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Sample records for apical junctional complexes

  1. Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli, strain LF82 disrupts apical junctional complexes in polarized epithelia

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    Ossa Juan C

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although bacteria are implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD, mechanisms of intestinal injury and immune activation remain unclear. Identification of adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC strains in IBD patients offers an opportunity to characterize the pathogenesis of microbial-induced intestinal inflammation in IBD. Previous studies have focused on the invasive phenotype of AIEC and the ability to replicate and survive in phagocytes. However, the precise mechanisms by which these newly identified microbes penetrate the epithelial lining remain to be clarified. Therefore, the aim of this study was to delineate the effects of AIEC, strain LF82 (serotype O83:H1 on model polarized epithelial monolayers as a contributor to intestinal injury in IBD. Results Infection of T84 and Madin-Darby Canine Kidney-I polarized epithelial cell monolayers with AIEC, strain LF82 led to a reduction in transepithelial electrical resistance and increased macromolecular (10 kilodalton dextran flux. Basolateral AIEC infection resulted in more severe disruption of the epithelial barrier. Increased permeability was accompanied by a redistribution of the tight junction adaptor protein, zonula occludens-1, demonstrated by confocal microscopy and formation of gaps between cells, as shown by transmission electron microscopy. After 4 h of infection of intestine 407 cells, bacteria replicated in the cell cytoplasm and were enclosed in membrane-bound vesicles positive for the late endosomal marker, LAMP1. Conclusion These findings indicate that AIEC, strain LF82 disrupts the integrity of the polarized epithelial cell barrier. This disruption enables bacteria to penetrate into the epithelium and replicate in the host cell cytoplasm. These findings provide important links between microbes related to IBD, the intestinal epithelial cell barrier and disease pathogenesis.

  2. Drosophila Big bang regulates the apical cytocortex and wing growth through junctional tension.

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    Tsoumpekos, Giorgos; Nemetschke, Linda; Knust, Elisabeth

    2018-03-05

    Growth of epithelial tissues is regulated by a plethora of components, including signaling and scaffolding proteins, but also by junctional tension, mediated by the actomyosin cytoskeleton. However, how these players are spatially organized and functionally coordinated is not well understood. Here, we identify the Drosophila melanogaster scaffolding protein Big bang as a novel regulator of growth in epithelial cells of the wing disc by ensuring proper junctional tension. Loss of big bang results in the reduction of the regulatory light chain of nonmuscle myosin, Spaghetti squash. This is associated with an increased apical cell surface, decreased junctional tension, and smaller wings. Strikingly, these phenotypic traits of big bang mutant discs can be rescued by expressing constitutively active Spaghetti squash. Big bang colocalizes with Spaghetti squash in the apical cytocortex and is found in the same protein complex. These results suggest that in epithelial cells of developing wings, the scaffolding protein Big bang controls apical cytocortex organization, which is important for regulating cell shape and tissue growth. © 2018 Tsoumpekos et al.

  3. The role of apical cell-cell junctions and associated cytoskeleton in mechanotransduction.

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    Sluysmans, Sophie; Vasileva, Ekaterina; Spadaro, Domenica; Shah, Jimit; Rouaud, Florian; Citi, Sandra

    2017-04-01

    Tissues of multicellular organisms are characterised by several types of specialised cell-cell junctions. In vertebrate epithelia and endothelia, tight and adherens junctions (AJ) play critical roles in barrier and adhesion functions, and are connected to the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons. The interaction between junctions and the cytoskeleton is crucial for tissue development and physiology, and is involved in the molecular mechanisms governing cell shape, motility, growth and signalling. The machineries which functionally connect tight and AJ to the cytoskeleton comprise proteins which either bind directly to cytoskeletal filaments, or function as adaptors for regulators of the assembly and function of the cytoskeleton. In the last two decades, specific cytoskeleton-associated junctional molecules have been implicated in mechanotransduction, revealing the existence of multimolecular complexes that can sense mechanical cues and translate them into adaptation to tensile forces and biochemical signals. Here, we summarise the current knowledge about the machineries that link tight and AJ to actin filaments and microtubules, and the molecular basis for mechanotransduction at epithelial and endothelial AJ. © 2017 Société Française des Microscopies and Société de Biologie Cellulaire de France. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. ASPP2 links the apical lateral polarity complex to the regulation of YAP activity in epithelial cells.

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    Christophe Royer

    Full Text Available The Hippo pathway, by tightly controlling the phosphorylation state and activity of the transcription cofactors YAP and TAZ is essential during development and tissue homeostasis whereas its deregulation may lead to cancer. Recent studies have linked the apicobasal polarity machinery in epithelial cells to components of the Hippo pathway and YAP and TAZ themselves. However the molecular mechanism by which the junctional pool of YAP proteins is released and activated in epithelial cells remains unknown. Here we report that the tumour suppressor ASPP2 forms an apical-lateral polarity complex at the level of tight junctions in polarised epithelial cells, acting as a scaffold for protein phosphatase 1 (PP1 and junctional YAP via dedicated binding domains. ASPP2 thereby directly induces the dephosphorylation and activation of junctional YAP. Collectively, this study unearths a novel mechanistic paradigm revealing the critical role of the apical-lateral polarity complex in activating this localised pool of YAP in vitro, in epithelial cells, and in vivo, in the murine colonic epithelium. We propose that this mechanism may commonly control YAP functions in epithelial tissues.

  5. Cytoskeletal Components of an Invasion Machine—The Apical Complex of Toxoplasma gondii

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    Hu, Ke; Johnson, Jeff; Florens, Laurence; Fraunholz, Martin; Suravajjala, Sapna; DiLullo, Camille; Yates, John; Roos, David S; Murray, John M

    2006-01-01

    The apical complex of Toxoplasma gondii is widely believed to serve essential functions in both invasion of its host cells (including human cells), and in replication of the parasite. The understanding of apical complex function, the basis for its novel structure, and the mechanism for its motility are greatly impeded by lack of knowledge of its molecular composition. We have partially purified the conoid/apical complex, identified ~200 proteins that represent 70% of its cytoskeletal protein components, characterized seven novel proteins, and determined the sequence of recruitment of five of these proteins into the cytoskeleton during cell division. Our results provide new markers for the different subcompartments within the apical complex, and revealed previously unknown cellular compartments, which facilitate our understanding of how the invasion machinery is built. Surprisingly, the extreme apical and extreme basal structures of this highly polarized cell originate in the same location and at the same time very early during parasite replication. PMID:16518471

  6. Micro‐CT analyses of apical enlargement and molar root canal complexity

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    Markvart, M.; Darvann, Tron Andre; Larsen, P.

    2012-01-01

    Markvart M, Darvann TA, Larsen P, Dalstra M, Kreiborg S, Bjørndal L. Micro‐CT analyses of apical enlargement and molar root canal complexity. International Endodontic Journal, 45, 273–281, 2012. Aim To compare the effectiveness of two rotary hybrid instrumentation techniques with focus on apical...

  7. The apical complex provides a regulated gateway for secretion of invasion factors in Toxoplasma.

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    Nicholas J Katris

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The apical complex is the definitive cell structure of phylum Apicomplexa, and is the focus of the events of host cell penetration and the establishment of intracellular parasitism. Despite the importance of this structure, its molecular composition is relatively poorly known and few studies have experimentally tested its functions. We have characterized a novel Toxoplasma gondii protein, RNG2, that is located at the apical polar ring--the common structural element of apical complexes. During cell division, RNG2 is first recruited to centrosomes immediately after their duplication, confirming that assembly of the new apical complex commences as one of the earliest events of cell replication. RNG2 subsequently forms a ring, with the carboxy- and amino-termini anchored to the apical polar ring and mobile conoid, respectively, linking these two structures. Super-resolution microscopy resolves these two termini, and reveals that RNG2 orientation flips during invasion when the conoid is extruded. Inducible knockdown of RNG2 strongly inhibits host cell invasion. Consistent with this, secretion of micronemes is prevented in the absence of RNG2. This block, however, can be fully or partially overcome by exogenous stimulation of calcium or cGMP signaling pathways, respectively, implicating the apical complex directly in these signaling events. RNG2 demonstrates for the first time a role for the apical complex in controlling secretion of invasion factors in this important group of parasites.

  8. The Apical Complex Provides a Regulated Gateway for Secretion of Invasion Factors in Toxoplasma

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    Katris, Nicholas J.; van Dooren, Giel G.; McMillan, Paul J.; Hanssen, Eric; Tilley, Leann; Waller, Ross F.

    2014-01-01

    The apical complex is the definitive cell structure of phylum Apicomplexa, and is the focus of the events of host cell penetration and the establishment of intracellular parasitism. Despite the importance of this structure, its molecular composition is relatively poorly known and few studies have experimentally tested its functions. We have characterized a novel Toxoplasma gondii protein, RNG2, that is located at the apical polar ring—the common structural element of apical complexes. During cell division, RNG2 is first recruited to centrosomes immediately after their duplication, confirming that assembly of the new apical complex commences as one of the earliest events of cell replication. RNG2 subsequently forms a ring, with the carboxy- and amino-termini anchored to the apical polar ring and mobile conoid, respectively, linking these two structures. Super-resolution microscopy resolves these two termini, and reveals that RNG2 orientation flips during invasion when the conoid is extruded. Inducible knockdown of RNG2 strongly inhibits host cell invasion. Consistent with this, secretion of micronemes is prevented in the absence of RNG2. This block, however, can be fully or partially overcome by exogenous stimulation of calcium or cGMP signaling pathways, respectively, implicating the apical complex directly in these signaling events. RNG2 demonstrates for the first time a role for the apical complex in controlling secretion of invasion factors in this important group of parasites. PMID:24743791

  9. A network of spectrin and plectin surrounds the actin cuffs of apical tubulobulbar complexes in the rat.

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    Aristaeus de Asis, Marc; Pires, Manuel; Lyon, Kevin; Vogl, A Wayne

    2013-07-01

    Tubulobulbar complexes (TBCs) are actin-related endocytic structures that internalize intercellular junctions in the seminiferous epithelium. The structures consist of elongate tubular projections of the attached plasma membranes of two adjacent cells that project into Sertoli cells. This double membrane core is cuffed by a dentritic actin network and is capped at its end by a clathrin-coated pit. Here we explore the possibility that elements of the spectrin cytoskeleton are associated with clusters of tubulobulbar complexes that develop at adhesion junctions between late spermatids and Sertoli cells at the apex of the epithelium, and extend what is known about the distribution of plectin at the sites. Cryo-sections of perfusion-fixed testes and apical processes of Sertoli cells mechanically dissociated from perfusion-fixed testes were probed for spectrin, EPB41, and actin and analyzed using conventional fluorescence microscopy and confocal microscopy. Data sets from confocal microscopy were analyzed further in three-dimensional reconstructions using computer software. Additional apical Sertoli cell processes were probed for plectin and analyzed using conventional fluorescence microscopy. Antibodies generated against elements of the spectrin cytoskeleton react with material around and between the actin cuffs of tubulobulbar complexes, but appear excluded from the actin cuffs themselves. A similar staining pattern occurs with a probe for plectin. Immunoelectron microscopy confirmed the staining patterns observed by fluourescence microscopy. Based on our results, we suggest that a network of spectrin and plectin forms a scaffold around tubulobulbar complexes that may provide support for the actin network that cuffs each complex and also link adjacent complexes together.

  10. Micro-CT analyses of apical enlargement and molar root canal complexity

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    Markvart, Merete; Darvann, Tron Andre; Larsen, Per

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To compare the effectiveness of two rotary hybrid instrumentation techniques with focus on apical enlargement in molar teeth and to quantify and visualize spatial details of instrumentation efficacy in root canals of different complexity. METHODOLOGY: Maxillary and mandibular molar teeth wer...

  11. Characterization of the Tetraspan Junctional Complex (4JC) superfamily.

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    Chou, Amy; Lee, Andre; Hendargo, Kevin J; Reddy, Vamsee S; Shlykov, Maksim A; Kuppusamykrishnan, Harikrishnan; Medrano-Soto, Arturo; Saier, Milton H

    2017-03-01

    Connexins or innexins form gap junctions, while claudins and occludins form tight junctions. In this study, statistical data, derived using novel software, indicate that these four junctional protein families and eleven other families of channel and channel auxiliary proteins are related by common descent and comprise the Tetraspan (4 TMS) Junctional Complex (4JC) Superfamily. These proteins all share similar 4 transmembrane α-helical (TMS) topologies. Evidence is presented that they arose via an intragenic duplication event, whereby a 2 TMS-encoding genetic element duplicated tandemly to give 4 TMS proteins. In cases where high resolution structural data were available, the conclusion of homology was supported by conducting structural comparisons. Phylogenetic trees reveal the probable relationships of these 15 families to each other. Long homologues containing fusions to other recognizable domains as well as internally duplicated or fused domains are reported. Large "fusion" proteins containing 4JC domains proved to fall predominantly into family-specific patterns as follows: (1) the 4JC domain was N-terminal; (2) the 4JC domain was C-terminal; (3) the 4JC domain was duplicated or occasionally triplicated and (4) mixed fusion types were present. Our observations provide insight into the evolutionary origins and subfunctions of these proteins as well as guides concerning their structural and functional relationships. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Cholesterol depletion of enterocytes. Effect on the Golgi complex and apical membrane trafficking

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    Hansen, Gert Helge; Niels-Christiansen, L L; Thorsen, Evy

    2000-01-01

    Intestinal brush border enzymes, including aminopeptidase N and sucrase-isomaltase, are associated with "rafts" (membrane microdomains rich in cholesterol and sphingoglycolipids). To assess the functional role of rafts in the present work, we studied the effect of cholesterol depletion on apical......, the rates of the Golgi-associated complex glycosylation and association with rafts of newly synthesized aminopeptidase N were reduced, and less of the enzyme had reached the brush border membrane after 2 h of labeling. In contrast, the basolateral Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase was neither missorted nor raft...

  13. Structural and functional insights into the malaria parasite moving junction complex.

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    Brigitte Vulliez-Le Normand

    Full Text Available Members of the phylum Apicomplexa, which include the malaria parasite Plasmodium, share many features in their invasion mechanism in spite of their diverse host cell specificities and life cycle characteristics. The formation of a moving junction (MJ between the membranes of the invading apicomplexan parasite and the host cell is common to these intracellular pathogens. The MJ contains two key parasite components: the surface protein Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA1 and its receptor, the Rhoptry Neck Protein (RON complex, which is targeted to the host cell membrane during invasion. In particular, RON2, a transmembrane component of the RON complex, interacts directly with AMA1. Here, we report the crystal structure of AMA1 from Plasmodium falciparum in complex with a peptide derived from the extracellular region of PfRON2, highlighting clear specificities of the P. falciparum RON2-AMA1 interaction. The receptor-binding site of PfAMA1 comprises the hydrophobic groove and a region that becomes exposed by displacement of the flexible Domain II loop. Mutations of key contact residues of PfRON2 and PfAMA1 abrogate binding between the recombinant proteins. Although PfRON2 contacts some polymorphic residues, binding studies with PfAMA1 from different strains show that these have little effect on affinity. Moreover, we demonstrate that the PfRON2 peptide inhibits erythrocyte invasion by P. falciparum merozoites and that this strong inhibitory potency is not affected by AMA1 polymorphisms. In parallel, we have determined the crystal structure of PfAMA1 in complex with the invasion-inhibitory peptide R1 derived by phage display, revealing an unexpected structural mimicry of the PfRON2 peptide. These results identify the key residues governing the interactions between AMA1 and RON2 in P. falciparum and suggest novel approaches to antimalarial therapeutics.

  14. Intramolecular apical metal-H-Csp3 interaction in molybdenum and silver complexes.

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    Ciclosi, Marco; Lloret, Julio; Estevan, Francisco; Sanaú, Mercedes; Pérez-Prieto, Julia

    2009-07-14

    The reaction of HTIMP3 (HTIMP3=tris[1-diphenylphosphino)-3-methyl-1H-indol-2-yl]methane) with AgBF4 and Mo(CO)3(NCCH3)3 leads to Ag(HTIMP3)BF4 and Mo(CO)3(HTIMP3), respectively. The metal centre is coordinated to the three phosphorus atoms of the HTIMP3 ligand, which adopts a facial coordination mode, placing a H-Csp3 hydrogen atom at the apical position close to the metal centre. The solid-state structure of Mo(CO)3(HTIMP3) has been determined by X-ray crystallography, and the data have been used as input parameters for obtaining the optimised geometry of the complex using the B3PW91 functional. The silver structure has been modelled from the X-ray parameters of the molybdenum structure. In addition, theoretical calculations on the H-Csp3 downfield shift upon metal coordination has also been performed. They reproduce the experimental H-Csp3 chemical shifts well and supports that proton deshielding is mainly due to the presence of the metal, since the hydrogen is already located in the cone created by the aromatic-phosphino arms in the free ligand.

  15. The 3D structure of the apical complex and association with the flagellar apparatus revealed by serial TEM tomography in Psammosa pacifica, a distant relative of the Apicomplexa.

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    Okamoto, Noriko; Keeling, Patrick J

    2014-01-01

    The apical complex is one of the defining features of apicomplexan parasites, including the malaria parasite Plasmodium, where it mediates host penetration and invasion. The apical complex is also known in a few related lineages, including several non-parasitic heterotrophs, where it mediates feeding behaviour. The origin of the apical complex is unclear, and one reason for this is that in apicomplexans it exists in only part of the life cycle, and never simultaneously with other major cytoskeletal structures like flagella and basal bodies. Here, we used conventional TEM and serial TEM tomography to reconstruct the three dimensional structure of the apical complex in Psammosa pacifica, a predatory relative of apicomplexans and dinoflagellates that retains the archetype apical complex and the flagellar apparatus simultaneously. The P. pacifica apical complex is associated with the gullet and consists of the pseudoconoid, micronemes, and electron dense vesicles. The pseudoconoid is a convex sheet consisting of eight short microtubules, plus a band made up of microtubules that originate from the flagellar apparatus. The flagellar apparatus consists of three microtubular roots. One of the microtubular roots attached to the posterior basal body is connected to bypassing microtubular strands, which are themselves connected to the extension of the pseudoconoid. These complex connections where the apical complex is an extension of the flagellar apparatus, reflect the ancestral state of both, dating back to the common ancestor of apicaomplexans and dinoflagellates.

  16. Isolation of Synaptosomes, Synaptic Plasma Membranes, and Synaptic Junctional Complexes.

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    Michaelis, Mary L; Jiang, Lei; Michaelis, Elias K

    2017-01-01

    Isolation of synaptic nerve terminals or synaptosomes provides an opportunity to study the process of neurotransmission at many levels and with a variety of approaches. For example, structural features of the synaptic terminals and the organelles within them, such as synaptic vesicles and mitochondria, have been elucidated with electron microscopy. The postsynaptic membranes are joined to the presynaptic "active zone" of transmitter release through cell adhesion molecules and remain attached throughout the isolation of synaptosomes. These "post synaptic densities" or "PSDs" contain the receptors for the transmitters released from the nerve terminals and can easily be seen with electron microscopy. Biochemical and cell biological studies with synaptosomes have revealed which proteins and lipids are most actively involved in synaptic release of neurotransmitters. The functional properties of the nerve terminals, such as responses to depolarization and the uptake or release of signaling molecules, have also been characterized through the use of fluorescent dyes, tagged transmitters, and transporter substrates. In addition, isolated synaptosomes can serve as the starting material for the isolation of relatively pure synaptic plasma membranes (SPMs) that are devoid of organelles from the internal environment of the nerve terminal, such as mitochondria and synaptic vesicles. The isolated SPMs can reseal and form vesicular structures in which transport of ions such as sodium and calcium, as well as solutes such as neurotransmitters can be studied. The PSDs also remain associated with the presynaptic membranes during isolation of SPM fractions, making it possible to isolate the synaptic junctional complexes (SJCs) devoid of the rest of the plasma membranes of the nerve terminals and postsynaptic membrane components. Isolated SJCs can be used to identify the proteins that constitute this highly specialized region of neurons. In this chapter, we describe the steps involved

  17. Unique cell type-specific junctional complexes in vascular endothelium of human and rat liver sinusoids.

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    Cyrill Géraud

    Full Text Available Liver sinusoidal endothelium is strategically positioned to control access of fluids, macromolecules and cells to the liver parenchyma and to serve clearance functions upstream of the hepatocytes. While clearance of macromolecular debris from the peripheral blood is performed by liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs using a delicate endocytic receptor system featuring stabilin-1 and -2, the mannose receptor and CD32b, vascular permeability and cell trafficking are controlled by transcellular pores, i.e. the fenestrae, and by intercellular junctional complexes. In contrast to blood vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells in other organs, the junctional complexes of LSECs have not yet been consistently characterized in molecular terms. In a comprehensive analysis, we here show that LSECs express the typical proteins found in endothelial adherens junctions (AJ, i.e. VE-cadherin as well as α-, β-, p120-catenin and plakoglobin. Tight junction (TJ transmembrane proteins typical of endothelial cells, i.e. claudin-5 and occludin, were not expressed by rat LSECs while heterogenous immunreactivity for claudin-5 was detected in human LSECs. In contrast, junctional molecules preferentially associating with TJ such as JAM-A, B and C and zonula occludens proteins ZO-1 and ZO-2 were readily detected in LSECs. Remarkably, among the JAMs JAM-C was considerably over-expressed in LSECs as compared to lung microvascular endothelial cells. In conclusion, we show here that LSECs form a special kind of mixed-type intercellular junctions characterized by co-occurrence of endothelial AJ proteins, and of ZO-1 and -2, and JAMs. The distinct molecular architecture of the intercellular junctional complexes of LSECs corroborates previous ultrastructural findings and provides the molecular basis for further analyses of the endothelial barrier function of liver sinusoids under pathologic conditions ranging from hepatic inflammation to formation of liver metastasis.

  18. Hypobaric hypoxia down-regulated junctional protein complex: Implications to vascular leakage.

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    Souvannakitti, Dangjai; Peerapen, Paleerath; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2017-07-04

    Acute mountain sickness (AMS) can cause capillary hyper-permeability and vasogenic edema. However, its underlying mechanisms remained unclear and there is no previous in vitro study on AMS. We therefore conducted an in vitro study and examined whether continuous hypobaric hypoxia (CHH) could alter expression of junctional protein complex of vascular endothelial cells, causing hyper-permeabilization. EA.hy926 human endothelial cells were exposed to either CHH or normoxia for up to 24 h. Flow cytometry using annexin V/propidium iodide co-staining demonstrated that cell death had no significant difference at 12-h, but was increased by CHH at 24-h. Transendothelial resistance (TER) of endothelial cell monolayer was progressively decreased by CHH from 1-h to 24-h. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence study demonstrated decreased expression levels of VE-cadherin, PECAM-1 and ZO-1 junctional proteins at both 12-h and 24-h exposure time-points. Interestingly, while the main form of ZO-1 (220 kDa) was decreased, its degraded form (100 kDa) was increased by 24-h CHH that might be linked to the increased cell death. Our data have demonstrated that CHH caused vascular endothelial hyper-permeability and defective junctional protein complex by reducing expression levels of VE-cadherin, PECAM-1, and ZO-1. Taken together, these data may explain pathophysiology underlying vascular hyper-permeability in AMS.

  19. Carcinoembryonic antigen promotes colorectal cancer progression by targeting adherens junction complexes

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    Bajenova, Olga, E-mail: o.bazhenova@spbu.ru [Theodosius Dobzhansky Center for Genome Bioinformatics, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Department of Genetics and Biotechnology, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Department of Surgery and Biomedical Sciences, Creighton University, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); Chaika, Nina [Department of Surgery and Biomedical Sciences, Creighton University, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); Tolkunova, Elena; Davydov-Sinitsyn, Alexander [Institute of Cytology, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg 194064 (Russian Federation); Gapon, Svetlana [Boston Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Thomas, Peter [Department of Surgery and Biomedical Sciences, Creighton University, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); O’Brien, Stephen [Theodosius Dobzhansky Center for Genome Bioinformatics, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation)

    2014-06-10

    Oncomarkers play important roles in the detection and management of human malignancies. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, CEACAM5) and epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) are considered as independent tumor markers in monitoring metastatic colorectal cancer. They are both expressed by cancer cells and can be detected in the blood serum. We investigated the effect of CEA production by MIP101 colorectal carcinoma cell lines on E-cadherin adherens junction (AJ) protein complexes. No direct interaction between E-cadherin and CEA was detected; however, the functional relationships between E-cadherin and its AJ partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins were impaired. We discovered a novel interaction between CEA and beta-catenin protein in the CEA producing cells. It is shown in the current study that CEA overexpression alters the splicing of p120 catenin and triggers the release of soluble E-cadherin. The influence of CEA production by colorectal cancer cells on the function of E-cadherin junction complexes may explain the link between the elevated levels of CEA and the increase in soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. - Highlights: • Elevated level of CEA increases the release of soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. • CEA over-expression alters the binding preferences between E-cadherin and its partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins in adherens junction complexes. • CEA produced by colorectal cancer cells interacts with beta-catenin protein. • CEA over-expression triggers the increase in nuclear beta-catenin. • CEA over-expression alters the splicing of p120 catenin protein.

  20. [Bacterial localization in apical cementum at the epithelial insertion using scanning electron microscopy].

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    García Núñez, J A; Herrera, I; Cerezo Lapiedra, R; Santa María, I

    1989-02-01

    Extracted teeth due to consequence of chronic periodontitis of adult are fractured and the apical cementum to junction epithelium is examined under S.E.M. (scanning electron microscopy) being found bacterias forms inside niches of the apical cementum.

  1. Humidity-controlled rectification switching in ruthenium-complex molecular junctions

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    Atesci, Huseyin; Kaliginedi, Veerabhadrarao; Celis Gil, Jose A.; Ozawa, Hiroaki; Thijssen, Joseph M.; Broekmann, Peter; Haga, Masa-aki; van der Molen, Sense Jan

    2018-02-01

    Although molecular rectifiers were proposed over four decades ago1,2, until recently reported rectification ratios (RR) were rather moderate2-11 (RR 101). This ceiling was convincingly broken using a eutectic GaIn top contact12 to probe molecular monolayers of coupled ferrocene groups (RR 105), as well as using scanning tunnelling microscopy-break junctions13-16 and mechanically controlled break junctions17 to probe single molecules (RR 102-103). Here, we demonstrate a device based on a molecular monolayer in which the RR can be switched by more than three orders of magnitude (between RR 100 and RR ≥ 103) in response to humidity. As the relative humidity is toggled between 5% and 60%, the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of a monolayer of di-nuclear Ru-complex molecules reversibly change from symmetric to strongly asymmetric (diode-like). Key to this behaviour is the presence of two localized molecular orbitals in series, which are nearly degenerate in dry circumstances but become misaligned under high humidity conditions, due to the displacement of counter ions (PF6-). This asymmetric gating of the two relevant localized molecular orbital levels results in humidity-controlled diode-like behaviour.

  2. Multiple regions of Crumbs3 are required for tight junction formation in MCF10A cells.

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    Fogg, Vanessa C; Liu, Chia-Jen; Margolis, Ben

    2005-07-01

    The formation and maintenance of tight junctions is essential for the development of epithelial cell polarity. Recently, a number of conserved polarity-regulating proteins have been shown to localize to epithelial tight junctions, and to play a role in the regulation of tight junction formation. The Crumbs3/PALS1/PATJ protein complex localizes at epithelial tight junctions and interacts with the polarity-regulating protein complex of Par6/Par3/aPKC. Overexpression of Crumbs3 in MDCKII cells leads to a delay in tight junction formation in these cells, suggesting a role in the regulation of tight junction development. Here we report new evidence that Crumbs3 indeed plays an essential role in tight junction formation. Mammary MCF10A cells express little endogenous Crumbs3 and fail to form tight junctions when grown under standard tissue culture conditions. The staining pattern of ZO-1, a tight junction marker, is fragmented, and other tight junction markers show either fragmented junctional expression or diffuse cytoplasmic staining. Expression of exogenous Crumbs3 induces the formation of tight junction structures marked by smooth, continuous ZO-1 staining at apical cell-cell junctions. A number of other tight junction markers, including claudin-1 and occludin, are also recruited to these junctions. Analysis by transmission electron microscopy and measurements of the transepithelial electrical resistance confirm that these structures are functional tight junctions. Mutations in either the Crumbs3 PDZ binding motif or the putative FERM binding motif lead to defects in the ability of Crumbs3 to promote tight junction development. Our results suggest that Crumbs3 plays an important role in epithelial tight junction formation, and also provide the first known functional role for the mammalian Crumbs FERM binding domain.

  3. Lats kinase is involved in the intestinal apical membrane integrity in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

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    Kang, Junsu; Shin, Donghoon; Yu, Jae-Ran; Lee, Junho

    2009-08-01

    The roles of Lats kinases in the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis have been well established. Here we report new roles for Lats kinase in the integrity of the apical membrane structure. WTS-1, the C. elegans Lats homolog, localized primarily to the subapical region in the intestine. A loss-of-function mutation in wts-1 resulted in an early larval arrest and defects in the structure of the intestinal lumen. An electron microscopy study of terminally arrested wts-1 mutant animals revealed numerous microvilli-containing lumen-like structures within the intestinal cells. The wts-1 phenotype was not caused by cell proliferation or apoptosis defects. Instead, we found that the wts-1 mutant animals exhibited gradual mislocalization of apical actin and apical junction proteins, suggesting that wts-1 normally suppresses the formation of extra apical membrane structures. Heat-shock-driven pulse-chase expression experiments showed that WTS-1 regulates the localization of newly synthesized apical actins. RNAi of the exocyst complex genes suppressed the mislocalization phenotype of wts-1 mutation. Collectively, the data presented here suggest that Lats kinase plays important roles in the integrity of the apical membrane structure of intestinal cells.

  4. Haploinsufficiency for Core Exon Junction Complex Components Disrupts Embryonic Neurogenesis and Causes p53-Mediated Microcephaly.

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    Hanqian Mao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The exon junction complex (EJC is an RNA binding complex comprised of the core components Magoh, Rbm8a, and Eif4a3. Human mutations in EJC components cause neurodevelopmental pathologies. Further, mice heterozygous for either Magoh or Rbm8a exhibit aberrant neurogenesis and microcephaly. Yet despite the requirement of these genes for neurodevelopment, the pathogenic mechanisms linking EJC dysfunction to microcephaly remain poorly understood. Here we employ mouse genetics, transcriptomic and proteomic analyses to demonstrate that haploinsufficiency for each of the 3 core EJC components causes microcephaly via converging regulation of p53 signaling. Using a new conditional allele, we first show that Eif4a3 haploinsufficiency phenocopies aberrant neurogenesis and microcephaly of Magoh and Rbm8a mutant mice. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of embryonic brains at the onset of neurogenesis identifies common pathways altered in each of the 3 EJC mutants, including ribosome, proteasome, and p53 signaling components. We further demonstrate all 3 mutants exhibit defective splicing of RNA regulatory proteins, implying an EJC dependent RNA regulatory network that fine-tunes gene expression. Finally, we show that genetic ablation of one downstream pathway, p53, significantly rescues microcephaly of all 3 EJC mutants. This implicates p53 activation as a major node of neurodevelopmental pathogenesis following EJC impairment. Altogether our study reveals new mechanisms to help explain how EJC mutations influence neurogenesis and underlie neurodevelopmental disease.

  5. A glimpse into the regulation of the Wilson disease protein, ATP7B, sheds light on the complexity of mammalian apical trafficking pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Arnab; Das, Santanu; Ray, Kunal

    2018-03-01

    Wilson disease (WD), a Mendelian disorder of copper metabolism caused by mutations in the ATP7B gene, manifests a large spectrum of phenotypic variability. This phenomenon of extensive symptom variation is not frequently associated with a monogenic disorder. We hypothesize that the phenotypic variability in WD is primarily driven by the variations in interacting proteins that regulate the ATP7B function and localization in the cell. Based on existing literature, we delineated a potential molecular mechanism for ATP7B mediated copper transport in the milieu of its interactome, its dysfunction in WD and the resulting variability in the phenotypic manifestation. Understanding the copper-induced apical trafficking of ATP7B also significantly contributes to the appreciation of the complexities of the ligand-induced transport pathway. We believe that this holistic view of WD will pave the way for a better opportunity for rational drug design and therapeutics.

  6. A complex craniovertebral junction malformation in a patient with late onset glycogenosis 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariasofia Cotelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycogenosis II (GSDII is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder resulting from deficiency of acid alpha-glucosidase and subsequent lysosomal accumulation of glycogen in skeletal, cardiac and smooth muscles. The late-onset form is characterized by wide variability of the phenotypical spectrum. Clinical findings may include muscle weakness, respiratory insufficiency, vascular abnormalities, low bone mineral density and higher risk of developing osteoporosis. Craniovertebral junction (CVJ malformations have never been described so far. We here report on a GSDII 43-year-old woman who harbored the mutations IVS1-13T>G and c.2237G>A in the acid alpha-glucosidase gene. She recurrently suffered from headache, neck pain and dizziness. Brain MRI and CT scan showed the presence of a very rare complex CVJ malformation composed of basilar invagination, basiocciput hypoplasia, partial C1 assimilation, C1 posterior arch aplasia and C1 lateral mass hypoplasia and offset. Although we cannot rule out their coincidental occurrence, the rarity of multiple CVJ malformations in the general population as well as the well-known GSDII multisystem involvement should suggest to study the CVJ in the diagnostic process of GSDII patients in order to assess the CVJ malformation frequency in GSDII population and verify a possible relationship between these two conditions.

  7. Food-web complexity across hydrothermal vents on the Azores triple junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portail, Marie; Brandily, Christophe; Cathalot, Cécile; Colaço, Ana; Gélinas, Yves; Husson, Bérengère; Sarradin, Pierre-Marie; Sarrazin, Jozée

    2018-01-01

    The assessment and comparison of food webs across various hydrothermal vent sites can enhance our understanding of ecological processes involved in the structure and function of biodiversity. The Menez Gwen, Lucky Strike and Rainbow vent fields are located on the Azores triple junction of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. These fields have distinct depths (from 850 to 2320 m) and geological contexts (basaltic and ultramafic), but share similar faunal assemblages defined by the presence of foundation species that include Bathymodiolus azoricus, alvinocarid shrimp and gastropods. We compared the food webs of 13 faunal assemblages at these three sites using carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analyses (SIA). Results showed that photosynthesis-derived organic matter is a negligible basal source for vent food webs, at all depths. The contribution of methanotrophy versus autotrophy based on Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) or reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycles varied between and within vent fields according to the concentrations of reduced compounds (e.g. CH4, H2S). Species that were common to vent fields showed high trophic flexibility, suggesting weak trophic links to the metabolism of chemosynthetic primary producers. At the community level, a comparison of SIA-derived metrics between mussel assemblages from two vent fields (Menez Gwen & Lucky Strike) showed that the functional structure of food webs was highly similar in terms of basal niche diversification, functional specialization and redundancy. Coupling SIA to functional trait approaches included more variability within the analyses, but the functional structures were still highly comparable. These results suggest that despite variable environmental conditions (physico-chemical factors and basal sources) and faunal community structure, functional complexity remained relatively constant among mussel assemblages. This functional similarity may be favoured by the propensity of species to adapt to fluid variations and

  8. Managing the complexity of communication: regulation of gap junctions by post-translational modification

    OpenAIRE

    Axelsen, Lene N.; Calloe, Kirstine; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Nielsen, Morten S.

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions are comprised of connexins that form cell-to-cell channels which couple neighboring cells to accommodate the exchange of information. The need for communication does, however, change over time and therefore must be tightly controlled. Although the regulation of connexin protein expression by transcription and translation is of great importance, the trafficking, channel activity and degradation are also under tight control. The function of connexins can be regulated by several po...

  9. Brief communication: Contributions of enamel-dentine junction shape and enamel deposition to primate molar crown complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Matthew M; Evans, Alistair; Smith, Tanya; Jernvall, Jukka; Tafforeau, Paul; Kupczik, Kornelius; Olejniczak, Anthony J; Rosas, Antonio; Radovcić, Jakov; Thackeray, J Francis; Toussaint, Michel; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2010-05-01

    Molar crown morphology varies among primates from relatively simple in some taxa to more complex in others, with such variability having both functional and taxonomic significance. In addition to the primary cusps, crown surface complexity derives from the presence of crests, cuspules, and crenulations. Developmentally, this complexity results from the deposition of an enamel cap over a basement membrane (the morphology of which is preserved as the enamel-dentine junction, or EDJ, in fully formed teeth). However, the relative contribution of the enamel cap and the EDJ to molar crown complexity is poorly characterized. In this study we examine the complexity of the EDJ and enamel surface of a broad sample of primate (including fossil hominin) lower molars through the application of micro-computed tomography and dental topographic analysis. Surface complexity of the EDJ and outer enamel surface (OES) is quantified by first mapping, and then summing, the total number of discrete surface orientation patches. We investigate the relative contribution of the EDJ and enamel cap to crown complexity by assessing the correlation in patch counts between the EDJ and OES within taxa and within individual teeth. We identify three patterns of EDJ/OES complexity which demonstrate that both crown patterning early in development and the subsequent deposition of the enamel cap contribute to overall crown complexity in primates.

  10. Structure of the exon junction core complex with a trapped DEAD-box ATPase bound to RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian Brix Folsted; Ballut, Lionel; Johansen, Jesper Sanderhoff

    2006-01-01

    exon junction core complex containing the DEAD-box adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) eukaryotic initiation factor 4AIII (eIF4AIII) bound to an ATP analog, MAGOH, Y14, a fragment of MLN51, and a polyuracil mRNA mimic. eIF4AIII interacts with the phosphate-ribose backbone of six consecutive nucleotides...... and prevents part of the bound RNA from being double stranded. The MAGOH and Y14 subunits lock eIF4AIII in a prehydrolysis state, and activation of the ATPase probably requires only modest conformational changes in eIF4AIII motif I....

  11. Managing the complexity of communication: regulation of gap junctions by post-translational modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Callø, Kirstine; von Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions are comprised of connexins that form cell-to-cell channels which couple neighboring cells to accommodate the exchange of information. The need for communication does, however, change over time and therefore must be tightly controlled. Although the regulation of connexin protein...... expression by transcription and translation is of great importance, the trafficking, channel activity and degradation are also under tight control. The function of connexins can be regulated by several post translational modifications, which affect numerous parameters; including number of channels, open...

  12. Deoxynivanelol and Fumonisin, Alone or in Combination, Induce Changes on Intestinal Junction Complexes and in E-Cadherin Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Basso

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Fusariotoxins such as fumonisin B1 (FB1 and deoxynivalenol (DON cause deleterious effects on the intestine of pigs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of these mycotoxins, alone and in combination, on jejunal explants from piglets, using histological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural assays. Five 24-day old pigs were used for sampling the explants. Forty-eight explants were sampled from each animal. Explants were incubated for 4 hours in culture medium and medium containing FB1 (100 µM, DON (10 µM and both mycotoxins (100 µM FB1 plus 10 µM DON. Exposure to all treatments induced a significant decrease in the normal intestinal morphology and in the number of goblet cells, which were more severe in explants exposed to DON and both mycotoxins. A significant reduction in villus height occurred in groups treated with DON and with co-contamination. Expression of E-cadherin was significantly reduced in explants exposed to FB1 (40%, DON (93% and FB1 plus DON (100%. The ultrastructural assay showed increased intercellular spaces and no junction complexes on enterocytes exposed to mycotoxins. The present data indicate that FB1 and DON induce changes in cell junction complexes that could contribute to increase paracellular permeability. The ex vivo model was adequate for assessing intestinal toxicity induced by exposure of isolated or associated concentrations of 100 µM of FB1 and 10 µM of DON.

  13. Managing the complexity of communication: regulation of gap junctions by post-translational modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsen, Lene N; Calloe, Kirstine; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Nielsen, Morten S

    2013-10-22

    Gap junctions are comprised of connexins that form cell-to-cell channels which couple neighboring cells to accommodate the exchange of information. The need for communication does, however, change over time and therefore must be tightly controlled. Although the regulation of connexin protein expression by transcription and translation is of great importance, the trafficking, channel activity and degradation are also under tight control. The function of connexins can be regulated by several post translational modifications, which affect numerous parameters; including number of channels, open probability, single channel conductance or selectivity. The most extensively investigated post translational modifications are phosphorylations, which have been documented in all mammalian connexins. Besides phosphorylations, some connexins are known to be ubiquitinated, SUMOylated, nitrosylated, hydroxylated, acetylated, methylated, and γ-carboxyglutamated. The aim of the present review is to summarize our current knowledge of post translational regulation of the connexin family of proteins.

  14. Managing the complexity of communication; regulation of gap junctions by post-translational modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lene Nygaard Axelsen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Gap junctions are comprised of connexins that form cell-to-cell channels which couple neighboring cells to accommodate the exchange of information. The need for communication does, however, change over time and therefore must be tightly controlled. Although the regulation of connexin protein expression by transcription and translation is of great importance, the trafficking, channel activity and degradation are also under tight control. The function of connexins can be regulated by several post translational modifications, which affect numerous parameters; including number of channels, open probability, single channel conductance or selectivity. The most extensively investigated post translational modifications are phosphorylations, which have been documented in all mammalian connexins. Besides phosphorylations, some connexins are known to be ubiquitinated, SUMOylated, nitrosylated, hydroxylated, acetylated, methylated and γ-carboxyglutamated. The aim of the present review is to summarize our current knowledge of post translational regulation of the connexin family of proteins.

  15. Interaction between transcellular and paracellular water transport pathways through Aquaporin 5 and the tight junction complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawedia, Jitesh D; Nieman, Michelle L; Boivin, Gregory P; Melvin, James E; Kikuchi, Ken-Ichiro; Hand, Arthur R; Lorenz, John N; Menon, Anil G

    2007-02-27

    To investigate potential physiological interactions between the transcellular and paracellular pathways of water transport, we asked whether targeted deletion of Aquaporin 5 (AQP5), the major transcellular water transporter in salivary acinar cells, affected paracellular transport of 4-kDa FITC-labeled dextran (FITC-D), which is transported through the paracellular but not the transcellular route. After i.v. injection of FITC-D into either AQP5 wild-type or AQP5-/- mice and saliva collection for fixed time intervals, we show that the relative amount of FITC-D transported in the saliva of AQP5-/- mice is half that in matched AQP5+/+ mice, indicating a 2-fold decrease in permeability of the paracellular barrier in mice lacking AQP5. We also found a significant difference in the proportion of transcellular vs. paracellular transport between male and female mice. Freeze-fracture electron microscopy revealed an increase in the number of tight junction strands of both AQP5+/+ and AQP5-/- male mice after pilocarpine stimulation but no change in strand number in female mice. Average acinar cell volume was increased by approximately 1.4-fold in glands from AQP5-/- mice, suggesting an alteration in the volume-sensing machinery of the cell. Western blots revealed that expression of Claudin-7, Claudin-3, and Occludin, critical proteins that regulate the permeability of the tight junction barrier, were significantly decreased in AQP5-/- compared with AQP5+/+ salivary glands. These findings reveal the existence of a gender-influenced molecular mechanism involving AQP5 that allows transcellular and paracellular routes of water transport to act in conjunction.

  16. Intercellular junctions in rabbit eye ora serrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobeschi, L; Freymuller, E; Smith, R L

    2006-10-01

    Summary The aim of this study was to describe and localize the intercellular junctions in the ora serrata region of albino and pigmented rabbit eyes. Eyes of albino and pigmented rabbits were fixed and processed for transmission electron microscopy. Light and electron microscope examination was carried out on semithin and ultrathin sections. The ora serrata region showed adherens, gap and tight junctions in the retinal and ciliary margins of albino and pigmented rabbit eyes. In the retinal margin, zonulae adherens between Müller cells and photoreceptors are associated with tight junctions. In the ciliary margin, epithelial cells are joined by adherens, gap and tight junctions localized between apical and apicolateral cell membranes. Tight junctions appear as zonulae occludens in the non-pigmented apicolateral cell membranes and as tight focal junctions between pigmented and non-pigmented apical cell membranes. Between the ciliary and retinal margins there are adherens and tight focal junctions which attach pigmented apical cell membranes to adjacent cells. There were no differences in the distribution of intercellular junctions between albino and pigmented rabbits.

  17. The Smc5-Smc6 complex is required to remove chromosome junctions in meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Farmer

    Full Text Available Meiosis, a specialized cell division with a single cycle of DNA replication round and two consecutive rounds of nuclear segregation, allows for the exchange of genetic material between parental chromosomes and the formation of haploid gametes. The structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC proteins aid manipulation of chromosome structures inside cells. Eukaryotic SMC complexes include cohesin, condensin and the Smc5-Smc6 complex. Meiotic roles have been discovered for cohesin and condensin. However, although Smc5-Smc6 is known to be required for successful meiotic divisions, the meiotic functions of the complex are not well understood. Here we show that the Smc5-Smc6 complex localizes to specific chromosome regions during meiotic prophase I. We report that meiotic cells lacking Smc5-Smc6 undergo catastrophic meiotic divisions as a consequence of unresolved linkages between chromosomes. Surprisingly, meiotic segregation defects are not rescued by abrogation of Spo11-induced meiotic recombination, indicating that at least some chromosome linkages in smc5-smc6 mutants originate from other cellular processes. These results demonstrate that, as in mitosis, Smc5-Smc6 is required to ensure proper chromosome segregation during meiosis by preventing aberrant recombination intermediates between homologous chromosomes.

  18. Bacterial interference with host epithelial junctional complexes: Probiotic bacteria vs. A/E lesion-forming Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TANIA TOPOUZOVA-HRISTOVA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available During colonization, enteropathogenic (EPEC and enterohaemorrhagic (EHEC Escherichia coli are capable to manipulate host cytoskeleton and colonize gut epithelia by a specific mode of attachment known as the attaching and effacing lesion (A/E lesion. While actin rearrangements during A/E lesion formation have been extensively investigated, the possible alterations of other cytoskeletal elements like those comprising the intercellular junctional complexes (JC of polarized cells during infection have only lately attracted attention. The present mini-review addresses the opposite effects of two groups of bacteria, A/E lesion-forming pathogenic E. coli and probiotic bacterial strains, on JC. JC are important in maintaining gut barrier functions. EPEC and EHEC can disrupt JC which as a consequence leads to reduction in the transepitelial electrical resistance (TER and an increase of the permeability to macromolecules. Probiotic bacteria on the other hand stabilize JC thus increasing TER and reducing permeability to macromolecular markers. Probiotic strains can protect JC integrity of polarized cells from the damage caused by EPEC or EHEC. Together with the promise of these results, of concern is the fact that the outcome of the studies can differ dependent on experimental protocols. Studies with living bacteria and different strain combinations have also put forward strain specific effects. Therefore, an important practical item for future studies is the identification of the molecules synthesized by probiotic bacteria that may be active on JC stability.

  19. Effects of Radiographic Contrast Media on the Micromorphology of the Junctional Complex of Erythrocytes Visualized by Immunocytology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Ralf-Peter; Krüger, Anne; Scharnweber, Tim; Wenzel, Folker; Jung, Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    Effects of radiographic contrast media (RCM) application were demonstrated in vitro and in vivo where the injection of RCM into the A. axillaris of patients with coronary artery disease was followed by a significant and RCM-dependent decrease of erythrocyte velocity in downstream skin capillaries. Another study in pigs revealed that the deceleration of erythrocytes coincided with a significant reduction of the oxygen partial pressure in the myocardium—supplied by the left coronary artery—after the administration of RCM into this artery. Further reports showed RCM dependent alterations of erythrocytes like echinocyte formation and exocytosis, sequestration of actin or band 3 and the buckling of endothelial cells coinciding with a formation of interendothelial fenestrations leading to areas devoid of endothelial cells. Key to morphological alterations of erythrocytes is the membrane cytoskeleton, which is linked to the band 3 in the erythrocyte membrane via the junctional complex. Fundamental observations regarding the cell biological and biochemical aspects of the structure and function of the cell membrane and the membrane cytoskeleton of erythrocytes have been reported. This review focuses on recent results gained, e.g., by advanced confocal laser scanning microscopy of different double-stained structural elements of the erythrocyte membrane cytoskeleton. PMID:25222553

  20. Nanotube junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon Sheng; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter

    2003-01-01

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  1. Abceso apical agudo

    OpenAIRE

    Jara Ortiz, M.; López, M.; Gómez Viglino, L.; Maydana, N.; Hervit, M.; Bertola, N.

    2015-01-01

    En casos de urgencia, muchas veces debemos poner a prueba distintos elementos de diagnóstico para encontrar la mejor respuesta posible. En este caso se reporta un absceso apical agudo en la zona palatina del sector 1, que, de acuerdo al test de vitalidad pulpar y correcta interpretación radiográfica se localiza la pieza causal N° 1.8.Asistió a la consulta un paciente masculino 30 años de edad, dolor a la masticación, edema y tumefacción, en zona palatina comprendida en piezas 1.5; 1.6; 1.7 y ...

  2. Middle Miocene paleotemperature anomalies within the Franciscan Complex of northern California: Thermo-tectonic responses near the Mendocino triple junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, M.B.; Shelton, K.L.; McLaughlin, R.J.; Laughland, M.M.; Solomon, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    This study documents three localities in the Franciscan accretionary complex of northern California, now adjacent to the San Andreas fault, that were overprinted thermally between 13.9 and 12.2 Ma: Point Delgada-Shelter Cove (King Range terrane); Bolinas Ridge (San Bruno Mountain terrane); and Mount San Bruno (San Bruno Mountain terrane). Vein assemblages of quartz, carbonate, sulfide minerals, and adularia were precipitated locally in highly fractured wall rock. Vitrinite reflectance (Rm) values and illite crystallinity decrease away from the zones of metalliferous veins, where peak wall-rock temperatures, as determined from Rm, were as high as 315??C. The ??18O values of quartz and calcite indicate that two separate types of fluid contributed to vein precipitation. Higher ??18O fluids produced widespread quartz and calcite veins that are typical of the regional paleothermal regime. The widespread veins are by-products of heat conduction and diffuse fluid flow during zeolite and prehnite-pumpellyite-grade metamorphism, and we interpret their paleofluids to have evolved through dehydration reactions and/or extensive isotopic exchange with accreted Franciscan rocks. Lower ??18O fluids, in contrast, evolved from relatively high temperature exchange between seawater (or meteoric water) and basaltic and/or sedimentary host rocks; focused flow of those fluids resulted in local deposition of the metalliferous veins. Heat sources for the three paleothermal anomalies remain uncertain and may have been unrelated to one another. Higher temperature metalliferous fluids in the King Range terrane could have advected either from a site of ridge-trench interaction north of the Mendocino fracture zone or from a "slabless window" in the wake of the northward migrating Mendocino triple junction. A separate paradox involves the amount of Quaternary offset of Franciscan basement rocks near Shelter Cove by on-land faults that some regard as the main active trace of the San Andreas

  3. Low-complexity full-melt laser-anneal process for fabrication of low-leakage implanted ultrashallow junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biasotto, C.; Gonda, V.; Nanver, L.K.; Scholtes, T.L.M.; Van der Cingel, J.; Vidal, D.; Jovanovic, V.

    2011-01-01

    Good-quality ultrashallow n + p junctions are formed using 5-keV amorphizing As+ implantations followed by a single-shot excimer laser anneal for dopant activation. By using an implant that is self-aligned to the contact windows etched in an oxide isolation layer, straightforward processing of the

  4. Apical trafficking in epithelial cells: signals, clusters and motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisz, Ora A; Rodriguez-Boulan, Enrique

    2009-12-01

    In the early days of epithelial cell biology, researchers working with kidney and/or intestinal epithelial cell lines and with hepatocytes described the biosynthetic and recycling routes followed by apical and basolateral plasma membrane (PM) proteins. They identified the trans-Golgi network and recycling endosomes as the compartments that carried out apical-basolateral sorting. They described complex apical sorting signals that promoted association with lipid rafts, and simpler basolateral sorting signals resembling clathrin-coated-pit endocytic motifs. They also noticed that different epithelial cell types routed their apical PM proteins very differently, using either a vectorial (direct) route or a transcytotic (indirect) route. Although these original observations have generally held up, recent studies have revealed interesting complexities in the routes taken by apically destined proteins and have extended our understanding of the machinery required to sustain these elaborate sorting pathways. Here, we critically review the current status of apical trafficking mechanisms and discuss a model in which clustering is required to recruit apical trafficking machineries. Uncovering the mechanisms responsible for polarized trafficking and their epithelial-specific variations will help understand how epithelial functional diversity is generated and the pathogenesis of many human diseases.

  5. Gap junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodenough, Daniel A; Paul, David L

    2009-07-01

    Gap junctions are aggregates of intercellular channels that permit direct cell-cell transfer of ions and small molecules. Initially described as low-resistance ion pathways joining excitable cells (nerve and muscle), gap junctions are found joining virtually all cells in solid tissues. Their long evolutionary history has permitted adaptation of gap-junctional intercellular communication to a variety of functions, with multiple regulatory mechanisms. Gap-junctional channels are composed of hexamers of medium-sized families of integral proteins: connexins in chordates and innexins in precordates. The functions of gap junctions have been explored by studying mutations in flies, worms, and humans, and targeted gene disruption in mice. These studies have revealed a wide diversity of function in tissue and organ biology.

  6. The non-glycosylated isoform of MIC26 is a constituent of the mammalian MICOS complex and promotes formation of crista junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koob, Sebastian; Barrera, Miguel; Anand, Ruchika; Reichert, Andreas S

    2015-07-01

    Mitochondrial membrane architecture is important for organelle function. Alterations thereof are linked to a number of human disorders including diabetes and cardiomyopathy. The MICOS complex was recently reported to be a central player determining cristae structure and formation of crista junctions. Here we investigated the functional role of MIC26, a lipoprotein formerly termed APOO. Its levels are increased in diabetic heart tissue and in blood plasma of patients suffering from acute coronary syndrome. We demonstrate that human MIC26 exists in three distinct forms: (1) a glycosylated and secreted 55kDa protein, (2) an ER/Golgi-resident form thereof, and (3) a non-glycosylated 22kDa mitochondrial protein. The latter isoform spans the mitochondrial inner membrane and physically interacts with several MICOS complex subunits such as MIC60, MIC27, and MIC10. We further demonstrate that MIC26 and MIC27, a homologous protein formerly termed APOOL, regulate their levels in an antagonistic manner. Both proteins are positively correlated with the levels of MIC10 as well as tafazzin, an enzyme required for cardiolipin remodeling. Overexpression of MIC26 induced fragmentation of mitochondria, promoted ROS formation and resulted in impaired mitochondrial respiration. Downregulation of MIC26 induced a decrease in mitochondrial oxygen consumption, whereas mitochondrial network morphology and ROS levels remained unaffected. MIC26 depletion led to alterations in mitochondrial ultrastructure and caused a significant reduction in the number of crista junctions. In summary, we show that the human apolipoprotein MIC26 is a bona fide subunit of the MICOS complex and that MIC26 is linked to cardiolipin metabolism and promotes crista junction formation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Possible Involvement of Tight Junctions, Extracellular Matrix and Nuclear Receptors in Epithelial Differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Ichikawa-Tomikawa, Naoki; Sugimoto, Kotaro; Satohisa, Seiro; Nishiura, Keisuke; Chiba, Hideki

    2011-01-01

    Tight junctions are intercellular junctions localized at the most apical end of the lateral plasma membrane. They consist of four kinds of transmembrane proteins (occludin, claudins, junctional adhesion molecules, and tricellulin) and huge numbers of scaffolding proteins and contribute to the paracellular barrier and fence function. The mutation and deletion of these proteins impair the functions of tight junctions and cause various human diseases. In this paper, we provide an overview of rec...

  8. Paracellin-1, a renal tight junction protein required for paracellular Mg2+ resorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simon, DB; Lu, Y; Choate, KA; Velazquez, H; Al-Sabban, E; Praga, M; Casari, C; Bettinelli, A; Colussi, C; Rodriguez-Soriano, J; McCredie, D; Milford, D; Sanjad, S; Lifton, RP

    1999-01-01

    Epithelia permit selective and regulated flux from apical to basolateral surfaces by transcellular passage through cells or paracellular flux between cells. Tight junctions constitute the barrier to paracellular conductance; however, Little is known about the specific molecules that mediate

  9. The Exon Junction Complex Controls the Efficient and Faithful Splicing of a Subset of Transcripts Involved in Mitotic Cell-Cycle Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Fukumura

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The exon junction complex (EJC that is deposited onto spliced mRNAs upstream of exon–exon junctions plays important roles in multiple post-splicing gene expression events, such as mRNA export, surveillance, localization, and translation. However, a direct role for the human EJC in pre-mRNA splicing has not been fully understood. Using HeLa cells, we depleted one of the EJC core components, Y14, and the resulting transcriptome was analyzed by deep sequencing (RNA-Seq and confirmed by RT–PCR. We found that Y14 is required for efficient and faithful splicing of a group of transcripts that is enriched in short intron-containing genes involved in mitotic cell-cycle progression. Tethering of EJC core components (Y14, eIF4AIII or MAGOH to a model reporter pre-mRNA harboring a short intron showed that these core components are prerequisites for the splicing activation. Taken together, we conclude that the EJC core assembled on pre-mRNA is critical for efficient and faithful splicing of a specific subset of short introns in mitotic cell cycle-related genes.

  10. Exon Junction Complexes Show a Distributional Bias toward Alternatively Spliced mRNAs and against mRNAs Coding for Ribosomal Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Hauer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The exon junction complex (EJC connects spliced mRNAs to posttranscriptional processes including RNA localization, transport, and regulated degradation. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of bona fide EJC binding sites across the transcriptome including all four RNA binding EJC components eIF4A3, BTZ, UPF3B, and RNPS1. Integration of these data sets permits definition of high-confidence EJC deposition sites as well as assessment of whether EJC heterogeneity drives alternative nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathways. Notably, BTZ (MLN51 or CASC3 emerges as the EJC subunit that is almost exclusively bound to sites 20–24 nucleotides upstream of exon-exon junctions, hence defining EJC positions. By contrast, eIF4A3, UPF3B, and RNPS1 display additional RNA binding sites suggesting accompanying non-EJC functions. Finally, our data show that EJCs are largely distributed across spliced RNAs in an orthodox fashion, with two notable exceptions: an EJC deposition bias in favor of alternatively spliced transcripts and against the mRNAs that encode ribosomal proteins.

  11. An asymmetric A-B-A' metallo-supramolecular triblock copolymer linked by Ni(2+)-bis-terpyridine complexes at one junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haixia; Wei, Wei; Xiong, Huiming

    2016-02-07

    A metallo-supramolecular triblock copolymer polystyrene-b-polyisoprene-[Ni(2+)]-polystyrene (SI-[Ni(2+)]-S') has been efficiently prepared using a one-pot, two-step procedure, where the blocks are held by bis-terpyridine complexes at the junction of SI-S'. This specific metallo-supramolecular chemistry is demonstrated to be a robust approach to potentially broaden the diversity of block copolymers. The location of the metal-ligand complexes has a profound influence on the phase separation of the triblock copolymer in the bulk, which results in a distinctive phase segregation between the end blocks and leads to an unexpected asymmetry of the triblock copolymer. The metal-ligand complexes are found to be preferentially located on the adjacent spherical domain and form a core-shell structure. The resulting multiphase material exhibits distinct elastomeric properties with significant toughness and creep recovery behavior. This type of triblock copolymer is anticipated to be a novel class of hybrid thermo-plastic elastomeric material with wide tunability and functionality.

  12. 'Special K' and a Loss of Cell-To-Cell Adhesion in Proximal Tubule-Derived Epithelial Cells: Modulation of the Adherens Junction Complex by Ketamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Claire E.; Jin, Tianrong; Siamantouras, Eleftherios; Liu, Issac K-K; Jefferson, Kieran P.; Squires, Paul E.

    2013-01-01

    Ketamine, a mild hallucinogenic class C drug, is the fastest growing ‘party drug’ used by 16–24 year olds in the UK. As the recreational use of Ketamine increases we are beginning to see the signs of major renal and bladder complications. To date however, we know nothing of a role for Ketamine in modulating both structure and function of the human renal proximal tubule. In the current study we have used an established model cell line for human epithelial cells of the proximal tubule (HK2) to demonstrate that Ketamine evokes early changes in expression of proteins central to the adherens junction complex. Furthermore we use AFM single-cell force spectroscopy to assess if these changes functionally uncouple cells of the proximal tubule ahead of any overt loss in epithelial cell function. Our data suggests that Ketamine (24–48 hrs) produces gross changes in cell morphology and cytoskeletal architecture towards a fibrotic phenotype. These physical changes matched the concentration-dependent (0.1–1 mg/mL) cytotoxic effect of Ketamine and reflect a loss in expression of the key adherens junction proteins epithelial (E)- and neural (N)-cadherin and β-catenin. Down-regulation of protein expression does not involve the pro-fibrotic cytokine TGFβ, nor is it regulated by the usual increase in expression of Slug or Snail, the transcriptional regulators for E-cadherin. However, the loss in E-cadherin can be partially rescued pharmacologically by blocking p38 MAPK using SB203580. These data provide compelling evidence that Ketamine alters epithelial cell-to-cell adhesion and cell-coupling in the proximal kidney via a non-classical pro-fibrotic mechanism and the data provides the first indication that this illicit substance can have major implications on renal function. Understanding Ketamine-induced renal pathology may identify targets for future therapeutic intervention. PMID:24009666

  13. Prolactin/Jak2 directs apical/basal polarization and luminal linage maturation of mammary epithelial cells through regulation of the Erk1/2 pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengming Liu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Tissue development/remodeling requires modulations in both cellular architecture and phenotype. Aberration in these processes leads to tumorigenesis. During the pregnancy/lactation cycle the mammary epithelial cells undergo complex morphological and phenotypic programs resulting in the acquisition of apical/basal (A/B polarization and cellular maturation necessary for proper lactation. Still the hormonal regulations and cellular mechanisms controlling these events are not entirely elucidated. Here we show that prolactin (PRL/Jak2 pathway in mammary epithelial cells uniquely signals to establish A/B polarity as determined by the apical localization of the tight junction protein zona occludens 1 (ZO-1 and the basal/lateral localization of E-cadherin, and the apical trafficking of lipid droplets. As well, our results indicate that this pathway regulates mammary stem cell hierarchy by inducing the differentiation of luminal progenitor (EpCAMhi/CD49fhi cells to mature luminal (EpCAMhi/CD49flow cells. Moreover, our data indicate that PRL/Jak2 coordinates both of these cellular events through limiting the mitogen activated protein kinase (Erk1/2 pathway. Together our findings define a novel unifying mechanism coupling mammary epithelial cell A/B polarization and terminal differentiation.

  14. Apical deficiency triggers JNK-dependent apoptosis in the embryonic epidermis of Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolahgar, Golnar; Bardet, Pierre-Luc; Langton, Paul F.; Alexandre, Cyrille; Vincent, Jean-Paul

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial homeostasis and the avoidance of diseases such as cancer require the elimination of defective cells by apoptosis. Here, we investigate how loss of apical determinants triggers apoptosis in the embryonic epidermis of Drosophila. Transcriptional profiling and in situ hybridisation show that JNK signalling is upregulated in mutants lacking Crumbs or other apical determinants. This leads to transcriptional activation of the pro-apoptotic gene reaper and to apoptosis. Suppression of JNK signalling by overexpression of Puckered, a feedback inhibitor of the pathway, prevents reaper upregulation and apoptosis. Moreover, removal of endogenous Puckered leads to ectopic reaper expression. Importantly, disruption of the basolateral domain in the embryonic epidermis does not trigger JNK signalling or apoptosis. We suggest that apical, not basolateral, integrity could be intrinsically required for the survival of epithelial cells. In apically deficient embryos, JNK signalling is activated throughout the epidermis. Yet, in the dorsal region, reaper expression is not activated and cells survive. One characteristic of these surviving cells is that they retain discernible adherens junctions despite the apical deficit. We suggest that junctional integrity could restrain the pro-apoptotic influence of JNK signalling. PMID:21693518

  15. Shoot apical meristem arrest in brassica and tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, de J.

    2013-01-01

    A pool of cells known as stem cells located in the center of the shoot apical meristem (SAM) are responsible to maintain meristematic activity throughout a plants life in order to produce organs. The maintenance of these stem cells is tightly controlled by a complex genetic and hormonal network. Any

  16. Sequential development of apical-basal and planar polarities in aggregating epitheliomuscular cells of Hydra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seybold, Anna; Salvenmoser, Willi; Hobmayer, Bert

    2016-04-01

    Apical-basal and planar cell polarities are hallmarks of metazoan epithelia required to separate internal and external environments and to regulate trans- and intracellular transport, cytoskeletal organization, and morphogenesis. Mechanisms of cell polarization have been intensively studied in bilaterian model organisms, particularly in early embryos and cultured cells, while cell polarity in pre-bilaterian tissues is poorly understood. Here, we have studied apical-basal and planar polarization in regenerating (aggregating) clusters of epitheliomuscular cells of Hydra, a simple representative of the ancestral, pre-bilaterian phylum Cnidaria. Immediately after dissociation, single epitheliomuscular cells do not exhibit cellular polarity, but they polarize de novo during aggregation. Reestablishment of the Hydra-specific epithelial bilayer is a result of short-range cell sorting. In the early phase of aggregation, apical-basal polarization starts with an enlargement of the epithelial apical-basal diameter and by the development of belt-like apical septate junctions. Specification of the basal pole of epithelial cells occurs shortly later and is linked to synthesis of mesoglea, development of hemidesmosome-like junctions, and formation of desmosome-like junctions connecting the basal myonemes of neighbouring cells. Planar polarization starts, while apical-basal polarization is already ongoing. It is executed gradually starting with cell-autonomous formation, parallelization, and condensation of myonemes at the basal end of each epithelial cell and continuing with a final planar alignment of epitheliomuscular cells at the tissue level. Our findings reveal that epithelial polarization in Hydra aggregates occurs in defined steps well accessible by histological and ultrastructural techniques and they will provide a basis for future molecular studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, N.; Tai, J.; Soofi, A.

    2007-01-01

    The transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome, also known as Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, is characterized by transient left ventricular dysfunction in the absence of obstructive epicardial coronary disease. Although the syndrome has been reported in Japan since 1990, it is rare in other regions. Rapid recognition of the syndrome can modify the diagnostic and therapeutic attitude i.e. avoiding thrombolysis and performing catheterization in the acute phase. (author)

  18. Disruption of the Cdc42/Par6/aPKC or Dlg/Scrib/Lgl Polarity Complex Promotes Epithelial Proliferation via Overlapping Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimizzi, Gregory V; Maher, Meghan T; Loza, Andrew J; Longmore, Gregory D

    2016-01-01

    The establishment and maintenance of apical-basal polarity is a defining characteristic and essential feature of functioning epithelia. Apical-basal polarity (ABP) proteins are also tumor suppressors that are targeted for disruption by oncogenic viruses and are commonly mutated in human carcinomas. Disruption of these ABP proteins is an early event in cancer development that results in increased proliferation and epithelial disorganization through means not fully characterized. Using the proliferating Drosophila melanogaster wing disc epithelium, we demonstrate that disruption of the junctional vs. basal polarity complexes results in increased epithelial proliferation via distinct downstream signaling pathways. Disruption of the basal polarity complex results in JNK-dependent proliferation, while disruption of the junctional complex primarily results in p38-dependent proliferation. Surprisingly, the Rho-Rok-Myosin contractility apparatus appears to play opposite roles in the regulation of the proliferative phenotype based on which polarity complex is disrupted. In contrast, non-autonomous Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) signaling appears to suppress the proliferation that results from apical-basal polarity disruption, regardless of which complex is disrupted. Finally we demonstrate that disruption of the junctional polarity complex activates JNK via the Rho-Rok-Myosin contractility apparatus independent of the cortical actin regulator, Moesin.

  19. Flexible 2D layered material junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balabai, R.; Solomenko, A.

    2018-03-01

    Within the framework of the methods of the electron density functional and the ab initio pseudopotential, we have obtained the valence electron density spatial distribution, the densities of electron states, the widths of band gaps, the charges on combined regions, and the Coulomb potentials for graphene-based flexible 2D layered junctions, using author program complex. It is determined that the bending of the 2D layered junctions on the angle α leads to changes in the electronic properties of these junctions. In the graphene/graphane junction, there is clear charge redistribution with different signs in the regions of junctions. The presence in the heterojunctions of charge regions with different signs leads to the formation of potential barriers. The greatest potential jump is in the graphene/fluorographene junction. The greatest value of the band gap width is in the graphene/graphane junction.

  20. Magnesium Lowers the Incidence of Postoperative Junctional Ectopic Tachycardia in Congenital Heart Surgical Patients: Is There a Relationship to Surgical Procedure Complexity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Dingchao; Sznycer-Taub, Nathaniel; Cheng, Yao; McCarter, Robert; Jonas, Richard A.; Hanumanthaiah, Sridhar; Moak, Jeffrey P.

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium sulfate was given to pediatric cardiac surgical patients during cardiopulmonary bypass period in an attempt to reduce the occurrence of postoperative junctional ectopic tachycardia (PO JET). We reviewed our data to evaluate the effect of magnesium on the occurrence of JET and assess a possible relationship between PO JET and procedure complexity. A total of 1088 congenital heart surgeries (CHS), performed from 2005 to 2010, were reviewed. A total of 750 cases did not receive magnesium, and 338 cases received magnesium (25 mg/kg). All procedures were classified according to Aristotle score from 1 to 4. Overall, there was a statistically significant decrease in PO JET occurrence between the two groups regardless of the Aristotle score, 15.3 % (115/750) in non-magnesium group versus 7.1 % (24/338) in magnesium group, P Aristotle score, P = 0.01. Following magnesium administration and controlling for body weight, surgical and aortic cross-clamp times in the analyses, reduction in adjusted risk of JET was significantly greater with increasing Aristotle level of complexity (JET in non-magnesium vs. magnesium group, Aristotle level 1: 9.8 vs. 14.3 %, level 4: 11.5 vs. 3.2 %; odds ratio 0.54, 95 % CI 0.31–0.94, P = 0.028). Our data confirmed that intra-operative usage of magnesium reduced the occurrence of PO JET in a larger number and more diverse group of CHS patients than has previously been reported. Further, our data suggest that magnesium’s effect on PO JET occurrence seemed more effective in CHS with higher levels of Aristotle complexity. PMID:25762470

  1. The EhCPADH112 complex of Entamoeba histolytica interacts with tight junction proteins occludin and claudin-1 to produce epithelial damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail Betanzos

    Full Text Available Entamoeba histolytica, the protozoan responsible for human amoebiasis, causes between 30,000 and 100,000 deaths per year worldwide. Amoebiasis is characterized by intestinal epithelial damage provoking severe diarrhea. However, the molecular mechanisms by which this protozoan causes epithelial damage are poorly understood. Here, we studied the initial molecular interactions between the E. histolytica EhCPADH112 virulence complex and epithelial MDCK and Caco-2 cells. By confocal microscopy, we discovered that after contact with trophozoites or trophozoite extracts (TE, EhCPADH112 and proteins forming this complex (EhCP112 and EhADH112 co-localize with occludin and claudin-1 at tight junctions (TJ. Immunoprecipitation assays revealed interaction between EhCPADH112 and occludin, claudin-1, ZO-1 and ZO-2. Overlay assays confirmed an interaction of EhCP112 and EhADH112 with occludin and claudin-1, whereas only EhADH112 interacted also with ZO-2. We observed degradation of all mentioned TJ proteins after incubation with TE. Importantly, inhibiting proteolytic activity or blocking the complex with a specific antibody not only prevented TJ protein degradation but also epithelial barrier disruption. Furthermore, we discovered that TE treatment induces autophagy and apoptosis in MDCK cells that could contribute to the observed barrier disruption. Our results suggest a model in which epithelial damage caused by E. histolytica is initiated by the interaction of EhCP112 and EhADH112 with TJ proteins followed by their degradation. Disruption of TJs then induces increased paracellular permeability, thus facilitating the entry of more proteases and other parasite molecules leading eventually to tissue destruction.

  2. Export of a Toxoplasma gondii rhoptry neck protein complex at the host cell membrane to form the moving junction during invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Besteiro

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the most conserved features of the invasion process in Apicomplexa parasites is the formation of a moving junction (MJ between the apex of the parasite and the host cell membrane that moves along the parasite and serves as support to propel it inside the host cell. The MJ was, up to a recent period, completely unknown at the molecular level. Recently, proteins originated from two distinct post-Golgi specialised secretory organelles, the micronemes (for AMA1 and the neck of the rhoptries (for RON2/RON4/RON5 proteins, have been shown to form a complex. AMA1 and RON4 in particular, have been localised to the MJ during invasion. Using biochemical approaches, we have identified RON8 as an additional member of the complex. We also demonstrated that all RON proteins are present at the MJ during invasion. Using metabolic labelling and immunoprecipitation, we showed that RON2 and AMA1 were able to interact in the absence of the other members. We also discovered that all MJ proteins are subjected to proteolytic maturation during trafficking to their respective organelles and that they could associate as non-mature forms in vitro. Finally, whereas AMA1 has previously been shown to be inserted into the parasite membrane upon secretion, we demonstrated, using differential permeabilization and loading of RON-specific antibodies into the host cell, that the RON complex is targeted to the host cell membrane, where RON4/5/8 remain associated with the cytoplasmic face. Globally, these results point toward a model of MJ organization where the parasite would be secreting and inserting interacting components on either side of the MJ, both at the host and at its own plasma membranes.

  3. A Point Mutation in the Exon Junction Complex Factor Y14 Disrupts Its Function in mRNA Cap Binding and Translation Enhancement*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Tzu-Wei; Lee, Kuo-Ming; Lou, Yuan-Chao; Lu, Chia-Chen; Tarn, Woan-Yuh

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic mRNA biogenesis involves a series of interconnected steps mediated by RNA-binding proteins. The exon junction complex core protein Y14 is required for nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) and promotes translation. Moreover, Y14 binds the cap structure of mRNAs and inhibits the activity of the decapping enzyme Dcp2. In this report, we show that an evolutionarily conserved tryptophan residue (Trp-73) of Y14 is critical for its binding to the mRNA cap structure. A Trp-73 mutant (W73V) bound weakly to mRNAs and failed to protect them from degradation. However, this mutant could still interact with the NMD and mRNA degradation factors and retained partial NMD activity. In addition, we found that the W73V mutant could not interact with translation initiation factors. Overexpression of W73V suppressed reporter mRNA translation in vitro and in vivo and reduced the level of a set of nascent proteins. These results reveal a residue of Y14 that confers cap-binding activity and is essential for Y14-mediated enhancement of translation. Finally, we demonstrated that Y14 may selectively and differentially modulate protein biosynthesis. PMID:26887951

  4. A Point Mutation in the Exon Junction Complex Factor Y14 Disrupts Its Function in mRNA Cap Binding and Translation Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Tzu-Wei; Lee, Kuo-Ming; Lou, Yuan-Chao; Lu, Chia-Chen; Tarn, Woan-Yuh

    2016-04-15

    Eukaryotic mRNA biogenesis involves a series of interconnected steps mediated by RNA-binding proteins. The exon junction complex core protein Y14 is required for nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) and promotes translation. Moreover, Y14 binds the cap structure of mRNAs and inhibits the activity of the decapping enzyme Dcp2. In this report, we show that an evolutionarily conserved tryptophan residue (Trp-73) of Y14 is critical for its binding to the mRNA cap structure. A Trp-73 mutant (W73V) bound weakly to mRNAs and failed to protect them from degradation. However, this mutant could still interact with the NMD and mRNA degradation factors and retained partial NMD activity. In addition, we found that the W73V mutant could not interact with translation initiation factors. Overexpression of W73V suppressed reporter mRNA translation in vitro and in vivo and reduced the level of a set of nascent proteins. These results reveal a residue of Y14 that confers cap-binding activity and is essential for Y14-mediated enhancement of translation. Finally, we demonstrated that Y14 may selectively and differentially modulate protein biosynthesis. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Fractional order junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, J. Tenreiro

    2015-01-01

    Gottfried Leibniz generalized the derivation and integration, extending the operators from integer up to real, or even complex, orders. It is presently recognized that the resulting models capture long term memory effects difficult to describe by classical tools. Leon Chua generalized the set of lumped electrical elements that provide the building blocks in mathematical models. His proposal of the memristor and of higher order elements broadened the scope of variables and relationships embedded in the development of models. This paper follows the two directions and proposes a new logical step, by generalizing the concept of junction. Classical junctions interconnect system elements using simple algebraic restrictions. Nevertheless, this simplistic approach may be misleading in the presence of unexpected dynamical phenomena and requires including additional "parasitic" elements. The novel γ -junction includes, as special cases, the standard series and parallel connections and allows a new degree of freedom when building models. The proposal motivates the search for experimental and real world manifestations of the abstract conjectures.

  6. Tolerance of brightness and contrast adjustments on chronic apical abscess and apical granuloma interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnamasari, L.; Iskandar, H. H. B.; Makes, B. N.

    2017-08-01

    In digitized radiography techniques, adjusting the image enhancement can improve the subjective image quality by optimizing the brightness and contrast for diagnostic needs. To determine the value range of image enhancement (brightness and contrast) on chronic apical abscess and apical granuloma interpretation. 30 periapical radiographs that diagnosed chronic apical abscess and 30 that diagnosed apical granuloma were adjusted by changing brightness and contrast values. The value range of brightness and contrast adjustment that can be tolerated in radiographic interpretations of chronic apical abscess and apical granuloma spans from -10 to +10. Brightness and contrast adjustments on digital radiographs do not affect the radiographic interpretation of chronic apical abscess and apical granuloma if conducted within the value range.

  7. Quantitative cell polarity imaging defines leader-to-follower transitions during collective migration and the key role of microtubule-dependent adherens junction formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revenu, Céline; Streichan, Sebastian; Donà, Erika; Lecaudey, Virginie; Hufnagel, Lars; Gilmour, Darren

    2014-03-01

    The directed migration of cell collectives drives the formation of complex organ systems. A characteristic feature of many migrating collectives is a 'tissue-scale' polarity, whereby 'leader' cells at the edge of the tissue guide trailing 'followers' that become assembled into polarised epithelial tissues en route. Here, we combine quantitative imaging and perturbation approaches to investigate epithelial cell state transitions during collective migration and organogenesis, using the zebrafish lateral line primordium as an in vivo model. A readout of three-dimensional cell polarity, based on centrosomal-nucleus axes, allows the transition from migrating leaders to assembled followers to be quantitatively resolved for the first time in vivo. Using live reporters and a novel fluorescent protein timer approach, we investigate changes in cell-cell adhesion underlying this transition by monitoring cadherin receptor localisation and stability. This reveals that while cadherin 2 is expressed across the entire tissue, functional apical junctions are first assembled in the transition zone and become progressively more stable across the leader-follower axis of the tissue. Perturbation experiments demonstrate that the formation of these apical adherens junctions requires dynamic microtubules. However, once stabilised, adherens junction maintenance is microtubule independent. Combined, these data identify a mechanism for regulating leader-to-follower transitions within migrating collectives, based on the relocation and stabilisation of cadherins, and reveal a key role for dynamic microtubules in this process.

  8. Par3 integrates Tiam1 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling to change apical membrane identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruch, Travis R; Bryant, David M; Mostov, Keith E; Engel, Joanne N

    2017-01-15

    Pathogens can alter epithelial polarity by recruiting polarity proteins to the apical membrane, but how a change in protein localization is linked to polarity disruption is not clear. In this study, we used chemically induced dimerization to rapidly relocalize proteins from the cytosol to the apical surface. We demonstrate that forced apical localization of Par3, which is normally restricted to tight junctions, is sufficient to alter apical membrane identity through its interactions with phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and the Rac1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor Tiam1. We further show that PI3K activity is required upstream of Rac1, and that simultaneously targeting PI3K and Tiam1 to the apical membrane has a synergistic effect on membrane remodeling. Thus, Par3 coordinates the action of PI3K and Tiam1 to define membrane identity, revealing a signaling mechanism that can be exploited by human mucosal pathogens. © 2017 Ruch et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  9. Progressive, generalized, apical idiopathic root resorption and hypercementosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schätzle, Marc; Tanner, Sandro D; Bosshardt, Dieter D

    2005-11-01

    Root resorption is a multifactorial process that results in loss of tooth structure. The causes of root resorption may vary, leading to several types of resorptions. Some factors have been identified and may be categorized into physiological resorption, local factors, systemic conditions, and idiopathic resorptions. The objective of this report was to present a case of a 17-year-old white female with progressive, generalized, apical idiopathic root resorption followed up for 34 months. Two panoramic radiographs, 14 and 34 months after initial clinical and radiological examinations, showed the rapid progression of apical root resorption. Two molars, teeth #15 and #16, which had to be extracted, and a bone sample from the distal aspect of tooth #15 were processed for histologic analysis. Two millimeters apical to the cemento-enamel junction, an abrupt increase in the cementum thickness was noted, amounting to 300 and 800 microm in teeth #15 and #16, respectively. The thickening of the cementum layer was due to an accelerated deposition of cellular intrinsic fiber cementum. An unusually high number of mineralization foci were observed in association with acellular extrinsic fiber cementum, and both free and fused cementicles were seen. In contrast to tooth #16, tooth #15 revealed extensive dentin replacement by a bone-like and a cementum-like tissue. Furthermore, ankylosis was demonstrated in tooth #15 and confirmed in the bone sample. At present, there is no preventive or therapeutic regimen for the type of root resorption seen in this case report. Treatment usually consists of the extraction of teeth with advanced lesions.

  10. Apical foramen morphology according to the length of merged canal at the apex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Ho Kim

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the apical foramen morphology and the length of merged canal at the apex in type II root canal system. Materials and Methods This study included intact extracted maxillary and mandibular human premolars (n = 20 with fully formed roots without any visible signs of external resorption. The root segments were obtained by removing the crown 1 mm beneath the cementum-enamel junction (CEJ using a rotary diamond disk. The distance between the file tip and merged point of joining two canals was defined as Lj. The roots were carefully sectioned at 1 mm from the apex by a slow-speed water-cooled diamond saw. All cross sections were examined under the microscope at ×50 magnification and photographed to estimate the shape of the apical foramen. The longest and the shortest diameter of apical foramen was measured using ImageJ program (1.44p, National Institutes of Health. Correlation coefficient was calculated to identify the link between Lj and the apical foramen shape by Pearson's correlation. Results The average value of Lj was 3.74 mm. The average of proportion (P, estimated by dividing the longest diameter into the shortest diameter of the apical foramen, was 3.64. This study showed a significant negative correlation between P and Lj (p < 0.05. Conclusions As Lj gets longer, the apical foramen becomes more ovally shaped. Likewise, as it gets shorter, the apical foramen becomes more flat shaped.

  11. 19-DEJ-1, a hemidesmosome-anchoring filament complex-associated monoclonal antibody. Definition of a new skin basement membrane antigenic defect in junctional and dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fine, J D; Horiguchi, Y; Couchman, J R

    1989-01-01

    50% of patients with recessive dystrophic EB further suggests, for the first time, that an inherited defect in basement membrane is shared in patients with junctional and some recessive dystrophic EB. The difference in site of skin cleavage in the latter two disorders gives additional support...

  12. Helicobacter pylori dwelling on the apical surface of gastrointestinal epithelium damages the mucosal barrier through direct contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen; Zhang, Hongyu; Yu, Lu; Cao, Yi

    2014-10-01

    Epithelial junctions and mucins compose a major portion of the mucosal barrier. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infections induce alterations of the tight junctions and adherens junctions in epithelial cells, although the precise mechanisms underlying this process are not fully understood. The expression of adhesion molecules and MUC1 was systematically investigated in gastrointestinal epithelial cells infected with H. pylori in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we developed several new in vitro methods to study the relationships between the bacterium and the dysfunction of tight junctions using Boyden Chambers. The expression of a series of junctional molecules and MUC1 decreased in the cultured cells that were infected with H. pylori. According to the degree of damage at the tight junctions, direct contact of H. pylori with the apical membrane of the cells resulted in the greatest increase in permeability compared to basal membrane binding or non-binding of H. pylori to the cells. Similarly, we noted that H. pylori infection could reduce the expression and glycosylation of MUC1. Helicobacter pylori dwelling on the apical surface of the gastrointestinal epithelium could directly induce serious injury of the mucosal barrier, and the new methods outlined here, based on the Boyden Chamber system, could be very useful for studying the relationships between bacteria and their target cells. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Apical wiring technique in surgical treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: the intermediate outcomes between Lenke types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiyamongkol, Weera; Klineberg, Eric O; Gupta, Munish C

    2013-02-01

    Retrospective cohort study of apical wiring technique for surgical treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients. To evaluate the intermediate outcome of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients treated with apical wiring technique. Regarding surgical treatment for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, there are reports of the superiority of coronal plane correction using all-screw constructs compared with all-hook or hybrid constructs. Major limitations of all-screw constructs are thoracic hypokyphosis and increased proximal junctional kyphosis. There are few reports about apical wiring technique outcomes and no reports of this surgical technique comparing Lenke types. Consecutive adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients treated with apical wiring technique were analyzed. Inclusion criteria were patient 21 years old or younger, who underwent a posterior only surgical correction with a follow-up of at least 2 years. Radiographic data were analyzed according to the criteria given by Lenke and colleagues. The radiographic parameters included global balance, Cobb angle, curve flexibility, apical vertebral translation, tilt angle of lower instrumented vertebra, angle of caudal disk to the lower instrumented vertebra, thoracic kyphosis, lumbar lordosis, and proximal junctional angle preoperatively and postoperatively. There was a significant improvement of Cobb angle in every Lenke type with an average correction of 74.6%. At latest follow-up, the average loss of correction was 3.5% (1.9 degrees). The greatest loss of correction for the minor curve of Lenke 2 was 14.1% (5.8 degrees). There was an improvement of thoracic kyphosis in hypokyphosis group (1.9-21.1 degrees; Pwiring technique for surgical treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis provides an average correction of 71.1% at 3.4 years of average follow-up with harmonious sagittal plane correction even with preexisting abnormal thoracic kyphosis.

  14. Nance-Horan syndrome protein, NHS, associates with epithelial cell junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shiwani; Ang, Sharyn L; Shaw, Marie; Mackey, David A; Gécz, Jozef; McAvoy, John W; Craig, Jamie E

    2006-06-15

    Nance-Horan syndrome, characterized by congenital cataracts, craniofacial, dental abnormalities and mental disturbances, is an X-linked disorder with significant phenotypic heterogeneity. Affected individuals have mutations in the NHS (Nance-Horan syndrome) gene typically resulting in premature truncation of the protein. This report underlines the complexity of the regulation of the NHS gene that transcribes several isoforms. We demonstrate the differential expression of the two NHS isoforms, NHS-A and NHS-1A, and differences in the subcellular localization of the proteins encoded by these isoforms. This may in part explain the pleiotropic features of the syndrome. We show that the endogenous and exogenous NHS-A isoform localizes to the cell membrane of mammalian cells in a cell-type-dependent manner and that it co-localizes with the tight junction (TJ) protein ZO-1 in the apical aspect of cell membrane in epithelial cells. We also show that the NHS-1A isoform is a cytoplasmic protein. In the developing mammalian lens, we found continuous expression of NHS that became restricted to the lens epithelium in pre- and postnatal lens. Consistent with the in vitro findings, the NHS-A isoform associates with the apical cell membrane in the lens epithelium. This study suggests that disturbances in intercellular contacts underlie cataractogenesis in the Nance-Horan syndrome. NHS is the first gene localized at TJs that has been implicated in congenital cataracts.

  15. Tight Junction Disruption Induced by Type 3 Secretion System Effectors Injected by Enteropathogenic and Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugalde-Silva, Paul; Gonzalez-Lugo, Octavio; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium consists of a single cell layer, which is a critical selectively permeable barrier to both absorb nutrients and avoid the entry of potentially harmful entities, including microorganisms. Epithelial cells are held together by the apical junctional complexes, consisting of adherens junctions, and tight junctions (TJs), and by underlying desmosomes. TJs lay in the apical domain of epithelial cells and are mainly composed by transmembrane proteins such as occludin, claudins, JAMs, and tricellulin, that are associated with the cytoplasmic plaque formed by proteins from the MAGUK family, such as ZO-1/2/3, connecting TJ to the actin cytoskeleton, and cingulin and paracingulin connecting TJ to the microtubule network. Extracellular bacteria such as EPEC and EHEC living in the intestinal lumen inject effectors proteins directly from the bacterial cytoplasm to the host cell cytoplasm, where they play a relevant role in the manipulation of the eukaryotic cell functions by modifying or blocking cell signaling pathways. TJ integrity depends on various cell functions such as actin cytoskeleton, microtubule network for vesicular trafficking, membrane integrity, inflammation, and cell survival. EPEC and EHEC effectors target most of these functions. Effectors encoded inside or outside of locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) disrupt the TJ strands. EPEC and EHEC exploit the TJ dynamics to open this structure, for causing diarrhea. EPEC and EHEC secrete effectors that mimic host proteins to manipulate the signaling pathways, including those related to TJ dynamics. In this review, we focus on the known mechanisms exploited by EPEC and EHEC effectors for causing TJ disruption.

  16. A Comparative Study of Apical Healing of Open Apices Using MTA and Ca(OH2 Apical Plugs in Cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Zarrabi

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of problem: Endodontic treatment of necrotic teeth with open apices is a challenge. After ruling out surgery as a treatment scheme and introduction of the multivisit apexification which in turn had its disadvantages, apical plug seems to be a suitable substitute treatment plan for such cases. Apical plug makes the treatment through formation of a barrier against the obturating material in a single visit.Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare histologically the periapical healing using MTA and calcium hydroxide apical plugs after intervals of 4 and 12 weeks in cats.Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial study 64 canines of 16 healthy and mature cats were divided into 3 groups after a periapical lesion formation by over instrumentation in the apical area with files up to no.120. The first group included 24 teeth on which MTA apical plug was applied. The second group included 24 teeth on which Ca (OH 2 apical plug was applied. In both groups the canals were filled with gutta percha and sealer. The third group included 16 control teeth whose canals were left empty after instrumentation and debridement. The access cavities of all teeth were sealed with varnish and amalgam and the vital perfusion of cats was performed in 4 and 12 week intervals. Statistical analysis was established by χ2 and independence test.Results: After 4 weeks, periapical healing in the first group was 90%, in the second group 80% and in the third group, it was only 12.5 %. After 12 weeks, periapical healing occurred in 100% of the MTA group, while it was 57.1% in the second and 40%in the third group .Generally, in the study of histological parameters of healing, no statistical significant difference was observed between the 2 experimental groups,although the MTA group results were much better than the Ca (OH 2 group especially at 12 weeks.Conclusion: The use of MTA apical plug is more effective than Ca (OH 2 in treatment of necrotic teeth with open

  17. Expression of Podoplanin in the Mouse Tooth Germ and Apical Bud Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawa, Yoshihiko; Iwasawa, Kana; Ishikawa, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the distribution of cells expressing podoplanin in the mouse tooth bud. Podoplanin expression was detected in enamel epithelia of the cervical loop at cell-cell contacts strongly, and weakly on the loosely aggregated stellate reticulum in the center and the neighboring stratum intermedium. Odontoblasts exhibited intense podoplanin expression at the junction with predentin while no expression was detected in the enamel organ containing ameloblasts. These results suggest that proliferating inner and outer enamel epithelia express podoplanin but that the expression is suppressed in the differentiated epithelia containing ameloblasts. On the other hand the podoplanin expression occurs in the differentiating odontoblasts and the expression is sustained in differentiated odontoblasts, indicating that odontoblasts have the strong ability to express podoplanin. In cultured apical bud cells podoplanin was detected at cell-cell contacts. In real-time PCR analysis the amount of podoplanin mRNA of the apical buds was 2-fold compared with the amount of kidney used as a positive control. These findings indicate that apical bud cells have the strong ability to express the podoplanin gene. Podoplanin is a mucin-type glycoprotein negatively charged by extensive O-glycosylation and a high content of sialic acid, which expresses the adhesive property. The podoplanin may contribute to form odontoblastic fiber or function as the anchorage to the tooth development and in proliferating epithelial cells of cervical loop and apical bud. PMID:18989465

  18. Apical dominance and apical control in multiple flushing of temperate woody species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Cline; C. Harrington

    2007-01-01

    In young plants of many woody species, the first flush of growth in the spring may be followed by one or more flushes of the terminal shoot if growing conditions are favorable. The occurrence of these additional flushes may significantly affect crown form and structure. Apical dominance (AD) and apical control (AC) are thought to be important control mechanisms in this...

  19. Determination of apical membrane polarity in mammary epithelial cell cultures: The role of cell-cell, cell-substratum, and membrane-cytoskeleton interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parry, G.; Beck, J.C.; Moss, L.; Bartley, J. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Ojakian, G.K. (State Univ. of New York, Brooklyn (United States))

    1990-06-01

    The membrane glycoprotein, PAS-O, is a major differentiation antigen on mammary epithelial cells and is located exclusively in the apical domain of the plasma membrane. The authors have used 734B cultured human mammary carcinoma cells as a model system to study the role of tight junctions, cell-substratum contacts, and submembranous cytoskeletal elements in restricting PAS-O to the apical membrane. Immunofluorescence and immunoelectronmicroscopy experiments demonstrated that while tight junctions demarcate PAS-O distribution in confluent cultures, apical polarity could be established at low culture densities when cells could not form tight junctions with neighboring cells. They suggest, then, that interactions between vitronectin and its receptor, are responsible for establishment of membrane domains in the absence of tight junctions. The role of cytoskeletal elements in restricting PAS-O distribution was examined by treating cultures with cytochalasin D, colchicine, or acrylamide. Cytochalasin D led to a redistribution of PAS0O while colchicine and acrylamide did not. They hypothesize that PAS-O is restricted to the apical membrane by interactions with a microfilament network and that the cytoskeletal organization is dependent upon cell-cell and cell-substratum interactions.

  20. Apical root resorption in orthodontically treated adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, S; Korn, E L; Boyd, R L

    1996-09-01

    This study analyzed the relationship in orthodontically treated adults between upper central incisor displacement measured on lateral cephalograms and apical root resorption measured on anterior periapical x-ray films. A multiple linear regression examined incisor displacements in four directions (retraction, advancement, intrusion, and extrusion) as independent variables, attempting to account for observed differences in the dependent variable, resorption. Mean apical resorption was 1.36 mm (sd +/- 1.46, n = 73). Mean horizontal displacement of the apex was -0.83 mm (sd +/- 1.74, n = 67); mean vertical displacement was 0.19 mm (sd +/- 1.48, n = 67). The regression coefficients for the intercept and for retraction were highly significant; those for extrusion, intrusion, and advancement were not. At the 95% confidence level, an average of 0.99 mm (se = +/- 0.34) of resorption was implied in the absence of root displacement and an average of 0.49 mm (se = +/- 0.14) of resorption was implied per millimeter of retraction. R2 for all four directional displacement variables (DDVs) taken together was only 0.20, which implied that only a relatively small portion of the observed apical resorption could be accounted for by tooth displacement alone. In a secondary set of univariate analyses, the associations between apical resorption and each of 14 additional treatment-related variables were examined. Only Gender, Elapsed Time, and Total Apical Displacement displayed statistically significant associations with apical resorption. Additional multiple regressions were then performed in which the data for each of these three statistically significant variables were considered separately, with the data for the four directional displacement variables. The addition of information on Elapsed Time or Total Apical Displacement did not explain a significant additional portion of the variability in apical resorption. On the other hand, the addition of information on Gender to the

  1. Microbiology and Treatment of Acute Apical Abscesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rôças, Isabela N.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute apical abscess is the most common form of dental abscess and is caused by infection of the root canal of the tooth. It is usually localized intraorally, but in some cases the apical abscess may spread and result in severe complications or even mortality. The reasons why dental root canal infections can become symptomatic and evolve to severe spreading and sometimes life-threatening abscesses remain elusive. Studies using culture and advanced molecular microbiology methods for microbial identification in apical abscesses have demonstrated a multispecies community conspicuously dominated by anaerobic bacteria. Species/phylotypes commonly found in these infections belong to the genera Fusobacterium, Parvimonas, Prevotella, Porphyromonas, Dialister, Streptococcus, and Treponema. Advances in DNA sequencing technologies and computational biology have substantially enhanced the knowledge of the microbiota associated with acute apical abscesses and shed some light on the etiopathogeny of this disease. Species richness and abundance and the resulting network of interactions among community members may affect the collective pathogenicity and contribute to the development of acute infections. Disease modifiers, including transient or permanent host-related factors, may also influence the development and severity of acute abscesses. This review focuses on the current evidence about the etiology and treatment of acute apical abscesses and how the process is influenced by host-related factors and proposes future directions in research, diagnosis, and therapeutic approaches to deal with this disease. PMID:23554416

  2. Spinal Gap Junction Channels in Neuropathic Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Young Hoon; Youn, Dong Ho

    2015-01-01

    Damage to peripheral nerves or the spinal cord is often accompanied by neuropathic pain, which is a complex, chronic pain state. Increasing evidence indicates that alterations in the expression and activity of gap junction channels in the spinal cord are involved in the development of neuropathic pain. Thus, this review briefly summarizes evidence that regulation of the expression, coupling, and activity of spinal gap junction channels modulates pain signals in neuropathic pain states induced...

  3. Construction of tunable peptide nucleic acid junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Tanghui; He, Liu; Tokura, Yu; Liu, Xin; Wu, Yuzhou; Shi, Zhengshuang

    2018-03-15

    We report here the construction of 3-way and 4-way peptide nucleic acid (PNA) junctions as basic structural units for PNA nanostructuring. The incorporation of amino acid residues into PNA chains makes PNA nanostructures with more structural complexity and architectural flexibility possible, as exemplified by building 3-way PNA junctions with tunable nanopores. Given that PNA nanostructures have good thermal and enzymatic stabilities, they are expected to have broad potential applications in biosensing, drug delivery and bioengineering.

  4. Evidence for a hopping mechanism in metal|single molecule|metal junctions involving conjugated metal–terpyridyl complexes; potential-dependent conductances of complexes [M(pyterpy)2]2+(M = Co and Fe; pyterpy = 4′-(pyridin-4-yl)-2,2′:6′,2′′-terpyridine) in ionic liquid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chappell, Sarah; Brooke, Carly; Nichols, Richard John

    2016-01-01

    Extensive studies of various families of conjugated molecules in metal|molecule|metal junctions suggest that the mechanism of conductance is usually tunnelling for molecular lengths < ca. 4 nm, and that for longer molecules, coherence is lost as a hopping element becomes more significant. In this...... potential in ionic liquid electrolyte, and the conductance–overpotential relationship is found to fit well with the Kuznetsov–Ulstrup relationship, which is essentially a hopping description.......Extensive studies of various families of conjugated molecules in metal|molecule|metal junctions suggest that the mechanism of conductance is usually tunnelling for molecular lengths .... In this work we present evidence that, for a family of conjugated, redox-active metal complexes, hopping may be a significant factor for even the shortest molecule studied (ca. 1 nm between contact atoms). The length dependence of conductance for two series of such complexes which differ essentially...

  5. Molecular electronic junction transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Gemma C.; Herrmann, Carmen; Ratner, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Whenasinglemolecule,oracollectionofmolecules,isplacedbetween two electrodes and voltage is applied, one has a molecular transport junction. We discuss such junctions, their properties, their description, and some of their applications. The discussion is qualitative rather than quantitative......, and focuses on mechanism, structure/function relations, regimes and mechanisms of transport, some molecular regularities, and some substantial challenges facing the field. Because there are many regimes and mechanisms in transport junctions, we will discuss time scales, geometries, and inelastic scattering...

  6. Incidental apical disease at CT scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLoud, T.C.; Satoh, K.; Shepard, J.O.; Moore, E.H.; Kosiuk, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    Apical caps are commonly noted on standard radiographs. This paper determines how often abnormalities in the extreme apex of the lung could be identified on CT scans obtained for other reasons. A total of 158 consecutive CT scans were reviewed prospectively. Excluded were patients with obvious upper lobe pleural or parenchymal disease. Apical abnormalities were identified in 74 (46.8%) of the 158 cases. The prevalence increased with age (19% in the 8-39-year age group and 82% in patients older than 80 years). Opacities were unilateral in 44.5% and bilateral in 55.5%. The most common abnormality was linear opacities (95%)

  7. Zonula occludens-1 and -2 regulate apical cell structure and the zonula adherens cytoskeleton in polarized epithelia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanning, Alan S.; Van Itallie, Christina M.; Anderson, James M.

    2012-01-01

    The structure and function of both adherens (AJ) and tight (TJ) junctions are dependent on the cortical actin cytoskeleton. The zonula occludens (ZO)-1 and -2 proteins have context-dependent interactions with both junction types and bind directly to F-actin and other cytoskeletal proteins, suggesting ZO-1 and -2 might regulate cytoskeletal activity at cell junctions. To address this hypothesis, we generated stable Madin-Darby canine kidney cell lines depleted of both ZO-1 and -2. Both paracellular permeability and the localization of TJ proteins are disrupted in ZO-1/-2–depleted cells. In addition, immunocytochemistry and electron microscopy revealed a significant expansion of the perijunctional actomyosin ring associated with the AJ. These structural changes are accompanied by a recruitment of 1-phosphomyosin light chain and Rho kinase 1, contraction of the actomyosin ring, and expansion of the apical domain. Despite these changes in the apical cytoskeleton, there are no detectable changes in cell polarity, localization of AJ proteins, or the organization of the basal and lateral actin cytoskeleton. We conclude that ZO proteins are required not only for TJ assembly but also for regulating the organization and functional activity of the apical cytoskeleton, particularly the perijunctional actomyosin ring, and we speculate that these activities are relevant both to cellular organization and epithelial morphogenesis. PMID:22190737

  8. West Nile virus-induced disruption of the blood-brain barrier in mice is characterized by the degradation of the junctional complex proteins and increase in multiple matrix metalloproteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Kelsey; Kumar, Mukesh; Lum, Stephanie; Orillo, Beverly; Nerurkar, Vivek R; Verma, Saguna

    2012-06-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) encephalitis is characterized by neuroinflammation, neuronal loss and blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. However, the mechanisms associated with the BBB disruption are unclear. Complex interactions between the tight junction proteins (TJP) and the adherens junction proteins (AJP) of the brain microvascular endothelial cells are responsible for maintaining the BBB integrity. Herein, we characterized the relationship between the BBB disruption and expression kinetics of key TJP, AJP and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the mice brain. A dramatic increase in the BBB permeability and extravasation of IgG was observed at later time points of the central nervous system (CNS) infection and did not precede virus-CNS entry. WNV-infected mice exhibited significant reduction in the protein levels of the TJP ZO-1, claudin-1, occludin and JAM-A, and AJP β-catenin and vascular endothelial cadherin, which correlated with increased levels of MMP-1, -3 and -9 and infiltrated leukocytes in the brain. Further, intracranial inoculation of WNV also demonstrated increased extravasation of IgG in the brain, suggesting the role of virus replication in the CNS in BBB disruption. These data suggest that altered expression of junction proteins is a pathological event associated with WNV infection and may explain the molecular basis of BBB disruption. We propose that WNV initially enters CNS without altering the BBB integrity and later virus replication in the brain initiates BBB disruption, allowing enhanced infiltration of immune cells and contribute to virus neuroinvasion via the 'Trojan-horse' route. These data further implicate roles of multiple MMPs in the BBB disruption and strategies to interrupt this process may influence the WNV disease outcome.

  9. Relationship between the Apical Preparation Diameter and the Apical Seal: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaoutar Laslami

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aim of the study is to define the relationship between the apical preparation diameter and the apical sealing ability to highlight the importance of the preservation of the diameter and the original position of the apical foramen. Materials and Methods. 50 extracted maxillary incisors were randomly allocated into three groups of 15 teeth each (n = 15 according to the apical preparation size: Group 1: finishing file F1 corresponding to size 20 reached the working length (ProTaper Universal system Dentsply®; Group 2: prepared up to size 30 corresponding to finishing file F30; Group 3: prepared up to size 50 corresponding to finishing file F5. Five teeth were assigned to positive and negative control groups. After the filling of the root canals, the teeth were isolated and immersed in a dye solution, then cut longitudinally, photographed, and the dye penetration were calculated using a computer software. Results. Comparison of the three different apical preparation sizes showed no statistically significant differences regarding the apical microleakage. Conclusion. The most important value of the dye penetration was observed in the group with the largest apical diameter.

  10. Rac1 controls epithelial tube length through the apical secretion and polarity pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kévin Sollier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The morphometric parameters of epithelial tubes are critical to the physiology and homeostasis of most organs. In addition, many human diseases are associated with tube-size defects. Here, we show that Rac1 limits epithelial tube elongation in the developing fly trachea by promoting Rab5-dependent endocytosis of the apical determinant Crumbs. Rac1 is also involved in a positive feedback loop with the septate junction protein Coracle. Thereby, Rac1 precludes paracellular diffusion and contributes to the septate junction-dependent secretion of the chitin-modifying enzymes Vermiform and Serpentine, which restrict epithelial tube length independently of Crumbs. Thus, Rac1 is a critical component of two important pathways controlling epithelial tube morphogenesis.

  11. Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Mimicking Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lütfü Bekar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a rare form of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and it can be mistaken for coronary artery disease due to the symptoms and electrocardiography findings. In this report, we aimed to present a patient referred to our clinic with complaints of chest pain and electrocardiography findings who had been misdiagnosed as non-ST elevation acute coronary syndrome.

  12. The resection angle in apical surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Arx, Thomas; Janner, Simone F M; Jensen, Simon S

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The primary objective of the present radiographic study was to analyse the resection angle in apical surgery and its correlation with treatment outcome, type of treated tooth, surgical depth and level of root-end filling. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In the context of a prospective clinical...

  13. Pathogenesis of Apical Periodontitis: a Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indre Graunaite

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This review article discusses the host response in apical periodontitis with the main focus on cytokines, produced under this pathological condition and contributing to the degradation of periradicular tissues. The pace of research in this field has greatly accelerated in the last decade. Here we provide an analysis of studies published in this area during this period.Material and methods: Literature was selected through a search of PubMed electronic database. The keywords used for search were pathogenesis of apical periodontitis cytokines, periapical granuloma cytokines, inflammatory infiltrate apical periodontitis. The search was restricted to English language articles, published from 1999 to December 2010. Additionally, a manual search in the cytokine production, cytokine functions and periapical tissue destruction in the journals and books was performed.Results: In total, 97 literature sources were obtained and reviewed. The topics covered in this article include cellular composition of an inflammatory infiltrate in the periapical lesions, mechanisms of the formation of the innate and specific immune response. Studies which investigated cytokine secretion and functions were identified and cellular and molecular interactions in the course of apical periodontitis described.Conclusions: The abundance and interactions of various inflammatory and anti-inflammatory molecules can influence and alter the state and progression of the disease. Therefore, periapical inflammatory response offers a model, suited for the study of many facets of pathogenesis, biocompatibility of different materials to periapical tissues and development of novel treatment methods, based on the regulation of cytokines expression.

  14. Pathogenesis of apical periodontitis: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graunaite, Indre; Lodiene, Greta; Maciulskiene, Vita

    2012-01-01

    This review article discusses the host response in apical periodontitis with the main focus on cytokines, produced under this pathological condition and contributing to the degradation of periradicular tissues. The pace of research in this field has greatly accelerated in the last decade. Here we provide an analysis of studies published in this area during this period. Literature was selected through a search of PubMed electronic database. The keywords used for search were pathogenesis of apical periodontitis cytokines, periapical granuloma cytokines, inflammatory infiltrate apical periodontitis. The search was restricted to English language articles, published from 1999 to December 2010. Additionally, a manual search in the cytokine production, cytokine functions and periapical tissue destruction in the journals and books was performed. In total, 97 literature sources were obtained and reviewed. The topics covered in this article include cellular composition of an inflammatory infiltrate in the periapical lesions, mechanisms of the formation of the innate and specific immune response. Studies which investigated cytokine secretion and functions were identified and cellular and molecular interactions in the course of apical periodontitis described. The abundance and interactions of various inflammatory and anti-inflammatory molecules can influence and alter the state and progression of the disease. Therefore, periapical inflammatory response offers a model, suited for the study of many facets of pathogenesis, biocompatibility of different materials to periapical tissues and development of novel treatment methods, based on the regulation of cytokines expression.

  15. Apical versus Non-Apical Lead: Is ICD Lead Position Important for Successful Defibrillation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amit, Guy; Wang, Jia; Connolly, Stuart J; Glikson, Michael; Hohnloser, Stephan; Wright, David J; Brachmann, Johannes; Defaye, Pascal; Neuzner, Joerg; Mabo, Philippe; Vanerven, Liselot; Vinolas, Xavier; O'Hara, Gilles; Kautzner, Josef; Appl, Ursula; Gadler, Fredrik; Stein, Kenneth; Konstantino, Yuval; Healey, Jeff S

    2016-05-01

    We aim to compare the acute and long-term success of defibrillation between non-apical and apical ICD lead position. The position of the ventricular lead was recorded by the implanting physician for 2,475 of 2,500 subjects in the Shockless IMPLant Evaluation (SIMPLE) trial, and subjects were grouped accordingly as non-apical or apical. The success of intra-operative defibrillation testing and of subsequent clinical shocks were compared. Propensity scoring was used to adjust for the impact of differences in baseline variables between these groups. There were 541 leads that were implanted at a non-apical position (21.9%). Patients implanted with a non-apical lead had a higher rate of secondary prevention indication. Non-apical location resulted in a lower mean R-wave amplitude (14.0 vs. 15.2, P defibrillation was similar between propensity score matched groups (89%). Over a mean follow-up of 3 years, there were no significant differences in the yearly rates of appropriate shock (5.5% vs. 5.4%, P = 0.98), failed appropriate first shock (0.9% vs. 1.0%, P = 0.66), or the composite of failed shock or arrhythmic death (2.8% vs. 2.3% P = 0.35) according to lead location. We did not detect any reduction in the ICD efficacy at the time of implant or during follow-up in patients receiving a non-apical RV lead. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. An Extended Surface Loop on Toxoplasma gondii Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA1 Governs Ligand Binding Selectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle L Parker

    Full Text Available Apicomplexan parasites are the causative agents of globally prevalent diseases including malaria and toxoplasmosis. These obligate intracellular pathogens have evolved a sophisticated host cell invasion strategy that relies on a parasite-host cell junction anchored by interactions between apical membrane antigens (AMAs on the parasite surface and rhoptry neck 2 (RON2 proteins discharged from the parasite and embedded in the host cell membrane. Key to formation of the AMA1-RON2 complex is displacement of an extended surface loop on AMA1 called the DII loop. While conformational flexibility of the DII loop is required to expose the mature RON2 binding groove, a definitive role of this substructure has not been elucidated. To establish a role of the DII loop in Toxoplasma gondii AMA1, we engineered a form of the protein where the mobile portion of the loop was replaced with a short Gly-Ser linker (TgAMA1ΔDIIloop. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements with a panel of RON2 peptides revealed an influential role for the DII loop in governing selectivity. Most notably, an Eimeria tenella RON2 (EtRON2 peptide that showed only weak binding to TgAMA1 bound with high affinity to TgAMA1ΔDIIloop. To define the molecular basis for the differential binding, we determined the crystal structure of TgAMA1ΔDIIloop in complex with the EtRON2 peptide. When analyzed in the context of existing AMA1-RON2 structures, spatially distinct anchor points in the AMA1 groove were identified that, when engaged, appear to provide the necessary traction to outcompete the DII loop. Collectively, these data support a model where the AMA1 DII loop serves as a structural gatekeeper to selectively filter out ligands otherwise capable of binding with high affinity in the AMA1 apical groove. These data also highlight the importance of considering the functional implications of the DII loop in the ongoing development of therapeutic intervention strategies targeting the AMA1-RON

  17. A modern approach to surgical endodontics: ultrasonic apical preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellert, M; Solomon, C; Chalfin, H

    1994-01-01

    Ultrasonic devices are capable of generating better apical preparations than rotary instruments with less sacrifice of root structure. Regardless of the technique used, good lighting and magnification are necessary to insure an adequate apical preparation.

  18. Regeneration of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus L.) via apical shoot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2012-10-25

    Oct 25, 2012 ... The present study was undertaken to evaluate the most suitable concentration of growth regulators for regeneration of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus L. Monech) via apical shoot culture system. The study of apical shoot culture system was found effective for regeneration of apical shoots. The okra (A.

  19. Regeneration of okra ( Abelmoschus esculentus L.) via apical shoot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the most suitable concentration of growth regulators for regeneration of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus L. Monech) via apical shoot culture system. The study of apical shoot culture system was found effective for regeneration of apical shoots. The okra (A. esculentus L. Monech) ...

  20. Two new septate junctions in the phylum Coelenterata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, C R; Flower, N E

    1980-04-01

    Freeze-fracture of fixed and unfixed tissue, lanthanum tracer and conventional thin-section studies have revealed 2 new types of septate junction in the class Anthozoa, phylum Coelenterata. These new junctions have the 15-18-nm intercellular spacing of all other described septate junctions and are found around the apical circumference of cells lining a lumen or outside edge. However, in freeze-fracture replicas and tangential views of lanthanum-impregnated tissue, they are seen to be quite different from other known septate junction types. One of the new junctions is found in endothelial tissue such as that lining the gut or the inside of the tentacles. In tangential view it is seen to consist of relatively short, straight, double septa, again with lateral projections. In feeeze-fracture of unfixed tissue, the junction consists of double rows of particles on the P face, the particles of one row being rounded, those of the other being elongated at right angles to the line of the septum. This dichotomy in particle size is unexpected, as the 2 halves of the septa as seen in tangential view are symmetrical. In freeze-fracture of fixed material the particle arrays remain on the P face and appear similar to those of unfixed material, but never as clear. In fixed tissue, some distortion had occurred and in extreme cases septa appear as a single broad jumbled row of particles. In this double septa junction, the rows of particles seen in freeze-fracture are occasionally seen to anastomose with a septum dividing into 2 and a third row of particles aligning with the 2 new septa to form their double particle rows. In both fixed and unfixed tissues, the E face of the junction consists of wide, shallow grooves. The second of the new junctions occurs in epithelial tissue, such as around the outer edge of sea-anemone tentacles, and consists of long wavy septa with lateral projections. In views where these projections appear longest, they arise predominantly from one side of the

  1. Type III apical transportation of root canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiv P Mantri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Procedural accidents leading to complications such as canal transportation have been ascribed to inapt cleaning and shaping concepts. Canal transportation is an undesirable deviation from the natural canal path. Herewith a case of apical transportation of root canal resulting in endodontic retreatment failure and its management is presented. A healthy 21-year-old young male presented discomfort and swelling associated with painful endodontically retreated maxillary incisor. Radiograph revealed periradicular radiolucency involving underfilled 11 and overfilled 12. Insufficiently obturated 11 exhibited apical transportation of canal. This type III transportation was treated by periradicular surgery and repair using white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA. Comfortable asymptomatic patient presented uneventful healing at third and fourth month recall visits. A decrease in the size of radiolucency in radiograph supported the clinical finding. In the present case, MTA is useful in repairing the transportation defect. The result of these procedures is predictable and successful.

  2. Evaluation of three instrumentation techniques at the precision of apical stop and apical sealing of obturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür Genç

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of two NiTi rotary apical preparation techniques used with an electronic apex locator-integrated endodontic motor and a manual technique to create an apical stop at a predetermined level (0.5 mm short of the apical foramen in teeth with disrupted apical constriction, and to evaluate microleakage following obturation in such prepared teeth. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 85 intact human mandibular permanent incisors with single root canal were accessed and the apical constriction was disrupted using a #25 K-file. The teeth were embedded in alginate and instrumented to #40 using rotary Lightspeed or S-Apex techniques or stainless-steel K-files. Distance between the apical foramen and the created apical stop was measured to an accuracy of 0.01 mm. In another set of instrumented teeth, root canals were obturated using gutta-percha and sealer, and leakage was tested at 1 week and 3 months using a fluid filtration device. RESULTS: All techniques performed slightly short of the predetermined level. Closest preparation to the predetermined level was with the manual technique and the farthest was with S-Apex. A significant difference was found between the performances of these two techniques (p<0.05. Lightspeed ranked in between. Leakage was similar for all techniques at either period. However, all groups leaked significantly more at 3 months compared to 1 week (p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Despite statistically significant differences found among the techniques, deviations from the predetermined level were small and clinically acceptable for all techniques. Leakage following obturation was comparable in all groups.

  3. Pathogenesis of Apical Periodontitis: a Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Graunaite, Indre; Lodiene, Greta; Maciulskiene, Vita

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives This review article discusses the host response in apical periodontitis with the main focus on cytokines, produced under this pathological condition and contributing to the degradation of periradicular tissues. The pace of research in this field has greatly accelerated in the last decade. Here we provide an analysis of studies published in this area during this period. Material and methods Literature was selected through a search of PubMed electronic database. The keywords...

  4. Fractal dimension of apical dendritic arborization differs in the superficial and the deep pyramidal neurons of the rat cerebral neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puškaš, Nela; Zaletel, Ivan; Stefanović, Bratislav D; Ristanović, Dušan

    2015-03-04

    Pyramidal neurons of the mammalian cerebral cortex have specific structure and pattern of organization that involves the presence of apical dendrite. Morphology of the apical dendrite is well-known, but quantification of its complexity still remains open. Fractal analysis has proved to be a valuable method for analyzing the complexity of dendrite morphology. The aim of this study was to establish the fractal dimension of apical dendrite arborization of pyramidal neurons in distinct neocortical laminae by using the modified box-counting method. A total of thirty, Golgi impregnated neurons from the rat brain were analyzed: 15 superficial (cell bodies located within lamina II-III), and 15 deep pyramidal neurons (cell bodies situated within lamina V-VI). Analysis of topological parameters of apical dendrite arborization showed no statistical differences except in total dendritic length (p=0.02), indicating considerable homogeneity between the two groups of neurons. On the other hand, average fractal dimension of apical dendrite was 1.33±0.06 for the superficial and 1.24±0.04 for the deep cortical neurons, showing statistically significant difference between these two groups (pfractal dimension values, apical dendrites of the superficial pyramidal neurons tend to show higher structural complexity compared to the deep ones. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Method for shallow junction formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Kurt H.

    1996-01-01

    A doping sequence that reduces the cost and complexity of forming source/drain regions in complementary metal oxide silicon (CMOS) integrated circuit technologies. The process combines the use of patterned excimer laser annealing, dopant-saturated spin-on glass, silicide contact structures and interference effects creates by thin dielectric layers to produce source and drain junctions that are ultrashallow in depth but exhibit low sheet and contact resistance. The process utilizes no photolithography and can be achieved without the use of expensive vacuum equipment. The process margins are wide, and yield loss due to contact of the ultrashallow dopants is eliminated.

  6. Scanning electron microscopic study of apical and intracanal resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzangles, B

    1989-07-01

    Apical radicular and intracanal surfaces of extracted teeth with apical lesions were examined by means of scanning electron microscopy. The distribution of apical and intracanal resorption areas varied with the presence of a granuloma or a cyst. Teeth bearing granulomas showed an apical resorption centered on the main foramina whereas the hard tissue underlying a cyst showed little or no resorption. Intracanal resorption was always marked in the apical third and more scattered in the middle and cervical third. The resorption disrupted the anatomical structures.

  7. Quantum Junction Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Jiang

    2012-09-12

    Colloidal quantum dot solids combine convenient solution-processing with quantum size effect tuning, offering avenues to high-efficiency multijunction cells based on a single materials synthesis and processing platform. The highest-performing colloidal quantum dot rectifying devices reported to date have relied on a junction between a quantum-tuned absorber and a bulk material (e.g., TiO 2); however, quantum tuning of the absorber then requires complete redesign of the bulk acceptor, compromising the benefits of facile quantum tuning. Here we report rectifying junctions constructed entirely using inherently band-aligned quantum-tuned materials. Realizing these quantum junction diodes relied upon the creation of an n-type quantum dot solid having a clean bandgap. We combine stable, chemically compatible, high-performance n-type and p-type materials to create the first quantum junction solar cells. We present a family of photovoltaic devices having widely tuned bandgaps of 0.6-1.6 eV that excel where conventional quantum-to-bulk devices fail to perform. Devices having optimal single-junction bandgaps exhibit certified AM1.5 solar power conversion efficiencies of 5.4%. Control over doping in quantum solids, and the successful integration of these materials to form stable quantum junctions, offers a powerful new degree of freedom to colloidal quantum dot optoelectronics. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  8. Structure and function of gap junction proteins: role of gap junction proteins in embryonic heart development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahir, Bhavesh K; Pratten, Margaret K

    2014-01-01

    Intercellular (cell-to-cell) communication is a crucial and complex mechanism during embryonic heart development. In the cardiovascular system, the beating of the heart is a dynamic and key regulatory process, which is functionally regulated by the coordinated spread of electrical activity through heart muscle cells. Heart tissues are composed of individual cells, each bearing specialized cell surface membrane structures called gap junctions that permit the intercellular exchange of ions and low molecular weight molecules. Gap junction channels are essential in normal heart function and they assist in the mediated spread of electrical impulses that stimulate synchronized contraction (via an electrical syncytium) of cardiac tissues. This present review describes the current knowledge of gap junction biology. In the first part, we summarise some relevant biochemical and physiological properties of gap junction proteins, including their structure and function. In the second part, we review the current evidence demonstrating the role of gap junction proteins in embryonic development with particular reference to those involved in embryonic heart development. Genetics and transgenic animal studies of gap junction protein function in embryonic heart development are considered and the alteration/disruption of gap junction intercellular communication which may lead to abnormal heart development is also discussed.

  9. Systemic antibiotics for symptomatic apical periodontitis and acute apical abscess in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Anwen; Francis, Nick; Wood, Fiona; Mann, Mala K; Chestnutt, Ivor G

    2014-06-26

    Dental pain can have a considerable detrimental effect on an individual's quality of life. Symptomatic apical periodontitis and acute apical abscess are common causes of dental pain and arise from an inflamed or necrotic dental pulp, or infection of the pulpless root canal system. Clinical guidelines recommend that the first-line treatment for teeth with symptomatic apical periodontitis or an acute apical abscess should be removal of the source of inflammation or infection by local, operative measures, and that systemic antibiotics are currently only recommended for situations where there is evidence of spreading infection (cellulitis, lymph node involvement, diffuse swelling) or systemic involvement (fever, malaise). Despite this, there is evidence that dentists continue to prescribe antibiotics for these conditions. There is concern that this could contribute to the development of antibiotic-resistant bacterial colonies both within the individual and within the community as a whole. To evaluate the effects of systemic antibiotics provided with or without surgical intervention (such as extraction, incision and drainage of a swelling or endodontic treatment), with or without analgesics, for symptomatic apical periodontitis or acute apical abscess in adults. We searched the following electronic databases: Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (to 1 October 2013); Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 9); MEDLINE via OVID (1946 to 1 October 2013); EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 1 October 2013) and CINAHL via EBSCO (1980 to 1 October 2013). We searched the World Health Organization (WHO) International Trials Registry Platform and the US National Institutes of Health Trials Registry (ClinicalTrials.gov) on 1 October 2013 to identify ongoing trials. We searched for grey literature using OpenGrey (to 1 October 2013) and ZETOC Conference Proceedings (1993 to 1 October 2013). We placed no restrictions on the language or date of

  10. Evaluation of the anatomical alterations of lower molars mesial root?s apical third

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FRÖNER Izabel Cristina

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The anatomical apex of the mesial root of the lower molars presents a morphological complexity related to the number and shape of the root canals as well as of the apical foramen and isthmus presence. The knowledge of the complexity of the endodontic system of the molar root area is essencial to select more carefully the best instrumentation and obturation technique, to obtain a more successful endodontic therapy.

  11. Multimodality imaging in apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Rosario; Mirabella, Francesca; Secco, Gioel Gabrio; Fattori, Rossella

    2014-01-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (AHCM) is a relatively rare morphologic variant of HCM in which the hypertrophy of myocardium is localized to the left ventricular apex. Symptoms of AHCM might vary from none to others mimic coronary artery disease including acute coronary syndrome, thus resulting in inappropriate hospitalization. Transthoracic echocardiography is the first-line imaging technique for the diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathies. However, when the hypertrophy of the myocardium is localized in the ventricular apex might results in missed diagnosis. Aim of this paper is to review the different imaging techniques used for the diagnosis of AHCM and their role in the detection and comprehension of this uncommon disease. PMID:25276293

  12. Junction-FET dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomimasu, T.; Yamazaki, T.

    1976-01-01

    The performance of a new junction-FET dosimeter and its application to the beam profile measurement are presented. One of the two junction FET's making up an astable multivibrator is used as a small-size (approx.0.4x0.4 mm) high-level dose detector. The irradiated dose can be estimated by the amount of the decrease of the oscillator period of the multivibrator. The distinct advantages in its small size and superior resistive property to radiation effect enable us to measure the cross-sectional profile of the electron beam from a linac with high spatial resolution of about 0.4 mm

  13. Tunable Nitride Josephson Junctions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Missert, Nancy A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Henry, Michael David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lewis, Rupert M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Howell, Stephen W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wolfley, Steven L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brunke, Lyle Brent [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wolak, Matthaeus [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-12-01

    We have developed an ambient temperature, SiO2/Si wafer - scale process for Josephson junctions based on Nb electrodes and Ta x N barriers with tunable electronic properties. The films are fabricated by magnetron sputtering. The electronic properties of the TaxN barriers are controlled by adjusting the nitrogen flow during sputtering. This technology offers a scalable alternative to the more traditional junctions based on AlOx barriers for low - power, high - performance computing.

  14. Intercellular junctions in the uterine epithelium of Salamandra salamandra (L.) (Amphibia, Urodela). A freeze-fracture study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greven, H; Robenek, H

    1980-01-01

    Intercellular junctions in the uterine epithelium of the ovoviviparous urodele Salamandra salamandra were studied in pregnant and non-pregnant females by freeze-fracture technique. Junctional complexes consist of zonulae occludentes (tight junctions) and numerous maculae adhaerentes (desmosomes); z. adhaerentes and nexuses (gap junctions) could not be identified. Tight junctions are of the "flexible" type exhibiting loosely interconnected fibrils. The fibrillary network appears stretched more often in pregnant females possibly due to the mechanical stress of pregnancy. The structure and occurrence of the junctions identified, especially that of the tight junctions, is discussed with regard to the functions of the uterus during pregnancy.

  15. Dynamical Properties of Two-Dimensional Josephson Junction Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-05-01

    current, i,0 , simply by Ic. = Mico , where M = 1000 is the number of junctions in parallel across the width of the array perpendicular to the current...identical junctions or some other form of disorder, the motion may be more complex , including effects such as vortex lattice shear. At higher temperatures...with the rf drive current as proposed in the vortex motion model. We have found interesting and complex dynamical behavior in the simulations that

  16. N-Glycosylation instead of cholesterol mediates oligomerization and apical sorting of GPI-APs in FRT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imjeti, Naga Salaija; Lebreton, Stéphanie; Paladino, Simona; de la Fuente, Erwin; Gonzalez, Alfonso; Zurzolo, Chiara

    2011-12-01

    Sorting of glycosylphosphatidyl-inositol--anchored proteins (GPI-APs) in polarized epithelial cells is not fully understood. Oligomerization in the Golgi complex has emerged as the crucial event driving apical segregation of GPI-APs in two different kind of epithelial cells, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) and Fisher rat thyroid (FRT) cells, but whether the mechanism is conserved is unknown. In MDCK cells cholesterol promotes GPI-AP oligomerization, as well as apical sorting of GPI-APs. Here we show that FRT cells lack this cholesterol-driven oligomerization as apical sorting mechanism. In these cells both apical and basolateral GPI-APs display restricted diffusion in the Golgi likely due to a cholesterol-enriched membrane environment. It is striking that N-glycosylation is the critical event for oligomerization and apical sorting of GPI-APs in FRT cells but not in MDCK cells. Our data indicate that at least two mechanisms exist to determine oligomerization in the Golgi leading to apical sorting of GPI-APs. One depends on cholesterol, and the other depends on N-glycosylation and is insensitive to cholesterol addition or depletion.

  17. Doped semiconductor nanocrystal junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borowik, Ł.; Mélin, T., E-mail: thierry.melin@isen.iemn.univ-lille1.fr [Institut d’Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie, CNRS-UMR8520, Avenue Poincaré, F-59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Nguyen-Tran, T.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P. [Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et des Couches Minces, CNRS-UMR7647, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2013-11-28

    Semiconductor junctions are the basis of electronic and photovoltaic devices. Here, we investigate junctions formed from highly doped (N{sub D}≈10{sup 20}−10{sup 21}cm{sup −3}) silicon nanocrystals (NCs) in the 2–50 nm size range, using Kelvin probe force microscopy experiments with single charge sensitivity. We show that the charge transfer from doped NCs towards a two-dimensional layer experimentally follows a simple phenomenological law, corresponding to formation of an interface dipole linearly increasing with the NC diameter. This feature leads to analytically predictable junction properties down to quantum size regimes: NC depletion width independent of the NC size and varying as N{sub D}{sup −1/3}, and depleted charge linearly increasing with the NC diameter and varying as N{sub D}{sup 1/3}. We thus establish a “nanocrystal counterpart” of conventional semiconductor planar junctions, here however valid in regimes of strong electrostatic and quantum confinements.

  18. Functional Molecular Junctions Derived from Double Self-Assembled Monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Sohyeon; Hwang, Eunhee; Cho, Yunhee; Lee, Junghyun; Lee, Hyoyoung

    2017-09-25

    Information processing using molecular junctions is becoming more important as devices are miniaturized to the nanoscale. Herein, we report functional molecular junctions derived from double self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) intercalated between soft graphene electrodes. Newly assembled molecular junctions are fabricated by placing a molecular SAM/(top) electrode on another molecular SAM/(bottom) electrode by using a contact-assembly technique. Double SAMs can provide tunneling conjugation across the van der Waals gap between the terminals of each monolayer and exhibit new electrical functions. Robust contact-assembled molecular junctions can act as platforms for the development of equivalent contact molecular junctions between top and bottom electrodes, which can be applied independently to different kinds of molecules to enhance either the structural complexity or the assembly properties of molecules. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. An apical granuloma with epithelial integument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, P N; Schmid-Meier, E

    1986-12-01

    A chronic periapicalesion--apical granuloma--of the first left maxillary molar, which had rarefied the bony plate and grown into the maxillary sinus, was observed in a 64-year-old white male patient. Light microscopic study of the epon-embedded specimen showed a lesion that had been infiltrated predominantly by mononuclear cells and that had isolated neutrophil-dominated foci. The lesion contained extensive networks and arcades of proliferating epithelium. Unlike the classic granulomas of the periapex, which are generally delimited by a well-developed connective tissue capsule, this particular lesion was lined with epithelial tissue consisting of ciliated columnar and stratified squamous components. While the former seemed to be an extension of the sinus epithelium, the latter appeared to be an outgrowth of the proliferating epithelium encountered within the lesion.

  20. Are additive effects of dietary surfactants on intestinal tight junction integrity an overlooked human health risk? - A mixture study on Caco-2 monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, Anders; Igra, Annachiara Malin; Sand, Salomon; Ilbäck, Nils Gunnar; Hellenäs, Karl Erik; Rosén, Johan; Aspenström-Fagerlund, Bitte

    2017-08-01

    Surfactants may cause dysfunction of intestinal tight junctions (TJs), which is a common feature of intestinal autoimmune diseases. Effects of dietary surfactants on TJ integrity, measured as trans-epithelial resistance (TEER), were studied in Caco-2 cell monolayers. Cytotoxicity was assessed as apical LDH leakage. Monolayers were apically exposed for 60 min to the dietary surfactants solanine and chaconine (SC, potato glycoalkaloids, 0-0.25 mM), perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS, industrial contaminant, 0-0.8 mM), and sucrose monolaurate (SML, food emulsifier E 473, 0-2.0 mM) separately and as a mixture. Dose-response modelling of TEER EC 50 showed that SC were 2.7- and 12-fold more potent than PFOS and SML, respectively. The mixture was composed of 1 molar unit SC, 2.7 units PFOS and 12 units SML ("SC TEER equivalent" proportions 1:1:1). Mixture exposure (0-0.05 mM SC equivalents) dose-response modelling suggested additive action on TJ integrity. Increasing SC and SML concentrations caused increased LDH leakage, but PFOS decreased LDH leakage at intermediate exposure concentrations. In the mixture PFOS appeared to protect from extensive SC- and SML-induced LDH leakage. Complex mixtures of surfactants in food may act additively on intestinal TJ integrity, which should be considered in risk assessment of emulsifier authorisation for use in food production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Apical extrusion of debris using reciprocating files and rotary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Procedure: Sixty extracted human mandibular premolars were used. The root canals were instrumented using reciprocating (WaveOne, Reciproc, SafeSider) or rotary ... and cross‑sections, and kinematics, and this situation may influence the amount of apically extruded debris through the apical foramen.[15]. The aim of this ...

  2. Association of ST elevation with apical aneurysm in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozcan Ozeke

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: Clinicians and specifically echocardiographers must pay special attention on the electrocardiography to correctly detect the frequently overlooked apical aneurysm in HCM patients, and should be careful for apical aneurysm particularly in the presence of STE in V4-6 derivations.

  3. Establishing Apical Patency and its Effect on Endodontic Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    accurate prognosis and improved treatment planning related to establishing apical patency. The preliminary results of this interim analysis indicate there...canal space and periodontal ligament. Establishing apical patency is controversial with only 50% of dental programs in the United States teaching the...concept. Both sides can cite articles favoring their position. However, the clinical impact of establishing patency on endodontic treatment outcome

  4. Apical Shell Sculpture of some African Freshwater Limpets ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Scanning Electron Microscope has been used to describe in detail the apical shell sculpture of sevenAfrican species (three genera) of freshwater limpet snails (Ancylidae). The apical sculpture of Ancylus fluviatilis (? syn. strigatus and ? brondeli) is striate, but quite different in basic pattern from the other three striate ...

  5. Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Association with PulmonaryArtery Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Peighambari

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy is an uncommon condition constituting 1% -2% of the cases with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM diagnosis. We interestingly report two patients with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in association with significant pulmonary artery hypertension without any other underlying reason for pulmonary hypertension. The patients were assessed by echocardiography, cardiac catheterization and pulmonary function parameters study.

  6. Apical extrusion of debris using reciprocating files and rotary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the other groups, with the exception of the Typhoon group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: According to our study, all systems caused apical debris extrusion. However, the Reciproc group was associated with less debris extrusion when compared to the other groups. Key words: Apical extrusion, endodontics, single file systems ...

  7. Diagnosis of apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: T-wave inversion and relative but not absolute apical left ventricular hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flett, Andrew S; Maestrini, Viviana; Milliken, Don; Fontana, Mariana; Treibel, Thomas A; Harb, Rami; Sado, Daniel M; Quarta, Giovanni; Herrey, Anna; Sneddon, James; Elliott, Perry; McKenna, William; Moon, James C

    2015-03-15

    Diagnosis of apical HCM utilizes conventional wall thickness criteria. The normal left ventricular wall thins towards the apex such that normal values are lower in the apical versus the basal segments. The impact of this on the diagnosis of apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has not been evaluated. We performed a retrospective review of 2662 consecutive CMR referrals, of which 75 patients were identified in whom there was abnormal T-wave inversion on ECG and a clinical suspicion of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. These were retrospectively analyzed for imaging features consistent with cardiomyopathy, specifically: relative apical hypertrophy, left atrial dilatation, scar, apical cavity obliteration or apical aneurysm. For comparison, the same evaluation was performed in 60 healthy volunteers and 50 hypertensive patients. Of the 75 patients, 48 met conventional HCM diagnostic criteria and went on to act as another comparator group. Twenty-seven did not meet criteria for HCM and of these 5 had no relative apical hypertrophy and were not analyzed further. The remaining 22 patients had relative apical thickening with an apical:basal wall thickness ratio >1 and a higher prevalence of features consistent with a cardiomyopathy than in the control groups with 54% having 2 or more of the 4 features. No individual in the healthy volunteer group had more than one feature and no hypertension patient had more than 2. A cohort of individuals exist with T wave inversion, relative apical hypertrophy and additional imaging features of HCM suggesting an apical HCM phenotype not captured by existing diagnostic criteria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Apical and basal epitheliomuscular F-actin dynamics during Hydra bud evagination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aufschnaiter, Roland; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bending of 2D cell sheets is a fundamental morphogenetic mechanism during animal development and reproduction. A critical player driving cell shape during tissue bending is the actin cytoskeleton. Much of our current knowledge about actin dynamics in whole organisms stems from studies of embryonic development in bilaterian model organisms. Here, we have analyzed actin-based processes during asexual bud evagination in the simple metazoan Hydra. We created transgenic Hydra strains stably expressing the actin marker Lifeact-GFP in either ectodermal or endodermal epitheliomuscular cells. We then combined live imaging with conventional phalloidin staining to directly follow actin reorganization. Bending of the Hydra epithelial double layer is initiated by a group of epitheliomuscular cells in the endodermal layer. These cells shorten their apical-basal axis and arrange their basal muscle processes in a circular configuration. We propose that this rearrangement generates the initial forces to bend the endoderm towards the ectoderm. Convergent tissue movement in both epithelial layers towards the centre of evagination then leads to elongation and extension of the bud along its new body axis. Tissue movement into the bud is associated with lateral intercalation of epithelial cells, remodelling of apical septate junctions, and rearrangement of basal muscle processes. The work presented here extends the analysis of morphogenetic mechanisms beyond embryonic tissues of model bilaterians. PMID:28630355

  9. Efficacy of Biodentine as an Apical Plug in Nonvital Permanent Teeth with Open Apices: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Bani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the apical microleakage of Biodentine and MTA orthograde apical plugs and to compare the effect of thickness of these biomaterials on their sealing ability. A total of eighty maxillary anterior teeth were used. The apices were removed by cutting with a diamond disc (Jota, Germany 2 mm from the apical root end in an attempt to standardize the working length of all specimens to 15 ± 1 mm. Both materials were placed in 1–4 mm thickness as apical plugs root canal. Root canal leakage was evaluated by the fluid filtration technique. One-way ANOVA was used in order to determine normality of dispersal distribution of parameters; thereafter, results were analyzed by Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Overall, between microleakage values of MTA and Biodentine regardless of apical plug thickness, no difference was observed. In terms of plug thickness, a statistically significant difference was observed between the subgroups of MTA and Biodentine (p<0.05. The apical sealing ability of Biodentine was comparable to MTA at any apical plug thickness.

  10. Healing of apical periodontitis through modern endodontic retreatment techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Jarom J; Kirkpatrick, Timothy C

    2013-01-01

    The presence of apical periodontitis in teeth which have undergone initial root canal treatment is largely attributed to bacteria residing in or invading from the apical root canal space. Bacteria-associated apical periodontitis will not heal spontaneously, nor will systemic antibiotics eradicate the infection. Only endodontic retreatment, endodontic surgery, or extraction will control the bacterial etiology. Modern retreatment is an effective means of addressing apical periodontitis. A mandibular premolar with apical periodontitis, apical root resorption, and overfilled gutta percha was retreated with post removal, retrieval of gutta percha from beyond the apex, ultrasonic irrigation and disinfection, and placement of a collagen internal matrix to facilitate a well-controlled MTA apical fill. The magnification and illumination imparted by the operating microscope was integral to achievement of treatment objectives. The patient's symptoms were resolved and complete osseous healing occurred. During treatment planning, clinicians should consider the capability of modern endodontic techniques to overcome technical challenges, often allowing the natural dentition to be preserved and restored to function days after retreatment.

  11. Cementoenamel junction: An insight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kharidi Laxman Vandana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The location and nature of cemento-enamel junction (CEJ are more than descriptive terms used simply to describe some aspects of tooth morphology; however, CEJ gains a lot of clinical significance due to various measurements dependent on it. It may be necessary to determine the location and pathological changes occurring at CEJ to make a diagnosis and treat diseases pertaining to epithelial attachment and gingival margin. However, the information related to CEJ is not discussed commonly. Hence, the present review paper provides an insight on CEJ in both primary and permanent dentition.

  12. The human myotendinous junction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, A B; Larsen, M; Mackey, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    The myotendinous junction (MTJ) is a specialized structure in the musculotendinous system, where force is transmitted from muscle to tendon. Animal models have shown that the MTJ takes form of tendon finger-like processes merging with muscle tissue. The human MTJ is largely unknown and has never...... been described in three dimensions (3D). The aim of this study was to describe the ultrastructure of the human MTJ and render 3D reconstructions. Fourteen subjects (age 25 ± 3 years) with isolated injury of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), scheduled for reconstruction with a semitendinosus...

  13. Mineral trioxide aggregate apical plugs in teeth with open apical foramina: a retrospective analysis of treatment outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mente, Johannes; Hage, Nathalie; Pfefferle, Thorsten; Koch, Martin Jean; Dreyhaupt, Jens; Staehle, Hans Joerg; Friedman, Shimon

    2009-10-01

    Teeth with open apical foramina present a challenge during root canal treatment, and little is known about the clinical outcome of treatment in such teeth. This retrospective study assessed healing of teeth with open apices managed by the placement of mineral trioxide aggregate apical plugs. Seventy-two patients with 78 teeth with apical resorption or excessive apical enlargement, treated between 2000 and 2006, were contacted for follow-up examination 12 to 68 months after treatment (median 30.9 months). Treatments were provided by supervised undergraduate students (27%), general dentists (32%), or dentists who had focused on endodontics (41%). The outcome based on clinical and radiographic criteria was assessed by calibrated examiners and dichotomized as "healed" or "disease." Of 56 teeth examined (72% recall), 84% were healed. Teeth without or with preoperative periapical radiolucency had a healed rate of 100% and 78%, respectively. None of the variables analyzed had a significant effect on the outcome. The results supported the management of open apical foramina with mineral trioxide aggregate apical plugs.

  14. Efficacy of Biodentine as an Apical Plug in Nonvital Permanent Teeth with Open Apices: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bani, Mehmet; Sungurtekin-Ekçi, Elif; Odabaş, Mesut Enes

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the apical microleakage of Biodentine and MTA orthograde apical plugs and to compare the effect of thickness of these biomaterials on their sealing ability. A total of eighty maxillary anterior teeth were used. The apices were removed by cutting with a diamond disc (Jota, Germany) 2 mm from the apical root end in an attempt to standardize the working length of all specimens to 15 ± 1 mm. Both materials were placed in 1-4 mm thickness as apical plugs root canal. Root canal leakage was evaluated by the fluid filtration technique. One-way ANOVA was used in order to determine normality of dispersal distribution of parameters; thereafter, results were analyzed by Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Overall, between microleakage values of MTA and Biodentine regardless of apical plug thickness, no difference was observed. In terms of plug thickness, a statistically significant difference was observed between the subgroups of MTA and Biodentine (p Biodentine was comparable to MTA at any apical plug thickness.

  15. Surgical treatment of adult scoliosis: is anterior apical release and fusion necessary for the lumbar curve?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngbae B; Lenke, Lawrence G; Kim, Yongjung J; Kim, Young-Woo; Bridwell, Keith H; Stobbs, Georgia

    2008-05-01

    A retrospective study. To analyze radiographic and functional outcomes after posterior segmental spinal instrumentation and fusion (PSSIF) with and without an anterior apical release of the lumbar curve in adult scoliosis patients. No comparison study on PSSIF of adult lumbar scoliosis with apical release versus without has been published. Forty-eight adult patients with lumbar scoliosis (average age at surgery 49.6 years, average follow-up 3.7 years) who underwent PSSIF were analyzed with respect to radiographic change, perioperative and postoperative complications, and Scoliosis Research Society (SRS) outcome scores. Twenty-three patients underwent an anterior apical release of the lumbar curve via a thoracoabdominal approach followed by PSSIF (Group I). The remaining 25 patients underwent a PSSIF of the lumbar curve followed by anterior column support at the lumbosacral region through an anterior paramedian retroperitoneal or posterior transforaminal approach (Group II). Before surgery, Group I showed a somewhat larger lumbar major Cobb angle (63.2 degrees vs. 55.9 degrees , P = 0.07), and both groups demonstrated significant differences in lumbar curve flexibility (26.9% vs. 37.2%, P = 0.02) and thoracolumbar kyphosis (27.0 degrees vs. 15.0 degrees , P = 0.03). After surgery, at the ultimate follow-up, there were no significant differences in major Cobb angle, C7 plumbline to the center sacral vertical line (P = 0.17), C7 plumbline to the posterior superior endplate of S1 (P = 0.44), and sagittal Cobb angles at the proximal junction (P = 0.57), T10-L2 (P = 0.24) and T12-S1 (P = 0.51). There were 4 pseudarthroses in Group I and one in Group II (P = 0.02). Postoperative total normalized SRS outcome scores at ultimate follow-up were significantly higher in Group II (69% vs. 79%, P = 0.01). Posterior segmental spinal instrumentation and fusion without anterior apical release of lumbar curves in adult scoliosis demonstrated better total SRS outcome scores and no

  16. Neuromuscular junction disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschuuren, Jan; Strijbos, Ellen; Vincent, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Diseases of the neuromuscular junction comprise a wide range of disorders. Antibodies, genetic mutations, specific drugs or toxins interfere with the number or function of one of the essential proteins that control signaling between the presynaptic nerve ending and the postsynaptic muscle membrane. Acquired autoimmune disorders of the neuromuscular junction are the most common and are described here. In myasthenia gravis, antibodies to acetylcholine receptors or to proteins involved in receptor clustering, particularly muscle-specific kinase, cause direct loss of acetylcholine receptors or interfere with the agrin-induced acetylcholine receptor clustering necessary for efficient neurotransmission. In the Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS), loss of the presynaptic voltage-gated calcium channels results in reduced release of the acetylcholine transmitter. The conditions are generally recognizable clinically and the diagnosis confirmed by serologic testing and electromyography. Screening for thymomas in myasthenia or small cell cancer in LEMS is important. Fortunately, a wide range of symptomatic treatments, immunosuppressive drugs, or other immunomodulating therapies is available. Future research is directed to understanding the pathogenesis, discovering new antigens, and trying to develop disease-specific treatments. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Phenotypic overlap in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: apical hypertrophy, midventricular obstruction, and apical aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Yuichiro; Haruki, Shintaro; Hagiwara, Nobuhisa

    2014-12-01

    Within the diverse phenotypic spectrum of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), subgroups of patients with apical hypertrophy (APH), midventricular obstruction (MVO), and apical aneurysm (APA) have emerged. While previous studies have suggested the existence of considerable overlap between APH, MVO, and APA, there are still many unanswered questions. Therefore, we attempted to clarify the relationship of the above three phenotypes of HCM with respect to prevalence, overlap, and outcomes. Among the 544 study HCM patients (mean follow-up period: 11.6±7.4 years), 170 with APH (31.3%), 51 with MVO (9.4%), and 24 with APA (4.4%) were examined. There was phenotypic overlap between APH and MVO in 17 patients, APH and APA in 14 patients, and MVO and APA in 14 patients. Furthermore, a combination of APH, MVO, and APA was observed in eight patients. Detailed analysis of the relationship between overlapping phenotypes and the prognosis showed that APA patients without a history of APH had an extremely poor outcome (probability of the combined endpoint of sudden death and potentially lethal arrhythmic events ≥50%). Conversely, APH patients without MVO had a strikingly good outcome (probability of the combined endpoint <5%). Other patients had an intermediate outcome (probability of the combined endpoint 10-40%). Our results suggest that overlap between these three forms of HCM is substantial, and that detailed classification of the overlapping phenotypes is clinically meaningful. Copyright © 2014 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Pathogenesis of apical periodontal cysts: guidelines for diagnosis in palaeopathology

    OpenAIRE

    Dias, G. J.; Prasad, K.; Santos, A. L.

    2007-01-01

    Apical periodontal cysts are benign lesions developing in relation to the apices of non-vital teeth due to inflammatory response from the infective pulp. These are epithelium-lined bony cavities containing fluid. Despite being widely reported in medical/dental literature, this common condition is poorly diagnosed and documented in the archaeological literature. We aim to clarify the correct terminology, demonstrate bony manifestations at different stages of pathogenesis of chronic periapical ...

  19. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with mid-ventricular obstruction and apical aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.D. Oryshchyn

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A case report of apical left ventricular aneurysm in patient with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with mid-ventricular obstruction (diagnosis and surgical treatment is presented. We revealed apical aneurysm and mid-ventricular obstruction during echocardiography and specified anatomical characteristics of aneurysm during computer tomography. There was no evidence of obstructive coronary artery disease during coronary angiography. Taking into consideration multiple cerebral infarcts, aneurysm resection and left ventricular plastics was performed. Electronic microscopy of myocardium confirmed the diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

  20. Apical Negative Pressure irrigation presents tissue compatibility in immature teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Maschietto Pucinelli

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim: To compare the apical negative pressure irrigation (ANP with conventional irrigation in the teeth of immature dogs with apical periodontitis. Methods: Fifty-two immature pre-molar root canals were randomly assigned into 4 groups: ANP (n=15; conventional irrigation (n=17; healthy teeth (control (n = 10; and teeth with untreated apical periodontitis (control (n=10. After induction of apical periodontitis, teeth were instrumented using EndoVac® (apical negative pressure irrigation or conventional irrigation. The animals were euthanized after 90 days. The sections were stained by HE and analyzed under conventional and fluorescence microscopy. TRAP histoenzymology was also performed. Statistical analyses were performed with the significance level set at 5%. Results: There was difference in the histopathological parameters between ANP and conventional groups (p0.05. However, a lower number of osteoclasts was observed in the ANP group (p<0.05. Conclusion: The EndoVac® irrigation system presented better biological results and more advanced repair process in immature teeth with apical periodontitis than the conventional irrigation system, confirming the hypothesis.

  1. Monocyte chemotactic protein-3: possible involvement in apical periodontitis chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezerega, A; Osorio, C; Mardones, J; Mundi, V; Dutzan, N; Franco, M; Gamonal, J; Oyarzún, A; Overall, C M; Hernández, M

    2010-10-01

    To study the expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-3 (MCP-3, also known as chemokine CCL-7) in tissue from apical lesions (AL) and to associate MCP-3 expression with symptomatic or asymptomatic apical periodontitis. To determine the expression of MCP-3 in AL, biopsies obtained during tooth extraction procedures were fixed, subjected to routine processing and diagnosed as apical granuloma (AG) (n = 7) or radicular cyst (RC) (n = 5). As controls, apical periodontal ligament (PDL) specimens from healthy premolars extracted for orthodontics reasons were included (n = 7). All specimens were immunostained for MCP-3 and examined under a light microscope. In addition, homogenates from AL (n = 14) and healthy PDL samples (n = 7) were studied through immunowestern blot. Finally, periapical exudates samples were collected from root canals of teeth having diagnosis of symptomatic (n = 14) and asymptomatic apical periodontitis (n = 14) during routine endodontic treatments and analysed by immunowestern blot and densitometry.   MCP-3 was detected in AG and RC and localized mainly to inflammatory leucocytes, whereas no expression was observed in healthy PDLs. MCP-3 was also detected in periapical exudate, and its levels were significantly higher in symptomatic than in asymptomatic apical periodontitis. MCP-3 was expressed in AL and its levels associated with clinical symptoms. MCP-3 might play a role in disease pathogenesis, possibly by stimulating mononuclear chemotaxis. © 2010 International Endodontic Journal.

  2. Mixing in T-junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Jacobus B.W.; van der Wal, S.

    1996-01-01

    The transport processes that are involved in the mixing of two gases in a T-junction mixer are investigated. The turbulent flow field is calculated for the T-junction with the k- turbulence model by FLOW3D. In the mathematical model the transport of species is described with a mixture fraction

  3. Fluid Flow at Branching Junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Sochi, Taha

    2013-01-01

    The flow of fluids at branching junctions plays important kinematic and dynamic roles in most biological and industrial flow systems. The present paper highlights some key issues related to the flow of fluids at these junctions with special emphasis on the biological flow networks particularly blood transportation vasculature.

  4. Terahertz pulse driven Josephson junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camerlingo, Carlo, E-mail: c.camerlingo@cib.na.cnr.it [CNR - Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto di Cibernetica ' E. Caianiello' , Via Campi Flegrei 34, I-80078 Pozzuoli (Italy)

    2011-09-15

    Theoretical model of the ac Josephson effect in pulsed current driven junctions. Evaluation of the voltage response of a THz pulsed radiation driven Josephson junction. The pulsed current bias induces steps in the junction I/V characteristics for voltages depending on the pulse rate. Working principles of a fast response detector for THz pulsed radiation. The voltage response of a Josephson junction to a pulsed terahertz current is evaluated in the limit of a negligible junction capacitance (overdamped limit). The time-dependent superconductor phase difference across the junction is calculated in the framework of the standard resistive shunted junction model by using a perturbative method. The pulsed current bias affects the time average value of the voltage across the junction and current steps are induced in the current-voltage characteristics for voltage values depending on the pulse repetition rate. The current step height is proportional to the square of the pulse time width ({tau}) to the period (T) ratio. A fast response detector for pulsed Terahertz radiation is proposed, with an expected responsivity of the order of 0.1 V/W and an equivalent noise power of about 3 x 10{sup -10} W/Hz{sup 1/2}.

  5. Electron transport in molecular junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Chengjun

    This thesis addresses the electron transport in molecular junctions, focusing on the energy level alignment and correlation effects. Various levels of theory have been applied to study the structural and electronic effects in different molecular junctions, starting from the single particle density...

  6. Topological Properties of Superconducting Junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pikulin, D.I.; Nazarov, Y.V.

    Motivated by recent developments in the field of one-dimensional topological superconductors, we investigate the topological properties of s-matrix of generic superconducting junctions where dimension should not play any role. We argue that for a finite junction the s-matrix is always topologically

  7. Effect of Calcium Hydroxide, Chlorhexidine Digluconate and Camphorated Monochlorophenol on the Sealing Ability of Biodentine Apical Plug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Harshit; Prasad, Ashwini B; Raisingani, Deepak; Soni, Dileep

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Teeth with immature apex are managed by establishing an apical plug using various materials and techniques. However, the use of previously placed intracanal medicament may affect the sealing ability of permanent filling material used as an apical plug. Aim To evaluate the effect of removal of previously placed Calcium Hydroxide, Chlorhexidine Digluconate and Camphorated Monochlorophenol as an intracanal medicament on the sealing ability of the Biodentine as an apical plug. Materials and Methods A total of 72 recently extracted human permanent teeth with single root were selected and stored in saline at room temperature. The crown portion of each tooth was removed at the level of cemento enamel junction; 14mm root length was taken as standard length. All the roots were submerged in 20% sulphuric acid up to 3 mm from the apex, for four days for root resorption. One sample was cut longitudinally to look for root resorption under stereo microscope. The canal preparation was done; the roots were kept in moist gauze after instrumentation. A total of 71 roots were randomly divided into three groups. GROUP 1:Calcium hydroxide paste, GROUP 2: Chlorhexidine digluconate, GROUP 3: Camphorated Monochlorophenol (CMCP). The medicaments were removed with stainless steel hand files and 0.5% sodium hypochlorite irrigation. After removal of medicament Biodentine was placed in apical third of resorbed roots and the remaining portion of the canals was filled with gutta-percha. All the 71 roots were analysed with fluid filtration method for evaluating microleakage. Results Comparing all the three groups statistically there was no significant difference. The mean values were found more for group 1 followed by group 2 & 3. Conclusion All the groups showed microleakage. Calcium hydroxide showed the maximum microleakage followed by Chlorhexidine digluconate and least with CMCP. PMID:27504409

  8. Ion bipolar junction transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tybrandt, Klas; Larsson, Karin C; Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta; Berggren, Magnus

    2010-06-01

    Dynamic control of chemical microenvironments is essential for continued development in numerous fields of life sciences. Such control could be achieved with active chemical circuits for delivery of ions and biomolecules. As the basis for such circuitry, we report a solid-state ion bipolar junction transistor (IBJT) based on conducting polymers and thin films of anion- and cation-selective membranes. The IBJT is the ionic analogue to the conventional semiconductor BJT and is manufactured using standard microfabrication techniques. Transistor characteristics along with a model describing the principle of operation, in which an anionic base current amplifies a cationic collector current, are presented. By employing the IBJT as a bioelectronic circuit element for delivery of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, its efficacy in modulating neuronal cell signaling is demonstrated.

  9. Five-year longitudinal assessment of the prognosis of apical microsurgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Arx, Thomas; Jensen, Simon S; Hänni, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Apical surgery is an important treatment option for teeth with post-treatment apical periodontitis. Knowledge of the long-term prognosis is necessary when weighing apical surgery against alternative treatments. This study assessed the 5-year outcome of apical surgery and its predictors in a cohor...

  10. CT findings in apical versus basal involvement of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Ji Young; Lee, In Jae; Im, Hyoung June; Lee, Kwanseop; Lee, Yul; Bae, Sang Hoon

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to compare clinical features and computed tomography (CT) findings of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) in lower lobe basal segments and upper lobe apical or apicoposterior segments. We retrospectively reviewed medical records and chest CT scans of 986 adults who were diagnosed with active pulmonary TB. Active pulmonary TB confined to the basal segments was found in 21 patients. Sixty patients had disease localized to the apical or apicoposterior segments only. Clinical features and CT abnormalities of the lung parenchyma, airways, mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes, and pleura were compared between these two groups. A significant difference was observed between two groups in terms of underlying disease prevalence associated with an immunocompromised state (basal, 6/21, 28.6%; apical or apico- posterior, 3/60, 5%; P = 0.008). Chest CT findings, including consolidation (P = 0.0016), lymphadenopathy (P = 0.0297), and pleural effusion (P = 0.008), were more common in basal segment TB than in apical or apicoposterior segment TB. Small nodules were less common in basal segment TB than in apical or apicoposterior segment TB (P = 0.0299). The tree-in-bud sign was the most common CT finding in both basal segment TB (17/21, 81%) and apical or apicoposterior segment TB groups (53/60, 88.3%) (P = 0.4633). Lower lobe basal segment TB was more commonly present with common CT findings of primary pulmonary TB including consolidation, mediastinal and hilar lymphadenopathy, and pleural effusion than apical or apicoposterior segment TB.

  11. Apical Revascularization after Delayed Tooth Replantation: An Unusual Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Pacífico Lucisano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present the clinical and radiological outcome of the treatment involving a delayed tooth replantation after an avulsed immature permanent incisor, with a follow-up of 1 year and 6 months. An 8-year-old boy was referred after dental trauma that occurred on the previous day. The permanent maxillary right central incisor (tooth 11 had been avulsed. The tooth was hand-held during endodontic therapy and an intracanal medication application with calcium hydroxide-based paste was performed. An apical plug with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA was introduced into the apical portion of the canal. When the avulsed tooth was replanted with digital pressure, a blood clot had formed within the socket, which moved the MTA apical plug about 2 mm inside of the root canal. These procedures developed apical revascularization, which promoted a successful endodontic outcome, evidenced by apical closure, slight increase in root length, and absence of signs of external root resorption, during a follow-up of 1 year and 6 months.

  12. [Histopathology and etiopathogenesis of chronic apical periodontitis--periapical granuloma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovác, J; Kovác, D

    2011-06-01

    Periapical lesions are among the most frequently diagnosed apical odontogenic pathologies in human teeth. The condition is generally described as apical periodontitis. Apical periodontitis is a sequel to endodontic infection and manifests itself as the host defense response to microbial challenge emanating from the root canal system to the periapical tissue. It is viewed as a dynamic encounter between microbial factors and host defenses at the interface between infected radicular pulp and periodontal ligament that results in local inflammation, resorption of hard tissues, destruction of other periapical tissues, and eventual formation of various histopathological categories of apical periodontitis, commonly referred to as periapical lesions. There are also factors located within the inflamed periapical tissue that can interfere with post-treatment healing of the lesion. The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive overview of the etiopathogenesis of apical periodontitis and causes of failed endodontic treatment. This study presents a histopathological analysis through optical microscopy of periapical lesions, commonly referred to as solid dental or periapical granuloma.

  13. [Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) a success story in apical surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Arx, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The objective of apical surgery is to retain teeth with persistent apical pathosis following orthograde root canal treatment if endodontic non-surgical revision is difficult or associated with risks, or is even declined by the patient. Since the most frequent cause of recurrent apical disease is bacterial reinfection from the (remaining) root canal system, the bacteria-tight root-end filling is the most important step in apical surgery. In the early 1990s, mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was developed at the Loma Linda University in California/USA. Preclinical studies clearly showed that MTA has a high sealing capability, a good material stability and an excellent biocompatbility. Multiple experimental studies in animals highlighted the mild tissue reactions observed adjacent to this material. Furthermore, histological analysis of the periapical regions demonstrated a frequent deposition of new cementum not only onto the resection plane (cut dentinal surface), but also directly onto MTA. For these reasons, MTA is considered a bioactive material. In 1997 MTA was cleared for clinical use in patients. Multiple prospective clinical and randomized studies have documented high and constant success rates of MTA-treated teeth in apical surgery. A recently published longitudinal study showed that MTA-treated teeth remained stable over five years; hence the high healed rates documented after one year are maintained during long-term observation.

  14. Structural Molecular Components of Septate Junctions in Cnidarians Point to the Origin of Epithelial Junctions in Eukaryotes

    KAUST Repository

    Ganot, P.

    2014-09-21

    Septate junctions (SJs) insure barrier properties and control paracellular diffusion of solutes across epithelia in invertebrates. However, the origin and evolution of their molecular constituents in Metazoa have not been firmly established. Here, we investigated the genomes of early branching metazoan representatives to reconstruct the phylogeny of the molecular components of SJs. Although Claudins and SJ cytoplasmic adaptor components appeared successively throughout metazoan evolution, the structural components of SJs arose at the time of Placozoa/Cnidaria/Bilateria radiation. We also show that in the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata, the structural SJ component Neurexin IV colocalizes with the cortical actin network at the apical border of the cells, at the place of SJs. We propose a model for SJ components in Cnidaria. Moreover, our study reveals an unanticipated diversity of SJ structural component variants in cnidarians. This diversity correlates with gene-specific expression in calcifying and noncalcifying tissues, suggesting specific paracellular pathways across the cell layers of these diploblastic animals.

  15. External apical root resorption in maxillary incisors in orthodontic patients: associated factors and radiographic evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanekrungsan, Kamonporn [Dept. of Dentistry, Overbrook Hospital, Chiang Rai (Thailand); Patanaporn, Virush; Janhom, Apirum; Korwanich, Narumanus [Dept. of Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (Thailand)

    2012-09-15

    This study was performed to evaluate the incidence and degree of external apical root resorption of maxillary incisors after orthodontic treatment and to evaluate particular associated factors related to external apical root resorption. The records and maxillary incisor periapical radiographs of 181 patients were investigated. Crown and root lengths were measured and compared on the pre- and post-treatment periapical radiographs. Crown length was measured from the center of the incisal edge to the midpoint of the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ). Root length was measured from the CEJ midpoint to the root apex. A correction factor for the enlargement difference was used to calculate root resorption. The periapical radiographs of 564 teeth showed that the average root resorption was 1.39{+-}1.27 (8.24{+-}7.22%) and 1.69{+-}1.14 mm (10.16{+-}6.78%) for the maxillary central and lateral incisors, respectively. The results showed that the dilacerated or pointed roots, maxillary premolar extraction cases, and treatment duration were highly significant factors for root resorption (p<0.001). Allergic condition was a significant factor at p<0.01. Age at the start of treatment, large overjet, and history of facial trauma were also factors significantly associated with root resorption (p<0.05). There was no statistically significant difference in root resorption among the factors of gender, overbite, tongue-thrusting habit, types of malocclusion, and types of bracket. These results suggested that orthodontic treatment should be carefully performed in pre-treatment extraction patients who have pointed or dilacerated roots and need long treatment duration.

  16. External apical root resorption in maxillary incisors in orthodontic patients: associated factors and radiographic evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanekrungsan, Kamonporn; Patanaporn, Virush; Janhom, Apirum; Korwanich, Narumanus

    2012-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the incidence and degree of external apical root resorption of maxillary incisors after orthodontic treatment and to evaluate particular associated factors related to external apical root resorption. The records and maxillary incisor periapical radiographs of 181 patients were investigated. Crown and root lengths were measured and compared on the pre- and post-treatment periapical radiographs. Crown length was measured from the center of the incisal edge to the midpoint of the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ). Root length was measured from the CEJ midpoint to the root apex. A correction factor for the enlargement difference was used to calculate root resorption. The periapical radiographs of 564 teeth showed that the average root resorption was 1.39±1.27 (8.24±7.22%) and 1.69±1.14 mm (10.16±6.78%) for the maxillary central and lateral incisors, respectively. The results showed that the dilacerated or pointed roots, maxillary premolar extraction cases, and treatment duration were highly significant factors for root resorption (p<0.001). Allergic condition was a significant factor at p<0.01. Age at the start of treatment, large overjet, and history of facial trauma were also factors significantly associated with root resorption (p<0.05). There was no statistically significant difference in root resorption among the factors of gender, overbite, tongue-thrusting habit, types of malocclusion, and types of bracket. These results suggested that orthodontic treatment should be carefully performed in pre-treatment extraction patients who have pointed or dilacerated roots and need long treatment duration.

  17. Predicting helical topologies in RNA junctions as tree graphs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Laing

    Full Text Available RNA molecules are important cellular components involved in many fundamental biological processes. Understanding the mechanisms behind their functions requires knowledge of their tertiary structures. Though computational RNA folding approaches exist, they often require manual manipulation and expert intuition; predicting global long-range tertiary contacts remains challenging. Here we develop a computational approach and associated program module (RNAJAG to predict helical arrangements/topologies in RNA junctions. Our method has two components: junction topology prediction and graph modeling. First, junction topologies are determined by a data mining approach from a given secondary structure of the target RNAs; second, the predicted topology is used to construct a tree graph consistent with geometric preferences analyzed from solved RNAs. The predicted graphs, which model the helical arrangements of RNA junctions for a large set of 200 junctions using a cross validation procedure, yield fairly good representations compared to the helical configurations in native RNAs, and can be further used to develop all-atom models as we show for two examples. Because junctions are among the most complex structural elements in RNA, this work advances folding structure prediction methods of large RNAs. The RNAJAG module is available to academic users upon request.

  18. Predicting helical topologies in RNA junctions as tree graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, Christian; Jung, Segun; Kim, Namhee; Elmetwaly, Shereef; Zahran, Mai; Schlick, Tamar

    2013-01-01

    RNA molecules are important cellular components involved in many fundamental biological processes. Understanding the mechanisms behind their functions requires knowledge of their tertiary structures. Though computational RNA folding approaches exist, they often require manual manipulation and expert intuition; predicting global long-range tertiary contacts remains challenging. Here we develop a computational approach and associated program module (RNAJAG) to predict helical arrangements/topologies in RNA junctions. Our method has two components: junction topology prediction and graph modeling. First, junction topologies are determined by a data mining approach from a given secondary structure of the target RNAs; second, the predicted topology is used to construct a tree graph consistent with geometric preferences analyzed from solved RNAs. The predicted graphs, which model the helical arrangements of RNA junctions for a large set of 200 junctions using a cross validation procedure, yield fairly good representations compared to the helical configurations in native RNAs, and can be further used to develop all-atom models as we show for two examples. Because junctions are among the most complex structural elements in RNA, this work advances folding structure prediction methods of large RNAs. The RNAJAG module is available to academic users upon request.

  19. Affordance-based individuation of junctions in Open Street Map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Scheider

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We propose an algorithm that can be used to identify automatically the subset of street segments of a road network map that corresponds to a junction. The main idea is to use turn-compliant locomotion affordances, i.e., restricted patterns of supported movement, in order to specify junctions independently of their data representation, and in order to motivate tractable individuation and classification strategies. We argue that common approaches based solely on geometry or topology of the street segment graph are useful but insufficient proxies. They miss certain turn restrictions essential to junctions. From a computational viewpoint, the main challenge of affordance-based individuation of junctions lies in its complex recursive definition. In this paper, we show how Open Street Map data can be interpreted into locomotion affordances, and how the recursive junction definition can be translated into a deterministic algorithm. We evaluate this algorithm by applying it to small map excerpts in order to delineate the contained junctions.

  20. Anchored PKA as a gatekeeper for gap junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidoux, Guillaume; Taskén, Kjetil

    2015-01-01

    Anchored protein kinase A (PKA) bound to A Kinase Anchoring Protein (AKAP) mediates effects of localized increases in cAMP in defined subcellular microdomains and retains the specificity in cAMP-PKA signaling to distinct extracellular stimuli. Gap junctions are pores between adjacent cells constituted by connexin proteins that provide means of communication and transfer of small molecules. While the PKA signaling is known to promote human trophoblast cell fusion, the gap junction communication through connexin 43 (Cx43) is a prerequisite for this process. We recently demonstrated that trophoblast fusion is regulated by ezrin, a known AKAP, which binds to Cx43 and delivers PKA in the vicinity gap junctions. We found that disruption of the ezrin-Cx43 interaction abolished PKA-dependent phosphorylation of Cx43 as well as gap junction communication and subsequently cell fusion. We propose that the PKA-ezrin-Cx43 macromolecular complex regulating gap junction communication constitutes a general mechanism to control opening of Cx43 gap junctions by phosphorylation in response to cAMP signaling in various cell types.

  1. Predicting Helical Topologies in RNA Junctions as Tree Graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Namhee; Elmetwaly, Shereef; Zahran, Mai; Schlick, Tamar

    2013-01-01

    RNA molecules are important cellular components involved in many fundamental biological processes. Understanding the mechanisms behind their functions requires knowledge of their tertiary structures. Though computational RNA folding approaches exist, they often require manual manipulation and expert intuition; predicting global long-range tertiary contacts remains challenging. Here we develop a computational approach and associated program module (RNAJAG) to predict helical arrangements/topologies in RNA junctions. Our method has two components: junction topology prediction and graph modeling. First, junction topologies are determined by a data mining approach from a given secondary structure of the target RNAs; second, the predicted topology is used to construct a tree graph consistent with geometric preferences analyzed from solved RNAs. The predicted graphs, which model the helical arrangements of RNA junctions for a large set of 200 junctions using a cross validation procedure, yield fairly good representations compared to the helical configurations in native RNAs, and can be further used to develop all-atom models as we show for two examples. Because junctions are among the most complex structural elements in RNA, this work advances folding structure prediction methods of large RNAs. The RNAJAG module is available to academic users upon request. PMID:23991010

  2. Imaging of cervicothoracic junction trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wongwaisayawan S

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sirote Wongwaisayawan,1 Ruedeekorn Suwannanon,2 Rathachai Kaewlai11Department of Radiology, Ramathibodi Hospital and Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; 2Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, ThailandAbstract: Cervicothoracic junction trauma is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in trauma patients. Imaging has played an important role in identifying injuries and guiding appropriate, timely therapy. Computed tomography is currently a method of choice for diagnosing cervicothoracic junction trauma, in which the pattern of injuries often suggests possible mechanisms and potential injuries. In this article, the authors describe and illustrate common and uncommon injuries that can occur in the cervicothoracic junction.Keywords: cervicothoracic junction, cervical spine, trauma, imaging, radiology

  3. The Control of Junction Flows

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smith, Charles

    1997-01-01

    An experimental study of the effects of spatially-limited (i.e. localized) surface suction on unsteady laminar and turbulent junction flows was performed using hydrogen bubble flow visualization and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV...

  4. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection associated with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuncer, M.; Gumrukcuoglu, H.A.; Ekim, H.; Gunes, Y.; Simsek, H.

    2010-01-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a relatively uncommon inherited disease. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is also uncommonly observed, which often occurs in pregnant or post partum women but is rare in men. This report describes a 38 years old man with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy who developed SCAD leading to acute inferior myocardial infarction. After emergent appendectomy operation at another hospital, he was immediately transferred to the Cardiology Department of our hospital due to acute myocardial infarction. He emergently underwent coronary angiography which showed a long dissection involving the right coronary. He underwent an emergent CABG with cardiopulmonary bypass. Postoperative recovery was uneventful and he was discharged. According to our knowledge, no case of spontaneous coronary artery dissection associated with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy unrelated to postpartum period or oral contraceptive use has been reported so far. (author)

  5. Intercellular junctions in nerve-free hydra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDowall, A W; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1980-01-01

    Epithelial cells of nerve-free hydra contain septate and gap junctions. In thin sections the gap junctions are characterized by a gap of 3-4 nm. Freeze-fracture demonstrates the presence of septate junctions and two further types of structures: (i) the "E-type" or "inverted" gap junctions...

  6. Josephson junctions with ferromagnetic interlayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wild, Georg Hermann

    2012-03-04

    We report on the fabrication of superconductor/insulator/ferromagnetic metal/superconductor (Nb/AlO{sub x}/Pd{sub 0.82}Ni{sub 0.18}/Nb) Josephson junctions (SIFS JJs) with high critical current densities, large normal resistance times area products, and high quality factors. For these junctions, a transition from 0- to {pi}-coupling is observed for a thickness d{sub F}=6 nm of the ferromagnetic Pd{sub 0.82}Ni{sub 0.18} interlayer. The magnetic field dependence of the critical current of the junctions demonstrates good spatial homogeneity of the tunneling barrier and ferromagnetic interlayer. Magnetic characterization shows that the Pd{sub 0.82}Ni{sub 0.18} has an out-of-plane anisotropy and large saturation magnetization indicating negligible dead layers at the interfaces. A careful analysis of Fiske modes up to about 400 GHz provides valuable information on the junction quality factor and the relevant damping mechanisms. Whereas losses due to quasiparticle tunneling dominate at low frequencies, at high frequencies the damping is explained by the finite surface resistance of the junction electrodes. High quality factors of up to 30 around 200 GHz have been achieved. They allow to study the junction dynamics, in particular the switching probability from the zero-voltage into the voltage state with and without microwave irradiation. The experiments with microwave irradiation are well explained within semi-classical models and numerical simulations. In contrast, at mK temperature the switching dynamics without applied microwaves clearly shows secondary quantum effects. Here, we could observe for the first time macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson junctions with a ferromagnetic interlayer. This observation excludes fluctuations of the critical current as a consequence of an unstable magnetic domain structure of the ferromagnetic interlayer and affirms the suitability of SIFS Josephson junctions for quantum information processing.

  7. Mineral trioxide aggregate as apical plug in teeth with necrotic pulp and immature apices: a 10-year case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Riccardo; Giuliani, Valentina; Nieri, Michele; Di Nasso, Luca; Pagavino, Gabriella

    2014-08-01

    This 10-year study evaluated the clinical and radiologic outcomes of teeth with necrotic pulp, immature apices, and periapical lesions treated with the mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) apical plug technique. Seventeen single-rooted immature teeth with necrotic pulp and periapical lesion from 17 patients treated between January 2001 and December 2001 were included in this study. Apical obturation on all teeth included in the study was completed in 2 visits: first using calcium hydroxide as an interappointment intracanal medication and a second visit for the creation of the artificial apical barrier with MTA. The outcome, based on clinical and radiographic criteria, was assessed by 2 calibrated investigators using the periapical index (PAI). The Friedman test was used to verify the differences between baseline and the 1-, 5-, and 10-year PAI scores. Of the 17 patients treated, 1 patient dropped out at 5 years. At the 10-year follow-up, 15 teeth were healed (PAI ≤2), and 1 tooth had been extracted because of the presence of a longitudinal root fracture. The PAI score exhibited a significant decrease between baseline and 1 year and between 1 and 5 years. The difference between 5 and 10 years was not significant. The apical plug with MTA was a successful and effective technique for long-term management of this group of teeth with necrotic pulps with immature root development and periapical lesions. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Peltier cooling in molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Longji; Miao, Ruijiao; Wang, Kun; Thompson, Dakotah; Zotti, Linda Angela; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Meyhofer, Edgar; Reddy, Pramod

    2018-02-01

    The study of thermoelectricity in molecular junctions is of fundamental interest for the development of various technologies including cooling (refrigeration) and heat-to-electricity conversion1-4. Recent experimental progress in probing the thermopower (Seebeck effect) of molecular junctions5-9 has enabled studies of the relationship between thermoelectricity and molecular structure10,11. However, observations of Peltier cooling in molecular junctions—a critical step for establishing molecular-based refrigeration—have remained inaccessible. Here, we report direct experimental observations of Peltier cooling in molecular junctions. By integrating conducting-probe atomic force microscopy12,13 with custom-fabricated picowatt-resolution calorimetric microdevices, we created an experimental platform that enables the unified characterization of electrical, thermoelectric and energy dissipation characteristics of molecular junctions. Using this platform, we studied gold junctions with prototypical molecules (Au-biphenyl-4,4'-dithiol-Au, Au-terphenyl-4,4''-dithiol-Au and Au-4,4'-bipyridine-Au) and revealed the relationship between heating or cooling and charge transmission characteristics. Our experimental conclusions are supported by self-energy-corrected density functional theory calculations. We expect these advances to stimulate studies of both thermal and thermoelectric transport in molecular junctions where the possibility of extraordinarily efficient energy conversion has been theoretically predicted2-4,14.

  9. Specificity of binding to four-way junctions in DNA by bacteriophage T7 endonuclease I.

    OpenAIRE

    Parsons, C A; West, S C

    1990-01-01

    T7 endonuclease I binds specifically to four-way junctions in duplex DNA and promotes their resolution into linear duplexes. Under conditions in which the nuclease activity is blocked by the absence of divalent cations, the enzyme forms a distinct protein-DNA complex with the junction, as detected by gel retardation and filter binding assays. The formation of this complex is structure-specific and contrasts with the short-lived binding complexes formed on linear duplex DNA. The binding comple...

  10. Electronic thermometry in tunable tunnel junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-03-15

    A tunable tunnel junction thermometry circuit includes a variable width tunnel junction between a test object and a probe. The junction width is varied and a change in thermovoltage across the junction with respect to the change in distance across the junction is determined. Also, a change in biased current with respect to a change in distance across the junction is determined. A temperature gradient across the junction is determined based on a mathematical relationship between the temperature gradient, the change in thermovoltage with respect to distance and the change in biased current with respect to distance. Thermovoltage may be measured by nullifying a thermoelectric tunneling current with an applied voltage supply level. A piezoelectric actuator may modulate the probe, and thus the junction width, to vary thermovoltage and biased current across the junction. Lock-in amplifiers measure the derivatives of the thermovoltage and biased current modulated by varying junction width.

  11. The PDZ-GEF protein Dizzy regulates the establishment of adherens junctions required for ventral furrow formation in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahn, Philipp; Ott, Alice; Reuter, Rolf

    2012-08-15

    The PDZ-GEF protein Dizzy (Dzy) and its downstream GTPase Rap1 have pleiotropic roles during development of the Drosophila embryo. Here, we show that maternally provided Dzy and Rap1 first function during ventral furrow formation (VFF) where they are critical to guarantee rapid apical cell constrictions. Contraction of the apical actomyosin filament system occurs independently of Dzy and Rap1, but loss of Dzy results in a delayed establishment of the apical adherens junction (AJ) belt, whereas in the absence of Rap1 only a fragmentary apical AJ belt is formed in the epithelium. The timely establishment of apical AJs appears to be essential for coupling actomyosin contractions to cell shape change and to assure completion of the ventral furrow. Immediately after VFF, the downregulation of Dzy and Rap1 is necessary to allow normal mesodermal development to continue after the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, as overexpression of Dzy or of constitutively active Rap1 compromises mesodermal migration and monolayer formation. We propose that Dzy and Rap1 are crucial factors regulating the dynamics of AJs during gastrulation.

  12. Ouabain Increases Gap Junctional Communication in Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Ponce

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The finding that endogenous ouabain acts as a hormone prompted efforts to elucidate its physiological function. In previous studies, we have shown that 10 nM ouabain (i.e., a concentration within the physiological range modulates cell-cell contacts such as tight junctions and apical/basolateral polarity. In this study, we examined whether 10 nM ouabain affects another important cell-cell feature: gap junction communication (GJC. Methods: We employed two different approaches: 1 analysis of the cell-to-cell diffusion of neurobiotin injected into a particular MDCK cell (epithelial cells from dog kidneys in a confluent monolayer by counting the number of neighboring cells reached by the probe and 2 measurement of the electrical capacitance. Results: We found that 10 nM ouabain increase GJC by 475% within 1 hour. The Na+-K+-ATPase acts as a receptor of ouabain. In previous works we have shown that ouabain activates c-Src and ERK1/2 in 1 hour; in the present study we show that the inhibition of these proteins block the effect of ouabain on GJC. This increase in GJC does not require synthesis of new protein components, because the inhibitors cycloheximide and actinomycin D did not affect this phenomenon. Using silencing assays we also demonstrate that this ouabain-induced enhancement of GJC involves connexins 32 and 43. Conclusion: Ouabain 10 nM increases GJC in MDCK cells.

  13. The antimicrobial effect of apical box versus apical cone preparation using iodine potassium iodide as root canal dressing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvart, Merete; Dahlén, Gunnar; Reit, Claes-Erik

    2013-01-01

    . Methods. Twenty-four patients were centrally randomized to apical box preparation (size #60) or cone preparation (apical size #25). The groups were comparable regarding the presence of primary caries and type of coronal restoration. In the course of canal preparation each tooth was irrigated with 2.5% Na......-week post-sampling, a power calculation revealed that over 900 patients are needed to show a difference of 9% between the two protocols tested. Conclusions. Future trials should be conducted using stringent protocols and as multi-centre trials for reaching the required information size....

  14. c-Yes regulates cell adhesion at the apical ectoplasmic specialization-blood-testis barrier axis via its effects on protein recruitment and distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiang; Mruk, Dolores D.

    2013-01-01

    During spermatogenesis, extensive restructuring takes place at the cell-cell interface since developing germ cells migrate progressively from the basal to the adluminal compartment of the seminiferous epithelium. Since germ cells per se are not motile cells, their movement relies almost exclusively on the Sertoli cell. Nonetheless, extensive exchanges in signaling take place between these cells in the seminiferous epithelium. c-Yes, a nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinase belonging to the Src family kinases (SFKs) and a crucial signaling protein, was recently shown to be upregulated at the Sertoli cell-cell interface at the blood-testis barrier (BTB) at stages VIII–IX of the seminiferous epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis. It was also highly expressed at the Sertoli cell-spermatid interface known as apical ectoplasmic specialization (apical ES) at stage V to early stage VIII of the epithelial cycle during spermiogenesis. Herein, it was shown that the knockdown of c-Yes by RNAi in vitro and in vivo affected both Sertoli cell adhesion at the BTB and spermatid adhesion at the apical ES, causing a disruption of the Sertoli cell tight junction-permeability barrier function, germ cell loss from the seminiferous epithelium, and also a loss of spermatid polarity. These effects were shown to be mediated by changes in distribution and/or localization of adhesion proteins at the BTB (e.g., occludin, N-cadherin) and at the apical ES (e.g., nectin-3) and possibly the result of changes in the underlying actin filaments at the BTB and the apical ES. These findings implicate that c-Yes is a likely target of male contraceptive research. PMID:23169788

  15. Assessment of apical periodontitis by MRI. A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geibel, M.A.; Schreiber, E.S.; Bracher, A.K.; Rasche, V.; Hell, E.; Ulrici, J.; Sailer, L.K.; Ozpeynirci, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this clinical feasibility study was to evaluate the applicability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of apical periodontitis in direct comparison with cone beam CT (CBCT). 19 consecutive patients (average age 43 ± 13 years) with 34 lesions in total (13 molars, 14 premolars and 7 front teeth) were enrolled in this feasibility study. Periapical lesions were defined as periapical radiolucencies (CBCT) or structural changes in the spongy bone signal (MRI), which were connected with the apical part of a root and with at least twice the width of the periodontal ligament space. The location and dimension of the lesions were compared between MRI and CBCT. While mainly mineralized tissue components such as teeth and bone were visible with CBCT, complimentary information of the soft tissue components was assessable with MRI. The MRI images provided sufficient diagnostic detail for the assessment of the main structures of interest. Heterogeneous contrast was observed within the lesion, with often a clear enhancement close to the apical foramen and the periodontal gap. No difference for lesion visibility was observed between MRI and CBCT. The lesion dimensions corresponded well, but were slightly but significantly overestimated with MRI. A heterogeneous lesion appearance was observed in several patients. Four patients presented with a well circumscribed hyperintense signal in the vicinity of the apical foramen. The MRI capability of soft tissue characterization may facilitate detailed analysis of periapical lesions. This clinical study confirms the applicability of multi-contrast MRI for the identification of periapical lesions.

  16. In vitro comparison of apical microleakage following canal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hope&shola

    2010-11-03

    Nov 3, 2010 ... The purpose of this study was to compare apical microleakage following canal obturation with lateral .... mm and the maximum was 6.69 mm. Statistical analysis of mean differences for independent groups (Independent samples t-test) showed that there was no ..... Clinical and radiographic evaluation of.

  17. Evaluation of the amount of apically extruded debris during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-04-06

    Apr 6, 2015 ... (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland). Root canal preparation and obturation. A size 15 K‑file (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) was placed into the canal until it was visible at the apical foramen. The working length (WL) was established as. 1 mm shorter than this length. The canals were ...

  18. Assessment of apical periodontitis by MRI. A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geibel, M.A. [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery; Schreiber, E.S.; Bracher, A.K.; Rasche, V. [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Internal Medicine II; Hell, E.; Ulrici, J. [Sirona Dental Systems GmbH, Bensheim (Germany). Dental Imaging; Sailer, L.K. [DOC Praxisklinik im Wiley, Neu-Ulm (Germany). MKG; Ozpeynirci, Y. [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2015-04-15

    The purpose of this clinical feasibility study was to evaluate the applicability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of apical periodontitis in direct comparison with cone beam CT (CBCT). 19 consecutive patients (average age 43 ± 13 years) with 34 lesions in total (13 molars, 14 premolars and 7 front teeth) were enrolled in this feasibility study. Periapical lesions were defined as periapical radiolucencies (CBCT) or structural changes in the spongy bone signal (MRI), which were connected with the apical part of a root and with at least twice the width of the periodontal ligament space. The location and dimension of the lesions were compared between MRI and CBCT. While mainly mineralized tissue components such as teeth and bone were visible with CBCT, complimentary information of the soft tissue components was assessable with MRI. The MRI images provided sufficient diagnostic detail for the assessment of the main structures of interest. Heterogeneous contrast was observed within the lesion, with often a clear enhancement close to the apical foramen and the periodontal gap. No difference for lesion visibility was observed between MRI and CBCT. The lesion dimensions corresponded well, but were slightly but significantly overestimated with MRI. A heterogeneous lesion appearance was observed in several patients. Four patients presented with a well circumscribed hyperintense signal in the vicinity of the apical foramen. The MRI capability of soft tissue characterization may facilitate detailed analysis of periapical lesions. This clinical study confirms the applicability of multi-contrast MRI for the identification of periapical lesions.

  19. Protein modeling of apical membrane antigen-1(AMA-1) of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Apical membrane Antigen-1(AMA-1), an asexual blood stage antigen of Plasmodium cynomolgi, is an important candidate for testing as a component of malarial vaccine. The degree of conservation of. AMA-1 sequences implies a conserved function for this molecule across different species of Plasmodium. Since the AMA-1 ...

  20. Histology of periapical lesions obtained during apical surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Malte; von Arx, Thomas; Altermatt, Hans Jörg; Bosshardt, Dieter

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this was to evaluate the histology of periapical lesions in teeth treated with periapical surgery. After root-end resection, the root tip was removed together with the periapical pathological tissue. Histologic sectioning was performed on calcified specimens embedded in methylmethacrylate (MMA) and on demineralized specimens embedded in LR White (Fluka, Buchs, Switzerland). The samples were evaluated with light and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The histologic findings were classified into periapical abscesses, granulomas, or cystic lesions (true or pocket cysts). The final material comprised 70% granulomas, 23% cysts and 5% abscesses, 1% scar tissues, and 1% keratocysts. Six of 125 samples could not be used. The cystic lesions could not be subdivided into pocket or true cysts. All cysts had an epithelium-lined cavity, two of them with cilia-lined epithelium. These results show the high incidence of periapical granulomas among periapical lesions obtained during apical surgery. Periapical abscesses were a rare occasion. The histologic findings from samples obtained during apical surgery may differ from findings obtained by teeth extractions. A determination between pocket and true apical cysts is hardly possible when collecting samples by apical surgery.

  1. [Expression of interleukin-17F in human apical periodontitis lesions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hui; Li, Song

    2012-06-01

    To examine the expression of interleukin-17F (IL-17F) in apical periodontitis lesions. Human apical periodontitis lesions were collected after periapical surgery from November 1, 2009 to August 1, 2011. After histological processing, serial sectioning, HE staining, and microscopic analysis, 33 periapical cysts and 18 periapical granulomas were selected for immunohistochemical analysis for IL-17F. Five alveolar bone samples were obtained from a group of impacted third molars recommended for extraction. These bone samples did not show any inflammation and were used as normal samples. Differences in IL-17F expression between the tissues with periapical cyst and periapica granuloma were subsequently analyzed by rank-sum test. IL-17F was expressed in epithelial cells, lymphocytes, fibroblast and endothelial cells of both types of lesions. Both types of lesions presented increased IL-17F expression when compared to healthy periapical alveolar bone. The expression of IL-17F in apical cyst (0.2365 ± 0.0708) and apical granuloma (0.8852 ± 0.0576) was significantly different (Z = 3.735, P granuloma was significantly different.

  2. Phenotypic plasticity to altered apical bud temperature in Cucumis sativus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savvides, Andreas; Ieperen, van Wim; Dieleman, Janneke A.; Marcelis, Leo F.M.

    2017-01-01

    Many studies investigated temperature effects on leaf initiation and expansion by relating these processes to air temperature or the temperature of a specific organ (e.g. leaf temperature). In reality plant temperature is hardly ever equal to air temperature or spatially uniform. Apical bud

  3. Evaluation of the Amount of Apically Extruded Debris during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To evaluate the amount of apically extruded debris during retreatment (with or without solvent) of root canals filled by two obturation techniques. Materials and Methods: Forty‑eight root canals were prepared using ProTaper Universal F3 and filled with Gutta‑percha and AH 26 sealer using single cone or lateral ...

  4. In vitro comparison of apical microleakage following canal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hope&shola

    2010-11-03

    Nov 3, 2010 ... the cause of failing case in which the instructions were not followed and/or the goals of the technique were not achieved. Conclusion. Since the present study did not exhibit any differences in apical microleakage following canal obturation with lateral and thermoplasticized gutta-percha compaction techni-.

  5. [Nonsurgical retreatment in a case of a radiolucent apical lesion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente Gómez, A; Rodríguez Ponce, A

    1989-01-01

    We present a case of failure that was helpful solved without surgical endodontic treatment. We don't achieve clinical success besides endodontic treatment was twice remade. Finally we decided to put a temporary filling with calcium hydroxide and wait until apical radiolucency disappear and complete our treatment with gutta-percha, sealer and lateral condensation.

  6. Apical dominance and growth in vitro of Alstroemeria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pumisutapon, P.

    2012-01-01

    In Alstroemeria, micropropagation is achieved by axillary bud outgrowth. However, the multiplication rate is rather low (1.2–2.0 per cycle of 4 weeks) due to strong apical dominance. Even though several factors (i.e. culture media, growth regulators, and environmental conditions) have been

  7. CLINICAL EFFECTIVENESS OF TREATMENT THE PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC APICAL PERIODONTITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. G. Gadzhula

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. The success of endodontic treatment is provided by a thorough instrumental and antiseptic treatment of infected root canals, and it depends on the composition of filling material, the degree of adhesion to dentin, hermetic obturation of apical foramen, solubility of sealer. Objective. The study was aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of root canal obturation with BioRootTM RCS sealer in the treatment of patients with chronic apical periodontitis. Methods. Endodontic treatment of 23 teeth in 20 patients with chronic apical periodontitis by method of lateral compaction of gutta-percha was carried out. In the main group root canals were obturated with BioRootTM RCS, in the control group the canals were filled with Apexit Plus. The percentage of efficient or non-efficient cases was evaluated on the basis of radiographic comparison of treated chronic apical periodontitis immediately after obturation, in three, six months and one year. Radiographic conditions were defined as existing state, improvement and worsening. Results. In a year of dynamic evaluation the final results were: in the main group – 54.55% of the patients had complete bone healing, in 27.27% of cases the focus of bone destruction was decreased by ½ or more of the initial sizes, 18.18% – resorption lesion was decreased by less than ½; in the control group – 33.33% of improvement, 25.0% of existing state and 41.66% of worsening. Conclusions. BioRootTM RCS using for root canals obturation in the treatment of chronic apical periodontitis we proved the high effectiveness of the treatment undertaken: complete healing or improvement of radiographic conditions of periapical bone destruction with X-ray signs of bone regeneration.

  8. Rab8a and Rab8b are essential for several apical transport pathways but insufficient for ciliogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takashi; Iwano, Tomohiko; Kunii, Masataka; Matsuda, Shinji; Mizuguchi, Rumiko; Jung, Yongwook; Hagiwara, Haruo; Yoshihara, Yoshihiro; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Harada, Reiko; Harada, Akihiro

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The small GTP-binding protein Rab8 is known to play an essential role in intracellular transport and cilia formation. We have previously demonstrated that Rab8a is required for localising apical markers in various organisms. Rab8a has a closely related isoform, Rab8b. To determine whether Rab8b can compensate for Rab8a, we generated Rab8b-knockout mice. Although the Rab8b-knockout mice did not display an overt phenotype, Rab8a and Rab8b double-knockout mice exhibited mislocalisation of apical markers and died earlier than Rab8a-knockout mice. The apical markers accumulated in three intracellular patterns in the double-knockout mice. However, the localisation of basolateral and/or dendritic markers of the double-knockout mice seemed normal. The morphology and the length of various primary and/or motile cilia, and the frequency of ciliated cells appeared to be identical in control and double-knockout mice. However, an additional knockdown of Rab10 in double-knockout cells greatly reduced the percentage of ciliated cells. Our results highlight the compensatory effect of Rab8a and Rab8b in apical transport, and the complexity of the apical transport process. In addition, neither Rab8a nor Rab8b are required for basolateral and/or dendritic transport. However, simultaneous loss of Rab8a and Rab8b has little effect on ciliogenesis, whereas additional loss of Rab10 greatly affects ciliogenesis. PMID:24213529

  9. An Atypical Case of Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Absence of Giant T Waves in spite of Extreme Apical Wall Hypertrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Sanidas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is an uncommon variant of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, with hypertrophy mainly affecting the apex of the left ventricle. We hereby describe a case of an octogenarian female patient who was randomly diagnosed with AHCM due to other comorbidities.

  10. Modulation of Tight Junction Structure and Function by Kinases and Phosphatases Targeting Occludin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Johannes Dörfel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tight junctions (TJs typically represent the most apical contacts in epithelial and endothelial cell layers where they play an essential role in the separation of extracellular or luminal spaces from underlying tissues in the body. Depending on the protein composition, TJs define the barrier characteristics and in addition maintain cell polarity. Two major families of integral membrane proteins form the typical TJ strand network, the tight junction-associated MARVEL protein (TAMP family members occludin, tricellulin, and MarvelD3 as well as a specific set of claudins. Occludin was the first identified member of these tetraspanins and is now widely accepted as a regulator of TJ assembly and function. Therefore, occludin itself has to be tightly regulated. Phosphorylation of occludin appears to be of central importance in this context. Here we want to summarize current knowledge on the kinases and phosphatases directly modifying occludin, and their role in the regulation of TJ structure, function, and dynamics.

  11. Nanotube junctions and the genus of multi-tori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diudea, Mircea V; Szefler, Beata

    2012-06-14

    Carbon nanotube junctions can be modeled by fullerene spanning or by using some operations on map. They can self-assemble into more complex structures, such as finite or infinite high genera multi-tori. Four junctions of tetrahedral and octahedral symmetry, covered by patches consisting only of hexagons, were designed. Their stability is discussed in terms of total energy, evaluated at Hartree-Fock (HF) level of theory, HOMO-LUMO gap, strain energy, HOMA index of aromaticity and the Kekulé structure count. Vibrational spectra of these junctions are given as well. A new multi-toroidal structure, of octahedral symmetry, is presented for the first time. The study on topology of the multi-tori herein designed revealed the relation of these structures with the genus of their embedding surface.

  12. Gravitation at the Josephson Junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Atanasov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A geometric potential from the kinetic term of a constrained to a curved hyperplane of space-time quantum superconducting condensate is derived. An energy conservation relation involving the geometric field at every material point in the superconductor is demonstrated. At a Josephson junction the energy conservation relation implies the possibility of transforming electric energy into geometric field energy, that is, curvature of space-time. Experimental procedures to verify that the Josephson junction can act as a voltage-to-curvature converter are discussed.

  13. Association mapping in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) reveals independent control of apical vs. basal branching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambeesan, Savithri U; Mandel, Jennifer R; Bowers, John E; Marek, Laura F; Ebert, Daniel; Corbi, Jonathan; Rieseberg, Loren H; Knapp, Steven J; Burke, John M

    2015-03-11

    Shoot branching is an important determinant of plant architecture and influences various aspects of growth and development. Selection on branching has also played an important role in the domestication of crop plants, including sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). Here, we describe an investigation of the genetic basis of variation in branching in sunflower via association mapping in a diverse collection of cultivated sunflower lines. Detailed phenotypic analyses revealed extensive variation in the extent and type of branching within the focal population. After correcting for population structure and kinship, association analyses were performed using a genome-wide collection of SNPs to identify genomic regions that influence a variety of branching-related traits. This work resulted in the identification of multiple previously unidentified genomic regions that contribute to variation in branching. Genomic regions that were associated with apical and mid-apical branching were generally distinct from those associated with basal and mid-basal branching. Homologs of known branching genes from other study systems (i.e., Arabidopsis, rice, pea, and petunia) were also identified from the draft assembly of the sunflower genome and their map positions were compared to those of associations identified herein. Numerous candidate branching genes were found to map in close proximity to significant branching associations. In sunflower, variation in branching is genetically complex and overall branching patterns (i.e., apical vs. basal) were found to be influenced by distinct genomic regions. Moreover, numerous candidate branching genes mapped in close proximity to significant branching associations. Although the sunflower genome exhibits localized islands of elevated linkage disequilibrium (LD), these non-random associations are known to decay rapidly elsewhere. The subset of candidate genes that co-localized with significant associations in regions of low LD represents the most

  14. Human zonulin, a potential modulator of intestinal tight junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W; Uzzau, S; Goldblum, S E; Fasano, A

    2000-12-01

    Intercellular tight junctions are dynamic structures involved in vectorial transport of water and electrolytes across the intestinal epithelium. Zonula occludens toxin derived from Vibrio cholerae interacts with a specific intestinal epithelial surface receptor, with subsequent activation of a complex intracellular cascade of events that regulate tight junction permeability. We postulated that this toxin may mimic the effect of a functionally and immunologically related endogenous modulator of intestinal tight junctions. Affinity-purified anti-zonula occludens toxin antibodies and the Ussing chamber assay were used to screen for one or more mammalian zonula occludens toxin analogues in both fetal and adult human intestine. A novel protein, zonulin, was identified that induces tight junction disassembly in non-human primate intestinal epithelia mounted in Ussing chambers. Comparison of amino acids in the active zonula occludens toxin fragment and zonulin permitted the identification of the putative receptor binding domain within the N-terminal region of the two proteins. Zonulin likely plays a pivotal role in tight junction regulation during developmental, physiological, and pathological processes, including tissue morphogenesis, movement of fluid, macromolecules and leukocytes between the intestinal lumen and the interstitium, and inflammatory/autoimmune disorders.

  15. Apical organs in echinoderm larvae: insights into larval evolution in the Ambulacraria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Maria; Nakajima, Yoko; Chee, Francis C; Burke, Robert D

    2007-01-01

    The anatomy and cellular organization of serotonergic neurons in the echinoderm apical organ exhibits class-specific features in dipleurula-type (auricularia, bipinnaria) and pluteus-type (ophiopluteus, echinopluteus) larvae. The apical organ forms in association with anterior ciliary structures. Apical organs in dipleurula-type larvae are more similar to each other than to those in either of the pluteus forms. In asteroid bipinnaria and holothuroid auricularia the apical organ spans ciliary band sectors that traverse the anterior-most end of the larvae. The asteroid apical organ also has prominent bilateral ganglia that connect with an apical network of neurites. The simple apical organ of the auricularia is similar to that in the hemichordate tornaria larva. Apical organs in pluteus forms differ markedly. The echinopluteus apical organ is a single structure on the oral hood between the larval arms comprised of two groups of cells joined by a commissure and its cell bodies do not reside in the ciliary band. Ophioplutei have a pair of lateral ganglia associated with the ciliary band of larval arms that may be the ophiuroid apical organ. Comparative anatomy of the serotonergic nervous systems in the dipleurula-type larvae of the Ambulacraria (Echinodermata+Hemichordata) suggests that the apical organ of this deuterostome clade originated as a simple bilaterally symmetric nerve plexus spanning ciliary band sectors at the anterior end of the larva. From this structure, the apical organ has been independently modified in association with the evolution of class-specific larval forms.

  16. Electronic noise of superconducting tunnel junction detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jochum, J.; Kraus, H.; Gutsche, M.; Kemmather, B.; Feilitzsch, F. v.; Moessbauer, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    The optimal signal to noise ratio for detectors based on superconducting tunnel junctions is calculated and compared for the cases of a detector consisting of one single tunnel junction, as well as of series and of parallel connections of such tunnel junctions. The influence of 1 / f noise and its dependence on the dynamical resistance of tunnel junctions is discussed quantitatively. A single tunnel junction yields the minimum equivalent noise charge. Such a tunnel junction exhibits the best signal to noise ratio if the signal charge is independent of detector size. In case, signal charge increases with detector size, a parallel or a series connection of tunnel junctions would provide the optimum signal to noise ratio. The equivalent noise charge and the respective signal to noise ratio are deduced as functions of tunnel junction parameters such as tunneling time, quasiparticle lifetime, etc. (orig.)

  17. Gap junctions and motor behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiehn, Ole; Tresch, Matthew C.

    2002-01-01

    The production of any motor behavior requires coordinated activity in motor neurons and premotor networks. In vertebrates, this coordination is often assumed to take place through chemical synapses. Here we review recent data suggesting that electrical gap-junction coupling plays an important role...... to the production of motor behavior in adult mammals....

  18. Gap Junctions and Chagas Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adesse, Daniel; Goldenberg, Regina Coeli; Fortes, Fabio S.; Jasmin; Iacobas, Dumitru A.; Iacobas, Sanda; de Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Campos; de Narareth Meirelles, Maria; Huang, Huan; Soares, Milena B.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.; Garzoni, Luciana Ribeiro; Spray, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Gap junction channels provide intercellular communication between cells. In the heart, these channels coordinate impulse propagation along the conduction system and through the contractile musculature, thereby providing synchronous and optimal cardiac output. As in other arrhythmogenic cardiac diseases, chagasic cardiomyopathy is associated with decreased expression of the gap junction protein connexin43 (Cx43) and its gene. Our studies of cardiac myocytes infected with Trypanosoma cruzi have revealed that synchronous contraction is greatly impaired and gap junction immunoreactivity is lost in infected cells. Such changes are not seen for molecules forming tight junctions, another component of the intercalated disc in cardiac myocytes. Transcriptomic studies of hearts from mouse models of Chagas disease and from acutely infected cardiac myocytes in vitro indicate profound remodelling of gene expression patterns involving heart rhythm determinant genes, suggesting underlying mechanisms of the functional pathology. One curious feature of the altered expression of Cx43 and its gene expression is that it is limited in both extent and location, suggesting that the more global deterioration in cardiac function may result in part from spread of damage signals from more seriously compromised cells to healthier ones. PMID:21884887

  19. The Effect of Canal Contamination with Saliva on Apical Sealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sabaghi

    2014-08-01

    Methods: In this laboratory study, 58 human uni-root teeth were cleaned and shaped for obturation with gutta percha and sealer AH26. In the case group, specimens were contaminated with human saliva immediately before obturation, whereas the teeth in the control group were kept dry. All canals were filled by lateral condensation technique. Moreover, the teeth were placed in methylene blue dye for 3 days. Dye penetration was measured using a stereomicrosope. As a matter of fact, the study data were analyzed via utilizing t-test. Results: A significant difference was found between the two groups in regard with the apical leakage(P<0.001. The microleakage mean of dye in the dry group was 3/48mm, whereas it was 6/36mm in the saliva contaminated group. Conclusion: The study findings revealed that complete drying of canal can improve apical sealing.

  20. Apical versus Basal Neurogenesis Directs Cortical Interneuron Subclass Fate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J. Petros

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Fate determination in the mammalian telencephalon, with its diversity of neuronal subtypes and relevance to neuropsychiatric disease, remains a critical area of study in neuroscience. Most studies investigating this topic focus on the diversity of neural progenitors within spatial and temporal domains along the lateral ventricles. Often overlooked is whether the location of neurogenesis within a fate-restricted domain is associated with, or instructive for, distinct neuronal fates. Here, we use in vivo fate mapping and the manipulation of neurogenic location to demonstrate that apical versus basal neurogenesis influences the fate determination of major subgroups of cortical interneurons derived from the subcortical telencephalon. Somatostatin-expressing interneurons arise mainly from apical divisions along the ventricular surface, whereas parvalbumin-expressing interneurons originate predominantly from basal divisions in the subventricular zone. As manipulations that shift neurogenic location alter interneuron subclass fate, these results add an additional dimension to the spatial-temporal determinants of neuronal fate determination.

  1. Characterization of human apical papilla-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantore, S; Ballini, A; De Vito, D; Martelli, F S; Georgakopoulos, I; Almasri, M; Dibello, V; Altini, V; Farronato, G; Dipalma, G; Farronato, D; Inchingolo, F

    2017-01-01

    Dental tissues represent an alternative and promising source of post-natal Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for tissue engineering. Furthermore, dental stem cells from apical papilla (SCAPs) cells can be obtained from the wisdom tooth which is unnecessary for human masticatory function and frequently extracted for orthodontic reasons or dysodontiasis. More precisely, apical papilla is the immature, mostly uncalcified, precursor of the tooth root, therefore is composed of more undifferentiated cells than dental pulp. In addition, tooth extraction, especially by piezosurgery technique, can be considered less invasive in comparison to bone marrow or other tissues biopsy. Our work is aimed to investigate the safety of and predictable procedure on surgical immature third molar extraction and to provide new insight on SCAP research for future biomedical applications. The isolated cells were examined for stem cell properties by analyzing their colony-forming efficiency, differentiation characteristics and the expression of MSC markers.

  2. Transient apical dyskinesia with a pacemaker: Electrocardiographic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez-Gil, Iván J; Feltes, Gisela I; Mejía-Rentería, Hernán D; Biagioni, Corina; De Agustín, J Alberto; Vivas, David; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Transient apical dyskinesia syndromes present features similar to acute coronary syndromes, but with normal coronary arteries and rapid complete resolution of wall motion alterations. We report the case of a 73-year-old woman who was admitted to hospital because of typical chest pain at rest after her brother's death. She had had a pacemaker implanted in 2001. Troponin levels were elevated and apical hypokinesia was shown by ventriculography and echocardiography, with normal coronary arteries. Evolving ECG alterations were observed in spite of the continued pacing rhythm. All these alterations were fully resolved after discharge. This case shows that, even in the presence of a pacemaker, evolving ECG alterations can be observed in Takotsubo syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. Dynamics of pi-junction interferometer circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornkev, V.K.; Mozhaev, P.B.; Borisenko, I.V.

    2002-01-01

    The pi-junction superconducting circuit dynamics was studied by means of numerical simulation technique. Parallel arrays consisting of Josephson junctions of both 0- and pi-type were studied as a model of high-T-c grain-boundary Josephson junction. The array dynamics and the critical current...... dependence on magnetic field are discussed. Experimental results for dc interferometers with 0 and pi high-T-c bi-crystal Josephson junctions are reported and discussed in comparison with numerical simulation....

  4. Relationships of Trichomonas gallinae to the palatal-esophageal junction of ring doves (Streptopelia risoria) as revealed by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kietzmann, G E

    1993-06-01

    Ring doves (Streptopelia risoria) were experimentally infected with pathogenic (virulent) Trichomonas gallinae so that trichomonad activities in the upper alimentary tract, prior to canker formation, could be examined with scanning electron microscopy. Between 6 and 15 hr postinoculation low numbers of ameboid T. gallinae were attached to apical microfolds and cell borders of the palatal-esophageal junction squamous epithelium. Initial parasite activities at tightly attached cell borders and apical microfolds suggest that some parasite-secreted factor or factors initiated squamous cell damage, separation, and removal. As squamous cell borders separated, trichomonads invaded areas beneath them and ultimately aided in their complete removal. Accelerated parasite-mediated desquamation, the invasion of increased mucosal surface area by trichomonads, and the eruption and expansion of cankers were the primary changes to the palatal-esophageal junction and other upper alimentary tract tissues that occurred between 19 and 240 hr postinoculation.

  5. Apically Extruded Sealers: Fate and Influence on Treatment Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricucci, Domenico; Rôças, Isabela N; Alves, Flávio R F; Loghin, Simona; Siqueira, José F

    2016-02-01

    This retrospective study evaluated cases of unintentional overfillings for the fate of the extruded sealers and their influence on treatment outcome. One hundred five teeth treated by a single operator and exhibiting overfillings in the postobturation radiograph were included in the study. Seventy-five teeth exhibited apical periodontitis lesions at the time of treatment. Sealers included Pulp Canal Sealer (Sybron Dental, Orange, CA), PCS Extended Working Time-EWT (Sybron Dental), Tubli-Seal (Sybron Endo), Endomethasone (Septodont, Saint-Maur-des-Fossés, France), AH Plus (DeTrey GmbH, Konstanz, Germany), and Apexit (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Lichtenstein). Recall radiographs were compared with immediate postobturation films for removal of the extruded material and status of the periradicular tissues. Data were grouped as 1-, 2- and >4-year recall and statistically analyzed using the chi-square and Fisher exact tests. As for the sealers' fate, the only statistically significant differences at the 1-year recall were observed when comparing Tubli-Seal with AH Plus, Apexit, and Endomethasone (P .05). Data from the >4-year recall revealed that 79% of the teeth with apical periodontitis lesions at the time of treatment had healed in comparison with 100% of the teeth with no apical periodontitis (P extruded sealers were predictably removed from the periradicular tissues. Treatment outcome was not significantly affected by the type of extruded sealer. A significantly better outcome was observed for teeth with no lesion in comparison with teeth with apical periodontitis. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Impact of osmotic dehydration on the encapsulated apices survival ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    L-1 activated charcoal) prior to encapsulation in alginate (3%) beads with calcium chloride (1.32M). Then, the apices were exposed to osmotic dehydration with two concentrations of sucrose (0.75M and 1.25M) at two durations (24h and 40h) before their culture in M2 medium (MS + 2mg.L-1 BAP, 100?g.L-1 d'ANA and 2g.

  7. The inner CSF–brain barrier: developmentally controlled access to the brain via intercellular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whish, Sophie; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M.; Møllgård, Kjeld; Noor, Natassya M.; Liddelow, Shane A.; Habgood, Mark D.; Richardson, Samantha J.; Saunders, Norman R.

    2015-01-01

    In the adult the interface between the cerebrospinal fluid and the brain is lined by the ependymal cells, which are joined by gap junctions. These intercellular connections do not provide a diffusional restrain between the two compartments. However, during development this interface, initially consisting of neuroepithelial cells and later radial glial cells, is characterized by “strap” junctions, which limit the exchange of different sized molecules between cerebrospinal fluid and the brain parenchyma. Here we provide a systematic study of permeability properties of this inner cerebrospinal fluid-brain barrier during mouse development from embryonic day, E17 until adult. Results show that at fetal stages exchange across this barrier is restricted to the smallest molecules (286Da) and the diffusional restraint is progressively removed as the brain develops. By postnatal day P20, molecules the size of plasma proteins (70 kDa) diffuse freely. Transcriptomic analysis of junctional proteins present in the cerebrospinal fluid-brain interface showed expression of adherens junctional proteins, actins, cadherins and catenins changing in a development manner consistent with the observed changes in the permeability studies. Gap junction proteins were only identified in the adult as was claudin-11. Immunohistochemistry was used to localize at the cellular level some of the adherens junctional proteins of genes identified from transcriptomic analysis. N-cadherin, β - and α-catenin immunoreactivity was detected outlining the inner CSF-brain interface from E16; most of these markers were not present in the adult ependyma. Claudin-5 was present in the apical-most part of radial glial cells and in endothelial cells in embryos, but only in endothelial cells including plexus endothelial cells in adults. Claudin-11 was only immunopositive in the adult, consistent with results obtained from transcriptomic analysis. These results provide information about physiological, molecular

  8. The inner CSF–brain barrier: developmentally controlled access to the brain via intercellular junctions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Ruthven Saunders

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In the adult the interface between the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and the brain is lined by the ependymal cells, which are joined by gap junctions. These intercellular connections do not provide a diffusional restrain between the two compartments. However during development this interface, initially consisting of neuroepithelial cells and later radial glial cells, is characterized by strap junctions, which limit the exchange of different sized molecules between CSF and the brain parenchyma. Here we provide a systematic study of permeability properties of this inner CSF-brain barrier during mouse development from embryonic day, E17 until adult. Results show that at fetal stages exchange across this barrier is restricted to the smallest molecules (286Da and the diffusional restraint is progressively removed as the brain develops. By postnatal day P20, molecules the size of plasma proteins (70kDa diffuse freely. Transcriptomic analysis of junctional proteins present in the CSF-brain interface showed expression of adherens junctional proteins, actins, cadherins and catenins changing in a development manner consistent with the observed changes in the permeability studies. Gap junction proteins were only identified in the adult as was claudin-11. Immunocytochemistry was used to localize at the cellular level some of the adherens junctional proteins of genes identified from transcriptomic analysis. N-cadherin, β– and α-catenin immunoreactivity was detected outlining the inner CSF-brain interface from E16; most of these markers were not present in the adult ependyma. Claudin-5 was present in the apical-most part of radial glial cells and in endothelial cells in embryos, but only in endothelial cells including plexus endothelial cells in adults. Claudin-11 was only immunopositive in the adult, consistent with results obtained from transcriptomic analysis. These results provide information about physiological, molecular and morphological

  9. Modelling and Analysis of Long Josephson Junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, T.P.P.

    2002-01-01

    For various reasons people have been interested in Josephson junctions. Ranging from "understanding nature" to building quantum computers. In this thesis we focus on a special type of junction (the long junction) and to a special type of problem fluxon dynamics.

  10. Soliton bunching in annular Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vernik, I.V; Lazarides, Nickos; Sørensen, Mads Peter

    1996-01-01

    By studying soliton (fluxon) motion in long annular Josephson junctions it is possible to avoid the influence of the boundaries and soliton-soliton collisions present in linear junctions. A new experimental design consisting of a niobium coil placed on top of an annular junction has been used...

  11. The Effect of Canal Contamination with Saliva on Apical Sealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sabaghi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Root canal obturation aims at sealing the root canal system to prevent re-contamination of canal and periapical space. Presence of moisture in canal before obturation may posit a negative effect on the quality of canal sealing. Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate the effect of canal contamination with saliva on apical microleakage. Methods: In this laboratory study, 58 human uni-root teeth were cleaned and shaped for obturation with gutta percha and sealer AH26. In the case group, specimens were contaminated with human saliva immediately before obturation, whereas the teeth in the control group were kept dry. All canals were filled by lateral condensation technique. Moreover, the teeth were placed in methylene blue dye for 3 days. Dye penetration was measured using a stereomicrosope. As a matter of fact, the study data were analyzed via utilizing t-test. Results: A significant difference was found between the two groups in regard with the apical leakage(P<0.001. The microleakage mean of dye in the dry group was 3/48mm, whereas it was 6/36mm in the saliva contaminated group. Conclusion: The study findings revealed that complete drying of canal can improve apical sealing.

  12. Apical transport of influenza A virus ribonucleoprotein requires Rab11-positive recycling endosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumitaka Momose

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus RNA genome exists as eight-segmented ribonucleoprotein complexes containing viral RNA polymerase and nucleoprotein (vRNPs. Packaging of vRNPs and virus budding take place at the apical plasma membrane (APM. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of apical transport of newly synthesized vRNP. Transfection of fluorescent-labeled antibody and subsequent live cell imaging revealed that punctate vRNP signals moved along microtubules rapidly but intermittently in both directions, suggestive of vesicle trafficking. Using a series of Rab family protein, we demonstrated that progeny vRNP localized to recycling endosome (RE in an active/GTP-bound Rab11-dependent manner. The vRNP interacted with Rab11 through viral RNA polymerase. The localization of vRNP to RE and subsequent accumulation to the APM were impaired by overexpression of Rab binding domains (RBD of Rab11 family interacting proteins (Rab11-FIPs. Similarly, no APM accumulation was observed by overexpression of class II Rab11-FIP mutants lacking RBD. These results suggest that the progeny vRNP makes use of Rab11-dependent RE machinery for APM trafficking.

  13. Impact of Dopant Compensation on Graded p-n Junctions in Si Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amit, Iddo; Jeon, Nari; Lauhon, Lincoln J; Rosenwaks, Yossi

    2016-01-13

    The modulation between different doping species required to produce a diode in VLS-grown nanowires (NWs) yields a complex doping profile, both axially and radially, and a gradual junction at the interface. We present a detailed analysis of the dopant distribution around the junction. By combining surface potential measurements, performed by KPFM, with finite element simulations, we show that the highly doped (5 × 10(19) cm(-3)) shell surrounding the NW can screen the junction's built in voltage at shell thickness as low as 3 nm. By comparing NWs with high and low doping contrast at the junction, we show that dopant compensation dramatically decreases the electrostatic width of the junction and results in relatively low leakage currents.

  14. Mic13 Is Essential for Formation of Crista Junctions in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Ruchika; Strecker, Valentina; Urbach, Jennifer; Wittig, Ilka; Reichert, Andreas S

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial cristae are connected to the inner boundary membrane via crista junctions which are implicated in the regulation of oxidative phosphorylation, apoptosis, and import of lipids and proteins. The MICOS complex determines formation of crista junctions. We performed complexome profiling and identified Mic13, also termed Qil1, as a subunit of the MICOS complex. We show that MIC13 is an inner membrane protein physically interacting with MIC60, a central subunit of the MICOS complex. Using the CRISPR/Cas method we generated the first cell line deleted for MIC13. These knockout cells show a complete loss of crista junctions demonstrating that MIC13 is strictly required for the formation of crista junctions. MIC13 is required for the assembly of MIC10, MIC26, and MIC27 into the MICOS complex. However, it is not needed for the formation of the MIC60/MIC19/MIC25 subcomplex suggesting that the latter is not sufficient for crista junction formation. MIC13 is also dispensable for assembly of respiratory chain complexes and for maintaining mitochondrial network morphology. Still, lack of MIC13 resulted in a moderate reduction of mitochondrial respiration. In summary, we show that MIC13 has a fundamental role in crista junction formation and that assembly of respiratory chain supercomplexes is independent of mitochondrial cristae shape.

  15. Mic13 Is Essential for Formation of Crista Junctions in Mammalian Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchika Anand

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial cristae are connected to the inner boundary membrane via crista junctions which are implicated in the regulation of oxidative phosphorylation, apoptosis, and import of lipids and proteins. The MICOS complex determines formation of crista junctions. We performed complexome profiling and identified Mic13, also termed Qil1, as a subunit of the MICOS complex. We show that MIC13 is an inner membrane protein physically interacting with MIC60, a central subunit of the MICOS complex. Using the CRISPR/Cas method we generated the first cell line deleted for MIC13. These knockout cells show a complete loss of crista junctions demonstrating that MIC13 is strictly required for the formation of crista junctions. MIC13 is required for the assembly of MIC10, MIC26, and MIC27 into the MICOS complex. However, it is not needed for the formation of the MIC60/MIC19/MIC25 subcomplex suggesting that the latter is not sufficient for crista junction formation. MIC13 is also dispensable for assembly of respiratory chain complexes and for maintaining mitochondrial network morphology. Still, lack of MIC13 resulted in a moderate reduction of mitochondrial respiration. In summary, we show that MIC13 has a fundamental role in crista junction formation and that assembly of respiratory chain supercomplexes is independent of mitochondrial cristae shape.

  16. Roles of gap junctions, connexins and pannexins in epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanthini eMylvaganam

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced gap junctional communication (GJC between neurons is considered a major factor underlying the neuronal synchrony driving seizure activity. In addition, the hippocampal sharp wave ripple complexes, associated with learning and seizures, are diminished by GJC blocking agents. Although gap junctional blocking drugs inhibit experimental seizures, they all have other nonspecific actions. Besides interneuronal GJC between dendrites, inter-axonal and inter-glial GJC is also considered important for seizure generation. Interestingly, in most studies of cerebral tissue from animal seizure models and from human patients with epilepsy, there is up-regulation of glial, but not neuronal gap junctional mRNA and protein. Significant changes in the expression and post-translational modification of the astrocytic connexin Cx43, and Panx1 were observed in an in vitro Co++ seizure model, further supporting a role for glia in seizure-genesis, although the reasons for this remain unclear. Further suggesting an involvement of astrocytic GJC in epilepsy, is the fact that the expression of astrocytic Cx mRNAs (Cxs 30 and 43 is several fold higher than that of neuronal Cx mRNAs (Cxs 36 and 45, and the number of glial cells outnumber neuronal cells in mammalian hippocampal and cortical tissue. Pannexin expression is also increased in both animal and human epileptic tissues. Specific Cx43 mimetic peptides, Gap 27 and SLS, inhibit the docking of astrocytic connexin Cx43 proteins from forming intercellular gap junctions, diminishing spontaneous seizures. Besides GJs, Cx membrane hemichannels in glia and Panx membrane channels in neurons and glia are also inhibited by gap junctional pharmacological blockers. Although there is no doubt that connexin-based gap junctions and hemichannels, and pannexin-based membrane channels are related to epilepsy, the specific details of how they are involved and how we can modulate their function for therapeutic purposes remain to

  17. Evaluation of the reinforcement effect on teeth with different apical foramen diameters of retrograde or orthograde MTA application with internal matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Bayram

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the apical foramen diameter and different application methods of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA on the fracture resistance of simulated immature teeth using a Universal Testing Machine. MATERIALS AND METHOD: Ninety extracted human teeth were used for the fracture resistance test. The apical foramen was prepared to a diameter of 1.0 mm or 1.4 mm to simulate the open apex of immature teeth. MTA was mixed according to manufacturer's recommendations and placed into the root canals with different apical foramen diameter by four different root filling techniques: retrograde, two-phased orthograde, and ortograde with or without internal matrix. Prepared roots were marked 2 mm below the cemento-enamel junction and embedded in transparent acrylic resin in cylinder moulds. Vertical force was applied along the long axis of the tooth at a speed of 5 mm/min, and the maximum resistance to fracture for each tooth was determined in Newton. A software package was used for the statistical analysis. The data were analyzed by using one-way ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey tests. RESULTS: A statistically significant difference could not be observed between the groups (p>0.05 whereas statistically significant differences were found between the test groups and the control groups (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: There was no significant difference between different vertical root filling techniques in increasing the fracture strength of the teeth. The diameter of the apical foramen did not have a significant effect on the fracture resistance.

  18. Evaluation of Apical Sealing Ability of a Dentin Bonding Agent and Epoxy Resin used as Root Canal Sealer - An In Vitro Dye Leakage Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinidhi Surya Raghavendra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Total obliteration of the canal space and perfect sealing of the apical foramen with an inert, dimensionally stable and biologically compatible material are the goals for successful endodontic treatment. A microscopic layer of debris is formed during bio-mechanical preparation of the canal called Smear layer. This interferes with adhesion and penetration of canal sealers and its removal is necessary. Dentin bonding agents have been studied extensively for their adhesive properties in restorative dentistry and recently as root canal sealers. Microleakage studies of their sealing abilities are few. Materials and Methods: This study evaluated sealing efficacy of a dentin bonding agent when used as root canal sealer along with AH26, an epoxy resin sealer and the effect of the smear layer on the sealing ability. 60 extracted maxillary anterior teeth were taken, sectioned at the Cemento enamel junction, cleaned and shaped with 2% K files. They were divided into 4 groups, GroupsAandBwithoutEDTApre-treatment and GroupsCandDwithEDTApre-treatment. GroupsAandCwere obturated withAH26 and Groups B and D were obturated with dentin bonding agent Polibond andAH26 with gutta percha and lateral condensation method. Apical dye penetration was measured using 2% Methylene Blue and evaluated with stereo microscope. Results were tabulated and statistical analysis done. Results: The chemically cured bonding agent Polibond used with AH26 showed significantly less apical leakage when smear layer was removed before obturation. Conclusion: Use of dentin bonding agents and resin sealers in root canal obturations achieves effective apical sealing when used with gutta percha. This improves the success of endodontic therapy.

  19. Development, characterization, and applications of high temperature superconductor nanobridge Josephson junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, J.R.; Tigges, C.P.; Hietala, V.M.; Plut, T.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Martens, J.S.; Char, K.; Johansson, M.E. [Conductus, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA (United States)

    1994-03-01

    A well-controlled, high-yield Josephson junction process in high temperature superconductors (HTS) is necessary for the demonstration of ultra-high-speed devices and circuits which exceed the capabilities of conventional electronics. The authors developed nanobridge Josephson junctions in high quality thin-film YBaCuO with dimensions below 100 nm fabricated using electron-beam nanolithography. They characterized this Josephson junction technology for process yield, junction parameter uniformity, and overall applicability for use in high-performance circuits. To facilitate the determination of junction parameters, they developed a measurement technique based on spectral analysis in the range of 90--160 GHz of phase-locked, oscillating arrays of up to 2,450 Josephson junctions. Because of the excellent yield and uniformity of the nanobridge junctions, they successfully applied the junction technology to a wide variety of circuits. These circuits included transmission-line pulse formers and 32 and 64-bit shift registers. The 32-bit shift register was shown to operate at clock speeds near 100 GHz and is believed to be one of the faster and more complex digital circuit demonstrated to date using high temperature superconductor technology.

  20. Josephson junctions and dark energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetzer, Philippe; Straumann, Norbert

    2006-08-01

    In a recent paper Beck and Mackey [C. Beck, M.C. Mackey, astro-ph/0603397] argue that the argument we gave in our paper [Ph. Jetzer, N. Straumann, Phys. Lett. B 606 (2005) 77, astro-ph/0411034] to disprove their claim that dark energy can be discovered in the Lab through noise measurements of Josephson junctions is incorrect. In particular, they emphasize that the measured noise spectrum in Josephson junctions is a consequence of the fluctuation dissipation theorem, while our argument was based on equilibrium statistical mechanics. In this note we show that the fluctuation dissipation relation does not depend upon any shift of vacuum (zero-point) energies, and therefore, as already concluded in our previous paper, dark energy has nothing to do with the proposed measurements.

  1. Josephson junctions and dark energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jetzer, Philippe; Straumann, Norbert

    2006-01-01

    In a recent paper Beck and Mackey [C. Beck, M.C. Mackey, astro-ph/0603397] argue that the argument we gave in our paper [Ph. Jetzer, N. Straumann, Phys. Lett. B 606 (2005) 77, astro-ph/0411034] to disprove their claim that dark energy can be discovered in the Lab through noise measurements of Josephson junctions is incorrect. In particular, they emphasize that the measured noise spectrum in Josephson junctions is a consequence of the fluctuation dissipation theorem, while our argument was based on equilibrium statistical mechanics. In this note we show that the fluctuation dissipation relation does not depend upon any shift of vacuum (zero-point) energies, and therefore, as already concluded in our previous paper, dark energy has nothing to do with the proposed measurements

  2. Josephson junctions and dark energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jetzer, Philippe [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zurich (Switzerland)]. E-mail: jetzer@physik.unizh.ch; Straumann, Norbert [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2006-08-03

    In a recent paper Beck and Mackey [C. Beck, M.C. Mackey, astro-ph/0603397] argue that the argument we gave in our paper [Ph. Jetzer, N. Straumann, Phys. Lett. B 606 (2005) 77, astro-ph/0411034] to disprove their claim that dark energy can be discovered in the Lab through noise measurements of Josephson junctions is incorrect. In particular, they emphasize that the measured noise spectrum in Josephson junctions is a consequence of the fluctuation dissipation theorem, while our argument was based on equilibrium statistical mechanics. In this note we show that the fluctuation dissipation relation does not depend upon any shift of vacuum (zero-point) energies, and therefore, as already concluded in our previous paper, dark energy hathing to do with the proposed measurements.

  3. PCBS AND TIGHT JUNCTION EXPRESSION

    OpenAIRE

    Eum, Sung Yong; András, Ibolya E.; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Hennig, Bernhard; Toborek, Michal

    2008-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners exhibit a broad range of adverse biological effects including neurotoxicity. The mechanisms by which PCBs cause neurotoxic effects are still not completely understood. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a physical and metabolic barrier separating brain microenvironment from the peripheral circulation and is mainly composed of endothelial cells connected by tight junctions. We examined the effects of several highly-chlorinated PCB congeners on expression ...

  4. Superconducting tunnel-junction refrigerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melton, R.G.; Paterson, J.L.; Kaplan, S.B.

    1980-01-01

    The dc current through an S 1 -S 2 tunnel junction, with Δ 2 greater than Δ 1 , when biased with eV 1 +Δ 2 , will lower the energy in S 1 . This energy reduction will be shared by the phonons and electrons. This device is shown to be analogous to a thermoelectric refrigerator with an effective Peltier coefficient π* approx. Δ 1 /e. Tunneling calculations yield the cooling power P/sub c/, the electrical power P/sub e/ supplied by the bias supply, and the cooling efficiency eta=P/sub c//P/sub e/. The maximum cooling power is obtained for eV= +- (Δ 2 -Δ 1 ) and t 1 =T 1 /T/sub c/1 approx. 0.9. Estimates are made of the temperature difference T 2 -T 1 achievable in Al-Pb and Sn-Pb junctions with an Al 2 O 3 tunneling barrier. The performance of this device is shown to yield a maximum cooling efficiency eta approx. = Δ 1 /(Δ 2 -Δ 1 ) which can be compared with that available in an ideal Carnot refrigerator of eta=T 1 /(T 2 -T 1 ). The development of a useful tunnel-junction refrigerator requires a tunneling barrier with an effective thermal conductance per unit area several orders of magnitude less than that provided by the A1 2 O 3 barrier in the Al-Pb and Sn-Pb systems

  5. Squeezed States in Josephson Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, X.; Nori, F.

    1996-03-01

    We have studied quantum fluctuation properties of Josephson junctions in the limit of large Josephson coupling energy and small charging energy, when the eigenstates of the system can be treated as being nearly localized. We have considered(X. Hu and F. Nori, preprints.) a Josephson junction in a variety of situations, e.g., coupled to one or several of the following elements: a capacitor, an inductor (in a superconducting ring), and an applied current source. By solving an effective Shrödinger equation, we have obtained squeezed vacuum (coherent) states as the ground states of a ``free-oscillating'' (linearly-driven) Josephson junction, and calculated the uncertainties of its canonical momentum, charge, and coordinate, phase. We have also shown that the excited states of the various systems we consider are similar to the number states of a simple harmonic oscillator but with different fluctuation properties. Furthermore, we have obtained the time-evolution operators for these systems. These operators can make it easier to calculate the time-dependence of the expectation values and fluctuations of various quantities starting from an arbitrary initial state.

  6. Irrigation dynamics associated with positive pressure, apical negative pressure and passive ultrasonic irrigations: a computational fluid dynamics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, José Enrique; Nurbakhsh, Babak; Layton, Gillian; Bussmann, Markus; Kishen, Anil

    2014-08-01

    Complexities in root canal anatomy and surface adherent biofilm structures remain as challenges in endodontic disinfection. The ability of an irrigant to penetrate into the apical region of a canal, along with its interaction with the root canal walls, will aid in endodontic disinfection. The aim of this study was to qualitatively examine the irrigation dynamics of syringe irrigation with different needle tip designs (open-ended and closed-ended), apical negative pressure irrigation with the EndoVac® system, and passive ultrasonic-assisted irrigation, using a computational fluid dynamics model. Syringe-based irrigation with a side-vented needle showed a higher wall shear stress than the open-ended but was localised to a small region of the canal wall. The apical negative pressure mode of irrigation generated the lowest wall shear stress, while the passive-ultrasonic irrigation group showed the highest wall shear stress along with the greatest magnitude of velocity. © 2013 The Authors. Australian Endodontic Journal © 2013 Australian Society of Endodontology.

  7. Single Molecule Nanoelectrochemistry in Electrical Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Richard J; Higgins, Simon J

    2016-11-15

    gating. This has been referred to as to a "single molecule transistor configuration" with the gate voltage being provided by the controllable potential achieved through the electrochemical double layer. It is shown how the electrolyte medium can control such gating, with ionic liquids providing more efficient gate coupling than aqueous electrolytes. Control of the conductance of viologen molecular wires can also be achieved by encapsulating the viologen redox moiety within a molecular cage, thereby controlling its immediate environment. Molecular conductance can also be gated through multiple redox states. This has been shown for the redox moiety pyrrolo-tetrathiafulvalene, which undergoes single molecule electrochemical transistor gating through three redox states in molecular junctions. Charge transport through this junction follows a two-step hopping mechanism, demonstrating the role of the redox center in electron transfer across the molecular bridge. Recent electrolyte gating studies of rigid, conjugated redox-active metal complexes with tailored terpyridine coordinating ligands and anchors are also presented. These aforementioned studies have all been performed with gold electrode contacts. The Account concludes with recent data showing that it is now possible to study single molecule electrochemical gating with nickel electrodes. This opens up new perspectives for studying interfacial charge transfer with a wide variety of other electrode materials including semiconductor electrodes and also points toward future opportunities for coupling molecular spintronics and nanoelectrochemistry.

  8. Vinculin but not alpha-actinin is a target of PKC phosphorylation during junctional assembly induced by calcium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez-Moreno, M; Avila, A; Islas, S

    1998-01-01

    The establishment of the junctional complex in epithelial cells requires the presence of extracellular calcium, and is controlled by a network of reactions involving G-proteins, phospholipase C and protein kinase C. Since potential candidates for phosphorylation are the tight junction associated ...

  9. Does apical root resection in endodontic microsurgery jeopardize the prosthodontic prognosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sin-Yeon Cho

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Apical surgery cuts off the apical root and the crown-to-root ratio becomes unfavorable. Crown-to-root ratio has been applied to periodontally compromised teeth. Apical root resection is a different matter from periodontal bone loss. The purpose of this paper is to review the validity of crown-to-root ratio in the apically resected teeth. Most roots have conical shape and the root surface area of coronal part is wider than apical part of the same length. Therefore loss of alveolar bone support from apical resection is much less than its linear length.The maximum stress from mastication concentrates on the cervical area and the minimum stress was found on the apical 1/3 area. Therefore apical root resection is not so harmful as periodontal bone loss. Osteotomy for apical resection reduces longitudinal width of the buccal bone and increases the risk of endo-perio communication which leads to failure. Endodontic microsurgery is able to realize 0 degree or shallow bevel and precise length of root resection, and minimize the longitudinal width of osteotomy. The crown-to-root ratio is not valid in evaluating the prosthodontic prognosis of the apically resected teeth. Accurate execution of endodontic microsurgery to preserve the buccal bone is essential to avoid endo-perio communication.

  10. Does apical root resection in endodontic microsurgery jeopardize the prosthodontic prognosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sin-Yeon; Kim, Euiseong

    2013-05-01

    Apical surgery cuts off the apical root and the crown-to-root ratio becomes unfavorable. Crown-to-root ratio has been applied to periodontally compromised teeth. Apical root resection is a different matter from periodontal bone loss. The purpose of this paper is to review the validity of crown-to-root ratio in the apically resected teeth. Most roots have conical shape and the root surface area of coronal part is wider than apical part of the same length. Therefore loss of alveolar bone support from apical resection is much less than its linear length.The maximum stress from mastication concentrates on the cervical area and the minimum stress was found on the apical 1/3 area. Therefore apical root resection is not so harmful as periodontal bone loss. Osteotomy for apical resection reduces longitudinal width of the buccal bone and increases the risk of endo-perio communication which leads to failure. Endodontic microsurgery is able to realize 0 degree or shallow bevel and precise length of root resection, and minimize the longitudinal width of osteotomy. The crown-to-root ratio is not valid in evaluating the prosthodontic prognosis of the apically resected teeth. Accurate execution of endodontic microsurgery to preserve the buccal bone is essential to avoid endo-perio communication.

  11. Bacterial communities associated with apical periodontitis and dental implant failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingsdag, Simon; Nelson, Stephen; Coleman, Nicholas V.

    2016-01-01

    Background Previously, we demonstrated that bacteria reside in apparently healed alveolar bone, using culture and Sanger sequencing techniques. Bacteria in apparently healed alveolar bone may have a role in peri-implantitis and dental implant failure. Objective To compare bacterial communities associated with apical periodontitis, those colonising a failed implant and alveolar bone with reference biofilm samples from healthy teeth. Methods and results The study consisted of 196 samples collected from 40 patients undergoing routine dental implant insertion or rehabilitation. The bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA sequences were amplified. Samples yielding sufficient polymerase chain reaction product for further molecular analyses were subjected to terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP; 31 samples) and next generation DNA sequencing (454 GS FLX Titanium; 8 samples). T-RFLP analysis revealed that the bacterial communities in diseased tissues were more similar to each other (p<0.049) than those from the healthy reference samples. Next generation sequencing detected 13 bacterial phyla and 373 putative bacterial species, revealing an increased abundance of Gram-negative [Prevotella, Fusobacterium (p<0.004), Treponema, Veillonellaceae, TG5 (Synergistetes)] bacteria and a decreased abundance of Gram-positive [(Actinomyces, Corynebacterium (p<0.008)] bacteria in the diseased tissue samples (n=5) relative to reference supragingival healthy samples (n=3). Conclusion Increased abundances of Prevotella, Fusobacterium and TG5 (Synergistetes) were associated with apical periodontitis and a failed implant. A larger sample set is needed to confirm these trends and to better define the processes of bacterial pathogenesis in implant failure and apical periodontitis. The application of combined culture-based, microscopic and molecular technique-based approaches is suggested for future studies. PMID:27834171

  12. SEM investigation of Er:YAG laser apical preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bǎlǎbuc, Cosmin; Todea, Carmen; Locovei, Cosmin; RǎduÅ£ǎ, Aurel

    2016-03-01

    Endodontic surgery involves the incision and flap elevation, the access to the root tip, its resection, the cavity retrograde preparation and filling it with biocompatible material that provides a good seal of the apex[1]. Apicoectomy is compulsory in endodontic surgery. The final stage involves the root retropreparation and the carrying out of the retrograde obturation. In order to perform the retrograde preparation the endodontist can use various tools such as lowspeed conventional handpieces, sonic and ultrasonic equipment. The ideal depth of the preparation should be 3 mm, exceeding this value may affect the long-term success of the obturation [2]. Resection at the depth of 3 mm reduces apical ramifications by 98% and lateral root canals by 93%. The ultrasonic retropreparation has numerous advantages compared to the dental drill. Firstly, the cavity will be in the axis of the tooth which implies a minimum destruction of the root canal morphology. The preparations are precise, and the cutting pattern is perpendicular to the long axis of the root, the advantage being the reduction in the number of dentinal tubules exposed at the resected area [3]. Therefore, the retrograde filling is the procedure when an inert and non-toxic material is compacted in the apically created cavity.[4,5]. The Er:YAG laser is the most common wavelength indicated for dental hard tissue preparation. Its natural selectivity offers a significant advantage compared to the conventional hard tissue preparation [6-9].The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the quality of Er:YAG laser apical third preparation using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), in comparison with the conventional ultrasonic method.

  13. Immunoexpression of interleukin 17 in apical periodontitis lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajuz, Natasha C; Antunes, Henrique; Mendonça, Thais A; Pires, Fábio R; Siqueira, José F; Armada, Luciana

    2014-09-01

    Interleukin (IL)-17 expression has been detected in apical periodontitis lesions, but its role in the disease process remains unclear. The present study compared the expression of IL-17 in periradicular cysts and granulomas and evaluated the association of this cytokine with clinical and radiographic findings. Apical periodontitis lesions (18 cysts and 20 granulomas) were obtained from 38 patients subjected to periradicular surgery. Some clinical, radiographic, and cone-beam computed tomographic features were recorded. Silanized slides containing paraffin sections were used for the immunohistochemical reactions using anti-IL-17 antibody. Image analysis was performed using an optical microscope, and each sample was divided into 5 high-power fields, which were evaluated for the expression of IL-17 in the epithelium and connective tissues. Results were evaluated for correlations with the lesion size and the occurrence of symptoms and sinus tract. Expression of IL-17 was significantly higher in cysts than in granulomas (P = .02). Among the periradicular cysts, a thin epithelium showed significantly increased labeling for IL-17 when compared with a hyperplastic epithelium (P = .003). IL-17 expression was usually associated with focal accumulations of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. No association of IL-17 expression with symptoms, sinus tract, or lesion size was observed (P > .05). The present study reinforces the notion that IL-17 may take part in the pathogenesis of apical periodontitis lesions. A role in the exacerbation of chronic inflammation and cyst formation is suspected. Further studies are required to shed light on the specific functions of IL-17 in periradicular inflammatory processes. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Bacterial communities associated with apical periodontitis and dental implant failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Dingsdag

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Previously, we demonstrated that bacteria reside in apparently healed alveolar bone, using culture and Sanger sequencing techniques. Bacteria in apparently healed alveolar bone may have a role in peri-implantitis and dental implant failure. Objective: To compare bacterial communities associated with apical periodontitis, those colonising a failed implant and alveolar bone with reference biofilm samples from healthy teeth. Methods and results: The study consisted of 196 samples collected from 40 patients undergoing routine dental implant insertion or rehabilitation. The bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA sequences were amplified. Samples yielding sufficient polymerase chain reaction product for further molecular analyses were subjected to terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP; 31 samples and next generation DNA sequencing (454 GS FLX Titanium; 8 samples. T-RFLP analysis revealed that the bacterial communities in diseased tissues were more similar to each other (p<0.049 than those from the healthy reference samples. Next generation sequencing detected 13 bacterial phyla and 373 putative bacterial species, revealing an increased abundance of Gram-negative [Prevotella, Fusobacterium (p<0.004, Treponema, Veillonellaceae, TG5 (Synergistetes] bacteria and a decreased abundance of Gram-positive [(Actinomyces, Corynebacterium (p<0.008] bacteria in the diseased tissue samples (n=5 relative to reference supragingival healthy samples (n=3. Conclusion: Increased abundances of Prevotella, Fusobacterium and TG5 (Synergistetes were associated with apical periodontitis and a failed implant. A larger sample set is needed to confirm these trends and to better define the processes of bacterial pathogenesis in implant failure and apical periodontitis. The application of combined culture-based, microscopic and molecular technique-based approaches is suggested for future studies.

  15. Apical Na+ permeability of frog skin during serosal Cl- replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibowich, S; DeLong, J; Civan, M M

    1988-05-01

    Gluconate substitution for serosal Cl- reduces the transepithelial short-circuit current (Isc) and depolarizes short-circuited frog skins. These effects could result either from inhibition of basolateral K+ conductance, or from two actions to inhibit both apical Na+ permeability (PapNa) and basolateral pump activity. We have addressed this question by studying whole-and split-thickness frog skins. Intracellular Na+ concentration (CcNa) and PapNa have been monitored by measuring the current-voltage relationship for apical Na+ entry. This analysis was conducted by applying trains of voltage pulses, with pulse durations of 16 to 32 msec. Estimates of PapNa and CcNa were not detectably dependent on pulse duration over the range 16 to 80 msec. Serosal Cl- replacement uniformly depolarized short-circuited tissues. The depolarization was associated with inhibition of Isc across each split skin, but only occasionally across the whole-thickness preparations. This difference may reflect the better ionic exchange between the bulk medium and the extracellular fluid in contact with the basolateral membranes, following removal of the underlying dermis in the split-skin preparations. PapNa was either unchanged or increased, and CcNa either unchanged or reduced after the anionic replacement. These data are incompatible with the concept that serosal Cl- replacement inhibits PapNa and Na,K-pump activity. Gluconate substitution likely reduces cell volume, triggering inhibition of the basolateral K+ channels, consistent with the data and conclusions of S.A. Lewis, A.G. Butt, M.J. Bowler, J.P. Leader and A.D.C. Macknight (J. Membrane Biol. 83:119-137, 1985) for toad bladder. The resulting depolarization reduces the electrical force favoring apical Na+ entry. The volume-conductance coupling serves to conserve volume by reducing K+ solute loss. Its molecular basis remains to be identified.

  16. The sound sensation of apical electric stimulation in cochlear implant recipients with contralateral residual hearing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane S Lazard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies using vocoders as acoustic simulators of cochlear implants have generally focused on simulation of speech understanding, gender recognition, or music appreciation. The aim of the present experiment was to study the auditory sensation perceived by cochlear implant (CI recipients with steady electrical stimulation on the most-apical electrode. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Five unilateral CI users with contralateral residual hearing were asked to vary the parameters of an acoustic signal played to the non-implanted ear, in order to match its sensation to that of the electric stimulus. They also provided a rating of similarity between each acoustic sound they selected and the electric stimulus. On average across subjects, the sound rated as most similar was a complex signal with a concentration of energy around 523 Hz. This sound was inharmonic in 3 out of 5 subjects with a moderate, progressive increase in the spacing between the frequency components. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: For these subjects, the sound sensation created by steady electric stimulation on the most-apical electrode was neither a white noise nor a pure tone, but a complex signal with a progressive increase in the spacing between the frequency components in 3 out of 5 subjects. Knowing whether the inharmonic nature of the sound was related to the fact that the non-implanted ear was impaired has to be explored in single-sided deafened patients with a contralateral CI. These results may be used in the future to better understand peripheral and central auditory processing in relation to cochlear implants.

  17. Locus of the apices of projectile trajectories under constant drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Saldaña, H.

    2017-11-01

    Using the hodograph method, we present an analytical solution for projectile coplanar motion under constant drag, parametrised by the velocity angle. We find the locus formed by the apices of the projectile trajectories, and discuss its implementation for the motion of a particle on an inclined plane in presence of Coulomb friction. The range and time of flight are obtained numerically, and we find that the optimal launching angle is smaller than in the drag-free case. This is a good example of a problem with constant dissipation of energy that includes curvature; it is appropriate for intermediate courses of mechanics.

  18. Pyogenic granuloma subsequent to apical fenestration of a primary tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiló, Luz; Bagán, José V

    2002-05-01

    The authors present two case reports of patients exhibiting pyogenic granulomas in the maxillary labial mucosa, which were related to an apical fenestration of a primary incisor. Several researchers have reported that the gingival wound and surrounding inflammatory tissue typically heal spontaneously after extraction of a fenestrated primary tooth. However, in the cases presented here, the gingival lesion did not heal after the fenestrated teeth were extracted. After extracting fenestrated teeth, clinicians need to examine the labial area at a follow-up appointment to ensure that the gingival hyperplasia heals properly. The authors suggest performing curettage of the surrounding abnormal tissue at the time of the tooth extraction.

  19. The psychostimulant modafinil enhances gap junctional communication in cortical astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinhe; Petit, Jean-Marie; Ezan, Pascal; Gyger, Joël; Magistretti, Pierre; Giaume, Christian

    2013-12-01

    Sleep-wake cycle is characterized by changes in neuronal network activity. However, for the last decade there is increasing evidence that neuroglial interaction may play a role in the modulation of sleep homeostasis and that astrocytes have a critical impact in this process. Interestingly, astrocytes are organized into communicating networks based on their high expression of connexins, which are the molecular constituents of gap junction channels. Thus, neuroglial interactions should also be considered as the result of the interplay between neuronal and astroglial networks. Here, we investigate the effect of modafinil, a wakefulness-promoting agent, on astrocyte gap junctional communication. We report that in the cortex modafinil injection increases the expression of mRNA and protein of connexin 30 but not those of connexin 43, the other major astroglial connexin. These increases are correlated with an enhancement of intercellular dye coupling in cortical astrocytes, which is abolished when neuronal activity is silenced by tetrodotoxin. Moreover, gamma-hydroxybutyric acid, which at a millimolar concentration induces sleep, has an opposite effect on astroglial gap junctions in an activity-independent manner. These results support the proposition that astroglia may play an important role in complex physiological brain functions, such as sleep regulation, and that neuroglial networking interaction is modified during sleep-wake cycle. This article is part of the Special Issue Section entitled 'Current Pharmacology of Gap Junction Channels and Hemichannels'. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Complex band structure and electronic transmission eigenchannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders; Strange, Mikkel; Smidstrup, Soren

    2017-01-01

    molecular junctions. The molecular junctions show that both the length dependence of the total transmission and the individual transmission eigenvalues can be, almost always, found through the complex band structure. The complex band structure of the semi-conducting material, however, does not predict...

  1. Protein kinase a dependent phosphorylation of apical membrane antigen 1 plays an important role in erythrocyte invasion by the malaria parasite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Leykauf

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Apicomplexan parasites are obligate intracellular parasites that infect a variety of hosts, causing significant diseases in livestock and humans. The invasive forms of the parasites invade their host cells by gliding motility, an active process driven by parasite adhesion proteins and molecular motors. A crucial point during host cell invasion is the formation of a ring-shaped area of intimate contact between the parasite and the host known as a tight junction. As the invasive zoite propels itself into the host-cell, the junction moves down the length of the parasite. This process must be tightly regulated and signalling is likely to play a role in this event. One crucial protein for tight-junction formation is the apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1. Here we have investigated the phosphorylation status of this key player in the invasion process in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. We show that the cytoplasmic tail of P. falciparum AMA1 is phosphorylated at serine 610. We provide evidence that the enzyme responsible for serine 610 phosphorylation is the cAMP regulated protein kinase A (PfPKA. Importantly, mutation of AMA1 serine 610 to alanine abrogates phosphorylation of AMA1 in vivo and dramatically impedes invasion. In addition to shedding unexpected new light on AMA1 function, this work represents the first time PKA has been implicated in merozoite invasion.

  2. Cigarette smoke disrupts the integrity of airway adherens junctions through the aberrant interaction of p120-catenin with the cytoplasmic tail of MUC1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lili; Gallup, Marianne; Zlock, Lorna; Basbaum, Carol; Finkbeiner, Walter E.; McNamara, Nancy A.

    2014-01-01

    Adherens junctions (AJs) containing epithelial cadherin (E-cad) bound to p120-catenin (p120ctn) and β-catenin (β-ctn) play a crucial role in regulating cell–cell adhesion. Cigarette smoke abrogates cell–cell adhesion between epithelial cells by disrupting E-cad, a hallmark of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), yet the underlying mechanism remains unknown. We used an organotypic culture of primary human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells treated with smoke-concentrated medium (Smk) to establish an essential role for the interaction between p120ctn and the cytoplasmic tail of MUC1 (MUC1-CT) in regulating E-cad disruption. Within the first 4 h of smoke exposure, apical MUC1-CT repositioned to the basolateral membrane of pseudo-stratified HBE cells, where it interacted with p120ctn. A time-dependent increase in MUC1-CT/p120ctn complexes occurred in conjunction with a time-dependent dissociation of p120ctn/E-cad/β-ctn complexes, as well as the coordinated degradation of p120ctn and E-cad. Interestingly, Smk induced a similar interaction between MUC1-CT and β-ctn, but this occurred 44 h after MUC1-CT’s initial interaction with p120ctn, and well after the AJs were destroyed. Blocking MUC1-CT’s interaction with p120ctn using a MUC1-CT dominant-negative peptide, PMIP, successfully abolished Smk’s disruptive effects on AJs and recovered apical-basolateral polarity of HBE cells. The MUC1-CT/p120ctn interaction was highly dependent on EGFR/Src/Jnk-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation (TyrP) of MUC1-CT. Accordingly, EGFR, Src or Jnk inhibitors (AG1478, PP2, SP600125, respectively) abrogated Smk-induced MUC1-CT-TyrP, MUC1-CT/p120ctn interaction, AJ disruption, and loss of cellular polarity. Our work identified MUC1-CT and p120ctn as important regulators of epithelial polarity and cell-cell adhesion during a smoke-induced EMT-like process. Novel therapeutics designed to inhibit MUC1-CT/p120ctn complex formation may prevent EMT in the smoker’s airway. PMID

  3. Histological evaluation of the root apices of failed endodontic cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Nicole Pecora

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this histological study was to evaluate the different causes of the failures of the endodontic treatment. Materials and Methods: Adult patients who were referred for endodontic surgery and for whom root-end resection was considered suitable were invited to participate in this study. The inclusion criteria were: (1 Patients aged between 18 and 65 years; (2 teeth with apical periodontitis that was diagnosed radiographically; (3 the tooth could not be adequately and better managed by root-canal retreatment; and (4 the crown of the tooth was adequately restored. One hundred root apices were surgically removed together with the periapical pathological tissue from 92 patients (56 males and 36 women.Histological sectioning was performed on calcified specimens that were embedded in a suitable medium. Results: The causes of endodontic failure identified through histological evaluation were as follows: Presence of bacterial and debris into canals (51%, apex transposition and overfilling (3%, presence of the isthmus (21%, bacterial colonization of root surface (2%, untreated canals (11%, and filling material outside root canal (4%. There was no significant difference between the distribution of teeth and the causes of endodontic failures (P = 0.32. Conclusions: The present study demonstrated that the most common cause of endodontic failure is the insufficient cleaning of the root canal system. It also explores the effectiveness of histological evaluation of the root apex following root-end resection in exploring the causes of endodontic failures.

  4. Apical canal sealing ability of calcium phosphate based cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, M; Inamoto, T; Hakata, T; Toda, T

    1996-12-01

    The apical canal sealing ability of newly developed calcium phosphate cement (TDM-C), an equimolar mixture of tetracalcium and dicalcium phosphate dihydrate kneaded with McIlvain's buffer solution containing sodium carboxymethyl cellulose, was evaluated in a relative comparison with several recognized available products. The latter included BONETRIX (alpha-tricalcium phosphate mixed with citric acid and tannic acid), ARS (alpha-tricalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite mixed with polyacrylic acid), and zine oxide eugenol sealer (ZOE). Canals of forty extracted human maxillary central incisors were prepared to the file size #70, divided into four groups, and obturated with each of the four above materials. Setting of all sealers took place either in 30% bovine serum solution or in phosphate buffered saline solution. Teeth were then decalcified and cleared to measure linear penetration of India ink from the apex into the canal. Results were statistically analyzed by Student's t-test. Surfaces of all materials, after setting, were also observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We found that TDM-C, BONETRIX, and ZOE all showed excellent apical sealing ability whereas ARS was less effective in this regard. SEM analysis revealed micropores on the surface of every apatitic product, but ZOE was free of such porosity. It was concluded that TDM-C and BONETRIX may prove clinically useful as root canal sealant materials.

  5. Apical versus Basal Neurogenesis Directs Cortical Interneuron Subclass Fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petros, Timothy J; Bultje, Ronald S; Ross, M Elizabeth; Fishell, Gord; Anderson, Stewart A

    2015-11-10

    Fate determination in the mammalian telencephalon, with its diversity of neuronal subtypes and relevance to neuropsychiatric disease, remains a critical area of study in neuroscience. Most studies investigating this topic focus on the diversity of neural progenitors within spatial and temporal domains along the lateral ventricles. Often overlooked is whether the location of neurogenesis within a fate-restricted domain is associated with, or instructive for, distinct neuronal fates. Here, we use in vivo fate mapping and the manipulation of neurogenic location to demonstrate that apical versus basal neurogenesis influences the fate determination of major subgroups of cortical interneurons derived from the subcortical telencephalon. Somatostatin-expressing interneurons arise mainly from apical divisions along the ventricular surface, whereas parvalbumin-expressing interneurons originate predominantly from basal divisions in the subventricular zone. As manipulations that shift neurogenic location alter interneuron subclass fate, these results add an additional dimension to the spatial-temporal determinants of neuronal fate determination. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Occipitocervical junction: Aanatomy, craniometry and pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtner, J; Woitek, R; Asenbaum, U; Prayer, D; Schueller-Weidekamm, C

    2016-04-01

    The occipitocervical junction comprises of the occiput condyles, the atlas, and the axis. The radiological evaluation of this region is supported by craniometric measurement methods which are based on predefined anatomical landmarks. The main pathologies of the occipitocervical junction are traumatic injuries, congenital anomalies or normal variants, infections, arthropathies, and tumors. In this article, the anatomy of the occipitocervical junction as well as the most important craniometric measurement methods are explained. Moreover various pathologies and similar appearing normal variants are presented.

  7. Calcium hydroxide as intracanal dressing for teeth with apical periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sari Dewiyani

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Root canal infection and periapical diseases are caused by bacteria and their products. Long term infection may spread bacteria throughout the root canal system. Apical periodontitis caused by infectious microbe that persistent in root canals can cause radiographic and histopathology periapical changes. Chemomechanical preparation and intracanal dressing then are recommended to be conducted and used in between visits to eliminate microbes in root canals. Calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH2 can be used as intracanal dressing since it can be used as musical physical defense barrier to eliminate re-infection in root canal and to disturb nutrition supply for bacterial development. Purpose: The aim of this study is observe the effectiveness of Ca(OH2 in treating endodontic teeth with apical periodontitis. Cases: Case 1 and 3 are about patients whose left posterior mandibular teeth had spontaneous intermittent pain. Case 2 is about a patient whose left posterior maxillary teeth had gingival abscess and fracture history. Based on the radiographic examination, it was known that the filling of root canal was incomplete and there was radiolucency in the apical area. Case management: The cases were treated with triad endodontics, which involves preparation, disinfection by using 2.5% NaOCl as irrigation substance and calcium hydroxide as intracanal dressing, and then the filling of root canal with gutta percha and endomethasone root canal cement. Evaluations were conducted one month, 12 months, and 24 months after the treatment. Conclusion: Calcium hydroxide is effective to be used as intracanal dressing in apical periodontitis cases.Latar belakang: Infeksi saluran akar dan penyakit periapeks disebabkan oleh mikroba dan produknya. Infeksi yang berlangsung lama memungkinkan bakteri masuk ke dalam seluruh sistem saluran akar. Periodontitis apikal disebabkan oleh infeksi persisten mikroba di dalam sistem saluran akar disertai perubahan radiografik dan

  8. Josephson junctions as heterodyne detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taur, Y.; Claassen, J.H.; Richards, P.L.

    Heterodyne detection with a point-contact Josephson junction has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The measured performance of the device at 36 GHz is in good agreement with the theory. By operating vanadium point contacts at 1.4 K, the authors have achieved a single-sideband (SSB) mixer noise temperature of 54 K with a conversion gain of 1.35 and a signal bandwidth on the order of 1 GHz. A potentially impressive performance for these devices at submillimeter wavelengths can be extrapolated from the results

  9. Josephson junctions as heterodyne detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taur, Y.; Claassen, J.H.; Richards, P.L.

    1974-01-01

    Heterodyne detection with a point-contact Josephson junction has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The measured performance of the device at 36 GHz is in good agreement with the theory. By operating vanadium point contacts at 1.4 K, a single-sideband (SSB) mixer noise temperature of 54 K with a conversion gain of 1.35 and a signal bandwidth on the order of 1 GHz has been achieved. From the results one can extrapolate a potentially impressive performance for these devices at submillimeter wavelengths

  10. Trafficking Ion Transporters to the Apical Membrane of Polarized Intestinal Enterocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engevik, Amy Christine; Goldenring, James R

    2018-01-02

    Epithelial cells lining the gastrointestinal tract require distinct apical and basolateral domains to function properly. Trafficking and insertion of enzymes and transporters into the apical brush border of intestinal epithelial cells is essential for effective digestion and absorption of nutrients. Specific critical ion transporters are delivered to the apical brush border to facilitate fluid and electrolyte uptake. Maintenance of these apical transporters requires both targeted delivery and regulated membrane recycling. Examination of altered apical trafficking in patients with Microvillus Inclusion disease caused by inactivating mutations in MYO5B has led to insights into the regulation of apical trafficking by elements of the apical recycling system. Modeling of MYO5B loss in cell culture and animal models has led to recognition of Rab11a and Rab8a as critical regulators of apical brush border function. All of these studies show the importance of apical membrane trafficking dynamics in maintenance of polarized epithelial cell function. Copyright © 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  11. Case report 332: A complex anomaly of the craniovertebral junction representing a regressive malformation with agenesis of the neural arch of C-2, hypomorphogenesis at C5-C6 and instability of the upper cervical spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernini, F.P.; Muras, I.

    1985-01-01

    In summary, a very complex anomaly, including agenesis of the neural arch of the axis, hypomorphogenesis of the cervical spine at the C5-C6 level with a partial ''blocked'' vertebra and disability of the upper cervical spine, is reported in a 31-year-old man. The anomalies associated with these changes are described in detail in the text and illustrated radiologically. The relationship of the embryological alterations in contrast with the normal is described and emphasized, particularly in the upper cervical area. It is stressed that narrowing of the space from the back of the odontoid (or the posterior lip of the foramen magnum) is a direct result of the complex anomalies described in this case, producing compression of the medulla and/or the upper cervical spinal cord. The literature on this subject is reviewed in depth. (orig.)

  12. Case report 332: A complex anomaly of the craniovertebral junction representing a regressive malformation with agenesis of the neural arch of C-2, hypomorphogenesis at C5-C6 and instability of the upper cervical spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernini, F.P.; Muras, I.

    1985-08-01

    A very complex anomaly, including agenesis of the neural arch of the axis, hypomorphogenesis of the cervical spine at the C5-C6 level with a partial ''blocked'' vertebra and disability of the upper cervical spine, is reported in a 31-year-old man. The anomalies associated with these changes are described in detail in the text and illustrated radiologically. The relationship of the embryological alterations in contrast with the normal is described and emphasized, particularly in the upper cervical area. It is stressed that narrowing of the space from the back of the odontoid (or the posterior lip of the foramen magnum) is a direct result of the complex anomalies described in this case, producing compression of the medulla and/or the upper cervical spinal cord. The literature on this subject is reviewed in depth.

  13. Role of contact inhibition of locomotion and junctional mechanics in epithelial collective responses to injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coburn, Luke; Lopez, Hender; Schouwenaar, Irin-Maya; Yap, Alpha S.; Lobaskin, Vladimir; Gomez, Guillermo A.

    2018-03-01

    Epithelial tissues form physically integrated barriers against the external environment protecting organs from infection and invasion. Within each tissue, epithelial cells respond to different challenges that can potentially compromise tissue integrity. In particular, cells collectively respond to injuries by reorganizing their cell–cell junctions and migrating directionally towards the sites of damage. Notwithstanding, the mechanisms that drive collective responses in epithelial aggregates remain poorly understood. In this work, we develop a minimal mechanistic model that is able to capture the essential features of epithelial collective responses to injuries. We show that a model that integrates the mechanics of cells at the cell–cell and cell–substrate interfaces as well as contact inhibition of locomotion (CIL) correctly predicts two key properties of epithelial response to injury as: (1) local relaxation of the tissue and (2) collective reorganization involving the extension of cryptic lamellipodia that extend, on average, up to 3 cell diameters from the site of injury and morphometric changes in the basal regions. Our model also suggests that active responses (like the actomyosin purse string and softening of cell–cell junctions) are needed to drive morphometric changes in the apical region. Therefore, our results highlight the importance of the crosstalk between junctional biomechanics, cell substrate adhesion, and CIL, as well as active responses, in guiding the collective rearrangements that are required to preserve the epithelial barrier in response to injury.

  14. Arecoline induced disruption of expression and localization of the tight junctional protein ZO-1 is dependent on the HER 2 expression in human endometrial Ishikawa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundar Shyam N

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Approximately 600 million people chew Betel nut, making this practice the fourth most popular oral habit in the world. Arecoline, the major alkaloid present in betel nut is one of the causative agents for precancerous lesions and several cancers of mouth among those who chew betel nut. Arecoline can be detected in the human embryonic tissue and is correlated to low birth weight of newborns whose mothers chew betel nut during pregnancy, suggesting that arecoline can induce many systemic effects. However, few reports exist as to the effects of arecoline in human tissues other than oral cancer cell lines. Furthermore, in any system, virtually nothing is known about the cellular effects of arecoline treatment on membrane associated signaling components of human cancer cells. Results Using the human Ishikawa endometrial cancer cell line, we investigated the effects of arecoline on expression, localization and functional connections between the ZO-1 tight junction protein and the HER2 EGF receptor family member. Treatment of Ishikawa cells with arecoline coordinately down-regulated expression of both ZO-1 and HER2 protein and transcripts in a dose dependent manner. Biochemical fractionation of cells as well as indirect immunofluorescence revealed that arecoline disrupted the localization of ZO-1 to the junctional complex at the cell periphery. Compared to control transfected cells, ectopic expression of exogenous HER2 prevented the arecoline mediated down-regulation of ZO-1 expression and restored the localization of ZO-1 to the cell periphery. Furthermore, treatment with dexamethasone, a synthetic glucocorticoid reported to up-regulate expression of HER2 in Ishikawa cells, precluded arecoline from down-regulating ZO-1 expression and disrupting ZO-1 localization. Conclusion Arecoline is known to induce precancerous lesions and cancer in the oral cavity of betel nut users. The arecoline down-regulation of ZO-1 expression and

  15. Myocardial scarring on cardiovascular magnetic resonance in asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic patients with “pure” apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Kyung-Hee

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR enables state-of-the-art in vivo evaluations of myocardial fibrosis. Although LGE patterns have been well described in asymmetrical septal hypertrophy, conflicting results have been reported regarding the characteristics of LGE in apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (ApHCM. This study was undertaken to determine 1 the frequency and distribution of LGE and 2 its prognostic implication in ApHCM. Methods Forty patients with asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic pure ApHCM (age, 60.2 ± 10.4 years, 31 men were prospectively enrolled. LGE images were acquired using the inversion recovery segmented spoiled-gradient echo and phase-sensitive inversion recovery sequence, and analyzed using a 17-segment model. Summing the planimetered LGE areas in all short axis slices yielded the total volume of late enhancement, which was subsequently presented as a proportion of total LV myocardium (% LGE. Results Mean maximal apical wall thickness was 17.9±2.3mm, and mean left ventricular (LV ejection fraction was 67.7 ± 8.0%. All but one patient presented with electrocardiographic negative T wave inversion in anterolateral leads, with a mean maximum negative T wave of 7.2 ± 4.7mm. Nine patients (22.5% had giant negative T waves, defined as the amplitude of ≥10mm, in electrocardiogram. LGE was detected in 130 segments of 30 patients (75.0%, occupying 4.9 ± 5.5% of LV myocardium. LGE was mainly detected at the junction between left and right ventricles in 12 (30% and at the apex in 28 (70%, although LGE-positive areas were widely distributed, and not limited to the apex. Focal LGE at the non-hypertrophic LV segments was found in some ApHCM patients, even without LGE of hypertrophied apical segments. Over the 2-year follow-up, there was no one achieving the study end-point, defined as all-cause death, sudden cardiac death and hospitalization for heart failure

  16. Graphene Josephson Junction Microwave Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Kin Chung; Walsh, Evan; Lee, Gil-Ho; Efetov, Dmitri; Crossno, Jesse; Ranzani, Leonardo; Ohki, Thomas; Kim, Philip; Englund, Dirk

    Modern readout schemes for superconducting qubits have predominately relied on weak microwave signal detection and discrimination. Most schemes are based on heterodyne or homodyne receiver systems and only a few have demonstrated direct detection of microwave photons. The challenges of direct detection stem from the low energy of microwave photons and existing detector efficiency. We have designed, fabricated, and measured a graphene-based Josephson junction (gJJ) microwave detector. Exploiting its low electronic thermal conductivity and specific heat, an electron temperature rise on the order of 0.1 K due to a time average of about 10 photons in the graphene thermal photodetector is readout via a Josephson junction embedded in an 8 GHz microwave cavity. We will estimate the quantum efficiency and dark count probability of the gJJ microwave single photon detectors. This document does not contain technology or technical data controlled under either the U.S. International Traffic in Arms Regulations or the U.S. Export Administration Regulations.

  17. [The eyelid-cheek junction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpei, Ch; Fernandez, J; Chignon-Sicard, B

    2017-10-01

    The eyelid-cheek junction is a key area which generates many comments: from looking tired to looking good or rested, without forgetting charm, beauty, and a youthful appearance. In spite of many interesting medical and surgical procedures, treating this area is sometimes difficult and results are not always up to our expectations. Standardized blepharoplasty, which has often been improperly used, has shown its limits. Since the latest refinements, lipostructure has revolutionised blepharoplasty and serving as a reference, it has become an established technique. Subperiostal mediofacial lift allows outstanding results at the cost of a certain technical aggressiveness. Aesthetic medicine proposes worthy alternative and/or appropriate complementary solutions. Different procedures we dispose of have been reviewed together with their assets and their limits. A codification of therapeutic indications is proposed. The positioning of the eyelid-cheek clinical junction in relation with the low orbital bone rim influences our strategy in choosing the appropriate technique. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  18. Innovative architecture design for high performance organic and hybrid multi-junction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Spyropoulos, George D.; Brabec, Christoph J.

    2017-08-01

    The multi-junction concept is especially attractive for the photovoltaic (PV) research community owing to its potential to overcome the Schockley-Queisser limit of single-junction solar cells. Tremendous research interests are now focused on the development of high-performance absorbers and novel device architectures for emerging PV technologies, such as organic and perovskite PVs. It has been predicted that the multi-junction concept is able to boost the organic and perovskite PV technologies approaching the 20% and 30% benchmarks, respectively, showing a bright future of commercialization of the emerging PV technologies. In this contribution, we will demonstrate innovative architecture design for solution-processed, highly functional organic and hybrid multi-junction solar cells. A simple but elegant approach to fabricating organic and hybrid multi-junction solar cells will be introduced. By laminating single organic/hybrid solar cells together through an intermediate layer, the manufacturing cost and complexity of large-scale multi-junction solar cells can be significantly reduced. This smart approach to balancing the photocurrents as well as open circuit voltages in multi-junction solar cells will be demonstrated and discussed in detail.

  19. Influence of Different Apical Preparations on Root Canal Cleanliness in Human Molars: a SEM Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotino, Gianluca; Grande, Nicola M; Tocci, Luigi; Testarelli, Luca; Gambarini, Gianluca

    2014-04-01

    To compare the influence of type and dimensions of the apical preparation on the cleanliness of the apical area in molars. A total of 120 root canals (MB and DB root canals from 30 maxillary molars and mesial root canals from 30 mandibular molars) were instrumented with Mtwo NiTi rotary instruments to a size 25/0.06 taper and were equally divided into three different experimental groups depending on the subsequently apical root canal preparation: Group 1: no further apical preparation, Group 2: apical preparation with Mtwo files to a size 40/0.04 taper, Group 3: apical preparation with Mtwo Apical Files. All root canals were observed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Presence of superficial debris and smear layer was evaluated using a score system. Data were statistically analysed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Bonferroni tests with a level of significance set at P 0.05), while at the apical level, there was a significant difference for both residual debris and presence of smear layer between Group 1 and both Group 2 (P = 0.003 and P = 0.014) and 3 (P = 0.012 and P = 0.021), while no difference was present between Group 2 and Group 3 (P = 0.871 and P = 0.923). Cleanliness of the apical third in terms of debris and smear layer was statistically better when an apical preparation was performed to a size 40/0.04 taper or with the use of the Mtwo Apical Files.

  20. Influence of Different Apical Preparations on Root Canal Cleanliness in Human Molars: a SEM Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Plotino

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare the influence of type and dimensions of the apical preparation on the cleanliness of the apical area in molars. Material and Methods: A total of 120 root canals (MB and DB root canals from 30 maxillary molars and mesial root canals from 30 mandibular molars were instrumented with Mtwo NiTi rotary instruments to a size 25/0.06 taper and were equally divided into three different experimental groups depending on the subsequently apical root canal preparation: Group 1: no further apical preparation, Group 2: apical preparation with Mtwo files to a size 40/0.04 taper, Group 3: apical preparation with Mtwo Apical Files. All root canals were observed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Presence of superficial debris and smear layer was evaluated using a score system. Data were statistically analysed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Bonferroni tests with a level of significance set at P 0.05, while at the apical level, there was a significant difference for both residual debris and presence of smear layer between Group 1 and both Group 2 (P = 0.003 and P = 0.014 and 3 (P = 0.012 and P = 0.021, while no difference was present between Group 2 and Group 3 (P = 0.871 and P = 0.923. Conclusions: Cleanliness of the apical third in terms of debris and smear layer was statistically better when an apical preparation was performed to a size 40/0.04 taper or with the use of the Mtwo Apical Files.

  1. Image segmentation algorithm based on T-junctions cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yanyu; Cao, Fengyun; Wang, Lu; Yang, Xuejie

    2016-03-01

    To improve the over-segmentation and over-merge phenomenon of single image segmentation algorithm,a novel approach of combing Graph-Based algorithm and T-junctions cues is proposed in this paper. First, a method by L0 gradient minimization is applied to the smoothing of the target image eliminate artifacts caused by noise and texture detail; Then, the initial over-segmentation result of the smoothing image using the graph-based algorithm; Finally, the final results via a region fusion strategy by t-junction cues. Experimental results on a variety of images verify the new approach's efficiency in eliminating artifacts caused by noise,segmentation accuracy and time complexity has been significantly improved.

  2. Bone Density and Dental External Apical Root Resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-Linares, Alejandro; Morford, Lorri Ann; Hartsfield, James Kennedy

    2016-12-01

    When orthodontic patients desire shorter treatment times with aesthetic results and long-term stability, it is important for the orthodontist to understand the potential limitations and problems that may arise during standard and/or technology-assisted accelerated treatment. Bone density plays an important role in facilitating orthodontic tooth movement (OTM), such that reductions in bone density can significantly increase movement velocity. Lifestyle, genetic background, environmental factors, and disease status all can influence a patients' overall health and bone density. In some individuals, these factors may create specific conditions that influence systemic-wide bone metabolism. Both genetic variation and the onset of a bone-related disease can influence systemic bone density and local bone density, such as observed in the mandible and maxilla. These types of localized density changes can affect the rate of OTM and may also influence the risk of unwanted outcomes, i.e., the occurrence of dental external apical root resorption (EARR).

  3. Serious arrhythmias in patients with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okishige, Kaoru; Sasano, Tetsuo; Yano, Kei; Azegami, Kouji; Suzuki, Kou; Itoh, Kuniyasu [Yokohama Red Cross Hospital (Japan)

    2001-05-01

    We report cases of serious arrhythmias associated with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (AHCM). Thirty-one patients were referred to our institute to undergo further assessment of their AHCM from 1988 to 1999. Three patients with nonsustained ventricular tachycardia demonstrated an {sup 123}I-MIBG regional reduction in the tracer uptake. In two patients with ventricular fibrillation (VF), the findings from {sup 123}I-MIBG imaging revealed regional sympathetic denervation in the inferior and lateral regions. Electrophysiologic study demonstrated reproducible induction of VF in aborted sudden death and presyncopal patients, resulting in the need for an implantable defibrillator device and amiodarone in each patient. Patients with refractory atrial fibrillation with a rapid ventricular response suffered from serious congestive heart failure. A prudent assessment and strategy in patients with this disease would be indispensable in avoiding a disastrous outcome. (author)

  4. Traumatic bone cyst suggestive of large apical periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Cleomar Donizeth; Estrela, Carlos

    2008-04-01

    This case report shows the importance of establishing the correct diagnosis to provide the appropriate treatment options The traumatic bone cyst is a pseudocyst, usually asymptomatic and found by a routine radiographic examination. Unicystic radiolucency is almost always observed, which can involve the periradicular area of teeth, simulating an inflammatory lesion of endodontic origin. Differential diagnosis should include other pathologies, such as odontogenic keratocyst, central giant cell granuloma, and unicystic ameloblastoma. Its etiology and pathogenesis are not yet definitely established. In the present study, after review of the medical and dental histories and clinical and radiographic examination of teeth #24-27 (pulpal vitality test showed positive), the primary diagnosis was traumatic bone cyst. The planning was excisional biopsy. After surgical exploration, only one small blood clot was observed in the intraosseous socket, which was carefully curetted and filled with blood. A clinical and radiographic examination after 6 months showed apical formation and pulpal vitality preserved.

  5. Geometry of shoot apical dome and distribution of growth rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Nakielski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of the relative elementary rate of growth (RERG in apical domes of various shapes and patterns of displacement lines can be analytically examined. The geometry of these domes may be described by parabolas of n-th order, the variant of the distribution of linear growth rate should be established along any displacement line (e.g. along the axis and then the RERG can be studied as the function depending on the position coordinates and the parameter n. Such investigations of several aplical domes of various shapes have been performed. The results confirm the occurrence of the minimum of relative, elementary growth rate (in volume in the subapical region of the dome independently of the type of geometry (n parabola order.

  6. Multiplication in Silicon p-n Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moll, John L.

    1965-01-01

    Multiplication values were measured in the collector junctions of silicon p-n-p and n-p-n transistors before and after bombardment by 1016 neutrons/cm2. Within experimental error there was no change either in junction fields, as deduced from capacitance measurements, or in multiplication values...

  7. Gap junctions and connexin-interacting proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, Ben N G

    2004-01-01

    Gap junctions form channels between adjacent cells. The core proteins of these channels are the connexins. Regulation of gap junction communication (GJC) can be modulated by connexin-associating proteins, such as regulatory protein phosphatases and protein kinases, of which c-Src is the

  8. Quantum synchronization effects in intrinsic Josephson junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machida, M.; Kano, T.; Yamada, S.; Okumura, M.; Imamura, T.; Koyama, T.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate quantum dynamics of the superconducting phase in intrinsic Josephson junctions of layered high-T c superconductors motivated by a recent experimental observation for the switching rate enhancement in the low temperature quantum regime. We pay attention to only the capacitive coupling between neighboring junctions and perform large-scale simulations for the Schroedinger equation derived from the Hamiltonian considering the capacitive coupling alone. The simulation focuses on an issue whether the switching of a junction induces those of the other junctions or not. The results reveal that the superconducting phase dynamics show synchronous behavior with increasing the quantum character, e.g., decreasing the junction plane area and effectively the temperature. This is qualitatively consistent with the experimental result

  9. Overlap junctions for high coherence superconducting qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, X.; Long, J. L.; Ku, H. S.; Lake, R. E.; Bal, M.; Pappas, D. P.

    2017-07-01

    Fabrication of sub-micron Josephson junctions is demonstrated using standard processing techniques for high-coherence, superconducting qubits. These junctions are made in two separate lithography steps with normal-angle evaporation. Most significantly, this work demonstrates that it is possible to achieve high coherence with junctions formed on aluminum surfaces cleaned in situ by Ar plasma before junction oxidation. This method eliminates the angle-dependent shadow masks typically used for small junctions. Therefore, this is conducive to the implementation of typical methods for improving margins and yield using conventional CMOS processing. The current method uses electron-beam lithography and an additive process to define the top and bottom electrodes. Extension of this work to optical lithography and subtractive processes is discussed.

  10. Aminopeptidase N is directly sorted to the apical domain in MDCK cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wessels, H P; Hansen, Gert Helge; Fuhrer, C

    1990-01-01

    In different epithelial cell types, integral membrane proteins appear to follow different sorting pathways to the apical surface. In hepatocytes, several apical proteins were shown to be transported there indirectly via the basolateral membrane, whereas in MDCK cells a direct sorting pathway from...

  11. An unusual ST-segment elevation: apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy shows the ace up its sleeve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Santis, Francesco; Pergolini, Amedeo; Zampi, Giordano; Pero, Gaetano; Pino, Paolo Giuseppe; Minardi, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is part of the broad clinical and morphologic spectrum of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We report a patient with electrocardiographic abnormalities in whom acute coronary syndrome was excluded and apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was demonstrated by careful differential diagnosis. Copyright © 2012 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  12. Nonsurgical root canal therapy of large cyst-like inflammatory periapical lesions and inflammatory apical cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Louis M; Ricucci, Domenico; Lin, Jarshen; Rosenberg, Paul A

    2009-05-01

    It is a general belief that large cyst-like periapical lesions and apical true cysts caused by root canal infection are less likely to heal after nonsurgical root canal therapy. Nevertheless, there is no direct evidence to support this assumption. A large cyst-like periapical lesion or an apical true cyst is formed within an area of apical periodontitis and cannot form by itself. Therefore, both large cyst-like periapical lesions and apical true cysts are of inflammatory and not of neoplastic origin. Apical periodontitis lesions, regardless of whether they are granulomas, abscesses, or cysts, fail to heal after nonsurgical root canal therapy for the same reason, intraradicular and/or extraradicular infection. If the microbial etiology of large cyst-like periapical lesions and inflammatory apical true cysts in the root canal is removed by nonsurgical root canal therapy, the lesions might regress by the mechanism of apoptosis in a manner similar to the resolution of inflammatory apical pocket cysts. To achieve satisfactory periapical wound healing, surgical removal of an apical true cyst must include elimination of root canal infection.

  13. Prognostic factors in apical surgery with root-end filling: a meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Arx, Thomas; Peñarrocha, Miguel; Jensen, Simon Storgård

    2010-01-01

    Apical surgery has seen continuous development with regard to equipment and surgical technique. However, there is still a shortage of evidence-based information regarding healing determinants. The objective of this meta-analysis was to review clinical articles on apical surgery with root-end fill...

  14. Apical bud toughness tests and tree sway movements to examine crown abrasion: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler Brannon; Wayne Clatterbuck

    2012-01-01

    Apical bud toughness differences were examined for several species to determine if crown abrasion affects shoot growth of determinate and indeterminate species during stand development. Determinate buds will set and harden after initial shoot elongation in the spring, while the indeterminate shoots form leaves from the apical meristem continuously based on the...

  15. Cranio-vertebral junction tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajkumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are variety of diseases which affect the region of craniovertebral junction, including congenital, malignant lesions, traumatic and infective/inflammatory lesions. CVJ tuberculosis is an extremely rare condition, accounting for 0.3 to 1% of all cases of spinal TB. Few case series have been reported in the literature about this rare condition, but there appears to be lack of consensus even on basic issues like whether to undertake surgical intervention or prefer a conservative approach in cases of CVJ TB. These cases can present with a myriad of symptoms and one needs to have a high index of suspicion for early diagnosis. Early diagnosis and treatment is very important for a favorable outcome. In this article, we have tried to review the available literature and also share our experience about this condition so as to have a better understanding of the disease process and have a more rational treatment protocol.

  16. Josephson tunnel junction microwave attenuator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koshelets, V. P.; Shitov, S. V.; Shchukin, A. V.

    1993-01-01

    A new element for superconducting electronic circuitry-a variable attenuator-has been proposed, designed, and successfully tested. The principle of operation is based on the change in the microwave impedance of a superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) Josephson tunnel junction when dc biased...... at different points in the current-voltage characteristic. Both numerical calculations based on the Tien-Gordon theory and 70-GHz microwave experiments have confirmed the wide dynamic range (more than 15-dB attenuation for one stage) and the low insertion loss in the ''open'' state. The performance of a fully...... integrated submillimeter receiver circuit which comprises a flux-flow oscillator (FFO) as local oscillator, a superconducting variable attenuator, and a microwave SIS detector with tuned-out capacitance is also reported....

  17. Glyphosate effects on the gene expression of the apical bud in soybean (Glycine max).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ling-Xue; Jin, Long-Guo; Guo, Yong; Tao, Bo; Qiu, Li-Juan

    2013-08-09

    Glyphosate is a broad spectrum, non-selective herbicide which has been widely used for weed control. Much work has focused on elucidating the high accumulation of glyphosate in shoot apical bud (shoot apex). However, to date little is known about the molecular mechanisms of the sensitivity of shoot apical bud to glyphosate. Global gene expression profiling of the soybean apical bud response to glyphosate treatment was performed in this study. The results revealed that the glyphosate inhibited tryptophan biosynthesis of the shikimic acid pathway in the soybean apical bud, which was the target site of glyphosate. Glyphosate inhibited the expression of most of the target herbicide site genes. The promoter sequence analysis of key target genes revealed that light responsive elements were important regulators in glyphosate induction. These results will facilitate further studies of cloning genes and molecular mechanisms of glyphosate on soybean shoot apical bud. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Endodontic management of open apex using Biodentine as a novel apical matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khetarpal, Ambica; Chaudhary, Sarika; Talwar, Sangeeta; Verma, Mahesh

    2014-01-01

    Endodontic management of open apex using Biodentine as an apical matrix. Summary : An immature tooth with pulpal necrosis and periapical pathology imposes a great difficulty to the endodontist. Endodontic treatment options for such teeth consist of conventional apexification procedure with and without apical barriers. Biodentine™ is new calcium silicate based cement that exhibits physical and chemical properties similar to those described for certain Portland cement derivatives. This article demonstrates the use of the newer material, Biodentine as an apical matrix barrier in root end apexification procedure. This case reports present apexification and successful healing with the use of Biodentine as an apical barrier matrix. Conclusion : Apexification in one step using an apical plug of Biodentine can be considered a predictable treatment and may be an alternative to mineral trioxide aggregate apexification.

  19. Laparoscopic pectopexy: initial experience of single center with a new technique for apical prolapse surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Kale

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To share our first experience with laparoscopic pectopexy, a new technique for apical prolapse surgery, and to evaluate the feasibility of this technique. Materials and Methods: Seven patients with apical prolapse underwent surgery with laparoscopic pectopexy. The lateral parts of the iliopectineal ligament were used for a bilateral mesh fixation of the descended structures. The medical records of the patients were reviewed, and the short-term clinical outcomes were analyzed. Results: The laparoscopic pectopexy procedures were successfully performed, without intraoperative and postoperative complications. De novo apical prolapse, de novo urgency, de novo constipation, stress urinary incontinence, anterior and lateral defect cystoceles, and rectoceles did not occur in any of the patients during a 6-month follow-up period. Conclusion: Although laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy has shown excellent anatomical and functional long-term results, laparoscopic pectopexy offers a feasible, safe, and comfortable alternative for apical prolapse surgery. Pectopexy may increase a surgeon's technical perspective for apical prolapse surgery.

  20. Resonance Transport of Graphene Nanoribbon T-Shaped Junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao-Lan, Kong; Yong-Jian, Xiong

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the transport properties of T-shaped junctions composed of armchair graphene nanoribbons of different widths. Three types of junction geometries are considered. The junction conductance strongly depends on the atomic features of the junction geometry. When the shoulders of the junction have zigzag type edges, sharp conductance resonances usually appear in the low energy region around the Dirac point, and a conductance gap emerges. When the shoulders of the junction have armchair type edges, the conductance resonance behavior is weakened significantly, and the metal-metal-metal junction structures show semimetallic behaviors. The contact resistance also changes notably due to the various interface geometries of the junction

  1. Targeted disruption of core 1 β1,3-galactosyltransferase (C1galt1 induces apical endocytic trafficking in human corneal keratinocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Guzman-Aranguez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Exposed mucosal surfaces limit constitutive endocytosis under physiological conditions to prevent uptake of macromolecules and pathogens and, therefore, cellular damage. It is now accepted that cell surface mucins, a group of high molecular weight glycoproteins on the epithelial glycocalyx, defined by their extensive O-glycosylation, play a major role in maintaining barrier function in these surfaces, but the precise mechanisms are unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work, we utilized a stable tetracycline-inducible RNA interfering system targeting the core 1 ß1,3-galactosyltransferase (C1galt1 or T-synthase, a critical galactosyltransferase required for the synthesis of core 1 O-glycans, to explore the role of mucin-type carbohydrates in apical endocytic trafficking in human corneal keratinocytes. Using cell surface biotinylation and subcellular fractionation, we found increased accumulation of plasma membrane protein in endosomes after C1galt1 depletion. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and fluorometry revealed increased translocation of negatively charged fluorescent nanospheres after C1galt1 knockdown sustained by an active transport process and largely independent of apical intercellular junctions. Internalization of nanospheres could be blocked by dynasore, nocodazole, chlorpromazine, and hyperosmotic sucrose, suggesting a mechanism for clathrin-coated pit budding and vesicular trafficking. This possibility was supported by experiments showing nanosphere colocalization with clathrin heavy chain in the cytoplasm. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Together, the data suggest that core 1 O-glycans contribute to maintenance of apical barrier function on exposed mucosal surfaces by preventing clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

  2. Assessment of Root Morphology and Apices of First and Second Maxillary Molars in Tehran Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandana Naseri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Objective: This study aimed to assess the possible variations in root canal anatomy and topography of the apices of first and second maxillary molars. Materials and methods: A total of 67 first and second maxillary permanent molars were collected. Access cavity was prepared and 2% methylene blue was injected. The teeth were demineralized by 5% nitric acid and cleared with methyl salicylate. Specimens were evaluated under stereomicroscopy and analyzed using the sample t-test. Results: Based on Vertucci’s classification, the mesiobuccal root of maxillary first molars was type I in 87.5% and type IV in 12.5% of the cases. The mesiobuccal root of second maxillary molars was type I in 60%, type II in 8.6%, type IV in 25.7% and type V in 5.7% of cases. In maxillary first and second molars, the distobuccal and palatal roots were type I in 100% of the cases. The distance of the apical constriction from the apical foramen was 0.21±0.09 mm, the distance from the apical constriction tothe anatomic apex was 0.44±0.19 mm and the distance of the apical foramen from the anatomic apex was 0.15±0.15 mm. The mean percentage of delta prevalence was 3.2% in both teeth. Conclusion: The mean distance of the apical foramen and apical constriction from the anatomic apex was less than 0.6 and 1.2 mm, respectively. In maxillary first and second molars, the mean distance of the apical constriction from the apical foramen and anatomic apex was 0.21 and 0.44, respectively and the mean distance of the apical foramen from the anatomic apex was 0.15 mm

  3. Proteomic and bioinformatic analysis of epithelial tight junction reveals an unexpected cluster of synaptic molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Vivian W

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zonula occludens, also known as the tight junction, is a specialized cell-cell interaction characterized by membrane "kisses" between epithelial cells. A cytoplasmic plaque of ~100 nm corresponding to a meshwork of densely packed proteins underlies the tight junction membrane domain. Due to its enormous size and difficulties in obtaining a biochemically pure fraction, the molecular composition of the tight junction remains largely unknown. Results A novel biochemical purification protocol has been developed to isolate tight junction protein complexes from cultured human epithelial cells. After identification of proteins by mass spectroscopy and fingerprint analysis, candidate proteins are scored and assessed individually. A simple algorithm has been devised to incorporate transmembrane domains and protein modification sites for scoring membrane proteins. Using this new scoring system, a total of 912 proteins have been identified. These 912 hits are analyzed using a bioinformatics approach to bin the hits in 4 categories: configuration, molecular function, cellular function, and specialized process. Prominent clusters of proteins related to the cytoskeleton, cell adhesion, and vesicular traffic have been identified. Weaker clusters of proteins associated with cell growth, cell migration, translation, and transcription are also found. However, the strongest clusters belong to synaptic proteins and signaling molecules. Localization studies of key components of synaptic transmission have confirmed the presence of both presynaptic and postsynaptic proteins at the tight junction domain. To correlate proteomics data with structure, the tight junction has been examined using electron microscopy. This has revealed many novel structures including end-on cytoskeletal attachments, vesicles fusing/budding at the tight junction membrane domain, secreted substances encased between the tight junction kisses, endocytosis of tight junction

  4. Vibrationally coupled electron transport through single-molecule junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haertle, Rainer

    2012-04-26

    vibrational effects have a profound influence on the transport characteristics of a single-molecule contact and play therefore a fundamental role in this transport problem. Our findings demonstrate that vibrationally coupled electron transport through a molecular junction involves two types of processes: (i) transport processes, where an electron tunnels through the molecular bridge from one lead to the other, and (ii) electron-hole pair creation processes, where an electron tunnels from one of the leads onto the molecular bridge and back to the same lead again. Transport processes directly contribute to the electrical current flowing through a molecular contact and involve both excitation and deexcitation processes of the vibrational modes of the junction. Electron-hole pair creation processes do not directly contribute to the electrical current and typically involve only deexcitation processes. Nevertheless, they constitute a cooling mechanism for the vibrational modes of a single-molecule junction that is as important as cooling by transport processes. As the level of vibrational excitation determines the efficiency of electron transport processes, they have an indirect influence on the electrical current flowing through the junction. As we show, however, this influence can be substantial, in particular, if the molecule is coupled asymmetrically to the leads. Accounting for all these processes and their complex interrelationship, we analyze a number of intriguing transport phenomena, including rectification, negative differential resistance, anomalous peak broadening, mode-selective vibrational excitation and vibrationally induced decoherence. Moreover, we show that higher levels of vibrational excitation are obtained for weaker electronic-vibrational coupling. Thus, based on physical grounds, we establish a relation between the weak electronic-vibrational coupling limit and the limit of large bias voltages, where the level of vibrational excitation in a molecular junction

  5. Valley dependent transport in graphene L junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K. S.

    2018-05-01

    We studied the valley dependent transport in graphene L junctions connecting an armchair lead and a zigzag lead. The junction can be used in valleytronic devices and circuits. Electrons injected from the armchair lead into the junction is not valley polarized, but they can become valley polarized in the zigzag lead. There are Fermi energies, where the current in the zigzag lead is highly valley polarized and the junction is an efficient generator of valley polarized current. The features of the valley polarized current depend sensitively on the widths of the two leads, as well as the number of dimers in the armchair lead, because this number has a sensitive effect on the band structure of the armchair lead. When an external potential is applied to the junction, the energy range with high valley polarization is enlarged enhancing its function as a generator of highly valley polarized current. The scaling behavior found in other graphene devices is also found in L junctions, which means that the results presented here can be extended to junctions with larger dimensions after appropriate scaling of the energy.

  6. Pro-oxidant status and matrix metalloproteinases in apical lesions and gingival crevicular fluid as potential biomarkers for asymptomatic apical periodontitis and endodontic treatment response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dezerega Andrea

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oxidative stress and matrix metalloproteinases -9 and -2 are involved in periodontal breakdown, whereas gingival crevicular fluid has been reported to reflect apical status. The aim of this study was to characterize oxidant balance and activity levels of MMP -2 and -9 in apical lesions and healthy periodontal ligament; and second, to determine whether potential changes in oxidant balance were reflected in gingival crevicular fluid from asymptomatic apical periodontitis (AAP-affected teeth at baseline and after endodontic treatment. Methods Patients with clinical diagnosis of AAP and healthy volunteers having indication of tooth extraction were recruited. Apical lesions and healthy periodontal ligaments, respectively, were homogenized or processed to obtain histological tissue sections. Matrix metalloproteinase -9 and -2 levels and/or activity were analyzed by Immunowestern blot, zymography and consecutive densitometric analysis, and their tissue localization was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. A second group of patients with AAP and indication of endodontic treatment was recruited. Gingival crevicular fluid was extracted from AAP-affected teeth at baseline, after endodontic treatment and healthy contralateral teeth. Total oxidant and antioxidant status were determined in homogenized tissue and GCF samples. Statistical analysis was performed using STATA v10 software with unpaired t test, Mann-Whitney test and Spearman's correlation. Results Activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 along with oxidant status were higher in apical lesions (p Conclusions Apical lesions display an oxidant imbalance along with increased activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 and might contribute to AAP progression. Oxidant imbalance can also be reflected in GCF from AAP-affected teeth and was restored to normal levels after conservative endodontic treatment. These mediators might be useful as potential biomarkers for chair-side complementary diagnostic

  7. Droplet formation in Hele-Shaw T-junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricouvier, Joshua; Yazhgur, Pavel; Leshansky, Alexander; Tabeling, Patrick; Microflusa Team

    The development of digital microfluidics has attracted considerable interest towards generation of highly monodisperse microdroplets. T-junction has become an essential element of most of microfluidic chips. Despite its importance, theoretical analysis of droplet formation at T-junction is still incomplete due to complexity of physics involved. We focused on droplet generation at the Hele-Shaw T-junction. The effect of various experimental parameters, such as channel geometry, flow rates, surface tension and fluid viscosities, was thoroughly investigated. Our results show that the experimental system exhibits three distinct regimes (squeezing, dripping and jetting regimes) and point out the effect of confinement on the transitions. We demonstrate that the size of the ''plug'' droplet depends not only on the flow rate ratio (as described in the literature), but also on the capillary number and the channel cross-section aspect ratio. Quasi-2D flow equations allow us to perform numerical simulations and to compare them with experimental results. The Microflusa project receives funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under Grant Agreement No. 664823.

  8. Symposia for a Meeting on Ion Channels and Gap Junctions

    CERN Document Server

    Sáez, Juan

    1997-01-01

    Ion channels allow us to see nature in all its magnificence, to hear a Bach suite, to smell the aroma of grandmother's cooking, and, in this regard, they put us in contact with the external world. These ion channels are protein molecules located in the cell membrane. In complex organisms, cells need to communicate in order to know about their metabolic status and to act in a coordinate manner. The latter is also accomplished by a class of ion channels able to pierce the lipid bilayer membranes of two adjacent cells. These intercellular channels are the functional subunits of gap junctions. Accordingly, the book is divided in two parts: the first part is dedicated to ion channels that look to the external world, and the second part is dedicated to gap junctions found at cell interfaces. This book is based on a series of symposia for a meeting on ion channels and gap junctions held in Santiago, Chile, on November 28-30, 1995. The book should be useful to graduate students taking the first steps in this field as...

  9. Palladium electrodes for molecular tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Shuai; Sen Suman; Zhang Peiming; Gyarfas, Brett; Ashcroft, Brian; Lindsay, Stuart; Lefkowitz, Steven; Peng Hongbo

    2012-01-01

    Gold has been the metal of choice for research on molecular tunneling junctions, but it is incompatible with complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor fabrication because it forms deep level traps in silicon. Palladium electrodes do not contaminate silicon, and also give higher tunnel current signals in the molecular tunnel junctions that we have studied. The result is cleaner signals in a recognition-tunneling junction that recognizes the four natural DNA bases as well as 5-methyl cytosine, with no spurious background signals. More than 75% of all the recorded signal peaks indicate the base correctly. (paper)

  10. Shot noise in YBCO bicrystal Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Constantinian, K.Y.; Ovsyannikov, G.A.; Borisenko, I.V.

    2003-01-01

    We measured spectral noise density in YBCO symmetric bicrystal Josephson junctions on sapphire substrates at bias voltages up to 100 mV and T 4.2 K. Normal state resistance of the Josephson junctions, R-N = 20-90 Omega and ICRN up to 2.2 mV have been observed in the experimental samples. Noise...... may explain the experimentally measured linewidth broadening of Josephson oscillations at mm and submm wave frequencies in high-Tc superconducting junctions. Experimental results are discussed in terms of bound states existing at surfaces of d-wave superconducting electrodes....

  11. Soliton excitations in Josephson tunnel junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomdahl, P. S.; Sørensen, O. H.; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    1982-01-01

    A detailed numerical study of a sine-Gordon model of the Josephson tunnel junction is compared with experimental measurements on junctions with different L / λJ ratios. The soliton picture is found to apply well on both relatively long (L / λJ=6) and intermediate (L / λJ=2) junctions. We find good...... agreement for the current-voltage characteristics, power output, and for the shape and height of the zero-field steps (ZFS). Two distinct modes of soliton oscillations are observed: (i) a bunched or congealed mode giving rise to the fundamental frequency f1 on all ZFS's and (ii) a "symmetric" mode which...

  12. Parametric frequency conversion in long Josephson junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irie, F.; Ashihara, S.; Yoshida, K.

    1976-01-01

    Current steps at voltages corresponding to the parametric coupling between an applied r.f. field and junction resonant modes have been observed in long Josephson tunnel junctions in the flux-flow state. The observed periodic variations of the step height due to the applied magnetic field are explained quantitatively by a perturbational analysis using Josephson phase equations. The present study demonstrates that the moving vortex array can serve as a coherent pump wave for signal waves propagating in the barrier region, which indicates, as a result, the possibility of traveling-wave parametric devices with long Josephson tunnel junctions. (author)

  13. Microscopic tunneling theory of long Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbech-Jensen, N.; Hattel, Søren A.; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm

    1992-01-01

    We present a numerical scheme for solving a nonlinear partial integro-differential equation with nonlocal time dependence. The equation describes the dynamics in a long Josephson junction modeled by use of the microscopic theory for tunneling between superconductors. We demonstrate that the detai......We present a numerical scheme for solving a nonlinear partial integro-differential equation with nonlocal time dependence. The equation describes the dynamics in a long Josephson junction modeled by use of the microscopic theory for tunneling between superconductors. We demonstrate...... that the detailed behavior of a solitonic mode (fluxon dynamics) in the junction is different from the results of the conventional perturbed sine-Gordon model....

  14. delta-biased Josephson tunnel junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monaco, R.; Mygind, Jesper; Koshelet, V.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: The behavior of a long Josephson tunnel junction drastically depends on the distribution of the dc bias current. We investigate the case in which the bias current is fed in the central point of a one-dimensional junction. Such junction configuration has been recently used to detect...... the persistent currents circulating in a superconducting loop. Analytical and numerical results indicate that the presence of fractional vortices leads to remarkable differences from the conventional case of uniformly distributed dc bias current. The theoretical findings are supported by detailed measurements...

  15. Rapid synthesis of acetylcholine receptors at neuromuscular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, D A; Drachman, D B; Pestronk, A

    1988-10-11

    The rate of acetylcholine receptor (AChR) degradation in mature, innervated mammalian neuromuscular junctions has recently been shown to be biphasic; up to 20% are rapidly turned over (RTOs; half life less than 1 day) whereas the remainder are lost more slowly ('stable' AChRs; half life 10-12 days). In order to maintain normal junctional receptor density, synthesis and insertion of AChRs should presumably be sufficiently rapid to replace both the RTOs and the stable receptors. We have tested this prediction by blocking pre-existing AChRs in the mouse sternomastoid muscle with alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BuTx), and monitoring the subsequent appearance of 'new' junctional AChRs at intervals of 3 h to 20 days by labeling them with 125I-alpha-BuTx. The results show that new receptors were initially inserted rapidly (16% at 24 h and 28% at 48 h). The rate of increase of 'new' 125I-alpha-BuTx binding sites gradually slowed down during the remainder of the time period studied. Control observations excluded possible artifacts of the experimental procedure including incomplete blockade of AChRs, dissociation of toxin-receptor complexes, or experimentally induced alteration of receptor synthesis. The present demonstration of rapid synthesis and incorporation of AChRs at innervated neuromuscular junctions provides support for the concept of a subpopulation of rapidly turned over AChRs. The RTOs may serve as precursors for the larger population of stable receptors and have an important role in the metabolism of the neuromuscular synapse.

  16. Identification of MarvelD3 as a tight junction-associated transmembrane protein of the occludin family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balda Maria S

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tight junctions are an intercellular adhesion complex of epithelial and endothelial cells, and form a paracellular barrier that restricts the diffusion of solutes on the basis of size and charge. Tight junctions are formed by multiprotein complexes containing cytosolic and transmembrane proteins. How these components work together to form functional tight junctions is still not well understood and will require a complete understanding of the molecular composition of the junction. Results Here we identify a new transmembrane component of tight junctions: MarvelD3, a four-span transmembrane protein. Its predicted transmembrane helices form a Marvel (MAL and related proteins for vesicle traffic and membrane link domain, a structural motif originally discovered in proteins involved in membrane apposition and fusion events, such as the tight junction proteins occludin and tricellulin. In mammals, MarvelD3 is expressed as two alternatively spliced isoforms. Both isoforms exhibit a broad tissue distribution and are expressed by different types of epithelial as well as endothelial cells. MarvelD3 co-localises with occludin at tight junctions in intestinal and corneal epithelial cells. RNA interference experiments in Caco-2 cells indicate that normal MarvelD3 expression is not required for the formation of functional tight junctions but depletion results in monolayers with increased transepithelial electrical resistance. Conclusions Our data indicate that MarvelD3 is a third member of the tight junction-associated occludin family of transmembrane proteins. Similar to occludin, normal expression of MarvelD3 is not essential for the formation of functional tight junctions. However, MarvelD3 functions as a determinant of epithelial paracellular permeability properties.

  17. Intraoperative cervix location and apical support stiffness in women with and without pelvic organ prolapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Carolyn W; Smith, Tovia M; Luo, Jiajia; Kolenic, Giselle E; Ashton-Miller, James A; DeLancey, John O

    2017-02-01

    It is unknown how initial cervix location and cervical support resistance to traction, which we term "apical support stiffness," compare in women with different patterns of pelvic organ support. Defining a normal range of apical support stiffness is important to better understand the pathophysiology of apical support loss. The aims of our study were to determine whether: (1) women with normal apical support on clinic Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification, but with vaginal wall prolapse (cystocele and/or rectocele), have the same intraoperative cervix location and apical support stiffness as women with normal pelvic support; and (2) all women with apical prolapse have abnormal intraoperative cervix location and apical support stiffness. A third objective was to identify clinical and biomechanical factors independently associated with clinic Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification point C. We conducted an observational study of women with a full spectrum of pelvic organ support scheduled to undergo gynecologic surgery. All women underwent a preoperative clinic examination, including Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification. Cervix starting location and the resistance (stiffness) of its supports to being moved steadily in the direction of a traction force that increased from 0-18 N was measured intraoperatively using a computer-controlled servoactuator device. Women were divided into 3 groups for analysis according to their pelvic support as classified using the clinic Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification: (1) "normal/normal" was women with normal apical (C -5 cm and Ba and/or Bp ≥ 0 cm). Demographics, intraoperative cervix locations, and apical support stiffness values were then compared. Normal range of cervix location during clinic examination and operative testing was defined by the total range of values observed in the normal/normal group. The proportion of women in each group with cervix locations within and outside the normal range was determined. Linear regression

  18. Evaluation of the distortion rate of panoramic and peri apical radiographs in erupted third molar inclination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezoddini Ardakani, F.; Zangouie Booshehri, M.; Behniafar, B.

    2011-01-01

    Panoramic and peri apical radiographs are normally used in impacted third molar teeth surgeries. The aim of the present study was to evaluate and compare the distortion of the erupted third molar teeth on panoramic and peri apical radiographs. Patients and Methods: A total of 44 radiographs were obtained of 22 patients (age range, 18-24 years) referred to the faculty of dentistry for orthodontic treatment. A plaster cast was prepared and panoramic radiography was taken for all patients to plan the orthodontic treatment and peri apical radiography was taken for investigation of tooth structure details. Therefore, a total of 66 views and samples were studied by two methods: 1) Measuring the angle between the longitudinal plane of the third molar and occlusal plane. 2) Measuring the angle between the longitudinal plane of second and third molar. Finally, 132 records were evaluated by one individual. Results: There was no significant statistical difference between the mean position of the third molar on panoramic, peri apical radiographs and the casts. However, measurements of the third molars on peri apical radiographs were slightly closer to the measurements of the casts compared to the panoramic radiographs. Conclusion: Distortion does not have a specific effect on the diagnosis of the position of the third erupted molars by peri apical or panoramic radiographs, though various studies have shown that these radiographs have an amount of distortion and peri apical radiographical distortion is less than that in panoramic radiography.

  19. The fast-recycling receptor Megalin defines the apical recycling pathway of epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Bay, Andres E.; Schreiner, Ryan; Benedicto, Ignacio; Paz Marzolo, Maria; Banfelder, Jason; Weinstein, Alan M.; Rodriguez-Boulan, Enrique J.

    2016-01-01

    The basolateral recycling and transcytotic pathways of epithelial cells were previously defined using markers such as transferrin (TfR) and polymeric IgA (pIgR) receptors. In contrast, our knowledge of the apical recycling pathway remains fragmentary. Here we utilize quantitative live-imaging and mathematical modelling to outline the recycling pathway of Megalin (LRP-2), an apical receptor with key developmental and renal functions, in MDCK cells. We show that, like TfR, Megalin is a long-lived and fast-recycling receptor. Megalin enters polarized MDCK cells through segregated apical sorting endosomes and subsequently intersects the TfR and pIgR pathways at a perinuclear Rab11-negative compartment termed common recycling endosomes (CRE). Whereas TfR recycles to the basolateral membrane from CRE, Megalin, like pIgR, traffics to subapical Rab11-positive apical recycling endosomes (ARE) and reaches the apical membrane in a microtubule- and Rab11-dependent manner. Hence, Megalin defines the apical recycling pathway of epithelia, with CRE as its apical sorting station. PMID:27180806

  20. Holliday Junction Thermodynamics and Structure: Coarse-Grained Simulations and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wujie; Nocka, Laura M.; Wiemann, Brianne Z.; Hinckley, Daniel M.; Mukerji, Ishita; Starr, Francis W.

    2016-03-01

    Holliday junctions play a central role in genetic recombination, DNA repair and other cellular processes. We combine simulations and experiments to evaluate the ability of the 3SPN.2 model, a coarse-grained representation designed to mimic B-DNA, to predict the properties of DNA Holliday junctions. The model reproduces many experimentally determined aspects of junction structure and stability, including the temperature dependence of melting on salt concentration, the bias between open and stacked conformations, the relative populations of conformers at high salt concentration, and the inter-duplex angle (IDA) between arms. We also obtain a close correspondence between the junction structure evaluated by all-atom and coarse-grained simulations. We predict that, for salt concentrations at physiological and higher levels, the populations of the stacked conformers are independent of salt concentration, and directly observe proposed tetrahedral intermediate sub-states implicated in conformational transitions. Our findings demonstrate that the 3SPN.2 model captures junction properties that are inaccessible to all-atom studies, opening the possibility to simulate complex aspects of junction behavior.

  1. Pre-crash scenarios at road junctions: A clustering method for car crash data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsche, Philippe; Thomas, Pete; Stuetz, Rainer; Welsh, Ruth

    2017-10-01

    Given the recent advancements in autonomous driving functions, one of the main challenges is safe and efficient operation in complex traffic situations such as road junctions. There is a need for comprehensive testing, either in virtual simulation environments or on real-world test tracks. This paper presents a novel data analysis method including the preparation, analysis and visualization of car crash data, to identify the critical pre-crash scenarios at T- and four-legged junctions as a basis for testing the safety of automated driving systems. The presented method employs k-medoids to cluster historical junction crash data into distinct partitions and then applies the association rules algorithm to each cluster to specify the driving scenarios in more detail. The dataset used consists of 1056 junction crashes in the UK, which were exported from the in-depth "On-the-Spot" database. The study resulted in thirteen crash clusters for T-junctions, and six crash clusters for crossroads. Association rules revealed common crash characteristics, which were the basis for the scenario descriptions. The results support existing findings on road junction accidents and provide benchmark situations for safety performance tests in order to reduce the possible number parameter combinations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Iron deficiency stimulates anthocyanin accumulation in grapevine apical leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caramanico, Leila; Rustioni, Laura; De Lorenzis, Gabriella

    2017-10-01

    Iron chlorosis is a diffuse disorder affecting Mediterranean vineyards. Beside the commonly described symptom of chlorophyll decrease, an apex reddening was recently observed. Secondary metabolites, such as anthocyanins, are often synthetized to cope with stresses in plants. The present work aimed to evaluate grapevine responses to iron deficiency, in terms of anthocyanin metabolism (reflectance spectrum, total anthocyanin content, HPLC profile and gene expression) in apical leaves of Cabernet sauvignon and Sangiovese grown in hydroponic conditions. Iron supply interruption produced after one month an increasing of anthocyanin content associated to a more stable profile in both cultivars. In Cabernet sauvignon, the higher red pigment accumulation was associated to a lower intensity of chlorotic symptoms, while in Sangiovese, despite the activation of the metabolism, the lower anthocyanin accumulation was associated to a stronger decrease in chlorophyll concentration. Gene expression data showed a significant increase of anthocyanin biosynthesis. The effects on the expression of structural and transcription factor genes of phenylpropanoid pathway were cultivar dependent. F3H, F3'H, F3'5'H and LDOX genes, in Cabernet sauvignon, and AOMT1 and AOMT genes, in Sangiovese, were positively affected by the treatment in response to iron deficiency. All data support the hypothesis of an anthocyanin biosynthesis stimulation rather than a decreased degradation of them due to iron chlorosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with hemodynamically unstable ventricular arrhythmia - Atypical presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Hemant; Pandey, Rudra Dev; Sharma, Krishna Kumar; Makkar, Jitendra Singh; Sharma, Sanjeev K

    2016-09-01

    We present a patient with asymptomatic apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (AHCM) who recently developed cardiac arrhythmias, and shortly discuss the diagnostic modalities, differential diagnosis, and treatment strategy for this condition. AHCM is a rare form of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, which usually involves the apex of the left ventricle. AHCM can occur with varied presentations such as chest pain, palpitations, dyspnea, syncope, atrial fibrillation, myocardial infarction, embolic events, ventricular fibrillation, and congestive heart failure. The most peculiar electrocardiogram findings are giant T-waves inversion in the precordial leads with left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy. A transthoracic echocardiogram is the initial diagnostic modality in the evaluation of AHCM and shows hypertrophy of the LV apex. Other diagnostic modalities, including left ventriculography, multislice spiral computed tomography, and cardiac magnetic resonance imagings, are also valuable tools. Medications used to manage include verapamil, beta-blockers, and antiarrhythmic agents. An implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is recommended for high-risk patients. Copyright © 2015 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Poda apical para uniformizar a colheita de flores de ?tango?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francine Lorena Cuquel

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho testou a poda apical das hastes de tango 4 e 6 semanas após a roçada, para homogeneizar a colheita que, comercialmente, necessita ser feita por um período de aproximadamente 5 dias numa mesma área. Foram avaliados altura média das plantas no primeiro dia de colheita, número médio de hastes colhidas/planta e a média do peso de matéria seca colhida/haste. Só foi verificada diferença significativa para altura média das plantas no primeiro dia de colheita, não se conseguindo reduzir o número de colheitas necessárias por planta. Existem indicações de que há necessidade de reduzir a variabilidade genética da população para homogeneizar a colheita de inflorescências de tango.

  5. Malignant Arrhythmia in Apical Ballooning Syndrome: Risk Factors and Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel J. Asirvatham

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We sought to determine the frequency and outcomes with symptomatic arrhythmia in patients with apical ballooning syndrome (ABS. Methods: A retrospective review of the Mayo Clinic Angiography database was conducted to identify patients who met the Mayo criteria for ABS. Patients with documented arrhythmias formed the study group, and 31 randomly selected patients with ABS but without arrhythmia formed the control group.Results: Out of 105 patients identified with ABS, 6 (5.7% women aged 69 +/- 9 years experienced significant arrhythmia (ventricular fibrillation, asystole, 2 patients died, and 1 required permanent pacemaker implantation. When compared with controls, the study group showed no significant difference with respect to ECG characteristics (QT, QRS duration or axis except for R-R interval variability (see comments below (30.6±6 vs 14.5±17 p = 0.0004, QTc, and P-R interval. Patients without arrhythmia were more likely to be on beta-blocker therapy than the study population (33% vs 80.6% p = 0.02. Conclusion: Life-threatening arrhythmia is uncommon (5.7% with ABS despite marked, structural abnormalities. When arrhythmias do occur, the outcome is poor. Prominent variability in R-R intervals appears to be predictive of significant arrhythmias in ABS. The role of beta-blocker therapy in preventing arrhythmia with ABS requires further investigation.

  6. Variability interexaminer of chronic apical periodontitis diagnostics in panoramic radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montero Aguilar, Mauricio; Zeledon Mayorga, Rodolfo; Ramirez Mora, Tatiana; Monestel Umana, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    The accuracy of radiological diagnosis of Apical Periodontitis (AP) is reported between examiners with differents levels of clinical experience using panoramic radiographs. 1032 teeth in 41 panoramic radiographs have been diagnosed. The evaluation of the x-rays and radiological diagnosis is performed by three independent dentists for AP to each tooth. The teeth have presented without radiological signs of AP in 96.6%. The number of teeth classified with an uncertain diagnosis of AP at the has been inversely proportional to the number of years of experience of the examiner. The examiner A has been used as a reference and compared the diagnoses of other examiners.The percentage agreement for all teeth was 95% for examiner B and 94% for examiner C. Kappa for all has been of 0.44 for examiner B and 0.43 for examiner C. The different categories were analyzed separately, the inferior teeth and the anterior teeth have obtained the best results. The level of clinical experience of the examiner has been indifferent in the diagnosis of AP in panoramic radiographs; however, it is important experience in the number of radiographs extras that will be needed to give a radiological diagnosis definitive. The panoramic radiographs were reliable diagnostic tools for AP. (author) [es

  7. Radiographic evaluation of apical root resorption following fixed orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Haghanifar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Apical root resorption is an adverse side effect of fixed orthodontic treatment which cannot be repaired. The aim of this study was to use panoramic radiographs to compare the root resorption before and after the orthodontic treatment with standard edgewise .018 appliance.Materials and Methods: The before and after treatment panoramic views of sixty-three patients needed fixed orthodontic treatment included 1520 teeth were categorized into 3 Grades (G0: without resorption, G1: mild resorption with blunt roots or ≤ 1/4 of root length, G2: moderate to severe resorption or > 1/4 to 1/2 of root length. Relationship between root resorption and sex and treatment duration was analyzed with Mann-whitney and Spearman's correlation coefficient, respectively.Results: The findings showed that 345 teeth were categorized as Grade 1. Grade 2 of root resorption was not found in this study. The highest amount of root resorption was recorded for the mandibular lateral incisor. In both gender, the root resorption of the mandible was more than that of the maxilla. The males showed significantly higher rate of resorption than the females (P0.05.Conclusion: The mandible and male patients showed higher amount of root resorption. In addition, root resorption was not related to the treatment duration and the side of the jaws.

  8. Embryology meets molecular biology: Deciphering the apical ectodermal ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheyden, Jamie M; Sun, Xin

    2017-09-15

    More than sixty years ago, while studying feather tracks on the shoulder of the chick embryo, Dr. John Saunders used Nile Blue dye to stain the tissue. There, he noticed a darkly stained line of cells that neatly rims the tip of the growing limb bud. Rather than ignoring this observation, he followed it up by removing this tissue and found that it led to a striking truncation of the limb skeletons. This landmark experiment marks the serendipitous discovery of the apical ectodermal ridge (AER), the quintessential embryonic structure that drives the outgrowth of the limb. Dr. Saunders continued to lead the limb field for the next fifty years, not just through his own work, but also by inspiring the next generation of researchers through his infectious love of science. Together, he and those who followed ushered in the discovery of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) as the AER molecule. The seamless marriage of embryology and molecular biology that led to the decoding of the AER serves as a shining example of how discoveries are made for the rest of the developmental biology field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Neuroelectric Tuning of Cortical Oscillations by Apical Dendrites in Loop Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David LaBerge

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bundles of relatively long apical dendrites dominate the neurons that make up the thickness of the cerebral cortex. It is proposed that a major function of the apical dendrite is to produce sustained oscillations at a specific frequency that can serve as a common timing unit for the processing of information in circuits connected to that apical dendrite. Many layer 5 and 6 pyramidal neurons are connected to thalamic neurons in loop circuits. A model of the apical dendrites of these pyramidal neurons has been used to simulate the electric activity of the apical dendrite. The results of that simulation demonstrated that subthreshold electric pulses in these apical dendrites can be tuned to specific frequencies and also can be fine-tuned to narrow bandwidths of less than one Hertz (1 Hz. Synchronous pulse outputs from the circuit loops containing apical dendrites can tune subthreshold membrane oscillations of neurons they contact. When the pulse outputs are finely tuned, they function as a local “clock,” which enables the contacted neurons to synchronously communicate with each other. Thus, a shared tuning frequency can select neurons for membership in a circuit. Unlike layer 6 apical dendrites, layer 5 apical dendrites can produce burst firing in many of their neurons, which increases the amplitude of signals in the neurons they contact. This difference in amplitude of signals serves as basis of selecting a sub-circuit for specialized processing (e.g., sustained attention within the typically larger layer 6-based circuit. After examining the sustaining of oscillations in loop circuits and the processing of spikes in network circuits, we propose that cortical functioning can be globally viewed as two systems: a loop system and a network system. The loop system oscillations influence the network system’s timing and amplitude of pulse signals, both of which can select circuits that are momentarily dominant in cortical activity.

  10. Transparency of atom-sized superconducting junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van-der-Post, N.; Peters, E.T.; Van Ruitenbeek, J.M.; Yanson, I.K.

    1995-01-01

    We discuss the transparency of atom-size superconducting tunnel junctions by comparing experimental values of the normal resistance and Subgap Structure with the theoretical predictions for these phenomena by Landauer's formula and Multiple Andreev Reflection, respectively

  11. Josephson tunnel junctions in niobium films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiik, Tapio.

    1976-12-01

    A method of fabricating stable Josephson tunnel junctions with reproducible characteristics is described. The junctions have a sandwich structure consisting of a vacuum evaporated niobium film, a niobium oxide layer produced by the glow discharge method and a lead film deposited by vacuum evaporation. Difficulties in producing thin-film Josephson junctions are discussed. Experimental results suggest that the lower critical field of the niobium film is the most essential parameter when evaluating the quality of these junctions. The dependence of the lower critical field on the film thickness and on the Ginzburg-Landau parameter of the film is studied analytically. Comparison with the properties of the evaporated films and with the previous calculations for bulk specimens shows that the presented model is applicable for most of the prepared samples. (author)

  12. Chirality effect in disordered graphene ribbon junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Wen

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the influence of edge chirality on the electronic transport in clean or disordered graphene ribbon junctions. By using the tight-binding model and the Landauer-Büttiker formalism, the junction conductance is obtained. In the clean sample, the zero-magnetic-field junction conductance is strongly chirality-dependent in both unipolar and bipolar ribbons, whereas the high-magnetic-field conductance is either chirality-independent in the unipolar or chirality-dependent in the bipolar ribbon. Furthermore, we study the disordered sample in the presence of magnetic field and find that the junction conductance is always chirality-insensitive for both unipolar and bipolar ribbons with adequate disorders. In addition, the disorder-induced conductance plateaus can exist in all chiral bipolar ribbons provided the disorder strength is moderate. These results suggest that we can neglect the effect of edge chirality in fabricating electronic devices based on the magnetotransport in a disordered graphene ribbon. (paper)

  13. Persistent junctional reciprocating tachycardia in the fetus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudijk, M. A.; Stoutenbeek, P.; Sreeram, N.; Visser, G. H. A.; Meijboom, E. J.

    2003-01-01

    Persistent junctional reciprocating tachycardia (PJRT) tends to be a persistent arrhythmia and requires aggressive therapeutic management. Diagnosis and management of this infrequently occurring tachycardia in the fetus at an early stage is of importance for the prevention of congestive heart

  14. Josephson junction arrays and superconducting wire networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobb, C.J.

    1992-01-01

    Techniques used to fabricate integrated circuits make it possible to construct superconducting networks containing as many as 10 6 wires or Josephson junctions. Such networks undergo phase transitions from resistive high-temperature states to ordered low-resistance low-temperature states. The nature of the phase transition depends strongly on controllable parameters such as the strength of the superconductivity in each wire or junction and the external magnetic field. This paper will review the physics of these phase transitions, starting with the simplest zero-magnetic field case. This leads to a Kosterlitz-Thouless transition when the junctions or wires are weak, and a simple mean-field fransition when the junctions or wires are strong. Rich behavior, resulting from frustration, occurs in the presence of a magnetic field. (orig.)

  15. The hamstring muscle complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Made, A. D.; Wieldraaijer, T.; Kerkhoffs, G. M.; Kleipool, R. P.; Engebretsen, L.; van Dijk, C. N.; Golanó, P.

    2015-01-01

    The anatomical appearance of the hamstring muscle complex was studied to provide hypotheses for the hamstring injury pattern and to provide reference values of origin dimensions, muscle length, tendon length, musculotendinous junction (MTJ) length as well as width and length of a tendinous

  16. Comparative immunohistochemical study of the presence of mast cells in apical granulomas and periapical cysts: possible role of mast cells in the course of human periapical lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Rodini, Camila; Batista, Aline Carvalho; Lara, Vanessa Soares

    2004-01-01

    Cells other than macrophages and lymphocytes have recently been shown capable of producing cytokines and mediators. Among these are mast cells, a cell population now recognized for its immunoregulatory properties. Little is known about the complex interactions between cells, cytokines, and other inflammatory elements in periapical lesions. The objective of this investigation was to determine the immunohistochemical pattern of expression of mast cells tryptase in periapical lesions based on study of 20 apical granulomas and 20 periapical cysts. Microscopic analysis revealed mast cells to be present in greater numbers in periapical cysts than in apical granulomas, and in cysts were more numerous in regions of active inflammation. Mast cells tended to be more common in the peripheral regions of both periapical lesions, and were often found in close proximity to lymphocytes. These findings lead us to propose a functional relationship between these two cell populations that may facilitate elicitation of an immune response contributory to the pathogenesis of periapical lesions.

  17. Junction depth measurement using carrier illumination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borden, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Carrier Illumination [trade mark] (CI) is a new method recently developed to meet the need for a non-destructive, high throughput junction depth measurement on patterned wafers. A laser beam creates a quasi-static excess carrier profile in the semiconductor underlying the activated junction. The excess carrier profile is fairly constant below the junction, and drops rapidly in the junction, creating a steep index of refraction gradient at the junction edge. Interference with light reflected from this index gradient provides a signal that is analyzed to determine the junction depth. The paper summarizes evaluation of performance in full NMOS and PMOS process flows, on both bare and patterned wafers. The aims have been to validate (1) performance in the presence of underlying layers typically found at the source/drain (S/D) process steps and (2) measurement on patterned wafers. Correlation of CI measurements to SIMS and transistor drive current are shown. The data were obtained from NMOS structures using As S/D and LDD implants. Correlations to SRP, SIMS and sheet resistance are shown for PMOS structures using B 11 LDD implants. Gage capability measurements are also presented

  18. Ballistic Josephson junctions based on CVD graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianyi; Gallop, John; Hao, Ling; Romans, Edward

    2018-04-01

    Josephson junctions with graphene as the weak link between superconductors have been intensely studied in recent years, with respect to both fundamental physics and potential applications. However, most of the previous work was based on mechanically exfoliated graphene, which is not compatible with wafer-scale production. To overcome this limitation, we have used graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) as the weak link of Josephson junctions. We demonstrate that very short, wide CVD-graphene-based Josephson junctions with Nb electrodes can work without any undesirable hysteresis in their electrical characteristics from 1.5 K down to a base temperature of 320 mK, and their gate-tuneable critical current shows an ideal Fraunhofer-like interference pattern in a perpendicular magnetic field. Furthermore, for our shortest junctions (50 nm in length), we find that the normal state resistance oscillates with the gate voltage, consistent with the junctions being in the ballistic regime, a feature not previously observed in CVD-graphene-based Josephson junctions.

  19. CLINICAL CASE OF AN ISOLATED LEFT VENTRICULAR APICAL HYPOPLASIA IN RSO–ALANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. B. Kasokhov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoplasia of the left ventricle is characterized by underdevelopment and functional weakness of the left ventricle. Defect occurs with  a frequency of from 0.5 to 7.5% of all congenital heart defects. In newborns, this anomaly is the most frequent death cause. Isolated  left ventricular apical hypoplasia is extremely rare, recently recognized congenital heart defect, which has characteristic magnetic  resonance and echocardiographic symptoms. Complexity of the diagnostics is an asymptomatic clinical current, so timely diagnostics  and therapy can help to delay possible complications and improve the quality of the life of these patients. 

  20. Environmental and Pathogenic Factors Inducing Brown Apical Necrosis on Fruit of English (Persian) Walnut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotton, Michele; Bortolin, Enrico; Fiorin, Antonio; Belisario, Alessandra

    2015-11-01

    Brown apical necrosis (BAN) is a most recently described disease affecting English (Persian) walnut fruit. BAN was only recorded in intensively managed walnut orchards and was found to be a disease complex mainly caused by Fusarium species. All fungi associated with this disease are polyphagous and ubiquitous, not specific to walnut. Consequently, BAN occurrence is more strictly dependent, than generally, on the interaction between pathological features and environmental conditions. Environmental variables identified with regression analysis showed that maximum temperature, angle of main wind direction versus tree row orientation, and orchard distance to the closest river/canal, all representative of climatic conditions occurring in the orchard, were related to fruit drop. The factor displaying the highest influence on severity of BAN fruit drop was maximum temperature and only subordinately factors are associated with relative humidity. BAN symptoms were reproduced with in planta artificial inoculation, and fruit drop of symptomatic fruit was significantly higher than that of the noninoculated trees for each type of inoculum (Fusarium semitectum, F. graminearum, and Alternaria spp.). F. semitectum and F. graminearum were more aggressive than Alternaria species, and the earliest artificial inoculations in mid-May resulted in the highest fruit drop. The extension of walnut fruit susceptibility and the conducive environmental factors to BAN are discussed.

  1. Fibroblast growth factor signaling potentiates VE-cadherin stability at adherens junctions by regulating SHP2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunihiko Hatanaka

    Full Text Available The fibroblast growth factor (FGF system plays a critical role in the maintenance of vascular integrity via enhancing the stability of VE-cadherin at adherens junctions. However, the precise molecular mechanism is not well understood. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the detailed mechanism of FGF regulation of VE-cadherin function that leads to endothelial junction stabilization.In vitro studies demonstrated that the loss of FGF signaling disrupts the VE-cadherin-catenin complex at adherens junctions by increasing tyrosine phosphorylation levels of VE-cadherin. Among protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs known to be involved in the maintenance of the VE-cadherin complex, suppression of FGF signaling reduces SHP2 expression levels and SHP2/VE-cadherin interaction due to accelerated SHP2 protein degradation. Increased endothelial permeability caused by FGF signaling inhibition was rescued by SHP2 overexpression, indicating the critical role of SHP2 in the maintenance of endothelial junction integrity.These results identify FGF-dependent maintenance of SHP2 as an important new mechanism controlling the extent of VE-cadherin tyrosine phosphorylation, thereby regulating its presence in adherens junctions and endothelial permeability.

  2. T1-nerve root neuroma presenting with apical mass and Horner's syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podnar Simon

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The appearance of dumbbell neuroma of the first thoracic root is extremely rare. The extradural component of a T1-dumbbell neuroma may present as an apical mass. The diagnosis of hand weakness is complex and may be delayed in T1-neuroma because of absence of the palpable cervical mass. One-stage removal of a T1-root neuroma and its intrathoracic extension demanded an extended posterior midline approach in the sitting position. Case presentation A 51-year old man had suffered a traumatic partial tendon rupture of his wrist flexor muscles 6 years ago. Since the incident he occasionally felt fullness and tenderness in the affected forearm with some tingling in his fingers bilaterally. During the last two years the hand weakness was continuous and hypotrophy of the medial flexor and intrinsic hand muscles had become apparent. Electrophysiological studies revealed an ulnar neuropathy in addition to mild median and radial nerve dysfunction, including a mild contralateral carpal tunnel syndrome. The diagnostic work-up for multiple mononeuropathy in the upper extremity was negative. Repeated electrophysiological studies revealed fibrillations in the C7 paravertebral muscles on the affected side. Chest x-ray revealed a large round apical mass on the affected side. A Horner's syndrome was noted at this point of diagnostic work-up. MRI of the cervical and thoracic spine revealed a dumbbell T1 neuroma enlarging the intervertebral foramen at T1-2 and a 5 cm large extradural tumor with extension into the apex of the ipsilateral lung. The patient underwent surgery in sitting position using a left dorsal midline approach. Although the T1 root could not be preserved, the patient's neurological condition was unchanged after the surgery. Conclusion Extended posterior midline exposure described here using hemilaminectomy, unilateral facetectomy and costo-transversectomy is efficient and safe for one-stage removal of dumbbell tumors at the T1

  3. Frecuencia de periodontitis apical en tratamientos endodónticos de pregrado Frequency of apical periodontitis in endodontic treatment in undergraduate

    OpenAIRE

    P León; MJ Ilabaca; M Alcota; FE González

    2011-01-01

    La periodontitis apical es una enfermedad de los tejidos periapicales de etiología bacteriana. Su tratamiento requiere erradicar los microorganismos del conducto radicular y obturarlo para lograr la reparación posterior. El objetivo de éste trabajo fue determinar la frecuencia de periodontitis apical en la población que asiste a la clínica de Endodoncia de la Facultad de Odontología de la Universidad de Chile y su relación con diferentes variables: diagnóstico específico, edad, sexo, agudas v...

  4. Root lengthening with apical closure in two maxillary immature permanent central incisors after placement of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) as an apical plug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masmoudi, F; Bourmeche, I; Sebai, A; Baccouche, Z; Maatouk, F

    2018-02-01

    Necrosis of permanent immature teeth is a common reason for consultation in paediatric dentistry. Apexification is a therapeutic procedure aiming to create an apical calcified barrier in open apex teeth. Two cases are presented in which apexification were completed on immature permanent traumatised incisors using a mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) plug. At 2 and 5 years showed apical closure and radicular elongation beyond the MTA plug. Unexpectedly, a regeneration of mineral tissues beyond the MTA plug occurred which is an uncommon outcome.

  5. The Legal Junction: the complex promise of modern legal professionalism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. Kwak

    2005-01-01

    textabstract“The language – and therefore also to some large degree the practice – of morality today is in great disorder,”1 Alasdair MacIntyre writes, and as long as our moral world is diverse and pluralistic, the confusion will not be easily overcome. Indeed, the legal world is daily confronted

  6. Risk Factors for Apical Periodontitis Sub-Urban Adult Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oginni, A O; Adeleke, A A; Mejabi, M O; Sotunde, O A

    2015-06-01

    To assess the risk factors of apical periodontitis (AP) in a Nigerian sub-urban adult population and to compare the findings with those previously reported for various population groups. The study was based on a full mouth radiographic survey of 285 patients. Patients' age ranged from 18-60 years. All teeth were assessed individually and data recorded for caries, fractured / cracked teeth, root fillings, and tooth restorations. The gender, smoking habit, and frequency of dental visit were also recorded. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to identify predictors of AP in the individual. The prevalence of AP was 74.4%. The average number of teeth with AP per patient was 2.8 (range 1-5). AP was found to be more prevalent among people 40- 49 years old (87.2%). Primary carious lesions, fractured / cracked teeth, root fillings and coronal fillings were associated with the incidence of AP in the individual. Fractured teeth had a higher risk of developing AP than carious teeth. The presence of root fillings and coronal restorations were also associated with the development of AP. Smoking (OR=3.82; CI=2.17-6.75) and irregular dental visit (OR=6.73; CI=3.75-12.06) were statistically significant risk factors for developing AP. Gender was not a risk factor for AP (OR=0.86; CI=0.50-1.46). The prevalence of AP among adult Nigerians is slightly higher than reported figures for many Western societies. Fractured/cracked teeth had a higher risk of developing AP than carious teeth; hence patients with fractured / cracked teeth should seek treatment early to prevent the development of AP.

  7. Chimaerin suppresses Rac1 activation at the apical membrane to maintain the cyst structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsuke Yagi

    Full Text Available Epithelial organs are made of a well-polarized monolayer of epithelial cells, and their morphology is maintained strictly for their proper functions. Previously, we showed that Rac1 activation is suppressed at the apical membrane in the mature organoid, and that such spatially biased Rac1 activity is required for the polarity maintenance. Here we identify Chimaerin, a GTPase activating protein for Rac1, as a suppressor of Rac1 activity at the apical membrane. Depletion of Chimaerin causes over-activation of Rac1 at the apical membrane in the presence of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, followed by luminal cell accumulation. Importantly, Chimaerin depletion did not inhibit extension formation at the basal membrane. These observations suggest that Chimaerin functions as the apical-specific Rac1 GAP to maintain epithelial morphology.

  8. Changes of Root Length and Root-to-Crown Ratio after Apical Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Arx, Thomas; Jensen, Simon S; Bornstein, Michael M

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Apical surgery is an important treatment option for teeth with post-treatment periodontitis. Although apical surgery involves root-end resection, no morphometric data are yet available about root-end resection and its impact on the root-to-crown ratio (RCR). The present study assessed...... the length of apicectomy and calculated the loss of root length and changes of RCR after apical surgery. METHODS: In a prospective clinical study, cone-beam computed tomography scans were taken preoperatively and postoperatively. From these images, the crown and root lengths of 61 roots (54 teeth in 47....... The following parameters were assessed for all treated teeth as well as for specific tooth groups: length of root-end resection and percentage change of root length, preoperative and postoperative RCRs, and percentage change of RCR after apical surgery. RESULTS: The mean length of root-end resection was 3...

  9. Comparison of extracted teeth and simulated resin blocks on apical canal transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalilak, Zohreh; Fallahdoost, Arjang; Dadresanfar, Bahareh; Rezvani, Gholamreza

    2008-01-01

    We aimed to compare apical canal transportation of extracted teeth and two types of simulated resin blocks. Mesiobuccal root of extracted maxillary molars, high hardness simulated resin blocks (Knoop hardness=40) and low hardness simulated resin blocks (Knoop hardness=22) were prepared with K-files using step-back technique (n=15 canals in each group). Double exposure radiographic technique was used for extracted teeth. Simulated resin blocks were stabilized and scanned before and after preparation. Pre and post-preparation pictures were superimposed and apical transportation was measured. The data were analyzed statistically using ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests. There was no significant difference in apical canal transportation between extracted teeth and high hardness resin blocks (P>0.05). Low hardness resin blocks showed more apical transportation than the other groups (Presin blocks were similar.

  10. Mineral trioxide aggregate-induced apical closure in nonvital immature permanent maxillary incisor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenu Bhola

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of nonvital immature permanent teeth with calcium hydroxide is associated with few difficulties such as weakened tooth root, root canal reinfection, and long treatment time. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA apical plug method is an alternative treatment method for open apices and has gained popularity in the recent times. This case report describes the management of a late-referral case of periapically involved, traumatized immature permanent incisor by endodontic treatment and the use of MTA apical plug. After preparing the access cavity, the working length was determined. The root canals were irrigated with 3% sodium hypochlorite and disinfected with metapex for 2 weeks. MTA was then placed in the apical 3 mm of the root canal. The remaining part of the root canal was filled with thermoplastic gutta-percha, and the coronal restoration was finished with composite resin. After 1-year follow-up, radiograph showed successful healing of periradicular radiolucency.

  11. Josephson effect in SIFS junctions at arbitrary scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugach, N. G.; Kupriyanov, M. Yu.; Goldobin, E.; Koelle, D.; Kleiner, R.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: The interplay between dirty and clean limits in Superconductor-Ferromagnet-Superconductor (SFS) Josephson junctions is a subject of intensive theoretical studies. SIFS junctions, containing an additional insulator (I) barrier are interesting as potential logic elements in superconducting circuits, since their critical current I c can be tuned over a wide range, still keeping a high I c R N product, where R N is the normal resistance of the junction. They are also a convenient model system for a comparative study of the 0-π transitions for arbitrary relations between characteristic lengths of the F-layer: the layer thickness d, the mean free path l, the magnetic length ξ H =v F /2H, and the nonmagnetic coherence length ξ 0 =v F /2πT, where v F is the Fermi velocity, H is the exchange magnetic energy, and T is the temperature. The spatial variations of the order parameter are described by the complex coherent length in the ferromagnet ξ F -1 = ξ 1 -1 + iξ 2 -1 . It is well known, that in the dirty limit (l 1,2 ) described by the Usadel equations both ξ 1 2 = ξ 2 2 = v F l/3H. In this work the spatial distribution of the anomalous Green's functions and the Josephson current in the SIFS junction are calculated. The linearized Eilenberger equations are solved together with the Zaitsev boundary conditions. This allows comparing the dirty and the clean limits, investigating a moderate disorder, and establishing the applicability limits of the Usadel equations for such structures. We demonstrate that for an arbitrary relation between l, ξ H , and d the spatial distribution of the anomalous Green's function can be approximated by a single exponent with reasonable accuracy, and we find its effective decay length and oscillation period for several values of ξ H , l and d. The role of different types of the FS interface is analyzed. The applicability range of the Usadel equation is established. The results of calculations have been applied to the

  12. Distribution and function of HCN channels in the apical dendritic tuft of neocortical pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnett, Mark T; Magee, Jeffrey C; Williams, Stephen R

    2015-01-21

    The apical tuft is the most remote area of the dendritic tree of neocortical pyramidal neurons. Despite its distal location, the apical dendritic tuft of layer 5 pyramidal neurons receives substantial excitatory synaptic drive and actively processes corticocortical input during behavior. The properties of the voltage-activated ion channels that regulate synaptic integration in tuft dendrites have, however, not been thoroughly investigated. Here, we use electrophysiological and optical approaches to examine the subcellular distribution and function of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated nonselective cation (HCN) channels in rat layer 5B pyramidal neurons. Outside-out patch recordings demonstrated that the amplitude and properties of ensemble HCN channel activity were uniform in patches excised from distal apical dendritic trunk and tuft sites. Simultaneous apical dendritic tuft and trunk whole-cell current-clamp recordings revealed that the pharmacological blockade of HCN channels decreased voltage compartmentalization and enhanced the generation and spread of apical dendritic tuft and trunk regenerative activity. Furthermore, multisite two-photon glutamate uncaging demonstrated that HCN channels control the amplitude and duration of synaptically evoked regenerative activity in the distal apical dendritic tuft. In contrast, at proximal apical dendritic trunk and somatic recording sites, the blockade of HCN channels decreased excitability. Dynamic-clamp experiments revealed that these compartment-specific actions of HCN channels were heavily influenced by the local and distributed impact of the high density of HCN channels in the distal apical dendritic arbor. The properties and subcellular distribution pattern of HCN channels are therefore tuned to regulate the interaction between integration compartments in layer 5B pyramidal neurons. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/351024-14$15.00/0.

  13. Apical atrophy of retinal pigment epithelial detachments in central serous chorioretinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryds, Anders; Hamann, Steffen; Larsen, Michael

    2012-01-01

    compatible with CSC. RESULTS: A juxtafoveal retinal pigment epithelial detachment with apical atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium with corresponding severe attenuation of the pigmentation of the retinal pigment epithelium was observed in both patients. One of the patients presented with a serous...... neurosensory retinal detachment with smokestack leakage 7 years after first being seen. The other patient was never seen with a neurosensory detachment. CONCLUSION: Isolated pigment epithelial detachment with apical retinal pigment epithelial atrophy may represent a precursor stage of CSC....

  14. Management of Teeth with Persistent Apical Periodontitis after Root Canal Treatment Using Regenerative Endodontic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saoud, Tarek Mohamed A; Huang, George T-J; Gibbs, Jennifer L; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Lin, Louis M

    2015-10-01

    Regenerative endodontic therapy (RET) is currently used to treat immature teeth with necrotic pulp and/or apical periodontitis. However, recently RET has been used to treat mature teeth with necrotic pulp and/or apical periodontitis and resulted in regression of clinical signs and/or symptoms and resolution of apical periodontitis. The purpose of this case report was to describe the potential of using RET to treat 2 mature teeth with persistent apical periodontitis after root canal therapy using RET. Two male patients, one 26-year old and another 12-year old, presented for retreatment of persistent apical periodontitis after root canal treatment of 2 mature teeth (#9 and #19). The gutta-percha fillings in the canals of teeth #9 and #19 were removed with Carvene gutta-percha solvent (Prevest DenPro, Jammu, India) and ProTaper Universal rotary retreatment files (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland). The canals of both teeth were further chemomechanically debrided with rotary retreatment files and copious amounts of sodium hypochlorite irrigation and dressed with Metapaste (Meta Biomed, Chungbuk, Korea). RET was performed on teeth #9 and #19. Periapical bleeding was provoked into the disinfected root canals. The blood clots were covered with mineral trioxide aggregate plugs, and the access cavities were restored with intermediate restorative material. Teeth #9 and #19 showed regression of clinical signs and/or symptoms and healing of apical periodontitis after 13-month and 14-month follow-ups, respectively. Tooth #9 revealed narrowing of the canal space and apical closure by deposition of hard tissue. RET has the potential to be used to retreat teeth with persistent apical periodontitis after root canal therapy. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Pathogenicity of Exopolysaccharide-Producing Actinomyces oris Isolated from an Apical Abscess Lesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    testing and 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequencing (Henssge et al. 2009). Materials and methods Bacteria A clinically isolated A. oris...described in many pathogens (Costerton et al. 1987). Although the bacteria in biofilms are considered to be dormant in general, it is conceivable that Actino...June 2012 Introduction Bacteria remaining in the apical part of the root canal are known to be involved in the development of apical abscesses (Nair

  16. Macrophage polarization differs between apical granulomas, radicular cysts, and dentigerous cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Manuel; Schlittenbauer, Tilo; Moebius, Patrick; Büttner-Herold, Maike; Ries, Jutta; Preidl, Raimund; Geppert, Carol-Immanuel; Neukam, Friedrich W; Wehrhan, Falk

    2018-01-01

    Apical periodontitis can appear clinically as apical granulomas or radicular cysts. There is evidence that immunologic factors are involved in the pathogenesis of both pathologies. In contrast to radicular cysts, the dentigerous cysts have a developmental origin. Macrophage polarization (M1 vs M2) is a main regulator of tissue homeostasis and differentiation. There are no studies comparing macrophage polarization in apical granulomas, radicular cysts, and dentigerous cysts. Forty-one apical granulomas, 23 radicular cysts, and 23 dentigerous cysts were analyzed in this study. A tissue microarray (TMA) of the 87 consecutive specimens was created, and CD68-, CD11c-, CD163-, and MRC1-positive macrophages were detected by immunohistochemical methods. TMAs were digitized, and the expression of macrophage markers was quantitatively assessed. Radicular cysts are characterized by M1 polarization of macrophages while apical granulomas show a significantly higher degree of M2 polarization. Dentigerous cysts have a significantly lower M1 polarization than both analyzed periapical lesions (apical granulomas and radicular cysts) and accordingly, a significantly higher M2 polarization than radicular cysts. Macrophage cell density in dentigerous cysts is significantly lower than in the periapical lesions. The development of apical periodontitis towards apical granulomas or radicular cysts might be directed by macrophage polarization. Radicular cyst formation is associated with an increased M1 polarization of infiltrating macrophages. In contrast to radicular cysts, dentigerous cysts are characterized by a low macrophage infiltration and a high degree of M2 polarization, possibly reflecting their developmental rather than inflammatory origin. As M1 polarization of macrophages is triggered by bacterial antigens, these results underline the need for sufficient bacterial clearance during endodontic treatment to prevent a possible M1 macrophage-derived stimulus for radicular cyst

  17. Frecuencia de periodontitis apical en tratamientos endodónticos de pregrado Frequency of apical periodontitis in endodontic treatment in undergraduate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P León

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available La periodontitis apical es una enfermedad de los tejidos periapicales de etiología bacteriana. Su tratamiento requiere erradicar los microorganismos del conducto radicular y obturarlo para lograr la reparación posterior. El objetivo de éste trabajo fue determinar la frecuencia de periodontitis apical en la población que asiste a la clínica de Endodoncia de la Facultad de Odontología de la Universidad de Chile y su relación con diferentes variables: diagnóstico específico, edad, sexo, agudas vs. crónicas, éxito/fracaso del tratamiento y rehabilitación post-tratamiento. Se recolectó información de 292 dientes de pacientes tratados en dicha clínica, analizándose la información de aquellos con dientes diagnosticados con algún tipo de periodontitis apical clasificándolo según la nueva nomenclatura de la asociación de endodoncia americana. La frecuencia de periodontitis apical fue de un 36.7% (92 pacientes, de los cuales un 77.8% presentaron patologías de tipo crónicas. Un 75% de los pacientes pertenecieron al sexo femenino y la 5ta década representó un 34.8% de los pacientes. El 100% de los pacientes que acudieron a control presentó éxito en sus tratamientos según variables clínico-radiográficas, mientras que la restauración más frecuente post-tratamiento fue la resina compuesta (52.4%. Dado el pequeño número de pacientes que concurrieron a la citación de control para determinar el éxito del tratamiento, esta variable debe ser considerada como preliminar. Nuestros resultados mostraron que la condición mas frecuente fue la periodontitis apical de tipo crónica, afectando más a mujeres y a la 5ta década.Apical periodontitis is a microbially induced inflammatory disease of the periapical tissues. Its treatment requires eliminating microorganism from root canal and sealing it properly to induce further tissue repair. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of apical periodontitis and its distribution by

  18. Josephson tunnel junctions with ferromagnetic interlayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weides, M.P.

    2006-07-01

    Superconductivity and ferromagnetism are well-known physical properties of solid states that have been widely studied and long thought about as antagonistic phenomena due to difference in spin ordering. It turns out that the combination of both superconductor and ferromagnet leads to a very rich and interesting physics. One particular example, the phase oscillations of the superconducting order parameter inside the ferromagnet, will play a major role for the devices discussed in this work. In this thesis, I present Josephson junctions with a thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} tunnel barrier and a ferromagnetic interlayer, i.e. superconductor-insulator-ferromagnet-superconductor (SIFS) stacks. The fabrication of junctions was optimized regarding the insulation of electrodes and the homogeneity of the current transport. The junctions were either in the 0 or {pi} coupled ground state, depending on the thickness of the ferromagnetic layer and on temperature. The influence of ferromagnetic layer thickness on the transport properties and the coupling (0, {pi}) of SIFS tunnel junctions was studied. Furthermore, using a stepped ferromagnetic layer with well-chosen thicknesses, I obtained the so-called 0-{pi} Josephson junction. At a certain temperature this 0-{pi} junction can be made perfectly symmetric. In this case the ground state corresponds to a vortex of supercurrent creating a magnetic flux which is a fraction of the magnetic flux quantum {phi}{sub 0}. Such structures allow to study the physics of fractional vortices and to build various electronic circuits based on them. The SIFS junctions presented here have an exponentially vanishing damping at T {yields} 0. The SIFS technology developed within the framework of this work may be used to construct classical and quantum devices such as oscillators, memory cells and qubits. (orig.)

  19. Numerical study of junction-angle effects on flow pattern in a river ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of main channel curvature on the flow pattern in river junctions is a complex and important issue. The 3-dimensional flow pattern in a river bend with a lateral or tributary channel is not only affected by the centrifugal force and pressure gradient but is also affected by the tributary channel's momentum.

  20. Model Building to Facilitate Understanding of Holliday Junction and Heteroduplex Formation, and Holliday Junction Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvarajah, Geeta; Selvarajah, Susila

    2016-01-01

    Students frequently expressed difficulty in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in chromosomal recombination. Therefore, we explored alternative methods for presenting the two concepts of the double-strand break model: Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. In addition to a lecture and…

  1. Effect of reciprocating systems and working lengths on apical microcrack development: a micro-CT Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Bruna Paloma de; Câmara, Andréa Cruz; Duarte, Daniel Amancio; Antonino, Antonio Celso Dantas; Aguiar, Carlos Menezes, E-mail: bruna_paloma@msn.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Heck, Richard John [Department of Land Resource Science, University of Guelph (Canada)

    2017-11-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of root canal preparation with single-file reciprocating systems at different working lengths on the development of apical microcracks using micro-computed tomographic (micro-CT) imaging. Forty extracted human mandibular incisors were randomly assigned to 4 groups (n=10) according to the systems and working length used to prepare the root canals: Group A - WaveOne Gold at apical foramen (AF), Group B - WaveOne Gold 1 mm short of the AF (AF-1 mm), Group C - Unicone (AF) and Group D - Unicone (AF-1 mm). Micro-CT scanning was performed before and after root canal preparation at an isotropic resolution of 14 μm. Then, three examiners assessed the cross-sectional images generated to detect microcracks in the apical portion of the roots. Apical microcracks were visualized in 3, 1, 1, and 3 specimens in groups A, B, C, and D, respectively. All these microcracks observed after root canal preparation already existed prior to instrumentation, and no new apical microcrack was detected. For all groups, the number of slices presenting microcracks after root canal preparation was the same as before canal preparation. Root canal preparation with WaveOne Gold and Unicone, regardless of the working length, was not associated with apical microcrack formation. (author)

  2. Basolateral cholesterol depletion alters Aquaporin-2 post-translational modifications and disrupts apical plasma membrane targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Hanne B; Fuglsang, Cecilia Hvitfeldt; Pedersen, Cecilie Nøhr; Fenton, Robert A

    2018-01-01

    Apical plasma membrane accumulation of the water channel Aquaporin-2 (AQP2) in kidney collecting duct principal cells is critical for body water homeostasis. Posttranslational modification (PTM) of AQP2 is important for regulating AQP2 trafficking. The aim of this study was to determine the role of cholesterol in regulation of AQP2 PTM and in apical plasma membrane targeting of AQP2. Cholesterol depletion from the basolateral plasma membrane of a collecting duct cell line (mpkCCD14) using methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MBCD) increased AQP2 ubiquitylation. Forskolin, cAMP or dDAVP-mediated AQP2 phosphorylation at Ser269 (pS269-AQP2) was prevented by cholesterol depletion from the basolateral membrane. None of these effects on pS269-AQP2 were observed when cholesterol was depleted from the apical side of cells, or when MBCD was applied subsequent to dDAVP stimulation. Basolateral, but not apical, MBCD application prevented cAMP-induced apical plasma membrane accumulation of AQP2. These studies indicate that manipulation of the cholesterol content of the basolateral plasma membrane interferes with AQP2 PTM and subsequently regulated apical plasma membrane targeting of AQP2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Proliferative effects of apical, but not basal, matrix metalloproteinase-7 activity in polarized MDCK cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrell, Permila C.; McCawley, Lisa J.; Fingleton, Barbara; McIntyre, J. Oliver; Matrisian, Lynn M.

    2005-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7) is primarily expressed in glandular epithelium. Therefore, its mechanism of action may be influenced by its regulated vectorial release to either the apical and/or basolateral compartments, where it would act on its various substrates. To gain a better understanding of where MMP-7 is released in polarized epithelium, we have analyzed its pattern of secretion in polarized MDCK cells expressing stably transfected human MMP-7 (MDCK-MMP-7), and HCA-7 and Caco2 human colon cancer cell lines. In all cell lines, latent MMP-7 was secreted to both cellular compartments, but was 1.5- to 3-fold more abundant in the basolateral compartment as compared to the apical. However, studies in the MDCK system demonstrated that MMP-7 activity was 2-fold greater in the apical compartment of MDCK-MMP-7 HIGH -polarized monolayers, which suggests the apical co-release of an MMP-7 activator. In functional assays, MMP-7 over-expression increased cell saturation density as a result of increased cell proliferation with no effect on apoptosis. Apical MMP-7 activity was shown to be responsible for the proliferative effect, which occurred, as demonstrated by media transfer experiments, through cleavage of an apical substrate and not through the generation of a soluble factor. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the importance of MMP-7 secretion in relation to its mechanism of action when expressed in a polarized epithelium

  4. Increasing gap junctional coupling: a tool for dissecting the role of gap junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Haugan, Ketil; Stahlhut, Martin

    2007-01-01

    . In a number of cases, gap junctions have been implicated in the initiation and progress of disease, and experimental uncoupling has been used to investigate the exact role of coupling. The inverse approach, i.e., to increase coupling, has become possible in recent years and represents a new way of testing......Much of our current knowledge about the physiological and pathophysiological role of gap junctions is based on experiments where coupling has been reduced by either chemical agents or genetic modification. This has brought evidence that gap junctions are important in many physiological processes...... the role of gap junctions. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge obtained with agents that selectively increase gap junctional intercellular coupling. Two approaches will be reviewed: increasing coupling by the use of antiarrhythmic peptide and its synthetic analogs...

  5. Three viruses of the bovine respiratory disease complex apply different strategies to initiate infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhoff, Jana; Uhlenbruck, Sabine; Goris, Katherina; Keil, Günther M; Herrler, Georg

    2014-02-18

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is the major cause of serious respiratory tract infections in calves. The disease is multifactorial, with either stress or reduced immunity allowing several pathogens to emerge. We investigated the susceptibility of bovine airway epithelial cells (BAEC) to infection by the three major viruses associated with the BRDC: bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1) and bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV3). For this purpose, two culture systems for well-differentiated BAEC were used: the air-liquid interface (ALI) system, where filter-grown BAEC differentiate into a pseudostratified respiratory epithelium and precision-cut lung slices (PCLS) where BAEC are maintained in the original tissue organisation. Comparative infection studies demonstrated that entry and release of BPIV3 occurred specifically via the apical membrane with ciliated cells being the major target cells. By contrast, airway epithelial cells were largely resistant to infection by BHV-1. When the epithelial barrier was abolished by opening tight junctions or by injuring the cell monolayer, BHV-1 infected mainly basal cells. Respiratory epithelial cells were also refractory to infection by BRSV. However, this virus infected neither differentiated epithelial cells nor basal cells when the integrity of the epithelial barrier was destroyed. In contrast to cells of the airway epithelium, subepithelial cells were susceptible to infection by BRSV. Altogether, these results indicate that the three viruses of the same disease complex follow different strategies to interact with the airway epithelium. Possible entry mechanisms are discussed.

  6. Regulation of gap junctions by protein phosphorylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Sáez

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available Gap junctions are constituted by intercellular channels and provide a pathway for transfer of ions and small molecules between adjacent cells of most tissues. The degree of intercellular coupling mediated by gap junctions depends on the number of gap junction channels and their activity may be a function of the state of phosphorylation of connexins, the structural subunit of gap junction channels. Protein phosphorylation has been proposed to control intercellular gap junctional communication at several steps from gene expression to protein degradation, including translational and post-translational modification of connexins (i.e., phosphorylation of the assembled channel acting as a gating mechanism and assembly into and removal from the plasma membrane. Several connexins contain sites for phosphorylation for more than one protein kinase. These consensus sites vary between connexins and have been preferentially identified in the C-terminus. Changes in intercellular communication mediated by protein phosphorylation are believed to control various physiological tissue and cell functions as well as to be altered under pathological conditions.

  7. [The biomechanical analysis of craniovertebral junction finite element model in atlas assimilation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yiheng; Yu, Xinguang; Wang, Peng; Meng, Chunling; Zhang, Jianning

    2015-03-01

    To study the biomechanical change of the craniovertebral junction in conditions of atlas assimilation. Mimics software was used to process CT data of the craniovertebral junction in a health adult to obtain the three-dimensional reconstruction and the cloudy points of C1, C2 and part of the occipital bone. Then the cloudy points were imported into the Abaqus 6. 8 software to establish the occipito-atlantoaxial finite element model in normal structure. According to the established model in normal structure, the model in conditions of atlas assimilation was set by changing the model parameters. Both models of normal structure and atlas assimilation were loaded with 1. 5 N . m static moment to simulate four motions of flexion, extension, lateral bending and axial rotation respectively. The movement characteristics,joint stress force and ligament deformation was analyzed. Under 1. 5 N . m moment, in model of atlas assimilation the C1-C2 range of movement decreased from 13. 55° to 11.88° in flexion,increased from 13. 22° to 15. 24° in extension and from 4. 05° to 4. 23° in lateral bending and remained unchanged in axial rotation when compared with the normal model. In flexion movement, the contact force of the atlanto-dental joint increased from 1. 59 MPa to 3. 28 MPa and the deflection of apical ligament, tectorial membrane and alar ligament increased 129. 1%, 157. 6% and 75. 1% respectively when compared with the normal model. The normal C1-C2 motion mode is destructed in conditions of atlas assimilation, leading to the changes of the range of movement,joint stress force and the ligament deformation at C1 C2 junction. The atlantoaxial instability will likely occur in flexion motion.

  8. T-junction cross-flow mixing with thermally driven density stratification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kickhofel, John, E-mail: jkickhofel@gmail.com [Laboratory of Nuclear Energy Systems, ETH Zurich, Sonneggstrasse 3, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Prasser, Horst-Michael, E-mail: prasser@lke.mavt.ethz.ch [Laboratory of Nuclear Energy Systems, ETH Zurich, Sonneggstrasse 3, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Selvam, P. Karthick, E-mail: karthick.selvam@ike.uni-stuttgart.de [Institute of Nuclear Technology and Energy Systems (IKE), University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 31, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Laurien, Eckart, E-mail: eckart.laurien@ike.uni-stuttgart.de [Institute of Nuclear Technology and Energy Systems (IKE), University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 31, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Kulenovic, Rudi, E-mail: rudi.kulenovic@ike.uni-stuttgart.de [Institute of Nuclear Technology and Energy Systems (IKE), University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 31, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Mesh sensor for realistic nuclear thermal hydraulic scenarios is demonstrated. • Flow temperature behavior across a wide range of Richardson numbers measured. • Upstream stratified flow in the T-junction results in a thermal shock scenario. • Large, stable near-wall thermal gradients exist in spite of turbulent flows. - Abstract: As a means of further elucidating turbulence- and stratification-driven thermal fatigue in the vicinity of T-junctions in nuclear power plants, a series of experiments have been conducted at the high temperature high pressure fluid–structure interaction T-junction facility of the University of Stuttgart with novel fluid measurement instrumentation. T-junction mixing with large fluid temperature gradients results in complex flow behavior, the result of density driven effects. Deionized water mixing at temperature differences of up to 232 K at 7 MPa pressure have been investigated in a T-junction with main pipe diameter 71.8 mm and branch line diameter 38.9 mm. The experiments have been performed with fixed flow rates of 0.4 kg/s in the main pipe and 0.1 kg/s in the branch line. A novel electrode-mesh sensor compatible with the DN80 PN100 pipeline upstream and downstream of the T-junction has been utilized as a temperature sensor providing a high density information in the pipe cross-section in both space and time. Additionally, in-flow and in-wall thermocouples quantify the damping of thermal fluctuations by the wall material. The results indicate that large inflow temperature differences lead to strong turbulence damping, and ultimately stable stratification extending both downstream and upstream of the T-junction resulting in large local thermal gradients.

  9. Impurity scattering effect on charge transport in high-Tc cuprate junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Y.; Asano, Y.; Kashiwaya, S.

    2004-01-01

    It is known that the zero-bias conductance peak (ZBCP) is expected in tunneling spectra of normal-metal/high-Tc cuprate junctions because of the formation of the midgap Andreev resonant states (MARS) at junction interfaces. In the present review, we report the recent theoretical study of impurity scattering effects on the tunneling spectroscopy. In the former part of the present paper, we discuss impurity effects in normal metal. We calculate tunneling conductance for diffusive normal metal (DN)/high Tc cuprate junctions based on the Keldysh Green's function technique. Besides the ZBCP due to the MARS, we can expect ZBCP caused by the different origin, i.e., the coherent Andreev reflection (CAR) assisted by the proximity effect in DN. Their relative importance depends on the angle a between the interface normal and the crystal axis of high-Tc superconductors. At α = 0, we find the ZBCP by the CAR for low transparent junctions with small Thouless energies in DN; this is similar to the case of diffusive normal metal/insulator/s-wave superconductor junctions. Under increase of α from zero to π/4, the contribution of MARS to ZBCP becomes more prominent and the effect of the CAR is gradually suppressed. Such complex spectral features would be observable in conductance spectra of high-Tc junctions at very low temperatures. In the latter part of our paper, we study impurity effects in superconductors. We consider impurities near the junction interface on the superconductor side. The conductance is calculated from the Andreev and the normal reflection coefficients which are estimated by using the single-site approximation in an analytic calculation and by the recursive Green function method in a numerical simulation. We find splitting of the ZBCP in the presence of the time reversal symmetry. Thus the zero-field splitting of ZBCP in the experiment does not perfectly prove an existence of broken time reversal symmetry state

  10. Tunnel magnetoresistance in double spin filter junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saffarzadeh, Alireza

    2003-01-01

    We consider a new type of magnetic tunnel junction, which consists of two ferromagnetic tunnel barriers acting as spin filters (SFs), separated by a nonmagnetic metal (NM) layer. Using the transfer matrix method and the free-electron approximation, the dependence of the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) on the thickness of the central NM layer, bias voltage and temperature in the double SF junction are studied theoretically. It is shown that the TMR and electron-spin polarization in this structure can reach very large values under suitable conditions. The highest value of the TMR can reach 99%. By an appropriate choice of the thickness of the central NM layer, the degree of spin polarization in this structure will be higher than that of the single SF junctions. These results may be useful in designing future spin-polarized tunnelling devices

  11. Josephson junctions with ferromagnetic alloy interlayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himmel, Nico

    2015-01-01

    Josephson junctions are used as active devices in superconducting electronics and quantum information technology. Outstanding properties are their distinct non-linear electrical characteristics and a usually sinusoidal relation between the current and the superconducting phase difference across the junction. In general the insertion of ferromagnetic material in the barrier of a Josephson junction is associated with a suppression of superconducting correlations. But also new phenomena can arise which may allow new circuit layouts and enhance the performance of applications. This thesis presents a systematic investigation for two concepts to fabricate Josephson junctions with a rather uncommon negative critical current. Such devices exhibit an intrinsic phase slip of π between the electrodes, so they are also known as π junctions. Both studies go well beyond existing experiments and in one system a π junction is shown for the first time. All the thin film junctions are based on superconducting Nb electrodes. In a first approach, barriers made from Si and Fe were investigated with respect to the realisation of π junctions by spin-flip processes. The distribution of Fe in the Si matrix was varied from pure layers to disperse compounds. The systematic fabrication of alloy barriers was facilitated by the development of a novel timing-based combinatorial sputtering technique for planetary deposition systems. An orthogonal gradient approach allowed to create binary layer libraries with independent variations of thickness and composition. Second, Nb vertical stroke AlO x vertical stroke Nb vertical stroke Ni 60 Cu 40 vertical stroke Nb (SIsFS) double barrier junctions were experimentally studied for the occurrence of proximity effect induced order parameter oscillations. Detailed dependencies of the critical current density on the thickness of s-layer and F-layer were acquired and show a remarkable agreement to existing theoretical predictions. Especially a variation of

  12. Phase-dependent noise in Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Forrest; Peotta, Sebastiano; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2018-03-01

    In addition to the usual superconducting current, Josephson junctions (JJs) support a phase-dependent conductance related to the retardation effect of tunneling quasi-particles. This introduces a dissipative current with a memory-resistive (memristive) character that should also affect the current noise. By means of the microscopic theory of tunnel junctions we compute the complete current autocorrelation function of a Josephson tunnel junction and show that this memristive component gives rise to both a previously noted phase-dependent thermal noise, and an undescribed non-stationary, phase-dependent dynamic noise. As experiments are approaching ranges in which these effects may be observed, we examine the form and magnitude of these processes. Their phase dependence can be realized experimentally as a hysteresis effect and may be used to probe defects present in JJ based qubits and in other superconducting electronics applications.

  13. Silicon fiber with p-n junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homa, D.; Cito, A.; Pickrell, G.; Hill, C.; Scott, B. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 312 Holden Hall, Blacksburg, Virginia 24060 (United States)

    2014-09-22

    In this study, we fabricated a p-n junction in a fiber with a phosphorous doped silicon core and fused silica cladding. The fibers were fabricated via a hybrid process of the core-suction and melt-draw techniques and maintained overall diameters ranging from 200 to 900 μm and core diameters of 20–800 μm. The p-n junction was formed by doping the fiber with boron and confirmed via the current-voltage characteristic. The demonstration of a p-n junction in a melt-drawn silicon core fiber paves the way for the seamless integration of optical and electronic devices in fibers.

  14. Silicon fiber with p-n junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homa, D.; Cito, A.; Pickrell, G.; Hill, C.; Scott, B.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we fabricated a p-n junction in a fiber with a phosphorous doped silicon core and fused silica cladding. The fibers were fabricated via a hybrid process of the core-suction and melt-draw techniques and maintained overall diameters ranging from 200 to 900 μm and core diameters of 20–800 μm. The p-n junction was formed by doping the fiber with boron and confirmed via the current-voltage characteristic. The demonstration of a p-n junction in a melt-drawn silicon core fiber paves the way for the seamless integration of optical and electronic devices in fibers.

  15. Nanomembrane-based mesoscopic superconducting hybrid junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurmer, Dominic J; Bof Bufon, Carlos Cesar; Deneke, Christoph; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2010-09-08

    A new method for combining top-down and bottom-up approaches to create superconductor-normal metal-superconductor niobium-based Josephson junctions is presented. Using a rolled-up semiconductor nanomembrane as scaffolding, we are able to create mesoscopic gold filament proximity junctions. These are created by electromigration of gold filaments after inducing an electric field mediated breakdown in the semiconductor nanomembrane, which can generate nanometer sized structures merely using conventional optical lithography techniques. We find that the created point contact junctions exhibit large critical currents of a few milliamps at 4.2 K and an I(c)R(n) product placing their characteristic frequency in the terahertz region. These nanometer-sized filament devices can be further optimized and integrated on a chip for their use in superconductor hybrid electronics circuits.

  16. Ferromagnetic resonance with long Josephson junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovchanskiy, I. A.; Abramov, N. N.; Stolyarov, V. S.; Emelyanova, O. V.; Golubov, A. A.; Ustinov, A. V.; Ryazanov, V. V.

    2017-05-01

    In this work we propose a hybrid device based on a long Josephson junction (JJ) coupled inductively to an external ferromagnetic (FM) layer. The long JJ in a zero-field operation mode induces a localized AC magnetic field in the FM layer and enables a synchronized magnetostatic standing wave. The magnetostatic wave induces additional dissipation for soliton propagation in the junction and also enables a phase locking (resonant soliton synchronization) at a frequency of natural ferromagnetic resonance. The later manifests itself as an additional constant voltage step on the current-voltage characteristics at the corresponding voltage. The proposed device allows to study magnetization dynamics of individual micro-scaled FM samples using just DC technique, and also it provides additional phase locking frequency in the junction, determined exclusively by characteristics of the ferromagnet.

  17. Josephson junctions with ferromagnetic alloy interlayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himmel, Nico

    2015-07-23

    Josephson junctions are used as active devices in superconducting electronics and quantum information technology. Outstanding properties are their distinct non-linear electrical characteristics and a usually sinusoidal relation between the current and the superconducting phase difference across the junction. In general the insertion of ferromagnetic material in the barrier of a Josephson junction is associated with a suppression of superconducting correlations. But also new phenomena can arise which may allow new circuit layouts and enhance the performance of applications. This thesis presents a systematic investigation for two concepts to fabricate Josephson junctions with a rather uncommon negative critical current. Such devices exhibit an intrinsic phase slip of π between the electrodes, so they are also known as π junctions. Both studies go well beyond existing experiments and in one system a π junction is shown for the first time. All the thin film junctions are based on superconducting Nb electrodes. In a first approach, barriers made from Si and Fe were investigated with respect to the realisation of π junctions by spin-flip processes. The distribution of Fe in the Si matrix was varied from pure layers to disperse compounds. The systematic fabrication of alloy barriers was facilitated by the development of a novel timing-based combinatorial sputtering technique for planetary deposition systems. An orthogonal gradient approach allowed to create binary layer libraries with independent variations of thickness and composition. Second, Nb vertical stroke AlO{sub x} vertical stroke Nb vertical stroke Ni{sub 60}Cu{sub 40} vertical stroke Nb (SIsFS) double barrier junctions were experimentally studied for the occurrence of proximity effect induced order parameter oscillations. Detailed dependencies of the critical current density on the thickness of s-layer and F-layer were acquired and show a remarkable agreement to existing theoretical predictions. Especially

  18. Strong Josephson Coupling in Planar Graphene Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jinho; Lee, Gil-Ho; Lee, Jae Hyeong; Takane, Yositake; Imura, Ken-Ichiro; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Lee, Hu-Jong

    A recent breakthrough of processing graphene, employing encapsulation by hexagonal boron nitride layers (BGB structure), allows realizing the ballistic carrier transport in graphene. Thereafter, ballistic Josephson coupling has been studied by closely edge-contacted BGB structure with two superconducting electrodes. Here, we report on the strong Josephson coupling with planar graphene junction in truly short and ballistic regime. Our device showed high transmission probability and the junction critical current (IC) oscillating for sweeping the gate voltage along with the normal conductance oscillation (Fabry-Perot oscillations), providing a direct evidence for the ballistic nature of the junction pair current. We also observed the convex-upward shape of decreasing critical currents with increasing temperature, canonical properties of the short Josephson coupling. By fitting these curves into theoretical models, we demonstrate the strong Josephson coupling in our devices, which is also supported by the exceptionally large value of ICRN ( 2 Δ / e RNis the normal resistance).

  19. A congenital form of junctional ectopic tachycardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulino, Domenico; Dattilo, Giuseppe; Tulino, Viviana; Marte, Filippo; Patanè, Salvatore

    2010-11-19

    Accessory pathways have been described as well as their Ecg identification criteria also in pediatric population. Radiofrequency ablation is a curative treatment but its application has been more limited in the paediatric population. The congenital form of junctional ectopic tachycardia was firstly described by Coumel et al. in 1976. It usually occurs in the first six months of life presenting as a persistent sustained form, lasting up to 90% of the time and it is hampered by high mortality. Its clinical presentation may be dramatic, being associated in up to 60% of cases with cardiomegaly and/or heart failure. Secondary dilated cardiomyopathy, ventricular fibrillation and sudden cardiac death have also been reported. We present a case of congenital form of junctional ectopic tachycardia in a 12-day-old newborn infant. Also this case is illustrative of the congenital form of junctional ectopic tachycardia. Copyright © 2008 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Terahertz Responses of Intrinsic Josephson Junctions in High TC Superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H. B.; Wu, P. H.; Yamashita, T.

    2001-01-01

    High frequency responses of intrinsic Josephson junctions up to 2.5THz, including the observation of Shapiro steps under various conditions, are reported and discussed in this Letter. The sample was an array of intrinsic Josephson junctions singled out from inside a high T C superconducting Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+x single crystal, with a bow-tie antenna integrated to it. The number of junctions in the array was controllable, the junctions were homogeneous, the distribution of applied irradiation among the junctions was even, and the junctions could synchronously respond to high frequency irradiation

  1. Systematic study of shallow junction formation on germanium substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellings, Geert; Rosseel, Erik; Clarysse, Trudo

    2011-01-01

    Published results on Ge junctions are benchmarked systematically using RS–XJ plots. The electrical activation level required to meet the ITRS targets is calculated. Additionally, new results are presented on shallow furnace-annealed B junctions and shallow laser-annealed As junctions. Co-implanti......Published results on Ge junctions are benchmarked systematically using RS–XJ plots. The electrical activation level required to meet the ITRS targets is calculated. Additionally, new results are presented on shallow furnace-annealed B junctions and shallow laser-annealed As junctions. Co...

  2. TRPP2 and TRPV4 form an EGF-activated calcium permeable channel at the apical membrane of renal collecting duct cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Ren Zhang

    Full Text Available Regulation of apical calcium entry is important for the function of principal cells of the collecting duct. However, the molecular identity and the regulators of the transporter/channel, which is responsible for apical calcium entry and what factors regulate the calcium conduction remain unclear.We report that endogenous TRPP2 and TRPV4 assemble to form a 23-pS divalent cation-permeable non-selective ion channel at the apical membrane of renal principal cells of the collecting duct. TRPP2\\TRPV4 channel complex was identified by patch-clamp, immunofluorescence and co-immunprecipitation studies in both principal cells that either possess normal cilia (cilia (+ or in which cilia are absent (cilia (-. This channel has distinct biophysical and pharmacological and regulatory profiles compared to either TRPP2 or TRPV4 channels. The rate of occurrence detected by patch clamp was higher in cilia (- compared to cilia (+ cells. In addition, shRNA knockdown of TRPP2 increased the prevalence of TRPV4 channel activity while knockdown of TRPV4 resulted in TRPP2 activity and knockdown of both proteins vastly decreased the 23-pS channel activity. Epidermal growth factor (EGF stimulated TRPP2\\TRPV4 channel through the EGF receptor (EGFR tyrosine kinase-dependent signaling. With loss of cilia, apical EGF treatment resulted in 64-fold increase in channel activity in cilia (- but not cilia (+ cells. In addition EGF increased cell proliferation in cilia (- cell that was dependent upon TRPP2\\TRPV4 channel mediated increase in intracellular calcium.We conclude that in the absence of cilia, an EGF activated TRPP2\\TRPV4 channel may play an important role in increased cell proliferation and cystogenesis.

  3. Electronic Properties of Carbon Nanotubes and Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantram, M. P.; Han, Jie; Yang, Liu; Govindan, T. R.; Jaffe, R.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Metallic and semiconducting Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (CNT) have recently been characterized using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and the manipulation of individual CNT has been demonstrated. These developments make the prospect of using CNT as molecular wires and possibly as electronic devices an even more interesting one. We have been modeling various electronic properties such as the density of states and the transmission coefficient of CNT wires and junctions. These studies involve first calculating the stability of junctions using molecular dynamics simulations and then calculating the electronic properties using a pi-electron tight binding Hamiltonian. We have developed the expertise to calculate the electronic properties of both finite-sized CNT and CNT systems with semi-infinite boundary conditions. In this poster, we will present an overview of some of our results. The electronic application of CNT that is most promising at this time is their use as molecular wires. The conductance can however be greatly reduced because of reflection due to defects and contacts. We have modeled the transmission through CNT in the presence of two types of defects: weak uniform disorder and strong isolated scatterers. We find that the conductance is affected in significantly different manners due to these defects Junctions of CNT have also been imaged using STM. This makes it essential to derive rules for the formation of junctions between tubes of different chirality, study their relative energies and electronic properties. We have generalized the rules for connecting two different CNT and have calculated the transmission and density of states through CNT junctions. Metallic and semiconducting CNT can be joined to form a stable junction and their current versus voltage characteristics are asymmetric. CNT are deformed by the application of external forces including interactions with a substrate or other CNT. In many experiments, these deformation are expected to

  4. Boudin trafficking reveals the dynamic internalisation of specific septate junction components in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempesta, Camille; Hijazi, Assia; Moussian, Bernard; Roch, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    The maintenance of paracellular barriers in invertebrate epithelia depends on the integrity of specific cell adhesion structures known as septate junctions (SJ). Multiple studies in Drosophila have revealed that these junctions have a stereotyped architecture resulting from the association in the lateral membrane of a large number of components. However, little is known about the dynamic organisation adopted by these multi-protein complexes in living tissues. We have used live imaging techniques to show that the Ly6 protein Boudin is a component of these adhesion junctions and can diffuse systemically to associate with the SJ of distant cells. We also observe that this protein and the claudin Kune-kune are endocytosed in epidermal cells during embryogenesis. Our data reveal that the SJ contain a set of components exhibiting a high membrane turnover, a feature that could contribute in a tissue-specific manner to the morphogenetic plasticity of these adhesion structures.

  5. Low-Cost, Manufacturable, 6-Inch Wafer Bonding Process for Next-Generation 5-Junction IMM+Ge Photovoltaic Devices, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To continue the trend towards ever more efficient photovoltaic devices, next-generation multi-junction cells will be based on increasingly complex structures. These...

  6. Clinical significance of left ventricular apical aneurysms in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients: the role of diagnostic electrocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichida, Masaru; Nishimura, Yoshioki; Kario, Kazuomi

    2014-10-01

    Some patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) develop left ventricular apical aneurysm, leading to serious cardiovascular complications. The aims of this study were to identify the incidence and clinical course of HCM patients with apical aneurysms in Japan, and to evaluate the role of electrocardiography (ECG) as a screening test to detect apical aneurysms in HCM patients. In a retrospective, single center analysis of a population of 247 HCM patients, 21 patients (8.5%) had left ventricular apical aneurysms. Their mean age was 60 ± 14 years (range: 23-77 years) at study entry. Over 4.7 ± 3.3 years of follow-up, 10 patients (47.6%) experienced an adverse clinical event (annual event rate: 10.1%/y), including five implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) implantations for ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation (VT/VF), an appropriate discharge of ICD for VT/VF, and four nonfatal thromboembolic strokes. Two patients developed systolic dysfunction (ejection fraction <50%). No sudden cardiac death or progressive heart failure was detected. Fourteen patients showed ST-segment elevation (≥ 1 mm) in V3 through V5 of ECG. In four patients, progression of the ST-segment elevation was recognized. When the ST-segment elevation was used to identify apical aneurysms in HCM patients, the sensitivity was 66.7%, and the specificity was 98.7%. Apical aneurysms in HCM patients in Japan are not rare, and are associated with serious cardiovascular complications. The early diagnosis of apical aneurysms can be achieved by serial ECG. Copyright © 2014 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Do Parameters Of Irradiation Influences The Apical Sealing Of Er:YAG Laser Apicetomies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Aparecida Maria Cordeiro; dos Santos, Jean Nunes; Pinheiro, Antonio Luiz Barbosa

    2011-08-01

    Failures on the sealing of the tooth apex are responsible for many failures of apical surgeries. The Er:YAG laser has been proposed as an alternative for the use of rotator instruments on surgical endodontics. 12 human extracted canines had root endodontic treatment being the apical limit was set at 1mm before the apical foramen and were distributed into 2 groups. On group I, apicectomy was performed with the Er:YAG laser (250 mJ/15 Hz). Apical cut was performed of perpendicular mode with 3mm from the apical foramen. On Group II, the same procedures and the same sequence as above was used, varying only the parameters of the Er:YAG laser (400 mJ/6 Hz). The specimens were divided into groups and fixed, by the cervical third, on wax. Impermeabilization of the residual root apical third was performed following the same procedures used in the cervical third but the residual apex was left free from the impermeabilization. After that, the roots were immersed in a 2% methylene blue solution and placed in a bacteriological oven for 48 h. The segments were visually observed and the one showing greatest level of dye leakage was selected and kept in individual container and coded accordingly. Apical staining was measured using a stereoscopic magnifying glass; a compass; and caliper. The results showed that Group I showed significantly different higher mean level of dye leakage (5.67±4.9, p<0.05). There was a significantly difference between the groups. It is concluded that the apicectomies carried out with 400 mJ/6 Hz showed the smallest infiltration value.

  8. Size and geometry of apical sesamoid fracture fragments as a determinant of prognosis in Thoroughbred racehorses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamm, J L; Bramlage, L R; Schnabel, L V; Ruggles, A J; Embertson, R M; Hopper, S A

    2011-07-01

    Analysis was performed to examine a method for refining the preoperative prognosis for horses that had surgery to remove apical fractures of the proximal sesamoid bones (PSBs). To determine if: 1) there was a difference in size or configuration of apical fractures between the different anatomical locations of the PSBs, which have been shown to affect the prognosis; and 2) the size or configuration could predict the prognosis for racehorses with these fractures. The study included 110 weanlings and yearlings and 56 training racehorses that underwent surgery to remove apical PSB fractures. Radiographs of the fractures were used for measurement of the abaxial and axial proportion and the abaxial to axial ratio, and race records were used to determine average earnings per start (AEPS) and total post operative starts. Analysis of variance and regression statistics were used to compare the fragment sizes between the specific PSBs on each of the limbs and compare size and configuration of the fractures to prognosis. There was a significantly larger abaxial to axial ratio (more transverse fracture) for the forelimb medial sesamoids than for all other sesamoids in untrained racehorses (P = 0.03). There were no other significant differences in size. There was no relationship between fracture size or configuration and AEPS nor total post operative starts. Apical fractures in weanlings and yearlings tend to be more transverse in the forelimb medial PSBs than the other PSBs. Apical fracture size and geometry does not determine prognosis for apical sesamoid fractures. Horses that undergo surgery to remove larger apical fractures of the PSBs do not have a worse outcome than those horses with smaller fractures. © 2010 EVJ Ltd.

  9. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy for the treatment of teeth with apical periodontitis: a histopathological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Lea Assed Bezerra; Novaes, Arthur B; de Oliveira, Rafael R; Nelson-Filho, Paulo; Santamaria, Milton; Silva, Raquel Assed Bezerra

    2012-03-01

    This study evaluated the in vivo response of apical and periapical tissues of dogs' teeth with apical periodontitis after one-session endodontic treatment with and without antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT). Sixty root canals with experimentally induced apical periodontitis were instrumented and assigned to 4 groups receiving aPDT and root canal filling (RCF) or not: group aPDT+/RCF+ (n = 20): aPDT (photosensitizer phenothiazine chloride at 10 mg/mL for 3 minutes and diode laser [λ = 660 nm, 60 mW/cm(2)] for 1 minute) and RCF in the same session; group aPDT+/RCF- (n = 10); group aPDT-/RCF+ (n = 20), and group aPDT-/RCF- (n = 10). Teeth were restored, and the animals were killed after 90 days. Sections from the maxillas and mandibles were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and Mallory trichrome and examined under light microscopy. Descriptive (ie, newly formed apical mineralized tissue, periapical inflammatory infiltrate, apical periodontal ligament thickness, and mineralized tissue resorption) and quantitative (ie, periapical lesion size and number of inflammatory cells) microscopic analysis was performed. Quantitative data were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests (α = .05). In the aPDT-treated groups, the periapical region was moderately/severely enlarged with no inflammatory cells, moderate neoangiogenesis and fibrogenesis, and the smallest periapical lesions. Although apical closure by mineralized tissue deposition was not achieved, the absence of inflammatory cells, moderate neoangiogenesis, and fibrogenesis in the periapical region in the groups treated with aPDT indicate that this can be a promising adjunct therapy to cleaning and shaping procedures in teeth with apical periodontitis undergoing one-session endodontic treatment. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Fast thermometry with a proximity Josephson junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L. B.; Saira, O.-P.; Pekola, J. P.

    2018-01-01

    We couple a proximity Josephson junction to a Joule-heated normal metal film and measure its electron temperature under steady state and nonequilibrium conditions. With a timed sequence of heating and temperature probing pulses, we are able to monitor its electron temperature in nonequilibrium with effectively zero back-action from the temperature measurement in the form of additional dissipation or thermal conductance. The experiments demonstrate the possibility of using a fast proximity Josephson junction thermometer for studying thermal transport in mesoscopic systems and for calorimetry.

  11. Astroglial gap junctions shape neuronal network activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannasch, Ulrike; Derangeon, Mickael; Chever, Oana; Rouach, Nathalie

    2012-05-01

    Astrocytes, the third element of the tripartite synapse, are active players in neurotransmission. Up to now, their involvement in neuronal functions has primarily been investigated at the single cell level. However, a key property of astrocytes is that they communicate via extensive networks formed by gap junction channels. Recently, we have shown that this networking modulates the moment to moment basal synaptic transmission and plasticity via the regulation of extracellular potassium and glutamate levels. Here we show that astroglial gap junctional communication also regulates neuronal network activity. We discuss these findings and their implications for brain information processing.

  12. Gap junctions-guards of excitability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stroemlund, Line Waring; Jensen, Christa Funch; Qvortrup, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes are connected by mechanical and electrical junctions located at the intercalated discs (IDs). Although these structures have long been known, it is becoming increasingly clear that their components interact. This review describes the involvement of the ID in electrical disturbances...... of the heart and focuses on the role of the gap junctional protein connexin 43 (Cx43). Current evidence shows that Cx43 plays a crucial role in organizing microtubules at the intercalated disc and thereby regulating the trafficking of the cardiac sodium channel NaV1.5 to the membrane....

  13. APICAL SEAL BETWEEN ADHESIVE ROOT CANAL OBTURATION SYSTEM AND GUTTA-PERCHA/AH-PLUS SEALER: AN IN VITRO COMPARISON STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Three dimensional obturation of the root canal is important for success of root canal treatment. Microleakage is one of the reason for root canal failure. Numerous materials have been used for obturation of which Gutta-percha is the most successful with variety of sealers. One of the recent material to further improve root canal treatment success rate is use of Resilon with Epiphany root canal sealer to apply adhesive concepts in to endodontics. An adhesive bond forms between Epiphany sealer, Resilon and dentin, making it monolithic hence less microleakage if any significantly. METHODS 60 single rooted mandibular premolars were dissected at cement enamel junction with diamond disc. Root canals were explored and working length measured using K file. Root canals of all 60 samples were prepared with ProTaper and irrigated with 5% sodium hypochlorite and 17% EDTA solution. Teeth were divided in to group A and B, each having 30 samples. Group A teeth obturated with Resilon Epiphany obturation system and group B with Gutta-percha and AH-plus sealer. All specimens were stored in incubator for 30 days. Clearing process of samples done with Robertson’s technique to make them transparent. All the specimens were immersed in 2% methylene blue dye solution for 7 days. Specimens were then examined under stereomicroscope with 10x magnification to measure dye penetration in mm with image analysis software. The data collected were analysed statistically. RESULTS This study showed that Resilon Epiphany group has a mean leakage of 1.2307, while the Gutta-percha/AH-plus had a mean leakage of 3.6133. There was statistically significant differences between Resilon and Gutta-percha groups. CONCLUSIONS 1. Resilon Epiphany group showed less apical microleakage than Gutta-percha/AH-plus obturation. 2. Based on result obtained it is suggested that Resilon Epiphany can be recommended for root canal obturation.

  14. Induction of stable ER-plasma-membrane junctions by Kv2.1 potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Philip D; Haberkorn, Christopher J; Akin, Elizabeth J; Seel, Peter J; Krapf, Diego; Tamkun, Michael M

    2015-06-01

    Junctions between cortical endoplasmic reticulum (cER) and the plasma membrane are a subtle but ubiquitous feature in mammalian cells; however, very little is known about the functions and molecular interactions that are associated with neuronal ER-plasma-membrane junctions. Here, we report that Kv2.1 (also known as KCNB1), the primary delayed-rectifier K(+) channel in the mammalian brain, induces the formation of ER-plasma-membrane junctions. Kv2.1 localizes to dense, cell-surface clusters that contain non-conducting channels, indicating that they have a function that is unrelated to membrane-potential regulation. Accordingly, Kv2.1 clusters function as membrane-trafficking hubs, providing platforms for delivery and retrieval of multiple membrane proteins. Using both total internal reflection fluorescence and electron microscopy we demonstrate that the clustered Kv2.1 plays a direct structural role in the induction of stable ER-plasma-membrane junctions in both transfected HEK 293 cells and cultured hippocampal neurons. Glutamate exposure results in a loss of Kv2.1 clusters in neurons and subsequent retraction of the cER from the plasma membrane. We propose Kv2.1-induced ER-plasma-membrane junctions represent a new macromolecular plasma-membrane complex that is sensitive to excitotoxic insult and functions as a scaffolding site for both membrane trafficking and Ca(2+) signaling. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Relationship between Critical Current Fluctuation of Superconducting Bicrystal Junction and Junction Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enpuku, Keiji; Minotani, Tadashi; Shiraishi, Fumio; Kandori, Atushi

    1999-04-01

    Critical current fluctuation of bicrystal junctions is estimated from the 1/f flux noise of the superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) at T=77 K. The relationships between the current fluctuation and junction parameters, such as critical current Io and resistance R, are obtained. The obtained parameter dependence can be well explained by using the parameter dependence of the resistance fluctuation reported by Marx and Gross [Appl. Phys. Lett. 70, 120 (1997)] and the relationship between Io and R obtained for the present junctions. The agreement indicates that the critical current fluctuation is correlated with the resistance fluctuation through the relationship between Io and R.

  16. Síndrome do balonamento apical secundário ao uso abusivo de descongestionante nasal Síndrome del abombamiento apical secundario al uso abusivo de descongestionante nasal Apical ballooning syndrome secondary to nasal decongestant abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Wang

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Descrevemos um caso típico de síndrome do balonamento apical em uma paciente octogenária com alteração eletrocardiográfica, de contratilidade do ventrículo esquerdo, e que apresentou recuperação da função ventricular. A paciente é portadora de rinite alérgica e fez uso excessivo de descongestionante nasal horas antes do episódio da dor.Describimos un caso típico de síndrome de abombamiento apical en una paciente octogenaria con alteración electrocardiográfica, de contractilidad del ventrículo izquierdo, y que presentó recuperación de la función ventricular. La paciente es portadora de rinitis alérgica y hace uso excesivo de descongestionante nasal horas antes del episodio del dolor.We describe a typical case of apical ballooning syndrome in an octogenarian female patient with left ventricular wall motion abnormality on electrocardiography, whose ventricular function returned to normal. The patient has allergic rhinitis and had used nasal decongestant excessively a few hours prior to the episode of pain.

  17. Midventricular Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy with Apical Aneurysm: Potential for Underdiagnosis and Value of Multimodality Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Sivanandam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We illustrate a case of midventricle obstructive HCM and apical aneurysm diagnosed with appropriate use of multimodality imaging. A 75-year-old African American woman presented with a 3-day history of chest pain and dyspnea with elevated troponins. Her electrocardiogram showed sinus rhythm, left atrial enlargement, left ventricular hypertrophy, prolonged QT, and occasional ectopy. After medical therapy optimization, she underwent coronary angiography for an initial diagnosis of non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction. Her coronaries were unremarkable for significant disease but her left ventriculogram showed hyperdynamic contractility of the midportion of the ventricle along with a large dyskinetic aneurysmal apical sac. A subsequent transthoracic echocardiogram provided poor visualization of the apical region of the ventricle but contrast enhancement identified an aneurysmal pouch distal to the midventricular obstruction. To further clarify the diagnosis, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with contrast was performed confirming the diagnosis of midventricular hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with apical aneurysm and fibrosis consistent with apical scar on delayed enhancement. The patient was medically treated and subsequently underwent elective implantable defibrillator placement in the ensuing months for recurrent nonsustained ventricular tachycardia and was initiated on prophylactic oral anticoagulation with warfarin for thromboembolic risk reduction.

  18. En face optical coherence tomography investigation of apical microleakage after laser-assisted endodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todea, Carmen; Balabuc, Cosmin; Sinescu, Cosmin; Filip, Laura; Kerezsi, Cristina; Calniceanu, Mircea; Negrutiu, Meda; Bradu, Adrian; Hughes, Michael; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh

    2010-09-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the potential of en face optical coherence tomography (OCT) for the detection of apical microleakage after 980 nm and 1,064 nm laser-assisted endodontic treatment. Ninety, human, single-rooted teeth with one straight root canal and closed apices were used. All roots were prepared biomechanically to the working length at an apical size 30 and 0.06 taper. The teeth were divided into three equal groups of 30 samples each, according to the treatment to be applied to the root canal. Group I received 980 nm diode laser (3 W, 0.01 s on time, 0.01 s off time, 5 s per procedure, four procedures); group II received neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser (1.5 W, 15 Hz, 5 s per procedure, four procedures). In group III the root canals were approached conventionally only. In all groups the root canal filling was performed with AH Plus endodontic sealer and gutta-percha points. An en face OCT prototype was used for the investigation of apical microleakage. According to one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and en face OCT, the number of defects in the laser groups was significantly lower (P laser groups (P = 0.049). En face OCT imaging proved that laser-assisted endodontic treatment improved the prognosis of root canal filling and led to a reduction in apical microleakage.

  19. Apical Dimension of Root Canal Clinically Assessed with and without Periapical Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Gesi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To clinically evaluate the dimension of the more apical extent of the root canal after appropriate preflaring in the case of primary treatment and retreatment with and without the presence of periapical radiolucency, 392 single-rooted teeth with only one canal were evaluated during endodontic therapy. The canals were divided in two groups depending on the presence or absence of periapical radiolucency. After preflaring of the root canal the size of the root canal terminus (apical canal dimension was gauged with hand-held Light Speed LS1 files inserted at the estimated working length and established with the use of an electronic apex locator. The dimension recorded in the computer database was represented by the largest instrument able to reach the electronically established working length. The differences between the treatment groups were assessed using the Mann-Whitney U test and the significance level was set at P<0.05. Teeth with lesions had a significantly greater diameter in the apical region than teeth without lesions (P<0.001. The dimension of the apical portion of the root canal is larger in the case of periapical radiolucency. This involves verifying this parameter in order to use the correct sized instruments and to obtain an efficient cutting action at the apical level.

  20. Effects of apical meristem loss on sylleptic branching and growth of hybrid poplar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeleznik, Joseph D. [North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND (United States). Plant Sciences Department

    2007-07-15

    The effects of apical meristem loss on the growth and development of hybrid poplar trees was investigated. This was done by clipping back either the apical meristem alone (dividing cells), or the apical meristem plus a small amount of additional stem tissue (expanding cells, <1 cm), at various times during the first growing season. Two clones (NM6-nonsylleptic habit, and DN34-slightly sylleptic habit) were tested at close spacing (0.6 m) in the nursery. Clipping generally increased the number of sylleptic branches formed. Clipping 69 days after planting resulted in the largest number of sylleptic branches while clipping 4 weeks later gave no increase in syllepsis. Clipping temporarily reduced height growth of both clones but total height at the end of the first growing season was not affected by any treatment. There were some slight differences in growth during the second growing season; despite these differences, total stem biomass and total tree biomass after 2 years were not affected by temporary loss of the apical meristem in the first growing season. Results suggest that death or removal of hybrid poplar apical meristems by tip borers or ungulates has no long-term effects on aboveground growth as measured by height or biomass. (author)

  1. Effects of Different Rotary Files Combined with Different Irrigation Needles on Apically Extruded Debris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzunoglu, Emel; Turker, Sevinc Aktemur; Görduysus, Melahat

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the apically extruded debris associated with ProTaper Next and OneShape Apical files using two different irrigation needles, open-ended and closed-ended (Max-I-Probe). Forty-eight mandibular premolars were assigned to four groups (n=12) as follows: Group PTN-SN: Root canal was prepared with ProTaper Next (PTN) and irrigated with open-ended standard needle; Group PTN-MP: Root canal was prepared with PTN and irrigated with Max-I-Probe; Group OSA-SN: Root canal was prepared with OneShape Apical (OSA) and irrigated with open-ended needle; Group OSA-MP: Root canal was prepared with OSA and irrigated with Max-I-Probe. Debris extruded during instrumentation was collected into pre-weighed Eppendorf tubes. After storage in an incubator at 70 °C for 5 days, the Eppendorf tubes were weighed to obtain the final weight with extruded debris. The difference between pre-and post-debris weights was calculated and statistical analysis was performed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests (pextruded debris (p>0.05). OneShape Apical and ProTaper Next resulted in extrusion of debris beyond the apical foramen, regardless of needle tip.

  2. Regenerative endodontic treatment of an immature tooth with a necrotic pulp and apical periodontitis using platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA): a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, G S; Sachdeva, L T; Goel, M; Bala, S

    2015-09-01

    To report the successful clinical and radiographic outcome of a regenerative endodontic treatment. A 16-year-old male patient presented with a discoloured, maxillary left lateral incisor with a necrotic pulp. Radiographic examination revealed an incompletely developed root with an open apex. Under local anaesthesia and rubber dam isolation, an access cavity was prepared and the necrotic pulpal remnants were removed. The canal was disinfected without mechanical instrumentation with 5.25% NaOCl solution and dried with sterile paper points. A triple antibiotic (metronidazole, ciprofloxacin and minocycline) mixed with distilled water was packed in the canal and left for 28 days. Ten millimetres of whole blood was drawn by venipuncture from the patients antecubital vein for preparation of platelet-rich plasma (PRP). After removal of the antibiotic mixture, the PRP was injected into the canal space up to the cementoenamel junction level. Three millimetres of white MTA was placed directly over the PRP clot. Two days later, the tooth was restored with permanent filling materials. The patient was recalled for 3, 6, 12, 24 and 36 months clinical/radiographic follow-up. A 3-year follow-up radiograph revealed resolution of the periapical lesion, increased thickening of the root walls, further root development and continued apical closure of the root apex. The tooth was not responsive to cold tests; however, sensitivity tests with an electric pulp tester (EPT) elicited a delayed positive response. Regeneration is a viable treatment modality that allows continued root development of immature teeth with open apices and necrotic pulps. Platelet-rich plasma appears to be a suitable scaffold for regeneration of vital tissues in teeth with a necrotic pulps and an associated periapical lesion. Regenerative endodontic procedures may offer an effective treatment option to save teeth with compromised structural integrity. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley

  3. Improving transition voltage spectroscopy of molecular junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Troels; Chen, Jingzhe; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2011-01-01

    Transition voltage spectroscopy (TVS) is a promising spectroscopic tool for molecular junctions. The principles in TVS is to find the minimum on a Fowler-Nordheim plot where ln(I/V2) is plotted against 1/V and relate the voltage at the minimum Vmin to the closest molecular level. Importantly, Vmin...

  4. Intrinsically shunted Josephson junctions for electronics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belogolovskii, M.; Zhitlukhina, E.; Lacquaniti, V.; De Leo, N.; Fretto, M.; Sosso, A.

    2017-07-01

    Conventional Josephson metal-insulator-metal devices are inherently underdamped and exhibit hysteretic current-voltage response due to a very high subgap resistance compared to that in the normal state. At the same time, overdamped junctions with single-valued characteristics are needed for most superconducting digital applications. The usual way to overcome the hysteretic behavior is to place an external low-resistance normal-metal shunt in parallel with each junction. Unfortunately, such solution results in a considerable complication of the circuitry design and introduces parasitic inductance through the junction. This paper provides a concise overview of some generic approaches that have been proposed in order to realize internal shunting in Josephson heterostructures with a barrier that itself contains the desired resistive component. The main attention is paid to self-shunted devices with local weak-link transmission probabilities that are so strongly disordered in the interface plane that transmission probabilities are tiny for the main part of the transition region between two super-conducting electrodes, while a small part of the interface is well transparent. We discuss the possibility of realizing a universal bimodal distribution function and emphasize advantages of such junctions that can be considered as a new class of self-shunted Josephson devices promising for practical applications in superconducting electronics operating at 4.2 K.

  5. Generalized Eck peak in inhomogeneous Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fistul, Mikhail V.; Giuliani, Gabriele F.

    1997-02-01

    In inhomogeneous Josephson junctions the Eck peak characterizing the current-voltage characteristics is predicted to be replaced by a rather different yet prominent feature whose location and shape strongly depend on the strength of the applied magnetic field and the spatial correlations of the associated distorted Abrikosov flux lattice.

  6. Polyphosphonium-based ion bipolar junction transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielsson, Erik O; Tybrandt, Klas; Berggren, Magnus

    2014-11-01

    Advancements in the field of electronics during the past few decades have inspired the use of transistors in a diversity of research fields, including biology and medicine. However, signals in living organisms are not only carried by electrons but also through fluxes of ions and biomolecules. Thus, in order to implement the transistor functionality to control biological signals, devices that can modulate currents of ions and biomolecules, i.e., ionic transistors and diodes, are needed. One successful approach for modulation of ionic currents is to use oppositely charged ion-selective membranes to form so called ion bipolar junction transistors (IBJTs). Unfortunately, overall IBJT device performance has been hindered due to the typical low mobility of ions, large geometries of the ion bipolar junction materials, and the possibility of electric field enhanced (EFE) water dissociation in the junction. Here, we introduce a novel polyphosphonium-based anion-selective material into npn-type IBJTs. The new material does not show EFE water dissociation and therefore allows for a reduction of junction length down to 2 μm, which significantly improves the switching performance of the ion transistor to 2 s. The presented improvement in speed as well the simplified design will be useful for future development of advanced iontronic circuits employing IBJTs, for example, addressable drug-delivery devices.

  7. Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy for Esophageal or Junctional Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hagen, P.; Hulshof, M. C. C. M.; van Lanschot, J. J. B.; Steyerberg, E. W.; van Berge Henegouwen, M. I.; Wijnhoven, B. P. L.; Richel, D. J.; Nieuwenhuijzen, G. A. P.; Hospers, G. A. P.; Bonenkamp, J. J.; Cuesta, M. A.; Blaisse, R. J. B.; Busch, O. R. C.; ten Kate, F. J. W.; Creemers, G.-J.; Punt, C. J. A.; Plukker, J. T. M.; Verheul, H. M. W.; Spillenaar Bilgen, E. J.; van Dekken, H.; van der Sangen, M. J. C.; Rozema, T.; Biermann, K.; Beukema, J. C.; Piet, A. H. M.; van Rij, C. M.; Reinders, J. G.; Tilanus, H. W.; van der Gaast, A.; Bergman, J. J. G. H. M.; Bartelsman, J. F.; Bissumbar, A.; Blom, R. L.; Geijsen, E. D.; van Heijl, M.; Obertop, H.; Koning, C. C. E.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Omloo, J. M.; Wilmink, H.; Aparicio Pages, M. N.; van den Nieuwenhof-Biesheuvel, L.; Eijkenboom, W. M. H.; Koppert, L. B.; Meijer, D. A.; Siersema, P. D.; Spaander, M. C. V.; Verheij, C.; Vollebregt, C.; van Krieken, J. H. J. M.; van Mansum, W.; van Dam, G.; van Dullemen, H. M.; Eerens, A.; van der Jagt, E.; Karnebeld, A.; Kluin, Ph; Mul, V. E. M.; Pruim, J.; Siemerink, E.; Weersma, R. K.; Fraikin, T.; Peters, C. W. A. H.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND The role of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of patients with esophageal or esophagogastric-junction cancer is not well established. We compared chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery with surgery alone in this patient population. METHODS We randomly assigned patients with

  8. Maskless Arbitrary Writing of Molecular Tunnel Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byeon, Seo Eun; Kim, Miso; Yoon, Hyo Jae

    2017-11-22

    Since fabricating geometrically well-defined, noninvasive, and compliant electrical contacts over molecular monolayers is difficult, creating molecular-scale electronic devices that function in high yield with good reproducibility is challenging. Moreover, none of the previously reported methods to form organic-electrode contacts at the nanometer and micrometer scales have resulted in directly addressable contacts in an untethered form under ambient conditions without the use of cumbersome equipment and nanolithography. Here we show that in situ encapsulation of a liquid metal (eutectic Ga-In alloy) microelectrode, which is used for junction formation, with a convenient photocurable polymeric scaffold enables untethering of the electrode and direct writing of arbitrary arrays of high-yielding molecular junctions under ambient conditions in a maskless fashion. The formed junctions function in quantitative yields and can afford tunneling currents with high reproducibility; they also function at low temperatures and under bent. The results reported here promise a massively parallel printing technology to construct integrated circuits based on molecular junctions with soft top contacts.

  9. Macroscopic Refrigeration Using Superconducting Tunnel Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, Peter; O'Neil, Galen; Underwood, Jason; Zhang, Xiaohang; Ullom, Joel

    2014-03-01

    Sub-kelvin temperatures are often a prerequisite for modern scientific experiments, such as quantum information processing, astrophysical missions looking for dark energy signatures and tabletop time resolved x-ray spectroscopy. Existing methods of reaching these temperatures, such as dilution refrigerators, are bulky and costly. In order to increase the accessibility of sub-Kelvin temperatures, we have developed a new method of refrigeration using normal-metal/insulator/superconductor (NIS) tunnel junctions. NIS junctions cool the electrons in the normal metal since the hottest electrons selectively tunnel from the normal metal into the superconductor. By extending the normal metal onto a thermally isolated membrane, the cold electrons can cool the phonons through the electron-phonon coupling. When these junctions are combined with a pumped 3He system, they provide a potentially inexpensive method of reaching these temperatures. Using only three devices, each with a junction area of approximately 3,500 μm2, we have cooled a 2 cm3 Cu plate from 290 mK to 256 mK. We will present these experimental results along with recent modeling predictions that strongly suggest that further refinements will allow cooling from 300 mK to 120 mK. This work is supported by the NASA APRA program.

  10. Anatomy of the human atrioventricular junctions revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderson, R. H.; Ho, S. Y.; Becker, A. E.

    2000-01-01

    There have been suggestions made recently that our understanding of the atrioventricular junctions of the heart is less than adequate, with claims for several new findings concerning the arrangement of the ordinary working myocardium and the specialised pathways for atrioventricular conduction. In

  11. impairs gap junction function causing congenital cataract

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navya

    2017-03-24

    Mar 24, 2017 ... Connexin 46 (Cx46) is important for gap junction channels formation which plays crucial role in the preservation of lens homeostasis and transparency. Previously, we have identified a missense mutation. (p.V44M) of Cx46 in a congenital cataract family. This study aims at dissecting the potential.

  12. Two-dimensional bipolar junction transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharekhanlou, Behnaz; Khorasani, Sina; Sarvari, Reza

    2014-03-01

    Recent development in fabrication technology of planar two-dimensional (2D) materials has introduced the possibility of numerous novel applications. Our recent analysis has revealed that by definition of p-n junctions through appropriate patterned doping of 2D semiconductors, ideal exponential I-V characteristics may be expected. However, the theory of 2D junctions turns out to be very different to that of standard bulk junctions. Based on this theory of 2D diodes, we construct for the first time a model to describe 2D bipolar junction transistors (2D-BJTs). We derive the small-signal equivalent model, and estimate the performance of a 2D-BJT device based on graphone as the example material. A current gain of about 138 and maximum threshold frequency of 77 GHz, together with a power-delay product of only 4 fJ per 1 μm lateral width is expected at an operating voltage of 5 V. In addition, we derive the necessary formulae and a new approximate solution for the continuity equation in the 2D configuration, which have been verified against numerical solutions.

  13. Craniocervical junction abnormalities with atlantoaxial subluxation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Craniocervical junction abnormalities with atlantoaxial subluxation caused by ventral subluxation of C2 were diagnosed in a 6-month-old female Pomeranian with tetraplegia as a clinical sign. Lateral survey radiography of the neck with flexion revealed atlantoaxial subluxation with ventral subluxation of C2. Computed ...

  14. How far is the root apex of a unilateral impacted canine from the root apices' arch form?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Hun; Kim, You-Min; Oh, Sewoong; Kim, Seong-Sik; Park, Soo-Byung; Son, Woo-Sung; Kim, Yong-Il

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the arch form of the root apices of normally erupting teeth and then determine the differences in the location of the apex of impacted canines relative to normally erupting canines. In addition, we sought to determine whether the labiopalatal position of the impacted canines influences the position of the apices. The study included 21 patients with unerupted canines that subsequently had a normal eruption, 21 patients with palatally impacted canines, 27 patients with labially impacted canines, and 17 patients with midalveolus impacted canines. Images were obtained using cone beam computed tomography, and the x, y, and z coordinates of the root apices were determined using Ondemand3D software (Cybermed Co., Seoul, Korea). Two-dimensional coordinates were converted from acquired 3-dimensional coordinates via projection on a palatal plane, and the Procrustes method was used to process the converted 2-dimensional coordinates and to draw the arch forms of the root apices. Finally, we measured the extent of root apex deviation from the arch forms of the root apices. Normally erupting canines showed that even though calcifications may be immature, their positions were aligned with a normal arch form. The root apices of the impacted canines were an average of 6.572 mm away from the root apices' arch form, whereas those of the contralateral nonimpacted canines were an average distance of 2.221 mm away, a statistically significant difference. The palatally impacted canines' root apices distribution tended toward the first premolar root apices. Incompletely calcified, unerupted teeth with a subsequent normal eruption showed a normal arch form of the root apices. The root apices of impacted canines were farther from the arch forms than were the nonimpacted canines. Also, the root apices of impacted canines in the palatal area showed distributions different from those of the other impacted canine groups. Copyright © 2017 American

  15. Tissue reaction to Endométhasone sealer in root canal fillings short of or beyond the apical foramen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Suzuki

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the response of periapical tissues to the endodontic sealer Endométhasone in root canal fillings short of or beyond the apical foramen. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty root canals of premolars and incisors of 2 mongrel dogs were used. After coronal access and pulp extirpation, the canals were instrumented up to a size 55 K-file and the apical cemental barrier was penetrated with a size 15 K-file to obtain a main apical foramen, which was widened to a size 25 K-file. The canals were irrigated with saline at each change of file. The root canals were obturated either short of or beyond the apical foramen by the lateral condensation of gutta-percha and Endométhasone, originating 2 experimental groups: G1: Endométhasone/short of the apical foramen; G2: Endométhasone/beyond the apical foramen. The animals were killed by anesthetic overdose 90 days after endodontic treatment. The individual roots were obtained and serial histological sections were prepared for histomorphological analysis (H&E and Brown & Brenn techniques under light microscopy. The following parameters were examined: closure of the apical foramen of the main root canal and apical opening of accessory canals, apical cementum resorption, intensity of the inflammatory infiltrate, presence of giant cells and thickness and organization of the apical periodontal ligament. Each parameter was scored 1 to 4, 1 being the best result and 4 the worst. Data were analyzed statistically by the Wilcoxon nonparametric tests (p=0.05. RESULTS: Comparing the 2 groups, the best result (p<0.05 was obtained with root canal filling with Endométhasone short of the apical foramen but a chronic inflammatory infiltrate was present in all specimens. CONCLUSIONS: Limiting the filling material to the root canal space apically is important to determine the best treatment outcome when Endométhasone is used as sealer.

  16. Cell size and growth regulation in the Arabidopsis thaliana apical stem cell niche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Lisa; Refahi, Yassin; Wightman, Raymond; Landrein, Benoit; Teles, José; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Meyerowitz, Elliot M.

    2016-01-01

    Cell size and growth kinetics are fundamental cellular properties with important physiological implications. Classical studies on yeast, and recently on bacteria, have identified rules for cell size regulation in single cells, but in the more complex environment of multicellular tissues, data have been lacking. In this study, to characterize cell size and growth regulation in a multicellular context, we developed a 4D imaging pipeline and applied it to track and quantify epidermal cells over 3–4 d in Arabidopsis thaliana shoot apical meristems. We found that a cell size checkpoint is not the trigger for G2/M or cytokinesis, refuting the unexamined assumption that meristematic cells trigger cell cycle phases upon reaching a critical size. Our data also rule out models in which cells undergo G2/M at a fixed time after birth, or by adding a critical size increment between G2/M transitions. Rather, cell size regulation was intermediate between the critical size and critical increment paradigms, meaning that cell size fluctuations decay by ∼75% in one generation compared with 100% (critical size) and 50% (critical increment). Notably, this behavior was independent of local cell–cell contact topologies and of position within the tissue. Cells grew exponentially throughout the first >80% of the cell cycle, but following an asymmetrical division, the small daughter grew at a faster exponential rate than the large daughter, an observation that potentially challenges present models of growth regulation. These growth and division behaviors place strong constraints on quantitative mechanistic descriptions of the cell cycle and growth control. PMID:27930326

  17. Theoretical Analysis of Josephson Junction Systems and Superconducting Superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edis, Taner

    Superconducting superlattices and Josephson junction networks provide a context for investigation of various problems related to superconductivity. Aspects of the layered nature of high-T_{c} materials, the statistical mechanics of Josephson junction systems, and the response of granular systems in the presence of a magnetic field are explored. Experiments on superlattices with a structure of alternating layers of superconducting { rm YBa_2Cu_3O}_{7-x } and insulating {rm PrBa _2Cu_3O}_{7-x} exhibit a suppression of the resistive transition temperature T_{c}, depending on layer thicknesses. This behavior can be explained by reduction of the bulk T_{c} through charge redistribution into insulating layers, and a further reduction through the Kosterlitz-Thouless nature of the transition, taking place in the effectively two-dimensional superconducting layers. The statistical mechanics of Josephson junction systems must account for their macroscopic quantum nature, and the "unusual constraints" arising from knowledge of superconducting wave function magnitudes in a steady state. Working with the maximum entropy formulation of statistical mechanics, the equivalence of state-probability level and density matrix quantum information entropy maximization is demonstrated; a state-level approach is then used to enforce the unusual constraint, providing an extension of the standard formalism. A novel physical result is predicted, where in equilibrium, the temperature dependence becomes modified from the usual 1/kT factor. Magnetically Modulated Resistance (MMR) techniques are effective in experimentally determining the quality of superconducting samples, in particular when weak links are present in granular materials. The weak link component of the MMR response can be explained using numerical studies of a disordered network of non-ideal Josephson junctions, where the non-linear oscillations in the macroscopic grain phases is simulated, in order to obtain the voltage across the

  18. Ultralow power artificial synapses using nanotextured magnetic Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Michael L.; Donnelly, Christine A.; Russek, Stephen E.; Baek, Burm; Pufall, Matthew R.; Hopkins, Peter F.; Dresselhaus, Paul D.; Benz, Samuel P.; Rippard, William H.

    2018-01-01

    Neuromorphic computing promises to markedly improve the efficiency of certain computational tasks, such as perception and decision-making. Although software and specialized hardware implementations of neural networks have made tremendous accomplishments, both implementations are still many orders of magnitude less energy efficient than the human brain. We demonstrate a new form of artificial synapse based on dynamically reconfigurable superconducting Josephson junctions with magnetic nanoclusters in the barrier. The spiking energy per pulse varies with the magnetic configuration, but in our demonstration devices, the spiking energy is always less than 1 aJ. This compares very favorably with the roughly 10 fJ per synaptic event in the human brain. Each artificial synapse is composed of a Si barrier containing Mn nanoclusters with superconducting Nb electrodes. The critical current of each synapse junction, which is analogous to the synaptic weight, can be tuned using input voltage spikes that change the spin alignment of Mn nanoclusters. We demonstrate synaptic weight training with electrical pulses as small as 3 aJ. Further, the Josephson plasma frequencies of the devices, which determine the dynamical time scales, all exceed 100 GHz. These new artificial synapses provide a significant step toward a neuromorphic platform that is faster, more energy-efficient, and thus can attain far greater complexity than has been demonstrated with other technologies. PMID:29387787

  19. Apical Microleakage in Root Canals Obturated With 2 Different Endodontic Sealer Systems in Canine Teeth of Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lothamer, Chad W; Anderson, Ashley; Hetzel, Scott J; Adrian, Alex I; Snyder, Christopher; Goldschmidt, Stephanie; Soukup, Jason W

    2017-06-01

    An apical dye leakage test was utilized to compare 2 endodontic sealer systems commonly used in veterinary endodontic treatment. Rotary instrumentation followed by injection of 2 different sealers (GuttaFlow 2 and AH Plus) and a single master cone obturation technique were compared. Following obturation and restoration, specimens were immersed in India ink for 48 hours. A tooth mineral clearing technique was utilized to render the tooth samples transparent. Subsequently, the apices were evaluated for prevalence and magnitude of apical dye penetration under magnification. Statistical analysis of the results revealed no significant differences in the prevalence or magnitude of apical dye penetration between groups.

  20. Src- and Fyn-dependent apical membrane trafficking events control endothelial lumen formation during vascular tube morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Joong; Norden, Pieter R; Salvador, Jocelynda; Barry, David M; Bowers, Stephanie L K; Cleaver, Ondine; Davis, George E

    2017-01-01

    Here we examine the question of how endothelial cells (ECs) develop their apical membrane surface domain during lumen and tube formation. We demonstrate marked apical membrane targeting of activated Src kinases to this apical domain during early and late stages of this process. Immunostaining for phosphotyrosine or phospho-Src reveals apical membrane staining in intracellular vacuoles initially. This is then followed by vacuole to vacuole fusion events to generate an apical luminal membrane, which is similarly decorated with activated phospho-Src kinases. Functional blockade of Src kinases completely blocks EC lumen and tube formation, whether this occurs during vasculogenic tube assembly or angiogenic sprouting events. Multiple Src kinases participate in this apical membrane formation process and siRNA suppression of Src, Fyn and Yes, but not Lyn, blocks EC lumen formation. We also demonstrate strong apical targeting of Src-GFP and Fyn-GFP fusion proteins and increasing their expression enhances lumen formation. Finally, we show that Src- and Fyn-associated vacuoles track and fuse along a subapically polarized microtubule cytoskeleton, which is highly acetylated. These vacuoles generate the apical luminal membrane in a stereotypically polarized, perinuclear position. Overall, our study identifies a critical role for Src kinases in creating and decorating the EC apical membrane surface during early and late stages of lumen and tube formation, a central event in the molecular control of vascular morphogenesis.

  1. Src- and Fyn-dependent apical membrane trafficking events control endothelial lumen formation during vascular tube morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae Joong Kim

    Full Text Available Here we examine the question of how endothelial cells (ECs develop their apical membrane surface domain during lumen and tube formation. We demonstrate marked apical membrane targeting of activated Src kinases to this apical domain during early and late stages of this process. Immunostaining for phosphotyrosine or phospho-Src reveals apical membrane staining in intracellular vacuoles initially. This is then followed by vacuole to vacuole fusion events to generate an apical luminal membrane, which is similarly decorated with activated phospho-Src kinases. Functional blockade of Src kinases completely blocks EC lumen and tube formation, whether this occurs during vasculogenic tube assembly or angiogenic sprouting events. Multiple Src kinases participate in this apical membrane formation process and siRNA suppression of Src, Fyn and Yes, but not Lyn, blocks EC lumen formation. We also demonstrate strong apical targeting of Src-GFP and Fyn-GFP fusion proteins and increasing their expression enhances lumen formation. Finally, we show that Src- and Fyn-associated vacuoles track and fuse along a subapically polarized microtubule cytoskeleton, which is highly acetylated. These vacuoles generate the apical luminal membrane in a stereotypically polarized, perinuclear position. Overall, our study identifies a critical role for Src kinases in creating and decorating the EC apical membrane surface during early and late stages of lumen and tube formation, a central event in the molecular control of vascular morphogenesis.

  2. A dynamic genetic-hormonal regulatory network model explains multiple cellular behaviors of the root apical meristem of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gómez, Mónica L; Azpeitia, Eugenio; Álvarez-Buylla, Elena R

    2017-04-01

    The study of the concerted action of hormones and transcription factors is fundamental to understand cell differentiation and pattern formation during organ development. The root apical meristem of Arabidopsis thaliana is a useful model to address this. It has a stem cell niche near its tip conformed of a quiescent organizer and stem or initial cells around it, then a proliferation domain followed by a transition domain, where cells diminish division rate before transiting to the elongation zone; here, cells grow anisotropically prior to their final differentiation towards the plant base. A minimal model of the gene regulatory network that underlies cell-fate specification and patterning at the root stem cell niche was proposed before. In this study, we update and couple such network with both the auxin and cytokinin hormone signaling pathways to address how they collectively give rise to attractors that correspond to the genetic and hormonal activity profiles that are characteristic of different cell types along A. thaliana root apical meristem. We used a Boolean model of the genetic-hormonal regulatory network to integrate known and predicted regulatory interactions into alternative models. Our analyses show that, after adding some putative missing interactions, the model includes the necessary and sufficient components and regulatory interactions to recover attractors characteristic of the root cell types, including the auxin and cytokinin activity profiles that correlate with different cellular behaviors along the root apical meristem. Furthermore, the model predicts the existence of activity configurations that could correspond to the transition domain. The model also provides a possible explanation for apparently paradoxical cellular behaviors in the root meristem. For example, how auxin may induce and at the same time inhibit WOX5 expression. According to the model proposed here the hormonal regulation of WOX5 might depend on the cell type. Our results

  3. A dynamic genetic-hormonal regulatory network model explains multiple cellular behaviors of the root apical meristem of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica L García-Gómez

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The study of the concerted action of hormones and transcription factors is fundamental to understand cell differentiation and pattern formation during organ development. The root apical meristem of Arabidopsis thaliana is a useful model to address this. It has a stem cell niche near its tip conformed of a quiescent organizer and stem or initial cells around it, then a proliferation domain followed by a transition domain, where cells diminish division rate before transiting to the elongation zone; here, cells grow anisotropically prior to their final differentiation towards the plant base. A minimal model of the gene regulatory network that underlies cell-fate specification and patterning at the root stem cell niche was proposed before. In this study, we update and couple such network with both the auxin and cytokinin hormone signaling pathways to address how they collectively give rise to attractors that correspond to the genetic and hormonal activity profiles that are characteristic of different cell types along A. thaliana root apical meristem. We used a Boolean model of the genetic-hormonal regulatory network to integrate known and predicted regulatory interactions into alternative models. Our analyses show that, after adding some putative missing interactions, the model includes the necessary and sufficient components and regulatory interactions to recover attractors characteristic of the root cell types, including the auxin and cytokinin activity profiles that correlate with different cellular behaviors along the root apical meristem. Furthermore, the model predicts the existence of activity configurations that could correspond to the transition domain. The model also provides a possible explanation for apparently paradoxical cellular behaviors in the root meristem. For example, how auxin may induce and at the same time inhibit WOX5 expression. According to the model proposed here the hormonal regulation of WOX5 might depend on the cell

  4. Post-Junctional Modulatory Effects of Hemicholinium on Isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: HC-3 has antimuscarinic actions on Ach- and carbacholinduced responses; a post-junctional action at the neuromuscular junction and differing anticholinesterase activities with DFP and physostigmine but not edrophonium. KEY WORDS: Post-Junctional, Anti-Muscarinic, Anti-Cholinesterase Jnl of Medical ...

  5. Phenomenological approach to bistable behavior of Josephson junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, K.; Nara, S.; Hamanaka, K.

    1985-01-01

    The interaction of unbiased Josephson junction with external electromagnetic field in the presence of externally applied uniform magnetic field is theoretically examined by means of phenomenological treatment. It is proposed that an irradiated junction with suitably chosen parameters shows a bistable behavior of voltage across the junction as a function of the radiation intensity

  6. Gibberellin-enhanced elongation of inverted Pharbitis nil shoot prevents the release of apical dominance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, T. K.; Cline, M. G.

    1987-01-01

    Ethylene evolution resulting from the gravity stress of shoot inversion appears to induce the release of apical dominance in Pharbitis nil (L.) by inhibiting elongation of the inverted shoot. It has been previously demonstrated that this shoot inversion release of apical dominance can be prevented by promoting elongation in the inverted shoot via interference with ethylene synthesis or action. In the present study it was shown that apical dominance release can also be prevented by promoting elongation of the inverted shoot via treatment with gibberellic acid (GA3). A synergistic effect was observed when AgNO3, the ethylene action inhibitor, was applied with GA3. Both GA3 and AgNO3 increased ethylene production in the inverted shoot. These results are consistent with the view that it is ethylene-induced inhibition of elongation and not any direct effect of ethylene per se which is responsible for the outgrowth of the highest lateral bud.

  7. Analyses of Interactions Between Heparin and the Apical Surface Proteins of Plasmodium falciparum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kyousuke; Takano, Ryo; Takemae, Hitoshi; Sugi, Tatsuki; Ishiwa, Akiko; Gong, Haiyan; Recuenco, Frances C.; Iwanaga, Tatsuya; Horimoto, Taisuke; Akashi, Hiroomi; Kato, Kentaro

    2013-11-01

    Heparin, a sulfated glycoconjugate, reportedly inhibits the blood-stage growth of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Elucidation of the inhibitory mechanism is valuable for developing novel invasion-blocking treatments based on heparin. Merozoite surface protein 1 has been reported as a candidate target of heparin; however, to better understand the molecular mechanisms involved, we characterized the molecules that bind to heparin during merozoite invasion. Here, we show that heparin binds only at the apical tip of the merozoite surface and that multiple heparin-binding proteins localize preferentially in the apical organelles. To identify heparin-binding proteins, parasite proteins were fractionated by means of heparin affinity chromatography and subjected to immunoblot analysis with ligand-specific antibodies. All tested members of the Duffy and reticulocyte binding-like families bound to heparin with diverse affinities. These findings suggest that heparin masks the apical surface of merozoites and blocks interaction with the erythrocyte membrane after initial attachment.

  8. Differential Regulation of Apical-basolateral Dendrite Outgrowth by Activity in Hippocampal Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang eYuan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal pyramidal neurons have characteristic dendrite asymmetry, characterized by structurally and functionally distinct apical and basolateral dendrites. The ability of the neuron to generate and maintain dendrite asymmetry is vital, since synaptic inputs received are critically dependent on dendrite architecture. Little is known about the role of neuronal activity in guiding maintainance of dendrite asymmetry. Our data indicate that dendrite asymmetry is established and maintained early during development. Further, our results indicate that cell intrinsic and global alterations of neuronal activity have differential effects on net extension of apical and basolateral dendrites. Thus, apical and basolateral dendrite extension may be independently regulated by cell intrinsic and network neuronal activity during development, suggesting that individual dendrites may have autonomous control over net extension. We propose that regulated individual dendrite extension in response to cell intrinsic and neuronal network activity may allow temporal control of synapse specificity in the developing hippocampus.

  9. Depth of planting and apical dominance on cuttings of red pitayaProfundidade de plantio e dominância apical na estaquia de pitaia vermelha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virna Braga Marques

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of planting depth and breaking apical dominance on cutting of red pitaya Hylocereus undatus (Haw. Britton & Rose. The experiment was conducted in a randomized block design with four replications in a 2x3 factorial, with two kinds of cuttings (with or without apical dominance, cutting not sectioned and sectioned at 5 cm from the upper portion, and three planting depths (1.0, 5.0, and 10.0 cm and each plot consisted of ten 20 cm long cuttings. After 60 days of planting, counts of the number of shoots were began weekly and 90 days after planting survival rooting, number and length of shoots, dry weight of shoots and root dry mass were evaluated. Data were subjected to analysis of variance and polynomial regression at 5% significance level. The percentage of rooting and the survival were 100% in all treatments. With increasing depth of planting it was observed linear reduction in numbers of shoots, dry weight of shoot and root dry mass. The cladodes with apical dominance had longer shoots. The planting of red pitaya cuttings at 1 cm of planting depth with apical dominance is more suited to the production of nursery plants. O trabalho foi conduzido com o objetivo de avaliar os efeitos da profundidade de plantio e da quebra de dominância apical na estaquia de pitaia vermelha Hylocereus undatus (Haw. Britton & Rose. O experimento foi instalado no delineamento em blocos casualizados, com quatro repetições no esquema fatorial 2x3, sendo dois tipos de estacas (com e sem dominância apical, estacas não seccionadas e seccionadas a 5 cm da porção superior, e três profundidades de plantio (1,0; 5,0; 10,0 cm e cada parcela foi constituída de dez estacas com 20 cm de comprimento. Após 60 dias do plantio, foram iniciadas as avaliações semanais do número de brotações e aos 90 dias após o plantio foram avaliados sobrevivência, enraizamento, número e comprimento de brotações, massa seca das brota

  10. Mic10 oligomerizes to bend mitochondrial inner membranes at cristae junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbot, Mariam; Jans, Daniel C; Schulz, Christian; Denkert, Niels; Kroppen, Benjamin; Hoppert, Michael; Jakobs, Stefan; Meinecke, Michael

    2015-05-05

    The mitochondrial inner membrane is highly folded and displays a complex molecular architecture. Cristae junctions are highly curved tubular openings that separate cristae membrane invaginations from the surrounding boundary membrane. Despite their central role in many vital cellular processes like apoptosis, the details of cristae junction formation remain elusive. Here we identify Mic10, a core subunit of the recently discovered MICOS complex, as an inner mitochondrial membrane protein with the ability to change membrane morphology in vitro and in vivo. We show that Mic10 spans the inner membrane in a hairpin topology and that its ability to sculpt membranes depends on oligomerization through a glycine-rich motif. Oligomerization mutants fail to induce curvature in model membranes, and when expressed in yeast, mitochondria display an altered inner membrane architecture characterized by drastically decreased numbers of cristae junctions. Thus, we demonstrate that membrane sculpting by Mic10 is essential for cristae junction formation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Influence of Hero Apical instruments on cleaning ovoid-shaped root canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Interliche

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The cleaning capacity of Hero 642 nickel-titanium files, complemented by the Hero Apical instruments in flattened roots, was determined by histological analysis, considering the area of action of the instruments on the coronal walls and the presence of remaining debris. Twenty-four single-canal, human mandibular incisors were divided into three groups and prepared as follows: GI, instrumented with Hero 642 NiTi files 30/.06, 25/.06, 20/.06, 25/.06, and 30/.06; GII, instrumented as GI followed by Hero Apical size 30/.06; GIII, instrumented as GI followed by Hero Apical sizes 30/.06 and 30/.08, then returning to 30/.06 with pendulum movements. The apical thirds were prepared for histological processing, analyzed at 40× magnification and the images were examined morphometrically. Statistical analysis showed that GIII presented the best results for removing debris (5.22% ± 4.13, with more contact between the instruments and the root canal walls (19.31% ± 0.15. This differed statistically from GI (14.04% ± 4.96 debris removal, with 42.96% ± 7.11 instrument contact and GII (12.62% ± 5.76 debris removal, with 35.01% ± 0.15 instrument contact. Root canal preparation with Hero 642, complemented by Hero Apical instruments (30/.06 and 30/.08, then re-instrumented with Hero Apical 30/.06 using pendulum movements, was more efficient for debris removal and allowed more contact of the instruments with the root canal walls. GII presented the worst results.

  12. Biofilms and apical periodontitis: study of prevalence and association with clinical and histopathologic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricucci, Domenico; Siqueira, José F

    2010-08-01

    This study evaluated the prevalence of bacterial biofilms in untreated and treated root canals of teeth evincing apical periodontitis. The associations of biofilms with clinical conditions, radiographic size, and the histopathologic type of apical periodontitis were also investigated. The material comprised biopsy specimens from 106 (64 untreated and 42 treated) roots of teeth with apical periodontitis. Specimens were obtained by apical surgery or extraction and were processed for histopathologic and histobacteriologic techniques. Bacteria were found in all but one specimen. Overall, intraradicular biofilm arrangements were observed in the apical segment of 77% of the root canals (untreated canals: 80%; treated canals: 74%). Biofilms were also seen covering the walls of ramifications and isthmuses. Bacterial biofilms were visualized in 62% and 82% of the root canals of teeth with small and large radiographic lesions, respectively. All canals with very large lesions harbored intraradicular biofilms. Biofilms were significantly associated with epithelialized lesions (cysts and epithelialized granulomas or abscesses) (p granulomas was 95%, 83%, and 69.5%, respectively. No correlation was found between biofilms and clinical symptoms or sinus tract presence (p > 0.05). Extraradicular biofilms were observed in only 6% of the cases. The overall findings are consistent with acceptable criteria to include apical periodontitis in the set of biofilm-induced diseases. Biofilm morphologic structure varied from case to case and no unique pattern for endodontic infections was identified. Biofilms are more likely to be present in association with longstanding pathologic processes, including large lesions and cysts. Copyright 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Frecuencia de periodontitis apical en tratamientos endodónticos de pregrado

    OpenAIRE

    León, P.; Ilabaca, M.J.; Alcota, M.; González, F.E.

    2011-01-01

    La periodontitis apical es una enfermedad de los tejidos periapicales de etiología bacteriana. Su tratamiento requiere erradicar los microorganismos del conducto radicular y obturarlo para lograr la reparación posterior. El objetivo de éste trabajo fue determinar la frecuencia de periodontitis apical en la población que asiste a la clínica de Endodoncia de la Facultad de Odontología de la Universidad de Chile y su relación con diferentes variables: diagnóstico específico, edad, sexo, agudas v...

  14. Criterios Clínicos y Radiológicos de la Periodontitis Apical.

    OpenAIRE

    Jiménez Planas, Amparo

    2017-01-01

    Se realiza un trabajo con 271 casos diagnosticados de periodontitis apical, clínica o radiológicamente, en los que se valoran parámetros clínicos y radiológicos que nos permitan delimitar las diferentes formas clínicas de este proceso. se propone, como consecuencia de los resultados, una clasificación clara, simple, coherente y evolutiva de la periodontitis apical y se hacen diversas consideraciones sobre la nomenclatura, etiología, cl...

  15. Reestablishing the Function and Esthetics in Traumatized Permanent Teeth with Large Apical Lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Rubin Cocco

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental trauma is a challenge for dental integrity and can lead to pulp necrosis. The clinical case reports the diagnosis of a maxillary right central incisor traumatized and its multidisciplinary treatment. Calcium hydroxide material was used to perform the processing apexification. An apical surgery was carried out to remove the apical periodontitis and to return the aesthetics to the patient; internal and external tooth whitening in maxillary right central incisor was performed. We conclude that surgery associated with the root filling in the central incisor led to a successful completion. Moreover, it is of utmost importance to demonstrate the interaction between the various areas of dentistry.

  16. Periimplantitis apical - presentación de serie de 11 casos clínicos

    OpenAIRE

    Stavaru Marinescu, Bogdan; Naval Gías, Luis; Herrera Calvo, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Objetivos: Evaluar el protocolo quirúrgico y discutir los posibles factores predisponentes de la periimplantitis apical. Material y método: En el presente trabajo, se planteó un estudio descriptivo retrospectivo analizando una serie de 11 casos clínicos de periimplantitis apical diagnosticados y tratados en el ámbito del Hospital de La Princesa (Madrid) y la Clínica Universidad de Navarra (Pamplona) entre 2002 y 2013. Los pacientes sintomáticos fueron tratados mediante legrado de la zona c...

  17. Back-contacted back-junction silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangersnes, Krister

    2010-10-15

    Conventional silicon solar cells have a front-side contacted emitter. Back-contacted back-junction (BC-BJ) silicon solar cells, on the other hand, have both the complete metallization and the active diffused regions of both polarities on the backside. World-record efficiencies have already been demonstrated for this type of cell design in production, both on cell and module level. However, the production of these cells is both complex and costly, and a further cost reduction in fabrication is needed to make electricity from BC-BJ silicon solar cells cost-competitive with electricity on the grid ('grid-parity'). During the work with this thesis, we have investigated several important issues regarding BC-BJ silicon solar cells. The aim has been to reduce production cost and complexity while at the same time maintaining, or increasing, the already high conversion efficiencies demonstrated elsewhere. This has been pursued through experimental work as well as through numerical simulations and modeling. Six papers are appended to this thesis, two of which are still under review in scientific journals. In addition, two patents have been filed based on the work presented herein. Experimentally, we have focused on investigating and optimizing single, central processing steps. A laser has been the key processing tool during most of the work. We have used the same laser both to structure the backside of the cell and to make holes in a double-layer of passivating amorphous silicon and silicon oxide, where the holes were opened with the aim of making local contact to the underlying silicon. The processes developed have the possibility of using a relatively cheap and industrially proven laser and obtain results better than most state-of-the-art laser technologies. During the work with the laser, we also developed a thermodynamic model that was able to predict the outcome from laser interaction with amorphous and crystalline silicon. Alongside the experimental work, we

  18. Evaluation and Comparison of the Position of the Apical Constriction in Single-root and Multiple-root Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Farhad

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Precise knowledge of the location of the apical constriction is essential to root canal treatment and long-term prognosis. Considering the differences in the apical constriction and size of the roots in single- and multiple-root teeth in various races, examination and comparison of the location of the apical constriction in single-root and multiple-root teeth are of paramount importance. The present studies aimed to measure and compare the distance of the apical constriction from the apical foramen and anatomical apex in single-root and multiple-root teeth. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 60 roots of single-rooted teeth and 60 roots of multiple-rooted teeth were collected from the patients referring to the health centers in Isfahan, Iran. After cleansing and disinfecting the surface of the roots, the surface of the teeth was washed with hypochlorite. Based on the direction of the apical foramen, a longitudinal cut was made in the same direction, and the roots were examined microscopically at the magnification of 25. Following that, the distance of the apical constriction from the apical foramen and anatomical apex was measured using a digital camera. In addition, mean and standard deviation of the obtained distance values were determined. Distances in the single-root and multiple-root teeth were compared using independent t-test, at the significance level of Results: Mean distance between the apical constriction and apical foramen was 0.86±0.33 mm in the single-root teeth and 0.072±0.27 mm in the multiple-root teeth. Mean distance between the apical constriction and anatomical apex was 1.14±0.36 mm in the single-root teeth and 1.03±0.36 mm in the multiple-root teeth. Moreover, the results of independent t-test showed the distance of the apical constriction from the apical foramen to be significant between single-root and multiple-rooted teeth (P=0.013. However, the distance between the apical constriction

  19. Relationships between junction temperature, electroluminescence spectrum and ageing of light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaskuri, Anna; Kärhä, Petri; Baumgartner, Hans; Kantamaa, Olli; Pulli, Tomi; Poikonen, Tuomas; Ikonen, Erkki

    2018-04-01

    We have developed spectral models describing the electroluminescence spectra of AlGaInP and InGaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) consisting of the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution and the effective joint density of states. One spectrum at a known temperature for one LED specimen is needed for calibrating the model parameters of each LED type. Then, the model can be used for determining the junction temperature optically from the spectral measurement, because the junction temperature is one of the free parameters. We validated the models using, in total, 53 spectra of three red AlGaInP LED specimens and 72 spectra of three blue InGaN LED specimens measured at various current levels and temperatures between 303 K and 398 K. For all the spectra of red LEDs, the standard deviation between the modelled and measured junction temperatures was only 2.4 K. InGaN LEDs have a more complex effective joint density of states. For the blue LEDs, the corresponding standard deviation was 11.2 K, but it decreased to 3.5 K when each LED specimen was calibrated separately. The method of determining junction temperature was further tested on white InGaN LEDs with luminophore coating and LED lamps. The average standard deviation was 8 K for white InGaN LED types. We have six years of ageing data available for a set of LED lamps and we estimated the junction temperatures of these lamps with respect to their ageing times. It was found that the LEDs operating at higher junction temperatures were frequently more damaged.

  20. The anatomical locus of T-junction processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirillo, James A

    2009-07-01

    Inhomogeneous surrounds can produce either asymmetrical or symmetrical increment/decrement induction by orienting T-junctions to selectively group a test patch with surrounding regions [Melfi, T., & Schirillo, J. (2000). T-junctions in inhomogeneous surrounds. Vision Research, 40, 3735-3741]. The current experiments aimed to determine where T-junctions are processed by presenting each eye with a different image so that T-junctions exist only in the fused percept. Only minor differences were found between retinal and cortical versus cortical-only conditions, indicating that T-junctions are processed cortically.

  1. Planar Josephson tunnel junctions in a transverse magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monacoa, R.; Aarøe, Morten; Mygind, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally, since the discovery of the Josephson effect in 1962, the magnetic diffraction pattern of planar Josephson tunnel junctions has been recorded with the field applied in the plane of the junction. Here we discuss the static junction properties in a transverse magnetic field where...... demagnetization effects imposed by the tunnel barrier and electrodes geometry are important. Measurements of the junction critical current versus magnetic field in planar Nb-based high-quality junctions with different geometry, size, and critical current density show that it is advantageous to use a transverse...... magnetic field rather than an in-plane field. The conditions under which this occurs are discussed....

  2. In vitro investigation of intestinal transport mechanism of silicon, supplied as orthosilicic acid-vanillin complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergent, Thérèse; Croizet, Karine; Schneider, Yves-Jacques

    2017-02-01

    Silicon (Si) is one of the most abundant trace elements in the body. Although pharmacokinetics data described its absorption from the diet and its body excretion, the mechanisms involved in the uptake and transport of Si across the gut wall have not been established. Caco-2 cells were used as a well-accepted in vitro model of the human intestinal epithelium to investigate the transport, across the intestinal barrier in both the absorption and excretion directions, of Si supplied as orthosilicic acid stabilized by vanillin complex (OSA-VC). The transport of this species was found proportional to the initial concentration and to the duration of incubation, with absorption and excretion mean rates similar to those of Lucifer yellow, a marker of paracellular diffusion, and increasing in the presence of EGTA, a chelator of divalents cations including calcium. A cellular accumulation of Si, polarized from the apical side of cells, was furthermore detected. These results provide evidence that Si, ingested as a food supplement containing OSA-VC, crosses the intestinal mucosa by passive diffusion via the paracellular pathway through the intercellular tight junctions and accumulates intracellularly, probably by an uptake mechanism of facilitated diffusion. This study can help to further understand the kinetic of absorption of Si. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Cellular and Molecular Anatomy of the Human Neuromuscular Junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross A. Jones

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The neuromuscular junction (NMJ plays a fundamental role in transferring information from lower motor neuron to skeletal muscle to generate movement. It is also an experimentally accessible model synapse routinely studied in animal models to explore fundamental aspects of synaptic form and function. Here, we combined morphological techniques, super-resolution imaging, and proteomic profiling to reveal the detailed cellular and molecular architecture of the human NMJ. Human NMJs were significantly smaller, less complex, and more fragmented than mouse NMJs. In contrast to mice, human NMJs were also remarkably stable across the entire adult lifespan, showing no signs of age-related degeneration or remodeling. Super-resolution imaging and proteomic profiling revealed distinctive distribution of active zone proteins and differential expression of core synaptic proteins and molecular pathways at the human NMJ. Taken together, these findings reveal human-specific cellular and molecular features of the NMJ that distinguish them from comparable synapses in other mammalian species.

  4. Predicting placebo response in adolescents with major depressive disorder: The Adolescent Placebo Impact Composite Score (APICS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakonezny, Paul A; Mayes, Taryn L; Byerly, Matthew J; Emslie, Graham J

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to construct a composite scoring system to predict the probability of placebo response in adolescents with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Participants of the current study were 151 adolescents (aged 12-17 years) who were randomized to the placebo arm (placebo transdermal patches) of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing the selegiline transdermal patch with placebo (DelBello et al., 2014). The primary outcome of response was defined as a CGI-I score of 1 or 2 (very much or much improved) at week 12 (study-end) or exit. As a first step, a multiple logistic mixed model was used to estimate the odds of placebo response from each predictor in the model, including age, CDRS-R total at baseline (depressive symptom severity), history of recurrent depression (yes vs. no), sex (female vs. male), and race (non-Caucasian vs. Caucasian). On the basis of the initial logistic mixed model analysis, we then constructed an Adolescent Placebo Impact Composite Score (APICS) that became the sole predictor in a re-specified Bayesian logistic regression model to estimate the probability of placebo response. Finally, the AUC for the APICS was tested against a nominal area of 0.50 to evaluate how well the APICS discriminated placebo response status. Among the 151 adolescents, with a mean age of 14.6 years (SD = 1.6) and a mean baseline CDRS-R total of 60.6 (SD = 12.1), 68.2% were females, 50.3% was Caucasian, and 39.7% had a history of recurrent depression. Placebo response rate was 58.3%. Based on the logistic mixed model, the re-specified equation with the highest discriminatory ability to estimate the probability of placebo response was APICS = age + (0.32 × CDRS-R Total at baseline) + (-2.85 × if female) + (-5.50 × if history of recurrent depression) + (-5.85 × if non-Caucasian). The AUC for this model was 0.59 (p = .049). Within a Bayesian decision-theoretic framework, in 95.5% of the time, the 10,000 posterior Monte Carlo samples suggested

  5. Modeling of charge transport in ion bipolar junction transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Anton V; Tybrandt, Klas; Berggren, Magnus; Zozoulenko, Igor V

    2014-06-17

    Spatiotemporal control of the complex chemical microenvironment is of great importance to many fields within life science. One way to facilitate such control is to construct delivery circuits, comprising arrays of dispensing outlets, for ions and charged biomolecules based on ionic transistors. This allows for addressability of ionic signals, which opens up for spatiotemporally controlled delivery in a highly complex manner. One class of ionic transistors, the ion bipolar junction transistors (IBJTs), is especially attractive for these applications because these transistors are functional at physiological conditions and have been employed to modulate the delivery of neurotransmitters to regulate signaling in neuronal cells. Further, the first integrated complementary ionic circuits were recently developed on the basis of these ionic transistors. However, a detailed understanding of the device physics of these transistors is still lacking and hampers further development of components and circuits. Here, we report on the modeling of IBJTs using Poisson's and Nernst-Planck equations and the finite element method. A two-dimensional model of the device is employed that successfully reproduces the main characteristics of the measurement data. On the basis of the detailed concentration and potential profiles provided by the model, the different modes of operation of the transistor are analyzed as well as the transitions between the different modes. The model correctly predicts the measured threshold voltage, which is explained in terms of membrane potentials. All in all, the results provide the basis for a detailed understanding of IBJT operation. This new knowledge is employed to discuss potential improvements of ion bipolar junction transistors in terms of miniaturization and device parameters.

  6. Non-Lagrangian theories from brane junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao, Ling; Mitev, Vladimir

    2013-10-01

    In this article we use 5-brane junctions to study the 5D T N SCFTs corresponding to the 5D N=1 uplift of the 4D N=2 strongly coupled gauge theories, which are obtained by compactifying N M5 branes on a sphere with three full punctures. Even though these theories have no Lagrangian description, by using the 5-brane junctions proposed by Benini, Benvenuti and Tachikawa, we are able to derive their Seiberg-Witten curves and Nekrasov partition functions. We cross-check our results with the 5D superconformal index proposed by Kim, Kim and Lee. Through the AGTW correspondence, we discuss the relations between 5D superconformal indices and n-point functions of the q-deformed W N Toda theories.

  7. Relaxation oscillation logic in Josephson junction circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulton, T.A.

    1981-01-01

    A dc powered, self-resetting Josephson junction logic circuit relying on relaxation oscillations is described. A pair of Josephson junction gates are connected in series, a first shunt is connected in parallel with one of the gates, and a second shunt is connected in parallel with the series combination of gates. The resistance of the shunts and the dc bias current bias the gates so that they are capable of undergoing relaxation oscillations. The first shunt forms an output line whereas the second shunt forms a control loop. The bias current is applied to the gates so that, in the quiescent state, the gate in parallel with the second shunt is at V O, and the other gate is undergoing relaxation oscillations. By controlling the state of the first gate with the current in the output loop of another identical circuit, the invert function is performed

  8. Non-Lagrangian theories from brane junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Ling [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Mitev, Vladimir [Humboldt Univ., Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Mathematik und Inst. fuer Physik; Pomoni, Elli [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Taki, Masato [RIKEN Nishina Center, Saitama (Japan). Mathematical Physics Lab.; Yagi, Futoshi [International School of Advanced Studies (SISSA), Trieste (Italy); INFN, Trieste (Italy); Korea Institute for Advanced Study (KIAS), Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In this article we use 5-brane junctions to study the 5D T{sub N} SCFTs corresponding to the 5D N=1 uplift of the 4D N=2 strongly coupled gauge theories, which are obtained by compactifying N M5 branes on a sphere with three full punctures. Even though these theories have no Lagrangian description, by using the 5-brane junctions proposed by Benini, Benvenuti and Tachikawa, we are able to derive their Seiberg-Witten curves and Nekrasov partition functions. We cross-check our results with the 5D superconformal index proposed by Kim, Kim and Lee. Through the AGTW correspondence, we discuss the relations between 5D superconformal indices and n-point functions of the q-deformed W{sub N} Toda theories.

  9. Electron transport in doped fullerene molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Milanpreet; Sawhney, Ravinder Singh; Engles, Derick

    The effect of doping on the electron transport of molecular junctions is analyzed in this paper. The doped fullerene molecules are stringed to two semi-infinite gold electrodes and analyzed at equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions of these device configurations. The contemplation is done using nonequilibrium Green’s function (NEGF)-density functional theory (DFT) to evaluate its density of states (DOS), transmission coefficient, molecular orbitals, electron density, charge transfer, current, and conductance. We conclude from the elucidated results that Au-C16Li4-Au and Au-C16Ne4-Au devices behave as an ordinary p-n junction diode and a Zener diode, respectively. Moreover, these doped fullerene molecules do not lose their metallic nature when sandwiched between the pair of gold electrodes.

  10. Junction conditions in extended Teleparallel gravities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De la Cruz-Dombriz, Álvaro [Departamento de Física Teórica I, Ciudad Universitaria, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Dunsby, Peter K.S.; Sáez-Gómez, Diego, E-mail: dombriz@fis.ucm.es, E-mail: peter.dunsby@uct.ac.za, E-mail: diego.saezgomez@uct.ac.za [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre (ACGC), Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701, Cape Town (South Africa)

    2014-12-01

    In the context of extended Teleparallel gravity theories, we address the issue of junction conditions required to guarantee the correct matching of different regions of spacetime. In the absence of shells/branes, these conditions turn out to be more restrictive than their counterparts in General Relativity as in other extended theories of gravity. In fact, the general junction conditions on the matching hypersurfaces depend on the underlying theory and a new condition on the induced tetrads in order to avoid delta-like distributions in the field equations. This result imposes strict consequences on the viability of standard solutions such as the Einstein-Straus-like construction. We find that the continuity of the scalar torsion is required in order to recover the usual General Relativity results.

  11. Magnetoamplification in a bipolar magnetic junction transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangaraju, N; Peters, J A; Wessels, B W

    2010-09-10

    We have demonstrated the first bipolar magnetic junction transistor using a dilute magnetic semiconductor. For an InMnAs p-n-p transistor magnetoamplification is observed at room temperature. The observed magnetoamplification is attributed to the magnetoresistance of the magnetic semiconductor InMnAs heterojunction. The magnetic field dependence of the transistor characteristics confirm that the magnetoamplification results from the junction magnetoresistance. To describe the experimentally observed transistor characteristics, we propose a modified Ebers-Moll model that includes a series magnetoresistance attributed to spin-selective conduction. The capability of magnetic field control of the amplification in an all-semiconductor transistor at room temperature potentially enables the creation of new computer logic architecture where the spin of the carriers is utilized.

  12. Excess junction current of silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, E. Y.; Legge, R. N.; Christidis, N.

    1973-01-01

    The current-voltage characteristics of n(plus)-p silicon solar cells with 0.1, 1.0, 2.0, and 10 ohm-cm p-type base materials have been examined in detail. In addition to the usual I-V measurements, we have studied the temperature dependence of the slope of the I-V curve at the origin by the lock-in technique. The excess junction current coefficient (Iq) deduced from the slope at the origin depends on the square root of the intrinsic carrier concentration. The Iq obtained from the I-V curve fitting over the entire forward bias region at various temperatures shows the same temperature dependence. This result, in addition to the presence of an aging effect, suggest that the surface channel effect is the dominant cause of the excess junction current.

  13. Electron and Phonon Transport in Molecular Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qian

    transmission at the Fermi energy. We propose and analyze a way of using π   stacking to design molecular junctions to control heat transport. We develop a simple model system to identify optimal parameter regimes and then use density functional theory (DFT) to extract model parameters for a number of specific......Molecular electronics provide the possibility to investigate electron and phonon transport at the smallest imaginable scale, where quantum effects can be investigated and exploited directly in the design. In this thesis, we study both electron transport and phonon transport in molecular junctions....... The system we are interested in here are π-stacked molecules connected with two semi-infinite leads. π-stacked aromatic rings, connected via π-π electronic coupling, provides a rather soft mechanical bridge while maintaining high electronic conductivity. We investigate electron transport...

  14. Characterization of magnetic tunnel junction test pads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Kjær, Daniel; Nielsen, Peter Folmer

    2015-01-01

    relies on four-point probe measurements performed with a range of different probe pitches and was originally developed for infinite samples. Using the method of images, we derive a modified CIPT model, which compensates for the insulating boundaries of a finite rectangular sample geometry. We measure...... as a function of position on a square tunnel junction pad are used to investigate the sensitivity of the measurement results to probe misalignment....... on square tunnel junction pads with varying sizes and analyze the measured data using both the original and the modified CIPT model. Thus, we determine in which sample size range the modified CIPT model is needed to ensure validity of the extracted sample parameters, RA and TMR. In addition, measurements...

  15. Dissipation and traversal time in Josephson junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacciari, Ilaria; Ranfagni, Anedio; Moretti, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    The various ways of evaluating dissipative effects in macroscopic quantum tunneling are re-examined. The results obtained by using functional integration, while confirming those of previously given treatments, enable a comparison with available experimental results relative to Josephson junctions. A criterion based on the shortening of the semiclassical traversal time τ of the barrier with regard to dissipation can be established, according to which Δτ/τ > or approx. N/Q, where Q is the quality factor of the junction and N is a numerical constant of order unity. The best agreement with the experiments is obtained for N=1.11, as it results from a semiempirical analysis based on an increase in the potential barrier caused by dissipative effects.

  16. Shot noise in YBCO bicrystal Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Constantinian, K.Y.; Ovsyannikov, G.A.; Borisenko, I.V.

    2003-01-01

    We measured spectral noise density in YBCO symmetric bicrystal Josephson junctions on sapphire substrates at bias voltages up to 100 mV and T 4.2 K. Normal state resistance of the Josephson junctions, R-N = 20-90 Omega and ICRN up to 2.2 mV have been observed in the experimental samples. Noise...... measurements were carried out within frequency bands of 1-2 GHz and 0.3-300 kHz. At bias voltages 10 less than or equal to V less than or equal to 60 mV a linear voltage dependence of noise power has been registered, while at V less than or equal to 5 mV a noticeable noise rise has been observed. The latter...

  17. Charge Transport Phenomena in Peptide Molecular Junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Luchini

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS is a valuable in situ spectroscopic analysis technique that provides a direct portrait of the electron transport properties of a molecular species. In the past, IETS has been applied to small molecules. Using self-assembled nanoelectronic junctions, IETS was performed for the first time on a large polypeptide protein peptide in the phosphorylated and native form, yielding interpretable spectra. A reproducible 10-fold shift of the I/V characteristics of the peptide was observed upon phosphorylation. Phosphorylation can be utilized as a site-specific modification to alter peptide structure and thereby influence electron transport in peptide molecular junctions. It is envisioned that kinases and phosphatases may be used to create tunable systems for molecular electronics applications, such as biosensors and memory devices.

  18. Nonlinearity in superconductivity and Josephson junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarides, N.

    1995-01-01

    Within the framework of the Bardeen, Cooper and Schrieffers (BCS) theory, the influence of anisotropy on superconducting states are investigated. Crystal anisotropy exists in un-conventional low temperature superconductors as e.g. U 1-x Th x Be 13 and in high temperature superconductors. Starting from a phenomenological pairing interaction of the electrons or holes, the BCS approach is used to derive a set of coupled nonlinear algebraic equations for the momentum dependent gap parameter. The emphasis is put on bifurcation phenomena between s-, d-wave and mixed s- and d-wave symmetry and the influence on measurable quantities as the electron specific heat, spin susceptibility and Josephson tunnelling. Pitch-fork and perturbed pitch-fork bifurcations have been found separating s- and d-wave superconducting states from mixed s- and d-wave states. The additional superconducting states give rise to jumps in the electron specific heat below the transition temperature. These jumps are rounded in the case of perturbed pitch-fork bifurcations. An experiment to measure the sign of the interlayer interaction using dc SQUIDS is suggested. The Ambegaokar-Baratoff formalism has been used for calculating the quasiparticle current and the two phase coherent tunnelling currents in a Josephson junction made of anisotropic superconductors. It is shown that anisotropy can lead to a reduction in the product of the normal resistance and the critical current. For low voltages across the junction the usual resistively shunted Josephson model can be used. Finally, bunching in long circular Josephson junctions and suppression of chaos in point junctions have been investigated. (au) 113 refs

  19. Internal dynamics of long Josephson junction oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter Leth; Lomdahl, P. S.; Scott, Alwyn C.

    1981-01-01

    Numerical computations on a sine-Gordon model of the Josephson junction fluxon oscillator are compared with experimental measurements. Good agreement is found for the voltage current characteristic, oscillator power output, and range of current bias over which oscillation is observed. Our numeric...... results imply a ''bunched-fluxon'' mode of oscillation at larger values of bias current. Applied Physics Letters is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  20. An epitaxial ferroelectric tunnel junction on silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhipeng; Guo, Xiao; Lu, Hui-Bin; Zhang, Zaoli; Song, Dongsheng; Cheng, Shaobo; Bosman, Michel; Zhu, Jing; Dong, Zhili; Zhu, Weiguang

    2014-11-12

    Epitaxially grown functional perovskites on silicon (001) and the ferroelectricity of a 3.2 nm thick BaTiO3 barrier layer are demonstrated. The polarization-switching-induced change in tunneling resistance is measured to be two orders of magnitude. The obtained results suggest the possibility of integrating ferroelectric tunnel junctions as binary data storage media in non-volatile memory cells on a silicon platform. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Josephson spin current in triplet superconductor junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Asano, Yasuhiro

    2006-01-01

    This paper theoretically discusses the spin current in spin-triplet superconductor / insulator / spin-triplet superconductor junctions. At low temperatures, a midgap Andreev resonant state anomalously enhances not only the charge current but also the spin current. The coupling between the Cooper pairs and the electromagnetic fields leads to the Frounhofer pattern in the direct current spin flow in magnetic fields and the alternative spin current under applied bias-voltages.

  2. Defect formation in long Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordeeva, Anna; Pankratov, Andrey

    2010-01-01

    We study numerically a mechanism of vortex formation in a long Josephson junction within the framework of the one-dimensional sine-Gordon model. This mechanism is switched on below the critical temperature. It is shown that the number of fluxons versus velocity of cooling roughly scales according...... to the power law with the exponent of either 0.25 or 0.5 depending on the temperature variation in the critical current density....

  3. Development of Thin-Junction Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W.; Carini, G.; Keister, J.; Li, Z.; Rehak, P.

    2007-10-01

    Two methods to produce a thin-junction sensor are reported here. The first method consists of a regular boron implantation with energies of 2 keV (dose of 1 times 1015/cm2) and 5 keV (dose of 1 times 1014/cm2) into silicon directly, and 10 keV (1 X 1014/cm2), 45 keV (1 times 1015/cm2) into Si through a thin oxide layer (500 A and 1000 A respectively) to form a junction. An aluminum layer was coated in the same vacuum system after back-sputtering to remove oxide on top of the implanted silicon substrate. This method may have the following advantages: 1) it may improve the soft X-ray radiation hardness of the device because there is no oxide layer on the junction; 2) it substantially attenuates the incident visible light; and 3) it allows detection of low energy X-ray down to 300 eV. The second method consists of a low energy of 2 keV and dose of 1 times 1015/cm2 boron implantation into the bare silicon followed by laser annealing that activates boron with minimal diffusion, to retain the ultra thin-junction. The laser annealing method was compared with control wafers. Two of the control wafers were implanted by boron with the same energy and dose as that of the laser annealed wafer. One of them was annealed using high temperature of 1000degC and time of 30 minutes thermal annealing. The other was annealed using our regular annealing temperature of 700degC and with longer annealing time of 17 hours. The remaining control wafer was implanted by boron with higher energy of 45 keV and dose of 1 times 1015/cm2 (our standard boron implantation energy and dose) and annealed using regular (700degC, 30 min) thermal annealing.

  4. RADIOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF CRANIOVERTEBRAL JUNCTION ANOMALIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joji Reddy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Detailed discussions of the CVJ are conspicuously absent in many standard textbooks and chapters addressing the skull or cervical spine, since it lies in between these regions . CVJ anomalies are common in India subcontinent. OBJECTIVES : To outline the normal anatomy and various abnormalities of craniovertebral junction. To evaluate the most common developmental and acquired craniovertebral junction abnormalities . CRANIOMETRY AND DIAGNOSIS: Radiological evaluation of CVJ requir es identification of only a few anatomic structures. Over the years multiple lines , planes and angles have been described for assessment of CVJ relationship , initially with radiography and later with polytomography. Two lines have remained particularly use ful for evaluation of CVJ relationship with virtually any imaging modality: the chamberlain`s line and weckenheim ’ s clivus base line . Two angles also continue to be useful: the welcher basal angle and atlanto occipital joint axis angle. PATIENTS AND METHOD S: The prospective study of craniovertebral junction anomalies was carried out at Kurnool medical college , Governament general hospital Kurnool from NOV 2012 to AUG 2014. The patients are subjected to clinical evaluation and radiological evaluation. OBSERV ATIONS AND RESULTS : In our study there is male predominance with male to female ratio of 2:1 . Majority of patients are in the age group of 11 - 40 (73.26%. The commonest symptom seen is weakness of extremities ( 70% with associated numbness (50%. On clinica l examination pyramidal tract involvement noticed in 70% of cases. Basilar invagination is the most common followed by Atlantoocoipital assimilation (40% and AAD (30% . CONCLUSION : Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are invalvable adjuncts to the plain radiographs in the evaluation of the craniovertebral junction anomalies. Chamberlain’s line and McGregor line are the most commonly applied craniometric measurements

  5. Decreased Vision and Junctional Scotoma from Pituicytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Huynh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Pituicytomas are rare neoplasms of the sellar region. We report a case of vision loss and a junctional scotoma in a 43-year-old woman caused by compression of the optic chiasm by a pituitary tumor. The morphological and immunohistochemical characteristics of the tumor were consistent with the diagnosis of pituicytoma. The tumor was debulked surgically, and the patient’s vision improved.

  6. Magnetic remanence of Josephson junction arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Passos, W. A. C.; Araujo-Moreira, F. M.; Ortiz, W. A.

    1999-01-01

    In this work we study the magnetic remanence exhibited by Josephson junction arrays in response to an excitation with an AC magnetic field. The effect, predicted by numerical simulations to occur in a range of temperatures, is clearly seen in our tridimensional disordered arrays. We also discuss the influence of the critical current distribution on the temperature interval within which the array develops a magnetic remanence. This effect can be used to determine the critical current distribut...

  7. A unique approach to demonstrating that apical bud temperature specifically determines leaf initiation rate in the dicot Cucumis sativus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savvides, Andreas; Dieleman, Anja; Ieperen, van Wim; Marcelis, Leo F.M.

    2016-01-01

    Main conclusion: Leaf initiation rate is largely determined by the apical bud temperature even when apical bud temperature largely deviates from the temperature of other plant organs.We have long known that the rate of leaf initiation (LIR) is highly sensitive to temperature, but previous studies

  8. Correlation between prostate brachytherapy-related urethral stricture and peri-apical urethral dosimetry: A matched case–control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earley, James J.; Abdelbaky, Ather M.; Cunningham, Melanie J.; Chadwick, Eliot; Langley, Stephen E.M.; Laing, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: Radiation dose to the bulbomembranous urethra has been shown to correlate with urethral stricture formation. This retrospective case–control study was designed to explore the relationship between dose to the apical/peri-apical regions of the urethra and development of brachytherapy (BXT)-related urethral stricture. Materials and methods: Cases were patients who developed urethral stricture after treatment with BXT as monotherapy and who had urethral dosimetry post-implant. Each case was matched with a control that had not developed urethral stricture. Dosimetry was compared between cases and controls. Results: Twenty-three cases were pair matched with 23 controls. There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of age, presenting Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA), International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) or Gleason score. The dose delivered to the peri-apical and apical urethra was significantly higher for cases when compared with controls (peri-apical urethra: mean V 150 1.1 Vs 0.8 cc [p = 0.02]; apical urethra: mean dose 200 Vs 174 Gy [p = 0.01]). The distance from the prostate apex to isodose lines was also found to be significant in predicting stricture formation. Conclusion: There was evidence to suggest that the development of BXT-related stricture was associated with radiation dose at the apical and peri-apical urethra. Attention to the dose delivered to those areas may minimise the risk of developing such morbidity.

  9. Alterations in apical dendrite bundling in the somatosensory cortex of 5-HT3A receptor knockout mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit-Rigter, L.A.; Wadman, W.J.; van Hooft, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    In various species and areas of the cerebral cortex, apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons form clusters which extend through several layers of the cortex also known as dendritic bundles. Previously, it has been shown that 5-HT3A receptor knockout mice show hypercomplex apical dendrites of cortical

  10. Highly Charged Ion (HCI) Modified Tunnel Junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomeroy, J. M.; Grube, H.

    2009-01-01

    The neutralization energy carried by highly charged ions (HCIs) provides an alternative method for localizing energy on a target's surface, producing features and modifying surfaces with fluences and kinetic energy damage that are negligible compared to singly ionized atoms. Since each HCI can deposit an enormous amount of energy into a small volume of the surface (e.g., Xe 44+ delivers 51 keV of neutralization energy per HCI), each individual HCI's interaction with the target can produce a nanoscale feature. Many studies of HCI-surface features have characterized some basic principles of this unique ion-surface interaction, but the activity reported here has been focused on studying ensembles of HCI features in ultra-thin insulating films by fabricating multi-layer tunnel junction devices. The ultra-thin insulating barriers allow current to flow by tunneling, providing a very sensitive means of detecting changes in the barrier due to highly charged ion irradiation and, conversely, HCI modification provides a method of finely tuning the transparency of the tunnel junctions that spans several orders of magnitude for devices produced from a single process recipe. Systematic variation of junction bias, temperature, magnetic field and other parameters provides determination of the transport mechanism, defect densities, and magnetic properties of these nano-features and this novel approach to device fabrication.

  11. Superconducting junctions and method of making same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapituinik, A.

    1993-01-01

    A method of making Josephson junctions in high critical temperature superconductors is described comprising the consecutive steps of: first forming a layer of high Tc copper oxide superconductor on a substrate by forming the constituent components of the superconductor onto the substrate so as to epitaxially grow the superconductor on the substrate with copper-oxygen planes parallel to the surface of the substrate, said layer formed in a pattern to create a desired electronic circuit; then narrowing selected portions of the superconductor circuit at locations where Josephson junctions are desired; then creating weak link areas at said selected portions by moving an electrode across the surface of said selected portions, generally from one side of the selected portion to the other side of the selected portion, at a distance from the surface suitable to maintain a tunnel current between the electrode and the selected portion and maintaining said tunnel current directly into said junction locations while the electrode is proximate to the selected portions and sustaining said tunnel current through the electrodes long enough to physically remove superconducting material from the selected portion; and then depositing a noble metal in the selected portion by evaporating an electrode made from the noble metal

  12. The Effect of Calcium Hydroxide As an Intracanal Medication of The Apical Microleakage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heshmat Mohajer AR

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Nowadays, calcium hydroxide is used as a dressing for canal sterilization and repair progression of apical lesions. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of calcium hydroxide as an intracanal medicament on the apical microleakage of root filling.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 46 extracted single-rooted human teeth were instrumented with step-back technique to master apical file (MAF size 35. Specimens were randomly divided into 2 groups (n = 20. In group 1, the specimens were treated with calcium hydroxide intracanal medication; and in group 2, the samples did not receive any medication. The teeth were incubated in 100% humidity at 37°C for one week. After that, calcium hydroxide was removed using irrigation with normal saline and reaming with MAF. The root canals were obturated with gutta- percha and AH26 sealer using lateral compaction technique. Specimens were incubated in 100% humility at 37°C for 72 hours and then immersed in India ink for 1 week. Finally, the teeth were cleared and the maximum linear dye penetration was measured under a stereomicroscope at 4X magnification. The data were analyzed by T-test and Chi-square.Results: There was no significant difference between the two experimental groups (P=0.068. Conclusion: The findings of this study indicated that using calcium hydroxide as an intracanal medicament did not influence the apical microleakage after final obturation of the root canal system.

  13. Pulp Revascularization in Immature Permanent Tooth with Apical Periodontitis Using Mineral Trioxide Aggregate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsura Saeki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA is a material that has been used worldwide in several clinical applications, such as apical barriers in teeth with immature apices, repair of root perforations, root-end filling, pulp capping, and pulpotomy. The purpose of this case report was to describe successful revascularization treatment of an immature mandibular right second premolar with apical periodontitis in a 9-year-old female patient. After preparing an access cavity without anesthesia, the tooth was isolated using a rubber dam and accessed. The canal was gently debrided using 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl and 3% hydrogen peroxide irrigant. And then MTA was packed into the canal. X-ray photographic examination showed the dentin bridge 5 months after the revascularization procedure. Thickening of the canal wall and complete apical closure were confirmed 10 months after the treatment. In this case, MTA showed clinical and radiographic success at revascularization treatment in immature permanent tooth. The successful outcome of this case suggests that MTA is reliable and effective for endodontic treatment in the pediatric dentistry.

  14. Electric current affects the rate of development in isolated apical parts of rape in vitro

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Filek, M.; Koscielniak, J.; Marcińska, I.; Krekule, Jan; Macháčková, Ivana; Dubert, F.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 3 (2006), s. 465-468 ISSN 0006-3134 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Keywords : apical meristem differentiation * flowering factors * vernalization Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.198, year: 2006

  15. Oxidative Stress in the Local and Systemic Events of Apical Periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Hernández-Ríos

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of a variety of inflammatory disorders. Apical periodontitis (AP usually results in the formation of an osteolytic apical lesion (AL caused by the immune response to endodontic infection. Reactive oxygen species (ROS produced by phagocytic cells in response to bacterial challenge represent an important host defense mechanism, but disturbed redox balance results in tissue injury. This mini review focuses on the role of oxidative stress in the local and associated systemic events in chronic apical periodontitis. During endodontic infection, ligation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs on phagocytes' surface triggers activation, phagocytosis, synthesis of ROS, activation of humoral and cellular responses, and production of inflammatory mediators, such as, cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs. The increment in ROS perturbs the normal redox balance and shifts cells into a state of oxidative stress. ROS induce molecular damage and disturbed redox signaling, that result in the loss of bone homeostasis, increased pro-inflammatory mediators, and MMP overexpression and activation, leading to apical tissue breakdown. On the other hand, oxidative stress has been strongly involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, where a chronic inflammatory process develops in the arterial wall. Chronic AP is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD and especially atherogenesis. The potential mechanisms linking these diseases are also discussed.

  16. Clinical sustained uniform ventricular tachycardia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: association with left ventricular apical aneurysm.

    OpenAIRE

    Alfonso, F; Frenneaux, M P; McKenna, W J

    1989-01-01

    Of 51 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy who had episodes of ventricular tachycardia detected during ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring only two had clinical sustained uniform ventricular tachycardia that required medical treatment because of worsening symptoms. In both patients the arrhythmia was associated with the uncommon finding of an apical aneurysm with angiographically normal coronary arteries.

  17. Gingival recession following apical surgery in the esthetic zone: a clinical study with 70 cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Arx, Thomas; Salvi, Giovanni E; Janner, Simone

    2009-01-01

    The present study evaluated gingival recession 1 year following apical surgery of 70 maxillary anterior teeth (central and lateral incisors, canines, and first premolars). A visual assessment of the mid-facial aspect of the gingival level and of papillary heights of treated teeth was carried out...

  18. Morphology of the Physiological Apical Foramen in Maxillary and Mandibular First Molars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarca, J.; Zaror, C.; Monardes, H.; Hermosilla, V.; Muñoz, C.; Cantin, M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Information regarding the anatomy of the physiological apical foramen is limited. Knowing its diameter and shapes contributes to clinical work, specifically to the cleaning and shaping of the apical third. The aim of this ex vivo study was to determine the minimum and maximum diameters and shape of the physiological apical foramen in the roots of maxillary and mandibular first molars. A descriptive study was conducted on 89 recently extracted first molars. Roots 3–5 mm from the apex were sectioned and prepared for analysis at 40× magnification. The minimum and maximum diameters of each physiological foramen were measured using the program Motic Images plus 2.0 ML. The shape of the foramina, classified as round, oval or irregular, was determined by the difference between the maximum and minimum diameters. A total of 174 physiological foramina were analyzed. The average of the minimum and maximum diameters was between 0.24–0.33 mm in maxillary first molars and between 0.25–0.33 mm in mandibular first molars. In maxillary molars, the most common shape of the foramen was oval (50%), then irregular (32%), then round (18%). In mandibular molars, the oval shape was also the most frequent (59%), followed by irregular (23%) and round (18%). The findings of this study regarding the morphology of physiological apical foramina in first molars make it easier for the operator to choose the appropriately-sized instruments to perform endodontic therapy successfully. PMID:25937698

  19. Cone beam computed tomography study of apical root resorption induced by Herbst appliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    SCHWARTZ, João Paulo; RAVELI, Taísa Boamorte; ALMEIDA, Kélei Cristina de Mathias; SCHWARTZ-FILHO, Humberto Osvaldo; RAVELI, Dirceu Barnabé

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated the frequency of root resorption during the orthodontic treatment with Herbst appliance by Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT). Material and Methods The sample comprised 23 patients (11 men, 12 women; mean ages 15.76±1.75 years) with Class II division 1 malocclusion, treated with Herbst appliance. CBCT was obtained before treatment (T0) and after Herbst treatment (T1). All the dental roots, except third molars, were evaluated, and apical root resorption was determined using the axial guided navigation method. Paired t-tests and Wilcoxon T Test were used to compare the dependent samples in parametric and nonparametric cases, respectively. Chi-Square Test with Yates’ correction was used to evaluate the relationship between apical root resorption and gender. Results were considered at a significance level of 5%. Results Apical resorption was detected by CBCT in 57.96% of 980 roots that underwent Herbst appliance treatment. All patients had minimal resorption and there was no statistical significance between the genders. Conclusion CBCT three-dimensional evaluation showed association between Herbst appliance and minimal apical root resorption, mostly in the anchoring teeth, without clinical significance. PMID:26537718

  20. Coordination of growth in root and shoot apices by AIL/PLT transcription factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheres, Ben; Krizek, Beth A.

    2018-01-01

    Growth at the root tip and organ generation at the shoot tip depend on the proper functioning of apical meristems and the transitioning of meristematic cell descendants from a proliferating state to cell elongation and differentiation. Members of the AINTEGUMENTA-LIKE/PLETHORA (AIL/PLT)

  1. Hormonal networks involved in apical hook development in darkness and their response to light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Agustina Mazzella

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In darkness, the dicot seedlings produces an apical hook as result of differential cell division and extension at opposite sides of the hypocotyl. This hook protects the apical meristem from mechanical damage during seedling emergence from the soil. In darkness, gibberellins act via the DELLA-PIF (PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTORs pathway, and ethylene acts via the EIN3/EIL1 (ETHYLENE INSENSITIE 3/EIN3 like 1-HLS1 (HOOKLESS 1 pathway to control the asymmetric accumulation of auxin required for apical hook formation and maintenance. These core pathways form a network with multiple points of connection. Light perception by phytochromes and cryptochromes reduces the activity of PIFs and CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1 (COP1 --both required for hook formation in darkness--, lowers the levels of gibberellins, and triggers hook opening as a component of the switch between heterotrophic and photoautotrophic development. Apical hook opening is thus a suitable model to study the convergence of endogenous and exogenous signals on the control of cell division and cell growth.

  2. RECIPROC VERSUS TWISTED FILE FOR ROOT CANAL FILLING REMOVAL:ASSESSMENT OF APICALLY EXTRUDED DEBRIS*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demet ALTUNBAŞ

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the amount of apically extruded debris during endodontic retreatment with different file systems. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted human mandibular premolar teeth were used in this study. Root canals of the teeth were instrumented and filled before being randomly assigned to three groups. Guttapercha was removed using the Reciproc system, the Twisted File system (TF, and Hedström-files (H-file. Apically extruded debris was collected and dried in pre-weighed Eppendorf tubes. The amount of extruded debris was assessed with an electronic balance. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann-Whitney U tests. Results: The Reciproc and TF systems extruded significantly less debris than the H-file (p<0.05. However, no significant difference was found between the Reciproc and TF systems. Conclusion: All tested file systems caused apical extrusion of debris. Both the rotary file (TF and the reciprocating single-file (Reciproc systems were associated with less apical extrusion compared with the H-file.

  3. Cone beam computed tomography study of apical root resorption induced by Herbst appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, João Paulo; Raveli, Taísa Boamorte; Almeida, Kélei Cristina de Mathias; Schwartz-Filho, Humberto Osvaldo; Raveli, Dirceu Barnabé

    2015-10-01

    This study evaluated the frequency of root resorption during the orthodontic treatment with Herbst appliance by Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT). The sample comprised 23 patients (11 men, 12 women; mean ages 15.76±1.75 years) with Class II division 1 malocclusion, treated with Herbst appliance. CBCT was obtained before treatment (T0) and after Herbst treatment (T1). All the dental roots, except third molars, were evaluated, and apical root resorption was determined using the axial guided navigation method. Paired t-tests and Wilcoxon T Test were used to compare the dependent samples in parametric and nonparametric cases, respectively. Chi-Square Test with Yates' correction was used to evaluate the relationship between apical root resorption and gender. Results were considered at a significance level of 5%. Apical resorption was detected by CBCT in 57.96% of 980 roots that underwent Herbst appliance treatment. All patients had minimal resorption and there was no statistical significance between the genders. CBCT three-dimensional evaluation showed association between Herbst appliance and minimal apical root resorption, mostly in the anchoring teeth, without clinical significance.

  4. Evaluation of the amount of apically extruded debris using Mtwo and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-12-26

    Dec 26, 2011 ... Extrusion of debris into the periradicular tissue during endodontic treatment is one of the main causes of postoperative flare-ups. The aim of this study was to compare the amount of apically extruded debris using Mtwo instruments with single length technique and RaCe system using crown-down approach.

  5. Identification of apical vertebra for grading of idiopathic scoliosis using image processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitha, H; Prabhu, G K

    2012-02-01

    Scoliosis is a 3-D deformity of spinal column, characterized by both lateral curvature and vertebral rotation. The disease can be caused by congenital, developmental, or degenerative problems; but most cases of scoliosis actually have no known cause, and this is known as idiopathic scoliosis. Vertebral rotation has become increasingly prominent in the study of scoliosis and the most deformed vertebra is named as apical vertebra. Apical vertebral deformity demonstrates significance in both preoperative and postoperative assessment, providing better appreciation of the impact of bracing or surgical interventions. Precise measurement of apical vertebral rotation in terms of grading is most valuable for the determination of reference value in normal and pathological conditions for better understanding of scoliosis. Routine quantitative evaluation of vertebral rotation is difficult and error prone due to limitations of observer characteristic and specific imaging property. This paper proposes automatic identification of the apical vertebra and its parameter that depends on the objective criteria of measurement using active contour models. The proposed technique is more accurate and is a reliable measurement compared to manual and computer-assisted system.

  6. Role of apical oxygen in 2-1-4 electron-doped superconductors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Richard, P.; Riou, G.; Jandl, S.; Poirier, M.; Furnier, P.; Nekvasil, Vladimír; Diviš, M.

    408-410, - (2004), s. 830-831 ISSN 0921-4534 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/03/0552 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : Nd 2-x Ce x CuO 4 * crystal-field * apical oxygen * HTSC Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.072, year: 2004

  7. Three Arabidopsis AIL/PLT genes act in combination to regulate shoot apical meristem function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudunkothge, Janaki S; Krizek, Beth A

    2012-07-01

    The shoot apical meristem, a small dome-shaped structure at the shoot apex, is responsible for the initiation of all post-embryonic shoot organs. Pluripotent stem cells within the meristem replenish themselves and provide daughter cells that become incorporated into lateral organ primordia around the meristem periphery. We have identified three novel regulators of shoot apical meristem activity in Arabidopsis thaliana that encode related AIL/PLT transcription factors: AINTEGUMENTA (ANT), AINTEGUMENTA-LIKE6 (AIL6)/PLETHORA3 (PLT3) and AINTEGUMENTA-LIKE7 (AIL7)/PLETHORA7 (PLT7). Loss of these genes results in plants that initiate only a few leaves prior to termination of shoot apical meristem activity. In 7-day-old ant ail6 ail7 seedlings, we observed reduced cell division in the meristem region, differentiation of meristematic cells and altered expression of the meristem regulators WUSCHEL (WUS), CLAVATA3 (CLV3) and SHOOT MERISTEMLESS (STM). Genetic experiments suggest that these three AIL genes do not act specifically in either the WUS/CLV or STM pathway regulating meristem function. Furthermore, these studies indicate that ANT, AIL6 and AIL7 have distinct functions within the meristem rather than acting in a strictly redundant manner. Our study thus identifies three new genes whose distinct functions are together required for continuous shoot apical meristem function. © 2012 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Cone beam computed tomography study of apical root resorption induced by Herbst appliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo SCHWARTZ

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study evaluated the frequency of root resorption during the orthodontic treatment with Herbst appliance by Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT.Material and Methods The sample comprised 23 patients (11 men, 12 women; mean ages 15.76±1.75 years with Class II division 1 malocclusion, treated with Herbst appliance. CBCT was obtained before treatment (T0 and after Herbst treatment (T1. All the dental roots, except third molars, were evaluated, and apical root resorption was determined using the axial guided navigation method. Paired t-tests and Wilcoxon T Test were used to compare the dependent samples in parametric and nonparametric cases, respectively. Chi-Square Test with Yates’ correction was used to evaluate the relationship between apical root resorption and gender. Results were considered at a significance level of 5%.Results Apical resorption was detected by CBCT in 57.96% of 980 roots that underwent Herbst appliance treatment. All patients had minimal resorption and there was no statistical significance between the genders.Conclusion CBCT three-dimensional evaluation showed association between Herbst appliance and minimal apical root resorption, mostly in the anchoring teeth, without clinical significance.

  9. Apical root resorption 6 months after initiation of fixed orthodontic appliance therapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smale, I.M.; Artun, J.; Behbehani, F.; Doppel, D.; Hof, M.A. van 't; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Individual predisposition might be a major reason for the observed variation in apical orthodontic root resorption. If so, resorption might be expressed during the initial stages of orthodontic therapy in patients at risk. METHODS: To explore this hypothesis, we evaluated standardized,

  10. Apically extruded dentin debris by reciprocating single-file and multi-file rotary system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De-Deus, Gustavo; Neves, Aline; Silva, Emmanuel João; Mendonça, Thais Accorsi; Lourenço, Caroline; Calixto, Camila; Lima, Edson Jorge Moreira

    2015-03-01

    This study aims to evaluate the apical extrusion of debris by the two reciprocating single-file systems: WaveOne and Reciproc. Conventional multi-file rotary system was used as a reference for comparison. The hypotheses tested were (i) the reciprocating single-file systems extrude more than conventional multi-file rotary system and (ii) the reciprocating single-file systems extrude similar amounts of dentin debris. After solid selection criteria, 80 mesial roots of lower molars were included in the present study. The use of four different instrumentation techniques resulted in four groups (n = 20): G1 (hand-file technique), G2 (ProTaper), G3 (WaveOne), and G4 (Reciproc). The apparatus used to evaluate the collection of apically extruded debris was typical double-chamber collector. Statistical analysis was performed for multiple comparisons. No significant difference was found in the amount of the debris extruded between the two reciprocating systems. In contrast, conventional multi-file rotary system group extruded significantly more debris than both reciprocating groups. Hand instrumentation group extruded significantly more debris than all other groups. The present results yielded favorable input for both reciprocation single-file systems, inasmuch as they showed an improved control of apically extruded debris. Apical extrusion of debris has been studied extensively because of its clinical relevance, particularly since it may cause flare-ups, originated by the introduction of bacteria, pulpal tissue, and irrigating solutions into the periapical tissues.

  11. Reciproc versus Twisted file for root canal filling removal: assessment of apically extruded debris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunbas, Demet; Kutuk, Betul; Toyoglu, Mustafa; Kutlu, Gizem; Kustarci, Alper; Er, Kursat

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the amount of apically extruded debris during endodontic retreatment with different file systems. Sixty extracted human mandibular premolar teeth were used in this study. Root canals of the teeth were instrumented and filled before being randomly assigned to three groups. Guttapercha was removed using the Reciproc system, the Twisted File system (TF), and Hedström-files (H-file). Apically extruded debris was collected and dried in pre-weighed Eppendorf tubes. The amount of extruded debris was assessed with an electronic balance. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann-Whitney U tests. The Reciproc and TF systems extruded significantly less debris than the H-file (p<0.05). However, no significant difference was found between the Reciproc and TF systems. All tested file systems caused apical extrusion of debris. Both the rotary file (TF) and the reciprocating single-file (Reciproc) systems were associated with less apical extrusion compared with the H-file.

  12. Evaluation of apically extruded debris and irrigant using different file systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kütük, B; Akpınar, K E; Altunbaş, D

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the amount of apically extruded debris and irrigant during cleaning and shaping with different file systems. Seventy-five extracted mandibular premolar and canine teeth were randomly divided into five groups (n = 15). The root canals were instrumented by using Mtwo (VDW, Munich, Germany), Twisted File (TF; Sybron Endo, Orange, California, USA), Reciproc (VDW), Self-Adjusting File (SAF; Re Dent-Nova, Ra'anana, Israel) systems, and K-type stainless steel hand file (Mani Inc., Tochigi, Japan). Apically extruded debris was collected and dried in preweighed Eppendorf tubes. Extruded irrigant was collected from the cannula by using a plastic insulin syringe. After drying, the amount of apically extruded debris was established by subtracting the initial weight from the final weight of the tubes. After performing the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, data were analyzed by Kruskall-Wallis test at a significance level of P value less than 0.05. There were no statistically significant differences between the file systems in terms of debris and irrigant extrusion. Mtwo group produced the highest mean debris extrusion value and the TF group produced the less compared with the other files. The least mean irrigant extrusion value was associated with the SAF group, whereas the highest mean irrigant extrusion value was associated with the Reciproc group. Under the conditions of the study, all file systems were associated with apical debris and irrigant extrusion.

  13. Absorbable Suture as an Apical Matrix in Single Visit Apexification with Mineral Trioxide Aggregate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayush Goyal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Several procedures have been recommended to induce the root end barrier formation in teeth with open apices. Conventional treatment for such cases will require many appointments with an average duration of 12.9 months. During this period, the root canal is susceptible to reinfection from around the provisional restoration, which may promote apical periodontitis and arrest of apical repair. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA has been successfully used for one visit apexification wherein the root canal can be obturated within 24 hours after placement of MTA. Using a matrix prior to the placement of MTA avoids its extrusion, reduces leakage in the sealing material, and allows favorable response of the periapical tissues. This report presents a case of apexification where an absorbable suture was used as an apical matrix. Use of an absorbable suture circumvents all the problems associated with other conventional materials. Conclusion. Placement of the matrix made from the suture material is predictable and is easily positioned at the apex and the length can be adjusted as required. 10-month follow-up of the case shows resorbed matrix and bone healing in the periapical region. The patient was asymptomatic during the whole follow-up period and tooth exhibited mobility within physiologic limits and was functioning normally.

  14. Single Versus Multi-visit Endodontic Treatment of Teeth with Apical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    [3] Treatment of AP aims at the removal of cause, i.e., bacteria present in the canal. Single Versus Multi-visit Endodontic Treatment of. Teeth with Apical Periodontitis: An In vivo ... periapical healing of teeth with AP treated in (a) single visit versus (b) two visits, either with or .... The canal was left empty, and access cavity was.

  15. Comparative evaluation of total RNA extraction methods in Theobroma cacao using shoot apical meristems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, D V; Branco, S M J; Holanda, I S A; Royaert, S; Motamayor, J C; Marelli, J P; Corrêa, R X

    2016-03-04

    Theobroma cacao is a species of great economic importance with its beans used for chocolate production. The tree has been a target of various molecular studies. It contains many polyphenols, which complicate the extraction of nucleic acids with the extraction protocols requiring a large amount of plant material. These issues, therefore, necessitate the optimization of the protocols. The aim of the present study was to evaluate different methods for extraction of total RNA from shoot apical meristems of T. cacao 'CCN 51' and to assess the influence of storage conditions for the meristems on the extraction. The study also aimed to identify the most efficient protocol for RNA extraction using a small amount of plant material. Four different protocols were evaluated for RNA extraction using one shoot apical meristem per sample. Among these protocols, one that was more efficient was then tested to extract RNA using four different numbers of shoot apical meristems, subjected to three different storage conditions. The best protocol was tested for cDNA amplification using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction; the cDNA quality was determined to be satisfactory for molecular analyses. The study revealed that with the best RNA extraction protocol, one shoot apical meristem was sufficient for extraction of high-quality total RNA. The results obtained might enable advances in genetic analyses and molecular studies using reduced amount of plant material.

  16. Transmission electron microscopy of apical cells of Sphacelaria spp. (Sphacelariales, Phaeophyceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prud’homme van Reine, W.F.; Star, W.

    1981-01-01

    The ultrastructure of apical cells of six species of Sphacelaria (S. arctica, S. cirrosa, S. nana, S. racemosa, S. radicans, and S. rigidula) is studied here. In most details such as ultrastructure of chloroplasts, mitochondria, microbodies, nuclei and centrioles all Sphacelaria species studied are

  17. Single Versus Multi‑visit Endodontic Treatment of Teeth with Apical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Apical periodontitis (AP) is one of the most prevalent diseases of the teeth. Treatment of AP is based on the removal of the cause, i.e., bacteria from the root canals. Achievement of adequate bacterial eradication in one appointment treatment remains a controversy. Aim: This prospective study was conducted ...

  18. Deep-apical tubules: dynamic lipid-raft microdomains in the brush-border region of enterocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert H; Pedersen, Jens; Niels-Christiansen, Lise-Lotte

    2003-01-01

    microdomains. Deep-apical tubules were positioned close to the actin rootlets of adjacent microvilli in the terminal web region, which had a diameter of 50-100 nm, and penetrated up to 1 microm into the cytoplasm. Markers for transcytosis, IgA and the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, as well as the resident...... lipid raft-containing compartments, but little is otherwise known about these raft microdomains. We therefore studied in closer detail apical lipid-raft compartments in enterocytes by immunogold electron microscopy and biochemical analyses. Novel membrane structures, deep-apical tubules, were visualized...... brush-border enzyme aminopeptidase N, were present in these deep-apical tubules. We propose that deep-apical tubules are a specialized lipid-raft microdomain in the brush-border region functioning as a hub in membrane trafficking at the brush border. In addition, the sensitivity to cholesterol depletion...

  19. Wizard CD Plus and ProTaper Universal: analysis of apical transportation using new software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannastasio, Daiana; Rosa, Ricardo Abreu da; Peres, Bernardo Urbanetto; Barreto, Mirela Sangoi; Dotto, Gustavo Nogara; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; Só, Marcus Vinícius Reis

    2013-01-01

    This study has two aims: 1) to evaluate the apical transportation of the Wizard CD Plus and ProTaper Universal after preparation of simulated root canals; 2) to compare, with Adobe Photoshop, the ability of a new software (Regeemy) in superposing and subtracting images. Twenty five simulated root canals in acrylic-resin blocks (with 20º curvature) underwent cone beam computed tomography before and after preparation with the rotary systems (70 kVp, 4 mA, 10 s and with the 8×8 cm FoV selection). Canals were prepared up to F2 (ProTaper) and 24.04 (Wizard CD Plus) instruments and the working length was established to 15 mm. The tomographic images were imported into iCAT Vision software and CorelDraw for standardization. The superposition of pre- and post-instrumentation images from both systems was performed using Regeemy and Adobe Photoshop. The apical transportation was measured in millimetres using Image J. Five acrylic resin blocks were used to validate the superposition achieved by the software. Student's t-test for independent samples was used to evaluate the apical transportation achieved by the rotary systems using each software individually. Student's t-test for paired samples was used to compare the ability of each software in superposing and subtracting images from one rotary system per time. The values obtained with Regeemy and Adobe Photoshop were similar to rotary systems (P>0.05). ProTaper Universal and Wizard CD Plus promoted similar apical transportation regardless of the software used for image's superposition and subtraction (P>0.05). Wizard CD Plus and ProTaper Universal promoted little apical transportation. Regeemy consists in a feasible software to superpose and subtract images and appears to be an alternative to Adobe Photoshop.

  20. Wizard CD Plus and ProTaper Universal: analysis of apical transportation using new software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiana Giannastasio

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study has two aims: 1 to evaluate the apical transportation of the Wizard CD Plus and ProTaper Universal after preparation of simulated root canals; 2 to compare, with Adobe Photoshop, the ability of a new software (Regeemy in superposing and subtracting images. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty five simulated root canals in acrylic-resin blocks (with 20º curvature underwent cone beam computed tomography before and after preparation with the rotary systems (70 kVp, 4 mA, 10 s and with the 8×8 cm FoV selection. Canals were prepared up to F2 (ProTaper and 24.04 (Wizard CD Plus instruments and the working length was established to 15 mm. The tomographic images were imported into iCAT Vision software and CorelDraw for standardization. The superposition of pre- and post-instrumentation images from both systems was performed using Regeemy and Adobe Photoshop. The apical transportation was measured in millimetres using Image J. Five acrylic resin blocks were used to validate the superposition achieved by the software. Student's t-test for independent samples was used to evaluate the apical transportation achieved by the rotary systems using each software individually. Student's t-test for paired samples was used to compare the ability of each software in superposing and subtracting images from one rotary system per time. RESULTS: The values obtained with Regeemy and Adobe Photoshop were similar to rotary systems (P>0.05. ProTaper Universal and Wizard CD Plus promoted similar apical transportation regardless of the software used for image's superposition and subtraction (P>0.05. CONCLUSION: Wizard CD Plus and ProTaper Universal promoted little apical transportation. Regeemy consists in a feasible software to superpose and subtract images and appears to be an alternative to Adobe Photoshop.

  1. CASE OF DIAGNOSIS OF APICAL FORM OF HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY WITH A PATIENT WITH PROGRESSIVE ANGINA CLINIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Krylova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective of work: to describe the apical form of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (AFHC developing under the "mask" of the ischemic heart disease not diagnosed for a long period.Materials and methods. Patient B., 73 y.o., female, was brought to the cardiology department with complains of severe pressing pain behind the breastbone caused with no apparent reason and lasting for over 4 hours. The following examination of the patient was performed: electrocardiography (ECG, echocardiography (EchoCG, Holter ECG monitoring, coronary angiography (CAG, ventriculography.Results. The final diagnosis for the patient was set on the basis of the following readings: ECG data (basic rhythm – atrial fibrillation, left ventricle (LV hypertrophy, negative T-waves in leads V1–6, ST segment depression up to 1–2 mm in leads V4–6, EchoCG (hypertrophy of apical segments of the LV with decreasing of its cavity, moderate dilatation of the left atrium, intraventricular obstruction in the apical third of the LV with the maximum pressure gradient of up to 48 mm Hg., CAG (stenotic lesions of coronary arteries were found, ventriculography (LV volume is not increased, no violations of local contractility, narrowing of the LV cavity in the lower third is observed with thinning in the apex, which indicatesexpressed apical hypertrophy of the LV myocard. AFHC, apical form with moderate obstruction in the lower third of the left ventricle. Stress angina syndrome. CAG and ventriculography were main diagnostic methods that allowed setting the final diagnosis.Conclusion. The clinical case sets forth the peculiarities of diagnostics, therapy, and post-therapy management of patients with this form of AFHC.

  2. DHT deficiency perturbs the integrity of the rat seminiferous epithelium by disrupting tight and adherens junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Wiszniewska

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In rats with a DHT deficiency induced by finasteride, morphological changes in the seminiferous epithelium were observed. The structural alterations were manifested by the premature germ cells sloughing into the lumen of seminiferous tubules. The etiology of this disorder could be connected with intercellular junctions disintegration. We showed in the immunohistochemical study the changes in expression of some proteins building tight and adherens junctions. The depression of N-cadherin, β-catenin and occludin immunoexpressions could be the reason for the release of immature germ cells from the seminiferous epithelium. However, the observed increase of the immunohistochemical reaction intensity of vinculin, one of the cadherin/catenin complex regulators, could be insufficient to maintain the proper function of adherens junctions. The hormonal imbalance appears to influence the pattern of expression of junctional proteins in the seminiferous epithelium. It could lead to untimely germ cells sloughing, and ultimately could impair fertility. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011, Vol. 49, No. 1, 62–71

  3. Junctional transfer in cultured vascular endothelium: II. Dye and nucleotide transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, D.M.; Sheridan, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cultures, derived from large vessels, retain many of the characteristics of their in vivo counterparts. However, the observed reduction in size and complexity of intercellular gap and tight junctions in these cultured cells suggests that important functions, thought to be mediated by these structures, may be altered in vitro. In continuing studies on intercellular communication in vessel wall cells, the authors have quantitated the extent of junctional transfer of small molecular tracers (the fluorescent dye Lucifer Yellow CH and tritiated uridine nucleotides) in confluent cultures of calf aortic (BAEC) and umbilical vein (BVEC) endothelium. Both BAEC and BVEC show extensive (and quantitatively equivalent) dye and nucleotide transfer. As an analogue of intimal endothelium, the authors have also tested dye transfer in freshly isolated sheets of endothelium. Transfer in BAEC and BVEC sheets was more rapid, extensive and homogeneous than in the cultured cells, implying a reduction in molecular coupling as endothelium adapts to culture conditions. In addition, they have documented heterocellular nucleotide transfer between cultured endothelium and vascular smooth muscle cells, of particular interest considering the prevalence of ''myo-endothelial'' junctions in vivo. These data yield further information on junctional transfer in cultured vascular endothelium and have broad implications for the functional integration of the vessel wall in the physiology and pathophysiology of the vasculature

  4. A quantitative structural and morphometric analysis of the Purkinje network and the Purkinje-myocardial junctions in pig hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Bustos, V; Sebastian, R; Izquierdo, M; Molina, P; Chorro, F J; Ruiz-Sauri, A

    2017-05-01

    The morpho-functional properties of the distal section of the cardiac Purkinje network (PN) and the Purkinje-myocardial junctions (PMJs) are fundamental to understanding the sequence of electrical activation in the heart. The overall structure of the system has already been described, and several computational models have been developed to gain insight into its involvement in cardiac arrhythmias or its interaction with implantable devices, such as pacemakers. However, anatomical descriptions of the PN in the literature have not enabled enough improvements in the accuracy of anatomical-based electrophysiological simulations of the PN in 3D hearts models. In this work, we study the global distribution and morphological properties of the PN, with special emphasis on the cellular and architectural characterization of its intramural branching structure, mesh-like sub-endocardial network, and the PMJs in adult pig hearts by both histopathological and morphometric evaluation. We have defined three main patterns of PMJ: contact through cell bodies, contact through cell prolongations either thick or piliform, and contact through transitional cells. Moreover, from hundreds of micrographs, we quantified the density of PMJs and provided data for the basal/medial/apical regions, anterior/posterior/septal/lateral regions and myocardial/sub-endocardial distribution. Morphometric variables, such as Purkinje cell density and thickness of the bundles, were also analyzed. After combining the results of these parameters, a different septoanterior distribution in the Purkinje cell density was observed towards the cardiac apex, which is associated with a progressive thinning of the conduction bundles and the posterolateral ascension of intramyocardial terminal scattered fibers. The study of the PMJs revealed a decreasing trend towards the base that may anatomically explain the early apical activation. The anterolateral region contains the greatest number of contacts, followed by the

  5. Fast, clash-free RNA conformational morphing using molecular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héliou, Amélie; Budday, Dominik; Fonseca, Rasmus; van den Bedem, Henry

    2017-07-15

    Non-coding ribonucleic acids (ncRNA) are functional RNA molecules that are not translated into protein. They are extremely dynamic, adopting diverse conformational substates, which enables them to modulate their interaction with a large number of other molecules. The flexibility of ncRNA provides a challenge for probing their complex 3D conformational landscape, both experimentally and computationally. Despite their conformational diversity, ncRNAs mostly preserve their secondary structure throughout the dynamic ensemble. Here we present a kinematics-based procedure to morph an RNA molecule between conformational substates, while avoiding inter-atomic clashes. We represent an RNA as a kinematic linkage, with fixed groups of atoms as rigid bodies and rotatable bonds as degrees of freedom. Our procedure maintains RNA secondary structure by treating hydrogen bonds between base pairs as constraints. The constraints define a lower-dimensional, secondary-structure constraint manifold in conformation space, where motions are largely governed by molecular junctions of unpaired nucleotides. On a large benchmark set, we show that our morphing procedure compares favorably to peer algorithms, and can approach goal conformations to within a low all-atom RMSD by directing fewer than 1% of its atoms. Our results suggest that molecular junctions can modulate 3D structural rearrangements, while secondary structure elements guide large parts of the molecule along the transition to the correct final conformation. The source code, binaries and data are available at https://simtk.org/home/kgs . amelie.heliou@polytechnique.edu or vdbedem@stanford.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  6. Coulomb blockade in turnstile with multiple tunnel junctions

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, S C; Kang, D S; Kim, D C; Choi, C K; Ryu, J Y

    1999-01-01

    On the basis of the analytic solutions to the electrostatic problem of the multi-grated-small-junction systems, the stable domain for the Coulomb blockade of turnstile with multiple tunnel junctions at zero temperature has been analyzed as a function of the number of tunnel junction, the ratio of the gate capacitance to the junction capacitance, and the asymmetric factor. Our results show that domains form various shaped regions according to the asymmetric factor and their size depends on the number of junction and the ratio of the gate capacitance to the junction capacitance. In particular, it is shown that electrons can be transferred in positive and/or negative bias voltage depending on the asymmetric factor when an appropriate gate cycle is applied. Thus, the asymmetric factor plays an important role in determining the turnstile operation.

  7. Single P-N junction tandem photovoltaic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw [Kensington, CA; Ager, III, Joel W.; Yu, Kin Man [Lafayette, CA

    2011-10-18

    A single P-N junction solar cell is provided having two depletion regions for charge separation while allowing the electrons and holes to recombine such that the voltages associated with both depletion regions of the solar cell will add together. The single p-n junction solar cell includes an alloy of either InGaN or InAlN formed on one side of the P-N junction with Si formed on the other side in order to produce characteristics of a two junction (2J) tandem solar cell through only a single P-N junction. A single P-N junction solar cell having tandem solar cell characteristics will achieve power conversion efficiencies exceeding 30%.

  8. Apical extrusion of sodium hypochlorite using different root canal irrigation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Ross P; Baumgartner, J Craig; Sedgley, Christine M

    2011-12-01

    Root canal irrigation carries a risk of extrusion of irrigant into the periapical tissues. The objective of this study was to compare different irrigation systems in matched pairs of teeth prepared to an apical size of 35.06 and 50.06 by measuring the frequency and extent of apical extrusion of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) into a simulated periapical environment. The null hypothesis was tested that there is no difference between systems. Bilaterally matched pairs (n = 10) of single-canal extracted human anterior teeth were instrumented to an apical size of either 35.06 or 50.06. Teeth were embedded in a gel containing the pH-sensitive dye M-cresol purple that changes from yellow at pH 7.4 to purple at pH 9. Root canals were irrigated with 6% NaOCl (pH 11) by using EndoActivator (EA), EndoVac (EV), Rispi-Sonic/MicroMega 1500 (MM), passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI), and syringe irrigation with a slot-tipped needle (SN), so that each tooth underwent all irrigation procedures in a randomized crossover design. Apical extrusion was evaluated by image analyses. The frequency of extrusion was less in teeth with apical preparation size 35.06 (36%) compared with 50.06 (60%) (P = .014) and was dependent on the irrigation system in 35.06 (P = .039) but not 50.06 groups. In the 35.06 group the frequency of extrusion was less for EV than for MM and SN (both P = .029). The extent of extrusion was less for MM compared with PUI (P = .024) and SN (P = .046) in the 35.06 group and greater for SN compared with all other systems in the 50.06 group (P root canal irrigation system and apical preparation size. The extent of extrusion depended on the irrigation system, with syringe and slotted-needle irrigation resulting in the greatest extent of extrusion. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Clinical characteristics and speech therapy of lingua-apical articulation disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng-hua; Jin, Xing-ming; Zhang, Yi-wen; Wu, Hong; Jiang, Fan; Shen, Xiao-ming

    2006-03-01

    To explore the clinical characteristics and speech therapy of 62 children with lingua-apical articulation disorder. Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT), Gesell development scales (Gesell), Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Preschool Children (WPPSI) and speech test were performed for 62 children at the ages of 3 to 8 years with lingua-apical articulation disorder. PPVT was used to measure receptive vocabulary skills. GESELL and WPPSI were utilized to represent cognitive and non-verbal ability. The speech test was adopted to assess the speech development. The children received speech therapy and auxiliary oral-motor functional training once or twice a week. Firstly the target sound was identified according to the speech development milestone, then the method of speech localization was used to clarify the correct articulation placement and manner. It was needed to change food character and administer oral-motor functional training for children with oral motor dysfunction. The 62 cases with the apical articulation disorder were classified into four groups. The combined pattern of the articulation disorder was the most common (40 cases, 64.5%), the next was apico-dental disorder (15 cases, 24.2%). The third was palatal disorder (4 cases, 6.5%) and the last one was the linguo-alveolar disorder (3 cases, 4.8%). The substitution errors of velar were the most common (95.2%), the next was omission errors (30.6%) and the last was absence of aspiration (12.9%). Oral motor dysfunction was found in some children with problems such as disordered joint movement of tongue and head, unstable jaw, weak tongue strength and poor coordination of tongue movement. Some children had feeding problems such as preference of eating soft food, keeping food in mouths, eating slowly, and poor chewing. After 5 to 18 times of therapy, the effective rate of speech therapy reached 82.3%. The lingua-apical articulation disorders can be classified into four groups. The combined pattern of the

  10. Spectral Flow in Josephson Junctions and Effective Magnus Force

    OpenAIRE

    Makhlin, Yu. G.; Volovik, G. E.

    1995-01-01

    Momentum production during the phase slip process in SNS Josephson junction is discussed. It is caused by the spectral flow of bound states of fermions localized within the junction. This effectively reduces the Magnus force acting on vortices which provides an explanation for the experimental observation of the negligible Magnus force in 2D Josephson junction arrays. The flow of the fermionic levels is similar to that in sphalerons in particle physics, where it gives rise to the baryogenesis.

  11. Magnetic interaction between spatially extended superconducting tunnel junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbech-Jensen, Niels; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm

    2002-01-01

    A general description of magnetic interactions between superconducting tunnel junctions is given. The description covers a wide range of possible experimental systems, and we explicitly explore two experimentally relevant limits of coupled junctions. One is the limit of junctions with tunneling...... been considered through arrays of superconducting weak links based on semiconductor quantum wells with superconducting electrodes. We use the model to make direct interpretations of the published experiments and thereby propose that long-range magnetic interactions are responsible for the reported...

  12. Shottky-barrier formation. Abrupt metal-semiconductor junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guines, F.; Sanchez-Dehesa, J.; Flores, F.

    1983-02-01

    In this paper a realistic self-consistent calculation of an abrupt metal-semiconductor junction is presented by means of a tight-binding approach. A specific Si-Ag junction has been considered, and the charge neutrality level as well as the barrier height have been determined in good agreement with experiments. For a general junction it is shown that the interface properties depend essentially on the characteristics of the first metal layer and its interaction with the semiconductor.

  13. Deviations of Mesial Root Canals of Mandibular First Molar Teeth at the Apical Third: A Micro-computed Tomographic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keles, Ali; Keskin, Cangül

    2018-04-19

    The present study aimed to quantitatively analyze apical foramen deviations of mesial root canals of mandibular first molar teeth by means of micro-computed tomographic (micro-CT) imaging. Micro-CT images of the mesial roots of 109 mandibular first molar teeth with independent mesiobuccal (MB) and mesiolingual (ML) root canals were analyzed. The deviations of the apical foramina of the MB, ML, and middle mesial root canals from the anatomic apex were measured. The vertical distance between the apical foramina of each mesial root canal in relation to each other was also calculated. The distances from the apical foramina of the MB, ML, and middle mesial root canals to the anatomic apex of the mesial root were up to 2.51 mm, 3.21 mm, and 5.67 mm, respectively. There was no significant difference between the deviations of MB and ML root canals from each other (P > .05). The middle mesial root canal showed the greatest deviation compared with the MB and ML canals (P < .05). The apical foramina of mesial root canals of mandibular first molar teeth showed greater variations from each other and anatomic apices than previously reported. Clinically, the use of electronic apex locators for the detection of minor apical foramen of each mesial root canal is of the utmost important. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Adenovirus Entry From the Apical Surface of Polarized Epithelia Is Facilitated by the Host Innate Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotha, Poornima L. N.; Sharma, Priyanka; Kolawole, Abimbola O.; Yan, Ran; Alghamri, Mahmoud S.; Brockman, Trisha L.; Gomez-Cambronero, Julian; Excoffon, Katherine J. D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Prevention of viral-induced respiratory disease begins with an understanding of the factors that increase or decrease susceptibility to viral infection. The primary receptor for most adenoviruses is the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR), a cell-cell adhesion protein normally localized at the basolateral surface of polarized epithelia and involved in neutrophil transepithelial migration. Recently, an alternate isoform of CAR, CAREx8, has been identified at the apical surface of polarized airway epithelia and is implicated in viral infection from the apical surface. We hypothesized that the endogenous role of CAREx8 may be to facilitate host innate immunity. We show that IL-8, a proinflammatory cytokine and a neutrophil chemoattractant, stimulates the protein expression and apical localization of CAREx8 via activation of AKT/S6K and inhibition of GSK3β. Apical CAREx8 tethers infiltrating neutrophils at the apical surface of a polarized epithelium. Moreover, neutrophils present on the apical-epithelial surface enhance adenovirus entry into the epithelium. These findings suggest that adenovirus evolved to co-opt an innate immune response pathway that stimulates the expression of its primary receptor, apical CAREx8, to allow the initial infection the intact epithelium. In addition, CAREx8 is a new target for the development of novel therapeutics for both respiratory inflammatory disease and adenoviral infection. PMID:25768646

  15. Obesity-induces Organ and Tissue Specific Tight Junction Restructuring and Barrier Deregulation by Claudin Switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Rizwan; Rah, Bilal; Bastola, Dhundy; Dhawan, Punita; Singh, Amar B

    2017-07-11

    Obesity increases susceptibility to multiple organ disorders, however, underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The subclinical inflammation assisted by obesity-induced gut permeability may underlie obesity-associated co-morbidities. Despite eminent clinical significance of the obesity led gut barrier abnormalities, its precise molecular regulation remains unclear. It is also unknown whether barrier deregulations, similar to the gut, characterize other vital organs in obese individuals. The claudin family of proteins is integral to the tight junction (TJ), the apical cell-cell adhesion and a key regulator of the epithelial barrier. Using comprehensive physiological and biochemical analysis of intestinal and renal tissues from high-fat diet fed mice, critical for maintaining metabolic homeostasis, this study demonstrates that profound TJ-restructuring by organ and tissue-specific claudin switching characterize obese organs. Protein expression and cellular distribution were examined. In-silico analysis further highlighted potential association of select claudins, modulated by the obesity, with signaling and metabolic pathways of pathological significance. In vitro studies using Leptin or DCA-treatment suggested causal significance of obesity-induced changes in tissue microenvironment in regulating barrier deregulations in tissue-specific manner. Overall, current findings advances our understanding of the molecular undertakings of obesity associated changes that help predispose to specific diseases and also identifies novel windows of preventive and/or therapeutic interventions.

  16. ADAM10 Is Involved in Cell Junction Assembly in Early Porcine Embryo Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongwoo Kwon

    Full Text Available ADAM10 (A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease domain-containing protein 10 is a cell surface protein with a unique structure possessing both potential adhesion and protease domains. However, the role of ADAM10 in preimplantation stage embryos is not clear. In this study, we examined the expression patterns and functional roles of ADAM10 in porcine parthenotes during preimplantation development. The transcription level of ADAM10 dramatically increased from the morula stage onward. Immunostaining revealed that ADAM10 was present in both the nucleus and cytoplasm in early cleavage stage embryos, and localized to the apical region of the outer cells in morula and blastocyst embryos. Knockdown (KD of ADAM10 using double strand RNA did not alter preimplantation embryo development until morula stage, but resulted in significantly reduced development to blastocyst stage. Moreover, the KD blastocyst showed a decrease in gene expression of adherens and tight junction (AJ/TJ, and an increase in trophectoderm TJ permeability by disrupting TJ assembly. Treatment with an ADAM10 specific chemical inhibitor, GI254023X, at the morula stage also inhibited blastocyst development and led to disruption of TJ assembly. An in situ proximity ligation assay demonstrated direct interaction of ADAM10 with coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CXADR, supporting the involvement of ADAM10 in TJ assembly. In conclusion, our findings strongly suggest that ADADM10 is important for blastocyst formation rather than compaction, particularly for TJ assembly and stabilization in preimplantation porcine parthenogenetic development.

  17. Some chaotic features of intrinsically coupled Josephson junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolahchi, M.R.; Shukrinov, Yu.M.; Hamdipour, M.; Botha, A.E.; Suzuki, M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Intrinsically coupled Josephson junctions model a high-T c superconductor. ► Intrinsically coupled Josephson junctions can act as a chaotic nonlinear system. ► Chaos could be due to resonance overlap. ► Avoiding parameters that lead to chaos is important for the design of resonators. -- Abstract: We look for chaos in an intrinsically coupled system of Josephson junctions. This study has direct applications for the high-T c resonators which require coherence amongst the junctions

  18. Towards field theory in spaces with multivolume junctions

    CERN Document Server

    Fomin, P I

    2002-01-01

    We consider a spacetime formed by several pieces with common timelike boundary which plays the role of a junction between them. We establish junction conditions for fields of various spins and derive the resulting laws of wave propagation through the junction, which turn out to be quite similar for fields of all spins. As an application, we consider the case of multivolume junctions in four-dimensional spacetime that may arise in the context of the theory of quantum creation of a closed universe on the background of a big mother universe. The theory developed can also be applied to braneworld models and to the superstring theory.

  19. ‘Gap Junctions and Cancer: Communicating for 50 Years’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasen, Trond; Mesnil, Marc; Naus, Christian C.; Lampe, Paul D.; Laird, Dale W.

    2017-01-01

    Fifty years ago, tumour cells were found to lack electrical coupling, leading to the hypothesis that loss of direct intercellular communication is commonly associated with cancer onset and progression. Subsequent studies linked this phenomenon to gap junctions composed of connexin proteins. While many studies support the notion that connexins are tumour suppressors, recent evidence suggests that, in some tumour types, they may facilitate specific stages of tumour progression through both junctional and non-junctional signalling pathways. This Timeline article highlights the milestones connecting gap junctions to cancer, and underscores important unanswered questions, controversies and therapeutic opportunities in the field. PMID:27782134

  20. Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication and Breast Cancer Metastasis to Bone

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Donahue, Henry

    2001-01-01

    .... We found that: 1) expressing the metastasis suppressing gene BRMS1 in diverse cancer cell lines, including breast and melanoma, restores homotypic gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC); 2...