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Sample records for apicoectomy

  1. Lasers in Apicoectomy: A Brief Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Zahed; Jafarzadeh, Hamid; Shalavi, Sousan; Kinoshita, Jun-Ichiro; Giardino, Luciano

    2017-02-01

    Since the invention of laser, various applications for lasers in endodontics have been proposed, such as disinfection of the root canal system, canal shaping, pulp diagnosis, and apico-ectomy. One of the major applications of laser in endodontics is apicoectomy. The aim of this article is to review the benefits and drawbacks of laser applications in apicoectomy, including effect on apical seal, effect on dentin permeability, effect on postsurgery pain, effect on crack formation, effect on root-end morphology, effect on treatment outcome, and connective tissue response to laser-treated dentin.

  2. Mandibular incisor apicoectomy in a Canadian Beaver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenkamp, Gerhard; Venter, Leon; Crossley, David; Buss, Peter

    2009-01-01

    A 52-month-old Canadian beaver was presented for treatment of lip trauma resulting from overgrowth of the right mandibular incisor tooth following earlier loss of the right maxillary incisor tooth. Extraction of the affected tooth was considered, but rejected due to the length of the embedded portion of rodent mandibular incisor teeth. The lip injury was managed by crown reduction (odontoplasty) of the overgrowing incisor tooth pending a more permanent treatment plan. A 2-cm apicoectomy of the right mandibular incisor tooth was performed to arrest growth of the tooth when the beaver was 82-months-old. The remainder of the tooth continued to erupt and was completely expelled during a 9-month period with one additional odontoplasty being required. The beaver continued to feed normally with just the left maxillary and mandibular incisor teeth until its death at 118-months, with odontoplasty performed twice on the remaining incisor teeth during the 30-months following exfoliation.

  3. Apicoectomies with the erbium laser: a complementary technique for retrograde endodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angiero, Francesca; Benedicenti, Stefano; Signore, Antonio; Parker, Steven; Crippa, Rolando

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of erbium lasers for retrograde endodontic treatment, in terms of clinical outcome and therapeutic success. Apicoectomy with retrograde filling is a well-established surgical procedure to treat teeth affected by persistent periapical lesions. The apical root end is generally removed with burs, and the adjacent periapical tissue curetted, or alternatively treated with ultrasound or laser. Between 2000 and 2010, 65 apicoectomies were performed on necrotic teeth that presented apical lesions (29 men, 36 women). The lasers used in the study were the erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser, wavelength 2940 nm, and the erbium,chromium-doped:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser, wavelength 2780 nm. Of the 65 teeth in the study, failure only occurred in 9 CASES, MANIFESTING AFTER DIFFERENT TIMES. THE REMAINING PATIENTS, 86.15%, experienced no complications, and their treatment followed a positive course. Laser-assisted surgery increases the range of therapeutic approaches in the sphere of retrograde endodontic treatment. The results of this study show that the erbium laser, used for apicoectomy, results in a high success rate with considerable benefit in terms of clinical outcome and therapeutic success.

  4. Outcome of orthograde retreatment after failed apicoectomy: use of a mineral trioxide aggregate apical plug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mente, Johannes; Leo, Meltem; Michel, Annemarie; Gehrig, Holger; Saure, Daniel; Pfefferle, Thorsten

    2015-05-01

    This controlled, single-center historic cohort study project evaluates treatment outcomes of a nonsurgical treatment approach after failed apicoectomy. The treatment outcomes of nonsurgical retreatment after a failed apicoectomy were evaluated clinically and radiographically. The study cohort consisted of teeth that had received primary root canal treatment and subsequent apicoectomy elsewhere before the patients presented with post-treatment disease. Orthograde retreatment and obturation using an apical mineral trioxide aggregate plug was performed by postgraduate students and endodontic specialists in 25 cases between 2004 and 2012. Pre-, intra-, and postoperative information and the potential effect on the retreatment outcome were evaluated and statistically analyzed using the chi-square test. Twenty-two patients with 23 teeth attended the follow-up examinations (recall rate = 92%). The follow-up periods ranged from 12 to 102 months (median = 35 months). Twenty teeth (87%) were classified as "success," and 3 teeth were considered (17%) "failure." The chi-square test confirmed that the preoperative factor "number of roots" had a statistically significant effect on treatment outcome (odds ratio = 0.08; 95% confidence interval, 0-1.76; P = .03). The factor "tooth location" was of borderline significance (odds ratio = 0.1; 95% confidence interval, 0-2.14; P = .05). The results of the present study suggest that orthograde retreatment combined with orthograde placement of an apical mineral trioxide aggregate plug is a promising long-term treatment option for teeth with postsurgical pathosis. The success rates were higher for single-rooted teeth. The use of cone-beam computed tomographic imaging in cases of inconclusive periapical radiographs is recommended to minimize the risk of misinterpretation when assessing treatment outcome. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. In-vitro study of the conventional and laser apicoectomy effects on dentin permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradella, Thais C.; de Mello, Guilherme P. E.; Munin, Egberto; Redigolo, Marcela L.; Pacheco, Marcos T. T.

    2001-10-01

    In the past years, lasers have become a special tool in dentistry. To study the effects of laser apicoectomy compared to the conventional surgical treatment, freshly-extracted single-root teeth were used, submitted to traditional endodontic treatment and divided into four groups: Group I, conventional apicoectomy using diamond burs; Group II, the same treatment as Group I, however, with a 15 second orthophosphoric acid application; Group III Er:YAG laser cut (10 Hz - 400 mJ); and finally, Group IV Er:YAG laser cut (10 Hz - 400 mJ) and surface treatment with Nd:YAG laser (10 Hz - 2 W). The samples were submitted to 2,5 % blue methylene dye solution, at 25 degree(s)C and 37 degree(s)C for 36 h and 18 h, respectively, and analyzed under optical microscope. The results show that Group II had the higher permeability of all the groups and Group IV had the lower one, due to the successful Nd:YAG laser surface treatment.

  6. Evaluation of Er:YAG, CO2, and Nd:YAG lasers on apical dentine permeability after apicoectomies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Careli de Castro, Fabiana; Gariba Silva, Ricardo; Marchesan, Melissa A.; Zanin, Fatima; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Pecora, Jesus D.

    2004-05-01

    Apicoectomy is a surgical procedure that consists of radicular apex resection, eliminating periapical lesion. This study evaluated the effect of CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers on root dentine permeability after apicoectomy with Er:YAG laser. Forty-four single-rooted teeth, obtained from the Endodontic Laboratory stock from the Faculty of Dentistry of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, were used. The teeth were instrumented with the step-back technique, irrigated with 1.0% sodium hypochlorite and sealed with Sealer 26 (Dentsply, Brazil; lateral condensation. The samples were divided into four groups of 11 teeth each that had the root sectioned 2mm from the apex: G1 - roots were sectioned with a 4138 diamond bur with cooling; G2 - roots were sectioned with pulsed Er:YAG laser at the following parameters: 15 Hz and 250 mJ; G3 - roots were sectioned with pulsed Er:YAG laser and Nd:YAG laser (10 Hz, 100 mJ, and 1 W) was app0lied on the sectioned surface; G4 - roots were sectioned with pulsed Er:YAG laser and CO2 laser (5 W, 10 seconds ON and 20 seconds OFF) was applied to the sectioned surface. The teeth were then impermeabilized with cyanoacrylate and placed in 0.5% methylene blue for 7 days. The proximal surface of the samples was removed for exposure of the sealed root canal and dye penetration was measured by means of microscopic evaluation. The results showed a statistically significant difference at the level of 1%. We conclude that all treatments presented microleakage and can placed in increasing order: Er:YAG (G2), Bur (G1), Er:YAG + Nd:YAG (G3); Er:YAG laser presented the lowest microleakage values, showing its viability for clinical use in apicoectomies.

  7. Evaluation of the permeability and morphological alteration of the dental surface after apicoectomy, treatment and preparation with Er:YAG and Nd:YAG lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Rodrigo Guerra de

    2001-01-01

    One of the objectives of endodontic treatment is to resolve pathological periapical processes caused by microbial contamination of the dental pulp. Correct execution of the necessary chemical preparation prior to surgery generally results in positive outcomes. However, a percentage of cases do not respond favorably and therefore require retreatment, a conservative therapeutic option. There are meanwhile a number of treatment failures which do not respond to these conservative measures and must therefore be subjected to paraendodontic surgical procedures. One of the principal problems of this therapeutic conduct is linked to the surface permeability of the dentin after apicoectomy and the lack of adequate marginal adaptation between the retrofilling material and the cavity walls. This permits the percolation of microorganisms and their metabolic by products from the system of root canals to the periapical region, thereby compromising the necessary tissue repair. The present work proposes the evaluation of the surface and marginal permeability of cut dentin after apicoectomy and treatment with Er:YAG and Nd:YAG lasers with fiber optics and then retrofilled with intermediate restorative material (IRM). A total of 24 single rooted teeth whose canals were endodontically treated were divided into 3 experimental groups: group I, whose apices were sectioned with an Er:YAG laser and the resulting cavity and the cut dental surface were irradiated with this laser via a 50/10 type fiber; in group II the apicoectomy was conducted with an Er:YAG laser and the resulting cavity and the cut surface were irradiated with a Nd:YAG laser; in group III, the samples were apicoectomized and the cavities were treated with a high speed bur (control group). Analysis of the infiltration of the dye methylene blue throughout the cut dental surface and the reconstruction demonstrated that the samples in the irradiated groups presented lower indices of infiltration than the control group. The

  8. Apicectomía quirúrgica: propuesta de un protocolo basado en la evidencia Surgical apicoectomy: proposed evidence-based protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Gómez-Carrillo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Diversos refinamientos de la técnica quirúrgica de apicectomía han propiciado que su tasa de éxito haya aumentado de modo considerable. Se revisa la bibliografía científica para determinar cuáles de estos procedimientos son superiores. Se realiza un protocolo que aúna racionalmente esas técnicas, con lo que así se optimiza el resultado final de la intervención.Diverse refinements of the apicoectomy surgical technique have considerably increased the success rate of the procedure. The scientific literature was reviewed to identify the most relevant procedures for the final outcome of surgery. A protocol was prepared to facilitate the rational selection of technique, thus optimizing the surgical outcome.

  9. Evaluation of the permeability and morphological alteration of the dental surface after apicoectomy, treatment and preparation with Er:YAG and Nd:YAG lasers; Avaliacao da permeabilidade e da alteracao morfologica da superficie dentinaria apos apicectomia, tratamento e retropreparo com os lasers de Er:YAG e Nd:YAG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Rodrigo Guerra de

    2001-07-01

    One of the objectives of endodontic treatment is to resolve pathological periapical processes caused by microbial contamination of the dental pulp. Correct execution of the necessary chemical preparation prior to surgery generally results in positive outcomes. However, a percentage of cases do not respond favorably and therefore require retreatment, a conservative therapeutic option. There are meanwhile a number of treatment failures which do not respond to these conservative measures and must therefore be subjected to paraendodontic surgical procedures. One of the principal problems of this therapeutic conduct is linked to the surface permeability of the dentin after apicoectomy and the lack of adequate marginal adaptation between the retrofilling material and the cavity walls. This permits the percolation of microorganisms and their metabolic by products from the system of root canals to the periapical region, thereby compromising the necessary tissue repair. The present work proposes the evaluation of the surface and marginal permeability of cut dentin after apicoectomy and treatment with Er:YAG and Nd:YAG lasers with fiber optics and then retrofilled with intermediate restorative material (IRM). A total of 24 single rooted teeth whose canals were endodontically treated were divided into 3 experimental groups: group I, whose apices were sectioned with an Er:YAG laser and the resulting cavity and the cut dental surface were irradiated with this laser via a 50/10 type fiber; in group II the apicoectomy was conducted with an Er:YAG laser and the resulting cavity and the cut surface were irradiated with a Nd:YAG laser; in group III, the samples were apicoectomized and the cavities were treated with a high speed bur (control group). Analysis of the infiltration of the dye methylene blue throughout the cut dental surface and the reconstruction demonstrated that the samples in the irradiated groups presented lower indices of infiltration than the control group. The

  10. A comparative study of materials and storage modes for human teeth in apicoectomy: scanning electron microscopy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Conto, F; Ericson Flores, M; Cucco, C; Prates Soares Zerbinati, L; Dedavid, B A; Gerhardt De Oliveira, M

    2014-04-01

    Periradicular surgery is a procedure that includes surgical exposure of the diseased apex, root-end cavity preparation, and retrofilling of the root canal. The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of periradicular surgery in vitro using different dental materials and storage methods for human teeth specimens. The sample comprised 60 human single-rooted teeth, divided into two groups according to mode of storage (hydrated or non-hydrated); each group was then subdivided by retrofilling material (mineral trioxide aggregate or resin-modified glass ionomer cement). Each specimen was analyzed by digital radiography and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Quantitative assessment of the gap between the retrofilling material and dentin surface was conducted by observation of apical views (2000x magnification) of four areas of each specimen. The gap between retrofilling material and the internal dentin surface of the root was found to be significantly wider in hydrated teeth (P=0.002). Comparison of the two retrofilling materials showed that, regardless of tooth storage method, use of glass ionomer cement was associated with significantly wider gaps between the filling material and dentin surface (P=0.001). Comparisons of tooth storage mode versus retrofilling material showed a statistical interaction (P=0.009) between these factors. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA®) provided the best apical sealing, regardless of storage medium. Resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitremer®) was associated with substantially larger mean gap values when used in hydrated teeth.

  11. Fuji Ortho LC®: uma alternativa para retrobturações = Fuji ortho LC ®: an alternative for apicoectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellwig, Ingeburg

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A apicectomia com retrobturação apical é uma alternativa cirúrgica para tratamento de lesões apicais persistentes ou quando ocorre insucesso em terapia endodôntica convencional. Existe na literatura, um grande número de estudos sobre as técnicas para ressecções apicais, retrocavitações e materiais retrobturadores. Nesse estudo foram utilizados 10 dentes humanos unirradiculares tratados endodonticamente, apicetomizados, retrocavitados e retrobturados com um cimento de ionômero de vidro (Fuji Ortho LC®. O objetivo desse estudo foi verificar se o material testado preenchia as condições necessárias para ser utilizado como retrobturador. Os resultados revelaram que o Fuji ORTHO LC® é um material com propriedades suficientes para promover selamento adequado do conduto radicular quando usado em retrobturações apicais

  12. CO2, Er: YAG and Nd:YAG lasers in endodontic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Humberto Pozza

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: CO2, Er:YAG and Nd:YAG lasers have been used in endodontic surgery. This in vitro study evaluated 1% Rhodamine B dye penetration using computer-assisted morphometry (ImageTool Software® of 108 endodontically treated human permanent canines. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Teeth were divided into 9 groups according to the technique used: A: 90-degree apicoectomy with bur, root-end cavity preparation with ultrasound and filled with MTA; B: 90-degree apicoectomy with bur, root-end cavity prepared with ultrasound and filled with MTA, and treatment of apical surface with CO2 laser (1 W, CW/CW; C: 90-degree apicoectomy with bur, and treatment of apical surface with Nd:YAG laser (150 mJ, 10 Hz; D: 90-degree apicoectomy with bur, and treatment of apical surface with CO2 laser,(1 W, CW/CW; E: apicoectomy with Er:YAG laser (400 mJ, 10 Hz, root-end cavity prepared with ultrasound and filled with MTA; F: apicoectomy with Er:YAG laser (400 mJ, 10 Hz and treatment of apical surface with Nd:YAG laser (150 mJ, 10Hz; G: apicoectomy with CO2 laser (5W, CW/SP, root-end cavity prepared with ultrasound and filled with MTA; H: irradiation of apical end with CO2 laser (1 W, CW/CW; I: irradiation of apical end with Nd:YAG laser (150 mJ, 10 Hz. RESULTS: Dye penetration was found in all specimens at different rates, the lowest penetration occurring in groups C (16.20%, B (17.24% and F (17.84%. CONCLUSIONS: Groups B, C and F represent the best technical sequences to perform endodontic surgery.

  13. CO2, ER:YAG AND ND:YAG LASERS IN ENDODONTIC SURGERY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozza, Daniel Humberto; Fregapani, Patrícia Wehmeyer; Xavier, Cristina Braga; Weber, João Batista Blessmann; de Oliveira, Marília Gerhardt

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: CO2, Er:YAG and Nd:YAG lasers have been used in endodontic surgery. This in vitro study evaluated 1% Rhodamine B dye penetration using computer-assisted morphometry (ImageTool Software®) of 108 endodontically treated human permanent canines. Material and methods: Teeth were divided into 9 groups according to the technique used: A: 90-degree apicoectomy with bur, root-end cavity preparation with ultrasound and filled with MTA; B: 90-degree apicoectomy with bur, root-end cavity prepared with ultrasound and filled with MTA, and treatment of apical surface with CO2 laser (1 W, CW/CW); C: 90-degree apicoectomy with bur, and treatment of apical surface with Nd:YAG laser (150 mJ, 10 Hz); D: 90-degree apicoectomy with bur, and treatment of apical surface with CO2 laser (1 W, CW/CW); E: apicoectomy with Er:YAG laser (400 mJ, 10 Hz), root-end cavity prepared with ultrasound and filled with MTA; F: apicoectomy with Er:YAG laser (400 mJ, 10 Hz) and treatment of apical surface with Nd:YAG laser (150 mJ, 10Hz); G: apicoectomy with CO2 laser (5W, CW/SP), root-end cavity prepared with ultrasound and filled with MTA; H: irradiation of apical end with CO2 laser (1 W, CW/CW); I: irradiation of apical end with Nd:YAG laser (150 mJ, 10 Hz). Results: Dye penetration was found in all specimens at different rates, the lowest penetration occurring in groups C (16.20%), B (17.24%) and F (17.84%). Conclusions: Groups B, C and F represent the best technical sequences to perform endodontic surgery. PMID:20027433

  14. CO(2), Er: YAG and Nd:YAG lasers in endodontic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozza, Daniel Humberto; Fregapani, Patrícia Wehmeyer; Xavier, Cristina Braga; Weber, João Batista Blessmann; Oliveira, Marília Gerhardt de

    2009-01-01

    CO(2), Er:YAG and Nd:YAG lasers have been used in endodontic surgery. This in vitro study evaluated 1% Rhodamine B dye penetration using computer-assisted morphometry (ImageTool Software) of 108 endodontically treated human permanent canines. Teeth were divided into 9 groups according to the technique used: A: 90-degree apicoectomy with bur, root-end cavity preparation with ultrasound and filled with MTA; B: 90-degree apicoectomy with bur, root-end cavity prepared with ultrasound and filled with MTA, and treatment of apical surface with CO(2) laser (1 W, CW/CW); C: 90-degree apicoectomy with bur, and treatment of apical surface with Nd:YAG laser (150 mJ, 10 Hz); D: 90-degree apicoectomy with bur, and treatment of apical surface with CO(2) laser,(1 W, CW/CW); E: apicoectomy with Er:YAG laser (400 mJ, 10 Hz), root-end cavity prepared with ultrasound and filled with MTA; F: apicoectomy with Er:YAG laser (400 mJ, 10 Hz) and treatment of apical surface with Nd:YAG laser (150 mJ, 10Hz); G: apicoectomy with CO(2) laser (5W, CW/SP), root-end cavity prepared with ultrasound and filled with MTA; H: irradiation of apical end with CO(2) laser (1 W, CW/CW); I: irradiation of apical end with Nd:YAG laser (150 mJ, 10 Hz). Dye penetration was found in all specimens at different rates, the lowest penetration occurring in groups C (16.20%), B (17.24%) and F (17.84%). Groups B, C and F represent the best technical sequences to perform endodontic surgery.

  15. Evaluation of mental foramen location in the 10–70 years age range ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-08-18

    Aug 18, 2015 ... surgery (apicoectomy), anesthesia, and implant treatment,. Evaluation of mental foramen location in the. 10–70 years age range using cone‑beam computed tomography. E Gungor, OS Aglarci1, M Unal2, MS Dogan3, S Guven4. Department of Dentomaxillofacial Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Zirve ...

  16. Prevalence of periapical lesions in endodontic treatment teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Juliana Machado Barroso; Kleber Borgo Kill; Marcelo Peçanha; João Batista Gagno Intra; Rosana de Souza Pereira; Armelindo Roldi; Bruno Fabri; Francisco Carlos Ribeiro

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of of persistent periapical lesions after conventional endodontic therapy. The persistent periapical lesions were removed paraendodontic surgery, followed by apicoectomy. The root ends were retroprepared with ultrasound and retrofilling with MTA. The specimens were stored in formaldehyde 10%, making a total of 107 samples. The lesions were referred to the Department of Pathology, FOB-USP for microscopic analysis using the te...

  17. [Nonsurgical retreatment of lateral radiopacity after surgical treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias de Luxan, A

    1990-01-01

    A case report is presented of an upper central incisor with incomplete endodontic procedure evidencing a radiolucent image that was treated by apicoectomy and retroamalgam. A year later the periapical lesion had healed completely but a new lateral radiolucency is observed. A reentry of the canal is performed eliminating the old obturating material, biomechanical preparation and obturation with sealer and thermo gutta-percha. The lesion was cured in nine months.

  18. The solutions to your problems in endodontic retreatment and microsurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Ang

    2016-06-01

    How to find the 4th canal in the upper Second molars in 60% of your patients, How to find the 4th canal in the upper First molars in 90% of your patients, How to retreat canals root filled with metal posts, fiber posts, gutta percha, hard canal cement & thermafils, How to remove fractured posts and posts cemented with resin cements. Understand why and how to perform Endodontic Surgery: How to treat large periapical lesions microsurgically, How to use the latest Ultrasonic technology under the Surgical Operating Microscope in all forms of microsurgery, Learn about the modern concepts in transplants, apicoectomies and intentional replantations.

  19. Biocompatibility of retrograde root filling materials: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodrumlu, Emre

    2008-04-01

    The aim of a retrograde filling material is to fill the apical canal space and to obtain a hermetic seal between the periodontium and the root canal system. Several materials have been suggested for root-end filling including: amalgam, gutta-percha, zinc oxide-eugenol cements, glass ionomer cement, gold foil pellets, Cavit, composite resin and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Super-ethoxy benzoic acid and MTA are the most suitable materials and provide better results in apicoectomy procedures than other filling materials. Unfortunately, the ideal material for this purpose has yet to be found. This article is a review of the biocompatibility of retrograde filling materials.

  20. Surgical management of an endodontic retreatment failure of a mandibular first molar

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    Kinjal M Gathani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the common endodontic iatrogenic mishaps is the extrusion of obturation material which has a negative effect on the long-term prognosis of the tooth. Surgical endodontics has enabled us to save teeth with persistent infections and extrusions when orthograde treatment has been unsuccessful. Apicoectomy of the molars is not frequently performed even though its success rate can reach that of anteriors and premolars. This case report describes the orthograde and surgical management of a mandibular first molar with external root resorption, instrument separation in the canal, and extruded obturation material, which had been unresponsive to endodontic retreatment.

  1. [Sequence orthodontic treatment of impacted dilacerated maxillary central incisors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yi; Pang, Xuannai; Nan, Lan; Mo, Shuixue

    2012-06-01

    To explore an effective orthodontic method for treating impacted dilacerated maxillary central incisors. 12 impacted teeth of 11 cases were chosen. The position of the impacted teeth and the relations with neighbour tissues were assessed by X-ray images, oral examination and plaster model, etc. The impacted teeth were induced to erupt with the closed-eruption technique and fixed orthodontic appliances, root canal therapy, apicoectomy and prosthetic treatment. 12 impacted teeth were moved into arches, and the occlusal relationship was normal. There were no root resorption or conglutination in those impacted teeth. The labial impacted teeth of nine cases had bigger labial crown torsion. The root apexes of four impacted teeth were palpable under mucosa of the labial sulcus and operated by root canal therapy and apicoectomy. One of them received prosthetic treatment. Others (five cases) hadn't accepted root canal therapy, and were observed temporarily. The effects of two palatal impacted teeth was stable. It was a good method to expand indication with sequence orthodontic treatment. The impacted dilacerated maxillary central incisors could be aligned with good esthetical and functional effect.

  2. Doença periapical em eqüinos: estudo de quatro casos Periapical disease in equine: study of four cases

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    G.M. Pagliosa

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Estudaram-se quatro casos de doença periapical (DP em eqüinos submetidos à apicectomia e extração dentária. O diagnóstico baseou-se na anamnese, nos exames físico geral e oral e na radiologia. A apicectomia foi ineficaz devido à falta de tratamento endodôntico e a extração dentária mostrou-se a melhor conduta de tratamento, apesar da dificuldade de cura completa da infecção. A DP pode ter causas adicionais a serem definidas, além das classificadas como primária e secundária pela literatura.Four cases of periapical disease (PC in equines submitted to apicoectomy and dental extraction were studied. The diagnosis was based on anamnesis, physical and oral examination and radiology. The apicoectomy was not effective due of the lack of endodontic treatment. The dental extraction was the better treatment, despite of the difficulty of complete cure of the infection. The PC can have other causes, beyond of those classified as primary and secondary by the literature.

  3. Prevalence of periapical lesions in endodontic treatment teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Machado Barroso

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of of persistent periapical lesions after conventional endodontic therapy. The persistent periapical lesions were removed paraendodontic surgery, followed by apicoectomy. The root ends were retroprepared with ultrasound and retrofilling with MTA. The specimens were stored in formaldehyde 10%, making a total of 107 samples. The lesions were referred to the Department of Pathology, FOB-USP for microscopic analysis using the technique of serial sections. The present results showed periapical cyst (48, granuloma (43, Crohn's abscess (2, apical fibrosis (3 and others (11. . Among the lesions analyzed in this study it can be observed a higher incidence of apical periodontal cyst, followed by apical granuloma and other pathologies.

  4. PREVALENCE OF PERIAPICAL LESIONS IN ENDODONTIC TREATMENT TEETH

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    Francisco Carlos Ribeiro

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of of persistent periapical lesions after conventional endodontic therapy. The persistent periapical lesions were removed paraendodontic surgery, followed by apicoectomy. The root ends were retroprepared with ultrasound and retrofilling with MTA. The specimens were stored in formaldehyde 10%, making a total of 107 samples. The lesions were referred to the Department of Pathology, FOB-USP for microscopic analysis using the technique of serial sections. The present results showed periapical cyst (48, granuloma (43, Crohn's abscess (2, apical fibrosis (3 and others (11. . Among the lesions analyzed in this study it can be observed a higher incidence of apical periodontal cyst, followed by apical granuloma and other pathologies.

  5. Esthetic periodontal surgery for impacted dilacerated maxillary central incisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yu-Ju; Lin, Yi-Chun; Kaung, Shou-Shin; Yang, Shue-Fen; Lee, Shyh-Yuan; Lai, Yu-Lin

    2012-10-01

    Clinicians do not frequently see impacted dilacerated maxillary incisors in their patients. When they do, there are several diagnostic and management challenges for correcting root dilacerations. An unfavorable esthetic outcome might occur as a result of soft-tissue complications during surgical eruption procedures. We present 2 patients with an impacted and dilacerated maxillary central incisor. Computed tomography scans with 3-dimensional reformation were used to accurately assess the positions of the dilacerated teeth, the degree of dilaceration, and the stage of root formation. The therapy primarily involved 2-stage crown exposure surgery combined with orthodontic traction. An apicoectomy was performed on 1 dilacerated tooth; the other exhibited pulp vitality. This article highlights the periodontal surgical strategies for the esthetic management of inverted crowns. Through periodontal plastic surgery and interdisciplinary cooperation, the impacted dilacerated central incisors were properly aligned, and successful esthetic results were achieved. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A systematic review of in vivo retrograde obturation materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederman, R; Theodosopoulou, J N

    2003-09-01

    The aim of this study was to answer the question: For patients requiring apicoectomy (apicectomy/root-end resection) and retrograde (root-end) obturation (filling), which retrograde obturation (root-end filling) material(s) is/are the most effective, as determined by reduction in periapical radiolucency and elimination of signs and symptoms? A MEDLINE and a Cochrane search (two specified searches) were conducted to identify randomised (RCT) and nonrandomised controlled clinical trials (CCT), cohort studies (CS) and case-control studies (CCS), published between 1966 and 2002, October week 4, conducted on humans, and published in English, German and French language, relating to retrograde obturation materials following apicoectomy. The MEDLINE and the Cochrane search identified 324 and 21 published articles, respectively. The Cochrane search identified three additional articles to the MEDLINE-search articles. Fourteen studies met the inclusion criteria: two were RCTs, six were CCTs, none was a CS and six were retrospective CCSs. Nine of the 14 studies compared a new retrograde (root-end)-filling material to amalgam, 4 of the 14 studies compared orthograde root canal fillings to retrograde (root-end) amalgam and the fourteenth study compared variations of a resin composite (Retroplast) when used in combination with the bonding agent Gluma (Bayer AG, Gluma 1 and 2). The two RCTs indicated that glass ionomer cement appeared to be equivalent to amalgam. The six CCTs indicated that orthograde filling with gutta-percha and sealer was more effective than amalgam retrograde (root-end)-filling (one trial). Similarly, retrograde (root-end)-filling with (i) composite and Gluma (Bayer AG, Leverkusen, Germany) as bonding agent (one trial), (ii) reinforced zinc oxide eugenol cement (EBA cement) (Stailine, Staident, Middlesex, England; one trial) and (iii) gold leaf (one trial) appeared to be better than amalgam retrograde (root-end)-filling. Finally, gutta-percha retrograde (root

  7. Endodontic therapy using magnification devices: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Fabbro, Massimo; Taschieri, Silvio

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate if the use of magnification devices in endodontics is associated with the improvement of clinical and radiographic outcomes. The treatment success as determined by clinical and radiographic evaluation after 1-year follow-up was the main outcome. The main search terms used alone or in combination were: endodontic treatment, endodontic therapy, endodontic surgery, apicoectomy, periapical surgery, microscope, endoscope, loupes, magnification devices. The authors searched MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Oral Health Specialized Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for articles published up to September 2009 plus hand-searching of relevant journals and reference list of pertinent reviews and included studies. Prospective clinical trials comparing endodontic therapy performed with or without using magnification devices, as well as trials comparing two or more magnification devices for endodontic therapy were considered. Three prospective studies were included, all dealing with endodontic surgery. No significant difference in outcomes was found among patients treated using magnifying loupes, surgical microscope or endoscope. Similarly, no difference was found with or without using the endoscope. No comparative study on magnification devices was found regarding orthograde endodontic treatment. The type of magnification device per se can only minimally affect the treatment outcome. Well-designed randomized trials should be performed to determine the true difference in treatment outcomes when using a magnification device in both orthograde and surgical endodontic treatment, if any exist. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Lasers in endodontics: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frentzen, Matthias; Braun, Andreas; Koort, Hans J.

    2002-06-01

    The interest in endodontic use of dental laser systems is increasing. Developing laser technology and a better understanding of laser effects widened the spectrum of possible endodontic indications. Various laser systems including excimer-, argon+-, diode-, Nd:YAG-, Er:YAG- and CO2-lasers are used in pulp diagnosis, treatment of hypersensitivity, pulp capping, sterilization of root canals, root canal shaping and obturation or apicoectomy. With the development of new delivery systems - thin and flexible fibers - for many different wavelengths laser applications in endodontics may increase. Since laser devices are still relatively costly, access to them is limited. Most of the clinical applications are laser assisted procedures such as the removing of pulp remnants and debris or disinfection of infected root canals. The essential question is whether a laser can provide improved treatment over conventional care. To perform laser therapy in endodontics today different laser types with adopted wavelengths and pulse widths are needed, each specific to a particular application. Looking into the future we will need endodontic laser equipment providing optimal laser parameters for different treatment modalities. Nevertheless, the quantity of research reports from the last decade promises a genuine future for lasers in endodontics.

  9. Laser-assisted oral surgery in general practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Mark C.

    1995-04-01

    This presentation will demonstrate and discuss any surgical applications of the Argon dental laser. This presentation will also increase the awareness and basic understanding of the physical principals of the Argon laser. The wavelength of the Argon laser is specifically absorbed by red pigments such a hemoglobin which is abundant in oral soft tissue. The result is a sharp clean incision with minimal thermal damage to adjacent healthy tissue. Preprosthetic procedures such as full arch vestibuloplasty, labial and lingual frenectomy, and epulis fissuratum removal will be demonstrated. Other soft tissue management procedures such as minor periodontal pocket elimination surgery (gingivectomy), removal of hyperplastic granulation tissue from around poorly maintained implants, and the removal of granulation and/or cystic tissue from the apex of teeth undergoing endodontic (apicoec-tomy) surgery will also be demonstrated and discussed. Provided basic oral surgery protocol is followed, surgical procedures utilizing the Argon laser can be accomplished with minimal bleeding, minimal trauma and with minimal post-operative discomfort.

  10. Hybrid layer seals the cementum/4-META/MMA-TBB resin interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Saori; Sugaya, Tsutomu; Kawanami, Masamitsu; Nodasaka, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Toshiki; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yuko; Ikeda, Takatsumi; Sano, Hidehiko; Sidhu, Sharanbir K

    2007-01-01

    Although 4-META/MMA-TBB resin has adhesive properties to dentin, and has been clinically used for the bonding treatment of vertically fractured roots and apicoectomy, there has not been any investigation on the adhesion of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin to cementum. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the bonding and the sealing ability of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin to cementum. Bovine root cementum and dentin surfaces were treated with a citric acid and ferric chloride solution, and the 4-META/MMA-TBB resin was applied on the treated surfaces before testing. The microtensile bond strength and the leakage levels obtained for the cementum were almost equal to those for the dentin. In SEM and TEM observations, a hybrid layer approximately 2-3 microm in thickness was observed at the interface between the resin and the cementum. It is concluded that 4-META/MMA-TBB resin adhered to cementum via a hybrid layer on cementum, as previously reported for dentin. 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Binary Decision Trees for Preoperative Periapical Cyst Screening Using Cone-beam Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, Brandon; Alaqla, Ali; Noujeim, Marcel; Wealleans, James A; Kotsakis, Georgios; Chrepa, Vanessa

    2017-03-01

    Cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) analysis allows for 3-dimensional assessment of periradicular lesions and may facilitate preoperative periapical cyst screening. The purpose of this study was to develop and assess the predictive validity of a cyst screening method based on CBCT volumetric analysis alone or combined with designated radiologic criteria. Three independent examiners evaluated 118 presurgical CBCT scans from cases that underwent apicoectomies and had an accompanying gold standard histopathological diagnosis of either a cyst or granuloma. Lesion volume, density, and specific radiologic characteristics were assessed using specialized software. Logistic regression models with histopathological diagnosis as the dependent variable were constructed for cyst prediction, and receiver operating characteristic curves were used to assess the predictive validity of the models. A conditional inference binary decision tree based on a recursive partitioning algorithm was constructed to facilitate preoperative screening. Interobserver agreement was excellent for volume and density, but it varied from poor to good for the radiologic criteria. Volume and root displacement were strong predictors for cyst screening in all analyses. The binary decision tree classifier determined that if the volume of the lesion was >247 mm 3 , there was 80% probability of a cyst. If volume was decision tree classifier renders it a useful preoperative cyst screening tool that can aid in clinical decision making but not a substitute for definitive histopathological diagnosis after biopsy. Confirmatory studies are required to validate the present findings. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Removal of surgical smear layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabiani, Cristiano; Franco, Vittorio; Covello, Francesco; Brambilla, Eugenio; Gagliani, Massimo M

    2011-06-01

    During apicoectomy and retrograde cavity preparation, a smear layer, which contains microorganisms and necrotic pulpal tissues, is formed on the dentinal surfaces cut by the instruments. Bacteria can survive and proliferate inside or below the smear layer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vitro two different procedures for the removal of the smear layer in retrocavities prepared with ultrasonic retrotips. Twenty-eight single-rooted teeth were cleaned, shaped, and obturated with gutta-percha and sealer. The apical 3 mm of each root were cut with a carbide bur, and retrograde cavities were prepared with ProUltra ultrasonic retrotips (Maillefer Dentsply, Baillagues, Switzerland) at a depth of 3 mm. Teeth in group A were treated with a gel of 35% orthophosphoric acid for 15 seconds, and teeth in group B were treated with a gel of 24% EDTA at a neutral pH for 2 minutes. The samples were prepared for scanning electron microscopic observation and scored for the presence of the smear layer on the retrocavity walls. Eighty percent of the teeth in group A showed an optimal degree of cleanliness of the walls, with dentinal tubules completely open. The majority of analyzed samples coming from group B showed dentinal tubules covered with the smear layer. The analysis of the samples showed that orthophosphoric acid is more effective than EDTA in removing surgical smear layer even with less time of action. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Frequency of Bacetrial Content Finding in Persistant Periapical Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joško Grgurević

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine the percentage of persistant apical lesions positive for bacterial nucleic acids, to detect microorganisms difficult to cultivate in persistant apical lesions by PCR and relate them to endodontic failure, clinical symptoms and diabetes mellitus. Materials and methods: The samples of persistent apical lesions were collected during apicoectomy. Bacterial ubiquitous primer 16S rRNA was used to detect 16S ribosomal RNA in 36 samples. A species–specific PCR was performed with primers targeted to the bacterial 16S rRNA genes of Prevotella Nigrescens, Pseudoramibacter alactolyticus, and Propionobacterium propionicum. Results: Six samples (16.67% were positive for bacterial ribosomal RNA. Pseudoramibacter alactolyticus was detected in three samples. Propionibacterium propionicum and Prevotella nigrescens were detected in one sample each. The prevalence of infection of such lesions with P. intermedia, P. propionicum and P. alactolyticus is low. Conslusion: The study we conducted gave insufficient data about extraradicular infection and its connection with diabetes mellitus and clinical symptoms. Conclusions: Apical lesions persisting after endodontic treatment could harbor microorganisms other than Actinomyces and Propionicum species.

  14. Laser scanning dental probe for endodontic root canal treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Molly A. B.; Friedrich, Michal; Hamilton, Jeffrey D.; Lee, Peggy; Berg, Joel; Seibel, Eric J.

    2011-03-01

    Complications that arise during endodontic procedures pose serious threats to the long-term integrity and health of the tooth. Potential complexities of root canals include residual pulpal tissue, cracks, mesial-buccal 2 and accessory canals. In the case of a failed root canal, a successful apicoectomy can be jeopardized by isthmuses, accessory canals, and root microfracture. Confirming diagnosis using a small imaging probe would allow proper treatment and prevent retreatment of endodontic procedures. An ultrathin and flexible laser scanning endoscope of 1.2 to 1.6mm outer diameter was used in vitro to image extracted teeth with varied root configurations. Teeth were opened using a conventional bur and high speed drill. Imaging within the opened access cavity clarified the location of the roots where canal filing would initiate. Although radiographs are commonly used to determine the root canal size, position, and shape, the limited 2D image perspective leaves ambiguity that could be clarified if used in conjunction with a direct visual imaging tool. Direct visualization may avoid difficulties in locating the root canal and reduce the number of radiographs needed. A transillumination imaging device with the separated illumination and light collection functions rendered cracks visible in the prepared teeth that were otherwise indiscernible using reflected visible light. Our work demonstrates that a small diameter endoscope with high spatial resolution may significantly increase the efficiency and success of endodontic procedures.

  15. SEM investigation of Er:YAG laser apical preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bǎlǎbuc, Cosmin; Todea, Carmen; Locovei, Cosmin; RǎduÅ£ǎ, Aurel

    2016-03-01

    Endodontic surgery involves the incision and flap elevation, the access to the root tip, its resection, the cavity retrograde preparation and filling it with biocompatible material that provides a good seal of the apex[1]. Apicoectomy is compulsory in endodontic surgery. The final stage involves the root retropreparation and the carrying out of the retrograde obturation. In order to perform the retrograde preparation the endodontist can use various tools such as lowspeed conventional handpieces, sonic and ultrasonic equipment. The ideal depth of the preparation should be 3 mm, exceeding this value may affect the long-term success of the obturation [2]. Resection at the depth of 3 mm reduces apical ramifications by 98% and lateral root canals by 93%. The ultrasonic retropreparation has numerous advantages compared to the dental drill. Firstly, the cavity will be in the axis of the tooth which implies a minimum destruction of the root canal morphology. The preparations are precise, and the cutting pattern is perpendicular to the long axis of the root, the advantage being the reduction in the number of dentinal tubules exposed at the resected area [3]. Therefore, the retrograde filling is the procedure when an inert and non-toxic material is compacted in the apically created cavity.[4,5]. The Er:YAG laser is the most common wavelength indicated for dental hard tissue preparation. Its natural selectivity offers a significant advantage compared to the conventional hard tissue preparation [6-9].The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the quality of Er:YAG laser apical third preparation using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), in comparison with the conventional ultrasonic method.

  16. Oral soft tissue infections: causes, therapeutic approaches and microbiological spectrum with focus on antibiotic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, Carolin; Reinhart, Edeltraud; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Kolk, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Intraoral soft tissue infections (OSTI) are a common problem in dentistry and oral surgery. These abscesses are mostly exacerbated dental infections (OIDC), and some emerge as postoperative infections (POI) after tooth extraction (OITR) or apicoectomy (OIRR). The main aim of this study was to compare OIDC with POI, especially looking at the bacteria involved. An additional question was, therefore, if different antibiotic treatments should be used with OSTI of differing aetiologies. The impact of third molars on OSTI was evaluated and also the rates of POI after removal of third molars were specified. Patient data was collected from the patients' medical records and the results were statistically evaluated with SPSS (SPSS version 21.0; SPSS, IBM; Chicago, IL, USA). The inclusion criterion was the outpatient treatment of a patient with an exacerbated oral infection; the exclusion criteria were an early stage of infiltration without abscess formation; and a need for inpatient treatment. Periapical exacerbated infections, especially in the molar region were the commonest cause of OIDC. In the OITR group, mandibular tooth removal was the commonest factor (p=0.016). Remarkably, retained lower wisdom teeth led to significant number of cases in the OITR group (p=0.022). In our study we could not define differences between the causal bacteria found in patients with OIDC and POI. Due to resistance rates we conclude that amoxicillin combined with clavulanic acid seems to be the antibiotic standard for exacerbated intraoral infections independent of their aetiology. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Apices of maxillary premolars observed by swept source optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebihara, Arata; Iino, Yoshiko; Yoshioka, Toshihiko; Hanada, Takahiro; Sunakawa, Mitsuhiro; Sumi, Yasunori; Suda, Hideaki

    2015-02-01

    Apicoectomy is performed for the management of apical periodontitis when orthograde root canal treatment is not possible or is ineffective. Prior to the surgery, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) examination is often performed to evaluate the lesion and the adjacent tissues. During the surgical procedure, the root apex is resected and the resected surface is usually observed under dental operating microscope (DOM). However, it is difficult to evaluate the details and the subsurface structure of the root using CBCT and DOM. A new diagnostic system, swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT), has been developed to observe the subsurface anatomical structure. The aim of this study was to observe resected apical root canals of human maxillary premolars using SS-OCT and compare the findings with those observed using CBCT and DOM. Six extracted human maxillary premolars were used. After microfocus computed tomography (Micro CT; for gold standard) and CBCT scanning of the root, 1 mm of the apex was cut perpendicular to the long axis of the tooth. Each resected surface was treated with EDTA, irrigated with saline solution, and stained with methylene blue dye. The resected surface was observed with DOM and SS-OCT. This sequence was repeated three times. The number of root canals was counted and statistically evaluated. There was no significant difference in the accuracy of detecting root canals among CBCT, DOM and SS-OCT (p > 0.05, Wilcoxon test). Because SS-OCT can be used in real time during surgery, it would be a useful tool for observing resected apical root canals.

  18. Levels of oxidative stress biomarkers and bone resorption regulators in apical periodontitis lesions infected by Epstein-Barr virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovljevic, A; Andric, M; Nikolic, N; Coric, V; Krezovic, S; Carkic, J; Knezevic, A; Beljic-Ivanovic, K; Pljesa-Ercegovac, M; Miletic, M; Soldatovic, I; Radosavljevic, T; Jovanovic, T; Simic, T; Ivanovic, V; Milasin, J

    2018-01-09

    To investigate whether apical periodontitis lesions infected by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) exhibit higher levels of oxidative stress biomarkers [8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG)] and bone resorption regulators [receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG)] compared to EBV-negative periapical lesions and healthy pulp tissues. The experimental group consisted of 30 EBV-positive and 30 EBV-negative periapical lesions collected in conjunction with apicoectomy. The pulp tissues of 20 impacted third molars were used as healthy controls. The qualitative and quantitative analysis of EBV was performed by nested and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), respectively. The levels of RANKL and OPG were analysed by reverse transcriptase real-time PCR. The levels of 8-OHdG and GSSG were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Mann-Whitney U-test and Spearman's correlation were used for statistical analysis. The levels of RANKL, OPG, 8-OHdG and GSSG were significantly higher in apical periodontitis lesions compared to healthy pulp controls (P = 0.001, P < 0.001, P < 0.001 and P < 0.05, respectively). RANKL and OPG mRNA expression was significantly higher in EBV-positive compared to EBV-negative periapical lesions (P < 0.05). There was no significant correlation between EBV copy numbers and levels of RANKL, OPG, 8OH-dG and GSSG in apical periodontitis. Levels of bone resorption regulators and oxidative stress biomarkers were increased in apical periodontitis compared to healthy pulp tissues. EBV-positive periapical lesions exhibited higher levels of RANKL and OPG compared to EBV-negative periapical lesions. EBV may contribute to progression of apical periodontitis via enhanced production of bone resorption regulators. © 2018 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. MICROLEAKAGE ASSOCIATED WITH RETROGRADE FILLING AFTER ROOT END RESECTION (in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elka Radeva

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to compare microleakage after root end resection of the two materials (MTA and Biodentine for two different apical cavity preparation using the method of penetration of dye - 0, 2 % Rodamine B. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight extracted single-rooted human teeth were used in this study. The resection was made at 3 mm from the root tip with a high speed diamond bur at an angle of 90 degree to the long axis of the tooth. For the retrofilling, ProRoot MTA and Biodentine were used. The teeth were divided into 5 groups: 1st group (10 teeth – the apical cavity was prepared with stainless steel fissure bur #10 at 3 mm depth in the root canal parallel to the long axis of the tooth and is filled retrograde with MTA. 3rd group (10 teeth - retrofilling with Biodentine. 2 nd group (10 teeth - with a round bur apical cavity was prepared with a concave shape and cavity along the root canal with a depth of 3 mm and retrograde obturation with MTA. 4th group (10 teeth - retrofilling with Biodentine. 5th group (8 teeth - control group - with preparation of the cavity after resection without retrofilling. The outer surface of the root is covered with two layers of varnish, with the exception of the apical 3 mm then immersed in 0.2% Rodamine B for 72 h. The degree of penetration of the dye is measured in millimeters. Results: Relative highest median value of penetration of the dye in mm is in the control group. MTA group has a higher value in mm versus the Biodentine. The apical preparation with a concave shape and cavity along the root canal with a depth of 3 mm after apicoectomy is important to reduce apical microleakage. Conclusion: Different apical cavity preparations in both types of material have led to the microleakage dye, but to varying degrees.

  20. Apicectomia con obturación retrograda e injerto óseo para el tratamiento de una lesión apical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Diaz Caballero

    2013-10-01

    lesion and overfilling root system, describes the surgical technique of apicectomy and retrograde filling with bone graft as a better alternative for bone regeneration.Keywords: Apicoectomy; Sealing retrograde; bone graft.