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Sample records for aortic aneurysm repair

  1. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to become you to our live webcast. Today we’re going to repair an abdominal aortic aneurysm ... and together as a team of multidisciplinary physicians, we’re going to repair an abdominal aortic aneurysm ...

  2. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Aortic Aneurysm Repair May 7, 2009 Good afternoon. Welcome to the Baptist Cardiac and Vascular Institute here in Miami. My name ... our live webcast. Today we’re going to repair an abdominal aortic aneurysm using a technology called ...

  3. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to repair an abdominal aortic aneurysm using a technology called an “endograft,” which is sometimes called the “ ... separate area, and it’s because of this small technology that allows you to do this. Exactly. So ...

  4. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... atherosclerosis, high blood pressure, smokers, or a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysms. Today’s patient is a ... screened. In fact, patients who have a family history of aneurysm, men who are smoking over the ...

  5. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as atherosclerosis, high blood pressure, smokers, or a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysms. Today’s patient is ... be screened. In fact, patients who have a family history of aneurysm, men who are smoking over ...

  6. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the age of 65. It’s most common in males. There is an increasing number, due to the ... The risk factors for abdominal aortic aneurysms are males over 60, hardening of the arteries, which is ...

  7. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... wall will actually thin out. And the big risk here is that if this gets too big ... to the aging baby boomers. Next slide. The risk factors for abdominal aortic aneurysms are males over ...

  8. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this procedure. So let’s go back now and learn a little bit about abdominal aortic aneurysms. Great. ... And one of the things that I’m learning from this movie as we looking at these ...

  9. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to the aging baby boomers. Next slide. The risk factors for abdominal aortic aneurysms are males over 60, ... doing a good examination and also accessing for risk factors. So we have a very integrated team here, ...

  10. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this is to prevent rupture and to prevent death from rupture. This area just underneath the renal ... Okay. Abdominal aortic aneurysms cause approximately 15,000 deaths in the United States each year. It affects ...

  11. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an abdominal aortic aneurysm. Normally this procedure takes us about 45 minutes to an hour of doctor work time, which is, I think, a fairly quick procedure to replace a major life-threatening problem in the patient’s abdomen. So you can see ...

  12. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rua, and together as a team of multidisciplinary physicians, we’re going to repair an abdominal aortic ... takes a special type of training. Both the doctors in the room are board certified and highly ...

  13. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for the past three years, and his aneurysm has now grown to 5.4 centimeters. And this ... that in this particular patient that the aneurysm has reached the size where risk of rupture when ...

  14. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is actually an important factor. Most aneurysms we treat conservatively and we’ll just watch them. But ... has to be, and we generally don’t treat aneurysms until they get to be 5 to ...

  15. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... screened. In fact, patients who have a family history of aneurysm, men who are smoking over the age of 55 should be screened for aneurysms. And the way to screen is with a simple ultrasound. But sometimes a ...

  16. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... And one of the things that I’m learning from this movie as we looking at these ... screened. In fact, patients who have a family history of aneurysm, men who are smoking over the ...

  17. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with such holes in the groin, this really offers the patient a tremendous advantage over having his ... a thousand aneurysms with this. So we can offer patients a very, very good integrated care with ...

  18. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... moving inside in the aneurysm sack with the spine projected in the background. So how long have ... have a much more rapid recovery than open surgery. What do you think about that, Ignacio, compared ...

  19. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... years, and his aneurysm has now grown to 5.4 centimeters. And this is actually an important ... balloon is trying to iron out the attachment. 5 So right now we have the first half ...

  20. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... been following in the institute for the past three years, and his aneurysm has now grown to ... may get for other reasons, but we use three-dimensional reconstruction and we can reconstruct all the ...

  1. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... They carry oxygen and blood to various organs. These arteries have muscular walls, and when they get ... continue to expand, and they can rupture. And these aneurysms can occur in a lot of different ...

  2. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... dye and also to do measurements using our computer techniques that are going on here. So what ... screened. In fact, patients who have a family history of aneurysm, men who are smoking over the ...

  3. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to do now is begin to do the process of putting an endograft in, and I’m ... that we saw, actually thrombosis. So in the process of thrombosing or clotting off the aneurysm sack, ...

  4. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... information is critical for us in terms of planning and guiding the procedure we’re going to ... be screened. In fact, patients who have a family history of aneurysm, men who are smoking over ...

  5. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... past three years, and his aneurysm has now grown to 5.4 centimeters. And this is actually ... that looks like kind of railroad tracks going up and down, that’s the catheter that we’re ...

  6. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for all of you listening, you can ask online. Just click the “Ask a question” button, and ... aneurysm. Please feel free to ask any questions online. Just click “Ask a question,” and they’ll ...

  7. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... racquet-like device whether or not there is flow in this sack after we replace in aneurysm. ... space age. That’s fine. Don’t go too high. Pull it down a little bit. Pull that ...

  8. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an interventional radiologist. That’s a specialty many people haven’t heard of, but that’s a specialty that ... in that patient’s abdominal sack. Now remember we haven’t treated his aneurysm. We’re sort of ...

  9. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an aneurysm, it’s important that you ask your doctor about your options. As I said, about 80 percent of the patients we treat end up -- 80 or 90 percent these days, end up being good candidates for this type of therapy. We would encourage you to seek the least ...

  10. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... microchip that acts a little bit like a cell phone technology. We’ll show you how that works. But this is the device that we’re going to put in that space between the endograft and the patient to the wall of the aneurysm. So in that space where ...

  11. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the arteries, which is known as atherosclerosis, high blood pressure, smokers, or a family history of abdominal aortic ... imaging. We can integrate ultrasound imaging, the patient’s blood pressure, and so it’s a little bit like being ...

  12. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this is Dr. Rua, and together as a team of multidisciplinary physicians, we’re going to repair ... Institute is we have a highly- integrated multidisciplinary team; Dr. Rua and I being an example. There ...

  13. Outcomes After Elective Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de la Motte, L; Jensen, L P; Vogt, K;

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess outcomes after treatment for asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in Denmark in a period when both open surgery (OR) and endoluminal repair (EVAR) have been routine procedures. METHODS: We performed a retrospective nationwide cohort study of patients treated for asymp...

  14. Endovascular repair of aortic aneurysm: Preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davidović Lazar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR has been introduced into clinical practice at the beginning of the 90's of the last century. Because of economic, political and social problems during the last 25 years, the introduction of this procedure in Serbia was not possible. Objective. The aim of this study was to present preliminary experiences and results of the Clinic for Vascular Surgery of the Serbian Clinical Centre in Belgrade in endovascular treatment of thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms. Methods. The procedure was performed in 33 patients (3 female and 30 male, aged from 42 to 83 years. Ten patients had a descending thoracic aorta aneurysm (three atherosclerotic, four traumatic - three chronic and one acute as a part of polytrauma, one dissected, two penetrated atherosclerotic ulcers, while 23 patients had the abdominal aortic aneurysm, one ruptured and two isolated iliac artery aneurysms. The indications for EVAR were isthmic aneurismal localisation, aged over 80 years and associated comorbidity (cardiac, pulmonary and cerebrovasular diseases, previous thoracotomy or multiple laparotomies associated with abdominal infection, idiopatic thrombocitopaenia. All of these patients had three or more risk factors. The diagnosis was established using duplex ultrasonography, angiography and MSCT. In the case of thoracic aneurysm, a Medtronic-Valiant® endovascular stent graft was implanted, while for the abdominal aortic aneurysm Medtronic-Talent® endovascular stent grafts with delivery systems were used. In three patients, following EVAR a surgical repair of the femoral artery aneurysm was performed, and in another three patients femoro-femoral cross over bypass followed implantation of aortouniiliac stent graft. Results. During procedure and follow-up period (mean 1.6 years, there were: one death, one conversion, one endoleak type 1, six patients with endoleak type 2 that disappeared during the follow-up period, one early graft

  15. Open surgical repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm: Proximal aortic control by endoaortic balloon - A novel approach

    OpenAIRE

    Balakrishnan Soundaravalli; Palaniappan, M.; Rajani Sundar; Chandrasekar, P.

    2012-01-01

    Patients with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm with unfavorable anatomy for endovascular aneurysm repair have to undergo open surgical repair. Open surgery has its own morbidity in terms of proximal clamping and declamping, bleeding and prolonged hospital stay and mortality. We present two such patients with juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm who underwent open surgical repair. The proximal aortic control during open surgical repair of the aneurysm was achieved by endoaortic balloon occ...

  16. Open surgical repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm: Proximal aortic control by endoaortic balloon - A novel approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balakrishnan Soundaravalli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm with unfavorable anatomy for endovascular aneurysm repair have to undergo open surgical repair. Open surgery has its own morbidity in terms of proximal clamping and declamping, bleeding and prolonged hospital stay and mortality. We present two such patients with juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm who underwent open surgical repair. The proximal aortic control during open surgical repair of the aneurysm was achieved by endoaortic balloon occlusion technique.

  17. Open Versus Endovascular Stent Graft Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Firwana, Belal; Ferwana, Mazen; Hasan, Rim; Alpert, Martin A; Faries, Peter; Dangas, George; Gluud, Christian

    2014-01-01

    We performed an analysis to assess the need for conducting additional randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing open and endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Trial sequential analysis (TSA) is a statistical methodology that can calculate the required inform...

  18. Chylous Ascites after Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohki, Shinichi; Kurumisawa, Soki; Misawa, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    A 73-year-old man was transferred for treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm. He had no history of abdominal surgeries. Grafting between the infra-renal abdominal aorta and the bilateral common iliac arteries was performed. Proximal and distal cross clamps were applied for grafting. He developed chylous ascites on the 5th post-operative day, 2 days after initiation of oral intake. Fortunately, he responded to treatment with total parenteral hyper-alimentation for 10 days, followed by a low-fat diet. There was no recurrence of ascites. PMID:27087873

  19. Perioperative management of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To summarize the clinical experience of perioperative management in performing endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). Methods: EVAR was performed in 22 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm. The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. Before treatment the functions of main organs were evaluated and certain measures were adopted in order to protect them. Useful parameters, including the length, diameter, angle and configuration of the proximal and distal aneurysmal neck, the relationship of the aneurysm to aortic branches, the distance from the lowest renal artery to the bifurcation of abdominal aorta, and the quality of access vessels (such as diameter, tortuosity and calcification degree) were determined and assessed with CTA. According to the parameters thus obtained, the suitable stent-graft with ideal diameter and length was selected, and the optimal surgery pattern was employed. Local anesthesia was employed in 20 patients, among them the local anesthesia had to be changed to general anesthesia in one. Epidural anesthesia was carried out in one patient through the surgically-reconstructed iliac artery access,and general anesthesia was employed in one patient who had Stanford type A aortic dissection. The lowest renal artery must be accurately localized before deployment of stent-graft was started. At least one patent internal iliac artery should be reserved when bilateral internal iliac arteries needed to be covered, to be covered by stages or to be reconstructed. After stent-graft placement, angiography must be performed to find out if there was any endoleak and, if any, to determine the type of endoleak and to deal with it properly. Two cases had proximal type I endoleak, so balloon dilation was employed in one and cuff implantation in another one. Distal type I endoleak occurred in one case, but, unfortunately, the iliac artery ruptured when balloon dilation was employed, therefore the patient had to receive vascular repair

  20. Nursing cooperation in endovascular aneurysm repair treatment for aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To summarize the main points of nursing cooperation in endovascular aneurysm repair treatment for aortic dissection. Methods: Preoperative psychological care and the other preparations were carefully conducted. During the operation, the patient's body was correctly placed. Active cooperation with the performance of angiography and close observation during heparinization were carried out. The proper delivery of catheter and stent to the operator was carefully done. Close observation for the patient's vital signs, the renal function and the changes of limb blood supply were made. Results: Under close cooperation of' the operators, nurses, anesthesiologists and technicians, the surgery was successfully accomplished in 35 patients. The monitoring of vital signs during the entire performance of operation was well executed. No surgical instruments delivery error's or surgery failure due to unsuitable cooperation occurred. Conclusion: Perfect preoperative preparation, strict nursing cooperation and team cooperation are the key points to ensure a successful endovascular aneurysm repair for aortic dissection. (authors)

  1. Use of omental pedicles in mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    OpenAIRE

    Alibhai, M.K.; Samee, A; Ahmed, M.; Duffield, R.

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of a sixty year old man with a mycotic infra-renal abdominal aortic aneurysm complicated by a left psoas abscess. After treatment with parenteral antibiotics he underwent early aortic reconstruction with an in-situ prosthetic graft wrapped in an omental pedicle. Mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysms can be treated in this way despite the potential for graft infection from persisting retroperitoneal sepsis.

  2. Endotension - a cause of failure in endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phenomenon of aortic aneurysm enlargement after endovascular repair without detectable endoleak is called 'endotension'. It is caused by persistent pressurization within the excluded aneurysm sac and may cause subsequent rupture of the aneurysm. We undertake a review of current knowledge about causes, significance and treatment of endotension as a failure in endovascular aortic aneurysm repair. The goal of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair is to prevent aneurysm ruptures by excluding the aneurysms from the aortic circulation. AAA (Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm) after EVAR (Endovascular Aneurysm Repair) can enlarge even in the absence of detectable endoleak because of persistent pressurization within the excluded aneurysm. There are many theories about the mechanism of pressure transmission into the excluded aneurismal sac. Some laboratory and clinical research shows that endotension can be connected with attachment side failure, graft fabrics or aneurysm sac geometry. Pressure transmission by the thrombus, poor outflow, osmotic effect or ultrafiltration are the other possible mechanisms causing this phenomenon. Maximal diameter measurement by CT is considered to be the best management method in patients after EVAR. However, lack of aneurysm sac shrinkage observed in some cases does not mean the presence of endotension. The role of pulsatility inside the excluded aneurysm sac remains unclear. Several possible concepts of endotension treatment have been discussed, including both open surgical convention and nonoperative approach. The absence of endoleak after endovascular repair not always means that there is no pressurization within the aneurysm. Success of endovascular repair can be evaluated indirectly by observation of changes in the diameter of the aneurysm sac after EVAR. Thus, it is essential to follow up patients after endovascular repair in order to detect any late complications including endotension

  3. Risk factors influencing outcome of endovascular abdominol aortic aneurysm repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leurs, Lina Jessica

    2006-01-01

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) is a vascular disorder in which the abdominal aorta becomes permanently dilated to at least 1.5 times its normal diameter. The prevalence of AAA has increased rapidly during the last decade, and aneurysmal rupture is now the 13th most common cause of death in the West

  4. Current state in tracking and robotic navigation systems for application in endovascular aortic aneurysm repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Ruiter, Quirina M B; Moll, Frans L.; Van Herwaarden, Joost A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study reviewed the current developments in manual tracking and robotic navigation technologies for application in endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). Methods EMBASE and MEDLINE databases were searched for studies reporting manual tracking or robotic navigation systems that are

  5. Endovascular vs open repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedeau, April E.; Pomposelli, Frank B.; Hamdan, Allen D.; Wyers, Mark C.; Hsu, Richard; Sachs, Teviah; Siracuse, Jeffrey J.; Schermerhorn, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Endovascular repair (EVAR) of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) has become first-line therapy at our institution and is performed under a standardized protocol. We compare perioperative mortality, midterm survival, and morbidity after EVAR and open surgical repair (OSR). Methods Records were retrospectively reviewed from May 2000 to September 2010 for repair of infrarenal rAAAs. Primary end points included perioperative mortality and midterm survival. Secondary end points included acute limb ischemia, length of stay, ventilator-dependent respiratory failure, myocardial infarction, renal failure, abdominal compartment syndrome, and secondary intervention. Statistical analysis was performed using the t-test,X2 test, the Fisher exact test, and logistic regression calculations. Midterm survival was assessed with Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazard models. Results Seventy-four infrarenal rAAAs were repaired, 19 by EVAR and 55 by OSR. Despite increased age and comorbidity in the EVAR patients, perioperative mortality was 15.7% for EVAR, which was significantly lower than the 49% for OSR (odds ratio, 0.19; 95% CI, 0.05-0.74; P = .008). Midterm survival also favored EVAR (hazard ratio, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.21-0.77; P = .028, adjusted for age and sex). Mean follow-up was 20 months, and 1-year survival was 60% for EVAR vs 45% for OSR. Mean length of stay for patients surviving >1 day was 10 days for EVAR and 21 days for OSR (P = .004). Ventilator-dependent respiratory failure was 5% in the EVAR group vs 42% for OSR (odds ratio, 0.08; 95% CI, 0.01-0.62; P = .001). Conclusions EVAR of rAAA has a superior perioperative survival advantage and decreased morbidity vs OSR. Although not statistically significant, overall survival favors EVAR. We recommend that EVAR be considered as the first-line treatment of rAAAs and practiced as the standard of care. PMID:22626871

  6. Aneurysms: thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Kevin C; Lee, Eugene S

    2015-04-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) have many possible etiologies, including congenital heart defects (eg, bicuspid aortic valves, coarctation of the aorta), inherited connective tissue disorders (eg, Marfan, Ehlers-Danlos, Loeys-Dietz syndromes), and degenerative conditions (eg, medial necrosis, atherosclerosis of the aortic wall). Symptoms of rupture include a severe tearing pain in the chest, back, or neck, sometimes associated with cardiovascular collapse. Before rupture, TAAs may exert pressure on other thoracic structures, leading to a variety of symptoms. However, most TAAs are asymptomatic and are found incidentally during imaging for other conditions. Diagnosis is confirmed with computed tomography scan or echocardiography. Asymptomatic TAAs should be monitored with imaging at specified intervals and patients referred for repair if the TAAs are enlarging rapidly (greater than 0.5 cm in diameter over 6 months for heritable etiologies; greater than 0.5 cm over 1 year for degenerative etiologies) or reach a critical aortic diameter threshold for elective surgery (5.5 cm for TAAs due to degenerative etiologies, 5.0 cm when associated with inherited syndromes). Open surgery is used most often to treat asymptomatic TAAs in the ascending aorta and aortic arch. Asymptomatic TAAs in the descending aorta often are treated medically with aggressive blood pressure control, though recent data suggest that endovascular procedures may result in better long-term survival rates. PMID:25860136

  7. Dilatation of the proximal neck of infrarenal aortic aneurysms after endovascular AAA repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever, JJ; de Nie, AJ; Blankensteijn, JD; Broeders, IAMJ; Mail, WPTM; Eikelboom, BC

    2000-01-01

    Objectives: to assess size changes of the proximal aortic neck after endograft placement. Methods: since 1994, 54 consecutive patients have undergone abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair with the Endovascular Technologies (EVT) endograft. The study group comprised the 33 patients who had completed

  8. Sac Angiography and Glue Embolization in Emergency Endovascular Aneurysm Repair for Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koike, Yuya, E-mail: r06118@hotmail.co.jp; Nishimura, Jun-ichi, E-mail: jun-ichi-n@nifty.com; Hase, Soichiro, E-mail: haseman@hotmail.co.jp; Yamasaki, Motoshige, E-mail: genyamasaki@gmail.com [Kawasaki Saiwai Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to demonstrate a sac angiography technique and evaluate the feasibility of N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) embolization of the ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) sac in emergency endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in hemodynamically unstable patients.MethodsA retrospective case series of three patients in whom sac angiography was performed during emergency EVAR for ruptured AAA was reviewed. After stent graft deployment, angiography within the sac of aneurysm (sac angiography) was performed by manually injecting 10 ml of contrast material through a catheter to identify the presence and site of active bleeding. In two patients, sac angiography revealed active extravasation of the contrast material, and NBCA embolization with a coaxial catheter system was performed to achieve prompt sealing.ResultsSac angiography was successful in all three patients. In the two patients who underwent NBCA embolization for aneurysm sac bleeding, follow-up computed tomography (CT) images demonstrated the accumulation of NBCA consistent with the bleeding site in preprocedural CT images.ConclusionsEVAR is associated with a potential risk of ongoing bleeding from type II or IV endoleaks into the disrupted aneurysm sac in patients with severe coagulopathy. Therefore, sac angiography and NBCA embolization during emergency EVAR may represent a possible technical improvement in the treatment of ruptured AAA in hemodynamically unstable patients.

  9. Sac Angiography and Glue Embolization in Emergency Endovascular Aneurysm Repair for Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to demonstrate a sac angiography technique and evaluate the feasibility of N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) embolization of the ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) sac in emergency endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in hemodynamically unstable patients.MethodsA retrospective case series of three patients in whom sac angiography was performed during emergency EVAR for ruptured AAA was reviewed. After stent graft deployment, angiography within the sac of aneurysm (sac angiography) was performed by manually injecting 10 ml of contrast material through a catheter to identify the presence and site of active bleeding. In two patients, sac angiography revealed active extravasation of the contrast material, and NBCA embolization with a coaxial catheter system was performed to achieve prompt sealing.ResultsSac angiography was successful in all three patients. In the two patients who underwent NBCA embolization for aneurysm sac bleeding, follow-up computed tomography (CT) images demonstrated the accumulation of NBCA consistent with the bleeding site in preprocedural CT images.ConclusionsEVAR is associated with a potential risk of ongoing bleeding from type II or IV endoleaks into the disrupted aneurysm sac in patients with severe coagulopathy. Therefore, sac angiography and NBCA embolization during emergency EVAR may represent a possible technical improvement in the treatment of ruptured AAA in hemodynamically unstable patients

  10. Type I Endoleak-like Phenomenon Causing Rupture of the Replaced Aneurysm Sac 12 Years after Open Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    OpenAIRE

    Matsushita, Masahiro; Ikezawa, Teruo; Banno, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Only a few cases of endoleak following conventional abdominal aortic aneurysm repair have been reported. We treated a patient with a type I endoleak-like phenomenon occuring 12 years after conventional abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Computed tomography demonstrated dilation of the surgically replaced, once-shrunken aneurysm sac to a diameter of 3.5 cm. Thrombus was identified between the graft and the sac. Four months later the sac ruptured, and emergency repair was performed. Dehiscence o...

  11. Abdominal aortic aneurysm calcification and thrombus volume are not associated with outcome following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aortic calcification and thrombus have been postulated to worsen outcome following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). The purpose of this study was to assess the association of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) calcification and thrombus volume with outcome following EVAR using a reproducible, quantifiable computed tomography (CT) assessment protocol. Patients with elective EVAR performed between January 2002 and 2012 at the Townsville Hospital, Mater Private Hospital (Townsville) and Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital (RBWH) were included if preoperative CTAs were available for analysis. AAA calcification and thrombus volume were measured using a semiautomated workstation protocol. Outcomes were assessed in terms of clinical failure, endoleak (type I, type II) and reintervention. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Median follow-up was 1.7 years and the interquartile range 1.0-3.8 years. One hundred thirty-four patients undergoing elective EVAR were included in the study. Rates of primary clinical success and freedom from reintervention were 82.8 % and 88.9 % at the 24-month follow-up. AAA calcification and thrombus volume were not associated with clinical failure, type I endoleak, type II endoleak or reintervention. AAA calcification and thrombus volume were not associated with poorer outcome after EVAR in this study. (orig.)

  12. Abdominal aortic aneurysm calcification and thrombus volume are not associated with outcome following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Divyajeet; Velu, Ramesh; Tosenovsky, Patrik; Quigley, Francis [James Cook University, Queensland Research Centre for Peripheral Vascular Disease, School of Medicine and Dentistry, Townsville, Queensland (Australia); The Townsville Hospital, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Douglas (Australia); Wisniowski, Brendan; Walker, Philip J. [James Cook University, Queensland Research Centre for Peripheral Vascular Disease, School of Medicine and Dentistry, Townsville, Queensland (Australia); University of Queensland, School of Medicine and Centre for Clinical Research, Department of Vascular Surgery, Royal Brisbane and Women' s Hospital, Herston, QLD (Australia); Bradshaw, Barbara [James Cook University, Queensland Research Centre for Peripheral Vascular Disease, School of Medicine and Dentistry, Townsville, Queensland (Australia); Golledge, Jonathan [James Cook University, Queensland Research Centre for Peripheral Vascular Disease, School of Medicine and Dentistry, Townsville, Queensland (Australia); The Townsville Hospital, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Douglas (Australia); University of Queensland, School of Medicine and Centre for Clinical Research, Department of Vascular Surgery, Royal Brisbane and Women' s Hospital, Herston, QLD (Australia)

    2014-08-15

    Aortic calcification and thrombus have been postulated to worsen outcome following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). The purpose of this study was to assess the association of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) calcification and thrombus volume with outcome following EVAR using a reproducible, quantifiable computed tomography (CT) assessment protocol. Patients with elective EVAR performed between January 2002 and 2012 at the Townsville Hospital, Mater Private Hospital (Townsville) and Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital (RBWH) were included if preoperative CTAs were available for analysis. AAA calcification and thrombus volume were measured using a semiautomated workstation protocol. Outcomes were assessed in terms of clinical failure, endoleak (type I, type II) and reintervention. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Median follow-up was 1.7 years and the interquartile range 1.0-3.8 years. One hundred thirty-four patients undergoing elective EVAR were included in the study. Rates of primary clinical success and freedom from reintervention were 82.8 % and 88.9 % at the 24-month follow-up. AAA calcification and thrombus volume were not associated with clinical failure, type I endoleak, type II endoleak or reintervention. AAA calcification and thrombus volume were not associated with poorer outcome after EVAR in this study. (orig.)

  13. A prospective clinical, economic, and quality-of-life analysis comparing endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), open repair, and best medical treatment in high-risk patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms suitable for EVAR: the Irish patient trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hynes, Niamh

    2007-12-01

    To report the results of a trial comparing endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) to open repair (OR) and best medical therapy (BMT) involving high-risk patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) suitable for EVAR.

  14. Lessons learnt from the EUROSTAR registry on endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The EUROSTAR project is a multicentred database of the outcome of endovascular repair of infra-renal aortic aneurysms. To date 92 European centres of vascular surgery have contributed. The purpose of the article here is to review the medium term (up to 4 years) results of endovascular aneurysm repair as reported to Eurostar. Patients and methods: Patients intended for endovascular aneurysm repair were notified to the EUROSTAR Data Registry Centre before treatment in order to eliminate bias due to selective reporting. The following data was collected on all patients: (1) their demographic details and the anatomical characteristics of their aneurysms, (2) details of the endovascular device used, (3) procedural complications and the immediate outcome, (4) results of contrast enhanced CT imaging at 3, 6, 12 and 18 months after operation and at yearly intervals thereafter, (5) all adverse events. Life table analysis was performed to determine the cumulative rates of: (1) death from all causes, (2) secondary intervention. Risk factors for rupture and late conversion were identified by regression analysis. Results: By July 2000, 2862 patients had been registered and their median duration of follow-up was 12 mo (range 0-72). Successful deployment was achieved in 2812 patients with a perioperative (30 day) mortality of 2.9%. In 2464 patients enrolled by March 2000 late rupture of the aneurysm occurred in 14 patients for an annual cumulative rate of 1%. The significant factors were proximal type I endoleak (P=0.001), midgraft (type III) endoleak (P=0.001), graft migration (P=0.001) and post-operative kinking of the endograft (P=0.001). Forty-one patients had late conversion to open repair for an annual cumulative rate (risk) of approximately 2.1%. Risk factors (indications) for late conversion were: proximal type I endoleak (P=0.001), midgraft (type III) endoleak (P=0.001), type II endoleak (P=0.003), graft migration (P=0.001), graft kinking (P=0.001) and distal

  15. Open Surgical Repair for a Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with a Horseshoe Kidney

    OpenAIRE

    Ikeda, Akihiko; Tsukada, Toru; Konishi, Taisuke; Matsuzaki, Kanji; Jikuya, Tomoaki; HIRAMATSU, YUJI

    2015-01-01

    Horseshoe kidney is a congenital anomaly characterized by medial fusion of the bilateral kidneys. Treatment for an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) with a horseshoe kidney is a technical challenge because of the complex anatomy. We report a successful open surgical repair for a ruptured AAA with a horseshoe kidney. An aortic grafting was performed with division of the renal isthmus through a transperitoneal approach. In the case of a ruptured AAA, quick open surgery is the most reliable treatm...

  16. Embolization with Histoacryl Glue of an Anastomotic Pseudoaneurysm following Surgical Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walid, Ayesha; Ul Haq, Tanveer; Ur Rehman, Zia

    2013-01-01

    We report a 62-year-old female who had surgical repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm with a bifurcated graft 2 years ago. She presented with a distal anastomotic pseudoaneurysm which was successfully embolized with histoacryl glue. Only one such similar case has been reported in the literature so far (Yamagami et al. (2006)). PMID:23476883

  17. Multimodality Imaging Approach towards Primary Aortic Sarcomas Arising after Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Case Series Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamran, Mudassar; Fowler, Kathryn J; Mellnick, Vincent M; Sicard, Gregorio A; Narra, Vamsi R

    2016-06-01

    Primary aortic neoplasms are rare. Aortic sarcoma arising after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a scarce subset of primary aortic malignancies, reports of which are infrequent in the published literature. The diagnosis of aortic sarcoma is challenging due to its non-specific clinical presentation, and the prognosis is poor due to delayed diagnosis, rapid proliferation, and propensity for metastasis. Post-EVAR, aortic sarcomas may mimic other more common aortic processes on surveillance imaging. Radiologists are rarely knowledgeable about this rare entity for which multimodality imaging and awareness are invaluable in early diagnosis. A series of three pathologically confirmed cases are presented to display the multimodality imaging features and clinical presentations of aortic sarcoma arising after EVAR. PMID:26721588

  18. Imaging and management of complications of open surgical repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Open repair is still considered the reference standard for long-term repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). In contrast to endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), patients with open surgical repair of AAA are not routinely followed up with imaging. Although complications following EVAR are widely recognized and routinely identified on follow-up imaging, complications also do occur following open surgical repair. With frequent use of multi-slice computed tomography (CT) angiography (CTA) in vascular patients, there is now improved recognition of the potential complications following open surgical repair. Many of these complications are increasingly being managed using endovascular techniques. The aim of this review is to illustrate a variety of potential complications that may occur following open surgical repair and to demonstrate their management using both surgical and endovascular techniques.

  19. Imaging and management of complications of open surgical repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayeemuddin, M. [Department of Interventional Radiology, City General Hospital, University Hospital of North Staffordshire NHS Trust, Stoke-On-Trent (United Kingdom); Pherwani, A.D. [Department of Vascular Surgery, City General Hospital, University Hospital of North Staffordshire NHS Trust, Stoke-On-Trent (United Kingdom); Asquith, J.R., E-mail: john.asquith@uhns.nhs.uk [Department of Interventional Radiology, City General Hospital, University Hospital of North Staffordshire NHS Trust, Stoke-On-Trent (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-15

    Open repair is still considered the reference standard for long-term repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). In contrast to endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), patients with open surgical repair of AAA are not routinely followed up with imaging. Although complications following EVAR are widely recognized and routinely identified on follow-up imaging, complications also do occur following open surgical repair. With frequent use of multi-slice computed tomography (CT) angiography (CTA) in vascular patients, there is now improved recognition of the potential complications following open surgical repair. Many of these complications are increasingly being managed using endovascular techniques. The aim of this review is to illustrate a variety of potential complications that may occur following open surgical repair and to demonstrate their management using both surgical and endovascular techniques.

  20. A case of acute ischemic colitis after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Grigorios Voulalas; Chrisostomos Maltezos

    2016-01-01

    Colonic ischemia is a recognized complication of either open or endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. The clinical difficulty in establishing the diagnosis, the severity of this complication and the patient's poor physiological status may lead to a fatal outcome. We presented a case of ischemic colitis in a patient with patent hypogastric arteries that occurred after an endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair as well as a review of the available literature. The patient's preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative data were recorded. A thorough search through the Google data and Medline to review similar cases or any analyses that referred to ischemic colitis after endovascular abdominal aneurysm repair was conducted. A 76-year-old male was admitted to our department for an elective endovascular repair of an 8 cm in diameter abdominal aortic aneurysm. A Zenith bifurcation graft was implanted. The whole procedure was uneventful and the final angiogram showed an accurate deployment of the endograft without endoleaks and patency of both hypogastric arteries. During the 1st postoperative day, the patient developed symptoms of acute abdomen in combination with metabolic acidosis and oliguria. He underwent an exploratory laparotomy, which revealed necrosis of the sig-moid. A Hartmann's procedure was performed;the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit where he deceased after 24 h. Postoperative ischemic colitis has been described after open abdominal aneurysm repair. The description of this complication has been reported since the early phase of endovascular abdominal aneurysm repair development with a current incidence of 1.5%–3.0%. Possible mechanisms that may contribute to ischemic colitis in spite of the presence of patent hypogastric arteries include athe-roembolization, shock, vasopressive drugs and inferior mesenteric artery occlusion.

  1. A case of acute ischemic colitis after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigorios Voulalas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Colonic ischemia is a recognized complication of either open or endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. The clinical difficulty in establishing the diagnosis, the severity of this complication and the patient's poor physiological status may lead to a fatal outcome. We presented a case of ischemic colitis in a patient with patent hypogastric arteries that occurred after an endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair as well as a review of the available literature. The patient's preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative data were recorded. A thorough search through the Google data and Medline to review similar cases or any analyses that referred to ischemic colitis after endovascular abdominal aneurysm repair was conducted. A 76-year-old male was admitted to our department for an elective endovascular repair of an 8 cm in diameter abdominal aortic aneurysm. A Zenith bifurcation graft was implanted. The whole procedure was uneventful and the final angiogram showed an accurate deployment of the endograft without endoleaks and patency of both hypogastric arteries. During the 1st postoperative day, the patient developed symptoms of acute abdomen in combination with metabolic acidosis and oliguria. He underwent an exploratory laparotomy, which revealed necrosis of the sigmoid. A Hartmann's procedure was performed; the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit where he deceased after 24 h. Postoperative ischemic colitis has been described after open abdominal aneurysm repair. The description of this complication has been reported since the early phase of endovascular abdominal aneurysm repair development with a current incidence of 1.5%–3.0%. Possible mechanisms that may contribute to ischemic colitis in spite of the presence of patent hypogastric arteries include atheroembolization, shock, vasopressive drugs and inferior mesenteric artery occlusion.

  2. Endovascular repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm in the presence of a hydronephrotic horseshoe kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivoshei, Lian; Akin-Olugbade, Yemi; McWilliams, Glen; Halak, Moshe; Silverberg, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to report an unusual case of a patient with an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and a hydronephrotic horseshoe kidney (HSK) that was repaired by endovascular means. An 81-year-old male patient with a known HSK was found to have hydronephrosis and an AAA. The patient's aneurysm was treated with an endovascular stent graft which required the covering of accessory renal arteries. He had an uneventful recovery with complete resolution of the hydronephrosis evident on a computed tomography scan performed seven months after the surgery. In conclusion, endovascular aneurysm repair is a feasible therapeutic option for an AAA coexisting with an HSK and may be considered as a valid alternative to open repair when concomitant hydronephrosis is present. PMID:22328622

  3. Surgical repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm with non-bleeding aortocaval fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unosawa, Satoshi; Kimura, Haruka; Niino, Tetsuya

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of an aortocaval fistula (ACF) without bleeding because a clot was covering the fistula. A 60-year-old man was diagnosed as having a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and an aortocaval fistula, by enhanced computed tomography (CT). After the aneurysm had been opened, the fistula was detected, but there was no bleeding because it was covered with clot. After graft repair, bleeding from the fistula occurred when the clot was removed by suction. Direct closure of the fistula was achieved after bleeding was controlled by digital compression. PMID:23825505

  4. A multidetector tomography protocol for follow-up of endovascular aortic aneurysm repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Moraes Bastos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to improve the use of 64-channel multidetector computed tomography using lower doses of ionizing radiation during follow-up procedures in a series of patients with endovascular aortic aneurysm repair. METHODS: Thirty patients receiving 5 to 29 months of follow-up after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair were analyzed using a 64-channel multidetector computed tomography device by an exam that included pre-and postcontrast with both arterial and venous phases. Leak presence and type were classified based on the exam phase. RESULTS: Endoleaks were identified in 8/30 of cases; the endoleaks in 3/8 of these cases were not visible in the arterial phases of the exams. CONCLUSION: The authors conclude that multidetector computed tomography with pre-contrast and venous phases should be a part of the ongoing follow-up of patients undergoing endovascular aortic aneurysm repair. The arterial phase can be excluded when the aneurism is stable or regresses. These findings permit a lower radiation dose without jeopardizing the correct diagnosis of an endoleak.

  5. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... access catheters Vertebroplasty Women and vascular disease Women's health Social Media Facebook Twitter ... Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Interventional Radiologists Treat Abdominal Aneurysms Nonsurgically Interventional radiologists are vascular ...

  6. Dutch experience with the fenestrated Anaconda endograft for short-neck infrarenal and juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Martijn L.; Tielliu, Ignace F. J.; Meerwaldt, Robbert; Pierie, Maurice; van Brussel, Jerome; Schurink, Geert Willem H.; Lardenoye, Jan-Willem; Zeebregts, Clark J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In the past decennium, the management of short-neck infrarenal and juxtarenal aortic aneurysms with fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair (FEVAR) has been shown to be successful, with good early and midterm results. Recently, a new fenestrated device, the fenestrated Anaconda (Vascutek

  7. Aortic Aneurysm Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... connective tissue disorders, such as Marfan syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, get thoracic aortic aneurysms. Signs and symptoms of thoracic aortic aneurysm can include Sharp, sudden pain in the chest or upper back. Shortness of ...

  8. Surgical repair for giant ascending aortic aneurysm to superior vena cava fistula with positive syphilitic test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Yuji; Yamamoto, Shin; Fujikawa, Takuya; Oshima, Susumu; Ono, Makoto; Sasaguri, Shiro

    2015-10-01

    Syphilitic aortitis is usually associated with thoracic aortic saccular aneurysm, aortic regurgitation and coronary ostial stenosis. However, syphilitic aneurysms have rarely been reported today. Here, we report a patient with ascending aortic aneurysm with aorta-superior vena cava (SVC) fistula with positive syphilitic test. A 52-year-old man was admitted to our institution with a giant ascending aortic aneurysm complicated with SVC syndrome. Computed tomography revealed a giant ascending aneurysm 79 mm in diameter. The result of serodiagnostic tests for syphilis had not been judged yet preoperatively. Total arch replacement concomitant with elephant trunk was performed. Intraoperatively, we detected the ascending aorta to SVC fistula. Postoperatively, we suspected the syphilitic aneurysm strongly, because preoperative serodiagnostic test was concluded to be positive. However, histological examination did not show typical syphilitic features. The patient remains asymptomatic 1 year later. Although extremely rarely today, syphilitic aneurysm should be still considered in the differential diagnosis of ascending aortic aneurysm. PMID:24000069

  9. Impact of graft composition on the systemic inflammatory response after an elective repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm

    OpenAIRE

    Baek, Jong Kwan; Kwon, Hyunwook; Ko, Gi-Young; Kim, Min Joo; Han, Youngjin; Chung, Young Soo; Park, Hojong; Kwon, Tae-Won; Cho, Yong-Pil

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The present study aimed to evaluate the risk factors and the role of graft material in the development of an acute phase systemic inflammatory response, and the clinical outcome in patients who undergo endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) or open surgical repair (OSR) of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Methods We retrospectively evaluated the risk factors and the role of graft material in an increased risk of developing systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), and the clinic...

  10. Management of an aorto-esophageal fistula, complicating a descending thoracic aortic aneurysm endovascularly repaired.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georvasili, Vaia K; Bali, Christina; Peroulis, Michalis; Kouvelos, George; Avgos, Stavros; Godevenos, Dimitris; Liakakos, Theodoros; Matsagkas, Miltiadis

    2016-04-01

    Aorto-esophageal fistula (AEF) is a rare but devastating complication of thoracic aorta endovascular repair (TEVAR). We report a case of a 64-year-old male who presented with chest pain and high CRP levels 10 months after TEVAR for a 9 cm diameter descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. The diagnosis of an AEF was confirmed and the patient was treated conservatively with broad spectrum antibiotics and total parental alimentation. After control of sepsis was achieved, esophagectomy with gastric tube reconstruction was performed and an omental pedicle was used to cover the aortic wall. No intervention to the aorta was made at that time due to the potentially infected mediastinum. The patient's recovery was uneventful and 2 years postoperatively he is in good condition and lives a normal life. Esophagectomy seems to be a mandatory stage of treatment in the setting of AEF. In cases where signs of graft infection are persistent, aortic surgery might be also necessary. PMID:24838140

  11. Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in the Presence of a Transplanted Kidney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverberg, Daniel, E-mail: silverberg-d@msn.com; Yalon, Tal; Halak, Moshe [The Chaim Sheba Medical Center, The Department of Vascular Surgery (Israel)

    2015-08-15

    PurposeTo present our experience performing endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms in kidney transplanted patients.MethodsA retrospective review of all patients who underwent endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) performed at our institution from 2007 to 2014. We identified all patients who had previously undergone a kidney transplant. Data collected included: comorbidities, preoperative imaging modalities, indication for surgery, stent graft configurations, pre- and postoperative renal function, perioperative complications, and survival rates.ResultsA total of 267 EVARs were performed. Six (2 %) had a transplanted kidney. Mean age was 74 (range, 64–82) years; five were males. Mean time from transplantation to EVAR was 7.5 (range, 2–12) years. Five underwent preoperative planning with noncontrast modalities only. Devices used included bifurcated (n = 3), aortouniiliac (n = 2), and tube (n = 1) stent grafts. Technical success was achieved in all patients. None experienced deterioration in renal function. Median follow-up was 39 (range, 6–51) months. Four patients were alive at the time of the study. Two patients expired during the period of follow-up from unrelated causes.ConclusionsEVAR is an effective modality for the management of AAAs in the coexistence of a transplanted kidney. It can be performed with minimal morbidity and mortality without harming the transplanted kidney. Special consideration should be given to device configuration to minimize damage to the renal graft.

  12. Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in the Presence of a Transplanted Kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PurposeTo present our experience performing endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms in kidney transplanted patients.MethodsA retrospective review of all patients who underwent endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) performed at our institution from 2007 to 2014. We identified all patients who had previously undergone a kidney transplant. Data collected included: comorbidities, preoperative imaging modalities, indication for surgery, stent graft configurations, pre- and postoperative renal function, perioperative complications, and survival rates.ResultsA total of 267 EVARs were performed. Six (2 %) had a transplanted kidney. Mean age was 74 (range, 64–82) years; five were males. Mean time from transplantation to EVAR was 7.5 (range, 2–12) years. Five underwent preoperative planning with noncontrast modalities only. Devices used included bifurcated (n = 3), aortouniiliac (n = 2), and tube (n = 1) stent grafts. Technical success was achieved in all patients. None experienced deterioration in renal function. Median follow-up was 39 (range, 6–51) months. Four patients were alive at the time of the study. Two patients expired during the period of follow-up from unrelated causes.ConclusionsEVAR is an effective modality for the management of AAAs in the coexistence of a transplanted kidney. It can be performed with minimal morbidity and mortality without harming the transplanted kidney. Special consideration should be given to device configuration to minimize damage to the renal graft

  13. Multidirectional flow analysis by cardiovascular magnetic resonance in aneurysm development following repair of aortic coarctation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stalder Aurelien F

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aneurysm formation is a life-threatening complication after operative therapy in coarctation. The identification of patients at risk for the development of such secondary pathologies is of high interest and requires a detailed understanding of the link between vascular malformation and altered hemodynamics. The routine morphometric follow-up by magnetic resonance angiography is a well-established technique. However, the intrinsic sensitivity of magnetic resonance (MR towards motion offers the possibility to additionally investigate hemodynamic consequences of morphological changes of the aorta. We demonstrate two cases of aneurysm formation 13 and 35 years after coarctation surgery based on a Waldhausen repair with a subclavian patch and a Vosschulte repair with a Dacron patch, respectively. Comprehensive flow visualization by cardiovascular MR (CMR was performed using a flow-sensitive, 3-dimensional, and 3-directional time-resolved gradient echo sequence at 3T. Subsequent analysis included the calculation of a phase contrast MR angiography and color-coded streamline and particle trace 3D visualization. Additional quantitative evaluation provided regional physiological information on blood flow and derived vessel wall parameters such as wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index. The results highlight the individual 3D blood-flow patterns associated with the different vascular pathologies following repair of aortic coarctation. In addition to known factors predisposing for aneurysm formation after surgical repair of coarctation these findings indicate the importance of flow sensitive CMR to follow up hemodynamic changes with respect to the development of vascular disease.

  14. Long-term results after repair of ruptured and non-ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuzmanović Ilija B.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Abdominal aortic aneurysm can be repaired by elective procedure while asymptomatic, or immediately when it is complicated - mostly due to rupture. Treating abdominal aneurysm electively, before it becomes urgent, has medical and economical reason. Today, the first month mortality after elective operations of the abdominal aorta aneurysm is less than 3%; on the other hand, significant mortality (25%-70% has been recorded in patients operated immediately because of rupture of the abdominal aneurysm. In addition, the costs of elective surgical treatment are significantly lower. OBJECTIVE The objective of this study is to compare long-term survival of patients that underwent elective or immediate repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (due to rupture, and to find out the factors influencing the long-term survival of these patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS Through retrospective review of prospectively collected data of the Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases of Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade, 56 patients that had elective surgery and 35 patients that underwent urgent operation due to rupture of abdominal aneurysm were followed up. Only the patients that survived 30 postoperative days were included in this review, and were followed up (ranging from 2 to 126 months. Electively operated patients were followed during 58.82 months on the average (range 7 to 122, and urgently operated were followed over 52.26 months (range 2 to 126. There was no significant difference of the length of postoperative follow-up between these two groups. RESULTS During this period, out of electively operated and immediately operated patients, 27 and 22 cases died, respectively. There was no significant difference (p>0,05a of long-term survival between these two groups. Obesity and early postoperative complications significantly decreased long-term survival of both electively and immediately operated patients. Graft infection, ventral hernia, aneurysm of

  15. Endovascular stent graft repair for thoracic aortic aneurysms: the history and the present in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Satoshi; Shimizu, Hideyuki; Yoshitake, Akihiro; Shimazaki, Taro; Iwahashi, Toru; Ogino, Hitoshi; Ishimaru, Shin; Shigematsu, Hiroshi; Yozu, Ryohei

    2013-01-01

    Stent-grafts for endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysms have been commercially available for more than ten years in the West, whereas, in Japan, a manufactured stent-graft was not approved for the use until March 2008. Nevertheless, endovascular thoracic intervention began to be performed in Japan in the early 1990s, with homemade devices used in most cases. Many researchers have continued to develop their homemade devices. We have participated in joint design and assessment efforts with a stent-graft manufacturer, focusing primarily on fenestrated stent-grafts used in repairs at the distal arch, a site especially prone to aneurysm. In March 2008, TAG (W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc., Flagstaff, Arizona, USA) was approved as a stent graft for the thoracic area first in Japan, which was major turning point in treatment for thoracic aortic aneurysms. Subsequently, TALENT (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA) was approved in May 2009, and TX2 (COOK MEDICAL Inc., Bloomington, Indiana, USA) in March 2011. Valiant as an improved version of TALENT was approved in November 2011, and TX2 Proform as an improved version of TX2 began to be supplied in October 2012. These stent grafts are excellent devices that showed good results in Western countries, and marked effectiveness can be expected by making the most of the characteristics of each device. A clinical trial in Japan on Najuta (tentative name) (Kawasumi Labo., Inc., Tokyo, Japan) as a line-up of fenestrated stent grafts that can be applied to distal arch aneurysms showing a high incidence, and allow maintenance of blood flow to the arch vessel was initiated. This trial was completed, and Najuta has just been approved in January of 2013 in Japan, and further development is expected. In the U.S., great efforts have recently been made to develop and manufacture excellent stent grafts for thoracic aneurysms, and rapid progress has been achieved. In particular, in the area of the aortic arch, in which we

  16. Contemporary management of the demanding infra-renal neck in abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mees, B M; Peppelenbosch, A G; De Haan, M W; Jacobs, M J; Schurink, G W

    2015-04-01

    Proximal infrarenal neck anatomy is a crucial factor in determining outcome of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. Unfavorable or demanding infrarenal neck anatomy significantly increases the complexity of both standard endovascular and open repair resulting in increased rates of morbidity and mortality. While technological improvements and expanding institutional experience have resulted in an increased proportion of patients with an AAA with unfavorable infrarenal neck treated by (fenestrated) endovascular techniques, open repair has also remained a valid technique. The purpose of this manuscript was to describe the wide array of endovascular and open techniques in use to treat patients with an AAA with a demanding infrarenal neck and discuss their results and indications. PMID:25592277

  17. Endovascular treatment of type II endoleak following thoracic endovascular aortic repair for thoracic aortic aneurysm: Case report of squeeze technique to reach the aneurysmal sac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyun Jung; Kim, Chang Won; Lee, Tae Hong; Song, Seung Hwan; Lee, Chung Won; Chung, Sung Woon [Pusan National University Hospital, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Type II endoleaks are common after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). Various strategies are introduced to manage type II endoleaks, such as the use of coils, plugs, or liquid embolic agents (histoacryl, thrombin, onyx, etc.) through a transarterial approach or a direct puncture of the aneurysmal sac. We herein report a case of a type II endoleak caused by reverse blood flow through intercostal artery after TEVAR which was successfully treated with n-butyl cyanoacrylate (histoacryl)-lipiodol mixture by a squeeze technique to reach the aneurismal sac using a microcatheter.

  18. Endovascular treatment of type II endoleak following thoracic endovascular aortic repair for thoracic aortic aneurysm: Case report of squeeze technique to reach the aneurysmal sac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Type II endoleaks are common after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). Various strategies are introduced to manage type II endoleaks, such as the use of coils, plugs, or liquid embolic agents (histoacryl, thrombin, onyx, etc.) through a transarterial approach or a direct puncture of the aneurysmal sac. We herein report a case of a type II endoleak caused by reverse blood flow through intercostal artery after TEVAR which was successfully treated with n-butyl cyanoacrylate (histoacryl)-lipiodol mixture by a squeeze technique to reach the aneurismal sac using a microcatheter.

  19. Renal replacement therapies after abdominal aortic aneurysm repair--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudorović, Narcis; Lovricević, Ivo; Brkić, Petar; Ahel, Zaky; Vicić-Hudorović, Visnja

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this review is to assess the incidence of postoperative acute renal failure that necessitates the application of hemofiltration and to determine the factors that influence the outcome in patients undergoing surgical repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm. In addition, the review aims to assess the outcomes of postoperative early hemofiltration as compared to late intensive hemofiltration. Different forms of renal replacement therapies for use in abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery patients are discussed. Electronic literature searches were performed using Pubmed, Medline, Embase, Sumsearch, Cinahil, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Excerpta Medica. The search identified 419 potentially eligible studies, of which 119 were excluded based on the title and abstract. Of the remaining 300 studies, full articles were collected and re-evaluated. Forty-five articles satisfied our inclusion criteria, of which only 12 were of the IA Level of evidence. The search results indicated that the underlying disease, its severity and stage, the etiology of acute renal failure, clinical and hemodynamic status of the patient, the resources available, and different costs of therapy might all influence the choice of the renal replacement therapy strategy. However, clear guidelines on renal replacement therapy duration are still lacking. Moreover, it is not known whether in acute renal failure patients undergoing abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery, renal replacement therapy modalities can eliminate significant amounts of clinically relevant inflammatory mediators. This review gives current information available in the literature on the possible mechanisms underlying acute renal failure and recent developments in continuous renal replacement treatment modalities. PMID:22384777

  20. Provider volume and outcomes for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, carotid endarterectomy, and lower extremity revascularization procedures.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Killeen, Shane D

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Intuitively, vascular procedures performed by high-volume vascular subspecialists working at high-volume institutions should be associated with improved patient outcome. Although a large number of studies assess the relationship between volume and outcome, a single contemporary compilation of such studies is lacking. METHODS: A review of the English language literature was performed incorporating searches of the Medline, EMBASE, and Cochrane collaboration databases for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (elective and emergent), carotid endarterectomy, and arterial lower limb procedures for any volume outcome relationship. Studies were included if they involved a patient cohort from 1980 onwards, were community or population based, and assessed health outcomes (mortality and morbidity) as a dependent variable and volume as an independent variable. RESULTS: We identified 74 relevant studies, and 54 were included. All showed either an inverse relationship of variable magnitude between provider volume and mortality, or no volume-outcome effect. The reduction in the risk-adjusted mortality rate (RAMR) for high-volume providers was 3% to 11% for elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair, 2.5 to 5% for emergent AAA repair, 0.7% to 4.7% carotid endarterectomy, and 0.3% to 0.9% for lower limb arterial bypass procedures. Subspeciality training also conferred a considerable morbidity and mortality benefit for emergent AAA repair, carotid endarterectomy, and lower limb arterial procedures. CONCLUSION: High-volume providers have significantly better outcomes for vascular procedures both in the elective and emergent setting. Subspeciality training also has a considerable impact. These data provide further evidence for the specialization of vascular services, whereby vascular procedures should generally be preformed by high-volume, speciality trained providers.

  1. Brain aneurysm repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aneurysm repair; Dissecting aneurysm repair; Endovascular aneurysm repair - brain; Subarachnoid hemorrhage - aneurysm ... Your scalp, skull, and the coverings of the brain are opened. A metal clip is placed at ...

  2. Computer-supported diagnosis for endotension cases in endovascular aortic aneurysm repair evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, G; Tapia, A; De Blas, M

    2014-06-01

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a localized abnormal enlargement of the abdominal aorta with fatal consequences if not treated on time. The endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a minimal invasive therapy that reduces recovery times and improves survival rates in AAA cases. Nevertheless, post-operation difficulties can appear influencing the evolution of treatment. The objective of this work is to develop a pilot computer-supported diagnosis system for an automated characterization of EVAR progression from CTA images. The system is based on the extraction of texture features from post-EVAR thrombus aneurysm samples and on posterior classification. Three conventional texture-analysis methods, namely the gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM), the gray level run length matrix (GLRLM), the gray level difference method (GLDM), and a new method proposed by the authors, the run length matrix of local co-occurrence matrices (RLMLCM), were applied to each sample. Several classification schemes were experimentally evaluated. The ensembles of a k-nearest neighbor (k-NN), a multilayer perceptron neural network (MLP-NN), and a support vector machine (SVM) classifier fed with a reduced version of texture features resulted in a better performance (Az=94.35±0.30), as compared to the classification performance of the other alternatives. PMID:24721658

  3. Hybrid-repair of thoraco-abdominal or juxtarenal aortic aneurysm: what the radiologist should know

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, Tobias; Pfammatter, Thomas; Hechelhammer, Lukas; Marincek, Borut; Frauenfelder, Thomas [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Medical Radiology, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Mayer, Dieter; Lachat, Mario [University Hospital Zurich, Clinic for Cardiovascular Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2010-04-15

    Endovascular aneurysm repair of the infrarenal or thoracic aorta has been shown to be a less invasive alternative to open surgery. A combined aneurysm of the thoracic and abdominal aorta is complex and challenging; the involvement of renal and/or visceral branches requires new treatment methods. A hybrid approach is currently an accepted alternative to conventional surgery. Renal and/or visceral revascularisation enables subsequent stent-graft placement into the visceral portion of the aorta. Knowledge of the surgical procedure and a precise assessment of the vascular morphology are crucial for pre-procedural planning and for detection of post-procedural complications. Multi-detector computed tomography angiography (MDCTA) combined with two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) rendering is useful for pre-interventional planning and for the detection of post-procedural complications. Three-dimensional rendering allows proper anatomical analyses, influencing interventional strategies and resulting in a better outcome. With the knowledge of procedure-specific MDCTA findings in various vascular conditions, the radiologist and surgeon are able to perform an efficient pre-interventional planning and follow-up examination. Based on our experience with this novel technique of combined open and endovascular aortic aneurysm treatment, this pictorial review illustrates procedure-specific imaging findings, including common and rare complications, with respect to 2D and 3D post-processing techniques. (orig.)

  4. Correlations of perioperative coagulopathy, fluid infusion and blood transfusions with survival prognosis in endovascular aortic repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    OpenAIRE

    Kawatani, Yohei; Nakamura, Yoshitsugu; Kurobe, Hirotsugu; Suda, Yuji; Hori, Takaki

    2016-01-01

    Background Factors associated with survival prognosis among patients who undergo endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (rAAA) have not been sufficiently investigated. In the present study, we examined correlations between perioperative coagulopathy and 24-h and 30-day postoperative survival. Relationships between coagulopathy and the content of blood transfusions, volumes of crystalloid infusion and survival. Methods This was a retrospective study of the me...

  5. PCA-induced respiratory depression simulating stroke following endoluminal repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Javed; Riley Richard; Sieunarine Kishore

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Aim To report a case of severe respiratory depression with PCA fentanyl use simulating stroke in a patient who underwent routine elective endoluminal graft repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) Case presentation A 78-year-old obese lady underwent routine endoluminal graft repair for AAA that was progressively increasing in size. Following an uneventful operation postoperative analgesia was managed with a patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) device with fentanyl. On the morning fol...

  6. Study Design of PROCEDURE Study. A Randomized Comparison of the Dose-Dependent Effects of Pitavastatin in Patients with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Massive Aortic Atheroma: Prevention of Cholesterol Embolization during Endovascular and Open Aneurysm Repair with Pitavastatin (PROCEDURE) Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hoshina, Katsuyuki; Nemoto, Masaru; Hashimoto, Takuya; Miura, Sumio; Urabe, Go; Nakazawa, Tatsu; Hosaka, Akihiro; Kato, Masaaki; Ohkubo, Nobukazu; Miyairi, Takeshi; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Shigematsu, Kunihiro; Miyata, Tetsuro

    2013-01-01

    Outcomes of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair have improved in the 2 decades since the emergence of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). However, EVAR is considered a contraindication for shaggy aorta because of the high risk of shower embolization. Recently, statins have been implicated in preventing embolization in patients with shaggy aorta via its pleiotropic effects, including atheroma reduction and coronary artery stabilization. We selected pitavastatin, a statin with potent effect...

  7. Follow-up of endovascular aortic aneurysm repair: Preliminary validation of digital tomosynthesis and contrast enhanced ultrasound in detection of medium- to long-term complications

    OpenAIRE

    Mazzei, Maria Antonietta; Guerrini, Susanna; Mazzei, Francesco Giuseppe; Cioffi Squitieri, Nevada; Notaro, Dario; de Donato, Gianmarco; Galzerano, Giuseppe; Sacco, Palmino; Setacci, Francesco; Volterrani, Luca; Setacci, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To validate the feasibility of digital tomosynthesis of the abdomen (DTA) combined with contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in assessing complications after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) by using computed tomography angiography (CTA) as the gold standard.

  8. Early prediction of acute kidney injury biomarkers after endovascular stent graft repair of aortic aneurysm: a prospective observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Ueta, Kazuyoshi; Watanabe, Michiko; Iguchi, Naoya; Uchiyama, Akinori; Shirakawa, Yukitoshi; Kuratani, Toru; Sawa, Yoshiki; Fujino, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common and serious condition usually detected some time after onset by changes in serum creatinine (sCr). Although stent grafting to repair aortic aneurysms is associated with AKI caused by surgical procedures or the use of contrast agents, early biomarkers for AKI have not been adequately examined in stent graft recipients. We studied biomarkers including urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), blood NGAL, N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminid...

  9. Successful reversal of recurrent spinal cord ischemia following endovascular repair of a descending thoracic aortic aneurysm

    OpenAIRE

    Appoo, J J; Gregory, H D; Toeg, H D; Prusinkiewicz, C A; Kent, W D T; Ferland, A; Ha, D V

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent advances in technique, spinal cord ischemia remains one of the most dreaded complications of thoracic aortic surgery. Recently, it has been suggested that thoracic endovascular aortic repair may decrease the risk of paraplegia. We present a case of delayed paraplegia following thoracic endovascular aortic repair that was successfully reversed on 3 separate occasions in the same patient. This highlights the importance of vigilant clinical assessments, efficient multidisciplinary...

  10. Risk-adjusted outcome analysis of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in a large population: how do stent-grafts compare?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marrewijk, C.J. van; Leurs, L.J.; Vallabhaneni, S.R.; Harris, P.L.; Buth, J.; Laheij, R.J.F.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare differences in the applicability and incidence of postoperative adverse events among stent-grafts used for repair of infrarenal aortic aneurysms. METHODS: An analysis of 6787 patients from the EUROSTAR Registry database was conducted to compare aneurysm morphological features, pa

  11. Embolisation of a Proximal Type I Endoleak Post-Nellix Aortic Aneurysm Repair Complicated by Reflux of Onyx into the Nellix Endograft Limb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ameli-Renani, S., E-mail: seyedameli@doctors.org.uk; Das, R., E-mail: raj.das@stgeorges.nhs.uk; Weller, A., E-mail: alweller@gmail.com; Chung, R., E-mail: rchung@doctors.org.uk; Morgan, R. A., E-mail: robert.Morgan@stgeorges.nhs.uk [St George’s Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    We report the first case of intervention for a proximal type 1 endoleak following Nellix endovascular aneurysm sealing repair of an aortic aneurysm. This was complicated by migration of Onyx into one of the Nellix graft limbs causing significant stenosis. Subsequent placement of a covered stent to affix the Onyx between the stent and the wall of the Nellix endograft successfully restored stent patency.

  12. Successful repair of a syphilitic aortic arch aneurysm accompanied by serious cerebral infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Katsutoshi; Chiba, Kiyoshi; Koizumi, Nobusato; Ogino, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    We present a 52-year-old male with a syphilitic aortic arch aneurysm accompanied by relevant extensive cerebral infarction. He was admitted to a local hospital for sudden loss of consciousness, where he was diagnosed with serious cerebral infarction. During his treatment, a multilocular aortic arch aneurysm involving the arch vessels was found incidentally. He was transferred to our hospital for surgical treatment. A preoperative routine laboratory test for syphilis was highly positive, which suggested that the aneurysm was likely caused by syphilis and the cerebral infarction was also induced by the involvement of syphilitic aortitis or arteritis. After 2 weeks of antibiotic therapy for syphilis, total arch replacement was performed successfully using meticulous brain protection with antegrade selective cerebral perfusion and deep hypothermia. He recovered without any further cerebral deficits. The pathological examination of the surgical specimen showed some characteristic changes of syphilitic aortitis. PMID:24492165

  13. Antiplatelet treatment and prothrombotic diathesis following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trellopoulos, G; Georgiadis, G S; Nikolopoulos, E S; Kapoulas, K C; Georgakarakos, E I; Lazarides, M K

    2014-10-01

    Prothrombotic diathesis expressed by elevated levels of coagulation-specific biomarkers has been reported in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and after AAA endovascular repair (EVAR). This study investigates the effect of antiplatelet agents (APLs) on the prothrombotic diathesis in the post-EVAR period. Forty elective EVAR patients had thrombin-antithrombin complex, d-dimer, fibrinopeptide A, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein measured before, at 24 hours, 1 month, and 6 months after EVAR. Patients receiving APLs postoperatively were compared with those not receiving APLs. All biomarkers were above the normal limits preoperatively and increased significantly 24 hours postoperatively followed by a drop at 1 and 6 months. No statistically significant changes were noted among patients receiving APLs in comparison with those not receiving APLs. The preoperative and postoperative prothrombotic diathesis of AAA following EVAR was confirmed in line with other reports. There was however no significant alteration of the examined biomarkers in patients receiving APLs. PMID:24101707

  14. Type II Endoleak Following Endovascular Repair of Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Innovative Transgraft Approach to Contemporary Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fuad Jan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Elective endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR is the first-line therapeutic option for patients with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm. However, endoleaks –– persistent blood flow outside the lumen of the stent graft (or endograft but within the aneurysm sac or adjacent vascular segment being treated by the graft –– continue to be a persistent problem in the post-EVAR setting. The type II endoleak is the most common of these and can be a demanding challenge to address by standard endovascular techniques. Currently, two prominent endovascular techniques exist for the management of type II endoleaks: direct translumbar embolization and transarterial embolization. Both of these are fraught with their own limitations and complications. In this review, we describe the contemporary trends in management of type II endoleaks and introduce a novel endovascular technique to treat this challenging and common EVAR complication.

  15. Endovascular Repair of a Type III Thoracoabdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Patient with Occlusion of Visceral Arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The successful endovascular repair of a type III thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) with the use of a tube endograft is reported. A 56-year-old male with a 6.4-cm type III TAAA, a 4.2-cm infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm, and chronic renal insufficiency presented with flank pain, nausea, acute anuria, and serum creatinine of 6.1 mg/dl. Acute occlusion of the left solitary renal artery was diagnosed and emergent recanalization with percutaneus transluminal angioplasty and stenting was performed successfully, with reversal of the serum creatinine level at 1.6 mg/dl. Further imaging studies for TAAA management revealed ostial occlusion of both the celiac artery (CA) and the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) but a hypertrophic inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) providing retrograde flow to the aforementioned vessels. This rare anatomic serendipity allowed us to repair the TAAA simply by using a two-component tube endograft without fenestrations (Zenith; William Cook, Bjaeverskov, Denmark) that covered the entire length of the aneurysm, including the CA and SMA origins, since a natural arterial bypass from the IMA to the CA and SMA already existed, affording protection from gastrointestinal ischemic complications. The patient had a fast and uneventful recovery and is currently doing well 6 months after the procedure. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the English literature of successful endovascular repair of a TAAA involving visceral arteries with the simple use of a tube endograft

  16. Transretroperitoneal CT-guided Embolization of Growing Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysm after Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: A Transretroperitoneal Approach with Intramuscular Lidocaine Injection Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of CT-guided embolization of internal iliac artery aneurysm (IIAA) after repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm by transretroperitoneal approach using the lidocaine injection technique to iliacus muscle, making window for safe needle path for three patients for whom CT-guided embolization of IIAA was performed by transretroperitoneal approach with intramuscular lidocaine injection technique. Transretroperitoneal access to the IIAA was successful in all three patients. In all three patients, the IIAA was first embolized using microcoils. The aneurysmal sac was then embolized with glue and coils without complication. With a mean follow-up of 7 months, the volume of the IIAAs remained stable without residual endoleaks. Transretroperitoneal CT-guided embolization of IIAA using intramuscular lidocaine injection technique is effective, safe, and results in good outcome

  17. Transretroperitoneal CT-guided Embolization of Growing Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysm after Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: A Transretroperitoneal Approach with Intramuscular Lidocaine Injection Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Joon Young, E-mail: pjy1331@hanmail.net; Kim, Shin Jung, E-mail: witdd2@hanmail.net; Kim, Hyoung Ook, E-mail: chaos821209@hanmail.net [Chonnam National University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Tae, E-mail: mono-111@hanmail.net [Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Nam Yeol, E-mail: apleseed@hanmail.net; Kim, Jae Kyu, E-mail: kjkrad@jnu.ac.kr [Chonnam National University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Sang Young, E-mail: sycpvts@jnu.ac.kr; Choi, Soo Jin Na, E-mail: choisjn@jnu.ac.kr; Lee, Ho Kyun, E-mail: mhaha@hanmail.net [Chonnam National University Hospital, Department of Surgery (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of CT-guided embolization of internal iliac artery aneurysm (IIAA) after repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm by transretroperitoneal approach using the lidocaine injection technique to iliacus muscle, making window for safe needle path for three patients for whom CT-guided embolization of IIAA was performed by transretroperitoneal approach with intramuscular lidocaine injection technique. Transretroperitoneal access to the IIAA was successful in all three patients. In all three patients, the IIAA was first embolized using microcoils. The aneurysmal sac was then embolized with glue and coils without complication. With a mean follow-up of 7 months, the volume of the IIAAs remained stable without residual endoleaks. Transretroperitoneal CT-guided embolization of IIAA using intramuscular lidocaine injection technique is effective, safe, and results in good outcome.

  18. Blood flow dynamic improvement with aneurysm repair detected by a patient-specific model of multiple aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sughimoto, Koichi; Takahara, Yoshiharu; Mogi, Kenji; Yamazaki, Kenji; Tsubota, Ken'ichi; Liang, Fuyou; Liu, Hao

    2014-05-01

    Aortic aneurysms may cause the turbulence of blood flow and result in the energy loss of the blood flow, while grafting of the dilated aorta may ameliorate these hemodynamic disturbances, contributing to the alleviation of the energy efficiency of blood flow delivery. However, evaluating of the energy efficiency of blood flow in an aortic aneurysm has been technically difficult to estimate and not comprehensively understood yet. We devised a multiscale computational biomechanical model, introducing novel flow indices, to investigate a single male patient with multiple aortic aneurysms. Preoperative levels of wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index (OSI) were elevated but declined after staged grafting procedures: OSI decreased from 0.280 to 0.257 (first operation) and 0.221 (second operation). Graftings may strategically counter the loss of efficient blood delivery to improve hemodynamics of the aorta. The energy efficiency of blood flow also improved postoperatively. Novel indices of pulsatile pressure index (PPI) and pulsatile energy loss index (PELI) were evaluated to characterize and quantify energy loss of pulsatile blood flow. Mean PPI decreased from 0.445 to 0.423 (first operation) and 0.359 (second operation), respectively; while the preoperative PELI of 0.986 dropped to 0.820 and 0.831. Graftings contributed not only to ameliorate wall shear stress or oscillatory shear index but also to improve efficient blood flow. This patient-specific modeling will help in analyzing the mechanism of aortic aneurysm formation and may play an important role in quantifying the energy efficiency or loss in blood delivery. PMID:23852404

  19. Antithrombin can modulate coagulation, cytokine production, and expression of adhesion molecules in abdominal aortic aneurysm repair surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Tomoki

    2006-04-01

    We investigated the effects of antithrombin on coagulation, fibrinolysis, and production of cytokines and adhesion molecules in abdominal aortic aneurysm repair surgery. Sixteen patients for Y-shaped graft replacement of abdominal aortic aneurysm were divided into an antithrombin group and a control group. In the antithrombin group, 3000 U antithrombin was infused over 30 min before heparin administration and 24 h later. White blood cell counts, platelet counts, prothrombin time ratio, and serum concentrations of antithrombin, polymorphonuclear leukocyte elastase, interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and adhesion molecules, and variables of coagulation and fibrinolysis were measured before surgery, at the end of surgery, and 1 and 2 days after surgery. The antithrombin concentration decreased in the control group, whereas it increased in the antithrombin group with significant differences between the groups. Prothrombin time ratio, concentrations of d-dimer, thrombin-antithrombin complex, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 increased only in the control group and polymorphonuclear leukocyte elastase, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 increased in both groups. They were significantly less in the antithrombin group except for intercellular adhesion molecule-1. In conclusion, antithrombin could decrease hypercoagulation and inflammatory activation during abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery, which may decrease adverse events. PMID:16551889

  20. Study Design of PROCEDURE Study. A Randomized Comparison of the Dose-Dependent Effects of Pitavastatin in Patients with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Massive Aortic Atheroma: Prevention of Cholesterol Embolization during Endovascular and Open Aneurysm Repair with Pitavastatin (PROCEDURE) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemoto, Masaru; Hashimoto, Takuya; Miura, Sumio; Urabe, Go; Nakazawa, Tatsu; Hosaka, Akihiro; Kato, Masaaki; Ohkubo, Nobukazu; Miyairi, Takeshi; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Shigematsu, Kunihiro; Miyata, Tetsuro

    2013-01-01

    Outcomes of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair have improved in the 2 decades since the emergence of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). However, EVAR is considered a contraindication for shaggy aorta because of the high risk of shower embolization. Recently, statins have been implicated in preventing embolization in patients with shaggy aorta via its pleiotropic effects, including atheroma reduction and coronary artery stabilization. We selected pitavastatin, a statin with potent effects, discovered and developed by a Japanese company because it has shown excellent pleiotropic effects on atheromatous arteries in the Japanese population. A randomized comparison study of dose-dependent effects of pitavastatin in patients with AAA with massive atheromatous aortic thrombus (PROCEDURE study) has begun. PROCEDURE has an enrollment goal of up to 80 patients with AAA with massive aortic atheroma (excluding intrasac atheroma), randomly allocated into 2 groups receiving pitavastatin at a dose of 1 or 4 mg/day. The endpoints of the PROCEDURE study include change in atheroma volume, major adverse events related to shower embolization after aneurysm repair, and lipid-lowering effects. When complete, results of the PROCEDURE study should provide objective evidence to use statins preoperatively for AAA with massive aortic atheroma. PMID:23641286

  1. Distal small bowel motility and lipid absorption in patients following abdominal aortic aneurysm repair surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert J Fraser; Paul Jury; John Dent; Marc Ritz; Addolorata C Di Matteo; Rosalie Vozzo; Monika Kwiatek; Robert Foreman; Brendan Stanley; Jack Walsh; Jim Burnett

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate distal small bowel motility and lipid absorption in patients following elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair surgery.METHODS: Nine patients (aged 35-78 years; body mass index (BMI) range: 23-36 kg/m2) post-surgery for AAA repair, and seven healthy control subjects (20-50 years;BMI range: 21-29 kg/m2) were studied. Continuous distal small bowel manometry was performed for up to 72 h, during periods of fasting and enteral feeding (Nutrison(R)). Recordings were analyzed for the frequency,origin, length of migration, and direction of small intestinal burst activity. Lipid absorption was assessed on the first day and the third day post surgery in a subset of patients using the 13C-triolein-breath test, and compared with healthy controls. Subjects received a 20-min intraduodenal infusion of 50 mL liquid feed mixed with 200 μL 13C-triolein. End-expiratory breath samples were collected for 6 h and analyzed for 13CO2 concentration.RESULTS: The frequency of burst activity in the proximal and distal small intestine was higher in patients than in healthy subjects, under both fasting and fed conditions (P<0.005). In patients there was a higher proportion of abnormally propagated bursts (71% abnormal), which began to normalize by d 3 (25% abnormal) post-surgery.Lipid absorption data was available for seven patients on d 1 and four patients on d 3 post surgery. In patients,absorption on d 1 post-surgery was half that of healthy control subjects (AUC 13CO2 1323 ± 244 vs 2 646 ±365;P< 0.05, respectively), and was reduced to the one-fifth that of healthy controls by d 3 (AUC 13CO2 470 ± 832 vs 2646 ± 365; P< 0.05, respectively).CONCLUSION: Both proximal and distal small intestinal motor activity are transiently disrupted in critically ill patients immediately after major surgery,with abnormal motility patterns extending as far as the ileum. These motor disturbances may contribute to impaired absorption of enteral nutrition, especially when

  2. Percutaneous Transabdominal Approach for the Treatment of Endoleaks after Endovascular Repair of Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sun Young; Lee, Do Yun; Lee, Kwang Hun [Severance Hospital, University of Yonsei, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Won, Jong Yun [Gangnam Severance Hospital, University of Yonsei, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Dong Hoon; Shim, Won Heum [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technical feasibility and clinical efficacy of percutaneous transabdominal treatment of endoleaks after endovascular aneurysm repair. Between 2000 and 2007, six patients with type I (n = 4) or II (n = 2) endoleaks were treated by the percutaneous transabdominal approach using embolization with N-butyl cyanoacrylate with or without coils. Five patients underwent a single session and one patient had two sessions of embolization. The median time between aneurysm repair and endoleak treatment was 25.5 months (range: 0-84 months). Follow-up CT images were evaluated for changes in the size and shape of the aneurysm sac and presence or resolution of endoleaks. The median follow-up after endoleak treatment was 16.4 months (range: 0-37 months). Technical success was achieved in all six patients. Clinical success was achieved in four patients with complete resolution of the endoleak confirmed by follow-up CT. Clinical failure was observed in two patients. One eventually underwent surgical conversion, and the other was lost to follow-up. There were no procedure-related complications. The percutaneous transabdominal approach for the treatment of type I or II endoleaks, after endovascular aneurysm repair, is an alternative method when conventional endovascular methods have failed.

  3. Using machine learning methods for predicting inhospital mortality in patients undergoing open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsalve-Torra, Ana; Ruiz-Fernandez, Daniel; Marin-Alonso, Oscar; Soriano-Payá, Antonio; Camacho-Mackenzie, Jaime; Carreño-Jaimes, Marisol

    2016-08-01

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm is an abnormal dilatation of the aortic vessel at abdominal level. This disease presents high rate of mortality and complications causing a decrease in the quality of life and increasing the cost of treatment. To estimate the mortality risk of patients undergoing surgery is complex due to the variables associated. The use of clinical decision support systems based on machine learning could help medical staff to improve the results of surgery and get a better understanding of the disease. In this work, the authors present a predictive system of inhospital mortality in patients who were undergoing to open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Different methods as multilayer perceptron, radial basis function and Bayesian networks are used. Results are measured in terms of accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of the classifiers, achieving an accuracy higher than 95%. The developing of a system based on the algorithms tested can be useful for medical staff in order to make a better planning of care and reducing undesirable surgery results and the cost of the post-surgical treatments. PMID:27395372

  4. Abdominal aortic aneurysm demonstrated on renal scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phisitkul, Sorot; Brian, Susan; Rakvit, Ariwan; Jenkins, Leigh A; Bohannon, W Todd; Harris, Jennifer; Tsikouris, James; Silva, Michael B; Meyerrose, Gary E

    2003-08-01

    A 74-year-old hypertensive woman presented with abdominal discomfort and a pulsatile abdominal mass. Anterior abdominal angiography during cardiac blood pool, and renal scintigraphic imaging demonstrated a large abdominal aortic aneurysm. 1, 2 Before endovascular repair with an aortoiliac endograft, the abdominal aneurysm measured 7.5 x 7.0 cm on abdominal computed tomography. This study demonstrates that a suspected abdominal aortic aneurysm can be confirmed using the addition of anterior abdominal imaging with normal posterior imaging at the time of renal scintigraphy. PMID:12897671

  5. Seventeen Years’ Experience of Late Open Surgical Conversion after Failed Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair with 13 Variant Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Ziheng, E-mail: wuziheng303@hotmail.com [Zhejiang University, Department of Vascular Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine (China); Xu, Liang, E-mail: maxalive@163.com [Zhejiang University, Department of Neurosurgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine (China); Qu, Lefeng, E-mail: qulefeng@gmail.com [The Second Military Medical University, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Changzheng Hospital (China); Raithel, Dieter, E-mail: dieter.raithel@rzmail.uni-erlangen.de [Nuremberg Southern Hospital, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo investigate the causes and results of late open surgical conversion (LOSC) after failed abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) and to summarize our 17 years’ experience with 13 various endografts.MethodsRetrospective data from August 1994 to January 2011 were analyzed at our center. The various devices’ implant time, the types of devices, the rates and causes of LOSC, and the procedures and results of LOSC were analyzed and evaluated.ResultsA total of 1729 endovascular aneurysm repairs were performed in our single center (Nuremberg South Hospital) with 13 various devices within 17 years. The median follow-up period was 51 months (range 9–119 months). Among them, 77 patients with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms received LOSC. The LOSC rate was 4.5 % (77 of 1729). The LOSC rates were significantly different before and after January 2002 (p < 0.001). The reasons of LOSC were mainly large type I endoleaks (n = 51) that were hard to repair by endovascular techniques. For the LOSC procedure, 71 cases were elective and 6 were emergent. The perioperative mortality was 5.2 % (4 of 77): 1 was elective (due to septic shock) and 3 were urgent (due to hemorrhagic shock).ConclusionLarge type I endoleaks were the main reasons for LOSC. The improvement of devices and operators’ experience may decrease the LOSC rate. Urgent LOSC resulted in a high mortality rate, while selective LOSC was relatively safe with significantly lower mortality rate. Early intervention, full preparation, and timely LOSC are important for patients who require LOSC.

  6. Seventeen Years’ Experience of Late Open Surgical Conversion after Failed Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair with 13 Variant Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PurposeTo investigate the causes and results of late open surgical conversion (LOSC) after failed abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) and to summarize our 17 years’ experience with 13 various endografts.MethodsRetrospective data from August 1994 to January 2011 were analyzed at our center. The various devices’ implant time, the types of devices, the rates and causes of LOSC, and the procedures and results of LOSC were analyzed and evaluated.ResultsA total of 1729 endovascular aneurysm repairs were performed in our single center (Nuremberg South Hospital) with 13 various devices within 17 years. The median follow-up period was 51 months (range 9–119 months). Among them, 77 patients with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms received LOSC. The LOSC rate was 4.5 % (77 of 1729). The LOSC rates were significantly different before and after January 2002 (p < 0.001). The reasons of LOSC were mainly large type I endoleaks (n = 51) that were hard to repair by endovascular techniques. For the LOSC procedure, 71 cases were elective and 6 were emergent. The perioperative mortality was 5.2 % (4 of 77): 1 was elective (due to septic shock) and 3 were urgent (due to hemorrhagic shock).ConclusionLarge type I endoleaks were the main reasons for LOSC. The improvement of devices and operators’ experience may decrease the LOSC rate. Urgent LOSC resulted in a high mortality rate, while selective LOSC was relatively safe with significantly lower mortality rate. Early intervention, full preparation, and timely LOSC are important for patients who require LOSC

  7. Abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gefke, K; Schroeder, T V; Thisted, B; Olsen, P S; Perko, M J; Agerskov, Kim; Røder, O; Lorentzen, Jørgen Ewald

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify patients who need longer care in the ICU (more than 48 hours) following abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery and to evaluate the influence of perioperative complications on short- and long-term survival and quality of life. AAA surgery was performed in 55......, 78% stated that their quality of life had improved or was unchanged after surgery and had resumed working. These data justify a therapeutically aggressive approach, including ICU therapy following AAA surgery, despite failure of one or more organ systems.......The goal of this study was to identify patients who need longer care in the ICU (more than 48 hours) following abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery and to evaluate the influence of perioperative complications on short- and long-term survival and quality of life. AAA surgery was performed in 553...

  8. Cell washing versus immediate reinfusion of intraoperatively shed blood during abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, G W; Glover, J L; Bendick, P J; Brown, O W; Kitzmiller, J W; Lombness, P; Hanson, D

    1993-08-01

    Significant hematologic changes are known to occur following intraoperative autotransfusion of shed blood, but the clinical importance of cell washing prior to reinfusion has not been substantiated. To evaluate these changes and their relationship to the use of blood bank products and postoperative morbidity, 26 patients undergoing elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair were prospectively randomized to reinfusion with washed shed blood or to the use of a collection system in which filtered, but unwashed, whole blood was reinfused intraoperatively. Each patient was evaluated with respect to standard metabolic and hematologic laboratory parameters preoperatively, immediately postoperatively, and 12 to 18 hours postoperatively. Patient demographic data were similar for both groups. Perioperative survival was 100% for both groups. Total blood loss and blood volume autotransfused were significantly greater in the unwashed cell group compared with the washed cell group (p = 0.00014 and p = 0.00011, respectively). Hemoglobin, fibrinogen, prothrombin time, and partial thromboplastin time levels were not significantly different between the two groups at any time perioperatively; fibrin split product and d-dimer levels were significantly higher in the unwashed cell group postoperatively (p = 0.016 and p < 0.001, respectively). Serum free hemoglobin levels were significantly higher in the immediate postoperative period in the unwashed cell group compared with the washed cell group (p = 0.0013); by 12 to 18 hours postoperatively, this difference was not significant. Haptoglobin levels were significantly lower in the unwashed cell group at both postoperative times (123 +/- 86 mg/dL versus 41 +/- 50 mg/dL, p = 0.0086; 102 +/- 66 mg/dL versus 24 +/- 36 mg/dL, p = 0.0001); however, there was no perioperative renal failure in either group. Furthermore, homologous blood product use was not significantly different between the two groups, with an average of 1.5 +/- 2.5 units of

  9. Bilateral prevascular herniae – A rare complication of aorto-uniiliac endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair and femoro-femoral bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obinna Obinwa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of a 78-year-old female with bilateral groin prevascular herniae following an emergency aorto-uniiliac EVAR and femoro-femoral bypass for a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm is presented. Primary repair of the herniae was achieved using a preperitoneal approach. The case emphasises a safe approach to dealing with this rare complication.

  10. Graft Distortion After Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Association with Sac Morphology and Mid-Term Complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence, significance, and mechanism of stent-graft distortion after endovascular repair (EVR) of abdominal aortic aneurysm.Methods: EVR of abdominal aortic aneurysm was performed in 51 cases (49 modular, bifurcated; 2 tube). Thirty-two patients were followed for 6 or more months and had equivalent baseline and follow-up images which could be used to determine changes in graft configuration. Sac dimensions were measured using computed tomographic (CT) images and graft-related complications were recorded.Results: Amongst 32 patients evaluated on follow-up, there was graft distortion in 24. Distorted grafts were significantly (p= 0.002) associated with sac diameter reduction (mean 5 mm) and sac length reduction (mean 8.1 mm). All graft-related complications occurred in the limbs of eight distorted grafts, with a mean reduction of sac length in this group of 7.8 mm on reformatted CT images.Conclusion: There was a highly significant association between graft distortion and limb complications, and reduced sac dimensions

  11. Enhanced Recovery after Elective Open Surgical Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: A Complementary Overview through a Pooled Analysis of Proportions from Case Series Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Gurgel, Sanderland J. T.; Regina El Dib; Paulo do Nascimento

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) programs in elective open surgical repair (OSR) of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). BACKGROUND: Open surgical repair of AAA is associated with high morbidity and mortality, prolonged hospital stay and high costs. ERAS programs contribute to the optimization of treatment by reducing hospital stay and improving clinical outcomes. METHODS: A review of PubMed, EMBASE and LILACS databases was conducted. As on...

  12. Thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfinger, Judith Z; Halperin, Jonathan L; Marin, Michael L; Stewart, Allan S; Eagle, Kim A; Fuster, Valentin

    2014-10-21

    Aortic dissection is the most devastating complication of thoracic aortic disease. In the more than 250 years since thoracic aortic dissection was first described, much has been learned about diseases of the thoracic aorta. In this review, we describe normal thoracic aortic size; risk factors for dissection, including genetic and inflammatory conditions; the underpinnings of genetic diseases associated with aneurysm and dissection, including Marfan syndrome and the role of transforming growth factor beta signaling; data on the role for medical therapies in aneurysmal disease, including beta-blockers, angiotensin receptor blockers, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors; prophylactic surgery for aneurysm; surgical techniques for the aortic root; and surgical and endovascular management of aneurysm and dissection for different aortic segments. PMID:25323262

  13. Emergency Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair in a Patient with Failing Heart: Axillofemoral Bypass Using a Centrifugal Pump Combined with Levosimendan for Inotropic Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Michalek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of an 83-year-old patient requiring repair of a large symptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA. The patient was known to have coronary artery disease (CAD with symptoms and signs of significant myocardial dysfunction, left-heart failure, and severe aortic insufficiency. The procedure was performed with the help of both mechanical and pharmacological circulatory support. Distal perfusion was provided by an axillofemoral bypass with a centrifugal pump, with dobutamine and levosimendan administered as pharmacological inotropic support. The patient's hemodynamic status was monitored with continuous cardiac output monitoring and transesophageal echocardiography. No serious circulatory complications were recorded during the perioperative and postoperative periods. This paper suggests a potential novel approach to combined circulatory support in patients with heart failure, scheduled for open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

  14. Tobacco smoking and aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sode, Birgitte F; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Grønbæk, Morten;

    2012-01-01

    from the Copenhagen City Heart Study followed for up to 34years and in 56,211 individuals from the Copenhagen General Population Study followed for up to 7years. RESULTS: During follow-up, 335 and 169 individuals developed aortic aneurysm outcomes in the Copenhagen City Heart Study and Copenhagen...... General Population Study, respectively. According to the magnitude of the hazard ratios, tobacco consumption was the most important risk factor for hospitalization and death from aortic aneurysm, followed by male sex and hypertension in both cohorts. The population attributable risk of aortic aneurysm...... outcomes due to tobacco consumption was 64% and 47% in the Copenhagen City Heart Study and Copenhagen General Population Study, respectively, and ranked highest among population attributable risks of aortic aneurysm in both cohorts. The absolute 10-year risk for hospitalization or death from aortic...

  15. Sex differences in 30-day and 5-year outcomes after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms in the EUROSTAR study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grootenboer, Nathalie; Hunink, M G Myriam; Hendriks, Johanna M; van Sambeek, Marc R H M; Buth, Jaap

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of sex on 30-day and long-term outcomes after elective endovascular aneurysm repair.......The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of sex on 30-day and long-term outcomes after elective endovascular aneurysm repair....

  16. ABDOMINAL AORTIC ANEURYSM (AAA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh G

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available AAA is defined as a distension of the infrarenal aorta by more than 50% (or 1.5 times compared with a corresponding healthy, aged and gender matched population. AAA afflicts 1 to 6 % of the general population aged more than 60 years and the incidence rises by approximately 0.15% annually. When the definition of a maximum external diameter ≥3 cm is used, the prevalence of AAA is upto 6 times greater in men than in women. AAAs are much more common than thoracic aortic aneurysms. Most common cause of AAA is atherosclerosis (95%. Less common causes include infectious or inflammatory origin or those associated with connective tissue disorders. Process of AAA formation is multifactorial. Other than the general risk factors for atherosclerosis, genetic predispo s iti on, aut o immunity and hemodynamic factors all play roles in its formation. AAA is 1.5 times more frequent in hypert ensive patients. Smokers have 8 times risk for developing AAA. The existence of familial aggre gation of AAA implicates genetic factors in the etiology of AAA. Women with AAA are more likely to have a positive family history of this disorder. Those with a family history of AAA have an increased risk of 30%, and their aneurysms tend to occur at a younger age and carry a greater risk of rupture than do sporadic aneurysms.

  17. [Novel strategy for thoracoabdomianl aortic aneurysm repair; intraoperative selective perfusion of the Adamkiewicz artery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsubo, S; Furukawa, K; Rikitake, K; Okazaki, Y; Sato, M; Natsuaki, M; Matsumoto, K; Kato, A; Kudo, S; Itoh, T

    2004-04-01

    We report our method for delineating the Adamkiewicz artery using multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) with selective perfusion using a distal perfusion cannula that is clinically available for off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB). The tip of a distal perfusion catheter (Medtronic Quickflow, Minneapolis) designed for OPCAB was applicable for selective perfusion of the segmental arteries. The femoro-femoral venoarterial bypass was branched off into selective perfusion of the segmental arteries, using an independent roller pump and heat exchanger. Our method of visualization of the Adamkiewicz artery was MDCT scanning with injection of contrast medium directly into the proximal descending aorta: namely, "CT during aortography". Lower descending aorta to abdominal aorta (the range involving the aneurysm) was scanned in a cephalad-to-caudal direction using a detector collimation of 4 x 1.25 mm with a table speed of 9.4 mm/sec, pitch of 6, and image thickness of 1.25 mm. All images were reviewed on a workstation to investigate the continuity between the Adamkiewicz artery and its proximal segmental artery with paging, mulitplanar reformation and curved planar reformation. Distal perfusion cannulae of 2.0 mm in diameter were inserted into the respective intercostal arteries. 4-0 polyethylene sutures were placed to tourniquet the catheters. Segmental arteries were perfused with total flow of approximately 80 ml/min at a circuit pressure of 120 mmHg. Reattachment of the ninth intercostal arteries related to the Adamkiewicz artery was carried out. A total of 6 consecutive 6 patients with thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) have undergone graft replacement by the methods described, since April 2002. All patients survived surgery without any neurological complications. This method is expected to minimize the ischemic time of the spinal cord and attenuate the reperfusion injury. PMID:15071861

  18. Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair with the Talent Stent-Graft: Outcomes in Patients with Large Iliac Arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to report outcomes following endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in patients with ectatic common iliac arteries (CIAs). Of 117 AAA patients treated by EVAR between 1998 and 2005, 87 (74%) had CIAs diameters 18 but <25 mm. All patients were treated with Talent stent-grafts, 114 bifurcated and 3 AUI devices. Departmental databases and patient records were reviewed to assess outcomes. Technical success, iliac-related outcome, and iliac-related reintervention (IRSI) were analyzed. Patients with EVAR extending into the external iliac artery were excluded. Median (range) follow-up for the study group was 24 (1-84) months. Initial technical success was 98% for CIAs <18 mm and 100% for CIAs ≥18 mm (p = 0.551). There were three distal type I endoleaks (two in the ectatic group) and six iliac limb occlusions (one in an ectatic patient); there were no statistically significant differences between groups (p = 0.4). There were nine IRSIs (three stent-graft extensions, six femorofemoral crossover grafts); three of these patients had one or both CIAs ≥18 mm (p = 0.232). One-year freedom from IRSI was 92% ± 3% and 84% ± 9% for the <18-mm and ≥18-mm CIA groups, respectively (p = 0.232). We conclude that the treatment of AAA by EVAR in patients with CIAs 18-24 mm appears to be safe and effective, however, it may be associated with more frequent reinterventions.

  19. Can Surgeons Assess CT Suitability for Endovascular Repair (EVAR) in Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm? Implications for a Ruptured EVAR Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether surgeons without formal radiological training are able to assess suitability of patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) for EVAR. The CT scans of 20 patients with AAA were reviewed under timed conditions by six vascular surgeons. Twenty minutes was allocated per scan. They were asked to determine if each aneurysm would be treatable by EVAR in the emergency setting and, if so, to measure for device selection. The results were then compared with those of a vascular radiologist. Six surgeons agreed on the suitability of endovascular repair in 45% of cases (95% CI, 23.1-68.5%; 9/20 scans; κ = 0.41 [p = 0.01]) and concurred with the radiologist in eight of these. Individually, agreement ranged from 13 to 16 of the 20 scans, 65-80% between surgeons. The kappa value for agreement between all the surgeons and the radiologist was 0.47 (p = 0.01, moderate agreement). For the individual surgeons, this ranged from 0.3 to 0.6 (p = 0.01). In conclusion, while overall agreement was moderate between the surgeons and the radiologist, it is clear that if surgeons are to assess patients for ruptured EVAR in the future, focused training of surgical trainees is required.

  20. Medium-Term Outcomes Following Endovascular Repair of Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms with an Unfavourable Proximal Neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Prakash, E-mail: prakash.2.saha@kcl.ac.uk; Hughes, John, E-mail: johnhughes387@rocketmail.com; Patel, Ashish S., E-mail: ashish.s.patel@kcl.ac.uk; Donati, Tommaso, E-mail: tommaso.donati@gstt.nhs.uk; Sallam, Morad, E-mail: morad.sallam@gstt.nhs.uk; Patel, Sanjay D., E-mail: sanjay.patel@gstt.nhs.uk; Bell, Rachel E. [King’s Health Partners, Department of Vascular Surgery, Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom); Katsanos, Konstantinos, E-mail: katsanos@med.upatras.gr [King’s Health Partners, Department of Interventional Radiology, Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom); Modarai, Bijan, E-mail: bijan.modarai@kcl.ac.uk; Zayed, Hany A., E-mail: hany.zayed@gstt.nhs.uk [King’s Health Partners, Department of Vascular Surgery, Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to evaluate medium-term outcomes following endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVAR) with unfavourable neck anatomy using stent grafts with a 36 mm or larger proximal diameter.Materials and MethodsA retrospective review of 27 patients who underwent elective EVAR between 2006 and 2008 using a stent graft with a 36 mm or larger proximal diameter was carried out. All patients had computed tomography angiography (CTA) for procedure planning, and detailed assessment of the aneurysm neck was performed using a three-dimensional CTA workstation. Patients were followed up with CTA at 3 and 12 months and annual duplex thereafter.ResultsThe median aneurysm diameter was 7 cm, and the median aneurysm neck diameter was 31 mm. Cook Zenith stent grafts were used in all patients, with a proximal diameter of 36 mm (n = 25) and 40 mm (n = 2). Primary and assisted primary technical success rates were 74 and 93 %, respectively. The follow-up period ranged from 62 to 84 months, with a median of 72 months. 15 patients died during follow-up. Two patients died from aortic rupture, and the remaining patients died from cardiac disease (n = 4), chest sepsis (n = 6), cancer (n = 2) and renal failure (n = 1). Complications included type I endoleak (n = 5), limb occlusion (n = 2), limb stenosis (n = 2), limb kinking (n = 1), dissection of an artery (n = 1), occlusion of a femorofemoral cross-over graft (n = 1) and poor attachment of a distal limb (n = 1).ConclusionsEVAR using stent grafts in the presence of an unfavourable neck has a high risk of complications. Medium-term survival in this group is low but mainly due to patient co-morbidities.

  1. Medium-Term Outcomes Following Endovascular Repair of Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms with an Unfavourable Proximal Neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to evaluate medium-term outcomes following endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVAR) with unfavourable neck anatomy using stent grafts with a 36 mm or larger proximal diameter.Materials and MethodsA retrospective review of 27 patients who underwent elective EVAR between 2006 and 2008 using a stent graft with a 36 mm or larger proximal diameter was carried out. All patients had computed tomography angiography (CTA) for procedure planning, and detailed assessment of the aneurysm neck was performed using a three-dimensional CTA workstation. Patients were followed up with CTA at 3 and 12 months and annual duplex thereafter.ResultsThe median aneurysm diameter was 7 cm, and the median aneurysm neck diameter was 31 mm. Cook Zenith stent grafts were used in all patients, with a proximal diameter of 36 mm (n = 25) and 40 mm (n = 2). Primary and assisted primary technical success rates were 74 and 93 %, respectively. The follow-up period ranged from 62 to 84 months, with a median of 72 months. 15 patients died during follow-up. Two patients died from aortic rupture, and the remaining patients died from cardiac disease (n = 4), chest sepsis (n = 6), cancer (n = 2) and renal failure (n = 1). Complications included type I endoleak (n = 5), limb occlusion (n = 2), limb stenosis (n = 2), limb kinking (n = 1), dissection of an artery (n = 1), occlusion of a femorofemoral cross-over graft (n = 1) and poor attachment of a distal limb (n = 1).ConclusionsEVAR using stent grafts in the presence of an unfavourable neck has a high risk of complications. Medium-term survival in this group is low but mainly due to patient co-morbidities

  2. Combined surgical and catheter-based treatment of extensive thoracic aortic aneurysm and aortic valve stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Backer, Ole; Lönn, Lars; Søndergaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    An extensive thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) is a potentially life-threatening condition and remains a technical challenge to surgeons. Over the past decade, repair of aortic arch aneurysms has been accomplished using both hybrid (open and endovascular) and totally endovascular techniques. Thoraci...

  3. Predictors of Outcome after Open Repair of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao-Jui Li

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: To determine predictors associated with early hospital death, 30-day mortality, and long-term survival after open surgical treatment of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (RAAAs.Methods: A retrospective chart review of 127 consecutive patients who received opensurgical treatment of a RAAA at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan,from February 1994 to May 2007. Data recorded included patient characteristics, medical history, perioperative variables, and outcomes.Results: There were 104 men and 23 women with a mean age of 70Ų12 years in theanalysis. Patients with RAAAs were classified into two groups; 100 (78.7%patients were classified as group I (hemodynamically stable, and 27 (21.3%patients were classified as group II (hemodynamically unstable at arrival.T h e 3 0 - d a y mo r t a l i t y wa s 2 2% f o r g r o u p I a n d 7 4 . 1% f o r g r o u p I I .Multivariate analysis identified age > 75 years old (odds ratio [OR], 0.083;95% confidence interval [CI] 0.02-0.36, hemodynamically unstable state(OR, 0.081; 95% CI 0.016-0.4, blood transfusion > 5 L (OR, 0.14; 95% CI0.038-0.54, intraperitoneal rupture (OR, 7.2; 95% CI 1.4-36, urine output 75 years old, intraperitoneal rupture, lowintraoperative urine output, and suprarenal cross-clamping.

  4. Coagulation and fibrinolysis after open infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in a long-term perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, A; Bergqvist, D; Siegbahn, A

    1999-10-15

    In patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems have been found to be activated preoperatively. Does the increased activity of the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems persist after AAA surgery in a long-term perspective? Prothrombin fragment 1+2 (F1+2), thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT), tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), human plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, and human cross-linked fibrin degradation product (D-dimer) were analysed in 18 patients after open AAA surgery (postop-AAA). The median time between surgery and blood sampling was 19 months (range, 5-37 months). Comparisons were made with both preoperative values of 23 patients with AAA (preop-AAA) as well as 20 age-matched healthy controls (AMC). F1+2, TAT, and D-dimer in preop-AAA were significantly higher compared to AMC (pD-dimer). However, TAT and D-dimer levels were still higher in postop-AAA than in AMC (paneurysmal sac but still higher than in a nonaneurysmal aorta. PMID:10574587

  5. Effects of postimplantation systemic inflammatory response on long-term clinical outcomes after endovascular aneurysm repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyunwook; Ko, Gi-Young; Kim, Min-Ju; Han, Youngjin; Noh, Minsu; Kwon, Tae-Won; Cho, Yong-Pil

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the association between postimplantation syndrome (PIS) and long-term clinical outcomes after elective endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of an abdominal aortic aneurysm.In this single-center, observational cohort study, a total of 204 consecutive patients undergoing EVAR were included. Primary outcome was long-term mortality from any cause; secondary outcomes included long-term mortality, systemic or implant-related complications, and secondary therapeutic procedures.The diagnosis of PIS was established in 64 patients (31.4%). PIS patients were more likely to receive woven polyester endografts and have a longer postoperative hospital stay and lower incidence of type II endoleaks. In multivariate analysis, PIS was significantly associated with a decreased risk of developing type II endoleaks (P = 0.044). During follow-up period of 44 months, clinical outcomes showed no significant differences in mortality (P = 0.876), systemic (P = 0.668), or implant-related complications (P = 0.847), although rates of secondary therapeutic procedure were significantly higher in non-PIS patients (P = 0.037). The groups had similar rates of overall survival (P = 0.761) and other clinical outcomes (P = 0.562).Patients with and without PIS had similar long-term overall survival rates and other clinical outcomes. PIS was beneficial in preventing type II endoleaks during postoperative period. PMID:27512875

  6. PCA-induced respiratory depression simulating stroke following endoluminal repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Javed

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim To report a case of severe respiratory depression with PCA fentanyl use simulating stroke in a patient who underwent routine elective endoluminal graft repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA Case presentation A 78-year-old obese lady underwent routine endoluminal graft repair for AAA that was progressively increasing in size. Following an uneventful operation postoperative analgesia was managed with a patient-controlled analgesia (PCA device with fentanyl. On the morning following operation the patient was found to be unusually drowsy and unresponsive to stimuli. Her GCS level was 11 with plantars upgoing bilaterally. A provisional diagnosis of stroke was made. Urgent transfer to a high-dependency unit (HDU was arranged and she was given ventilatory support with a BiPap device. CT was performed and found to be normal. Arterial blood gas (ABG analysis showed respiratory acidosis with PaCO2 81 mmHg, PaO2 140 mmHg, pH 7.17 and base excess -2 mmol/l. A total dose of 600 mcg of fentanyl was self-administered in the 16 hours following emergence from general anaesthesia. Naloxone was given with good effect. There was an increase in the creatinine level from 90 μmol/L preoperatively to 167 μmol/L on the first postoperative day. The patient remained on BiPap for two days that resulted in marked improvement in gas exchange. Recovery was complete.

  7. Novel Molecular Imaging Approaches to Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Risk Stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toczek, Jakub; Meadows, Judith L; Sadeghi, Mehran M

    2016-01-01

    Selection of patients for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair is currently based on aneurysm size, growth rate, and symptoms. Molecular imaging of biological processes associated with aneurysm growth and rupture, for example, inflammation and matrix remodeling, could improve patient risk stratification and lead to a reduction in abdominal aortic aneurysm morbidity and mortality. (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography and ultrasmall superparamagnetic particles of iron oxide magnetic resonance imaging are 2 novel approaches to abdominal aortic aneurysm imaging evaluated in clinical trials. A variety of other tracers, including those that target inflammatory cells and proteolytic enzymes (eg, integrin αvβ3 and matrix metalloproteinases), have proven effective in preclinical models of abdominal aortic aneurysm and show great potential for clinical translation. PMID:26763279

  8. Infectious or Noninfectious? Ruptured, Thrombosed Inflammatory Aortic Aneurysm with Spondylolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanczyk, Ludomir; Elgalal, Marcin, E-mail: telgalal@yahoo.co.uk [Medical University of Lodz, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging (Poland); Papiewski, Andrzej [Medical University of Lodz, Department of Gastroenterological Surgery (Poland); Szubert, Wojciech [Medical University of Lodz, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging (Poland); Szopinski, Piotr [Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, Clinic of Vascular Surgery (Poland)

    2013-06-15

    Osteolysis of vertebrae due to inflammatory aortic aneurysm is rarely observed. However, it is estimated that up to 10 % of infectious aneurysms coexist with bone tissue destruction, most commonly the vertebrae. Inflammatory aneurysms with no identified infection factor, along with infiltration of adjacent muscle and in particular extensive destruction of bone tissue have rarely been described in the literature. A case of inflammatory aneurysm with posterior wall rupture and inflammatory infiltration of the iliopsoas muscle and spine, together with extensive vertebral body destruction, is presented. The aneurysm was successfully treated with endovascular aneurysm repair EVAR.

  9. Near-infrared spectroscopy assessed cerebral oxygenation during open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Henrik; Nielsen, H B; Secher, N H

    2016-01-01

    not prevent an increase in ScO2 by 2 % (-1 to 4; P < 0.001) as EtCO2 increased 0.5 kPa (0.1-1.0; P < 0.001) despite an increase in ventilation by 1.8 l min(-1) (0.9-2.7; P < 0.001). Changes in ScO2 related to those in EtCO2 (r = 0.41; P = 0.0001) and cerebral deoxygenation (-15 %) was noted in three......During open abdominal aortic aneurism (AAA) repair cerebral blood flow is challenged. Clamping of the aorta may lead to unintended hyperventilation as metabolism is reduced by perfusion of a smaller part of the body and reperfusion of the aorta releases vasodilatory substances including CO2. We...... intend to adjust ventilation according end-tidal CO2 tension (EtCO2) and here evaluated to what extent that strategy maintains frontal lobe oxygenation (ScO2) as determined by near infrared spectroscopy. For 44 patients [5 women, aged 70 (48-83) years] ScO2, mean arterial pressure (MAP), EtCO2, and...

  10. “Open” repair of ruptured thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (experience of 51 cases)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, Piero Paolo; Walas, Ryszard; Cebotaru, Theodor; Popa, Calin; Vintila, Bogdan; Steiu, Flaviu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Surgical treatment of toracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAA) represents a difficult problem for the vascular surgeon and may become a formidable challenge in an emergency procedure. In patient with hemodynamic instability, protective measures as cerebral spinal fluid drainage and bio-pump against spinal cord, visceral and renal ischemia, may be ineffective or impracticable. Material and methods We report our experience of 51 emergency-operated patients with TAAA out of 660 treated between 1994 and 2014; 48 patients (94%) were hemodynamically unstable, 3 (6%) were hemodynamically stable. The TAAA patients were evaluated, according to Crawford classification, as: 18 type I, 13 type II, 15 type III, 5 type IV. Results Overall mortality was 23 cases out of 51 (43.1%); 8 deaths occurred during the surgical procedure and 14 in the postoperative period. Early deaths, subdivided by Crawford TAAA classification, were: type I 9/18 (50%), type II 9/13 (69.2%), type III 7/15 (46.6%), type IV 3/5 (60%). Paraplegia-paraparesis developed in 6 cases out of 43 (16.2%), excluding 8 deaths during the operative procedure. Acute renal failure was observed in 8 out of 43 patients (18.6%). Dialysis was found to be a risk factor for hospital mortality (p = 0.03). Pulmonary insufficiency was diagnosed in 15 patients out of 43 (34.8%), and 5 patients (15.5%) needed tracheostomy, out of whom 3 died (p = 0.04%). Postoperative bleeding was present in 8 cases out of 43 (18.6%). Inferior laryngeal nerve palsy was present in 6 cases out of 43 (13.5%). The follow-up period comprised 1-3-5-10 years postoperative follow-up. The actuarial survival rate of patients discharged from hospital was respectively 75%, 63%, 48%, 35%. Conclusions In the literature there are very few studies published on emergency treatment for TAAA. Having usually low numbers of patients in the groups wider experiences are still needed to give more light on the pathophysiology and surgical treatment of this type

  11. Sealing zones have a greater influence than iliac anatomy on the occurrence of limb occlusion following endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoudal, Anne; Cardon, Alain; Verhoye, Jean-Philippe; Clochard, Elodie; Lucas, Antoine; Kaladji, Adrien

    2016-06-01

    Limb occlusion is a well-known complication following endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR), and it very often leads to reoperation. The aim of this study is to identify predictive factors for limb occlusion following EVAR. Two hundred and twenty-four patients undergoing EVAR between 2004 and 2012 were included in this retrospective study. Demographics, anatomic, and follow-up data were compared between two groups (with or without thrombosis). Preoperative anatomy was analyzed with a dedicated workstation, using the Society of Vascular Surgery reporting standards. Eleven (4.9%) patients presented with a limb occlusion during follow-up (46 ± 12 months). Univariate analyses were first performed to investigate the influence of preoperative variables on limb occlusion. Then, variables with a p value <0.1 were included in the multivariate analysis and showed that in the occlusion group there was a greater rate of chronic renal failure (18.2% vs. 3.8%, p = 0.012), a more frequent occurrence of distal landing zones in the external iliac artery (15.4% vs. 2.1%, p = 0.006), and a smaller aortic neck diameter (21.0 ± 2.9 mm vs. 23.6 ± 3.3 mm, p = 0.014). Although iliac anatomy does not appear to have a significant influence on limb occlusion rate in the multivariate analysis, proximal and distal sealing zones appear to be involved in this complication. PMID:26084467

  12. Successful Surgical Treatment for Thoracoabdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Leriche Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Byung Kwon; Kim, Joon Bum

    2015-01-01

    Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm accompanied by Leriche syndrome is an extremely rare combination of aortic diseases, the surgical management of which has not been described to date. We report the successful treatment of one such case through open surgical repair of the thoracoabdominal aorta. PMID:25883898

  13. Comparison of clinical curative effect between open surgery and endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Si-wen; LIN Ying; YAO Chen; LIN Pei-liang; WANG Shen-ming

    2012-01-01

    Objective To compare clinical curative effects of open surgery (OS) or endovascular repair (EVAR) for patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in China.Data sources We performed a comprehensive search of both English and Chinese literatures involving case studies on retrograde OS or EVAR of AAA in China from January 1976 to December 2010.Study selection According to the inclusion criteria,76 articles were finally analyzed to compare patient characteristics,clinical success,complications,and prognosis.Results We analyzed a total of 2862 patients with 1757 undergoing OS (OS group) and 1105 undergoing EVAR (EVAR group).There was no significant difference in the success rate of the procedures.Operative time,length of ICU stay,fasting time,duration of total postoperative stay,blood loss,and blood transfusion requirements during the procedure were significantly lower in the EVAR group.A 30-day follow up revealed more cardiac,renal,pulmonary,and visceral complications in the OS group (P<0.01).Low-limb ischemia,however,was more common in the EVAR group (P<0.05).The 30-day mortality rate,including aorta-related and non-aorta related mortality,was significantly lower in the EVAR group (P<0.01).In the follow-up period,there were more patients with occlusions of artificial vessel and late endoleak in the EVAR group (P<0.01).The overall late mortality rate was higher in the OS group (P <0.01),especially non-aorta-related late mortality and mortality during the fourth to the sixth year (P<0.01).Conclusions EVAR was safer and less invasive for AAA patients.Patients suffered fewer complications and recovered sooner.However,complications such as artificial vessel occlusion,low-limb ischemia,and endoleak were common in EVAR.Clinicians should carry out further research to solve these complications and improve the efficacy of EVAR.

  14. Surveillance intervals for small abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bown, Matthew J; Sweeting, Michael J; Brown, Louise C;

    2013-01-01

    Small abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs [3.0 cm-5.4 cm in diameter]) are monitored by ultrasound surveillance. The intervals between surveillance scans should be chosen to detect an expanding aneurysm prior to rupture....

  15. Aortic aneurysm secondary to umbilical artery catheterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 14-month-girl presented with an asymptomatic posterior mediastinal mass. She had a history of prematurity, umbilical artery catheterization, and sepsis. The diagnosis of aortic aneurysm was made by dynamic computed tomography. The aneurysm was successfully resected. (orig.)

  16. Infected aortic aneurysm and inflammatory aortic aneurysm. In search of an optimal differential diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infected aortic aneurysm and inflammatory aortic aneurysm each account for a minor fraction of the total incidence of aortic aneurysm and are associated with periaortic inflammation. Despite the similarity, infected aortic aneurysm generally shows a more rapid change in clinical condition, leading to a fatal outcome; in addition, delayed diagnosis and misuse of corticosteroid or immunosuppressing drugs may lead to uncontrolled growth of microorganisms. Therefore, it is mandatory that detection of aortic aneurysm is followed by accurate differential diagnosis. In general, infected aortic aneurysm appears usually as a saccular form aneurysm with nodularity, irregular configuration; however, the differential diagnosis may not be easy sometimes for the following reasons: symptoms, such as abdominal and/or back pain and fever, and blood test abnormalities, such as elevated C-reactive protein and enhanced erythrocyte sedimentation rate, are common in infected aortic aneurysm, but they are not found infrequently in inflammatory aortic aneurysm; some inflammatory aortic aneurysms are immunoglobulin (Ig) G4-related, but not all of them; the prevalence of IgG4 positivity in infected aortic aneurysm has not been well investigated; enhanced uptake of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) by 18F-FDG-positron emission tomography may not distinguish between inflammation mediated by autoimmunity and that mediated by microorganism infection. Here we discuss the characteristics of these two forms of aortic aneurysm and the points of which we have to be aware before reaching a final diagnosis. (author)

  17. Predictive Factors for Mortality and Morbidity of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manabu Shiraishi

    2012-04-01

    Conclusions: Emergency open repair can be safely performed in patients for infrarenal rAAA. In particular, we identified specific independent predictive factors of clinical examination and laboratory studies for mortality, major morbidity and renal insufficiency. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2012; 1(2.000: 94-101

  18. Predictive Factor for Mortality and Morbidity of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manabu Shiraishi

    2013-02-01

    Conclusions: Open repair and EVAR can both be safely performed in patients treated for elective and emergency infrarenal AAA. EVAR has perioperative advantages of reduced blood loss and blood transfusion, as well as decreased mortality and duration of post-operative hospital stay. In particular, we identified specific independent predictive factors of serum chemistry values for mortality and renal insufficiency. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2013; 2(1.000: 8-15

  19. Endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Dominique B; van Herwaarden, Joost A; Schermerhorn, Marc L; Moll, Frans L

    2014-02-01

    Patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are usually treated with endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), which has become the standard of care in many hospitals for patients with suitable anatomy. Clinical evidence indicates that EVAR is associated with superior perioperative outcomes and similar long-term survival compared with open repair. Since the randomized, controlled trials that provided this evidence were conducted, however, the stent graft technology for infrarenal AAA has been further developed. Improvements include profile downsizing, optimization of sealing and fixation, and the use of low porosity fabrics. In addition, imaging techniques have improved, enabling better preoperative planning, stent graft placement, and postoperative surveillance. Also in the past few years, fenestrated and branched stent grafts have increasingly been used to manage anatomically challenging aneurysms, and experiments with off-label use of stent grafts have been performed to treat patients deemed unfit or unsuitable for other treatment strategies. Overall, the indications for endovascular management of AAA are expanding to include increasingly complex and anatomically challenging aneurysms. Ongoing studies and optimization of imaging, in addition to technological refinement of stent grafts, will hopefully continue to broaden the utilization of EVAR. PMID:24343568

  20. Should Endovascular Repair Be Reimbursed for Low Risk Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Patients? Evidence from Ontario, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Eric Tarride

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This paper presents unpublished clinical and economic data associated with open surgical repair (OSR in low risk (LR patients and how it compares with EVAR and OSR in high risk (HR patients with an AAA > 5.5 cm. Design. Data from a 1-year prospective observational study was used to compare EVAR in HR patients versus OSR in HR and LR patients. Results. Between 2003 and 2005, 140 patients were treated with EVAR and 195 with OSR (HR: 52; LR: 143. The 1-year mortality rate with EVAR was statistically lower than HR OSR patients and comparable to LR OSR patients. One-year health-related quality of life was lower in the EVAR patients compared to OSR patients. EVAR was cost-effective compared to OSR HR but not when compared to OSR LR patients. Conclusions. Despite a similar clinical effectiveness, these results suggest that, at the current price, EVAR is more expensive than open repair for low risk patients.

  1. Abdominal aortic aneurysms: treatment with Zenith endoluminal stent-graft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of Zenith transrenal stent-graft in repairing the abdominal aortic aneurysms. Methods: Endoluminal stent-grafts repair was performed in 5 male patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. Their age ranged from 52 years to 73 years with a mean of 65 years. Three-dimensional CT angiography demonstrated Blum type B in 4 cases and Blum type C in 1 case. The diameter of aneurysmal neck was between 21 mm and 25 mm (mean 22.8 mm), and the length of aneurysmal neck was between 16.5 mm and 32.8 mm (mean 25.6mm). Stent-grafts were inserted through surgically exposed femoral arteries in general anesthesia with the fluoroscopic guidance. The Zenith transrenal bifurcated stent-grafts were applied in all 5 patients. Results: The endoluminal stent-graft repair was successful in all 5 patients with operational duration of 1.8-3.0 hours. The hospitalization duration was 7-14 days following the procedure. No endoleaks occurred in the 5 cases following the contrast-enhanced CT scans seven days after the interventions. Still no endoleaks or stent-grafts migration recurred in 2 patients followed up at the 2nd and 11th month, respectively. During the follow-up from 6 months to 55 months (mean 26.6 months), five patients were still asymptomatic. Conclusion: Zenith aortic stent-graft repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms is an effective and safe treatment method

  2. Visceral hybrid reconstruction of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm after open repair of type a aortic dissection by the Bentall procedure with the elephant trunk technique: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjanović Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Reconstruction of chronic type B dissection and thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA remaining after the emergency reconstruction of the ascending thoracic aorta and aortic arch for acute type A dissection represents one of the major surgical challenges. Complications of chronic type B dissection are aneurysmal formation and rupture of an aortic aneurysm with a high mortality rate. We presented a case of visceral hybrid reconstruction of TAAA secondary to chronic dissection type B after the Bentall procedure with the elephant trunk technique due to acute type A aortic dissection in a high-risk patient. Case report. A 62 year-old woman was admitted to our institution for reconstruction of Crawford type I TAAA secondary to chronic dissection. The patient had had an acute type A aortic dissection 3 years before and undergone reconstruction by the Bentall procedure with the elephant trunk technique with valve replacement. On admission the patient had coronary artery disease (myocardial infarction, two times in the past 3 years, congestive heart disease with ejection fraction of 25% and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. On computed tomography (CT of the aorta TAAA was revealed with a maximum diameter of 93 mm in the descending thoracic aorta secondary to chronic dissection. All the visceral arteries originated from the true lumen with exception of the celiac artery (CA, and the end of chronic dissection was below the origin of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA. The patient was operated on using surgical visceral reconstruction of the SMA, CA and the right renal artery (RRA as the first procedure. Postoperative course was without complications. Endovascular TAAA reconstruction was performed as the second procedure one month later, when the elephant trunk was used as the proximal landing zone for the endograft, and distal landing zone was the level of origin of the RRA. Postoperatively, the patient had no neurological deficit and

  3. Contemporary Applications of Ultrasound in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Management

    OpenAIRE

    Scaife, Mark; Giannakopoulos, Triantafillos; Al-Khoury, Georges E.; Chaer, Rabih A.; Avgerinos, Efthymios D.

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) is a well-established screening tool for detection of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) and is currently recommended not only for those with a relevant family history but also for all men and high-risk women older than 65 years of age. The advent of minimally invasive endovascular techniques in the treatment of AAAs [endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR)] has increased the need for repeat imaging, especially in the postoperative period. Nevertheless, preoperative planning, intra...

  4. 腹主动脉瘤开放手术时机选择%Opportunity of open surgical repair in abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁卫; 张纪蔚

    2012-01-01

    It is the core concept to exclude aneurysm and reconstruct the abdominal aorta for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) treatment. The purpose of the treatment is to prevent aneurysm rupture. Evaluation of the risk of AAA rupture and the patients' condition are the key for the indication of operation. Open surgical repair (OR) and endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) are two treatments for AAA. Though the early result of the EVAR is better than that of the OR according to the multi-center clinical studies, the mid-result and long-result are the same between two treatments. For the hostile anatomy, OR is better than EVAR for AAA treatment. The OR still has the applicability for the AAA treatment.%腹主动脉瘤瘤腔隔绝和动脉血管的重建是治疗腹主动脉瘤的核心概念,治疗的根本目的在于防止动脉瘤的破裂.手术指征的关键在于术前评估动脉瘤破裂危险性和病人全身状况.目前的治疗方法有传统的开放手术和近年迅速发展的腔内修复术.国外多中心研究发现虽然腔内治疗的近期效果较传统开放手术好,但两种治疗方法的中远期结果差异并无统计学意义.同时,对于特殊解剖形态的腹主动脉瘤,传统开放手术更具优势.因此,传统的开放手术治疗腹主动脉瘤仍具有临床应用的价值.

  5. A case of syphilitic aortic aneurysm with sternal erosion and impending rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed Sarjun Basha, Khadhar; Raman, Karthik; Ahmed, Sheriff Ejaz; Latchumanadoss, Kalidoss; Rajan, Sethuratnam

    2016-02-01

    Syphilitic aortic aneurysm is a rare occurrence in the current antibiotic era. Cardiovascular syphilis has nearly disappeared in developed countries, although it remains a factor in differential diagnosis in developing nations. We report a case of syphilitic aortic aneurysm eroding through the sternum in a 52-year-old man who underwent successful surgical repair. PMID:25344618

  6. Multiple idiopathic arterial aneurysms masquerading as aortic dissection

    OpenAIRE

    Naha, Kushal; Vivek, G; Shetty, Ranjan K; Dias, Lorraine Simone

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 58-year-old lady who presented with abdominal pain and backache. Although initial evaluation was strongly suggestive of abdominal aortic dissection, she was ultimately found to have multiple arterial aneurysms. Work-up for underlying vasculitis was negative. Surgical repair was planned and the patient was referred to a cardiovascular surgeon. This case highlights the importance of careful radiological assessment in patients with suspected aortic dissection.

  7. Improving Results of Elective Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair at a Low-Volume Hospital by Risk-Adjusted Selection of Treatment in the Endovascular Era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several studies have observed both higher mortality rates and lower utilization of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) at low-volume centers. This article presents the results of elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair at a low-volume center in the endovascular era and investigates whether postprocedural mortality can be improved by extension of EVAR application also in this setting. This is an 11.6-year retrospective cohort study of 132 patients undergoing elective surgical or endovascular AAA repair at a tertiary care academic hospital between 1997 and July 2008, i.e., a median volume of 12 cases per year. The study was divided into two periods of time according to the respective indications and contraindications for EVAR, which substantially changed in 2005. During period 1, only aneurysms with necks ≥20 mm long and not involving the iliac arteries were treated endoluminally. Beginning in 2005, indication for EVAR was expanded to aortoiliac aneurysms with a minimum neck length of 15 mm. Preoperative risk was assessed by the SVS/AAVS comorbidity score. During the first period (1997-2004) 18.4% (16/87) of all patients received EVAR. By extending anatomical confines and indications for EVAR in 2005, the utilization rate of EVAR increased to 40.0% (18/45) during the second period (2005-July 2008; p = 0.007). Prevalence of preoperative risk factors did not change during the two observation periods. In contrast to period 1, high-risk patients were preferentially treated endoluminally during the second period, resulting in a significantly higher median SVS/AAVS score in the EVAR group (p < 0.001). A significant decrease in median length of stay at the intensive/intermediate care unit (5 vs. 2 days; p = 0.006) and length of in-hospital stay (20 vs. 12.5 days; p < 0.001) was observed during period 2. Overall perioperative mortality was reduced from 6.9% during the first period to 2.2% during the second period (p = 0.256). EVAR mortality was 0%, mortality after

  8. Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    OpenAIRE

    Linné, Anneli

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) is a common disease with a prevalence of 1.5-2.0% in 65-year old men in Sweden. The risk of having AAA is increased with smoking, high age, family history of AAA and cardiovascular disease. Women have a lower prevalence (0.5%) and develop AAA later in life. An AAA seldom gives any symptom prior to rupture. Untreated rupture is associated with 100% mortality, while surgically treated rupture is associated with 25-70% mortality. Prophylactic sur...

  9. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... these microchips and the sort of next generation nanotechnology, so to speak. So I think what we’ ... with a little bit of injection of dye material. And I don’t have a way to ...

  10. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... as an important landmark in this procedure. So let’s go back now and learn a little bit about ... re going to do is actually deploy this. Let’s go ahead and record it while we’re working, ...

  11. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... the Institute and in other places around the world is the less invasive treatment of this type ... that goes down to the right leg and one that goes down to the left leg. These ...

  12. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... get for other reasons, but we use three-dimensional reconstruction and we can reconstruct all the blood ... actually participated in a lot of the original research that was done to get these devices approved. ...

  13. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... is a CT scan that we performed several days ago. So having this type of information is ... this patient will go home likely in two days time. Come back to me. The patient will ...

  14. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... the officer and we follow the patient with CAT scan. Is that right, Ignacio? Yeah. Usually we ... about the second year, it’s usually an annual CAT scan just to check position of the endograft. ...

  15. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... the way to screen is with a simple ultrasound. But sometimes a CT scan can show that, ... can integrate CAT scan imaging. We can integrate ultrasound imaging, the patient’s blood pressure, and so it’s ...

  16. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... what we’re doing is we’re actually reading that signal. And you can see our monitor ... institute, one of our main goals is advancing research in endovascular therapy. And to do this we’ ...

  17. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... microchip that acts a little bit like a cell phone technology. We’ll show you how that ... a little radio transmitter signal just like a cell phone might. And what we’re doing is ...

  18. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... you may get for other reasons, but we use three-dimensional reconstruction and we can reconstruct all ... What we’re going to do is just use this image where we can see everything superimposed ...

  19. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... saw, that big bubble that we saw, actually thrombosis. So in the process of thrombosing or clotting ... up being good candidates for this type of therapy. We would encourage you to seek the least ...

  20. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... And what’s happening right now is for all practical purposes, the procedure itself, the treatment of this ... institute, one of our main goals is advancing research in endovascular therapy. And to do this we’ ...

  1. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... that because we’re doing this with such holes in the groin, this really offers the patient a tremendous advantage over having his bellow open. The recovery time for what we’re doing here is going ...

  2. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... is that those of us that do image-guided therapy depend on all these sophisticated ways of ... that we have when we do these image-guided therapies and treatment of stent graft. So I ...

  3. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... experience here. We have been part of a number of the clinical trials that have been run through the FDA to get these devices approved. Yeah, I do that. Let me have the dilator first. Dilator first. Jim? Yes, Barry. So what we’ ...

  4. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... red tube that represents an artery. The arteries carry blood in your body. They carry oxygen and blood to various organs. These arteries ... with such holes in the groin, this really offers the patient a tremendous advantage over having his ...

  5. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... abdomen, patient’s abdomen. Okay. Can I have a shot of this, please, the patient’s abdomen. Step back. ... about the pulsatility. 13 Barry, that’s a good shot, just to show how small those incisions are ...

  6. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... who are in the room working on the patient, Dr. Barry Katsen, who is a medical director ... essentially we place a new tube inside the patient’s diseased tubing. And this concept is what we’ ...

  7. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... the less invasive treatment of this type of problem with something called “stent grafts.” The next slide ... quick procedure to replace a major life-threatening problem in the patient’s abdomen. So you can see ...

  8. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... using to inject dye and also to do measurements using our computer techniques that are going on ... we’re just looking, we’re trying to measurement. We’re actually doing measurements inside of these ...

  9. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... we’re going to do now -- and I should mention, Barry, that because we’re doing this ... have to follow the patients closely, this device should last this patient through the remainder of his ...

  10. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... your hand there. Let me have a wire real quick. Now to go back to what you’re working on, Barry. Well, I was just going to show you something. We have a little bit of a control issue here. What we’re doing right now is our sheathe, our access, our tube ...

  11. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... m going to do anther injection of dye material so everyone can see better, and we’re ... have is made out of metal and graft material, and in this case Gor- Tex. The first ...

  12. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... artery going to the right kidney. And the goal is to place this device just below the ... the rest of their life, and that’s our goal. So even though we still have to follow ...

  13. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... arteries that looks normal is another very important landing zone that we’re going to refer back ... how most of these are found in the emergency room when we do other things. And it’s ...

  14. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... this, the patient doesn’t need any special type of anticoagulation or blood thinners. This device will basically be anchored in place and stay there forever. Now I want to go back. What I’m going to now ... what I’m going to do is do a similar type of x-ray with a little bit of ...

  15. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... And one of the things that I’m learning from this movie as we looking at these ... slide that catheter up like a little snake type of thing right inside the artery. There’s no ...

  16. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... 15,000 deaths in the United States each year. It affects eight percent of the population over ... Today’s patient is a gentleman who is 76 years old. He’s somebody we have been following in ...

  17. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... procedure takes us about 45 minutes to an hour of doctor work time, which is, I think, ... it this evening or anytime in a few hours, so we’re very excited about that. What ...

  18. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... has some wires on it that’s intended to protect it. And inside of there is a very ... basically constructing this device inside the patient to protect him from rupture by replacing his diseased pipeline ...

  19. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... do this without incisions if they have appropriate anatomy for that. Just going to keep this up. ... this procedure. They have to have the right anatomy, as this patient does, and that turns out ...

  20. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... to your doctor and he does a physical examination and examines your abdomen, what he’s doing is ... rely on a good physician doing a good examination and also accessing for risk factors. So we ...

  1. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... a shot of this, please, the patient’s abdomen. Step back. So what we’re doing right now ... So we’re still doing research here to improve devices, improve outcomes, and to get the best ...

  2. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... for all of you listening, you can ask online. Just click the “Ask a question” button, and ... we’re just looking, we’re trying to measurement. We’re actually doing measurements inside of these ...

  3. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... this a little bit. You can see that large sheathe come down. I’m just going to ... patient. And now look, we have this very large device inside the patient, and it went in ...

  4. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... using to inject dye and also to do measurements using our computer techniques that are going on here. So what I’m going to do now is using the fluoroscopy, using the X-ray fluoro, I’m going to unsheathe this a ...

  5. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... the ability to be shaped differently at different temperatures, so we can make it very, very small. ... we’re just looking, we’re trying to measurement. We’re actually doing measurements inside of these ...

  6. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... very, very good integrated care with surgery and radiology together. Okay. Okay. Jim. Yes, Barry. Okay. So ... best medical specialists we have. We have interventional radiology, vascular surgeons, board certified and highly trained. And ...

  7. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... patient that’s on the table. This is a CT scan that we performed several days ago. So having ... is with a simple ultrasound. But sometimes a CT scan can show that, which is how most of ...

  8. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... be done -- this takes a lot of real skill with your hands and your hand/eye coordination. ... here, including our anesthesia teams, all of our nurses and our technologists and a lot of people ...

  9. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... invasive nature of it -- let’s have the straight flush, please -- the less invasive nature of it, this ... now. Okay. About right there. All right. Let’s flush this. And you can also see that we ...

  10. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... how most of these are found in the emergency room when we do other things. And it’s ... very, very good demonstration of how we can use these microchips and the sort of next generation ...

  11. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... invasive treatment of this type of problem with something called “stent grafts.” The next slide shows how ... So, again, to show you, how does this something that big -- how does something as big as ...

  12. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... invasive treatment of this type of problem with something called “stent grafts.” The next slide shows how ... So, again, to show you, how does this something that big -- how does something as big as ...

  13. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... into the patient’s body through a tiny little hole? Well this device, as you saw, is actually ... and we can introduce it through this small hole. Now the device is actually made of -- this ...

  14. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... in Miami. My name is Dr. James Benenati. I’m an interventional radiologist here at the Institute, and I want to become you to our live webcast. ... endograft,” which is sometimes called the “stent graft.” I want to introduce to you two of my ...

  15. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... one more reason before we’re ready to employee. Okay. Apnea, please. What I’m doing is ... devices in 1999, and then other devices, next-generation devices such as this subsequently. So we’re ...

  16. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... of this slide, you can see a smooth red tube that represents an artery. The arteries carry ... wave form is what we started with. The red one, just below it, is what happened after ...

  17. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... be done -- this takes a lot of real skill with your hands and your hand/eye coordination. ... we’re coming near the end of our presentation today. Dr. Rua, as you can see, is ...

  18. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... here, including our anesthesia teams, all of our nurses and our technologists and a lot of people ... seek the least invasive therapy for your own care as long as you’re an appropriate patient. ...

  19. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... one more reason before we’re ready to employee. Okay. Apnea, please. What I’m doing is ... be done -- this takes a lot of real skill with your hands and your hand/eye coordination. ...

  20. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... stent grafts.” The next slide shows how this works. Here you can see the artery that’s diseased ... this you’ll start and see as we work through the skin into the abdomen, you can ...

  1. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... catheters and our wires and do everything. We leave the sheathe in the artery, and that’s what ... constantly taking things in and out. But we leave this one conduit, this one small tubing in ...

  2. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... I’m learning from this movie as we looking at these images is that the device is ... this and everyone is watching this, you’re looking on a TV screen inside the patient’s body, ...

  3. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... dye and also to do measurements using our computer techniques that are going on here. So what ... I’m going to show a very important part of the procedure where we actually use a ...

  4. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... be done -- this takes a lot of real skill with your hands and your hand/eye coordination. ... about two inches. Dr. Rua did an incredible job with those. And he has hardly anything we ...

  5. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... re just dilating this to just get very good attachment of the device to the wall, and now we’re deflating the balloon. Barry, as you do that, one thing I think we failed to mention, it’s very ...

  6. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... placing that paperclip-shaped sensor, which is really nano or micro technology that will stay in the ... is with a simple ultrasound. But sometimes a CT scan can show that, which is how most ...

  7. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... the Institute and in other places around the world is the less invasive treatment of this type ... actually participated in a lot of the original research that was done to get these devices approved. ...

  8. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... can offer patients a very, very good integrated care with surgery and radiology together. Okay. Okay. Jim. ... seek the least invasive therapy for your own care as long as you’re an appropriate patient. ...

  9. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... re in the body of the graft by rotating this catheter because of the shape of it. ... There’s nothing left here? Okay. We’re just rotating things around Jim, so I’m just trying ...

  10. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... dye and also to do measurements using our computer techniques that are going on here. So what ... of see it. It’s not exactly X-ray vision, but it’s something similar to X-ray vision ...

  11. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... Is that right, Ignacio? Yeah. Usually we do serial surveillance every three to six months, depending on ... here is this collaborative effort using the best medical specialists we have. We have interventional radiology, vascular ...

  12. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... training. Both the doctors in the room are board certified and highly trained to do just this ... we have. We have interventional radiology, vascular surgeons, board certified and highly trained. And one of the ...

  13. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... Vascular Institute is that we have a very level of expertise. We’ve done almost a thousand ... possible results for our patients with the least level of invasiveness. So here you can see the ...

  14. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... it actually has the ability to be shaped differently at different temperatures, so we can make it ... that all of you have been able to learn something from this experience. Certainly our principle focus ...

  15. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... left side you can see this tube-like structure. This is a main blood vessel that runs ... treat conservatively and we’ll just watch them. But the two most important factors in terms of ...

  16. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... each year. It affects eight percent of the population over the age of 65. It’s most common in males. There is an increasing number, due to the aging baby boomers. Next slide. The risk factors for ...

  17. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... sure those barbs and everything else are very well seated. Okay. Somebody needs to be grabbing images. Now for those of you just ... Okay? And in doing this, this has to be done -- this takes a lot of real skill with ... surgeon, very well trained, and it takes very special training. It’s ...

  18. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... watch just one second here. Oh, it looks beautiful. Very nice. So you can breathe. Yeah. So ... now we can have apnea, please. That’s really beautiful, Barry. Now we don’t see that sack ...

  19. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... Institute here in Miami. My name is Dr. James Benenati. I’m an interventional radiologist here at ... arteries carry blood in your body. They carry oxygen and blood to various organs. These arteries have ...

  20. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... pen is here, he’s placing that paperclip-shaped sensor, which is really nano or micro technology that ... no reaction, no allergic reaction. It’s inert. But sensor will allow us to always come back and ...

  1. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... getting that set up, for all of you listening, you can ask online. Just click the “Ask ... be done -- this takes a lot of real skill with your hands and your hand/eye coordination. ...

  2. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... therapy depend on all these sophisticated ways of imaging, and so we’re looking at the images ... we can integrate. We can integrate CAT scan imaging. We can integrate ultrasound imaging, the patient’s blood ...

  3. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... places around the world is the less invasive treatment of this type of problem with something called “ ... what we’re going to demonstrate today in treatment of this patient. So why don’t we ...

  4. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... dye and also to do measurements using our computer techniques that are going on here. So what ... ten, okay. Twelve, okay. Let me have the super stiff. Okay. Jim, what we’re doing is ...

  5. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... two different components, and essentially we place a new tube inside the patient’s diseased tubing. And this ... really very exciting, Barry, because this is a new technology that really makes follow up for the ...

  6. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... is nickel titanium, and it actually has the ability to be shaped differently at different temperatures, so ... actually participated in a lot of the original research that was done to get these devices approved. ...

  7. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... black marks on the screen. And I’m positioning the graft on the patient’s tummy here to ... we have right here. Okay. And all that positioning he was doing was just to make sure ...

  8. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... very well trained, and it takes very special training. It’s not just any type of surgeon. So Dr. Rua has done special type of training in vascular surgery, and Dr.. Katsen is an ...

  9. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... ask a question. You can just click the tab “Ask a question.” The other thing I wanted ... that all of you have been able to learn something from this experience. Certainly our principle focus ...

  10. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... have been part of a number of the clinical trials that have been run through the FDA ... device, we are part of a number of clinical trials looking at more difficult types of anatomy. ...

  11. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... the patient, Dr. Barry Katsen, who is a medical director of the Baptist Cardiac and Vascular Institute, and Dr. Ignacio Rua, who is a medical director of vascular surgery. Good afternoon, guys. Good ...

  12. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... can see, to the audience that there’s a paper clip. If we can show monitor camera number four, you can see all the wires curled around. But just to your left when you’re looking at the screen is something that looks like a little paperclip ...

  13. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... small incisions where we can kind of get access. Okay. Apnea, please. Apnea. We’re just going ... re doing right now is our sheathe, our access, our tube has sort of come back a ...

  14. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... 7, 2009 Good afternoon. Welcome to the Baptist Cardiac and Vascular Institute here in Miami. My name ... who is a medical director of the Baptist Cardiac and Vascular Institute, and Dr. Ignacio Rua, who ...

  15. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... the ability to be shaped differently at different temperatures, so we can make it very, very small. ... pen is here, he’s placing that paperclip-shaped sensor, which is really nano or micro technology that ...

  16. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... really makes follow up for the patients very easy. So people frequently ask after you treat a ... that all of you have been able to learn something from this experience. Certainly our principle focus ...

  17. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... patient, Dr. Barry Katsen, who is a medical director of the Baptist Cardiac and Vascular Institute, and Dr. Ignacio Rua, who is a medical director of vascular surgery. Good afternoon, guys. Good afternoon. ...

  18. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... What we’re going to do today in concept and what was really pioneered here at the ... tube inside the patient’s diseased tubing. And this concept is what we’re going to demonstrate today ...

  19. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... a very minimum injection of contrast just to test injection if we can get apnea for a ... seek the least invasive therapy for your own care as long as you’re an appropriate patient. ...

  20. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... actually participated in a lot of the original research that was done to get these devices approved. ... way in 1990 in an experimental and a research way. And we started this Cardiac and Vascular ...

  1. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... You can probably see that there’s a little gold ring there that shows up on the X- ... trying to get a wire directly into that gold ring, which can be a little tricky. Watch ...

  2. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... see that I’ve got this kind of tennis racquet device here that’s sitting on the patient’s ... needle, no contact or anything. And from this tennis racquet, you can now come over to the ...

  3. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... catheters and our wires and do everything. We leave the sheathe in the artery, and that’s what he’s working right 14 now to secure. And that’s what the device went through a sheathe like this. The balloons go through a ... in and out. But we leave this one conduit, this one small tubing in ...

  4. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... the patient’s body through a tiny little hole? Well this device, as you saw, is actually wrapped ... sure those barbs and everything else are very well seated. Okay. Somebody needs to be grabbing images. ...

  5. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... And one of the things that I’m learning from this movie as we looking at these ... quick procedure to replace a major life-threatening problem in the patient’s abdomen. So you can see ...

  6. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... Jim mentioned, most of them are detected by accident. But many times when you go to your ... issues because most of these are detected by accident. So if you happen to have a family ...

  7. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... re coming near the end of our presentation today. Dr. Rua, as you can see, is putting some stitches in. I’d like to thank my partner, Dr. Jim Benenati, who shared so much ...

  8. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... do by showing a little bit of graphic information about the device and the procedure. Jim, would ... several days ago. So having this type of information is critical for us in terms of planning ...

  9. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... we placed a combination of graft fabric and metal. It’s called a “stent graft” because there are ... jacket might be made out of, and the metal framework that Dr. Katsen alluding to is a ...

  10. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... going to -- try not the lean on the controls. Okay. What you’re going to see now ... something. We have a little bit of a control issue here. What we’re doing right now ...

  11. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... be done -- this takes a lot of real skill with your hands and your hand/eye coordination. ... in that these devices will last the patient’s life. They will be free of risk of rupture ...

  12. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... of these devices is basically sized for the individual, so we don’t just take any old ... where we go from here, we know several factors. One is that from the picture point of ...

  13. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... being monitored mostly by sort of X-ray vision where we’re using this X-ray equipment ... of see it. It’s not exactly X-ray vision, but it’s something similar to X-ray vision ...

  14. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... groin, this really offers the patient a tremendous advantage over having his bellow open. The recovery time ... just this type of work. One of the advantages we have at the Baptist Cardiac and Vascular ...

  15. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... placed a combination of graft fabric and metal. It’s called a “stent graft” because there are two ... runs through abdomen. At about the belly button, it divides into a vessel that goes down to ...

  16. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... the background, so we can see everything for orientation. And now we’ve released everything, and I’ ... that long marker that we were using for orientation, you can see that long marker came out ...

  17. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... exactly, the patient can breathe. So that was forward on the injector. What we’re going to ... can reduce the need for CAT scans moving forward, because this is the way we use to ...

  18. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... I’m just going to inject a little dye that you’re going to see. And you ... the catheter that we’re using to inject dye and also to do measurements using our computer ...

  19. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... of my partners who are in the room working on the patient, Dr. Barry Katsen, who is ... stent grafts.” The next slide shows how this works. Here you can see the artery that’s diseased ...

  20. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... And one of the things that I’m learning from this movie as we looking at these ... still doing research here to improve devices, improve outcomes, and to get the best possible results for ...

  1. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... can offer this patient a much less invasive therapy. This gentleman is going to be out of ... up being good candidates for this type of therapy. We would encourage you to seek the least ...

  2. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... now is do an angiographic run or an injection of contrast, and you’ll see that. If ... to see, I’m going to do anther injection of dye material so everyone can see better, ...

  3. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... Apnea, please. Okay, now what’s happening is that diagnostic catheter is coming down. I don’t want ... days, end up being good candidates for this type of therapy. We would encourage you to seek ...

  4. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... Apnea, please. Okay, now what’s happening is that diagnostic catheter is coming down. I don’t want ... here is this collaborative effort using the best medical specialists we have. We have interventional radiology, vascular ...

  5. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... devices in 1999, and then other devices, next-generation devices such as this subsequently. So we’re ... use these microchips and the sort of next generation nanotechnology, so to speak. So I think what ...

  6. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... microchip that acts a little bit like a cell phone technology. We’ll show you how that works. ... a little radio transmitter signal just like a cell phone might. And what we’re doing is we’ ...

  7. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... ray. And so if you show camera number one please, you’ll be able to see a number of black marks on the screen. And I’m positioning the graft on the patient’s tummy here to orient things, and you can see if ... long black marker and a short one. Perhaps you can see that a little bit ...

  8. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... in on this very small tube that we call a “catheter.” So Barry, where are you right ... referral to any of our physicians you can call (786) 596-2700. Or if you’re outside ...

  9. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... have been part of a number of the clinical trials that have been run through the FDA to ... device, we are part of a number of clinical trials looking at more difficult types of anatomy. If ...

  10. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... drop in the sack. Let me have a real wire quick. There you go. I’m just ... to be done -- this takes a lot of real skill with your hands and your hand/eye ... your hand there. Let me have a wire real quick. Now to go back to what you’ ...

  11. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

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    Full Text Available ... real skill with your hands and your hand/eye coordination. I just wanted to mention that the ... kinds of things, but it’s very much an eye/hand coordination. And what we’re doing here -- ...

  12. New insights in (acute) endovascular abdominal aneurysm repair : when fenestrated devices fall short

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, R. A.; Tielliu, I. F. J.; Zeebregts, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    The suitability for endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is determined primarily by abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) anatomy. For patients unsuitable for standard EVAR, due to proximal neck anatomy, fenestrated aortic stent-grafting (FEVAR) is a viable alternative to open repair surgery. Initially FEV

  13. Giant Aortic Root Aneurysm Presenting as Acute Type A Aortic Dissection

    OpenAIRE

    Raz, Guy M.; Stamou, Sotiris C.

    2014-01-01

    A 49-year-old woman with four months of increasing episodic palpitations, chest pain, and shortness of breath presented to an outside clinic where a new 4/6 systolic ejection murmur was identified. A transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a large aortic root aneurysm. The patient underwent emergent repair of the dissected root aneurysm with a modified Bentall procedure utilizing a #19 St Jude Valsalva mechanical valve conduit. Postoperatively, she required a permanent pacemaker placement. Her ...

  14. Dual-energy computed tomography after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair: The role of hard plaque imaging for endoleak detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller-Wille, R.; Borgmann, T.; Wohlgemuth, W.A.; Jung, E.M.; Heiss, P.; Schreyer, A.G.; Stroszczynski, C.; Dornia, C. [Institute of Radiology, University Medical Center Regensburg, Regensburg (Germany); Zeman, F. [University Medical Center Regensburg, Center for Clinical Studies, Regensburg (Germany); Pfister, K. [University Medical Center Regensburg, Department of Surgery, Regensburg (Germany); Krauss, B. [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) for detection of endoleaks and aneurysm sac calcifications after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) using hard plaque imaging algorithms. One hundred five patients received 108 triple-phase contrast-enhanced CT (non-contrast, arterial and delayed phase) after EVAR. The delayed phase was acquired in dual-energy and post-processed using the standard (HPI-S) and a modified (HPI-M) hard plaque imaging algorithm. The reference standard was determined using the triple-phase CT and contrast-enhanced ultrasound. All images were analysed separately for the presence of endoleaks and calcifications by two independent readers; sensitivity, specificity and interobserver agreement were calculated. Endoleaks and calcifications were present in 25.9 % (28/108) and 20.4 % (22/108) of images. The HPI-S images had a sensitivity/specificity of 54 %/100 % (reader 1) and 57 %/99 % (reader 2), the HPI-M images of 93 %/92 % (reader 1) and 96 %/92 % (reader 2) for detection of endoleaks. For detection of calcifications HPI-S had a sensitivity/specificity of 91 %/99 % (reader 1) and 95 %/97 % (reader 2), the HPI-M images of 91 %/99 % (reader 1) and 91 %/99 % (reader 2), respectively. Using HPI-M, DECT enables an accurate diagnosis of endoleaks after EVAR and allows distinguishing between endoleaks and calcifications with high diagnostic accuracy. (orig.)

  15. Why routine intensive care unit admission after elective open infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm repair is no longer an evidence based practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, David

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Elective open infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) repair is major surgery performed on high-risk patients. Routine ICU admission postoperatively is the current accepted standard of care. Few of these patients actually require a level of care that cannot be provided just as effectively in a surgical high dependency unit (HDU). Our aim was to determine, \\'can high risk patients that will require ICU admission postoperatively be reliably identified preoperatively?\\'. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of all elective open infrarenal AAA repairs in our institution over a 3-year period was performed. The Estimation of Physiological Ability and Surgical Stress (E-PASS) model was used as our risk stratification tool for predicting post-operative morbidity. Renal function was also considered as a predictor of outcome, independent of the E-PASS. RESULTS: 80% (n = 16) were admitted to ICU. Only 30% (n = 6) of the total study population necessitated intensive care. There were 9 complications in 7 patients in our study. The E-PASS comprehensive risk score (CRS)\\/Surgical stress score (SSS) were found to be significantly associated with the presence of a complication (p = 0.009)\\/(p = 0.032) respectively. Serum creatinine (p = 0.013) was similarly significantly associated with the presence of a complication. CONCLUSIONS: The E-PASS model possessing increasing external validity is an effective risk stratification tool in safely deciding the appropriate level of post-operative care for elective infrarenal AAA repairs.

  16. Resultados da cirurgia do aneurisma da aorta abdominal em pacientes jovens Outcomes after surgical repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms in young patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telmo P. Bonamigo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: A presença de aneurisma da aorta abdominal (AAA é rara em pacientes jovens. OBJETIVO: Avaliar os resultados da cirurgia do AAA em pacientes com idade BACKGROUND: Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA are rare in young patients. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate outcomes after AAA repair in patients aged < 50 years. METHODS: Between June 1979 and January 2008, 946 patients underwent elective repair for an infrarenal AAA performed by the first author. Of these, 13 patients (1.4% were < 50 years old at surgery. Demographic characteristics and surgical data were analyzed, as well as early and late outcomes after surgical intervention. RESULTS: Mean age was 46±3.4 years (ranging from 43 to 50 years. Most patients were men (76.9%, hypertensive (76.9% and smokers (61.5%. Perioperative morbidity and mortality rates were low (15.4% and 0%, respectively; one patient had respiratory infection and another patient had unstable angina. Median follow-up was 85.5 months, and two patients died due to ischemic cardiopathy and cerebrovascular accident during the follow-up period. CONCLUSION: AAA repair in young patients is a safe procedure, with good long-term results. In our study, there were no perioperative deaths, and a good long-term survival was observed.

  17. Dissecting aortic aneurysm in maintenance hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ounissi M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The dissecting aortic aneurysm (DAA is a rare pathology that may result in fatal outcome. We report follow up of three cases of DAA patients undergoing maintenance hemo-dialysis who were managed conservatively.

  18. Successful endovascular infrarenal aneurysm repair in a patient with situs inversus totalis

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, YC; Cheng, SW; Ting, AC; Qing, KX

    2010-01-01

    Situs inversus totalis is a rare autosomal recessive developmental anomaly. There are very few reports in the published literature of abdominal aortic aneurysm in patient with situs inversus totalis, all of whom underwent open aneurysm repair. This is the first case in the world's literature to describe a patient with situs inversus totalis who had a successful endovascular infrarenal aneurysm repair. Although endovascular infrarenal aneurysm repair should not be more challenging, the endovas...

  19. An Aortoenteric Fistula Arising after Endovascular Management of a Mycotic Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Complicated with a Psoas Abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aytaç Gülcü

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mycotic aortic aneurysms account for 1–3% of all aortic aneurysms. The management of this disease is controversial. Since open surgical repair is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates, endovascular aneurysm repair is an alternative treatment method with promising early and midterm outcomes, although its long-term durability is unknown. Secondary aortoenteric fistulas may occur iatrogenically after either aortic reconstructive surgery or endovascular repair. As the number of aneurysms managed with endovascular aneurysm repair has substantially increased, cases of aortoenteric fistulas referred for endovascular repair are augmented. We report the case of an aortoduodenal fistula manifested with duodenal perforation after staged endovascular and surgical treatment of a mycotic aortic aneurysm.

  20. Six years' experience with prostaglandin I2 infusion in elective open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm: a parallel group observational study in a tertiary referral vascular center.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Beirne, Chris

    2008-11-01

    The prostaglandin I(2) (PGI(2)) analogue iloprost, a potent vasodilator and inhibitor of platelet activation, has traditionally been utilized in pulmonary hypertension and off-label use for revascularization of chronic critical lower limb ischemia. This study was designed to assess the effect of 72 hr iloprost infusion on systemic ischemia post-open elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (EAAA) surgery. Between January 2000 and 2007, 104 patients undergoing open EAAA were identified: 36 had juxtarenal, 15 had suprarenal, and 53 had infrarenal aneurysms, with a mean maximal diameter of 6.9 cm. The male-to-female ratio was 2.5:1, with a mean age of 71.9 years. No statistically significant difference was seen between the study groups with regard to age, sex, risk factors, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade, or diameter of aneurysm repaired. All emergency, urgent, and endovascular procedures for aneurysms were excluded. Fifty-seven patients received iloprost infusion for 72 hr in the immediate postoperative period compared with 47 patients who did not. Patients were monitored for signs of pulmonary, renal, cardiac, systemic ischemia, and postoperative intensive care unit (ICU) morbidity. Statistically significantly increased ventilation rates (p=0.0048), pulmonary complication rates (p=0.0019), and myocardial ischemia (p=0.0446) were noted in those patients not receiving iloprost. These patients also had significantly higher renal indices including estimate glomerular filtration rate changes (p=0.041) and postoperative urea level rises (p=0.0286). Peripheral limb trashing was noted in five patients (11.6%) in the non-iloprost group compared with no patients who received iloprost. Increased rates of transfusion requirements and bowel complications were noted in those who did not receive iloprost, with their ICU stay greater than twice that of iloprost patients. All-cause morbidity affected 67% of patients not receiving iloprost compared to 40% who did

  1. Branched and fenestrated options to treat aortic arch aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurel, Blandine; Mastracci, Tara M; Spear, Rafaelle; Hertault, Adrien; Azzaoui, Richard; Sobocinski, Jonathan; Haulon, Stephan

    2016-10-01

    Conventional surgical repair of aortic arch aneurysms using cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermic circulatory arrest remains the gold standard, however it is associated with a substantial mortality and morbidity rate, especially in the elderly. Hybrid techniques avoid aortic cross-clamping and circulatory arrest, but are of limited use and are only applicable to selected patients. The development of new devices to treat aortic arch aneurysms endovascularly has the potential to offer a treatment modality to patients unfit for an open repair. We present the challenges specific to endovascular arch repair based on our experience and the literature available from the first experience in 1999 to the third generation graft currently commonly used. Following an initial learning curve associated with the use of the third generation arch branch device, along with careful patient selection and operator experience, early results are promising. Technical success was achieved in all cases, there was no early mortality and strokes were noted in 11%. As with branched and fenestrated technology for thoracoabdominal aneurysm repair, the use of total endovascular repair for arch pathology will require an evolution in endovascular practice and device design. However, at present, the early use of the latest generation device offers a novel approach to patients who previously had no surgical options. PMID:27332680

  2. A comparative study on the medium-long term results of endovascular repair and open surgical repair in the management of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Yan-shuo; ZHANG Jian; XIA Qian; LIU Zhi-min; ZHANG Xiao-yu; WU Xiao-yu; LUN Yu

    2013-01-01

    Background Although it is generally acknowledged that patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA)obtain the greatest benefit from endovascular repair (EVAR),convincing evidence on the medium-long term effect is lacking.The aim of this study was to compare and summarize published results of rAAA that underwent EVAR with open surgical repair (OSR).Methods A search of publicly published literature was performed.Based on an inclusion and exclusion criteria,a systematic meta-analysis was undertaken to compare patient characteristics,complications,short term mortality and medium-long term outcomes.A random-effects model was used to pool the data and calculate pooled odds ratios and weighted mean differences.A quantitative method was used to analyze the differences between these two methods.Results A search of the published literature showed that fourteen English language papers comprising totally 1213 patients with rAAA (435 EVAR and 778 OSR) would be suitable for this study.Furthermore,13 Chinese studies were included,including 267 patients with rAAA totally,among which 238 patients received operation.The endovascular method was associated with more respiratory diseases before treatment (OR=1.81,P=0.01),while there are more patients with hemodynamic instability before treatment in OSR group (OR=1.53,P=0.031).Mean blood transfusion was 1328 ml for EVAR and 2809 ml for OSR (weighted mean difference (WMD) 1500 ml,P=0.014).The endovascular method was associated with a shorter stay in intensive care (WMD 2.34 days,P <0.001) and a shorter total postoperative stay (WMD 6.27 days,P <0.001).The pooled post-operative complication rate of respiratory system and visceral ischemia seldom occurred in the EVAR group (OR=0.48,P <0.001 and OR=0.28,P=0.043,respectively).The pooled 30-day mortality was 25.7% for EVAR and 39.6% for OSR,and the odds ratio was 0.53 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.41-0.70,P <0.001).There was not,however,any significant reduction in

  3. New Technique for the Preservation of the Left Common Carotid Artery in Zone 2a Endovascular Repair of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe a technique for the preservation of the left common carotid artery (CCA) in zone 2 endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysm. This technique involves the placement of a guide wire into the left CCA via the right brachial artery before stent graft deployment to enable precise visualization and protection of the left CCA during the whole procedure. Of the 107 patients with thoracic endovascular aortic repair in our study, 32 (30%) had the left subclavian artery intentionally covered (landing zone 2). Eight (25%) of those 32 had landing zone 2a—the segment distally the origin of the left CCA, halfway between the origin of the left CCA and the left subclavian artery. In all patients, a guide wire was positioned into the left CCA via the right brachial artery before stent graft deployment. It is a retrospective study in design. In seven patients, stent grafts were positioned precisely. In the remaining patient, the positioning was imprecise; the origin of the left CCA was partially covered by the graft. A stent was implanted into the left CCA to restore the flow into the vessel. All procedures were performed successfully. The technique of placing a guide wire into the left CCA via the right brachial artery before stent graft deployment is a safe and effective method that enables the precise visualization of the left CCA during the whole procedure. Moreover, in case of inadvertent complete or partial coverage of the origin of the left CCA, it supplies safe and quick access to the artery for stent implantation.

  4. Automatic pose initialization for accurate 2D/3D registration applied to abdominal aortic aneurysm endovascular repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Shun; Lucas, Joseph; Liao, Rui

    2012-02-01

    Minimally invasive abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) stenting can be greatly facilitated by overlaying the preoperative 3-D model of the abdominal aorta onto the intra-operative 2-D X-ray images. Accurate 2-D/3-D registration in 3-D space makes the 2-D/3-D overlay robust to the change of C-Arm angulations. By far, the 2-D/3-D registration methods based on simulated X-ray projection images using multiple image planes have been shown to be able to provide satisfactory 3-D registration accuracy. However, one drawback of the intensity-based 2-D/3-D registration methods is that the similarity measure is usually highly non-convex and hence the optimizer can easily be trapped into local minima. User interaction therefore is often needed in the initialization of the position of the 3-D model in order to get a successful 2-D/3-D registration. In this paper, a novel 3-D pose initialization technique is proposed, as an extension of our previously proposed bi-plane 2-D/3-D registration method for AAA intervention [4]. The proposed method detects vessel bifurcation points and spine centerline in both 2-D and 3-D images, and utilizes landmark information to bring the 3-D volume into a 15mm capture range. The proposed landmark detection method was validated on real dataset, and is shown to be able to provide a good initialization for 2-D/3-D registration in [4], thus making the workflow fully automatic.

  5. Endovascular aortic repair: first twenty years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koncar, Igor; Tolić, Momcilo; Ilić, Nikola; Cvetković, Slobodan; Dragas, Marko; Cinara, Ilijas; Kostić, Dusan; Davidović, Lazar

    2012-01-01

    Endovascular aortic/aneurysm repair (EVAR) was introduced into clinical practice at the beginning of the nineties. Its fast development had a great influence on clinicians, vascular surgeons and interventional radiologists, educational curriculums, patients, industry and medical insurance. The aim of this paper is to present the contribution of clinicians and industry to the development and advancement of endovascular aortic repair over the last 20 years. This review article presents the development of EVAR by focusing on the contribution of physicians, surgeons and interventional radiologists in the creation of the new field of vascular surgery termed hybrid vascular surgery, and also the contribution of technological advancement by a significant help of industrial representatives--engineers and their counselors. This article also analyzes studies conducted in order to compare the successfulness of EVAR with up-to-now applied open surgical repair of aortic aneurysms, and some treatment techniques of other aortic diseases. During the first two decades of its development the EVAR method was rapidly progressing and was adopted concurrently with the expansion of technology. Owing to large randomized studies, early and long-term results indicate specific complications of this method, thus influencing further technological improvement and defining risk patients groups in whom the use of the technique should be avoided. Good results are insured only in centers, specialized in vascular surgery, which have on their disposal adequate conditions for solving all complications associated with this method. PMID:23350259

  6. Circumaortic Left Renal Vein Associated with Juxtarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    OpenAIRE

    Hashizume, Koji; Taniguchi, Shinichiro; Ariyoshi, Tsuneo; Hisata, Yoichi; Tanigawa, Kazuyoshi; Miura, Takashi; Sumi, Mizuki; Eishi, Kiyoyuki

    2013-01-01

    The patient was an 82-year-old man who was found to have a juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm accompanied by a circumaortic left renal vein (CLRV). During dissection of the proximal anastomosis site the CLRV was injured, but was successfully repaired. A graft implantation was performed below the renal arteries. The incidence of CLRV is thought to be rare, however it is found in 7% of cadavers donated for anatomy. CLRV may cause unexpected bleeding by inadvertent dissection of the abdominal ...

  7. Doxycycline inhibition of proteases and inflammation in abdominal aortic aneurysms

    OpenAIRE

    Khawaja, Hazem Al-

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to evaluate the effect of doxycycline on the proteolytic and inflammatory processes in abdominal aneurysms. This data is essential for the development of pharmaceutical strategies for the stabilization of an AAA. Such an approach could reduce the need for elective surgery and endovascular repair. It has repeatedly been shown that AAA progression and rupture is related to the failure of collagen in the aortic wall. Yet the exact mechanism underlying this failure remai...

  8. The role of gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging in the preoperative evaluation of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anbarasu, A.; McWilliams, R.G. [Department of Radiology, Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Prescot Street, Liverpool, L7 8XP (United Kingdom); Harris, P.L. [Department of Vascular Surgery, Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Prescot Street, Liverpool, L7 8XP (United Kingdom)

    2002-07-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm is an uncommon variant of abdominal aortic aneurysms. Thorough preoperative imaging of the extent of the aneurysm and inflammation and the associated complications are crucial in the management of this condition. We report a case of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm where, after the initial contrast-enhanced CT, gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging was used to define the true extent of the inflammation and differentiate inflammation from mural thrombus at the iliac extension of the aneurysm. The imaging appearances are presented and the impact of MR imaging on further surgical management options including endovascular repair are discussed. (orig.)

  9. Buttock Claudication and Erectile Dysfunction After Internal Iliac Artery Embolization in Patients Prior to Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coil embolization of the internal iliac artery (IIA) is used to extend the application of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in cases of challenging iliac anatomy. Pelvic ischemia is a complication of the technique, but reports vary as to the rate and severity. This study reports our experience with IIA embolization and compares the results to those of other published series. The vascular unit database of the Leicester Royal Infirmary was used to identify patients who had undergone IIA coil embolization prior to EVAR. Data were collected from hospital case notes and by telephone interviews. Thirty-eight patients were identified; 29 of these were contactable by telephone. A literature search was performed for other studies of IIA embolization and the results were pooled. In this series buttock claudication occurred in 55% (16 of 29 patients) overall: in 52% of unilateral embolizations (11 of 21) and 63% of bilateral embolizations (5 of 8). New erectile dysfunction occurred in 46% (6 of 13 patients) overall: in 38% of unilateral embolizations (3 of 8) and 60% of bilateral embolizations (3 of 5). The literature review identified 18 relevant studies. The results were pooled with our results, to give 634 patients in total. Buttock claudication occurred in 28% overall (178 of 634 patients): in 31% of unilateral embolizations (99 of 322) and 35% of bilateral embolizations (34 of 98) (p = 0.46, Fisher's exact test). New erectile dysfunction occurred in 17% overall (27 of 159 patients): in 17% of unilateral embolizations (16 of 97) and 24% of bilateral embolizations (9 of 38) (p = 0.33). We conclude that buttock claudication and erectile dysfunction are frequent complications of IIA embolization and patients should be counseled accordingly.

  10. TEVAR for Flash Pulmonary Edema Secondary to Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm to Pulmonary Artery Fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornak, Arash; Baqai, Atif; Li, Xiaoyi; Rey, Jorge; Tashiro, Jun; Velazquez, Omaida C

    2016-01-01

    Enlarging aneurysms in the thoracic aorta frequently remain asymptomatic. Fistulization of thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA) to adjacent structures or the presence of a patent ductus arteriosus and TAA may lead to irreversible cardiopulmonary sequelae. This article reports on a large aneurysm of the thoracic aorta with communication to the pulmonary artery causing pulmonary edema and cardiorespiratory failure. The communication was ultimately closed after thoracic endovascular aortic aneurysm repair allowing rapid symptom resolution. Early diagnosis and closure of such communication in the presence of TAA are critical for prevention of permanent cardiopulmonary damage. PMID:26522587

  11. Implementation of the Continuous AutoTransfusion System (C.A.T.S) in open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: an observational comparative cohort study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tawfick, Wael A

    2008-01-01

    The use of the Continuous AutoTransfusion System (C.A.T.S; Fresenius Hemotechnology, Bad Homburg v.d.H., Germany), which conserves allogenic blood, is reported in 187 patients having abdominal aortic aneurysm repair during a 9-year period. Patients were allocated to C.A.T.S if a Haemovigilance technician was available. A mean of 685 mL of retrieved blood was reinfused in 101 patients receiving C.A.T.S; 61% required 2 U or less. All control patients required 3 U or more of allogenic blood. Allogenic transfusion in C.A.T.S patients decreased significantly (P < .0001). Mean intensive care unit stay was significantly reduced in C.A.T.S patients (P = .042). Mean postoperative hospital stay was 18 days for C.A.T.S group and 25 days in control patients (P = .014). The respective 30-day mortality was 12% versus 19% (P = .199). The C.A.T.S markedly reduced the amount of blood transfused, was associated with reduced intensive care unit and postoperative hospital stay, and was cost-effective.

  12. Follow-up of endovascular aortic aneurysm repair: Preliminary validation of digital tomosynthesis and contrast enhanced ultrasound in detection of medium- to long-term complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzei, Maria Antonietta; Guerrini, Susanna; Mazzei, Francesco Giuseppe; Cioffi Squitieri, Nevada; Notaro, Dario; de Donato, Gianmarco; Galzerano, Giuseppe; Sacco, Palmino; Setacci, Francesco; Volterrani, Luca; Setacci, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To validate the feasibility of digital tomosynthesis of the abdomen (DTA) combined with contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in assessing complications after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) by using computed tomography angiography (CTA) as the gold standard. METHODS: For this prospective study we enrolled 163 patients (123 men; mean age, 65.7 years) referred for CTA for EVAR follow-up. CTA, DTA and CEUS were performed at 1 and 12 mo in all patients, with a maximum time interval of 2 d. RESULTS: Among 163 patients 33 presented complications at CTA. DTA and CTA correlated for the presence of complications in 32/33 (96.96%) patients and for the absence of complications in 127/130 (97.69%) patients; the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy of DTA were 97%, 98%, 91%, 99%, and 98%, respectively. CEUS and CTA correlated for the presence of complications in 19/33 (57.57%) patients and for the absence of complications in 129/130 (99.23%) patients; the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy of CEUS were 58%, 99%, 95%, 90%, and 91%, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of combining DTA and CEUS together in detecting EVAR complications were 77%, 98% and 95%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Combining DTA and CEUS in EVAR follow-up has the potential to limit the use of CTA only in doubtful cases. PMID:27247719

  13. Tubercular mycotic aortic aneurysm: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tubercular aneurysms of larger vessels, particularly the aorta is very rare. The first case of tubercular involvement of the aorta in the form of aortitis was reported in 1882 by Weigert and the first case of tubercular mycotic aneurysm of the aorta was reported in 1895. The preoperative diagnosis of tubercular aortic aneurysm is difficult. Even at surgery, determining the tubercular nature of the lesion is problematic. The gross appearance may not be distinctive, and acid-fast stains are unlikely to be performed. We report the case of a young female patient who was started on antitubercular treatment for pleural effusion and was found to have aortic aneurysm, which later on proved to be tubercular in origin.

  14. Enhanced recovery after elective open surgical repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm: a complementary overview through a pooled analysis of proportions from case series studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanderland J T Gurgel

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS programs in elective open surgical repair (OSR of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA. BACKGROUND: Open surgical repair of AAA is associated with high morbidity and mortality, prolonged hospital stay and high costs. ERAS programs contribute to the optimization of treatment by reducing hospital stay and improving clinical outcomes. METHODS: A review of PubMed, EMBASE and LILACS databases was conducted. As only one randomized controlled trial was found, a pooled analysis of proportions from case series was conducted, considering it a complementary overview of the topic. Inclusion criteria were case series with more than five cases reported, adult patients who underwent an elective OSR of AAA and use of an ERAS program. ERAS was compared to conventional perioperative care. The pooled proportion and the confidence interval (CI are shown for each outcome. The overlap of the CI suggests similar effect of the interventions studied. RESULTS: Thirteen case series studies with ERAS involving 1,250 patients were compared to six case series with conventional care with a total of 1,429 patients. The pooled, respective proportions for ERAS and conventional care were: mortality, 1.51% [95% CI: 0.0091, 0.0226] and 3.0% [95% CI 0.0183, 0.0445]; and incidence of complications, 3.82% [95% CI 0.0259, 0.0528] and 4.0% [95% CI 0.03, 0.05]. CONCLUSION: This review shows that ERAS and conventional care therapies have similar mortality and complication rates in OSR of AAA.

  15. Early inflammatory response following elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: A comparison between endovascular procedure and conventional, open surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjanović Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Abdominal aorta aneurysm (AAA represents a pathological enlargment of infrarenal portion of aorta for over 50% of its lumen. The only treatment of AAA is a surgical reconstruction of the affected segment. Until the late XX century, surgical reconstruction implied explicit, open repair (OR of AAA, which was accompanied by a significant morbidity and mortality of the treated patients. Development of endovascular repair of (EVAR AAA, especially in the last decade, offered another possibility of surgical reconstruction of AAA. The preliminary results of world studies show that complications of such a procedure, as well as morbidity and mortality of patients, are significantly lower than with OR of AAA. The aim of this paper was to present results of comparative clinical prospective study of early inflammatory response after reconstruction of AAA between endovascular and open, conventional surgical technique. Methods. A comparative clinical prospective study included 39 patients, electively operated on for AAA within the period of December 2008 - February 2010, divided into two groups. The group I counted 21 (54% of the patients, 58-87 years old (mean 74.3 years, who had been submited to EVAR by the use of excluder stent graft. The group II consisted of 18 (46% of the patients, 49-82 (mean 66.8 years, operated on using OR technique. All of the treated patients in both groups had AAA larager than 50 mm. The study did not include patients who have been treated as urgent cases, due to the rupture or with simptomatic AAA. Clinical, biochemical and inflamatory parameters in early postoperative period were analyzed, in direct postoperative course (number of leucocytes, thrombocytes, serum circulating levels of cytokine - interleukine (IL-2, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10. Parameters were monitored on the zero, first, second, third and seventh postoperative days. The study was approved by the Ethics Commitee of the Military Medical Academy. Results

  16. Endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Open surgical repair is considered the traditional treatment for patients with thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA). In view of the persistent perioperative mobidity and mortality, endovascular stent-graft placement as a minimally invasive and potentially safer treatment for aneurysm of the descending aorta was introduced in 1992. Since then, progress has been made and several institutions have substantiated the safety and effectiveness of stent grafts in the repair of descending TAAs or type-B aortic dissections. Currently, both custom-designed, home-made, and commercially available stent grafts are used. Prior to placement of the endoprosthesis, three major prerequisites must be considered: the localization and morphology of the aneurysm; the distal vascular access of sufficient size; and a limited tortuosity of the abdominal and thoracic aorta. Although short-term results are encouraging, severe complications, including paraplegia, cerebral strokes, and aortic rupture, have been encountered. The long-term durability of currently available stent-graft systems is nonexistent and material fatigue are of major concern to both surgeons and radiologists. Nevertheless, endovascular stent-graft placement could become the procedure of choice in a substantial number of patients with descending TAA. (orig.)

  17. Current technology for the treatment of infection following abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) fixation by endovascular repair (EVAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capoccia, L; Mestres, G; Riambau, V

    2014-06-01

    In recent years, in parallel with the increase of endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) procedures performances, a rise of late open surgical removal of EVAR implants has been observed, due to non-endovascularly correctable graft complications. Among them endograft infection is a rare but devastating occurrence, accounting for an incidence ranging from 0.2% to 0.7% in major series, and almost 1% of all causes of endograft explantations. However, a real estimation of the incidence of the problem respect to the number of EVAR implantations is difficult to obtain. Time to infection is usually defined as the period between EVAR and presentation of symptoms that leads to the infection diagnosis. It can be extremely variable, depending on bacterial virulence and host conditions. The diagnosis of an endograft infection is usually based on a combination of clinical symptoms, imaging studies and microbial cultures whenever possible. If computed tomography (CT) scan is employed in almost 100% of infection diagnosis, a combination of fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and CT scan is nowadays used with increasing frequency in order to rise the likelihood of detecting a graft infection, since even cultures of blood or samples collected from the infected field can sometimes be negative. Complete graft excision seems the best approach whenever a surgical reconstruction could be attempted. In situ reconstruction can be performed by the interposition of an autologous vein, a cryopreserved allograft or a rifampin-soaked Dacron graft. The so-called conventional treatment contemplates the re-establishment of vascularization through extranatomical routes, thus preserving the new graft material from possible contamination by the surgical field just cleaned. When severe comorbid conditions did not allow graft excision, a conservative treatment should be taken into account. It is mainly based on broad-spectrum or culture-specific antibiotic therapy combined, whenever

  18. Natural history of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perko, M J; Schroeder, T V; Olsen, P S;

    1993-01-01

    During a 10-year period in which 735 patients presented with abdominal aortic aneurysms to our clinic, 63 were not offered operative treatment. The primary reason for choosing conservative treatment was concomitant diseases that increased the risk of operation. After 2 years of followup, half of ...

  19. Relationship between acute kidney injury before thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair and in-hospital outcomes in patients with type B acute aortic dissection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Mei REN; Xiao WANG; Chun-Yan HU; Bin QUE; Hui AI; Chun-Mei WANG; Li-Zhong SUN; Shao-Ping NIE

    2015-01-01

    Objective Acute kidney injury (AKI) frequently occurs after catheter-based interventional procedures and increases mortality. How-ever, the implications of AKI before thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR) of type B acute aortic dissection (AAD) remain un-clear. This study evaluated the incidence, predictors, and in-hospital outcomes of AKI before TEVAR in patients with type B AAD. Meth-ods Between 2009 and 2013, 76 patients were retrospectively evaluated who received TEVAR for type B AAD within 36 h from symptom onset. The patients were classified into no-AKI vs. AKI groups, and the severity of AKI was further staged according to kidney disease:im-proving global outcomes criteria before TEVAR. Results The incidence of preoperative AKI was 36.8%. In-hospital complications was significantly higher in patients with preoperative AKI compared with no-AKI (50.0%vs. 4.2%, respectively;P<0.001), including acute renal failure (21.4%vs. 0, respectively;P<0.001), and they increased with severity of AKI (P<0.001). The maximum levels of body tem-perature and white blood cell count were significantly related to maximum serum creatinine level before TEVAR. Multivariate analysis showed that systolic blood pressure on admission (OR:1.023;95%CI:1.003–1.044;P=0.0238) and bilateral renal artery involvement (OR:19.076;95%CI:1.914–190.164;P=0.0120) were strong predictors of preoperative AKI. Conclusions Preoperative AKI frequently oc-curred in patients with type B AAD, and correlated with higher in-hospital complications and enhanced inflammatory reaction. Systolic blood pressure on admission and bilateral renal artery involvement were major risk factors for AKI before TEVAR.

  20. Diagnosis of aortic aneurysms by scintigraphy and ultrasonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caille, G. (Centre Hospitalier, Saint-Nazaire (France)); Chatal, J.F.; Tellier, J.L.; Talmant, C.; Guihard, R. (Centre Rene-Gauducheau, 44 - Nantes (France))

    1981-10-01

    Angioscintigraphy, performed on 50 patients suspected of aortic aneurysm and complemented by abdominal ultrasonography in 31 cases, disclosed: - Three cases of thoracic aortic aneurysm, 2 of which were confirmed by arteriography and surgery. It was impossible to perform surgery in the third case, no arteriography was done. Strict agreement with standard thoracic images had made the angioscintigraphic diagnosis seem correct. Twenty-seven cases of abdominal aortic aneurysms were confirmed by arteriography or surgery. Ultrasonography disclosed an abdominal aortic aneurysm in 26 cases, 20 of which were confirmed. The agreement of the two procedures in 10 unconfirmed cases led us to consider the diagnosis as correct. Angioscintigraphy appears to be a reliable procedure for detecting thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms. Ultrasonography is the simplest and least costly procedure for study of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

  1. Diagnosis of aortic aneurysms by scintigraphy and ultrasonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angioscintigraphy, performed on 50 patients suspected of aortic aneurysm and complemented by abdominal ultrasonography in 31 cases, disclosed: - Three cases of thoracic aortic aneurysm, 2 of which were confirmed by arteriography and surgery. It was impossible to perform surgery in the third case, no arteriography was done. Strict agreement with standard thoracic images had made the angioscintigraphic diagnosis seems correct. - Twenty-seven cases of abdominal aortic aneurysms confirmed by arteriography or surgery. Ultrasonography disclosed an abdominal aortic aneurysm in 26 cases, 20 of which were confirmed. The agreement of the two procedures in 10 unconfirmed cases led us to consider the diagnosis as correct. Angioscintigraphy appears to be a reliable procedure for detecting thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms. Ultrasonography is the simplest and least costly procedure for study of abdominal aortic aneurysms

  2. Talk to Your Doctor about Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print This Topic En español Talk to Your Doctor about Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Browse Sections The Basics ... Why do I need to talk to the doctor? Aneurysms usually grow slowly without any symptoms. When ...

  3. Giant aortic arch aneurysm complicating Kawasaki′s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kaouthar Hakim; Rafik Boussada; Lilia Chaker; Fatma Ouarda

    2014-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a common acute vasculitis in pediatric population that usually involves small- and middle-sized arteries, commonly coronary arteries. Although the incidence and natural course of coronary aneurysms after KD are well documented in studies, related reports on peripheral arterial and aortic aneurysms are scarce. We report the occurrence of a giant aortic aneurysm involving the horizontal part of aortic arch in a 28-month-old boy diagnosed with KD. This complication was m...

  4. Abdominal aortic aneurysm: Treatment options, image visualizations and follow-up procedures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-Hua Sun

    2012-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm is a common vascular disease that affects elderly population.Open surgical repair is regarded as the gold standard technique for treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm,however,endovaseular aneurysm repair has rapidly expanded since its first introduction in 1990s.As a less invasive technique,endovascular aneurysm repair has been confirmed to be an effective alternative to open surgical repair,especially in patients with co-morbid conditions.Computed tomography (CT) angiography is currently the preferred imaging modality for both preoperative planning and post-operative follow-up.2D CT images are complemented by a number of 3D reconstructions which enhance the diagnostic applications of CT angiography in both planning and follow-up of endovascular repair.CT has the disadvantage of high cummulative radiation dose,of particular concern in younger patients,since patients require regular imaging follow-ups after endovascular repair,thus,exposing patients to repeated radiation exposure for life.There is a trend to change from CT to ultrasound surveillance of endovascular aneurysm repair.Medical image visualizations demonstrate excellent morphological assessment of aneurysm and stent-grafts,but fail to provide hemodynamic changes caused by the complex stent-graft device that is implanted into the aorta.This article reviews the treatment options of abdominal aortic aneurysm,various image visualization tools,and follow-up procedures with use of different modalities including both imaging and computational fluid dynamics methods.Future directions to improve treatment outcomes in the follow-up of endovascular aneurysm repair are outlined.

  5. Diagnostic imaging of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The survey explains the available methods for diagnostic imaging of aortic aneurysms, i.e. the conventional methods of ultrasonography and intra-arterial angiography as well as the modern tomographic and image processing techniques such as CT, DSA, and MRT. The various methods are briefly discussed with respect to their sensitivity and specificity. The authors expect that MRI will become the modality of choice, due to absence of radiation exposure of the patients

  6. The vanishing giant abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivoshei, Lian; Halak, Moshe; Schneiderman, Jacob; Silverberg, Daniel

    2011-05-01

    Spontaneous sac size regression of a giant abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a rare event that has not been previously described. We report a case of an 89-year-old woman with a known 9-cm AAA, which was diagnosed in 2003. The patient had refused any kind of treatment at that time. Recent imaging studies obtained 7 years later revealed an AAA of 4 cm diameter. This is the first recorded case of significant spontaneous AAA sac shrinkage. PMID:21444348

  7. Drug Therapy for Small Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Meenakshisundaram

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal aortic aneurysm is often asymptomatic, less recognized, and causes considerable mortalityand morbidity, if missed. The incidence varies from country to country and the occurrence is influencedby modifiable (smoking, coronary heart disease, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and prolonged steroid therapyand non-modifiable risk factors (increasing age, male gender, and positive family history. Most ofthe patients with such aneurysm do not exhibit symptoms and the diagnosis is made accidentally duringroutine medical investigations, abdominal ultrasonography, or by an astute surgeon during an abdominalprocedure. Sometimes the diagnosis is made in an emergency room, if the attending resident/doctor isaware of it. Despite good diagnosis and effective management, the outcomes of complicated cases arepoor and the treatment cost is prohibitive. Hence, we reviewed the literature to find out the pathogenesisof such aneurysms and the usefulness of available drugs in its prevention.

  8. Pulsatile blood flow in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsac, Anne-Virginie; Lasheras, Juan C.; Singel, Soeren; Varga, Chris

    2001-11-01

    We discuss the results of combined in-vitro laboratory measurements and clinical observations aimed at determining the effect that the unsteady wall shear stresses and the pressure may have on the growth and eventual rupturing of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA), a permanent bulging-like dilatation occurring near the aortic bifurcation. In recent years, new non-invasive techniques, such as stenting, have been used to treat these AAAs. However, the development of these implants, aimed at stopping the growth of the aneurysm, has been hampered by the lack of understanding of the effect that the hemodynamic forces have on the growth mechanism. Since current in-vivo measuring techniques lack the precision and the necessary resolution, we have performed measurements of the pressure and shear stresses in laboratory models. The models of the AAA were obtained from high resolution three-dimensional CAT/SCANS performed in patients at early stages of the disease. Preliminary DPIV measurements show that the pulsatile blood flow discharging into the cavity of the aneurysm leads to large spikes of pressure and wall shear stresses near and around its distal end, indicating a possible correlation between the regions of high wall shear stresses and the observed location of the growth of the aneurysm.

  9. Colorectal cancer associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm: results of EVAR followed by colectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, Giulio; Ceccanei, Gianluca; Pacilè, Maria A; Pizzardi, Giulia; Palumbo, Piergaspare; Vietri, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    The association of colorectal cancer and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is infrequent but poses special problems of priority of treatment under elective circumstances. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the outcome of 16 consecutive patients undergoing endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) followed by colectomy. Operative mortality was nil. Operative morbidity included two transient rise of serum creatinine level and one extraperitoneal anastomotic leakage which evolved favourably with conservative treatment. EVAR allowed a very short delay of treatment of colorectal cancer after aneurysm repair, minimizing operative complications. PMID:23151840

  10. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair and Sealing (EVARS): A Useful Adjunct in Treating Challenging Morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Gareth J; Antoniou, George A; Torella, Francesco; McWilliams, Richard G; Fisher, Robert K

    2016-04-01

    An 81-year-old male with previous open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair presented with asymptomatic large pseudoaneurysms at both ends of an open surgical tube graft. Endovascular aneurysm sealing (EVAS) in combination with the iliac limbs of a standard endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) successfully excluded both pseudoaneurysms from circulation. We describe the combination of elements of EVAS and EVAR and have termed this endovascular aneurysm repair and sealing (EVARS). EVARS has the advantage of harnessing the benefits of endobag sealing in aortic necks unsuitable for standard EVAR whilst providing the security of accurate stent placement within short common iliac arteries. In conclusion, EVAS may be combined with standard endovascular iliac limbs and is a possible treatment option for pseudoaneurysm following open aneurysm repair. PMID:26493819

  11. A large un-ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm causing pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajjad, Jahangir; Ahmed, Abubakr; Coveney, Andrew; Fulton, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    A 79 years old woman presented in a peripheral hospital with dyspnea, right-sided pleuritic chest pain and cough for 3 days. On examination, she was tachycardiac and tachypneic. She had reduced air entry bilaterally on auscultation. Computed tomography-pulmonary angiogram, performed in peripheral Hospital, confirmed the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, and she was commenced on warfarin. Ultrasonography showed no evidence of deep venous thrombosis in legs; however, ultrasound of the abdomen revealed an aortic aneurysm. She was hemodynamically stable on transfer to vascular surgery department, and her complete clinical examination revealed a pulsatile mass in the central abdomen. Computed tomography angiogram of aorta showed 8.7-cm abdominal aortic aneurysm. Venogram performed during inferior vena cava (IVC) filter insertion showed that IVC was displaced and compressed due to this large aortic aneurysm, causing thromboembolism. An open repair of the aneurysm was performed with uneventful recovery. PMID:26205717

  12. Ruptured Mycotic Aortic Aneurysm after Bacille Calmette-Guerin Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floros, Nikolaos; Meletiadis, Konstantinos; Kusenack, Ulrich; Zirngibl, Hubert; Kamper, Lars; Haage, Patrick; Dreger, Nici Markus

    2015-10-01

    To report a case of a ruptured mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm (MAA) after intravesical Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) therapy because of bladder carcinoma. A 57-year-old male patient was admitted to our hospital for follow-up computed tomography 14 months after transurethral resection of a papillary carcinoma of the bladder and intravesical BCG therapy. The CT scan revealed a ruptured MAA aneurysm and the patient underwent an endovascular repair with an aorto-bi-iliac stent graft. A ruptured MAA is a rare but lethal complication after BCG instillation therapy. The standard therapy is the open reconstruction but according to the literature an endovascular therapy in combination with long-term antibiotics should be considered as a bridging or a definite solution. PMID:26119640

  13. Can release of urinary retention trigger abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, Andreas; Powell-Bowns, Matilda; Elseedawy, Emad

    2013-01-01

    Only 50% of abdominal aortic aneurysms present with the classic triad of hypotension, back pain and a pulsatile abdominal mass. This variability in symptoms can delay diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a patient presenting with a unique combination of symptoms suggesting that decompression of urinary retention can lead to abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture. PMID:24964430

  14. Incidence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome after endovascular aortic repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De La Motte, L; Vogt, K; Jensen, Leif Panduro;

    2011-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence of the post-implantation syndrome/systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) after endovascular aortic repair. METHODS: All patients, undergoing elective primary endovascular repair of an asymptomatic infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm...... groups (3% in the SIRS group vs. none in the non-SIRS group). CONCLUSION: The high incidence of SIRS after EVAR is unexpected considering the minimally invasive procedure. Further studies on the cause of this response and measures to attenuate the response seem appropriate....

  15. Endoleakage after endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms: diagnosis, significance and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endoleak, also called leakage, leak and Perigraft leak, is a major complication and its persistence represents a failure of endovascular aortic aneurysm repair. Its detection and treatment is therefore of primary importance, since endoleak can be associated with pressurization (increase in pressure) of the sac, resulting in expansion and rupture of the aneurysm. The aim of this paper is to discuss the definition, significance, diagnosis and different options to treat endoleak. (orig.)

  16. Tratamento do aneurisma da aorta toracoabdominal com endoprótese ramificada para as artérias viscerais Branched endovascular stent graft for thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Simi

    2007-03-01

    AATA com endoprótese ramificada é factível. A melhora dos recursos técnicos e da qualidade dos materiais poderá ampliar a indicação desse procedimento como alternativa à cirurgia aberta.We report a case of branched stent graft system for endovascular repair of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA. A 68-year-old female patient, smoker, hypertensive, with a large TAAA and multiple comorbid conditions that restricted indication for conventional surgery. The aneurysm originated from the descending thoracic aorta, extending until the infrarenal abdominal aorta, involving the emergence of visceral arteries, celiac trunk, superior and renal mesenteric arteries. The TAAA was treated with the endovascular technique using a branched stent graft. This stent graft was customized based on the anatomical characteristics of the aorta and on the position of visceral branches, which were obtained by tomographic angiography, with the aim of excluding the aneurysm and maintaining perfusion of visceral arteries. The procedure was performed under regional and general anesthesia in the surgical room, preceded by cerebrospinal fluid drainage under fluoroscopic guidance. The femoral arteries, which were previously dissected, were used to implement the branched stent graft and for radiological control. Through the stent graft branches, secondary extensions were implanted, with covered stents, to the respective visceral arteries, which were approached via left axillary artery. Total operative time was 14 hours, 4 hours and 30 minutes of fluoroscopy time and 120 mL of iodinated contrast. The patient became hemodynamically unstable after the surgery. Transesophageal echocardiogram showed a type A retrograde dissection of the thoracic aorta, followed by spontaneous thrombosis of the false lumen. Control tomography showed exclusion of the TAAA and patency of the bypasses to visceral branches, with no endoleaks. The patient was discharged on the 13th postoperative day. Branched

  17. CT Study of the Relationship Between the Common Iliac Artery and Vein and Their Juxtaposition: Implications for Conduit Construction Prior to Endosvascular Stent-Graft Repair of Aortic Aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to determine the anatomical relationship and juxtaposition between the common iliac artery and vein in a population of patients with aortic aneurysmal disease and a population clinically and radiologically free of atheroma. It was a retrospective study of 100 consecutive patients undergoing computed tomographic assessment of abdominal aortic aneurysm prior to endovascular or open surgical repair and 100 patients undergoing computed tomographic assessment for other pathologies who did not have clinical or imaging signs of aorto-iliac atheroma. In both groups the anatomical relationship between the right and left iliac artery and vein was studied, and the thickness of the fat plane separating the artery from the vein measured. The right iliac vein was posterolateral to the artery at the level of the common iliac artery bifurcation in 95% of patients in both groups. At the same level the left iliac vein was posterior in 23% (p ≤ 0.001). Eighty-three percent of patients in the aneurysm group had a fat plane between the right artery and vein that measured 0 mm (no visible fat plane = 52%) to 1 mm (= 31%). Ninety-eight percent of patients in the aneurysm group had a measurable fat plane between the left iliac artery and vein of up to 5 mm (p = 0.001). Six percent of the control group demonstrated no visible fat plane between the right iliac artery and vein (p ≤ 0.001), while the fat plane measured more than 1 mm (1-5 mm) on the left in 100%. We conclude that in patients where conduit construction is required for aortic stent-graft access, the anatomical configuration and intimate relationship of the iliac arteries and veins should be assessed and taken into account at CT scan evaluation. The distal right common iliac artery should not be used, as venous damage can be predicted from the anatomical and intimate relationship of the iliac artery and vein at this level in patients with atheroma and the difficulties this relationship

  18. Mycotic aneurysm in a child with history of coarctation of the aorta repair

    OpenAIRE

    M Santiago Restrepo; Turek, Joseph W; Benjamin Reinking; Nicholas Von Bergen

    2014-01-01

    A mycotic aneurysm is a rare condition occasionally seen in patients with a history of prior cardiac or vascular surgery. Here we report the presentation of a mycotic aneurysm in a pediatric patient at the site of prior aortic coarctation repair. This patient′s initial presentation suggested rheumatologic or oncologic disease, and after diagnosis he continued to show evidence of splenic, renal and vascular injury distal to the mycotic aneurysm site while being treated with antibiotics. We dis...

  19. Endovascular repair of para-anastomotic aortoiliac aneurysms.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tsang, Julian S

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of endovascular stent grafts in the treatment of para-anastomotic aneurysms (PAAs) as an alternative to high-risk open surgical repair. We identified all patients with previous open aortic aneurysm repair who underwent infrarenal endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) at our institution from June 1998 to April 2007. Patient demographics, previous surgery, and operative complications were recorded. One hundred forty-eight patients underwent EVAR during the study period and 11 patients had previous aortic surgery. Of these 11 redo patients, the mean age was 62 years at initial surgery and 71 years at EVAR. All patients were male. Initial open repair was for rupture in five (45%) patients. The average time between initial and subsequent reintervention was 9 years. All patients were ASA Grade III or IV. Fifty-five percent of the PAAs involved the iliac arteries, 36% the abdominal aorta, and 9% were aortoiliac. Ten patients had endovascular stent-grafts inserted electively, and one patient presented with a contained leak. Aorto-uni-iliac stent-grafts were deployed in seven patients, and bifurcated stent-grafts in four patients. A 100% successful deployment rate was achieved. Perioperative mortality was not seen and one patient needed surgical reintervention to correct an endoleak. Endovascular repair of PAAs is safe and feasible. It is a suitable alternative and has probably now become the treatment of choice in the management of PAAs.

  20. Quantitative expression and localization of cysteine and aspartic proteases in human abdominal aortic aneurysms

    OpenAIRE

    Lohoefer, Fabian; Reeps, Christian; Lipp, Christina; Rudelius, Martina; Haertl, Felix; Matevossian, Edouard; Zernecke, Alma; Eckstein, Hans-Henning; Pelisek, Jaroslav

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine and aspartic proteases possess high elastolytic activity and might contribute to the degradation of the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) wall. The aim of this study was to analyze, in detail, the proteases (cathepsins B, D, K, L and S, and inhibitor cystatin C) found in human AAA and healthy aortic tissue samples. The vessel walls from AAA patients (n=36) and nonaneurysmal aortae (n=10) were retrieved using conventional surgical repair and autopsy methods. Serum samples from the same ...

  1. Aortic Disease in the Young: Genetic Aneurysm Syndromes, Connective Tissue Disorders, and Familial Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Cury

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many genetic syndromes associated with the aortic aneurysmal disease which include Marfan syndrome (MFS, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS, Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS, familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD, bicuspid aortic valve disease (BAV, and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD. In the absence of familial history and other clinical findings, the proportion of thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms and dissections resulting from a genetic predisposition is still unknown. In this study, we propose the review of the current genetic knowledge in the aortic disease, observing, in the results that the causative genes and molecular pathways involved in the pathophysiology of aortic aneurysm disease remain undiscovered and continue to be an area of intensive research.

  2. Neuropsychiatric symptoms in patients with aortic aneurysms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard T Baune

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Emerging evidence suggests that vascular disease confers vulnerability to a late-onset of depressive illness and the impairment of specific cognitive functions, most notably in the domains of memory storage and retrieval. Lower limb athero-thrombosis and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA have both been previously associated with neuropsychiatric symptoms possibly due to associated intracerebral vascular disease or systemic inflammation, hence suggesting that these illnesses may be regarded as models to investigate the vascular genesis of neuropsychiatric symptoms. The aim of this study was to compare neuropsychiatric symptoms such as depression, anxiety and a variety of cognitive domains in patients who had symptoms of peripheral athero-thrombosis (intermittent claudication and those who had an asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm AAA. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a cross-sectional study, 26 participants with either intermittent claudication or AAA were assessed using a detailed neuropsychiatric assessment battery for various cognitive domains and depression and anxiety symptoms (Hamilton Depression and Anxiety Scales. Student t test and linear regression analyses were applied to compare neuropsychiatric symptoms between patient groups. AAA participants showed greater levels of cognitive impairment in the domains of immediate and delayed memory as compared to patients who had intermittent claudication. Cognitive dysfunction was best predicted by increasing aortic diameter. CRP was positively related to AAA diameter, but not to cognitive function. AAA and aortic diameter in particular were associated with cognitive dysfunction in this study. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: AAA patients are at a higher risk for cognitive impairment than intermittent claudication patients. Validation of this finding is required in a larger study, but if confirmed could suggest that systemic factors peculiar to AAA may impact on cognitive function.

  3. Modification of an endovascular stent graft for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloye, Olajompo Busola

    Endovascular surgery is currently used to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). A stent graft is deployed to exclude blood flow from the aneurysm sac. It is an effective procedure used in preventing aneurysm rupture, with reduced patient morbidity and mortality compared to open surgical repair. Migration and leakage around the device ("endoleak") due to poor sealing of the stent graft to the aorta have raised concerns about the long-term durability of endovascular repair. A preliminary study of cell migration and proliferation is presented as a prelude to a more extensive in vivo testing. A method to enhance the biological seal between the stent graft and the aorta is proposed to eliminate this problem. This can be achieved by impregnating the stent graft with 50/50 poly (DL-lactide co glycolic acid) (PLGA) and growth factors such as basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) or connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), at the proximal and distal ends. It is hypothesized that as PLGA degrades it will release the growth factors that will promote proliferation and migration of aortic smooth muscle cells to the coated site, leading to a natural seal between the aorta and the stent graft. In addition, growth factor release should promote smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction that will help keep the stent graft in place at the proximal and distal ends. It is shown that a statistically significant effect of increased cell proliferation and migration is observed for CTGF release. Less of an effect is noted for bFGF or just the PLGA. The effect is estimated to be large enough to be clinically significant in a future animal study. The long term goal of this study is to reduce migration encounter after graft deployment and to reduce secondary interventions of EVAR especially for older patients who are unfit for open surgical treatment.

  4. Comparison of arterial stiffness and microcirculatory changes following abdominal aortic aneurysm grafting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moloney, M A

    2012-02-01

    BACKGOUND: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery provides a unique opportunity to study the impact of arterial stiffness on central haemodynamics, reflected in augmentation index (AI). The aneurysmal aorta is significantly stiffer than undilated age-matched aorta. AIM: We investigated whether replacement of an aneurysmal aorta with a compliant graft would result in a decrease in AI, which would thus decrease myocardial workload parameters. METHODS: Patients undergoing elective open or endovascular AAA repair were assessed with applanation tonometry and laser fluximetry pre-operatively, immediately and long-term post-operatively. RESULTS: Replacement of a small segment of abnormal conduit vessel resulted in improvements in AI, demonstrating that arterial stiffness can be surgically manipulated. CONCLUSIONS: These results reflect a decreased myocardial workload post-aortic grafting. This decrease in AI is important from a risk factor management perspective, and arterial stiffness should become a further recognised and screened for risk factor in patients with known aneurysmal disease.

  5. Comparison of arterial stiffness and microcirculatory changes following abdominal aortic aneurysm grafting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moloney, M A

    2010-11-11

    BACKGOUND: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery provides a unique opportunity to study the impact of arterial stiffness on central haemodynamics, reflected in augmentation index (AI). The aneurysmal aorta is significantly stiffer than undilated age-matched aorta. AIM: We investigated whether replacement of an aneurysmal aorta with a compliant graft would result in a decrease in AI, which would thus decrease myocardial workload parameters. METHODS: Patients undergoing elective open or endovascular AAA repair were assessed with applanation tonometry and laser fluximetry pre-operatively, immediately and long-term post-operatively. RESULTS: Replacement of a small segment of abnormal conduit vessel resulted in improvements in AI, demonstrating that arterial stiffness can be surgically manipulated. CONCLUSIONS: These results reflect a decreased myocardial workload post-aortic grafting. This decrease in AI is important from a risk factor management perspective, and arterial stiffness should become a further recognised and screened for risk factor in patients with known aneurysmal disease.

  6. Turner's syndrome associated with bicuspid aortic stenosis and dissecting aortic aneurysm

    OpenAIRE

    Slater, D N; Grundman, M. J.; Mitchell, L

    1982-01-01

    A case of Turner's syndrome is described associated with bicuspid aortic stenosis and fatal rupture of a thoracic dissecting aortic aneurysm. Histology of the aneurysm showed severe cystic medial necrosis. This association has not been previously described in the absence of coarctation.

  7. Combination of traumatic thoracic aortic pseudoaneurysm and myocardial contusion leading to left ventricular aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combination of thoracic aortic pseudoaneurysm and left ventricular aneurysm resulting from a single traumatic incident is an exceedingly rare occurrence. We present a case of a 10-year-old girl who sustained significant blunt trauma to the chest after being involved in a rollover motor vehicle accident. The child underwent immediate repair of a transected aortic arch. An inferior wall left ventricular aneurysm developed 3 weeks later, and the patient underwent successful repair of the left ventricular aneurysm and a damaged mitral valve. The use of fast multidetector row CT, cardiac MRI, and echocardiography have improved our ability to diagnose these types of injuries and accurately image their anatomic relationships in the acute and perioperative settings. (orig.)

  8. Endovascular treatment of atherosclerotic and other thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattori, Rossella; Russo, Vincenzo

    2007-06-01

    The incidence of thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) is increasing with the present rate of occurrence at 10.9 cases per 100,000 people per year. The estimated 5-year risk of rupture of a TAA with a diameter between 4 and 5.9 cm is 16%, but it rises to 31% for aneurysms ≥ 6 cm. Despite increasing awareness of the importance of early diagnosis and treatment options, there are no clear guidelines available at the time of writing. Nor is there any clear evidence for specific pharmacological treatment able to resolve or delay the disease progression. Endovascular treatment (EVT), proposed as an alternative to surgery, has been considered a therapeutic innovation, especially because it is minimally invasive, which allows treatment even in high surgical risk patients. Vascular imaging is crucial for patient selection, endoprosthesis choice, and planning of the treatment because not all aneurysms are suitable. Early and midterm results are encouraging, but long-term results are necessary to definitively assess reliability of stent-graft materials and improvement in patient survival. In the choice between surgical or endovascular repair of TAAs, many factors must be considered, including the clinical situation, comorbidities, anatomy, choice of equipment, and last, but not less important, experience of the clinical team. PMID:21326796

  9. Positron emission tomography (PET) evaluation of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA)

    OpenAIRE

    SakalihasanN, Natzi; Van Damme, Hendrik; Gomez, P.; RIGO, PIERRE; Lapiere, C. M.; Nusgens, Betty; Limet, Raymond

    2002-01-01

    Background: aneurysmal disease is associated with all inflammatory Cell infiltrate and enzymatic degradation of the vessel wall. Aim of the study: to detect increased metabolic activity in abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) by means of positron emission tomography (PET-imaging). Study design: twenty-six patients with AAA underwent PET-imaging Results: in tell patients, PET-imaging revealed increased, fluoro-deoxy-glucose (18-FDG) uptake at the level of the aneurysm. Patients with positive PET-i...

  10. Management of severe asymmetric pectus excavatum complicating aortic repair in a patient with Marfan's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Jonathan C; Marcuzzi, Danny; Peterson, Mark D; Ko, Michael A

    2016-05-01

    We describe the case of a 28-year old man with Marfan's syndrome and severe pectus excavatum who required an aortic root replacement for an ascending aortic aneurysm. There was a near-vertical angulation of the sternum that presented challenges with opening and exposure of the heart during aortic surgery. Furthermore, removal of the sternal retractor after aortic repair resulted in sudden loss of cardiac output. A Ravitch procedure was then performed to successfully close the chest without further cardiovascular compromise. We propose that patients with a severe pectus excavatum and mediastinal displacement seen on preoperative CT scanning should be considered for simultaneous, elective repair. PMID:26874148

  11. [A hybrid approach to surgery for thoracic aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    L., de la Motte; Baekgaard, N.; Jensen, L.P.; Just, S.; Olesen, A.; Skott, P.

    2009-01-01

    graft and a newly developed aneurysm of the aortic arch. Using a left lateral thoracotomy to avoid manipulation of the pseudoaneurysm, we adopted a hybrid approach by first debranching the subclavian and carotid arteries from the descending aorta followed by endoluminal grafting of the aortic arch. The...

  12. 18F-FDG PET-CT uptake is a feature of both normal diameter and aneurysmal aortic wall and is not related to aneurysm size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aortic metabolic activity is suggested to correlate with presence and progression of aneurysmal disease, but has been inadequately studied. This study investigates the 2-[18F] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) uptake in a population of infra-renal abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), compared to a matched non-aneurysmal control group. The Positron Emission Tomography - Computed Tomography (PET/CT) database was searched for infra-renal AAA. Exclusion criteria were prior repair, vasculitis, and saccular/mycotic thoracic or thoraco-abdominal aneurysms. Matching of 159 non-aneurysmal (max) and target to background mediastinal blood pool ratio (TBR) were documented. Predictors of FDG uptake (age, sex, aortic diameter, hypertension, statin use, and diabetes) were assessed using univariate analysis. Follow-up questionnaires were sent to referring clinicians. Aneurysms (n = 151) and controls (n = 159) were matched (p > 0.05) for age, sex, diabetes, hypertension, smoking status, statin use, and indication for PET/CT. Median aneurysm diameter was 5.0 cm (range 3.2-10.4). On visual analysis there was no significant difference in the overall numbers with increased visual uptake 24 % (36/151) in the aneurysm group vs. 19 % (30/159) in the controls, p = ns. SUVmax was slightly lower in the aneurysm group vs. controls (mean (2 SD) 1.75(0.79) vs. 1.84(0.58), p = 0.02). However there was no difference in TBR between the AAA group and controls (mean (2 SD) 1.03 (0.46) vs. 1.05(0.31), p = 0.36). During a median 18 (interquartile range 8-35) months' follow-up 20 were repaired and four were confirmed ruptured. The level of metabolic activity as assessed by 18F-FDG PET/CT in infra-renal AAA does not correlate with aortic size and does not differ between aneurysms and matched controls. (orig.)

  13. Epidemiology of aortic disease - aneurysm, dissection, occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physiological infrarenal aortic diameter varies between 12.4 mm in women an 27.6 mm in men. As defined, an aneurysmatic dilatation begins with 29 mm. According to that, 9% of all people above the age of 65 are affected by an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Compared with the female sex, the male sex predominates at a rate of about 5:1. The disease is predominant in men of the white race. In black men, black and white women the incidence of AAA is identical. 38 to 50 percent of the AAA patients (patients) suffer from hypertension, 33 to 60% from coronary, 28% from cerebrovascular and 25% from peripheral occlusive disease. The AAA expansion rate varies between 0.2 and 0.8 cm per year and is exponential from a diameter of 5 cm on. In autopsy studies, the rupture rates with AAA diameters of 7 cm were below 5%, 39% and 65%, respecitvely. 70% of the AAA patients do not die of a rupture, but of a cardiac disease. Serum markers, such as metalloproteinases and procollagen peptides are significantly increased in AAA patients. Thoraco-abdominal aneurysms (TAA) make up only 2 to 5% of all degenerative aneurysms. 20 to 30% of the TAA patients are also affected by an AAA. 80% of the TAA are degenerative, 15 to 20% are a consequence of the chronic dissection - including 5% of Marfan patients -, 2% occur in case of infections and 1 to 2% in case of aortitis. The TAA incidence in 100,000 person-years is 5.9% during a monitoring period of 30 years. In case of TAA, an operation is indicated with a maximum diameter of 5.5 to 6 cm and more and, in case of a Marfan's syndrome (incidence of 1:10,000), with a maximum diameter of 5.5 cm and more. With regard to aorto-iliac occlusive diseases, there are defined 3 types of distribution. Type I refers to the region of the bifurcation itself. Type II defines the diffuse aortoiliac spread of the disease. Type III designates multiple-level occlusions also beyond the inguinal ligament. Type I patients in most cases are female and more

  14. Haemostatic factors, atherosclerosis and risk of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, A J; Fowkes, F G; Lowe, G D; Rumley, A

    1996-10-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms have traditionally been thought to be a consequence of severe atherosclerosis of the arterial wall. To date, the role of haemostatic factors in aneurysmal disease has not been extensively researched. The aim of this study was to see if such factors were independently related to the occurrence of aortic aneurysm. Furthermore, were the associations maintained after taking into account the presence of underlying atherosclerotic disease? Using data from the Edinburgh Artery Study, a nested case-control design was used involving 40 cases of aortic aneurysm, each being matched to five controls by sex and within a 5-year age band. After adjustment for age and sex, both fibrinogen (P D-dimer (P aneurysm. Further adjustment for packyears, history of cardiovascular disease and the ankle brachial pressure index resulted in odds ratios of 1.51 (95% CI 1.05 to 2.16, P D-dimer. These associations probably arise as a consequence of fibrin deposition and turnover within the aneurysmal sac, although further prospective studies are needed before thrombotic factors can be used in the identification of a group who are at high risk of developing an abdominal aortic aneurysm. PMID:8958392

  15. Aortic Aneurysm: A Rare Cause of Ortner's Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A young man presented with hoarseness of voice and was found to have left vocal cord paralysis and a large opacity on chest X-ray in the left upper zone. CT angiography showed a giant aneurysm of the aortic arch involving the left subclavian artery. Using a dual perfusion system, with the femoral bypass circuit taking care of the spinal protection and the aortic bypass circuit providing the cerebral protection, the aneurysm was excised and a 16 mm Dacron graft was anastomosed to the aortic arch and the left subclavian artery was anastomosed to the interposition graft. He had a smooth postoperative course and his hoarseness subsided in next 6 months. (author)

  16. Aortic cusp extension valvuloplasty: repair with an extracellular patch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Szymon; Śliwka, Joanna; Urlik, Maciej; Maruszewski, Marcin; Kukulski, Tomasz; Nożyński, Jerzy; Zembala, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The proportion of valve repair procedures is increasing in experienced centers. The aim of the study was to assess the clinical and echocardiographic outcomes after aortic valve reconstruction with a novel surgical technique. Material and methods The study group consisted of 30 patients (23 male and 7 female) at a mean age of 35 ± 14 years. In patients with aortic root aneurysm the reimplantation or Florida sleeve technique was used. A sub-commissural annuloplasty, plication of the free edge of the cusp, shaving, and commissurotomy were performed. At this stage of surgery aortic repair was then attempted by cusp extension. Since 2013 the strips have been tailored from extracellular matrix. Results The mean aortic cross-clamp time was 90 ± 32 min. The mean cardiopulmonary bypass time was 126 ± 38 min. There was no in-hospital death. Re-exploration for bleeding was required in 1 patient. During follow-up, 1 patient needed reoperation at 1 year due to endocarditis. All patients remained alive in New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class I. The echocardiographic findings remained unchanged in all cases during follow-up. Conclusions Our modification of aortic valve repair results in a good outcome. PMID:26855646

  17. The effect of endoleak on intra-aneurysmal pressure after EVE for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the intra-aneurysmal pressure curve in the presence of endoleak after endovascular exclusion (EVE) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Methods: Infrarenal aortic aneurysms were created with bovine jugular vein segments or patches. Then they were underwent incomplete endovascular exclusion of the aneurysm and formation of endoleaks. The pressures of blood flow outside the graft into the sac were measured. Results: The intrasac pressure was higher than systemic pressure in the presence of endoleak. After sealing the endoleak, pressure decreased significantly, and the pressure cure showed approximately linear. Conclusion: The change of intra-aneurysmal pressure curve reflected the load on aneurysmal wall after EVE, and can also help to determine the endoleak existence

  18. Contemporary Applications of Ultrasound in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaife, Mark; Giannakopoulos, Triantafillos; Al-Khoury, Georges E; Chaer, Rabih A; Avgerinos, Efthymios D

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) is a well-established screening tool for detection of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) and is currently recommended not only for those with a relevant family history but also for all men and high-risk women older than 65 years of age. The advent of minimally invasive endovascular techniques in the treatment of AAAs [endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR)] has increased the need for repeat imaging, especially in the postoperative period. Nevertheless, preoperative planning, intraoperative execution, and postoperative surveillance all mandate accurate imaging. While computed tomographic angiography and angiography have dominated the field, repeatedly exposing patients to the deleterious effects of cumulative radiation and intravenous nephrotoxic contrast, US technology has significantly evolved over the past decade. In addition to standard color duplex US, 2D, 3D, or 4D contrast-enhanced US modalities are revolutionizing AAA management and postoperative surveillance. This technology can accurately measure AAA diameter and volume, and most importantly, it can detect endoleaks post-EVAR with high sensitivity and specificity. 4D contrast-enhanced US can even provide hemodynamic information about the branch vessels following fenestrated EVARs. The need for experienced US operators and accredited vascular labs is mandatory to guarantee the reliability of the results. This review article presents a comprehensive overview of the literature on the state-of-art US imaging in AAA management, including post-EVAR follow-up, techniques, and diagnostic accuracy. PMID:27303669

  19. Emergent Endovascular Stent Grafts for Ruptured Aortic Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Jennifer P; Kolbeck, Kenneth J; Kaufman, John A

    2015-09-01

    Ruptured aortic aneurysms uniformly require emergent attention. Historically, urgent surgical repair or medical management was the only treatment options. The development of covered stent grafts has introduced a third approach in the care of these critical patients. The clinical status of the patient and local physician expertise drive the treatment modalities in the majority of cases. The goal of therapy in these patients is to stabilize the patient as quickly as possible, establish maximum survival with minimum morbidity, and provide a long lasting result. The endovascular approach has become an acceptable treatment option in an increasing number of patients presenting with ruptured aneurysmal disease of both the descending thoracic and abdominal aorta. Major factors influencing treatment include patient clinical status, characteristics of the aorta, physician preference, institutional experience, and availability of appropriate equipment. Planning, experience, and the ability to improvise effective solutions are keys to the success of the procedure when endovascular techniques are utilized. Three separate cases, requiring intraprocedural improvisation, are presented followed by a review of the literature. PMID:26327743

  20. Typical exposure parameters, organ doses and effective doses for endovascular aortic aneurysm repair: Comparison of Monte Carlo simulations and direct measurements with an anthropomorphic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation exposure of patients during endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) procedures ranks in the upper sector of medical exposure. Thus, estimation of radiation doses achieved during EVAR is of great importance. Organ doses (OD) and effective doses (ED) administered to 17 patients receiving EVAR were determined (1) from the exposure parameters by performing Monte Carlo simulations in mathematical phantoms and (2) by measurements with thermoluminescent dosimeters in a physical anthropomorphic phantom. The mean fluoroscopy time was 26 min, the mean dose area product was 24995 cGy cm2. The mean ED was 34.8 mSv, ODs up to 626 mSv were found. Whereas digital subtraction angiographies (DSA) and fluoroscopies each contributed about 50 % to the cumulative ED, the ED rates of DSAs were found to be ten times higher than those of fluoroscopies. Doubling of the field size caused an ED rate enhancement up to a factor of 3. EVAR procedures cause high radiation exposure levels that exceed the values published thus far. As a consequence, (1) DSAs should be only performed when necessary and with a low image rate, (2) fluoroscopies should be kept as short as possible, and (3) field sizes should be minimized. (orig.)

  1. Typical exposure parameters, organ doses and effective doses for endovascular aortic aneurysm repair: Comparison of Monte Carlo simulations and direct measurements with an anthropomorphic phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerth, Monika; Treitl, Karla Maria; Treitl, Marcus [Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Seidenbusch, Michael C. [Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Clinical Centre of the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Sadeghi-Azandaryani, Mojtaba [Clinical Centre of the County of Erding, Department of Vascular Surgery, Erding (Germany); Lechel, Ursula [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Department of Medical and Occupational Radiation Protection, Oberschleissheim (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Radiation exposure of patients during endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) procedures ranks in the upper sector of medical exposure. Thus, estimation of radiation doses achieved during EVAR is of great importance. Organ doses (OD) and effective doses (ED) administered to 17 patients receiving EVAR were determined (1) from the exposure parameters by performing Monte Carlo simulations in mathematical phantoms and (2) by measurements with thermoluminescent dosimeters in a physical anthropomorphic phantom. The mean fluoroscopy time was 26 min, the mean dose area product was 24995 cGy cm2. The mean ED was 34.8 mSv, ODs up to 626 mSv were found. Whereas digital subtraction angiographies (DSA) and fluoroscopies each contributed about 50 % to the cumulative ED, the ED rates of DSAs were found to be ten times higher than those of fluoroscopies. Doubling of the field size caused an ED rate enhancement up to a factor of 3. EVAR procedures cause high radiation exposure levels that exceed the values published thus far. As a consequence, (1) DSAs should be only performed when necessary and with a low image rate, (2) fluoroscopies should be kept as short as possible, and (3) field sizes should be minimized. (orig.)

  2. Echocardiographic and radiographic imaging of aortic root and arotic arch aneurysm in the horse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aneurysm of the aortic root and the aortic arch were demonstrated in two warm-blooded geldings( 6 and 7 years old) by diagnostic ultrasound and radiology. In case one a severe dilatation of the aortic root and in case two an abnormal position of the endopericardial part of the aortic root was detected with diagnostic ultrasound. In the second case radiology revealed an enlargement of the dilated aortic aneurysm. ln the first case an aneurysm verum spontaneum is probable

  3. Hereditary Influence in Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm and Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isselbacher, Eric M; Lino Cardenas, Christian Lacks; Lindsay, Mark E

    2016-06-14

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm is a potentially life-threatening condition in that it places patients at risk for aortic dissection or rupture. However, our modern understanding of the pathogenesis of thoracic aortic aneurysm is quite limited. A genetic predisposition to thoracic aortic aneurysm has been established, and gene discovery in affected families has identified several major categories of gene alterations. The first involves mutations in genes encoding various components of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signaling cascade (FBN1, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, TGFB2, TGFB3, SMAD2, SMAD3 and SKI), and these conditions are known collectively as the TGF-β vasculopathies. The second set of genes encode components of the smooth muscle contractile apparatus (ACTA2, MYH11, MYLK, and PRKG1), a group called the smooth muscle contraction vasculopathies. Mechanistic hypotheses based on these discoveries have shaped rational therapies, some of which are under clinical evaluation. This review discusses published data on genes involved in thoracic aortic aneurysm and attempts to explain divergent hypotheses of aneurysm origin. PMID:27297344

  4. ALTERNATIVE METHOD OF SURGICAL CORRECTION OF DISSECTING AORTIC ANEURYSMS WITH AORTIC INSUFFIECIENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Semenovsky

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with dissecting aortic aneurysm and associated acute aortic insufficiency form a group of seriously ill patients with significant cardiac failure, generally involving other organs and systems. It justifies an attempt to reduce a surgical risk, by using more sparing procedures, including supracoronary replacement of the ascending aorta with its root reconstruction. The latter has been performed in 27 patients (mean 54,5 ± 2,1 years with dissecting aortic aneurysm and aortic valvular insufficiency in 1996 to 2009. The major etiological factor was atherosclerosis (88%/ Seventeen (63%, 6 (22,2% and 4 (16% had types I, IIA and II dissection, respectively. Overall hospital mortality was 11%. In late period, progressive aneurysm dissection needed reinterventions in 2 cases. The competence of the reconstructed aortic valve was satisfactory both just after surgery and throughout the follow-up. Indications for this option of chronic correction, surgical techniques, and immediate and long-term results are outlined. 

  5. How To Diagnose and Manage Infected Endografts after Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Setacci, Carlo; Chisci, Emiliano; Setacci, Francesco; Ercolini, Leonardo; de Donato, Gianmarco; Troisi, Nicola; Galzerano, Giuseppe; Michelagnoli, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of endograft infections (EI) after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair is below 1%. With the growing number of patients with aortic endografts and the aging population, the number of patients with EI might also increase. The diagnosis is based on an association of clinical symptoms, imaging, and microbial cultures. Angio-computed tomography is currently the gold-standard technique for diagnosis. Low-grade infection sometimes requires nuclear medicine imaging to make a...

  6. Endoluminal stent-graft management for type B aortic dissection and descending thoracic aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility and short-term early results of endoluminal stent-graft placement in the Stanford B type aortic dissection and the descending thoracic aortic aneurysms. Methods: From March 2003 to September 2005, a total of 31 patients underwent placement of endovascular stent-grafts ,including the descending thoracic aortic aneurysm (n=2) and Standford B type aortic dissection (n=29). All patients had hypertension, with urgent onset of progressive thoracic pain in 27. Two kinds of stent-graft were used in this series: the Talent (Medtronic) in 15 and Aegis (Microportmedicine, Shanghai) in 16 patients. Follow-up was carried out with clinical observations and CTA. Results: Stent-graft implantation for the proximal entry closure was successfully performed in all patients. The DSA of immediately post deployment of the stent-graft showed complete occlusion the proximal entry tear in 23/29 patients with dissection, and complete isolation of the aneurysm in two patients with aortic aneurysm. Endoleak was revealed in 6 patients with dissection. No major complications related to the procedure were encountered. Conclusions: The interventional placement of stent-graft for Type B aortic dissection and descending thoracic aortic aneurysm is safe with satisfactory short-term outcomes. Nonetheless, longer follow-up is highly desirable to assess its real advantages. (authors)

  7. Diabetes and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Hisato; Umemoto, Takuya

    2016-07-01

    We performed a systematic literature search and a meta-analysis to assess the association between diabetes mellitus (DM) and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) growth. Databases including MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched through June 2015 using PubMed and OVID. For each study, data regarding AAA growth rates in both the DM and the non-DM groups were used to generate standardized mean differences (SMDs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Our search identified 19 relevant studies including data on 9777 patients with AAA. Pooled analyses demonstrated a statistically significant slower growth rates in DM patients than in non-DM patients (unadjusted SMD, -0.32; 95% CI, -0.40 to -0.24; P plot asymmetry, even adjustment of the asymmetry did not alter the beneficial effect of DM. In conclusion, on the basis of a meta-analysis of data on a total of 9777 patients (19 studies) identified through a systematic literature search, we confirmed the association of DM with slower growth rates of AAA. PMID:26311742

  8. Are there fewer complications with third generation endografts in endovascular aneurysm repair?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jayia, P; Constantinou, J; Morgan-Rowe, L;

    2013-01-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is widely accepted as a safe technique for treatment of aortic diseases since the concept was first pioneered by Volodos in 1986 and Parodi in 1991. Numerous registries have shown that this minimally invasive technique is associated with lower mortality when co...

  9. A special type of endovascular stent repair with complicated thoracic aneurysm and chronic type B dissection aligned in tandem: double perfusion in true and false distal aorta lumen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAN Hui-li; ZHANG Jian-qun

    2008-01-01

    @@ Aortic dissection and aortic aneurysm are two of the most common catastrophic events involving the aorta. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair is now considered as a promising alternative to open surgical graft replacement, The aim of endovascular repair of a thoracic aneurysm is to exclude, and thus depressurize, the aneurismal wall and the aim of the endovascular repair of type B aortic dissection is to obliterate all of the false lumen through thrombosis after sealing the primary entry tears, thus to ensure the true lumen perfusion.

  10. Neurologic injury after endovascular exclusion of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the mechanism of neurologic injury after endovascular graft exclusion of abdominal aortic aneurysms and the methods of prevention and treatment. Materials: Since March 1997 to October 2002, endovascular graft exclusion for abdominal aortic aneurysm have been preformed on 136 patients, with one occurrence of neurologic injury after the operation. The main body-short limb graft was used in this case (Talent) and the operation was successful. The patient complained of bilateral lower extremities pain and disability. Electromusculogram showed bilateral femoral nerve injury. Then the patient was treated with vitamin B12, hyperbaric oxygen and physical therapy for 2 months outcoming with the symptom improvement. Conclusions: Neurologic injury after endovascular graft exclusion for abdominal aortic aneurysms is possible due to the occlusion of the lumbar artery during the operation. Early treatment is important and more effective. Later nerve nutrition and physical treatment can improve some symptoms partly

  11. Tissue Responses to Stent Grafts with Endo-Exo-Skeleton for Saccular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in a Canine Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Il Young; Chung, Jin Wook; Kim, Hyo Cheol [Dept. of Radiology and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Clinical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Young Ho; So Young Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Beom [Dept. of Radiology, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Min, Seung Kee [Dept. of Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae Hyung [Dept. of Radiology, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    We evaluated the effect of close contact between the stent and the graft on the induction of endothelial covering on the stent graft placed over an aneurysm. Saccular abdominal aortic aneurysms were made with Dacron patch in eight dogs. The stent graft consisted of an inner stent, a expanded polytetrafluoroethylene graft, and an outer stent. After sacrificing the animals, the aortas with an embedded stent graft were excised. The aortas were inspected grossly and evaluated microscopically. The animals were sacrificed at two (n = 3), six (n = 3), and eight months (n = 2) after endovascular repair. In two dogs, the aortic lumen was occluded at two months after the placement. On gross inspection of specimens from the other six dogs with a patent aortic lumen, stent grafts placed over the normal aortic wall were covered by glossy white neointima, whereas, stent grafts placed over the aneurysmal aortic wall were covered by brownish neointima. On microscopic inspection, stent grafts placed over the normal aortic wall were covered by thin neointima (0.27 ± 0.05 mm, mean ± standard deviation) with an endothelial layer, and stent grafts placed over the aneurysmal aortic wall were covered by thick neointima (0.62 ± 0.17 mm) without any endothelial lining. Transgraft cell migration at the normal aortic wall was more active than that at the aneurysmal aortic wall. Close contact between the stent and the graft, which was achieved with stent grafts with endo-exo-skeleton, could not enhance endothelial covering on the stent graft placed over the aneurysms.

  12. Tissue Responses to Stent Grafts with Endo-Exo-Skeleton for Saccular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in a Canine Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated the effect of close contact between the stent and the graft on the induction of endothelial covering on the stent graft placed over an aneurysm. Saccular abdominal aortic aneurysms were made with Dacron patch in eight dogs. The stent graft consisted of an inner stent, a expanded polytetrafluoroethylene graft, and an outer stent. After sacrificing the animals, the aortas with an embedded stent graft were excised. The aortas were inspected grossly and evaluated microscopically. The animals were sacrificed at two (n = 3), six (n = 3), and eight months (n = 2) after endovascular repair. In two dogs, the aortic lumen was occluded at two months after the placement. On gross inspection of specimens from the other six dogs with a patent aortic lumen, stent grafts placed over the normal aortic wall were covered by glossy white neointima, whereas, stent grafts placed over the aneurysmal aortic wall were covered by brownish neointima. On microscopic inspection, stent grafts placed over the normal aortic wall were covered by thin neointima (0.27 ± 0.05 mm, mean ± standard deviation) with an endothelial layer, and stent grafts placed over the aneurysmal aortic wall were covered by thick neointima (0.62 ± 0.17 mm) without any endothelial lining. Transgraft cell migration at the normal aortic wall was more active than that at the aneurysmal aortic wall. Close contact between the stent and the graft, which was achieved with stent grafts with endo-exo-skeleton, could not enhance endothelial covering on the stent graft placed over the aneurysms.

  13. Impact of intraoparetive parametres on survival of patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Miroslav

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm is one of the most urgent surgical conditions with high mortality that has not been changed in decades. Between 1991-2001 total number of 1058 patients was operated at the Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases of Clinical Center of Serbia due to abdominal aortic aneurysm. Of this number, 288 patients underwent urgent surgical repair because of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. The aim of this retrospective study was to show results of the early outcome of surgical treatment of patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm, and to define relevant intraoperative factors that influence their survival. There were 83% male and 17% female patients in the study, mean aged 67 years. Mean duration of surgical procedure was 190 minutes (75-420 min. Most common localization of aneurysm was infrarenal - in 74% of patients, then juxtarenal (12.3%. Suprarenal aneurysm was found in 6.8% of patients, as well as thoracoabdominal aneurysm (6.8%. Retroperitoneal rupture of aortic aneurysm was most common - in 65% of patients, then intraperotineal in 26%. Rare finding such as chronic rupture was found in 3.8%, aortocaval fistula in 3.2% and aorto-duodenal fistula in 0.6% of patients. Mean aortic cross-clamping time was 41.7 minutes (10-150 min. Average intraoperative systolic pressure in patients was 106.5 mmHg (40-160 mmHg. Mean intraoperative blood loss was 3700 ml (1400-8500 ml. Mean intraoperative diuresis was 473 ml (0-2100 ml. Tubular graft was implanted in 53% of patients, aortoiliac bifurcated graft in 32.8%. Aortobifemoral reconstruction was done in 14.2% of patients. These data refer to the patients that survived surgical procedure. Intrahospital mortality that included intraoperative and postoperative deaths was 53.7%. Therefore, 46.3% patients survived surgical treatment and were released from the hospital. Intraoperative mortality was 13.5%. Type of aneurysm had no influence on outcome of patients (p>0.05, as

  14. Mycotic aneurysm in a child with history of coarctation of the aorta repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Santiago Restrepo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A mycotic aneurysm is a rare condition occasionally seen in patients with a history of prior cardiac or vascular surgery. Here we report the presentation of a mycotic aneurysm in a pediatric patient at the site of prior aortic coarctation repair. This patient′s initial presentation suggested rheumatologic or oncologic disease, and after diagnosis he continued to show evidence of splenic, renal and vascular injury distal to the mycotic aneurysm site while being treated with antibiotics. We discuss the diagnosis, treatment and management of this condition.

  15. Mycotic aneurysm in a child with history of coarctation of the aorta repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mycotic aneurysm is a rare condition occasionally seen in patients with a history of prior cardiac or vascular surgery. Here we report the presentation of a mycotic aneurysm in a pediatric patient at the site of prior aortic coarctation repair. This patient's initial presentation suggested rheumatologic or oncologic disease, and after diagnosis he continued to show evidence of splenic, renal and vascular injury distal to the mycotic aneurysm site while being treated with antibiotics. We discuss the diagnosis, treatment and management of this condition

  16. Treatment of abdominal aortic and peripheral aneurysms with stent grafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The implantation of stent grafts is a relatively new method for the treatment of aneurysms of the aorta or peripheral aneurysms. Before the implantation precise measurements are mandatory to obtain the necessary information about the aneurysm. The numerous contraindications must be observed strictly to successfully exclude the aneurysmal sac. The stent graft is inserted via a percutaneous puncture or, in the case of an aortic graft, through a surgical arteriotomy. After the implantation rigorous follow-up is mandatory to detect complications such as leaks or thrombi: Spiral CT angiography is the method of choice. Some of the complications require secondary interventions such as the implantation of additional stent grafts. The results are encouraging, with a secondary exclusion rate of the aneurysm of up to more than 95%; however, long-term results are not available. (orig.)

  17. Endovascular therapy for abdominal aortic aneurysm and iliac artery aneurysm using SEAL aortic stent-graft: A single center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of SEAL aortic stent-graft for abdominal aortoiliac aneurysms. Between October 2007 and January 2014, 33 patients with abdominal aortoiliac aneurysms were treated with SEAL aortic stent-graft. We evaluated the technical success rate, clinical and CT follow-up periods, major complications, need for additional interventional treatment, aneurysm-related mortality and clinical success rate. SEAL bifurcated aortic stent-graft was successfully placed in 32 patients (97%). Clinical and CT follow-up periods were 24 and 14 months, respectively. Endoleak developed in 13 patients (41%): spontaneous regression or decrease in 6, need for additional treatment in 4 and follow-up loss in 3. Significant stenosis of stent-graft occurred in 4 patients (12%) and was treated with stenting in 3. Migration of stent-graft was noted in 3 patients (9%) and treated with additional stent-grafting. Aneurysm-related mortality was 9% (3 of 33). The placement of SEAL stent-graft was effective in 26 patients (79%). The placement of SEAL aortic stent-graft was safe and effective in patients with aneurysms of abdominal aorta and iliac arteries. However, complicating endoleaks, stenosis and migration of the stent-graft developed during the follow-up. Therefore, regular CT follow-up seems to be mandatory.

  18. Endovascular therapy for abdominal aortic aneurysm and iliac artery aneurysm using SEAL aortic stent-graft: A single center experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Su Young; Kim, Jeong Ho; Byun, Sung Su; Kang, Jin Mo; Choi, Sang Tae; Park, Jae Hyung [Gachon University Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of SEAL aortic stent-graft for abdominal aortoiliac aneurysms. Between October 2007 and January 2014, 33 patients with abdominal aortoiliac aneurysms were treated with SEAL aortic stent-graft. We evaluated the technical success rate, clinical and CT follow-up periods, major complications, need for additional interventional treatment, aneurysm-related mortality and clinical success rate. SEAL bifurcated aortic stent-graft was successfully placed in 32 patients (97%). Clinical and CT follow-up periods were 24 and 14 months, respectively. Endoleak developed in 13 patients (41%): spontaneous regression or decrease in 6, need for additional treatment in 4 and follow-up loss in 3. Significant stenosis of stent-graft occurred in 4 patients (12%) and was treated with stenting in 3. Migration of stent-graft was noted in 3 patients (9%) and treated with additional stent-grafting. Aneurysm-related mortality was 9% (3 of 33). The placement of SEAL stent-graft was effective in 26 patients (79%). The placement of SEAL aortic stent-graft was safe and effective in patients with aneurysms of abdominal aorta and iliac arteries. However, complicating endoleaks, stenosis and migration of the stent-graft developed during the follow-up. Therefore, regular CT follow-up seems to be mandatory.

  19. Long telomeres in blood leukocytes are associated with a high risk of ascending aortic aneurysm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuija J Huusko

    Full Text Available Ascending aortic aneurysm is a connective tissue disorder. Even though multiple novel gene mutations have been identified, risk profiling and diagnosis before rupture still represent a challenge. There are studies demonstrating shorter telomere lengths in the blood leukocytes of abdominal aortic aneurysm patients. The aim of this study was to measure whether relative telomere lengths are changed in the blood leukocytes of ascending aortic aneurysm patients. We also studied the expression of telomerase in aortic tissue samples of ascending aortic aneurysms. Relative lengths of leukocyte telomeres were determined from blood samples of patients with ascending aortic aneurysms and compared with healthy controls. Telomerase expression, both at the level of mRNA and protein, was quantified from the aortic tissue samples. Mean relative telomere length was significantly longer in ascending aortic aneurysm blood samples compared with controls (T/S ratio 0.87 vs. 0.61, p<0.001. Expressions of telomerase mRNA and protein were elevated in the aortic aneurysm samples (p<0.05 and p<0.01. Our study reveals a significant difference in the mean length of blood leukocyte telomeres in ascending aortic aneurysm and controls. Furthermore, expression of telomerase, the main compensating factor for telomere loss, is elevated at both the mRNA and protein level in the samples of aneurysmal aorta. Further studies will be needed to confirm if this change in telomere length can serve as a tool for assessing the risk of ascending aortic aneurysm.

  20. Mass or high-risk screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Henneberg, E W; Fasting, H;

    1997-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is known to be associated with various diseases, especially hypertension, acute myocardial infarction (AMI), chronic obstructive airway disease (COAD), and intermittent claudication. These associations have led to a debate about whether screening of older men for AAA...

  1. Antimicrobial Treatment to Impair Expansion of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergqvist, David; Lindeman, Johannes H N; Lindholt, Jes Sanddal;

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial treatment to attenuate expansion of abdominal aortic aneurysm has been suggested, especially with the focus on Chlamydophila. In this systematic literature review only four randomized trials were identified. In two small studies there is an indication of an effect of roxithromycin. In...

  2. Beveled reversed elephant trunk procedure for complex aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikawa, Takuya; Yamamoto, Shin; Sekine, Yuji; Oshima, Susumu; Kasai, Reo; Sasaguri, Shiro

    2016-03-01

    The reversed elephant trunk procedure uses an inverted graft for distal aortic replacement before aortic arch replacement in patients with mega aorta, to reduce the risk in the second stage. However, the conventional technique restricts the maximum diameter of the inverted graft to the aortic graft diameter. We employed a beveled reversed elephant trunk procedure to overcome the discrepancy between graft diameters in a 54-year-old woman with a severely twisted ascending aortic graft and enlarging chronic dissection of the aortic arch and descending thoracic aorta. The patient was discharged with a satisfactory repair and no neurologic deficit. PMID:25406402

  3. Bicuspid Aortic Valve Disease and Ascending Aortic Aneurysms: Gaps in Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie L. Losenno

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The bicuspid aortic valve is the most common congenital cardiac anomaly in developed nations. The abnormal bicuspid morphology of the aortic valve results in valvular dysfunction and subsequent hemodynamic derangements. However, the clinical presentation of bicuspid aortic valve disease remains quite heterogeneous with patients presenting from infancy to late adulthood with variable degrees of valvular stenosis and insufficiency and associated abnormalities including aortic coarctation, hypoplastic left heart structures, and ascending aortic dilatation. Emerging evidence suggests that the heterogeneous presentation of bicuspid aortic valve phenotypes may be a more complex matter related to congenital, genetic, and/or connective tissue abnormalities. Optimal management of patients with BAV disease and associated ascending aortic aneurysms often requires a thoughtful approach, carefully assessing various risk factors of the aortic valve and the aorta and discerning individual indications for ongoing surveillance, medical management, and operative intervention. We review current concepts of anatomic classification, pathophysiology, natural history, and clinical management of bicuspid aortic valve disease with associated ascending aortic aneurysms.

  4. Ductus arteriosus aneurysm presenting as hoarseness: successful repair with an endovascular approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Freitas, Simon; Connolly, Caoilfhionn; Neary, Colm; Sultan, Sherif

    2016-01-01

    An aneurysm of the ductus arteriosus is a rare finding, particularly in the adult population. These saccular aneurysms arise at the site of an incompletely obliterated ductus arteriosus along the lesser curvature of the aortic arch. Left untreated, it is associated with a high risk of potentially life-threatening complications including rupture, infection and thromboembolism. As a result, surgical correction is recommended. Previously, options were limited to open repair but as endovascular experience grows, novel techniques afford safer and less invasive alternatives. In contrast, neonatal ductus arteriosus aneurysms may regress spontaneously and expectant treatment can be justified. We present the case of a 74-year-old woman who presented with hoarseness secondary to a ductus arteriosus aneurysm; a diagnosis consistent with Ortner's syndrome. The patient underwent an uncomplicated endovascular repair using the chimney-graft technique. PMID:27141045

  5. Identification of predictive CT angiographic factors in the development of high-risk type 2 endoleaks after endovascular aneurysm repair in patients with infrarenal aortic aneurysms; Identifikation praediktiver CT-angiographischer Faktoren fuer die Entstehung eines Hochrisiko Typ-2 Endoleaks nach endovaskulaerem Aortenrepair bei Patienten mit infrarenalen Bauchaortenaneurysmen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewenthal, D.; Herzog, L.; Rogits, B.; Bulla, K.; Pech, M.; Ricke, J.; Dudeck, O. [Magdeburg Univ. (Germany). Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Weston, S. [Magdeburg Univ. (Germany). Biometry and Medical Informatics; Meyer, F.; Halloul, Z. [Magdeburg Univ. (Germany). General, Visceral and Vascular Surgery

    2015-01-15

    An extensive analysis of the value of computed tomography (CT) parameters as potential predictors of the clinical outcome of type 2 endoleaks after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). Initial CT scans of 130 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) were retrospectively reviewed. On the basis of postoperative CT scans and angiographies, patients were stratified into a low-risk group (LRG; without or transient type 2 endoleak; n = 80) and a high-risk group (HRG, persistent type 2 endoleak or need for reintervention; n = 50). Statistical analysis comprised a univariate and multivariate analysis. Anatomical, thrombus-specific, as well as aortic side branch parameters were assessed on the initial CT scan. Of all anatomical parameters, the diameter of the immediate infrarenal aorta was significantly different in the univariate analysis (LRG 22.4 ± 3.8 mm; HRG 23.6 ± 2.5 mm; p = 0.03). The investigation of the thrombus-specific parameters showed a trend towards statistical significance for the relative thrombus load (LRG 31.7 ± 18.0 %; HRG 25.3 ± 17.5 %; p = 0.09). Assessment of aortic side branches revealed only for the univariate analysis significant differences in the patency of the inferior mesenteric artery (LRG 71.3 %; HRG 92.0 %; p = 0.003) and their diameter (LRG 3.3 ± 0.7 mm; HRG 3.8 ± 0.9 mm; p = 0.004). In contrast, the number of lumbar arteries (LAs; LRG 2.7 ± 1.4; HRG 3.6 ± 1.2; univariate: p = 0.01; multivariate: p = 0.006) as well as their diameter (LRG 2.1 ± 0.4 mm; HRG 2.4 ± 0.4 mm; univariate: p < 0.001; multivariate: p = 0.006) were highly significantly associated with the development of type 2 endoleaks of the HRG. The most important predictive factors for the development of high-risk type 2 endoleaks were mainly the number and the diameter of the LAs which perfused the AAA.

  6. 18F-FDG PET-CT uptake is a feature of both normal diameter and aneurysmal aortic wall and is not related to aneurysm size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barwick, Tara D. [Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Charing Cross Hospital, Department of Radiology/Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Hammersmith Hospital, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Lyons, O.T.A.; Waltham, M. [King' s College London, BHF Centre of Research Excellence and NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at King' s Health Partners, Academic Department of Surgery, London (United Kingdom); Mikhaeel, N.G. [Guy' s and St Thomas' Foundation NHS Trust, Department of Oncology, London (United Kingdom); O' Doherty, M.J. [King' s Health Partners, Clinical PET Centre, St Thomas' Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    Aortic metabolic activity is suggested to correlate with presence and progression of aneurysmal disease, but has been inadequately studied. This study investigates the 2-[{sup 18}F] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) uptake in a population of infra-renal abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), compared to a matched non-aneurysmal control group. The Positron Emission Tomography - Computed Tomography (PET/CT) database was searched for infra-renal AAA. Exclusion criteria were prior repair, vasculitis, and saccular/mycotic thoracic or thoraco-abdominal aneurysms. Matching of 159 non-aneurysmal (<3 cm diameter) controls from the same population was assessed. Infra-renal aortic wall FDG uptake was assessed using visual analysis; maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) and target to background mediastinal blood pool ratio (TBR) were documented. Predictors of FDG uptake (age, sex, aortic diameter, hypertension, statin use, and diabetes) were assessed using univariate analysis. Follow-up questionnaires were sent to referring clinicians. Aneurysms (n = 151) and controls (n = 159) were matched (p > 0.05) for age, sex, diabetes, hypertension, smoking status, statin use, and indication for PET/CT. Median aneurysm diameter was 5.0 cm (range 3.2-10.4). On visual analysis there was no significant difference in the overall numbers with increased visual uptake 24 % (36/151) in the aneurysm group vs. 19 % (30/159) in the controls, p = ns. SUV{sub max} was slightly lower in the aneurysm group vs. controls (mean (2 SD) 1.75(0.79) vs. 1.84(0.58), p = 0.02). However there was no difference in TBR between the AAA group and controls (mean (2 SD) 1.03 (0.46) vs. 1.05(0.31), p = 0.36). During a median 18 (interquartile range 8-35) months' follow-up 20 were repaired and four were confirmed ruptured. The level of metabolic activity as assessed by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in infra-renal AAA does not correlate with aortic size and does not differ between aneurysms and matched controls

  7. FOXE3 mutations predispose to thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Shao-Qing; Medina-Martinez, Olga; Guo, Dong-chuan; Gong, Limin; Regalado, Ellen S.; Reynolds, Corey L.; Boileau, Catherine; Jondeau, Guillaume; Prakash, Siddharth K.; Kwartler, Callie S.; Zhu, Lawrence Yang; Peters, Andrew M.; Duan, Xue-Yan; Bamshad, Michael J.; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Debbie A.; Santos-Cortez, Regie L.; Dong, Xiurong; Leal, Suzanne M.; Majesky, Mark W.; Swindell, Eric C.; Jamrich, Milan; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2016-01-01

    The ascending thoracic aorta is designed to withstand biomechanical forces from pulsatile blood. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections (TAADs) occur as a result of genetically triggered defects in aortic structure and a dysfunctional response to these forces. Here, we describe mutations in the forkhead transcription factor FOXE3 that predispose mutation-bearing individuals to TAAD. We performed exome sequencing of a large family with multiple members with TAADs and identified a rare variant in FOXE3 with an altered amino acid in the DNA-binding domain (p.Asp153His) that segregated with disease in this family. Additional pathogenic FOXE3 variants were identified in unrelated TAAD families. In mice, Foxe3 deficiency reduced smooth muscle cell (SMC) density and impaired SMC differentiation in the ascending aorta. Foxe3 expression was induced in aortic SMCs after transverse aortic constriction, and Foxe3 deficiency increased SMC apoptosis and ascending aortic rupture with increased aortic pressure. These phenotypes were rescued by inhibiting p53 activity, either by administration of a p53 inhibitor (pifithrin-α), or by crossing Foxe3–/– mice with p53–/– mice. Our data demonstrate that FOXE3 mutations lead to a reduced number of aortic SMCs during development and increased SMC apoptosis in the ascending aorta in response to increased biomechanical forces, thus defining an additional molecular pathway that leads to familial thoracic aortic disease. PMID:26854927

  8. Treatment options for postdissection aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobocinski, Jonathan; Patterson, Benjamin O; Clough, Rachel E; Spear, Rafaelle; Martin-Gonzalez, Teresa; Azzaoui, Richard; Hertault, Adrien; Haulon, Stéphan

    2016-04-01

    Aortic dissection is one of the most devastating catastrophes that can affect the aorta. Surgical treatment is proposed only when complications such as rupture or malperfusion occur. No clear consensus has been reached regarding the best therapy to prevent aortic rupture after the acute phase. We have performed a thorough review of the most recent literature on the strategies to treat patients in the chronic phase of aortic dissection. PMID:26771869

  9. [Sudden deaths due to non-traumatic aortic aneurysms rupture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bury, Anna; Meissner, Ewa; Szram, Stefan; Berent, Jarosław

    2011-01-01

    In this work we review two cases of ruptured aortic aneurysms which arose from congenital abnormalities of the aortic wall structure. In the first case, a 16-year old, previously untreated boy died, with no previous symptoms of an aortic aneurysm. The boy was suspected of taking drugs and even of committing suicide. A young couple found the boy's body in the wood close to the bus stop. There were no signs of violence on the corpse and the body was fully and properly dressed. The autopsy revealed enlarged (true aneurysm) and ruptured ascending aorta with about 700 ml of blood in the pericardial sac. Toxicological examination was negative. Histopathology showed abnormalities in the structure of the wall of aorta in the place of the rupture. All other body organs and vessels seemed to be normal and properly developed except the thoracic aorta, and no other morphologic abnormalities were present. In the second case, the corpse of a 30-year-old man was found in his apartment (he lived with his parents). The parents claimed he did not use drugs or alcohol. The autopsy, as in the previous case, revealed a ruptured true aneurysm of the ascending aorta with 370 g of blood in the pericardial sac. The concaved thoracic cavity was also observed. After the autopsy, the man's parents reported that in childhood, their son was diagnosed to suffer from Marfan syndrome. PMID:22715682

  10. Navigation Technology in Endovascular Aortic Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Manstad-Hulaas, Frode

    2013-01-01

    A number of diseases can affect the aorta, and endovascular (minimally invasive) techniques can be used to treat many of these conditions. During endovascular aortic repair, different instruments, such as catheters (plastic tubes), metal wires and balloons are visualized by X-rays. Intermittent aortic injections of contrast medium improve the depiction of the aorta; however, contrast medium may damage kidney function in some patients, radiation can be harmful and X-ray images are 2- dimension...

  11. Computed tomography of the aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnostic usefulness of CT was studied in 31 cases in total of thoracic and abdominal aneurysm. CT was useful for not only visualizing the transverse plane and wall of an aneurysm but also ascertaining the status of destruction of vertebra due to aneurysm. CT was considered to be of value, particularly for diagnosis of dissecting aneurysm. Of 8 cases of dissecting aneurysm, it in fact brought about a correct diagnosis in 6 cases (75%). The tomographic findings in these cases were characterized by formation of images of the exfoliated intima and dissection cavity, abnormality in the site of intimal calcification, and delay in opacification of the dissection cavity. The use of a bolus injection of contrast medium is recommended in the CT of thoracic or abdominal aneurysm. Since CT can be performed non-invasively, it is suitable for follow-up of the clinical course of dissection cavity. The CT value of thrombi varies among individual cases, which raises a possibility that the CT value may reflect the time-course change in their properties after thrombogenesis. (author)

  12. Primary congenital abdominal aortic aneurysm: a case report with perinatal serial follow-up imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Im; Lee, Whal; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Sang Joon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Seoul (Korea); Seo, Jeong-Wook [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea)

    2008-11-15

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms in neonates and infants are rare and are usually associated with infection, vasculitis, connective tissue disorder, or iatrogenic trauma such as umbilical catheterization. An idiopathic congenital abdominal aortic aneurysm is the least common category and there are few descriptions of the imaging features. We present the antenatal and postnatal imaging findings of an idiopathic congenital abdominal aortic aneurysm including the findings on US, MRI and CT. (orig.)

  13. Primary congenital abdominal aortic aneurysm: a case report with perinatal serial follow-up imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms in neonates and infants are rare and are usually associated with infection, vasculitis, connective tissue disorder, or iatrogenic trauma such as umbilical catheterization. An idiopathic congenital abdominal aortic aneurysm is the least common category and there are few descriptions of the imaging features. We present the antenatal and postnatal imaging findings of an idiopathic congenital abdominal aortic aneurysm including the findings on US, MRI and CT. (orig.)

  14. Renal failure after operation for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, P S; Schroeder, T; Perko, M;

    1990-01-01

    Among 656 patients undergoing surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm, 81 patients (12%) developed postoperative renal failure. Before operation hypotension and shock occurred in 88% of the patients with ruptured aneurysm, whereas none of the patients operated electively were hypotensive. Dialysis......-up. In six cases the death was caused by renal failure only or in combination with failure of other organs. Analysis of the cumulative survival shows that, if the patients survive the postoperative period, their life expectancy is comparable to that of patients without renal complications....

  15. Complex pathologies of angiotensin Ⅱ-induced abdominal aortic aneurysms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alan DAUGHERTY; Lisa A. CASSIS; Hong LU

    2011-01-01

    Angiotensin Ⅱ (Angll) is the primary bioactive peptide of the renin angiotensin system that plays a critical role in many cardiovascular diseases.Subcutaneous infusion of Angll into mice induces the development of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs).Like human AAAs,Angll-induced AAA tissues exhibit progressive changes and considerable heterogeneity.This complex pathology provides an impediment to the quantification of aneurysmal tissue composition by biochemical and immunostaining techniques.Therefore,while the mouse model of Angll-induced AAAs provides a salutary approach to studying the mechanisms of the evolution of AAAs in humans,meaningful interpretation of mechanisms requires consideration of the heterogeneous nature of the diseased tissue.

  16. Chronic Paraspinal Pain due to Multiple Aortic Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Arindam; Biswas, Nirendra Mohan; Roy, Pinaki; Maity, Pranab Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Mainak

    2015-05-01

    Aneurysms of the aorta are not uncommon, both of the thoracic aorta or the abdominal aorta and may be associated with congenital aortic valve diseases, cystic medial necrosis, Marfan's Syndrome or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, or atherosclerosis. We report a case of a 46 year old smoker who had developed multiple aneurysms of the aorta in both the thoracic and abdominal parts and was incidentally diagnosed on work-up of a chronic back pain associated with venous prominence on left side of chest and left arm. PMID:26591150

  17. Endovascular interventions for descending thoracic aortic aneurysms: The pivotal role of the clinical nurse in postoperative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolinger, Cami; Strider, David V

    2010-12-01

    Descending thoracic aortic aneurysms (dTAA) comprise 40% of all aneurysms arising from the thoracic aorta. Because rupture of thoracic aneurysms is associated with a 94% mortality rate, timely detection, surveillance and treatment is imperative. Endovascular stent-graft repair of thoracic aneurysms was first performed in 1992 and has become an accepted treatment option for this condition in select candidates. There is an abundance of information for the care of patients after open surgical repair of dTAA. However, still relatively few written guidelines exist in the nursing literature for postoperative care and complications associated with endovascular stent-graft repair. The prevalence of aortic endografting, however, now makes it necessary for nurses to have a solid knowledge base in the operative procedure, complications and postoperative care for this patient population. Ideal candidates for aortic endografting undergo CTA or MRI preoperatively and fit a set of strict anatomic criteria to ensure proper delivery and fixation of the device. The early postoperative care focuses on minimizing pulmonary complications, paraplegia, renal failure and embolic complications such as stroke and limb ischemia through skilled nursing assessment and interventions. Late complications such as stent-graft migration, kinking, stent fracture and endoleak are often without symptoms, making it necessary for patients to be educated about these potential complications and to be encouraged to comply with lifelong follow up. This overview provides a sound cognitive framework for nurses practicing in a vascular surgery milieu. PMID:21074117

  18. Induction of histone deacetylases (HDACs in human abdominal aortic aneurysm: therapeutic potential of HDAC inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Galán

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Clinical management of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is currently limited to elective surgical repair because an effective pharmacotherapy is still awaited. Inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC activity could be a promising therapeutic option in cardiovascular diseases. We aimed to characterise HDAC expression in human AAA and to evaluate the therapeutic potential of class I and IIa HDAC inhibitors in the AAA model of angiotensin II (Ang II-infused apolipoprotein-E-deficient (ApoE−/− mice. Real-time PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry evidenced an increased expression of HDACs 1, 2 (both class I, 4 and 7 (both class IIa in abdominal aorta samples from patients undergoing AAA open repair (n=22 compared with those from donors (n=14. Aortic aneurysms from Ang-II-infused ApoE−/− mice exhibited a similar HDAC expression profile. In these animals, treatment with a class I HDAC inhibitor (MS-275 or a class IIa inhibitor (MC-1568 improved survival, reduced the incidence and severity of AAA and limited aneurysmal expansion evaluated by Doppler ultrasonography. These beneficial effects were more potent in MC-1568-treated mice. The disorganisation of elastin and collagen fibres and lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration were effectively reduced by both inhibitors. Additionally, HDAC inhibition attenuated the exacerbated expression of pro-inflammatory markers and the increase in metalloproteinase-2 and -9 activity induced by Ang II in this model. Therefore, our data evidence that HDAC expression is deregulated in human AAA and that class-selective HDAC inhibitors limit aneurysm expansion in an AAA mouse model. New-generation HDAC inhibitors represent a promising therapeutic approach to overcome human aneurysm progression.

  19. Contemporary Applications of Ultrasound in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Management

    OpenAIRE

    Mark eScaife; Triantafillos eGiannakopoulos; Georges eAlkhoury; Chaer, Rabih A.; Avgerinos, Efthymios D.

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) is a well-established screening tool for detection of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) and is currently recommended not only for those with a relevant family history but for all men and high-risk women older than 65 years of age. The advent of minimally invasive endovascular techniques in the treatment of AAAs (EVAR) has increased the need for repeat imaging especially in the post-operative period. Nevertheless, preoperative planning, intraoperative execution and postoperative...

  20. Recent Advances in Molecular Mechanisms of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Annambhotla, Suman; Bourgeois, Sebastian; Wang, Xinwen; Lin, Peter H.; Yao, Qizhi; Chen, Changyi

    2008-01-01

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) is an increasingly common clinical condition with fatal implications. It is associated with advanced age, male gender, cigarette smoking, atherosclerosis, hypertension, and genetic predisposition. Although significant evidence has emerged in the last decade, the molecular mechanisms of AAA formation remains poorly understood. Currently, the treatment for AAA remains primarily surgical with the lone innovation of endovascular therapy. With advance in the human g...

  1. Techniques for aortic arch endovascular repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    kHONGKU, Kiattisak; Dias, Nuno; Sonesson, Bjorn; Resch, Timothy

    2016-06-01

    This article reviews endovascular strategies for aortic arch repair. Open repair remains the gold standard particularly for good risk patients. Endovascular treatment potentially offers a less invasive repair. Principles, technical considerations, devices and outcomes of each technique are discussed and summarized. Hybrid repair combines less invasive revascularization options, instead of arch replacement while extending stent-graft into the arch. Outcomes vary with regard to extent of repair and aortic arch pathologies treated. Results of arch chimney and other parallel graft techniques perhaps make it a less preferable choice for elective cases. However, they are very appealing options for urgent or bailout situations. Fenestrated stent-grafting is subjected to many technical challenges in aortic arch due to difficulties in stent-graft orientation and fenestration positioning. In situ fenestration techniques emerge to avoid these problems, but durability of stent-grafts after fenestration and ischemic consequences of temporary carotid arteries coverage raises some concern total arch repair using this technique. Arch branched graft is a new technology. Early outcomes did not meet the expectation; however the results have been improving after its learning curve period. Refining stent-graft technologies and implantation techniques positively impact outcomes of endovascular approaches. PMID:26940011

  2. Abdominal Aortic Diameter Is Increased in Males with a Family History of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejnert Jørgensen, Trine; Houlind, K; Green, A;

    2014-01-01

    participants with male and female relatives with AAA. DESIGN: Observational population-based cross-sectional study. MATERIALS: 18,614 male participants screened for AAA in the VIVA-trial 2008-2011 with information on both family history of AAA and maximal aortic diameter. METHODS: Standardized ultrasound scan......OBJECTIVE: To investigate, at a population level, whether a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is independently related to increased aortic diameter and prevalence of AAA in men, and to elucidate whether the mean aortic diameter and the prevalence of AAA are different between...... measurement of maximum antero-posterior aortic diameter. Family history obtained by questionnaire. Multivariate regression analysis was used to test for confounders: age, sex, smoking, comorbidity and medication. RESULTS: From the screened cohort, 569 participants had at least one first degree relative...

  3. Rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm into sigmoid colon: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Murat Aksoy; Hakan Yanar; Korhan Taviloglu; Cemalettin Ertekin; Kemal Ayalp; Fatih Yanar; Recep Guloglu; Mehrnet Kurtoglu

    2006-01-01

    Primary aorto-colic fistula is rarely reported in the literature. Although infrequently encountered, it is an important complication since it is usually fatal unless detected. Primary aorto-colic fistula is a spontaneous rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm into the lumen of the adjacent colon loop. Here we report a case of primary aorto-colic fistula in a 54-year old male. The fistulated sigmoid colon was repaired by end-to-end anastomosis. Despite inotropic support, the patient died of sepsis and multiorgan failure on the first postoperative day.

  4. Advances in determining abdominal aortic aneurysm size and growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontopodis, Nikolaos; Lioudaki, Stella; Pantidis, Dimitrios; Papadopoulos, George; Georgakarakos, Efstratios; Ioannou, Christos V

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm is a common pathology in the aging population of the developed world which carries a significant mortality in excess of 80% in case of rupture. Aneurysmal disease probably represents the only surgical condition in which size is such a critical determinant of the need for intervention and therefore the ability to accurately and reproducibly record aneurysm size and growth over time is of outmost importance. In the same time that imaging techniques may be limited by intra- and inter-observer variability and there may be inconsistencies due to different modalities [ultrasound, computed tomography (CT)], rapid technologic advancement have taken aortic imaging to the next level. Digital imaging, multi-detector scanners, thin slice CT and most- importantly the ability to perform 3-dimensional reconstruction and image post-processing have currently become widely available rendering most of the imaging modalities used in the past out of date. The aim of the current article is to report on various imaging methods and current state of the art techniques used to record aneurysm size and growth. Moreover we aim to emphasize on the future research directions and report on techniques which probably will be widely used and incorporated in clinical practice in the near future. PMID:26981224

  5. An experimental and clinical study on the dissecting aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the treatment of dissecting aortic aneurysm, it is important to understand the exact conditions of the disease. For this purpose Aortography (AOG) and X-ray computorized tomography (CT) have been used. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and the ultrasonic pulsed Doppler duplex system are completely non-invasive and may be used instead of AOG and CT. Experimental aortic dissection was done surgically using modified Blanton's method in 8 mongrel dogs. MRI and the ultrasonic pulsed Doppler duplex system were used on these dogs before and after surgery which consisted of surgical closure of entry and insertion of Ivalon Sponge to false lumen. MRI patterns were classified into three: i.e, low, middle, and high intensity. The ultrasonic pulsed Doppler duplex system patterns were classified into four: i.e, normal flow, to and fro, turbulent flow and wall motion patterns respectively. These patterns of MRI and the ultrasonic pulsed Doppler duplex system were closely correlated to autopsy findings. These results indicated that MRI and the ultrasonic pulsed Doppler duplex system are useful to evaluate the changes of figures and hemodynamics of the false lumen. In the clinical study, MRI was performed on 26 patients of dissecting aortic aneurysm before and after surgery. These results were compared with those of AOG and CT. In the detection of the intimal flap, the main arterial branches, and the location of the entry and reentry, MRI was superior to CT and almost equal to AOG. key words: dissecting aortic aneurysm, hemodynamics of aortic dissection, the Ivalon Sponge Occlusion method, MRI, the ultrasonic pulsed Doppler duplex system. (author)

  6. Helical CT Angiography of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Treated with Suprarenal Stent Grafting: A Pictorial Essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The endovascular repair of abdominal aorticaneurysm (AAA) with stent grafts is rapidly becoming an important alternative to open repair. Suprarenal stent grafting, recently modified from conventional infrarenal stent grafting, is a technique for the purpose of treating patients with inappropriate aneurysm necks.Unlike open repair, the success of endoluminal repair cannot be ascertained by means of direct examination and thus relies on imaging results. The use of conventional angiography for arterial imaging has become less dominant, while helical computed tomography angiography(CTA) has become the imaging modality of choice for both preoperative assessment and postoperative followup after treatment with stent graft implants. There is an increasing likelihood that radiologists will become more and more involved in the procedure of aortic stent grafting and in giving the radiological report on these patients treated with stent grafts. It is necessary for radiologists to be familiar with the imaging findings, including common and uncommon appearances following aortic stent grafting. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to describe and present normal and abnormal imaging appearances following aortic stent grafting based on helical CTA

  7. Arterial Stiffness Alterations and Inflammatory Response Following Endovascular Aortic Repair: Based on a Presentation at the 2013 VEITH Symposium, November 19-23, 2013 (New York, NY, USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulakakis, Konstantinos G; Mylonas, Spyridon N; Kakisis, John; Kadoglou, Nikolaos P E; Papadakis, Ioannis; Sfyroeras, George S; Antonopoulos, Constantine C N; Mantas, George; Ikonomidis, Ignatios; Liapis, Christos D

    2015-04-01

    Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) and thoracic aortic aneurysm repair (TEVAR) have been widely incorporated into clinical practice. However, changes in arterial stiffness and post-implantation syndrome after aortic endografting remain important issues under investigation. The aneurysm sac wall motion after successful EVAR and TEVAR reflects complex interactions between all the components of the excluded aneurysm, including true compliance of the aneurysm wall itself, intra-aneurysm sac pressure, remodeling of the thrombus, and mechanical characteristics of the endograft. Experimental and clinical studies have shown that aortic endografting results in increased arterial stiffness in animal models. It can be assumed that the alterations of aortic mechanical properties can have a direct impact on heart output. The long-term impact of these mechanical changes on cardiovascular outcomes and the potential effects of different endografts on hemodynamics are important issues under investigation. Post-implantation syndrome (PIS) is a systemic inflammatory response frequently observed after endovascular treatment of aortic pathologies. The main features of PIS include fever, leukocytosis, elevated C-reactive protein levels, and coagulation disturbances. Endograft design appears to influence this inflammatory response following aortic endografting; woven polyester endografts have been shown to be associated with greater inflammatory response compared to PTFE stent grafts. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature to elucidate arterial stiffness alterations and inflammatory response after EVAR and TEVAR and the impact of endograft design on aortic stiffness and the post-inflammatory response. PMID:26798761

  8. Failure of aneurysm sac shrinkage after endovascular repair; the effect of mural calcification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Love, M. [Department of Radiology, Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: mark.love@royalhospitals.n-i.nhs.uk; Wray, A. [Department of Radiology, Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast (United Kingdom); Worthington, M. [Department of Radiology, Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast (United Kingdom); Ellis, P. [Department of Radiology, Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast (United Kingdom)

    2005-12-15

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of abdominal aortic aneurysm wall calcification on subsequent sac shrinkage after endovascular repair. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventy-three patients underwent endovascular aneurysm repair. The degree of sac wall calcification on pre-procedural computed tomography (CT) examination was graded from 1 to 4 according to the degree of circumferential involvement. On follow-up CT imaging, the maximum transverse diameter (MTD) of the sac was recorded, as well as the presence or absence of endoleak. In those patients with a non-shrinking aneurysm, but no CT evidence of endoleak, contrast-enhanced ultrasound (USS) was performed. Any patient with an endoleak, however diagnosed, was excluded from the study. Kruskal-Wallis and Spearman's rank correlation coefficient testing was applied to compare the degree of calcification and change in MTD. RESULTS: Sixty-three pre-procedural CT images were available for calcification grading. Six of this group had endoleaks resulting in 57 sets of data being available for the study. A reduction in MTD occurred in 68.25% of these patients by 1 year post-procedure. Our figures show aortic calcification is inversely associated with MTD reduction at 6 months (p=0.01), 1 year (p=0.05) and 2 years (p=0.05). CONCLUSION: This study indicates that the degree of aortic wall calcification is significant in predicting MTD reduction post-endovascular repair. The possible mechanisms and implications of this are discussed.

  9. Natural history of abdominal aortic aneurysm with and without coexisting chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Heickendorff, Lene; Antonsen, Sebastian; Fasting, H; Henneberg, E W

    1998-01-01

    To study the relation between abdominal aortic aneurysms and chronical obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), in particular the suggested common elastin degradation caused by elastase and smoking.......To study the relation between abdominal aortic aneurysms and chronical obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), in particular the suggested common elastin degradation caused by elastase and smoking....

  10. Identification of peroxiredoxin-1 as a novel biomarker of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez-Pinna, Roxana; Ramos-Mozo, Priscila; Madrigal-Matute, Julio; Blanco-Colio, Luis M; Lopez, Juan A; Calvo, Enrique; Camafeita, Emilio; Lindholt, Jes S.; Meilhac, Olivier; Delbosc, Sandrine; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; de Ceniga, Melina Vega; Egido, Jesus; Martin-Ventura, Jose L

    2011-01-01

    In the search of novel biomarkers of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) progression, proteins released by intraluminal thrombus (ILT) were analyzed by a differential proteomic approach.......In the search of novel biomarkers of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) progression, proteins released by intraluminal thrombus (ILT) were analyzed by a differential proteomic approach....

  11. [Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms - a rational measure to prevent sudden rupture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torsello, Giovanni; Debus, Eike Sebastian; Schmitz-Rixen, Thomas; Grundmann, Reinhart Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) has still a high hospital mortality rate of about 50 % (intervention and non-corrective treatment combined). With an easy non-invasive and inexpensive measure such as the ultrasound screening rupture threatened aneurysms can be recognized in time and then treated prophylactically, hemorrhagic shock can be avoided. Screening programs in England and Sweden currently describe an AAA prevalence of 1.5 % among screened 65-year-old males. With an absolute risk reduction for aneurysm-related death of 15.1 per 10,000 men invited for screening and a cost of £ 7,370 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY), screening for this target group is highly cost-effective. Comprehensive AAA screening requires defined criteria for the quality of the aortic ultrasound examination and for the surgical treatment of detected large AAA. These interventions should be concentrated in centers obligated to quality registry documentation. Patients with smaller AAA, requiring no repair, should be included in a surveillance program, also with registry of their long-term data. PMID:27404935

  12. A case of megadolichobasilar anomaly complicated with abdominal aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 41 year-old hypertensive male was admitted because of progressing left hemiparesis and dysarthria. CT demonstrated hyperdense mass with partial contast enhancement, extending from the level of lower pons to that of suprasellar cistern. Reconstructed imaging of CT showed a huge mass lesion, in which a wide curvilinear hyperdensity was demonstrated by contrast enhancement. Cerebral angiography revealed markedly elongated and dilated basilar and carotid arteries. From these findings, the prepontine hyperdense mass lesion was diagnosed as megadolichobasilar anomaly with marked wall thickening. Findings of abdominal aortic angiography and abdominal CT suggested the presence of marked atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysm with mural thrombi. Six months after initial admission, neurological symptoms gradually deteriorated and CT showed dilatation of the 3rd and lateral ventricles, suggesting the development of hydrocephalus due to compression of the aqueduct by the megadolichobasilar anomaly. Magnetic resonance imaging at this time demonstrated more details of the lesion and the deformity of the brain stem, which was not detected by conventional CT. Complications of vascular anomalies other than intracranial vasculature, such as aortic aneurysm, have also been repoted. After the introduction of CT, demonstration of a long, wide, curvilinear structure with abnormal density in the prepontine region has been reported to be diagnostic for the megadolichobasilar anomaly. This patient has had hypertension for 10 years, which probably due to chronic nephritis. He had no definite findings for angitis, but had abdominal aortic aneurysm with mural thrombi. From these findings, atherosclerosis of large vessels may have played one of the roles in the pathogenesis of this anomaly in the present case. (J.P.N.)

  13. Preoperative methylprednisolone enhances recovery after endovascular aortic repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de la Motte, Louise; Kehlet, Henrik; Vogt, Katja;

    2014-01-01

    methylprednisolone (MP) (n = 77) or placebo (n = 76) preoperatively. Primary outcome was a modified version of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Secondary outcome measures were the effect on inflammatory biomarkers, morbidity, and time to meet discharge criteria. RESULTS: Of 153 randomized patients, 150...... (98%) were evaluated for the primary outcome. MP reduced systemic inflammatory response syndrome from 92% to 27% (P < 0.0001) (number needed to treat = 1.5), maximal plasma interleukin 6 from 186 pg/mL [interquartile range (IQR) = 113-261 pg/mL] to 20 pg/mL (IQR = 11-28 pg/mL) (P < 0.001) and......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate effects of preoperative high-dose glucocorticoid on the inflammatory response and recovery after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). BACKGROUND: The postimplantation syndrome after EVAR may delay recovery due to the release of proinflammatory mediators...

  14. Outcome and survival of patients aged 75 years and older compared to younger patients after ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: do the results justify the effort?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahidi, S; Schroeder, T Veith; Carstensen, M.;

    2009-01-01

    were also performed with the variables that were found to be significant in the univariate analysis. Health economy and cost analysis for the two groups were estimated. Out of 72 open repairs of RAAA, 44 patients (61%) were under 75 years of age and 28 (39%) were 75 years or older. The average age of...... elderly because of the increased incidence of surgical risk factors and hospital mortality in this subset of patients (cut-off age). Demographic, clinical, and operative factors were analyzed together with 30-day mortality. Univariate analysis was performed with the chi-squared test. Multivariate analyses......%-33%) of 44 younger patients (p < 0.001). An age of 75 years or older and a serum creatinine >or=0.150 mmol/L in elderly patients with RAAA (p < 0.01) were identified to be significant risk factors for operative mortality. We did not encounter significant differences in the distribution of other risk...

  15. Fusobacterium necrophorum in an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm, Treated by Once Daily Ertapenem

    OpenAIRE

    Wotherspoon, D.; Street, J. A.; Hedderwick, S.; Baker, R.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory aneurysms may make up a small percentage of the total number of abdominal aortic aneurysms, but they present their own unique challenges. We present a case of a 65-year-old man whose aneurysm was found to be colonized by Fusobacterium necrophorum.

  16. Non-Invasive Pulse Wave Analysis in a Thrombus-Free Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm after Implantation of a Nitinol Aortic Endograft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgakarakos, Efstratios; Argyriou, Christos; Georgiadis, George S.; Lazarides, Miltos K.

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair has been associated with changes in arterial stiffness, as estimated by pulse wave velocity (PWV). This marker is influenced by the medical status of the patient, the elastic characteristics of the aneurysm wall, and the presence of intraluminal thrombus. Therefore, in order to delineate the influence of the endograft implantation in the early post-operative period, we conducted non-invasively pulse wave analysis in a male patient with an abdominal aortic aneurysm containing no intraluminal thrombus, unremarkable past medical history, and absence of peripheral arterial disease. The estimated parameters were the systolic and diastolic pressure calculated at the aortic level (central pressures), PWV, augmentation pressure (AP) and augmentation index (AI), pressure wave reflection magnitude (RM), and peripheral resistance. Central systolic and diastolic pressure decreased post-operatively. PWV showed subtle changes from 11.6 to 10.6 and 10.9 m/s at 1-week and 1-month, respectively. Accordingly, the AI decreased from 28 to 14% and continued to drop to 25%. The AP decreased gradually from 15 to 6 and 4 mmHg. The wave RM dropped from 68 to 52% at 1-month. Finally, the peripheral resistance dropped from 1.41 to 0.99 and 0.85 dyn × s × cm−5. Our example shows that the implantation of an aortic endograft can modify the pressure wave reflection over the aortic bifurcation without causing significant alterations in PWV. PMID:26793712

  17. Endovascular treatment of false-aneurysm ten years after dacron patch aortoplasty for coarctation of the aortic isthmus. Report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, Giulio; Pacilè, Maria Antonietta; Palumbo, Piergaspare; Salvatori, Filippo Maria; Vietri, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    False aneurysm degeneration is a known complication of patch aortoplasty for coarctation of the aortic isthmus. Open surgical treatment consists of prosthetic graft repair of the involved aorta, often requires circulatory arrest to achieve a safe proximal aortic control and perform proximal anastomosis, and finally is associated with substantial perioperative morbidity. Endografting of the diseased aorta is a valuable alternative to open repair, when feasible, with good short and long term results. We now report one more case of false aneurysm ten years after Dacron patch aortoplasty for isthmic coarctation in a 26-year-old woman, successfully treated by endovascular repair via the left common iliac artery, and a complete exclusion of the aneurysm at two year follow-up. PMID:23080212

  18. Hybrid procedure in the treatment of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davidović Lazar B.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Treatment of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms is a major problem in vascular surgery. Conventional open repair is associated with significant rates of mortality and morbidity and therefore, there is a need for better solutions. One of them is a hybrid procedure that includes visceral debranching. This paper presents the first such case performed in Serbia, with a brief overview on all published procedures worldwide. Case Outline. A 57-year-old woman was admitted to the hospital because of thoracoabdominal aneurysms type V by Crawford-Safi classifications. Because of the significant comorbidities it was concluded that conventional treatment would bear unacceptably high perioperative risk, and that the possible alternative could be the hybrid procedure in two stages. In the first stage aortobiliacal reconstruction with bifurcated Dacron graft (16×8 mm and visceral debranching with hand made tailored branched graft was done. In the second act, the thoracoabdominal aneurysm was excluded with implantation of the endovascular Valiant stent graft, 34×150 mm (Medtronic, Santa Rosa, CA. Control MSCT angiography showed a proper visceral branch patency and positioning of the stent graft without endoleaks. Nine months after the procedure the patient was symptom-free, with no aneurysm, diameter change and no graft-related complication. All visceral branches were patent. Conclusion. So far about 500 cases of visceral debranching have been published with the aim of treating thoracoabdominal aneurysms, and still we have no valid guidelines concerning this method. However, in carefully selected high-risk patients this is an excellent alternative to open surgery of thoracoabdominal aneurysms.

  19. Surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysms. A survey of 656 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, P S; Schroeder, T; Agerskov, Kim; Røder, Ole Christian; Sørensen, Steffen; Perko, M; Lorentzen, J E

    1991-01-01

    renal function or chronic pulmonary disease showed an increased perioperative mortality. Development of postoperative cardiac and renal complications could not be related to previous cardiac or renal diseases. The major postoperative complications were renal failure in 81 patients (12%), pulmonary......Between 1979 and 1988, 656 patients were operated upon for abdominal aortic aneurysm. Elective operation was performed in 287 patients (44%) and acute operation in 369 patients. A ruptured aneurysm was found in 218 patients (33%). Patients with arteriosclerotic heart disease, hypertension, impaired...... insufficiency in 77 patients (11%) and cardiac complications in 96 patients (13%). Failure of one or more organs occurred in 153 patients (23%) and the mortality rate for patients with multiorgan failure was 68%. Complications leading to reoperation occurred in 93 patients (14%). The perioperative mortality was...

  20. Clinical usefulness of urinary liver-type fatty-acid-binding protein as a perioperative marker of acute kidney injury in patients undergoing endovascular or open-abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    OpenAIRE

    Obata, Yumi; Kamijo-Ikemori, Atsuko; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Sugaya, Takeshi; Kimura, Kenjiro; Shibagaki, Yugo; Tateda, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common after cardiovascular surgery and is usually diagnosed on the basis of the serum creatinine (SCr) level and urinary output. However, SCr is of low sensitivity in patients with poor renal function. Because urinary liver-type fatty-acid-binding protein (L-FABP) reflects renal tubular injury, we evaluated whether perioperative changes in urinary L-FABP predict AKI in the context of abdominal aortic repair. Methods Study participants were 95 patients who...

  1. Elective reconstruction of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm type IV by transabdominal approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjanović Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA type IV represents an aortic dilatation from the level of the diaphragmatic hiatus to the iliac arteries branches, including visceral branches of the aorta. In the traditional procedure of TAAA type IV repair, the body is opened using thoractomy and laparotomy in order to provide adequate exposure of the descending thoracic and abdominal aorta for safe aortic reconstruction. Case report. We reported a 71-yearold man with elective reconstruction of the TAAA type IV performed by transabdominal approach. Computed tomography scans angiography revealed a TAAA type IV with diameter of 62 mm in the region of celiac trunk and superior mesenteric artery branching, and the largest diameter of 75 mm in the infrarenal aortic level. The patient comorbidity included a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and hypertension, therefore he was treated for a prolonged period. In preparation for the planned aortic reconstruction asymptomatic carotid disease (occlusion of the left internal carotid artery and subtotal stenosis of the right internal carotid artery was diagnosed. Within the same intervention percutaneous transluminal angioplasty with stent placement in right internal carotid artery was made. In general, under endotracheal anesthesia and epidural analgesia, with transabdominal approach performed aortic reconstruction with tubular dakron graft 24 mm were, and reimplantation of visceral aortic branches into the graft performed. Postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged on the postoperative day 17. Control computed tomography scan angiography performed three months after the operation showed vascular state of the patient to be in order. Conclusion. Complete transabdominal approach to TAAA type IV represents an appropriate substitute for thoracoabdominal approach, without compromising safety of the patient. This approach is less traumatic, especially in patients with impaired

  2. Rare presentation of ruptured syphilitic aortic aneurysm with pseudoaneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Feitosa, Israel Nilton; Dantas Leite Figueiredo, Magda; de Sousa Belem, Lucia; Evelin Soares Filho, Antônio Wilon

    2015-11-01

    We report the interesting case of a rare form of presentation of rupture of the ascending aorta with formation of a pseudoaneurysm, diagnosed following the development of a large mass on the surface of the chest over a period of about eight months. Serological tests were positive for syphilis. Echocardiography and computed tomography angiography were essential to confirm the diagnosis and therapeutic management. Cardiovascular syphilis is a rare entity since the discovery of penicillin. Rupture of an aortic aneurysm with formation of a pseudoaneurysm is a potentially fatal complication. The postoperative period was uneventful and the patient was discharged from hospital within days of surgery. PMID:26481180

  3. Plasma cytokine levels and risks of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liao, Mengyang; Liu, Cong-Lin; Lv, Bing-Jie; Zhang, Jin-Ying; Cheng, Longxian; Cheng, Xiang; Lindholt, Jes S; Rasmussen, Lars M; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is characterized by inflammatory cell accumulation in AAA lesions that produce inflammatory cytokines and advance its pathogenesis. Peripheral cytokines may predict the degree or risk of AAA. METHODS AND RESULTS: ELISA determined plasma interleukin-6 (IL6......), IL10, IL17A, IFN-γ, and C-reactive protein (CRP) from 476 AAA patients and 200 controls. AAA patients had lower IL6, IFN-γ, IL10, IL17A, and higher CRP than controls. IL10 correlated positively with IFN-γ, IL17A, or IL6, but not CRP in control or AAA populations. IL10 associated negatively with...... systolic blood pressure, whereas CRP associated positively with diastolic blood pressure and body mass index. CRP was an independent AAA risk factor and correlated positively with aortic diameters before and after adjustments for other risk factors. IFN-γ, IL17A, and CRP correlated positively with cross...

  4. Aortic Valve Repair: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Published Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Matthew; Shaw, Matthew; Sancho, Elena; Abello, David; Bashir, Mohamad

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is widely accepted that aortic valve disease is surgically managed with aortic valve replacement (AVR) using different available prostheses. The long-term survival, durability of the valve, and freedom from reoperation after AVR are well established in published literature. Over the past two decades, aortic valve repair (AVr) has evolved into an accepted surgical option for patients with aortic valve disease. We review and analyze the published literature on AVr. Methods: A systematic review of the current literature was performed through three electronic databases from inception to August 2013 to identify all relevant studies relating to aortic valve repair. Articles selected were chosen by two reviewers. Articles were excluded if they contained a pediatric population or if the patient number was less than 50. Results: Twenty-four studies conformed to the inclusion criteria for inclusion in the systematic review. In total, 4986 patients underwent aortic valve repair. 7 studies represented bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) repair, 5 studies represented cusp prolapse, and 3 studies represented valve repair with root dilation or aneurysm. Overall weighted in-hospital mortality for all studies was low (1.46% ± 1.21). Preoperative aortic insufficiency (AI) ≥ 2+ did not correlate to reoperation for valve failure (Pearson's Rs 0.2705, P = 0.2585). AI at discharge was reported in 9 studies with a mean AI ≥ 2+ in 6.1% of patients. Weighted average percentage for valve reoperation following BAV repair was 10.23% ± 3.2. Weighted average reoperation following cusp prolapse repair was 3.83 ± 1.96. Weighted average reoperation in aortic valve sparing procedures with root replacement was 4.25% ± 2.46. Although there are limitations and complications of prosthetic valves, especially for younger individuals, there is ample published literature that confers strong evidence for AVR. On the contrary, aortic valve repair may be a useful option for selected patients

  5. Transesophageal echocardiography in surgical management of pseudoaneurysm of mitral-aortic intervalvular fibrosa with aneurysms of right sinus of Valsalva and left main coronary artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreedhar S Joshi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudoaneurysm of mitral-aortic intervalvular fibrosa (MAIVF is a rare complication associated with aortic and/or mitral valve surgery complicated by infective endocarditis. We report pseudoaneurysm of MAIVF in a young adult without overt cardiac disease or previous cardiac surgery. The patient had a rare combination of pseudoaneurysm of MAIVF impinging on anterior mitral leaflet causing moderate mitral regurgitation, right sinus of Valsalva aneurysm extending into interventricular septum, and left main coronary artery aneurysm. Transesophageal echocardiography helped in confirming the lesions, delineating the anatomy of all the lesions, and assessing the adequacy of surgical repair.

  6. Activation of Endocannabinoid System Is Associated with Persistent Inflammation in Human Aortic Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Gestrich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human aortic aneurysms have been associated with inflammation and vascular remodeling. Since the endocannabinoid system modulates inflammation and tissue remodeling, we investigated its components in human aortic aneurysms. We obtained anterior aortic wall samples from patients undergoing elective surgery for aortic aneurysm or coronary artery disease as controls. Histological and molecular analysis (RT-qPCR was performed, and endocannabinoid concentration was determined using LC-MRM. Patient characteristics were comparable between the groups except for a higher incidence of arterial hypertension and diabetes in the control group. mRNA level of cannabinoid receptors was significantly higher in aneurysms than in controls. Concentration of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol was significantly higher, while the second endocannabinoid anandamide and its metabolite arachidonic acid and palmitoylethanolamide were significantly lower in aneurysms. Histology revealed persistent infiltration of newly recruited leukocytes and significantly higher mononuclear cell density in adventitia of the aneurysms. Proinflammatory environment in aneurysms was shown by significant upregulation of M-CSF and PPARγ but associated with downregulation of chemokines. We found comparable collagen-stained area between the groups, significantly decreased mRNA level of CTGF, osteopontin-1, and MMP-2, and increased TIMP-4 expression in aneurysms. Our data provides evidence for endocannabinoid system activation in human aortic aneurysms, associated with persistent low-level inflammation and vascular remodeling.

  7. Activation of Endocannabinoid System Is Associated with Persistent Inflammation in Human Aortic Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gestrich, Christopher; Duerr, Georg D.; Heinemann, Jan C.; Meertz, Anne; Probst, Chris; Roell, Wilhelm; Schiller, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Bindila, Laura; Lutz, Beat; Welz, Armin; Dewald, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Human aortic aneurysms have been associated with inflammation and vascular remodeling. Since the endocannabinoid system modulates inflammation and tissue remodeling, we investigated its components in human aortic aneurysms. We obtained anterior aortic wall samples from patients undergoing elective surgery for aortic aneurysm or coronary artery disease as controls. Histological and molecular analysis (RT-qPCR) was performed, and endocannabinoid concentration was determined using LC-MRM. Patient characteristics were comparable between the groups except for a higher incidence of arterial hypertension and diabetes in the control group. mRNA level of cannabinoid receptors was significantly higher in aneurysms than in controls. Concentration of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol was significantly higher, while the second endocannabinoid anandamide and its metabolite arachidonic acid and palmitoylethanolamide were significantly lower in aneurysms. Histology revealed persistent infiltration of newly recruited leukocytes and significantly higher mononuclear cell density in adventitia of the aneurysms. Proinflammatory environment in aneurysms was shown by significant upregulation of M-CSF and PPARγ but associated with downregulation of chemokines. We found comparable collagen-stained area between the groups, significantly decreased mRNA level of CTGF, osteopontin-1, and MMP-2, and increased TIMP-4 expression in aneurysms. Our data provides evidence for endocannabinoid system activation in human aortic aneurysms, associated with persistent low-level inflammation and vascular remodeling. PMID:26539497

  8. Endovascular repair of early rupture of Dacron aortic graft--two case reports.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sultan, Sherif

    2005-01-01

    Complications after open aortic surgery pose a challenge both to the vascular surgeon and the patient because of aging population, widespread use of cardiac revascularization, and improved survival after aortic surgery. The perioperative mortality rate for redo elective aortic surgery ranges from 5% to 29% and increases to 70-100% in emergency situation. Endovascular treatment of the postaortic open surgery (PAOS) patient has fewer complications and a lower mortality rate in comparison with redo open surgical repair. Two cases of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) were managed with the conventional open surgical repair. Subsequently, spiral contrast computer tomography scans showed reperfusion of the AAA sac remnant mimicking a type III endoleak. These graft-related complications presented as vascular emergencies, and in both cases endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) procedure was performed successfully by aortouniiliac (AUI) stent graft and femorofemoral crossover bypass. These 2 patients add further merit to the cases reported in the English literature. This highlights the crucial importance of endovascular grafts in the management of such complex vascular problems.

  9. Evaluation of patient renal function following endovascular aneurysm repair with suprarenal fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YingBin Jia

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess the mid-term renal function of abdominal aortic aneurysm patients following suprarenal endovascular repair. From March 2005 to December 2009, 290 abdominal aortic aneurysm patients were included in the study and grouped according to whether they had received infrarenal or suprarenal endovascular aneurysm repair. Suprarenal endovascular aneurysm repair was performed in 173 patients, with a mean age of 72(±8 years (85.0% male. Infrarenal endovascular aneurysm repair was performed in 117 patients, with a mean age of 71(±9 years (90.6% male. Preoperative and one week, 1-, 3-, 6- and 12-month postoperative serum creatinine and cystatin C values were recorded. Estimated glomerular filtration rate was calculated by cystatin-based formula and Cr-based Cockcroft formula. The t-test was used to determine statistical differences between or within groups. All patients received Talent or Zenith endograft. Patients’ characteristics and operative files in the two groups were well matched. Preoperative serum creatinine and cystatin C were 82 (±8 mmol/L and 0.89 (±0.11 mg/L for suprarenal endovascular aneurysm repair, respectively, and 81 (±11 mmol/L and 0.87 (±0.15 mg/L, respectively, for infrarenal endovascular aneurysm repair; no differences were observed between the two groups. Compared to preoperative renal markers within each group, a deterioration in serum creatinine, cystatin C and estimated glomerular filtration rate values was found at one week and 12 months after surgery(P<0.05. A deterioration in cystatin C [SR:(0.93±0.17 mg/L, IR: (0.92±0.31 mg/L] and estimated glomerular filtration rate by cystatin C was also found at six months after surgery(P<0.05. However, no differences in patient serum creatinine, cystatin C and estimated glomerular filtration rate values were observed between groups at each follow-up time interval. There was no greater significant difference in the association of the use of suprarenal

  10. [Completion pneumonectomy combined with graft replacement of thoracic aortic aneurysm by simple clamping].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamoto, A; Takao, M; Kanemitsu, S; Fujinaga, K; Yan, G; Cruz, B P; Onoda, K; Shimono, T; Shimpo, H; Namikawa, S; Yuasa, H; Yada, I

    1999-01-01

    A 59-years-old male patient who had left upper lobe partial resection 30 years ago. He was seen at the family physician because of cough. A chest X-ray was showing an abnormal mass shadow measuring 3 x 4 cm in left lower lobe like honey comb. And squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) was detected in his sputum. He was diagnosed as primary lung cancer and introduced to our department to have operation. Chest CT-scan was showing lung tumor suspected SCC measuring 4.3 x 2.6 cm in segment 8 faced chest wall. At the same time, we detected thoracic aortic aneurysm and subcarinal lymph node, but could not see where the boundary is, so it was hard to distinguish between parietal thrombus with thoracic aortic aneurysm and swelling subcarinal lymph node. We decided it swelling subcarinal lymph node by three-dimensional treated CT-scan. Aortic angiography was showing proximal descending aortic aneurysm measuring diameter was 4.5 cm. Abdominal CT-scan was showing infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm measuring diameter was 5.5 cm. He was diagnosed as primary lung cancer (It. S8, SCC) (cT2N2M0, Stage IIIB), thoracic aortic aneurysm, abdominal aortic aneurysm, and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, and had completion pneumonectomy (R 2 b) for primary lung cancer and graft replacement with aneurysm dissection for thoracic aortic aneurysm without extracorporeal circulation. In this operation, we could find swelling subcarinal lymph node measuring 5 x 3 cm instead of parietal thrombus with thoracic aortic aneurysm. Pathological examination diagnosed middle differential SCC and no metastasis from dissected lymph node (PT2N0M0, Stage I A). PMID:10024802

  11. Potential value of aneurysm sac volume measurements in addition to diameter measurements after endovascular aneurysm repair.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulen, J.W. van; Prehn, J. van; Prokop, M.; Moll, F.L.; Herwaarden, J.A. van

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE:To investigate the value of aneurysm sac volume measurement in addition to diameter measurements based on computed tomographic angiography (CTA) after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). METHODS:Interrogation of a vascular database identified 56 patients (51 men; median age 77 years, range

  12. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... After spending 1 to 3 days in the intensive care unit (ICU), you spent more time recovering in a ... Call your doctor or nurse if: You have pain in your belly or back that does not go away or is very bad Your legs ...

  13. MicroRNA expression signature in human abdominal aortic aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pahl Matthew C

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is a dilatation of the aorta affecting most frequently elderly men. Histologically AAAs are characterized by inflammation, vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis, and extracellular matrix degradation. The mechanisms of AAA formation, progression, and rupture are currently poorly understood. A previous mRNA expression study revealed a large number of differentially expressed genes between AAA and non-aneurysmal control aortas. MicroRNAs (miRNAs, small non-coding RNAs that are post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, could provide a mechanism for the differential expression of genes in AAA. Methods To determine differences in miRNA levels between AAA (n = 5 and control (n = 5 infrarenal aortic tissues, a microarray study was carried out. Results were adjusted using Benjamini-Hochberg correction (adjusted p  Results A microarray study identified eight miRNAs with significantly different expression levels between AAA and controls (adjusted p  Conclusions Our genome-wide approach revealed several differentially expressed miRNAs in human AAA tissue suggesting that miRNAs play a role in AAA pathogenesis.

  14. Appearance of femoropopliteal segment aneurysms in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksić Milanko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. To promote better treatment outcome, as well as economic benefit it is very important to find out patients with simultaneous occurrence of both aortic and arterial aneurysms. The aim of this prospective study was to determine the frequency and factors affecting femoropopliteal (F-P segment aneurysms appearance in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA. Methods. This study included 70 patients who had underwent elective or urgent surgery of AAA from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2007. After ultrasonographic examination of F-P segment, all the patients were divided into two groups - those with adjunctive F-P segment aneurysm (n = 20 and the group of 50 patients with no adjunctive F-P segment aneurysm. In both groups demographic characteristics (gender, age, risk factors (diabetes mellitus, elevated serum levels of cholesterol and triglycerides, arterial hypertension, smoking, obesity and cardiovascular comorbidity (cerebrovascular desease, ischemic heart desease were investigated. Results. Twenty (28.57% patients who had been operated on because of AAA, had adjunctive aneurysmal desease of F-P segment. Diabetes was no statistically significantly more present among the patients who, beside AAA, had adjunctive aneurismal desease of F-P segment (χ2 = 0.04; DF = 1; p > 0.05. Also, in both groups there was no statistically significant difference in gender structure (χ2 = 2. 05; DF = 2; p > 0.05, age (χ2 = 5. 46; DF = 1; p > 0.05, total cholesterol level (χ2 = 0.89; DF = 1; p > 0.05 and triglyceride (χ2 = 0.89; DF = 1; p > 0.05 levels, the presence of arterial hypertension (χ2 = 1.38; DF = 2; p > 0.05, smoking (χ2 = 1.74; DF = 1; p > 0.05, obesity (χ2 = 1.76; DF = 1; p > 0.05 and presence of cerebrovascular desease (χ2 = 2.34; DF = 1; p > 0.05. Conversly, ischemic heart desease was statistically significantly more present among the patients who, beside AAA, had adjunctive aneurismal desease of F-P segment (χ2 = 5

  15. National Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-08

    Marfan Syndrome; Turner Syndrome; Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome; Loeys-Dietz Syndrome; FBN1, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, ACTA2 or MYH11 Genetic Mutation; Bicuspid Aortic Valve Without Known Family History; Bicuspid Aortic Valve With Family History; Bicuspid Aortic Valve With Coarctation; Familial Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm and Dissections; Shprintzen-Goldberg Syndrome; Other Aneur/Diss of Thoracic Aorta Not Due to Trauma, <50yo; Other Congenital Heart Disease

  16. Occupational Radiation Exposure During Endovascular Aortic Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sailer, Anna M., E-mail: anni.sailer@mumc.nl [Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC), Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Schurink, Geert Willem H., E-mail: gwh.schurink@mumc.nl [Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC), Department of Surgery (Netherlands); Bol, Martine E., E-mail: m.bol@maastrichtuniversity.nl; Haan, Michiel W. de, E-mail: m.de.haan@mumc.nl; Zwam, Willem H. van, E-mail: w.van.zwam@mumc.nl; Wildberger, Joachim E., E-mail: j.wildberger@mumc.nl; Jeukens, Cécile R. L. P. N., E-mail: cecile.jeukens@mumc.nl [Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC), Department of Radiology (Netherlands)

    2015-08-15

    PurposeThe aim of the study was to evaluate the radiation exposure to operating room personnel and to assess determinants for high personal doses during endovascular aortic repair.Materials and MethodsOccupational radiation exposure was prospectively evaluated during 22 infra-renal aortic repair procedures (EVAR), 11 thoracic aortic repair procedures (TEVAR), and 11 fenestrated or branched aortic repair procedures (FEVAR). Real-time over-lead dosimeters attached to the left breast pocket measured personal doses for the first operators (FO) and second operators (SO), radiology technicians (RT), scrub nurses (SN), anesthesiologists (AN), and non-sterile nurses (NSN). Besides protective apron and thyroid collar, no additional radiation shielding was used. Procedural dose area product (DAP), iodinated contrast volume, fluoroscopy time, patient’s body weight, and C-arm angulation were documented.ResultsAverage procedural FO dose was significantly higher during FEVAR (0.34 ± 0.28 mSv) compared to EVAR (0.11 ± 0.21 mSv) and TEVAR (0.06 ± 0.05 mSv; p = 0.003). Average personnel doses were 0.17 ± 0.21 mSv (FO), 0.042 ± 0.045 mSv (SO), 0.019 ± 0.042 mSv (RT), 0.017 ± 0.031 mSv (SN), 0.006 ± 0.007 mSv (AN), and 0.004 ± 0.009 mSv (NSN). SO and AN doses were strongly correlated with FO dose (p = 0.003 and p < 0.001). There was a significant correlation between FO dose and procedural DAP (R = 0.69, p < 0.001), iodinated contrast volume (R = 0.67, p < 0.001) and left-anterior C-arm projections >60° (p = 0.02), and a weak correlation with fluoroscopy time (R = 0.40, p = 0.049).ConclusionAverage FO dose was a factor four higher than SO dose. Predictors for high personal doses are procedural DAP, iodinated contrast volume, and left-anterior C-arm projections greater than 60°.

  17. Incidence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome after endovascular aortic repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De La Motte, L; Vogt, K; Jensen, Leif Panduro;

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence of the post-implantation syndrome/systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) after endovascular aortic repair.......The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence of the post-implantation syndrome/systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) after endovascular aortic repair....

  18. A proposal for standardizing computed tomography reports on abdominal aortic aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: to propose a model to standardize computed tomography reports on abdominal aortic aneurysms. Materials and methods: interviews were carried out with members of the Vascular Surgery Division of our institution, in the period between April and October 2004, aiming at developing a standardized model of computed tomography reports on abdominal aortic aneurysms. Based on this model, a questionnaire was elaborated and sent to other nine surgeons, all of them experienced in the field of abdominal aortic surgery. The questionnaires response rate was 55.5% (5/9). Results: the most frequently mentioned parameters of interest for evaluation of abdominal aortic aneurysms were: maximum diameter of proximal aortic neck, proximal aortic neck length to lower renal arteries, shape of proximal aortic neck, maximum diameter of the aneurysm and diameter of the common iliac arteries. These data allowed the development of a proposal for a model to standardize computed tomography reports. Conclusion: a model for standardized tomographic analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysms has met vascular surgeons' needs for following-up patients and planning their treatment. (author)

  19. Reproducibility of ECG-gated Ultrasound Diameter Assessment of Small Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredahl, K; Eldrup, N; Meyer, C;

    2013-01-01

    No standardised ultrasound procedure to obtain reliable growth estimates for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is currently available. We investigated the feasibility and reproducibility of a novel approach controlling for a combination of vessel wall delineation and cardiac cycle variation....

  20. Plasma cathepsin S and cystatin C levels and risk of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lv, Bing-Jie; Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Cheng, Xiang;

    2012-01-01

    Human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) lesions contain high levels of cathepsin S (CatS), but are deficient in its inhibitor, cystatin C. Whether plasma CatS and cystatin C levels are also altered in AAA patients remains unknown....

  1. Multivariate Analysis of Risk Factors of Cerebral Infarction in 439 Patients Undergoing Thoracic Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaoka, Yuji; Ohki, Takao; Maeda, Koji; Baba, Takeshi; Fujita, Tetsuji

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study is to identify the potential risk factors of cerebral infarction associated with thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR). TEVAR was developed as a less invasive surgical alternative to conventional open repair for thoracic aortic aneurysm treatment. However, outcomes following TEVAR of aortic and distal arch aneurysms remain suboptimal. Cerebral infarction is a major concern during the perioperative period. We included 439 patients who underwent TEVAR of aortic aneurysms at a high-volume teaching hospital between July 2006 and June 2013. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify perioperative cerebral infarction risk factors. Four patients (0.9%) died within 30 days of TEVAR; 17 (3.9%) developed cerebral infarction. In univariate analysis, history of ischemic heart disease and cerebral infarction and concomitant cerebrovascular disease were significantly associated with cerebral infarction. “Shaggy aorta” presence, left subclavian artery coverage, carotid artery debranching, and pull-through wire use were identified as independent risk factors of cerebral infarction. In multivariate analysis, history of ischemic heart disease (odds ratio [OR] 6.49, P = 0.046) and cerebral infarction (OR 43.74, P = 0.031), “shaggy aorta” (OR 30.32, P < 0.001), pull-through wire use during surgery (OR 7.196, P = 0.014), and intraoperative blood loss ≥800 mL (OR 24.31, P = 0.017) were found to be independent risk factors of cerebral infarction. This study identified patient- and procedure-related risk factors of cerebral infarction following TEVAR. These results indicate that patient outcomes could be improved through the identification and management of procedure-related risk factors. PMID:27082585

  2. Daily diurnal variation in admissions for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Killeen, Shane

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Many vascular events, such as myocardial infarction and cerebrovascular accident, demonstrate a circadian pattern of presentation. Blood pressure is intimately related to these pathologies and is the one physiological variable consistently associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture. It also demonstrates a diurnal variation. The purpose of this study was to determine if rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA) exhibits a diurnal variation. METHODS: A retrospective cohort-based study was performed to determine the timing of presentation of RAAA to the vascular unit of Cork University Hospital over a 15-year period. Time of admission, symptom onset, and co-morbidities such as hypertension were noted. Fournier\\'s analysis and chi-squared analysis were performed. To ameliorate possible confounding factors, patients admitted with perforated peptic ulcers were examined in the same manner. RESULTS: A total of 148 cases of RAAA were identified, with a male preponderance (71.7% [124] male versus 29.3% [44] female patients) and a mean age of 74.4 +\\/- 7.2 years at presentation. 70.9% (105) were known to have hypertension, 52.2% (77) were current smokers, and 46.8% (69) were being treated for chronic obstructive airway disease (COAD). Time of symptom onset was recorded in 88.5% (131) of patients. There was a marked early morning peak in RAAA admissions, with the highest number of RAAA being admitted between 08.00 and 09.59. A second, smaller peak was observed at 14.00-15.59. These findings were suggestive of diurnal variation. [chi(2) =16.75, p < 0.003]. Some 40% (59) of patients were admitted between 00.00 and 06.00, an incidence significantly higher than for other time periods (06.00-12.00, 12.00-18.00, and 18.00-24.00) [chi(2) = 18.72; df = 3; p < 0.0003]. A significantly higher number of patients admitted between 00.00 and 06.00 were known hypertensives (chi(2) = 7.94; p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study suggest a distinct

  3. Aortic Endoprosthesis for the Treatment of Native Aortic Coarctation and Concomitant Aneurysm in an Octogenarian Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabellino, Martín; Kotowicz, Vadim; Kenny, Alberto; Kohan, Andres Alejandro; García-Mónaco, Ricardo

    2015-11-01

    We report a case of an 82-year-old female patient with native coarctation of the aorta and poststenotic aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta. On consultation, she was receiving 4 antihypertensive drugs, and physical examination revealed nonpalpable lower-limb pulses with intermittent claudication at 50 min. Because of her age, high surgical risk and combination of lesions, endovascular treatment was suggested. Placement of a Valiant thoracic aorta endoprosthesis followed by coarctation angioplasty was performed. At 48 hr, the patient was discharged on 1 antihypertensive drug, palpable pulses on both limbs and a normal ankle-brachial index. At 1 month follow-up, the patient remained as discharged and multislice computed tomography angiography depicted complete coarctation expansion without residual stenosis, exclusion of the aortic aneurysm, and no signs of endoleaks. PMID:26318556

  4. 11 cm Haughton D left cervical aortic arch aneurysm

    OpenAIRE

    Kaul, Pankaj

    2013-01-01

    A 56 year old Caucasian man presented with sudden loss of consciousness while driving and was found to have an 11 cm Haughton D type left cervical aortic arch aneurysm with normal brachiocephalic branching and normal descending thoracic laterality but with considerable tortuosity and redundancy of aortic arch. The aneurysm arose between the left common carotid artery and the left subclavian artery. It compressed and stretched the left common carotid artery, compressed the pulmonary trunk and ...

  5. Diagnostic value of ultrasound, computed tomography, and angiography in ruptured aortic aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landtman, M.; Kivisaari, L.; Bondestam, S.; Taavitsainen, M.; Standertskjoeld-Nordenstam, C.G.; Somer, K.

    1984-11-01

    Some ruptural aneurysms cause nonspecific symptoms and the patients are referred for radiological examination because of the problems of differential diagnosis from conditions such as renal colic, diverticulitis, herniated disc, aortic dissection etc. Seven such patients have been examined either with ultrasonography, computed tomography or angiography. The diagnostic methods are compared. The more recent US and CT imaging methods are sufficiently rapid and reliable for diagnostic purposes, which should improve the prognosis for patients requiring immediate surgery for ruptured aortic aneurysms.

  6. Upper gastrointestinal obstruction secondary to aortoduodenal syndrome owing to a noninflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cahill, Kevin

    2012-01-31

    Aortoduodenal syndrome is a rare complication of an abdominal aortic aneurysm wherein the aneurysm sac obstructs the patient\\'s duodenum. It presents with the symptoms of an upper gastrointestinal tract obstruction and requires surgical intervention to relieve it. Previously, gastric bypass surgery was advocated, but now aortic replacement is the mainstay of treatment. We report a case of a 67-year-old woman whose aortoduodenal syndrome was successfully managed and review the literature on this topic.

  7. Simulation of bifurcated stent grafts to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA)

    CERN Document Server

    Egger, Jan; Freisleben, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a method is introduced, to visualize bifurcated stent grafts in CT-Data. The aim is to improve therapy planning for minimal invasive treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). Due to precise measurement of the abdominal aortic aneurysm and exact simulation of the bifurcated stent graft, physicians are supported in choosing a suitable stent prior to an intervention. The presented method can be used to measure the dimensions of the abdominal aortic aneurysm as well as simulate a bifurcated stent graft. Both of these procedures are based on a preceding segmentation and skeletonization of the aortic, right and left iliac. Using these centerlines (aortic, right and left iliac) a bifurcated initial stent is constructed. Through the implementation of an ACM method the initial stent is fit iteratively to the vessel walls - due to the influence of external forces (distance- as well as balloonforce). Following the fitting process, the crucial values for choosing a bifurcated stent graft are measured, ...

  8. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) follow-up imaging: the assessment and treatment of common postoperative complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a well-established procedure, which has long-term mortality rates similar to that of open repair. It has the additional benefit of being less invasive, making it the favoured method of treating abdominal aortic aneurysms in elderly and high-risk patients with multiple co-morbidities. The main disadvantage of EVAR is the higher rate of re-intervention, due to device-related complications, including endoleaks, limb occlusion, stent migration, kinking, and infection. As a result lifelong surveillance is required. In order to avoid missing these complications, intricate knowledge of stent graft design, good-quality diagnostic ultrasound skills, multiplanar reformatting of CT images, and reproducible investigations are important. Most of these complications can be treated via an endovascular approach using cuff extensions, uncovered stents, coils, and liquid embolic agents. Open surgery is reserved for complex complications, where an endovascular approach is not feasible. - Highlights: • Comprehensive pictorial review of EVAR related complications. • Importance of life-long EVAR surveillance, to prevent aortic rupture or lower limb ischaemia. • Identification and management of endoleaks, rupture, migration, kink/infolding, occlusion and infection

  9. Report of a child with aortic aneurysm, orofacial clefting, hemangioma, upper sternal defect, and marfanoid features: possible PHACE syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavotinek, Anne M; Dubovsky, Elizabeth; Dietz, Harry C; Lacbawan, Felicitas

    2002-07-01

    We report a female patient who had a scalp hemangioma, a cleft uvula, an upper sternal defect, pectus excavatum, arachnodactyly, pes planus, and joint hypermobility. She had rupture of an aortic aneurysm after minor trauma at 11 years of age. At 17 years of age, elective repair of a dilated, ectatic aorta was complicated by cerebral ischemia. Other vascular abnormalities in the proband included an aneurysm of the left subclavian artery, atresia of the right carotid artery, and calcified cerebral aneurysms. We believe that the proband's physical anomalies are best described by the PHACE (posterior fossa brain malformations, hemangiomas, arterial anomalies, coarctation of the aorta and cardiac defects, and eye abnormalities) phenotypic spectrum. This spectrum of physical anomalies also includes sternal clefting and hemagiomas as part of the sternal malformation/vascular dysplasia (SM/VD) association, as found in our patient, and the acronym PHACES has also been used. We consider that the PHACE phenotypic spectrum is likely to be broader than previously recognized and includes orofacial clefting and aortic dilatation and rupture. Our patient also had skeletal anomalies that lead to consideration of Marfan syndrome as a diagnosis. It should be recognized that there is clinical overlap between PHACE syndrome and Marfan syndrome when aortic dilatation is present. We would also like to emphasize the minor nature of the cutaneous findings in our patient despite her severe vascular complications. This is in contrast to previous reports of large or multiple hemangiomas in PHACE syndrome. PMID:12116239

  10. The diagnosis and management of abdominal aortic aneurysms: a comparison of computed tomography, ultrasound and aortography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is suggested that all clinically significant abdominal aneurysms can be shown by infusion C.T. or ultrasound and routine aortography is no longer indicated. These methods give more information about wall thickness and wall thrombus but do not give detailed information about the extent of an aneurysm and its exact relationship to important aortic branches. They should complement rather than replace aortography

  11. Giant aortic arch aneurysm complicating Kawasaki disease: an original case report

    OpenAIRE

    Kaouthar, Hakim; Rafik, Boussaada; Jihen, Ayari; Imen, Hamdi; Lilia, Chaker; Fatma, Ouarda; Hela, Msaad

    2013-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a common acute vasculitis in pediatric population that usually involves small and middle-sized arteries, commonly coronary arteries. Although the incidence and natural course of coronary aneurysms after KD are well documented, related reports on peripheral arterial and aortic aneurysms are scarce.

  12. Syphilitic Aortic Aneurysm in a Young HIV-Infected Man: Case Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataño, Juan Carlos; Ramirez, Isabel Cristina

    2011-01-01

    We describe the case of a young HIV-positive man who presented to the emergency room in hypovolemic shock. During subsequent evaluation, we documented a huge aortic aneurysm consistent with tertiary syphilis. The final autopsy demonstrated the extent of cardiovascular compromise caused by this aneurysm. PMID:22567481

  13. HAS-1 genetic polymorphism in sporadic abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Balbarini

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The hyaluronan synthase 1 (HAS-1 gene encodes a plasma membrane protein that synthesizes hyaluronan (HA, an extracellular matrix molecule. Accumulating evidence emphasizes the relevance of HA metabolism in an increasing number of processes of clinical interest, including abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA. The existence of aberrant splicing variants of the HAS-1 gene could partly explain the altered extracellular matrix architecture and influence various biological functions, resulting in progressive arterial wall failure in the development of AAA. In the present study, we assessed the hypothesis that HAS-1 genetic 833A/G polymorphism could be associated with the risk of AAA by performing a case-control association study, involving AAA patients and healthy matched donors.

  14. Diagnostic imaging of abdominal aortic aneurysms; Diagnostik des Bauchaortenaneurysmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraemer, S.C.; Goerich, J. [Ulm Univ. (DE). Abt. Radiologie 1 (Roentgendiagnostik); Pamler, R. [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Torax- und Gefaesschirurgie

    1999-07-01

    The survey explains the available methods for diagnostic imaging of aortic aneurysms, i.e. the conventional methods of ultrasonography and intra-arterial angiography as well as the modern tomographic and image processing techniques such as CT, DSA, and MRT. The various methods are briefly discussed with respect to their sensitivity and specificity. The authors expect that MRI will become the modality of choice, due to absence of radiation exposure of the patients. [German] Klassische Verfahren der Diagnostik von Aortenaneurysmen sind Ultrasonographie sowie die intraarterielle Angiographie. Inzwischen werden mehr und mehr die modernen Schnittbildtechniken und Rekonstruktionsverfahren wie CT, DSA und MRT verwendet. Die verschiedenen Methoden werden bez/''uglich ihrer Sensitivit/''at und Spezifizit/''at diskutiert. Die Autoren nehmen an, da/ss sich die MRT wegen der fehlenden Strahlenbelastung als Methode der Wahl durchsetzen wird. (orig/MG)

  15. Atmospheric pressure variations and abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Killeen, S D

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA) presents with increased frequency in the winter and spring months. Seasonal changes in atmospheric pressure mirrors this pattern. AIM: To establish if there was a seasonal variation in the occurrence of RAAA and to determine if there was any association with atmospheric pressure changes. METHODS: A retrospective cohort-based study was performed. Daily atmospheric pressure readings for the region were obtained. RESULTS: There was a statistically significant monthly variation in RAAA presentation with 107 cases (52.5%) occurring from November to March. The monthly number of RAAA and the mean atmospheric pressure in the previous month were inversely related (r = -0.752, r (2) = 0.566, P = 0.03), and there was significantly greater daily atmospheric pressure variability on days when patients with RAAA were admitted. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest a relationship between atmospheric pressure and RAAA.

  16. Asthma Associates With Human Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm and Rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Cong-Lin; Wemmelund, Holger; Wang, Yi;

    2016-01-01

    ruptured AAA and age- and sex-matched AAA controls without rupture in Denmark from 1996 to 2012; Viborg vascular trial, subgroup study of participants from the population-based randomized Viborg vascular screening trial. Patients with asthma were categorized by hospital diagnosis, bronchodilator use, and...... the recorded use of other anti-asthma prescription medications. Logistic regression models were fitted to determine whether asthma associated with the risk of ruptured AAA in Danish National Registry of Patients and an independent risk of having an AAA at screening in the Viborg vascular trial. From......OBJECTIVE: Both asthma and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) involve inflammation. It remains unknown whether these diseases interact. APPROACH AND RESULTS: Databases analyzed included Danish National Registry of Patients, a population-based nationwide case-control study included all patients with...

  17. Computed tomography angiography of hybrid thoracic endovascular aortic repair of the aortic arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Nila J; Oderich, Gustavo S; Vrtiska, Terri J; Williamson, Eric E; Araoz, Philip A

    2013-05-01

    Endovascular repair of the aorta has traditionally been limited to the abdominal aorta and, more recently, the descending thoracic aorta. However, recently hybrid repairs (a combination of open surgical and endovascular repair) have made endovascular repair of the aortic arch possible. Hybrid repair of the aortic arch typically involves an open surgical debranching procedure that allows for revascularization of the aortic arch vessels and subsequent endovascular stent placement. These approaches avoid the deep hypothermic circulatory arrest required for full, open surgical repair of the aortic arch. In hybrid repairs, the stent landing zone determines which branch vessels will be covered and therefore need revascularization. This article will review the preprocedure assessment with computed tomography angiography, techniques for revascularization and postprocedure complications. PMID:23621141

  18. Phenotypic and Functional Changes of Endothelial and Smooth Muscle Cells in Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Malashicheva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thoracic aortic aneurysm develops as a result of complex series of events that alter the cellular structure and the composition of the extracellular matrix of the aortic wall. The purpose of the present work was to study the cellular functions of endothelial and smooth muscle cells from the patients with aneurysms of the thoracic aorta. We studied endothelial and smooth muscle cells from aneurysms in patients with bicuspid aortic valve and with tricuspid aortic valve. The expression of key markers of endothelial (CD31, vWF, and VE-cadherin and smooth muscle (SMA, SM22α, calponin, and vimentin cells as well extracellular matrix and MMP activity was studied as well as and apoptosis and cell proliferation. Expression of functional markers of endothelial and smooth muscle cells was reduced in patient cells. Cellular proliferation, migration, and synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins are attenuated in the cells of the patients. We show for the first time that aortic endothelial cell phenotype is changed in the thoracic aortic aneurysms compared to normal aortic wall. In conclusion both endothelial and smooth muscle cells from aneurysms of the ascending aorta have downregulated specific cellular markers and altered functional properties, such as growth rate, apoptosis induction, and extracellular matrix synthesis.

  19. Endovascular stent graft repair of multiple tuberculous thoracoabdominal aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Jung; Won, Je Hwan [Dept. of Radiology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    We describe a case of multiple tuberculous aneurysms of the descending thoracic aorta and abdominal aorta repaired with endovascular stent graft. The case was a 47-year-old man who presented with three saccular pseudoaneurysms of aortoiliac bifurcation at computed tomography (CT) scan. Despite of antimycobacterial treatment, these aneurysms grew rapidly and saccular pseudoaneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta was newly seen. A bifurcated stent graft was successfully implanted in the aortoiliac bifurcation. Subsequently, endovascular stent graft was placed well in the descending thoracic aorta. Fourteen months after the procedure, the patient was stable and serial CT images showed regression of aneurysms with ongoing antimycobacterial treatment. Therefore, endovascular stent graft repair with antimycobacterial therapy may be a treatment option in patients with multiple tuberculous aneurysms.

  20. Various complications of abdominal aortic aneurysm : CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Byun, Jae Young; Kim, Bum Soo; Kim, Euy Neyung; Yoon, Yeo Dong; Kim, Ki Tae; Lee, Jae Mun; Shinn, Kyung Sub [The Catholic Univ. of Korea, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-03-01

    To evaluate on abdominal CT the type and incidence of various complications of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Twenty six suspected cases of AAA were confirmed by operation(n=21) and by CT(n=5). The etiology, size, shape and incidence of various complications of AAA were then retrospectively evaluated. In addition, post-operative complications were also evaluated in five cases. The etiology of the aneurysm was atherosclerotic in 18 cases and mycotic in three;it showed the presence of Behcet disease in three cases, of tuberculosis in one, and of Marfan syndrome in one. Among the 18 fusiform AAA, the mean maximum diameter of ruptured AAA(7.5{+-}3cm, n=3) was significantly larger than that of unruptured AAA(4.9{+-}1.6cm, n=15) (p<0.05). The saccular type was much more likely to rupture than the fusiform type(p<0.00001). Out of the eight saccular AAA, seven ruptured ; their mean maximum diameter was 3.9{+-}1.3cm This was significantly smaller than that of ruptured fusiform aneurysm(p<0.05). The most common complication was rupture, and occurred ten of 26 cases(38%). Others included hydronephrosis in three cases, bowel infarction in one, and perianeurysmal retroperitoneal fibrosis in one case. Various post-oper-ative complications developed in five patients; these comprised periprosthetic pseudoaneurysm with hematoma (two cases), bowel ischemia (one), focal renal infarction (one), and secondary aorticoduodenal fistula (one). The most common complication of AAA was rupture, the rate of which was much higher in the saccular type with smaller size than the fusiform type. Other various and uncommon complications were observed. CT was helpful in detecting complications arising from AAA and in planning its treatment.

  1. Various complications of abdominal aortic aneurysm : CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate on abdominal CT the type and incidence of various complications of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Twenty six suspected cases of AAA were confirmed by operation(n=21) and by CT(n=5). The etiology, size, shape and incidence of various complications of AAA were then retrospectively evaluated. In addition, post-operative complications were also evaluated in five cases. The etiology of the aneurysm was atherosclerotic in 18 cases and mycotic in three;it showed the presence of Behcet disease in three cases, of tuberculosis in one, and of Marfan syndrome in one. Among the 18 fusiform AAA, the mean maximum diameter of ruptured AAA(7.5±3cm, n=3) was significantly larger than that of unruptured AAA(4.9±1.6cm, n=15) (p<0.05). The saccular type was much more likely to rupture than the fusiform type(p<0.00001). Out of the eight saccular AAA, seven ruptured ; their mean maximum diameter was 3.9±1.3cm This was significantly smaller than that of ruptured fusiform aneurysm(p<0.05). The most common complication was rupture, and occurred ten of 26 cases(38%). Others included hydronephrosis in three cases, bowel infarction in one, and perianeurysmal retroperitoneal fibrosis in one case. Various post-oper-ative complications developed in five patients; these comprised periprosthetic pseudoaneurysm with hematoma (two cases), bowel ischemia (one), focal renal infarction (one), and secondary aorticoduodenal fistula (one). The most common complication of AAA was rupture, the rate of which was much higher in the saccular type with smaller size than the fusiform type. Other various and uncommon complications were observed. CT was helpful in detecting complications arising from AAA and in planning its treatment

  2. Possible dual role of decorin in abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koshiro Ueda

    Full Text Available Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is characterized by chronic inflammation, which leads to pathological remodeling of the extracellular matrix. Decorin, a small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan, has been suggested to regulate inflammation and stabilize the extracellular matrix. Therefore, the present study investigated the role of decorin in the pathogenesis of AAA. Decorin was localized in the aortic adventitia under normal conditions in both mice and humans. AAA was induced in mice using CaCl2 treatment. Initially, decorin protein levels decreased, but as AAA progressed decorin levels increased in all layers. Local administration of exogenous decorin prevented the development of CaCl2-induced AAA. However, decorin was highly expressed in the degenerative lesions of human AAA walls, and this expression positively correlated with matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9 expression. In cell culture experiments, the addition of decorin inhibited secretion of MMP-9 in vascular smooth muscle cells, but had the opposite effect in macrophages. The results suggest that decorin plays a dual role in AAA. Adventitial decorin in normal aorta may protect against the development of AAA, but macrophages expressing decorin in AAA walls may facilitate the progression of AAA by up-regulating MMP-9 secretion.

  3. Aortic Valve Sparing in Different Aortic Valve and Aortic Root Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Tirone E

    2016-08-01

    The development of aortic valve-sparing operations (reimplantation of the aortic valve and remodeling of the aortic root) expanded the surgical armamentarium for treating patients with aortic root dilation caused by a variety of disorders. Young adults with aortic root aneurysms associated with genetic syndromes are ideal candidates for reimplantation of the aortic valve, and the long-term results have been excellent. Incompetent bicuspid aortic valves with dilated aortic annuli are also satisfactorily treated with the same type of operation. Older patients with ascending aortic aneurysm and aortic insufficiency secondary to dilated sinotubular junction and a normal aortic annulus can be treated with remodeling of the aortic root or with reimplantation of the aortic valve. The first procedure is simpler, and both procedures are likely equally effective. As with any heart valve-preserving procedure, patient selection and surgical expertise are keys to successful and durable repairs. PMID:27491910

  4. Detection of periodontal pathogens in the patients with aortic aneurysm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ding Fang; Lyu Yalin; Han Xiao; Zhang Hai; Liu Dongyu; Hei Wei; Liu Yinhua

    2014-01-01

    Background The occurrence and development of aortic aneurysm (AA) are associated with infection.Some researchers have detected the DNA of periodontal pathogens in AA samples in certain populations.However,it has not been done in Chinese population.The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of periodontal pathogens in oral tissue samples and aneurysm samples of AA patients.Methods Eighty-nine subjects with AA and 59 subjects without AA were examined.Periodontal clinical parameters were evaluated.Unstimulated saliva and subgingival plaque somples were collected from all subjects.Twenty-six dissected AA samples were obtained.Evidence of eight periodontal pathogens including Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg),Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (Aa),Prevotella intermedia (Pi),Tannerella forsythensis (Tf),Treponema denticola (Td),Campylobacter rectus (Cr),Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn),and Prevotella nigrescens (Pn) was ascertained in all samples by 16S rRNA-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay.Results The periodontal indexes including plaque index (PLI),probing depth (PD),bleeding index (BI),and clinical attachment loss (CAL),of the six Ramfjord index teeth were significantly higher in the AA group than those in the control group (P <0.01).Eight periodontal pathogens in subgingival plaque samples were more frequently detected in the AA group than in control group.The difference in prevalence between the groups was significant for six (out of eight) periodontal pathogens assayed (Pg,Pi,Fn,Pn,Tf,and Td,P <0.01).Additionally,all eight periodontal pathogens were more frequently detected in saliva samples of the AA group than in those of the control group,again with six (out of eight) (Pg,Pi,Fn,Cr,Tf,and Td) displaying significant differences in prevalence between the two groups (P <0.01).Out of 26 aneurysm samples examined,Pg,Pi,Fn,Crand Tfwere detected in 6 (23.1%),2 (7.7%),3 (11.5%),1 (3.8%),2 (7.7%),respectively,and Aa,Pn,and Td were not

  5. Cysteine protease cathepsins and matrix metalloproteinases in the development of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, Yanwen; Cao, Xu; Yang, Yaoguo; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Both cysteine protease cathepsins and matrix metalloproteinases are implicated in the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) in humans and animals. Blood and aortic tissues from humans or animals with AAAs contain much higher levels of these proteases, and often lower levels of their endogenous inhibitors, than do blood and aortic tissues from healthy subjects. Protease- and protease inhibitor-deficient mice and synthetic protease inhibitors have affirmed that cysteinyl cathepsins ...

  6. Closed injury of the aortic arch and subsequent formation of a false aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janevski, B

    1983-01-01

    The case history of a 25-year-old man who sustained a blunt trauma to the chest in a car accident and developed a false aneurysm of the aortic isthmus is reported. The injury of the aortic arch was not initially recognized. The diagnosis was established on the chest X-rays and arteriograms obtained 1 year after the trauma. The clinical and radiological signs of closed injuries of the aortic arch are reviewed. PMID:6617430

  7. SURGICAL MANAGEMENT OF A RARE CASE OF MARFAN SYNDROME - THE RUPTURE OF AN ABDOMINAL AORTIC ANEURYSM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Stoica

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a rare manifestation of the Marfan syndrome. A 33 years old woman with a 10 cm diameter juxta-renal aortic aneurysm ruptured in the retro peritoneum arrived in hemorrhagic shock. Surgery was performed in emergency by thoraco-phreno-laparatomy, the aneurysm was resected and a 20 mm Dacron tube was sutured between the origin of the renal arteries and the aortic bifurcation. Rapid thoracic aortic cross-clamping to stop the hemorrhage and good aneurismal exposure by the division of the left renal vein was the key of this successful management. The patient recovered without any complication. Rupture of the abdominal aortic aneurysm is a life threatening complication which requires a rapid diagnosis and an emergency treatment by open surgery or by endovascular stent grafting. We present the surgical strategy in our case

  8. Patient-specific simulation of endovascular repair surgery with tortuous aneurysms requiring flexible stent-grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, David; Badel, Pierre; Orgeas, Laurent; Geindreau, Christian; du Roscoat, Sabine Rolland; Albertini, Jean-Noël; Avril, Stéphane

    2016-10-01

    The rate of post-operative complications is the main drawback of endovascular repair, a technique used to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms. Complex anatomies, featuring short aortic necks and high vessel tortuosity for instance, have been proved likely prone to these complications. In this context, practitioners could benefit, at the preoperative planning stage, from a tool able to predict the post-operative position of the stent-graft, to validate their stent-graft sizing and anticipate potential complications. In consequence, the aim of this work is to prove the ability of a numerical simulation methodology to reproduce accurately the shapes of stent-grafts, with a challenging design, deployed inside tortuous aortic aneurysms. Stent-graft module samples were scanned by X-ray microtomography and subjected to mechanical tests to generate finite-element models. Two EVAR clinical cases were numerically reproduced by simulating stent-graft models deployment inside the tortuous arterial model generated from patient pre-operative scan. In the same manner, an in vitro stent-graft deployment in a rigid polymer phantom, generated by extracting the arterial geometry from the preoperative scan of a patient, was simulated to assess the influence of biomechanical environment unknowns in the in vivo case. Results were validated by comparing stent positions on simulations and post-operative scans. In all cases, simulation predicted stents deployed locations and shapes with an accuracy of a few millimetres. The good results obtained in the in vitro case validated the ability of the methodology to simulate stent-graft deployment in very tortuous arteries and led to think proper modelling of biomechanical environment could reduce the few local discrepancies found in the in vivo case. In conclusion, this study proved that our methodology can achieve accurate simulation of stent-graft deployed shape even in tortuous patient specific aortic aneurysms and may be potentially helpful to

  9. Aortocaval fistula (ACF) in patients operated for ruptured aortic aneurysm (rAAA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warning, Karina; Houlind, Kim Christian; Ravn, Hans

    Aortocaval fistula (ACF) in patients operated for Ruptured Acute Aorta Aneurysm (rAAA): A surgical challenge. Introduction Aortocaval fistula is a rare complication of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). It been reported to be present in less than 1% of all AAAs. ACF arise in patients with large...... aneurysms and is typically discovered peroperatively in patients with rAAA. Open surgical treatment is associated with high mortality and morbidity. ACF is a result of spontaneously rupture of large atherosclerotic aneurysms into the inferior vena cava in 80%, 15% arise after trauma and 5% are iatrogenic...

  10. Estudo comparativo entre tratamento endovascular e cirurgia convencional na correção eletiva de aneurisma de aorta abdominal: revisão bibliográfica Endovascular elective treatment of the abdominal aortic aneurysm versus conventional open repair: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina P. Simão

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available O tratamento eletivo do aneurisma de aorta abdominal é recomendado pela alta morbiletalidade decorrente da eventual ruptura. O objetivo deste trabalho foi comparar o reparo endovascular eletivo com a cirurgia aberta e avaliar as mortalidades hospitalar e perioperatória, em 1 ano, por todas as causas e relacionadas ao aneurisma, a permanência hospitalar, as complicações, as taxas de sobrevida, conversão e reintervenção, a durabilidade do enxerto, o custo-benefício e a relação desses dados com o treinamento da equipe médica responsável pelo tratamento. Realizou-se uma revisão da literatura sobre reparo endovascular versus cirurgia convencional. Foram observados vantagem na sobrevivência perioperatória e menor estresse pós-cirúrgico; no entanto, os benefícios iniciais são perdidos por complicações e reintervenções tardias. Trabalhos baseados nas primeiras gerações de endopróteses superestimam as taxas de mortalidade em curto prazo, complicações e reintervenções. A durabilidade do enxerto, a real vantagem na sobrevida e o custo-benefício são incertos, e outros estudos são necessários para o seguimento em longo prazo.The elective treatment of the abdominal aortic aneurysm is recommended due to the high morbidity and mortality of a possible rupture. The objective of this study was to compare the elective endovascular aneurysm repair with open repair and to analyze the in-hospital and perioperative mortality rate during 1 year related to all causes and to the aneurysm, as well as the postoperative length of hospital stay, complications, survival rates, conversion and reintervention, graft durability, cost-benefit ratio, and relation with the medical team’s experience. A review of the scientific literature about endovascular versus open repair was carried out. We found a higher rate of perioperative survival and less postoperative stress; nevertheless, the initial benefits were lost due to late complications and

  11. Tratamento endovascular do aneurisma da aorta abdominal infrarrenal em pacientes com anatomia favorável para o procedimento: experiência inicial em um serviço universitário Endovascular treatment of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm in patients with favorable anatomy for the repair: initial experience in a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manoel da Silva Silvestre

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: Desde sua introdução, em 1991, o reparo endovascular do aneurisma da aorta abdominal infrarrenal tem se tornado uma alternativa atraente para o tratamento dessa doença. Avaliar nossos resultados iniciais quanto à segurança e eficácia dessa técnica nos levou à realização deste estudo. OBJETIVOS: Analisar a mortalidade perioperatória, a sobrevida tardia, as reoperações, as taxas de perviedade e o comportamento do saco aneurismático em pacientes com anatomia favorável para a realização do procedimento. MÉTODOS: Trata-se de um estudo longitudinal, observacional e retrospectivo realizado entre outubro de 2004 e janeiro de 2009 com 41 pacientes que foram submetidos à correção endovascular do aneurisma de aorta abdominal infrarrenal por apresentarem anatomia favorável para o procedimento. Foram analisados os achados dos exames diagnósticos, o tratamento e o seguimento em todos os pacientes. RESULTADOS: Foram implantadas, com sucesso, 31 (75,6% próteses bifurcadas e 10 (24,5% monoilíacas, de 5 diferentes marcas. O diâmetro médio dos aneurismas fusiformes era de 62 mm. A mortalidade perioperatória foi de 4,8% e a sobrevida tardia, 90,2%. Durante o acompanhamento médio de 30 meses, 2 (4,8% pacientes necessitaram de reintervenção, um por migração da endoprótese e outro por vazamento tipo II. Dois (4,8% pacientes apresentaram oclusão de ramo da prótese. Oito (19,5% vazamentos foram diagnosticados e não houve nenhuma rotura dos aneurismas. CONCLUSÃO: Apesar do pequeno número de pacientes, os resultados observados parecem justificar a realização do procedimento endovascular nos pacientes com anatomia favorável.BACKGROUND: Since its introduction in 1991, endovascular repair of infrarenal aortic aneurysms has become an attractive option to treat this disease. The evaluation of our initial results about safety and efficacy of this technique has led us to carry out this study. OBJECTIVES: To analyze

  12. Value of volume measurements in evaluating abdominal aortic aneurysms growth rate and need for surgical treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kontopodis, Nikolaos, E-mail: kontopodisn@yahoo.gr [Department of Vascular Surgery, University of Crete Medical School, Heraklion (Greece); Metaxa, Eleni, E-mail: emmetaxa@gmail.com [Institute of Applied and Computational Mathematics, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Papaharilaou, Yannis, E-mail: yannisp@iacm.forth.gr [Institute of Applied and Computational Mathematics, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Georgakarakos, Efstratios, E-mail: efstratiosgeorg@gmail.com [Vascular Surgery Department, “Demokritus” University of Thrace Medical School, Alexandroupolis (Greece); Tsetis, Dimitris, E-mail: tsetis@med.uoc.gr [Interventional Radiology Unit, Department of Radiology, University of Crete Medical School, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Ioannou, Christos V., E-mail: ioannou@med.uoc.gr [Department of Vascular Surgery, University of Crete Medical School, Heraklion (Greece)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To examine whether indices other than the traditionally used abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) maximum diameter, such as AAA volume, intraluminal thrombus (ILT) thickness and ILT volume, may be superior to evaluate aneurismal enlargement. Materials and methods: Thirty-four small AAAs (initially presenting a maximum diameter <5.5 cm which is the threshold for surgical repair) with an initial and a follow-up CT were examined. Median increase and percentile annual change of these variables was calculated. Correlation between growth rates as determined by the new indices under evaluation and those of maximum diameter were assessed. AAAs were divided according to outcome (surveillance vs. elective repair after follow-up which is based on the maximum diameter criterion) and according to growth rate (high vs. low) based on four indices. Contingency between groups of high/low growth rate regarding each of the four indices on one hand and those regarding need for surgical repair on the other was assessed. Results: A strong correlation between growth rates of maximum diameter and those of AAA and ILT volumes could be established. Evaluation of contingency between groups of outcome and those of growth rate revealed significant associations only for AAA and ILT volumes. Subsequently AAAs with a rapid volumetric increase over time had a likelihood ratio of 10 to be operated compared to those with a slower enlargement. Regarding increase of maximum diameter, likelihood ratio between AAAs with rapid and those with slow expansion was only 3. Conclusion: Growth rate of aneurysms regarding 3Dimensional indices of AAA and ILT volumes is significantly associated with the need for surgical intervention while the same does not hold for growth rates determined by 2Dimensional indices of maximum diameter and ILT thickness.

  13. Value of volume measurements in evaluating abdominal aortic aneurysms growth rate and need for surgical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To examine whether indices other than the traditionally used abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) maximum diameter, such as AAA volume, intraluminal thrombus (ILT) thickness and ILT volume, may be superior to evaluate aneurismal enlargement. Materials and methods: Thirty-four small AAAs (initially presenting a maximum diameter <5.5 cm which is the threshold for surgical repair) with an initial and a follow-up CT were examined. Median increase and percentile annual change of these variables was calculated. Correlation between growth rates as determined by the new indices under evaluation and those of maximum diameter were assessed. AAAs were divided according to outcome (surveillance vs. elective repair after follow-up which is based on the maximum diameter criterion) and according to growth rate (high vs. low) based on four indices. Contingency between groups of high/low growth rate regarding each of the four indices on one hand and those regarding need for surgical repair on the other was assessed. Results: A strong correlation between growth rates of maximum diameter and those of AAA and ILT volumes could be established. Evaluation of contingency between groups of outcome and those of growth rate revealed significant associations only for AAA and ILT volumes. Subsequently AAAs with a rapid volumetric increase over time had a likelihood ratio of 10 to be operated compared to those with a slower enlargement. Regarding increase of maximum diameter, likelihood ratio between AAAs with rapid and those with slow expansion was only 3. Conclusion: Growth rate of aneurysms regarding 3Dimensional indices of AAA and ILT volumes is significantly associated with the need for surgical intervention while the same does not hold for growth rates determined by 2Dimensional indices of maximum diameter and ILT thickness

  14. Endovascular Repair of Aortic Dissection in Marfan Syndrome: Current Status and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosario Parisi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decades, improvement of medical and surgical therapy has increased life expectancy in Marfan patients. Consequently, the number of such patients requiring secondary interventions on the descending thoracic aorta due to new or residual dissections, and distal aneurysm formation has substantially enlarged. Surgical and endovascular procedures represent two valuable options of treatment, both associated with advantages and drawbacks. The aim of the present manuscript was to review endovascular outcomes in Marfan syndrome and to assess the potential role of Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair (TEVAR in this subset of patients.

  15. Experimental modelling of aortic aneurysms: novel applications of silicone rubbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Barry J; Corbett, Timothy J; Cloonan, Aidan J; O'Donnell, Michael R; Walsh, Michael T; Vorp, David A; McGloughlin, Timothy M

    2009-10-01

    A range of silicone rubbers were created based on existing commercially available materials. These silicones were designed to be visually different from one another and have distinct material properties, in particular, ultimate tensile strengths and tear strengths. In total, eleven silicone rubbers were manufactured, with the materials designed to have a range of increasing tensile strengths from approximately 2 to 4 MPa, and increasing tear strengths from approximately 0.45 to 0.7 N/mm. The variations in silicones were detected using a standard colour analysis technique. Calibration curves were then created relating colour intensity to individual material properties. All eleven materials were characterised and a 1st order Ogden strain energy function applied. Material coefficients were determined and examined for effectiveness. Six idealised abdominal aortic aneurysm models were also created using the two base materials of the study, with a further model created using a new mixing technique to create a rubber model with randomly assigned material properties. These models were then examined using videoextensometry and compared to numerical results. Colour analysis revealed a statistically significant linear relationship (pmaterial strength to be determined using a non-destructive experimental technique. The effectiveness of this technique was assessed by comparing predicted material properties to experimentally measured methods, with good agreement in the results. Videoextensometry and numerical modelling revealed minor percentage differences, with all results achieving significance (prubbers that have unique colour intensities and material strengths. Strengths can be readily determined using a non-destructive analysis technique with proven effectiveness. These silicones may further aid towards an improved understanding of the biomechanical behaviour of aneurysms using experimental techniques. PMID:19595622

  16. Salmonella aortitis treated with endovascular aortic repair: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Strahm Carol; Lederer Heidi; Schwarz Esther I; Bachli Esther B

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Salmonella is a typical cause of aortitis, which is associated with high morbidity and mortality. In infrarenal disease, besides open surgery, endovascular aortic repair as an alternative treatment has been reported. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first successful endovascular aortic repair documented by necropsy to date. Case presentation A 67-year-old Caucasian man presented with low back pain, fever and positive blood cultures for Salmonella Enteritidis. ...

  17. [Hybrid operation for a posttraumatic saccular aneurysm of the aortic arch].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignat'ev, I M; Volodiukhin, M Iu; Zanochkin, A V; Terekhin, S V

    2013-01-01

    The article deals with a case report of successful hybrid surgical treatment of a patient presenting with a posttraumatic large false saccular aneurysm of the aortic arch with mediastinal displacement and compression of the left recurrent laryngeal nerve and trachea. The patient was subjected to a hybrid operation, i. e., bypass grafting of the brachiocephalic trunk and the left common carotid artery with a bifurcation prosthesis from the ascending aorta through sternotomy, carotid-vertebral and carotid-subclavian bypass grafting on the left in a combination with endoprosthetic repair of the aortic arch with the stent graft Valiant Thoracic 40 × 224 mm (VAMF 4040c200TE) manufactured by the Medtronic Company. The postoperative period was uneventful followed by rather rapid rehabilitation of the patient. One month after the operation, the clinical state improved considerably. His voice restored virtually completely, and breathlessness disappeared. According to the findings of MSCT angiography, the aneurysmatic cavity is thrombosed, with the stent graft showing no evidence of either dislocation or endoleak. The bifurcation bypass graft is functioning. According to the data of duplex scanning, the anastomoses established on the neck are patent. PMID:23531669

  18. [Hybrid surgical intervention in a patient with an aortic arch aneurysm and coronary artery disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charchan, E R; Abugov, S A; Puretsky, M V; Kim, S Yu; Skvortsov, A A; Khachatryan, Z R

    2015-01-01

    Presented herein is a clinical case report regarding the use of hybrid technology in surgical treatment of a patient with an aneurysm of the distal portion of the aortic arch and coronary artery disease. The patient underwent a hybrid operation, i.e. debranching of the aortic arch branches, exoprosthetic repair of the ascending aorta, autovenous prosthetic coronary bypass grafting of the branch of the blunt edge of the anterior interventricular artery, stenting of the ascending portion, arch and descending portion of the aorta (stent graft "Medtronic Valiant"). In doing so, we used a non-standard approach to connecting the artificial circulation unit and to choosing the place for establishing proximal anastomoses of autovenous coronary bypass grafts. The early postoperative period was complicated by the development of respiratory insufficiency requiring continuation artificial pulmonary ventilation. The duration of the hospital stay of the patient amounted to 15 days. The check-up multispiral computed tomography showed normal functioning of the reconstruction zones, the stent graft is expanded, with no leak observed. The conclusion was made that hybrid interventions may be considered as an alternative to the classical surgical treatment associated in patients of older age group with a severe course of the postoperative period and high lethality. PMID:26035581

  19. Migration of a retained temporary epicardial pacing wire into an abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukaihara, Kosuke; Yotsumoto, Goichi; Matsumoto, Kazuhisa; Imoto, Yutaka

    2015-07-01

    A 69-year old male was referred to our hospital for the treatment of coronary artery disease. Preoperative computed tomography (CT) revealed an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and a giant tumour of the left kidney. He underwent off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB) prior to aneurysmectomy and nephrectomy. Temporary epicardial pacing wires (TEPWs) were placed on the right atrium and right ventricle. The bipolar ventricular wire was removed and the unipolar atrial wire was cut flush with the skin surface on postoperative day 5. CT 7 days after the OPCAB procedure revealed a retained TEPW sutured to the right atrial wall. One month later, the patient underwent a repair of the AAA and left nephrectomy. We found that a TEPW had migrated inside the AAA intraoperatively. The retained TEPW was thus no longer observed on postoperative CT. Migration of the atrial pacing wire through the aortic lumen was suspected, although the detailed mechanism is unknown. This is the first reported case of a migrated temporary pacing wire into the aorta under noninfectious conditions. PMID:25173602

  20. Long-term benefit and cost-effectiveness analysis of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms from a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes S.; Sørensen, J; Søgaard, R; Henneberg, E W

    2010-01-01

    The aim was to estimate long-term mortality benefits and cost-effectiveness of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in men aged 64-73 years.......The aim was to estimate long-term mortality benefits and cost-effectiveness of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in men aged 64-73 years....

  1. The cardiac cycle is a major contributor to variability in size measurements of abdominal aortic aneurysms by ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøndal, Nikolaj Fibiger; Bramsen, Morten; Thomsen, Marie Dahl;

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the impact of the cardiac cycle on ultrasound measurements of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) diameters.......The objective of the study was to evaluate the impact of the cardiac cycle on ultrasound measurements of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) diameters....

  2. Quantification of aortic distensibility in abdominal aortic aneurysm using ECG-gated multi-detector computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To detect distensibility changes that might be an indicator for an increased risk of rupture, cross-sectional area changes of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) have been determined using ECG-gated CT. Distensibility measurements of the aorta were performed in 67 patients with AAA. Time-resolved images were acquired with a four detector-row CT system using a modified CT-angiography protocol. Pulsatility-related cross-sectional area changes were calculated above and at AAA level by semiautomatic segmentation; distensibility values were obtained using additional systemic blood pressure measurements. Values were compared for small Oe 5 cm (n = 23) aneurysms. The aorta could be segmented successfully in all patients. Upstream AAA distensibility D was significantly higher than at AAA level for both groups: means above AAA (at AAA) Dabove = (1.3 ±0.8) .10 -5 Pa -1 (DAAA (0.6 ±0.5) .10 -5 Pa -1) t-test pD<0.0001. Differences of the distensibility between smaller and larger aneurysms were not found to be significant. Distensibility can be measured non-invasively with ECG-gated CT. The reduction of distensibility within aneurysms compared to normal proximal aorta is subtle; the lack of difference between both small and large aneurysms suggests that this reduction occurs early in the aneurysm's development. Hence, reduced distensibility might be a predictive parameter in patients with high risk of aortic disease. (orig.)

  3. Hemoptysis as a first symptom of endoleak after thoracic endovascular aortic repair, which caused aortic rupture and required complex management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warot, Marcin; Burchard, Paweł; Paschke, Łukasz; Łysiak, Zuzanna; Chęciński, Paweł

    2013-01-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has become the most common procedure in the treatment of thoracic aorta aneurysms. However, potential long-term complications of this technique could be life-threatening. Hemoptysis is a common symptom of lung tumor, especially cancer. On the other hand, hemoptysis can also be caused by bronchitis, tuberculosis, mycosis, and trauma. In this case report, we present a patient with hemoptysis and lung tumor suggesting lung cancer, which was a unique symptom of type IA endoleak after TEVAR and led to rupture of the thoracic aneurysm. It was decided to perform next an endovascular procedure due to the severe state of the patient. Next the thoracotomy was performed because drainage of the left pleural cavity was unsuccessful. In the last stage bronchoscopy was needed to remove the thrombus, which occluded the left main bronchi. Successful management has led to the patient's full recovery. Despite justified popularity of endovascular procedures in the treatment of thoracic aorta aneurysms, we should remember about potential long-term complications. Hemoptysis could be a unique symptom of the endoleak after TEVAR and treatment of such complications could be complex and demanding. PMID:23837105

  4. Novel risk predictor for thrombus deposition in abdominal aortic aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestola, M. G. C.; Gizzi, A.; Cherubini, C.; Filippi, S.; Succi, S.

    2015-10-01

    The identification of the basic mechanisms responsible for cardiovascular diseases stands as one of the most challenging problems in modern medical research including various mechanisms which encompass a broad spectrum of space and time scales. Major implications for clinical practice and pre-emptive medicine rely on the onset and development of intraluminal thrombus in which effective clinical therapies require synthetic risk predictors/indicators capable of informing real-time decision-making protocols. In the present contribution, two novel hemodynamics synthetic indicators, based on a three-band decomposition (TBD) of the shear stress signal, are introduced. Extensive fluid-structure computer simulations of patient-specific scenarios confirm the enhanced risk-prediction capabilities of the TBD indicators. In particular, they permit a quantitative and accurate localization of the most likely thrombus deposition in realistic aortic geometries, where previous indicators would predict healthy operation. The proposed methodology is also shown to provide additional information and discrimination criteria on other factors of major clinical relevance, such as the size of the aneurysm.

  5. Thoracic aortic aneurysm in a buck associated with caseous lymphadenitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.R. Pinheiro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the clinical, bacteriological and pathological findings of a thoracic aortic aneurysm in a four-year-old Anglo-Nubian goat buck, related to a framework of visceral caseous lymphadenitis. General clinical examination showed heart rate of 75 beats per minute, respiratory rate of 20 movements per minute and ruminal movements of four movements per minute. Superficial lymph nodes were normal upon palpation. Rectal temperature was slightly high (40.5°C. Blood test showed an intense leukocytosis (54,000/µL, characterized by strong neutrophil shift to the left. At necropsy, a large blood clot was detected in the thoracic cavity. The thickening of the myocardium and dilatation of the aorta in the thoracic portion, presenting a saculiform format was also observed. A large number of abscesses were disseminated in the media and intima layers of aorta. The aorta lumen obstruction by arterial plaques consisting of inflammatory infiltrate, predominantly neutrophilic was also detected. Abscesses were found spread in turbinate, rumen, reticulum, kidneys, liver, spleen, testicles and aorta wall. The microbiological exam of exudate confirmed Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis as the causal agent.

  6. Perioperative nursing for patients receiving endovascular therapy for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To discuss the nursing strategy and practical measures for patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm during the perioperative period of endovascular intervention. Methods: Endovascular therapy was carried out in 34 patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm,who were encountered in our department during the period of July 1997 to September 2008. The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed and the nursing points were summarized. Results: The average hospitalization days of the 34 patients were (14 ± 5) days, the mortality rate within 30 days was 23.5% (8/34). No nursing-related complications occurred. Conclusion: A comprehensive understanding of the mechanism, development and clinical evolution of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm is very important for nursing care. For nursing staff, well mastering the relevant nursing technique, carefully guarding against any nursing errors and lessening patient's suffering as far as possible, all these are the task of primary importance. (authors)

  7. Impact of poroelasticity of intraluminal thrombus on wall stress of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    OpenAIRE

    Polzer Stanislav; Gasser T; Markert Bernd; Bursa Jiri; Skacel Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The predictions of stress fields in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) depend on constitutive descriptions of the aneurysm wall and the Intra-luminal Thrombus (ILT). ILT is a porous diluted structure (biphasic solid–fluid material) and its impact on AAA biomechanics is controversially discussed in the literature. Specifically, pressure measurements showed that the ILT cannot protect the wall from the arterial pressure, while other (numerical and experimental) studies showed t...

  8. Successful abdominal aortic aneurysm resection in long-term survivors of cardiac transplantation.

    OpenAIRE

    Defraigne, Jean-Olivier; SakalihasanN, Natzi; DEMOULIN, Julie; Limet, Raymond

    1995-01-01

    With the improvement of survival rates following cardiac transplantation, the probability of recipients developing extracardiac disease is increased. Three cases are reported of abdominal aortic aneurysm successfully operated on in cardiac allograft recipients 1 to 4 years after transplantation. Indications for transplantation were valvular, idiopathic and ischaemic cardiomyopathy. Post-transplant hypertension and hyperlipidaemia may have played a role in the rapid growth of the aneurysms. Ca...

  9. The limitation of MRA reconstruction imaging evaluating intraluminal thrombus on endovascular exclusion for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the effect of pitfall MRA reconstruction imaging without intraluminal thrombus on endovascular exclusion for abdominal aortic aneurysm. Methods: Comparing the MRA reconstruction imaging with the MRA cross-section imaging, all of 22 patients underwent endovascular exclusion from Jan 2002 to Oct 2002 were included. Results: Intraluminal thrombus possessed the merit of clinical treatment, otherwise would mislead the evaluation of the procedure. Conclusions: It is important to use MRA reconstruction imaging evaluating abdominal aortic aneurysm combining MRA cross-section imaging

  10. Surgical Treatment of a Voluminous Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Horseshoe Kidney: Tips and Tricks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Caridi, Giovanni; Massara, Mafalda; Greco, Michele; Mastrojeni, Claudio; Serra, Raffaele; Salomone, Ignazio; La Spada, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Horseshoe kidney is a common urology anomaly, while its association with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm represents a very rare condition. Surgical approach remains controversial however, we believe that the left retroperitoneal approach should be preferred in order to avoid isthmus resection with any subsequent renal infarction, urinary tract damage and to facilitate renal arteries reimplantation, when required. We present a case of voluminous infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm associated with horseshoe kidney, successfully treated through a left retroperitoneal approach on the retro-renal space. PMID:26730260

  11. Vascular dysfunctions in the isolated aorta of double-transgenic hypertensive mice developing aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waeckel, L.; Badier-Commander, C.; Damery, T.;

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin-II and oxidative stress are involved in the genesis of aortic aneurysms, a phenomenon exacerbated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) deletion or uncoupling. The purpose of this work was to study the endothelial function in wild-type C57BL/6 (BL) and transgenic mice expressing....... Seventy-five percent of ARSL developed aortic aneurysms, characterized by major histo-morphological changes and associated with an increase in NADP(H) oxidase-2 (NOX2) expression. Contractile responses (KCl, norepinephrine, U-46619) were similar in the four groups of mice, and relaxations were not......, does not appear to involve oxidative stress....

  12. Experimental Model of Saccular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in Swines with Pericardium Sac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício de Amorim Aquino

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To consider modifications in an experimental model of saccular aortic aneurysm, aiming at better reproducibility, to be used in the development of vascular prostheses. Methods: Experimental study in two phases, developed in the Center of Experimental Surgery and Bioterium (CCEB of the University of Health Sciences of Alagoas (UNCISAL, with 11 hybrid swine, female, mean weight of 20 ± 5 kg, according to modifications in the Perini technique was performed. In the first phase, the aneurysm was confectioned with bovine pericardial patch. In the second phase, fifteen days later, the patency of the aneurysms was confirmed by Doppler ultrasonography. The described variables were aortic and aneurysm sac patency, incidence of rupture, morbidity and mortality. The statistical analysis program used was STATA v.8. Results: All animals survived to the procedures. Surgical mean time was 73 minutes. Aneurysm rupture, proximal or distal aortic thrombosis, visceral or legs ischemia weren't observed. Parietal thrombus formation was observed in all of the aneurysms, two of which (18%; IC 95% = 3.98 - 48.84 were occluded and nine (82%; IC 95% = 51.15 - 96.01 were patent. Conclusion: In this series, the modifications carried out in the technique related to the surgical approach, race, anesthesia, and imaging exams reproduced the experimental model, reducing its costs, without hindering the analysis of the variables. The satisfactory patency ratio allows the method to be used in experimental models for the development of vascular prostheses.

  13. Giant Thoracic Aneurysm Following Valve Replacement for Bicuspid Aortic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Cao; Ul Haq, Ehtesham; Nguyen, Ngoc; Omar, Bassam

    2015-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve is a common congenital anomaly associated with aortopathy, which can cause aortic root dilatation, necessitating regular screening if the aortic root is > 4.0 cm. Despite the low absolute incidence of aortic complications associated with bicuspid aortic valve in the general population, the consequences of such complications for an individual patient can be devastating. Herein we propose a balanced algorithm that incorporates recommendations from the three major guidelines for follow-up imaging of the aortic root and ascending thoracic aorta in patients with a bicuspid aortic valve, maintaining the current recommendations with regard to surgical thresholds. PMID:26827748

  14. A multicentre observational study of the outcomes of screening detected sub-aneurysmal aortic dilatation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wild, J B; Stather, P W; Biancari, F; Choke, E C; Earnshaw, J J; Grant, S W; Hafez, H; Holdsworth, R; Juvonen, T; Lindholt, Jes S.; McCollum, C; Parvin, S; Sayers, R D; Bown, M J

    2013-01-01

    dilatation (aortic diameter 30 mm or greater), progression to size threshold for surgical intervention (55 mm) and aneurysm rupture. RESULTS: Aortic measurements for 1696 men and women (median age 66 years at initial scan) with sub-aneurysmal aortae were obtained, median period of follow up was 4.0 years...... (range 0.1-19.0 years). Following Kaplan Meier and life table analysis 67.7% of patients with 5 complete years of surveillance reached an aortic diameter of 30 mm or greater however 0.9% had an aortic diameter of 54 mm. A total of 26.2% of patients with 10 complete years of follow up had an AAA of...

  15. Correção endovascular de aneurisma de aorta abdominal e artéria ilíaca comum esquerda em paciente com hemofilia C grave Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm and left common iliac artery in a patient with severe hemophilia C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Quilici Belczak

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A deficiência do fator XI, também conhecida como hemofilia C, é uma doença hematológica hereditária rara, que se manifesta clinicamente com hemorragia persistente após cirurgias, traumas, menorragias e extrações dentárias. Neste artigo, relatou-se a correção endovascular de um paciente com aneurisma de aorta e de artéria ilíaca comum esquerda em um paciente portador de deficiência major do fator XI (atividade do fator XI inferior a 20%. O procedimento foi realizado com sucesso, com o manuseio do distúrbio da coagulação por meio da infusão de plasma fresco no pré-operatório imediato e no pós-operatório, e controle laboratorial da coagulação do paciente.Factor XI deficiency, also known as hemophilia C, is a rare hereditary blood disease that manifests with persistent bleeding after surgery, trauma, menorrhagia, and dental extractions. This article reports an endovascular repair of a patient diagnosed with an aortic and left common iliac aneurysm, with severe factor XI deficiency (factor XI activity below 20%. The procedure was successfully performed with management of the coagulation disorder by preoperative and postoperative infusion of plasma and laboratory control of the coagulation.

  16. Hybrid Repair of Complex Thoracic Aortic Arch Pathology: Long-Term Outcomes of Extra-anatomic Bypass Grafting of the Supra-aortic Trunk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotfi, S., E-mail: shamim.lotfi@kcl.ac.uk; Clough, R. E.; Ali, T. [Guy' s and St. Thomas' NHS Trust, Vascular Surgery (United Kingdom); Salter, R. [Guy' s and St. Thomas' NHS Trust, Interventional Radiology (United Kingdom); Young, C. P. [Guy' s and St. Thomas' NHS Trust, Cardiac Surgery (United Kingdom); Bell, R.; Modarai, B.; Taylor, P., E-mail: peter.taylor@gstt.nhs.uk [Guy' s and St. Thomas' NHS Trust, Vascular Surgery (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-15

    Hybrid repair constitutes supra-aortic debranching before thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). It offers improved short-term outcome compared with open surgery; however, longer-term studies are required to assess patient outcomes and patency of the extra-anatomic bypass grafts. A prospectively maintained database of 380 elective and urgent patients who had undergone TEVAR (1997-2011) was analyzed retrospectively. Fifty-one patients (34 males; 17 females) underwent hybrid repair. Median age was 71 (range, 18-90) years with mean follow-up of 15 (range, 0-61) months. Perioperative complications included death: 10 % (5/51), stroke: 12 % (6/51), paraplegia: 6 % (3/51), endoleak: 16 % (8/51), rupture: 4 % (2/51), upper-limb ischemia: 2 % (1/51), bypass graft occlusion: 4 % (2/51), and cardiopulmonary complications in 14 % (7/51). Three patients (6 %) required emergency intervention for retrograde dissection: (2 aortic root repairs; 2 innominate stents). Early reintervention was performed for type 1 endoleak in two patients (2 proximal cuff extensions). One patient underwent innominate stenting and revision of their bypass for symptomatic restenosis. At 48 months, survival was 73 %. Endoleak was detected in three (6 %) patients (type 1 = 2; type 2 = 1) requiring debranching with proximal stent graft (n = 2) and proximal extension cuff (n = 1). One patient had a fatal rupture of a mycotic aneurysm and two arch aneurysms expanded. No bypass graft occluded after the perioperative period. Hybrid operations to treat aortic arch disease can be performed with results comparable to open surgery. The longer-term outcomes demonstrate low rates of reintervention and high rates of graft patency.

  17. Stent-graft implantation for clinically diagnosed syphilitic aortic aneurysm in an HIV-infected patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Shota; Imoto, Kiyotaka; Uchida, Keiji; Kawaguchi, Satoshi; Yokoi, Yoshihiko; Shigematsu, Hiroshi; Masuda, Munetaka

    2014-01-01

    We describe our experience with stent-graft placement in a patient with a clinically diagnosed syphilitic aortic aneurysm.The patient was a 43-year-old man with syphilitic and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection. Computed tomography (CT) revealed an aortic aneurysm with 89 mm in maximum size which was located at distal aortic arch and was considered syphilis derived saccular aneurysm. The aneurysm was judged at high risk of rupture from its shape. We decided to perform stent-graft implantation. Before surgery, the patient was given antibacterial and anti-HIV agents. Hand-made fenestrated stent graft by Tokyo Medical University was implanted. The graft was placed from the ascending aorta to Th 9 level in the descending aorta. The aneurysm completely disappeared during follow-up, with no flare-up of syphilitic infection up to 2 years after surgery.The number of patients with syphilis and human immunodeficiency virus co-infection is now increasing. Stent-graft implantation may be an effective treatment in such immunocompromised patients. PMID:23774613

  18. Surgical Treatment of a Voluminous Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Horseshoe Kidney: Tips and Tricks

    OpenAIRE

    De Caridi, Giovanni; Massara, Mafalda; Greco, Michele; Mastrojeni, Claudio; Serra, Raffaele; Salomone, Ignazio; La Spada, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Horseshoe kidney is a common urology anomaly, while its association with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm represents a very rare condition. Surgical approach remains controversial however, we believe that the left retroperitoneal approach should be preferred in order to avoid isthmus resection with any subsequent renal infarction, urinary tract damage and to facilitate renal arteries reimplantation, when required.

  19. Plasma levels of cathepsins L, K, and V and risks of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lv, Bing-Jie; Lindholt, Jes S; Wang, Jing;

    2013-01-01

    Cathepsin L (CatL), cathepsin K (CatK), and cathepsin V (CatV) are potent elastases implicated in human arterial wall remodeling. Whether plasma levels of these cathepsins are altered in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) remains unknown....

  20. Hemoglobin induces monocyte recruitment and CD163-macrophage polarization in abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubio-Navarro, Alfonso; Amaro Villalobos, Juan Manuel; Lindholt, Jes S;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increased hemoglobin (Hb) accumulation was reported in abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). CD163 is a macrophage receptor involved in tissue Hb clearance, however its role in AAA has not been reported. We investigated the role of Hb on monocyte recruitment and differentiation towards C...

  1. HLA-DR expression on monocytes and systemic inflammation in patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haveman, Jan Willem; van den Berg, Aad P.; Verhoeven, Eric L. G.; Nijsten, Maarten W. N.; van den Dungen, Jan J. A. M.; The, T. Hauw; Zwaveling, Jan Harm

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Mortality from ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (RAAA) remains high. Severe systemic inflammation, leading to multi-organ failure, often occurs in these patients. In this study we describe the level of HLA-DR expression in a consecutive group of patients following surgery for RAAA an

  2. Abdominal aortic aneurysm in a premature neonate with disseminated candidiasis: Ultrasound and angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoss, A.E.; Ponhold, W.; Pollak, A.; Schlemmer, M.; Weninger, M.

    1985-09-01

    When using ultrasound for detection of kidney enlargement, we found an acute abdominal aortic aneurysm secondary to aortitis arising from umbilical artery catheterisation in a premature neonate with systemic candidiasis. Aortography was performed to provide vascular details such as involvement of celiac, renal, iliac and femoral arteries.

  3. Low-dose aspirin and rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wemmelund, Holger; Jørgensen, Trine M M; Høgh, Annette;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The use of low-dose aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid [ASA]) has been suggested to attenuate growth of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), yet solid clinical evidence of this hypothesis is still missing. This study aimed to investigate whether preadmission ASA use influenced the risk of...

  4. Abdominal aortic aneurysm in a premature neonate with disseminated candidiasis: Ultrasound and angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When using ultrasound for detection of kidney enlargement, we found an acute abdominal aortic aneurysm secondary to aortitis arising from umbilical artery catheterisation in a premature neonate with systemic candidiasis. Aortography was performed to provide vascular details such as involvement of celiac, renal, iliac and femoral arteries. (orig.)

  5. Perioperative changes in coagulative and fibrinolytic function during surgical treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm and arteriosclerosis obliterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramoto, H; Shigematsu, H; Muto, T

    1994-12-01

    To determine the factors which influence perioperative coagulative and fibrinolytic function, we studied 41 patients who underwent surgical repair of unruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and 30 patients who underwent arterial reconstruction for arteriosclerosis obliterans (ASO). In patients with AAA, the levels of fibrin/fibrinogen degradation products (FDP) (11.4 +/- 20.1 micrograms/ml), thrombin-antithrombin III complex (TAT) (22.0 +/- 21.8 micrograms/l), plasmin-alpha 2 plasmin inhibitor complex (PIC) (2.6 +/- 2.9 micrograms/ml) and d-dimer of cross-linked fibrin degradation products (D-D) (8.4 +/- 10.8 micrograms/ml) were elevated, particularly when the AAAs had a large mural thrombus surface area or were accompanied by aneurysm of the iliac or femoral artery. In arterial aneurysms, blood coagulability and secondary fibrinolytic activity were believed to be enhanced. In patients with ASO, the level of TAT (17.2 +/- 24.8 micrograms/l) was so elevated that they were considered to show chronic hypercoagulability. Among the ASO patients with aorto-iliac lesions, those with concomitant graft occlusion or anastomotic aneurysm had significantly elevated levels of TAT. Proximal arterial occlusion or accompanying aneurysm in the ASO patients was associated with increased levels of PIC and D-D. Postoperative fluctuations in conventional hematological variables did not differ significantly among the surgical procedures. Conventional markers showed a transient decrease due to consumption during surgery, and a subsequent recovery or an actual increase within several days after surgery.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7737753

  6. Is the size of an abdominal aortic aneurysm associated with coagulopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindo, Shunya; Matsumoto, Harunobu; Kubota, Kenji; Kojima, Atsuo; Matsumoto, Masahiko; Satoh, Kaneo; Ozaki, Yukio

    2005-07-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) volume and intraluminal thrombi were analyzed with respect to the number and function of platelets, blood cells, and coagulation factors. A group of 43 patients who underwent repair of an AAA were enrolled in this study. The maximum diameter and volume of the AAA, and the volume of intraluminal thrombi and lumen were measured by computed tomography with planimetry. The platelet count and platelet function, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, fibrinogen, plasminogen, antithrombin 3, fibrin degradation products (FDP), D-dimer, and blood cell counts were measured. Spontaneous platelet aggregation and the FDP, and D-dimer levels were elevated; all other factors remained within the normal range. Intraluminal thrombus volume was strongly correlated with the volume and diameter of the AAA. However, no correlation was observed between the size of the AAA and coagulating factors, including the number and aggregation value of platelets. AAAs are frequently associated with a coagulating disorder. However, its size and thrombus volume are not correlated with coagulation changes. Although an intraluminal thrombus increases along with fee enlargement of the AAA, the clinical manifestation of bleeding is rarely associated with an AAA. Therefore coagulopathy in patients with an AAA is not fully explained by its morphology. PMID:15951938

  7. Update on Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Research: From Clinical to Genetic Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Kuivaniemi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is a dilatation of the abdominal aorta with a diameter of at least 3.0 cm. AAAs are often asymptomatic and are discovered as incidental findings in imaging studies or when the AAA ruptures leading to a medical emergency. AAAs are more common in males than females, in individuals of European ancestry, and in those over 65 years of age. Smoking is the most important environmental risk factor. In addition, a positive family history of AAA increases the person’s risk for AAA. Interestingly, diabetes has been shown to be a protective factor for AAA in many large studies. Hallmarks of AAA pathogenesis include inflammation, vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis, extracellular matrix degradation, and oxidative stress. Autoimmunity may also play a role in AAA development and progression. In this Outlook paper, we summarize our recent studies on AAA including clinical studies related to surgical repair of AAA and genetic risk factor and large-scale gene expression studies. We conclude with a discussion on our research projects using large data sets available through electronic medical records and biobanks.

  8. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: Is Imaging Surveillance Robust, and Does It Influence Long-term Mortality?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waduud, Mohammed Abdul, E-mail: m.a.waduud@doctors.org.uk [Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Department of Surgery (United Kingdom); Choong, Wen Ling, E-mail: wenlingchoong@nhs.net [Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, NHS Grampian, Department of Surgery (United Kingdom); Ritchie, Moira, E-mail: moirasim9@gmail.com; Williams, Claire, E-mail: c.williams.3@research.gla.ac.uk [University of Glasgow, Institute of Health and Wellbeing Glasgow (United Kingdom); Yadavali, Reddi, E-mail: reddi.yadavali@nhs.net [Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, NHS Grampian, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Lim, Shueh, E-mail: s.lim.06@aberdeen.ac.uk [Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, NHS Lothian, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Buchanan, Fraser, E-mail: f.buchanan.11@aberdeen.ac.uk [University of Aberdeen, The School of Medicine and Dentistry (United Kingdom); Bhat, Raj, E-mail: raj.bhat@nhs.net [Ninewells Hospital, NHS Tayside, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Ramanathan, Krishnappan, E-mail: k.ramanathan@dundee.ac.uk [University of Dundee, School of Medicine (United Kingdom); Ingram, Susan, E-mail: susan.ingram@luht.scot.nhs.uk; Cormack, Laura, E-mail: lgcormack@googlemail.com [Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, NHS Lothian, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Moss, Jonathan G., E-mail: jon.moss@ggc.scot.nhs.uk [Gartnavel General Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-15

    PurposeEndovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is the dominant treatment strategy for abdominal aortic aneurysms. However, as a result of uncertainty regarding long-term durability, an ongoing imaging surveillance program is required. The aim of the study was to assess EVAR surveillance in Scotland and its effect on all-cause and aneurysm-related mortality.MethodsA retrospective analysis of all EVAR procedures carried out in the four main Scottish vascular units. The primary outcome measure was the implementation of post-EVAR imaging surveillance across Scotland. Patients were identified locally and then categorized as having complete, incomplete, or no surveillance. Secondary outcome measures were all-cause mortality and aneurysm-related mortality. Cause of death was obtained from death certificates.ResultsData were available for 569 patients from the years 2001 to 2012. All centers had data for a minimum of 5 contiguous years. Surveillance ranged from 1.66 to 4.55 years (median 3.03 years). Overall, 53 % had complete imaging surveillance, 43 % incomplete, and 4 % none. For the whole cohort, all-cause 5-year mortality was 33.5 % (95 % confidence interval 28.0–38.6) and aneurysm-related mortality was 4.5 % (.8–7.3). All-cause mortality in patients with complete, incomplete, and no imaging was 49.9 % (39.2–58.6), 19.1 % (12.6–25.2), and 47.2 % (17.7–66.2), respectively. Aneurysm-related mortality was 3.7 % (1.8–7.4), 4.4 % (2.2–8.9), and 9.5 % (2.5–33.0), respectively. All-cause mortality was significantly higher in patients with complete compared to incomplete imaging surveillance (p < 0.001). No significant differences were observed in aneurysm-related mortality (p = 0.2).ConclusionOnly half of EVAR patients underwent complete long-term imaging surveillance. However, incomplete imaging could not be linked to any increase in mortality. Further work is required to establish the role and deliverability of EVAR imaging surveillance.

  9. Endovascular Repair of Aortic Disease: A Venture Capital Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Buchanan, Lucas W.; Stavropoulos, S. William; Resnick, Joshua B.; Solomon, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Endovascular devices for the treatment of abdominal and thoracic aortic disease are poised to become the next $1 billion medical device market. A shift from open repair to endovascular repair, advances in technology, screening initiatives, and new indications are driving this growth. Although billion-dollar medical device markets are rare, this field is fraught with risk and uncertainty for startups and their venture capital investors. Technological hurdles, daunting clinical and regulatory t...

  10. Precision medical and surgical management for thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections based on the causative mutant gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewicz, Dianna; Hostetler, Ellen; Wallace, Stephanie; Mellor-Crummey, Lauren; Gong, Limin; Pannu, Hariyadarshi; Guo, Dong-chuan; Regalado, Ellen

    2016-04-01

    Almost one-quarter of patients presenting with thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) or acute aortic dissections (TAADs) have an underlying mutation in a specific gene. A subset of these patients will have systemic syndromic features, for example, skeletal features in patients with Marfan Syndrome. It is important to note that the majority of patients with thoracic aortic disease will not have these syndromic features but many will have a family history of the disease. The genes predisposing to these thoracic aortic diseases are inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, and thirteen genes have been identified to date. As the clinical phenotype associated with each specific gene is defined, the data indicate that the underlying gene dictates associated syndromic features. More importantly, the underlying gene also dictates the aortic disease presentation, the risk for dissection at a given range of aortic diameters, the risk for additional vascular diseases and what specific vascular diseases occur associated with the gene. These results lead to the recommendation that the medical and surgical management of these patients be dictated by the underlying gene, and for patients with mutations in ACTA2, the specific mutation in the gene. PMID:26837258

  11. Endovascular repair of aortic disease: a venture capital perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Lucas W; Stavropoulos, S William; Resnick, Joshua B; Solomon, Jeffrey

    2009-03-01

    Endovascular devices for the treatment of abdominal and thoracic aortic disease are poised to become the next $1 billion medical device market. A shift from open repair to endovascular repair, advances in technology, screening initiatives, and new indications are driving this growth. Although billion-dollar medical device markets are rare, this field is fraught with risk and uncertainty for startups and their venture capital investors. Technological hurdles, daunting clinical and regulatory timelines, market adoption issues, and entrenched competitors pose significant barriers to successful new venture creation. In fact, the number of aortic endografts that have failed to reach commercialization or have been pulled from the market exceeds the number of Food and Drug Administration-approved endografts in the United States. This article will shed some light on the venture capital mind-set and decision-making paradigm in the context of aortic disease. PMID:21326532

  12. The murine angiotensin II-induced abdominal aortic aneurysm model: rupture risk and inflammatory progression patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Y Cao

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is an enlargement of the greatest artery in the body defined as an increase in diameter of 1.5-fold. AAAs are common in the elderly population and thousands die each year from their complications. The most commonly used mouse model to study the pathogenesis of AAA is the angiotensin II (Ang II infusion method delivered via osmotic mini-pump for 28 days. Here, we studied the site-specificity and onset of aortic rupture, characterized three-dimensional (3D images and flow patterns in developing AAAs by ultrasound imaging, and examined macrophage infiltration in the Ang II model using 65 apolipoprotein E deficient mice. Aortic rupture occurred in 16 mice (25 % and was nearly as prevalent at the aortic arch (44 % as it was in the suprarenal region (56 % and was most common within the first seven days after Ang II infusion (12 of 16; 75 %. Longitudinal ultrasound screening was found to correlate nicely with histological analysis and AAA volume renderings showed a significant relationship with AAA severity index. Aortic dissection preceded altered flow patterns and macrophage infiltration was a prominent characteristic of developing AAAs. Targeting the inflammatory component of AAA disease with novel therapeutics will hopefully lead to new strategies to attenuate aneurysm growth and aortic rupture.

  13. Recurrent Rare Genomic Copy Number Variants and Bicuspid Aortic Valve Are Enriched in Early Onset Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Siddharth; Kuang, Shao-Qing; Regalado, Ellen; Guo, Dongchuan; Milewicz, Dianna

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections (TAAD) are a major cause of death in the United States. The spectrum of TAAD ranges from genetic disorders, such as Marfan syndrome, to sporadic isolated disease of unknown cause. We hypothesized that genomic copy number variants (CNVs) contribute causally to early onset TAAD (ETAAD). We conducted a genome-wide SNP array analysis of ETAAD patients of European descent who were enrolled in the National Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions (GenTAC). Genotyping was performed on the Illumina Omni-Express platform, using PennCNV, Nexus and CNVPartition for CNV detection. ETAAD patients (n = 108, 100% European American, 28% female, average age 20 years, 55% with bicuspid aortic valves) were compared to 7013 dbGAP controls without a history of vascular disease using downsampled Omni 2.5 data. For comparison, 805 sporadic TAAD patients with late onset aortic disease (STAAD cohort) and 192 affected probands from families with at least two affected relatives (FTAAD cohort) from our institution were screened for additional CNVs at these loci with SNP arrays. We identified 47 recurrent CNV regions in the ETAAD, FTAAD and STAAD groups that were absent or extremely rare in controls. Nine rare CNVs that were either very large (>1 Mb) or shared by ETAAD and STAAD or FTAAD patients were also identified. Four rare CNVs involved genes that cause arterial aneurysms when mutated. The largest and most prevalent of the recurrent CNVs were at Xq28 (two duplications and two deletions) and 17q25.1 (three duplications). The percentage of individuals harboring rare CNVs was significantly greater in the ETAAD cohort (32%) than in the FTAAD (23%) or STAAD (17%) cohorts. We identified multiple loci affected by rare CNVs in one-third of ETAAD patients, confirming the genetic heterogeneity of TAAD. Alterations of candidate genes at these loci may contribute to the pathogenesis of TAAD. PMID:27092555

  14. Aneurysm of the left aortic sinus causing acute myocardial infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Jan-Peter Smedema; Vernon Freeman; Johan Brink

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the findings and management of a young male who presented with an acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction due to compression of the circumflex coronary artery by a large aneurysm of left sinus of Valsalva.

  15. Aneurysm of the left aortic sinus causing acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the findings and management of a young male who presented with an acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction due to compression of the circumflex coronary artery by a large aneurysm of left sinus of Valsalva

  16. In vivo characterization of a new abdominal aortic aneurysm mouse model with conventional and molecular MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klink, Ahmed; Heynens, Joeri; Herranz, Beatriz; Lobatto, Mark E.; Arias, Teresa; Sanders, Honorius M. H. F.; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Merkx, Maarten; Nicolay, Klaas; Fuster, Valentin; Tedgui, Alain; Mallat, Ziad; Mulder, Willem J.M.; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To use non-invasive conventional and molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect and characterize abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) in vivo. Background Collagen is an essential constituent of aneurysms. Non-invasive MRI of collagen may represent an opportunity to help detect and better characterize AAA and initiate intervention. Methods We used an AAA C57BL/6 mouse model where a combination of angiotensin-II infusion and TGF-β neutralization results in AAA formation with incidence of aortic rupture. High-resolution multi-sequence MRI was performed to characterize the temporal progression of AAA. To allow molecular MRI of collagen, paramagnetic/fluorescent micellar nanoparticles functionalized with a collagen-binding protein (CNA-35) were intravenously administered. In vivo imaging results were corroborated with immunohistochemistry and confocal fluorescence microscopy. Results High-resolution multi-sequence MRI allowed the visualization of the primary fibrotic response in the aortic wall. As the aneurysm progressed, the formation of a secondary channel or dissection was detected. Further analysis revealed a dramatic increase of the aortic diameter. Injection of CNA-35 micelles resulted in a significant higher MR signal enhancement in the aneurysmal wall compared to non-specific micelles. Histological studies demonstrated the presence of collagen in regions of MR signal enhancement and confocal microscopy proved the precise colocalization of CNA-35 micelles with collagen-I. In addition, in a proof of concept experiment, we have shown the potential of CNA-35 micelles to discriminate between stable AAA lesions and aneurysms that were likely to rapidly progress/rupture. Conclusion Multi-sequence MRI allowed longitudinal monitoring of AAA progression while the presence of collagen was visualized by nanoparticle-enhanced MRI. PMID:22133853

  17. Acute Contained Ruptured Aortic Aneurysm Presenting as Left Vocal Fold Immobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon H. Gnagi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To recognize intrathoracic abnormalities, including expansion or rupture of aortic aneurysms, as a source of acute onset vocal fold immobility. Methods. A case report and review of the literature. Results. An 85-year-old female with prior history of an aortic aneurysm presented to a tertiary care facility with sudden onset hoarseness. On laryngoscopy, the left vocal fold was immobile in the paramedian position. A CT scan obtained that day revealed a new, large hematoma surrounding the upper descending aortic stent graft consistent with an acute contained ruptured aortic aneurysm. She was referred to the emergency department for evaluation and treatment by vascular surgery. She was counseled regarding surgical options and ultimately decided not to pursue further treatment. Her vocal fold immobility was subsequently treated via office-based injection medialization two weeks after presentation and again 5 months after the initial injection which dramatically improved her voice. Follow-up CT scan at 8 months demonstrated a reduction of the hematoma. The left vocal cord remains immobile to date. Conclusion. Ortner’s syndrome, or cardiovocal syndrome, is hoarseness secondary to left recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy caused by cardiovascular pathology. It is a rare condition and, while typically presenting gradually, may also present with acute symptomatology.

  18. Traumatic Pseudo-Aneurysm and Concurrent Dissection of the Aortic Arch Treated with Endovascular Stenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ghanaati

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The pseudo-aneurysms of thoracic aorta are rare and a life-threatening complication of aortic"nsurgery and blunt chest trauma. This article demonstrates a case report of a traumatic aortic"narch dissection and formation of a false aneurysm after blunt chest trauma in Iran. A 23-year-old"nman was referred complaining of chest pain and exertional cough. He had a history of chest and"nabdominal trauma five months ago after a car accident, resulting in acceleration-deceleration"ninjury. The trauma resulted in an extensive injury on the left side of the chest and abdomen"nassociated with multiple rib fractures, hemopneumothorax and splenic rupture. Splenectomy"nand left chest tube drainage was performed. The patient was admitted for 15 days. Finally, he"nrecovered to normal and was discharged in satisfactory condition. However, his chest pain and"ncough restarted and its severity gradually increased. In chest x-ray, a left upper mediastinal mass"nwas detected, which was later confirmed by 64 multi-slice chest CT scan as a false aortic arch"naneurysm and aortic dissection. It seems endovascular stent-graft technique for the treatment of"nthoracic aorta aneurysm may present a good treatment choice with a low risk and less invasive"napproach.

  19. Case report: ruptured aortic aneurysm into oesophagus - treatment by covered stent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A case report of a 70 year old man acutely presenting with a large descending thoracic aortic aneurysm, ruptured into the adjacent oesophagus. He was treated with an Aneurex covered stent (Medtronics). This patient has a long history of ischaemic heart disease, hypertension and previously treated abdominal aortic aneurysm. After diagnosis by CT, the bleeding was emergency temponaded by insertion of a Sengstaken-Blackmore tube into the oesophagus and inflated to arterial pressure. After stabilisation in ICU, it was decided that open surgery would probably prove fatal, and insertion of a covered thoracic aortic stent was performed in theatre with a femoral artery cut-down. Post-operatively the bleeding from the aortic aneurysm ceased. However, the patient has ongoing problems with large, open oesophageal ulcer with chronic ooze requiring intermittent transfusions, chronic infection with MRSA, requiring long term antibiotics, feeding via feeding gastrostomy tubes. The patient is stable 12 months after presentation. Treatment of this otherwise fatal problem by covered stent has permitted survival benefit. However, there are significant, unresolved issues of oesophageal ulcer and ongoing MRSA infection. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  20. Comparison of ejection fraction and Goldman risk factor analysis to dipyridamole-thallium 201 studies in the evaluation of cardiac morbidity after aortic aneurysm surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Associated coronary artery disease is the critical factor that influences early and late mortality after abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery. Dipyridamole-thallium 201 scintigraphy, left ventricular ejection fraction, and Goldman risk factor analysis have been suggested as preoperative noninvasive screening methods to detect significant coronary artery disease. In this series of 95 elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repairs dipyridamole-thallium 201 scintigraphy was highly predictive of the absence of perioperative cardiac morbidity (96% specificity, 44/46 normal scans, no cardiac morbidity), whereas ejection fraction (73% specificity, 31/42 normal ejection fraction, no cardiac morbidity) and Goldman risk factor analysis (84% specificity, 44/51 class I, no cardiac morbidity) were less. Furthermore, thallium redistribution on dipyridamole-thallium 201 scintigraphy leading to coronary angiography identified a significant number of patients with occult coronary artery disease who required preoperative coronary revascularization (8%, 8/95) and might have remained undetected on the basis of left ventricular ejection fraction or Goldman risk factor analysis. Finally, fixed thallium deficit, which some investigators have interpreted as a low probability finding for cardiac morbidity, was associated with a higher than expected incidence of cardiac complications. Forty-six percent (7/15) of all postoperative cardiac complications (three myocardial infarctions, three ischemic events, one death) occurred in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms with fixed deficits. This suggests that patients with fixed deficits on dipyridamole-thallium 201 scintigraphy should be considered for later delayed (4 hours) thallium images or coronary angiography or both