico analysis of 10 B. pseudomallei genome sequences provided evidence for the variable presence of these regions, together with micro-evolutionary changes that generate GI diversity. The diversity of GIs in 186 isolates from NE Thailand (83 environmental and 103 clinical isolates was investigated using multiplex PCR screening. The proportion of all isolates positive by PCR ranged from 12% for a prophage-like island (GI 9, to 76% for a metabolic island (GI 16. The presence of each of the five GIs did not differ between environmental and disease-associated isolates (p > 0.05 for all five islands. The cumulative number of GIs per isolate for the 186 isolates ranged from 0 to 5 (median 2, IQR 1 to 3. The distribution of cumulative GI number did not differ between environmental and disease-associated isolates (p = 0.27. The presence of GIs was defined for the three largest clones in this collection (each defined as a single sequence type, ST, by multilocus sequence typing; these were ST 70 (n = 15 isolates, ST 54 (n = 11, and ST 167 (n = 9. The rapid loss and/or acquisition of gene islands was observed within individual clones. Comparisons were drawn between isolates obtained

  3. Genome-wide comparative analysis of the Brassica rapa gene space reveals genome shrinkage and differential loss of duplicated genes after whole genome triplication

    OpenAIRE

    Mun, Jeong-Hwan; Kwon, Soo-Jin; Yang, Tae-Jin; Seol, Young-Joo; Jin, Mina; Kim, Jin-A; Lim, Myung-Ho; Kim, Jung Sun; Baek, Seunghoon; Choi, Beom-Soon; Yu, Hee-Ju; Kim, Dae-Soo; Kim, Namshin; Lim, Ki-Byung; Lee, Soo-In

    2009-01-01

    Background Brassica rapa is one of the most economically important vegetable crops worldwide. Owing to its agronomic importance and phylogenetic position, B. rapa provides a crucial reference to understand polyploidy-related crop genome evolution. The high degree of sequence identity and remarkably conserved genome structure between Arabidopsis and Brassica genomes enables comparative tiling sequencing using Arabidopsis sequences as references to select the counterpart regions in B. rapa, whi...

  4. Genome-wide effects of long-term divergent selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M Johansson

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available To understand the genetic mechanisms leading to phenotypic differentiation, it is important to identify genomic regions under selection. We scanned the genome of two chicken lines from a single trait selection experiment, where 50 generations of selection have resulted in a 9-fold difference in body weight. Analyses of nearly 60,000 SNP markers showed that the effects of selection on the genome are dramatic. The lines were fixed for alternative alleles in more than 50 regions as a result of selection. Another 10 regions displayed strong evidence for ongoing differentiation during the last 10 generations. Many more regions across the genome showed large differences in allele frequency between the lines, indicating that the phenotypic evolution in the lines in 50 generations is the result of an exploitation of standing genetic variation at 100s of loci across the genome.

  5. Genomic Data Commons | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI’s Center for Cancer Genomics launches the Genomic Data Commons (GDC), a unified data sharing platform for the cancer research community. The mission of the GDC is to enable data sharing across the entire cancer research community, to ultimately support precision medicine in oncology.

  6. Phytophthora genomics: the plant destroyers' genome decoded

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Govers, F.; Gijzen, M.

    2006-01-01

    The year 2004 was an exciting one for the Phytophthora research community. The United States Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) completed the draft genome sequence of two Phytophthora species, Phytophthora sojae and Phytophthora ramorum. In August of that year over 50 people gathered

  7. Comparative Genome Analysis and Genome Evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snel, Berend

    2003-01-01

    This thesis described a collection of bioinformatic analyses on complete genome sequence data. We have studied the evolution of gene content and find that vertical inheritance dominates over horizontal gene trasnfer, even to the extent that we can use the gene content to make genome phylogenies. Usi

  8. Genome sequence surveys of Brachiola algerae and Edhazardia aedis reveal microsporidia with low gene densities

    OpenAIRE

    Fast Naomi M; Weiss Louis M; Becnel James J; Lee Renny CH; Williams Bryony AP; Keeling Patrick J

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Microsporidia are well known models of extreme nuclear genome reduction and compaction. The smallest microsporidian genomes have received the most attention, but genomes of different species range in size from 2.3 Mb to 19.5 Mb and the nature of the larger genomes remains unknown. Results Here we have undertaken genome sequence surveys of two diverse microsporidia, Brachiola algerae and Edhazardia aedis. In both species we find very large intergenic regions, many transposa...

  9. Genomes Behave as Social Entities: Alien Chromatin Minorities Evolve Through Specificities Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hybridization and chromosome doubling entailed by allopolyploidization requires genetic and epigenetic modifications, resulting in the adjustment of different genomes to the same nuclear environment. Recently, the main role of retrotransposon/microsatellite-rich regions of the genome in DNA sequenc...

  10. Genomic Data Commons launches

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Genomic Data Commons (GDC), a unified data system that promotes sharing of genomic and clinical data between researchers, launched today with a visit from Vice President Joe Biden to the operations center at the University of Chicago.

  11. Rat Genome Database (RGD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Rat Genome Database (RGD) is a collaborative effort between leading research institutions involved in rat genetic and genomic research to collect, consolidate,...

  12. Genomics of Sorghum

    OpenAIRE

    Paterson, Andrew H.

    2008-01-01

    Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) is a subject of plant genomics research based on its importance as one of the world's leading cereal crops, a biofuels crop of high and growing importance, a progenitor of one of the world's most noxious weeds, and a botanical model for many tropical grasses with complex genomes. A rich history of genome analysis, culminating in the recent complete sequencing of the genome of a leading inbred, provides a foundation for invigorating progress toward relatin...

  13. Exploiting the genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, S. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Cornwall, J. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Dyson, F. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Koonin, S. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Lewis, N. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Schwitters, R. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office

    1998-09-11

    In 1997, JASON conducted a DOE-sponsored study of the human genome project with special emphasis on the areas of technology, quality assurance and quality control, and informatics. The present study has two aims: first, to update the 1997 Report in light of recent developments in genome sequencing technology, and second, to consider possible roles for the DOE in the ''post-genomic" era, following acquisition of the complete human genome sequence.

  14. Small RNA in rice genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王凯; 朱小蓬; 钟兰; 陈润生

    2002-01-01

    Rice has many characteristics of a model plant. The recent completion of the draft of the rice genome represents an important advance in our knowledge of plant biology and also has an important contribution to the understanding of general genomic evolution. Besides the rice genome finishing map, the next urgent step for rice researchers is to annotate the genes and noncoding functional sequences. The recent work shows that noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) play significant roles in biological systems. We have explored all the known small RNAs (a kind of ncRNA) within rice genome and other six species sequences, including Arabidopsis, maize, yeast, worm, mouse and pig. As a result we find 160 out of 552 small RNAs (sRNAs) in database have homologs in 108 rice scaffolds, and almost all of them (99.41%) locate in intron regions of rice by gene predication. 19 sRNAs only appear in rice. More importantly, we find two special U14 sRNAs: one is located in a set of sRNA ZMU14SNR9(s) which only appears in three plants, 86% sequences of them can be compared as the same sequence in rice, Arabidopsis and maize; the other conserved sRNA XLHS7CU14 has a segment which appears in almost all these species from plants to animals. All these results indicate that sRNA do not have evident borderline between plants and animals.

  15. Localized hypermutation and associated gene losses in legume chloroplast genomes

    OpenAIRE

    KAVANAGH, THOMAS; WOLFE, KENNETH; POWELL, ANTOINETTE

    2010-01-01

    PUBLISHED Point mutations result from errors made during DNA replication or repair, so they are usually expected to be homogeneous across all regions of a genome. However, we have found a region of chloroplast DNA in plants related to sweetpea (Lathyrus) whose local point mutation rate is at least 20 times higher than elsewhere in the same molecule. There are very few precedents for such heterogeneity in any genome, and we suspect that the hypermutable region may be subject to an unusual p...

  16. Dissection of the octoploid strawberry genome by deep sequencing of the genomes of Fragaria species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakawa, Hideki; Shirasawa, Kenta; Kosugi, Shunichi; Tashiro, Kosuke; Nakayama, Shinobu; Yamada, Manabu; Kohara, Mistuyo; Watanabe, Akiko; Kishida, Yoshie; Fujishiro, Tsunakazu; Tsuruoka, Hisano; Minami, Chiharu; Sasamoto, Shigemi; Kato, Midori; Nanri, Keiko; Komaki, Akiko; Yanagi, Tomohiro; Guoxin, Qin; Maeda, Fumi; Ishikawa, Masami; Kuhara, Satoru; Sato, Shusei; Tabata, Satoshi; Isobe, Sachiko N

    2014-01-01

    Cultivated strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa) is octoploid and shows allogamous behaviour. The present study aims at dissecting this octoploid genome through comparison with its wild relatives, F. iinumae, F. nipponica, F. nubicola, and F. orientalis by de novo whole-genome sequencing on an Illumina and Roche 454 platforms. The total length of the assembled Illumina genome sequences obtained was 698 Mb for F. x ananassa, and ∼200 Mb each for the four wild species. Subsequently, a virtual reference genome termed FANhybrid_r1.2 was constructed by integrating the sequences of the four homoeologous subgenomes of F. x ananassa, from which heterozygous regions in the Roche 454 and Illumina genome sequences were eliminated. The total length of FANhybrid_r1.2 thus created was 173.2 Mb with the N50 length of 5137 bp. The Illumina-assembled genome sequences of F. x ananassa and the four wild species were then mapped onto the reference genome, along with the previously published F. vesca genome sequence to establish the subgenomic structure of F. x ananassa. The strategy adopted in this study has turned out to be successful in dissecting the genome of octoploid F. x ananassa and appears promising when applied to the analysis of other polyploid plant species. PMID:24282021

  17. Whole Genome Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whole genome selection (WGS) is an approach to using DNA markers that are distributed throughout the entire genome. Genes affecting most economically-important traits are distributed throughout the genome and there are relatively few that have large effects with many more genes with progressively sm...

  18. Chicken's Genome Decoded

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ After completing the work on mapping chicken genome sequence and chicken genome variation in early March, 2004, two international research consortiums have made significant progress in reading the maps, shedding new light on the studies into the first bird as well as the first agricultural animal that has its genome sequenced and analyzed in the world.

  19. Public Health Genomics

    OpenAIRE

    Lavinha, João

    2012-01-01

    Professional genomic and molecular medicine and consumer genetics. The health field concept and the public health wheel. The enterprise of Public Health Genomics (PHGEN). Genetic exceptionalism. Ethical benchmarks. Introduction and use of genome-based knowledge in the health services. Stakeholder involvement.

  20. Ebolavirus comparative genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jun, Se-Ran; Leuze, Michael R.; Nookaew, Intawat;

    2015-01-01

    The 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa is the largest documented for this virus. To examine the dynamics of this genome, we compare more than 100 currently available ebolavirus genomes to each other and to other viral genomes. Based on oligomer frequency analysis, the family Filoviridae forms...

  1. HLA diversity in the 1000 genomes dataset.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Antoine Gourraud

    Full Text Available The 1000 Genomes Project aims to provide a deep characterization of human genome sequence variation by sequencing at a level that should allow the genome-wide detection of most variants with frequencies as low as 1%. However, in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC, only the top 10 most frequent haplotypes are in the 1% frequency range whereas thousands of haplotypes are present at lower frequencies. Given the limitation of both the coverage and the read length of the sequences generated by the 1000 Genomes Project, the highly variable positions that define HLA alleles may be difficult to identify. We used classical Sanger sequencing techniques to type the HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 genes in the available 1000 Genomes samples and combined the results with the 103,310 variants in the MHC region genotyped by the 1000 Genomes Project. Using pairwise identity-by-descent distances between individuals and principal component analysis, we established the relationship between ancestry and genetic diversity in the MHC region. As expected, both the MHC variants and the HLA phenotype can identify the major ancestry lineage, informed mainly by the most frequent HLA haplotypes. To some extent, regions of the genome with similar genetic or similar recombination rate have similar properties. An MHC-centric analysis underlines departures between the ancestral background of the MHC and the genome-wide picture. Our analysis of linkage disequilibrium (LD decay in these samples suggests that overestimation of pairwise LD occurs due to a limited sampling of the MHC diversity. This collection of HLA-specific MHC variants, available on the dbMHC portal, is a valuable resource for future analyses of the role of MHC in population and disease studies.

  2. Complete mitochondrial genome of the gray mouse lemur, Microcebus murinus (Primates, Cheirogaleidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecompte, Emilie; Crouau-Roy, Brigitte; Aujard, Fabienne; Holota, Hélène; Murienne, Jérôme

    2016-09-01

    We report the high-coverage complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the gray mouse lemur Microcebus murinus. The sequencing has been performed on an Illumina Hiseq 2500 platform, with a genome skimming strategy. The total length of this mitogenome is 16 963 bp, containing 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and 1 non-coding region (D-loop region). The genome organization, nucleotide composition and codon usage are similar to those reported from other primate's mitochondrial genomes. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence reported here will be useful for comparative genomics studies in primates.

  3. Complete mitochondrial genome of the gray mouse lemur, Microcebus murinus (Primates, Cheirogaleidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecompte, Emilie; Crouau-Roy, Brigitte; Aujard, Fabienne; Holota, Hélène; Murienne, Jérôme

    2016-09-01

    We report the high-coverage complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the gray mouse lemur Microcebus murinus. The sequencing has been performed on an Illumina Hiseq 2500 platform, with a genome skimming strategy. The total length of this mitogenome is 16 963 bp, containing 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and 1 non-coding region (D-loop region). The genome organization, nucleotide composition and codon usage are similar to those reported from other primate's mitochondrial genomes. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence reported here will be useful for comparative genomics studies in primates. PMID:27158869

  4. Genomic treasure troves: complete genome sequencing of herbarium and insect museum specimens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martijn Staats

    Full Text Available Unlocking the vast genomic diversity stored in natural history collections would create unprecedented opportunities for genome-scale evolutionary, phylogenetic, domestication and population genomic studies. Many researchers have been discouraged from using historical specimens in molecular studies because of both generally limited success of DNA extraction and the challenges associated with PCR-amplifying highly degraded DNA. In today's next-generation sequencing (NGS world, opportunities and prospects for historical DNA have changed dramatically, as most NGS methods are actually designed for taking short fragmented DNA molecules as templates. Here we show that using a standard multiplex and paired-end Illumina sequencing approach, genome-scale sequence data can be generated reliably from dry-preserved plant, fungal and insect specimens collected up to 115 years ago, and with minimal destructive sampling. Using a reference-based assembly approach, we were able to produce the entire nuclear genome of a 43-year-old Arabidopsis thaliana (Brassicaceae herbarium specimen with high and uniform sequence coverage. Nuclear genome sequences of three fungal specimens of 22-82 years of age (Agaricus bisporus, Laccaria bicolor, Pleurotus ostreatus were generated with 81.4-97.9% exome coverage. Complete organellar genome sequences were assembled for all specimens. Using de novo assembly we retrieved between 16.2-71.0% of coding sequence regions, and hence remain somewhat cautious about prospects for de novo genome assembly from historical specimens. Non-target sequence contaminations were observed in 2 of our insect museum specimens. We anticipate that future museum genomics projects will perhaps not generate entire genome sequences in all cases (our specimens contained relatively small and low-complexity genomes, but at least generating vital comparative genomic data for testing (phylogenetic, demographic and genetic hypotheses, that become increasingly more

  5. A genomic island linked to ecotype divergence in Atlantic cod

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Hemmer; Eg Nielsen, Einar; Therkildsen, Nina O.;

    2013-01-01

    gene flow and large effective population sizes, properties which theoretically could restrict divergence in local genomic regions. We identify a genomic region of strong population differentiation, extending over approximately 20 cM, between pairs of migratory and stationary ecotypes examined at two......The genomic architecture underlying ecological divergence and ecological speciation with gene flow is still largely unknown for most organisms. One central question is whether divergence is genome‐wide or localized in ‘genomic mosaics’ during early stages when gene flow is still pronounced....... Empirical work has so far been limited, and the relative impacts of gene flow and natural selection on genomic patterns have not been fully explored. Here, we use ecotypes of Atlantic cod to investigate genomic patterns of diversity and population differentiation in a natural system characterized by high...

  6. The genome of turkey herpesvirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, C L; Tulman, E R; Lu, Z; Zsak, L; Rock, D L; Kutish, G F

    2001-01-01

    Here we present the first complete genomic sequence of Marek's disease virus serotype 3 (MDV3), also known as turkey herpesvirus (HVT). The 159,160-bp genome encodes an estimated 99 putative proteins and resembles alphaherpesviruses in genomic organization and gene content. HVT is very similar to MDV1 and MDV2 within the unique long (UL) and unique short (US) genomic regions, where homologous genes share a high degree of colinearity and their proteins share a high level of amino acid identity. Within the UL region, HVT contains 57 genes with homologues found in herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), six genes with homologues found only in MDV, and two genes (HVT068 and HVT070 genes) which are unique to HVT. The HVT US region is 2.2 kb shorter than that of MDV1 (Md5 strain) due to the absence of an MDV093 (SORF4) homologue and to differences at the UL/short repeat (RS) boundary. HVT lacks a homologue of MDV087, a protein encoded at the UL/RS boundary of MDV1 (Md5), and it contains two homologues of MDV096 (glycoprotein E) in the RS. HVT RS are 1,039 bp longer than those in MDV1, and with the exception of an ICP4 gene homologue, the gene content is different from that of MDV1. Six unique genes, including a homologue of the antiapoptotic gene Bcl-2, are found in the RS. This is the first reported Bcl-2 homologue in an alphaherpesvirus. HVT long repeats (RL) are 7,407 bp shorter than those in MDV1 and do not contain homologues of MDV1 genes with functions involving virulence, oncogenicity, and immune evasion. HVT lacks homologues of MDV1 oncoprotein MEQ, CxC chemokine, oncogenicity-associated phosphoprotein pp24, and conserved domains of phosphoprotein pp38. These significant genomic differences in and adjacent to RS and RL regions likely account for the differences in host range, virulence, and oncogenicity between nonpathogenic HVT and highly pathogenic MDV1.

  7. The Genomic Medicine Game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Elvis; de Andrés-Galiana, Enrique J; Benitez, Sonia; Martin-Sanchez, Fernando; Lopez-Campos, Guillermo H

    2016-01-01

    With advancements in genomics technology, health care has been improving and new paradigms of medicine such as genomic medicine have evolved. The education of clinicians, researchers and students to face the challenges posed by these new approaches, however, has been often lagging behind. From this the Genomic Medicine Game, an educational tool, was created for the purpose of conceptualizing the key components of Genomic Medicine. A number of phenotype-genotype associations were found through a literature review, which was used to be a base for the concepts the Genomic Medicine Game would focus on. Built in Java, the game was successfully tested with promising results. PMID:27577486

  8. A genome blogger manifesto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corpas Manuel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cheap prices for genomic testing have revolutionized consumers’ access to personal genomics. Exploration of personal genomes poses significant challenges for customers wishing to learn beyond provider customer reports. A vibrant community has spontaneously appeared blogging experiences and data as a way to learn about their personal genomes. No set of values has publicly been described to date encapsulating ideals and code of conduct for this community. Here I present a first attempt to address this vacuum based on my own personal experiences as genome blogger.

  9. Statistics of genome architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main statistical distributions applicable to the analysis of genome architecture and genome tracks are briefly discussed and critically assessed. Although the observed features in distributions of element lengths can be equally well fitted by the different statistical approximations, the interpretation of observed regularities may strongly depend on the chosen scheme. We discuss the possible evolution scenarios and describe the main characteristics obtained with different distributions. The expression for the assessment of levels in hierarchical chromatin folding is derived and the quantitative measure of genome architecture inhomogeneity is suggested. This theory provides the ground for the regular statistical study of genome architecture and genome tracks.

  10. Reconstruction of the ancestral plastid genome in Geraniaceae reveals a correlation between genome rearrangements, repeats, and nucleotide substitution rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Mao-Lun; Blazier, John C; Govindu, Madhumita; Jansen, Robert K

    2014-03-01

    Geraniaceae plastid genomes are highly rearranged, and each of the four genera already sequenced in the family has a distinct genome organization. This study reports plastid genome sequences of six additional species, Francoa sonchifolia, Melianthus villosus, and Viviania marifolia from Geraniales, and Pelargonium alternans, California macrophylla, and Hypseocharis bilobata from Geraniaceae. These genome sequences, combined with previously published species, provide sufficient taxon sampling to reconstruct the ancestral plastid genome organization of Geraniaceae and the rearrangements unique to each genus. The ancestral plastid genome of Geraniaceae has a 4 kb inversion and a reduced, Pelargonium-like small single copy region. Our ancestral genome reconstruction suggests that a few minor rearrangements occurred in the stem branch of Geraniaceae followed by independent rearrangements in each genus. The genomic comparison demonstrates that a series of inverted repeat boundary shifts and inversions played a major role in shaping genome organization in the family. The distribution of repeats is strongly associated with breakpoints in the rearranged genomes, and the proportion and the number of large repeats (>20 bp and >60 bp) are significantly correlated with the degree of genome rearrangements. Increases in the degree of plastid genome rearrangements are correlated with the acceleration in nonsynonymous substitution rates (dN) but not with synonymous substitution rates (dS). Possible mechanisms that might contribute to this correlation, including DNA repair system and selection, are discussed. PMID:24336877

  11. Identification of Horizontally-transferred Genomic Islands and Genome Segmentation Points by Using the GC Profile Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ren; Ou, Hong-Yu; Gao, Feng; Luo, Hao

    2014-04-01

    The nucleotide composition of genomes undergoes dramatic variations among all three kingdoms of life. GC content, an important characteristic for a genome, is related to many important functions, and therefore GC content and its distribution are routinely reported for sequenced genomes. Traditionally, GC content distribution is assessed by computing GC contents in windows that slide along the genome. Disadvantages of this routinely used window-based method include low resolution and low sensitivity. Additionally, different window sizes result in different GC content distribution patterns within the same genome. We proposed a windowless method, the GC profile, for displaying GC content variations across the genome. Compared to the window-based method, the GC profile has the following advantages: 1) higher sensitivity, because of variation-amplifying procedures; 2) higher resolution, because boundaries between domains can be determined at one single base pair; 3) uniqueness, because the GC profile is unique for a given genome and 4) the capacity to show both global and regional GC content distributions. These characteristics are useful in identifying horizontally-transferred genomic islands and homogenous GC-content domains. Here, we review the applications of the GC profile in identifying genomic islands and genome segmentation points, and in serving as a platform to integrate with other algorithms for genome analysis. A web server generating GC profiles and implementing relevant genome segmentation algorithms is available at: www.zcurve.net.

  12. Genome sequence analysis of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon: insights into grass genome evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulman, Al

    2009-08-09

    Three subfamilies of grasses, the Erhardtoideae (rice), the Panicoideae (maize, sorghum, sugar cane and millet), and the Pooideae (wheat, barley and cool season forage grasses) provide the basis of human nutrition and are poised to become major sources of renewable energy. Here we describe the complete genome sequence of the wild grass Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium), the first member of the Pooideae subfamily to be completely sequenced. Comparison of the Brachypodium, rice and sorghum genomes reveals a precise sequence- based history of genome evolution across a broad diversity of the grass family and identifies nested insertions of whole chromosomes into centromeric regions as a predominant mechanism driving chromosome evolution in the grasses. The relatively compact genome of Brachypodium is maintained by a balance of retroelement replication and loss. The complete genome sequence of Brachypodium, coupled to its exceptional promise as a model system for grass research, will support the development of new energy and food crops

  13. Causes of genome instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langie, Sabine A S; Koppen, Gudrun; Desaulniers, Daniel;

    2015-01-01

    Genome instability is a prerequisite for the development of cancer. It occurs when genome maintenance systems fail to safeguard the genome's integrity, whether as a consequence of inherited defects or induced via exposure to environmental agents (chemicals, biological agents and radiation). Thus......, genome instability can be defined as an enhanced tendency for the genome to acquire mutations; ranging from changes to the nucleotide sequence to chromosomal gain, rearrangements or loss. This review raises the hypothesis that in addition to known human carcinogens, exposure to low dose of other...... chemicals present in our modern society could contribute to carcinogenesis by indirectly affecting genome stability. The selected chemicals with their mechanisms of action proposed to indirectly contribute to genome instability are: heavy metals (DNA repair, epigenetic modification, DNA damage signaling...

  14. The genomes of root-knot nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, David McK; Williamson, Valerie M; Abad, Pierre; McCarter, James; Danchin, Etienne G J; Castagnone-Sereno, Philippe; Opperman, Charles H

    2009-01-01

    Plant-parasitic nematodes are the most destructive group of plant pathogens worldwide and are extremely challenging to control. The recent completion of two root-knot nematode genomes opens the way for a comparative genomics approach to elucidate the success of these parasites. Sequencing revealed that Meloidogyne hapla, a diploid that reproduces by facultative, meiotic parthenogenesis, encodes approximately 14,200 genes in a compact, 54 Mpb genome. Indeed, this is the smallest metazoan genome completed to date. By contrast, the 86 Mbp Meloidogyne incognita genome encodes approximately 19,200 genes. This species reproduces by obligate mitotic parthenogenesis and exhibits a complex pattern of aneuploidy. The genome includes triplicated regions and contains allelic pairs with exceptionally high degrees of sequence divergence, presumably reflecting adaptations to the strictly asexual reproductive mode. Both root-knot nematode genomes have compacted gene families compared with the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and both encode large suites of enzymes that uniquely target the host plant. Acquisition of these genes, apparently via horizontal gene transfer, and their subsequent expansion and diversification point to the evolutionary history of these parasites. It also suggests new routes to their control. PMID:19400640

  15. Copy number variation in the bovine genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fadista, João; Thomsen, Bo; Holm, Lars-Erik;

    2010-01-01

    to genetic variation in cattle. Results We designed and used a set of NimbleGen CGH arrays that tile across the assayable portion of the cattle genome with approximately 6.3 million probes, at a median probe spacing of 301 bp. This study reports the highest resolution map of copy number variation...... in the cattle genome, with 304 CNV regions (CNVRs) being identified among the genomes of 20 bovine samples from 4 dairy and beef breeds. The CNVRs identified covered 0.68% (22 Mb) of the genome, and ranged in size from 1.7 to 2,031 kb (median size 16.7 kb). About 20% of the CNVs co-localized with segmental...

  16. Development in Rice Genome Research Based on Accurate Genome Sequence

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Rice is one of the most important crops in the world. Although genetic improvement is a key technology for the acceleration of rice breeding, a lack of genome information had restricted efforts in molecular-based breeding until the completion of the high-quality rice genome sequence, which opened new opportunities for research in various areas of genomics. The syntenic relationship of the rice genome to other cereal genomes makes the rice genome invaluable for understanding how cereal genomes...

  17. Genomic adaptation of admixed dairy cattle in East Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eui-Soo eKim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dairy cattle in East Africa imported from the U.S. and Europe have been adapted to new environments. In small local farms, cattle have generally been maintained by crossbreeding that could increase survivability under a severe environment. Eventually, genomic ancestry of a specific breed will be nearly fixed in genomic regions of local breeds or crossbreds when it is advantageous for survival or production in harsh environments. To examine this situation, 25 Friesians and 162 local cattle produced by crossbreeding of dairy breeds in Kenya were sampled and genotyped using 50K SNPs. Using principal component analysis, the admixed local cattle were found to consist of several imported breeds, including Guernsey, Norwegian Red, and Holstein. To infer the influence of parental breeds on genomic regions, local ancestry mapping was performed based on the similarity of haplotypes. As a consequence, it appears that no genomic region has been under the complete influence of a specific parental breed. Nonetheless, the ancestry of Holstein-Friesians was substantial in most genomic regions (>80%. Furthermore, we examined the frequency of the most common haplotypes from parental breeds that have changed substantially in Kenyan crossbreds during admixture. The frequency of these haplotypes from parental breeds, which were likely to be selected in temperate regions, has deviated considerably from expected frequency in eleven genomic regions. Additionally, extended haplotype homozygosity based methods were applied to identify the regions responding to recent selection in crossbreds, called candidate regions, resulting in seven regions that appeared to be affected by Holstein-Friesians. However, some signatures of selection were less dependent on Holsteins-Friesians, suggesting evidence of adaptation in East Africa. The analysis of local ancestry is a useful approach to understand the detailed genomic structure and may reveal regions of the genome required for

  18. Whole-exome/genome sequencing and genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grody, Wayne W; Thompson, Barry H; Hudgins, Louanne

    2013-12-01

    As medical genetics has progressed from a descriptive entity to one focused on the functional relationship between genes and clinical disorders, emphasis has been placed on genomics. Genomics, a subelement of genetics, is the study of the genome, the sum total of all the genes of an organism. The human genome, which is contained in the 23 pairs of nuclear chromosomes and in the mitochondrial DNA of each cell, comprises >6 billion nucleotides of genetic code. There are some 23,000 protein-coding genes, a surprisingly small fraction of the total genetic material, with the remainder composed of noncoding DNA, regulatory sequences, and introns. The Human Genome Project, launched in 1990, produced a draft of the genome in 2001 and then a finished sequence in 2003, on the 50th anniversary of the initial publication of Watson and Crick's paper on the double-helical structure of DNA. Since then, this mass of genetic information has been translated at an ever-increasing pace into useable knowledge applicable to clinical medicine. The recent advent of massively parallel DNA sequencing (also known as shotgun, high-throughput, and next-generation sequencing) has brought whole-genome analysis into the clinic for the first time, and most of the current applications are directed at children with congenital conditions that are undiagnosable by using standard genetic tests for single-gene disorders. Thus, pediatricians must become familiar with this technology, what it can and cannot offer, and its technical and ethical challenges. Here, we address the concepts of human genomic analysis and its clinical applicability for primary care providers.

  19. First Complete Genome Sequence of Cherry virus A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koinuma, Hiroaki; Nijo, Takamichi; Iwabuchi, Nozomu; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Keima, Takuya; Okano, Yukari; Maejima, Kensaku; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Namba, Shigetou

    2016-01-01

    The 5'-terminal genomic sequence of Cherry virus A (CVA) has long been unknown. We determined the first complete genome sequence of an apricot isolate of CVA (7,434 nucleotides [nt]). The 5'-untranslated region was 107 nt in length, which was 53 nt longer than those of known CVA sequences. PMID:27284130

  20. SNP detection for massively parallel whole-genome resequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ruiqiang; Li, Yingrui; Fang, Xiaodong;

    2009-01-01

    -genome or target region resequencing. Here, we have developed a consensus-calling and SNP-detection method for sequencing-by-synthesis Illumina Genome Analyzer technology. We designed this method by carefully considering the data quality, alignment, and experimental errors common to this technology. All...

  1. The complete mitochondrial genome of human parasitic roundworm, Ascaris lumbricoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yung Chul; Kim, Won; Park, Joong-Ki

    2011-08-01

    The genome length of the Ascaris lumbricoides, human parasitic roundworm, is 14,281 bp with a nucleotide composition of 22.1% A, 49.8% T, 7.8% C, and 20.3% G. The genome consists of 12 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes, and 1 control region.

  2. Genome sequence surveys of Brachiola algerae and Edhazardia aedis reveal microsporidia with low gene densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fast Naomi M

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microsporidia are well known models of extreme nuclear genome reduction and compaction. The smallest microsporidian genomes have received the most attention, but genomes of different species range in size from 2.3 Mb to 19.5 Mb and the nature of the larger genomes remains unknown. Results Here we have undertaken genome sequence surveys of two diverse microsporidia, Brachiola algerae and Edhazardia aedis. In both species we find very large intergenic regions, many transposable elements, and a low gene-density, all in contrast to the small, model microsporidian genomes. We also find no recognizable genes that are not also found in other surveyed or sequenced microsporidian genomes. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that microsporidian genome architecture varies greatly between microsporidia. Much of the genome size difference could be accounted for by non-coding material, such as intergenic spaces and retrotransposons, and this suggests that the forces dictating genome size may vary across the phylum.

  3. A genome-wide survey of switchgrass genome structure and organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj K Sharma

    Full Text Available The perennial grass, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L., is a promising bioenergy crop and the target of whole genome sequencing. We constructed two bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC libraries from the AP13 clone of switchgrass to gain insight into the genome structure and organization, initiate functional and comparative genomic studies, and assist with genome assembly. Together representing 16 haploid genome equivalents of switchgrass, each library comprises 101,376 clones with average insert sizes of 144 (HindIII-generated and 110 kb (BstYI-generated. A total of 330,297 high quality BAC-end sequences (BES were generated, accounting for 263.2 Mbp (16.4% of the switchgrass genome. Analysis of the BES identified 279,099 known repetitive elements, >50,000 SSRs, and 2,528 novel repeat elements, named switchgrass repetitive elements (SREs. Comparative mapping of 47 full-length BAC sequences and 330K BES revealed high levels of synteny with the grass genomes sorghum, rice, maize, and Brachypodium. Our data indicate that the sorghum genome has retained larger microsyntenous regions with switchgrass besides high gene order conservation with rice. The resources generated in this effort will be useful for a broad range of applications.

  4. Genomic hypomethylation in the human germline associates with selective structural mutability in the human genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Li

    Full Text Available The hotspots of structural polymorphisms and structural mutability in the human genome remain to be explained mechanistically. We examine associations of structural mutability with germline DNA methylation and with non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR mediated by low-copy repeats (LCRs. Combined evidence from four human sperm methylome maps, human genome evolution, structural polymorphisms in the human population, and previous genomic and disease studies consistently points to a strong association of germline hypomethylation and genomic instability. Specifically, methylation deserts, the ~1% fraction of the human genome with the lowest methylation in the germline, show a tenfold enrichment for structural rearrangements that occurred in the human genome since the branching of chimpanzee and are highly enriched for fast-evolving loci that regulate tissue-specific gene expression. Analysis of copy number variants (CNVs from 400 human samples identified using a custom-designed array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH chip, combined with publicly available structural variation data, indicates that association of structural mutability with germline hypomethylation is comparable in magnitude to the association of structural mutability with LCR-mediated NAHR. Moreover, rare CNVs occurring in the genomes of individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and developmental delay and de novo CNVs occurring in those diagnosed with autism are significantly more concentrated within hypomethylated regions. These findings suggest a new connection between the epigenome, selective mutability, evolution, and human disease.

  5. Adaptive genic evolution in the Drosophila genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Joshua A; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Chenhui;

    2007-01-01

    Determining the extent of adaptive evolution at the genomic level is central to our understanding of molecular evolution. A suitable observation for this purpose would consist of polymorphic data on a large and unbiased collection of genes from two closely related species, each having a large and...... the theories and data pertaining to the interpretation of adaptive evolution in genomic studies.......Determining the extent of adaptive evolution at the genomic level is central to our understanding of molecular evolution. A suitable observation for this purpose would consist of polymorphic data on a large and unbiased collection of genes from two closely related species, each having a large....... melanogaster and its close relatives were adaptive. (iv) This signature of adaptive evolution is observable only in regions of normal recombination. Hence, the low level of polymorphism observed in regions of reduced recombination may not be driven primarily by positive selection. Finally, we discuss...

  6. Genomics at the evolving species boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Carlos F; Van Belleghem, Steven; McMillan, W Owen

    2016-02-01

    Molecular studies on hybridization date back to Dobzhansky who compared chromosomal banding patterns to determine if interspecific gene flow occurred in nature [1]. Now, the advent of high-throughput sequencing provides increasingly fine insights into genomic differentiation between incipient taxa that are changing our view of adaptation and speciation and the links between the two. Empirical data from hybridizing taxa demonstrate highly heterogeneous patterns of genomic differentiation. Although underlining reasons for this heterogeneity are complex, studies of hybridizing taxa offers some of the best insights into the regions of the genome under divergent selection and the role these regions play in species boundaries. The challenge moving forward is to develop a better theoretical framework that fully leverages these powerful natural experiments. PMID:27436548

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Serotype O Isolated from Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Sultana, Munawar; Siddique, Mohammad Anwar; Momtaz, Samina; Rahman, Arafat; Ullah, Huzzat; Nandi, Shuvro Prokash; Hossain, M. Anwar

    2014-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly infectious enzootic disease caused by FMD virus. The complete genome sequence of a circulatory FMD virus (FMDV) serotype O isolated from Natore, Bangladesh, is reported here. Genomic analysis revealed antigenic heterogeneity within the VP1 region, a fragment deletion, and insertions at the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) and 3A region compared to the genome of the available vaccine strain.

  8. UniFrag and GenomePrimer : selection of primers for genome-wide production of unique amplicons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hijum, SAFT; de Jong, A; Buist, G; Kok, J; Kuipers, OP

    2003-01-01

    The complementary programs UniFrag and GenomePrimer were developed to provide a reliable high-throughput method to select the most unique regions within genomic DNA sequence(s) and design primers therein, involving minimal user intervention and maximum flexibility.

  9. Bioinformatics decoding the genome

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Deutsch, Sam; Michielin, Olivier; Thomas, Arthur; Descombes, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    Extracting the fundamental genomic sequence from the DNA From Genome to Sequence : Biology in the early 21st century has been radically transformed by the availability of the full genome sequences of an ever increasing number of life forms, from bacteria to major crop plants and to humans. The lecture will concentrate on the computational challenges associated with the production, storage and analysis of genome sequence data, with an emphasis on mammalian genomes. The quality and usability of genome sequences is increasingly conditioned by the careful integration of strategies for data collection and computational analysis, from the construction of maps and libraries to the assembly of raw data into sequence contigs and chromosome-sized scaffolds. Once the sequence is assembled, a major challenge is the mapping of biologically relevant information onto this sequence: promoters, introns and exons of protein-encoding genes, regulatory elements, functional RNAs, pseudogenes, transposons, etc. The methodological ...

  10. State of cat genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Stephen J; Johnson, Warren; Driscoll, Carlos; Pontius, Joan; Pecon-Slattery, Jill; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn

    2008-06-01

    Our knowledge of cat family biology was recently expanded to include a genomics perspective with the completion of a draft whole genome sequence of an Abyssinian cat. The utility of the new genome information has been demonstrated by applications ranging from disease gene discovery and comparative genomics to species conservation. Patterns of genomic organization among cats and inbred domestic cat breeds have illuminated our view of domestication, revealing linkage disequilibrium tracks consequent of breed formation, defining chromosome exchanges that punctuated major lineages of mammals and suggesting ancestral continental migration events that led to 37 modern species of Felidae. We review these recent advances here. As the genome resources develop, the cat is poised to make a major contribution to many areas in genetics and biology.

  11. Integrated analysis of whole genome and transcriptome sequencing reveals diverse transcriptomic aberrations driven by somatic genomic changes in liver cancers.

    Directory