WorldWideScience

Sample records for apnea syndrome osas

  1. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) and Cardiovascular System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Carolina; Tobaldini, Eleonora; Montano, Nicola; Losurdo, Anna; Parati, Gianfranco

    2017-08-28

    There is increasing evidence of a relationship between Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) and cardiovascular diseases. The strong association between OSA and arterial hypertension, in particular in patients with resistant hypertension and/or a non-dipping profile, has been extensively reported. The relationship between OSA and high blood pressure (BP) has been found independent from a number of confounders, but several factors may affect this relationship, including age and sex. It is thus important to better assess pathophysiologic and clinical interactions between OSA and arterial hypertension, also aimed at optimizing treatment approaches in OSA and hypertensive patients with co-morbidities. Among possible mechanisms, cardiovascular autonomic control alterations, altered mechanics of ventilation, inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system should be considered with particular attention. Additionally, available studies also support the occurrence of a bidirectional association between OSA and cardiovascular alterations, in particular heart failure, stroke and cardiac arrhythmias, emphasizing that greater attention is needed to both identify and treat sleep apneas in patients with cardiovascular diseases. However, a number of aspects of such a relationship are still to be clarified, in particular with regard to gender differences, effect of sleep-related breathing disorders in childhood, and influence of OSA treatment on cardiovascular risk, and they may represent important targets for future studies.

  2. Lack of effect of sleep apnea on oxidative stress in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Simiakakis

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate markers of systemic oxidative stress and antioxidant capacity in subjects with and without OSAS in order to investigate the most important factors that determine the oxidant-antioxidant status. METHODS: A total of 66 subjects referred to our Sleep laboratory were examined by full polysomnography. Oxidative stress and antioxidant activity were assessed by measurement of the derivatives of reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs and the biological antioxidant capacity (BAP in blood samples taken in the morning after the sleep study. Known risk factors for oxidative stress, such as age, sex, obesity, smoking, hypelipidemia, and hypertension, were investigated as possible confounding factors. RESULTS: 42 patients with OSAS (Apnea-Hypopnea index >15 events/hour were compared with 24 controls (AHI<5. The levels of d-ROMS were significantly higher (p = 0.005 in the control group but the levels of antioxidant capacity were significantly lower (p = 0.004 in OSAS patients. The most important factors predicting the variance of oxidative stress were obesity, smoking habit, and sex. Parameters of sleep apnea severity were not associated with oxidative stress. Minimal oxygen desaturation and smoking habit were the most important predicting factors of BAP levels. CONCLUSION: Obesity, smoking, and sex are the most important determinants of oxidative stress in OSAS subjects. Sleep apnea might enhance oxidative stress by the reduction of antioxidant capacity of blood due to nocturnal hypoxia.

  3. Genetic analysis of candidate SNPs for metabolic syndrome in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilo, Antonio; Ruiz-Granados, Elena S.; Moreno-Rey, Concha; Rivera, Jose M.; Ruiz, Agustin; Real, Luis M.; Sáez, Maria E.

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder characterized by the reduction or complete cessation in airflow resulting from an obstruction of the upper airway. Several studies have observed an increased risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality among OSA patients. Metabolic syndrome (MetS), a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors characterized by the presence of insulin resistance, is often found in patients with OSA, but the complex interplay between these two syndromes is not well understood. In this study, we present the results of a genetic association analysis of 373 candidate SNPs for MetS selected in a previous genome wide association analysis (GWAS). The 384 selected SNPs were genotyped using the Illumina VeraCode Technology in 387 subjects retrospectively assessed at the Internal Medicine Unit of the “Virgen de Valme” University Hospital (Seville, Spain). In order to increase the power of this study and to validate our findings in an independent population, we used data from the Framingham Sleep study which comprises 368 individuals. Only the rs11211631 polymorphism was associated with OSA in both populations, with an estimated OR=0.57 (0.42-0.79) in the joint analysis (p=7.21 × 10-4). This SNP was selected in the previous GWAS for MetS components using a digenic approach, but was not significant in the monogenic study. We have also identified two SNPs (rs2687855 and rs4299396) with a protective effect from OSA only in the abdominal obese subpopulation. As a whole, our study does not support that OSA and MetS share major genetic determinants, although both syndromes share common epidemiological and clinical features. PMID:23524009

  4. Long-term results in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS after laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty (LAUP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Önder Göktas

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS is a serious disease. The etiology of and optimum therapy options for this disorder have been much discussed and have been the subject of many publications. One much discussed therapy option is laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty (LAUP. Despite conflicting opinions and guidelines which recommend that it should not be used, it remains in use. Patients who had previously undergone this procedure were invited for follow-up appointments, at which they were asked to complete a questionnaire, underwent an ENT examination and underwent sleep laboratory analysis using a portable sleep lab device. The average time since LAUP treatment was 11 years. The cohort comprised 25 patients. The average preoperative apnea-hypopnea-index (AHI score was 25.25/h; the average postoperative AHI score 23.62/h. Closer examination of our data enabled us to identify 10 responders (40% and 15 non-responders (60%. 12% (3/25 of non-responders experienced either no reduction in their AHI score or an increase compared to their preoperative AHI score of less than 5/h. In the remaining 48% (12/25, AHI increased by more than 5/h compared to the preoperative figure. Our questionnaire showed that 40% (10/25 of patients suffered from dry mouth and 20% (5/25 from foreign body sensation. The data led us to conclude that laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty can indeed result in a reduction in AHI score comparable to other mucosal resection methods. Also in common with these methods, the efficacy of the therapy reduces with time and the procedure carries a high risk of bringing about an increase in the patient's AHI score.

  5. Depression and Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Hara Ruth

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract For over two decades clinical studies have been conducted which suggest the existence of a relationship between depression and Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA. Recently, Ohayon underscored the evidence for a link between these two disorders in the general population, showing that 800 out of 100,000 individuals had both, a breathing-related sleep disorder and a major depressive disorder, with up to 20% of the subjects presenting with one of these disorders also having the other. In some populations, depending on age, gender and other demographic and health characteristics, the prevalence of both disorders may be even higher: OSA may affect more than 50% of individuals over the age of 65, and significant depressive symptoms may be present in as many as 26% of a community-dwelling population of older adults. In clinical practice, the presence of depressive symptomatology is often considered in patients with OSA, and may be accounted for and followed-up when considering treatment approaches and response to treatment. On the other hand, sleep problems and specifically OSA are rarely assessed on a regular basis in patients with a depressive disorder. However, OSA might not only be associated with a depressive syndrome, but its presence may also be responsible for failure to respond to appropriate pharmacological treatment. Furthermore, an undiagnosed OSA might be exacerbated by adjunct treatments to antidepressant medications, such as benzodiazepines. Increased awareness of the relationship between depression and OSA might significantly improve diagnostic accuracy as well as treatment outcome for both disorders. In this review, we will summarize important findings in the current literature regarding the association between depression and OSA, and the possible mechanisms by which both disorders interact. Implications for clinical practice will be discussed.

  6. The rheological properties of blood and the risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Władysław Pierzchała

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is an important public health concern, which affects around 2–4% of the population. Left untreated, it causes a decrease not only in quality of life, but also of life expectancy. Despite the fact that knowledge about the mechanisms of development of cardiovascular disease in patients with OSA is still incomplete, observations confirm a relationship between sleep disordered breathing and the rheological properties of blood. One possible consequence of an increased incidence of cardiovascular disease may be a rise in mortality in OSA patients. Continuously improved research methods are allowing for an increasingly more accurate understanding of the significance of observed changes. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011, Vol. 49, No. 2, 206–210

  7. A pilot study to compare the cerebral hemodynamics between patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) and periodic limb movement syndrome (PLMS) during nocturnal sleep with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongxing; Schneider, Maja; Laures, Marco; Fritschi, Ursula; Hügli, Gordana; Lehner, Isabella; Qi, Ming; Khatami, Ramin

    2014-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) and periodic limb movement in sleep syndrome (PLMS) are two common sleep disorders. Previous studies showed that OSA and PLMS share common features, such as increased cardio-vascular risk, both apnea events and limb movements occur periodically, they are usually associated with cortical arousals, and both of them can induce declines in peripheral oxygen saturation measured with pulse oximetry. However, the question whether apnea events and limb movements also show similar characteristics in cerebral hemodynamic and oxygenation has never been addressed. In this pilot study, we will first time compare the cerebral hemodynamic changes induced by apnea events and limb movements in patients with OSA (n=4) and PLMS (n=4) with NIRS. In patients with OSA, we found periodic oscillations in HbO2, HHb, and blood volume induced by apnea/hypopnea events, HbO2 and HHb showed reverse changing trends. By contrast, the periodic oscillations linked to limb movements were only found in HbO2 and blood volume in patients with PLMS. These findings of different cerebral hemodynamics patterns between apnea events and limb movements may indicate different regulations of nervous system between these two sleep disorders.

  8. Role of computed tomography in the evaluation of orthodontic treatment in adult patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozza, Paola; Ballanti, Fabiana; Castellano, Monica; Fanucci, Ezio

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate pharyngeal size differences between pre- and posttrials of a Mandibular Advancement Device (MAD), using a computed tomography (CT),in the treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) adult patients. Eighteen patients with mild to moderate OSA (mean Apnea/Hypopnea Index, AHI, of 16.7) were treated with a MAD to wear at night only. After 3 months of treatment, three-dimensional changes in pharyngeal dimensions were measured on CT images performed with a sixteen detector-row CT scanner (Light Speed Plus; GE Medical Systems). Two consecutive axial sections from the hard palate to the epiglottis were obtained with and without the appliance. Measurements were made of the following airway areas (mm2) and lengths (mm): RF (nasopharynx); ROF (naso-oropharynx); OF (oropharynx); IPF (hypopharynx); SPL (soft palate length); SPT (soft palate thickness); Rgn (retrognation)-hyoid bone; hyoid bone-C2; Rgn-C2; PhL (oropharynx length); pharynx posterior wall thickness at three level. The angle between the hard and the soft palate (APDM) was also calculated. AHI improved significantly (from 16.7 to 11.2) when the appliance was used. Measurements from CT scans showed statistically significant expansion in the naso-oropharynx area (RF p<.014; ROF p<.050), in the Rgn-C2 length (p<.005) and in the angle between the hard and the soft palate (APDM p<.001). Our findings confirm the effectiveness of MAD in the treatment of patients with mild to moderate OSA. The use of MAD significantly expands the areas of the upper airway lumen most involved in the collapse.

  9. Adaptation and Validation of the Spanish Version of OSA-18, a Quality of Life Questionnaire for Evaluation of Children with Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiner, Eusebi; Landete, Pedro; Sancho-Chust, José Norberto; Martínez-García, Miguel Ángel; Pérez-Ferrer, Patricia; Pastor, Esther; Senent, Cristina; Arlandis, Mar; Navarro, Cristina; Selma, María José

    2016-11-01

    To analyze the reliability and validity of the Spanish version of the OSA-18 quality of life questionnaire in children with apnea-hypopnea syndrome (SAHS). Children with suspected SAHS were studied with polysomnography (PSG) before and after adenotonsillectomy (AA). Age, gender, clinical data, PSG, anthropometric data, and Mallampati and Brodsky scales were analyzed. OSA-18 was administered at baseline and 3-6months post AA. After translation and backtranslation by bilingual professionals, the internal consistency, reliability, construct validity, concurrent validity, predictive validity and sensitivity to change of the questionnaire was assessed. In total, 45 boys and 15 girls were evaluated, showing BMI 18±4, neck 28±5, Brodsky (0: 7%; 50 to 75%: 6%), AHI 12±7 pre AA. Global Cronbach alpha was 0.91. Correlations between domains were significant except for emotional aspects, although the total scores correlated with all domains (0.50 to 0.90). The factorial analysis was virtually identical to the original structure. The total scores showed good correlation for concurrent validity (0.2-0.45). With regard to predictive validity, the questionnaire adequately differentiated levels of severity according to Mallampati (ANOVA P=.002) and apnea-hypopnea index (ANOVA P=.006). Test-retest reliability was excellent, as was sensitivity to change, both in the total scores (P<.001) and in each domain (P<.001). The Spanish adaptation of the OSA-18 and its psychometric characteristics suggest that the Spanish version is equivalent to the original and can be used in Spanish-speaking countries. Copyright © 2016 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in children with Class III malocclusion: involvement of the PHOX2B gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavezzi, Anna Maria; Casale, Valentina; Oneda, Roberta; Gioventù, Silvia; Matturri, Luigi; Farronato, Giampietro

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study is to provide new molecular approaches to the children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome by evaluating the possible involvement of the PHOX2B gene, notoriously associated to congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS), in Class III malocclusion. Fifty subjects with Class III malocclusion, aged from 8 to 14 years, and with history of sleep apneic episodes, and 20 age-matched controls were submitted to genomic DNA examination from oral cells to specifically analyze the PHOX2B genotype. Point "silent" mutations affecting different nucleotides of the PHOX2B gene were observed in 32 % of patients with Class III malocclusion and never in controls (0 %). The genetic data obtained in this study in children with Class III malocclusion and sleep-related breathing disorders provide new information useful to the genetic characterization of this pathology. The PHOX2B gene silent mutations can lead to structural and functional modification of their product providing to a group of children with Class III malocclusion similar features to those of CCHS (sleep apnea episodes and craniofacial malformations).

  11. Early markers of renal damage in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS patients with or without diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shereen Farghaly

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: Renal impairment is common in OSAS patients but more frequent if associated with diabetes mellitus. RDW% can be used as simple screening test for early detection of renal injury in OSAS patients with or without diabetes mellitus.

  12. Complex sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang J

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Juan Wang,1,* Yan Wang,1,* Jing Feng,1,2 Bao-yuan Chen,1 Jie Cao1 1Respiratory Department of Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, People's Republic of China; 2Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA *The first two authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Complex sleep apnea syndrome (CompSAS is a distinct form of sleep-disordered breathing characterized as central sleep apnea (CSA, and presents in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA patients during initial treatment with a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP device. The mechanisms of why CompSAS occurs are not well understood, though we have a high loop gain theory that may help to explain it. It is still controversial regarding the prevalence and the clinical significance of CompSAS. Patients with CompSAS have clinical features similar to OSA, but they do exhibit breathing patterns like CSA. In most CompSAS cases, CSA events during initial CPAP titration are transient and they may disappear after continued CPAP use for 4–8 weeks or even longer. However, the poor initial experience of CompSAS patients with CPAP may not be avoided, and nonadherence with continued therapy may often result. Treatment options like adaptive servo-ventilation are available now that may rapidly resolve the disorder and relieve the symptoms of this disease with the potential of increasing early adherence to therapy. But these approaches are associated with more expensive and complicated devices. In this review, the definition, potential plausible mechanisms, clinical characteristics, and treatment approaches of CompSAS will be summarized. Keywords: complex sleep apnea syndrome, obstructive sleep apnea, central sleep apnea, apnea threshold, continuous positive airway pressure, adaptive servo-ventilation

  13. Adipocytokines in sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wysocka E

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Biomarkers of adipose tissue may affect glucose and lipid metabolism and present pro-inflammatory properties, thus could be involved in the pathobiochemistry of cardiovascular disease (CVD. The coexistence of sleep apnea syndrome (OSA and metabolic risk factors of CVD is worth explaining. The aim of the study was to compare the serum adipocytokines in subjects with and without OSA, who had all elevated body mass index (BMI. Methods Overweight (BMI: 25.0-29.9 kg/m2 and obese (BMI: 30.0-39.9 kg/m2 OSA-suspected Caucasian males, aged 30-63, with no acute disease or chronic disorder underwent polysomnographic evaluation to select OSA-positive (AHI ≥ 5 and OSA-negative (AHI Results A decreased resistin level was observed in Over-OSA-Pos vs. Over-OSA-Neg subjects (P = 0.037 as well as in Obese-OSA-Pos vs. Obese-OSA-Neg (P = 0.045. No differences in leptin concentrations were observed. A positive correlation between leptin and BMI was in both overweight subgroups and a negative one between resistin and fasting glucose was in both obese subgroups. Conclusions OSA may decrease the serum resistin level in subjects with excess body mass and also may contribute to glucose metabolism, but has no influence on the leptin level.

  14. Overlap syndrome of COPD and OSA in Koreans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyung-Mee; Thomas, Robert J; Kim, Jinkwan; Lee, Seung Ku; Yoon, Dae Wui; Shin, Chol

    2017-07-01

    Overlap syndrome of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) leads to increased morbidity and mortality. There have been no reports available on the overlap syndrome for Koreans. Our primary aim was to identify prevalence and predictors of the overlap syndrome in Koreans.This is a cross-sectional study with a community-based sample of 1298 participants (mean age, 59.7 ± 6.7) from the cohort of Korean Genomic and Epidemiologic Study during 2013 to 2014. OSA and COPD were assessed by apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) and the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 s to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC syndrome. The prevalence of COPD remained the same as 10.8% regardless of the presence of OSA. The mean ratio of FEV1/FVC for those with COPD was 0.77, regardless of OSA. The OR increased for age (OR, 1.1; 95% CI, 1.0-1.1) and smokers (OR, 3.6; 95% CI, 2.0-6.4), but decreased for body mass index (BMI) (OR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.8-0.9) and overweight state (OR, 0.4; 95% CI, 0.2-0.7). Risk factors of the overlap syndrome differed by OSA severity, that is, BMI in those with moderate-to-severe OSA, whereas sex (OR, 4.7; 95% CI, 2.1-10.6) and age (OR, 1.1; 95% CI, 1.0-1.1) in those with mild OSA.In a population study from Korea, 10.8% of OSA patients had an overlap syndrome with COPD. Although BMI is a well-known risk factor of OSA, it is likely that being overweight may be protective for moderate-to-severe OSA patients from the risk of COPD (i.e., overlap syndrome).

  15. The role of sleep position in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richard, Wietske; Kox, Dennis; den Herder, Cindy; Laman, Martin; van Tinteren, Harm; de Vries, Nico

    2006-01-01

    We analyzed the role of sleep position in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). The polysomnograms of 120 patients with sleep apnea syndrome were analyzed. We associated the apnea hypopnea index (AHI) of the supine position with the AHI of the other positions. Patients were stratified in a group

  16. Videoradiography at submental electrical stimulation during apnea in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillarp, B.; Rosen, I.; Wickstroem, O.; Malmoe Allmaenna Sjukhus

    1991-01-01

    Percutaneous submental electrical stimulation during sleep may be a new therapeutic method for patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Electrical stimulation to the submental region during obstructive apnea is reported to break the apnea without arousal and to diminish apneic index, time spent in apnea, and oxygen desaturation. The mode of breaking the apnea by electrical stimulation has not yet been shown. However, genioglossus is supposed to be the muscle responsible for breaking the apnea by forward movement of the tongue. To visualize the effect of submental electrical stimulation, one patient with severe OSAS has been examined with videoradiography. Submental electrical stimulation evoked an immediate complex muscle activity in the tongue, palate, and hyoid bone. This was followed by a forward movement of the tongue which consistently broke obstructive apnea without apparent arousal. Time spent in apnea was diminished but intervals between apnea were not affected. (orig.)

  17. Videoradiography at submental electrical stimulation during apnea in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome; A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillarp, B.; Rosen, I.; Wickstroem, O. (Malmoe Allmaenna Sjukhus (Sweden). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology Malmoe Allmaenna Sjukhus (Sweden). Dept. of Clinical Neurophysiology)

    1991-05-01

    Percutaneous submental electrical stimulation during sleep may be a new therapeutic method for patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Electrical stimulation to the submental region during obstructive apnea is reported to break the apnea without arousal and to diminish apneic index, time spent in apnea, and oxygen desaturation. The mode of breaking the apnea by electrical stimulation has not yet been shown. However, genioglossus is supposed to be the muscle responsible for breaking the apnea by forward movement of the tongue. To visualize the effect of submental electrical stimulation, one patient with severe OSAS has been examined with videoradiography. Submental electrical stimulation evoked an immediate complex muscle activity in the tongue, palate, and hyoid bone. This was followed by a forward movement of the tongue which consistently broke obstructive apnea without apparent arousal. Time spent in apnea was diminished but intervals between apnea were not affected. (orig.).

  18. Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... find out more. Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a ... find out more. Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a ...

  19. Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... find out more. Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a ... find out more. Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a ...

  20. Obstructive sleep apnea - adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep apnea - obstructive - adults; Apnea - obstructive sleep apnea syndrome - adults; Sleep-disordered breathing - adults; OSA - adults ... When you sleep, all of the muscles in your body become more relaxed. This includes the muscles that help keep your ...

  1. Airway inflammation in patients affected by obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, F G; Carpagnano, E; Guido, P; Bonsignore, M R; Roberti, A; Aliani, M; Vignola, A M; Spanevello, A

    2004-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) has been shown to be associated to upper airway inflammation. The object of the present study was to establish the presence of bronchial inflammation in OSAS subjects. In 16 subjects affected by OSAS, and in 14 healthy volunteers, airway inflammation was detected by the cellular analysis of the induced sputum. OSAS patients, as compared to control subjects, showed a higher percentage of neutrophils (66.7+/-18.9 vs. 25.8+/-15.6) (Pbronchial inflammation characterized by a significant increase in neutrophils.

  2. The roles of dentisty in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Makoto; Higurashi, Naoki; Miyazaki, Soichiro

    2007-01-01

    The roles of dentistry in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) are mainly: Craniofacial skeletal diagnosis, Treatment by oral appliance, Prevention of craniofacial skeletal problem. We use cephalometrics, CT and MRI to diagnose craniofacial skeleton of the patients and treat the OSAS patient by the oral appliance. We could make the airway of the OSAS patients bigger by the orthodontic treatment and ENT doctor could make the airway of the patient's patency by removing tonsils and adenoids. If the patient has the airway patency, the mandible of the patient could grow naturally in advanced position and have the airway bigger, consequently the patient could avoid OSAS in his future. (author)

  3. Sleep apnea syndrome and cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia eSforza

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is a sleep-related breathing disorder characterized by repetitive episodes of airflow cessation resulting in brief arousals and intermittent hypoxemia. Several studies have documented significant daytime cognitive and behavioral dysfunction that seems to extend beyond that associated with simple sleepiness and that persists in some patients after therapeutic intervention. A still unanswered question is whether cognitive symptoms in OSA are primarily a consequence of sleep fragmentation and hypoxemia, or whether they coexist independently from OSA. Moreover, very little is known about OSA effects on cognitive performances in the elderly in whom an increased prevalence of OSA is present.In this review we will consider recent reports in the association between sleep apnea and cognition, with specific interest in elderly subjects, in whom sleep disturbances and age-related cognitive decline naturally occur. This will allow us to elucidate the behavioral and cognitive functions in OSA patients and to gain insight into age differences in the cognitive impairment.Clinically, these outcomes will aid clinicians in the evaluation of diurnal consequences of OSA and the need to propose early treatment.

  4. Nasal Involvement in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, Daniel de Sousa; Rodrigues, Amanda da Mota Silveira; Nakanishi, Márcio; Sampaio, André Luiz Lopes; Venosa, Alessandra Ramos

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported an association between nasal obstruction and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), but the precise nature of this relationship remains to be clarified. This paper aimed to summarize data and theories on the role of the nose in the pathophysiology of sleep apnea as well as to discuss the benefits of surgical and medical nasal treatments. A number of pathophysiological mechanisms can potentially explain the role of nasal pathology in OSAS. These include the Starling resistor model, the unstable oral airway, the nasal ventilatory reflex, and the role of nitric oxide (NO). Pharmacological treatment presents some beneficial effects on the frequency of respiratory events and sleep architecture. Nonetheless, objective data assessing snoring and daytime sleepiness are still necessary. Nasal surgery can improve the quality of life and snoring in a select group of patients with mild OSAS and septal deviation but is not an effective treatment for OSA as such. Despite the conflicting results in the literature, it is important that patients who are not perfectly adapted to CPAP are evaluated in detail, in order to identify whether there are obstructive factors that could be surgically corrected. PMID:25548569

  5. A Rare Cause of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: Retropharyngeal Lipoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okan Dilek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipoma is the most common benign mesenchymal neoplasm. About 16% of lipomas arise in the head and neck region, especially in the posterior neck. Large lipomas that originate from the retropharyngeal space may cause dyspnea, dysphagia, and snoring and occasionally may lead to obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS. Herein, we report a 45-year-old male patient with OSAS caused by a giant retropharyngeal lipoma with emphasis on CT findings.

  6. Can you die from obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS)?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Carroll, G

    2015-02-01

    Studies suggest an independent association between Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Syndrome (OSAS) and cardiovascular death. The purpose of our study is to examine doctors\\' awareness of this association and to determine whether this correlates with recording of OSAS on death certificates. We contacted the Central Statistics Office (CSO) and obtained relevant mention of OSAS on death certificates. We surveyed doctors on their view of OSAS-related deaths, CSO data from 2008-2011 reveal two deaths with OSAS documented as a direct cause and 52 deaths with OSAS as a contributory cause. Seventy-five doctors\\' surveyed (41%) believe OSAS can be a direct cause of death and 177 (96%) believe OSAS can be an indirect cause of death. Only 22 (12%) had putdown OSAS as a cause of death. OSAS is seldom recorded on death certificates. This is at odds with epidemiological forecasts and contrary to an opinion poll from a selection of doctors.

  7. Effects of edentulism in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-11-29

    Nov 29, 2014 ... Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of edentulism in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) patients. Materials and Methods: The study patients' were selected from the Gaziantep University Sleep Clinic and Orthodontic. Department archives between the years of 2009 and ...

  8. Effects of edentulism in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of edentulism in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) patients. Materials and Methods: The study patients' were selected from the Gaziantep University Sleep Clinic and Orthodontic Department archives between the years of 2009 and 2011.

  9. Asthma Control and Its Relationship with Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA in Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Teodorescu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objectives. Asthma in older individuals is poorly understood. We aimed to characterize the older asthma phenotype and test its association with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. Design. Cross-sectional. Setting. Pulmonary and Asthma/Allergy clinics. Participants. 659 asthma subjects aged 18–59 years (younger and 154 aged 60–75 (older. Measurements. Sleep Apnea scale of Sleep Disorders Questionnaire (SA-SDQ, asthma severity step (1–4, severe if step 3 or 4, established OSA diagnosis, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP use, and comorbidities. Results. Older versus younger had worse control, as assessed by asthma step, lung function, and inhaled corticosteroid use. Among older subjects, after controlling for known asthma aggravators, OSA diagnosis was the only factor robustly associated with severe asthma: on average, OSA was associated with nearly 7 times greater likelihood of severe asthma in an older individual (OR=6.67. This relationship was of greater magnitude than in younger subjects (OR=2.16. CPAP use attenuated the likelihood of severe asthma in older subjects by 91% (P=0.005, much more than in the younger asthmatics. Conclusion. Diagnosed OSA increases the risk for worse asthma control in older patients, while CPAP therapy may have greater impact on asthma outcomes. Unrecognized OSA may be a reason for poor asthma control, particularly among older patients.

  10. Assessment of the depression, anxiety, and stress scale (DASS-21) in untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nanthakumar, Shenooka; Bucks, Romola S.; Skinner, Timothy C.

    2017-01-01

    The assessment of depression in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is confounded by symptom overlap. The Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale-short form (DASS-21) is a commonly used measure of negative affect, but it not known whether the DASS-21 is suitable for use in an OSA sample. This study compa...... disorders or chronic illness conditions with different patterns of overlapping symptoms.......The assessment of depression in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is confounded by symptom overlap. The Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale-short form (DASS-21) is a commonly used measure of negative affect, but it not known whether the DASS-21 is suitable for use in an OSA sample. This study...... (DIF) was examined using dMACS. The correlated 3-factor structure (with correlated errors) of the DASS-21 was a better fit in the non-OSA sample. dMACS indicated that there was a degree of DIF for each of the subscales, especially for the Anxiety subscale, in which 2 symptoms (that are also...

  11. Obstructive sleep apnea and other sleep-related syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Teresa; Attarian, Hrayr

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a common disorder characterized by repetitive episodes of breathing cessation due to complete or partial collapse of the upper airway therefore affecting ventilation. It is quite common, with a prevalence of about 2-4%, has a strong genetic component, and creates a proinflammatory state with elevated TNFα and other cytokines. If untreated, OSA can lead to significant neurological problems that include stroke, cognitive decline, depression, headaches, peripheral neuropathy, and nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION). Treatment reverses some of these neurological problems. Treatment includes continuous positive airway pressure and its variants, oral appliances, weight loss, upper airway surgery, and rarely maxillofacial procedures. Other sleep breathing disorders such as hypoventilation, central sleep apnea, complex sleep apnea, and Cheyne-Stokes respiration are less common and are sometimes associated with neuromuscular disorders causing diaphragmatic paralysis, but can also be seen in opiate exposure and severe obesity. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Impaired driving simulation in patients with Periodic Limb Movement Disorder and patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieteling, Esther W.; Bakker, Marije S.; Hoekema, Aarnoud; Maurits, Natasha M.; Brouwer, Wiebo H.; van der Hoeven, Johannes H.

    Background: Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is considered to be responsible for increased collision rate and impaired driving simulator performance in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) patients. Periodic Limb Movement Disorder (PLMD) patients also frequently report EDS and may also have

  13. Complex Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Talha Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex sleep apnea is the term used to describe a form of sleep disordered breathing in which repeated central apneas (>5/hour persist or emerge when obstructive events are extinguished with positive airway pressure (PAP and for which there is not a clear cause for the central apneas such as narcotics or systolic heart failure. The driving forces in the pathophysiology are felt to be ventilator instability associated oscillation in PaCO2 arterial partial pressure of Carbon Dioxide, continuous cositive airway pressure (CPAP related increased CO2 carbon dioxide elimination, and activation of airway and pulmonary stretch receptors triggering these central apneas. The prevalence ranges from 0.56% to 18% with no clear predictive characteristics as compared to simple obstructive sleep apnea. Prognosis is similar to obstructive sleep apnea. The central apnea component in most patients on followup using CPAP therap, has resolved. For those with continued central apneas on simple CPAP therapy, other treatment options include bilevel PAP, adaptive servoventilation, permissive flow limitation and/or drugs.

  14. Ocorrência da síndrome da apneia obstrutiva do sono (SAOS em crianças respiradoras orais Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS in mouth breathing children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suemy Cioffi Izu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available É bem estabelecido que a respiração oral em crianças está relacionada à hipertrofia adenoamigdaliana, que é a principal causa de apneia do sono nesta população. Apesar da importância deste tema, há poucos estudos que comprovam a relação entre SAOS e respiração oral. OBJETIVO: Determinar a prevalência de distúrbios respiratórios do sono em crianças respiradoras orais e sua correlação com achados otorrinolaringológicos. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Foram avaliados retrospectivamente 248 prontuários de crianças respiradoras orais do serviço de Otorrinolaringologia Pediátrica de uma grande instituição entre 2000 e 2006, analisando os achados otorrinolaringológicos, polissonografia, nasofibroscopia e/ou radiografia em perfil do Cavum. O principal dado polissonográfico utilizado foi o índice de apneia (IA. Classificou-se como ronco primário aqueles com IA1. Desenho Científico: Coorte retrospectivo. RESULTADOS: Dos 248 pacientes incluídos, 144 (58% apresentavam ronco primário e 104 (42% apresentavam SAOS. Os achados otorrinolaringológicos mais frequentes foram Hipertrofia adenoamigdaliana (n=152; 61,2%, Hipertrofia de tonsila palatina (n=17; 6,8% Hipertrofia da tonsila faríngea (n=37; 14,9%, Rinite Alérgica (n=155; 62,5% e Otite Secretora (36; 14,5%. CONCLUSÕES: Ronco Primário e SAOS são frequentes em crianças respiradoras orais. A afecção otorrinolaringológica mais encontrada em crianças com SAOS é a hipertrofia adenoamigdaliana acompanhada ou não de rinite alérgica.It is well known that mouth breathing is associated with adenotonsillar hypertrophy - which is the main cause of obstructive sleep apnea among children. Despite the importance of this matter, there are only a handful of studies showing the relationship between OSAS and mouth breathing. AIM: to determine the prevalence of obstructive sleep disorders in mouth breathing children and study its correlation with otorhinolaryngological findings. STUDY

  15. Vestibular evoked myogenic potential responses in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, Murad; Bayır, Ömer; Yüceege, Melike B; Karagöz, Tuğba; Fırat, Hikmet; Özdek, Ali; Akın, İstemihan; Korkmaz, Hakan

    2015-11-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) provokes oxidative stress and ischemia, which affects the central nervous system. The degeneration of neurons in the brainstem due to periodic hypoxia can be evaluated by vestibular and audiologic tests. The objective of this study is to determine brainstem damage in severe OSAS patients with the help of vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) responses. Prospective, randomize, double-blind. Research-training hospital. We compared cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP) responses between severe OSAS patients and a control group. 54 patients were included and divided into the OSAS group, with severe OSAS (apnea-hypopnea index, AHI >70), and a control group with snoring without OSAS (AHI <5). Both groups underwent cVEMP. Bilateral recordings with simultaneous binaural logon stimulations were used during VEMP recordings. The existing p1n1 and n2p2 responses, p1, n1, n2, and p2 latencies and amplitudes, and p1n1 and n2p2 intervals were measured. Statistically significant differences were revealed between patients and controls for the response rate of the p1n1, n2p2 and p1n1, n2p2 amplitudes. There were no significant differences between the two groups with respect to the latencies of p1, n1, n2 and p2, or the p1n1 and n2p2 intervals. The VEMP response rate was lower in severe OSAS patients, and all amplitudes were shorter than in healthy subjects. VEMP recordings in severe OSAS subjects demonstrates abnormalities in brainstem pathways. It appears that brainstem damage in severe OSAS can be detected by cVEMP recordings.

  16. Computerized analysis of snoring in sleep apnea syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Shiomi,Fabio Koiti; Pisa,Ivan Torres; Campos,Carlos José Reis de

    2011-01-01

    The International Classification of Sleep Disorders lists 90 disorders. Manifestations, such as snoring, are important signs in the diagnosis of the Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome; they are also socially undesirable. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this paper was to present and evaluate a computerized tool that automatically identifies snoring and highlights the importance of establishing the duration of each snoring event in OSA patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The low-sampling (200 Hz) electrical si...

  17. Prosthodontic Approach to Treat Obstructive Sleep Apnea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prosthodontic Approach to Treat Obstructive Sleep Apnea. ... Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research ... disordered breathing represents a continuum, ranging from simple snoring sans sleepiness, upper‑airway resistance syndrome, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome, to hypercapnic respiratory failure.

  18. Sexual function status in women with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köseoğlu, Nalan; Köseoğlu, Hikmet; Itil, Oya; Oztura, Ibrahim; Baklan, Bariş; Ikiz, Ahmet Omer; Esen, Ahmet Adil

    2007-09-01

    Several co-morbid diseases have been shown to affect sexual functions in both genders. In the literature, sexual function status in men with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) has been studied; however, sexual functions in women with OSAS have not yet been studied. In this prospective study, we aimed to determine sexual function status in women with OSAS and its relationship with the disease parameters of OSAS. Women, who were diagnosed with OSAS with polysomnography performed in the sleep center of our university hospital, formed the study population. Women with any genital deformity, postmenopausal women, and women without a regular partner were excluded from the study. General demographic properties, medical histories, polysomnography parameters, and frequency of intercourse per month were noted for each patient. Patients completed the Sexual Function Questionnaire Version 2 (SFQ-V2) and Epworth Sleepiness Scale. The patients were grouped as mild, moderate, and severe OSAS according to the level of respiratory disturbance index (RDI). Scores of sexual function domains were determined from SFQ, and their relationships with parameters of polysomnography and demographics were studied. Twenty-five patients were included in the study. Mean age was 48.1 +/- 2.7 years. All were married with a mean marriage duration of 25.6 +/- 3.3 years. Mean frequency of intercourse per month was 3.3 +/- 1.8. All domains of sexual functions except pain and enjoyment significantly decreased with increasing severity of OSAS. When we controlled for factors of age and co-morbid diseases, correlation analyses showed significant negative correlation between levels of RDI and all domains of sexual functions except pain and enjoyment (P < 0.05). Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome negatively impacts sexual function in women independent of age and associated co-morbid diseases.

  19. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Hypopnea Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    Obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) is an important medical condition brought to limelight in the last five decades.[1] It is a major cause of morbidity and significant cause of mortality worldwide, including developed and developing nations. A survey done in Abuja, Nigeria,[2] showed that OSAHS may be a ...

  20. [Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and cognition: A review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daurat, Agnès; Sarhane, Majdouline; Tiberge, Michel

    2016-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a sleep-related breathing disorder characterized by repetitive episodes of airflow cessation, resulting in brief arousals and intermittent hypoxemia. OSAS is associated with a number of adverse health consequences, and cognitive difficulties. The overall pattern of cognitive impairment in OSAS is complex, and research in this field is mixed. On balance, OSAS have negative effects on cognition, most likely in the domain of attention/vigilance, verbal and visual delayed long-term memory, and executive functions. A still unanswered question is whether these deficits are primarily a consequence of sleep fragmentation and/or hypoxemia, or whether they coexist independently from OSAS. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the most effective and widely used treatment of OSAS. No consistent effect of CPAP use on cognitive performance was evident. This may be due, in part, to variability in study design and sampling methodology across studies. Structural changes have been reported in different brain regions, particularly in hippocampus and frontal cortex. Recent evidence suggests that the OSAS-related structural changes may improve with CPAP treatment. However, one of the challenges is to interpret the findings in light of comorbid conditions that also cause neural lesions. Animal models will be specifically useful to disentangle the different potential contributors to cognitive impairment in OSAS. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the literature on cognition and neuroimaging in OSAS patients before and after CPAP treatment. We also discuss the mechanisms that have been proposed to explain cognitive deficits in OSAS patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. [Treatment of sleep apnea syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardif, C

    NECESSARY TREATMENT: Sleep apnea syndrome requires treatment because it affects cardiovascular and cerebrovascular morbidity and mortality and has important neuropsychological consequences with the risk of accidents due to impaired wakefulness. The patientís quality of life is greatly altered. GENERAL MEASURES: Patients should be informed of the risk due to the lack of sleep, advised that alcohol tranquilizers and hypnotic drugs are contraindicated, and counseled about loosing weight, the most difficult problem for obese patients. POSITIVE PRESSURE VENTILATION: Continuous positive pressure ventilation with a facial mask acts like a pneumatic prosthesis holding the airways open during sleep. Sleep can be reconstructed by eliminating the recorded pathological nocturnal events and thus reducing diurnal hypersomnia. Quality of life is improved and accidents related to diminished wakefulness are avoided. Death rate in treated patients is significantly lower than in non-treated patients. In France, the national health care system will reimburse positive pressure ventilation for sleep apnea syndromes recognized to cause more than 30 events per hour of recording or fragmented sleep due to respiratory impairment. OTHER TREATMENTS: Indications for other treatments in case of moderately severe sleep apnea syndrome (or if health care benefits are not recognized for positive pressure ventilation) are currently debated. No medication has been proven to be effective. Mandibular advancement ortheses are in the development stage and require multidisiplinary cooperation to verify their efficacy. Velar surgery has been proposed but is usually disappointing except for young patients actively participating in an integrated surgical treatment strategy.

  2. Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Antonio; Mozzanica, Francesco; Sonzini, Giulia; Plebani, Daniela; Urbani, Emanuele; Pecis, Marica; Montano, Nicola

    2014-02-01

    Although previous studies demonstrated that patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) may present subclinical manifestations of dysphagia, in not one were different textures and volumes systematically studied. The aim of this study was to analyze the signs and symptoms of oropharyngeal dysphagia using fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) with boluses of different textures and volumes in a large cohort of patients with OSAS. A total of 72 OSAS patients without symptoms of dysphagia were enrolled. The cohort was divided in two groups: 30 patients with moderate OSAS and 42 patients with severe OSAS. Each patient underwent a FEES examination using 5, 10 and 20 ml of liquids and semisolids, and solids. Spillage, penetration, aspiration, retention, and piecemeal deglutition were considered. The penetration-aspiration scale (PAS), pooling score (PS), and dysphagia outcome and severity scale (DOSS) were used for quantitative analysis. Each patient completed the SWAL-QOL questionnaire. Forty-six patients (64 %) presented spillage, 20 (28 %) piecemeal deglutition, 26 (36 %) penetration, and 30 (44 %) retention. No differences were found in the PAS, PS, and DOSS scores between patients with moderate and severe OSAS. Patients with severe OSAS scored higher General Burden and Food selection subscales of the SWAL-QOL. Depending on the DOSS score, the cohort of patients was divided into those with and those without signs of dysphagia. Patients with signs of dysphagia scored lower in the General Burden and Symptoms subscales of the SWAL-QOL. OSAS patients show signs of swallowing impairment in about half of the population; clinicians involved in the management of these patients should include questions on swallowing when taking the medical history.

  3. Predictors of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Risk among Blacks with Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, A; Ravenell, J; Donat, M; Sexias, A; Ogedegbe, C; McFarlane, S I; Jean-Louis, G

    Identification of risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is important to enable comprehensive intervention to reduce OSA-related cardiovascular disease (CVD). The metabolic syndrome outcome study (MetSO) provides a unique opportunity to address these factors. This study investigated risk of OSA among blacks with metabolic syndrome. The present study utilized data from MetSO, an NIH-funded cohort study of blacks with metabolic syndrome. A total of 1,035 patients provided data for the analysis. These included sociodemographic factors, health risks, and medical history. Physician-diagnosed conditions were obtained using an electronic medical record system (Allscripts, Sunrise Enterprise). Patients were diagnosed with metabolic syndrome using criteria articulated in the joint interim statement for harmonizing the metabolic syndrome. Patients with a score ≥6 on the Apnea Risk Evaluation System (ARES) questionnaire were considered at risk for OSA. Obesity is defined by body mass index (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m 2 ). Of the 1,035 patients screened in the MetSO cohort, 48.9% were at high risk for OSA. Using multivariate-adjusted logistic regression analysis, we observed that obesity was the strongest predictor of OSA risk (OR=1.59, 95%CI=1.24-2.04, pmetabolic syndrome.

  4. Prevalence and predictors of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and Diabetes Mellitus (DM) are growing health challenges worldwide. However, the relation of OSA with type 2 diabetes is not well understood in developing countries. This study described the prevalence and predictors of OSA in type 2 DM patients using a screening ...

  5. Neuroendocrine Alterations in Obese Patients with Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Lanfranco

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS is a serious, prevalent condition that has significant morbidity and mortality when untreated. It is strongly associated with obesity and is characterized by changes in the serum levels or secretory patterns of several hormones. Obese patients with OSAS show a reduction of both spontaneous and stimulated growth hormone (GH secretion coupled to reduced insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I concentrations and impaired peripheral sensitivity to GH. Hypoxemia and chronic sleep fragmentation could affect the sleep-entrained prolactin (PRL rhythm. A disrupted Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA axis activity has been described in OSAS. Some derangement in Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH secretion has been demonstrated by some authors, whereas a normal thyroid activity has been described by others. Changes of gonadal axis are common in patients with OSAS, who frequently show a hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Altogether, hormonal abnormalities may be considered as adaptive changes which indicate how a local upper airway dysfunction induces systemic consequences. The understanding of the complex interactions between hormones and OSAS may allow a multi-disciplinary approach to obese patients with this disturbance and lead to an effective management that improves quality of life and prevents associated morbidity or death.

  6. Functional MRI of the pharynx in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) with rapid 2-D flash sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, L.; Guenther, E.; Gauger, J.; Nitz, W.; Kastenbauer, E.; Reiser, M.

    1996-01-01

    Functional imaging of the pharynx used to be the domain of cineradiography, CT and ultrafast CT. The development of modern MRI techniques led to new access to functional disorders of the pharynx. The aim of this study was to implement a new MRI technique to examine oropharyngeal obstructive mechanisms in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Sixteen patients suffering from OSA and 6 healthy volunteers were examined on a 1.5 T whole-body imager ('Vision', Siemens, Erlangen Medical Engineering, Germany) using a circular polarized head coil. Imaging was performed with 2D flash sequences in midsagittal and axial planes. Patients and volunteers were asked to breathe normally through the nose and to simulate snoring and the Mueller maneuver during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Prior to MRI, all patients underwent an ear, nose and throat (ENT) examination, functional fiberoptic nasopharyngoscopy and polysomnography. A temporal resolution of 6 images/s and an in-plane resolution of 2.67x1.8 mm were achieved. The mobility of the tongue, soft palate and pharyngeal surface could be clearly delineated. The MRI findings correlated well with the clinical examinations. We propose ultrafast MRI as a reliable and non-invasive method of evaluating pharyngeal obstruction and their levels. (orig.) [de

  7. Sound spectral analysis of snoring sound and site of obstruction in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huijie; Huang, Weining; Yu, Lisheng; Chen, Lan

    2010-10-01

    This study demonstrates that there is a significant difference in sound spectrum between first snoring sound after upper level and lower level obstructive apneas, and it is possible to use sound spectrum analysis as a supplementary method to determine the obstructive site of a patient with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). To investigate the difference in sound spectrum between the first snoring sounds after upper level (above the free margin of soft palate) obstructive apneas and lower level (below the free margin of soft palate) obstructive apneas in patients with OSAS. Thirty male patients with OSAS were included in this study. Overnight snoring sound was recorded and continuous upper airway pressure measurement was performed simultaneously on each subject. The first snores after upper level and lower level obstructive apneas were identified and analyzed acoustically. The mean of peak frequencies, central frequencies, and proportions of energy from 800 Hz to 2000 Hz and above 2000 Hz of the first snoring sounds after lower level obstructive apneas were higher and the proportion of energy below 800 Hz was lower than those after upper level obstructive apneas. The differences of all the parameters were of significance. The power spectrum of the two types of snoring sounds also exhibited different characters.

  8. Obstructive Sleep Apnea in a Patient with Cornelia de Lange Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashaqi, Saif; Hennessy, Jill; Eaton, Matthew; Erickson, Joel

    2017-12-28

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a rare genetic disorder that is characterized by specific facial, skeletal, and behavioral features associated with variable degrees of intellectual disabilities. Sleep disturbances have been reported in patients with CdLS including insomnia, sleep-disordered breathing, intrinsic sleep disorders, and circadian rhythm disorders. The prevalence of sleep-related breathing disorders, in particular, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), was conducted using validated questionnaires. We report the first case of CdLS that confirmed a moderate to severe degree of OSA using overnight polysomnography, which is the gold standard diagnostic test for OSA.

  9. Does the Treatment of Sleep Apnea Improve the Sexual Performance in Men with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavit Ceylan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available        Aim: We aimed to investigate the eff ect of obstructive sleep apnea treatment on sexual performance in the case of obstructive sleep apnea in men with erectile dysfunction. Material and Methods: IIEF (international index of erectile function form was fi lled for 141 male patients who admitted with obstructive sleep apnea and with erectile dysfunction and investigated in polysomnography laboratory. All patients were examined at ENT (Ear Nose and Throat clinic. Patients in the treatment of surgery and CBAP (continuous positive airway pressure were evaluated according to the apnehipopne index (AHI. Preliminary report has been done at the 3. month aſt er the OSAS(Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome therapy for the 23 patients. IIEF form was fi lled again and symptom scoring has been updated for 23 patients who could be followed aſt er sleep apnea treatment. The age of these patients ranged from 26 to 65 years. Wilcoxon signed ranks, Kruskal Wallis, and Spearman’s rho tests were used to evaluate diff erences in IIEF scores before and aſt er the treatment. Results: Signifi cant improvement were confi rmed at IIEF scores of 23 patients with obstructive sleep apnea who could be followed and treated statistically (p0.05. Discussion: Sexual performance may decline in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and a signifi cant improvement was detected on sexual performance with apnea treatment in this group of patients.

  10. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and gastroesophageal reflux disease: the importance of obesity and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basoglu, Ozen K; Vardar, Rukiye; Tasbakan, Mehmet Sezai; Ucar, Zeynep Zeren; Ayik, Sibel; Kose, Timur; Bor, Serhat

    2015-05-01

    It is claimed that gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) increases in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of GERD in patients with OSAS and primary snoring and identify OSAS-related risk factors associated with GERD. In this prospective, cross-sectional, multicenter study, in total 1,104 patients were recruited for polysomnography: 147 subjects were in non-OSAS (primary snoring) and 957 patients were in OSAS group. All patients completed a validated GERD questionnaire. Demographic, anthropometric characteristics, and medical history were recorded. The prevalence of GERD was similar in OSAS (38.9%) and non-OSAS (32.0%) groups (p = 0.064). There was no difference in terms of major gastroesophageal reflux (GER) symptoms (heartburn/acid regurgitation) between non-OSAS and mild, moderate, and severe OSAS groups. The prevalence of GERD was increased in female OSAS patients (46.6%) compared to males (35.7%) (p = 0.002). In OSAS patients with GERD, body mass index was greater (34.0 ± 7.0 vs. 33.1 ± 6.8, p = 0.049), waist (115.5 ± 13.9 vs. 113.1 ± 13.4, p = 0.007) and hip (117.9 ± 13.7 vs. 114.2 ± 12.8, p gender, hip circumference, and daytime sleepiness. In this large cohort, the prevalence of GERD was significantly increased in those with primary snoring and OSAS compared to the general population, but severity of OSAS did not influence GERD prevalence. The present results suggest that OSAS was not likely a causative factor but female gender, obesity, and sleepiness were related with prevalence of GERD in OSAS patients.

  11. Evaluation of depression and quality of life in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yosunkaya, S; Kutlu, R; Cihan, F G

    2016-01-01

    Sleep fragmentation, repetitive hypoxemia during sleep, excessive sleepiness during the day, lack of concentration, memory loss, depression, decreased libido, and impotence are the characteristics of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) that may impair quality of life (QOL). This study aimed to investigate the QOL and factors that may affect QOL in people with different OSAS severity and without sleep apnea. This was an analytical cross-sectional study. Polysomnography was performed on 200 people. Those detected as having nonapnea and mild-moderate-severe OSAS were administered the Epworth sleepiness scale, Beck Depression Inventory, and the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF) scale. According to the apnea-hypopnea index, 36 people (18.0%) were in the nonapnea-hypopnea group, 28 (14.0%) in the mild OSAS group, 63 (31.5%) in the moderate OSAS group, and 73 people (36.5%) were in the severe OSAS group. Depression was present in 31 people (15.5%) who participated in the study. The nonapnea-hypopnea group comprised 12.9% of those with depression, mild OSAS group comprised 16.1%, moderate OSAS group comprised 22.6%, and severe OSAS group had 48.4% of the depressed subjects. Beck depression scores showed a significant positive correlation with the Epworth scale (tsleep duration, increased arousal index, and a high ratio of sleep duration with oxygen saturation below 90% to the duration of the entire sleep period increase daytime sleepiness and depressive symptoms in those with OSAS; thus, disrupting general health and QOL.

  12. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and cognitive impairment: effects of CPAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Giordano

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS is a sleep disorder characterised by repetitive episodes of upper airway obstruction (apnea or reduced airflow (hypopnoea despite persistent respiratory effort. Apnea is defined as the cessation of breathing for at least 10 seconds during sleep, while hypopnoea is defined as at least 30% reduction in airflow for 10 seconds associated with oxygen desaturation and sleep fragmentation. The presence in the general population is about 4%. The principal symptoms are: excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS, snoring, dry throat, morning headache, night sweats, gastro-esophageal reflux, and increased blood pressure.Long term complications can be: increased cardio-cerebrovascular risk and cognitive impairment such as deficiency in attention, vigilance, visual abilities, thought, speech, perception and short term memory.Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP is currently the best non-invasive therapy for OSAS.CPAP guarantees the opening of upper airways using pulmonary reflexive mechanisms increasing lung volume during exhalation and resistance reduction, decreasing electromyografical muscular activity around airways.The causes of cognitive impairments and their possible reversibility after CPAP treatment have been analysed in numerous studies. The findings, albeit controversial, show that memory, attention and executive functions are the most compromised cognitive functions.The necessity of increasing the patient compliance with ventilotherapy is evident, in order to prevent cognitive deterioration and, when possible, rehabilitate the compromised functions, a difficult task for executive functions.

  13. Lack of association of matrix metalloproteinase-9 promoter gene polymorphism in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcınkaya, Mustafa; Erbek, Selim S; Babakurban, Seda Turkoglu; Kupeli, Elif; Bozbas, Serife; Terzi, Yunus K; Sahin, Feride Iffet

    2015-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a public health problem. There is an effort to establish the genetic contributions to the development of OSAS. One is matrix metalloproteinases, extracellular matrix degrading enzymes related to systemic inflammation. However, the impact of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) genotypes on the development of OSAS is unknown. Our aim was to determine whether MMP-9 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (MMP-9 -1562C > T) is related to susceptibility to OSAS. A total of 106 patients with a history of sleep apnea and 88 controls without a history of sleep apnea were enrolled in this study. Genotypes were determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses after polymerase chain reaction. Genotypes and allele frequencies of the MMP-9 -1562C > T SNP was not statistically different between the patient and control groups (p > 0.05). There was a statistical association between apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) and body mass index (BMI), and also between AHI and neck circumference (p 0.05). We found no association between MMP-9 -1562C > T SNP and OSAS. Studies to investigate the role of other polymorphisms and expression of MMP-9 gene will provide more information. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Sleep-disordered breathing in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: a genetic model of OSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilleminault, Christian; Primeau, Michelle; Chiu, Hsiao-Yean; Yuen, Kin Min; Leger, Damien; Metlaine, Arnaud

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the presence of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a genetic disorder characterized by cartilaginous defects, including nasal-maxillary cartilages. A retrospective series of 34 patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and complaints of fatigue and poor sleep were evaluated by clinical history, physical examination, polysomnography (PSG), and, in some cases, anterior rhinomanometry. Additionally, a prospective clinical investigation of nine patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome was performed in a specialized Ehlers-Danlos syndrome clinic. All patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome evaluated had SDB on PSG. In addition to apneas and hypopneas, SDB included flow limitation. With increasing age, flow limitation decreased in favor of apnea and hypopnea events, but clinical complaints were similar independent of the type of PSG finding. In the subgroup of patients who underwent nasal rhinomanometry, increased nasal resistance was increased relative to normative values. Nasal CPAP improved symptoms. Patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome presenting to the medical clinic had symptoms and clinical signs of SDB, but they were never referred for evaluation of SDB. In patients with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, abnormal breathing during sleep is commonly unrecognized and is responsible for daytime fatigue and poor sleep. These patients are at particular risk for SDB because of genetically related cartilage defects that lead to the development of facial structures known to cause SDB. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome may be a genetic model for OSA because of abnormalities in oral-facial growth. Early recognition of SDB may allow treatment with orthodontics and myofacial reeducation.

  15. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulcun, Emel; Ekici, Mehmet; Ekici, Aydanur; Tireli, Gökhan; Karakoç, Tülay; Şentürk, Erol; Altınkaya, Volkan

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) is not well known. In this study, we investigated the association between BHR and disease severity in patients with OSAS. Fourty seven (37 male/10 female) OSAS patients admitted with polysomnography enrolled to the study. Histamine bronchial challenge test was performed and body mass index (BMI, kg/m2) was calculated. Presence of BHR was diagnosed as positivity of bronchial provocative test (BPT) (PD values ≤ 16 mg/mL). Patients were questioned with Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS). Histamine bronchial challenge test was positive in 21 of 47 patients. There were significant negative correlations between PD 20 value and AHI (r= -0.47, p= 0.03), BMI (r= -0.45, p= 0.03), and ESS score (r= -0.45, p= 0.03) in the patients with BHR. In addition, AHI (p= 0.03), BMI (p= 0.02), ESS scores (p= 0.03) were higher in patients with BHR (21 patients) than in patients not having BHR (26 patients). Significant negative relation was found between PD 20 value and AHI (b=-0.45, p= 0.03) and significant positive relation was found between presence of BHR and AHI (p= 0.04), BMI (p= 0.03) independently of age and sex in multiple regression analysis. BHR is common in patients with OSAS. As severity of OSAS increased, severity of BHR increased. In addition, obesity may trigger presence of BHR in patients with OSAS.

  16. [Clinical Characteristics of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Cui-Xia; Gao, Yun; Wang, Chun; Li, Yan; Feng, Xiao-Bing; Cheng, Yang-Fan; Zhang, Yang; Ran, Xing-Wu

    2017-05-01

    To compare the clinical characteristics and prevalence of chronic complications in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients with various degrees of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). A total of 170 patients with T2DM and OSAS were enrolled in this study. These participants were divided into three groups with low, medium and high apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), respectively. The demographic characteristics, biochemical indicators and chronic complications of the patients in the three groups were compared. Multivariate Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the associations between chronic complications and OSAS. The patients with severe OSAS had higher waist circumference ( P =0.045), higher BMI ( P =0.069), higher prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), and higher prevalence of diabetic retinopathy (DR) than the patients with mild-moderate OSAS. Similar levels of macrovascular complications were found in the three groups ( P >0.05). The logistic regression analyses showed that DPN ( OR =1.024, 95% CI 1.002-1.046) and chronic kidney disease ( OR =1.026, 95% CI 1.004-1.049) were independent predictors of AHI, adjusting for the lowest oxygen saturation, gender, age, diabetic duration, family history of diabetes, BMI, and HbA1c. Other microvascular and macrovascular complications were not predictors of AHI. Patients with T2DM and severe OSAS have a higher risk of DPN and DR. Particular attention should be paid to T2DM patients with severe OSAS to prevent complications.

  17. Comparison of the area of the pharynx during wakefulness and induced sleep in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Ana Célia; Garcia, Luis Vicente; Santos, Antonio Carlos Dos; Diniz, Paula Rejane Beserra; Ribeiro, Helcio Tadeu; Mello-Filho, Francisco Veríssimo de

    2012-02-01

    The study of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has received growing attention over the past years since various aspects have not been sufficiently established. To evaluate, with the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), changes in the area of the pharynx during wakefulness and induced sleep in patients with OSA. A prospective study of thirty-two patients with a polysomnographic diagnosis of OSA. All patients were submitted to MR imaging in order to obtain high-definition anatomical sagittal sequences during wakefulness and during sleep induced with Propofol. An area was defined on the sagittal plane in the midline of the pharynx. This region was called pharyngeal midplane (PMP) area. A significant difference in PMP area (mm²) was observed between wakefulness and induced sleep in each patient (p sleep compared to wakefulness.

  18. [Treatment compliance with continuous positive airway pressure device among adults with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA): how many adhere to treatment?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrell, E Michael; Chomsky, Ofer; Shechter, Dalia

    2013-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) afflicts approximately 5% of the adult population and increases with age. The gold standard treatment is with the Continuous Positive Airways Pressure (CPAP) machine. Well-designed prospective trials to elucidate long term compliance with CPAP machine are rare. Assessing compliance and long-term use of CPAP machines among patients with OSA who were referred for treatment with this machine. A 4 years prospective cohort observational study was conducted using telephone interviews of 371 newly diagnosed patients with moderate to severe OSA, who received a specialist recommendation to use the CPAP machine which was bought and adjusted to their use. At the end of the first year, 126 (34%) of the OSA patients used the CPAP machine on a nightly basis (regular users), 120 (32.3%) had not used it at all, and 125 (33.7%) had used it only intermittently. The number of regular users increased between the 1st and 2nd year from 126 (34%), to 163 (44%) (p < 0.07) due to additions from the intermittent users group. The non-users group grew from 120 (32.3%) in the first year, and every year afterwards, up to 221 (59.6%) in the fourth year (p < 0.02). In contrast, there was a significant decrease in the intermittent users group, which declined from 125 (33.7%) in the first year to only 18 (4.8%) in the 4th year (p < 0.005). Most of the patients (92.9%) were males. The average age of the regular users was 59.6 years (+/- 11), which was higher in comparison to 55.9 years (+/- 10.3) for the non-users or 58.9 years (+/- 12.6) among the intermittent users (p = 0.064). There were no statistical differences in co-morbidities or demographics between the three groups. However, the regular users were found to have a higher score in the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and a minimal arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) level lower than the patients in the non-users and intermittent users groups (p = 0.019 and p = 0.03 respectively). Four years follow

  19. Leptin and ghrelin levels in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulukavak Ciftci, Tansu; Kokturk, Oguz; Bukan, Neslihan; Bilgihan, Ayse

    2005-01-01

    Leptin is a hormone with well-investigated functions concerning body composition, energy homeostasis and feeding behavior in humans. The obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is strongly associated with obesity, which is known to be closely associated with hyperleptinemia. More recently, ghrelin, a hormone that also influences appetite and energy homeostasis, has been discovered. The aim of this study was to investigate serum leptin and ghrelin levels in obese patients with OSAS in comparison with equally obese controls without OSAS. Thirty untreated obese patients with moderate-severe OSAS (apnea-hypopnea index: AHI > or =15) and 22 obese controls (AHI <5) were studied. To confirm the diagnosis, all patients underwent standard polysomnography in our sleep disorders center. Serum samples were taken at 08:00 h in the morning after overnight fasting. Significantly higher serum leptin levels were found in OSAS patients compared to controls (p = 0.012), but there was no significant difference in serum ghrelin levels between OSAS patients and controls. Serum leptin levels were significantly correlated with body mass index in both OSAS patients (r = 0.55, p = 0.002) and controls (r = 0.46, p = 0.028), but only in OSAS patients was the leptin level significantly correlated with AHI (r = 0.38, p = 0.036). These data support findings suggesting that leptin is a hormonal factor affected by OSAS and not determined by obesity alone. Further studies are needed to investigate the relationship between serum ghrelin and OSAS. (c) 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel

  20. Excessive daytime sleepiness and metabolic syndrome in men with obstructive sleep apnea: a large cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yiqun; Xu, Huajun; Xia, Yunyan; Qian, Yingjun; Li, Xinyi; Zou, Jianyin; Wang, Yuyu; Meng, Lili; Tang, Xulan; Zhu, Huaming; Zhou, Huiqun; Su, Kaiming; Yu, Dongzhen; Yi, Hongliang; Guan, Jian; Yin, Shankai

    2017-10-03

    Excessive daytime sleepiness is a common symptom in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Previous studies have showed that excessive daytime sleepiness is associated with some individual components of metabolic syndrome. We performed a large cross-sectional study to explore the relationship between excessive daytime sleepiness and metabolic syndrome in male OSA patients. A total of 2241 suspected male OSA patients were consecutively recruited from 2007 to 2013. Subjective daytime sleepiness was assessed using the Epworth sleepiness scale. Anthropometric, metabolic, and polysomnographic parameters were measured. Metabolic score was used to evaluate the severity of metabolic syndrome. Among the male OSA patients, most metabolic parameters varied by excessive daytime sleepiness. In the severe group, male OSA patients with excessive daytime sleepiness were more obese, with higher blood pressure, more severe insulin resistance and dyslipidemia than non-sleepy patients. Patients with metabolic syndrome also had a higher prevalence of excessive daytime sleepiness and scored higher on the Epworth sleepiness scale. Excessive daytime sleepiness was independently associated with an increased risk of metabolic syndrome (odds ratio =1.242, 95% confidence interval: 1.019-1.512). No substantial interaction was observed between excessive daytime sleepiness and OSA/ obesity. Excessive daytime sleepiness was related to metabolic disorders and independently associated with an increased risk of metabolic syndrome in men with OSA. Excessive daytime sleepiness should be taken into consideration for OSA patients, as it may be a simple and useful clinical indicator for evaluating the risk of metabolic syndrome.

  1. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) does not affect ventilatory and perceptual responses to exercise in morbidly obese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocenti Bruni, Giulia; Gigliotti, Francesco; Scano, Giorgio

    2012-09-30

    We have tested the hypothesis that high mass loading effects and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) constrain the ventilatory response to exercise in morbidly obese subjects as compared to their counterparts without OSA. Fifteen obese patients with (8) and without OSA and 12 lean healthy subjects performed incremental cycle exercise. The functional evaluation included ventilation, oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide production, end-expiratory-lung-volumes (EELV), inspiratory capacity, heart rate, dyspnea and leg effort (by a modified Borg scale). Changes in ventilation and dyspnea per unit changes in work rate and metabolic variables were similar in the three groups. Breathing pattern and heart rate increased from rest to peak exercise similarly in the three groups. Leg effort was the prevailing symptom for stopping exercise in most subjects. In conclusion, OSA does not limit exercise capacity in morbidly obese subjects. Ventilation contributes to exertional dyspnea similarly as in lean subjects and in obese patients regardless of OSA. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The correlation of anxiety and depression with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariborz Rezaeitalab

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS is a common sleep disorder characterized by repeated upper airway obstruction during sleep. While respiratory pauses followed by loud snoring and daytime sleepiness are the main symptoms of OSAS, the patients may complain from sleep disruption, headache, mood disturbance, irritability, and memory impairment. However, the association of sleep apnea with anxiety and depression is not completely understood. Adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP, the treatment of choice for OSAS, may be influenced by psychological conditions, especially claustrophobia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of OSAS with anxiety and depression symptoms. This study also investigated the association of anxiety with body mass index (BMI and the severity of OSAS. Materials and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study on 178 adult individuals diagnosed with OSAS at the sleep laboratory between September 2008 and May 2012. The participants were interviewed according to a checklist regarding both their chief complaints and other associated symptoms. The psychological status was assessed according to Beck anxiety inventory (BAI and Beck depression inventory (BDI scoring. The severity of breathing disorder was classified as mild, moderate, and severe based on apnea-hypopnea index (AHI which was ascertained by overnight polysomnography. Daytime sleepiness was assessed by Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS. Results: The mean (SD age of participants was 50.33 years. In terms of sex, 85.5% of the study population were males and14.4% were females. We found no relation between sex and the symptoms of OSAS. Regarding the frequency of anxiety and depression symptoms, 53.9% of the individuals had some degree of anxiety, while 46.1% demonstrated depressive symptoms. In terms of OSAS severity, this study showed that OSAS severity was associated with the frequency of anxiety, chocking, and sleepiness (P

  3. Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... sleep apnea (OSA) is a serious and even life-threatening condition. The risks of undiagnosed OSA are ... sleep apnea (OSA) is a serious and even life-threatening condition. The risks of undiagnosed OSA are ...

  4. The impact of obstructive sleep apnea on metabolic and inflammatory markers in consecutive patients with metabolic syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano F Drager

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA is tightly linked to some components of Metabolic Syndrome (MetS. However, most of the evidence evaluated individual components of the MetS or patients with a diagnosis of OSA that were referred for sleep studies due to sleep complaints. Therefore, it is not clear whether OSA exacerbates the metabolic abnormalities in a representative sample of patients with MetS.We studied 152 consecutive patients (age 48+/-9 years, body mass index 32.3+/-3.4 Kg/m2 newly diagnosed with MetS (Adult Treatment Panel III. All participants underwent standard polysomnography irrespective of sleep complaints, and laboratory measurements (glucose, lipid profile, uric acid and C-reactive protein. The prevalence of OSA (apnea-hypopnea index>or=15 events per hour of sleep was 60.5%. Patients with OSA exhibited significantly higher levels of blood pressure, glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, LDL, cholesterol/HDL ratio, triglycerides/HDL ratio, uric acid and C-reactive protein than patients without OSA. OSA was independently associated with 2 MetS criteria: triglycerides: OR: 3.26 (1.47-7.21 and glucose: OR: 2.31 (1.12-4.80. OSA was also independently associated with increased cholesterol/HDL ratio: OR: 2.38 (1.08-5.24, uric acid: OR: 4.19 (1.70-10.35 and C-reactive protein: OR: 6.10 (2.64-14.11. Indices of sleep apnea severity, apnea-hypopnea index and minimum oxygen saturation, were independently associated with increased levels of triglycerides, glucose as well as cholesterol/HDL ratio, uric acid and C-reactive protein. Excessive daytime sleepiness had no effect on the metabolic and inflammatory parameters.Unrecognized OSA is common in consecutive patients with MetS. OSA may contribute to metabolic dysregulation and systemic inflammation in patients with MetS, regardless of symptoms of daytime sleepiness.

  5. Comparison of the efficiency of rhinomanometry and E.N.T examination in diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Amra

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available ntroduction: Considering the high prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS and its complications, proper diagnosis and treatment is particularly important. Since the standard diagnostic test for OSAS is polysomnography, which is not widely available, finding a simple, available, and cheap diagnostic method is very helpful. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of anterior rhinomanometry and upper respiratory tract examination in diagnosis of the OSAS. Materials and Methods: In this observational analytic study, all patients referred to BAMDAD sleep clinic for polysomnography from Feb 2007 to Jul 2007 were evaluated by anterior rhinomanometry as well as upper respiratory tract examination and results were compared with each other. Results: Of 66 patients participated in our study, 31 patients were in the normal group, 19 in mild apnea group, and 16 in moderate to severe apnea group. The results of ENT examination showed clear obstruction in 22 patients. 12 of them were in moderate to severe apnea group, and 9 of them in mild apnea group. Only one patient with abnormal examination was in the normal group. The respiratory tract resistance which was measured by anterior rhinomanometry showed no significant association with positive results of polysomnography. Conclusion: Our study showed that although anterior rhinomanometry is invalid for diagnosis of OSAS, ENT examination (such as noctural oxymetry can be a useful diagnostic method for OSAS.  

  6. Consensus and evidence-based Indian initiative on obstructive sleep apnea guidelines 2014 (first edition)

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Surendra K.; Katoch, Vishwa Mohan; Mohan, Alladi; Kadhiravan, T.; Elavarasi, A.; Ragesh, R.; Nischal, Neeraj; Sethi, Prayas; Behera, D.; Bhatia, Manvir; Ghoshal, A. G.; Gothi, Dipti; Joshi, Jyotsna; Kanwar, M. S.; Kharbanda, O. P.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) are subsets of sleep-disordered breathing. Awareness about OSA and its consequences among the general public as well as the majority of primary care physicians across India is poor. This necessitated the development of the Indian initiative on obstructive sleep apnea (INOSA) guidelines under the auspices of Department of Health Research, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India. OSA is the occurrence o...

  7. Prevalence of central sleep apnea during continous positive airway pressure (CPAP) titration in subjects with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome at an altitude of 2640 m.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazurto Zapata, Maria Angelica; Martinez-Guzman, William; Vargas-Ramirez, Leslie; Herrera, Karen; Gonzalez-Garcia, Mauricio

    2015-03-01

    The occurrence of central apneas when applying positive pressure (CPAP) to patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is called complex sleep apnea (CompSA). This causes poor adherence to CPAP and persistence of symptoms. In Bogota, a city located at an altitude of 2640 m above sea level, chronic hypoxemia can generate certain instability of the respiratory system during sleep which could increase the presence of central apnea. The aim was to establish the prevalence of central apnea (central apnea index >5/h) in adults with moderate or severe OSAS during CPAP titration, and the factors associated with this. Patients over 18 years old with OSAS were referred to the Fundacion Neumologica Colombiana Sleep Center, from January 2008 to June 2010. Polysomnogram (PSG) for CPAP titration was performed according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine criteria. The prevalence was calculated and the clinical and baseline PSG factors associated with the CompSA were analyzed. We included 988 patients, 58% men. CompSA prevalence was 11.6%. Factors associated with CompSA were: central apneas in the baseline PSG (OR: 5.34 [3.49-8.16]), history of heart failure (OR: 2.53 [1.58-4.07]), and male sex (OR: 1.68 [1.06-2.69]). The prevalence of complex sleep apnea in Bogota (11.6%) was intermediate compared to the reported in lower altitudes. The factors associated with the development of CompSA were male sex, heart failure, and the presence of central apnea in the baseline PSG. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Supra-Epiglottic Upper Airway Volume in Elderly Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Hypopnea Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutet, Claire; Abdirahman Mohamed Moussa, Syad; Celle, Sébastien; Laurent, Bernard; Barthélémy, Jean-Claude; Barral, Fabrice-Guy; Roche, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Small upper airway measurements areas and high body mass index are recognized risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in non-elderly populations; however, there is limited information regarding elderly patients. We evaluated whether upper airway volume is associated with OSAS and OSAS treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment and whether BMI is correlated with upper airway volume and measurements in elderly subjects. In 60 volunteers aged 75.58±0.9 years: 20 OSAS, 20 OSAS chronically treated with CPAP, and 20 controls, semi-automatic segmentation, retropalatal distance and transverse diameter of the supra-epiglottic upper airway were evaluated using 3DT1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Anteroposterior to transverse diameter ratio was defined as retropalatar diameter/transverse diameter. There were no significant differences in supra-epiglottic upper airway volume between OSAS, CPAP treated patients, and controls. There were significant differences in retropalatal distance and anteroposterior to transverse diameter ratio between OSAS, CPAP treated patients, and controls (P = 0.008 and Psupra-epiglottic upper airway volume. In elderly subjects, OSAS and body mass index are not associated with changes in supra-epiglottic upper airway volume but are associated with modification of pharynx shape.

  9. Alveolar-derived exhaled nitric oxide is reduced in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foresi, Antonio; Leone, Clementina; Olivieri, Dario; Cremona, George

    2007-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with cardiovascular diseases, in particular systemic arterial hypertension. We postulated that intermittent nocturnal hypoxia in OSAS may be associated to decreased fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) levels from distal airspaces. Multiple flow rate measurements have been used to fractionate nitric oxide (NO) from alveolar and bronchial sources in 34 patients with OSAS, in 29 healthy control subjects, and in 8 hypertensive non-OSAS patients. The effect of 2 days of treatment with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) on FENO was examined in 18 patients with severe OSAS. We found that the mean [+/- SE] concentrations of exhaled NO at a rate of 50 mL/s was 21.8 +/- 1.9 parts per billion (ppb) in patients with OSAS, 25.1 +/- 3.3 ppb in healthy control subjects, and 15.4 +/- 1.7 ppb in hypertensive control patients. The mean fractional alveolar NO concentration (CANO) in OSAS patients was significantly lower than that in control subjects (2.96 +/- 0.48 vs 5.35 +/- 0.83 ppb, respectively; p bronchial FENO, is impaired in patients with OSAS and that this impairment is associated with an increased risk of hypertension. NO production within the alveolar space is modified by treatment with nCPAP.

  10. Obstructive sleep apnea in Down syndrome: Benefits of surgery and noninvasive respiratory support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudoignon, Benjamin; Amaddeo, Alessandro; Frapin, Annick; Thierry, Briac; de Sanctis, Livio; Arroyo, Jorge Olmo; Khirani, Sonia; Fauroux, Brigitte

    2017-08-01

    Children with Down syndrome are at increased risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The aim of the study was to describe the management of OSA in a large cohort of children with Down syndrome. A retrospective analysis of sleep studies and consequent management was performed for all consecutive Down syndrome patients evaluated between September 2013 and April 2016. The data of 57 patients were analyzed: 51/53 had an interpretable overnight polygraphy and 4 the recording of nocturnal gas exchange. Mean age at baseline sleep study was 6.2 ± 5.9 years. Eighteen patients (32%) had prior upper airway surgery. Mean apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was 14 ± 16 events/hr with 41 of the 51 (80%) patients having OSA with an AHI >1 event/hr and 20 patients (39%) having an AHI ≥10 events/hr. Consequently, eight patients (14%) had upper airway surgery. OSA improved in all patients except two who needed noninvasive respiratory support. Nineteen (33%) patients required noninvasive respiratory support. Mean age at noninvasive respiratory support initiation was 7 ± 7 years. On 11 patients with objective adherence data available, mean compliance at 2 ± 1 years of treatment was excellent with an average use per night of 8 hr46 ± 3 hr59 and 9 patients using the noninvasive respiratory support >4 hr/night. Noninvasive respiratory support was associated with an improvement of nocturnal gas exchange. The prevalence of OSA is high in Down syndrome. Upper airway surgery is not always able to correct OSA. Noninvasive respiratory support represents then an effective treatment for OSA and good compliance may be achieved in a majority of patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Computerized analysis of snoring in sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiomi, Fabio Koiti; Pisa, Ivan Torres; Campos, Carlos José Reis de

    2011-01-01

    The International Classification of Sleep Disorders lists 90 disorders. Manifestations, such as snoring, are important signs in the diagnosis of the Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome; they are also socially undesirable. The aim of this paper was to present and evaluate a computerized tool that automatically identifies snoring and highlights the importance of establishing the duration of each snoring event in OSA patients. The low-sampling (200 Hz) electrical signal that indicates snoring was measured during polysomnography. The snoring sound of 31 patients was automatically classified by the software. The Kappa approach was applied to measure agreement between the automatic detection software and a trained observer. Student's T test was applied to evaluate differences in the duration of snoring episodes among simple snorers and OSA snorers. Of a total 43,976 snoring episodes, the software sensitivity was 99. 26%, the specificity was 97. 35%, and Kappa was 0. 96. We found a statistically significant difference (p snoring episodes (simple snoring x OSA snorers). This computer software makes it easier to generate quantitative reports of snoring, thereby reducing manual labor.

  12. Patients with a high risk for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: postoperative respiratory complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, H; Xará, D; Mendonça, J; Santos, A; Abelha, F J

    2013-01-01

    STOP-BANG score (snore; tired; observed apnea; arterial pressure; body mass index; age; neck circumference and gender) can predict the risk of a patient having Obstructive Syndrome Apnea (OSA). The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence STOP-BANG score≥3, in surgical patients admitted to the Post-Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU). Observational, prospective study conducted in a post-anesthesia care unit (PACU) during three weeks (2011). The study population consisted of adult patients after noncardiac and non-neurological surgery. Patients were classified as high risk of OSA (HR-OSA) if STOP-BANG score≥3 and Low-risk of OSA (LR-OSA) if STOP-BANG score<3 (LR-OSA). Patient demographics, intraoperative and postoperative data were collected. Patient characteristics were compared using Mann-Whitney U-test, t-test for independent groups, and chi-square or Fisher's exact test. A total of 357 patients were admitted to PACU; 340 met the inclusion criteria. 179 (52%) were considered HR-OSA. These patients were older, more likely to be masculine, had higher BMI, higher ASA physical status, higher incidence of ischemic heart disease, heart failure, hypertension, dyslipidemia and underwent more frequently insulin treatment for diabetes. These patients had more frequently mild/moderated hypoxia in the PACU (9% vs. 3%, p=0.012) and had a higher incidence of residual neuromuscular blockade (NMB) (20% vs. 16%, p=0.035). Patients with HR-OSA had a longer hospital stay. Patients with HR-OSA had an important incidence among patients scheduled for surgery in our hospital. These patients had more co-morbidities and were more prone to post-operative complications. Copyright © 2012 Sociedade Portuguesa de Pneumologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  13. Cerebral Blood Flow Response to Hypercapnia in Children with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, David R; Lynch, Jennifer M; Winters, Madeline E; McCarthy, Ann L; Newland, John J; Ko, Tiffany; Cornaglia, Mary Anne; Radcliffe, Jerilynn; McDonough, Joseph M; Samuel, John; Matthews, Edward; Xiao, Rui; Yodh, Arjun G; Marcus, Carole L; Licht, Daniel J; Tapia, Ignacio E

    2016-01-01

    Children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) often experience periods of hypercapnia during sleep, a potent stimulator of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Considering this hypercapnia exposure during sleep, it is possible that children with OSAS have abnormal CBF responses to hypercapnia even during wakefulness. Therefore, we hypothesized that children with OSAS have blunted CBF response to hypercapnia during wakefulness, compared to snorers and controls. CBF changes during hypercapnic ventilatory response (HCVR) were tested in children with OSAS, snorers, and healthy controls using diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS). Peak CBF changes with respect to pre-hypercapnic baseline were measured for each group. The study was conducted at an academic pediatric sleep center. Twelve children with OSAS (aged 10.1 ± 2.5 [mean ± standard deviation] y, obstructive apnea hypopnea index [AHI] = 9.4 [5.1-15.4] [median, interquartile range] events/hour), eight snorers (11 ± 3 y, 0.5 [0-1.3] events/hour), and 10 controls (11.4 ± 2.6 y, 0.3 [0.2-0.4] events/hour) were studied. The fractional CBF change during hypercapnia, normalized to the change in end-tidal carbon dioxide, was significantly higher in controls (9 ± 1.8 %/mmHg) compared to OSAS (7.1 ± 1.5, P = 0.023) and snorers (6.7 ± 1.9, P = 0.025). Children with OSAS and snorers have blunted CBF response to hypercapnia during wakefulness compared to controls. Noninvasive DCS blood flow measurements of hypercapnic reactivity offer insights into physiopathology of OSAS in children, which could lead to further understanding about the central nervous system complications of OSAS. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  14. Overactive bladder syndrome and bladder wall thickness in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Zahide; Voyvoda, Bekir; Şirinocak, Pinar Bekdik

    2018-01-01

    The main objective of the present study was to evaluate the presence of overactive bladder (OAB) syndrome, nocturia, urgency, and urge incontinence in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), and measure bladder wall thickness (BWT) in these patients. The patient group was composed of 38 patients with OSAS. The control group was composed of 15 healthy individuals. All patients were evaluated using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (OABSS). The bladder wall thickness was measured by transabdominal ultrasound (US). The presence of nocturia, urinary urgency, and urge incontinence were also evaluated. The mean OABSS was significantly higher in the patient group compared with the control group (p=0.048). The minimum oxygen saturation (Min.SO2) of patients with urgency was found to be significantly lower (p=0.014). The time spent below 90% of oxygen saturation (SO2) was significantly longer in patients with urinary urgency (p=0.009). There was no difference in BWT measurements between the patient group and the control group. There was a significant relationship between BWT values and OABSS in patients with OSAS (p=0.002). The results of the present study suggest that OSAS is associated with OAB syndrome. As a key symptom of OAB, urgency correlates with hypoxia in cases with OSAS. Although the present study did not observe any difference in BWT measurements between the patients and the control group, there was a correlation between BWT measurements and OABSS in patients with OSAS. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  15. Oral Appliance Versus Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome : A 2-Year Follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doff, Michiel H. J.; Hoekema, Aarnoud; Wijkstra, Peter J.; van der Hoeven, Johannes H.; Slater, James J. R. Huddleston; de Bont, Lambert G. M.; Stegenga, Boudewijn

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Oral appliance therapy has emerged as an important alternative to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in treating patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). In this study we report about the subjective and objective treatment outcome of oral appliance therapy and

  16. Long-term oral appliance therapy in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome : a controlled study on temporomandibular side effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doff, Michiel H. J.; Veldhuis, Steffanie K. B.; Hoekema, Aarnoud; Slater, James J. R. Huddleston; Wijkstra, P. J.; de Bont, Lambert G. M.; Stegenga, Boudewijn

    The objective of this study was to assess variations in the occurrence of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and the risk of developing pain and function impairment of the temporomandibular complex in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) patients treated with either an oral appliance (mandibular

  17. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome in Company Workers: Development of a Two-Step Screening Strategy with a New Questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijsvogel, Michiel M.; Wiegersma, Sytske; Randerath, Winfried; Verbraecken, Johan; Wegter-Hilbers, Esther; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria

    2016-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: To develop and evaluate a screening questionnaire and a two-step screening strategy for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in healthy workers. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: A total of 1,861 employees comprising healthy blue- and white-collar workers

  18. The relationship between serum cytokine levels with obesity and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciftci, Tansu Ulukavak; Kokturk, Oguz; Bukan, Neslihan; Bilgihan, Ayse

    2004-10-21

    Inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) may have a direct effect on glucose and lipid metabolism. On the other hand, it is known that IL-6 and TNF-alpha are important pro-inflammatory cytokines in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The goal of present study was to test whether sleep apnea contributes to the previously reported increases of IL-6 and TNF-alpha independent of obesity. Forty-three obese (body mass index, BMI>27 kg/m2) men with newly diagnosed obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) (apnea-hypopnea index, AHI> or =5) and age- and BMI-matched 22 obese nonapneic male controls (AHI<5) were enrolled in this study. To confirm the diagnosis, all patients underwent standard polysomnography in the sleep disorders center. Serum samples were taken at 08:00 h in the morning after overnight fasting. Serum IL-6 and TNF-alpha levels were found significantly higher in OSAS patients than in controls (p=0.002, p=0.03). Serum IL-6 and TNF-alpha levels were significantly correlated with AHI in OSAS patients (r=0.03, p=0.046 and r=0.36, p=0.016). There was no significant correlation between serum IL-6, TNF-alpha levels and AHI in controls. Serum IL-6 and TNF-alpha levels were not correlated with BMI both in OSAS patients and controls. In conclusion, circulating IL-6 and TNF-alpha levels in patients with OSAS, as independent of BMI are significantly higher than levels in controls and there is a positive relationship between previously mentioned cytokines' levels and the severity of OSAS. According to these results, the link between cardiovascular morbidity and OSAS may be explained by the coexistence of other cardiovascular risk factors such as circulating IL-6 and TNF-alpha levels.

  19. Microscopic bilateral posterior cordotomy in severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome with bilateral vocal cord paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarıman, Nesrin; Koca, Öncel; Boyacı, Zerrin; Levent, Ender; Soylu, Akın Cem; Alparslan, Sümeyye; Saygı, Attila

    2012-03-01

    Vocal cord paralysis is a rare cause of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Recurrent laryngeal nerve injury after thyroid gland surgery is one of the leading causes of acquired vocal cord paralysis. A 46-year-old woman with OSAS due to bilateral abductor vocal cord paralysis was presented. She had thyroidectomy 30 years ago and had a weak, breathy voice. She had been referred with a history of high-pitched snoring, apnea witnessed by her spouse, and excessive daytime sleepiness for the last 5 years. Full-night polysomnography revealed that her apnea-hypopnea index was 72/h and minimal oxygen saturation level was 81%. There was no REM and deep sleep periods. Ear-nose-throat consultation offered an endoscopic bilateral posterior cordotomy operation via microscopic suspension laryngoscopy (MLS) as a treatment option. Instead of using a nasal positive airway pressure (nCPAP) device, she was treated surgically. Her OSAS resolved completely within 5 months of the surgery. Her phonation was preserved, and symptoms such as snoring and hypersomnolance disappeared. In OSAS patients with bilateral vocal cord paralysis, MLS-associated bilateral posterior cordotomy can be a choice of treatment as an alternative to nCPAP application.

  20. Perinatal Risk Factors Associated with the Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome in School-Aged Children Born Preterm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Ignacio E; Shults, Justine; Doyle, Lex W; Nixon, Gillian M; Cielo, Christopher M; Traylor, Joel; Marcus, Carole L

    2016-04-01

    The obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is more prevalent in ex-preterm children compared to the general pediatric population. However, it is unknown whether OSAS in ex-preterm children is associated with specific perinatal risk factors. This multicenter cohort study aimed to determine perinatal factors associated with OSAS at school age. 197 ex-preterm (500-1,250 g) children aged 5-12 y who participated as neonates in a double-blind, randomized clinical trial of caffeine versus placebo (Caffeine for Apnea of Prematurity) underwent comprehensive ambulatory polysomnography. A negative binomial regression model was used to identify perinatal risk factors associated with OSAS. 19 children had OSAS (9.6%). Chorioamnionitis and multiple gestation were positively associated with OSAS with P values of 0.014 and 0.03, respectively. Maternal white race (P = 0.047) and maternal age (P = 0.002) were negatively associated with OSAS. Other risk factors, such as birth weight, Apgar score at 5 min, antenatal corticosteroids, delivery route, and sex were not significant. OSAS is very frequent, and is associated with chorioamnionitis and multiple gestation in ex-preterm children. Those born to older white mothers appear to be protected. We speculate that the former may be due to systemic inflammation and the latter to a higher socio-economic status. A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 721. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  1. Obstructive sleep apnea and heart rate variability in male patients with metabolic syndrome: cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Véber, Orsolya; Lendvai, Zsofia; Ronai, Katalin Zsuzsanna; Dunai, Andrea; Zoller, Rezso; Lindner, Anett Virag; Turányi, Csilla Zita; Szocs, Julia Luca; Keresztes, Katalin; Tabák, Adam Gyula; Novak, Marta; Molnar, Miklos Z; Mucsi, Istvan

    2014-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is often accompanied by the metabolic syndrome. Because both conditions are associated with depressed heart rate variability (HRV) separately, our aim was to study whether co-morbid OSA is associated with more reduced HRV in male patients with the metabolic syndrome. In this cross-sectional study, 35 men (age, 57±11 years) with the metabolic syndrome (according to International Diabetes Federation criteria) were included. OSA severity was defined by the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). HRV was assessed by 24-hr ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring. Standard deviation of all normal-to-normal RR intervals (SDNN), the high frequency power (HFP), and the ratio of low- to high-frequency power (LF/HF) were measured. There were 14, 6, and 8 cases of severe (AHI ≥30/hr), moderate (15/hr≤AHI hr), and mild (5/hr ≤AHI hr) OSA, respectively. Seven patients had no OSA. Patients with mild-moderate or severe OSA had reduced SDNN and HFP values compared to those without OSA. Increasing OSA severity was associated significantly with lower daytime LF/HF ratio [standardized β regression coefficient (β)=-0.362, P=0.043] and higher night/day LF/HF ratio (β=0.377, P=0.023) after controlling for age, duration of diabetes, and severity of metabolic syndrome. Co-morbid OSA is associated with decreased overall HRV, parasympathetic loss, and impaired diurnal pattern of sympathovagal balance that may further increase the cardiovascular vulnerability of male patients with the metabolic syndrome. The role of the HRV analysis in the risk assessment of these patients warrants further studies.

  2. Information processing speed in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpinen, R; Saunamäki, T; Jehkonen, M

    2014-04-01

    To provide a comprehensive review of studies on information processing speed in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) as compared to healthy controls and normative data, and to determine whether continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment improves information processing speed. A systematic review was performed on studies drawn from Medline and PsycINFO (January 1990-December 2011) and identified from lists of references in these studies. After inclusion criteria, 159 articles were left for abstract review, and after exclusion criteria 44 articles were fully reviewed. The number of patients in the studies reviewed ranged from 10 to 157 and the study samples consisted mainly of men. Half of the studies reported that patients with OSAS showed reduced information processing speed when compared to healthy controls. Reduced information processing speed was seen more often (75%) when compared to norm-referenced data. Psychomotor speed seemed to be particularly liable to change. CPAP treatment improved processing speed, but the improvement was marginal when compared to placebo or conservative treatment. Patients with OSAS are affected by reduced information processing speed, which may persist despite CPAP treatment. Information processing is usually assessed as part of other cognitive functioning, not as a cognitive domain per se. However, it is important to take account of information processing speed when assessing other aspects of cognitive functioning. This will make it possible to determine whether cognitive decline in patients with OSAS is based on lower-level or higher-level cognitive processes or both. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Comparison of Syndrome Severity and Risk Factors for Adult Jewish and Arab Males in Northern Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carel, Rafael S; Brodsky, Inna; Pillar, Giora

    2015-08-01

    Background: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common health problem with an estimated prevalence of 4% among men, many of whom are undiagnosed and untreated. To compare demographic characteristics, health profiles, risk factors, and disease severity in Arab and Jewish men with OSA syndrome. In this cross-sectional study we retrospectively analyzed clinical data from the medical files of men ≥ 22 years old who were referred to the Rambam Medical Center sleep clinic during the period 2001-2009 with a suspected diagnosis of OSA. OSA severity was measured using the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). Categorical variables were compared using the chi-square test. Relations between OSA severity and a set of independent risk factors were assessed by linear regression analysis. A total of 207 men were included (39 Arabs, 19%; 168 Jews, 81%). Arab participants were younger than their Jewish counterparts (45.5 ± 8.9 years vs. 49.8 ± 11.8, P = 0.04) and their body mass index (BMI) was higher (3.1 ± 5.1 vs. 30.0 ± 4.4, P = 0.001). OSA severity (AHI score) was higher among Arab men, with low, medium and high severity scores seen in 10%, 33% and 56% of Arab men vs. 35%, 29% and 37% of Jewish men, respectively [T(198) = 2.39, P = 0.02]. Mean blood oxygen saturation was comparable. Arab men presenting for evaluation of sleep apnea harbored more severe OSA symptoms, were younger, and had higher BMI compared to Jewish men. Since OSA syndrome evolves for several years until it becomes severe, these findings suggest that Arab men seek medical assistance later than Jewish men with OSA.

  4. A Different Clinical Type of OSAS: REM-Related OSAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handan İnönü Köseoğlu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Rapid eye movement (REM is an entity in which the collapsibility of upper respiratory tract increases. Different opinions have been proposed with regard to the definition of REM-related obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS. Some authors consider REM-related OSAS as the first presentation, and others consider it as a different clinical type of OSAS. We aimed to compare the clinical and polysomnographic findings of REM-related and non-REM-related OSAS patients to test whether REM-related OSAS is a different clinical type OSAS or the manifestation of early stage or the onset of OSAS. Methods: The study had a retrospective design. Patients with an initial diagnosis of sleep-related breathing disorders were later diagnosed to have OSAS based on an apnea–hypopnea index (AHI of ≥5 and were divided into the following two groups: patients with AHINREM of 2 whose REM recordings were obtained for at least 30 min were defined as having “REM-related OSAS,” and those who did not meet this description were defined as having “non-REM-related OSAS.” Results: A total of 329 patients with a mean age of 51±10 years were included in the study. Thirty-five (10.6% patients with OSAS were REM-related and 294 (89.4% were non-REM-related. Age, body mass index, smoking status, and concomitant diseases were comparable between groups (p>0.05. In REM-related patients, AHI was lower, REM duration was longer, and mean oxygen saturations were comparatively higher (p<0.05. Conclusion: Similarities between groups in age, body mass index, and concomitant disease suggest that REM-related OSAS is a different clinical type of OSAS, rather than the early phase of OSAS.

  5. Effects of Adenotonsillectomy on Neurocognitive Function in Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumie Horiuchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS in children does not only present with symptoms of sleep disturbances but also with associated symptoms such as growth failure, enuresis, academic learning difficulties, and behavioral problems, including attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder- (ADHD- like symptoms. We evaluated neurocognitive functions before and after adenotonsillectomy in a patient with OSAS. An 11-year-old boy suspected of having ADHD with nocturnal enuresis was referred for evaluation. He was found to have adenotonsillar hypertrophy. Presence of snoring was evident only after detailed medical interview. Polysomnography confirmed the diagnosis of OSAS, which was subsequently treated by adenotonsillectomy. The apnea/hypopnea index decreased from 21.9 at baseline to 1.8 after surgery, and the frequency of enuresis fell from almost nightly to 2-3 times per month. Neurocognitive and behavioral assessment after the treatment of OSAS showed significant improvement in cognitive functions, especially attention capacity and considerable amelioration of behavioral problems including ADHD-like symptoms. As the most common cause of pediatric OSAS is adenotonsillar hypertrophy, medical interview and oropharyngeal examination should always be performed in children suspected of having ADHD. The necessity of sleep evaluation for children with ADHD-like symptoms was also emphasized.

  6. What is the efficacy of nasal surgery in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bican, Aylin; Kahraman, Ahmet; Bora, Ibrahim; Kahveci, Ramazan; Hakyemez, Bahattin

    2010-11-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is characterized by repetitive episodes of partial or complete obstruction of the upper airway during sleep and is associated with increasing respiratory efforts, with a consequent oxyhemoglobin desaturation, sleep fragmentation, and daytime symptoms, most commonly excessive sleepiness. The effectiveness of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is undoubtedly high in treating those patients who use it regularly, but for those who refuse it, the success rate is 0. It is for this subset of patients that surgical therapy can be useful. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of nasal surgery on nasal resistance, sleep apnea, sleep quality, and nasal volumetric measurement in adult male patients with OSAS. Twenty male patients with complaints of hypersomnia and snoring were included in the study. Polysomnography of patients with the prediagnosis of OSAS was planned. All patients underwent CPAP treatment before and after surgery. Patients, who had anatomic structural defects causing nasal valve shrinkage, were operated on at the Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Department. Volumetric measurements of the nose were obtained before and after the operation. In our study, it was observed that respiratory tract space of patients increased subsequent to the surgery, and thereby OSAS level decreased, and tolerating CPAP device was easier. Measurements of internal nasal valve vertex and fields and external nasal valve fields before and after operation were significant. Surgical relief of this nasal obstruction may improve quality of life in patients with OSAS.

  7. Melatonin Effects in REM Sleep Behavior Disorder Associated with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Carolin; Kunz, Dieter; Bes, Frederik

    2017-01-01

    REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD), with its main clinical symptoms of nightmares with dream-enacting behavior, is considered as a possible precursor of neurodegenerative disease. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) is known to be capable of provoking RBD-like symptoms by apneic event related arousals. The two sleep related pathologies must coincide in a relevant number of individuals because of overlapping prevalence in similar age groups. Until now RBD symptoms coexisting with OSAS are rarely described in scientific literature and in fact considered as OSAS mimicking RBD. We report four cases with a severe clinical RBD syndrome which were polysomnographically also diagnosed with concomitant OSAS (AHI range: 10.1 -53.2/h). Treatment with 2 mg prolonged release melatonin led to a relevant clinical improvement of RBD symptoms in all patients, so far untreated for the sleep related breathing disorder. Measure of REM sleep without atonia (RSWA) in polysomnography showed values ranging from 5.1 to 20.4% determined with the Montplaisir method. Surprisingly, RSWA values in PSG with melatonin were high, probably because of the still untreated OSAS. We presume that in patients with RBD and OSAS both pathologies contribute in varying degrees to the emergence of RBD symptoms by a destabilization of REM sleep. We suggest by consequence to consider a therapeutic strategy including the treatment of both disorders for an optimal therapeutic response. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and growth failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteller, E; Villatoro, J C; Agüero, A; Lopez, R; Matiñó, E; Argemi, J; Girabent-Farrés, M

    2018-05-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is a common problem among children and is recognized as a cause of significant medical morbidity. Since the 1980s, it has been suggested that obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is a risk factor for growth failure in children. In many cases, it has been shown that growth failure is reversible once the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is resolved. The objectives of this study were to analyze and compare growth failure prevalence in a Mediterranean population of children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and healthy children matched in age and sex, and to assess the effectiveness of tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy in resolving growth retardation. We compared 172 children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (apnea-hypopnea index ≥ 3) who had undergone tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy with 172 healthy controls in terms of key anthropometric parameters. Most of the criteria used for growth failure were higher to a statistically significant degree in the study group vs the control group: height-for-age ≤ 3rd percentile (7.56% vs 2.91%; p = 0.044), weight-for-age ≤ 5th percentile (9.30% vs 2.33%; p = 0.005), weight-for-age ≤ 3rd percentile (8.14% vs 2.33%; p = 0.013) and height and/or weight for-age ≤ 5th percentile (13.95% vs 5.81%; p = 0.009). The height-for-age ≤ 5th percentile was almost at the limit of statistical significance (8.72% for the study group vs 4.65% for the control group; p = 0.097). At one-year post-surgery follow-up, 10 of 15 children with height-for-age ≤ 5th percentile had achieved catch-up growth (66.6%), and 14 of 24 children with height- and/or weight-for-age ≤ 5th percentile had normalized growth (58.33%). For children with failure to thrive or who have growth failure, physicians should consider the possibility of obstructive sleep apnea. A significant number of children with obstructive sleep apnea concurrent with growth failure could benefit from

  9. [Insulin-like growth factor-I and cognitive function in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Li, Shunwei; Huang, Xizhen; Cong, Bo

    2002-10-25

    To explore the possible biochemical mechanism of cognitive impairment in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Polysomnography was administered to thirty-six patients with OSAS and eighteen education and BMI-matched controls, all males aged 40 approximately 49 for 8.5 hours at night. Early next morning blood was drawn and serum insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) was determined by immunoradiometric assay. Then neuropsychological tests of visual regeneration, digital symbol, comprehensive memory and digital span were conducted. The quality of sleep in the patients with OSAS was significantly worse than that of the controls. The score of visual regeneration in the patients with OSAS was 8.4 +/- 2.7, significantly lower than that in control group (11.6 +/- 1.4, P sleep duration (r = 0.598, P sleep deprivation may be the reason of the decrease of the serum IGF-I level in patients with OSAS.

  10. Correlation of clinical profiles with obstructive sleep apnea and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Ashfaq; Uzma, Nazia; Swamy, T L N; Shoba, Alluri; Kumar, B Santhosh

    2012-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common condition being increasingly recognized and is associated with many diseases. Few data are available for Indian patients and public health hazard of the condition continues to be seriously underestimated in this country. The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of obesity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and hyperlipidemia (HLP) in a South Indian population with proven OSA. A retrospective analysis of data accrued in patients undergoing polysomnography (PSG) was undertaken. Two hundred thirty-four patients of either sex in the age of 54 ± 11 years who tested positive for OSA were compared with control group. An apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of >5 in the presence of snoring and daytime somnolence was taken to define sleep apnea. The mean AHI among the study group with OSA was 31.3 ± 18.6 as compared with 1.2 ± 0.5 in the control group. The BMI among patients with OSA was 36 ± 6 as compared with 29 ± 4 in comparison group (p lack of concentration, changes in mood, morning headache, and dry mouth. Nonrestorative sleep, awakening with choking, nocturnal dyspnea, insomnia with frequent awakenings, nocturia, and diaphoresis were observed in (>80%) patients. A significant difference in the sleep efficiency (16%), sleep onset (14%), and mean saturation (9%) was observed in the study group as compared to the control group. The risk of obesity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and HLP in OSA syndrome patients was almost three times more than that of the comparing group.

  11. Volumetric analysis of the pharynx in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) treated with maxillomandibular advancement (MMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Ana Célia; da Silva-Junior, Savio Nogueira; Garcia, Luis Vicente; dos Santos, Antonio Carlos; Fernandes, Maria Regina França; de Mello-Filho, Francisco Veríssimo

    2013-03-01

    Maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) has been reported to be the most effective surgical treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Most reports about MMA aim to confirm the efficiency of this treatment modality, but few describe the anatomical changes produced in the pharynx by the surgery. Thus, the objective of the present investigation was to quantify the anatomical changes of the pharynx that occur in patients with OSA after MMA surgery using magnetic resonance (MR). Twenty patients with a polysomnographic diagnosis of OSA participated in the study. All patients were submitted to image acquisition by MR performed during wakefulness. Polysomnography and MR were performed preoperatively and 6 months after MMA. Volume analysis (in cubic millimeters) was performed as the sum of the areas multiplied by their thickness, with no intervals between sections. The pharyngeal air space of the region between the hard palate and the base of the epiglottis was divided into a retropalatal (RP) region and a retrolingual (RL) region. Postoperative MR showed a mean volumetric increase of 26.72 % in the RP region and of 27.2 % in the RL region. MMA increases the air space of the pharynx by expanding the facial skeletal structure to which the soft tissues of the pharynx and tongue are fixed, with a consequent reduction of collapsibility in the presence of negative pressure during inspiration. This reduced possibility of pharyngeal collapse may contribute to the reduction of obstructive events.

  12. Sleep problems and obstructive sleep apnea in children with down syndrome, an overwiew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maris, Mieke; Verhulst, Stijn; Wojciechowski, Marek; Van de Heyning, Paul; Boudewyns, An

    2016-03-01

    Children with Down syndrome (DS) have a high prevalence of sleep problems, including behavioural sleep disturbances and obstructive sleep apnea. Sleep problems are associated with a wide range of adverse health effects. Since children with DS are already known to have many comorbidities, they are particularly susceptible for the negative impact of sleep problems. Aim of this study is (1) to evaluate the prevalence of sleep problems in children with DS, (2) compare the prevalence of sleep problems in children with DS with a community sample of typical developing school-aged children, and (3) to correlate the existence of sleep problems in children with DS and OSA. Children enrolled at the multidisciplinary Down team of the University Hospital Antwerp and seen at the ENT department were eligible for this study. The prevalence of sleep problems was evaluated by the use of the Child Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ) and a full overnight polysomnography was performed to screen for obstructive sleep apnea. Parents of fifty-four children with DS, aged 7.5 years (5.4-11.6), completed the CSHQ and an overall prevalence of sleep problems was found in 74.1%. In 57.1% of the children OSA was diagnosed with a median obstructive apnea-hypopnea index (oAHI) 7.25/h (5.7-9.8). Overall sleep problems were not age-or gender related, however boys suffer more from daytime sleepiness. Symptoms of sleep disordered breathing correlate with parasomnias, a longer sleep duration and more daytime sleepiness. No correlation was found between sleep problems and underlying OSA. Children with Down syndrome have a significantly higher prevalence of sleep problems, compared to normal developing healthy school-aged children. We didn't find any correlation between the parental report of sleep problems and underlying OSA, or OSA severity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Surgical treatment of a Pattern I Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome individual - clinical case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Cavalcante Feitoza

    Full Text Available Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSA is a multifactorial disease that highly alters a persons quality of life. It is characterized by the repeated interruption of breathing during sleep, due to an obstruction or the collapse of the upper airways. Since it is a multifactorial etiological disorder, it requires a thorough diagnosis and treatment with an interdisciplinary team, which comprises several professionals such as a surgical dentist, phonoaudiologist, otorhinolaryngologist, sleep doctor, neurologist and physiotherapist. The diagnosis and the degree of severity of the syndrome is determined through a polysomnography examination. After that, the best form of treatment is devised depending on the gravity of the case. In cases of moderate to severe apnea, invasive treatment through surgical procedures such as maxillomandibular advancement remains the preferred option as it increases the posterior air space, reducing and/or eliminating the obstruction. Thus, improving the patients respiratory function and, consequently, his quality of life as it is shown in the clinical case at hand. In which the male patient, facial pattern type I, 41 years of age, diagnosed with moderate OSA (Apnea-Hypopnea Index - AHI of 23.19, decided to have a surgical treatment instead of a conservative one, resulting in the cure of apnea (AHI of 0.3.

  14. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome after operative intervention for velopharyngeal insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Jeffrey Crockett

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surgical treatment of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is often warranted. In this patient population, VPI is characterized by poor palatal elevation and muscular hypotonia with an intact palate. We hypothesize that 22q11.2 deletion patients are at greater risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA after surgical correction of VPI, due, in part, to their functional hypotonia, large velopharyngeal gap size, and the need to surgically obstruct the velopharynx. Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome treated at a tertiary pediatric hospital between the years of 2002-2012. The incidence of VPI, need for surgery, post-operative polysomnogram, post-operative VPI assessment, and OSA treatments were evaluated. Results: Forty-three patients (18 males, 25 females, ages 1-14 years fitting the inclusion criteria were identified. Twenty-eight patients were evaluated by speech pathology due to hypernasality. Twenty-one patients had insufficient velopharyngeal function and required surgery. Fifteen underwent pharyngeal flap surgery, three underwent sphincter pharyngoplasty, two underwent Furlow palatoplasty, and one underwent combined sphincter pharyngoplasty with Furlow palatoplasty. Of these, eight had post-operative snoring. Six of these underwent polysomnography. Four patients were found to have OSA based on the results of the polysomnography (average apnea/hypopnea index of 4.9 events/hour, median=5.1, SD=2.1. Two required continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP due to moderate OSA.Conclusion: Surgery is often necessary to correct VPI in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Monitoring for OSA should be considered after surgical correction of VPI due to a high occurrence in this population. Furthermore, families should be counseled of the risk of OSA after surgery and the potential need for treatment with CPAP.

  15. Perinatal Risk Factors Associated with the Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome in School-Aged Children Born Preterm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Ignacio E.; Shults, Justine; Doyle, Lex W.; Nixon, Gillian M.; Cielo, Christopher M.; Traylor, Joel; Marcus, Carole L.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: The obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is more prevalent in ex-preterm children compared to the general pediatric population. However, it is unknown whether OSAS in ex-preterm children is associated with specific perinatal risk factors. This multicenter cohort study aimed to determine perinatal factors associated with OSAS at school age. Methods: 197 ex-preterm (500–1,250 g) children aged 5–12 y who participated as neonates in a double-blind, randomized clinical trial of caffeine versus placebo (Caffeine for Apnea of Prematurity) underwent comprehensive ambulatory polysomnography. A negative binomial regression model was used to identify perinatal risk factors associated with OSAS. Results: 19 children had OSAS (9.6%). Chorioamnionitis and multiple gestation were positively associated with OSAS with P values of 0.014 and 0.03, respectively. Maternal white race (P = 0.047) and maternal age (P = 0.002) were negatively associated with OSAS. Other risk factors, such as birth weight, Apgar score at 5 min, antenatal corticosteroids, delivery route, and sex were not significant. Conclusions: OSAS is very frequent, and is associated with chorioamnionitis and multiple gestation in ex-preterm children. Those born to older white mothers appear to be protected. We speculate that the former may be due to systemic inflammation and the latter to a higher socio-economic status. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 721. Citation: Tapia IE, Shults J, Doyle LW, Nixon GM, Cielo CM, Traylor J, Marcus CL. Perinatal risk factors associated with the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in school-aged children born preterm. SLEEP 2016;39(4):737–742. PMID:26446117

  16. Oral appliance versus continuous positive airway pressure in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: a 2-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doff, Michiel H J; Hoekema, Aarnoud; Wijkstra, Peter J; van der Hoeven, Johannes H; Huddleston Slater, James J R; de Bont, Lambert G M; Stegenga, Boudewijn

    2013-09-01

    Oral appliance therapy has emerged as an important alternative to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in treating patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). In this study we report about the subjective and objective treatment outcome of oral appliance therapy and CPAP in patients with OSAS. Cohort study of a previously conducted randomized clinical trial. University Medical Center, Groningen, The Netherlands. One hundred three patients with OSAS. CPAP and oral appliance therapy (Thornton Adjustable Positioner type-1, Airway Management, Inc., Dallas, TX, USA). Objective (polysomnography) and subjective (Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire, Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short Form Health Survey [SF-36]) parameters were assessed after 1 and 2 years of treatment. Treatment was considered successful when the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was oral appliance therapy and CPAP in treating mild to severe OSAS in a 2-year follow-up. More patients (not significant) dropped out under oral appliance therapy (47%) compared with CPAP (33%). Both therapies showed substantial improvements in polysomnographic and neurobehavioral outcomes. However, CPAP was more effective in lowering the AHI and showed higher oxyhemoglobin saturation levels compared to oral appliance therapy (P Oral appliance therapy should be considered as a viable treatment alternative to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in patients with mild to moderate obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). In patients with severe OSAS, CPAP remains the treatment of first choice. The original randomized clinical trial, of which this study is a 2-year follow-up, is registered at ISRCTN.org; identifier: ISRCTN18174167; trial name: Management of the obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome: oral appliance versus continuous positive airway pressure therapy; URL: http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN18174167.

  17. The effect of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome on growth and development in nonobese children: a parallel study of twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao Man; Shi, Jun; Meng, Guo Zhen; Chen, Hong Sai; Zhang, Li Na; Wang, Zhao Yan; Wu, Hao

    2015-03-01

    To explore the effects of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) on children's growth by the study of identical twins. Seventeen cases of nonobese children with OSAS were included in this study. The control group was their identical twin sibling, who had no signs of OSAS. Data including height, weight, and serum insulin-like growth factor 1 levels were analyzed before tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy (T&A) and at 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery. The mean apnea hyponea index was 3.9 times/hour in patients with OSAS and became normal after surgery. Minimum oxygen saturation gradually increased after T&A. The height and weight of the OSAS group before T&A was lower than the control group. During the follow-up period, height and weight increased but were lower than the control group. Serum insulin-like growth factor 1 levels in the OSAS group before T&A were lower than the control group. The level was significantly increased 3 months after T&A. OSAS impairs growth and development. Significant growth recovery occurs after T&A, and early surgical intervention is an important factor for improvement in growth. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome Patients Have Worse Sleep Quality Compared to Mild Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Balester Mello de Godoy

    Full Text Available To compare sleep quality and sustained attention of patients with Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome (UARS, mild Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA and normal individuals.UARS criteria were presence of excessive daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale-ESS-≥ 10 and/or fatigue (Modified Fatigue Impact Scale-MFIS-≥ 38 associated to Apnea/hypopnea index (AHI ≤ 5 and Respiratory Disturbance Index (RDI > 5 events/hour of sleep or more than 30% of total sleep time with flow limitation. Mild OSA was considered if the presence of excessive daytime sleepiness (ESS ≥ 10 and/or fatigue (MFIS ≥ 38 associated to AHI ≥ 5 and ≤ 15 events/hour. "Control group" criteria were AHI < 5 events/hour and RDI ≤ 5 events/hour and ESS ≤ 9, without any sleep, clinical, neurological or psychiatric disorder. 115 individuals (34 UARS and 47 mild OSA patients and 34 individuals in "control group", adjusted for age, gender, body mass index (BMI and schooling years, performed sleep questionnaires and sustained attention evaluation. Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT was performed five times (each two hours from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.UARS patients had worse sleep quality (Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire-FOSQ-and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index-PSQI: p < 0.05 and more fatigue than mild OSA patients (p = 0.003 and scored significantly higher in both Beck inventories than "control group" (p < 0.02. UARS patients had more lapses early in the morning (in time 1 compared to the results in the afternoon (time 5 than mild OSA (p = 0.02. Mild OSA patients had more lapses in times 2 than in time 5 compared to "control group" (p = 0.04.UARS patients have a worse sleep quality, more fatigue and a worse early morning sustained attention compared to mild OSA. These last had a worse sustained attention than controls.

  19. A comprehensive rehabilitation program improves disease severity in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: a pilot randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desplan, M; Mercier, J; Sabaté, M; Ninot, G; Prefaut, C; Dauvilliers, Y

    2014-08-01

    Exercise training may improve components of metabolic syndrome and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). The objective of our pilot randomized controlled study was to determine the benefits of a short intensive inpatient individualized exercise training (IET) program in sedentary untreated OSAS patients. Twenty-two sedentary patients with moderate to severe OSAS were randomly assigned either to one-month education activity sessions (n=11; control group) or to inpatient rehabilitation program (n=11), including IET, education activities sessions, and dietary management. Full polysomnography (PSG), OSLER (Oxford Sleep Resistance test), body composition, anthropometric measurements, metabolic syndrome components, and questionnaires were performed at baseline and at study end point. No changes occurred in the control group in all variables. Compared to controls, participants randomized to the IET group presented a significant decrease in apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) (40.6±19.4 vs. 28.0±19.3; Psleep latency was found in participants in the IET group with altered values at baseline. IET reduced OSAS severity with improvement of metabolic syndrome components with concomitant loss in body fat in sedentary adults. If confirmed on a larger scale, a comprehensive rehabilitation program could constitute an additional or alternative treatment for moderate to severe OSAS patients. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Flexible surface acoustic wave respiration sensor for monitoring obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hao; Tao, Xiang; Dong, Shurong; Qin, Yiheng; Yu, Liyang; Luo, Jikui; Deen, M. Jamal

    2017-11-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) has received much attention in recent years due to its significant harm to human health and high morbidity rate. A respiration monitoring system is needed to detect OSAS, so that the patient can receive treatment in a timely manner. Wired and wireless OSAS monitoring systems have been developed, but they require a wire connection and batteries to operate, and they are bulky, heavy and not user-friendly. In this paper, we propose the use of a flexible surface acoustic wave (SAW) microsensor to detect and monitor OSAS by measuring the humidity change associated with the respiration of a person. SAW sensors on rigid 128° YX LiNbO3 substrate are also characterized for this application. Results show both types of SAW sensors are suitable for OSAS monitoring with good sensitivity, repeatability and reliability, and the response time and recovery time for the flexible SAW sensors are 1.125 and 0.75 s, respectively. Our work demonstrates the potential for an innovative flexible microsensor for the detection and monitoring of OSAS.

  1. Occupational health of patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmi, Ottavia; Jurado-Gámez, Bernabé; Gude, Francisco; Buela-Casal, Gualberto

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this systematic literature review was to assess the impact of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) on patients' occupational health. We selected 19 studies that dealt with issues related to job performance and productivity, absenteeism, and psychosocial health of patients with OSAS and assessed the risk of bias in their conclusions. Although methodologically rigorous studies are needed to confirm these findings, the results obtained suggest the existence of multiple relationships between OSAS and work limitations of patients (i.e., difficulties maintaining attention, learning new tasks, or performing monotonous tasks). The studies reviewed reached more scientifically consistent conclusions about such patients' risk of taking more days of sick leave or having work disability, particularly if they reported excessive daytime sleepiness. Very few studies have explored the relationship between OSAS and psychosocial occupational health of patients. Thus, there is a need for research to clarify these aspects of occupational medicine. OSAS has numerous effects on patients' occupational health, yet, in general, results should be confirmed by studies with sufficiently large samples in which OSAS is diagnosed with reliable methods and occupational variables are assessed with standardized and validated questionnaires.

  2. SURGICAL AND NON-SURGICAL THERAPY OF OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA SYNDROME IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Šujanská

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Interventions of paediatric obstructive sleep apnea syndrome are complex, varied and multidisciplinary. The goal of the treatment is to restore optimal breathing during the night and to relieve associated symptoms. Evidence suggests that the surgical intervention with removal of the tonsils and adenoids will lead to significant improvements in the most incomplicated cases, as recently reported from a meta-analysis. However, post-operative persistence of this syndrome in paediatric population is more frequent than expected, which supports the idea of the complexity of this syndrome. Adenotomy alone may not be sufficient in children with OSAS, because it does not address oropharyngeal obstruction secondary to tonsillar hyperplasia. Continuous positive airway pressure can effectively treat this syndrome in selected groups of children, improving both nocturnal and daytime symptoms, but poor adherence is a limiting factor. For this reason, CPAP is not recommended as first-line therapy for OSAS when adenotonsillectomy is an option. It is now being investigated the incorporation of nonsurgical approaches for milder forms and for residual OSAS after surgical intervention. Althought adeno­tonsillar hypertrophy is the most common for OSAS in children; obesity is emerging as an equally important etiological factor. Therefore an intensive weight reduction program and adequate sleep hygiene are also important lifestyle changes that may be very effective in mitigating the symptoms of this syndrome. Pharmacological therapy (leukotriene antagonists, topical nasal steroids is usually use for mild forms of OSAS and in children with associated allergic diseases. Special orthodontic treatment and oropharyngeal exercises are a relatively new and promising alternative therapeutic modality used in selected groups of children with OSAS.

  3. Hormonal status and the orexin system in obese patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya Viktorovna Strueva

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of research was to estimate the influence of hormone metabolism and sleep apnea on patients with obesity. 76 patients (37 males and 39 females with obesity were included in this study. After night polysomnography all patients were divided in two groups comparableby age, sex ratio and BMI. The first group consisted of 41 patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS, the second (controls – 35 patients without breath disorders during sleep. OSAS is accompanied by the increase in urinary cortisol during the night, high levels ofbasal insulin, disturbances of hepatic production of IGF-1, dysfunction of the pituitary-gonadal axis. Our results show that sleep-related breathing disorders render markedly and negatively affect on hormonal parameters of patients with obesity. As a reliable difference of basalsecretion of orexin A in obese patients with and without OSAS was not revealed (42,0 [14; 99,5] vs. 18,0 [14,5; 124,5] pg/ml; р=0,9, we were not able to show the existence that the existence of OSAS is followed by any special changes of activity of the orexin system.

  4. Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome Patients Have Worse Sleep Quality Compared to Mild Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Godoy, Luciana Balester Mello; Luz, Gabriela Pontes; Palombini, Luciana Oliveira; E Silva, Luciana Oliveira; Hoshino, Wilson; Guimarães, Thaís Moura; Tufik, Sergio; Bittencourt, Lia; Togeiro, Sonia Maria

    2016-01-01

    To compare sleep quality and sustained attention of patients with Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome (UARS), mild Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) and normal individuals. UARS criteria were presence of excessive daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale-ESS-≥ 10) and/or fatigue (Modified Fatigue Impact Scale-MFIS-≥ 38) associated to Apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) ≤ 5 and Respiratory Disturbance Index (RDI) > 5 events/hour of sleep or more than 30% of total sleep time with flow limitation. Mild OSA was considered if the presence of excessive daytime sleepiness (ESS ≥ 10) and/or fatigue (MFIS ≥ 38) associated to AHI ≥ 5 and ≤ 15 events/hour. "Control group" criteria were AHI sleep, clinical, neurological or psychiatric disorder. 115 individuals (34 UARS and 47 mild OSA patients and 34 individuals in "control group"), adjusted for age, gender, body mass index (BMI) and schooling years, performed sleep questionnaires and sustained attention evaluation. Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT) was performed five times (each two hours) from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. UARS patients had worse sleep quality (Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire-FOSQ-and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index-PSQI: p sleep quality, more fatigue and a worse early morning sustained attention compared to mild OSA. These last had a worse sustained attention than controls.

  5. Reduced brain gray matter concentration in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Eun Yeon; Tae, Woo Suk; Lee, Min Joo; Kang, Jung Woo; Park, Hwan Seok; Lee, Jun Young; Suh, Minah; Hong, Seung Bong

    2010-02-01

    To investigate differences in brain gray matter concentrations or volumes in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) and healthy volunteers. Optimized voxel-based morphometry, an automated processing technique for MRI, was used to characterize structural differences in gray matter in newly diagnosed male patients. University hospital. The study consisted of 36 male OSA and 31 non-apneic male healthy volunteers matched for age (mean age, 44.8 years). Using the t-test, gray matter differences were identified. The statistical significance level was set to a false discovery rate P 200 voxels. The mean apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of patients was 52.5/h. On visual inspection of MRI, no structural abnormalities were observed. Compared to healthy volunteers, the gray matter concentrations of OSA patients were significantly decreased in the left gyrus rectus, bilateral superior frontal gyri, left precentral gyrus, bilateral frontomarginal gyri, bilateral anterior cingulate gyri, right insular gyrus, bilateral caudate nuclei, bilateral thalami, bilateral amygdalo-hippocampi, bilateral inferior temporal gyri, and bilateral quadrangular and biventer lobules in the cerebellum (false discovery rate P memory impairment, affective and cardiovascular disturbances, executive dysfunctions, and dysregulation of autonomic and respiratory control frequently found in OSA patients might be related to morphological differences in the brain gray matter areas.

  6. Genetic polymorphisms variants in interleukin-6 and interleukin-1beta patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in East Northern Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilhami Gok

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim To investigate the relationship of IL-1β and IL-6 cytokine gene polymorphisms with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS in 61 patients admitted to the neurology clinic in Kafkas University Hospital with insomnia problem who were diagnosed with OSAS in sleeping labs, and 80 healthy subjects not associated with the syndrome. Methods Blood samples were taken to isolate DNA from patients diagnosed with OSAS based on polysomnography results and healthy controls. DNA amplification of the genes was performed with PCR. Amplification products were cut with the restriction enzymes in order to determine IL-1 gene (TaqI and IL-6 gene (Lwel polymorphisms. The cut DNA fragments were carried out in agarose gel electrophoresis, and RFLP analysis was performed by utilizing the images with gel imaging system. PCR products were sequenced with an Applied Biosystems Automated Sequencer. Results Polymorphic changes were observed for IL-1β gene in 26 of 62 patients (41.9%, and 16 of the 80 (25.8% in the control group. The incidence of polymorphic changes in IL-6 gene was in seen in seven (of the 62 patients (11.3%, and in the 16 (20% controls. Conclusion The findings on the genomic level in OSAS may provide an important contribution to diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in clinical practice, as well as it helps to obtain the results easily about environmental and genetic interaction of OSAS patients.

  7. Sleep Apnea and Hypoventilation in Patients with Down Syndrome: Analysis of 144 Polysomnogram Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Fan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Patients with Down syndrome (DS are at risk for both obstructive sleep apnea (OSA and central sleep apnea (CSA; however, it is unclear how these components evolve as patients age and whether patients are also at risk for hypoventilation. A retrospective review of 144 diagnostic polysomnograms (PSG in a tertiary care facility over 10 years was conducted. Descriptive data and exploratory correlation analyses were performed. Sleep disordered breathing was common (seen in 78% of patients with an average apnea-hypopnea index (AHI = 10. The relative amount of obstructive apnea was positively correlated with age and body mass index (BMI. The relative amount of central sleep apnea was associated with younger age in the very youngest group (0–3 years. Hypoventilation was common occurring in more than 22% of patients and there was a positive correlation between the maximum CO2 and BMI. Sleep disordered breathing, including hypoventilation, was common in patients with DS. The obstructive component increased significantly with age and BMI, while the central component occurred most in the very young age group. Due to the high risk of hypoventilation, which has not been previously highlighted, it may be helpful to consider therapies to target both apnea and hypoventilation in this population.

  8. Endocan: a novel predictor of endothelial dysfunction in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanbay, Asiye; Ceylan, Erkan; Köseoğlu, Handan İnönü; Çalışkan, Mustafa; Takir, Mumtaz; Tulu, Selcan; Telci Çaklılı, Ozge; Köstek, Osman; Erek, Aybala; Afsar, Baris

    2018-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) is an independent risk factor for endothelial dysfunction and cardiometabolic diseases. Plasma endocan levels are elevated in a large number of diseases, and is a novel surrogate endothelial cell dysfunction marker. We aimed to assess the role of serum endocan level as a potential mechanism of endothelial dysfunction in OSA patients. This was a cohort study in which patients who had undergone a sleep study for diagnosis of OSA were recruited. Included patients were grouped according to apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) as mild, moderate and severe OSA. Patients with AHI < 5 served as control group. Endothelial function was evaluated with flow-mediated dilatation (FMD). Plasma endocan level was measured for all patients. One hundred twenty eight OSA patients included (15 controls, 22 with mild, 22 with moderate and 69 with severe OSA). The mean age was 51.6 ± 11.9 years and 43.8% (56/128) of the study population was female. As expected, the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes and cardiovascular disease increased as the severity of OSA increased. Endocan levels were significantly higher and FMD measurements were lower in patients with OSA compared to healthy controls. There was a positive correlation between AHI and serum endocan levels (rho = 0.826, P < 0.0001) and there was a negative correlation between AHI and FMD (rho = -0.686, P < 0.0001) In addition, we observed a strong negative correlation between serum endocan level and FMD (rho = -0.613, P < 0.0001). In linear regression analysis AHI was independently related both with endocan (P < 0.0001) and FMD (P = 0.011). Serum endocan level is strongly associated with the severity of OSA and endothelial dysfunction. Endocan might be a useful early novel marker for premature vascular endothelial system damage in OSA patients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Backer, W

    2013-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) is characterized by recurrent episodes of partial or complete upper airway collapse during sleep that is highlighted by a reduction in, or complete cessation of, airflow despite documented on going inspiratory efforts. Due to the lack of adequate alveolar ventilation that results from the upper airway narrowing, oxygen saturation may drop and partial pressure of CO2 may occasionally increase. The events are mostly terminated by arousals. Clinical consequences are excessive daytime sleepiness related to the sleep disruption. Minimal diagnostic criteria have been defined for OSAHS. Patients should have excessive daytime sleepiness that can not be better explained by other factors, or experience two or more of the following symptoms, again that are not better explained by other factors: choking or gasping during sleep; recurrent awakenings from sleep; un-refreshing sleep; daytime fatigue; and impaired concentration. All patients should have more than five obstructed breathing events per hour during sleep. An obstructive apnea or hypopnoea can be defined as an event that lasts for ≥ 10 s and is characterized by an absence or a decrease from baseline in the amplitude of a valid measure of breathing during sleep that either reaches >50% with an oxygen desaturation of 3% or an arousal (alternatively a 30% reduction with 4% desaturation). The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) recommends these definitions. The Task Force of the AASM also states that there are common pathogenic mechanisms for obstructive apnea syndrome, central apnea syndrome, sleep hypoventilation syndrome and Cheyne-Stokes breathing. It was more preferable to discuss each of these separately; although, they could be placed under the common denominator of "sleep-disordered breathing syndrome". The definition of OSAHS using two components, daytime symptoms and breathing pattern disturbances during sleep, may suggest that there is a tight correlation

  10. Effect of hypoxia on glucose metabolism in nondiabetic patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sökücü, Sinem Nedime; Karasulu, Levent; Dalar, Levent; Ozdemir, Cengiz; Seyhan, Ekrem Cengiz; Aydin, Senay; Altin, Sedat

    2013-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) may promote hyperglycemia and insulin resistance. Our aim is to investigate the effect of OSAS on the fasting plasma glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and C reactive protein (CRP) in nondiabetic patients. Blood parameters of consecutive 90 non diabetic patients whom polysomnografic evaluations were done in our sleep laboratory was evaluated. Among these 61 patients with normal fasting blood glucose were classified due to their apne-hipopnea index (AHI) as mild (n=16, 26.2%), moderate (n=18, 29.5%) and severe (n=27, 44.2%) OSAS. The fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c and CRP were measured. Mean age of the patients was 47.7±11.2 years, 72% male. HbA1c, fasting glucose levels show positive correlation with BMI (r=.503, P=.00; r=.258, P=.045). No relation of HbA1c to apnea index nor AHI was detected while positive corelation of fasting glucose and CRP was detected (r=.262, P=.042; r=.258, P=.045). HbA1c, fasting glucose and CRP levels show negative correlation with minimum SpO2 levels (by order of r=-.302, P=.018; r=-.368, P=.004; r=-.365, P=.004). HbA1c, fasting glucose levels and CRP levels show positive correlation with mean desaturation index (time duration in which SpO2<90% by pulse oxymeter) (r=.263, P=.041; r=.311, P=.015; r=.283, P=.027). Although no relation in between increased HbA1c or glucose levels and severity of OSAS was detected in nondiabetic OSAS patients, the correlation with the night hypoxia was detected. This could also show the effect of night time hypoxia on glucose metabolism in OSAS patients. Copyright © 2012 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Nocturnal Blood Pressure Variability in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynowicz, H; Porębska, I; Poręba, R; Mazur, G; Brzecka, A

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common respiratory disorder associated with hypertension and cardiovascular complications. Blood pressure variability may be a sign of risk of cardiovascular events. The aim of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that severe OSA syndrome is associated with increased blood pressure variability. Based on respiratory polygraphy, 58 patients were categorized into two groups: severe OSA with apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) greater than 29 episodes per hour (mean 52.2 ± 19.0/h) and mild-to-moderate OSA with AHI between 5 and 30 episodes per hour (mean 20.2 ± 7.8/h). A 24-h noninvasive blood pressure monitoring was performed. The standard deviation of mean blood pressure was used as the indicator of blood pressure variability. In patients with severe, compared with mild-to-moderate OSA, a higher mean nocturnal systolic blood pressure (133.2 ± 17.4 mmHg vs. 117.7 ± 31.2 mmHg, p variability (12.1 ± 6.0 vs. 7.6 ± 4.3, p variability (10.5 ± 6.1 vs. 7.3 ± 4.0 p variability (9.1 ± 4.9 mmHg vs. 6.8 ± 3.5 mmHg) were detected. The findings of the study point to increased nocturnal systolic and diastolic arterial blood pressure and blood pressure variability as risk factors of cardiovascular complications in patients with severe OSA.

  12. Energy types of snoring sounds in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: a preliminary observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Li-Ang; Yu, Jen-Fang; Lo, Yu-Lun; Chen, Yen-Sheng; Wang, Ding-Li; Cho, Chih-Ming; Ni, Yung-Lun; Chen, Ning-Hung; Fang, Tuan-Jen; Huang, Chung-Guei; Li, Hsueh-Yu

    2012-01-01

    Annoying snore is the principle symptom and problem in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). However, investigation has been hampered by the complex snoring sound analyses. This study was aimed to investigate the energy types of the full-night snoring sounds in patients with OSAS. Twenty male OSAS patients underwent snoring sound recording throughout 6 hours of in-lab overnight polysomnogragphy. Snoring sounds were processed and analyzed by a new sound analytic program, named as Snore Map®. We transformed the 6-hour snoring sound power spectra into the energy spectrum and classified it as snore map type 1 (monosyllabic low-frequency snore), type 2 (duplex low-&mid-frequency snore), type 3 (duplex low- & high-frequency snore), and type 4 (triplex low-, mid-, & high-frequency snore). The interrator and test-retest reliabilities of snore map typing were assessed. The snore map types and their associations among demographic data, subjective snoring questionnaires, and polysomnographic parameters were explored. The interrator reliability of snore map typing were almost perfect (κ = 0.87) and the test-retest reliability was high (r = 0.71). The snore map type was proportional to the body mass index (r = 0.63, P = 0.003) and neck circumference (r = 0.52, P = 0.018). Snore map types were unrelated to subjective snoring questionnaire scores (All P>0.05). After adjustment for body mass index and neck circumference, snore map type 3-4 was significantly associated with severity of OSAS (r = 0.52, P = 0.026). Snore map typing of a full-night energy spectrum is feasible and reliable. The presence of a higher snore map type is a warning sign of severe OSAS and indicated priority OSAS management. Future studies are warranted to evaluate whether snore map type can be used to discriminate OSAS from primary snoring and whether it is affected by OSAS management.

  13. The "DOC" screen: Feasible and valid screening for depression, Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) and cognitive impairment in stroke prevention clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Richard H; Cayley, Megan L; Lanctôt, Krista L; Murray, Brian J; Cohen, Ashley; Thorpe, Kevin E; Sicard, Michelle N; Lien, Karen; Sahlas, Demetrios J; Herrmann, Nathan

    2017-01-01

    Post-stroke Depression, Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and Cognitive impairment ("DOC") are associated with greater mortality, worse recovery and poorer quality of life. Best practice recommendations endorse routine screening for each condition; yet, all are under-assessed, diagnosed and treated. We seek to determine the feasibility and validity of an integrated tool ("DOC" screen) to identify stroke clinic patients at high-risk of depression, OSA, and cognitive impairment. All consecutive new referrals to a regional Stroke Prevention Clinic who were English-speaking and non-aphasic were eligible to be screened. Time for screen completion was logged. DOC screen results were compared to the neuropsychological battery and polysomnogram assessments using a modified receiver operator characteristic and area under the curve analysis. Data is reported to conform to STARD guidelines. 1503 people were screened over 2 years. 89% of eligible patients completed the screen in 5 minutes or less (mean 4.2 minutes), less than half the time it takes to complete the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). 437 people consented to detailed testing. Of those, 421 completed the Structured Clinical Interview for Depression within 3 months of screening, 387 completed detailed neuropsychological testing within 3 months, and 88 had overnight polysomnograms. Screening scores combined with demographic variables (age, sex, education, body mass index), had excellent validity compared to gold standard diagnoses: DOC-Mood AUC 0.90; DOC-Apnea AUC 0.80; DOC-Cog AUC 0.81. DOC screen scores can reliably categorize patients in to low-, intermediate- or high-risk groups for further action and can do so with comparable accuracy to more time-consuming screens. Systematic screening of depression, obstructive sleep apnea, and cognitive impairment in 5 minutes or less is feasible and valid in a high volume stroke clinic using the DOC screen. The DOC screen may facilitate improved identification and treatment

  14. The "DOC" screen: Feasible and valid screening for depression, Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA and cognitive impairment in stroke prevention clinics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard H Swartz

    Full Text Available Post-stroke Depression, Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA and Cognitive impairment ("DOC" are associated with greater mortality, worse recovery and poorer quality of life. Best practice recommendations endorse routine screening for each condition; yet, all are under-assessed, diagnosed and treated. We seek to determine the feasibility and validity of an integrated tool ("DOC" screen to identify stroke clinic patients at high-risk of depression, OSA, and cognitive impairment.All consecutive new referrals to a regional Stroke Prevention Clinic who were English-speaking and non-aphasic were eligible to be screened. Time for screen completion was logged. DOC screen results were compared to the neuropsychological battery and polysomnogram assessments using a modified receiver operator characteristic and area under the curve analysis. Data is reported to conform to STARD guidelines.1503 people were screened over 2 years. 89% of eligible patients completed the screen in 5 minutes or less (mean 4.2 minutes, less than half the time it takes to complete the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA. 437 people consented to detailed testing. Of those, 421 completed the Structured Clinical Interview for Depression within 3 months of screening, 387 completed detailed neuropsychological testing within 3 months, and 88 had overnight polysomnograms. Screening scores combined with demographic variables (age, sex, education, body mass index, had excellent validity compared to gold standard diagnoses: DOC-Mood AUC 0.90; DOC-Apnea AUC 0.80; DOC-Cog AUC 0.81. DOC screen scores can reliably categorize patients in to low-, intermediate- or high-risk groups for further action and can do so with comparable accuracy to more time-consuming screens.Systematic screening of depression, obstructive sleep apnea, and cognitive impairment in 5 minutes or less is feasible and valid in a high volume stroke clinic using the DOC screen. The DOC screen may facilitate improved identification and

  15. New Data Pre-processing on Assessing of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: Line Based Normalization Method (LBNM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdemir, Bayram; Güneş, Salih; Yosunkaya, Şebnem

    Sleep disorders are a very common unawareness illness among public. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) is characterized with decreased oxygen saturation level and repetitive upper respiratory tract obstruction episodes during full night sleep. In the present study, we have proposed a novel data normalization method called Line Based Normalization Method (LBNM) to evaluate OSAS using real data set obtained from Polysomnography device as a diagnostic tool in patients and clinically suspected of suffering OSAS. Here, we have combined the LBNM and classification methods comprising C4.5 decision tree classifier and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to diagnose the OSAS. Firstly, each clinical feature in OSAS dataset is scaled by LBNM method in the range of [0,1]. Secondly, normalized OSAS dataset is classified using different classifier algorithms including C4.5 decision tree classifier and ANN, respectively. The proposed normalization method was compared with min-max normalization, z-score normalization, and decimal scaling methods existing in literature on the diagnosis of OSAS. LBNM has produced very promising results on the assessing of OSAS. Also, this method could be applied to other biomedical datasets.

  16. What is the most important factor affecting the cognitive function of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome patients: a single center study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Xiang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective Patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS usually complain of daytime hypersomnia and decrease in cognitive function, which affects the quality of their work and life. The reason why the cognitive function of OSAS patients decreased remains controversial. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impairment and the main influencing factors of cognitive function in OSAS. Methods There were totally 50 OSAS patients (OSAS group and 25 volunteers (control group included in our study. All of them were monitored by polysomnography (PSG and tested by Continuous Performance Test (CPT, n-back test and Stroop Color?Word Test (CWT to evaluate their sleep condition and cognitive function. Results No significant difference was found between the two groups in total sleep time and sleep efficiency (P > 0.05, for all. Compared with control group, OSAS group had significant increased time of non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep stage Ⅰ and stage Ⅱ, significant decreased time of stage Ⅲ (P 0.05, for all, while had significant connection with AI and NREM Ⅲ (P < 0.05, for all. The rate of OSAS patients who underwent nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP treatment was very low, only 8% (4/50. Conclusion The abnormality of OSAS patients' sleep structure is characterized with sleep fragmentation and decrease of NREM Ⅲ, which may be the main factors of cognitive impairment. Exploration of treatment methods targeted on regulating the effected hormones and receptors is meaningful.

  17. Effect of CPAP-therapy on bronchial and nasal inflammation in patients affected by obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacedonia, D; Salerno, F G; Carpagnano, G E; Sabato, R; Depalo, A; Foschino-Barbaro, M P

    2011-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) has been shown to be associated to upper and lower airways inflammation. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the elective treatment of OSAS. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of CPAP-therapy on airway and nasal inflammation. In 13 non-smoking subjects affected by untreated OSAS and in 11 non-smoking normal volunteers, airway inflammation was detected by analyses of the induced sputum. In the OSAS group measurements were repeated after 1, 10 and 60 days of the appropriate CPAP treatment. In addition, in 12 subjects of the OSAS group, nasal inflammation was detected by the analysis of induced nasal secretions at baseline, and after 1, 10 and 60 days of CPAP treatment. OSAS patients, compared to normal controls, showed at baseline a higher percentage of neutrophils and a lower percentage of macrophages in the induced sputum. One, 10 and 60 days of appropriate CPAP-therapy did not change the cellular profile of the induced sputum. In addition, in the OSAS patients, the high neutrophilic nasal inflammation present under baseline conditions was not significantly modified by CPAP-therapy. Finally, no patients developed airway hyper-responsiveness after CPAP therapy. In OSAS subjects, the appropriate CPAP-therapy, while correcting the oxygen desaturation, does not modify the bronchial and nasal inflammatory profile.

  18. The effect of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and hypothyroidism to intima-media thickness of carotid artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkus, Fulsen; Dikmen, Nursel; Güngör, Gülay; Samur, Anıl

    2017-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a common disorder and in subjects with OSAS the prevalence of hypothyroidism is approximately 1.2-11 %. The episodes of hypoxia/reoxygenation associated with the respiratory disturbances observed in subjects with OSAS increases the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Hypothyroidism; primary or subclinical, has several effects on cardiovascular system. In our study, we investigated carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) which is an early sign of atherosclerosis, in OSAS subjects with hypothyroidism. Subjects who admitted to Kahramanmaras Necip Fazıl City State Hospital Chest Diseases out-patient clinic between May 2014 and January 2016 for snoring and had polysomnographic evaluation at the sleep laboratory were included in this study. Each subject was evaluated for serum thyroid function tests and carotid artery IMT was measured by a Doppler ultrasound. Mean carotid artery IMT values in the isolated OSAS, OSAS plus hypothyroidism, and control groups were 0.67 ± 0.12, 0.8 ± 0.12, and 0.54 ± 0.08 mm, respectively; difference between groups was statistically significant (p hypothyroidism comorbidity in OSAS, and suspected subjects with OSAS should be screened for hypothyroidism considering the potential cardiovascular complications.

  19. Risk of Common Mental Disorders in Relation to Symptoms of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome among Ethiopian College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutagarama, Ornella; Gelaye, Bizu; Tadesse, Mahlet G; Lemma, Seblewengel; Berhane, Yemane; Williams, Michelle A

    The Berlin and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) are simple, validated, and widely used questionnaires designed to assess symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) a common but often unrecognized cause of morbidity and mortality. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 2,639 college students to examine the extent to which symptoms of OSAS are associated with the odds of common mental disorders (CMDs). The General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) was used to evaluate the presence of CMDs while the Berlin and ESS were used to assess high-risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and excessive daytime sleepiness, respectively. Logistic regression procedures were used to derive odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) assessing the independent and joint associations of high-risk for OSA and excessive daytime sleepiness with odds of CMDs. Approximately 19% of students had high-risk for OSA while 26.4% had excessive daytime sleepiness. Compared to students without high-risk for OSA and without excessive daytime sleepiness (referent group), students with excessive daytime sleepiness only (OR=2.01; 95%CI: 1.60-2.52) had increased odds of CMDs. The odds of CMDs for students with high-risk OSA only was 1.26 (OR=1.26; 95%CI 0.94-1.68). Students with both high-risk for OSA and excessive daytime sleepiness, compared to the referent group, had the highest odds of CMDs (OR=2.45; 95%CI: 1.69-3.56). Our findings indicate that symptoms of OSAS are associated with increased risk of CMDs. These findings emphasize the comorbidity of sleep disorders and CMDs and suggest that there may be benefits to investing in educational programs that extend the knowledge of sleep disorders in young adults.

  20. The Effects of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome on the Dentate Gyrus and Learning and Memory in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Jiook; Zea-Hernandez, Johanna A; Sin, Sanghun; Graw-Panzer, Katharina; Shifteh, Keivan; Isasi, Carmen R; Wagshul, Mark E; Moran, Eileen E; Posner, Jonathan; Zimmerman, Molly E; Arens, Raanan

    2017-04-19

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with intermittent hypoxia and sleep loss. In children, impairments of cognitive function are important manifestations, but the underlying pathology is unknown. We hypothesized that OSAS would affect the dentate gyrus, a hippocampal subdivision essential to neurogenesis and cognition, and that this impact would further affect cognitive function in children. In children with OSAS ( n = 11) and control subjects ( n = 12; age and sex matched), we performed diffusion tensor imaging and structural MRI, polysomnography, and neuropsychological assessments. We found that OSAS was associated with decreased mean diffusivity of the left dentate gyrus ( p = 0.002; false discovery rate corrected; adjusting for sex, age, and body mass index), showing a large effect size (partial η 2 = 0.491), but not with any other structural measures across the brain. Decreased dentate gyrus mean diffusivity correlated with a higher apnea hypopnea index (Spearman's r = -0.50, p = 0.008) and a greater arousal index ( r = -0.44, p = 0.017). OSAS did not significantly affect neuropsychological measures ( p values >0.5); however, a lower verbal learning score correlated with lower dentate gyrus mean diffusivity ( r = 0.54, p = 0.004). Path analysis demonstrated that dentate gyrus mean diffusivity mediates the impact of OSAS on verbal learning capacity. Finally, the diagnostic accuracy of a regression model based on dentate gyrus mean diffusivity reached 85.8% (cross validated). This study demonstrates a likely pathway of effects of OSAS on neurocognitive function in children, as well as potential utility of the dentate gyrus mean diffusivity as an early marker of brain pathology in children with OSAS. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In this study we investigate the relationships between dentate gyrus structure, hippocampus-dependent cognition, and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). We demonstrate lower mean diffusivity of the dentate gyrus in

  1. The effect of continuous positive airway pressure on blood pressure in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgiana Dediu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS is a disease with increasing prevalence nowadays, being associated with multiple cardiovascular diseases, such as arterial hypertension. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP on blood pressure values. Materials and methods. We performed a prospective interventional study on 52 patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. The patients were divided into 2 groups: Group A (who received both pharmacological and CPAP treatment and Group B (who received only pharmacological treatment, and were followed up at 3 and 6 months. The statistical analysis was made with SPSS and Microsoft Excel. At the same time, using the surrogate marker –RDW, we tried to evaluate the persistence of systemic inflammation, knowing that OSAS is associated with inflammation. Results. The systolic blood pressure values decreased at 6 months in all OSAS patients who have used CPAP, including patients with normal values of blood pressure. At the same time, the lack of OSAS treatment led to increased values of blood pressure by approximately 10 mmHg. We noticed a link between RDW, age and blood pressure values, respectively the increase of RDW and age may result in an increase in blood pressure. Conclusions. The OSAS treatment can decrease the blood pressure values. A higher RDW may be considered a negative prognostic factor for these patients, reflecting the role of systemic inflammation in the appearance of cardiovascular disorders.

  2. Regular CPAP utilization reduces nasal inflammation assessed by nasal cytology in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelardi, Matteo; Carbonara, Giuseppe; Maffezzoni, Enrico; Marvisi, Maurizio; Quaranta, Nicola; Ferri, Raffaele

    2012-08-01

    To analyze nasal inflammation in a group of patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) by means of nasal cytology and to describe the changes induced by continuous positive air pressure (CPAP) treatment. Thirty-two consecutive patients affected by OSAS (mean age 46.9 years) and 13 control subjects (mean age 49.1 years) were enrolled. Detailed clinical, laboratory, and polysomnographic studies were obtained in all participants and, in particular, nasal cytology was performed; inflammatory cells (neutrophils, eosinophils, mast cells, lymphocytes), bacteria, and spores were counted. A subgroup of 19 OSAS patients underwent regular nasal CPAP for eight weeks while the remaining 13 were noncompliant. Nasal cytology was repeated after eight weeks in all patients and controls. All patients with OSAS were affected by some form of rhinopathy, mostly subclinical, which was not found to influence compliance to CPAP. Regular CPAP treatment induced a significant reduction of cell infiltration (neutrophils, eosinophils, lymphocytes, and muciparous cells), which was not seen in nontreated patients. Nasal inflammation/infection is a very frequent finding in OSAS and can be reverted by the regular use of CPAP. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Predictors of success for mandibular repositioning appliance in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thays Crosara Abrahão CUNHA

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The characteristics of non-obese patients with mild to moderate Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS who will present with a good response to Mandibular Repositioning Appliance (MRA treatment have not yet been well established in the literature. The aim of this study is to assess whether polysomnographic (PSG, demographic, anthropometric, cephalometric, and otorhinolaryngological parameters predict MRA success in the treatment of OSAS. Forty (40 males with mild and moderate OSAS were assessed pretreatment and 2-months post-treatment after wearing an MRA. Demographic, anthropometric, otorhinolaryngological (ENT, cephalometric, and polysomnographic parameters, including continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP titrated pressure, dental models, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, quality of life (Short Form SF-36, and mood state (Profile of Mood States – POMS, were assessed. The responders exhibited fewer oropharyngeal alterations, increased upper pharyngeal space, reduced lower airway space, and increased mandibular intercanine width, and they had milder disease. Nevertheless, no predictive factors of MRA success could be found. MRA was more successful among men with a more pervious airway, a larger interdental width and milder OSAS. However, a combined [1] functional and structural assessment is needed to successfully predict the [2] effectiveness of MRA treatment of OSA.

  4. Effect of Nasal CPAP on SIRT1 and Endothelial Function in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Ji; Liaw, Shwu-Fang; Lin, Ching-Chi; Chiu, Chung-Hsin; Lin, Mei-Wei; Chang, Feng-Ting

    2015-12-01

    Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), a histone/protein deacetylase, has been implicated in aging, metabolism, and stress resistance. SIRT1 regulates endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase, restores NO availability, and is involved in different aspects of cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate any abnormalities with regard to SIRT1 protein level in the blood, SIRT1 activity, and impaired endothelial function in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). We also investigated whether or not OSAS patients who received nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment showed improvements in the levels of SIRT1. Thirty-five patients with moderately severe to severe OSAS who requested nasal CPAP treatment and 20 healthy controls were prospectively enrolled. The SIRT1 protein levels in blood and its activity, and the serum levels of nitric oxide derivative (NO x ) were assessed. All subjects participated in sleep studies, which were repeated 3 months after nasal CPAP treatment in the patients with OSAS. In the patients with OSAS, the level of SIRT1 in the blood, its activity, and that of NO x was lower than those of normal subjects before nasal CPAP treatment. After nasal CPAP treatment, the level of SIRT1 in the blood and its activity increased from 0.55 ± 0.32 pg/μg of total protein and 3085.53 ± 1071.57 arbitrary fluorescence units (AFUs)/μg of total protein to 1.13 ± 0.43 pg/μg of total protein and 5344.65 ± 1579.71 AFUs/μg of total protein. The serum levels of NO x in the patients with OSAS increased from 16.36 ± 5.78 to 25.94 ± 5.17 µM. Successful treatment for OSAS with nasal CPAP can restore blood levels of the SIRT1 protein and its activity and serum levels of NO x .

  5. [Usefulness of cephalometry and pharyngeal findings in the primary diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Takuro; Sakabe, Akiko; Ueda, Narihisa; Shiomori, Teruo; Udaka, Tsuyoshi; Ohbuchi, Toyoaki; Suzuki, Hideaki

    2008-11-01

    We studied the usefulness of cephalometry and pharyngeal findings in determining efficient primary diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Subjects were 171 adult men with sleep-disordered breathing, who underwent cephalometry and polysomnography (PSG) and had pharyngeal findings evaluated by modified Mallampati grade (MMP) and palatine tonsil size. An apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of > or = 15 in PSG was considered to indicate OSAS. We analyzed the correlation between AHI and other parameters and conducted stepwise multiple regression analysis to predict AHI, and studied the screening performance of prediction equations using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Of the 8 cephalometric parameters examined, the length of the soft palate (PNS-P; p = 0.011) and the distance from the mandibular plane to the hyoid bone (MP-H; p (a) > (b). Sensitivity and of equation (c) with a cutoff of 15 were 0.95 and specificity 0.25. These results indicate that both cephalometric parameters and pharyngeal indices should be included in conducting an efficient primary diagnosis for OSAS.

  6. Treatment of snoring with positional therapy in patients with positional obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Chyuan; Lee, Li-Ang; Chen, Ning-Hung; Fang, Tuan-Jen; Huang, Chung-Guei; Cheng, Wen-Nuan; Li, Hsueh-Yu

    2015-12-11

    Position therapy plays a role in treating snoring and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). The purpose of this study was to investigate whether position therapy using a head-positioning pillow (HPP) could reduce snoring sounds in patients with mild-to-moderate positional OSAS, taking into account the potential confounding effects of body weight. A total of 25 adults with positional OSAS (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI]supine:AHInon-supine ≥ 2) were prospectively enrolled. Patients were asked to use their own pillows at home during the first night (N0), and the HPP during the second (N1) and third (N2) nights. The primary outcome measures included the subjective snoring severity (SS, measured on a visual analogue scale ranging from 0 to 10) and the objective snoring index (SI, expressed as the number of snoring events per hour measured on an acoustic analytical program). Both endpoints were recorded over three consecutive nights. From N0 to N2, the median SS and SI values in the entire study cohort decreased significantly from 5.0 to 4.0 and from 218.0 events/h to 115.0 events/h, respectively. In the subgroup of overweight patients, SS showed a significant improvement, whereas SI did not. Both SS and SI were found to be significantly improved in normal-weight patients.

  7. Treatment of snoring with positional therapy in patients with positional obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Chyuan; Lee, Li-Ang; Chen, Ning-Hung; Fang, Tuan-Jen; Huang, Chung-Guei; Cheng, Wen-Nuan; Li, Hsueh-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Position therapy plays a role in treating snoring and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). The purpose of this study was to investigate whether position therapy using a head-positioning pillow (HPP) could reduce snoring sounds in patients with mild-to-moderate positional OSAS, taking into account the potential confounding effects of body weight. A total of 25 adults with positional OSAS (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI]supine:AHInon-supine ≥ 2) were prospectively enrolled. Patients were asked to use their own pillows at home during the first night (N0), and the HPP during the second (N1) and third (N2) nights. The primary outcome measures included the subjective snoring severity (SS, measured on a visual analogue scale ranging from 0 to 10) and the objective snoring index (SI, expressed as the number of snoring events per hour measured on an acoustic analytical program). Both endpoints were recorded over three consecutive nights. From N0 to N2, the median SS and SI values in the entire study cohort decreased significantly from 5.0 to 4.0 and from 218.0 events/h to 115.0 events/h, respectively. In the subgroup of overweight patients, SS showed a significant improvement, whereas SI did not. Both SS and SI were found to be significantly improved in normal-weight patients. PMID:26657174

  8. Heat Shock Proteins, L-Arginine, and Asymmetric Dimethylarginine Levels in Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İn, Erdal; Özdemir, Cengiz; Kaman, Dilara; Sökücü, Sinem Nedime

    2015-11-01

    Vascular endothelial inflammation and enhanced oxidative stress are important factors in the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). The aim of this study was to determine the levels of heat shock protein (HSP) 27, HSP70, HSP90, L-arginine, and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) in patients with OSAS and determine their relationship with cardiovascular (CV) risk factors. Forty patients with OSAS, comprising 26 with and 14 without traditional CV risk factors (obesity, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, hypertension, and smoking), and 20 control subjects without OSAS were included. All patients underwent a full polysomnographic evaluation, and blood samples were obtained in the morning after the night the diagnostic study was performed. No significant differences were found in serum HSP27 and HSP70 levels between the groups. HSP90 and ADMA levels increased significantly, whereas L-arginine levels decreased significantly in patients with OSAS, both with and without CV risk factors, compared with controls, but were not different among the subgroups. In all patients with OSAS, serum HSP70 levels were positively correlated with a percent time with saturationL-arginine levels were negatively correlated with desaturation number (r=-.360, P=.022) and apnea-hypopnea index (r=-.354, P=.025) and positively correlated with mean oxygen saturation (r=.328, P=.039). Serum levels of HSP90 and ADMA increased, whereas those of L-arginine decreased in patients with OSAS regardless of CV risk factors. These findings indicate the presence of oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction in patients with OSAS. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. [Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in patients attending a psychiatry outpatient service: a case series].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo Martínez, Nathalie; Rosselli Cock, Diego

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a condition associated with multiple negative outcomes. People with mental illness might be at increased risk of having it, given that medication given has adverse effects on weight and there are alterations in sleep associated with them; however, there are few studies in this population. Describe the patients and the results of polysomnography ordered based on clinical symptoms in a psychiatric outpatient clinic between 2012 and 2014. A case series in which medical records were evaluated. 58 patients who underwent polysomnography, 89% of them had OSAS, 16% were obese and 19% were been treated with benzodiazepines. This is a condition that must be considered during the clinical evaluation of patients with mental illness, since its presence should make clinicians think about drug treatment and follow up. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of prolonged supine position on the intraocular pressure in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Sin Yee; Wan Abdul Halim, Wan Haslina; Mat Baki, Marina; Din, Norshamsiah Md

    2018-04-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) patients are at risk of glaucoma but the risk increases if they have higher intraocular pressure (IOP) while sleeping. We aim to evaluate the postural effect of upright and prolong supine positions on IOP in these patients. This is a cross-sectional study involving 27 patients with symptoms of OSAS seen at a tertiary institutional center and 25 normal controls performed between June 2015 and June 2016. All patients and controls underwent a polysomnography (PSG) test and were diagnosed with OSAS based on the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). Patients are those with OSAS symptoms and had AHI > 5, whereas controls are staffs from the ophthalmology clinic without clinical criteria for OSAS and had PSG result of AHI < 5. IOP was measured 10 min after sitting, immediately and at 30 min on supine position and immediately after resuming sitting position. The main outcome measures were the changes in mean IOP in different positions. The increase in mean IOP when changing from sitting to supine position was significantly higher in OSAS patients in both the right eye (RE) (1.01 ± 1.14 vs 0.44 ± 0.41 mmHg, p = 0.033) and left eye (LE) (1.20 ± 1.26 vs 0.48 ± 0.62 mmHg, p = 0.044). After 30 min supine, the IOP in OSAS patients showed a further increase in IOP than controls (RE 1.20 ± 1.79 vs 0.12 ± 0.66 mmHg, p = 0.001 and LE 0.59 ± 2.00 vs 0.15 ± 0.78 mmHg, p = 0.246). Higher IOP when sitting post supine is associated with higher IOP on supine position. IOP increase is significantly more in OSAS patients on prolong supine position.

  11. Tumor necrosis factor alpha is a promising circulating biomarker for the development of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingsheng; Zheng, Xin

    2017-04-18

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a chronic inflammatory disorder. The relationship between tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and OSAS has been widely evaluated, but the results thus far remain inconclusive. We thereby decided to quantify the changes of TNF-alpha between OSAS patients and controls by a meta-analysis. This study complies with the MOOSE guidelines. Two reviewers independently searched articles and abstracted relevant data. In total, 47 articles (59 studies) were analyzed, including 2857 OSAS patients and 2115 controls. Overall, OSAS patients had a significantly higher level of circulating TNF-alpha than controls (weighted mean difference [WMD]: 9.66 pg/mL, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 8.66 to 11.24, Pgrades of OSAS. In patients with mild, mild-to-moderate, moderate, moderate-to-severe and severe OSAS, circulating TNF-alpha was higher than respective controls by 0.99, 1.48. 7.79, 10.08 and 8.85 pg/mL, with significant heterogeneity (I2: 91.2%, 74.5%, 97.6%, 99.0% and 98.1%). In conclusion, our findings demonstrated that circulating TNF-alpha was significantly higher in OSAS patients than in controls, and this difference became more pronounced with the more severe grades of OSAS, indicating that TNF-alpha might be a promising circulating biomarker for the development of OSAS.

  12. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Hypopnea Syndrome | Mbata | Annals of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) is an important medical condition which is on the increase in the past 50 years. It causes significant morbidity and mortality in both developed and developing nations of the world. To review the relevant literature on obstructive sleep apnea. Literature review was ...

  13. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: Pathogenetic Aspects and Treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Boot (Hendrik)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractAlmost twenty years ago obstmctive sleep apnea was considered to be a medical curiosity that was of little importance, and snoring was merely the subject of humor than one of serious investigation. Although the clinical manifestations of sleep apnea syndrome have been described as early

  14. Changes in dreaming induced by CPAP in severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Eva; Santamaria, Joan; Iranzo, Alex; Pintor, Luis; De Pablo, Joan; Solanas, Antonio; Kumru, Hatice; Martínez-Rodríguez, José Enrique; Boget, Teresa

    2006-12-01

    To study dream content in patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and its modification with Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) therapy. We assessed twenty consecutive patients with severe OSAS and 17 healthy controls. Polysomnograms were recorded at baseline in patients and controls and during the CPAP titration night, 3 months after effective treatment and 2 years later in patients. Subjects were awakened 5-10 min after the beginning of the first and last rapid eye movement (REM) sleep periods and we measured percentage of dream recall, emotional content of the dream, word count, thematic units, sleep architecture and REM density. Dream recall in REM sleep was similar in patients at baseline and controls (51.5% versus 44.4% respectively; P = .421), decreased to 20% and 24.3% the first and third month CPAP nights, and increased to 39% 2 years later (P = 0.004). Violent/highly anxious dreams were only seen in patients at baseline. Word count was higher in patients than in controls. REM density was highest the first CPAP night. Severe OSAS patients recall dreams in REM sleep as often as controls, but their dreams have an increased emotional tone and are longer. Despite an increase in REM density, dream recall decreased the first months of CPAP and recovered 2 years later. Violent/highly anxious dreams disappeared with treatment. A dream recall decrease with CPAP is associated with normalization of sleep in OSAS patients.

  15. Soluble (Prorenin Receptor and Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: Oxidative Stress in Brain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Takahashi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available (Prorenin receptor ((PRR is a multi-functional molecule that is related to both the renin-angiotensin system (RAS and vacuolar H+-ATPase (v-ATPase, an ATP-dependent multi-subunit proton pump. Soluble (PRR (s(PRR, which consists of the extracellular domain of (PRR, is present in blood and urine. Elevated plasma s(PRR concentrations are reported in patients with chronic kidney disease and pregnant women with hypertension or diabetes mellitus. In addition, we have shown that plasma s(PRR concentrations are elevated in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS. Interestingly, the levels are elevated in parallel with the severity of OSAS, but are not related to the presence of hypertension or the status of the circulating RAS in OSAS. It is known that v-ATPase activity protects cells from endogenous oxidative stress, and loss of v-ATPase activity results in chronic oxidative stress. We hypothesize that hypoxia and subsequent oxidative stress, perhaps in the brain, may be one of the factors that elevate plasma s(PRR levels in OSAS.

  16. Effects on neuropsychological performance and sleep quality in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Staub

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS may have impaired neuropsychological performance. The aim of the study is to assess neuropsychological function in OSAS patients before and on continous positive airway pressure (CPAP therapy to assess different neuropsychological tests – especially of sensomotor memory – in OSAS patients, and to relate neuropsychological test results to polysomnographic findings. Therefore, 36 normal controls and 18 OSAS patients performed tests of attention capacity and memory with retrieval in the evening and the following morning. Six weeks later, the tests were repeated (patients on CPAP. Controls performed significantly better than patients in the tests of attention and of memory of facts without and on CPAP therapy. Moreover, good compliance of CPAP therapy was not associated with better performance. However, there was no significant difference between controls and patients in the tests of sensomotor memory. The neuropsychological results depended on oxygen values, the arousal index, and sleep stages. There is no group difference in overnight improvement in the neuropsychological tests, which could indicate that sleep has an important function in homeostatic regulation rather than in consolidation.

  17. Volumetric MR imaging of the upper airway in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gefter, W.B.; Nordberg, J.E.; Hoffman, E.A.

    1989-01-01

    Structural abnormalities in the upper airway and surrounding soft tissues may contribute to the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). The authors have utilized MR imaging (3-mm contiguous T1-weighted sagittal images obtained with a local coil at 1.5 T) combined with a computer graphics-based analysis of three-dimensional geometry to study the upper airways of 10 awake, supine normal subjects (29--50 years-old), seven patients with OSAS (34--54 years old), and a nonapneic snorer (24 years old). Upper-airway anatomic segments were compared with regard to regional volumes, minimum cross-sectional areas, and pharyngeal wall thickness. Results to date show a smaller retropalatial airway volume in the patients with OSAS (1.8 cm 3 ± 0.8 [SEM]) and a smaller minimum cross-sectional retropalatal area in patients with OSAS (0.45 cm 2 ) than in the nonapneic snorer (0.9 cm 2 ) and the normal subjects (2.5 cm 2 ± 0.2)

  18. Sleep microstructure dynamics and neurocognitive performance in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimzadeh, Foroozan; Nami, Mohammad; Boostani, Reza

    2017-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between the increment in cyclic alternating patterns (CAPs) in sleep electroencephalography and neurocognitive decline in obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) patients through source localization of the phase-A of CAPs. All-night polysomnographic recordings of 10 OSAS patients and 4 control subjects along with their cognitive profile using the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination (ACE) test were acquired. The neuropsychological assessment involved five key domains including attention and orientation, verbal fluency, memory, language and visuo-spatial skills. The standardized low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA) tool was used to source-localize the phase-A of CAPs in sleep EEG aiming to investigate the correlation between CAP phase-A and cognitive functions. Our findings suggested a significant increase in CAP rates among OSAS subjects versus control subjects. Moreover, sLORETA revealed that CAP phase-A is mostly activated in frontoparietal cortices. As CAP rate increases, the activity of phase-A in such areas is dramatically enhanced leading to arousal instability, lower sleep efficiency and a possibly impaired cortical capacity to consolidate cognitive inputs in frontal and parietal areas during sleep. As such, cognitive domains including verbal fluency, memory and visuo-spatial skills which predominantly relate to frontoparietal areas tend to be affected. Based on our findings, CAP activity may possibly be considered as a predictor of cognitive decline among OSAS patients.

  19. Negative expiratory pressure (NEP) parameters can predict obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in snoring patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouatbi, Sonia; Tabka, Zouhair; Dogui, Mohamed; Abdelghani, Ahmed; Guénard, Hervé

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess whether parameters of the negative expiratory pressure (NEP) technique are able to detect obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in snoring patients. A cross-sectional study included 42 OSAS patients diagnosed by polysomnography (PSG), 34 simple snorers, and 32 healthy subjects. Lung function was measured by using a plethysmograph and the NEP technique was performed with the patient in the seated and supine positions in a random order. The depression was fixed to 5 cmH(2)O. All patients had normal forced expiratory flow/volume loops. Apneic patients had lower Dflow in both positions with a number of oscillations on the expiratory curve obtained with NEP and an expiratory flow limitation (EFL) in the supine position higher than that of other groups (p < 0.05). Changing from the sitting to the supine position raised the EFL of the three groups, with a significant decrease in Dflow and an increase in the number of oscillations in snoring and OSAS patients (p < 0.05). The analysis of variance showed that only the number of oscillations was significantly different between apneic and snoring patients. NEP constitutes a simple and useful tool for the screening OSAS by EFL, especially the number of oscillations obtained with NEP.

  20. Acceptance and Adherence to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy in patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA in a Southeast Asian privately funded healthcare system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheah Hooi Ken Lee

    Full Text Available Background: There is limited data on long term Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP adherence in Southeast Asian countries. This is a prospective study on CPAP adherence among Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA patients in a Southeast Asian privately funded healthcare system. Methods: Patients with moderate-severe OSA who had been initiated on CPAP at least one year previously were contacted for a scripted telephone interview to assess compliance and factors associated with CPAP adherence. Results: Of 135 consecutive patients diagnosed to have moderate to severe OSA, 78 (57.8% were initiated on CPAP treatment while 57 (42.2% rejected CPAP upfront. 41 (52.6% who initiated CPAP remained adherent at one year. OSA severity (AHI, ODI and symptomatic improvement after CPAP were associated with better adherence. Presence of machine related side effects was associated with lower adherence. Inconvenience, cost and poor disease perception were reported as major barriers to uptake of CPAP therapy. Conclusions: In this Southeast Asian privately funded healthcare system, almost half of all patients with significant OSA rejected CPAP treatment upfront, but adherence among those who started CPAP is comparable to other reports. Challenges with CPAP acceptance as well as CPAP adherence need to be addressed to improve outcomes.

  1. Maxillomandibular Advancement in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome Patients: a Restrospective Study on the Sagittal Cephalometric Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Ronchi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The present retrospective study analyzes sagittal cephalometric changes in patients affected by obstructive sleep apnea syndrome submitted to maxillomandubular advancement. Material and Methods: 15 adult sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS patients diagnosed by polysomnography (PSG and treated with maxillomandubular advancement (MMA were included in this study. Pre- (T1 and postsurgical (T2 PSG studies assessing the apnea/hypopnea index (AHI and the lowest oxygen saturation (LSAT level were compared. Lateral cephalometric radiographs at T1 and T2 measuring sagittal cephalometric variables (SNA, SNB, and ANB were analyzed, as were the amount of maxillary and mandibular advancement (Co-A and Co-Pog, the distance from the mandibular plane to the most anterior point of the hyoid bone (Mp-H, and the posterior airway space (PAS.Results: Postoperatively, the overall mean AHI dropped from 58.7 ± 16 to 8.1 ± 7.8 events per hour (P < 0.001. The mean preoperative LSAT increased from 71% preoperatively to 90% after surgery (P < 0.001. All the patients in our study were successfully treated (AHI < 20 or reduced by 50%. Cephalometric analysis performed after surgery showed a statistically significant correlation between the mean SNA variation and the decrease in the AHI (P = 0.01. The overall mean SNA increase was 6°.Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the improvement observed in the respiratory symptoms, namely the apnea/hypopnea episodes, is correlated with the SNA increase after surgery. This finding may help maxillofacial surgeons to establish selective criteria for the surgical approach to sleep apnea syndrome patients.

  2. Hypothyroidism in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Ayık

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, we aimed to search the possible association between Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome’s (OSAS severity and thyroid gland malfunctions, and the effects of hypothyroidism on the mode of sleep in patients with OSAS. Methods:Demographic features and thyroid function tests of 211 patients (59, 28% female with a mean age of 50.9 ± 10.4 years (ranging from 30 to 75 who underwent polysomnography between September 2010 and September 2011 were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Hypothyroidism was detected in 8.3% of the patients with simple snoring and 10.6% of those with OSAS (9.1% in mild OSAS, 20.3% in moderate OSASand 6.3% in severe OSAS. There was no correlation between the severity of OSAS and the rate of hypothyroidism (p=0.620. The incidence of ypothyroidism was 16.9% in women and 6.6% in men and this difference was statistically significant (p=0.024. The polysomnographic findings did not differ between the patients with hypothyroidism and the others (table 5. However, in patients with elevated TSH levels, the rate of desaturation during sleep was high despite a lower AHI (r=0.126, p=0.05. Conclusion: No correlation was seen between the severity of OSAS and the rate of hypothyroidism. Women with OSAS had higher incidence of hypothyroidism. The polysomnographic findings did not differ whether the patient had hypothyroidism or not. The rate of desaturation during sleep was relatively high in patients with elevated TSH levels.

  3. The relationship between neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hülya Günbatar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: There is a strong relationship between obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS and cardiovascular disease (CVD. Chronic intermittent hypoxia, inflammation, oxidative stress, and endothelial dysfunction may create etiologic mechanisms, connection between OSAS to CVD. Inflammation play an important role in the development of CVD. Platelet- Lymphocyte Ratio (PLR and Neutrophil-lymphocyte Ratio (NLR are new biomarkers showing inflammation. This study was designed to investigate the association between PLR, NLR and relationship between severity of OSAS, polysomnographic parameters and PLR. Methods: This was a cohort study in which patients who had undergone a full night polysomnography for diagnosis of OSA were recruited. Patients were divided according to their apnea hypopnea index (AHI scores into OSAS negative simple snoring (Group 1; AHI 30 groups. Results: A total of 111 patients were included in this study. There were 26, 22 and 63 patients in Groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively. PLR were significantly different between groups (Group 1: 87.12, Group 2: 103.6, Group 3: 112.5, p < 0.05. PLR were significantly correlated with NLR, AHI, oxygen desaturation index, average and minimum O2 saturation values (p < 0.05. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that PLR is an independent predictor of CVD. PLR cut-off value for demonstrating the presence of CVD is higher than 86.03. Conclusion: In the light of these findings, PLR is strongly associated with the severity of OSAS. PLR might be used as a biomarker to predict CVD in OSAS patients.

  4. MRI analysis on soft tissue around upper airway in obese adolescent patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhengjiao; Yuan Haibo; Peng Liping; Li Dan; Hua Shucheng

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the correlation of soft tissue structure of upper airway with the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in adolescents age group by analyzing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of upper airway. Methods: The subjects were divided into obese OSAS, obese controls and normal weight controls groups according to the results from polysomnography and body mass index measurements; Upper airway was scanned by MRI sagittally and axially; upper airway at all levels and soft tissue was analyzed by Amira Medical image analysis system. Results: Tongue volumes in obese OSAS and obese controls were significantly greater than that in normal weight controls (P<0.05); tonsil and adenoid volumes in obese OSAS were significantly higher than those in two control groups (P<0.05 or P<0.001), but no significant difference was found between two control groups. The volumes of lateral pharyngeal wall in obese OSAS were higher than those in obese controls and normal weight controls (P<0.05 or P<0.001), and they were higher in obese controls compared with normal weight controls (P<0.05). In obese OSAS group, positive correlations were found between volumes of lateral pharyngeal wall and apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) (r=0.879, P<0.01), as well volumes of tonsils and AHI (r=0.824, P<0.01). Conclusion: Obesity can increase the soft tissue volumes around upper airway, there by increase the upper airway obstruction; lateral pharyngeal wall and adenoid volumes play major roles in evaluating the severity of OSAS in adolescents. (authors)

  5. Role of spousal involvement in continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP adherence in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batool-Anwar S

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Little is known about the impact of spousal involvement on continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP adherence. The aim of this study was to determine whether spouse involvement affects adherence with CPAP therapy, and how this association varies with gender. Methods: 194 subjects recruited from Apnea Positive Pressure Long Term Efficacy Study (APPLES completed the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS. The majority of participants were Caucasian (83%, and males (73%, with mean age of 56 years, mean BMI of 31 kg/m2. & 62% had severe OSA. The DAS is a validated 32-item self-report instrument measuring dyadic consensus, satisfaction, cohesion, and affectional expression. A high score in the DAS is indicative of a person’s adjustment to the marriage. Additionally, questions related to spouse involvement with general health and CPAP use were asked. CPAP use was downloaded from the device and self-report, and compliance was defined as usage > 4 h per night. Results: There were no significant differences in overall marital quality between the compliant and noncompliant subjects. However, level of spousal involvement was associated with increased CPAP adherence at 6 months (p=0.01. After stratifying for gender these results were significant only among males (p=0.03. Three years after completing APPLES, level of spousal involvement was not associated with CPAP compliance even after gender stratification. Conclusion: Spousal involvement is important in determining CPAP compliance in males in the 1st 6 months after initiation of therapy but is not predictive of longer-term adherence. Involvement of the spouse should be considered an integral part of CPAP initiation procedures.

  6. Clinical, polysomnographic, and CPAP titration features of obstructive sleep apnea: Mixed versus purely obstructive type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Ahm; Lee, Gha-Hyun; Chung, Yoo-Sam; Kim, Woo Sung

    2015-08-15

    To determine whether obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) patients with mixed sleep apnea (MSA) have different clinical, polysomnographic, and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) titration findings compared to OSAS patients without MSA. We retrospectively reviewed the records of OSAS patients who had undergone CPAP titration and categorized them into pure-OSA and mixed-OSA groups. Demographic features, daytime sleepiness, and apnea severity were compared between the two groups using univariate and multivariate analyses. CPAP titration findings were also compared between the two groups. One hundred and ninety-five subjects (n=126 pure-OSA; n=69 mixed-OSA) were included in the analysis. Compared to the pure-OSA group, the mixed-OSA group had a higher percentage of males (p=0.003) and a higher body mass index (p=0.044), Epworth Sleepiness Scale score (p=0.028), and apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) (ptitration, and a higher titrated pressure than the pure-OSA group. Severe OSA, older age, male sex, obesity, and daytime sleepiness were related to mixed-OSA. Complex sleep apnea, less optimal titration, and a higher titrated CPAP were also associated with MSA in OSAS patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Volumetric Brain Morphometry Changes in patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome : effects of CPAP treatment and literature review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelly T Huynh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS is a frequent breathing disorder occurring during sleep that is characterized by recurrent hypoxic episodes and sleep fragmentation. It remains unclear whether OSAS leads to structural brain changes, and if so, in which brain regions. Brain region-specific gray and white matter volume (GMV and WMV changes can be measured with voxel-based morphometry (VBM. The aims of this study were to use VBM to analyze GMV and WMV in untreated OSAS patients compared to healthy controls (HC; examine the impact of OSAS-related variables (nocturnal hypoxemia duration and sleep fragmentation index on GMV and WMV; and assess the effects of therapeutic versus sham continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP. We discuss our results in light of previous findings and provide a comprehensive literature review. Methods: Twenty-seven treatment-naïve male patients with moderate to severe OSAS and seven healthy age- and education-matched control subjects (HC were recruited. After a baseline fMRI scan, patients randomly received either active (therapeutic, n=14 or sham (subtherapeutic, n=13 nasal CPAP treatment for 2 months. Results: Significant negative correlations were observed between nocturnal hypoxemia duration and GMV in bilateral lateral temporal regions. No differences in GMV or WMV were found between OSAS patients and HC, and no differences between CPAP versus sham CPAP treatment effects in OSAS patients. Conclusion: It appears that considering VBM GMV changes there is little difference between OSAS patients and HC. The largest VBM study to date indicates structural changes in the lateral aspect of the temporal lobe, which also showed a significant negative correlation with nocturnal hypoxemia duration in our study. This finding suggests an association between the effect of nocturnal hypoxemia and decreased GMV in OSAS patients.

  8. The association of 5-HT2A, 5-HTT, and LEPR polymorphisms with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Baodong; Sun, Zhen; Liang, Yan; Yang, Zaixing; Zhong, Renqian

    2014-01-01

    A consensus has not been reached regarding the association of several different gene polymorphisms and susceptibility to obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). We performed a meta-analysis to better evaluate the associations between 5-HT2A, 5-HTT, and LEPR polymorphisms, and OSAS. 5-HT2A, 5-HTT, and LEPR polymorphisms and OSAS were identified in PubMed and EMBASE. The pooled odd rates (ORs) with 95%CIs were estimated using a fixed-effect or random-effect models. The associations between these polymorphisms and OSAS risk were assessed using dominant, recessive and additive models. Twelve publications were included in this study. The -1438 "A" allele of 5-HT2A was identified as a candidate genetic risk factor for OSAS (OR: 2.33, 95%CI 1.49-3.66). Individuals carrying the -1438 "G" allele had a nearly 70% reduced risk of OSAS when compared with AA homozygotes (OR: 0.30, 95%CI 0.23-0.40). There was no significant association between 5-HT2A 102C/T and OSAS risk, using any model. The "S" allele of 5-HTTLPR conferred protection against OSAS (OR: 0.80, 95%CI 0.67-0.95), while the "10" allele of 5-HTTVNTR contributed to the risk of OSAS (OR: 2.08, 95%CI: 1.58-2.73). The "GG" genotype of LEPR was associated with a reduced risk of OSAS (OR: 0.39, 95%CI 0.17-0.88). The meta-analysis demonstrated that 5-HTR-1438 "A" and 5-HTTVNTR "10" alleles were significantly associated with OSAS. The "S" allele of 5-HTTLPR and the "GG" genotype of LEPR conferred protection against OSAS. Further studies, such as Genome-Wide Association study (GWAS), should be conducted in a large cohort of OSAS patients to confirm our findings.

  9. The association of 5-HT2A, 5-HTT, and LEPR polymorphisms with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baodong Qin

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: A consensus has not been reached regarding the association of several different gene polymorphisms and susceptibility to obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS. We performed a meta-analysis to better evaluate the associations between 5-HT2A, 5-HTT, and LEPR polymorphisms, and OSAS. METHOD: 5-HT2A, 5-HTT, and LEPR polymorphisms and OSAS were identified in PubMed and EMBASE. The pooled odd rates (ORs with 95%CIs were estimated using a fixed-effect or random-effect models. The associations between these polymorphisms and OSAS risk were assessed using dominant, recessive and additive models. RESULTS: Twelve publications were included in this study. The -1438 "A" allele of 5-HT2A was identified as a candidate genetic risk factor for OSAS (OR: 2.33, 95%CI 1.49-3.66. Individuals carrying the -1438 "G" allele had a nearly 70% reduced risk of OSAS when compared with AA homozygotes (OR: 0.30, 95%CI 0.23-0.40. There was no significant association between 5-HT2A 102C/T and OSAS risk, using any model. The "S" allele of 5-HTTLPR conferred protection against OSAS (OR: 0.80, 95%CI 0.67-0.95, while the "10" allele of 5-HTTVNTR contributed to the risk of OSAS (OR: 2.08, 95%CI: 1.58-2.73. The "GG" genotype of LEPR was associated with a reduced risk of OSAS (OR: 0.39, 95%CI 0.17-0.88. CONCLUSION: The meta-analysis demonstrated that 5-HTR-1438 "A" and 5-HTTVNTR "10" alleles were significantly associated with OSAS. The "S" allele of 5-HTTLPR and the "GG" genotype of LEPR conferred protection against OSAS. Further studies, such as Genome-Wide Association study (GWAS, should be conducted in a large cohort of OSAS patients to confirm our findings.

  10. Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Apnea (OSA) Download Download the ebook for further information Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a serious and ... that can create the necessary air passageway. The information provided here is not intended as a substitute ...

  11. Undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children with syndromal craniofacial synostosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijpers, M.; Poels, P.J.P.; Vaandrager, J.M.; Hoog, M. de; Berg, S.W. van den; Hoeve, H.J.; Joosten, K.F.

    2004-01-01

    Children with syndromal craniofacial synostosis have a high risk for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Early diagnosis and treatment can relieve symptoms and morbidity. Little is known about the development and natural history of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome through life. The aim of this study

  12. The Predictors of Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aylin Pıhtılı

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: As obesity increases, the frequency of obstructive sleep apnea and obesity hypoventilation syndrome increases also. However, obesity hypoventilation syndrome frequency is not known, as capnography and arterial blood gas analysis are not routinely performed in sleep laboratories. Aims: To investigate the frequency and predictors of obesity hypoventilation syndrome in obese subjects. Study Design: Retrospective clinical study Methods: Obese subjects who had arterial blood gas analysis admitted to the sleep laboratory and polysomnography were retrospectively analyzed. Subjects with restrictive (except obesity and obstructive pulmonary pathologies were excluded. Demographics, Epworth-Sleepiness-Scale scores, polysomnographic data, arterial blood gas analysis, and spirometric measurements were recorded. Results: Of the 419 subjects, 45.1% had obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Apnea hypopnea index (p<0.001, oxygen desaturation index (p<0.001 and sleep time with SpO2<90% (p<0.001 were statistically higher in subjects with obesity hypoventilation syndrome compared to subjects with eucapnic obstructive sleep apnea. The nocturnal mean SpO2 (p<0.001 and lowest SpO2 (p<0.001 were also statistically lower in subjects with obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Logistic regression analysis showed that the lowest SpO2, oxygen desaturation index, apnea hypopnea index and sleep time with SpO2 <90% were related factors for obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Conclusion: Obesity hypoventilation syndrome should be considered when oxygen desaturation index, apnea hypopnea index and sleep time with SpO2 <90% are high

  13. Functional MRI of the pharynx in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) with rapid 2-D flash sequences; Funktionelle MRT des Pharynx bei obstruktiver Schlafapnoe (OSA) mit schnellen 2D-FLASH-Sequenzen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeger, L. [Inst. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Klinikum Grosshadern der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Muenchen (Germany); Guenther, E. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Hals-, Nasen- und Ohrenkranke, Klinikum Grosshadern der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Muenchen (Germany); Gauger, J. [Inst. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Klinikum Grosshadern der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Muenchen (Germany); Nitz, W. [Siemens Medizintechnik, Erlangen (Germany); Kastenbauer, E. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Hals-, Nasen- und Ohrenkranke, Klinikum Grosshadern der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Muenchen (Germany); Reiser, M. [Inst. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Klinikum Grosshadern der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Muenchen (Germany)

    1996-03-01

    Functional imaging of the pharynx used to be the domain of cineradiography, CT and ultrafast CT. The development of modern MRI techniques led to new access to functional disorders of the pharynx. The aim of this study was to implement a new MRI technique to examine oropharyngeal obstructive mechanisms in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Sixteen patients suffering from OSA and 6 healthy volunteers were examined on a 1.5 T whole-body imager (`Vision`, Siemens, Erlangen Medical Engineering, Germany) using a circular polarized head coil. Imaging was performed with 2D flash sequences in midsagittal and axial planes. Patients and volunteers were asked to breathe normally through the nose and to simulate snoring and the Mueller maneuver during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Prior to MRI, all patients underwent an ear, nose and throat (ENT) examination, functional fiberoptic nasopharyngoscopy and polysomnography. A temporal resolution of 6 images/s and an in-plane resolution of 2.67x1.8 mm were achieved. The mobility of the tongue, soft palate and pharyngeal surface could be clearly delineated. The MRI findings correlated well with the clinical examinations. We propose ultrafast MRI as a reliable and non-invasive method of evaluating pharyngeal obstruction and their levels. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die funktionelle Bildgebung des Pharynx war bisher eine Domaene der Hochfrequenzroentgenkinematographie, der Computertomographie (CT) und der ultraschnellen Computertomographie. Die Entwicklung moderner Techniken in der Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) fuehrte zu neuen Ansaetzen in der Diagnostik pharyngealer Dysfunktionen. Ziel der vorliegenden Studie war die Implementierung neuer schneller MR-Sequenzen, um Verschlussmechanismen entlang des Pharnyxschlauches bei Patienten mit obstruktiver Schlafapnoe (OSA) zu untersuchen. 16 Patienten mit OSA und 6 gesunde Probanden wurden an einem 1,5-T-Ganzkoerpermagnetresonanztomographen (`Vision`, Siemens Medizintechnik, Erlangen

  14. [Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome and Pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, M; Schäfer, T; Schiermeier, S; Rasche, K

    2018-03-01

    Die Schwangerschaft hat einen erheblichen Einfluss auf Atmungsregulation und Atemmechanik sowie auf die Schlafregulation: Durch seine Größenzunahme schränkt der Uterus zwar die maximale willkürliche Ventilation ein, das Schwangerschaftshormon Progesteron hingegen bewirkt eine kompensierende Bronchodilatation und eine markante Hyperventilation mit arteriellen PCO 2 -Werten der Schwangeren unter 30 mmHg. Die Schlafqualität nimmt in der Schwangerschaft ab, insbesondere aufgrund steigender Hormonspiegel des Progesterons, einer generellen Stoffwechselsteigerung, Nykturie, fetaler Bewegungen und wegen der Begünstigung schlafbezogener Atmungsstörungen. Beim Embryo entwickelt sich bereits in der 4. Woche die Lungenanlage und reift über ein pseudoglanduläres, kanalikuläres, sakkuläres zum alveolaren Stadium. Ab Schwangerschaftswoche 29 – 30 sezernieren Typ-2-Alveozyten Surfactant. Ab der Mitte des zweiten Trimenons sind fetale Atembewegungen nachweisbar. Ohne sie fehlt der Stimulus für ein adäquates Lungenwachstum. Sie sind abhängig vom Ruhe-/Aktivitätsrhythmus des Fetusses und antworten auf erhöhten Kohlendioxidpartialdruck, während sie durch Sauerstoffmangel inhibiert werden. Die innere Uhr entwickelt sich beim Fetus im letzten Trimester und wird durch Zeitgeber der Mutter, zum Beispiel durch den Melatoninspiegel synchronisiert. In den letzten 10 Wochen der Schwangerschaft lassen sich Phasen ruhigen (NREM-) und aktiven (REM-)Schlafes differenzieren. Schwangerschaft und intrauterine Entwicklung sind von erheblichen Veränderungen von Atmung und Schlaf bei Mutter und Kind begleitet, die Ansatzpunkte pathophysiologischer Entwicklungen sein können.Schlafbezogene Atmungsstörungen (SBAS) in Form von Schnarchen oder obstruktivem Schlafapnoe-Syndrom (OSAS) sind auch bei Frauen insbesondere nach der Menopause häufige Schlafstörungen. Aber auch prämenopausal tritt das OSAS mit einer Häufigkeit von mehr als 2 % auf. Einige während der

  15. Sleep apnea syndrome after irradiation of the neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herlihy, J.P.; Whitlock, W.L.; Dietrich, R.A.; Shaw, T.

    1989-01-01

    After irradiation of the neck for a squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsillar pillar and vocal cord, a 71-year-old man presented with a rapidly progressive sleep apnea syndrome. Previous reports describe the condition of patients with obstructive sleep apnea that developed after neck irradiation and secondary to supraglottic edema. Our patient had an obstructive component to his apnea similar to that described in previous cases, but, in addition, he had hypothyroidism. Myxedema is a well-described cause of both obstructive and central apnea. We believe both contributed to his condition. He was successfully treated by placement of a tracheostomy and by thyroid supplementation. In patients who present with sleep apnea after neck irradiation, especially with acute or severe symptoms, the differential diagnosis should include both a central cause from hypothyroidism as well as a peripheral obstructive cause from laryngeal edema

  16. Sleep apnea syndrome after irradiation of the neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herlihy, J.P.; Whitlock, W.L.; Dietrich, R.A.; Shaw, T. (Pulmonary Disease Service, Presidio of San Francisco, CA (USA))

    1989-12-01

    After irradiation of the neck for a squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsillar pillar and vocal cord, a 71-year-old man presented with a rapidly progressive sleep apnea syndrome. Previous reports describe the condition of patients with obstructive sleep apnea that developed after neck irradiation and secondary to supraglottic edema. Our patient had an obstructive component to his apnea similar to that described in previous cases, but, in addition, he had hypothyroidism. Myxedema is a well-described cause of both obstructive and central apnea. We believe both contributed to his condition. He was successfully treated by placement of a tracheostomy and by thyroid supplementation. In patients who present with sleep apnea after neck irradiation, especially with acute or severe symptoms, the differential diagnosis should include both a central cause from hypothyroidism as well as a peripheral obstructive cause from laryngeal edema.

  17. The Influence of a Mandibular Advancement Plate on Polysomnography in Different Grades of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    OpenAIRE

    Antti Raunio; Pauli Mattila; Usko Huuskonen; Kyösti Oikarinen; George K. Sándor

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a mandibular advancement device on different grades of obstructive sleep apnea using a relatively simple test for the apnea-hypopnea index to determine if a mandibular device will be effective. Material and Methods: A total of 68 patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) including, 31 with mild, 23 with moderate and 14 with severe OSAS were treated with a mandibular advancement device (MAD) and monitored wi...

  18. The Influence of a Mandibular Advancement Plate on Polysomnography in Different Grades of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    OpenAIRE

    Raunio, Antti; Mattila, Pauli; Huuskonen, Usko; Oikarinen, Ky?sti; S?ndor, George K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a mandibular advancement device on different grades of obstructive sleep apnea using a relatively simple test for the apnea-hypopnea index to determine if a mandibular device will be effective. Material and Methods A total of 68 patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) including, 31 with mild, 23 with moderate and 14 with severe OSAS were treated with a mandibular advancement device (MAD) and monitored...

  19. Energy Types of Snoring Sounds in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: A Preliminary Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Li-Ang; Yu, Jen-Fang; Lo, Yu-Lun; Chen, Yen-Sheng; Wang, Ding-Li; Cho, Chih-Ming; Ni, Yung-Lun; Chen, Ning-Hung; Fang, Tuan-Jen; Huang, Chung-Guei; Li, Hsueh-Yu

    2012-01-01

    Background Annoying snore is the principle symptom and problem in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). However, investigation has been hampered by the complex snoring sound analyses. Objective This study was aimed to investigate the energy types of the full-night snoring sounds in patients with OSAS. Patients and Method Twenty male OSAS patients underwent snoring sound recording throughout 6 hours of in-lab overnight polysomnogragphy. Snoring sounds were processed and analyzed by a new sound analytic program, named as Snore Map®. We transformed the 6-hour snoring sound power spectra into the energy spectrum and classified it as snore map type 1 (monosyllabic low-frequency snore), type 2 (duplex low-&mid-frequency snore), type 3 (duplex low- & high-frequency snore), and type 4 (triplex low-, mid-, & high-frequency snore). The interrator and test-retest reliabilities of snore map typing were assessed. The snore map types and their associations among demographic data, subjective snoring questionnaires, and polysomnographic parameters were explored. Results The interrator reliability of snore map typing were almost perfect (κ = 0.87) and the test-retest reliability was high (r = 0.71). The snore map type was proportional to the body mass index (r = 0.63, P = 0.003) and neck circumference (r = 0.52, P = 0.018). Snore map types were unrelated to subjective snoring questionnaire scores (All P>0.05). After adjustment for body mass index and neck circumference, snore map type 3–4 was significantly associated with severity of OSAS (r = 0.52, P = 0.026). Conclusions Snore map typing of a full-night energy spectrum is feasible and reliable. The presence of a higher snore map type is a warning sign of severe OSAS and indicated priority OSAS management. Future studies are warranted to evaluate whether snore map type can be used to discriminate OSAS from primary snoring and whether it is affected by OSAS management. PMID:23300931

  20. Energy types of snoring sounds in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: a preliminary observation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Ang Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Annoying snore is the principle symptom and problem in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS. However, investigation has been hampered by the complex snoring sound analyses. OBJECTIVE: This study was aimed to investigate the energy types of the full-night snoring sounds in patients with OSAS. PATIENTS AND METHOD: Twenty male OSAS patients underwent snoring sound recording throughout 6 hours of in-lab overnight polysomnogragphy. Snoring sounds were processed and analyzed by a new sound analytic program, named as Snore Map®. We transformed the 6-hour snoring sound power spectra into the energy spectrum and classified it as snore map type 1 (monosyllabic low-frequency snore, type 2 (duplex low-&mid-frequency snore, type 3 (duplex low- & high-frequency snore, and type 4 (triplex low-, mid-, & high-frequency snore. The interrator and test-retest reliabilities of snore map typing were assessed. The snore map types and their associations among demographic data, subjective snoring questionnaires, and polysomnographic parameters were explored. RESULTS: The interrator reliability of snore map typing were almost perfect (κ = 0.87 and the test-retest reliability was high (r = 0.71. The snore map type was proportional to the body mass index (r = 0.63, P = 0.003 and neck circumference (r = 0.52, P = 0.018. Snore map types were unrelated to subjective snoring questionnaire scores (All P>0.05. After adjustment for body mass index and neck circumference, snore map type 3-4 was significantly associated with severity of OSAS (r = 0.52, P = 0.026. CONCLUSIONS: Snore map typing of a full-night energy spectrum is feasible and reliable. The presence of a higher snore map type is a warning sign of severe OSAS and indicated priority OSAS management. Future studies are warranted to evaluate whether snore map type can be used to discriminate OSAS from primary snoring and whether it is affected by OSAS management.

  1. [Depressive symptomatology and sleep apnea syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pochat, M D; Ferber, C; Lemoine, P

    1993-01-01

    The sleep apnea syndrome (SAS), which is defined by more than 5 apneas or hypopneas per hour of sleep (9), is quite a frequent affection which concerns 1.4 to 10% of general population (1.7). The major daytime complaints of the SAS are daytime sleepiness, memory and attention disorders, headaches and asthenia especially in the morning, and sexual impotence (9). The nocturnal manifestations are dominated by sonorous and generally long standing snoring, increased by dorsal decubitus and intake of alcohol, with repeated interruptions by respiratory arrests. These manifestations are always noted but rarely spontaneously reported. The sleep, non refreshing, is agitated and perturbed by numerous awakenings. The findings of the clinical examination are poor: obesity is found in 2/3 of the cases and arterial hypertension in 1/2 of the cases (20). Polygraphic recording during sleep only permits an absolute diagnosis. This frequent affection is a real problem of public health because of its numerous complications (3, 10, 12, 13, 18, 21). Symptoms of depression are often found when a patient with a SAS is examined and conversely, symptoms which evoke a SAS can be found in the clinical examination of depressed patients. We decided so to study the thymic and anxious status of 24 patients investigated for a SAS and submitted to a polygraphic recording during sleep. Four clinical parameters were studied: DSM III-R diagnosis criteria, Montgomery and Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS) and thymasthenia rating scale of Lecrubier, Payan and Puech. We also reported Total Sleep Time (TST = 6.5 +/- 1.5), Apnea Hypopnea Index (AHI = 26.7 +/- 21.6), number (2.1 +/- 2.8/h) and duration (174.2 +/- 150.8 s/h) of hypoxic events. Results showed that among 24 patients, 8 were depressed according to DSM III-R diagnosis criteria and had MADRS > 25, 22 were anxious, 11 had a major anxiety (HARS > 15) and 15 presented thymasthenia (SET > 15). Significative

  2. The correlation between growth hormone receptor (GHR) polymorphism and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome among the Han and Hani population in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Juanjuan; Yang, Yunwei; Lin, Yan; Li, Xudong; Wu, Xiaoguang; Yang, Xi; Zhong, Ling; Tang, Ying; Huang, Zhiyong; He, Xiaoguang

    2018-04-13

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a common health problem that is associated with abnormality in craniofacial morphology. The growth hormone receptor (GHR) belongs to the cytokine receptor superfamily and mediates the majority of growth hormone signaling, which, among other functions, determines mandibular growth and development. The aim of this study was to determine if correlations exist between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the GHR gene and OSAS in the Han or Hani ethnic groups in China. A total of 274 Han subjects (106 with OSAS and 168 without OSAS) and a total of 270 Hani subjects (64 with OSAS and 206 without OSAS) were enrolled in our study. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood obtained from all subjects. Genotyping was undertaken for eight SNPs in the GHR gene (rs3756416, rs7727047, rs2910875, rs12153009, rs2972781, rs12518414, rs4410646, and rs6451620) using PCR amplification and Sanger sequencing. The genotype frequency of rs12518414 was associated with OSAS in both the Han and Hani groups, and the A allele frequency was remarkably lower in Hani OSAS patients compared with Hani controls (16.7 vs 29.9%). In addition, the G allele frequency of the rs3756416 SNP was significantly lower in OSAS patients compared with normal controls in the Hani ethnic group (12.5 vs 24.6%). In a comparison between ethnic groups, genotype frequencies of four SNPs (rs2972781, rs6451620, rs12518414, and rs7727047) differed between Han and Hani OSAS patients, with the A allele frequency of the rs12518414 and G allele frequency of the rs7727047 were significantly higher in the Han OSAS patients. In conclusion, significant associations were detected between some SNPs in the GHR gene and OSAS occurrence while others appeared to be ethnicity-dependent.

  3. Endocrine and Metabolic Aspects of OSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinder Goswami

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is characterized by repeated spells of apnea.Collapsibility of hypopharynx due to multiple factors involving pharyngeal dilatormuscles and deposition of fat or fluid in the surrounding soft tissues are importantcontributing factors in its pathogenesis. OSA commonly affects obese individuals.Males are more commonly affected than the females probably due to the disturbingeffect of testosterone on sleep.The impact of OSA on human health include disturbances in endocrine and metabolicsystem affecting hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, adrenocorticotrophic-cortisolaxis, growth hormone, antidiuretic hormones and insulin resistance. There is atendency for predisposition of the metabolic syndrome or its components includingglycemic dysregulation, hypertension, hyperlipidemia and physical parameters relatedto adiposity. On the other hand, several endocrine disorders such as hypothyroidism,growth hormone excess, polycystic ovarian disease and testosterone replacement areassociated with increased prevalence of OSA.There is limited information on the effect of treatment of OSA by continuous positiveairway pressure (CPAP on the endocrine and metabolic disturbances. There is a needto conduct randomized controlled trials using CPAP therapy in patients with OSA andto study its cause and effect relationship with endocrine and metabolic disturbances.

  4. Neck Circumference Is a Predictor of Metabolic Syndrome and Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Short-Sleeping Obese Men and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, Lilian; Piaggi, Paolo; Mattingly, Megan; Zhao, Xiongce; Lucassen, Eliane; Rother, Kristina I.; Sumner, Anne E.; Csako, Gyorgy

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: The constellation of metabolic syndrome, although controversial with regard to its clinical usefulness, is epidemiologically related to increased diabetes risk and cardiovascular mortality. Our goal was to investigate the associations among neck circumference (NC), obstructive sleep apnea syndromes (OSAS), and metabolic syndrome in obese men and women sleeping less than 6.5 hr per night. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of obese men and premenopausal obese women sleeping less than 6.5 hr per night. We enrolled 120 individuals (92 women), age 40.5±6.9 years and body mass index (BMI) 38.6±6.5 kg/m2. Metabolic syndrome severity was assessed by a score and OSAS was defined as a respiratory disturbance index (RDI) ≥5. Metabolic end endocrine parameters were measured, and sleep duration was determined by actigraphy and validated questionnaires. Results: Metabolic syndrome was found in 41% and OSAS in 58% (28% had both). Subjects with metabolic syndrome were 3 years older and more often Caucasian; they had higher RDI scores, larger NC, more visceral fat, lower serum adiponectin, higher 24-hr urinary norepinephrine (NE) excretion, and lower growth hormone concentrations. A NC of ≥38 cm had a sensitivity of 54% and 58% and a specificity of 70% and 79% in predicting the presence of metabolic syndrome and OSAS, respectively. RDI, adiponectin, and NC accounted for approximately 30% of the variability in the metabolic syndrome score, as estimated by an age-, gender-, and race-corrected multivariate model (R2=0.376, Pmetabolic syndrome in short-sleeping obese men and premenopausal obese women. Addition of NC to the definition of metabolic syndrome should be considered and needs to be validated in future studies. PMID:24571423

  5. Cerebral hemodynamics in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome monitored with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during positive airways pressure (CPAP) therapy: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongxing; Schneider, Maja; Laures, Marco; Fritschi, Ursula; Lehner, Isabella; Qi, Ming; Khatami, Ramin

    2014-03-01

    In obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) the periodic reduction or cessation of breathing due to narrowing or occlusion of the upper airway during sleep leads to daytime symptoms and increased cardiovascular risk, including stroke. The higher risk of stroke is related to the impairment in cerebral vascular autoregulation. Continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP) therapy at night is the most effective treatment for OSA. However, there is no suitable bedside monitoring method evaluating the treatment efficacy of CPAP therapy, especially to monitor the recovery of cerebral hemodynamics. NIRS is ideally suited for non-invasive monitoring the cerebral hemodynamics during sleep. In this study, we will for first time assess dynamic changes of cerebral hemodynamics during nocturnal CPAP therapy in 3 patients with OSA using NIRS. We found periodic oscillations in HbO2, HHb, tissue oxygenation index (TOI) and blood volume associated with periodic apnea events without CPAP in all OSA patients. These oscillations were gradually attenuated and finally eliminated with the stepwise increments of CPAP pressures. The oscillations were totally eliminated in blood volume earlier than in other hemodynamic parameters. These results suggested that 1) the cerebral hemodynamic oscillations induced by OSA events can effectively be attenuated by CPAP therapy, and 2) blood flow and blood volume recovered first during CPAP therapy, followed by the recovery of oxygen consumption. Our study suggested that NIRS is a useful tool to evaluate the efficacy of CPAP therapy in patients with OSA bedside and in real time.

  6. Impact of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome on Endothelial Function, Arterial Stiffening, and Serum Inflammatory Markers: An Updated Meta-analysis and Metaregression of 18 Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiayang; Yu, Wenyuan; Gao, Mingxin; Zhang, Fan; Gu, Chengxiong; Yu, Yang; Wei, Yongxiang

    2015-11-13

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) has been indicated to contribute to the development of cardiovascular disease; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study aimed to test the hypothesis that OSAS may be associated with cardiovascular disease by elevating serum levels of inflammatory markers and causing arterial stiffening and endothelial dysfunction. Related scientific reports published from January 1, 2006, to June 30, 2015, were searched in the following electronic literature databases: PubMed, Excerpta Medica Database, ISI Web of Science, Directory of Open Access Journals, and the Cochrane Library. The association of OSAS with serum levels of inflammatory markers, endothelial dysfunction, and arterial stiffening were investigated. Overall, 18 eligible articles containing 736 patients with OSAS and 424 healthy persons were included in this meta-analysis. Flow-mediated dilation in patients with moderate-severe OSAS was significantly lower than that in controls (standardized mean difference -1.02, 95% CI -1.31 to -0.73, Preactive protein and C-reactive protein (standardized mean difference 0.58, 95% CI 0.42-0.73, P<0.0001) were significantly higher in patients with OSAS than in controls. OSAS, particularly moderate-severe OSAS, appeared to reduce endothelial function, increase arterial stiffness, and cause chronic inflammation, leading to the development of cardiovascular disease. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  7. Factors affecting executive functions in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and volumetric changes in the prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Zahide; Voyvoda, Nuray; İnan, Eda; Şirinocak, Pınar Bekdik; Terzi, Rabia

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with cognitive changes and executive functions are among the cognitive domains most affected. However, it is not completely understood which of the factor(s) among hypoxemia, repeated arousal, and sleepiness affect the executive functions. This study aims to evaluate the possible relationship between the executive functions and nocturnal parameters, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) scores, and prefrontal cortex (PFC) volumes. A total of 28 patients aged between 18 and 60 years who were newly diagnosed with OSAS were included in this study. The Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) and Stroop test which were used in the evaluation of executive functions were applied to all patients. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and volumetric measurements of the PFC were performed. Polysomnography (PSG), WCST, Stroop test, and cranial MRI were also applied to the control group which consisted of age- and education status-matched 15 healthy subjects. The correlation of WCST and Stroop tests and PFC volume, PSG parameters, and ESS scale was examined. The WCST-6 test scores were statistically significantly higher in the patient group (p = 0.022; p executive functions in OSAS is evident. The most influential factor is excessive daytime sleepiness, rather than hypoxemia and severity of the disease.

  8. Patient's perception of the facial appearance after maxillomandibular advancement for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, K K; Riley, R W; Powell, N B; Guilleminault, C

    2001-04-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the patient's perception of the facial appearance after maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) surgery for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). During a 14-month period, 58 patients underwent MMA for OSAS. All of the patients underwent preoperative and postoperative cephalometric analysis. Between 6 and 12 months after surgery, a questionnaire was mailed to each patient. The questionnaire asked the patient to evaluate subjectively their postoperative facial appearance. Visual analog scale ([VAS] 0 to 10) was used to assess the extent of the facial changes. Forty-four (76%) patients (39 men, 6 women) responded to the questionnaire. Cephalometric analysis revealed that 40 patients had maxillomandibular protrusion postoperatively. Forty-two (96%) of the 44 patients reported changes in their facial appearance (VAS, 4.8 +/- 2.5). Twenty-four (55%) patients reported favorable facial changes (ie, they were more attractive [15 patients] and/or more youthful). Fourteen patients gave neutral responses (ie, they were no more or no less attractive). Four patients gave unfavorable responses (ie, they were less attractive after surgery). The results suggest that most patients who underwent MMA for OSAS noted moderate changes in their facial appearance. Despite significant maxillomandibular protrusion based on the postoperative cephalometric analysis, more than 90% of the patients gave either positive or neutral responses to the changes in their facial appearance.

  9. Role of Oxidative Stress in the Neurocognitive Dysfunction of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS is characterized by chronic nocturnal intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentations. Neurocognitive dysfunction, a significant and extraordinary complication of OSAS, influences patients’ career, family, and social life and reduces quality of life to some extent. Previous researches revealed that repetitive hypoxia and reoxygenation caused mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum dysfunction, overactivated NADPH oxidase, xanthine oxidase, and uncoupling nitric oxide synthase, induced an imbalance between prooxidants and antioxidants, and then got rise to a series of oxidative stress (OS responses, such as protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation, and DNA oxidation along with inflammatory reaction. OS in brain could trigger neuron injury especially in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex regions. Those two regions are fairly susceptible to hypoxia and oxidative stress production which could consequently result in cognitive dysfunction. Apart from continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP, antioxidant may be a promising therapeutic method to improve partially reversible neurocognitive function. Understanding the role that OS played in the cognitive deficits is crucial for future research and therapeutic strategy development. In this paper, recent important literature concerning the relationship between oxidative stress and cognitive impairment in OSAS will be summarized and the results can provide a rewarding overview for future breakthrough in this field.

  10. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and snoring in patients with bilateral vocal cord paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiolek, Maciej; Namyslowski, Grzegorz; Karpe, Jacek; Ziora, Dariusz; Misiolek, Hanna; Czecior, Eugeniusz; Scierski, Wojciech

    2003-04-01

    The analysis of the correlation between bilateral vocal cord paralysis and the occurrence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and snoring is presented. The aim of the study was to establish whether the decrease of the air flow in the upper airway in patients with bilateral vocal cord paralysis involves OSAS and/or snoring occurrence and whether arytenoidectomy affects an improvement of breathing parameters measured during sleep. Fourteen patients with bilateral vocal cord paralysis underwent Poly-MESAM examination before and 3 months after arytenoidectomy. They had never complained of snoring before. The Epworth sleepiness scale was used to quantify excessive daytime somnolence. The RDI, DI, mean saturation and percentage of snoring, loud snoring and sleep without snoring were estimated and compared pre- and postoperatively. The results were compared by the Student's t-test for dependent values. No significant differences were shown between the Epworth scores before and after the treatment. The RDI, DI and mean saturation were normal before and after the operation. The percentage of loud snoring decreased and the percentage of sleep without snoring increased significantly after arytenoidectomy in both cases. The mechanism of snoring in patients with vocal cord paralysis seems to be similar to OSAS. The difference consists in the level of flow limitation. On the basis of the results there is no reason to diagnose OSAS and UARS in patients with bilateral vocal cord paralysis. On the other hand, the intensive snoring that occurs after paralysis was significantly reduced as a result of arytenoidectomy.

  11. The Development of a Screening Questionnaire for Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Children with Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Emma; Hill, Catherine Mary; Evans, Hazel Jean; Tuffrey, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a condition which affects an estimated 50% of children with Down syndrome, particularly in their early years. It can cause serious sequelae in affected children but may not be recognized by parents or health professionals. Routine screening has been recommended in some countries, but is not standard practice. There are no validated questionnaire-based tools available to screen this population of children for this particular sleep-related disorder. Using existing validated sleep questionnaire items, we have developed a questionnaire to screen children with Down syndrome up to 6 years of age for obstructive sleep apnea, which corresponds with the recommendations made in UK national guidelines. This paper describes these first steps in demonstrating content validity for a new questionnaire, which will be subject to further in-depth psychometric analysis. Relevance, clarity, and age appropriateness were rated for 33 items using a content review questionnaire by a group of 18 health professionals with expertise in respiratory pediatrics, neurodevelopmental pediatrics, and sleep physiology. The content validity index was calculated for individual items and contributed to decisions about item inclusion. Scale level content validity index for the modified questionnaire of 14 items was at an accepted level of 0.78. Two parents of children with Down syndrome took part in cognitive interviews after completing the modified questionnaire. We describe the development of this 14 item questionnaire to screen for OSA in children with DS from infancy to 6 years.

  12. Effects of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure on Cognitive Deficits in Middle-aged Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Yue-Ying; Deng, Yan; Xu, Xiu; Liu, Ya-Ping; Liu, Hui-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Current views on continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment to improve the cognitive deficits of patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) are controversial, so we performed a meta-analysis. Methods: A comprehensive literature search was undertaken in PubMed, CINAHL, Medline, PsycInfo, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, CNKI, WanFang, VIP, and CBMdisc for studies published from June 1971 to July 2014. The outcome measures included neuropsychological tests of the 7 ...

  13. Antioxidant Carbocysteine Treatment in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Wu

    Full Text Available This study aimed to examine the effects of carbocysteine in OSAS patients.A total of 40 patients with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS were randomly divided into two groups. One group was treated with 1500 mg carbocysteine daily, and the other was treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP at night. Before treatment and after 6 weeks of treatment, all patients underwent polysomnography and completed questionnaires. Treatment compliance was compared between the two groups. Plasma was collected for various biochemical analyses. Endothelial function was assessed with ultrasound in the carbocysteine group.The proportion of patients who fulfilled the criteria for good compliance was higher in the carbocysteine group (n = 17 than in the CPAP group (n = 11; 100% vs. 64.7%. Compared with baseline values, the carbocysteine group showed significant improvement in their Epworth Sleepiness Scale score (10.18 ± 4.28 vs. 6.82 ± 3.66; P ≤ 0.01, apnea-hypopnea index (55.34 ± 25.03 vs. 47.56 ± 27.32; P ≤ 0.01, time and percentage of 90% oxygen desaturation (12.66 (2.81; 50.01 vs. 8.9 (1.41; 39.71; P ≤ 0.01, and lowest oxygen saturation level (65.88 ± 14.86 vs. 70.41 ± 14.34; P ≤ 0.01. Similar changes were also observed in the CPAP group. The CPAP group also showed a decreased oxygen desaturation index and a significant increase in the mean oxygen saturation after treatment, but these increases were not observed in the carbocysteine group. Snoring volume parameters, such as the power spectral density, were significantly reduced in both groups after the treatments. The plasma malondialdehyde level decreased and the superoxide dismutase and nitric oxide levels increased in both groups. The endothelin-1 level decreased in the CPAP group but did not significantly change in the carbocysteine group. Ultrasonography showed that the intima-media thickness decreased (0.71 ± 0.15 vs. 0.66 ± 0.15; P ≤ 0.05 but that flow

  14. Medical treatment of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karem Parejo-Gallardo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAHS seeks to solve the signs and symptoms related to the disease, as well as to reduce the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI and the desaturations, to achieve a decrease of associated risks and comorbidities. However, this disease requires long-term treatment, with combined therapies developed by a multidisciplinary team. Medical treatment should be performed on all patients, even if additional therapies are necessary. In addition, this syndrome may be associated with other diseases that need specific treatment.

  15. Executive dysfunction in children affected by obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esposito M

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Maria Esposito,1 Lorenzo Antinolfi,1 Beatrice Gallai,2 Lucia Parisi,3 Michele Roccella,3 Rosa Marotta,4 Serena Marianna Lavano,4 Giovanni Mazzotta,5 Francesco Precenzano,1 Marco Carotenuto1 1Sleep Clinic for Developmental Age, Clinic of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, Department of Mental and Physical Health and Preventive Medicine, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy; 2Unit of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy; 3Child Neuropsychiatry, Department of Psychology, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy; 4Department of Psychiatry, Magna Graecia University of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, Italy; 5Unit of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, AUSL Umbria 2, Terni, Italy Introduction: The role of sleep in cognitive processes can be considered clear and well established. Different reports have disclosed the association between sleep and cognition in adults and in children, as well as the impact of disturbed sleep on various aspects of neuropsychological functioning and behavior in children and adolescents. Behavioral and cognitive dysfunctions can also be considered as related to alterations in the executive functions (EF system. In particular, the EF concept refers to self-regulatory cognitive processes that are associated with monitoring and controlling both thought and goal directed behaviors. The aim of the present study is to assess the impact of the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS on EF in a large sample of school aged children. Materials and methods: The study population comprised 79 children (51 males and 28 females aged 7–12 years (mean 9.14 ± 2.36 years with OSAS and 92 healthy children (63 males and 29 females, mean age 9.08 ± 2.44 years. To identify the severity of OSAS, an overnight respiratory evaluation was performed. All subjects filled out the Italian version of the Modified Card Sorting Test to screen EFs. Moreover, to check the degree of subjective perceived daytime sleepiness

  16. Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA and depressive symptoms Sintomas depressivos e síndrome de apnéia obstrutiva do sono

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Dominici

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The relationship between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA and depressive symptoms is ambiguous in the literature. PURPOSE: To investigate if there is a correlation between depressive symptoms and the severity of OSA. METHOD: A retrospective, cross-sectional study of data from 123 consecutive adults patients with neither mental illness nor psychotropic drugs intake, referred to a sleep laboratory for an evaluation of OSA. For the statistical analysis (uni- and multivariate, we used the following variables: gender and age, as well as scores based on several scales and indexes such as Beck Depressive Inventory (BDI, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS, Body Mass Index (BMI and Apnea-Hypopnea Index (AHI. RESULTS: Univariate analysis found a weak but statistically significant negative correlation between BDI and AHI. However, with the multivariate logistic regression analysis model, the inverse relation between AHI and BDI no longer has statistical significance. CONCLUSION: There is no causal relationship between OSA and depressive symptoms in the population studied.CONTEXTO: A relação entre apnéia obstrutiva do sono (AOS e sintomas depressivos é ambígua na literatura. OBJETIVO: Investigar se há relação entre sintomas depressivos e intensidade da AOS. MÉTODO: Estudo transversal e retrospectivo com 123 pacientes adultos, consecutivamente atendidos em laboratório de sono, para avaliar AOS, sem transtornos mentais nem uso de psicotrópicos. Para análise estatística (uni e multivariada, utilizamos as seguintes variáveis: sexo e idade, além de escores de diversas escalas: Escala de Depressão de Beck (EDB, Escala de Sonolência diurna de Epworth (EPW, Índice de Massa Corporal e o Índice de Apnéia /Hipopnéia (IAH. RESULTADOS: A análise univariada demonstrou fraca, mas estatisticamente significativa relação negativa entre EDB e IAH. Porém, na análise multivariada por regressão logística, esta relação inversa perdeu sua signific

  17. Clinical symptoms of sleep apnea syndrome and automobile accidents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haraldsson, P O; Carenfelt, C; Diderichsen, Finn

    1990-01-01

    Patients with clinical features of sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) and self-reported sleep spells at the wheel do poorly in simulated monotonous driving. To evaluate whether drivers with defined symptoms of SAS (heavy snoring, sleep disturbances and daytime sleepiness) compensate in real traffic by ca...

  18. Sleep apnea syndrome: experience of the pulmonology department ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction Sleep apnea syndrome is a highly prevalent disorder that is still underdiagnosed and undertreated and whose obstructive form is the most common. The diagnosis is suspected on clinical signs collected by interrogation and questionnaires (Berlin questionnaire and Epworth sleepiness scale), then confirmed by ...

  19. Definition of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karem Josefina Parejo-Gallardo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS is one of the most prevalent sleep disorders in the general population, and is associated with different biological alterations that can trigger important cognitive, metabolic and cardiovascular problems. This article aims at defining and providing the minimum diagnostic criteria, both clinical and polysomnographic, currently in use.

  20. Consequências cardiovasculares na SAOS Cardiovascular consequences of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Lorenzi Filho

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Uma condição clínica muito comum é SAOS, que está associada a várias doenças cardiovasculares, incluindo hipertensão arterial sistêmica, fibrilação atrial e aterosclerose. A associação entre SAOS e doença cardiovascular não é somente uma consequência da sobreposição de fatores de risco, incluindo obesidade, sedentarismo, ser do sexo masculino e ter idade maior. Existem evidências crescentes de que SAOS contribui de forma independente para o aparecimento e a progressão de várias doenças cardiovasculares. Os mecanismos pelos quais SAOS pode afetar o sistema cardiovascular são múltiplos e incluem a ativação do sistema nervoso simpático, inflamação sistêmica, resistência a insulina e geração de estresse oxidativo. Existem evidências que o tratamento de SAOS com CPAP pode reduzir a pressão arterial, sinais precoces de aterosclerose, risco de recorrência de fibrilação atrial e mortalidade, principalmente por acidente vascular cerebral e infarto agudo do miocárdio, em pacientes com SAOS grave.Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS is a common condition associated with various cardiovascular diseases, including systemic arterial hypertension, atrial fibrillation, and atherosclerosis. The association between OSAS and cardiovascular disease has been related to the overlapping of risk factors, including obesity, having a sedentary lifestyle, being male, and being older. However, there is mounting evidence that OSAS can also independently contribute to the development and progression of various cardiovascular diseases. The mechanisms by which OSAS can affect the cardiovascular system are multiple, including the activation of the sympathetic nervous system, systemic inflammation, insulin resistance, and oxidative stress. There is also evidence that the treatment of OSAS with CPAP can reduce arterial blood pressure, early signs of atherosclerosis, the risk of atrial fibrillation recurrence, and mortality (principally

  1. Application of 3C insulin pump system in combination with non-invasive ventilation in the treatment of a patient with type 2 diabetes and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Peng; Xu, Jing; Wang, Junhong; Zhang, Chunhong

    2018-03-01

    We observed the curative effect of the 3C insulin system in combination with non-invasive ventilation in a patient with type 2 diabetes and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). The 3C insulin pump is a system of devices that closely monitors and effectively regulates blood glucose levels. Non-invasive ventilation has been shown to be an effective treatment for OSAS. A type 2 diabetes patient with concomitant OSAS was treated with a 3C insulin pump system for real-time continuous glucose monitoring and nocturnal non-invasive ventilation for OSAS. Treatment-induced diabetic remission with improved sleep and reduced hypoglycemic episodes was achieved. Therefore, the 3C insulin pump system, in combination with non-invasive ventilation, is an effective treatment for type 2 diabetes patients with concomitant OSAS. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in a pubescent boy of short stature was improved with an orthodontic mandibular advancement oral appliance: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Shin; Otake, Hironao; Tsuiki, Satoru; Miyao, Etsuko; Noda, Akiko

    2015-01-15

    We report a 16-year-old pubescent pediatric patient with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and short stature whose apnea hypopnea index (AHI) was significantly reduced following the use of an orthodontic oral appliance that advances the mandible ventrally. The mandible was advanced 64% of the maximal mandibular protrusive position with use of the appliance over a 3-year period. The patient's AHI without the appliance in place decreased from 101.6/h at baseline to 11/h after treatment. Moreover, the patient's height increased 14 cm during treatment, resulting in height close to the average height for his age. Cephalometric analysis revealed an improvement in his retrognathic mandible and proclination of the upper front teeth. In conclusion, an orthodontic mandibular advancement oral appliance played an important role not only in improving the patient's OSAS but also in normalizing his physical growth during puberty. © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  3. Obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Arnold

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS is a potentially serious disorder attacking millions of people around the world. Many of these individuals are undiagnosed, and even though diagnosed often exhibit a poor compliance with the use of continuous positive airway pressure at nights, a very effective nonsurgical treatment. A variety of surgical procedures have been proposed to manage and treat OSA. This article throws insights into assessing the sites of obstruction and a number of surgical procedures designed to address OSA. The scope of this article is to provide information to dentists which enables them to identify the patients who have OSAS and to guide these patients in making informed decisions regarding treatment options.

  4. Aspectos genéticos da SAOS Genetic aspects of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriane C. Mesquita Petruco

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A fisiopatologia da SAOS é resultante da interação entre fatores genéticos e ambientais. Os mais importantes fatores de risco são obesidade e idade. Outros fatores relevantes são anormalidades craniofaciais, hipotireoidismo, menopausa e uso de álcool e de sedativos. A hereditariedade tem sido relacionada a SAOS pela a associação de SAOS a níveis de HLA, obesidade, síndromes genéticas, etnias, sonolência excessiva, alteração do controle ventilatório, expressão de mediadores inflamatórios, entre outros. Este capítulo aborda a variabilidade genética e fenotípica da doença, demonstrando sua relevância no entendimento da fisiopatologia e na avaliação clínica de SAOS.The physiopathology of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS results from the interaction between genetic and environmental factors. The principal risk factors are obesity and age. Other relevant risk factors are craniofacial abnormalities, hypothyroidism and menopause, as well as the use of alcohol and sedatives. By virtue of its association with factors such as HLA levels, obesity, genetic syndromes, ethnicity, excessive sleepiness, alterations in ventilatory control and expression of inflammatory mediators, OSAS has been related to heritability. This chapter addresses the genetic and phenotypic variability of the disease, showing its relevance in the understanding of the physiopathology and clinical evaluation of OSAS.

  5. Testosterone levels in obese male patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: relation to oxygen desaturation, body weight, fat distribution and the metabolic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambineri, A; Pelusi, C; Pasquali, R

    2003-06-01

    To investigate the impact of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) on testosterone levels and on the main parameters of the metabolic syndrome in abdominally obese men, 15 male subjects with abdominal obesity phenotype and polysomnographic diagnosis of OSAS (OB-OSAS) and 15 controls matched for age and anthropometric parameters (OB) were investigated. Anthropometry, SHBG, sex hormones and several parameters of the metabolic syndrome were measured. Only subjects with an Epworth Sleepiness Score greater than 10 underwent a polysomnographic study with calculation of the number of desaturation rates per sleeping hour (ODI), the minimal oxygen saturation during each desaturation episode (minSaO2) and the mean minimal arterial oxygen saturation for the whole night period (MminSaO2). Both total and free testosterone levels were lower in OB-OSAS than in OB patients. A negative correlation between polysomnographic parameters (ODI, minSaO2 and MminSaO2) and testosterone levels was found. The relationship between total and free testosterone and ODI persisted after adjusting for body mass index (BMI) and waist (W) values. Triglyceride and uric acid levels were significantly higher in OB-OSAS than in OB patients. A negative correlation between testosterone and acid uric level and a positive correlation between testosterone and HDL-cholesterol level was found, regardless of BMI and W circumference, particularly in the OB-OSAS group. Our study suggests that, in patients with obesity and OSAS, the severity of hypoxia during sleeping hours may be an additional factor in reducing testosterone levels, regardless of BMI and abdominal fatness. This may contribute in worsening metabolic abnormalities which, in men with OSAS, exceed those expected on the basis of degree of obesity and pattern of fat distribution.

  6. Influence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome on blood glucose control and occurrence of chronic diabetic complications in type 2 diabetes patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran LIU

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To explore the influence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS on blood glucose control and chronic diabetic complications in type 2 diabetes patients. Methods  The type 2 diabetes patients hospitalized in 307 Hospital of PLA from September 2011 to July 2012 were screened for OSAS with a portable sleep respiration monitor ApneaLinkTM device. According to screening results mentioned above, patients were divided into two groups as OSAS group and control group, whose fasting blood glucose level, 2-h postprandial blood glucose level, HbA1c level, HOMA-IR index and prevalence of diabetic retinopathy (DR, and incidences of diabetic nephropathy (DN, diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia were recorded and analyzed for evaluating the relationship between OSAS severity and aforesaid factors. Results  One hundred and forty-five patients completed the protocal with 114 cases (87 males and 27 females stratified in OSAS group and 31 cases (22 males and 9 females in control group. Compared with control group, the average fasting blood glucose level, 2-h postprandial blood glucose level, HbA1c level and HOMA-IR index were significantly higher in OSAS patients (P<0.05. The apnea-hypopnea index (AHI and body mass index (BMI were both independently and positively correlated with the fasting blood glucose (adjust R2=37.1%, AHI 31.1%, 2-h postprandial blood glucose (adjust R2=31.2%, AHI 26.2% and HbA1c levels (adjust R2=38.7%, AHI 33.1% with AHI as the predominant risk factor of patient's poor blood glucose control. HbA1c level (OR5.86, 95%CI 4.64-7.08, suffering from OSAS (OR2.38, 95%CI 1.44-3.32, complicated hypertension (OR1.04, 95%CI 1.02-1.06 and patient's diabetes duration (OR2.10, 95%CI 1.80-2.40 were also independently and positively correlated with DR, and the independent and positive correlation factor of DPN included HbA1c level (OR 8.56, 95%CI 5.86-10.64, OSAS (OR 3.21, 95%CI 1.79-4.62 and hypertension

  7. A pictorial Sleepiness and Sleep Apnoea Scale to recognize individuals with high risk for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelmann, Cathrin; Ghiassi, Ramesh; Vogt, Deborah R; Partridge, Martyn R; Khatami, Ramin; Leuppi, Jörg D; Miedinger, David

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the validity of a new pictorial form of a screening test for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) - the pictorial Sleepiness and Sleep Apnoea Scale (pSSAS). Validation was performed in a sample of patients admitted to sleep clinics in the UK and Switzerland. All study participants were investigated with objective sleep tests such as full-night-attended polysomnography or polygraphy. The pSSAS was validated by taking into account the individual result of the sleep study, sleep-related questionnaires and objective parameters such as body mass index (BMI) or neck circumference. Different scoring schemes of the pSSAS were evaluated, and an internal validation was undertaken. The full data set consisted of 431 individuals (234 patients from the UK, 197 patients from Switzerland). The pSSAS showed good predictive performance for OSAS with an area under the curve between 0.77 and 0.81 depending on which scoring scheme was used. The subscores of the pSSAS had a moderate-to-strong correlation with widely used screening questionnaires for OSAS or excessive daytime sleepiness as well as with BMI and neck circumference. The pSSAS can be used to select patients with a high probability of having OSAS. Due to its simple pictorial design with short questions, it might be suitable for screening in populations with low health literacy and in non-native English or German speakers.

  8. Evaluation of pain sensitivity by tender point counts and myalgic score in patients with and without obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzi, Rabia; Yılmaz, Zahide

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the difference between patients with and without obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) with respect to pain sensitivity. The study was conducted on 31 womens diagnosed with OSAS and 31 healthy women. All patients underwent polysomnographic testing. A pressure algometer (dolorimeter) was used to measure the pressure pain threshold. Fibromyalgia was diagnosed based on the 1990 American College of Rheumatology diagnosis criteria. The myalgic score was 73.95 ± 18.09 in patients with OSAS, while this value was 84.18 ± 24.31 in the control group. The difference between the groups was statistically significant (P = 0.041).The number of tender points was 8.19 ± 3.35 in the patient group with OSAS, while this number was 6.35 ± 2.23 in the control group. The difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P = 0.014). No statistically significant differences were found between age, body mass index, Beck depression scores, control point score and the presence of fibromyalgia, between the two groups (P > 0.05). A statistically significant positive correlation was found between the myalgic scores and mean saturation O 2 (%) values of the patients (r = 0.357; P = 0.049). The differences noted between OSAS patients and the control group with respect to myalgic score and the number of tender points suggest that there might be a relation between OSAS and pain sensitivity. There might be an association between low oxygen saturation and total myalgic score. © 2015 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Acoustic Analysis of Snoring in the Diagnosis of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: A Call for More Rigorous Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hui; Lee, Li-Ang; Song, Lijuan; Li, Yanmei; Peng, Jianxin; Zhong, Nanshan; Li, Hsueh-Yu; Zhang, Xiaowen

    2015-07-15

    Snoring is a common symptom of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) and has recently been considered for diagnosis of OSA. The goal of the current study was to systematically determine the accuracy of acoustic analysis of snoring in the diagnosis of OSA using a meta-analysis. PubMed, Cochrane Library database, and EMBASE were searched up to July 15, 2014. A systematic review and meta-analysis of sensitivity, specificity, and other measures of accuracy of acoustic analysis of snoring in the diagnosis of OSA were conducted. The median of apneahypopnea index threshold was 10 events/h, range: 5-15 or 10-15 if aforementioned suggestion is adopted. A total of seven studies with 273 patients were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled estimates were as follows: sensitivity, 88% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 82-93%); specificity, 81% (95% CI: 72-88%); positive likelihood ratio (PLR), 4.44 (95% CI: 2.39-8.27); negative likelihood ratio (NLR), 0.15 (95% CI: 0.10-0.24); and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), 32.18 (95% CI: 13.96-74.81). χ(2) values of sensitivity, specificity, PLR, NLR, and DOR were 2.37, 10.39, 12.57, 3.79, and 6.91 respectively (All p > 0.05). The area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.93. Sensitivity analysis demonstrated that the pooled estimates were stable and reliable. The results of publication bias were not significant (p = 0.30). Acoustic analysis of snoring is a relatively accurate but not a strong method for diagnosing OSA. There is an urgent need for rigorous studies involving large samples and single snore event tests with an efficacy criterion that reflects the particular features of snoring acoustics for OSA diagnosis. © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  10. Psychiatric implications of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin Escobar-Córdoba

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Sleep apnea is a syndrome that affects multiple systems and produces varied symptoms. This article reviews the most frequent psychiatric illnesses associated with this condition, as well as the need for an adequate diagnosis and an interdisciplinary treatment. The most common entity observed in patients with sleep apnea is depression, probably caused by sleep fragmentation, which alters the production of neurotransmitters in the brain. Anxiety is the second most common entity, perhaps, due to the release of catecholamines at night. Other symptoms associated with sleep apnea can be found, and should be reviewed and improved with appropriate treatment; addressing such symptoms could also improve the quality of life of patients, since attention, concentration and memory would increase or decrease irritability and other symptoms.

  11. Diet and exercise improve chemoreflex sensitivity in patients with metabolic syndrome and obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki-Nunes, Cristiane; Toschi-Dias, Edgar; Cepeda, Felipe X; Rondon, Maria Urbana P B; Alves, Maria-Janieire N N; Fraga, Raffael F; Braga, Ana Maria F W; Aguilar, Adriana M; Amaro, Aline C; Drager, Luciano F; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo; Negrão, Carlos E; Trombetta, Ivani C

    2015-08-01

    Chemoreflex hypersensitity was caused by obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS). This study tested the hypothesis that hypocaloric diet and exercise training (D+ET) would improve peripheral and central chemoreflex sensitivity in patients with MetS and OSA. Patients were assigned to: (1) D+ET (n = 16) and (2) no intervention control (C, n = 8). Minute ventilation (VE, pre-calibrated pneumotachograph) and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA, microneurography) were evaluated during peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity by inhalation of 10% O2 and 90% N2 with CO2 titrated and central chemoreflex by 7% CO2 and 93% O2 for 3 min at study entry and after 4 months. Peak VO2 was increased by D+ET; body weight, waist circumference, glucose levels, systolic/diastolic blood pressure, and apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) (34 ± 5.1 vs. 18 ± 3.2 events/h, P = 0.04) were reduced by D+ET. MSNA was reduced by D+ET at rest and in response to hypoxia (8.6 ± 1.2 vs. 5.4 ± 0.6 bursts/min, P = 0.02), and VE in response to hypercapnia (14.8 ± 3.9 vs. 9.1 ± 1.2 l/min, P = 0.02). No changes were found in the C group. A positive correlation was found between AHI and MSNA absolute changes (R = 0.51, P = 0.01) and body weight and AHI absolute changes (R = 0.69, P sleep pattern. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  12. [Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children as a risk of cardiovascular pathology development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhevnikova, O V; Namazova-Baranova, L S; Abashidze, E A; Altunin, V V; Balabanov, A S; Shirokova, I V; Kondrahina, I I; Polunina, T A; Margieva, T V

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to examine the predictors of cardiovascular disorders in children affected by obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) based on the results of polysomnography and continuous monitoring of blood glycose. Before the examination, parents filled in questionnaires concerning their children sleep quality. The procedure was followed by the study of the sleep by means of polysomnography (Embla s 7000, USA). A system of continuous monitoring of blood glucose was applied (Guardianreal-time, Medtronicminimed, USA) by means of which a glycemic profile tissue fluid was studied. A night sleep research of 120 children aged 3-16 y.o. is presented. There were 4 groups depending on the pathology: diseases of the nervous system (n = 31), ENT-pathology (n = 18), bronchial asthma (n = 24) and overweight and obesity (n = 34). The comparison group consisted of 13 apparently healthy children. The study has shown that the parents of every second child with sleep disorders did not know about the fact. The 60 % of the patients with high body mass index (BMI) had a snore, which was significantly higher the in children with normal body mass index--35% (p = 0.012). The index of apnea-hypopnea (AHI) was higher in the patients with ENT-pathology 17 times (p 1sd). Children with ENT-pathology and with high high body mass index have high risk of cardio-vascular diseases. Children with above average stature and with increased body mass index affected by OSAS have additional backgrounds for cardiovascular diseases develop- ment as a result of the latent periods of hypoglycemia at night.

  13. Prevalence of signs and symptoms suggestive of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in Guangxi, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianhong; Wei, Caizhou; Huang, Luying; Wang, Wu; Liang, Dahua; Lei, Zhijian; Wang, Feng; Wang, Xiaoyuan; Hou, Xiujuan; Tang, Xiaojun

    2014-05-01

    The prevalence, profiles, and potential risk factors of snoring and obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) in China are largely unknown. This study aims to investigate the prevalence, profiles, and potential risk factors for snoring and OSAHS in Guangxi, China, and the association between OSAHS and ethnicity. Urban and rural population-based cluster samples were randomly selected in each of eight counties/cities. All residents aged 14 years or older in the selected clusters were interviewed using a standardized questionnaire. A subject was considered to have clinically diagnosed OSAHS if snoring was loud and habitual, breathing pauses were observed, and the subject experienced excessive daytime sleepiness. Among 12,742 sampled subjects, 10,819 completed the questionnaire (response rate = 84.9%). The overall OSAHS prevalence was 4.1% (men, 5.7% (5.1-6.3%); women, 2.4% (2.0-2.9%); Zhuang people, 3.2% (2.8-3.7%); Han people 6.0% (5.2-6.8%).The overall rate of habitual snoring was 11.5 % (men, 17.1% (16.1-18.1%); women, 5.6% (5.0-6.2%)). Univariate analysis showed that the OSAHS prevalence was significantly higher among the following groups: urban residents, elderly individuals, smokers, drinkers, those with higher body mass indexes (BMI), those with more years of schooling, those with nasal problems, those whose parents are Han, and those who usually sleep in prone position. However, multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that only urban residency, age, smoking status, drinking status, and BMI were the risk factors for OSAHS. OSAHS is prevalent in individuals aged 14 years or older in Guangxi, China. Han and Zhuang people differ significantly in their obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) prevalence, but this difference is explained by the combination of classic OSA risk factors.

  14. Adolescents and young adults with Down syndrome presenting to a medical clinic with depression: co-morbid obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capone, George T; Aidikoff, Jenna M; Taylor, Kay; Rykiel, Natalie

    2013-09-01

    Adolescents and young adults with Down syndrome (DS) sometimes experience new-onset mood disorder and decline in adaptive skills. The clinical phenomenon is poorly characterized and its pathogenesis is not understood. The possible contribution of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) to this phenomenon has not been studied. Subjects were ascertained as a convenience sample through our clinic for persons with DS and medical or mental health concerns between 2004 and 2009. When mood symptoms were present an axis I diagnosis was made using DSM-IV-R criteria. Subjects without an axis I diagnosis served as controls. The Reiss scales for children's dual diagnosis and the aberrant behavior checklist (ABC) were completed by caretakers. Twenty-eight cases meeting criteria for major depressive episode (MDE) and nine controls without psychopathology were referred for overnight polysomnography (PSG). Functional decline was reported in 19 (68%) of cases with MDE, but none of the controls. Twenty-four (86%) cases had OSAS compared with only 4 (44%) of controls. Moderate-severe OSAS was present in 15 (54%) of cases compared to only 1 (11%) of controls. Intermittent sleep-associated hypoxia and REM sleep deficits were also more frequent in cases. Across all subjects, prior tonsillectomy was not related to the presence or absence of OSAS. Our findings suggest that OSAS may be a common co-morbidity in adolescents and younger adults with DS and depression. Recognition of this association maybe critical to understanding the pathogenesis and management of mood-related disorders, and functional decline in affected individuals. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The “DOC” screen: Feasible and valid screening for depression, Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) and cognitive impairment in stroke prevention clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Richard H.; Cayley, Megan L.; Lanctôt, Krista L.; Murray, Brian J.; Cohen, Ashley; Thorpe, Kevin E.; Sicard, Michelle N.; Lien, Karen; Sahlas, Demetrios J.; Herrmann, Nathan

    2017-01-01

    Background Post-stroke Depression, Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and Cognitive impairment (“DOC”) are associated with greater mortality, worse recovery and poorer quality of life. Best practice recommendations endorse routine screening for each condition; yet, all are under-assessed, diagnosed and treated. We seek to determine the feasibility and validity of an integrated tool (“DOC” screen) to identify stroke clinic patients at high-risk of depression, OSA, and cognitive impairment. Methods All consecutive new referrals to a regional Stroke Prevention Clinic who were English-speaking and non-aphasic were eligible to be screened. Time for screen completion was logged. DOC screen results were compared to the neuropsychological battery and polysomnogram assessments using a modified receiver operator characteristic and area under the curve analysis. Data is reported to conform to STARD guidelines. Findings 1503 people were screened over 2 years. 89% of eligible patients completed the screen in 5 minutes or less (mean 4.2 minutes), less than half the time it takes to complete the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). 437 people consented to detailed testing. Of those, 421 completed the Structured Clinical Interview for Depression within 3 months of screening, 387 completed detailed neuropsychological testing within 3 months, and 88 had overnight polysomnograms. Screening scores combined with demographic variables (age, sex, education, body mass index), had excellent validity compared to gold standard diagnoses: DOC-Mood AUC 0.90; DOC-Apnea AUC 0.80; DOC-Cog AUC 0.81. DOC screen scores can reliably categorize patients in to low-, intermediate- or high-risk groups for further action and can do so with comparable accuracy to more time-consuming screens. Conclusions Systematic screening of depression, obstructive sleep apnea, and cognitive impairment in 5 minutes or less is feasible and valid in a high volume stroke clinic using the DOC screen. The DOC screen may

  16. Chronic Cough and OSA: A New Association?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, Krishna M.; Daly, Sarah E.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic cough is defined as cough lasting more than 2 months. Common causes for chronic cough in nonsmokers with normal chest radiographs and pulmonary functions include gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), cough-variant asthma (CVA), and upper airway cough syndrome (UACS). Current guidelines recommend diagnosing the etiology of chronic cough based upon the results of therapy for suspected GERD, CVA, and UACS. Despite following current recommendations for diagnosis and treatment, the cause for a significant proportion of chronic cough remains unexplained. Recent reports indicate the resolution of chronic cough following treatment of concomitantly diagnosed obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Whether this represents a co-occurrence of two commonly prevalent disorders or a pathophysiologic relationship between OSA and cough remains unknown. This review offers insights into a pathophysiologic link between OSA and the commonly purported etiologies for cough, namely, GERD, UACS, and CVA. In addition, evidence for a relationship between airway inflammation that can trigger or perpetuate cough and OSA is discussed. This review explores mechanisms by which nocturnal continuous positive airway therapy resolves cough by improving underlying airway inflammation secondary to OSA and impacts upon GERD, CVA, and UACS. Citation: Sundar KM; Daly SE. Chronic cough and OSA: a new association? J Clin Sleep Med 2011;7(6):669-677. PMID:22171209

  17. Assessing the severity of sleep apnea syndrome based on ballistocardiogram.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Wang

    Full Text Available Sleep Apnea Syndrome (SAS is a common sleep-related breathing disorder, which affects about 4-7% males and 2-4% females all around the world. Different approaches have been adopted to diagnose SAS and measure its severity, including the gold standard Polysomnography (PSG in sleep study field as well as several alternative techniques such as single-channel ECG, pulse oximeter and so on. However, many shortcomings still limit their generalization in home environment. In this study, we aim to propose an efficient approach to automatically assess the severity of sleep apnea syndrome based on the ballistocardiogram (BCG signal, which is non-intrusive and suitable for in home environment.We develop an unobtrusive sleep monitoring system to capture the BCG signals, based on which we put forward a three-stage sleep apnea syndrome severity assessment framework, i.e., data preprocessing, sleep-related breathing events (SBEs detection, and sleep apnea syndrome severity evaluation. First, in the data preprocessing stage, to overcome the limits of BCG signals (e.g., low precision and reliability, we utilize wavelet decomposition to obtain the outline information of heartbeats, and apply a RR correction algorithm to handle missing or spurious RR intervals. Afterwards, in the event detection stage, we propose an automatic sleep-related breathing event detection algorithm named Physio_ICSS based on the iterative cumulative sums of squares (i.e., the ICSS algorithm, which is originally used to detect structural breakpoints in a time series. In particular, to efficiently detect sleep-related breathing events in the obtained time series of RR intervals, the proposed algorithm not only explores the practical factors of sleep-related breathing events (e.g., the limit of lasting duration and possible occurrence sleep stages but also overcomes the event segmentation issue (e.g., equal-length segmentation method might divide one sleep-related breathing event into

  18. [Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Analytical study of 63 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battikh, Mohamed H; Joobeur, Sameh; Ben Sayeh, Mohamed M; Rouetbi, Naceur; Maatallah, Anis; Daami, Monia; el Kamel, Ali

    2004-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a relatively common disorder, in developed country with prevalence estimated to lie between 2 and 4% in adult population. The diagnosis of this syndrome is made on the basis of characteristic clinical features and the results of nocturnal polysomnography. There is no data concerning the OSA in developing country. It is therefore of interest to determine the clinic and polysomnographic profile of this disease and to landmark factors correlated with severity in our country. This was achieved by studying a set of 63 OSA. The mean of age was 53 + 13 years with sex ratio 1. The means of Epworth sleepiness scale score, BMI and Apnoea/Hypopnoea index (AHI) were respectively 16 + 4, 38.8 + 7 kg/m2 and 51.7 + 28.6. 44% of patients have OSA severe with IAH > 50/h. Arousal index and desaturation index were respectively 36.4 + 21.7 and 49 + 26. Trial of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy was proposed first to 40 patients, 17 were able to use CPAP.

  19. Patients with a high risk for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: Postoperative respiratory complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Pereira

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: STOP-BANG score (snore; tired; observed apnea; arterial pressure; body mass index; age; neck circumference and gender can predict the risk of a patient having Obstructive Syndrome Apnea (OSA. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence STOP-BANG score ≥ 3, in surgical patients admitted to the Post-Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU. Methods: Observational, prospective study conducted in a post-anesthesia care unit (PACU during three weeks (2011. The study population consisted of adult patients after noncardiac and non-neurological surgery. Patients were classified as high risk of OSA (HR-OSA if STOP-BANG score ≥ 3 and Low-risk of OSA (LR-OSA if STOP-BANG score  3, em pacientes cirúrgicos internados na Unidade de Cuidados Pós-Anestésica (UCPA. Métodos: Estudo observacional e prospectivo conduzido numa UCPA, durante três semanas (2011. A população de estudo consistiu em doentes adultos após cirurgia não cardíaca e não neurológica. Os doentes foram considerados com alto risco de SAOS (AR-SAOS se tinham um score de STOP-BANG ≥3 e de baixo risco de SAOS (BR-SAOS se tinham score de STOP-BANG <3. Foram avaliados dados demográficos dos doentes e colhidas variáveis intraoperatórias e pós-operatórias. As características dos doentes foram comparadas através do teste de Mann-Whitney, teste t, qui-quadrado ou teste exato de Fisher. Resultados: Um total de 357 doentes foram admitidos de UCPA e 340 preencheram os critérios de inclusão. Cento e setenta e nove (52% tinham AR-SAOS. Estes doentes eram mais velhos, tinham maior probabilidade de serem do sexo masculino, tinham um Índice Massa Corporal superior, tiveram uma classificação maior no estado físico American Society Anesthesiologists, uma maior incidência de doença cardíaca isquémica, insuficiência cardíaca, hipertensão, dislipidemia e eram mais frequentemente doentes

  20. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: assessing and managing risk in the motor vehicle operator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiestand, David; Phillips, Barbara

    2011-11-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common condition that can significantly affect daytime functioning, leading to excessive daytime sleepiness and fatigue. Motor vehicle crashes are common, resulting in financial burden, property loss, injury, and death. Motor vehicle operators are at increased risk for crash in the context of excessive daytime sleepiness and fatigue, largely due to inattention. The physician caring for individuals with risk of or diagnosed OSA must be aware of the potentially increased risk for motor vehicle crashes, especially in professional drivers. Because of empiric data on increased risk for crashes in commercial vehicle operators, the importance of identifying OSA has become the subject of focused attention by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). A task force has published recommendations for clinical care and urged further research on the interplay between sleep apnea, sleepiness, and crash risk. Despite the logical relationship between OSA and motor vehicle crashes, data to support this theory remain of overall modest quality. Recent case-control and cohort studies continue to produce supportive evidence. Additionally, several meta-analyses of past studies have supported the crash risk associated with OSA and confirmed improvement with effective treatment using continuous positive airway pressure. Further study is needed to more fully characterize the interplay between sleepiness and OSA, the crash risk associated with untreated OSA, and the benefit of treatment on reducing crash risk. For now, empiric recommendations are offered to screen and manage all individuals who drive, particularly those who drive professionally. © 2011 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

  1. The influence of a mandibular advancement plate on polysomnography in different grades of obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raunio, Antti; Mattila, Pauli; Huuskonen, Usko; Oikarinen, Kyösti; Sándor, George K

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a mandibular advancement device on different grades of obstructive sleep apnea using a relatively simple test for the apnea-hypopnea index to determine if a mandibular device will be effective. A total of 68 patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) including, 31 with mild, 23 with moderate and 14 with severe OSAS were treated with a mandibular advancement device (MAD) and monitored with polysomnography. 25 of the 31 mild, 15 of the 23 moderate and 2 of the 14 severe OSAS patients were cured of their OSAS if a post treatment apnea-hypopnea index of less than 5 is regarded as cured. The odds ratios for success with MAD therapy are 3 for women over men, 14.9 for mild obstructive sleep apnea, 5.42 for moderate obstructive sleep apnea if severe obstructive sleep apnea is assigned an odds ratio of 1. The use of the apnea-hypopnea index alone is useful in mild and moderate disease to predict the effectiveness of mandibular advancement device. Treatment with a mandibular advancement device is very effective in treating mild and moderate obstructive sleep apnea. Conservative treatment with a mandibular advancement device can be successful in less severe grades of sleep apnea and may be an alternative for non-surgical patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea intolerant of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure management.

  2. The Influence of a Mandibular Advancement Plate on Polysomnography in Different Grades of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antti Raunio

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a mandibular advancement device on different grades of obstructive sleep apnea using a relatively simple test for the apnea-hypopnea index to determine if a mandibular device will be effective. Material and Methods: A total of 68 patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS including, 31 with mild, 23 with moderate and 14 with severe OSAS were treated with a mandibular advancement device (MAD and monitored with polysomnography. Results: 25 of the 31 mild, 15 of the 23 moderate and 2 of the 14 severe OSAS patients were cured of their OSAS if a post treatment apnea-hypopnea index of less than 5 is regarded as cured. The odds ratios for success with MAD therapy are 3 for women over men, 14.9 for mild obstructive sleep apnea, 5.42 for moderate obstructive sleep apnea if severe obstructive sleep apnea is assigned an odds ratio of 1. Conclusions: The use of the apnea-hypopnea index alone is useful in mild and moderate disease to predict the effectiveness of mandibular advancement device. Treatment with a mandibular advancement device is very effective in treating mild and moderate obstructive sleep apnea. Conservative treatment with a mandibular advancement device can be successful in less severe grades of sleep apnea and may be an alternative for non-surgical patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea intolerant of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure management.

  3. Obstructive sleep apnea in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lee, Ruth

    2011-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) represent two of the most prevalent chronic respiratory disorders and cardiovascular diseases are major co-morbidities in both. Co-existence of both disorders (overlap syndrome) occurs in 1% of adults and overlap patients have worse nocturnal hypoxemia and hypercapnia than COPD and OSA patients alone. The present review discusses recent data concerning the pathophysiological and clinical significance of the overlap syndrome.

  4. Depressive symptoms and childhood sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carotenuto M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Marco Carotenuto,1 Maria Esposito,1 Lucia Parisi,2 Beatrice Gallai,3 Rosa Marotta,4 Antonio Pascotto,1 Michele Roccella21Sleep Clinic for Developmental Age, Clinic of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy; 2Child Neuropsychiatry, Department of Psychology, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy; 3Unit of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, University of Perugia, Perugia, 4Department of Psychiatry, "Magna Graecia" University of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, ItalyBackground: The relationship between sleep and mood regulation is well known, and some reports suggest a key role of sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBD in the development of the symptomatology of depression, even if no conclusive data are actually found in the clinical literature. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between SRBD and depressive symptoms in a population of school-aged children.Methods: The study population comprised 94 children affected by SRBD and 107 healthy children. To identify the severity of SRBD, an overnight respiratory evaluation was performed. All subjects filled out the Italian version of the Children Depression Inventory (CDI to screen for the presence of depressive symptoms.Results: The group with SRBD showed higher CDI scores than the group without SRBD, with a positive correlation found between CDI scores, apnea-hypopnea index, and oxygen desaturation index values. Logistic regression showed that an apnea-hypopnea index ≥ 3 and an oxygen desaturation index ≥ 1 could be risk factors for development of depressive symptoms. According to receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis, the cutoff point for the apnea-hypopnea index that could cause a pathological CDI score (≥19 was >5.66, and the cutoff point for the oxygen desaturation index was >4.2. The limitations of this study are that our data are derived from one single psychometric test and not from a complete psychiatric evaluation, and our

  5. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the association between serotonergic gene polymorphisms and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huajun; Guan, Jian; Yi, Hongliang; Yin, Shankai

    2014-01-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine receptor (5-HTR) and 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter (5-HTT) gene polymorphisms have been reported to be associated with susceptibility to obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). The associations, derived from sporadic, inconsistent, small-sample-size studies, need to be evaluated further in a meta-analysis. Relevant studies were identified by searching PubMed, Embase, The Cochrane Library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Wanfang, and Weipu. Eligible data were extracted from each included study. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated using a fixed-effects or a random-effects model. The ORs and 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to assess the strength of the association between serotonergic gene polymorphisms and OSAS in the dominant and recessive models, as well as alleles. The Q statistic was used to evaluate homogeneity and Begg's test was used to assess publication bias. Eight studies were finally included in the meta-analysis of the association between 5-HTR2A gene variants (including 102T/C and 1438G/A), 5-HTT gene polymorphisms (including 5-HTT gene-linked promoter region (5-HTTLRP), and serotonin transporter intron 2 variable number tandem repeat (STin2VNTR) and OSAS risk. The G allele of 5-HTR2A 1438G/A, long 5-HTTLPR, and 10-tandem-repeats STin2VNTR were shown to increase OSAS susceptibility, with ORs of 2.33 (A vs. G, 95% CI 1.48-3.66), 1.24 (L vs. S, 95% CI: 1.04-1.49), and 2.87 (10 vs. 12, 95% CI: 1.38-5.97), respectively. These significant differences were determined in both dominant and recessive models. Of the 5-HTR2A 1438G/A gene polymorphism, the AA genotype increased the OSAS risk, with an OR of 4.21 (95% CI: 2.83-6.25) in a recessive model in male OSAS patients, but no significant association was found in females. Our meta-analysis demonstrated that polymorphisms in the 5-HTR2A 1438G/A and 5-HTT genes contributed to susceptibility to OSAS. The A allele of the 1438G/A gene polymorphism is predominantly

  6. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the association between serotonergic gene polymorphisms and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huajun Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: 5-Hydroxytryptamine receptor (5-HTR and 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter (5-HTT gene polymorphisms have been reported to be associated with susceptibility to obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS. The associations, derived from sporadic, inconsistent, small-sample-size studies, need to be evaluated further in a meta-analysis. METHODS: Relevant studies were identified by searching PubMed, Embase, The Cochrane Library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI, Wanfang, and Weipu. Eligible data were extracted from each included study. Odds ratios (ORs were calculated using a fixed-effects or a random-effects model. The ORs and 95% confidence interval (CI were used to assess the strength of the association between serotonergic gene polymorphisms and OSAS in the dominant and recessive models, as well as alleles. The Q statistic was used to evaluate homogeneity and Begg's test was used to assess publication bias. RESULTS: Eight studies were finally included in the meta-analysis of the association between 5-HTR2A gene variants (including 102T/C and 1438G/A, 5-HTT gene polymorphisms (including 5-HTT gene-linked promoter region (5-HTTLRP, and serotonin transporter intron 2 variable number tandem repeat (STin2VNTR and OSAS risk. The G allele of 5-HTR2A 1438G/A, long 5-HTTLPR, and 10-tandem-repeats STin2VNTR were shown to increase OSAS susceptibility, with ORs of 2.33 (A vs. G, 95% CI 1.48-3.66, 1.24 (L vs. S, 95% CI: 1.04-1.49, and 2.87 (10 vs. 12, 95% CI: 1.38-5.97, respectively. These significant differences were determined in both dominant and recessive models. Of the 5-HTR2A 1438G/A gene polymorphism, the AA genotype increased the OSAS risk, with an OR of 4.21 (95% CI: 2.83-6.25 in a recessive model in male OSAS patients, but no significant association was found in females. CONCLUSIONS: Our meta-analysis demonstrated that polymorphisms in the 5-HTR2A 1438G/A and 5-HTT genes contributed to susceptibility to OSAS. The A allele of the

  7. Determination of new prediction formula for nasal continuous positive airway pressure in Turkish patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basoglu, Ozen K; Tasbakan, Mehmet Sezai

    2012-12-01

    Race/ethnicity may play an important role in determining body size, severity of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), and effective continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) (Peff). Turkey is composed of different ethnic groups. Therefore, the aims of this study were to determine new prediction formula for CPAP (Ppred) in Turkish OSAS patients, validate performance of this formula, and compare with Caucasian and Asian formulas. Peff of 250 newly diagnosed moderate-to-severe OSAS patients were calculated by in-laboratory manual titration. Correlation and multiple linear regression analysis were used to model effects of ten anthropometric and polysomnographic variables such as neck circumference (NC) and oxygen desaturation index (ODI) on Peff. New formula was validated in different 130 OSAS patients and compared with previous formulas. The final prediction formula was [Formula: see text]. When Peff of control group was assessed, it was observed that mean Peff was 8.39 ± 2.00 cmH(2)O and Ppred was 8.23 ± 1.22 cmH(2)O. Ppred was within ±3 cmH(2)O of Peff in 96.2% patients. Besides, Peff was significantly correlated with new formula, and prediction formulas developed for Caucasian and Asian populations (r = 0.651, p < 0.001, r = 0.648, p < 0.001, and r = 0.622, p < 0.001, respectively). It is shown that level of CPAP can be successfully predicted from our prediction formula, using NC and ODI and validated in Turkish OSAS patients. New equation correlates with other formulas developed for Caucasian and Asian populations. Our simple formula including ODI, marker of intermittent hypoxia, may be used easily in different populations.

  8. Socio-Economic Status: A Barrier to Access to Mandibular Advancement Device Therapy for Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Marion; Le Vaillant, Marc; Pelletier-Fleury, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a major public health problem which affects between 5 to 10% of the general population. OSAS is known to be associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality mainly due to cardiovascular diseases and traffic accidents. The burden of illness is high for the individual and society. There are 2 treatment options for OSAS, Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) and Mandibular Advancement Device therapy (MAD). CPAP is known to be an effective but very constraining treatment. Patients are usually poorly adherent. MAD is a more recent treatment easier to use and consequently better tolerated, but MAD can only be prescribed to patients with satisfactory oral hygiene. Oral health constitutes a real issue particularly among underprivileged groups in France. Through this link, the question of whether low socio-economic status constitutes a barrier to access to care for patients with OSAS is raised. In a multicenter prospective cohort of 2822 consecutive OSAS patients in whom MAD has been proposed as an alternative to CPAP between May 15, 2007 and December 1st, 2014, we identified the factors that lead to a patient diagnosed with OSAS to be treated by MAD instead of CPAP. A logistic regression was performed using a stepwise forward procedure. The main outcome of the study was that treatment by MAD was significantly associated with both educational attainment, as determined by the age at which the patient left full-time education, ≥18 years compared with economic status constitutes a barrier to access to MAD for patients with OSAS in France. MAD use in patients with OSAS highlights inequalities in health care access.

  9. CT findings in adults with obstructive sleep apnea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Fumiaki; Asakura, Kohji; Nakano, Yuji; Shintani, Tomoko; Akita, Nobuto; Kataura, Akikatsu

    1993-01-01

    The obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is characterized by recurrent obstruction of the upper airway during sleep. In this study, we performed CT scans in 20 adult OSAS patients and 6 control subjects, and measured the airspaces in the nasopharynx, mesopharynx and hypopharynx, using an image analyzer. The airspaces were significantly smaller at all sites of the pharynx in OSAS patients than in the control subjects, but they did not show a positive correlation with the apnea index or the body mass index. In good responders whose apnea indexes improved more than 50% after uvulo-palato-pharyngoplasty (UPPP), the nasopharyngeal and mesopharyngeal airspaces were significantly smaller, and the hypopharyngeal space tended to be larger than in poor responders. Our results suggest that CT scan is a helpful method for analyzing the area of the upper airway, especially in relation to the response to UPPP in adults with OSAS. (author)

  10. Cotton-wool spot in a patient with sleep apnea syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kitagawa, Kiyotaka; Hayasaka, Seiji; Nagaki, Yasunori

    2003-01-01

    A 55-year-old woman complained of visible floaters in the right eye. The patient had a cotton-wool spot in the right fundus and sleep apnea syndrome. After treatment with nasal continuous positive airway pressure during sleep, the cotton-wool spot disappeared. Sleep apnea syndrome should be added to the list of causes of cotton-wool spots.

  11. Papilledema in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaayathri, N.; Kalthum, U.; Jemaima, C.H.

    2015-01-01

    We report a diagnostically challenging case of papilloedema in a morbidly obese, 25 year old male who presented to us with blurring of vision of both eyes, but more marked in the right. Fundus examination revealed severe papilloedema, with corresponding visual field and colour vision defects. He was worked up for possible life threatening causes of papilloedema like intracranial space occupying lesion but his CT scan was normal. As his hematocrit was in the polycythemic range, multiple venesections were performed in fear that the hyperviscosity picture could be a contributing factor. However there was no change in symptoms or the fundus appearance. We could not come to a diagnosis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension too because he refused lumbar puncture. A sleep study was done as he did give symptoms of mild obstructive sleep apnea but the results were that of severe disease. He was given therapeutic nocturnal oxygen by CPAP to prevent further cardiovascular and respiratory complications and interestingly enough it helped in treating the papilloedema. He was seen 2 months after commencement of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) with good functional and anatomical recovery. (author)

  12. Sleep Misperception in Chronic Insomnia Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: Implications for Clinical Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Su Jung; Suh, Sooyeon; Ong, Jason; Joo, Eun Yeon

    2016-11-15

    To investigate whether sleep perception (SP), defined by the ratio of subjective and objective total sleep time, and habitual sleep time in various sleep disorders may be based on comorbid insomnia status. We enrolled 420 patients (age 20-79 y) who underwent polysomnography (PSG). They were divided into three groups based on chief complaints: chronic insomnia (CI, n = 69), patients with both obstructive sleep apnea and insomnia (OSA-I, n = 49) or OSA only (OSA, n = 149). Healthy volunteers were also recruited (normal controls [NC], n = 80). We compared differences in PSG parameters and habitual sleep duration and investigated the discrepancy between objective and subjective total sleep time (TST) and sleep latency among four groups. Subjective TST was defined as sleep time perceived by participants the next morning of PSG. SP for TST was highest in the OSA group (median 92.9%), and lowest in the CI group (80.3%). SP of the NC group (91.4%) was higher than the CI, but there was no difference between OSA-I and OSA groups. OSA-I had higher depressive mood compared to the OSA group (p insomnia and arousal index of PSG. Insomnia patients with (OSA-I) or without OSA (CI) reported the smallest discrepancy between habitual sleep duration and objective TST. Patients with OSA with or without insomnia have different PSG profiles, which suggests that objective measures of sleep are an important consideration for differentiating subtypes of insomnia and tailoring proper treatment. A commentary on this articles appears in this issue on page 1437. © 2016 American Academy of Sleep Medicine

  13. Sleep apnea in patients reporting insomnia or restless legs symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, M T; Goparaju, B; Moro, M

    2016-01-01

    Insomnia and restless legs syndrome (RLS) are defined by self-reported symptoms, and polysomnography (PSG) is not routinely indicated. Occult obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), common even in asymptomatic adults, may complicate management of patients presenting with insomnia or restless legs. To this end, we investigated objective sleep apnea metrics in a large retrospective cohort according to self-reported symptom profiles. We compared sleep apnea findings in patients referred to our center according to self-reported symptoms associated with insomnia, sleep apnea, and restless legs. The cohort included over 1900 adults who underwent diagnostic (n = 1418) or split-night (n = 504) PSGs and completed a symptom and medical history questionnaire. More than 30% of patients who did not endorse any OSA symptoms, but did endorse insomnia or restless legs symptoms, were found to have OSA based on apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) >5 during overnight laboratory testing. Regression models of the full cohort showed that the risk of OSA was related, as expected, to older age, male sex, elevated body mass index, and presence of OSA symptoms. The presence of insomnia symptoms did not alter the risk of OSA. The presence of restless legs symptoms showed a small odds ratio for lowered OSA risk. Objective evidence of OSA occurs similarly in those with insomnia or restless legs symptoms, even among those without self-reported OSA symptoms. Providers should be aware of the potential for occult OSA in populations with insomnia and restless legs, which may complicate their management in addition to presenting an independent medical risk itself. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Childhood Obesity and Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indra Narang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The global epidemic of childhood and adolescent obesity and its immediate as well as long-term consequences for obese individuals and society as a whole cannot be overemphasized. Obesity in childhood and adolescence is associated with an increased risk of adult obesity and clinically significant consequences affecting the cardiovascular and metabolic systems. Importantly, obesity is additionally complicated by obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, occurring in up to 60% of obese children. OSA, which is diagnosed using the gold standard polysomnogram (PSG, is characterised by snoring, recurrent partial (hypopneas or complete (apneas obstruction of the upper airway. OSA is frequently associated with intermittent oxyhemoglobin desaturations, sleep disruption, and sleep fragmentation. There is emerging data that OSA is associated with cardiovascular burden including systemic hypertension, changes in ventricular structure and function, arterial stiffness, and metabolic syndromes. Thus, OSA in the context of obesity may independently or synergistically magnify the underlying cardiovascular and metabolic burden. This is of importance as early recognition and treatment of OSA in obese children are likely to result in the reduction of cardiometabolic burden in obese children. This paper summarizes the current state of understanding of obesity-related OSA. Specifically, this paper will discuss epidemiology, pathophysiology, cardiometabolic burden, and management of obese children and adolescents with OSA.

  15. Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with increased arterial stiffness in severe obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seetho, Ian W; Parker, Robert J; Craig, Sonya; Duffy, Nick; Hardy, Kevin J; Wilding, John P H

    2014-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome, leading to greater cardiovascular risk. Severely obese patients with obstructive sleep apnea may still be at risk of adverse health outcomes, even without previous cardiovascular disease. Pulse wave analysis non-invasively measures peripheral pulse waveforms and derives measures of haemodynamic status, including arterial stiffness, augmentation pressure and subendocardial viability ratio. We hypothesized that the presence of obstructive sleep apnea in severe obesity, even in the absence of an antecedent history of cardiovascular disease, would affect measurements derived from pulse wave analysis. Seventy-two severely obese adult subjects [obstructive sleep apnea 47 (body mass index 42 ± 7 kg m(-2) ), without obstructive sleep apnea (non-OSA) 25 (body mass index 40 ± 5 kg m(-2) )] were characterised using anthropometric, respiratory and cardio-metabolic parameters. Groups were similar in age, body mass index and gender. More subjects with obstructive sleep apnea had metabolic syndrome [obstructive sleep apnea 60%, without obstructive sleep apnea (non-OSA) 12%]. Those with obstructive sleep apnea had greater arterial stiffness, augmentation pressure and decreased subendocardial viability ratio (all P arterial pressures (P = 0.004) than patients without obstructive sleep apnea (non-OSA). Arterial stiffness correlated with mean arterial blood pressure (P = 0.003) and obstructive sleep apnea severity (apnea-hypopnea index; P arterial stiffness in multiple regression analysis, but components of the metabolic syndrome did not. Thus, patients with obstructive sleep apnea with severe obesity have increased arterial stiffness that may potentially influence cardiovascular risk independently of metabolic abnormalities. The presence of obstructive sleep apnea in severe obesity identifies a group at high cardiovascular risk; clinicians should ensure that risk factors are managed

  16. Neurological implications of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Venegas-Mariño

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS is a pathology with frequent systemic repercussions. One of the most affected organs is the brain, as well as the central nervous system, thus becoming a cerebrovascular risk factor regardless of other factors. This syndrome may increase the frequency and severity of primary central nervous system diseases such as epilepsy and dementia syndromes. A cardinal symptom of OSAHS is headache, which has specific characteristics; in addition, different pathophysiological mechanisms involved in its development have been identified such as frequent micro-arousals from sleep, secondary daytime sleepiness, altered attention capacity, concentration, motor reaction, affection, among others. Together, these mechanisms affect other higher mental functions including judgment, reasoning or memory. Factors like hypoxemia, hypercapnia, increased heart rate and blood pressure, adrenaline secretion, noradrenaline or cortisol during sleep contribute to the endothelial alteration responsible for cerebrovascular disease.

  17. High altitude pulmonary edema, down syndrome, and obstructive sleep apneas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richalet, Jean-Paul; Chenivesse, Cécile; Larmignat, Philippe; Meille, Laurent

    2008-01-01

    A 24-year-old adult with a Down syndrome was admitted in December 2006 at the Moutiers hospital in the French Alps for an acute inaugural episode of high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) that occurred in the early morning of day 3 after his arrival to La Plagne (2000 m). This patient presented an interventricular septal defect operated on at the age of 7, a hypothyroidism controlled by 50 microg levothyrox, a state of obesity (BMI 37.8 kg/m(2)), and obstructive sleep apneas with a mean of 42 obstructive apneas or hypopneas per hour, treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). The patient refused to use his CPAP during his stay in La Plagne. At echocardiography, resting parameters were normal, with a left ventricular, ejection fraction of 60%, a normokinetic right ventricle, and an estimated systolic pulmonary artery pressure (sPAP) of 30 mmHg. At exercise, sPAP rose to 45 mmHg and the right ventricle was still normokinetic and not dilated. An exercise hypoxic tolerance test performed at 60 W and at the equivalent altitude of 3300 m revealed a severe drop in arterial oxygen saturation down to 60%, with an abnormal low ventilatory response to hypoxia, suggesting a defect in peripheral chemosensitivity to hypoxia. In conclusion, patients with Down syndrome, including adults with no cardiac dysfunction and regular physical activity, are at risk of HAPE even at moderate altitude when they suffer from obstructive sleep apneas associated with obesity and low chemoresponsiveness. This observation might be of importance since an increasing number of young adults with Down syndrome participate in recreational or sport activities, including skiing and mountaineering.

  18. Integrating postural and vestibular dimensions to depict impairment in moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micarelli, Alessandro; Liguori, Claudio; Viziano, Andrea; Izzi, Francesca; Placidi, Fabio; Alessandrini, Marco

    2017-08-01

    Vestibular dysfunction was linked to moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) patients in literature. However, due to a lack of knowledge among valid and recent implementations conceived to study postural control on static posturography (SP) and vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) gain under physiological conditions (video Head Impulse Test; vHIT), the aim of this work was to integrate (i) VOR changes via vHIT implementation, (ii) postural arrangement by studying both classical parameters and frequency spectra (PS) and (iii) correlation between these findings, polygraphic (PG) and subjective scores along Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Thus, 32 moderate-to-severe OSAS patients and 32 healthy subjects - studied by using PG, DHI and ESS - underwent vHIT and SP posturographic assessment. Analysis of variance was performed to disclose between-group effects and correlation analysis was implemented between otoneurological, PG, DHI and ESS values. OSAS group demonstrated a significant decay of VOR gain and an increase in both frequency spectra PS values, especially within the low-frequency interval, and in classical posturographic SP parameters. Further, positive and negative correlations between mean SaO 2 and gain and low frequency interval spectra PS were found, respectively. Strengthening previous hypothesis related to brainstem chronic hypoxemia phenomena affecting vestibular network, implementation of these data could generate future attentions (i) for screening under physiological conditions postural and vestibular detriments in OSAS subjects, especially exposed at risk settings, and (ii) among PG parameters, such as mean SaO 2 , to propose further reliable tools in monitoring postural and vestibular decay in these patients demonstrating PG parameters detriments. © 2017 European Sleep Research Society.

  19. Network science meets respiratory medicine for OSAS phenotyping and severity prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Mihaicuta

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS is a common clinical condition. The way that OSAS risk factors associate and converge is not a random process. As such, defining OSAS phenotypes fosters personalized patient management and population screening. In this paper, we present a network-based observational, retrospective study on a cohort of 1,371 consecutive OSAS patients and 611 non-OSAS control patients in order to explore the risk factor associations and their correlation with OSAS comorbidities. To this end, we construct the Apnea Patients Network (APN using patient compatibility relationships according to six objective parameters: age, gender, body mass index (BMI, blood pressure (BP, neck circumference (NC and the Epworth sleepiness score (ESS. By running targeted network clustering algorithms, we identify eight patient phenotypes and corroborate them with the co-morbidity types. Also, by employing machine learning on the uncovered phenotypes, we derive a classification tree and introduce a computational framework which render the Sleep Apnea Syndrome Score (SASScore; our OSAS score is implemented as an easy-to-use, web-based computer program which requires less than one minute for processing one individual. Our evaluation, performed on a distinct validation database with 231 consecutive patients, reveals that OSAS prediction with SASScore has a significant specificity improvement (an increase of 234% for only 8.2% sensitivity decrease in comparison with the state-of-the-art score STOP-BANG. The fact that SASScore has bigger specificity makes it appropriate for OSAS screening and risk prediction in big, general populations.

  20. Hearing loss in mild OSAS and simple snoring patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinosi, Maria Carla; D'Amico, Francesca; Passali, Giulio; Cingi, Cemal; Rodriguez, Hugo; Passali, Desiderio

    2017-04-30

    Introduction Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) is characterized by recurrent episodes of prolonged partial or complete obstruction of the upper airways. Several study groups studied the effect of snoring and OSAS on auditory function, showing an increase in the incidence of hearing loss in apneic patients, an earlier onset and/or a degree of hearing loss deeper than in peers. The aim of our study is to evaluate the audiological performance of a population of simple-snoring patients and patients suffering from mild OSAS, and the impact that such pathological condition can have on the auditory function, considering the significant levels of chronic noise. Materials and Methods Data was collected by analyzing audiometric exams on snoring patients and a control group of non-snoring patients. Our study included simple snoring patients without OSAS (AHI < 5) or with low level of OSAS (5< AHI < 15). Possible hearing loss was classified in a crescent scale (A-B-C-D-E), from greater to minor auditory performance, according to the indications of the national protocol of occupational medicine for evaluation of hearing loss in patients exposed to chronic noise. Results We have found independence between simple snorers, mild-OSAS snorers and non-snoring patients compared to the scale of hearing performance classification. Conclusions Our results show a distribution of hearing loss in the different groups that appear independent of the presence or absence of snoring, complicated or uncomplicated by mild OSAS.

  1. [Different effect of sleep on working memory and skill learning: cognitive function in obstructive sleep apnea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csábi, Eszter; Janacsek, Karolina; Várszegi, Mária; Németh, Dezsô

    2011-01-01

    In obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) hypoxia and sleep deprivation lead to neuropsychological impairments. Our goal in this study to evaluate working memory and skill learning to get a complex picture about cortical and sub-cortical function in patients with sleep apnea. Twenty-one OSAS patients and 21 healthy controls participated in the study. We analyzed verbal-, vizuo-spatial, complex working memory, general skill learning and sequence specific learning separately. Our data show that complex working memory was impaired in OSAS patients, in contrary OSAS patients represented better achievement in the vizuo-spatial task compared to the control group. We found that OSAS patients showed general skill learning and implicit learning of probabilistic sequences similar to that of controls. Taken together, we found dissociation between working memory and implicit sequence learning in OSAS. These findings suggest that sleep has less influence on the functions related to sub-cortical structures like cortical functions.

  2. Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantaree Aswanetmane

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are common disorders in clinical practice and are associated with significant cardiovascular morbidity. The simultaneous occurrence of OSA and COPD happens frequently and is referred to as an overlap syndrome. These patients often have very poor quality sleep and more nocturnal hypoxemia. This combination may increase the severity of metabolic complications and cardiovascular disease, and these patients have increased mortality when compared to patients with either COPD or OSA alone. The treatment of overlap syndrome should focus on both coexisting diseases and includes continuous positive airway pressure, oxygen supplementation, and medications for chronic lung disease.

  3. Measurement of the square measure of the pharynx and the positional diagnosis of airway obstruction during obstructive sleep apnea syndrome by dynamic MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozuki, Taizo; Ohkubo, Yasuo; Abe, Kimihiko [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    2000-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to apply dynamic MRI for the positional diagnosis of airway obstruction during snoring and sleep apnea and to compare the apnea hypopnea index (AHI) and the square measure of the pharynx obtained before and after laser-assisted uvula-palate-pharyngoplasty (LAUP). From December 1997 to October 1998, dynamic MRI and overnight monitoring were performed at the hospital of Tokyo Medical University on 42 patients who complained of snoring and symptoms related to sleep apnea syndrome (SAS). Of the 42 patients, four exhibited collapse at the position of the soft palate (soft palate type) as diagnosed by dynamic MRI, and four exhibited collapse at the position of the soft palate as well as the tongue (complex type). LAUP was performed on these eight patients with obstructive SAS (OSAS). After LAUP, the AHI of these eight patients with OSAS decreased significantly (p<0.05). The square measure of the pharynx of these eight patients was increased (p<0.01). The AHI of all four patients with soft-palate obstruction decreased, and the square measure of the pharynx of three of these four patients increased. The AHI of three of four patients with the complex type decreased, while the square measure of the pharynx of two of these four patients increased. (author)

  4. Association between Occupational Accidents and Sleep Apnea in Hospital Staff

    OpenAIRE

    Hassani, Somayeh; Rahnama, Nooshin; Seyedmehdi, Seyed Mohammad; Yazdanparast, Taraneh; Roozbahani, Rahim; Attarchi, Mirsaeed; Adimi Naghan, Parisa; Jamaati, Hamidreza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a common disorder in which instability of the upper airways leads to a reduction or cessation of airflow during sleep. Sleep disorders such as OSAS increase the risk of occupational accidents and impaired work performance. Sleep deprivation during shift increases the risk of occupational accidents among health care employees. The purpose of this study was to determine the association between occupational injuries in hospital staff and the...

  5. Pathophysiology of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Venegas-Mariño

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS is a disease characterized by recurrent upper airway obstruction (UAO, with decreased airflow, intermittent hypoxemia, and awakening during sleep. Two essential factors are related to the pathophysiology of OSAHS: anatomical alterations and reduction or absence of neural control. While studying OSAHS, the site or sites of obstruction of the UA should be identified; they may extend from the nasal wings to the hypopharynx. Another important factor in this syndrome is the nervous influence on muscle tone of the hypopharynx, as well as the changes in blood pH, which are secondary to micro-arousals. Body position and sleep stage determine the severity. The pathophysiology of OSAHS should be understood to properly study a patient and provide the best treatment option.

  6. OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA-HYPOPNEA SYNDROME. MODERN VIEW ON THE PROBLEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G .M. Fomych

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is a common chronic syndrome that significantly affects the quality of life of patients and often requires lifelong care. This review deals with modern ideas about the prevalence, causes, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Using modern methods of diagnosis and the correct approach to such patients helps prevent unwanted effects and significantly improves quality of life.

  7. Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Download Download the ebook for further ... more than 30 apneas during a seven-hour sleep. In severe cases, periods of not breathing may last for as long as 60 to ... on whether your OSA is mild, moderate ...

  8. Snoring Sounds Predict Obstruction Sites and Surgical Response in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Hypopnea Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Li-Ang; Lo, Yu-Lun; Yu, Jen-Fang; Lee, Gui-She; Ni, Yung-Lun; Chen, Ning-Hung; Fang, Tuan-Jen; Huang, Chung-Guei; Cheng, Wen-Nuan; Li, Hsueh-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Snoring sounds generated by different vibrators of the upper airway may be useful indicators of obstruction sites in patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). This study aimed to investigate associations between snoring sounds, obstruction sites, and surgical responses (?50% reduction in the apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] and

  9. Erectile dysfunction in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome—Prevalence and determinants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Santos

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: OSAS (obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is defined by recurrent episodes of upper airway obstruction during sleep, causing multiple clinical consequences. Literature review suggests that OSAS induces a spectrum of abnormalities in neural, hormonal and vascular regulation that contribute to the development of ED (erectile dysfunction.The aims of this study were to estimate the prevalence of ED in OSAS patients and evaluate its determinants. Methods: 62 patients from Hospital S. João Sleep Laboratory with newly diagnosed OSAS were included in the study and answered the IIEF-5 (international index erectile function 5 item version questionnaire. Results: The prevalence of ED in OSAS patients was 64.4%. Age and diabetes constituted themselves as independent risk factors for more severe degrees of ED: OR = 1.226 (95% CI: 1.062–1.415 and OR = 31.205 (95% CI: 1.222–796.557, respectively. Compared with nonsmokers, ex-smokers group revealed a positive association with ED: OR = 4.32 (95% CI: 1.09–17.11. Hypertension and ACEI (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or ARB (angiotensin II receptor blockers therapy were also correlated to ED symptoms: OR = 3.25 (95% CI: 1.09–9.65 and 7.39 (95% CI: 1.52–35.99, respectively.No association was found relating BMI (p = 0.254, alcoholic habits (p = 0.357, acute myocardial infarction (p = 0.315, dyslipidemia (p = 0.239, metabolic syndrome (p = 0.215 and ED.OSAS severity was not associated with ED in our sample. Conclusions: The prevalence of ED in OSAS patients is high. ED determinants in our sample were age and diabetes. Past smoking habits, hypertension and ACEI/ARB therapy also revealed a statistically significant association with ED. Resumo: Introdução: A SAOS (síndroma de apneia obstrutiva do sono define-se pela ocorrência frequente de obstrução da via aérea superior durante o sono, com m

  10. Prevalence and risk factors of moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in insomnia sufferers: a study on 1311 subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Matthieu; Lanquart, Jean-Pol; Loas, Gwénolé; Hubain, Philippe; Linkowski, Paul

    2017-07-06

    Several studies have investigated the prevalence and risk factors of insomnia in subjects with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. However, few studies have investigated the prevalence and risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in insomnia sufferers. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine the prevalence and risk factors of moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in a large sample of insomnia sufferers. Data from 1311 insomnia sufferers who were recruited from the research database of the sleep laboratory of the Erasme Hospital were analysed. An apnea-hypopnea index of ≥15 events per hour was used as the cut-off score for moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine clinical and demographic risk factors of moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in insomnia sufferers. The prevalence of moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in our sample of insomnia sufferers was 13.88%. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that male gender, snoring, excessive daytime sleepiness, lower maintenance insomnia complaint, presence of metabolic syndrome, age ≥ 50 & 30 kg/m 2 , and CRP >7 mg/L were significant risk factors of moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in insomnia sufferers. Moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is a common pathology in insomnia sufferers. The identification of these different risk factors advances a new perspective for more effective screening of moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in insomnia sufferers.

  11. Investigation of acetone, butanol and carbon dioxide as new breath biomarkers for convenient and noninvasive diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayrakli, Ismail; Öztürk, Önder; Akman, Hatice

    2016-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate whether analysis of carbon dioxide, acetone and/or butanol present in human breath can be used as a simple and noninvasive diagnosis method for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). For this purpose, overnight changes in the concentrations of these breath molecules were measured before and after sleep in 10 patients who underwent polysomnography and were diagnosed with OSAS, and were compared with the levels of these biomarkers determined after sleep in 10 healthy subjects. The concentrations of exhaled carbon dioxide were measured using external cavity laser-based off-axis cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy, whereas the levels of exhaled acetone and butanol were determined using thermal desorption gas chromatography mass spectrometry. We observed no significant changes in the levels of exhaled acetone and carbon dioxide in OSAS patients after sleep compared with pre-sleep values and compared with those in healthy control subjects. However, for the first time, to our knowledge, analyses of expired air showed an increased concentration of butanol after sleep compared with that before sleep and compared with that in healthy subjects. These results suggest that butanol can be established as a potential biomarker to enable the convenient and noninvasive diagnosis of OSAS in the future. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Asthma and Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yi-Xian; Xiao, Yi

    2015-10-20

    To get a comprehensive understanding about the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and asthma by reviewing the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical manifestation and then summarizing the latest progress on diagnosis and treatment. Articles referred in this review were mainly collected from a comprehensive search of the PubMed published in English from 1990 to 2015 with the terms "OSA" and "asthma" as the main keywords. Highly regarded older publications were also included. Information about the features of the two diseases in common, the pathophysiologic association between them and their current treatments from the literature search were identified, retrieved, and summarized. Both OSA and asthma are very prevalent conditions. The incidences of them have kept on rising in recent years. Asthma is often accompanied by snoring and apnea, and OSA often combines with asthma, as well. They have many predisposing and aggravating factors in common. Possible shared direct mechanistic links between them include mechanical effects, intermittent hypoxia, nerve reflex, inflammation, leptin, etc. Indirect mechanistic links include medication, nose diseases, smoking, obesity, and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Since OSA presents many similar features with nocturnal asthma, some scholars termed them as a sole syndrome - "alternative overlap syndrome," and proved that asthma symptoms in those patients could be improved through the treatment of continuous positive airway pressure. OSA and asthma are closely associated in pathogenesis, symptoms, and therapies. With the growing awareness of the relationship between them, we should raise our vigilance on the coexistence of OSA in those difficult-to-control asthmatic patients. Further studies are still needed to guide the clinical works.

  13. [Obesity and obstructive sleep apnea in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaddeo, A; de Sanctis, L; Olmo Arroyo, J; Giordanella, J-P; Monteyrol, P-J; Fauroux, B

    2017-02-01

    Obesity, along with hypertrophy of the adenoids and the tonsils, represents one of the major risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children. Obesity is associated with an increase in the prevalence and the severity of OSA and is a major factor in the persistence and aggravation of OSA over time. Neurocognitive dysfunction and abnormal behavior are the most important and frequent end-organ morbidities associated with OSA in children. Other deleterious consequences such as cardiovascular stress and metabolic syndrome are less common in children than in adults with OSA. Defining the exact role of obesity in OSA-associated end-organ morbidity in children is difficult because of the complex and multidimensional interactions between sleep in general, OSA, obesity, and metabolic dysregulation. This may explain why obesity itself has not been shown to be associated with a significant increase in OSA-associated end-organ morbidity. Obesity is linked to a decreased treatment efficacy and, in particular, of adenotonsillectomy. Peri- and postoperative complications are more common and more severe in obese children as compared with normal-weight controls. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is frequently needed, but compliance with CPAP is less optimal in obese children than in non-obese children. In conclusion, obesity represents a major public health problem worldwide; its prevention is one of the most efficient tools for decreasing the incidence and the morbidity associated with OSA in children. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Chiari malformation and central sleep apnea syndrome: efficacy of treatment with adaptive servo-ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Marques do Vale

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The Chiari malformation type I (CM-I has been associated with sleep-disordered breathing, especially central sleep apnea syndrome. We report the case of a 44-year-old female with CM-I who was referred to our sleep laboratory for suspected sleep apnea. The patient had undergone decompressive surgery 3 years prior. An arterial blood gas analysis showed hypercapnia. Polysomnography showed a respiratory disturbance index of 108 events/h, and all were central apnea events. Treatment with adaptive servo-ventilation was initiated, and central apnea was resolved. This report demonstrates the efficacy of servo-ventilation in the treatment of central sleep apnea syndrome associated with alveolar hypoventilation in a CM-I patient with a history of decompressive surgery.

  15. Endocrinological implications of the obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Londoño-Palacio

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Since obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS is a multisystemic disease, it also affects the endocrine system. Normal production of hormones can be influenced by the presence of intermittent hypoxia, inflammation, and oxidative stress; for example, subjects with obesity and OSAHS have much higher leptin levels than obese subjects without OSAHS. This article discusses the relationship between sleep apnea and obesity, metabolic syndrome (MS, diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2, neuroendocrine disorders and osteoporosis.

  16. The Main Symptoms in Dorsal Sleep Apnea - Hypopnea Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Alexandra POP

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available OSAHS is a chronic, multifactorial disease, accompanied by significant and complex symptoms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between OSAHS and dorsal AHI in order to improve early diagnosis of dorsal sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome. There were significant statistical differences between: the dorsal AHI Mean of the group without excessive daytime sleepiness as opposed to the dorsal AHI Mean of the group with excessive daytime sleepiness; the dorsal AHI Mean of the group without snoring as opposed to the dorsal AHI Mean of the group with snoring; the dorsal AHI Mean of the group without restless sleep as opposed to the dorsal AHI Mean of the group with restless sleep; the dorsal AHI Mean of the group without dyspnea as opposed to the dorsal AHI Mean of the group with dyspnea; the dorsal AHI Mean of the group without night sweats as opposed to the dorsal AHI Mean of the group with night sweats; the dorsal AHI Mean of the group without irritability as opposed to the dorsal AHI Mean of the group with irritability and the dorsal AHI Mean of the group without nightmares as opposed to the dorsal AHI Mean of the group with nightmares. Through this study we highlighted that excessive daytime sleepiness and snoring are prevalent symptoms in dorsal OSAHS. The presence of these symptoms in patients with sleep disorders may improve early diagnosis and the choice of an appropriate treatment for dorsal sleep apnea- hypopnea syndrome, thus participating in improving the patient’s life quality

  17. CT findings in adults with obstructive sleep apnea; Measurement of pharyngeal spaces with an image analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Fumiaki; Asakura, Kohji; Nakano, Yuji; Shintani, Tomoko; Akita, Nobuto; Kataura, Akikatsu (Sapporo Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1993-09-01

    The obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is characterized by recurrent obstruction of the upper airway during sleep. In this study, we performed CT scans in 20 adult OSAS patients and 6 control subjects, and measured the airspaces in the nasopharynx, mesopharynx and hypopharynx, using an image analyzer. The airspaces were significantly smaller at all sites of the pharynx in OSAS patients than in the control subjects, but they did not show a positive correlation with the apnea index or the body mass index. In good responders whose apnea indexes improved more than 50% after uvulo-palato-pharyngoplasty (UPPP), the nasopharyngeal and mesopharyngeal airspaces were significantly smaller, and the hypopharyngeal space tended to be larger than in poor responders. Our results suggest that CT scan is a helpful method for analyzing the area of the upper airway, especially in relation to the response to UPPP in adults with OSAS. (author).

  18. [The research progress of relationship between the obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome and asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinfeng; Xie, Yuping; Ma, Wei

    2015-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) is characterized by repeated episodes of upper airway obstruction that results in brief periods of breathing cessation (apnea) or a marked reduction in airflow (hypopnea) during sleep. Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways characterized by revesible air-flow obstruction and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. This article reviewed related reseaches progress of relationship between the obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrom and asthma in the vascular endothelial growth factor, systemic inflammation, leptin, obesity, gastroesophageal reflux disease and upper airway diseases, excessive daytime sleepiness and asthma control.

  19. Multiple causes of apnea in 1p36 deletion syndrome include seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanabar, Gorande; Boyd, Stewart; Schugal, Anna; Bhate, Sanjay

    2012-06-01

    Apneic episodes have not previously been described in children with 1p36 deletion syndrome with seizures. Having encountered one such patient, we reviewed our experience of breathing difficulties in this syndrome, with particular attention to evidence of ictal apnea. We describe four children with 1p36 deletion syndrome, seizures and apneic episodes. Retrospective analysis of clinical features, seizure semiology and video-EEG data. All patients showed characteristic craniofacial features, mental retardation, and diffuse hypotonia and apnea. Seizure semiology included focal motor, ± secondary generalized tonic clonic and tonic events. All had histories of status epilepticus; three showed clustering of their habitual seizures. Assessment of apnea was complicated by the presence of multiple other potential causes including obesity, reflux, respiratory, and cardiac problems Epileptic apneas were confirmed in one child by video-telemetry. In three other children, an epileptic basis for apneas was inferred from their clinical histories and treatment response supported by EEG findings. In three children, epileptiform discharges occurred over fronto-centro-temporal regions. Epileptic apnea is a feature of 1p36 deletion syndrome, though episodic apnea is multifactorial in these children, and may need repeated re-appraisal. Copyright © 2012 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Critical evaluation of the overactive bladder and urgency urinary incontinence association with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in a relatively young adult male population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncer, Murat; Yazici, Ozgur; Kafkasli, Alper; Sabuncu, Kubilay; Salepci, Banu; Narter, Fehmi; Gungor, Gulten A; Yucetas, Ugur

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of Overactive Bladder (OAB) and Urgency Urinary Incontinence (UUI) in males with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) using the OSAS grading system. A total of 194 patients who underwent Polysomnography (PSG) were included in our prospective cross sectional study. Patients were divided into four groups according to Apnea-Hypopnea Index (AHI). Group 1, 35 patients with normal AHI (Bladder (OAB-V8), ICIQ-SF, and IPSS questionnaires were filled out for all patients. Prevalence of OAB, UUI, nocturia, and scores of OAB-V8, ICIQ-SF, IPSS were compared between the study groups. The statistical analysis was adjusted by the demographics of age and BMI. The mean age was 44.6 ± 11.2 years, and the mean BMI was 29.9 ± 4.9 within the whole study group, and both were statistically different between the groups. The scores of OAB-V8 (P = 0.298), ICIQ-SF (P = 0.392), IPSS total, IPSS storage, and IPSS voiding (P = 0.268, P = 0.380, P = 0.167, respectively), the prevalence of OAB (P = 0.078), UUI (P = 0.423), and nocturia (P = 0.096) were not statistically different between the study groups. Our findings demonstrated that there is no increase in prevalence of OAB and UUI in relatively young adult male with OSAS. Furthermore, analysis revealed that the higher OSAS grade does not mean the higher prevalence of OAB. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome as an accident risk factor in professional drivers in Yekaterinburg. Dangerous Sleep (DS-1 study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Belkin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available About 20% of all road traffic accidents may be associated with falling asleep while driving. This may be caused by sleep disorders leading to daytime sleepiness, the most common of which is obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS. Objective: to study somatic and mental health, sleep disorders, OSAS in particular, in the population of Russian drivers (Sverdlovsk Region. Patients and methods. The descriptive cohort «Dangerous Sleep» (DS-1 study of 20 professional drivers having more than 5-year driving experience was conducted at the Clinical Institute of the Brain. The mean age of the drivers was 45.8 years. They underwent somatic evaluation for cardiovascular risk factors and a psychological examination involving a risk readiness diagnostic procedure, the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale, the Beck Depression Inventory, and an electroencephalographic examination. A somnological examination assumed testing using the Epworth sleepiness scale, polysomnography, or overnight pulse metry. Results and discussion. 30% of the drivers were found to have marked attention disorders and an inability to adapt to extreme conditions, which create a risk for professional duties. The predisposing factors were noted to be alcohol addiction, overweight, and OSAS, the rate of the latter proved to be higher than that in the general population of able-bodied men. It was shown that a somnological examination should be obligatorily performed while hiring professional drivers, particularly to long hauliers. The drivers having a long length of experience, in whom a periodic examination detects sleep disorders, should be treated for somatic diseases and should also have individual working schedules to rule out their long night-time driving. 

  2. Comprehensive evaluation of functional and anatomical disorders of the patients with distal occlusion and accompanying obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabiev, F. H.; Dobrodeev, A. S.; Libin, P. V.; Kotov, I. I.; Ovsyannikov, A. G.

    2015-11-01

    The paper defines the therapeutic and rehabilitation approach to the patients with Angle's classification Class II dento-facial anomalies, accompanied by obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The proposed comprehensive approach to the diagnostics and treatment of patients with posterior occlusion, accompanied by OSA, allows for objective evaluation of intensity of a dento-facial anomaly and accompanying respiratory disorders in the nasal and oral pharynx, which allows for the pathophysiological mechanisms of OSA to be identified, and an optimal plan for surgical procedures to be developed. The proposed comprehensive approach to the diagnostics and treatment of patients with Angle's classification Class II dento-facial anomalies provides high functional and aesthetic results.

  3. Clinical consequences and economic costs of untreated obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Knauert

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To provide an overview of the healthcare and societal consequences and costs of untreated obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Data sources: PubMed database for English-language studies with no start date restrictions and with an end date of September 2014. Methods: A comprehensive literature review was performed to identify all studies that discussed the physiologic, clinical and societal consequences of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome as well as the costs associated with these consequences. There were 106 studies that formed the basis of this analysis. Conclusions: Undiagnosed and untreated obstructive sleep apnea syndrome can lead to abnormal physiology that can have serious implications including increased cardiovascular disease, stroke, metabolic disease, excessive daytime sleepiness, work-place errors, traffic accidents and death. These consequences result in significant economic burden. Both, the health and societal consequences and their costs can be decreased with identification and treatment of sleep apnea. Implications for practice: Treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, despite its consequences, is limited by lack of diagnosis, poor patient acceptance, lack of access to effective therapies, and lack of a variety of effective therapies. Newer modes of therapy that are effective, cost efficient and more accepted by patients need to be developed. Keywords: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, Cost, Continuous positive airway pressure, Mandibular advancement device

  4. Observational study on efficacy of negative expiratory pressure test proposed as screening for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome among commercial interstate bus drivers - protocol study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirata Raquel P

    2011-12-01

    enrollment of this study protocol, the expectation is to encounter predictive NEP values for different degrees of OSA in order to contribute toward an early diagnosis of this condition and reduce its impact and complications among commercial interstate bus drivers. Trial registration Registro Brasileiro de Ensaios Clinicos (local acronym RBEC [Internet]: Rio de Janeiro (RJ: Instituto de Informaçao Cientifica e Tecnologica em Saude (Brazil; 2010 - Identifier RBR-7dq5xx. Cross-sectional study on efficacy of negative expiratory pressure test proposed as screening for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome among commercial interstate bus drivers; 2011 May 31 [7 pages]. Available from http://www.ensaiosclinicos.gov.br/rg/RBR-7dq5xx/.

  5. [Arterial hypertension and sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome in primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayó Llibre, J; Riel Cabrera, R; Mellado Breña, E; Filomena Paci, J; Priego Artero, M; García Alfaro, F J; Grau Granero, J M; Vázquez González, D; López Solana, J; Fernández San Martín, M I

    2015-01-01

    Sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (SAHS) is frequent in hypertensive patients and plays a role in a greater incidence of cardiovascular morbidity-mortality. This study aims to know the clinical profile of hypertensive patients with SAHS compared to hypertensive patients without SAHS to know which variables should be used to orient their screening from primary care. An observational, descriptive, retrospective study of cases (hypertensive patients with SAHS) and controls (hypertensive patients without) was performed in an urban health care center. Based on a computerized registry of the site, patients diagnosed of SAHS and hypertension over 30 years of age were selected. For each case, one control case of hypertensive patients without SAHS paired by age and gender was randomly obtained. A total of 64 cases and 64 controls were selected. Standing out in the bivariate analysis were greater BMI (34.3±12.8 vs. 28.6±3.6), predominance of obesity (70.3 vs. 35.9%), metabolic syndrome (77.3 vs. 42.2%), consumption of psychopharmaceuticals (19.7 vs. 7.8%) and anithypertensive drugs (26.5 vs. 14.0%), ischemic heart disease (20.3 vs. 9.4%) in the case group versus control group (P<.05 for all the variables). The multivariate analysis showed that only the presence of metabolic syndrome was related with the presence of SAHS in hypertensive patients (OR 4.65; 95% CI: 2.03-10.64; P<.001). Screening for SAHS should be performed in hypertensive patients seen in primary care if they have metabolic syndrome criteria. Copyright © 2014 SEHLELHA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Alterações cognitivas na SAOS Cognitive impairment in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Felipe Carvalhedo de Bruin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Alterações da cognição e do desempenho estão bem estabelecidas em pacientes com SAOS, causando um impacto significativo sobre a qualidade de vida e o risco de acidentes nesses indivíduos. Tais alterações são mais profundas nos quadros mais graves de SAOS, o que explica a aparente discrepância na frequência e gravidade desse prejuízo entre estudos com pacientes de clínicas de sono e estudos de base populacional. Vários aspectos podem estar comprometidos, incluindo o processamento cognitivo, a atenção sustentada, as funções executivas e a memória. Entretanto, os mecanismos causais desses déficits não estão inteiramente elucidados, e existem controvérsias, particularmente em relação à contribuição relativa da hipóxia intermitente e da interrupção do sono presentes na SAOS. O impacto da sonolência diurna sobre o desempenho desses pacientes nos diversos testes cognitivos também ainda deve ser determinado, assim como o possível efeito de comorbidades frequentes, incluindo o diabete melito, a hipertensão arterial sistêmica, a doença cardiovascular e a obesidade. Existem evidências convincentes de que o tratamento com CPAP produz uma significativa melhora do desempenho e da cognição, sobretudo nos portadores de SAOS moderada e grave, embora sejam necessários mais estudos acerca do seu impacto a longo prazo.Cognitive and performance impairment is well established in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS, having a significant impact on the quality of life and the risk of accidents in these individuals. The severity of the impairment correlates with that of the OSAS, which explains the apparent discrepancy between studies using patients from sleep clinics and population-based studies in terms of the reported frequency and severity of such impairment. Cognitive processing, sustained attention, executive functioning, and memory have all been reported to be impaired in OSAS. However, the causal

  7. Does Race-Ethnicity Moderate the Relationship between CPAP Adherence and Functional Outcomes of Sleep in US Veterans with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Douglas M.; Wohlgemuth, William K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the association of race-ethnicity and the relationship of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) adherence with functional outcomes of sleep in American samples with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). This retrospective study examines whether race-ethnicity moderates the relationship between CPAP adherence and functional outcomes of sleep in OSAS. Methods: Over 4 months, consecutive OSAS patients had CPAP data downloads and completed questionnaires (demographics, Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire [FOSQ], Epworth Sleepiness Scale [ESS], Insomnia Severity Index [ISI]) at the Miami VA sleep center. Medical diagnoses and polysomnography data were obtained from medical record. CPAP adherence was measured as mean daily hours of use. Hierarchical regression modeling was used to explore the differential impact of race-ethnicity and CPAP adherence on functional outcomes of sleep. Results: Two hundred twenty-seven veterans (93% male, age 59 ± 11 years) were included; 142 (63%) participants self-reported as white or Hispanic, and 85 participants (37%) as black. Hierarchical regression analyses failed to show main effects for race-ethnicity or CPAP use and FOSQ scores; however, the interaction of race-ethnicity with CPAP adherence was significantly associated with the total FOSQ (p = 0.04), Social (p = 0.02), and Intimacy (p = 0.01) subscale scores. For blacks, in adjusted analyses, CPAP adherence was positively associated with Social and Intimacy FOSQ subscales; however, no significant relationship was noted between CPAP use and FOSQ scores in whites/Hispanics. Conclusions: Race-ethnicity may moderate the relationship between CPAP adherence and some functional outcomes of sleep; however, further studies are needed. Citation: Wallace DM, Wohlgemuth WK. Does race-ethnicity moderate the relationship between CPAP adherence and functional outcomes of sleep in US veterans with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome? J Clin Sleep Med

  8. [Acoustic characteristics of snoring sound in patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Qin, Yong; Haung, Weining; Peng, Hao; Xu, Huijie

    2012-04-01

    To investigate the acoustic characteristics of snoring sound in patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). Thirty-one patients with OSAHS were included in this study. Natural overnight snoring was digitally recorded and polysomnography (PSG) was performed simultaneously. Thirty hundred and ten snores which after obstructive apnea and 310 continuous snores which not after obstructive apnea were extracted and peak frequency, maximal frequency, mean frequency,central frequency and power ratio were analyzed. The maximal frequency, peak frequency, mean frequency and central frequency of the snores which after obstructive apnea was higher than that of the continuous snores. But 800 Hz power ratio of the snores which after obstructive apnea was lower than those of the continuous snores. The differences of all parameters were of statistical significance (Psnores of OSAHS patients. It indicates that it is feasible to study the OSAHS by way of snore monitoring and analyzing technique employed in this study.

  9. Insomnia as an expression of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome--the effect of treatment with nocturnal ventilatory support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, M Saldanha; dos Santos, J Moutinho

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and insomnia often coexist, and it is estimated that nearly half of those who suffer from the former report symptoms of the latter. The fact that these patients have no other causes of insomnia indicates that it is a sign of OSAS. The aim of the study is to evaluate the effectiveness of nocturnal ventilatory support (NVS) in the treatment of insomnia secondary to OSAS. In order to conduct the retrospective study, the authors reviewed the medical records of patients with insomnia and OSAS that had received NVS. Patients with psychiatric disorders, sleep movement disorders, psycho-physiological insomnia, circadian rhythm sleep disorders, inadequate sleep hygiene, use and abuse of hypnotic agents, stimulants, antidepressants, anxiolytics and alcohol, were excluded. For the selected patients, the effects of NVS in terms of clinical signs and symptoms of insomnia, apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) score, and number of sleep hours were analyzed, before and after treatment with NVS. After reviewing 1241 medical records, 56 patients were selected, with a mean age of 60.9±10.0 years. Twenty-two (39.3%) suffered from intermediate insomnia, 19 (33.9%) had initial insomnia, eight (14.3%) had the mixed type, and seven patients (12.5%) had terminal insomnia. The majority of patients (n=48; 85.7%) were treated with auto-titrating continuous positive airway pressure (APAP). Forty-four patients (78.6%) overcame insomnia; insomnia symptoms persisted in nine (16.1%), and three (5.4%) patients abandoned during the medical follow-up. There was an association between the type of insomnia and its resolution and, in percentage terms patients with the mixed type did not manage to overcome insomnia symptoms (75%). There was a statistically significant difference between patients that overcame insomnia and those who did not in terms of the average time which elapsed between the initiation of treatment with NVS and compliance

  10. Repeatability of sleep apnea detection in 48-hour holter ECG monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uznańska, Barbara; Trzos, Ewa; Rechciński, Tomasz; Kasprzak, Jarosław D; Kurpesa, Małgorzata

    2010-07-01

    There is a significant relationship between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and cardiovascular diseases. Reliability of new methods evaluating apnea in Holter ECG monitoring is still the matter of investigators' studies. In 48-hour Holter ECG monitoring recordings of 63 patients, we assessed repeatability, comparing the results from both sleep periods. We found good repeatability in evaluation of apnea-hypopnea index value. There was moderate agreement in three categories, that is, normal or bordeline or apneic assignment. Assignment to "healthy" (normal and borderline) or apneic subgroup during consecutive sleep periods showed high repeatability. Holter ECG monitoring is a repetitive method of preliminary diagnosis in patients evaluated for sleep apnea syndrome.

  11. Role of sleep endoscopy in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan Salama

    2013-07-01

    Conclusion: Sleep endoscopy is a useful tool for the assessment of level, degree and shape of the upper airway obstruction during sleep in OSAS and this could be helpful in preoperative evaluation. Presence of obstruction at hypopharyngeal level or tongue base obstruction is an indicator of OSAS severity.

  12. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and erectile dysfunction: does ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: It is not certainly possible to say that OSAS is clearly associated with ED. However, after 3 months of regular CPAP usage, ED complaints in patients with OSAS might improve positively. Trials with larger series may give more conclusive data. Key Words: Sleep disorder, erectile dysfunction, obstructive sleep ...

  13. Evaluation of degree of lacunar infarction and carotid atherosclerosis in patients with different severity of OSAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Du

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the degree of lacunar infarction and carotid atherosclerosis in patients with different severity of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS. Methods: A total of 198 patients with OSAS were retrospectively studied from case information and test results, and were divided into mild group 84 cases, medium group 70 cases and severe group 44 cases according to apnea-hypopnea index (AHI, and 176 cases of non-OSAS people who received physical examination in our hospital during the same period were selected as healthy control group. Differences in the values of serum lacunar infarction-related indexes, blood viscosity and hemocyte-related indexes, carotid structure and function parameters, serum arteriosclerosis-related indexes and so on were compared among groups. Results: t-PA value of healthy control group was higher than those of OSAS group while vWF, PAI-1 and Fg values were lower than those of OSAS group (P<0.05, and with the increase of OSAS severity, t-PA value decreased while vWF, PAI-1 and Fg values increased (P<0.05; blood viscosity, Hct, PDW, RDW and EFR values of healthy control group were lower than those of OSAS group (P<0.05, and with the increase of OSAS severity, blood viscosity, Hct, PDW, RDW and EFR values increased (P<0.05; FMD, NID and DC values of healthy control group were higher than those of OSAS group while Dis, CC and PWV values were lower than those of OSAS group (P<0.05, and with the increase of OSAS severity, FMD, NID and DC values decreased while Dis, CC and PWV values increased (P<0.05; blood uric acid and EF-1 values of healthy control group were lower than those of OSAS group while CGRP and fetuin A levels were higher than those of OSAS group (P<0.05, and with the aggravation of OSAS, blood uric acid and EF-1 levels increased while CGRP and fetuin A levels decreased, and differences among groups were significant (P<0.05. Conclusions: With the aggravation of OSAS, patients’ microcirculation

  14. Socio-Economic Status: A Barrier to Access to Mandibular Advancement Device Therapy for Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome in France.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Fleury

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS is a major public health problem which affects between 5 to 10% of the general population. OSAS is known to be associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality mainly due to cardiovascular diseases and traffic accidents. The burden of illness is high for the individual and society. There are 2 treatment options for OSAS, Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP and Mandibular Advancement Device therapy (MAD. CPAP is known to be an effective but very constraining treatment. Patients are usually poorly adherent. MAD is a more recent treatment easier to use and consequently better tolerated, but MAD can only be prescribed to patients with satisfactory oral hygiene. Oral health constitutes a real issue particularly among underprivileged groups in France. Through this link, the question of whether low socio-economic status constitutes a barrier to access to care for patients with OSAS is raised.In a multicenter prospective cohort of 2822 consecutive OSAS patients in whom MAD has been proposed as an alternative to CPAP between May 15, 2007 and December 1st, 2014, we identified the factors that lead to a patient diagnosed with OSAS to be treated by MAD instead of CPAP. A logistic regression was performed using a stepwise forward procedure. The main outcome of the study was that treatment by MAD was significantly associated with both educational attainment, as determined by the age at which the patient left full-time education, ≥18 years compared with <18 (adjusted odds ratio (aOR: 1.64, 95% CI 1.23 to 2.20, and the patient's occupational category. Executives and higher intellectual professions, intermediate professions, technicians, foremen and employees were significantly more likely to be treated by MAD than workers (aOR: 2.21, 95% CI 1.88 to 2.58; aOR: 1.74, 95% CI 1.15 to 2.63; aOR: 1.96, 95% CI 1.11 to 3.47, respectively.Overall, these results suggest that low socio-economic status constitutes a

  15. Socio-Economic Status: A Barrier to Access to Mandibular Advancement Device Therapy for Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome in France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Marion; Le Vaillant, Marc; Pelletier-Fleury, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a major public health problem which affects between 5 to 10% of the general population. OSAS is known to be associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality mainly due to cardiovascular diseases and traffic accidents. The burden of illness is high for the individual and society. There are 2 treatment options for OSAS, Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) and Mandibular Advancement Device therapy (MAD). CPAP is known to be an effective but very constraining treatment. Patients are usually poorly adherent. MAD is a more recent treatment easier to use and consequently better tolerated, but MAD can only be prescribed to patients with satisfactory oral hygiene. Oral health constitutes a real issue particularly among underprivileged groups in France. Through this link, the question of whether low socio-economic status constitutes a barrier to access to care for patients with OSAS is raised. Methods and Principal Findings In a multicenter prospective cohort of 2822 consecutive OSAS patients in whom MAD has been proposed as an alternative to CPAP between May 15, 2007 and December 1st, 2014, we identified the factors that lead to a patient diagnosed with OSAS to be treated by MAD instead of CPAP. A logistic regression was performed using a stepwise forward procedure. The main outcome of the study was that treatment by MAD was significantly associated with both educational attainment, as determined by the age at which the patient left full-time education, ≥18 years compared with foremen and employees were significantly more likely to be treated by MAD than workers (aOR: 2.21, 95% CI 1.88 to 2.58; aOR: 1.74, 95% CI 1.15 to 2.63; aOR: 1.96, 95% CI 1.11 to 3.47, respectively). Conclusions Overall, these results suggest that low socio-economic status constitutes a barrier to access to MAD for patients with OSAS in France. MAD use in patients with OSAS highlights inequalities in health care access. PMID:26402443

  16. Pulse Oximetry for the Detection of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: Can the Memory Capacity of Oxygen Saturation Influence Their Diagnostic Accuracy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Nigro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the diagnostic ability of WristOx 3100 using its three different recording settings in patients with suspected obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS. Methods. All participants (135 performed the oximetry (three oximeters WristOx 3100 and polysomnography (PSG simultaneously in the sleep laboratory. Both recordings were interpreted blindly. Each oximeter was set to one of three different recording settings (memory capabilities 0.25, 0.5, and 1 Hz. The software (nVision 5.1 calculated the adjusted O2 desaturation index-mean number of O2 desaturation per hour of analyzed recording ≥2, 3, and 4% (ADI2, 3, and 4. The ADI2, 3, and 4 cutoff points that better discriminated between subjects with or without OSAS arose from the receiver-operator characteristics (ROCs curve analysis. OSAS was defined as a respiratory disturbance index (RDI ≥ 5. Results. 101 patients were included (77 men, mean age 52, median RDI 22.6, median BMI 27.4 kg/m2. The area under the ROCs curves (AUC-ROCs of ADI2, 3, and 4 with different data storage rates were similar (AUC-ROCs with data storage rates of 0.25/0.5/1 Hz: ADI2: 0.958/0.948/0.965, ADI3: 0.961/0.95/0.966, and ADI4: 0.957/0.949/0.963, P NS. Conclusions. The ability of WristOx 3100 to detect patients with OSAS was not affected by the data storage rate of the oxygen saturation signal. Both memory capacity of 0.25, 0.5, or 1 Hz showed a similar performance for the diagnosis of OSAS.

  17. Perioperative management of children with obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwengel, Deborah A; Sterni, Laura M; Tunkel, David E; Heitmiller, Eugenie S

    2009-07-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) affects 1%-3% of children. Children with OSA can present for all types of surgical and diagnostic procedures requiring anesthesia, with adenotonsillectomy being the most common surgical treatment for OSA in the pediatric age group. Thus, it is imperative that the anesthesiologist be familiar with the potential anesthetic complications and immediate postoperative problems associated with OSA. The significant implications that the presence of OSA imposes on perioperative care have been recognized by national medical professional societies. The American Academy of Pediatrics published a clinical practice guideline for pediatric OSA in 2002, and cited an increased risk of anesthetic complications, though specific anesthetic issues were not addressed. In 2006, the American Society of Anesthesiologists published a practice guideline for perioperative management of patients with OSA that noted the pediatric-related risk factor of obesity, and the increased perioperative risk associated with adenotonsillectomy in children younger than 3 yr. However, management of OSA in children younger than 1 yr-of-age was excluded from the guideline, as were other issues related specifically to the pediatric patient. Hence, many questions remain regarding the perioperative care of the child with OSA. In this review, we examine the literature on pediatric OSA, discuss its pathophysiology, current treatment options, and recognized approaches to perioperative management of these young and potentially high-risk patients.

  18. Is There a Relationship Between Snoring Sound Intensity and Frequency and OSAS Severity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Mustafa; Yazıcı, Demet; Bayar Muluk, Nuray; Hancı, Deniz; Seren, Erdal; Cingi, Cemal

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between snoring sounds and severity of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). A total number of 103 snoring patients (60 males and 43 females) were evaluated by means of polysomnographic findings and snoring sound recordings. Snoring sound intensity was assessed using fast Fourier transform (FFT) method by measuring maximal frequency (Fmax) and average snoring sound intensity level (SSIL). Maximal frequency and SSIL are correlated with apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), REM AHI, and severity of the OSAS. So, as the severity of the OSAS increased, so did the Fmax and SSIL of the snoring recordings, meaning patients started snoring louder with more frequency. In older patients, in females, in severe OSAS group, and in patients with higher body mass index (BMI), AHI and AHI REM values and SSIL and Fmax values increased. As mean oxygen (O2) saturation and lowest O2 saturation decreased, SSIL and Fmax values increased. Maximal frequency and SSIL analysis of the snoring sound increased in severe OSAS patients. People should be aware of the importance of snoring sounds. In particular, patients with snoring sounds increasing in intensity and of higher frequency should discuss with their physicians the possibility of OSAS. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Pediatric sleep apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep apnea - pediatric; Apnea - pediatric sleep apnea syndrome; Sleep-disordered breathing - pediatric ... During sleep, all of the muscles in the body become more relaxed. This includes the muscles that help keep ...

  20. Leptin level correlates with obesity and health related quality of life in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Abhishek; Kant, Surya; Tiwari, Sunita; Agarwal, Sarita; Mahdi, Abbas Ali

    2015-04-01

    Leptin takes part in regulation of energy balance, neuronal functions, pain and mood. It may act as intermediary marker for various components of HRQOL in patients of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. To document the correlation among leptin levels, obesity and HRQoL in OSAS patients. A tertiary care hospital based cross-sectional study was done in 224 subjects aged 18-65 years, after taking informed consent. Subjects with previous history of smoking, Liver disease, COPD, CHD, T2 DM, asthma, cancer, end stage renal disease, heart failure, any endocrine disorder including Cushing syndrome, thyroid, on systemic steroid or any continuous medication for last 6 months, on dieting or suffering from any disability condition (other than obesity and OSAS) affecting their HRQoL were excluded from the study. All subjects underwent Polysomnography. Leptin assay was done by ELISA method. Hindi version of HRQoL tool SF-36 was used to evaluate HRQoL. SPSS 20 was used to analyse data. Three groups (AHI 15) were compared. Significant differences were observed in BMI, NC, WC, WHR and ESS. Differences were not significant in sleep architecture and Leptin level. SF-36 HRQoL, scores were observed decreased with increase in severity of disease. Leptin level was found significantly correlated with "Role limitations due to physical health problems", "Social functioning", Hypopnea and obesity indices. In these subjects Obesity indices are the most important correlates of Leptin level. Oxygen desaturation indices with exception of Hypopnea and HRQoL may not be exclusively correlated to leptin levels. Copyright © 2015 Tuberculosis Association of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. [Pediatric obstructive sleep apnea--an orthodontic perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzur-Gadassi, L; Hevroni, A; Gross, M; Davidovich, E

    2014-07-01

    Sleep disturbed breathing in children, is a general term describing a wide range of respiratory disorders that occur during sleep, ranging from snoring to Obstructive Sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). In recent years, the role of OSAS in a vast range of morbidities has been recognized, namely metabolic, neuro-cognitive and cardio-vascular disorders, thus emphasizing the importance of early detection. The recommended initial treatment for pediatric OSAS consists of surgical removal of adenoids and tonsils. However, today it is clear that there are other factors involved in the etiology of the syndrome. An association is believed to exist between the airway and craniofacial development and vice versa. The structure of the face and jaws has been shown to play an important role in the pathophysiology of OSAS, thus, the orthodontist plays a substantial role in the diagnosis and treatment of these children. Moreover, OSAS is believed to have a direct and indirect effect on oral health. Obstructive Sleep apnea syndrome is also common in adults, but is defined as a separate entity being different in terms of pathophysiology, clinical presentation and treatment. This paper reviews the pathophysiology, diagnosis, clinical implications and available treatment options for pediatric OSAS. Moreover, we will review the impact of the condition on the structures of the face, jaws, mouth and teeth and discuss the dentist's critical role in identifying and treating these problems.

  2. [The relationship of vasoactive intestinal peptide, other substances and the changes of nocturnal blood pressure in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, D; Kang, J; Hu, X

    2000-06-01

    To determine the difference of plasma VIP, NO and ET concentrations in awake and in different sleep periods and the relationship between VIP, NO and ET values and the changes in nocturnal blood pressure in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome(OSAS). Retaining manometric tube in radial artery and polysomnography(PSG) were done synchronously in 12 patients with OSAS whom was diagnosed by whole-night PSG. Blood specimens were collected before sleep, during NREM sleep and REM sleep and the next morning to detect the concentrations of VIP and ET by radioimmunoassay(RIA) and NO by nitrate reductase method. (1) Plasma NO values were significantly decreased in the morning than those before sleep (P = 0.014). There was no remarkable changes of VIP and ET values in different testing periods. (2) Plasma NO and ET values in the morning were correlated with hypoxia at night, but not with AHI (P > 0.05). (3) Plasma VIP values were significantly correlated with the baseline of SBP (r = 0.654, P NREM sleep and that of DBP (r = 0.613, P REM sleep. There was no significant correlation between BP and plasma NO and ET values in different times. Endothelial dysfunction associated with NO reduction might be present and VIP might be involved in regulating BP changes in patients with OSAS.

  3. [A comparative study on efficiency of different therapeutics methods used for obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chenyi; Cai, Xiaohong; Wen, Zhengwang; Liang, Dongshi; Hu, Qingqing; Ni, Liyan; Lin, Jian

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate effectiveness therapeutic regimens for obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) children at an acceptable cost. This study was performed at Yuying Children's Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University from Mar. 2008 to Dec. 2010. Prospective random number table method was used for the analysis; 60 children with mild OSAHS were divided into Mild OSAHS Montelukast Treatment (MM) group and Mild OSAHS Adenotonsillectomy Treatment (MAT) group. 32 children in MM group were treated with leukotriene receptor antagonists (LTRAs), while 28 children in MAT group were treated with adenotonsillectomy. Also, 58 children with moderate and severe OSAHS were divided into severe OSAHS Montelukast Treatment (SM) group and severe OSAHS Adenotonsillectomy Treatmen (SAT) group. Twenty-two children in SM group were treated with LTRAs, while 36 children in SAT group were treated with adenotonsillectomy. All selected children were evaluated by polysomnography (PSG) and Obstructive Sleep Apnea-18 (OSA-18) items before and after a six-month treatment. Both records were taken and analyzed, surgical complications and the reason for non-remission after operation were also analyzed. Two therapies were compared based on economic consideration and therapeutic effect. Result (1) PSG: A significant change of a significant change of Apnea Hypopnea Index (AHI) was observed in MM group after the treatment (before receiving the treatment 4.56 ± 1. 26, and after receiving the treatment 3. 48 ± 1. 52, t =3. 50, P oxygen desaturation Index (ODI) (MM group 2. 18 ± 2. 19, and MAT group 1. 80 ± 2. 34) and Lowest Oxygen satuation (LSaO2) (MM group 91. 66 ± 2. 34, and MAT group 92. 79 ± 2. 18), there was no significant difference in MM group and MAT group after the treatment (ODI, t =0. 65, and LSaO2 t = - 1. 93, P >0. 05). (2) OSA-18 scores: Significant differences were found in sleeping disorder (before 14. 81 ± 6. 28, and after 10. 56 ± 3. 57), the degree of familial stress (before

  4. Response to Statin Therapy in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Joyeux-Faure

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale. Accumulated evidence implicates sympathetic activation as inducing oxidative stress and systemic inflammation, which in turn lead to hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, and atherosclerosis in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. Statins through their pleiotropic properties may modify inflammation, lipid profile, and cardiovascular outcomes in OSA. Methods. This multicenter, randomized, double-blind study compared the effects of atorvastatin 40 mg/day versus placebo over 12 weeks on endothelial function (the primary endpoint measured by peripheral arterial tone (PAT. Secondary endpoints included office blood pressure (BP, early carotid atherosclerosis, arterial stiffness measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV, and metabolic parameters. Results. 51 severe OSA patients were randomized. Key demographics for the study population were age 54 ± 11 years, 21.6% female, and BMI 28.5 ± 4.5 kg/m2. In intention to treat analysis, mean PAT difference between atorvastatin and placebo groups was 0.008 (−0.29; 0.28, P=0.979. Total and LDL cholesterol significantly improved with atorvastatin. Systolic BP significantly decreased with atorvastatin (mean difference: −6.34 mmHg (−12.68; −0.01, P=0.050 whereas carotid atherosclerosis and PWV were unchanged compared to the placebo group. Conclusion. In OSA patients, 3 months of atorvastatin neither improved endothelial function nor reduced early signs of atherosclerosis although it lowered blood pressure and improved lipid profile. This trial is registered with NCT00669695.

  5. Consensus and evidence-based Indian initiative on obstructive sleep apnea guidelines 2014 (first edition)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Surendra K.; Katoch, Vishwa Mohan; Mohan, Alladi; Kadhiravan, T.; Elavarasi, A.; Ragesh, R.; Nischal, Neeraj; Sethi, Prayas; Behera, D.; Bhatia, Manvir; Ghoshal, A. G.; Gothi, Dipti; Joshi, Jyotsna; Kanwar, M. S.; Kharbanda, O. P.; Kumar, Suresh; Mohapatra, P. R.; Mallick, B. N.; Mehta, Ravindra; Prasad, Rajendra; Sharma, S. C.; Sikka, Kapil; Aggarwal, Sandeep; Shukla, Garima; Suri, J. C.; Vengamma, B.; Grover, Ashoo; Vijayan, V. K.; Ramakrishnan, N.; Gupta, Rasik

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) are subsets of sleep-disordered breathing. Awareness about OSA and its consequences among the general public as well as the majority of primary care physicians across India is poor. This necessitated the development of the Indian initiative on obstructive sleep apnea (INOSA) guidelines under the auspices of Department of Health Research, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India. OSA is the occurrence of an average five or more episodes of obstructive respiratory events per hour of sleep with either sleep-related symptoms or co-morbidities or ≥15 such episodes without any sleep-related symptoms or co-morbidities. OSAS is defined as OSA associated with daytime symptoms, most often excessive sleepiness. Patients undergoing routine health check-up with snoring, daytime sleepiness, obesity, hypertension, motor vehicular accidents, and high-risk cases should undergo a comprehensive sleep evaluation. Medical examiners evaluating drivers, air pilots, railway drivers, and heavy machinery workers should be educated about OSA and should comprehensively evaluate applicants for OSA. Those suspected to have OSA on comprehensive sleep evaluation should be referred for a sleep study. Supervised overnight polysomnography is the “gold standard” for evaluation of OSA. Positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy is the mainstay of treatment of OSA. Oral appliances (OA) are indicated for use in patients with mild to moderate OSA who prefer OA to PAP, or who do not respond to PAP or who fail treatment attempts with PAP or behavioral measures. Surgical treatment is recommended in patients who have failed or are intolerant to PAP therapy. PMID:26180408

  6. Consensus and evidence-based Indian initiative on obstructive sleep apnea guidelines 2014 (first edition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surendra K Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS are subsets of sleep-disordered breathing. Awareness about OSA and its consequences among the general public as well as the majority of primary care physicians across India is poor. This necessitated the development of the Indian initiative on obstructive sleep apnea (INOSA guidelines under the auspices of Department of Health Research, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India. OSA is the occurrence of an average five or more episodes of obstructive respiratory events per hour of sleep with either sleep-related symptoms or co-morbidities or ≥15 such episodes without any sleep-related symptoms or co-morbidities. OSAS is defined as OSA associated with daytime symptoms, most often excessive sleepiness. Patients undergoing routine health check-up with snoring, daytime sleepiness, obesity, hypertension, motor vehicular accidents, and high-risk cases should undergo a comprehensive sleep evaluation. Medical examiners evaluating drivers, air pilots, railway drivers, and heavy machinery workers should be educated about OSA and should comprehensively evaluate applicants for OSA. Those suspected to have OSA on comprehensive sleep evaluation should be referred for a sleep study. Supervised overnight polysomnography is the "gold standard" for evaluation of OSA. Positive airway pressure (PAP therapy is the mainstay of treatment of OSA. Oral appliances (OA are indicated for use in patients with mild to moderate OSA who prefer OA to PAP, or who do not respond to PAP or who fail treatment attempts with PAP or behavioral measures. Surgical treatment is recommended in patients who have failed or are intolerant to PAP therapy.

  7. Consensus and evidence-based Indian initiative on obstructive sleep apnea guidelines 2014 (first edition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Surendra K; Katoch, Vishwa Mohan; Mohan, Alladi; Kadhiravan, T; Elavarasi, A; Ragesh, R; Nischal, Neeraj; Sethi, Prayas; Behera, D; Bhatia, Manvir; Ghoshal, A G; Gothi, Dipti; Joshi, Jyotsna; Kanwar, M S; Kharbanda, O P; Kumar, Suresh; Mohapatra, P R; Mallick, B N; Mehta, Ravindra; Prasad, Rajendra; Sharma, S C; Sikka, Kapil; Aggarwal, Sandeep; Shukla, Garima; Suri, J C; Vengamma, B; Grover, Ashoo; Vijayan, V K; Ramakrishnan, N; Gupta, Rasik

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) are subsets of sleep-disordered breathing. Awareness about OSA and its consequences among the general public as well as the majority of primary care physicians across India is poor. This necessitated the development of the Indian initiative on obstructive sleep apnea (INOSA) guidelines under the auspices of Department of Health Research, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India. OSA is the occurrence of an average five or more episodes of obstructive respiratory events per hour of sleep with either sleep-related symptoms or co-morbidities or ≥15 such episodes without any sleep-related symptoms or co-morbidities. OSAS is defined as OSA associated with daytime symptoms, most often excessive sleepiness. Patients undergoing routine health check-up with snoring, daytime sleepiness, obesity, hypertension, motor vehicular accidents, and high-risk cases should undergo a comprehensive sleep evaluation. Medical examiners evaluating drivers, air pilots, railway drivers, and heavy machinery workers should be educated about OSA and should comprehensively evaluate applicants for OSA. Those suspected to have OSA on comprehensive sleep evaluation should be referred for a sleep study. Supervised overnight polysomnography is the "gold standard" for evaluation of OSA. Positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy is the mainstay of treatment of OSA. Oral appliances (OA) are indicated for use in patients with mild to moderate OSA who prefer OA to PAP, or who do not respond to PAP or who fail treatment attempts with PAP or behavioral measures. Surgical treatment is recommended in patients who have failed or are intolerant to PAP therapy.

  8. Ictal central apnea and bradycardia in temporal lobe epilepsy complicated by obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Nishimura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a 12-year-old boy who developed temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE with daily complex partial seizures (CPS and monthly generalized seizures. Moreover, he frequently snored while asleep since early childhood. Polysomnography (PSG revealed severe obstructive sleep apnea with apnea–hypopnea index (AHI of 37.8/h. Video-PSG with simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG recording captured two ictal apneic episodes during sleep, without any motor manifestations. The onset of rhythmic theta activity in the midtemporal area on EEG was preceded by the onset of apnea by several seconds and disappeared soon after cessation of central apnea. One episode was accompanied by ictal bradycardia of <48 beats/min which persisted for 50 s beyond the end of epileptic activity. After treatment with carbamazepine and tonsillectomy/adenoidectomy, the seizures were well controlled and AHI decreased to 2.5/h. Paroxysmal discharges also disappeared during this time. Uncontrolled TLE complicated by sleep apnea should be evaluated for the presence of ictal central apnea/bradycardia.

  9. Effects of heated humidification and topical steroids on compliance, nasal symptoms, and quality of life in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome using nasal continuous positive airway pressure.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Silke

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Nasal side effects are common in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) starting on nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. We tested the hypothesis that heated humidification or nasal topical steroids improve compliance, nasal side effects and quality of life in this patient group. METHODS: 125 patients with the established diagnosis of OSAS (apnea\\/hypopnea index > or = 10\\/h), who tolerated CPAP via a nasal mask, and who had a successful CPAP titration were randomized to 4 weeks of dry CPAP, humidified CPAP or CPAP with additional topical nasal steroid application (fluticasone, GlaxoWellcome). Groups were similar in all demographic variables and in frequency of nasal symptoms at baseline. Outcome measures were objective compliance, quality of life (short form 36), subjective sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale score) and nasal symptoms such as runny, dry or blocked nose, sneezing and headaches; all variables assessed using a validated questionnaire and by direct interview. RESULTS: There was no difference in compliance between groups after 4 weeks (dry: 5.21 +\\/- 1.66 h\\/night, fluticasone: 5.66 +\\/- 1.68, humidifier: 5.21 +\\/- 1.84; p = 0.444). Quality of life and subjective sleepiness improved in all groups, but there were no differences in the extent of improvement. Nasal Symptoms were less frequently reported in the humidifier group (28%) than in the remaining groups (dry: 70%, fluticasone: 53%, p = 0.002). However, the addition of fluticasone resulted in increased frequency of sneezing. CONCLUSION: The addition of a humidifier, but not nasal steroids decreases the frequency of nasal symptoms in unselected OSAS patients initiating CPAP therapy; however compliance and quality of life remain unaltered.

  10. Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Oral Surgeries Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Injury / Trauma Surgery Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are ...

  11. Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Other Oral Surgeries Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Injury / Trauma Surgery Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons ...

  12. Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The National Sleep Foundation estimates that 18 million adults have obstructive sleep apnea and it is likely ... Maxillofacial Surgeon (OMS). An estimated 18-20 million adults in the US suffer from OSA. What Is ...

  13. The OXIMAPA Study: Hypertension Control by ABPM and Association with Sleep Apnea Syndrome by Pulse Oximetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maricoto, Tiago; Silva, Eurico Alves Rodrigues; Damião, Pedro; Bastos, José Mesquita

    2017-02-27

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring by automatic device is the best blood pressure evaluation method and sleep apnea syndrome is the leading cause of poor control. Oximetry allows screening these individuals but its usefulness has been poorly explored in Primary Health Care. The aim was to evaluate the blood pressure control at the office and with ambulatory blood pressure monitoring by automatic device and to relate it to sleep apnea syndrome. We selected a sample of 50 participants, representative of 3036 hypertensive patients. The variables were: blood pressure value at the office and blood pressure with ambulatory blood pressure monitoring by automatic device; presence of criteria of sleep apnea syndrome in oximetry. The prevalence of uncontrolled blood pressure was 56% on office evaluation and 68% on ambulatory blood pressure monitoring by automatic device. It was found: 36% of daytime hypertension, 52% nocturnal hypertension, 40% non-dipper profile, 16% of white coat hypertension and 28% masked hypertension. The prevalence of sleep apnea syndrome was 16%. Blood pressure in ambulatory blood pressure monitoring by automatic device and blood pressure in office showed no statistically significant association (p = 0.761). We found a statistically significant association between sleep apnea syndrome and daytime hypertension (p = 0.019) and non-dipper profile (p = 0.005). Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring by automatic device detected more 12% of uncontrolled hypertension than office blood pressure. Sleep apnea syndrome is strongly associated with uncontrolled hypertension and oximetry may be a good screening method, but should be studied further.

  14. Prevalence of sleep apnea syndrome in hemodialyzed patients with end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miśkowiec, I; Klawe, J J; Tafil-Klawe, M; Jeske, K; Laudencka, A; Bielicka, B; Manitius, J; Zlomańczuk, P

    2006-09-01

    The majority of hemodialyzed patients suffer from sleep disturbances. In the present study the prevalence of sleep apnea syndrome in hemodialyzed patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD-patients) was investigated by the survey, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and polysomnography (PSG). Sixty-one patients: 24 women and 37 men were involved in the study. All subjects participated in the first part of the study consisting of the survey and ESS. The second and third parts consisted of nighttime PSG, performed the night after hemodialysis (17 patients) and between hemodialyses (11 patients). Eleven out of the 61 patients had the symptoms of sleep apnea and heavy daily sleepiness. Eleven subjects were involved in the double PSG study: after and between hemodialyses. Obstructive sleep apnea was found in 7 of those patients during both nights analyzed. Our results confirm the occurrence of sleep disorders in ESRD-patients. Hemodialysis does not change the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea in chronic renal disease.

  15. Sleep EEG Characteristics in Young and Elderly Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu Jin; Kim, Jong Won; Lee, Yu-Jin G; Jeong, Do-Un

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, it was hypothesized that the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) characteristics of young (55 yrs) OSAS patients would differ. We analyzed 76 sleep EEG recordings from OSAS patients (young group: n=40, mean age: 24.3±4.9 yrs; elderly group: n=36, mean age: 59.1±4.9 yrs), which were obtained during nocturnal polysomnography. The recordings were assessed via spectral analysis in the delta (0.5-4.5 Hz), theta (4.5-8 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz), beta (12-32 Hz), slow sigma (11-13 Hz), and fast sigma (13-17 Hz) frequency bands. Apnea Hypopnea Index (AHI) and sleep efficiency (%) did not differ significantly between the two groups (19.8±14.4 vs. 25.9±16.0, p=0.085; 84.4±12.6 vs. 80.9±11.0, p=0.198, respectively). After adjusting for gender, the slow/fast sigma ratio was not significantly correlated with AHI in the elderly group (r=-0.047, p=0.790) but AHI was inversely correlated with the slow/fast sigma ratio in the young group (r=-0.423, p=0.007). A multiple linear regression analysis revealed that a higher AHI was related with a lower slow/fast sigma ratio in the young group (β=-0.392, p=0.028) but not the elderly. In the present study, sleep EEG activity differed between young and elderly OSAS patients. The slow/fast sigma ratio was associated with OSAS severity only in young patients, suggesting that young OSAS patients may have a distinctive brain plasticity compared with elderly patients.

  16. Scientific research in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: bibliometric analysis in SCOPUS, 1991-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huamaní, Charles; Rey de Castro, Jorge; González-Alcaide, Gregorio; Polesel, Daniel Ninello; Tufik, Sergio; Andersen, Monica Levy

    2015-03-01

    The research in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may be beneficial from the collaboration between countries and researchers. In this study, we aimed to analyze the scientific research on OSA from 1991 to 2012 and to evaluate the collaboration networks between countries. We conducted a bibliometric study in the SCOPUS database. The systematic search was limited to "articles" published from 1991 to 2012. Articles are results of original research; we evaluated the following criteria: number of countries represented, number of authors, number of citations, and journal names. We determined which countries were the most productive (more articles published) and the number of collaborations between these countries. The probability of citation was evaluated using adjusted odds ratios in a logistic regression analysis. We found a total of 6,896 OSA-related articles that had been published in 1,422 journals, 50 % of these articles were concentrated in 41 journals. Of the 74 different countries associated with these articles, the USA had the highest involvement with 23.8 % of all articles published. The probability of citation increased by 1.23 times for each additional author, and by 2.23 times for each additional country represented; these findings were independent of time since publication, journal, or the country of the author. Scientific production on OSA is increasing with limited international collaboration. The country with the greatest production in this period (1991-2012) was the USA, which concentrated the international collaboration network on OSA. We recommended that articles should be produced with international collaboration to improve the quantity of scientific publications and their chances of publication in high impact journals.

  17. Obstructive sleep apnea and inflammation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNicholas, Walter T

    2012-02-01

    The pathogenesis of cardiovascular complications in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is not fully understood but is likely multifactorial in origin. Inflammatory processes play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, and circulating levels of several markers of inflammation have been associated with future cardiovascular risk. These include cell adhesion molecules such as intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and selectins, cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 6, chemokines such as interleukin 8, and C-reactive protein. There is also increasing evidence that inflammatory processes play an important role in the cardiovascular pathophysiology of OSAS and many of the inflammatory markers associated with cardiovascular risk have been reported as elevated in patients with OSAS. Furthermore, animal and cell culture studies have demonstrated preferential activation of inflammatory pathways by intermittent hypoxia, which is an integral feature of OSAS. The precise role of inflammation in the development of cardiovascular disease in OSAS requires further study, particularly the relationship with oxidative stress, metabolic dysfunction, and obesity.

  18. Effects of Heated Humidification and Topical Steroids on Compliance, Nasal Symptoms, and Quality of Life in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome Using Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Silke; Doherty, Liam S.; Nolan, Geraldine M.; McNicholas, Walter T.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Nasal side effects are common in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) starting on nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. We tested the hypothesis that heated humidification or nasal topical steroids improve compliance, nasal side effects and quality of life in this patient group. Methods: 125 patients with the established diagnosis of OSAS (apnea/hypopnea index ≥ 10/h), who tolerated CPAP via a nasal mask, and who had a successful CPAP titration were randomized to 4 weeks of dry CPAP, humidified CPAP or CPAP with additional topical nasal steroid application (fluticasone, GlaxoWellcome). Groups were similar in all demographic variables and in frequency of nasal symptoms at baseline. Outcome measures were objective compliance, quality of life (short form 36), subjective sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale score) and nasal symptoms such as runny, dry or blocked nose, sneezing and headaches; all variables assessed using a validated questionnaire and by direct interview. Results: There was no difference in compliance between groups after 4 weeks (dry: 5.21 ± 1.66 h/night, fluticasone: 5.66 ± 1.68, humidifier: 5.21 ± 1.84; p = 0.444). Quality of life and subjective sleepiness improved in all groups, but there were no differences in the extent of improvement. Nasal Symptoms were less frequently reported in the humidifier group (28%) than in the remaining groups (dry: 70%, fluticasone: 53%, p = 0.002). However, the addition of fluticasone resulted in increased frequency of sneezing. Conclusion: The addition of a humidifier, but not nasal steroids decreases the frequency of nasal symptoms in unselected OSAS patients initiating CPAP therapy; however compliance and quality of life remain unaltered. Citation: Ryan S; Doherty LS; Nolan GM; McNicholas WT. Effects of heated humidification and topical steroids on compliance, nasal symptoms, and quality of life in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome using nasal

  19. Sleep Apnea in Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Doumit, Jimmy; Prasad, Bharati

    2016-01-01

    IN BRIEF Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) alters glucose metabolism, promotes insulin resistance, and is associated with development of type 2 diabetes. Obesity is a key moderator of the effect of OSA on type 2 diabetes. However, chronic exposure to intermittent hypoxia and other pathophysiological effects of OSA affect glucose metabolism directly, and treatment of OSA can improve glucose homeostasis.

  20. Mean Platelet Volume, Vitamin D and C Reactive Protein Levels in Normal Weight Children with Primary Snoring and Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zicari, Anna Maria; Occasi, Francesca; Di Mauro, Federica; Lollobrigida, Valeria; Di Fraia, Marco; Savastano, Vincenzo; Loffredo, Lorenzo; Nicita, Francesco; Spalice, Alberto; Duse, Marzia

    2016-01-01

    Studies on Mean Platelet Volume (MPV) in children with Sleep Disordered Breathing (SDB) report conflicting results and the hypothesis of an intermittent hypoxemia leading to a systemic inflammation is reaching consensus. Vitamin D exerts anti-inflammatory properties and its deficiency has been supposed to play a role in sleep disorders. Emerging interest is rising about Primary Snoring (PS) since it is reasonable that also undetectable alteration of hypoxia might predispose to an increased production of inflammatory mediators. In this perspective, in a group of children affected by SDB, our aim was to investigate MPV, vitamin D and C Reactive Protein (CRP) levels, which had been previously evaluated separately in different studies focused only on Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS). We enrolled 137 children: 70 healthy controls (HC), 67 affected by SDB undergoing a polysomnographic evaluation, 22 with a diagnosis of PS and 45 with a diagnosis of OSAS. All patients underwent routine biochemical evaluations including blood cell counts, CRP and vitamin D. Children affected by SDB had a mean age of 8.49±2.19 and were prevalently males (23 females, 34%; 44 males, 66%). MPV levels were higher in OSAS and PS when compared to HC; platelet count (PLT) and CRP levels were higher while Vitamin D levels were lower in children with SDB when compared to HC. MPV levels were correlated with PLT (r = -0.54; pchildren with PS as well as in children with OSAS, and supports the underlying inflammation, hence, highlighting the importance of an early diagnosis of this previously considered benign form of SDB.

  1. Utility of ApneaLinkTM for the diagnosis of sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome Utilidad del ApneaLinkT para el diagnóstico del síndrome apnea-hipopnea del sueño

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Nigro

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Portable sleep studies may play an important role to take decisions on patients referred for suspicion of Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome (SAHS. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of automated analysis of ApneaLinkT in patients with suspicion of SAHS. All participants (75 performed the ApneaLink and polysomnography (PSG simultaneously in the sleep laboratory. The two recordings were interpreted blindly. The ApneaLink software calculated: (1 risk indicator (RI-a combination of apnea/hypopnea index (AHI plus inspiratory flow limitation events and (2 the AHI. ApneaLinkT and SAHS were defined in three ways: AHI or respiratory disturbance index (RDI = 5, 10 and 15 respectively. ROC curves analysis was performed. The sensitivity (S, specificity (E and positive and negative likelihood ratio (LR+, LR- for the different thresholds for RI or AHI were calculated; 66 patients were included (47 men, mean age 51, median RDI 10.6, mean BMI 29.3 kg/m². The best cut off points of RI were: SAHS = RDI = 5: RI > 9 (S 80%, E 100%, LR- 0.20; SAHS = RDI = 10: RI > 13 (S 92%, E 93%, LR+ 13.7 LR- 0.089; SAHS = RDI = 15 =: RI > 16 (S 93.5%, E 91%, LR+ 10.9, LR- 0.071. The AHI had a similar diagnostic accuracy to RI for the different definitions of SAHS. The RI and AHI obtained from automated analysis of ApneaLinkT were highly sensitive and specific to diagnose moderate to severe SAHS.Los equipos portátiles para estudios del sueño pueden tener un rol importante para tomar decisiones en pacientes con sospecha de Síndrome Apneas-Hipopneas del Sueño (SAHS. El objetivo del estudio fue evaluar la exactitud diagnóstica del análisis automático del ApneaLinkT en pacientes con sospecha de SAHS. Setenta y cinco sujetos realizaron simultáneamente el ApneaLinkT y una polisomnografía (PSG en el laboratorio de sueño. Los dos registros fueron interpretados en forma ciega. Un programa calculó: (1 el índice apnea/hipopnea (IAH, (2 el indicador de

  2. Insomnia as an expression of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome – the effect of treatment with nocturnal ventilatory support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Saldanha Mendes

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS and insomnia often coexist, and it is estimated that nearly half of those who suffer from the former report symptoms of the latter. The fact that these patients have no other causes of insomnia indicates that it is a sign of OSAS. Objective: The aim of the study is to evaluate the effectiveness of nocturnal ventilatory support (NVS in the treatment of insomnia secondary to OSAS. Materials and methods: In order to conduct the retrospective study, the authors reviewed the medical records of patients with insomnia and OSAS that had received NVS. Patients with psychiatric disorders, sleep movement disorders, psycho-physiological insomnia, circadian rhythm sleep disorders, inadequate sleep hygiene, use and abuse of hypnotic agents, stimulants, antidepressants, anxiolytics and alcohol, were excluded. For the selected patients, the effects of NVS in terms of clinical signs and symptoms of insomnia, apnea–hypopnea index (AHI, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS score, and number of sleep hours were analyzed, before and after treatment with NVS. Results: After reviewing 1241 medical records, 56 patients were selected, with a mean age of 60.9 ± 10.0 years. Twenty-two (39.3% suffered from intermediate insomnia, 19 (33.9% had initial insomnia, eight (14.3% had the mixed type, and seven patients (12.5% had terminal insomnia. The majority of patients (n = 48; 85.7% were treated with auto-titrating continuous positive airway pressure (APAP. Forty-four patients (78.6% overcame insomnia; insomnia symptoms persisted in nine (16.1%, and three (5.4% patients abandoned during the medical follow-up. There was an association between the type of insomnia and its resolution and, in percentage terms patients with the mixed type did not manage to overcome insomnia symptoms (75%.There was a statistically significant difference between patients that overcame insomnia and those who did not in terms of the

  3. Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Download Download the ebook for further information Obstructive sleep ... high blood pressure, heart disease and decreased libido. In addition, OSA causes daytime ...

  4. Inflammation and Growth in Young Children with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome before and after Adenotonsillectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuval Nachalon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is associated with growth impairment that usually improves following effective treatment. In this study we investigated the mechanisms underlying the growth processes in young children diagnosed with OSA, before and after adenotonsillectomy (T&A. Methods. Young children (6–36 months old were enrolled and evaluated before and several months after T&A surgery for height, weight, circulating high sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP, and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1 levels. Caloric intake was assessed by a validated Short Food Frequency Questionnaire (SFFQ. Results. Following T&A, children added 4.81 cm and 1.88 kg to their height and weight, respectively (P<0.001 for both and had a significant increase in BMI Z score (P=0.002. Increased caloric intake of 377 kcal/day was noted (P<0.001, with increased protein and decreased fat intake. The decrease in CRP levels correlated with the increase in body weight in boys (P<0.05, adjusted for caloric intake. Conclusions. Adenotonsillectomy results in enhanced somatic growth in young children that correlates with a decrease in systemic inflammation and caloric intake increment. Our findings imply that systemic inflammation may have an important role in this OSA-related morbidity.

  5. Sleep position trainer versus tennis ball technique in positional obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijsvogel, Michiel M.; Ubbink, Rinse; Dekker, Janita; Mos-Oppersma, Eline; de Jongh, Franciscus H.C.; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria; Brusse-Keizer, Marjolein G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective Positional therapy (PT) is an effective therapy in positional obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (POSAS) when used, but the compliance of PT is low. The objective of this study was to investigate whether a new kind of PT is effective and can improve compliance. Methods 29 patients were

  6. Sleep position trainer versus tennis ball technique in positional obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijsvogel, Michiel M.; Ubbink, Rinse; Dekker, Janita; Oppersma, Eline; de Jongh, Frans H.; van der Palen, Job; Brusse-Keizer, Marjolein G.

    2015-01-01

    Positional therapy (PT) is an effective therapy in positional obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (POSAS) when used, but the compliance of PT is low. The objective of this study was to investigate whether a new kind of PT is effective and can improve compliance. 29 patients were treated with the Sleep

  7. Myosin heavy chain proteins are responsible for the development of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šedý, Jiří; Horká, E.; Pavlíková, G.; Bulík, O.; Foltán, R.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 6 (2009), s. 1014-1016 ISSN 0306-9877 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : obstructive sleep apnea syndrome * MHC Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.393, year: 2009

  8. Oral-appliance therapy obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome : a clinical study on therapeutic outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekema, Aarnoud

    2007-01-01

    The obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) is a common sleep-related breathing disorder characterized by disruptive snoring and repetitive upper airway obstructions. Its neurobehavioral consequences include excessive sleepiness, an increased risk of accidents, and an impaired quality of

  9. Risk factors associated with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Páez-Moya

    2017-08-01

    Knowing the risk factors associated to sleep disorders allows to develop therapeutic measures focused on their origin. Modifiable factors such as overweight/obesity, smoking and consumption of central nervous system depressants are especially important since prevention of these conditions may have an impact on the prevention of the onset of the obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome.

  10. [Obesity hypoventilation syndrome and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: is there an association?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douik El Gharbi, Leila; Ismail, Imene; Dhahri, Besma; Ben Ammar, Jihene; Baccar, Mohamed Ali; Azzabi, Saloua; Aouina, Hichem; Zouari, Bechir; Bouacha, Hend

    2011-01-01

    Severe obesity sometimes leads to a chronic alveolar hypoventilation: obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS), (Pao245mmHG and body mass index (BMI)>30Kg/m2). The association with an OSAS is frequent. To assess predicting factors that lead to hypoventilation in a population of obese patients with SAS and to deduct the type of association between OHS and SAS. We have study during 4 years, at pneumology service of Charles Nicolle hospital, 62 obese patients (BMI>30Kg /m2), 41men and 21 women and presenting an OSAS. We excluded those carriers of a bronchial obstruction (VEMS/CV 40) in 77.8% of patients of the G1 with significant difference with the G2 (P=0.004). We noted that there is a positive interrelationship between BMI and Paco2. We identified severe gazométrique perturbation in G1 (Pao2 medium = 61± 9 mmHg,Paco2 medium=50 ± 7 mmHg), in the G2 we noted a moderate hypoxemia. Patients of the group1 make of the minimal desaturation of 63 ± 17% and a Sao2 average of 81 ± 20% what is meaningfully more important than in the G2. The alveolar hypoventilation in SAS seems to be in correlation with the degree of obesity. The hypercapnie in the OHS is in relation neither with the SAOS nor with its severity. The OHSSAS association is usual but not synonym; the OHS is an autonomous disease.

  11. Developments in diagnosis and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richard, W.

    2012-01-01

    Wietske Richard beschrijft de ontwikkelingen in diagnose en behandeling van het obstructief slaapapneu-syndroom (OSAS). Richard ging na of verbeteringen in de technologie van beademingsmachines hebben geleid tot een beter gebruik. Verder onderzocht ze de positietherapie waarbij de apneu-patiënt

  12. Pierre Robin sequence and obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens Reimão

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available The case of a 12-year-old female patient with Pierre Robin sequence is reported, in which reduction of the pharyngeal airway leads to obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS and excessive daytime sleepiness. Radiological evaluation, computerized tomography and magnetic resonance image showed bilateral temporomandibular ankylosis. Cephalometric data evidenced marked reduction of the posterior airway space. Three all-night polysomnographic evaluations detected severe OSAS with decrease in oxygen saturation. The Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT perfomed on two separate days objectively quantified the excessive daytime sleepiness with short sleep latencies; stage REM was not present. Polysomnography, MSLT and thorough radiologic studies, in this case, made it possible to determine the severity of OSAS, the site of obstruction, and the associated malformations.

  13. Serum YKL-40 level is correlated with apnea hypopnea index in patients with obstructive sleep apnea sindrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, L C; Tülübaş, F; Alp, R; Kaplan, G; Yildiz, Z D; Gürel, A

    2017-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) has been associated with elevated biochemical markers of inflammation. Although the exact mechanism is unknown, both sleep deprivation and hypoxemia are believed to be important causative factors. YKL-40, also known as chitinase-like protein, has been shown to be related to various inflammatory conditions including atherosclerosis, diabetes, cancer, and asthma. The present study aimed to evaluate the relationship between YKL-40 levels and the Apnea Hypopnea Index (AHI) in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. The study was conducted at the Sleep Unit of the Namik Kemal University Research Center. From January 2013 to December 2013, 120 patients diagnosed with OSAS by polysomnography and 40 subjects without OSAS were recruited. Patients in both groups were matched by age, sex, and body mass index (BMI). They were further divided into groups of mild, moderate and severe OSAS based on their AHI value. Serum YKL-40 concentrations were measured by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). OSAS patients showed significantly elevated YKL-40 levels compared to the control group; 102,05 (23.14) pg/ml in the control group vs. 144.81 (65.53) pg/ml in the OSAS group. A Spearman correlation analysis showed that serum YKL-40 levels were significantly and positively correlated with AHI (r = 0.434, p < 0.001) and oxygen desaturation index (r = 0.374, p < 0.001). The study demonstrated that high serum YKL-40 levels correlated with the severity of OSAS and might serve as a nonspecific biomarker for prediction and progression of the disease.

  14. Síndrome da apneia obstrutiva do sono em motoristas de caminhão Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in truck drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Castro Lemos

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estimar a prevalência da síndrome da apneia obstrutiva do sono (SAOS e verificar os fatores associados à chance de desenvolver SAOS em motoristas de caminhão. MÉTODOS: A população desse estudo constituiu-se de motoristas de caminhão de duas filiais de uma empresa transportadora (n = 209, com idade média de 38,8 anos, sendo 98,5% do sexo masculino. O índice de massa corpórea médio foi de 26,5 ± 4,4 kg/m². Os participantes responderam questionários sobre dados sociodemográficos, atividade física e SAOS. A prevalência de SAOS foi estimada por meio do Questionário de Berlim e sua associação com os fatores estudados foi verificada pela análise de regressão univariada e multivariada. RESULTADOS: A prevalência de SAOS na população foi de 11,5%. Dos 209 motoristas, 72 (34,5% referiram dormir ao volante enquanto dirigiam ao menos uma vez e 81 (38,7% referiram roncar durante o sono. As variáveis estatisticamente significativas associadas à SAOS foram vínculo empregatício informal (OR = 0,27; p = 0,01, índice de massa corpórea > 25 kg/m² (OR = 13,64; p = 0,01 e qualidade do sono ruim (OR = 3,00; p = 0,02. CONCLUSÕES: Apesar de a prevalência de SAOS ter sido inferior à observada em outros estudos com motoristas, essa prevalência é superior à da população em geral. Os resultados ainda sugerem que as características do trabalho, entre as quais o vínculo de trabalho, estão associadas à SAOS. Esses dados evidenciam a relevância de se levar em consideração a atividade de trabalho em estudos que investiguem fatores associados à SAOS.OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS, as well as to identify factors associated with a greater risk of developing OSAS, among truck drivers. METHODS: The study population comprised 209 truck drivers (mean age, 38.8 years; 98.5% males at two branches of a transportation company. The mean body mass index was 26.5 ± 4.4 kg/m². The

  15. Evaluation of obstructive sleep apnea symptoms in pregnant women with chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaduman, Mevlüt; Sarı, Oktay; Aydoğan, Umit; Akpak, Yaşam Kemal; Semiz, Altuğ; Yılanlıoğlu, Necip Cihangir; Keskin, Uğur

    2016-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a disease which is estimated to be undiagnosed to a large extent. Hence, the prevalence of OSAS in pregnant women is unknown. We aimed to evaluate the symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea in pregnant women with chronic diseases. In the study, 97 pregnant women with chronic diseases and 160 healthy pregnant women were included. A form questioning socio-demographic characteristics and pregnancy characteristics, Epworth scale and the Berlin questionnaire to evaluate the risk of OSAS were applied to participants. It has been determined that 10-12.5% of healthy pregnant women, 34-45.4% of pregnants with chronic diseases and 20.6-23.3% of all pregnant women had a high risk of OSAS, the pregnants with chronic disease compared to healthy pregnant women had statistically significant higher risk of OSAS. The risk of OSAS was found to be significantly higher especially in pregnant women with hypertension and diabetes. OSAS can lead to the adverse consequences in pregnancy, should be questioned for all pregnants especially those with chronic diseases. Pregnant women with OSAS should be monitored more carefully in terms of diabetes and hypertension in antenatal care.

  16. Obstructive sleep apnea and P300 evoked auditory potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Carlos Henrique; Castro Júnior, Ney de; Costa Filho, Orozimbo Alves; Souza Neto, Osmar Mesquita de

    2011-01-01

    The obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) reduces attention span, memory and concentration capacities, all associated with cognition. The analysis of the auditory P300 parameters could help infer cognitive dysfunction. To compare the data from polysomnography and the auditory P300 in adults, primary snorers with OSAS patients. Prospective study with primary snorers (N=12) and in OSAS patients (N=54), submitted to polysomnography, defined by the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). The polysomnography and P300 variables were compared by the t-Student test, the Exact Fisher's Test, logistic regression and analysis of correlation with a significance level of 5%. AIH had an inverse correlation with the oximetry in both groups. The P300 prevalence was lower in the OSAS group (Fisher's Exact Test, p=0.027). Patient age did not influence the P300 prevalence (regression analysis; p=0.232). The P300 amplitude was lower in the OSAS group (t-Student test; p=0.003) and the P300 latency was similar in both groups (t-Student test; p=0.89). The reduction in the P300 amplitude in patients with OSAS suggests cognitive dysfunction induced by a reduction in auditory memory.

  17. [Relationship between sleep architecture and blood pressure dynamic change in patients with sleep apnea syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y Q; Long, Q; Wang, C; Shuai, X J; Chen, B; Kong, J; Wei, Y L

    2016-07-26

    To investigate sleep architecture and blood pressure dynamic change in patients with Sleep apnea syndrome by electrocardiogram-based cardiopulmonary coupling analysis system. Seventy-nine sleep disorder participants (PSQI≥8) were enrolled. Electrocardiogram-based cardiopulmonary coupling analysis device and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring were synchronously used to evaluate sleep architecture and blood pressure circadian rhythm. The patients were divided into SAS group (47 participants) and non-SAS group (32 participants) according to the Apnea Hypopnea Index (AHI) that calculated by CPC device. The data of sleep architecture and blood pressure variability were compared between two groups. Compared with non-SAS group, SAS group have less proportion of deep sleep, more proportion of light sleep, higher mean blood pressure in 24 hours and daytime, lower nocturnal blood pressure dipping, faster mean heart rate in night time (Pdream time (-0.6≤rApnea Syndrome. The severity of Sleep Apnea Syndrome has a positive correlation with the severity of abnormal sleep architecture and the degree of blood pressure elevation.

  18. Oral appliances and maxillomandibular advancement surgery : An alternative treatment protocol for the obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekema, A; de Lange, J; Stegenga, B; de Bont, LGM

    Purpose: The present study comprises a retrospective evaluation of the potential application of mandibular repositioning appliance (MRA) therapy preceding maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) surgery in the treatment of the Obstructive Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome (OSAHS). Our initial experiences

  19. Implant-retained oral appliances : a novel treatment for edentulous patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekema, Aarnoud; de Vries, Frist; Heydenrijk, Kees; Stegenga, Boudewijn

    Objectives: Mandibular repositioning appliances (MRAs) are a viable treatment alternative in patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). Because these appliances require retention in the patient's dentition, edentelous patients generally do not qualify for this treatment. This

  20. EFFECT OF OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA SYNDROME ON ARTERIAL STIFFNESS IN PATIENTS AT HIGH CARDIOVASCULAR RISK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. E. Oleynikov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess the impact of metabolic abnormalities in combination with obstructive sleep apnea on endothelial function and vascular stiffness parameters in patients with arterial hypertension 1-2 degrees. Material and methods. Patients (n=74 with metabolic syndrome and obstructive sleep apnea were included into the study. All patients underwent cardiorespiratory monitoring of sleep using SomnoCheck2 device (Wiennmann, Germany and were divided into two groups based on its results. Patients with apnea-hypopnea index (AHI <30 episodes per hour were included into group 1 and patients with AHI >30 episodes per hour – into group 2. Monitoring of ambulatory blood pressure (BP and arterial stiffness was performed by the device BPLab ("Peter Telegin", Russia. Endothelial function was assessed in a probe of flow-mediated dilation by the ultrasound device MyLab 90 (Esaote, Italy. Diameter of the common carotid artery (DCCA and the intima-media thickness (IMT were determined. Results. Patients with AHI >30 episodes per hour had higher mean daily and night systolic BP and pulse BP in aorta and brachial artery. Pulse wave velocity in aorta in per day averaged was also higher in these patients (8.2±0.8 vs 9.1±1.1 m/sec; p<0.05. Mean level of flow-mediated dilation was significantly lower in patients with severe sleep apnea> (8.8% (5.6; 13.1 vs 4.5% (2.2; 8.0; p<0.05. Prevalence of negative index of reactivity in group 2 was 2 times higher than this in group 1. An increase in IMT and DCCA in patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea was also revealed. Conclusion. Severe sleep apnea in patients with metabolic syndrome in combination with hypertension aggravates structural changes and endothelial dysfunction of the main arteries, as well as contributes to the progression of atherosclerosis.

  1. Obstructive sleep apnea in Prader-Willi syndrome: risks and advantages of adenotonsillectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leone Giordano

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea is a well-known clinical manifestation of Prader-Willi syndrome. The aim of our study is to evaluate the efficacy of adenotonsillectomy for the treatment of the disorder as well as the improvement of their post-operative quality of life. Five patients with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apneas and adenotonsillar hypertrophy of grade III-IV underwent adenotonsillectomy. Pre- and postoperative apneas and Quality of Life were assessed respectively with a polysomnography with multi-sleep latency test and with the pediatric Quality of Life questionnaire, performed before and 6 months after surgery. A decrease of apnea/hypopnea index values has been detected between pre- and post-surgery (t=2.64, P=0.005, as well as oxygen desaturation index values (t=5.51, P=0.005, multi-sleep latency test (t=4.54, P=0.01, and of the values of pediatric Quality of Life questionnaire. No correlation has been detected between body mass index and apnea/hypopnea index, oxygen desaturation index and multi-sleep latency test values pre- and post-adenotonsillectomy. A correlation has been found between multi-sleep latency test and oxygen desaturation index values post-surgery (P=0.04. No post-operative complications were observed. Our data underline the efficacy of surgery in Prader-Willi patients with adenotonsillar hypertrophy in order to improve their quality of life.

  2. Neurobehavioral functioning in adolescents with and without obesity and obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xanthopoulos, Melissa S; Gallagher, Paul R; Berkowitz, Robert I; Radcliffe, Jerilynn; Bradford, Ruth; Marcus, Carole L

    2015-03-01

    Children and adults with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) exhibit neurobehavioral abnormalities, but few studies have evaluated the transitional stage of adolescence. Obesity is also associated with neurobehavioral abnormalities, and many patients with OSAS are obese. However, the confounding effect of obesity on neurobehavioral abnormalities in adolescents with OSAS has not been evaluated. We hypothesized that obese adolescents with OSAS would exhibit more neurobehavioral abnormalities than obese and lean adolescents without OSAS. Cross-sectional, case control. Sleep Center and community. Obese adolescents with OSAS compared to (1) nonsnoring, obese controls without OSAS, and (2) nonobese, nonsnoring controls. Neurobehavioral evaluation. Obese adolescents with OSAS had significantly worse executive function and attention compared to both obese (P Obese adolescents with OSAS show impaired executive and behavioral function compared to obese and lean controls, and are more likely to score in the clinically abnormal range on measures of neurobehavioral functioning. These results are especially concerning given that the frontal lobe is still developing during this critical age period. We speculate that untreated OSAS during adolescence may lead to significant neurobehavioral deficits in adulthood. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  3. Impact of gender on snore-based obstructive sleep apnea screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Silva, S; Abeyratne, U R; Hukins, C

    2012-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) is a serious widespread disease in which upper airways (UA) are collapsed during sleep. OSA has marked male predominance in prevalence. Although women are less vulnerable to OSA, under-diagnosed OSA in women may associate with serious consequences. Snoring is commonly associated with OSA and one of the earliest symptoms. Snore sounds (SS) are generated due to vibration of the collapsing soft tissues of the UA. Structural and functional properties of the UA are gender dependent. SS capture these time varying gender attributed UA properties and those could be embedded in the acoustic properties of SS. In this paper, we investigate the gender-specific acoustic property differences of SS and try to exploit these differences to enhance the snore-based OSA detection performance. We developed a snore-based multi-feature vector for OSA screening and one time-measured neck circumference was augmented. Snore features were estimated from SS recorded in a sleep laboratory from 35 females and 51 males and multi-layer neural network-based pattern recognition algorithms were used for OSA/non-OSA classification. The results were K-fold cross-validated. Gender-dependent modeling resulted in an increase of around 7% in sensitivity and 6% in specificity at the decision threshold AHI = 15 against a gender-neutral model. These results established the importance of adopting gender-specific models for the snore-based OSA screening technique. (paper)

  4. Inflammatory Markers and Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Obese Children: The NANOS Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Gileles-Hillel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Obesity and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA are common coexisting conditions associated with a chronic low-grade inflammatory state underlying some of the cognitive, metabolic, and cardiovascular morbidities. Aim. To examine the levels of inflammatory markers in obese community-dwelling children with OSA, as compared to no-OSA, and their association with clinical and polysomnographic (PSG variables. Methods. In this cross-sectional, prospective multicenter study, healthy obese Spanish children (ages 4–15 years were randomly selected and underwent nocturnal PSG followed by a morning fasting blood draw. Plasma samples were assayed for multiple inflammatory markers. Results. 204 children were enrolled in the study; 75 had OSA, defined by an obstructive respiratory disturbance index (RDI of 3 events/hour total sleep time (TST. BMI, gender, and age were similar in OSA and no-OSA children. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 levels were significantly higher in OSA children, with interleukin-6 concentrations being higher in moderate-severe OSA (i.e., AHI > 5/hrTST; P<0.01, while MCP-1 levels were associated with more prolonged nocturnal hypercapnia (P<0.001. Conclusion. IL-6, MCP-1, and PAI-1 are altered in the context of OSA among community-based obese children further reinforcing the proinflammatory effects of sleep disorders such as OSA. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01322763.

  5. Effects of obstructive sleep apnea and its treatment over the erectile function: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Campos-Juanatey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Erectile dysfunction (ED is considered a condition with a broad range of etiologies. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA syndrome is one of the lesser studied risk factors for ED. We intend to summarize the current evidence on the relationship between OSA and sexual impairment, focusing on the results in terms of erectile function of the different therapies offered to OSA patients. A systematic review was conducted, selecting articles related to the physiology of OSA and ED, and to the treatments of OSA syndrome and their reported outcomes in erectile and sexual function. Higher prevalences of ED in the OSA groups have been published. However, whether this effect on the erectile function occurs in the entire range of OSA severities remains unclear. Several hypotheses were proposed to explain the physiology of this association. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure as a treatment for OSA patients with ED has achieved a significative improvement in the sexual parameters in most of the studies. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (iPDE5 on demand are useful as a treatment for ED in this subgroup of patients, with high satisfaction rates. The surgical treatment for the OSA evidenced benefits over the erectile function, and the effect on the sexual satisfaction of the therapy using Mandibular Advancement Devices is still undefined.

  6. Psychoeducation in obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin Escobar-Córdoba

    2017-08-01

    In order to treat sleep apnea, that patients know the characteristics of the disease and the treatment is important since they become aware of it, thus achieving greater adherence to the treatments. There are several types of therapy: individual therapy, which is characterized as support provided by mental health professionals to the patient; couple and family therapy, which offer psychological help for the management of sleep apnea and its side effects, and group therapy, which educates about the entity and its treatment by sharing positive experiences with the group. Field intervention at work and progressive desensitization and relaxation techniques are also used to improve the adhesion to positive pressure in the airway (PAP therapy.

  7. Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS and pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Bourjeily

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy is a temporary condition of life during which important changes in the physiology of women occur; such changes are resolved, to a large extent, after childbirth. Physical, hormonal and psychological changes can be observed as weight increases progressively. These factors may predispose to a respiratory sleep disorder or exacerbate an existing sleep disorder. The scientific literature suggests a higher prevalence of snoring in pregnant women, although databases show the diagnosis code of sleep apnea in less than 1% of pregnancies. The presence of both snoring and apnea during pregnancy has been associated with some adverse outcomes discussed in this article, which seeks to sensitize physicians to consider this diagnosis during pregnancy.

  8. Neurocognitive impairment in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Chitra; Strange, Charlie; Bachman, David

    2012-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a common disorder with far-reaching health implications. One of the major consequences of OSAS is an impact on neurocognitive functioning. Several studies have shown that OSAS has an adverse effect on inductive and deductive reasoning, attention, vigilance, learning, and memory. Neurocognitive impairment can be measured objectively with tests such as the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised, the Psychomotor Vigilance Task, the Steer Clear Performance Test, and tests of repetitive finger tapping. In children, OSAS may cause attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in addition to behavioral problems and learning disabilities. Risk factors for cognitive impairment include increasing age, male sex, apolipoprotein E ε4 allele positivity, current cigarette smoking, obesity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, Down syndrome, hypothyroidism, significant alcohol consumption, stroke, and the use of psychoactive medications. At a cellular level, OSAS likely causes cognitive impairment through intermittent hypoxia, hormonal imbalance, and/or systemic inflammation, either independently or via the resultant endothelial dysfunction that occurs. Excessive daytime sleepiness should be measured and minimized in all studies of neurocognitive impairment. Recent studies have used functional and structural neuroimaging to delineate the brain areas affected in patients with OSAS with neurocognitive dysfunction. A common finding in several of these studies is decreased hippocampal volume. Other affected brain areas include the frontal and parietal lobes of the brain, which show focal reductions in gray matter. These changes can be reversed at least partially with the use of CPAP, which highlights the importance of early recognition and treatment of OSAS. The currently available data in this field are quite limited, and more research is needed.

  9. Accurate method for home-based diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosna Ghandeharioun

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Overnight polysomnography is the gold standard for the detection of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAS. However, it is expensive and needs attending personnel. The study of simplified sleep apnea monitoring is one of the recent trends for sleep medicine research. The proposed clinical prediction rules employ the vital and social statistics, symptoms, craniofacial traits, and obesity-related measures for initial screening of OSAS in an ambulatory setting. However, most of them are partially or completely clinical and not home-based. One disadvantage of this sort of screening methods is their inability to asses OSAS severity. Another approach of initial OSAS screening is a usage of just one or two physiological signals such as electrocardiography (ECG, pulse oximetry, snoring, nasal airflow, or even speech sound. In this study, we aimed to review the different strategies and to compare their performances, reported by means of their sensitivity–specificity and accuracy for OSAS incidence and severity. OSAS severity is determined by apnea-hypopnea index (AHI value. Based on the data obtained from the related articles, the most accurate methods of AHI estimation exploit ECG and pulse oximetry signals.

  10. Obstructive sleep apnea and type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Rasche, K; Keller, T; Tautz, B; Hader, C; Hergen?, G; Antosiewicz, J; Di Giulio, C; Pokorski, M

    2010-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are diseases with high prevalence and major public health impact. There is evidence that regular snoring and OSA are independently associated with alterations in glucose metabolism. Thus, OSA might be a risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes. Possible causes might be intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation, which are typical features of OSA. OSA might also be a reason of ineffective treatment of type 2 diabetes. There is furth...

  11. Maxillomandibular Advancement Surgery as Alternative to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in Morbidly Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea : A Case Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doff, Michiel H. J.; Jansma, Johan; Schepers, Rutger H.; Hoekema, Aamoud

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a sleep-related breathing disorder, characterized by disrupted snoring and repetitive upper airway obstructions. Oral appliance therapy is an effective alternative to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and is especially effective in mild and

  12. Association of subclinical inflammation, glycated hemoglobin and risk for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Aurea, Carolina Vicaria Rodrigues; Cerazi, Bruno Gion de Andrade; Laurinavicius, Antonio Gabriele; Janovsky, Carolina Castro Porto Silva; Conceição, Raquel Dilguerian de Oliveira; Santos, Raul D; Bittencourt, Márcio Sommer

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To investigate the inter-relation between high sensitivity C-reactive protein and glycated hemoglobin in prediction of risk of obstructive sleep apnea. Methods We included all individuals participating in a check-up program at the Preventive Medicine Center of Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein in 2014. The Berlin questionnaire for risk of obstructive sleep apnea was used, and the high sensitivity C-reactive protein and glycated hemoglobin levels were evaluated. Results The sample included 7,115 participants (age 43.4±9.6 years, 24.4% women). The Berlin questionnaire showed changes in 434 (6.1%) individuals. This finding was associated with high sensitivity C-reactive protein and glycated hemoglobin levels (p<0.001). However, only the association between the Berlin questionnaire result and glycated hemoglobin remained significant in the adjusted multivariate analysis, for the traditional risk factors and for an additional model, including high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides. Conclusion The glycated hemoglobin, even below the threshold for diagnosis of diabetes, is independently associated with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, even after adjustment for obesity and C-reactive protein. These findings suggest a possible pathophysiological link between changes in insulin resistance and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, independently from obesity or low-grade inflammation. PMID:28767909

  13. Potential Role of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreras, Alba; Almendros, Isaac; Farré, Ramon

    2011-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) is a prevalent disease caused by increased collapsibility of the upper airway. OSA induces oxidative stress, inflammation and endothelial dysfunction, with important clinical consequences such as neurocognitive alterations and cardiovascular diseases. Although it has been shown that bone marrow-derived stem cells play a protective and reparative function in several diseases involving inflammatory processes and endothelial dysfunction, the data currently available on the potential role of adult stem cells in OSA are scarce. The present review presents recent data on the potential role of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in OSA. The results obtained in animal models that realistically mimic the events characterizing this sleep breathing disorder strongly support the notion that MSC are mobilized in circulating blood and then activated to play an anti-inflammatory role in OSA. PMID:24298333

  14. DNA damage and repair capacity in lymphocytes from obstructive sleep apnea patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontogianni, Konstantina; Messini-Nikolaki, Niki; Christou, Konstantinos; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos; Tsilimigaki, Smaragdi; Piperakis, Stylianos M

    2007-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome is a respiratory disease that is linked to heart attacks and high blood pressure. In the present study, we used the Comet assay to compare basal DNA damage and DNA damage induction by hydrogen peroxide, ethanol, and gamma-irradiation in lymphocytes from 35 OSA patients and 35 controls. We also measured the apoptosis and necrosis produced by these agents and the ability of the lymphocytes to repair the induced DNA damage. It was found that lymphocytes isolated from OSA patients had higher basal levels of DNA damage and were more sensitive to the effects of the DNA-damaging agents than lymphocytes from controls. OSA patients also had a reduced capacity to repair the DNA damage induced by the three agents, but apoptosis and necrosis were similar in OSA patients and the controls. (Copyright) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. The comparison of nasal surgery and CPAP on daytime sleepiness in patients with OSAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagaya, M; Otake, H; Suzuki, K; Yasuma, F; Yamamoto, H; Noda, A; Nishimura, Y; Sone, M; Nakashima, T; Nakata, S

    2017-09-01

    Residual sleepiness after continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a critical problem in some patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). However, nasal surgery is likely to reduce daytime sleepiness and feelings of unrefreshed sleep. The aim of this study is to clarify the effects of nasal surgery and CPAP on daytime sleepiness. This is a retrospective and matched-case control study. The participants were consecutive 40 patients with OSAS who underwent nasal surgery (Surgery group) and 40 matched patients who were treated with CPAP (CPAP group). In the Surgery group, although the nasal surgery did not decrease either apnea or hypopnea, it improved oxygenation, the quality of sleep. In the CPAP Group, the CPAP treatment reduced apnea and hypopnea, and improved oxygenation, quality of sleep. The degree of relief from daytime sleepiness was different between the two groups. The improvement of Epworth Sleepiness Scale was more significant in the Surgery Group than those in the CPAP Group (Surgery from 11.0 to 5.1, CPAP from 10.0 to 6.2). These findings suggest that the results of the nasal surgery is more satisfactory for some patients with OSAS than CPAP on daytime sleepiness.

  16. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome, Objectively Measured Physical Activity and Exercise Training Interventions: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Mendelson

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A systematic review of English and French articles using Pubmed/Medline and Embase included studies assessing objective physical activity levels of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA patients and exploring the effects of exercise training on OSA severity, body mass index (BMI, sleepiness, and cardiorespiratory fitness [peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak]. Two independent reviewers analyzed the studies, extracted the data, and assessed the quality of evidence. For objective physical activity levels, eight studies were included. The mean number of steps per day across studies was 5,388 (95% CI: 3,831–6,945; p < 0.001, which was by far lower than the recommended threshold of 10,000 steps per day. For exercise training, six randomized trials were included. There was a significant decrease in apnea–hypopnea-index following exercise training (mean decrease of 8.9 events/h; 95% CI: −13.4 to −4.3; p < 0.01, which was accompanied by a reduction in subjective sleepiness, an increase in VO2peak and no change in BMI. OSA patients present low levels of physical activity and exercise training is associated with improved outcomes. Future interventions (including exercise training focusing on increasing physical activity levels may have important clinical impacts on both OSA severity and the burden of associated co-morbidities. Objective measurement of physical activity in routine OSA management and well-designed clinical trials are recommended.Registration # CRD42017057319 (Prospero.

  17. Sleep apnea in stroke: Diagnosis, consequences & treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaronson, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common sleep disorder in stroke, but is often left unrecognized and untreated. When left untreated, OSA is thought to contribute to decreased recovery from stroke. The main objectives of this thesis were 1) to improve early recognition of sleep apnea in

  18. Effect of Emphysema Severity on the Apnea-Hypopnea Index in Smokers with Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krachman, Samuel L; Tiwari, Rachna; Vega, Maria Elena; Yu, Daohai; Soler, Xavier; Jaffe, Fredric; Kim, Victor; Swift, Irene; D'Alonzo, Gilbert E; Criner, Gerard J

    2016-07-01

    The presence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is referred to as the OSA-COPD overlap syndrome. While lung inflation has been shown to be an important factor in determining upper airway stability, its role in determining OSA severity in smokers, including those with emphysema, has not been evaluated. To evaluate the importance of lung inflation on OSA severity (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI]) in smokers with suspected OSA. Fifty-one smokers (18 males; mean [±SD] age, 59 ± 9 yr; body mass index [BMI], 32 ± 9 kg/m(2)) who were part of the Genetic Epidemiology of COPD (COPDGene) project were studied. Patients underwent a full-night polysomnography for suspected OSA. Other testing included spirometry and volumetric chest computed tomography (CT) for quantitative measurement of CT-derived percent emphysema and CT-derived percent gas trapping. For the group overall, there was evidence of obstructive airway disease by spirometry (FEV1, 1.4 ± 0.5 L, 58 ± 14% predicted) and emphysema by quantitative CT (CT-derived percent emphysema, 11 ± 13%; CT-derived percent gas trapping, 31.6 ± 24.1%). Twenty-nine (57%) of the patients had OSA (AHI, 18 ± 12 events/h). Patients with OSA had a higher BMI but were younger than those without OSA (BMI, 35 ± 9 kg/m(2) vs. 29 ± 7 kg/m(2), respectively [P = 0.007]; age, 56 ± 8 yr vs. 62 ± 9 yr, respectively [P = 0.01]). There was an inverse correlation between the AHI and the CT-derived percent emphysema and CT-derived percent gas trapping, both for the entire group (r = -0.41 [P smokers with OSA, increased gas trapping and emphysema as assessed by CT are associated with a decreased AHI. Along with sex and BMI, these measurements may be important in determining the severity of OSA in patients with COPD and may offer a protective mechanism in patients with more advanced disease.

  19. Eighty Kilograms Weight Reduction in a Case of Obstructive Sleep Apnea with Several Comorbidities: Did the Conditions Improve?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moein Foroughi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA together with metabolic disorders is common in severely obese patients. Weight reduction is considered as a treatment modality in these cases while few of them can succeed in considerable weight loss. Here, we present a severely obese man with body mass index of 54 suffered from OSA, type 2 diabetes, hypothyroidism, and hypertension. He intentionally lost 80 kilograms weight during the 2-year follow-up. Diabetes and hypertension completely resolved with considerable improvement in OSA syndrome after this huge weight reduction.

  20. Dream Anxiety in Patients with Rapid Eye Movement Dependent Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ece Yazla; Mustafa Bilici; Zerrin Pelin

    2017-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the breathing disorders that arise during sleep and are predominantly observed in Rapid Eye Movement (REM) phase onto the dreams which have negative effects on daily life. While doing this, we also investigated differences between the REM dependent and non REM dependent obstructive sleep apnea syndrome groups in terms of some sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Methods: Seventy patients who had got the diagnosis of obs...

  1. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Obesity: Implications for Public Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehan, Shazia; Zizi, Ferdinand; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R; Wall, Steven; Auguste, Evan; Myers, Alyson K; Jean-Louis, Girardin; McFarlane, Samy I

    2017-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a global disease with a rising incidence along with its comorbidities, especially with metabolic syndrome. One of the main components contributing to sleep apnea is obesity; as well as diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM), hypercholesterolemia, and hypertension. OSA is a condition that requires management and the disease can be treated by using CPAP therapy. The awareness of this global issue is rising, and health care systems are providing preventive measures, diagnosis and the treatment options. The major preventable risk factors to decrease obesity are the awareness of lifestyle modification (eating behaviors, smoking, drinking alcohol, etc.) and understanding the importance of exercise. If these lifestyle modifications are widely applied, then not only will the consequences of obesity and sleep apnea be reduced, but also the incidence of cardiovascular disease will decrease greatly. Public awareness of the importance of weight loss by lifestyle modification or bariatric surgery to improve the quality of life is needed. These preventive actions, screening measures, and treatment strategies for obesity and OSA can significantly reduce the incidence of obesity, as well as OSA and the related comorbidities such as cardiovascular disease, atherosclerosis, and depression. Finally, health care costs will also be reduced.

  2. Obstructive Sleep Apnea In The Formerly Preterm Infant: An Overlooked Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti B Sharma

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS is a frequent disorder in children. The clinical characteristics of OSAS in very young children under 2 years of age, and more particularly, in those born prematurely, and who have respiratory complications such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD, are not well defined. We therefore retrospectively reviewed our experience in a group of preterm infants with OSAS. Methods. The records of premature infants with BPD followed in the Pediatric Pulmonary Clinic at the University of Chicago who were diagnosed with OSAS from 2004-2009 were reviewed and analyzed.Results. Twelve children, 8 males and 4 females with a mean gestational age of 27 weeks were found to have OSAS. Mean age at diagnosis was 19 months. Inability to wean nighttime oxygen, the need to resume oxygen after intercurrent respiratory illness, and snoring were the most common presenting symptoms. The apnea-hypopnea index (AHI ranged from 1 to120/hrTST (mean: 29. SpO2 nadir ranged from 50% to 91%. Despite adenotonsillectomy (T&A, all children had persistent sleep disordered breathing.Conclusions. In preterm infants, while snoring is a frequent symptom, poor weight gain and inability to wean nighttime oxygen may indicate the need for further investigation for OSAS. In the former preterm infant structural changes in the airway may play an important role along with adenotonsillar hypertrophy. A high index of suspicion is required to identify OSA in the formerly preterm infant.

  3. Obstructive sleep apnea in the formerly preterm infant: an overlooked diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Preeti B; Baroody, Fuad; Gozal, David; Lester, Lucille A

    2011-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) is a frequent disorder in children. The clinical characteristics of OSA in very young children under 2 years of age, and more particularly, in those born prematurely, and who have respiratory complications such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), are not well defined. We therefore retrospectively reviewed our experience in a group of preterm infants with OSAS. The records of premature infants with BPD followed in the Pediatric Pulmonary Clinic at the University of Chicago who were diagnosed with OSA from 2004 to 2009 were reviewed and analyzed. Twelve children, eight males, and four females with a mean gestational age of 27 weeks were found to have OSA. Mean age at diagnosis was 19 months. Inability to wean nighttime oxygen, the need to resume oxygen after intercurrent respiratory illness, and snoring were the most common presenting symptoms. The apnea-hypopnea index ranged from 1 to 120/h total sleep time (TST; mean: 29). SpO(2) nadir ranged from 50 to 91%. Despite adenotonsillectomy (AT), all children had persistent sleep disordered breathing. In preterm infants, while snoring is a frequent symptom, poor weight gain, and inability to wean nighttime oxygen may indicate the need for further investigation for OSA. In the former preterm infant structural changes in the airway may play an important role along with adenotonsillar hypertrophy. A high level of clinical awareness is required to identify OSA in the formerly preterm infant.

  4. Difference between apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) and oxygen desaturation index (ODI): proportional increase associated with degree of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, G; Bosio, M; Salvado, A; Dibur, E; Nigro, C; Borsini, E

    2016-12-01

    Obesity is one of the main predisposing factors for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) hypopnea syndrome. It has been described that body mass index (BMI) influences the accuracy of oxygen desaturation index (ODI) for the diagnosis of OSA by polysomnography (PSG). We analyzed the relationship between traditional indicators: apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) and ODI in a population at high risk for OSA, by respiratory polygraphy (RP) and PSG. This is a retrospective study of 1898 patients with suspicion of OSA, from which 1053 underwent RP and 582 underwent PSG with OSA. We compared results considering gender, age, and degree of obesity. This study included 1333 records of patients with OSA-more than 80 % of whom were overweight or obese. We observed that AHI and ODI increased progressively with obesity grade and said increase was associated with BMI only in men. The evaluation of the agreement between AHI and ODI found a difference between normal weight and obese patients, regardless of gender. Study findings contribute to understand the role of oximetry in the diagnosis of OSA in obese patients. Our results were observed using full PSG and a simplified home method. The correlation between these indicators could improve our clinical interpretation of OSA severity among obese patients when abbreviated tests are used.

  5. Consequências metabólicas na SAOS não tratada Metabolic consequences of untreated obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaucia Carneiro

    2010-06-01

    /85 mmHg; and fasting glucose > 100 mg/dL. Central obesity is associated with OSAS and metabolic syndrome, and there is evidence that obstructive sleep apnea is an independent risk factor for obesity, glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. The implied mechanisms result from the activation of the sympathetic nervous system and of the hypothalamus-hypophysis-adrenal axis; activation of pro-inflammatory markers, such as IL-6 and TNF-α; and the reduction in adiponectin levels, principally triggered by intermittent hypoxemia related to apnea. Despite such evidence, the results are controversial regarding the benefits of treating sleep apnea with CPAP in the presence of these metabolic alterations. In addition, the few studies that have addressed sleep apnea as a risk factor for dyslipidemia have presented conflicting results. Population-based, longitudinal controlled studies are necessary in order to elucidate the interaction between sleep apnea and metabolic consequences so that these individuals are properly treated.

  6. Sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome and type 2 diabetes. A reciprocal relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Cerón, Elisabet; Casitas Mateos, Raquel; García-Río, Francisco

    2015-03-01

    Epidemiological data suggest that sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (SAHS) is independently associated with the development of insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. Moreover, despite significant methodological limitations, some studies report a high prevalence of SAHS in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). A recent meta-analysis shows that moderate-severe SAHS is associated with an increased risk of DM2 (relative risk=1.63 [1.09 to 2.45]), compared to the absence of apneas and hypopneas. Common alterations in various pathogenic pathways add biological plausibility to this relationship. Intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation, caused by successive apnea-hypopnea episodes, induce several intermediate disorders, such as activation of the sympathetic nervous system, oxidative stress, systemic inflammation, alterations in appetite-regulating hormones and activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis which, in turn, favor the development of insulin resistance, its progression to glucose intolerance and, ultimately, to DM2. Concomitant SAHS seems to increase DM2 severity, since it worsens glycemic control and enhances the effects of atherosclerosis on the development of macrovascular complications. Furthermore, SAHS may be associated with the development of microvascular complications: retinopathy, nephropathy or diabetic neuropathy in particular. Data are still scant, but it seems that DM2 may also worsen SAHS progression, by increasing the collapsibility of the upper airway and the development of central apneas and hypopneas. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of 3 titration methods of positive airway pressure for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: a random, single-blind and self-control clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan LI

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To evaluate the efficacy and safety of polysomnography-manual continuous positive airway pressure titration (PSG-CPAP, polysomnography-automatic positive airway pressure titration (PSG-APAP, or automatic positive airway pressure titration (APAP in patients with moderate or severe simple obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS. Methods  Twenty patients with moderate or severe OSAS sequentially underwent PSG-CPAP, PSG-APAP and APAP titration 3 days apart, and then 3 primary efficacy indicators (titration pressure, remaining respiratory event and state of sleep, and safety indicators (compression injury of face skin, the subjective evaluation on degree of comfort or any complaint during titration were compared. Results  The results of efficacy indicators revealed that all PSG-APAP, APAP and PSG-CPAP were effective. Compared with the optimal pressure of PSG-CPAP titration, PSG-APAP and APAP pressures were 3.05 and 2.55cmH2O higher, respectively, in 90% of occasion (P0.05. There was no statistically significant difference between the optimal pressure of PSG-CPAP and the mean pressures of PSG-APAP and APAP (P>0.05. There was no statistically significant difference between the 3 titration methods on residue apnea/hypopnea index (AHI, P>0.05. The oxygen desaturation index (ODI decreased significantly after titration treatment (P0.05. Both PSG-CPAP and PSG-APAP titrations showed the same effects in improving ODI. Compared with basic PSG, no obvious improvement was found in sleep efficiency (SE after PSG-CPAP and PSG-APAP titration (P>0.05, however, the arousal index (ArI decreased obviously (P0.05. The results of safety indicators showed that no face skin compression injury or severe adverse event related to the titration was found in all the patients during the study. The main complaints of the patients were sleep disturbance, dryness of eyes or mouth, headache, breath holding and abdominal distention. Conclusion  Both PSG-APAP and

  8. Efficacy and safety of adjunctive modafinil treatment on residual excessive daytime sleepiness among nasal continuous positive airway pressure-treated japanese patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: a double-blind placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yuichi; Takasaki, Yuji; Yamashiro, Yoshihiro

    2013-08-15

    This double-blind study evaluated the efficacy and safety of modafinil for treating excessive daytime sleepiness in Japanese patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Patients with residual excessive sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale [ESS] ≥ 11) on optimal nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) therapy (apnea-hypopnea index ≤ 10) were randomized to either 200 mg modafinil (n = 52) or placebo (n = 62) once daily for 4 weeks. Outcomes included baseline-week 4 changes in ESS total score, sleep latency on maintenance of wakefulness test (SL-MWT), nocturnal polysomnography, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and safety. All 114 randomized patients completed the study. Mean change in ESS total score (-6.6 vs -2.4, p modafinil than with placebo. ESS total score decreased from > 11 to modafinil-treated patients and 30.6% of placebo-treated patients (p modafinil and placebo groups, respectively (p = 0.146). Once-daily modafinil was effective and well tolerated for managing residual daytime sleepiness in Japanese OSAS patients with residual excessive daytime sleepiness on optimal nCPAP therapy.

  9. Obstructive sleep apnea, inflammation, and cardiopulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arter, Jim L; Chi, David S; M, Girish; Fitzgerald, S Matthew; Guha, Bhuvana; Krishnaswamy, Guha

    2004-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) occurs commonly in the U.S. population and is seen in both obese as well as non-obese individuals. OSA is a disease characterized by periodic upper airway collapse during sleep, which then results in either apnea, hypopnea, or both. The disorder leads to a variety of medical complications. Neuropsychiatric complications include daytime somnolence, cognitive dysfunction, and depression. Increased incidence of motor vehicle accidents has been documented in these patients and probably reflects disordered reflex mechanisms or excessive somnolence. More importantly, vascular disorders such as hypertension, stroke, congestive cardiac failure, arrhythmias, and atherosclerosis occur frequently in these patients. The lungs may be affected by pulmonary hypertension and worsening of asthma. Recent data from several laboratories demonstrate that obstructive sleep apnea is characterized by an inflammatory response. Cytokines are elaborated during the hypoxemic episodes leading to inflammatory responses as marked clinically by elevated C-reactive protein (CRP). As elevated CRP levels are considered markers of the acute phase response and characterize progression of vascular injury in coronary artery disease, it is likely that obstructive sleep apnea could lead to worsening of vasculopathy. Moreover, as inflammatory mechanisms regulate bronchial asthma, it is also likely that cytokines and superoxide radicals generated during hypoxemic episodes could exacerbate reactive airway disease. Patients with Cough, Obstructive sleep apnea, Rhinosinusitis, and Esophageal reflux clustered together can be categorized by the acronym, "CORE", syndrome. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the inflammatory responses that occur in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and relate them to the occurrence of cardiopulmonary disease.

  10. Symptomless Multi-Variable Apnea Prediction Index Assesses Obstructive Sleep Apnea Risk and Adverse Outcomes in Elective Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Brendan T; Li, Junxin; Khan, Tanya; Elkassabany, Nabil; Walsh, Colleen M; Williams, Noel N; Pack, Allan I; Gurubhagavatula, Indira

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Study Objective To validate that the symptomless Multi-Variable Apnea Prediction index (sMVAP) is associated with Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) diagnosis and assess the relationship between sMVAP and adverse outcomes in patients having elective surgery. We also compare associations between Bariatric surgery, where preoperative screening for OSA risk is mandatory, and non-Bariatric surgery groups who are not screened routinely for OSA. Methods Using data from 40 432 elective inpatient surgeries, we used logistic regression to determine the relationship between sMVAP and previous OSA, current hypertension, and postoperative complications: extended length of stay (ELOS), intensive-care-unit-stay (ICU-stay), and respiratory complications (pulmonary embolism, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and/or aspiration pneumonia). Results Higher sMVAP was associated with increased likelihood of previous OSA, hypertension and all postoperative complications (p complications compared to the bottom quintile. For ELOS, ICU-stay, and respiratory complications, respective odds ratios (95% CI) were: 1.83 (1.62, 2.07), 1.44 (1.32, 1.58), and 1.85 (1.37, 2.49). Compared against age-, gender- and BMI-matched patients having Bariatric surgery, sMVAP was more strongly associated with postoperative complications in non-Bariatric surgical groups, including: (1) ELOS (Orthopedics [p complications (Orthopedics [p =.037] and Otorhinolaryngology [p =.011]). Conclusions OSA risk measured by sMVAP correlates with higher risk for select postoperative complications. Associations are stronger for non-Bariatric surgeries, where preoperative screening for OSA is not routinely performed. Thus, preoperative screening may reduce OSA-related risk for adverse postoperative outcomes. PMID:28364424

  11. Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with alterations in markers of fetoplacental wellbeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourjeily, Ghada; Butterfield, Kristen; Curran, Patrizia; Lambert-Messerlian, Geralyn

    2015-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been associated with adverse fetal outcomes in some studies. Second trimester Down syndrome screening markers reflect fetal and fetoplacental wellbeing. We aimed to compare markers of fetal and feto-placental wellbeing in women with OSA and low risk controls. A retrospective case-control study of pregnant women with OSA and available second trimester markers was performed. Controls were screened for sleep disordered breathing (SDB) at the time of delivery using a questionnaire. Women at low risk for OSA were selected. Marker levels were adjusted for gestational age and race and reported as multiples of median and later adjusted for body mass index (BMI). Twenty-four OSA cases and 166 controls were identified. Women with OSA had a higher mean BMI when compared to controls (37.1 ± 12.7 versus 24.1 ± 5.1, p = 0.03). Estriol (uE3) multiples of the median (MoM) levels were lower in women with OSA compared to controls, even after adjusting for BMI, 0.74 (interquartile range (IQR) 0.45) versus 1.06 (IQR 0.38), respectively, p = 0.026. Once adjusted for BMI, alpha feto-protein (AFP) MoM levels were no longer significantly different in women with OSA compared to controls. OSA is associated with reduced serum uE3 levels, independently of BMI, possibly indicating fetal distress.

  12. Management of obstructive sleep apnea: A dental perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padma Ariga

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep disordered breathing is a term which includes simple snoring, upper airway resistance syndrome, and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. Simple snoring is a common complaint affecting 45% of adults occasionally and 25% of adults habitually and is a sign of upper airway obstruction. Snoring has also been identified as a possible risk factor for hypertension, ischemic heart disease, and stroke. The role of dentistry in sleep disorders is becoming more significant, especially in co-managing patients with simple snoring and mild to moderate OSA. The practicing dental professional has the opportunity to assist patients at a variety of levels, starting with the recognition of a sleep-related disorder, referring patients to a physician for evaluation, and assisting in the management of sleep disorders. Obesity is the main predisposing factor for OSA. In nonobese patients, craniofacial anomalies like micrognathia and retrognathia may also predispose to OSA. Diagnosis of OSA is made on the basis of the history and physical examination and investigations such as polysomnography, limited channel testing, split-night testing, and oximetry. Nocturnal attended polysomnography, which requires an overnight stay in a sleep facility, is the standard diagnostic modality in determining if a patient has OSA. As far as treatment is concerned, the less invasive procedures are to be preferred to the more invasive options. The first and simplest option would be behavior modification, followed by insertion of oral devices suited to the patient, especially in those with mild to moderate OSA. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP and surgical options are chosen for patients with moderate to severe OSA. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AAOSM has recommended oral appliances for use in patients with primary snoring and mild to moderate OSA. It can also be used in patients with a lesser degree of oxygen saturation, relatively less day time sleepiness, lower frequency

  13. Comparison of lingual tonsil size as depicted on MR imaging between children with obstructive sleep apnea despite previous tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy and normal controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fricke, Bradley L. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Emory University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Donnelly, Lane F. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Shott, Sally R. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Otolaryngology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Kalra, Maninder; Poe, Stacy A.; Chini, Barbara A.; Amin, Raouf S. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2006-06-15

    Cine MRI has become a useful tool in the evaluation of patients with persistent obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) despite previous surgical intervention and in patients with underlying conditions that render them susceptible to multilevel airway obstruction. Findings on cine MRI studies have also increased our understanding of the mechanisms and anatomic causes of OSA in children. To compare lingual tonsil size between children with OSA and a group of normal controls. In addition, a subanalysis was made of the group of children with OSA comparing lingual tonsils between children with and without underlying Down syndrome. Children with persistent OSA despite previous palatine tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy and controls without OSA underwent MR imaging with sagittal fast spin echo inversion-recovery images, and lingual tonsils were categorized as nonperceptible at imaging or present and measurable. When present, lingual tonsils were measured in the maximum anterior-posterior diameter. If lingual tonsils were greater than 10 mm in diameter and abutting both the posterior border of the tongue and the posterior pharyngeal wall, they were considered markedly enlarged. There were statistically significant differences between the OSA and control groups for the presence vs. nonvisualization of lingual tonsils (OSA 33% vs. control 0%, P=0.0001) and mean diameter of the lingual tonsils (OSA 9.50 mm vs. control 0.0 mm, P=0.00001). Within the OSA group, there were statistically significant differences between children with and without Down syndrome for the three lingual tonsil width categories (P=0.0070) and occurrence of markedly enlarged lingual tonsils (with Down syndrome 35% vs. without Down syndrome 3%, P=0.0035). Enlargement of the lingual tonsils is relatively common in children with persistent obstructive sleep apnea after palatine tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy. This is particularly true in patients with Down syndrome. (orig.)

  14. Comparison of lingual tonsil size as depicted on MR imaging between children with obstructive sleep apnea despite previous tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy and normal controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fricke, Bradley L.; Donnelly, Lane F.; Shott, Sally R.; Kalra, Maninder; Poe, Stacy A.; Chini, Barbara A.; Amin, Raouf S.

    2006-01-01

    Cine MRI has become a useful tool in the evaluation of patients with persistent obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) despite previous surgical intervention and in patients with underlying conditions that render them susceptible to multilevel airway obstruction. Findings on cine MRI studies have also increased our understanding of the mechanisms and anatomic causes of OSA in children. To compare lingual tonsil size between children with OSA and a group of normal controls. In addition, a subanalysis was made of the group of children with OSA comparing lingual tonsils between children with and without underlying Down syndrome. Children with persistent OSA despite previous palatine tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy and controls without OSA underwent MR imaging with sagittal fast spin echo inversion-recovery images, and lingual tonsils were categorized as nonperceptible at imaging or present and measurable. When present, lingual tonsils were measured in the maximum anterior-posterior diameter. If lingual tonsils were greater than 10 mm in diameter and abutting both the posterior border of the tongue and the posterior pharyngeal wall, they were considered markedly enlarged. There were statistically significant differences between the OSA and control groups for the presence vs. nonvisualization of lingual tonsils (OSA 33% vs. control 0%, P=0.0001) and mean diameter of the lingual tonsils (OSA 9.50 mm vs. control 0.0 mm, P=0.00001). Within the OSA group, there were statistically significant differences between children with and without Down syndrome for the three lingual tonsil width categories (P=0.0070) and occurrence of markedly enlarged lingual tonsils (with Down syndrome 35% vs. without Down syndrome 3%, P=0.0035). Enlargement of the lingual tonsils is relatively common in children with persistent obstructive sleep apnea after palatine tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy. This is particularly true in patients with Down syndrome. (orig.)

  15. Effects of positive airway pressure therapy on cardiovascular and metabolic markers in males with obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliciano, A; Oliveira, M J; Cysneiros, A; Martinho, C; Reis, R P; Penque, D; Pinto, P; Bárbara, C

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with cardiovascular/metabolic complications. Some analytical parameters (homocysteine, glycemic and lipidic profiles) are recognized markers of these consequences. Limited data is available on the association of these markers and OSAS's severity/response to positive airway pressure therapy (PAP). In this prospective study we analyzed polysomnographic and analytical data of male patients admitted to sleep laboratory. The aim was to evaluate metabolic/cardiovascular markers in snorers and OSAS patients, to relate with sleep parameters and PAP response. One-hundred and three patients were included, and 73 (71%) were OSAS patients. OSAS patients were similar to snorers except for higher body mass index (BMI) and dyslipidemia. Severe OSAS patients showed higher glycemia, HbA1c, insulin, and insulin resistance, and lower HDL cholesterol in comparison to mild-moderate (pprofile and triglycerides were slightly correlated with OSAS severity. 46 OSAS patients were submitted to 6 months of PAP, with a statistical decrease in mean values of homocysteine, glycemia, total and LDL cholesterol (pprofiles changed significantly after 6 months of PAP therapy in OSAS, supporting its cardiovascular and metabolic protective effect. Our study has reinforced the importance of analytical cardiovascular/metabolic evaluation as complementary tool of diagnosis/treatment response in OSAS. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Pneumologia. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Heart rate responses to autonomic challenges in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Macey

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is accompanied by structural alterations and dysfunction in central autonomic regulatory regions, which may impair dynamic and static cardiovascular regulation, and contribute to other syndrome pathologies. Characterizing cardiovascular responses to autonomic challenges may provide insights into central nervous system impairments, including contributions by sex, since structural alterations are enhanced in OSA females over males. The objective was to assess heart rate responses in OSA versus healthy control subjects to autonomic challenges, and, separately, characterize female and male patterns. We studied 94 subjects, including 37 newly-diagnosed, untreated OSA patients (6 female, age mean ± std: 52.1 ± 8.1 years; 31 male aged 54.3 ± 8.4 years, and 57 healthy control subjects (20 female, 50.5 ± 8.1 years; 37 male, 45.6 ± 9.2 years. We measured instantaneous heart rate with pulse oximetry during cold pressor, hand grip, and Valsalva maneuver challenges. All challenges elicited significant heart rate differences between OSA and control groups during and after challenges (repeated measures ANOVA, p<0.05. In post-hoc analyses, OSA females showed greater impairments than OSA males, which included: for cold pressor, lower initial increase (OSA vs. control: 9.5 vs. 7.3 bpm in females, 7.6 vs. 3.7 bpm in males, OSA delay to initial peak (2.5 s females/0.9 s males, slower mid-challenge rate-of-increase (OSA vs. control: -0.11 vs. 0.09 bpm/s in females, 0.03 vs. 0.06 bpm/s in males; for hand grip, lower initial peak (OSA vs. control: 2.6 vs. 4.6 bpm in females, 5.3 vs. 6.0 bpm in males; for Valsalva maneuver, lower Valsalva ratio (OSA vs. control: 1.14 vs. 1.30 in females, 1.29 vs. 1.34 in males, and OSA delay during phase II (0.68 s females/1.31 s males. Heart rate responses showed lower amplitude, delayed onset, and slower rate changes in OSA patients over healthy controls, and impairments may be more pronounced in

  17. Magnetic therapy is ineffective for the treatment of snoring and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, D

    1997-03-01

    Snoring and the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome are common and chronic ailments with potentially serious medical complications. There are several accepted treatments, but these can be uncomfortable, inconvenient, and expensive. A number of alternative treatments have been reported to be beneficial in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea and snoring. They are advertised in magazines, on the radio and television, and on the Internet. The lay press is reporting about the effectiveness of these treatments without the benefit of clinical trials or scientific studies. Among the therapies currently being promoted for the treatment of snoring and sleep apnea is biomagnetic therapy. Unlike many of the other treatments which have not undergone scientific evaluation, biomagnetic therapy has been evaluated in the past. In fact, the evaluation of biomagnetic therapy is one of the first controlled scientific investigations found in the literature. This report showed that magnet therapy had no medicinal value. Despite this clear evidence, magnetic therapy continues to be utilized today and currently is being promoted for the treatment of snoring and sleep apnea. At out Sleep Disorder Center, we have had the opportunity to evaluate a patient with severe obstructive sleep apnea both before and after treatment with magnetic therapy, as well as with conventional therapy. Our study clearly indicates there was no benefit from magnetic therapy in this case. While alternative therapy may be helpful in the treatment of certain medical conditions, extreme care must be exercised to prevent inappropriate treatment or undertreat-ment of significant medical problems. Close clinical follow-up and controlled studies are important in determining the effectiveness of therapies.

  18. [Differentiation of arousal in sleep before and after CPAP therapy in patients with pronounced sleep apnea syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fietze, I; Warmuth, R; Waschke, K; Witt, C; Baumann, G

    1995-03-01

    The sleep apnea syndrome is often associated with the syndromes of daytime exhaustion and involuntary daytime sleeping fits. The cause is assumed to be fragmentary sleep resulting from night-time arousal. The central nervous activation reactions caused by apnea or hypopnea, respectively, and not the movement arousal determine the sleep structure. We have examined 10 male patients in the age range 40-55 years (48 +/- 6 SD) before and during the first 3 nights of CPAP therapy. Cardiorespiratory polysomnography was performed in all four nights. Sleep way analyzed visually and differentiation was made between respiratory (RA) and movement arousal (MA). All 10 patients had a pronounced sleep apnea syndrome. Deep and dream sleep were reduced, significantly more respiratory arousals occurred than movement arousals. The SWS latency was shortened in the first therapy night, the deep and dream sleep proportions increased and the RA decreased significantly. No further significant changes in the sleep parameters occurred during the second and third nights. We found that the number of apnea/hypopnea was not equal to the number of RA. When less arousal was recognized it was suggestive of a deficit of the diversion function while more RA was indicative of additional respiratory events, e.g. pharyngeal obstructions and hyperventilations which were not recognized as apnea or hypopnea. In addition to its role in the differential diagnosis of sleeping disorders, in particular sleep apnea, arousal differentiation is also an important criterion for estimating the efficiency of CPAP therapy.

  19. Medical and surgical treatment of obesity in obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Darío Escobar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is one of the most important risk factors in sleep-related respiratory disorders; more than 70% of patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS show some degree of obesity. Weight loss, through medical or surgical means, should be a primary goal in the management of OSAHS since it improves the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI in a high percentage, which should be stimulated in all patients. Changes in the lifestyle are the first step and should be done through multi-component interventions that include eating habits, physical activity, and psychological support. If after three to six months of treatment the goals established for weight loss have not been met, drugs against obesity or bariatric surgery can be formulated. The current risk of undergoing bariatric surgery is low and the benefits are evident.

  20. Association of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and obstructive sleep apnea consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Zamarrón

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Carlos Zamarrón1, Vanesa García Paz1, Emilio Morete1, Felix del Campo Matías21Servicio de Neumología, Hospital Clínico Universitario de Santiago, Santiago, Spain; 2Servicio de Neumologia, Hospital Universitario Rio Ortega de Vallaclolid, Vallaclolid, SpainAbstract: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are two diseases that often coexist within an individual. This coexistence is known as overlap syndrome and is the result of chance rather than a pathophysiological link. Although there are claims of a very high incidence of OSAS in COPD patients, recent studies report that it is similar to the general population. Overlap patients present sleep-disordered breathing associated to upper and lower airway obstruction and a reduction in respiratory drive. These patients present unique characteristics, which set them apart from either COPD or OSAS patients. COPD and OSAS are independent risk factors for cardiovascular events and their coexistence in overlap syndrome probably increases this risk. The mechanisms underlying cardiovascular risk are still unclear, but may involve systemic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and tonic elevation of sympathetic neural activity. The treatment of choice for overlap syndrome in stable patients is CPAP with supplemental oxygen for correction of upper airway obstructive episodes and hypoxemia during sleep.Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, overlap syndrome, sleep, cardiovascular disease

  1. Relationship between the quality of life and the severity of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lopes

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects of sleep disorders on the quality of life (QOL have been documented in the literature. Excessive sleepiness and altered circadian rhythms may negatively affect ability to learn, employment, and interpersonal relations, and directly degrade QOL. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the impact of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome of varying severity on QOL. The study was conducted on 1892 patients aged 18 years or older referred by a physician to the Sleep Institute, São Paulo, with complaints related to apnea (snoring, excessive daytime sleepiness, hyperarousal, and fatigue. They were submitted to overnight polysomnography for the diagnosis of sleep disorders from August 2005 through April 2006. The patients completed the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and QOL SF-36 sleep questionnaires. They were classified as non-physically active and physically active and not-sleepy and sleepy and the results of polysomnography were analyzed on the basis of the apnea hypopnea index (AHI. The apneic subjects showed a reduction in QOL which was proportional to severity. There was a significant decrease in all domains (physical functioning, role physical problems, bodily pain, general health perceptions, vitality, social functioning, emotional problems, general mental health for apneics with AHI >30, who generally were sleepy and did not participate in physical activities (P < 0.05. The present study provides evidence that the impact of sleep disorders on QOL in apneics is not limited to excessive daytime sleepiness and that physical activity can contribute to reducing the symptoms. Thus, exercise should be considered as an adjunct interventional strategy in the management of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

  2. 77 FR 25226 - Proposed Recommendations on Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Proposed Recommendations on Obstructive Sleep Apnea AGENCY... withdrawing its proposed regulatory guidance for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and request for comment as...

  3. History of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Guilleminault

    2017-08-01

    Thus, the neurophysiological studies carried out since then, as well as the European Society of Neurology conference held in 1964, the description of the syndrome in pediatric patients, the confirmation of cardiovascular co-morbidity associated with the disease, tracheostomy as treatment and the creation of hypoglossal nerve stimulus implants —including Sullivan’s discovery of positive pressure as a home treatment— have been essential for the understanding of this syndrome

  4. [Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome in children: beyond adenotonsillar hypertrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteller, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome in the general childhood population is 1-2% and the most common cause is adenotonsillar hypertrophy. However, beyond adenotonsillar hypertrophy, there are other highly prevalent causes of this syndrome in children. The causes are often multifactorial and include muscular hypotonia, dentofacial abnormalities, soft tissue hypertrophy of the airway, and neurological disorders). Collaboration between different specialties involved in the care of these children is essential, given the wide variability of conditions and how frequently different factors are involved in their genesis, as well as the different treatments to be applied. We carried out a wide literature review of other causes of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome in children, beyond adenotonsillar hypertrophy. We organised the prevalence of this syndrome in each pathology and the reasons that cause it, as well as their interactions and management, in a consistent manner. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  5. Estudio de la inmunidad innata en pacientes con apnea obstructiva del sueño: Un microambiente favorable para el progreso tumoral

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández Jiménez, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Tesis doctoral inédita leída en la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Medicina, Departamento de Bioquímica. Fecha de lectura: 23-06-2016 Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a syndrome characterized by repetitive pauses of breathing induced by a partial or complete collapse of upper airways during sleep. Intermittent hypoxia (IH), a hallmark characteristic of OSA, has been proposed to be a major determinant of cancer development, and patients with OSA are at a higher risk of ...

  6. Obstructive sleep apnea and diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Vale

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is convincing evidence that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is highly associated with impaired glucose metabolism. Objectives: Analyze the prevalence of OSA in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM patients. Evaluate the influence of OSA on glycemic control. Methods: The adult patients with diabetes mellitus (DM followed in the department of internal medicine were referred to our Sleep Unit. A home respiratory polygraphy was then performed on all patients with body mass index (BMI  30/h. The mean CT90 was 5.3 ± 12.5 and the mean AHI was 13.6 ± 18.3. The mean AHI was similar between type 1 and type 2 DM (15.7 ± 24.5 Vs 11.6 ± 8.9; p = 0.46. The AHI was not correlated with the BMI. Type 2 DM patients with poor glycemic control (HbA1c > 7.5% had a significantly higher mean AHI (14.3 ± 9.0 vs 6.4 ± 6.2; p = 0.038. This difference did not remain significant after adjustment for BMI (p = 0.151. Conclusions: The prevalence of OSA in type 1 DM is similar to that found in type 2 DM. We note the high prevalence of OSA in younger patients with type 1 DM. Keywords: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, Diabetes mellitus, Glycemic control

  7. Obstructive sleep apnea in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lee, Ruth

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) represent two of the most prevalent chronic respiratory disorders and cardiovascular diseases are major co-morbidities in both. Co-existence of both disorders (overlap syndrome) occurs in 1% of adults and overlap patients have worse nocturnal hypoxemia and hypercapnia than COPD and OSA patients alone. The present review discusses recent data concerning the pathophysiological and clinical significance of the overlap syndrome. RECENT FINDINGS: The severity of obstructive ventilatory impairment and hyperinflation, especially the inspiratory capacity to total lung capacity (TLC) ratio, correlates with the severity of sleep-related breathing disturbances. Early treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) improves survival, reduces hospitalization and pulmonary hypertension, and also reduces hypoxemia. Evidence of systemic inflammation and oxidative stress in COPD and sleep apnea provides insight into potential interactions between both disorders that may predispose to cardiovascular disease. Long-term outcome studies of overlap patients currently underway should provide further evidence of the clinical significance of the overlap syndrome. SUMMARY: Studies of overlap syndrome patients at a clinical, physiological and molecular level should provide insight into disease mechanisms and consequences of COPD and sleep apnea, in addition to identifying potential relationships with cardiovascular disease.

  8. Equivalence of nasal and oronasal masks during initial CPAP titration for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Ming; Amis, Terence; Lee, Sharon; Falland, Karina; Lambert, Stephen; Wheatley, John

    2011-07-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) titration studies are commonly performed using a nasal mask but some patients may prefer a full-face or oronasal mask. There is little evidence regarding the equivalence of different mask interfaces used to initiate treatment. We hypothesized that oronasal breathing when using an oronasal mask increases upper airway collapsibility and that a higher pressure may be required to maintain airway patency. We also assessed patient preferences for the 2 mask interfaces. Prospective, randomized, cross-over design with 2 consecutive CPAP titration nights. Accredited laboratory in a university hospital. Twenty-four treatment-naive subjects with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and respiratory disturbance index of greater than 15 events per hour. CPAP titration was performed using an auto-titrating machine with randomization to a nasal or oronasal mask, followed by a second titration night using the alternate mask style. There was no significant difference in the mean pressures determined between nasal and oronasal masks, although 43% of subjects had nasal-to-oronasal mask-pressure differences of 2 cm H(2)O or more. Residual respiratory events, arousals, and measured leak were all greater with the oronasal mask. Seventy-nine percent of subjects preferred the nasal mask. Patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome can generally switch between nasal and oronasal masks without changing machine pressure, although there are individual differences that may be clinically significant. Measured leak is greater with the oronasal mask. Most patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome prefer a nasal mask as the interface for initiation of CPAP. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR). ACTRN: ACTRN12611000243910. URL: http://www.ANZCTR.org.au/ACTRN12611000243910.aspx

  9. Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS and its relation to cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Ortíz-Santacruz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available For some years, it has been suggested that patients with untreated obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome are more likely to have solid cancer and increased cancer mortality, although some doubt on the issue has arisen. In consequence, this article describes, on the one hand, the most important studies on the topic and, on the other, the pathophysiology proposed by researchers, who formulate an association in which hypoxia, DNA oxidative damage, endothelial dysfunction and the disruption of the dream architecture play a fundamental role, in addition to other interesting considerations.

  10. Quality of life in obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Londoño-Palacio

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS has a direct influence on the quality of life of people who suffer from it. Objectively measuring this impact at diagnosis and during treatment is important to improve the subsequent adherence to treatment. Based on different studies, general and specific disease scales for OSAHS have been created, which allow to evaluate different dimensions such as daytime symptoms, nocturnal symptoms, daytime sleepiness, emotions, the repercussion of the disease on the social interactions of people, as well as the patient’s perception of the treatment indicated.

  11. The association between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Alzheimer's Disease: a Meta-analysis perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnoosh eEmamian

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA are highly prevalent, chronic conditions with intriguing, yet poorly understood epidemiological overlap. To date, the amount of OSA syndrome present in patients with AD across literature remains unknown. To address this question, we collected all available published clinical data and analyzed them through a quantitative meta-analytical approach. The results of our quantitative meta-analysis suggest that the aggregate odds ratio for OSA in AD versus healthy control was 5.05 and homogeneous. This reflects that patients with AD have a five times higher chance of presenting with OSA than cognitively non-impaired individuals of similar age. Moreover, these data suggest that around half of patients with AD have experienced OSA at some point after their initial diagnosis. The additive impact of progressive changes in sleep quality and structure, changes in cerebral blood flow and the cellular redox status in OSA patients may all be contributing factors to cognitive decline and may further aggravate AD progression. It is hoped that the high OSA rate in AD patients, as suggested by the findings of our meta-analysis, might provide a sufficient clinical incentive to alert clinicians the importance of screening patients for OSA in AD, and stimulate further research in this area.

  12. The consolidation of implicit sequence memory in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eszter Csabi

    Full Text Available Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA Syndrome is a relatively frequent sleep disorder characterized by disrupted sleep patterns. It is a well-established fact that sleep has beneficial effect on memory consolidation by enhancing neural plasticity. Implicit sequence learning is a prominent component of skill learning. However, the formation and consolidation of this fundamental learning mechanism remains poorly understood in OSA. In the present study we examined the consolidation of different aspects of implicit sequence learning in patients with OSA. We used the Alternating Serial Reaction Time task to measure general skill learning and sequence-specific learning. There were two sessions: a learning phase and a testing phase, separated by a 10-hour offline period with sleep. Our data showed differences in offline changes of general skill learning between the OSA and control group. The control group demonstrated offline improvement from evening to morning, while the OSA group did not. In contrast, we did not observe differences between the groups in offline changes in sequence-specific learning. Our findings suggest that disrupted sleep in OSA differently affects neural circuits involved in the consolidation of sequence learning.

  13. ACETAZOLAMIDE IS A MEDICINE FOR THE MEDICATED CORRECTION OF THE SLEEP APNEA AND HYPOPNEA SYNDROME AMONG CHILDREN AND ADULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Bykova

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep apnea and hypopnea syndrome is a life bendangering sleep dis order among both adults and children. The prevalence of the sleep apnea and hypopnea syndrome both in adult and pediatric population may be evaluated only approximately, as not all of the patients, suffering from this pathology, may call some adequate complaints, which, in their turn, help diagnose the disease. For example, only obstructive sleep apnea syndrome according to the data of British epidemiologists is met among the adults at the frequency rate, which can be compared with the prevalence of the bronchial asthma. Since metabolic acidosis caused by the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor of acetazolamide stimulates the ventilation of lungs, the researchers have set forth a supposition that the application of this medicine can be efficient to treat the respiratory disturbances in sleep. There is wide application of acetazolamide for the medicated correction of sleep apnea and hypopnea syndrome of the central genesis among both adults and children. When using acetazolamide for the long term therapy of respiratory disturbances among adult patients, the main issue is the probable growth of tolerance towards the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor along with the continuous longbterm application of the medicine. In pediatry, quite on the contrary, the sleep apnea and hypopnea syndrome is usually a transit problem of the early infancy and it does not require any longbterm drug therapy, which defines specifically high perspectives of the efficient and safe application of acetazolamide for the medicated correction of respiratory disturbances in sleep precisely within this category of patients.Key words: apnea, hypopnea, sleep disorder, acetazolamide, children.

  14. Factors related to pediatric obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in different age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiali; Gu, Meizhen; Chen, Shumei; Chen, Wei; Ni, Kun; Xu, Hongming; Li, Xiaoyan

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to retrospectively investigate the factors related to pediatric obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children younger than 6 years and those older than 6 years.A total of 437 children who were hospitalized due to OSAHS between January 2014 and December 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. The children were further divided into OSAHS group and OSAHS + ADHD group. The general characteristics, OSA-18 quality of life, intention-hyperactivity score, and polysomnographic parameters (apnea-hypopnea index and the lowest oxygen saturation) were collected and compared between groups.There were 298 boys and 139 girls with the male to female ratio of 2.14:1. ADHD was found in 146 children including 105 boys and 41 girls with the male to female ratio of 2.56:1. Of these children, 31.62% and 35.46% had concomitant ADHD in children aged 4 to 5 years and those aged 6 to 11 years, respectively. In children aged 4 to 5 years, the incidence of allergic rhinitis was significantly higher (P = .016) and the adenoid hypertrophy was more severe (P = .001) in those with concomitant ADHD. In children aged 6 to 11 years, the tonsil hypertrophy was more severe in those with concomitant ADHD (P = .019). In children with concomitant ADHD, OSA-18 score was higher than in those with OSAHS alone (P ADHD than in those with OSAHS alone.As high as 30% of OSAHS children have concomitant ADHD, and the incidence of ADHD in OSAHS children is increasing over age. Boys are more likely to develop OSAHS and incidence of ADHD in OSAHS boys is higher than in OSAHS girls. In addition, risk factors of ADHD also vary between age groups. The ADHD is related to the severity of allergic rhinitis and adenoid hypertrophy in children aged 4 to 5 years, and to the severity of tonsil hypertrophy in children aged 6 to 11 years. Hypoxia may be an important factor causing ADHD. OSAHS should be treated as early as possible to

  15. Obstructive sleep apnea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Tønnesen, Philip; Ibsen, Rikke

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Most studies have used cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease (CVD) end-points to measure the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), but pre-diagnostic morbidities involve a range of comorbidities that may influence the consequences of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We...

  16. Impact of sleep deprivation and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome on daytime vigilance and driving performance: a laboratory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizza, F; Contardi, S; Mondini, S; Cirignotta, F

    2012-01-01

    To study the impact of sleepiness, a well-established cause of car accidents, on driving ability, we designed a 30-min monotonous simulated driving task. Our simulated driving task encompasses both primary vehicle control (standard deviation of lane position, crash occurrence) and secondary tasks (type and reaction times to divided attention tasks). Driving simulator data were correlated to subjective (state/trait) and objective (MSLT/MWT) sleepiness measures in healthy subjects undergoing sleep deprivation (SD) and in obstructive sleep apnea (OSAS) patients. SD induced severe sleepiness during nighttime, when state sleepiness increased while primary vehicle control ability worsened. After SD, driving ability decreased and was inversely correlated to subjective and objective sleepiness at MSLT. OSAS patients driving ability was well correlated to objective sleepiness, with inverse correlation to sleep propensity at the MSLT and even more strict relation with the ability to maintain wakefulness at the MWT. Sleepiness worsens driving ability in healthy subjects after SD and in OSAS patients. Driving ability correlates with subjective and objective sleepiness measures, in particular to the ability to maintain wakefulness.

  17. Obstructive sleep apnea and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, James M; Somers, Virend K

    2004-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common medical condition that occurs in approximately 5% to 15% of the population. The pathophysiology of OSA is characterized by repetitive occlusions of the posterior pharynx during sleep that obstruct the airway, followed by oxyhemoglobin desaturation, persistent inspiratory efforts against the occluded airway, and termination by arousal from sleep. Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with daytime sleepiness and fatigue, likely due to fragmented sleep from recurrent arousals. Substantial evidence shows that patients with OSA have an increased incidence of hypertension compared with individuals without OSA and that OSA is a risk factor for the development of hypertension. Recent studies show that OSA may be implicated in stroke and transient ischemic attacks. Obstructive sleep apnea appears to be associated with coronary heart disease, heart failure, and cardiac arrhythmias. Pulmonary hypertension may be associated with OSA, especially in patients with preexisting pulmonary disease. Although the exact cause that links OSA with cardiovascular disease is unknown, there is evidence that OSA is associated with a group of proinflammatory and prothrombotic factors that have been identified to be important in the development of atherosclerosis. Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with increased daytime and nocturnal sympathetic activity. Autonomic abnormalities seen in patients with OSA include increased resting heart rate, decreased R-R interval variability, and increased blood pressure variability. Both atherosclerosis and OSA are associated with endothelial dysfunction, increased C-reactive protein, interleukin 6, fibrinogen, and plasminogen activator inhibitor, and reduced fibrinolytic activity. Obstructive sleep apnea has been associated with enhanced platelet activity and aggregation. Leukocyte adhesion and accumulation on endothelial cells are common in both OSA and atherosclerosis. Clinicians should be aware that OSA may be

  18. Obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven D. Brass

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA affects millions of Americans and is estimated to be as prevalent as asthma and diabetes. Given the fact that obesity is a major risk factor for OSA, and given the current global rise in obesity, the prevalence of OSA will increase in the future. Individuals with sleep apnea are often unaware of their sleep disorder. It is usually first recognized as a problem by family members who witness the apneic episodes or is suspected by their primary care doctor because of the individual’s risk factors and symptoms. The vast majority remain undiagnosed and untreated, despite the fact that this serious disorder can have significant consequences. Individuals with untreated OSA can stop breathing hundreds of times a night during their sleep. These apneic events can lead to fragmented sleep that is of poor quality, as the brain arouses briefly in order for the body to resume breathing. Untreated, sleep apnea can have dire health consequences and can increase the risk of hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, and heart failure. OSA management has also become important in a number of comorbid neurological conditions, including epilepsy, stroke, multiple sclerosis, and headache. Diagnosis typically involves use of screening questionnaires, physical exam, and an overnight polysomnography or a portable home study. Treatment options include changes in lifestyle, positive airway pressure, surgery, and dental appliances.

  19. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Greek OSA-18 questionnaire in children undergoing polysomnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousailidis, George K; Lachanas, Vasileios A; Skoulakis, Charalampos E; Sakellariou, Achilles; Exarchos, Sotirios T; Kaditis, Athanasios G; Bizakis, John G

    2014-12-01

    Translations of validated questionnaires help to compare different countries/cultures populations and establish protocols for global health. OSA-18 is a validated disease-specific questionnaire for pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). Our aim was to validate OSA-18 in Greek and correlate it with polysomnography results and OSA severity. Prospective instrument validation study. OSA-18 was translated in Greek and back into English. Children undergoing polysomnography due to snoring were recruited prospectively. OSA-18 was completed by parents during the initial clinic visit (test), in the evening prior to the sleep study (retest), and 3 months postoperatively for subjects who underwent adenotonsillectomy. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were evaluated. Validity was assessed by exploring correlations between OSA-18 and AHI, by comparing OSA-18 of OSA and non-OSA groups, and by calculating questionnaire's sensitivity and specificity for detecting OSA. Total scores of non-OSA, mild, moderate and severe OSA subgroups were compared. In OSA children who underwent adenotonsillectomy, preoperative and postoperative total scores were compared to assess responsiveness. Test-retest questionnaires were fully completed for 141 children. OSA-18 in Greek had good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha 0.951 for test and 0.947 for retest) and test-retest reliability (Pearson's correlation coefficients between test and retest scores: 0.850-0.946; PGreek OSA-18 is an instrument with satisfactory internal consistency, reliability, and responsiveness, but it is a poor predictor of OSA severity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Short-Term Memory Performances during Sustained Wakefulness in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greneche, Jerome; Krieger, Jean; Bertrand, Frederic; Erhardt, Christine; Maumy, Myriam; Tassi, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Both working and immediate memories were assessed every 4 h by specific short-term memory tasks over sustained wakefulness in 12 patients with obstructive sleep apnea and hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) and 10 healthy controls. Results indicated that OSAHS patients exhibited lower working memory performances than controls on both backward digit span and…

  1. Long-term oral appliance therapy in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome : a controlled study on dental side effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doff, M. H. J.; Finnema, K. J.; Hoekema, A.; Wijkstra, P. J.; de Bont, L. G. M.; Stegenga, B.

    This study aimed to assess possible dental side effects associated with long-term use of an adjustable oral appliance compared with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in patients with the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and to study the relationship between these possible side effects and

  2. Retinal Vascular Morphological Changes in Patients with Extremely Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yi Wang

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: This study indicated that increased AVR of retinal vessel can be observed in extremely severe OSAS patients. For patients with OSAS, retinal vascular abnormalities may become an early indication for further cardiovascular abnormalities.

  3. Reduced cerebral blood flow during wakefulness in obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Eun Yeon; Tae, Woo Suk; Han, Sun Jung; Cho, Jae-Wook; Hong, Seung Bong

    2007-11-01

    To investigate changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). We compared the 99mTc-ethylcysteinate dimer (ECD) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images of patients with OSAHS with those of age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers. University hospital. Twenty-seven patients with severe OSAHS and 27 healthy volunteers underwent 99mTc-ECD brain SPECT studies. For statistical parametric mapping analysis, all SPECT images were spatially normalized to the standard SPECT template and then smoothed using a 14-mm full-width at half-maximum Gaussian kernel. The Student t test was used for the statistical analysis. The mean age of patients and subjects was 44.3 years (range 31-58). All patients underwent overnight polysomnography. The mean apnea-hypopnea index of patients was 60.4 +/- 17.6 per hour (range 33 -104), indicating severe OSAHS. All patients snored heavily and had daytime sleepiness (mean Epworth Sleepiness Scale score, 10.7 +/- 3.7, range 6-12). Statistical parametric mapping analysis showed that rCBF in patients with OSAHS was significantly reduced in bilateral parahippocampal gyri and in the right lingual gyrus, as compared with that of healthy volunteers (P false discovery rate correction). Moreover, apnea-hypopnea indexes of patients were negatively correlated with rCBF in the right pericentral gyrus and right cuneus at uncorrected P memory, spatial learning, executive function, and attention, which are frequently found in patients with OSAHS.

  4. Study of low dose and dynamic multi-slice CT about obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in sleeping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Jie; Qi Ji; Yin Jianzhong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To perform Low dose dynamic MSCT(multi-slice CT) in sleeping obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) patients correcting the imprecise measure values in waking state, and to exactly analyse the location and extension of the dynamic changes about the condition. Methods: Sixteen OSAS patients were scanned both in waking and naturally sleeping period (end phase of inspiration and expiration). Measured at the narrowest part of the retropalatal (RP) and retroglossal (RG) and 5 mm under the tip of epiglottis at the epiglottal (EPG)at the end period of inspiration in sleeping, respectively, and compared the accurate position of the narrowest or occlusive level in 3 phases. All patients were also scanned using cine mode at the narrowest level at the end period of inspiration in sleeping to show the pharyngeal cavity changes during sleep. Results: The smallest XSA of RP region (M w =47.50 mm 2 , M e =73.00 mm 2 , M i =2.00 mm 2 ; Z we =2.897, P we =0.003; Z wi =4.192, P wi ie =4.538, P ie w =8.00 mm, M e =9.50 mm, M i =1.50 mm; Z we =1.933, P we =0.056; Z wi =3.720, P wi ie =4.230, P ie w =8.00 mm, M e =9.00 mm, M i =1.00 mm; Z we =1.210, P we =0.246; Z wi =4.203, P wi ie =4.557, P ie w =4.00 mm 3 , M e =5.50 mm 3 , M i =1.50 mm 3 ; Z we =1.576, P we =0.125; Z wi =3.532, P wi ie =4.077, P ie w =7.00 mm, M e =6.00 mm, M i =10.50 mm; Z we =0.557, P we =0.603; Z wi =2.541, P wi =0.011; Z ie =2.852, P ie =0.004) and RG regions (M w =5.00 mm, M e =3.00 mm, M i =9.50 mm; Z we =0.747, P we =0.482; Z wi =2.657, P wi =0.007; Z ie =3.075, P ie =0.001), were different between inspiration and expiration of sleeping or awake. The dynamic cine CT scan during sleeping could show pharyngeal change, clearly. Conclusion: At the end period of inspiration in sleeping, the location of narrow or obstructive of airway is the most precise and sensitive and the false negative at the waking could be obviously reduced. Low dose MSCT scan reduced exposure and expense. (authors)

  5. Missing teeth and pediatric obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilleminault, Christian; Abad, Vivien C; Chiu, Hsiao-Yean; Peters, Brandon; Quo, Stacey

    2016-05-01

    Missing teeth in early childhood can result in abnormal facial morphology with narrow upper airway. The potential association between dental agenesis or early dental extractions and the presence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) was investigated. We reviewed clinical data, results of polysomnographic sleep studies, and orthodontic imaging studies of children with dental agenesis (n = 32) or early extraction of permanent teeth (n = 11) seen during the past 5 years and compared their findings to those of age-, gender-, and body mass index-matched children with normal teeth development but tonsilloadenoid (T&A) hypertrophy and symptoms of OSA (n = 64). The 31 children with dental agenesis and 11 children with early dental extractions had at least 2 permanent teeth missing. All children with missing teeth (n = 43) had clinical complaints and signs evoking OSA. There was a significant difference in mean apnea-hypopnea indices (AHI) in the three dental agenesis, dental extraction, and T&A studied groups (p dental agenesis group. In the children with missing teeth (n = 43), aging was associated with the presence of a higher AHI (R (2) = 0.71, p dental agenesis in the studied children was not part of a syndrome and was an isolated finding. Our children with permanent teeth missing due to congenital agenesis or permanent teeth extraction had a smaller oral cavity, known to predispose to the collapse of the upper airway during sleep, and presented with OSA recognized at a later age. Due to the low-grade initial symptomatology, sleep-disordered breathing may be left untreated for a prolonged period with progressive worsening of symptoms over time.

  6. Sleep Architecture in Night Shift Workers Police Officers with Obstructive Sleep Apnea-hypopnea Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selene Verde-Tinoco

    Full Text Available Introduction: Reduced sleep to increase work hours is common among police officers, when this situation is combined with Obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS, health consequences are greater, therefore we believe there is a need of research for these alterations. The aim of this study was to measure the changes in sleep architecture (SA in police officers who currently have Night shift work (NSW and OSAHS. Methods: We compared SA in 107 subjects divided in three groups: the first group included police officers with NSW and severe OSAHS (n = 48; the second group were non-police officers with diurnal work time and severe OSAHS (n = 48 and the third group was formed by healthy controls (n = 11. Polysomnography (PSG variables and Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS scores were compared. Results: SA was more disrupted in the group of police officers with NSW and OSAHS than in patients with OSAHS only and in the control group. Police officers with NSW and OSAHS presented an increased number of electroencephalographic activations, apnea/hypopnea index, and sleep latency, and showed lower scores of oxygen saturation, and in the ESS. Multivariate analysis revealed significant influence of age and Body mass index (BMI. Conclusions: Data suggested with caution an additive detrimental effect of NSW and OSAHS in SA and ESS of police officers. However age and BMI must be also taken into account in future studies.

  7. Treatment of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS with positive airway pressure (PAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Campo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to treat any disease, an adequate multidisciplinary management and involving the patient in the long term are necessary, since not treating patients implies an enormous burden for the health system and the society. Currently, different treatments for patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS can be found, being PAP (positive airway pressure the most frequently chosen after ruling out anatomical abnormalities susceptible to surgery. Indications for PAP therapy include patients with apnea-hypopnea index (AHI ≥15 events/hour or ≥5 and ≤14 events/hour and complaints of excessive daytime sleepiness, cognitive impairment and affective disorder or insomnia, documented arterial hypertension, coronary artery disease, or cerebrovascular event history. It is important to remember that AHI should be based on polysomnographic recording of sleep ≥2 hours. There are different modalities of treatment with PAP and intervention should be sought to improve adherence to the device, which is the main limiting factor for achieving efficacy in the treatment. The impact of OSAHS treatment has been investigated, but most of the reported studies are observational.

  8. Transoral robotic surgery for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: Principles and technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Vicini

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study is a review of transoral robotic surgery (TORS for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS. Methods: The review presents the experience of the robotic center that developed the technique with regards to patient selection, surgical method, and post-operative care. In addition, the review provides results of a systematic review and meta-analysis of the complications and clinical outcomes of TORS when applied in the management of OSAHS. Results: The rate of success, defined as 50% reduction of pre-operative AHI and an overall AHI <20 events/h, is achieved in up to 76.6% of patients with a range between 53.8% and 83.3%. The safety of this approach is reasonable as the main complication (bleeding affected 4.2% of patients (range 4.2%–5.3%. However, transient dysphagia (7.2%; range 5%–14% does compromise the quality of life and must be discussed with patients preoperatively. Conclusions: TORS for the treatment of OSAHS appears to be a promising and safe procedure for patients seeking an alternative to traditional therapy. Appropriate patient selection remains an important consideration for successful implementation of this novel surgical approach requiring further research. Keywords: Transoral robotic surgery, TORS, Partial glossectomy, Midline glossectomy, Posterior glossectomy, Obstructive sleep apnea, Sleep surgery

  9. Snoring Sounds Predict Obstruction Sites and Surgical Response in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Hypopnea Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Li-Ang; Lo, Yu-Lun; Yu, Jen-Fang; Lee, Gui-She; Ni, Yung-Lun; Chen, Ning-Hung; Fang, Tuan-Jen; Huang, Chung-Guei; Cheng, Wen-Nuan; Li, Hsueh-Yu

    2016-07-29

    Snoring sounds generated by different vibrators of the upper airway may be useful indicators of obstruction sites in patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). This study aimed to investigate associations between snoring sounds, obstruction sites, and surgical responses (≥50% reduction in the apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] and snoring sound recordings during in-lab full-night polysomnography, drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE), and relocation pharyngoplasty. All patients received follow-up polysomnography after 6 months. Fifteen (42%) patients with at least two complete obstruction sites defined by DISE were significantly, positively associated with maximal snoring sound intensity (40-300 Hz; odds ratio [OR], 1.25, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05-1.49) and body mass index (OR, 1.48, 95% CI 1.02-2.15) after logistic regression analysis. Tonsil obstruction was significantly, inversely correlated with mean snoring sound intensity (301-850 Hz; OR, 0.84, 95% CI 0.74-0.96). Moreover, baseline tonsil obstruction detected by either DISE or mean snoring sound intensity (301-850 Hz), and AHI could significantly predict the surgical response. Our findings suggest that snoring sound detection may be helpful in determining obstruction sites and predict surgical responses.

  10. Effects of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Cognitive Functions: Evidence for a Common Nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Andreou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS show similar neurocognitive impairments. Effects are more apparent in severe cases, whereas in moderate and mild cases the effects are equivocal. The exact mechanism that causes cognitive dysfunctions in both diseases is still unknown and only suggestions have been made for each disease separately. The primary objective of this review is to present COPD and OSAS impact on cognitive functions. Secondly, it aims to examine the potential mechanisms by which COPD and OSAS can be linked and provide evidence for a common nature that affects cognitive functions in both diseases. Patients with COPD and OSAS compared to normal distribution show significant deficits in the cognitive abilities of attention, psychomotor speed, memory and learning, visuospatial and constructional abilities, executive skills, and language. The severity of these deficits in OSAS seems to correlate with the physiological events such as sleep defragmentation, apnea/hypopnea index, and hypoxemia, whereas cognitive impairments in COPD are associated with hypoventilation, hypoxemia, and hypercapnia. These factors as well as vascocerebral diseases and changes in systemic hemodynamic seem to act in an intermingling and synergistic way on the cause of cognitive dysfunctions in both diseases. However, low blood oxygen pressure seems to be the dominant factor that contributes to the presence of cognitive deficits in both COPD and OSAS.

  11. Is sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome a new cardiovascular risk factor? A literature review that does not confirm it

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Dolores Gómez Olivares

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The factors that favor and can trigger cardiovascular diseases are of great interest given their high morbidity and mortality in the population. In this paper, a literature review is carried out to verify whether sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (SAHS acts as a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases in adults. It is important to show if there is a correlation because sleep apneas are very prevalent in the population, increase with age and their diagnosis and treatment are simple. Objectives: To verify if SAHS is a cardiovascular risk factor in adults. Results: The association of SAHS with hypertension, cerebrovascular, cardiovascular, arrhythmia and sudden death in adults has been studied. It has been shown that apneas act as a risk factor independently for these pathologies and that CPAP treatment improves the clinical and decreases the risk of mortality from cardiovascular diseases. Conclusions: Although an abnormal respiratory pattern predisposes to cardiovascular disease, SAHS is not confirmed as a cardiovascular risk factor

  12. Placenta-secreted circulating markers in pregnant women with obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourjeily, Ghada; Curran, Patrizia; Butterfield, Kristen; Maredia, Hasina; Carpenter, Marshall; Lambert-Messerlian, Geralyn

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with placenta-mediated adverse clinical outcomes. We aimed at comparing placenta-secreted proteins, such as first and second trimester Down syndrome screening markers which have been linked to preeclampsia, and markers of angiogenesis in pregnant women with OSA, and pregnant controls at low risk for OSA. A case-control study of pregnant women with OSA and controls at low risk for OSA was performed. Levels of first and second trimester markers were reported as multiple of median (MoM), and adjusted for body mass index (BMI). Stored samples were tested for markers of angiogenesis and adjusted for gestational age, BMI, and chronic hypertension. A total of 24 women with OSA and 166 controls had screening markers. BMI was higher in cases compared to controls, P=0.01. MoM levels of placenta associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) were significantly lower in cases versus controls, even after adjusting for BMI (0.52 IQR 0.48 vs. 1.01 IQR 0.63, P=0.009). The ratio of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 to placental growth factor was significantly higher in cases than controls, even after adjusting for confounders (4.42 IQR 2.52 vs. 2.93 IQR 2.01, P=0.009). Circulating placenta-secreted glycoproteins and markers of angiogenesis are altered in pregnant women with OSA.

  13. Obstructive sleep apnea and bone mineral density in obese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariani S

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Stefania Mariani,1 Daniela Fiore,1 Laura Varone,2 Sabrina Basciani,1 Agnese Persichetti,1 Mikiko Watanabe,1 Maurizio Saponara,3 Giovanni Spera,1 Costanzo Moretti,4 Lucio Gnessi11Department of Experimental Medicine, Section of Medical Physiopathology and Endocrinology, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy; 2Department of Environmental Biology, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy; 3Department of Otolaryngology, Audiology and Phonation, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy; 4Division of Endocrinology, Department of System Medicine, Section of Reproductive Endocrinology University of TorVergata, Fatebenefratelli Hospital "San Giovanni Calibita" Rome, ItalyContext: Obesity and its co-morbidities may adversely affect bone mineral density (BMD. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is a major complication of obesity. To date, the effects of OSA on BMD in obese patients have been poorly studied.Objective: To examine whether the severity of OSA independently correlates with BMD in obese patients.Methods: One hundred and fifteen obese subjects with OSA (Apnea/Hypopnea Index [AHI] ≥5 events per hour were included in the study. BMD was measured at lumbar spine, total hip, and femoral neck by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Body mass index, lean mass, and representative measures of metabolic syndrome (waist circumference, fasting plasma glucose, blood pressure, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides and inflammation (ESR, CRP, fibrinogen were also evaluated.Results: BMD did not differ among obese individuals regardless of OSA severity. Correlation coefficient analysis for all the covariates showed a lack of association between AHI and BMD that was strongly influenced by age and weight.Conclusion: Our study does not support an independent association between AHI and BMD in obese patients. Controlled studies involving a greater number of patients are warranted.Keywords: obesity, polysomnography, metabolic syndrome

  14. Comparison of Cephalometric Variables in Non-obese and Obese Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Önder Öztürk

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the cephalometric variables of obese (body mass index (BMI ≥30 and non-obese (BMI<30 Turkish male patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS. Materials and Methods: OSAS diagnosed 85 patients who were obese [n=37; mean age (±SE, 49.41±1.54 year] and non-obese [n=48; mean age (±SE 46.92±1.39 year] were included in the study. The cephalometric measurements and polysomnographic data of the patients were compared and a discriminatory analysis was performed.Results: The apnea-hypopnea index (AHI was significantly higher in obese patients (p<0.01. Bimaxillary protrusion was found in obese patients (p<0.05. The non-obese patients with AHI ≥ 30 had an increased mandibular plane angle In the stepwise discriminant analysis done separately in obese and non-obese patients according to AHI; only the hyoid bone position was included in the model in obese patients and the estimated success of discrimination of AHI’s level (<30 and ≥30 was 70.3%. Age, anterior face and posterior face height were included to the model in non-obese patients and the estimated success of discrimination was found as 79.2%. Conclusion: Craniofacial morphology has an effect on the severity of OSAS. If the craniofacial morphology tends toward a worsening of OSAS with obesity, the severity of the OSAS increases.

  15. Clinical analysis of adjuvant ventilator treatment of type 2 diabetes with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Xiu Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To preliminarily explore the effect of auxiliary ventilator treatment of Type 2 diabetes mellitus with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS. Method: A total of 50 OSAHS patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus treated in Guang’anmen Hospital from September, 2014 to May, 2015 included experimental group (n=25 who received ventilator therapy and control group (n=25, and both groups received 3 months of treatment. Results: Compared with control group, AHI (20.5±9.4(h vs 57.6±16.1(h, LSPO (90.8±12.3(% vs 76.2±14.8(% in the experimental group were significantly improved after assisted ventilation therapy. Conclusions: In addition to controlling plasma glucose by conventional drugs, it is also very important for OSAHS patients with type 2 diabetes to actively use assisted ventilation therapy to improve hypoxia.

  16. Surgical treatment by otorhinolaryngology in obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Vallejo-Balen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS is characterized by the partial obstruction or total collapse of the upper airway in an intermittent and repetitive manner; in this scenario, surgical management was initially regarded as an alternative for treating this pathology. Nowadays, surgery is highly recognized because it improves tolerance and adaptation to positive pressure therapy; it remains as the first line of treatment, although high rates of effectiveness are not achieved. The first step before considering any surgical procedure is an adequate topographic diagnosis; therefore, a nasofibrolaryngoscopy should always be performed to identify the obstruction site(s. It is known that 75% of patients have obstructions at multiple levels, so correcting OSAHS by up to 95% is possible when the approach considers all the levels. Current procedures include nasal surgery, soft palate, tonsils, tongue base, hypoglossal nerve stimulator and facial skeletal procedures, as well as adjuvant procedures that include radiofrequency and palate implants.

  17. Comparative study between clinical history and polysomnogram in the obstructive sleep apnea/ hypopnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondim, Lys Maria Allenstein; Matumoto, Luciana Matshie; Melo Júnior, Marco Antônio Cezário de; Bittencourt, Sérgio; Ribeiro, Ulisses José

    2007-01-01

    Recognizing sleep-disordered breathing is on the rise every year. Manifestations, such as snoring, that were earlier considered mere inconvenients are now acquiring greater importance concerning life quality and social impact. To compare the clinical history to polysomnogram (PSG) results in the Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome (OSAHS). 125 patients were analyzed, in a retrospective study. Specific questionnaires, avaliations of Body Mass Index and Epworth Scale were carried out. Among the patients, 75 were males and 50 were females. The main symptom was snoring. 46% had normal PSG, 30% had light OSAHS, 15% moderate and 9% severe OSAHS and it was not observed a correlation between clinical data and PSG results. Concerning clinical symptoms, only insomnia has shown relevance when univariably analyzed in normal and light OSAHS patients (plosing its importance when analyzed together with other factors. the clinical history, per se, is not sufficient to define OSAHS' diagnosis or it's severity.

  18. Computer-Assisted Diagnosis of the Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Estevez, Diego; Moret-Bonillo, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Automatic diagnosis of the Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome (SAHS) has become an important area of research due to the growing interest in the field of sleep medicine and the costs associated with its manual diagnosis. The increment and heterogeneity of the different techniques, however, make it somewhat difficult to adequately follow the recent developments. A literature review within the area of computer-assisted diagnosis of SAHS has been performed comprising the last 15 years of research in the field. Screening approaches, methods for the detection and classification of respiratory events, comprehensive diagnostic systems, and an outline of current commercial approaches are reviewed. An overview of the different methods is presented together with validation analysis and critical discussion of the current state of the art. PMID:26266052

  19. Overlap syndrome: obstructive sleep apnea in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzenblum, Emmanuel; Chaouat, Ari; Kessler, Romain; Canuet, Matthieu

    2008-02-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (SAHS) are both common diseases affecting respectively 10 and 5% of the adult population over 40 years of age, and their coexistence, which is denominated overlap syndrome, can be expected to occur in about 0.5% of this population. A recent epidemiologic study has shown that the prevalence of SAHS is not higher in COPD than in the general population, and that the coexistence of the two conditions is due to chance and not through a pathophysiologic linkage between these two diseases. Patients with overlap have a more important sleep-related O(2) desaturation than do patients with COPD with the same degree of bronchial obstruction. They have an increased risk of developing hypercapnic respiratory insufficiency and pulmonary hypertension when compared with patients with SAHS alone and with patients with "usual" COPD. In patients with overlap, hypoxemia, hypercapnia, and pulmonary hypertension can be observed in the presence of mild to moderate bronchial obstruction, which is different from "usual" COPD. Therapy of the overlap syndrome consists of nasal continuous positive airway pressure or nocturnal noninvasive ventilation (NIV), with or without associated nocturnal O(2). Patients who are markedly hypoxemic during daytime (Pa(O(2)) < 55-60 mm Hg) should be given conventional long-term O(2) therapy in addition to nocturnal ventilation.

  20. [Treatment of distraction osteogenesis in the patients of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome with micrognathia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiao-feng; Tang, You-sheng; Shen, Guo-fang; Zhu, Min; Li, Qing-yun; Qiu, Wei-liu

    2003-06-01

    To apply the treatment of distraction osteogenesis(DO) to obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome(OSAHS) patients with croniomaxillofacial deformities. All 46 OSAHS patients with micrognathia are had polysomnography(PSG) study and cephalometric analysis. Their age from 4 to 18 years old, the mean age is 11.4. The number of temporal mandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis with micrognathia, micrognathia; 1st & 2nd bronchial arch syndrome and crouzon syndrome patients were 32, 9, 2 and 3 respectively. All were treated with DO. Maxilla or mandible was advanced from 5 to 35 micrometers; the mean advanced distance is 18.34 mm. They were all revaluated by PSG and cephalometric analysis postoperatively. All patients have good respond to the treatment. They have a better appearance and the narrow upper airway was enlarged remarkably, their AHI drop from 66.31 +/- 14.74 pre-operately to 3.16 +/- 1.70 pro-operately, and minimal posterior airway space(PAS) from (5.48 +/- 2.76) mm to (9.97 +/- 2.05) mm. There is remarkable difference (P < 0.001). DO is a good method for the patients of OSAHS with micrognathia.

  1. Innovative treatments for adults with obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Terri E; Calik, Michael W; Farabi, Sarah S; Fink, Anne M; Galang-Boquiren, Maria T; Kapella, Mary C; Prasad, Bharati; Carley, David W

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects one in five adult males and is associated with significant comorbidity, cognitive impairment, excessive daytime sleepiness, and reduced quality of life. For over 25 years, the primary treatment has been continuous positive airway pressure, which introduces a column of air that serves as a pneumatic splint for the upper airway, preventing the airway collapse that is the physiologic definition of this syndrome. However, issues with patient tolerance and unacceptable levels of treatment adherence motivated the exploration of other potential treatments. With greater understanding of the physiologic mechanisms associated with OSA, novel interventions have emerged in the last 5 years. The purpose of this article is to describe new treatments for OSA and associated complex sleep apnea. New approaches to complex sleep apnea have included adaptive servoventilation. There is increased literature on the contribution of behavioral interventions to improve adherence with continuous positive airway pressure that have proven quite effective. New non-surgical treatments include oral pressure devices, improved mandibular advancement devices, nasal expiratory positive airway pressure, and newer approaches to positional therapy. Recent innovations in surgical interventions have included laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty, radiofrequency ablation, palatal implants, and electrical stimulation of the upper airway muscles. No drugs have been approved to treat OSA, but potential drug therapies have centered on increasing ventilatory drive, altering the arousal threshold, modifying loop gain (a dimensionless value quantifying the stability of the ventilatory control system), or preventing airway collapse by affecting the surface tension. An emerging approach is the application of cannabinoids to increase upper airway tone.

  2. Innovative treatments for adults with obstructive sleep apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Terri E; Calik, Michael W; Farabi, Sarah S; Fink, Anne M; Galang-Boquiren, Maria T; Kapella, Mary C; Prasad, Bharati; Carley, David W

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects one in five adult males and is associated with significant comorbidity, cognitive impairment, excessive daytime sleepiness, and reduced quality of life. For over 25 years, the primary treatment has been continuous positive airway pressure, which introduces a column of air that serves as a pneumatic splint for the upper airway, preventing the airway collapse that is the physiologic definition of this syndrome. However, issues with patient tolerance and unacceptable levels of treatment adherence motivated the exploration of other potential treatments. With greater understanding of the physiologic mechanisms associated with OSA, novel interventions have emerged in the last 5 years. The purpose of this article is to describe new treatments for OSA and associated complex sleep apnea. New approaches to complex sleep apnea have included adaptive servoventilation. There is increased literature on the contribution of behavioral interventions to improve adherence with continuous positive airway pressure that have proven quite effective. New non-surgical treatments include oral pressure devices, improved mandibular advancement devices, nasal expiratory positive airway pressure, and newer approaches to positional therapy. Recent innovations in surgical interventions have included laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty, radiofrequency ablation, palatal implants, and electrical stimulation of the upper airway muscles. No drugs have been approved to treat OSA, but potential drug therapies have centered on increasing ventilatory drive, altering the arousal threshold, modifying loop gain (a dimensionless value quantifying the stability of the ventilatory control system), or preventing airway collapse by affecting the surface tension. An emerging approach is the application of cannabinoids to increase upper airway tone. PMID:25429246

  3. Coagulability in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Liak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is a common disorder that affects both quality of life and cardiovascular health. The causal link between OSA and cardiovascular morbidity/mortality remains elusive. One possible explanation is that repeated episodes of nocturnal hypoxia lead to a hypercoagulable state that predisposes patients to thrombotic events. There is evidence supporting a wide array of hematological changes that affect hemostasis (eg, increased hematocrit, blood viscosity, platelet activation, clotting factors and decreased fibrinolytic activity.

  4. Sleep apnea is associated with bronchial inflammation and continuous positive airway pressure-induced airway hyperresponsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devouassoux, Gilles; Lévy, Patrick; Rossini, Eliane; Pin, Isabelle; Fior-Gozlan, Michèle; Henry, Mireille; Seigneurin, Daniel; Pépin, Jean-Louis

    2007-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) is associated with systemic and upper airway inflammation. Pharyngeal inflammation has a potential role in upper airway collapse, whereas systemic inflammation relates to cardiovascular morbidity. However, the presence of an inflammatory involvement of lower airway has been poorly investigated. The aim of the study was to demonstrate an inflammatory process at the bronchial level in patients with OSA and to analyze effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) application and humidification on bronchial mucosa. The study was conducted by using sequential induced sputum for cell analysis and IL-8 production, nitric oxide exhalation measurement, and methacholine challenge before and after CPAP. Bronchial neutrophilia and a high IL-8 concentration were observed in untreated OSA compared with controls (75% +/- 20% vs 43% +/- 12%, P Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is associated with bronchial inflammation. Our data demonstrate CPAP effect on the development of AHR, possibly facilitated by the pre-existing inflammation. Both issues should be evaluated during long-term CPAP use. Results showing a spontaneous bronchial inflammation in OSA and the development of a CPAP-related AHR require a long-term follow-up to evaluate consequences on chronic bronchial obstruction.

  5. Obstructive sleep apnea and diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge Vale; Paula Manuel; Eurico Oliveira; Ana Rita Oliveira; Eloisa Silva; Vitor Melo; Marta Sousa; João Carlos Alexandre; Isabel Gil; Amparo Sanchez; Edite Nascimento; António Simões Torres

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is convincing evidence that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is highly associated with impaired glucose metabolism. Objectives: Analyze the prevalence of OSA in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients. Evaluate the influence of OSA on glycemic control. Methods: The adult patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) followed in the department of internal medicine were referred to our Sleep Unit. A home respiratory polygraphy was then performed on all patients with body mass in...

  6. Association between Occupational Accidents and Sleep Apnea in Hospital Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, Somayeh; Rahnama, Nooshin; Seyedmehdi, Seyed Mohammad; Yazdanparast, Taraneh; Roozbahani, Rahim; Attarchi, Mirsaeed; Adimi Naghan, Parisa; Jamaati, Hamidreza

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a common disorder in which instability of the upper airways leads to a reduction or cessation of airflow during sleep. Sleep disorders such as OSAS increase the risk of occupational accidents and impaired work performance. Sleep deprivation during shift increases the risk of occupational accidents among health care employees. The purpose of this study was to determine the association between occupational injuries in hospital staff and the risk of sleep apnea. This cross-sectional study was conducted on hospital staff of Masih Daneshvari Hospital in 2012. In this study, the hospital staff's (715) response to the Berlin questionnaire plus additional information including a history of an occupational accident, night shifts, less than four hours of night sleep, history of smoking, chronic disease and quality of sleep were assessed. Information obtained was analyzed using SPSS 15. In general, 27.6% reported a history of occupational accidents. The incidence of occupational accidents in the high-risk group for sleep apnea was significantly higher than the low-risk group (OR=2.736, CI=1.522-4.917, P=0.001). The results of logistic regression analysis also showed a statistically significant association between occupational accidents and risk of sleep apnea (OR = 2.247, CI = 1.194-4.231, P= 0.012). This study showed that the incidence of occupational accidents in the hospital employees is strongly related to the probability of OSA. Therefore, special attention should be directed to respiratory sleep disorders in order to reduce occupational injuries at hospitals.

  7. Obstructive sleep apnea: a clinical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Marvisi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Since the original classification of the obstructive nature of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS in 1965, much has been learned about the disorder. In 1990 respiratory disturbances during sleep have come to be recognized as extremely common disorders with important clinical consequences. DISCUSSION It is a condition with high prevalence of obesity as a major risk factor. Premenopausal women are relatively protected from the disorder: its prevalence in women rises after menopause. Although OSAS is a risk factor for excessive daytime sleepiness, there is developing evidence that it is also a risk factor for hypertension, acute cardiovascular events, and insulin resistance. Definitive diagnosis still depends on in-laboratory polysomnography. This involves recording of multiple variables during sleep, including electroencephalogram. There is a considerable interest in the role of unattended home sleep-monitoring and some evidence of its usefulness has yet to be established. The first line of therapy is nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP. Data into the efficacy of CPAP in severe OSAS have come from randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials the endpoints of which being sleepiness, quality of life, and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure. Data are currently less convincing for treatment outcomes in mild to moderate OSAS, and new clinical trails to assess outcomes in this group are underway. CONCLUSION The field of sleep medicine has now firmly entered the mainstream of clinical practice, substantial progress has been made, and OSAS has increasingly emerged as a major public health concern. The Internal Medicine specialist has to recognize this clinical entity.

  8. Effectiveness of Maxillomandibular advancement (MMA surgery in sleep apnea treatment: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otávio Ferraz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is characterized by episodes of pharyngeal collapse during sleep. Craniofacial alterations such as retrognathia are often found in OSA patients. Maxillomandibular advancement (MMA surgeries increase the pharyngeal space and are a treatment option for OSA. The aim of this study was to present a successful case of MMA surgery in the treatment of OSA. A patient with moderate OSA (apnea-hypopnea index (AHI=25.2 and mandibular retrognathism and Maxillomandibular asymmetry underwent MMA surgery. The apnea-hypopnea index (AHI were considerably improved after six months (IAH =6.7 and one year of treatment (IAH=0.2.

  9. Effectiveness of Maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) surgery in sleep apnea treatment: Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, Otávio; Guimarães, Thais M; Rossi, Rowdley R; Cunali, Paulo A; Fabbro, Cibele Dal; Chaves, Cauby M; Maluly, Milton; Bittencourt, Lia; Tufik, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by episodes of pharyngeal collapse during sleep. Craniofacial alterations such as retrognathia are often found in OSA patients. Maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) surgeries increase the pharyngeal space and are a treatment option for OSA. The aim of this study was to present a successful case of MMA surgery in the treatment of OSA. A patient with moderate OSA (apnea-hypopnea index (AHI)=25.2) and mandibular retrognathism and Maxillomandibular asymmetry underwent MMA surgery. The apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) were considerably improved after six months (IAH =6.7) and one year of treatment (IAH=0.2).

  10. [Comparison of different continuous positive airway pressure titration methods for obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingjing; Ye, Jingying; Zhang, Peng; Kang, Dan; Cao, Xin; Zhang, Yuhuan; Ding, Xiu; Zheng, Li; Li, Hongguang; Bian, Qiuli

    2014-10-01

    To explore whether there were differences between the results of automatic titration and the results of manual titration for positive airway pressure treatment in patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) and its influencing factors, the results might provide a theoretical basis for the rational use of two pressure titration methods. Sixty one patients with OSAHS were included in this study. All patients underwent a manual titration and an automatic titration within one week. The clinical informations, polysomnography data, and the results of both two titration of all patients were obtained for analysis. The overall apnea/hypopnea index was (63.1 ± 17.7)/h, with a range of 14.9/h to 110.4/h. The treatment pressure of manual titration was (8.4 ± 2.1) cmH(2)O, which was significantly lower than the treatment pressure of automatic titration, (11.5 ± 2.7) cmH(2)O (t = -9.797, P titration and manual titration), it was found that the pressure of automatic titration was significantly higher in patients with a ΔP > 3 cmH(2)O than in patients with a ΔP ≤ 3 cmH(2)O, which was (13.3 ± 2.3) cmH(2)O vs (10.0 ± 2.0) cmH(2)O (t = -6.159, P titration between these two groups, which was (8.6 ± 2.4) cmH(2)O vs (8.3 ± 2.0)cmH(2)O (P > 0.05). There was no significant difference in age, body mass index, neck circumference, abdomen circumference, apnea hypopnea index, and arterial oxygen saturation between these two groups. The treatment pressure of automatic titration is usually higher than that of manual titration. For patients with a high treatment pressure which is derived from automatic titration, a suggestion about manual titration could be given to decrease the potential treatment pressure of continuous positive airway pressure, which may be helpful in improving the comfortableness and the compliance of this treatment.

  11. Hypertension and obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips CL

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Craig L Phillips,1–3 Denise M O'Driscoll4,51Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, Australia; 2National Health and Medical Research Council Center for Integrated Research and Understanding of Sleep, Woolcock Institute of Medical Research, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia; 3Discipline of Sleep Medicine, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia; 4Monash Lung and Sleep, Monash Medical Centre, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia; 5Department of Medicine, Southern Clinical School, Monash University, Melbourne, AustraliaAbstract: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is increasingly being recognized as a major health burden with strong focus on the associated cardiovascular risk. Studies from the last two decades have provided strong evidence for a causal role of OSA in the development of systemic hypertension. The acute physiological changes that occur during apnea promote nocturnal hypertension and may lead to the development of sustained daytime hypertension via the pathways of sympathetic activation, inflammation, oxidative stress, and endothelial dysfunction. This review will focus on the acute hemodynamic disturbances and associated intermittent hypoxia that characterize OSA and the potential pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for the development of hypertension in OSA. In addition the epidemiology of OSA and hypertension, as well as the role of treatment of OSA, in improving blood pressure control will be examined.Keywords: obstructive sleep apnea, hypertension, intermittent hypoxia, ambulatory blood pressure, sympathetic activation

  12. [Value of actigraphy and oximetry for diagnosing sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qinghua; Wang, Biying; Dong, Xiaosong; Zhang, Chunfang; Li, Jing; An, Pei; Zhao, Long; Zhang, Xueli; Han, Fang

    2015-11-10

    To explore the value of actigraphy and oximetry for diagnosing sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (SAHS). Suspected SAHS subjects were enrolled from sleep center of Peking University People's Hospital between December 2013 and September 2014. Light-out and light-on were simultaneously recorded for polysomnography (PSG), actigraphy and oximetry. Actigraphy was used to correct total sleep time (TST) for oximetry. Oxygen desaturation index (ODI4), namely the times of pulse oxygen saturation (SpO2) drop≥4% per hour, was detected by oximetry. ODIA was used instead of ODI4 with TST corrected by actigraphy. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used for evaluating the value of ODI4 and ODIA for diagnosing SAHS and cut-off value was calculated. Paired t-test or signed rank t-test was used for data acquired using actigraphy or oximetry compared with data acquired by PSG. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated using fourfold table. Disease severity of SAHS was classified by apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) detected by PSG. If AHIODIA for diagnosing SAHS was 0.951 with a cut-off value of 5 as well. The sensitivity of ODI4 for mild, moderate and severe SAHS was 80.6%, 66.7% and 58.9% respectively, all with a specificity of 100%. After adjusting TST with actigraphy, the sensitivity of ODIA for mild, moderate and severe SAHS was 84.0%, 73.8 % and 68.9%, with specificity of 94.7%, 100% and 99.2% respectively. Actigraphy can correctly estimate TST in non-SAHS and mild SAHS groups. ODI4 can be used for diagnosing SAHS. After correcting TST by actigraphy, the sensitivity of ODIA is higher.

  13. Multivoxel 1H-MR spectroscopy in obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xuehuan; Liu Jun; Hao Caixian; Xu Liang; Wang Jinyue; Zhong Jin; Liu Zhenxing; Liu Jixiang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical value of multivoxel 1 H magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS) in patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). Materials and Methods: 20 patients (case group) with moderate to severe clinically diagnosed OSAHS and 20 age-gender matched healthy volunteers (control group) underwent brain multivoxel 1 H-MRS examinations. The ratios of brain metabolites of centrum ovale and basal ganglia were recorded respectively. Related clinical indexes, including sleep apnea and hypopnea index (AHI) and the average night-time oxygen saturation (SpO 2 ), were recorded. Results: In region of centrum ovale, the NAA/Cho and NAA/Cr of the case group decreased and were significantly lower than that of control group (P<0.05). The Cho/Cr of the case group was significantly increased compared to the controls (P<0.05). In region of basal ganglia, the NAA/Cho, NAA/Cr, and Cho/Cr had no significantly difference between the two groups (P>0.05). Lactate peak was not detected in the two groups. In the region of centrum ovale, the AHI showed inverse correlation to the NAA/Cho (P<0.05). The SpO 2 showed positive correlations to the NAA/Cho (P<0.05). There was no correlation between clinical indexes and NAA/Cr or Cho/Cr (P>0.05). Conclusion: Multivoxel 1 H-MRS could early detect the changes of cerebral metabolism in patients with OSAHS. It provides an objective imaging basis for the clinical diagnosis and treatment. (authors)

  14. Intelligent Approach for Analysis of Respiratory Signals and Oxygen Saturation in the Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Moret-Bonillo, Vicente; Alvarez-Estévez, Diego; Fernández-Leal, Angel; Hernández-Pereira, Elena

    2014-01-01

    This work deals with the development of an intelligent approach for clinical decision making in the diagnosis of the Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, SAHS, from the analysis of respiratory signals and oxygen saturation in arterial blood, SaO2. In order to accomplish the task the proposed approach makes use of different artificial intelligence techniques and reasoning processes being able to deal with imprecise data. These reasoning processes are based on fuzzy logic and on temporal analysis of ...

  15. CHARACTERISTICS OF TRACHEAL SOUNDS PRECEDING, DURING AND FOLLOWING HYPOPNEA IN PATIENTS WITH OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA--HYPOPNEA SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    大西, 徳信

    2000-01-01

    The author analyzed night tracheal sounds of hypopnea events in 12 patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). Tracheal sounds were recorded on a video tape recorder through a microphone attached to the anterior neck over the trachea during overnight polysomnography. In each patient ten hypopnea episodes were selected for analysis. Tracheal sounds were analyzed using sound-spectrogram and power spectra. Mean power spectra of inspiratory and expiratory tracheal sounds with...

  16. The challenge of identifying family medicine patients with obstructive sleep apnea: addressing the question of gender inequality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailes, Sally; Fichten, Catherine S; Rizzo, Dorrie; Baltzan, Marc; Grad, Roland; Pavilanis, Alan; Creti, Laura; Amsel, Rhonda; Libman, Eva

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the sleep characteristics, metabolic syndrome disease and likelihood of obstructive sleep apnea in a sample of older, family medicine patients previously unsuspected for sleep apnea. A total of 295 participants, minimum age 45, 58.7% women, were recruited from two family medicine clinics. None previously had been referred for sleep apnea testing. All participants completed a sleep symptom questionnaire and were offered an overnight polysomnography study, regardless of questionnaire results. 171 followed through with the sleep laboratory component of the study. Health data regarding metabolic syndrome disease (hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes and obesity) were gathered by chart review. Overall, more women than men enrolled in the study and pursued laboratory testing. Of those who underwent polysomnography testing, 75% of the women and 85% of the men were diagnosed with sleep apnea based on an apnea/hypopnea index of 10 or greater. Women and men had similar polysomnography indices, the majority being in the moderate to severe ranges. In those with OSA diagnosis, gender differences in sleep symptom severity were not significant. We conclude that greater gender equality in sleep apnea rates can be achieved in family practice if sleep apnea assessments are widely offered to older patients. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Cardiovascular risk and obesity in sleep apnea syndrome assessed with the Stop-Bang questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente-Herrero, María Teófila; Capdevila García, Luisa; Bellido Cambrón, María Del Carmen; Ramírez Iñiguez de la Torre, María Victoria; Lladosa Marco, Silvia

    2017-12-01

    Sleep disorders include a number of different processes, of which the most prevalent is the sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (SAHS). Prevalence of SAHS has increased worldwide, and has a significant social and health impact because of the increased cardiometabolic risk attributed to obesity and the associated metabolic syndrome. A cross-sectional epidemiological study of 1110 workers from public service companies in the Spanish Mediterranean area (Balearic Islands and Valencian Community) was conducted between January and December 2015. Cardiovascular risk was calculated using the Castelli, Kannel and TG/HDL indices, and prevalence of obesity using body mass index, waist circumference, waist-height ratio, and visceral fat. SAHS risk was assessed using the Stop-Bang questionnaire. Risk of SAHS was low in 77% of patients and intermediate-high in 23% of patients. All obesity parameters showed a statistically significant association (p value <.001) with intermediate/high risk of SAHS. Obesity prevalence is higher the worse the quality of sleep. There was a statistically significant relationship between risk of SAHS and cardiovascular risk with the atherogenic indexes found. Twenty-three percent of workers had intermediate/high SAHS risk. The results of this study support the relationship of SAHS with an increased CVR and with obesity parameters. Further prospective studies in different productive sectors may be useful to confirm the results of this research. Copyright © 2017 SEEN y SED. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Treatments for Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calik, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To review the efficacy of current treatment options for adults with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods Review of the literature. Results OSA, characterized by repetitive ≥ 10-second interruptions (apnea) or reductions (hypopnea) in airflow, is initiated by partial or complete collapse in the upper airway despite respiratory effort. When left untreated, OSA is associated with comorbid conditions, such as cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. The current “gold standard” treatment for OSA is continuous positive air pressure (CPAP), which pneumatically stabilizes the upper airways. CPAP has proven efficacy and potential cost savings via decreases in health comorbidities and/or motor-vehicle crashes. However, CPAP treatment is not well-tolerated due to various side effects, and adherence among OSA subjects can be as low as 50% in certain populations. Other treatment options for OSA include improving CPAP tolerability, increasing CPAP adherence through patient interventions, weight loss/exercise, positional therapy, nasal expiratory positive airway pressure, oral pressure therapy, oral appliances, surgery, hypoglossal nerve stimulation, drug treatment, and combining 2 or more of the aforementioned treatments. Despite the many options available to treat OSA, none of them are as efficacious as CPAP. However, many of these treatments are tolerable, and adherence rates are higher than those of the CPAP, making them a more viable treatment option for long-term use. Conclusion Patients need to weigh the benefits and risks of available treatments for OSA. More large randomized controlled studies on treatments or combination of treatments for OSA are needed that measure parameters such as treatment adherence, apnea-hypopnea index, oxygen desaturation, subjective sleepiness, quality of life, and adverse events. PMID:27134515

  19. Predictors of Success in the Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome with Mandibular Repositioning Appliance: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saffer, Fernanda

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome affects up to 4% of middle-aged men and 2% of adult women. It is associated with obesity. Objective The objective of this article is to review the literature to determine which factors best correlate with treatment success in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome treated with a mandibular repositioning appliance. Data Synthesis A search was performed of the PubMed, Cochrane, Lilacs, Scielo, and Web of Science databases of articles published from January 1988 to January 2012. Two review authors independently collected data and assessed trial quality. Sixty-nine articles were selected from PubMed and 1 from Cochrane library. Of these, 42 were excluded based on the title and abstract, and 27 were retrieved for complete reading. A total of 13 articles and 1 systematic review were considered eligible for further review and inclusion in this study: 6 studies evaluated anthropomorphic and physiologic factors, 3 articles addressed cephalometric and anatomic factors, and 4 studies evaluated variables related to mandibular repositioning appliance design and activation. All the studies evaluated had low to moderate methodologic quality and were not able to support evidence on prediction of treatment success. Conclusion Based on this systematic review on obstructive sleep apnea syndrome treatment, it remains unclear which predictive factors can be used with confidence to select patients suitable for treatment with a mandibular repositioning appliance.

  20. Systematic review: the influence of nasal obstruction on sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Petrungaro Migueis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS is a common disorder that can lead to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, as well as to metabolic, neurological, and behavioral consequences. It is currently believed that nasal obstruction compromises the quality of sleep when it results in breathing disorders and fragmentation of sleep. However, recent studies have failed to objectively associate sleep quality and nasal obstruction. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the influence of nasal obstruction on OSAS and polysomnographic indices associated with respiratory events. METHODS: Eleven original articles published from 2003 to 2013 were selected, which addressed surgical and non-surgical treatment for nasal obstruction, performing polysomnography type 1 before and after the intervention. RESULTS/CONCLUSIONS: In most trials, nasal obstruction was not related to the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI, indicating no improvement in OSAS with reduction in nasal resistance. However, few researchers evaluated other polysomnography indices, such as the arousal index and rapid eye movement (REM sleep percentage. These could change with nasal obstruction, since it is possible that the nasal obstruction does not completely block the upper airways, but can increase negative intrathoracic pressure, leading to sleep fragmentation.

  1. Mild obstructive sleep apnea: beyond the AHI

    OpenAIRE

    Lee-Iannotti J; Parish JM

    2014-01-01

    No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A common conundrum faced by sleep medicine practitioners is how to manage the large group of patients with mild sleep apnea. Many patients are referred for sleep evaluation, with symptoms thought to be due to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Often polysomnography demonstrates only mild sleep apnea, and the clinician and patient are faced with the dilemma of whether to use continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy or an oral applian...

  2. A prospective cohort study of the long-term effects of CPAP on carotid artery intima-media thickness in Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui David S

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To examine the long-term effect of CPAP on carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT in patients with Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome(OSAS. Methods A prospective observational study over 12 months at a teaching hospital on 50 patients newly diagnosed with OSAS who received CPAP or conservative treatment (CT. Carotid IMT was assessed with B-mode Doppler ultrasound from both carotid arteries using images of the far wall of the distal 10 mm of the common carotid arteries at baseline, 6 months and 12 months. Measurements and results [mean (SE] Altogether 28 and 22 patients received CPAP and CT respectively without significant differences in age 48.8(1.8 vs 50.5(2.0yrs, BMI 28.2(0.7 vs 28.0(1.2kg/m2, ESS 13.1(0.7 vs 12.7(0.6, AHI 38(3 vs 39(3/hr, arousal index 29(2 vs 29(2/hr, minimum SaO2 75(2 vs 77(2% and existing co-morbidities. CPAP usage was 4.6(0.3 and 4.7(0.4hrs/night over 6 months and 1 year respectively. Carotid artery IMT at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months were 758(30, 721(20, and 705(20micron for the CPAP group versus 760(30, 770(30, and 778(30micron respectively for the CT group, p = 0.002. Among those free of cardiovascular disease(n = 24, the carotid artery IMT at baseline, 6 months and 12 months were 722(40, 691(40, and 659(30micron for the CPAP group (n = 12 with usage 4.5(0.7 and 4.7(0.7 hrs/night over 6 months and 12 months whereas the IMT data for the CT group(n = 12 were 660(20, 685(10, and 690(20micron respectively, p = 0.006. Conclusions Reduction of carotid artery IMT occurred mostly in the first 6 months and was sustained at 12 months in patients with reasonable CPAP compliance.

  3. Intention to Exercise in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Simon S.; Doyle, Geoffrey; Pascoe, Thomas; Douglas, James A; Jorgensen, Greg

    2007-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common and serious health issue that is strongly associated with excess weight. Exercise may be an effective mechanism for reducing the severity of OSA both in association with, and independent of, reduction in body weight. As such, increased exercise has been suggested as a potential intervention for OSA, particularly for patients with mild to moderate clinical severity. However, it is unknown how ready to engage in exercise patients with OSA are. Self-repo...

  4. Adenotonsillectomy to treat obstructive sleep apnea: Is it enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudewyns, A; Abel, F; Alexopoulos, E; Evangelisti, M; Kaditis, A; Miano, S; Villa, M P; Verhulst, S L

    2017-05-01

    Although adenotonsillectomy is the first line treatment for children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (0SAS), 1 improvement in objectively documented outcomes is often inadequate and a substantial number of children have residual disease. Early recognition and treatment of children with persistent OSAS is required to prevent long-term morbidity. The management of these children is frequently complex and a multidisciplinary approach is required as most of them have additional risk factors for OSAS and comorbidities. In this paper, we first provide an overview of children at risk for persistent disease following adenotonsillectomy. Thereafter, we discuss different diagnostic modalities to evaluate the sites of persistent upper airway obstruction and the currently available treatment options. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2017;52:699-709. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Avaliação dos níveis séricos de testosterona em pacientes com síndrome da apneia obstrutiva do sono Evaluation of testosterone serum levels in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Drimel Molina

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Homens com síndrome da apneia obstrutiva do sono (SAOS podem apresentar diminuição dos níveis de testosterona devido à hipóxia. OBJETIVOS: Relacionar os níveis séricos da testosterona, em pacientes com SAOS, com parâmetros clínico-laboratoriais. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: Foram revisados 103 prontuários de pacientes com SAOS, entre os anos de 2002 e 2009, e coletados os seguintes dados: idade à época da realização da polissonografia, valores do Hematócrito e Hemoglobina, nível sérico da testosterona total, IMC, índice de apneia/hipopneia(IAH e SatO2. FORMA DO ESTUDO: Estudo de casos retrospectivo em corte transversal. RESULTADOS: 79 pacientes (77% não apresentaram alteração hormonal e 24 (23% apresentaram níveis séricos inferiores. Dos pacientes com testosterona normal 70% estavam com sobrepeso, enquanto que 63% com testosterona alterada apresentaram obesidade grau I (pMales with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS may present decreased testosterone serum levels because of hypoxemia. AIM: To correlate testosterone levels in OSAS patients with laboratory parameters. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 103 registries of OSAS patients were reviewed from 2002 to 2009. The following data collected: age when polysomnography was done, hematocrit and hemoglobin levels, total testosterone serum levels, BMI, apnea/hypopnea index (AHI, and O2 saturation. STUDY DESIGN: A cross-sectional retrospective case study. RESULTS: 79 patients (77% had no hormonal changes, and 24 patients (23% had decreased serum levels. In patients with normal testosterone levels, 70% were overweight; 63% with altered testosterone levels had obesity grade I (p<0.05. Patients with altered testosterone levels had significantly lower average doses of Ht, Hb and androgen compared to patients without altered androgen levels. The average BMI of patients with altered hormone levels was significantly higher compared to patients with normal hormone levels. CONCLUSIONS: The relationship

  6. Efetividade do aparelho ortopédico Bionator de Balters no tratamento do ronco e apnéia do sono The effectiveness of the Balters Bionator orthopedic appliance for the treatment of the Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Alberto Donadelli Nabarro

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: avaliar a efetividade do aparelho ortopédico Bionator de Balters no tratamento da Síndrome da Apnéia Obstrutiva do Sono (SAOS. METODOLOGIA: foram selecionados 16 pacientes (18,8% do gênero feminino e 81,3% do masculino que apresentaram a SAOS mediante diagnóstico. Dos 16 pacientes que utilizaram o aparelho ortopédico Bionator de Balters, apenas 9 apresentaram boa aceitação (56,25% e concluíram o tratamento. Estes foram submetidos a nova polissonografia, realizada com o paciente fazendo uso do aparelho ortopédico Bionator de Balters, para avaliar a eficácia deste dispositivo no tratamento do ronco e da apnéia. A comparação entre os resultados do IDR (índice de distúrbio respiratório inicial (11,5 e final (4,2 foi realizada utilizando-se o teste t pareado (α = 0,05. RESULTADOS: observou-se melhora estatisticamente significativa do IDR após a utilização do dispositivo. CONCLUSÕES: a utilização do aparelho ortopédico Bionator de Balters pode ser considerada um método de tratamento da SAOS em casos leves ou moderados, apesar de ser um método pouco tolerado pelos pacientes.AIM: to assess the effectiveness of the Balters Bionator orthopedic appliance for the treatment of the Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS. METHODS: Sixteen patients (18.8% women and 81.3% men that presented OSAS on diagnosis were selected. Of the 16 patients that used the Balters Bionator orthopedic appliance, only 9 presented good acceptance (56.25% and concluded the treatment. They were submitted to another polysomnography exam, performed with the patients using the Balters Bionator orthopedic appliance, in order to assess the effectiveness of this device in treating apnea snoring. Comparison between the results of the initial (11.5 and final (4.2 RDI (respiratory disturbance index was made by the paired t test (α = 0.05. RESULTS: A statistically significant improvement in the RDI was observed after the device was used. CONCLUSIONS: The

  7. Presence of Fragmented QRS Complexes in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammet Rasit Sayin

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: In our study fragmented QRS frequency and QRS duration were found to increase in OSAS patients. Both parameters are related with increased cardiovascular mortality. Considering the prognostic importance of ECG parameters, it may be reasonable to recommend more detailed evaluation of OSAS patients with fragmented or prolonged QRS complexes with respect to presence of cardiovascular diseases.

  8. Obstructive sleep apnea as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajan P

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Preethi Rajan, Harly Greenberg Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Hofstra-North Shore LIJ School of Medicine, New Hyde Park, NY, USA Abstract: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is independently associated with cardiovascular and cardiometabolic risk in several large epidemiologic studies. OSA leads to several physiologic disturbances such as intermittent hypoxia, sleep fragmentation, and increase in autonomic tone. These disturbances have been associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM in animal and human studies. Studies also suggest a bidirectional relationship between OSA and T2DM whereby T2DM itself might contribute to the features of OSA. Moreover, successful treatment of OSA may reduce these risks, although this is controversial. The purpose of this article is to review 1 the links and bidirectional associations between OSA and T2DM; 2 the pathogenic mechanisms that might link these two disease states; 3 the role of continuous positive airway pressure therapy in improving glucose tolerance, sensitivity, and resistance; and 4 the implications for clinical practice. Keywords: Insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, sleep disordered breathing, intermittent hypoxia

  9. Portable Prescreening System for Sleep Apnea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guul, Martin Kjær; Jennum, Poul; Sørensen, Helge Bjarup Dissing

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) occurs in more than 4 % of the adult population. Diagnoses for OSA in sleep clinics are costly and more than half of those submitted to a sleep clinic do not have OSA. A simple, easy, and portable homebased monitoring system to evaluate who are in high- or low risk...... for sleep apnea is at high risk or low risk of having OSA. A new test setup was developed containing an Android based smartphone, the built in accelerometer, and a microphone. To ease the clinical analysis of the data a MATLAB based graphical user interface has been developed visualizing the data allowing...... the user to navigate through the data and the detected apnea events. The events are classified using both features from the audio and the signal from the accelerometer placed on sternum. Furthermore using the accelerometer data the sleep position is estimated and the morphology from the respiratory pattern...

  10. Effect of sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors on obstructive sleep apnea in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Kei; Karashima, Shigehiro; Kometani, Mitsuhiro; Oka, Rie; Takeda, Yoshimichi; Sawamura, Toshitaka; Fujimoto, Aya; Demura, Masashi; Wakayama, Ayako; Usukura, Mikiya; Yagi, Kunimasa; Takeda, Yoshiyu; Yoneda, Takashi

    2018-02-20

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is often associated with metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes and may contribute to cardiovascular events. A novel class of antidiabetic drugs, the sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors (SGLT2i) reduce body weight (BW), although there is limited data on their impact on OSAS. We therefore evaluated the effect of SGLT2i on OSAS in patients with type 2 diabetes. The presented study was a retrospective design in 18 patients with type 2 diabetes with OSAS (4 males, age range 39-81 yr) administrated a SGLT2i. HbA1c, BW, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure (BP) and apnea hypopnea index (AHI) were evaluated before and after SGLT2i administration. The relationships between the reduction in AHI and the other variables were examined using Pearson correlation analysis. We have got result that SGLT2i reduced AHI from 31.9 ± 18.0 to 18.8 ± 11.5 events per hr (p = 0.003). HbA1c, BW and BMI decreased significantly, whereas BP did not. The Pearson correlation analysis showed a significant relationship between the reduction in AHI and pre-administration of AHI. In conclusion, SGLT2i reduced not only HbA1c, BW and BMI but also AHI significantly and therefore has potential as an effective treatment of OSAS.

  11. CARDIOVASCULAR AND METABOLIC IMPAIRMENT IN PATIENTS WITH OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Gorbunova

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the moment when the obstructive nature of sleep apnea was first revealed, many new in-formation on this disease have been obtained. Now obstructive sleep apnea (OSA recognized as an  independent predictor of the development of impaired glucose  tolerance (insulin resistance, fasting hyperglycaemia, type 2  diabetes mellitus (DM2, resistant arterial hypertension, cardio- vascular death. The problem of identifying and treating patients with OSA is still actual. In real clinical practice, there is a need for an integrated approach to the diagnosis and therapy of comorbid OSA patients with metabolic impairment and cardiovascular  diseases.The aim of this review is to assess the clinical and  pathogenesis features of metabolic impaired, carbohydrate metabolism, basic metabolism, eating behavior, body weight fluctuations in patients with ob-structive sleep apnea syndrome. Methods. In our work, we used a retrospective analysis of pub-lished clinical research data of domestic and foreign authors  over the past 20 years. The review included studies with adequate  design from the standpoint of «good clinical practice» (GCP and  evidence-based medicine.The conclusion. According to modern  interpretation, obstructive sleep apnea is considered as an  independent disease that has its pathogenic mechanisms, clinical  and functional manifestations. There are several main causes of the effect of OSA on the metabolic component and the work of the cardiovascular system. Among them, intermittent hypoxemia,  endothelial dysfunction, fluctuations in intrathoracic pressure,  increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system, disturbance of the structure of sleep are leading. OSA is considered as a disease capable of disabling patients of working age, dramatically changing  the quality of life, leading to early mortality due to cardiovascular  disasters. Timely detection of clinical symptoms of OSA and the  strategy of early

  12. Usefulness of snoreplasty in the treatment of simple snoring and mild obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome - Preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewska, Ewa; Panek, Justyna; O'Day, John; Rogowski, Marek

    2014-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness of sodium tetradecyl sulfate injection in the region of the soft palate to treat primary snoring and mild obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome. Sodium tetradecyl sulfate, a preparation belonging to detergents, widely applied in Poland to treat varices by the method of compressive sclerotherapy was used in the study. The procedure of injected snoreplasty was performed in 21 patients, who were diagnosed with primary snoring or mild obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome, based on subjective examination and polysomnography. Injected snoreplasty involves administration of sodium tetradecyl sulfate in the form of Fibrovein 1% or 3% preparation in the volume of 2ml, in the region of the soft palate. Injection of the preparation in the area of the soft palate induces the development of aseptic inflammation, which creates a scar which stiffens the soft palate and makes the tissues of this region less susceptible to vibrations. The patients after injected snoreplasty reported a significant decrease in the intensity of snoring. The markedly shortened total time of snoring was found in check-up polysomnography performed six months after the procedure. Injected snoreplasty is an effective procedure, especially, in patients manifesting persistent snoring. It is not indicated in the treatment of obstructive apneas during sleep. The advantages of this method are: minimal invasiveness, the low number of complications and slight pain. Copyright © 2013 Polish Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z.o.o. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinical variables determining the success of adenotonsillectomy in children with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha, Maíra; Ferraz, Renata Caroline Mendonça; Guo Chen, Vitor; Antonio Moreira, Gustavo; Raimundo Fujita, Reginaldo

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the evolution of polysomnographic parameters of children with Down syndrome and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome submitted to adenotonsillectomy and the interaction of comorbidities on therapeutic outcome. Ninety patients with Down syndrome and habitual snoring were identified between 2005 and 2015 in a Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology Clinic. Parent's complaints were evaluated by the test of equality of two proportions. Wilcoxon test was used to examine pre- and post-operative polysomnographic differences. Mann-Whitney test evaluated the influence of comorbidities. A p syndrome in 29.6% of children with Down syndrome. Nineteen patients (70.4%) remained with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and 44.4% showed a reduction of at least 50% of obstructive apnea-hypopnea index. Central apnea index post-adenotonsillectomy was worse in patients with heart disease (p = 0.022). Sleep efficiency (p = 0.031), N1 sleep stage (p = 0.001), apnea-hypopnea index (p = 0.023), and central apnea index (p = 0.008) were worse after surgery in patients with hypothyroidism. Patients with severe OSAS showed significant improvement in polysomnographic parameters after surgery. Although adenotonsillectomy improved symptoms and objective sleep data in children with Down syndrome, it was not able to resolve obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in most patients. Congenital heart diseases and hypothyroidism may affect the outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Cost and economic impact of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS on public health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ingram

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Untreated obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS is associated with significant direct and indirect medical costs. This disorder also has a significant negative impact on work performance and safety, and is implicated in a substantial proportion of motor vehicular crashes. Timely diagnosis and optimal therapy have shown a lower utilization rate related to health care systems and reduced costs, while adverse risks are mitigated at the same time. Prompt diagnosis and optimal therapy have shown to decrease heath care utilizaton and costs, as well as mitigating these adverse risks. Similarly, untreated OSAHS is associated with higher unemployment rates. For health care professionals, having a patient with OSAHS involved in a MVC is of paramount importance for a several reasons, including personal and public damage, as well as the potential physical disability that may be caused by the accident. In Latin America, measuring direct and indirect costs is necessary considering the public health problem associated with OSAHS and the implications mentioned above.

  15. Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome and cognitive impairments in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Shuling

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS is a common sleep-related breathing disorder that is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. It has received increasing attention that neurocognitive deficits occur with a high frequency in OSAHS. However, it is rarely known that OSAHS impacts on cognition in the elderly in whom an increased prevalence of OSAHS is present. In this review we consider recent studies in the association between OSAHS and cognitive impairments, with specific interest in the older population. Firstly, we elucidate the characteristics of OSAHS and OSAHS-related cognitive impairments in the older patients. Many studies have showed that the prevalence of OSAHS increases with age and it is higher in the elderly than other population. Moreover, OSAHS is associated with higher incidence of comorbidities and increased risk of clinical deterioration in the elderly, especially the neurocognitive impairments which even can develop dementia. Subsequently, we discuss the possible reasons of cognitive impairments that caused or aggravated by OSAHS in the elderly. The intermittent hypoxia (IH-related disturbances of homeostasis such as oxidative stress, inflammation, and age-related changes such as the changes of sleep architecture, the declined expression level of anti-aging gene, medical comorbidities and polypharmacy, may be both contribute to the increased risk of cognitive impairments in the older patients with OSAHS.

  16. [Sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome: risk factors in children and adolescents; a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar Cordero, M J; Sánchez López, A M; Mur Villar, N; García García, I; Guisado Barrilao, R

    2013-11-01

    The sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (SAHS) is a disorder that currently affects a large number of children and adolescents. The aim of this review is to assess the factors causing this condition and the risk of suffering another disease associated with SAHS. The 50 articles selected for inclusion in this review were identified through GOOGLE SCHOLAR. The validity of the items was established by the degree of evidence obtained, by recommendations made in this respect and by the applicability to the situation observed. The review considers studies of SAHS in children and adolescents, taking into account those relating this disorder with obesity, hypertension, physical activity and other variables. The studies reviewed show that SAHS is associated with childhood obesity and that it increases the risk of cerebro-cardiovascular disease. It is also shown that SAHS decreases children's and adolescents' physical capacity and quality of life. Psychological aspects are also affected, impacting on academic performance, which is poorer than in healthy children. Therefore, early paediatric diagnosis of SAHS is important in order to prevent associated disorders. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  17. Multi-feature snore sound analysis in obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunajeewa, Asela S; Abeyratne, Udantha R; Hukins, Craig

    2011-01-01

    Snoring is the most common symptom of obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS), which is a serious disease with high community prevalence. The standard method of OSAHS diagnosis, known as polysomnography (PSG), is expensive and time consuming. There is evidence suggesting that snore-related sounds (SRS) carry sufficient information to diagnose OSAHS. In this paper we present a technique for diagnosing OSAHS based solely on snore sound analysis. The method comprises a logistic regression model fed with snore parameters derived from its features such as the pitch and total airway response (TAR) estimated using a higher order statistics (HOS)-based algorithm. Pitch represents a time domain characteristic of the airway vibrations and the TAR represents the acoustical changes brought about by the collapsing upper airways. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated using the technique of K-fold cross validation, on a clinical database consisting of overnight snoring sounds of 41 subjects. The method achieved 89.3% sensitivity with 92.3% specificity (the area under the ROC curve was 0.96). These results establish the feasibility of developing a snore-based OSAHS community-screening device, which does not require any contact measurements.

  18. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and hypothyroidism - merely concurrence or causal association?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuczyński, Wojciech; Gabryelska, Agata; Mokros, Łukasz; Białasiewicz, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) ranges from 4 to 7% in men and from 2 to 5% in women. Its deleterious consequences such as traffic accidents, cardiovascular complications increasing morbidity and mortality, make it a major health problem. Apart from obesity (a major risk factor for OSAHS), hypothyroid patients are prone to reveal this phenotype. Although hypothyroidism seems an acknowledged risk factor for OSAHS, some authors report the lack of clinically relevant association. The argument partly depends on the increased prevalence of hypothyroidism in OSAHS patients, but the epidemiological data is limited and somehow inconsistent; even less is known about sub-clinical hypothyroidism in OSAHS patients. Even if frequency of overt and sub-clinical hypothyroidism in OSAHS patients is comparable to the general population, screening for it seems beneficial, as hormone replacement therapy may improve sleep disordered breathing. Unfortunately, this favorable outcome was found only in a few studies with limited number of patients with hypothyroidism. Yet, despite the lack of international guidelines and no large multicentre studies on the topic available, we think that TSH screening might prove beneficial in vast majority of OSAHS patients.

  19. Multifractal spectra of laser Doppler flowmetry signals in healthy and sleep apnea syndrome subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buard, Benjamin; Trzepizur, Wojciech; Mahe, Guillaume; Chapeau-Blondeau, François; Rousseau, David; Gagnadoux, Frédéric; Abraham, Pierre; Humeau, Anne

    2009-07-01

    Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) signals give a peripheral view of the cardiovascular system. To better understand the possible modifications brought by sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) in LDF signals, we herein propose to analyze the complexity of such signals in obstructive SAS subjects, and to compare the results with those obtained in healthy subjects. SAS is a pathology that leads to a drop in the parasympathetic tone associated with an increase in the sympathetic tone in awakens SAS patients. Nine men with obstructive SAS and nine healthy men participated awaken in our study and LDF signals were recorded in the forearm. In our work, complexity of LDF signals is analyzed through the computation and analysis of their multifractal spectra. The multifractal spectra are estimated by first estimating the discrete partition function of the signals, then by determining their Renyi exponents with a linear regression, and finally by computing their Legendre transform. The results show that, at rest, obstructive SAS has no or little impact on the multifractal spectra of LDF signals recorded in the forearm. This study shows that the physiological modifications brought by obstructive SAS do not modify the complexity of LDF signals when recorded in the forearm.

  20. Short-term efficacy of mandibular advancement splint in treatment of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calliandra Moura Pereira de Lima

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to determine the short-term efficacy of treatment for snoring and obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS using a mandibular advancement splint. METHODS: The sample comprised 20 patients (13 men and 7 women; mean age = 48 years; mean body mass index = 27.07 with OSAHS. Polysomnograms were performed before and 60 days after mandibular advancement splint therapy. RESULTS: There was a significant reduction in the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI following treatment (mean pretreatment AHI = 20.89 ± 17.9 versus mean posttreatment AHI = 4.43 ± 3.09 (p < 0.05. The snoring reduced and the sleep efficiency improved, as registered by polysomnograms (p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: The sleep quality improved in patients using mandibular advancement splint. Further studies evaluating long-term effects are needed.

  1. Maxillary, mandibular, and chin advancement: treatment planning based on airway anatomy in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schendel, Stephen; Powell, Nelson; Jacobson, Richard

    2011-03-01

    Surgical correction of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome involves understanding a number of parameters, of which the 3-dimensional airway anatomy is important. Visualization of the upper airway based on cone beam computed tomography scans and automated computer analysis is an aid in understanding normal and abnormal airway conditions and their response to surgery. The goal of surgical treatment of OSA syndrome is to enlarge the velo-oropharyngeal airway by anterior/lateral displacement of the soft tissues and musculature by maxillary, mandibular, and possibly, genioglossus advancement. Knowledge of the specific airway obstruction and characteristics based on 3-dimensional studies permits a directed surgical treatment plan that can successfully address the area or areas of airway obstruction. The end occlusal result can be improved when orthodontic treatment is combined with the surgical plan. The individual with OSA, though, is more complicated than the usual orthognathic patient, and both the medical condition and treatment length need to be judiciously managed when OSA and associated conditions are present. The perioperative management of the patient with OSA is more complex and the margin for error is reduced, and this needs to be taken into consideration and the care altered as indicated. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Sleep overlap syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Rezaeetalab

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Overlap syndrome, which is known as the coexistence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, was first defined by Flenley. Although it can refer to concomitant occurrence of any of the pulmonary diseases and OSA, overlap syndrome is commonly considered as the coexistence of OSA and COPD. This disease has unique adverse health consequences distinct from either condition alone. Given the high prevalence of each solitary disease, overlap syndrome is also likely to be common and clinically relevant. Despite the fact that overlap syndrome has been described in the literature for nearly 30 years, paucity of evaluations and studies limited the discussion on diagnosis, prevalence, pathophysiology, treatment, and outcomes of this disease. This review article addresses these issues by reviewing several recent studies conducted in Iran or other countries. This review suggests that overlap syndrome has worse outcomes than either disease alone. Our findings accentuated the urgent need for further studies on overlap syndrome and all overlaps between OSA and chronic pulmonary disease to provide a deeper insight into diagnosis and non-invasive treatments of this disease.

  3. The Effect of Acid Suppression on Upper Airway Anatomy and Obstruction in Patients with Sleep Apnea and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, William C.; Robert, Jennifer J.T.; Houck, John R.; Giddens, Cheryl L.; Tawk, Maroun M.

    2009-01-01

    Study Objectives: This study was designed to assess the effect of acid suppression on upper airway structure and function in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Methods: This is a single-site within-subjects design. Twenty five patients with documented mild OSAS and objectively documented GERD via 24-hour pH measurement were included in the study. Patients were studied before and after 8 weeks of treatment with rabeprazole, 20 mg, twice a day. Subjects underwent laryngoscopy, polysomnography, and 24-hour pH monitoring. Subjective assessments of sleep obtained included the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. Results: Posterior commissure edema was significantly reduced (p Giddens CL; Tawk MM. The effect of acid suppression on upper airway anatomy and obstruction in patients with sleep apnea and gastroesophageal reflux disease. J Clin Sleep Med 2009;5(4):330-334. PMID:19968010

  4. Reliability of SleepStrip as a screening test in obstructive sleep apnea patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinç, Aykut Erdem; Yılmaz, Metin; Tutar, Hakan; Aydil, Utku; Kızıl, Yusuf; Damar, Murat; Kemaloğlu, Yusuf K

    2014-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a common sleep disorder and related to multiple conditions that cause mortality in adults. In the present study, reliability of SleepStrip, a disposable screening device for detection of OSAS, is tested. In this prospective, nonrandomized double-blinded single cohort study at an academic health center, the performance of the SleepStrip in detecting respiratory events and establishing an SleepStrip score (Sscore) in domestic use were compared to the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) obtained by the standard polysomnography (PSG) recordings in the sleep laboratory. Forty-one patients who have the PSG results participated the study and wore the SleepStrips at home. Test efficiency rate was 75% and there was a positive correlation between PSG-AHI scores and Sscores (r = 0.71, p correlation between Sscores and PSG-AHI scores were significant only at AHI > 30 levels. The SleepStrip has 100% specificity and positive predictive values, but it also has low negative predictive and sensitivity values. The SleepStrip is not a reliable screening test in differential diagnosis among simple snorers, mild, moderate and severe OSAS patients. However, high Sscores highly indicate the presence of moderate-severe OSAS. We can safely send these patients to split-night PSG and continuous, automatic, bi-level positive airway pressure (CPAP/BPAP/APAP) titration at the same night. The SleepStrip may increase the effective use of the sleep laboratories.

  5. Gut epithelial barrier markers in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barceló, Antonia; Esquinas, Cristina; Robles, Juan; Piérola, Javier; De la Peña, Mónica; Aguilar, Irene; Morell-Garcia, Daniel; Alonso, Alberto; Toledo, Nuria; Sánchez-de la Torre, Manuel; Barbé, Ferran

    2016-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is now being recognized as an additional contributing factor to the pathogenesis of obesity-related comorbidities. At the same time, there is now increasing evidence to suggest that intestinal wall permeability plays a role in the development of metabolic syndrome. In the present study, circulating zonulin and fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) were measured in association with metabolic, hepatic, and inflammatory parameters. Compared with controls, plasma I-FABP levels were significantly higher in patients with OSA (571 pg/mL [IQR 290-950] vs 396 pg/mL [IQR 234-559], p = 0.04). Zonulin levels were similar between groups. Significant relationships were observed between zonulin levels and waist circumference (p zonulin levels correlated negatively with the mean nocturnal oxygenation saturation (p zonulin and ALT, AST, and hs-CRP were attenuated, but not eliminated, after adjustment for other variables. The results of this study suggest that OSA is a risk factor for intestinal damage, regardless of metabolic profile, and that intestinal permeability might be a possible contributor to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in patients with OSA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical analysis of pharyngeal musculature and genioglossus exercising to treat obstructive sleep apnea and hypopnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shi-xiong; Qing, Jing; Wang, Yao-wen; Chai, Liang; Zhang, Wei-min; Ye, Xian-wang; Zhang, Jie; Huang, Yi-qin; Cheng, Peng

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of pharyngeal musculature and genioglossus exercising on obstructive sleep apnea and hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). We conducted a non-randomized retrospective clinical trial of 75 patients with OSAHS. Fifty-four patients were managed by exercising of the pharyngeal musculature and genioglossus (exercising group). Twenty-one patients, who refused to undertake any treatment, were defined as the control group. We took the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), checked patients' polysomnography, and took 320-detector computed tomography (CT) before treatment. Six and twelve months later, we made records of apnea hypopnea index (AHI), lowest arterial oxygen saturation (LSaO2), body mass index (BMI), the shortest sagittal diameter, and transverse diameter, and the effective rates of exercising were calculated and compared with the 21 patients without any treatment (control group) at the same time. SPSS 10.0 was used to analyze the data. Before treatment, the ESS value was 7.67; 6 and 12 months later, the values were 3.54 and 3.25, respectively in the exercising group. AHI was decreased to 15.36 after 6 months and 13.79 after 12 months from 22.84 at the beginning. LSaO2 values were up to 81.18% after 6 months and 81.93% after 12 months from 74.05% at the beginning. There were significant differences in ESS scores, AHI, and LSaO2 between pre-treatment and post-treatment in the exercising group (P0.05). At 12 months of exercising, the compliance of the anteroposterior pharyngeal wall of the retropalatal area was lower (P<0.01) than that before treatment. There was no significant change of BMI in either group. Exercising pharyngeal musculature and genioglossus is a kind of non-invasive and cost-effective method to treat some OSAHS patients, especially those who are old, without surgical complications, and especially mild and moderate OSAHS patients who do not want to take surgery and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment. In addition, exercising

  7. Fractalkine in obstructive sleep apnea patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsar, Gulgun Cetintas; Oruc, Ozlem; Sarac, Sema; Topçuoğlu, Özgür Bilgin; Salturk, Cuneyt; Tepetam, Fatma Merve; Bulut, Ismet

    2017-05-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common sleep disorder affecting 2-4 % of the adult population. In addition to several potential mechanisms, inflammation is one of the suggested etiological factors in OSA. Fractalkine/CX3CL1 which is detected in activated or stressed endothelium, smooth muscle cells, skeletal muscle cells, macrophages, neurons, and hepatocytes is an inflammatory marker and attracts attention of sleep specialists in OSA pathogenesis. In this study, we had two goals. The first one was to investigate the role of fractalkine in OSA pathogenesis while the second one was to detect the impact of OSA treatment with positive airway pressure (PAP) on serum fractalkine levels. This study included 34 patients (6 females, 28 males) diagnosed as OSA and 20 healthy controls (4 females, 16 males). Initial serum fractalkine levels of both groups were first evaluated in order to demonstrate any potential relation of OSA with fractalkine. Subsequently, serum fractalkine levels of the OSA patients were evaluated following 1 week of PAP treatment to demonstrate the impact of PAP treatment on serum fractalkine levels. Although there was no significant difference between OSA patients and healthy controls by means of plasma fractalkine levels (p, 0.67) statistically, plasma fractalkine levels significantly decreased in OSA patients after 1 week of PAP treatment (p, 0.001). This study showed that fractalkine, a potential mediator of chronic inflammation, was not sensitive in diagnosing OSA but might be an indicator of the success of OSA treatment.

  8. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome is Associated with Metabolic Syndrome among Adolescents and Youth in Beijing: Data from Beijing Child and Adolescent Metabolic Syndrome Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Xue Qu

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: The prevalence of OSA by BQ was high in obese adolescents and youth. A high risk for OSA indicates a high cardiometabolic risk. Mechanisms mediating the observed associations require further investigation.

  9. Impact of dronabinol on quantitative electroencephalogram (qEEG) measures of sleep in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farabi, Sarah S; Prasad, Bharati; Quinn, Lauretta; Carley, David W

    2014-01-15

    To determine the effects of dronabinol on quantitative electroencephalogram (EEG) markers of the sleep process, including power distribution and ultradian cycling in 15 patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). EEG (C4-A1) relative power (% total) in the delta, theta, alpha, and sigma bands was quantified by fast Fourier transformation (FFT) over 28-second intervals. An activation ratio (AR = [alpha + sigma] / [delta + theta]) also was computed for each interval. To assess ultradian rhythms, the best-fitting cosine wave was determined for AR and each frequency band in each polysomnogram (PSG). Fifteen subjects were included in the analysis. Dronabinol was associated with significantly increased theta power (p = 0.002). During the first half of the night, dronabinol decreased sigma power (p = 0.03) and AR (p = 0.03), and increased theta power (p = 0.0006). At increasing dronabinol doses, ultradian rhythms accounted for a greater fraction of EEG power variance in the delta band (p = 0.04) and AR (p = 0.03). Females had higher amplitude ultradian rhythms than males (theta: p = 0.01; sigma: p = 0.01). Decreasing AHI was associated with increasing ultradian rhythm amplitudes (sigma: p < 0.001; AR: p = 0.02). At the end of treatment, lower relative power in the theta band (p = 0.02) and lower AHI (p = 0.05) correlated with a greater decrease in sleepiness from baseline. This exploratory study demonstrates that in individuals with OSA, dronabinol treatment may yield a shift in EEG power toward delta and theta frequencies and a strengthening of ultradian rhythms in the sleep EEG.

  10. Comparação da área da faringe na vigília e durante o sono induzido em pacientes com Síndrome da Apneia Obstrutiva do Sono (SAOS Comparison of the area of the pharynx during wakefulness and induced sleep in patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Célia Faria

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available O estudo da Síndrome da Apneia Obstrutiva do Sono (SAOS tem merecido atenção crescente nos últimos anos, uma vez que vários aspectos não foram ainda suficientemente esclarecidos. OBJETIVO: Avaliar, com o uso da Ressonância Magnética (RM, as modificações da área da faringe durante vigília e sono induzido em pacientes portadores de SAOS. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: Estudo prospectivo de 32 pacientes com diagnóstico polissonográfico de SAOS. Todos foram submetidos à aquisição das Imagens por RM, com sequências sagitais de alta definição anatômica, realizadas inicialmente com o paciente em vigília e durante o sono induzido por Propofol. Uma área foi definida no plano sagital na linha média da faringe. Essa região passou a ser denominada como área do plano mediano da faringe (PMF. RESULTADOS: As medidas (mm² da área do PMF de cada paciente, na vigília e durante o sono induzido, apresentaram diferença estatisticamente significante pThe study of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA has received growing attention over the past years since various aspects have not been sufficiently established. AIM: To evaluate, with the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, changes in the area of the pharynx during wakefulness and induced sleep in patients with OSA. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A prospective study of thirty-two patients with a polysomnographic diagnosis of OSA. All patients were submitted to MR imaging in order to obtain high-definition anatomical sagittal sequences during wakefulness and during sleep induced with Propofol. An area was defined on the sagittal plane in the midline of the pharynx. This region was called pharyngeal midplane (PMP area. RESULTS: A significant difference in PMP area (mm² was observed between wakefulness and induced sleep in each patient (p < 0.000001. CONCLUSION: The patients with OSA suffer a significant reduction of 75,5 % in the area of the pharynx during induced sleep compared to wakefulness.

  11. Low morning serum cortisol levels in children with tonsillar hypertrophy and moderate-to-severe OSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakasioti, Georgia; Alexopoulos, Emmanouel I; Varlami, Vasiliki; Chaidas, Konstantinos; Liakos, Nikolaos; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos; Kaditis, Athanasios G

    2013-09-01

    Hypertrophic tonsillar tissue in children with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has enhanced expression of glucocorticoid receptors, which may reflect low endogenous cortisol levels. We have evaluated the effect of the interaction between tonsillar hypertrophy and OSA severity on morning serum cortisol levels. Children with and without snoring underwent polysomnography, tonsillar size grading, and measurement of morning serum cortisol. Seventy children (2-13 years old) were recruited: 30 with moderate-to-severe OSA (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] > 5 episodes/h), 26 with mild OSA (AHI > 1 and ≤ 5), and 14 controls (no snoring; AHI ≤ 1). Tonsillar hypertrophy was present in 56.7%, 53.8%, and 42.9% of participants in each group, respectively. Application of a general linear model demonstrated a significant effect of the interaction between severity of OSA and tonsillar hypertrophy on cortisol levels (P = 0.04), after adjustment for obesity, gender, and age. Among children with tonsillar hypertrophy, subjects with moderate-to-severe OSA (n = 17; AHI 14.7 ± 10.6), mild OSA (n = 14; AHI 2.3 ± 1.2), and control participants (n = 6; AHI 0.7 ± 0.2) were significantly different regarding cortisol levels (P = 0.02). Subjects with moderate-to-severe OSA had lower cortisol (16.9 ± 8.7 mcg/dL) than those with mild OSA (23.3 ± 4.2; P = 0.01) and those without OSA (controls) (23.6 ± 5.3 mcg/dL; P = 0.04). In contrast, children with normal-size tonsils and moderate-to-severe OSA, mild OSA, and controls did not differ in cortisol levels. Children with moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea and the phenotype of hypertrophic tonsils have reduced morning serum cortisol levels and potentially decreased glucocorticoid inhibitory effects on tonsillar growth.

  12. Obstructive Sleep Apnea in MPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit Ricky Pal MBBChir, MA, MD, FRCS(ORL-HNS

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The mucopolysaccharidoses (MPSs are a group of inherited, metabolic disorders characterized by progressive multisystem accumulation of partially degraded glycosaminoglycans. This manifests with multilevel airway obstruction, presenting with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. We systematically reviewed the literature to determine the severity and prevalence of OSA in MPS based on polysomnography analysis. Fifteen studies with 294 participants met the inclusion criteria for review. The pretreatment prevalence of OSA in MPS was 81% with a mean apnea–hypopnea index (AHI of 10.4. Patients with MPS I are most significantly affected, with 75% suffering with moderate to severe OSA (mean AHI, 16.6. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT results in an almost significant reduction in OSA in MPS I ( P = .06, while adenotonsillar surgery significantly improves AHI ( P = .002. Obstructive sleep apnea least affects MPS III. There is a lack of long-term post-ERT and hematopoietic stem cell transplant data relating to OSA outcomes in this population, with further prospective studies required to determine the ongoing response to treatment.

  13. [The influence factors of sound pressure level parameters in patients with simple snoring and obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrom].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhan; Xu, Huijie; Huang, Weining; Peng, Hao; He, Yuxia

    2015-06-01

    To discuss the main influence factors of sound pressure level parameters in patients with simple snoring (SS) and obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrom (OSAHS). Eighty-four cases with snoring disease underwent polysomnography and simultaneously snoring sound pressure level recording. The correlations between AHI, age, BMI, abdomen circumference, neck circumference, the lowest oxygen saturation total apnea time and sound pressure level parameters: equivalent continuous sound level(LAeq)and maximum sound pressure level(L10) were analyzed. LAeq was significantly correlated to AHI (P= 0. 000) and BMI (P= 0. 007), and the odd ratios of AHI and BMI were 5. 74,2. 09 respectively, but it was unrelated to age, abdomen circumference, neck circumference, the lowest oxygen saturation and total apnea time. A significantly association also existed between L10 and AHI(P=0. 000), BMI(P=0. 032), and the odd ratios were 4. 11 and 2. 33 respectively. Other factors had nothing to do with L10. The main factors which affect the snoring sound pressure level parameters LAeq and L10 are AHI and BMI.

  14. Cost-Effectiveness of a Community Pharmacist-Led Sleep Apnea Screening Program - A Markov Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clémence Perraudin

    Full Text Available Despite the high prevalence and major public health ramifications, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS remains underdiagnosed. In many developed countries, because community pharmacists (CP are easily accessible, they have been developing additional clinical services that integrate the services of and collaborate with other healthcare providers (general practitioners (GPs, nurses, etc.. Alternative strategies for primary care screening programs for OSAS involving the CP are discussed.To estimate the quality of life, costs, and cost-effectiveness of three screening strategies among patients who are at risk of having moderate to severe OSAS in primary care.Markov decision model.Published data.Hypothetical cohort of 50-year-old male patients with symptoms highly evocative of OSAS.The 5 years after initial evaluation for OSAS.Societal.Screening strategy with CP (CP-GP collaboration, screening strategy without CP (GP alone and no screening.Quality of life, survival and costs for each screening strategy.Under almost all modeled conditions, the involvement of CPs in OSAS screening was cost effective. The maximal incremental cost for "screening strategy with CP" was about 455€ per QALY gained.Our results were robust but primarily sensitive to the treatment costs by continuous positive airway pressure, and the costs of untreated OSAS. The probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed that the "screening strategy with CP" was dominant in 80% of cases. It was more effective and less costly in 47% of cases, and within the cost-effective range (maximum incremental cost effectiveness ratio at €6186.67/QALY in 33% of cases.CP involvement in OSAS screening is a cost-effective strategy. This proposal is consistent with the trend in Europe and the United States to extend the practices and responsibilities of the pharmacist in primary care.

  15. Quality of life of patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome treated with an intraoral mandibular repositioner Qualidade de vida em pacientes com síndrome de apnéia obstrutiva do sono tratados com reposicionador mandibular intra-oral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Cardoso Machado

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS is a very important and prevalent disease, which is associated with a poor quality of life in many patients. Treatments for OSAS include surgery, Continuos Positive Air way Pressure, and an intraoral mandibular repositioner (IOMR, but the tendency of sleep centers is to emphasize the apnea index, neglecting quality of life as treatment outcome. OBJECTIVE: To verify to what extent treatment with an IOMR improves the OSAS patient's quality of life. METHOD: Eleven male patients aged 34 to 63 years (mean=49 with mild to moderate OSAS were evaluated using the Calgary SAQLI questionnaire applied before and four weeks after treatment with an IOMR. The mandibular repositioners were manufactured individually for each patient with acrylic polymer and equipped with a retentive device to maintain the mandible in a forward position during sleep. RESULTS: Excellent improvement in the quality of life was observed in five patients (45.5% and excellent improvement in symptoms in 10 (90.9%. CONCLUSION: The systematic use of the IOMR indicates a clear improvement in the global quality of life as well as in the symptoms of patients with OSAS.CONTEXTO:A síndrome da apnéia obstrutiva do sono (SAOS é importante e prevalente doença associada à má qualidade de vida em muitos pacientes. Os tratamentos disponíveis incluem cirurgias, CPAP e o aparelho reposicionador mandibular intra-oral (ARMIO. Muitos centros de distúrbios de sono valorizam apenas a redução do número de apnéias no tratamento da SAOS, dando pouca atenção à qualidade de vida como desfecho do tratamento. OBJETIVO: Graduar melhora da qualidade de vida dos pacientes com SAOS usando ARMIO. MÉTODO: O questionário Calgary SAQLI foi aplicado, antes e após, 4 semanas de tratamento com ARMIO, a 11 pacientes masculinos, entre 34 e 63 anos de idade (média de 49 anos, com SAOS leve a moderada. ARMIOs foram manufaturados com polímero acrílico e

  16. Drug-induced sleep endoscopy in the identification of obstruction sites in patients with obstructive sleep apnea: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Alonço da Cunha; Thuler, Luiz Claudio Santos; Araújo-Melo, Maria Helena de

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome has multifactorial causes. Although indications for surgery are evaluated by well-known diagnostic tests in the awake state, these do not always correlate with satisfactory surgical results. To undertake a systematic review on endoscopy during sleep, as one element of the diagnosis routine, aiming to identify upper airway obstruction sites in adult patients with OSAS. By means of electronic databases, a systematic review was performed of studies using drug-induced sleep endoscopy to identify obstruction sites in patients with OSAS. Ten articles were selected that demonstrated the importance of identifying multilevel obstruction, especially in relation to retrolingual and laryngeal collapse in OSAS. DISE is an additional method to reveal obstruction sites that have not been detected in awake patients. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Global brain blood-oxygen level responses to autonomic challenges in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Macey

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is accompanied by brain injury, perhaps resulting from apnea-related hypoxia or periods of impaired cerebral perfusion. Perfusion changes can be determined indirectly by evaluation of cerebral blood volume and oxygenation alterations, which can be measured rapidly and non-invasively with the global blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD signal, a magnetic resonance imaging procedure. We assessed acute BOLD responses in OSA subjects to pressor challenges that elicit cerebral blood flow changes, using a two-group comparative design with healthy subjects as a reference. We separately assessed female and male patterns, since OSA characteristics and brain injury differ between sexes. We studied 94 subjects, 37 with newly-diagnosed, untreated OSA (6 female (age mean ± std: 52.1±8.1 yrs; apnea/hypopnea index [AHI]: 27.7±15.6 events/hr and 31 male 54.3±8.4 yrs; AHI: 37.4±19.6 events/hr, and 20 female (age 50.5±8.1 yrs and 37 male (age 45.6±9.2 yrs healthy control subjects. We measured brain BOLD responses every 2 s while subjects underwent cold pressor, hand grip, and Valsalva maneuver challenges. The global BOLD signal rapidly changed after the first 2 s of each challenge, and differed in magnitude between groups to two challenges (cold pressor, hand grip, but not to the Valsalva maneuver (repeated measures ANOVA, p<0.05. OSA females showed greater differences from males in response magnitude and pattern, relative to healthy counterparts. Cold pressor BOLD signal increases (mean ± adjusted standard error at the 8 s peak were: OSA 0.14±0.08% vs. Control 0.31±0.06%, and hand grip at 6 s were: OSA 0.08±0.03% vs. Control at 0.30±0.02%. These findings, indicative of reduced cerebral blood flow changes to autonomic challenges in OSA, complement earlier reports of altered resting blood flow and reduced cerebral artery responsiveness. Females are more affected than males, an outcome which may contribute to the sex

  18. Tracheostomy for Severe Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Indications and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, Christopher J; Amin, Julian D; Isaiah, Amal; Valdez, Tulio A; Jeyakumar, Anita; Smart, Suzanne E; Pereira, Kevin D

    2017-08-01

    Objectives (1) To describe characteristics of pediatric patients undergoing tracheostomy for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). (2) To highlight perioperative events and outcomes of the procedure. Study Design Case series with chart review. Setting Four tertiary care academic children's hospitals. Subjects and Methods Twenty-nine children aged tracheostomy for severe OSA, defined as an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) >10, were included in the study. Data on patient characteristics, polysomnographic findings, comorbidities, and perioperative events and outcomes were collected and analyzed. Results Twenty-nine patients were included. Mean age at tracheostomy was 2.0 years (95% CI, -2.2 to 6.2). Mean body mass index z score was -1.2 (95% CI, -4.9 to -2.5). Mean preoperative AHI was 60.2 (95% CI, -15.7 to 136.1). Mean postoperative intensive care unit stay was 23.2 days (95% CI, 1.44-45.0). One procedure was complicated by bronchospasm. Thirteen patients had craniofacial abnormalities; 10 had a neurologic disorder resulting in hypotonia; and 5 had a diagnosis of laryngomalacia. Mean follow-up was 30.6 months (95% CI, -10.4 to 71.6). Six patients were decannulated, with a mean time to decannulation of 40.8 months (95% CI, 7.9-73.7). Five patients underwent capped sleep study prior to decannulation with a mean AHI of 6.6 (95% CI, -9.9 to 23.1) and a mean oxygen nadir of 90.0% (95% CI, 80%-100%). Conclusion OSA is an uncommon indication for tracheostomy in children. Patients who require the procedure usually have an associated syndromic diagnosis resulting in upper airway obstruction. The majority of children who undergo tracheostomy for OSA will remain dependent at 24 months.

  19. The Relationship between Diabetic Neuropathy and Sleep Apnea Syndrome: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuya Fujihara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. High prevalence of sleep apnea syndrome (SAS has been reported in patients with diabetes. However, whether diabetic neuropathy (DN contributes to this high prevalence is controversial. Our aim of this study is to compare the prevalence of SAS between patients with and without DN. Methods. Systematic literature searches were conducted for cross-sectional studies that reported the number of patients with DN and SAS using MEDLINE (from 1966 to Nov 5, 2012 and EMBASE (from 1974 to Nov 5, 2012. Odds ratios (ORs of SAS related to DN were pooled with the Mantel-Haenszel method. Results. Data were obtained from 5 eligible studies (including 6 data sets, 880 participants, and 429 cases. Overall, the pooled OR of SAS in patients with DN compared with that in non-DN patients was significant (OR (95% CI, −1.95 (1.03–3.70. The pooled OR of SAS was 1.90 (0.97–3.71 in patients with type 2 diabetes. Excluding data on patients with type 1 diabetes, a higher OR was observed in younger patients (mean age <60 years than in those ≥60 years among whom the OR remained significant (3.82; 95% CI, 2.24–6.51 and 1.17; 95% CI, 0.81–1.68. Conclusions. Current meta-analysis suggested the association of some elements of neuropathy with SAS in type 2 diabetes. Further investigations are needed to clarify whether the association is also true for patients with type 1 diabetes.

  20. The Relationship between Diabetic Neuropathy and Sleep Apnea Syndrome: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikawa, Chika; Hirasawa, Reiko; Shimano, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Akiko; Hanyu, Osamu; Sone, Hirohito

    2013-01-01

    Aims. High prevalence of sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) has been reported in patients with diabetes. However, whether diabetic neuropathy (DN) contributes to this high prevalence is controversial. Our aim of this study is to compare the prevalence of SAS between patients with and without DN. Methods. Systematic literature searches were conducted for cross-sectional studies that reported the number of patients with DN and SAS using MEDLINE (from 1966 to Nov 5, 2012) and EMBASE (from 1974 to Nov 5, 2012). Odds ratios (ORs) of SAS related to DN were pooled with the Mantel-Haenszel method. Results. Data were obtained from 5 eligible studies (including 6 data sets, 880 participants, and 429 cases). Overall, the pooled OR of SAS in patients with DN compared with that in non-DN patients was significant (OR (95% CI), −1.95 (1.03–3.70)). The pooled OR of SAS was 1.90 (0.97–3.71) in patients with type 2 diabetes. Excluding data on patients with type 1 diabetes, a higher OR was observed in younger patients (mean age <60 years) than in those ≥60 years among whom the OR remained significant (3.82; 95% CI, 2.24–6.51 and 1.17; 95% CI, 0.81–1.68). Conclusions. Current meta-analysis suggested the association of some elements of neuropathy with SAS in type 2 diabetes. Further investigations are needed to clarify whether the association is also true for patients with type 1 diabetes. PMID:24381764

  1. Association between Apnea of Prematurity and Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Late Preterm Infants: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, François; Nadeau, Sophie; Caouette, Georges; Piedboeuf, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Late preterm infants (34-36 weeks' gestation) remain a population at risk for apnea of prematurity (AOP). As infants affected by respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) have immature lungs, they might also have immature control of breathing. Our hypothesis is that an association exists between RDS and AOP in late preterm infants. The primary objective of this study was to assess the association between RDS and AOP in late preterm infants. The secondary objective was to evaluate if an association exists between apparent RDS severity and AOP. This retrospective observational study was realized in a tertiary care center between January 2009 and December 2011. Data from late preterm infants who presented an uncomplicated perinatal evolution, excepted for RDS, were reviewed. Information related to AOP and RDS was collected using the medical record. Odds ratios were calculated using a binary logistic regression adjusted for gestational age and sex. Among the 982 included infants, 85 (8.7%) had an RDS diagnosis, 281 (28.6%) had AOP diagnosis, and 107 (10.9%) were treated with caffeine for AOP. There was a significant association between AOP treated with caffeine and RDS for all infants (OR = 3.3, 95% CI: 2.0-5.7). There was no association between AOP and RDS in 34 weeks infants [AOR: 1.6 (95% CI: 0.7-3.8)], but an association remains for 35 [AOR: 5.7 (95% CI: 2.5-13.4)] and 36 [OR = 7.8 (95% CI: 3.2-19.4)] weeks infants. No association was found between apparent RDS severity and AOP, regarding mean oxygen administration duration or complications associated with RDS. The association between RDS and AOP in late preterm infants reflects that patients affected by RDS are not only presenting lung immaturity but also respiratory control immaturity. Special consideration should be given before discontinuing monitoring after RDS resolution in those patients.

  2. Relationship of symptoms with sleep-stage abnormalities in obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Basunia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS present with a variety of sleep-related symptoms. In polysomnography, sleep architecture is almost always abnormal, but it is not known which of the sleep-stage abnormalities are related to symptoms. Finding key sleep-stage abnormality that cause symptoms may be of therapeutic importance to alleviate symptoms. So far the mainstay of treatment is continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP/bi-level positive airway pressure (BIPAP therapy, but many patients are non-compliant to it. Correcting the sleep-stage abnormality that cause symptoms by pharmacotherapy may become an important adjunct to CPAP/BIPAP therapy. Methods: A cross-sectional study. Adult subjects who attended a sleep laboratory for diagnostic polysomnography for a period of 1 month were recruited consecutively. OSAHS was diagnosed using American Academy of Sleep Medicine criteria. Subjects filled a questionnaire for symptoms prior to polysomnography. Results: Thirty subjects, of whom 83.3% were obese, met diagnostic criteria, with males constituting 46.7% and females constituting 53%. Mean age was 53.40±11.60 years. Sleep architecture comprised N1 19.50±19.00%, N2 53.93±13.39%, N3 3.90±19.50%, and rapid eye movement 8.92±6.21%. Excessive fatigue or sleepiness, waking up tired, falling asleep during the day, trouble paying attention, snoring and insomnia were significantly related to decreased N3 sleep. Conclusions: Most of the symptoms in OSAHS in adults are related to decreased stage N3 sleep. If confirmed by larger controlled studies, correcting N3 sleep deficiency by pharmacotherapy may become an important adjunct to CPAP/BIPAP therapy to alleviate symptoms.

  3. Predictive factors warrant screening for obstructive sleep apnea in COPD: a Taiwan National Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang LW

    2016-03-01

    questionnaire to assess COPD symptoms and OSA risk, comorbidities, and performance of daily activities. Data from COPD cohorts with and without risk of OSA were analyzed and compared. Results: Of 6,600 interviews completed, 404 subjects fit the epidemiological case definition of COPD – an overall prevalence of 6.1% in this national sample. Data on OSA risk were available for 292 of this COPD cohort, of whom 29.5% were at risk of OSA. Compared to those without risk of OSA, those with risk of OSA were significantly more likely to have hypertension or cardiovascular disease and diabetes, had significantly higher body mass index and COPD Assessment Test scores, and reported impaired work performance and leisure activities. Conclusion: Among adults in Taiwan who fulfill epidemiologic criteria for COPD, 29.5% have coexisting risk of OSA. Comorbid hypertension or cardiovascular disease and diabetes are common and significantly more prevalent among the COPD population at risk of OSA than those who are not. OSA screening is warranted in patients with COPD with those risk factors that are more prevalent in COPD with risk of OSA than without, to target early interventions to reduce adverse cardiovascular sequelae from overlap syndrome. Keywords: cardiovascular risk, COPD, coexistent, obstructive sleep apnea, OSA, overlap syndrome

  4. Effects of positive airway pressure therapy on cardiovascular and metabolic markers in males with obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Feliciano

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS is associated with cardiovascular/metabolic complications. Some analytical parameters (homocysteine, glycemic and lipidic profiles are recognized markers of these consequences. Limited data is available on the association of these markers and OSAS's severity/response to positive airway pressure therapy (PAP. Material and methods: In this prospective study we analyzed polysomnographic and analytical data of male patients admitted to sleep laboratory. The aim was to evaluate metabolic/cardiovascular markers in snorers and OSAS patients, to relate with sleep parameters and PAP response. One-hundred and three patients were included, and 73 (71% were OSAS patients. OSAS patients were similar to snorers except for higher body mass index (BMI and dyslipidemia. Severe OSAS patients showed higher glycemia, HbA1c, insulin, and insulin resistance, and lower HDL cholesterol in comparison to mild–moderate (p < 0.05, p < 0.05, p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p < 0.05, respectively. Glycemic profile and triglycerides were slightly correlated with OSAS severity. 46 OSAS patients were submitted to 6 months of PAP, with a statistical decrease in mean values of homocysteine, glycemia, total and LDL cholesterol (p < 0.05, p < 0.05, p < 0.05, respectively, and in glycemia and LDL cholesterol in severe group only (p < 0.05, p < 0.05, respectively. Results: This study demonstrated an association between glucose metabolism parameters and triglycerides with OSAS severity underlying the complexity of the process leading to cardiovascular/metabolic complications in this disorder. Moreover, homocysteine, glycemic and lipidic profiles changed significantly after 6 months of PAP therapy in OSAS, supporting its cardiovascular and metabolic protective effect. Conclusion: Our study has reinforced the importance of analytical cardiovascular/metabolic evaluation as

  5. Innovative treatments for adults with obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weaver TE

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Terri E Weaver,1,2 Michael W Calik,1,2 Sarah S Farabi,1,2 Anne M Fink,1,2 Maria T Galang-Boquiren,2,3 Mary C Kapella,1,2 Bharati Prasad,2,4 David W Carley1,21Biobehavioral Health Science Department, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago; 2Center for Narcolepsy, Sleep and Health, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Nursing, 3Department of Orthodontics, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Dentistry, 4Sleep Center, Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA affects one in five adult males and is associated with significant comorbidity, cognitive impairment, excessive daytime sleepiness, and reduced quality of life. For over 25 years, the primary treatment has been continuous positive airway pressure, which introduces a column of air that serves as a pneumatic splint for the upper airway, preventing the airway collapse that is the physiologic definition of this syndrome. However, issues with patient tolerance and unacceptable levels of treatment adherence motivated the exploration of other potential treatments. With greater understanding of the physiologic mechanisms associated with OSA, novel interventions have emerged in the last 5 years. The purpose of this article is to describe new treatments for OSA and associated complex sleep apnea. New approaches to complex sleep apnea have included adaptive servoventilation. There is increased literature on the contribution of behavioral interventions to improve adherence with continuous positive airway pressure that have proven quite effective. New non-surgical treatments include oral pressure devices, improved mandibular advancement devices, nasal expiratory positive airway pressure, and newer approaches to positional therapy. Recent innovations in surgical interventions have included laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty, radiofrequency ablation, palatal implants, and electrical

  6. Pulmonary hypertension and echocardiogram parameters in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, H T; Chee, K H; Chong, A W

    2017-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a growing health hazard in the United States and worldwide. OSA is now recognized as a disorder with systemic manifestations and its association with obesity and adverse cardiovascular consequences. There is increasing evidence that OSA may be associated with systemic hypertension and an increased incidence of stroke, heart failure, myocardial infarction, and arrhythmias. Less information is available about the association between OSA and pulmonary hypertension (PH). We therefore conduct this study to look at the prevalence of the pulmonary hypertension in obstructive sleep apnea patient and to identify risk factors leading to pulmonary hypertension among OSA patient. We studied and analyzed all OSA patient confirmed by polysomnograph in the year 2015. Twenty-five patients with OSA were included in this study with prevalence of pulmonary hypertension of 16%. Univariate analysis of various factors revealed a statistically significant association between having the lowest SpO 2 of pulmonary hypertension (p = 0.016). There were no statistically significant associations between age, gender, smoking status, hypertension, body mass index (BMI), or apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) with occurrence of pulmonary hypertension. AHI is not a good predictor for pulmonary hypertension. The real value of using AHI to predict the health risk of OSA is doubtful. We recommend routine echocardiogram among OSA patient. The objective information in the echocardiogram provides evidence for counseling of patient with disease of OSA and hence hopefully can improve compliance of patient to treatment especially usage of CPAP.

  7. The effect of continuous positive airway pressure treatment for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome on the ocular surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayirci, Emre; Yagci, Ayse; Palamar, Melis; Basoglu, O K; Veral, Ali

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome on the ocular surface. This is a prospective, sectional cohort study of 80 eyes of 40 patients diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Routine ophthalmologic examination and ocular surface evaluation, including biomicroscopy, Schirmer 1 testing, tear break-up time measurement, ocular surface staining, and conjunctival impression cytology, were performed in both of each patient's eyes before and 4 months after starting CPAP therapy. After CPAP therapy, increases in squamous metaplasia (Nelson classification: t = 0.34, P = 0.014) and Schirmer 1 score (t = 3.20, P = 0.008), and decreases in tear break-up time (t = -1.38, P = 0.008) in the right eyes were statistically significant, as compared with the pretreatment values. Although these parameters changed in a similar fashion in the left eyes, differences between the pre-CPAP and post-CPAP values were not significant. The findings indicate that CPAP therapy increased ocular irritation, tear evaporation, and squamous metaplasia in the conjunctiva of the patients' right and left eyes. Although the parameters measured were similar in both eyes before CPAP therapy, these parameters changed significantly after CPAP therapy only in the right eyes. The observed differences between the right and left eyes require further investigation to determine the possible effects of sleeping position, CPAP mask displacement, and the other factors involved.

  8. Evaluation of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS using measurement instruments such as scales and mathematical formulas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin Escobar-Córdoba

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The psychometry of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS can be obtained through various methods of evaluation such as clinical interviews, scales, sleep questionnaires, self-reports and psychophysiological records. The gold test for the diagnosis of this disease is still polysomnography, which can be expensive and poses difficulties to access the study. Due to the high morbidity and mortality associated with this syndrome, instruments are needed to allow the rapid identification of individuals who may be at risk. In consequence, different tools have been developed to detect patients at risk, such as the Berlin Questionnaire, the STOP-Bang and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. Considering the scope and limitations of these tools is important to choose the correct instrument depending on what needs to be evaluated.

  9. Assessment of anatomic parameters on lateral cephalogram and body mass index in patients with obstructive sleep apnea symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemat Mokhtari Amir Majdi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS is a serious and life threatening disorder caused by various anatomic and physio-pathologic factors. This study was conducted to clarify some anatomic etiologic factors of OSAS and the role of body mass index (BMI in expression of its symptoms. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study 127 patients were included. Sixty patients had OSAS symptoms and 67 patients were considered as controls. Cephalometric parameters from lateral skull view of CT scan and BMI of patients were statistically analyzed and compared between two groups. Results: The position of hyoid bone was significantly lower and soft palate was significantly larger in patients with OSAS symptoms than control group. Moreover, mean BMI measurement was significantly higher in the patient group. Conclusion: Our results suggest that in addition to apparent role of BMI in OSAS symptoms, increased soft tissue compartment of pharyngeal area and position of hyoid bone are significant etiologic factors in this syndrome.    

  10. Management of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V K Vijayan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA is an important public health problem and is associatedwith considerable morbidity and mortality. Therefore, treatment of this condition is ofparamount importance. The treatment of OSA includes general and behaviouralmeasures, mechanical measures including continuous positive airway pressure(CPAP, Bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP and Oral Appliances (OA,pharmacological treatment and surgical procedures. Continuous positive airwaypressure (CPAP treatment reverses the repetitive upper airway obstruction of sleepapnea and associated daytime sleepiness and is the most effective treatment for OSA.However maintaining patient adherence to CPAP therapy is a challenge. Weight lossshould be recommended to overweight patients with OSA, as it has been shown thatweight reduction has additional health benefits. Treatment of underlying medicalconditions such as hypothyroidism or acromegaly has profound effect onapnea/hypopnea index. A subset of patients with OSA may benefit from supplementaloxygen and positional therapy. Presently, there are no effective pharmacotherapeuticagents for treatment of patients with OSA and the role of surgical treatment in OSA iscontroversial. However, pharmacological treatment of persisting residual sleepiness,despite adequate positive airway pressure therapy delivery and adherence, is indicatedand may improve daytime sleepiness.Key words : CPAP, Oral appliances, Modafinil, CPAP complianceUvulopalatopharyngoplasty, positional therapy

  11. Relative rather than absolute macroglossia in patients with Down syndrome: implications for treatment of obstructive sleep apnea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Carolina V.A. [Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Cincinnati Children' s Hospital, OH (United States); Donnelly