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Sample records for aortic aneurysm repair

  1. Trans-aortic repair of a sinus of valsalva aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Emmanouil I; Ieromonachos, Constantinos; Stavridis, George; Antoniou, Theofani A; Athanassopoulos, George; Cokkinos, Dennis V; Alivizatos, Peter A

    2007-01-01

    Sinus of Valsalva aneurysms are rare and vary in their presentation and approach of surgical repair. We report on a case of isolated right sinus of Valsalva aneurysm that underwent successful excision and patch repair with individual sutures placed through the annulus of the aortic valve.

  2. Open Versus Endovascular Stent Graft Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Firwana, Belal; Ferwana, Mazen; Hasan, Rim

    2014-01-01

    We performed an analysis to assess the need for conducting additional randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing open and endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Trial sequential analysis (TSA) is a statistical methodology that can calculate the required inform...

  3. Aneurysm growth after late conversion of thoracic endovascular aortic repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirofumi Kasahara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 69-year-old man underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair of a descending aortic aneurysm. Three years later, he developed impending rupture due to aneurysmal expansion that included the proximal landing zone. Urgent open surgery was performed via lateral thoracotomy, and a Dacron graft was sewn to the previous stent graft distally with Teflon felt reinforcement. Postoperatively, four sequential computed tomography scans demonstrated that the aneurysm was additionally increasing in size probably due to continuous hematoma production, suggesting a possibility of endoleaks. This case demonstrates the importance of careful radiologic surveillance after endovascular repair, and also after partial open conversion.

  4. Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

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    Paravastu, Sharath Chandra Vikram; Jayarajasingam, Rubaraj; Cottam, Rachel; Palfreyman, Simon J; Michaels, Jonathan A; Thomas, Steven M

    2014-01-23

    An abnormal dilatation of the abdominal aorta is referred to as an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Due to the risk of rupture, surgical repair is offered electively to individuals with aneurysms greater than 5.5 cm in size. Traditionally, conventional open surgical repair (OSR) was considered the first choice approach. However, over the past two decades endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has gained popularity as a treatment option. This article intends to review the role of EVAR in the management of elective AAA. To assess the effectiveness of EVAR versus conventional OSR in individuals with AAA considered fit for surgery, and EVAR versus best medical care in those considered unfit for surgery. This was determined by the effect on short, intermediate and long-term mortality, endograft related complications, re-intervention rates and major complications. The Cochrane Peripheral Vascular Diseases Group Trials Search Co-ordinator (TSC) searched the Specialised Register (January 2013) and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2012, Issue 12). The TSC also searched trial databases for details of ongoing or unpublished studies. Prospective randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing EVAR with OSR in individuals with AAA considered fit for surgery. and comparing EVAR with best medical care in individuals considered unfit for surgery. We excluded studies with inadequate data or using an inadequate randomisation technique. Three reviewers independently evaluated trials for appropriateness for inclusion and extracted data using pro forma designed by the Cochrane PVD Group. We assessed the quality of trials using The Cochrane Collaboration's 'Risk of bias' tool. We entered collected data in to Review Manager (version 5.2.3) for analysis. Where direct comparisons could be made, we determined odds ratios (OR). We tested studies for heterogeneity and, when present, we used a random-effects model; otherwise we used a fixed-effect model. We tabulated

  5. Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair in patients with marfan syndrome.

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    Mommertz, G; Sigala, F; Langer, S; Koeppel, T A; Mess, W H; Schurink, G W H; Jacobs, M J

    2008-02-01

    We assessed the surgical outcome of descending thoracic aortic aneurysm repair (DTAA) and thoracoabdominal aortic aneurym (TAAA) repair in patients with Marfan syndrome. During a six year period, 206 patients underwent DTAA and TAAA repair. In 22 patients, Marfan syndrome was confirmed. The median age was 40 years with a range between 18 and 57 years. The extend of the aneurysms included 6 DTAA (1 with total arch, 2 with distal hemi-arch), 11 type II TAAA (2 with total arch, 3 with distal hemi-arch), 4 type III and one type IV TAAA. All patients suffered from previous type A (n=6) or type B (n=16) aortic dissection and 15 already underwent aortic procedures like Bentall (n=7) and ascending aortic replacement (n=8). All patients were operated on according to the standard protocol with cerebrospinal fluid drainage, distal aortic and selective organ perfusion and monitoring motor evoked potentials. In patients undergoing simultaneous arch replacement (via left thoracotomy), transcranial Doppler and EEG assessed cerebral physiology during antegrade brain perfusion. In four patients circulatory arrest under moderate hypothermia was required. In-hospital mortality did not occur. Major postoperative complications like paraplegia, renal failure, stroke and myocardial infarction were not encountered. Mean pre-operative creatinine level was 125mmol/L, which peaked to a mean maximal level of 130 and returned to 92mmol/L at discharge. Median intubation time was 1.5 days (range 0.33-30 days). Other complications included bleeding requiring surgical intervention (n=1), arrhythmia (n=2), pneumonia (n=2) and respiratory distress syndrome (n=1). At a median follow-up of 38 months all patients were alive. Using CT surveillance, new or false aneurysms were not detected, except in one patient who developed a visceral patch aneurysm six years after open type II repair. Surgical repair of descending and thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms provides excellent short- and mid-term results in

  6. Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Single Center Experience in 122 Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yun Young; Song, Jang Hyeon; Kim, Yong Tae; Yim, Nam Yeol; Kim, Jae Kyu; Lee, Ho Kyun; Choi, Soo Jin Na; Chung, Sang Young; Kim, Soo Hyun; Chang, Nam Kyu

    2013-01-01

    To analyze a single center experience of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysms. Results of 122 patients who underwent EVAR were analyzed, retrospectively. Sex, age, aneurysmal morphology, hostile neck anatomy, preprocedural and postprocedural sac-diameter, technical and clinical success, postprocedural complication and need of additional procedure were analyzed. A total of 111 male and 11 female patients were included. Morphology of the aneurysms was as follows: fusiform (n = 108), saccular (n = 3) and ruptured type (n = 11). Sixty-four patients had hostile neck anatomy. The preprocedural mean sac-diameter was 52.4 mm. Postprocedural sac-diameter was decreased or stable in 110 patients (90.2%) and increased in 8 patients (6.6%). Technical success rate was 100% and clinical success rate was 86.1%. Fifty-one patients showed endoleak (41.8%) and 15 patients (12.3%) underwent secondary intervention due to type I endoleak (n = 4), type II endoleak (n = 4) and stent-graft thrombosis (n = 7). EVAR is a safe and effective therapy for abdominal aortic aneurysm, and it has high technical success and clinical success rate, and low complication rate.

  7. The impact of endovascular repair on specialties performing abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.H.J. Ultee (Klaas); R. Hurks (Rob); D.B. Buck (Dominique B.); G.S. Dasilva (George S.); P.A. Soden (Peter A.); J.A. van Herwaarden (Joost); H.J.M. Verhagen (Hence); M.L. Schermerhorn (Marc)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair has been performed by various surgical specialties for many years. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) may be a disruptive technology, having an impact on which specialties care for patients with AAA. Therefore, we examined the proportion

  8. The impact of endovascular repair on specialties performing abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ultee, Klaas H J; Hurks, Rob; Buck, Dominique B.; Dasilva, George S.; Soden, Peter A.; Van Herwaarden, Joost A.; Verhagen, Hence J M; Schermerhorn, Marc L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair has been performed by various surgical specialties for many years. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) may be a disruptive technology, having an impact on which specialties care for patients with AAA. Therefore, we examined the proportion of AAA

  9. Combined Repair of Ascending Aortic Pseudoaneurysm and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Patient with Marfan Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kokotsakis, John N.; Lioulias, Achilleas G.; Foroulis, Christophoros N.; Skouteli, Eleni Anna T.; Milonakis, Michael K.; Bastounis, Elias A.; Boulafendis, Dimitrios G.

    2003-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysms of the ascending aorta after the original inclusion/wrap technique of the Bentall procedure present a difficult surgical management problem and are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Patients with Marfan syndrome frequently develop aneurysms and dissections that involve multiple aortic segments. We present the case of a Marfan patient who successfully underwent repair of a giant ascending aortic pseudoaneurysm and concomitant repair of an abdominal aortic ane...

  10. Combined Repair of Ascending Aortic Pseudoaneurysm and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Patient with Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokotsakis, John N.; Lioulias, Achilleas G.; Foroulis, Christophoros N.; Skouteli, Eleni Anna T.; Milonakis, Michael K.; Bastounis, Elias A.; Boulafendis, Dimitrios G.

    2003-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysms of the ascending aorta after the original inclusion/wrap technique of the Bentall procedure present a difficult surgical management problem and are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Patients with Marfan syndrome frequently develop aneurysms and dissections that involve multiple aortic segments. We present the case of a Marfan patient who successfully underwent repair of a giant ascending aortic pseudoaneurysm and concomitant repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. An aggressive surgical strategy followed by life-long cardiovascular monitoring is warranted in order to prolong the survival of these patients. (Tex Heart Inst J 2003;30:233–5) PMID:12959210

  11. Jaundice as a Rare Indication for Aortic Aneurysm Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieß, Henrik C; Tsilimparis, Nikolaos; Behrendt, Christian A; Wipper, Sabine; Debus, Eike S; Larena-Avellaneda, Axel

    2015-10-01

    Compression of adjacent anatomic structures by an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) can result in a variety of symptoms. We describe the case of an 88-year-old Caucasian woman with jaundice, elevated laboratory parameters for extrahepatic and intrahepatic cholestasis, and concomitant juxtarenal AAA compressing the liver hilum. Following exclusion of other common causes for cholestasis, the patient was considered to have a symptomatic AAA. Open abdominal aortic surgery revealed a contained rupture and was repaired. Obstructive jaundice secondary to a compromising AAA is a rare condition and to the best of our knowledge has not been reported to date. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair of Acute Occlusion of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Intra-Aneurysmal Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terai, Yasuhiko; Mitsuoka, Hiroshi; Nakai, Masanao; Goto, Shinnosuke; Miyano, Yuta; Tsuchiya, Hirokazu; Yamazaki, Fumio

    2015-11-01

    To report a rare case of acute abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occlusion successfully treated by endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). An 89-year-old man complained of severe back pain and weakness in the bilateral lower extremities. Although there were neither acute ischemic signs on the brain computed tomography (CT) nor critical leg ischemia, the patient presented progressing weakness in the bilateral lower extremities and decreased sensation in the perianal and saddle area. Contrast-enhanced CT demonstrated an infrarenal AAA, the formation of an ulcer-like lesion in the aneurysmal wall, and the complete occlusion of distal AAA because of the caudal extension of intramural hematoma. Both common iliac arteries were patent because of the development of collateral vessels. The neurologic symptoms were considered to be caused by the occlusion of lumbar radicular arteries. EVAR seemed anatomically feasible, if the occlusion could be crossed by guidewires from both side of the common femoral artery. Wires easily traversed the occlusion, and the stent graft could be smoothly unwrapped and opened. The patient could recover decent iliac arterial flow. The neurovascular deficits recovered within 4 days after the procedure. Although our experience may not be reproduced in all case of AAA occlusion, EVAR warrants consideration to reduce the high mortality rate associated with the classical treatments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Nursing cooperation in endovascular aneurysm repair treatment for aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Li; Yuan Chanjuan; Chen Rumei; Xiao Zhanqiang; Qi Youfei

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the main points of nursing cooperation in endovascular aneurysm repair treatment for aortic dissection. Methods: Preoperative psychological care and the other preparations were carefully conducted. During the operation, the patient's body was correctly placed. Active cooperation with the performance of angiography and close observation during heparinization were carried out. The proper delivery of catheter and stent to the operator was carefully done. Close observation for the patient's vital signs, the renal function and the changes of limb blood supply were made. Results: Under close cooperation of' the operators, nurses, anesthesiologists and technicians, the surgery was successfully accomplished in 35 patients. The monitoring of vital signs during the entire performance of operation was well executed. No surgical instruments delivery error's or surgery failure due to unsuitable cooperation occurred. Conclusion: Perfect preoperative preparation, strict nursing cooperation and team cooperation are the key points to ensure a successful endovascular aneurysm repair for aortic dissection. (authors)

  14. Perioperative management of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haofu; Wang Yuwei; Li Jun; Zhao Zonggang; Qi Sen

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the clinical experience of perioperative management in performing endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). Methods: EVAR was performed in 22 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm. The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. Before treatment the functions of main organs were evaluated and certain measures were adopted in order to protect them. Useful parameters, including the length, diameter, angle and configuration of the proximal and distal aneurysmal neck, the relationship of the aneurysm to aortic branches, the distance from the lowest renal artery to the bifurcation of abdominal aorta, and the quality of access vessels (such as diameter, tortuosity and calcification degree) were determined and assessed with CTA. According to the parameters thus obtained, the suitable stent-graft with ideal diameter and length was selected, and the optimal surgery pattern was employed. Local anesthesia was employed in 20 patients, among them the local anesthesia had to be changed to general anesthesia in one. Epidural anesthesia was carried out in one patient through the surgically-reconstructed iliac artery access,and general anesthesia was employed in one patient who had Stanford type A aortic dissection. The lowest renal artery must be accurately localized before deployment of stent-graft was started. At least one patent internal iliac artery should be reserved when bilateral internal iliac arteries needed to be covered, to be covered by stages or to be reconstructed. After stent-graft placement, angiography must be performed to find out if there was any endoleak and, if any, to determine the type of endoleak and to deal with it properly. Two cases had proximal type I endoleak, so balloon dilation was employed in one and cuff implantation in another one. Distal type I endoleak occurred in one case, but, unfortunately, the iliac artery ruptured when balloon dilation was employed, therefore the patient had to receive vascular repair

  15. Causes and Implications of Readmission after Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenblatt, David Yu; Greenberg, Caprice C.; Kind, Amy J.H.; Havlena, Jeffrey A.; Mell, Matthew W.; Nelson, Matthew T.; Smith, Maureen A.; Kent, K. Craig

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the frequency, causes, predictors, and consequences of 30-day readmission after abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. Summary Background Data CMS will soon reduce total Medicare reimbursements for hospitals with higher-than-predicted 30-day readmission rates after vascular surgical procedures including AAA repair. However, causes and factors leading to readmission in this population have never before been systematically analyzed. Methods We analyzed elective AAA repairs over a two-year period from the CMS Chronic Conditions Warehouse, a 5% national sample of Medicare beneficiaries. Results 2481 patients underwent AAA repair – 1502 endovascular (EVAR) and 979 open. 30-day readmission rates were equivalent for EVAR (13.3%) and open repair (12.8%). While wound complication was the most common reason for readmission after both procedures, the relative frequency of other causes differed – e.g., bowel obstruction was common following open repair and graft complication after EVAR. In multivariate analyses, preoperative comorbidities had a modest effect on readmission; however, postoperative factors including serious complications leading to prolonged length of stay and discharge destination other than home had a profound influence on the probability of readmission. The one-year mortality in readmitted patients was 23.4% versus 4.5% in those not readmitted (preadmission is common after AAA repair. Adjusting for comorbidities, postoperative events predict readmission, suggesting that proactively preventing, detecting, and managing postoperative complications may provide an approach to decreasing readmissions, with the potential to reduce cost and possibly enhance long-term survival. PMID:22964736

  16. Preoperative Evaluation and Endovascular Procedure of Intraoperative Aneurysm Rupture During Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

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    Zha, Bin-Shan, E-mail: binszha2013@163.com; Zhu, Hua-Gang, E-mail: huagzhu@yeah.net; Ye, Yu-Sheng, E-mail: yeyusheng@aliyun.com; Li, Yong-Sheng, E-mail: 872868848@qq.com; Zhang, Zhi-Gong, E-mail: zzgedward@sina.com; Xie, Wen-Tao, E-mail: 345344347@qq.com [The First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Department of Vascular Surgery (China)

    2017-03-15

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms are now routinely repaired with endovascular repair if anatomically feasible because of advantages in safety and recovery. However, intraoperative aneurysm rupture is a severe complication which may have an adverse effect on the outcome of treatment. Comprehensive preoperative assessment and considerate treatment are keys to success of endovascular aneurysm repair, especially during unexpected circumstances. Few cases have reported on intraoperative aortic rupture, which were successfully managed by endovascular treatment. Here, we present a rare case of an intraoperative aneurysm rupture during endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysm with narrow neck and angulated aorta arch (coarctation-associated aneurysm), which was successfully treated using double access route approach and iliac limbs of infrarenal devices.Level of EvidenceLevel 5.

  17. Ex vivo repair of renal artery aneurysm associated with surgical treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Dušan M.

    2004-01-01

    shorter arteries was implanted into the long artery, and another one into PTFE graft. After 30 minutes of explanation, autotransplantation of the kidney into the right iliac fossa was performed. The right renal vein was implanted into the inferior vein cava, and PTFE graft into the right limb of Dacron graft. Immediately following the completion of both anastomoses, large volume of urine was evident. Finally, ureteneocystostomy was performed with previous insertion of double "J" catheter. In the immediate postoperative period, renal function was restored to normal, while postoperative angiography revealed all patent grafts. DISCUSSION The most common causes of renal artery aneurysms are arteriosclerosis, as in our case, and fibro-muscular dysplasia. Very often, renal artery aneurysms are asymptomatic and discovered only during angiography in patients with aneurysmal and occlusive aortic disease. Other cases include: arterial hypertension, groin pain and acute or chronic renal failure. Due to relatively small number of evaluated cases, the risk of aneurysmal rupture is not known. According to some authors, the overall rupture rate of renal artery aneurysm is 5%, however, the rupture risk becomes higher in young pregnant woman. Several standard surgical procedures are available for the repair of renal artery aneurysms. These include saphenous vein angioplasty, bypass grafting, as well as ex vivo reconstruction with reimplantation or autotransplantation. Furthermore, interventional embolization therapy, as well as endovascular treatment with ePTFE covered stent, or autologous vein-coverage stent graft, have been also reported to be successful. CONCLUSION The major indications for surgical treatment of renal artery aneurysms are to eliminate the source of thromboembolism which leads to fixed renal hypertension and kidney failure, as well as prevention of aneurysmal rupture.

  18. Extra-anatomic endovascular repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm with a horseshoe kidney supplied by the aneurysmal aorta.

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    Rey, Jorge; Golpanian, Samuel; Yang, Jane K; Moreno, Enrique; Velazquez, Omaida C; Goldstein, Lee J; Chahwala, Veer

    2015-07-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm complicated by a horseshoe kidney (HSK, fused kidney) represents a unique challenge for repair. Renal arteries arising from the aneurysmal aorta can further complicate intervention. Reports exist describing the repair of these complex anatomies using fenestrated endografts, hybrid open repairs (debranching), and open aneurysmorrhaphy with preservation of renal circulation. We describe an extra-anatomic, fully endovascular repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm with a HSK partially supplied by a renal artery arising from the aneurysm. We successfully applied aortouni-iliac endografting, femorofemoral bypass, and retrograde renal artery perfusion via the contralateral femoral artery to exclude the abdominal aortic aneurysm and preserve circulation to the HSK. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Is tube repair of aortic aneurysm followed by aneurysmal change in the common iliac arteries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provan, J L; Fialkov, J; Ameli, F M; St Louis, E L

    1990-10-01

    To address the concern that tube repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm might be followed by aneurysmal change in the common iliac arteries, 23 patients who had undergone the operation were re-examined 3 to 5 years later. Although 9 had had minimal ectasia of these arteries preoperatively, in none of the 23 was there symptomatic or radiologic evidence of aneurysmal change on follow-up. Measurements of the maximum intraluminal diameters were made by computed tomography; they indicated no significant differences between the preoperative and follow-up sizes of the common iliac arteries. The variation in time to follow-up also showed no significant correlation with change in artery diameter.

  20. Radiation Exposure in Endovascular Infra-Renal Aortic Aneurysm Repair and Factors that Influence It

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Machado

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: The endovascular repair of aortic abdominal aneurysms exposes the patients and surgical team to ionizing radiation with risk of direct tissue damage and induction of gene mutation. This study aims to describe our standard of radiation exposure in endovascular aortic aneurysm repair and the factors that influence it. Methods: Retrospective analysis of a prospective database of patients with abdominal infra-renal aortic aneurysms submitted to endovascular repair. This study evaluated the radiation doses (dose area product (DAP, fluoroscopy durations and their relationships to the patients, aneurysms, and stent-graft characteristics. Results: This study included 127 patients with a mean age of 73 years. The mean DAP was 4.8 mGy.m2, and the fluoroscopy time was 21.8 minutes. Aortic bilateral iliac aneurysms, higher body mass index, aneurysms with diameters larger than 60 mm, necks with diameters larger than 28 mm, common iliac arteries with diameters larger than 20 mm, and neck angulations superior to 50 degrees were associated with an increased radiation dose. The number of anatomic risk factors present was associated with increased radiation exposure and fluoroscopy time, regardless of the anatomical risk factors. Conclusion: The radiation exposure during endovascular aortic aneurysm repair is significant (mean DAP 4.8 mGy.m2 with potential hazards to the surgical team and the patients. The anatomical characteristics of the aneurysm, patient characteristics, and the procedure's technical difficulty were all related to increased radiation exposure during endovascular aortic aneurysm repair procedures. Approximately 40% of radiation exposure can be explained by body mass index, neck angulation, aneurysm diameter, neck diameter, and aneurysm type.

  1. Is Conventional Open Repair for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Feasible in Nonagenarians?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, Kyokun; Matsuda, Hitoshi; Inoue, Yosuke; Omura, Atsushi; Seike, Yoshimasa; Sasaki, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Junjiro

    2017-09-25

    Background : Although endovascular repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm has been found to be beneficial in very elderly patients, some patients have contraindications to this procedure. For nonagenarians, the results of open repair remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to compare the outcomes of open vs. endovascular repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm in nonagenarian patients. Methods and Results : Fourteen patients undergoing open surgical repair and 24 undergoing endovascular repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm were evaluated. There was no significant difference in early mortality between the open and endovascular groups (0% vs. 4.1%, p=0.16). The open repair group required much longer hospital stays (26.4 vs. 10.6 days, respectively, p=0.003). Finally, 12 patients (86%) undergoing open repair vs. 21 (88%) undergoing endovascular repair returned home (p=0.49). During a mean follow-up period of 23.4±23.5 months, cumulative estimated 1- and 3-year survival rates were 90.0% and 48.0%, respectively in the open repair group and 90.6% and 54.9%, respectively in the endovascular repair group (p=0.51). Conclusion : Although endovascular repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm was superior in terms of recovery, the results of conventional open repair were acceptable even in nonagenarian patients. Open repair remains an alternative for patients with contraindications to endovascular repair.

  2. Endovascular Treatment of Late Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms after Surgical Repair of Congenital Aortic Coarctation in Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juszkat, Robert; Perek, Bartlomiej; Zabicki, Bartosz; Trojnarska, Olga; Jemielity, Marek; Staniszewski, Ryszard; Smoczyk, Wiesław; Pukacki, Fryderyk

    2013-01-01

    Background In some patients, local surgery-related complications are diagnosed many years after surgery for aortic coarctation. The purposes of this study were: (1) to systematically evaluate asymptomatic adults after Dacron patch repair in childhood, (2) to estimate the formation rate of secondary thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) and (3) to assess outcomes after intravascular treatment for TAAs. Methods This study involved 37 asymptomatic patients (26 female and 11 male) who underwent surgical repair of aortic coarctation in the childhood. After they had reached adolescence, patients with secondary TAAs were referred to endovascular repair. Results Follow-up studies revealed TAA in seven cases (19%) (including six with the gothic type of the aortic arch) and mild recoarctation in other six (16%). Six of the TAA patients were treated with stentgrafts, but one refused to undergo an endovascular procedure. In three cases, stengrafts covered the left subclavian artery (LSA), in another the graft was implanted distally to the LSA. In two individuals, elective hybrid procedures were performed with surgical bypass to the supraaortic arteries followed by stengraft implantation. All subjects survived the secondary procedures. One patient developed type Ia endoleak after stentgraft implantation that was eventually treated with a debranching procedure. Conclusions The long-term course of clinically asymptomatic patients after coarctation patch repair is not uncommonly complicated by formation of TAAs (particularly in individuals with the gothic pattern of the aortic arch) that can be treated effectively with stentgrafts. However, in some patients hybrid procedures may be necessary. PMID:24386233

  3. Emergency abdominal aortic aneurysm repair with a preferential endovascular strategy : Mortality and cost-effectiveness analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapma, Marten R.; Groen, Henk; Oranen, Bjorn I.; van der Hilst, Christian S.; Tielliu, Ignace F.; Zeebregts, Clark J.; Prins, Ted R.; van den Dungen, Jan J.; Verhoeven, Eric L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess mortality and treatment costs of a new management protocol with preferential use of emergency endovascular aneurysm repair (eEVAR) for acute abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Methods: From September 2003 until February 2005, 49 consecutive patients (45 men; mean age 71 years) with

  4. Sac Angiography and Glue Embolization in Emergency Endovascular Aneurysm Repair for Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

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    Koike, Yuya, E-mail: r06118@hotmail.co.jp; Nishimura, Jun-ichi, E-mail: jun-ichi-n@nifty.com; Hase, Soichiro, E-mail: haseman@hotmail.co.jp; Yamasaki, Motoshige, E-mail: genyamasaki@gmail.com [Kawasaki Saiwai Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to demonstrate a sac angiography technique and evaluate the feasibility of N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) embolization of the ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) sac in emergency endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in hemodynamically unstable patients.MethodsA retrospective case series of three patients in whom sac angiography was performed during emergency EVAR for ruptured AAA was reviewed. After stent graft deployment, angiography within the sac of aneurysm (sac angiography) was performed by manually injecting 10 ml of contrast material through a catheter to identify the presence and site of active bleeding. In two patients, sac angiography revealed active extravasation of the contrast material, and NBCA embolization with a coaxial catheter system was performed to achieve prompt sealing.ResultsSac angiography was successful in all three patients. In the two patients who underwent NBCA embolization for aneurysm sac bleeding, follow-up computed tomography (CT) images demonstrated the accumulation of NBCA consistent with the bleeding site in preprocedural CT images.ConclusionsEVAR is associated with a potential risk of ongoing bleeding from type II or IV endoleaks into the disrupted aneurysm sac in patients with severe coagulopathy. Therefore, sac angiography and NBCA embolization during emergency EVAR may represent a possible technical improvement in the treatment of ruptured AAA in hemodynamically unstable patients.

  5. Discrepancies in abdominal aortic aneurysm expressions and repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurks, R.

    2011-01-01

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) disease is a growing healthcare burden. Besides theassociated cardiovascular comorbidities, the AAA itself poses a risk for the patient in two fashions. First, it could rupture, which is associated with high mortality and morbidity. This thesis focused on the second,

  6. Innovative chimney-graft technique for endovascular repair of a pararenal abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiñanes, Edgar Luis; Hernandez-Vila, Eduardo A; Krajcer, Zvonimir

    2015-02-01

    After abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, progressive degeneration of the aneurysm can be challenging to treat. Multiple comorbidities and previous operations place such patients at high risk for repeat surgery. Endovascular repair is a possible alternative; however, challenging anatomy can push the limits of available technology. We describe the case of a 71-year-old man who presented with a 5.3-cm pararenal aneurysm 4 years after undergoing open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. To avoid reoperation, we excluded the aneurysm by endovascular means, using visceral-artery stenting, a chimney-graft technique. Low-profile balloons on a monorail system enabled the rapid exchange of coronary wires via a buddy-wire technique. This novel approach facilitated stenting and simultaneous angioplasty of multiple visceral vessels and the abdominal aorta.

  7. Outcomes of fenestrated and branched endovascular repair of complex abdominal and thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanzer, Andres; Simons, Jessica P; Flahive, Julie; Durgin, Jonathan; Aiello, Francesco A; Doucet, Danielle; Steppacher, Robert; Messina, Louis M

    2017-09-01

    More than 80% of infrarenal aortic aneurysms are treated by endovascular repair. However, adoption of fenestrated and branched endovascular repair for complex aortic aneurysms has been limited, despite high morbidity and mortality associated with open repair. There are few published reports of consecutive outcomes, inclusive of all fenestrated and branched endovascular repairs, starting from the inception of a complex aortic aneurysm program. Therefore, we examined a single center's consecutive experience of fenestrated and branched endovascular repair of complex aortic aneurysms. This is a single-center, prospective, observational cohort study evaluating 30-day and 1-year outcomes in all consecutive patients who underwent fenestrated and branched endovascular repair of complex aortic aneurysms (definition: requiring one or more fenestrations or branches). Data were collected prospectively through an Institutional Review Board-approved registry and a physician-sponsored investigational device exemption clinical trial (G130210). We performed 100 consecutive complex endovascular aortic aneurysm repairs (November 2010 to March 2016) using 58 (58%) commercially manufactured custom-made devices and 42 (42%) physician-modified devices to treat 4 (4%) common iliac, 42 (42%) juxtarenal, 18 (18%) pararenal, and 36 (36%) thoracoabdominal aneurysms (type I, n = 1; type II, n = 4; type III, n = 12; type IV, n = 18; arch, n = 1). The repairs included 309 fenestrations, branches, and scallops (average of 3.1 branch arteries/case). All patients had 30-day follow-up for 30-day event rates: three (3%) deaths; six (6%) target artery occlusions; five (5%) progressions to dialysis; eight (8%) access complications; one (1%) paraparesis; one (1%) bowel ischemia; and no instances of myocardial infarction, paralysis, or stroke. Of 10 type I or type III endoleaks, 8 resolved (7 with secondary intervention, 1 without intervention). Mean follow-up time was 563 days (interquartile range

  8. Outcomes after open repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms in patients with friendly versus hostile aortoiliac anatomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, S. C.; Reimerink, J. J.; Vahl, A. C.; Wisselink, W.; Reekers, J. A.; Legemate, D. A.; Balm, R.

    2014-01-01

    In patients with a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA), anatomic suitability for endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) depends on aortic neck and iliac artery characteristics. If the aortoiliac anatomy is unsuitable for EVAR ("hostile anatomy"), open repair (OR) is the next option. We

  9. Open Repair of Mycotic Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms With Biological Grafts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinola, Ivika; Sörelius, Karl; Wyss, Thomas R

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The treatment of mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm requires surgery and antimicrobial therapy. Since prosthetic reconstructions carry a considerable risk of reinfection, biological grafts are noteworthy alternatives. The current study evaluated the durability, infection resistance......, and midterm outcome of biological grafts in treatment of mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm. METHODS AND RESULTS: All patients treated with biological graft in 6 countries between 2006 and 2016 were included. Primary outcome measures were 30- and 90-day survival, treatment-related mortality, and reinfection...... rate. Secondary outcome measures were overall mortality and graft patency. Fifty-six patients (46 males) with median age of 69 years (range 35-85) were included. Sixteen patients were immunocompromised (29%), 24 (43%) had concomitant infection, and 12 (21%) presented with rupture. Bacterial culture...

  10. Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair with Chimney and Snorkel Grafts: Indications, Techniques and Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Rakesh P., E-mail: rpatel9@nhs.net [Northwick Park Hospital, Department of Vascular Radiology (United Kingdom); Katsargyris, Athanasios, E-mail: kthanassos@yahoo.com; Verhoeven, Eric L. G., E-mail: Eric.Verhoeven@klinikum-nuernberg.de [Klinikum Nuernberg, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery (Germany); Adam, Donald J., E-mail: donald.adam@tiscali.co.uk [Heartlands Hospital, Department of Vascular Surgery (United Kingdom); Hardman, John A., E-mail: johnhardman@doctors.org.uk [Royal United Hospital Bath, Department of Vascular Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-15

    The chimney technique in endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (Ch-EVAR) involves placement of a stent or stent-graft parallel to the main aortic stent-graft to extend the proximal or distal sealing zone while maintaining side branch patency. Ch-EVAR can facilitate endovascular repair of juxtarenal and aortic arch pathology using available standard aortic stent-grafts, therefore, eliminating the manufacturing delays required for customised fenestrated and branched stent-grafts. Several case series have demonstrated the feasibility of Ch-EVAR both in acute and elective cases with good early results. This review discusses indications, technique, and the current available clinical data on Ch-EVAR.

  11. Abdominal aortic aneurysm calcification and thrombus volume are not associated with outcome following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Divyajeet; Velu, Ramesh; Tosenovsky, Patrik; Quigley, Francis [James Cook University, Queensland Research Centre for Peripheral Vascular Disease, School of Medicine and Dentistry, Townsville, Queensland (Australia); The Townsville Hospital, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Douglas (Australia); Wisniowski, Brendan; Walker, Philip J. [James Cook University, Queensland Research Centre for Peripheral Vascular Disease, School of Medicine and Dentistry, Townsville, Queensland (Australia); University of Queensland, School of Medicine and Centre for Clinical Research, Department of Vascular Surgery, Royal Brisbane and Women' s Hospital, Herston, QLD (Australia); Bradshaw, Barbara [James Cook University, Queensland Research Centre for Peripheral Vascular Disease, School of Medicine and Dentistry, Townsville, Queensland (Australia); Golledge, Jonathan [James Cook University, Queensland Research Centre for Peripheral Vascular Disease, School of Medicine and Dentistry, Townsville, Queensland (Australia); The Townsville Hospital, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Douglas (Australia); University of Queensland, School of Medicine and Centre for Clinical Research, Department of Vascular Surgery, Royal Brisbane and Women' s Hospital, Herston, QLD (Australia)

    2014-08-15

    Aortic calcification and thrombus have been postulated to worsen outcome following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). The purpose of this study was to assess the association of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) calcification and thrombus volume with outcome following EVAR using a reproducible, quantifiable computed tomography (CT) assessment protocol. Patients with elective EVAR performed between January 2002 and 2012 at the Townsville Hospital, Mater Private Hospital (Townsville) and Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital (RBWH) were included if preoperative CTAs were available for analysis. AAA calcification and thrombus volume were measured using a semiautomated workstation protocol. Outcomes were assessed in terms of clinical failure, endoleak (type I, type II) and reintervention. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Median follow-up was 1.7 years and the interquartile range 1.0-3.8 years. One hundred thirty-four patients undergoing elective EVAR were included in the study. Rates of primary clinical success and freedom from reintervention were 82.8 % and 88.9 % at the 24-month follow-up. AAA calcification and thrombus volume were not associated with clinical failure, type I endoleak, type II endoleak or reintervention. AAA calcification and thrombus volume were not associated with poorer outcome after EVAR in this study. (orig.)

  12. Abdominal aortic aneurysm calcification and thrombus volume are not associated with outcome following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, Divyajeet; Velu, Ramesh; Tosenovsky, Patrik; Quigley, Francis; Wisniowski, Brendan; Walker, Philip J.; Bradshaw, Barbara; Golledge, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Aortic calcification and thrombus have been postulated to worsen outcome following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). The purpose of this study was to assess the association of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) calcification and thrombus volume with outcome following EVAR using a reproducible, quantifiable computed tomography (CT) assessment protocol. Patients with elective EVAR performed between January 2002 and 2012 at the Townsville Hospital, Mater Private Hospital (Townsville) and Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital (RBWH) were included if preoperative CTAs were available for analysis. AAA calcification and thrombus volume were measured using a semiautomated workstation protocol. Outcomes were assessed in terms of clinical failure, endoleak (type I, type II) and reintervention. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Median follow-up was 1.7 years and the interquartile range 1.0-3.8 years. One hundred thirty-four patients undergoing elective EVAR were included in the study. Rates of primary clinical success and freedom from reintervention were 82.8 % and 88.9 % at the 24-month follow-up. AAA calcification and thrombus volume were not associated with clinical failure, type I endoleak, type II endoleak or reintervention. AAA calcification and thrombus volume were not associated with poorer outcome after EVAR in this study. (orig.)

  13. A prospective clinical, economic, and quality-of-life analysis comparing endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), open repair, and best medical treatment in high-risk patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms suitable for EVAR: the Irish patient trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hynes, Niamh

    2007-12-01

    To report the results of a trial comparing endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) to open repair (OR) and best medical therapy (BMT) involving high-risk patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) suitable for EVAR.

  14. Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms: vascular anatomy, device selection, procedure, and procedure-specific complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, Yolanda; Rogoff, Philip; Romanelli, Donald; Reichle, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is abnormal dilatation of the aorta, carrying a substantial risk of rupture and thereby marked risk of death. Open repair of AAA involves lengthy surgery time, anesthesia, and substantial recovery time. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) provides a safer option for patients with advanced age and pulmonary, cardiac, and renal dysfunction. Successful endovascular repair of AAA depends on correct selection of patients (on the basis of their vascular anatomy), choice of the correct endoprosthesis, and familiarity with the technique and procedure-specific complications. The type of aneurysm is defined by its location with respect to the renal arteries, whether it is a true or false aneurysm, and whether the common iliac arteries are involved. Vascular anatomy can be divided more technically into aortic neck, aortic aneurysm, pelvic perfusion, and iliac morphology, with grades of difficulty with respect to EVAR, aortic neck morphology being the most common factor to affect EVAR appropriateness. When choosing among the devices available on the market, one must consider the patient's vascular anatomy and choose between devices that provide suprarenal fixation versus those that provide infrarenal fixation. A successful technique can be divided into preprocedural imaging, ancillary procedures before AAA stent-graft placement, the procedure itself, postprocedural medical therapy, and postprocedural imaging surveillance. Imaging surveillance is important in assessing complications such as limb thrombosis, endoleaks, graft migration, enlargement of the aneurysm sac, and rupture. Last, one must consider the issue of radiation safety with regard to EVAR. (©)RSNA, 2015.

  15. Importance of stent-graft design for aortic arch aneurysm repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Singh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aneurysm of the aorta is currently treated by open surgical repair or endovascular repair. However, when the aneurysm occurs in regions between the aortic arch and proximal descending aorta, it can be a complex pathology to treat due to its intricate geometry. When complex aortic aneurysms are treated with the conventional procedures, some of the patients present with significant post-operative complications and high mortality rate. Consequently, a clinically driven hybrid innovation known as the frozen elephant trunk procedure was introduced to treat complex aortic aneurysms. Although this procedure significantly reduces mortality rate and operating time, it is still associated with complications such as endoleaks, spinal cord ischemia, renal failure and stroke. Some of these complications are consequences of a mismatch in the biomechanical behaviour of the stent-graft device and the aorta. Research on complex aneurysm repair tended to focus more on the surgical procedure than the stent-graft design. Current stent-graft devices are suitable for straight vessels. However, when used to treat aortic aneurysm with complex geometry, these devices are ineffective in restoring the normal biological and biomechanical function of the aorta. A stent-graft device with mechanical properties that are comparable with the aorta and aortic arch could possibly lead to fewer post-operative complications, thus, better outcome for patients with complex aneurysm conditions. This review highlights the influence stent-graft design has on the biomechanical properties of the aorta which in turn can contribute to complications of complex aneurysm repair. Design attributes critical for minimising postoperative biomechanical mismatch are also discussed.

  16. Transperitoneal versus retroperitoneal approach for open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in the targeted vascular National Surgical Quality Improvement Program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buck, Dominique B.; Ultee, Klaas H J; Zettervall, Sara L.; Soden, Pete A.; Darling, Jeremy; Wyers, Mark; van Herwaarden, Joost A.; Schermerhorn, Marc L.

    Objective: We sought to compare current practices in patient selection and 30-day outcomes for transperitoneal and retroperitoneal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repairs. Methods: All patients undergoing elective transperitoneal or retroperitoneal surgical repair for AAA between January 2011 and

  17. Logistic considerations for a successful institutional approach to the endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Dieter; Rancic, Zoran; Pfammatter, Thomas; Hechelhammer, Lukas; Veith, Frank J; Donas, Konstantin; Lachat, Mario

    2010-01-01

    The value of emergency endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in the setting of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm remains controversial owing to differing results. However, interpretation of published results remains difficult as there is a lack of generally accepted protocols or standard operating procedures. Furthermore, such protocols and standard operating procedures often are reported incompletely or not at all, thereby making interpretation of results difficult. We herein report our integrated logistic system for the endovascular treatment of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms. Important components of this system are prehospital logistics, in-hospital treatment logistics, and aftercare. Further studies should include details about all of these components, and a description of these logistic components must be included in all future studies of emergency EVAR for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

  18. Elective visceral hybrid repair of type III thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjanović Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. According to the classification given by Crawford et al. type III thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA is dilatation of the aorta from the level of the rib 6 to the separation of the aorta below the renal arteries, capturing all the visceral branch of aorta. Visceral hybrid reconstruction of TAAA is a procedure developed in recent years in the world, which involves a combination of conventional, open and endovascular aortic reconstruction surgery at the level of separation of the left subclavian artery to the level of visceral branches of aorta. Case report. We presented a 75-years-old man, with elective visceral hybrid reconstruction of type III TAAA. Computerized scanning (CT angiography of the patient showed type III TAAA with the maximum transverse diameter of aneurysm of 92 mm. Aneurysm started at the level of the sixth rib, and the end of the aneurysm was 1 cm distal to the level of renal arteries. Aneurysm compressed the esophagus, causing the patient difficulty in swallowing act, especially solid food, and frequent back pain. From the other comorbidity, the patient had been treated for a long time, due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and hypertension. In general endotracheal anesthesia with epidural analgesia, the patient underwent visceral hybrid reconstruction of TAAA, which combines classic, open vascular surgery and endovascular procedures. Classic vascular surgery is visceral reconstruction using by-pass procedure from the distal, normal aorta to all visceral branches: celiac trunk, superior mesenteric artery and both renal arteries, with ligature of all arteries very close to the aorta. After that, by synchronous endovascular technique a complete aneurysmal exclusion of thoracoabdominal aneurysm with thoracic stent-graft was performed. The postoperative course was conducted properly and the patient left the Clinic for Vascular Surgery on postoperative day 21. Control CT, performed 3 months after the surgery

  19. Atheroembolization and potential air embolization during aortic declamping in open repair of a pararenal aortic aneurysm: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dregelid, Einar Børre; Lilleng, Peer Kåre

    2016-01-01

    When ischemic events ascribable to microembolization occur during open repair of proximal abdominal aortic aneurysms, a likely origin of atheroembolism is not always found. A 78-year old man with enlargement of the entire aorta underwent open repair for a pararenal abdominal aortic aneurysm using supraceliac aortic clamping for 20min. Then the graft was clamped, the supraceliac clamp was removed, and the distal and right renal anastomoses were also completed. The patient was stable throughout the operation with only transient drop in blood pressure on reperfusion. Postoperatively the patient developed ischemia, attributable to microembolization, in legs, small intestine, gall bladder and kidneys. He underwent fasciotomy, small bowel and gall bladder resections. Intestinal absorptive function did not recover adequately and he died after 4 months. Microscopic examination of hundreds of intestinal, juxtaintestinal mesenteric, and gall bladder arteries showed a few ones containing cholesterol emboli. It is unsure whether a few occluded small arteries out of several hundred could have caused the ischemic injury alone. There had been only moderate backbleeding from aortic branches above the proximal anastomosis while it was sutured. Inadvertently, remaining air in the graft, aorta, and aortic branches may have been whipped into the pulsating blood, resulting in air microbubbles, when the aortic clamp was removed. Although both atheromatous particles and air microbubbles are well-known causes of iatrogenic microembolization, the importance of air microembolization in open repair of pararenal aortic aneurysms is not known and need to be studied. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Progressive Supranuclear Palsy-like Syndrome After Aortic Aneurysm Repair: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirisha Nandipati

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The syndrome of progressive supranuclear palsy‐like syndrome is a rare complication of ascending aortic aneurysm repair. We report two patients with videos and present a table of prior reported cases. To our knowledge there is no previously published video of this syndrome. The suspected mechanism is brainstem injury though neuroimaging is often negative for an associated infarct. We hope our report will increase recognition of this syndrome after aortic surgery, especially in patients with visual complaints.

  1. Statin use is associated with reduced all-cause mortality after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leurs, L.J.; Visser, P.; Laheij, R.J.F.; Buth, J.; Harris, P.L.; Blankensteijn, J.D.

    2006-01-01

    It has been shown that preoperative statin therapy reduces all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in patients undergoing major noncardiac vascular surgery. In this report, we investigated the influence of statin use on early and late outcome following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

  2. Outcome after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: a meta-analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walschot, L.H.B.; Laheij, R.J.F.; Verbeek, A.L.M.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the frequencies of complications and risk factors for complications following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair (EVAR). METHODS: Thirty-nine articles published between October 1995 and October 1999 in English, German, French, or Dutch were identified in

  3. The effect of endograft device on patient outcomes in endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansal, Vinay; Nagpal, Sudhir; Jetty, Prasad

    2017-12-01

    Objective Endovascular aneurysm repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm is being increasingly applied as the intervention of choice. The purpose of this study was to determine whether survival and reintervention rates after ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm vary between endograft devices. Methods This cohort study identified all ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms performed at The Ottawa Hospital from January 1999 to May 2015. Data collected included patient demographics, stability index at presentation, adherence to device instructions for use, endoleaks, reinterventions, and mortality. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare outcomes between groups. Mortality outcomes were assessed using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, and multivariate Cox regression modeling. Results One thousand sixty endovascular aneurysm repairs were performed using nine unique devices. Ninety-six ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms were performed using three devices: Cook Zenith ( n = 46), Medtronic Endurant ( n = 33), and Medtronic Talent ( n = 17). The percent of patients presented in unstable or extremis condition was 30.2, which did not differ between devices. Overall 30-day mortality was 18.8%, and was not statistically different between devices ( p = 0.16), although Medtronic Talent had markedly higher mortality (35.3%) than Cook Zenith (15.2%) and Medtronic Endurant (15.2%). AUI configuration was associated with increased 30-day mortality (33.3% vs. 12.1%, p = 0.02). Long-term mortality and graft-related reintervention rates at 30 days and 5 years were similar between devices. Instructions for use adherence was similar across devices, but differed between the ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm and elective endovascular aneurysm repair cohorts (47.7% vs. 79.0%, p 30 days post-endovascular aneurysm repair ( p = 0.01). Type 1 endoleak rates differed significantly across devices (Cook Zenith 0.0%, Medtronic Endurant 18.2%, Medtronic Talent 17.6%, p = 0

  4. Multimodality Imaging Approach towards Primary Aortic Sarcomas Arising after Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Case Series Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamran, Mudassar, E-mail: kamranm@mir.wustl.edu; Fowler, Kathryn J., E-mail: fowlerk@mir.wustl.edu; Mellnick, Vincent M., E-mail: mellnickv@mir.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology (United States); Sicard, Gregorio A., E-mail: sicard@wudosis.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Surgery (United States); Narra, Vamsi R., E-mail: narrav@mir.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Primary aortic neoplasms are rare. Aortic sarcoma arising after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a scarce subset of primary aortic malignancies, reports of which are infrequent in the published literature. The diagnosis of aortic sarcoma is challenging due to its non-specific clinical presentation, and the prognosis is poor due to delayed diagnosis, rapid proliferation, and propensity for metastasis. Post-EVAR, aortic sarcomas may mimic other more common aortic processes on surveillance imaging. Radiologists are rarely knowledgeable about this rare entity for which multimodality imaging and awareness are invaluable in early diagnosis. A series of three pathologically confirmed cases are presented to display the multimodality imaging features and clinical presentations of aortic sarcoma arising after EVAR.

  5. Successful Aortic Banding for Type IA Endoleak Due to Neck Dilatation after Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashima, Yasushi; Tamai, Koichi; Shirasugi, Takehiro; Sato, Kenichiro; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Imamura, Yusuke; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Adachi, Hideo; Kobinata, Toshiyuki

    2017-09-25

    A 69-year-old man with a type IA endoleak that developed approximately 21 months after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) of a 46 mm diameter aneurysm was referred to our department. He had impaired renal function, Parkinson's disease, and previous cerebral infarction. Computed tomography angiography showed a type IA endoleak with neck dilatation and that the aneurysm had grown to 60 mm in diameter. We decided to perform aortic banding. The type IA endoleak disappeared after banding and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 10. Aortic banding may be effective for type IA endoleak after EVAR and less invasive for high-risk patients in particular.

  6. Imaging and management of complications of open surgical repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayeemuddin, M.; Pherwani, A.D.; Asquith, J.R.

    2012-01-01

    Open repair is still considered the reference standard for long-term repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). In contrast to endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), patients with open surgical repair of AAA are not routinely followed up with imaging. Although complications following EVAR are widely recognized and routinely identified on follow-up imaging, complications also do occur following open surgical repair. With frequent use of multi-slice computed tomography (CT) angiography (CTA) in vascular patients, there is now improved recognition of the potential complications following open surgical repair. Many of these complications are increasingly being managed using endovascular techniques. The aim of this review is to illustrate a variety of potential complications that may occur following open surgical repair and to demonstrate their management using both surgical and endovascular techniques.

  7. A case of acute ischemic colitis after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigorios Voulalas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Colonic ischemia is a recognized complication of either open or endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. The clinical difficulty in establishing the diagnosis, the severity of this complication and the patient's poor physiological status may lead to a fatal outcome. We presented a case of ischemic colitis in a patient with patent hypogastric arteries that occurred after an endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair as well as a review of the available literature. The patient's preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative data were recorded. A thorough search through the Google data and Medline to review similar cases or any analyses that referred to ischemic colitis after endovascular abdominal aneurysm repair was conducted. A 76-year-old male was admitted to our department for an elective endovascular repair of an 8 cm in diameter abdominal aortic aneurysm. A Zenith bifurcation graft was implanted. The whole procedure was uneventful and the final angiogram showed an accurate deployment of the endograft without endoleaks and patency of both hypogastric arteries. During the 1st postoperative day, the patient developed symptoms of acute abdomen in combination with metabolic acidosis and oliguria. He underwent an exploratory laparotomy, which revealed necrosis of the sigmoid. A Hartmann's procedure was performed; the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit where he deceased after 24 h. Postoperative ischemic colitis has been described after open abdominal aneurysm repair. The description of this complication has been reported since the early phase of endovascular abdominal aneurysm repair development with a current incidence of 1.5%–3.0%. Possible mechanisms that may contribute to ischemic colitis in spite of the presence of patent hypogastric arteries include atheroembolization, shock, vasopressive drugs and inferior mesenteric artery occlusion.

  8. Maximum Diameter Measurements of Aortic Aneurysms on Axial CT Images After Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: Sufficient for Follow-up?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumueller, Stephan; Nguyen, Thi Dan Linh; Goetti, Robert Paul; Lachat, Mario; Seifert, Burkhardt; Pfammatter, Thomas; Frauenfelder, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of maximum diameter measurements of aortic aneurysms after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) on axial computed tomographic (CT) images in comparison to maximum diameter measurements perpendicular to the intravascular centerline for follow-up by using three-dimensional (3D) volume measurements as the reference standard. Materials and Methods: Forty-nine consecutive patients (73 ± 7.5 years, range 51–88 years), who underwent EVAR of an infrarenal aortic aneurysm were retrospectively included. Two blinded readers twice independently measured the maximum aneurysm diameter on axial CT images performed at discharge, and at 1 and 2 years after intervention. The maximum diameter perpendicular to the centerline was automatically measured. Volumes of the aortic aneurysms were calculated by dedicated semiautomated 3D segmentation software (3surgery, 3mensio, the Netherlands). Changes in diameter of 0.5 cm and in volume of 10% were considered clinically significant. Intra- and interobserver agreements were calculated by intraclass correlations (ICC) in a random effects analysis of variance. The two unidimensional measurement methods were correlated to the reference standard. Results: Intra- and interobserver agreements for maximum aneurysm diameter measurements were excellent (ICC = 0.98 and ICC = 0.96, respectively). There was an excellent correlation between maximum aneurysm diameters measured on axial CT images and 3D volume measurements (r = 0.93, P < 0.001) as well as between maximum diameter measurements perpendicular to the centerline and 3D volume measurements (r = 0.93, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Measurements of maximum aneurysm diameters on axial CT images are an accurate, reliable, and robust method for follow-up after EVAR and can be used in daily routine.

  9. JAG Tearing Technique with Radiofrequency Guide Wire for Aortic Fenestration in Thoracic Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricci, Carmelo; Ceccherini, Claudio; Leonini, Sara; Cini, Marco; Vigni, Francesco; Neri, Eugenio; Tucci, Enrico; Benvenuti, Antonio; Tommasino, Giulio; Sassi, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    An innovative approach, the JAG tearing technique, was performed during thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair in a patient with previous surgical replacement of the ascending aorta with a residual uncomplicated type B aortic dissection who developed an aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta with its lumen divided in two parts by an intimal flap. The proximal landing zone was suitable to place a thoracic stent graft. The distal landing zone was created by cutting the intimal flap in the distal third of the descending thoracic aorta with a radiofrequency guide wire and intravascular ultrasound catheter.

  10. Acute Testicular Ischemia following Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair Identified in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Finnerty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR is perhaps the most widely utilized surgical procedure for patients with large abdominal aortic aneurysms. This procedure is minimally invasive and reduces inpatient hospitalization requirements. The case involves a 72-year-old male who presented to the emergency department with right testicular ischemia two days following EVAR. Given the minimal inpatient hospitalization associated with this procedure, emergency physicians are likely to encounter associated complications. Ischemic and thromboembolic events following EVAR are extremely rare but require prompt vascular surgery intervention to minimize morbidity and mortality.

  11. Can an accessory renal artery be safely covered during endovascular aortic aneurysm repair?

    OpenAIRE

    Antoniou, George A.; Karkos, Christos D.; Antoniou, Stavros A.; Georgiadis, George S.

    2013-01-01

    A best evidence topic was constructed according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether coverage of an accessory renal artery (ARA) in patients undergoing endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) is associated with increased risk of renal impairment. Altogether, 106 papers were located using the reported searches, of which 5 represented the best evidence to answer the question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, study type, patient group studied, rel...

  12. A multidetector tomography protocol for follow-up of endovascular aortic aneurysm repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Moraes Bastos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to improve the use of 64-channel multidetector computed tomography using lower doses of ionizing radiation during follow-up procedures in a series of patients with endovascular aortic aneurysm repair. METHODS: Thirty patients receiving 5 to 29 months of follow-up after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair were analyzed using a 64-channel multidetector computed tomography device by an exam that included pre-and postcontrast with both arterial and venous phases. Leak presence and type were classified based on the exam phase. RESULTS: Endoleaks were identified in 8/30 of cases; the endoleaks in 3/8 of these cases were not visible in the arterial phases of the exams. CONCLUSION: The authors conclude that multidetector computed tomography with pre-contrast and venous phases should be a part of the ongoing follow-up of patients undergoing endovascular aortic aneurysm repair. The arterial phase can be excluded when the aneurism is stable or regresses. These findings permit a lower radiation dose without jeopardizing the correct diagnosis of an endoleak.

  13. Suprarenal fixation barbs can induce renal artery occlusion in endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subedi, Shree K; Lee, Andy M; Landis, Gregg S

    2010-01-01

    Renal artery occlusion following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair with suprarenal fixation is uncommon. We report one patient who was found to develop renal artery occlusion and parenchymal infarction 6 months after repair using an endovascular graft with suprarenal fixation. Our patient underwent emergent endovascular repair of a symptomatic 6 cm abdominal aortic aneurysm. The covered portion of the endograft was inadvertently deployed well below the renal artery orifices. At the completion of the procedure both renal arteries were confirmed to be patent. One month postoperatively, a computed tomographic (CT) scan showed exclusion of the aortic sac and normal enhancement of both kidneys. At 6 months, the patient was found to have elevated serum creatinine levels despite having no clinical symptoms. CT scanning revealed a nonenhancing left kidney, and angiography demonstrated an occlusion of the left renal artery. A barb welded to the bare metal stent appeared to be impinging on the renal artery. We believe that renal artery occlusion after endovascular repair can occur due to repetitive injury to the renal artery orifice from barbs welded to the bare metal stent. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of renal artery occlusion caused by repetitive injury from transrenal fixation systems. Copyright 2010 Annals of Vascular Surgery Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when atherosclerosis or plaque buildup causes the ... weak and bulge outward like a balloon. An AAA develops slowly over time and has few noticeable ...

  15. Fenestrated endovascular aortic aneurysm repair using physician-modified endovascular grafts versus company-manufactured devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossabhoy, Shernaz S; Simons, Jessica P; Flahive, Julie M; Aiello, Francesco A; Sheth, Parth; Arous, Edward J; Messina, Louis M; Schanzer, Andres

    2017-12-07

    Fenestrated endografts are customized, patient-specific endovascular devices with potential to reduce morbidity and mortality of complex aortic aneurysm repair. With approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, our center began performing fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair through a physician-sponsored investigational device exemption (IDE #G130210), using both physician-modified endografts (PMEGs) and company-manufactured devices (CMDs). Because these techniques are associated with specific advantages and disadvantages, we sought to investigate differences in outcomes between PMEG and CMD cases. A single-institution retrospective review of all fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repairs was performed. The cohort was analyzed by device type (PMEG or CMD) after matching of cases on the basis of (1) number of target vessels intended for treatment, (2) extent of aneurysm, (3) aneurysm diameter, (4) device configuration, and (5) date of operation. Outcomes of ruptures, common iliac artery aneurysms, and aortic arch aneurysms were excluded. Demographics, operative details, perioperative complications, length of stay, and reinterventions were compared. For patients with >1 year of follow-up time, survival, type I or type III endoleak rate, target artery patency, and reintervention rate were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Between November 30, 2010, and July 30, 2016, 82 patients were identified and matched. The cohort included 41 PMEG and 41 CMD patients who underwent repair of 38 juxtarenal (PMEG, 17; CMD, 21; P = .38), 14 pararenal (PMEG, 6; CMD, 8; P = .56), and 30 thoracoabdominal type I to type IV (PMEG, 18; CMD, 12; P = .17) aneurysms. There were significant differences in presentation requiring urgent aneurysm repair (PMEG, 9; CMD, 0; P = .002), total fluoroscopy time (PMEG, 76 minutes; CMD, 61 minutes; P = .02), volume of contrast material used (PMEG, 88 mL; CMD, 70 mL; P = .02), in-operating room to out-of-operating room time

  16. Hybrid repair of a very late, post-aortic coarctation surgery thoracic aneurysm: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilea Ioan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Local aneurysms after surgical repair of coarctation of the aorta occur mainly in patients surgically treated by Dacron patch plasty during adulthood. The management of these patients is always problematic, with frequent complications and increased mortality rates. Percutaneous stent-graft implantation avoids the need for surgical reintervention. Case presentation We report a case involving the hybrid treatment by stent-graft implantation and transposition of the left subclavian artery to the left common carotid artery of an aneurysmal dilatation of the thoracic aorta that occurred in a 64-year-old Caucasian man, operated on almost 40 years earlier with a Dacron patch plasty for aortic coarctation. Our patient presented to our facility for evaluation with back pain and shortness of breath after minimal physical effort. A physical examination revealed stony dullness to percussion of the left posterior thorax, with no other abnormalities. The results of chest radiography, followed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography and aortography, led to a diagnosis of giant aortic thoracic aneurysm. Successful treatment of the aneurysm was achieved by percutaneous stent-graft implantation combined with transposition of the left subclavian artery to the left common carotid artery. His post-procedural recovery was uneventful. Three months after the procedure, computed tomography showed complete thrombosis of the excluded aneurysm, without any clinical signs of left lower limb ischemia or new onset neurological abnormalities. Conclusions Our patient’s case illustrates the clinical outcomes of surgical interventions for aortic coarctation. However, the very late appearance of a local aneurysm is rather unusual. Management of such cases is always difficult. The decision-making should be multidisciplinary. A hybrid approach was considered the best solution for our patient.

  17. The effects of preoperative cardiology consultation prior to elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair on patient morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boniakowski, Anna E; Davis, Frank M; Phillips, Amanda R; Robinson, Adina B; Coleman, Dawn M; Henke, Peter K

    2017-08-01

    Objectives The relationship between preoperative medical consultations and postoperative complications has not been extensively studied. Thus, we investigated the impact of preoperative consultation on postoperative morbidity following elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Methods A retrospective review was conducted on 469 patients (mean age 72 years, 20% female) who underwent elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair from June 2007 to July 2014. Data elements included detailed medical history, preoperative cardiology consultation, and postoperative complications. Primary outcomes included 30-day morbidity, consult-specific morbidity, and mortality. A bivariate probit regression model accounting for the endogeneity of binary preoperative medical consult and patient variability was estimated with a maximum likelihood function. Results Eighty patients had preoperative medical consults (85% cardiology); thus, our analysis focuses on the effect of cardiac-related preoperative consults. Hyperlipidemia, increased aneurysm size, and increased revised cardiac risk index increased likelihood of referral to cardiology preoperatively. Surgery type (endovascular versus open repair) was not significant in development of postoperative complications when controlling for revised cardiac risk index ( p = 0.295). After controlling for patient comorbidities, there was no difference in postoperative cardiac-related complications between patients who did and did not undergo cardiology consultation preoperatively ( p = 0.386). Conclusions When controlling for patient disease severity using revised cardiac risk index risk stratification, preoperative cardiology consultation is not associated with postoperative cardiac morbidity.

  18. Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in the Presence of a Transplanted Kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverberg, Daniel; Yalon, Tal; Halak, Moshe

    2015-01-01

    PurposeTo present our experience performing endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms in kidney transplanted patients.MethodsA retrospective review of all patients who underwent endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) performed at our institution from 2007 to 2014. We identified all patients who had previously undergone a kidney transplant. Data collected included: comorbidities, preoperative imaging modalities, indication for surgery, stent graft configurations, pre- and postoperative renal function, perioperative complications, and survival rates.ResultsA total of 267 EVARs were performed. Six (2 %) had a transplanted kidney. Mean age was 74 (range, 64–82) years; five were males. Mean time from transplantation to EVAR was 7.5 (range, 2–12) years. Five underwent preoperative planning with noncontrast modalities only. Devices used included bifurcated (n = 3), aortouniiliac (n = 2), and tube (n = 1) stent grafts. Technical success was achieved in all patients. None experienced deterioration in renal function. Median follow-up was 39 (range, 6–51) months. Four patients were alive at the time of the study. Two patients expired during the period of follow-up from unrelated causes.ConclusionsEVAR is an effective modality for the management of AAAs in the coexistence of a transplanted kidney. It can be performed with minimal morbidity and mortality without harming the transplanted kidney. Special consideration should be given to device configuration to minimize damage to the renal graft

  19. Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in the Presence of a Transplanted Kidney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverberg, Daniel, E-mail: silverberg-d@msn.com; Yalon, Tal; Halak, Moshe [The Chaim Sheba Medical Center, The Department of Vascular Surgery (Israel)

    2015-08-15

    PurposeTo present our experience performing endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms in kidney transplanted patients.MethodsA retrospective review of all patients who underwent endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) performed at our institution from 2007 to 2014. We identified all patients who had previously undergone a kidney transplant. Data collected included: comorbidities, preoperative imaging modalities, indication for surgery, stent graft configurations, pre- and postoperative renal function, perioperative complications, and survival rates.ResultsA total of 267 EVARs were performed. Six (2 %) had a transplanted kidney. Mean age was 74 (range, 64–82) years; five were males. Mean time from transplantation to EVAR was 7.5 (range, 2–12) years. Five underwent preoperative planning with noncontrast modalities only. Devices used included bifurcated (n = 3), aortouniiliac (n = 2), and tube (n = 1) stent grafts. Technical success was achieved in all patients. None experienced deterioration in renal function. Median follow-up was 39 (range, 6–51) months. Four patients were alive at the time of the study. Two patients expired during the period of follow-up from unrelated causes.ConclusionsEVAR is an effective modality for the management of AAAs in the coexistence of a transplanted kidney. It can be performed with minimal morbidity and mortality without harming the transplanted kidney. Special consideration should be given to device configuration to minimize damage to the renal graft.

  20. Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) procedures: counterbalancing the benefits with the costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraskevas, Kosmas I; Bessias, Nikolaos; Giannoukas, Athanasios D; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P

    2010-05-01

    Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair (EVAR) is associated with lower 30-day mortality rates compared with open repair. Despite that, there are no significant differences in mortality rates between the two procedures at 2 years. On the other hand, EVAR is associated with considerably higher costs compared with open repair. The lack of significant long-term differences between the two procedures together with the substantially higher cost of EVAR may question the appropriateness of EVAR as an alternative to open surgical repair in patients fit for surgery. With several thousands of AAA procedures performed worldwide, the employment of EVAR for the management of all AAAs irrespective of the patient's surgical risk may hold implications for several national health economies. The lower perioperative mortality and morbidity rates associated with EVAR should thus be counterbalanced against the considerable costs of these procedures.

  1. Multidirectional flow analysis by cardiovascular magnetic resonance in aneurysm development following repair of aortic coarctation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stalder Aurelien F

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aneurysm formation is a life-threatening complication after operative therapy in coarctation. The identification of patients at risk for the development of such secondary pathologies is of high interest and requires a detailed understanding of the link between vascular malformation and altered hemodynamics. The routine morphometric follow-up by magnetic resonance angiography is a well-established technique. However, the intrinsic sensitivity of magnetic resonance (MR towards motion offers the possibility to additionally investigate hemodynamic consequences of morphological changes of the aorta. We demonstrate two cases of aneurysm formation 13 and 35 years after coarctation surgery based on a Waldhausen repair with a subclavian patch and a Vosschulte repair with a Dacron patch, respectively. Comprehensive flow visualization by cardiovascular MR (CMR was performed using a flow-sensitive, 3-dimensional, and 3-directional time-resolved gradient echo sequence at 3T. Subsequent analysis included the calculation of a phase contrast MR angiography and color-coded streamline and particle trace 3D visualization. Additional quantitative evaluation provided regional physiological information on blood flow and derived vessel wall parameters such as wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index. The results highlight the individual 3D blood-flow patterns associated with the different vascular pathologies following repair of aortic coarctation. In addition to known factors predisposing for aneurysm formation after surgical repair of coarctation these findings indicate the importance of flow sensitive CMR to follow up hemodynamic changes with respect to the development of vascular disease.

  2. Long-term results after repair of ruptured and non-ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuzmanović Ilija B.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Abdominal aortic aneurysm can be repaired by elective procedure while asymptomatic, or immediately when it is complicated - mostly due to rupture. Treating abdominal aneurysm electively, before it becomes urgent, has medical and economical reason. Today, the first month mortality after elective operations of the abdominal aorta aneurysm is less than 3%; on the other hand, significant mortality (25%-70% has been recorded in patients operated immediately because of rupture of the abdominal aneurysm. In addition, the costs of elective surgical treatment are significantly lower. OBJECTIVE The objective of this study is to compare long-term survival of patients that underwent elective or immediate repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (due to rupture, and to find out the factors influencing the long-term survival of these patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS Through retrospective review of prospectively collected data of the Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases of Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade, 56 patients that had elective surgery and 35 patients that underwent urgent operation due to rupture of abdominal aneurysm were followed up. Only the patients that survived 30 postoperative days were included in this review, and were followed up (ranging from 2 to 126 months. Electively operated patients were followed during 58.82 months on the average (range 7 to 122, and urgently operated were followed over 52.26 months (range 2 to 126. There was no significant difference of the length of postoperative follow-up between these two groups. RESULTS During this period, out of electively operated and immediately operated patients, 27 and 22 cases died, respectively. There was no significant difference (p>0,05a of long-term survival between these two groups. Obesity and early postoperative complications significantly decreased long-term survival of both electively and immediately operated patients. Graft infection, ventral hernia, aneurysm of

  3. Repair of left coronary artery aneurysm, recurrent ascending aortic aneurysm, and mitral valve prolapse 19 years after Bentall's procedure in a patient with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badmanaban, Balaji; Mallon, Peter; Campbell, Norman; Sarsam, Mazin A I

    2004-01-01

    A 45-year-old female with Marfan syndrome had a Bentall's procedure performed 19 years ago. She presented with a 4-year history of gradually worsening dyspnea and decreasing exercise tolerance. Investigations revealed severe mitral valve prolapse, a left main stem coronary artery (LMSCA) aneurysm, and a recurrent aneurysm of the ascending aorta. The mitral valve was replaced and the aortic aneurysmal sac and the LMSCA aneurysm were then repaired by a modified Bentall procedure. The patient made an uneventful recovery and was discharged home.

  4. Anatomic changes of target vessels after fenestrated and branched aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalder, J; Keschenau, P; Tamm, M; Jalaie, H; Jacobs, M J; Greiner, A

    2014-04-01

    Objective of this study was to evaluate the anatomic changes of the stented target vessels after endovascular repair of complex aortic aneurysms. Between July 2011 and December 2013, 53 aortic aneurysms were treated in our department with fenestrated and branched stent-graft devices. Forty-two of these patients were pre- and postoperatively scanned with a high resolution computer tomography (CT) (Cook Zenith® fenestrated or branched, Australia Pty. Ltd., Brisbane, Australia: N.=19; AnacondaTM fenestrated, Vascutek, Glasgow, Scotland, UK: N.=23). The other 11 out of the 53 patients did not receive a CT scan, because of a pre-existing renal failure. In the CT scans we retrospectively evaluated the anatomic vessel deviation at the origin of the target vessel and the vessel shift distal to the stent. For the first measurement the CT scans were loaded into OsiriX MD®, and the pre- and postoperative angles of the target vessels were measured and subtracted. For matching, the CT-scans were normalized at vertebral body lumbar 2. The second measured angle was the maximal measured angle distal to the target vessel stent-graft. Altogether, 113 target vessels were stented (celiac trunk [CT] 15, superior mesenteric arteries [SMA] 26, renal arteries [RA] 72), with 97 balloon-expandable PTFE stents: 90 Atrium V12 (Maquet Getinge group, Hudson, NH, USA), 7 BeGrafts (Bentley InnoMed, Hechingen, Germany) and 16 self-expandable fluency PTFE stents (Bard, Karlsruhe, Germany). The mean anatomic deviation at the target vessel origin was 28±17.3 and the mean vessel shift distal to the stent was 36.3±18.8. There were no significant differences between the main device and the target vessel stent types. Fenestrated and branched stent-graft solutions for aortic aneurysm repair induce changes of the target vessel anatomy. We did not observe significant differences between the several devices.

  5. Transient postoperative atrial fibrillation after abdominal aortic aneurysm repair increases mortality risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Anai N.; Halandras, Pegge M.; Drescher, Max; Blackwell, Robert H.; Graunke, Dawn M.; Kliethermes, Stephanie; Kuo, Paul C.; Cho, Jae S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine whether new-onset transient postoperative atrial fibrillation (TPAF) affects mortality rates after abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair and to identify predictors for the development of TPAF. Methods Patients who underwent open aortic repair or endovascular aortic repair for a principal diagnosis AAA were retrospectively identified using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project-State Inpatient Database (Florida) for 2007 to 2011 and monitored longitudinally for 1 year. Inpatient and 1-year mortality rates were compared between those with and without TPAF. TPAF was defined as new-onset atrial fibrillation that developed in the postoperative period and subsequently resolved in patients without a history of atrial fibrillation. Cox proportional hazards models, adjusted for age, gender, comorbidities, rupture status, and repair method, were used to assess 1-year survival. Predictive models were built with preoperative patient factors using Chi-squared Automatic Interaction Detector decision trees and externally validated on patients from California. Results A 3.7% incidence of TPAF was identified among 15,148 patients who underwent AAA repair. The overall mortality rate was 4.3%. The inpatient mortality rate was 12.3% in patients with TPAF vs 4.0% in those without TPAF. In the ruptured setting, the difference in mortality was similar between groups (33.7% vs 39.9%, P = .3). After controlling for age, gender, comorbid disease severity, urgency (ruptured vs nonruptured), and repair method, TPAF was associated with increased 1-year postoperative mortality (hazard ratio, 1.48; P predict an individual's probability of developing TPAF at the point of care. Conclusions The development of TPAF is associated with an increased risk of mortality in patients undergoing repair of nonruptured AAA. Predictive modeling can be used to identify those patients at highest risk for developing TPAF and guide interventions to improve

  6. Suprarenal fixation resulting in intestinal malperfusion after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siani, Andrea; Accrocca, Federico; De Vivo, Gennaro; Marcucci, Giustino

    2016-05-01

    Superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and coeliac axis (CA) occlusion after endovascular abdominal aneurysm aortic repair (EVAR-AAA), using endograft with suprarenal fixation, are uncommon. However, we are reporting a case of visceral malperfusion, which occurred 7 days after successful EVAR with suprarenal fixation for symptomatic AAA. Endograft metal stent barbs caused severe stenosis of SMA and CA. A successful recovery of SMA was carried out by means of a balloon-expandable stent released through bare metal stent barbs. We believe that an unfavourable anatomy of a proximal aortic neck and visceral aorta may have caused a wrong stent strut deployment with the coverage of CA and SMA. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  7. Outcomes of Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair in Patients with Hostile Neck Anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choke, Edward; Munneke, Graham; Morgan, Robert; Belli, Anna-Maria; Loftus, Ian; McFarland, Robert; Loosemore, Thomas; Thompson, Matthew M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose. The principal anatomic contraindication to endovascular aneurysm repair (EVR) is an unfavorable proximal aortic neck. With increasing experience, a greater proportion of patients with unfavorable neck anatomy are being offered EVR. This study aimed to evaluate outcomes in patients with challenging proximal aortic neck anatomy. Methods. Prospectively collected data from 147 consecutive patients who underwent EVR between December 1997 and April 2005 were supplemented with a retrospective review of medical records and radiological images. Unfavorable anatomic features were defined as neck diameter >28 mm, angulation >60 deg., circumferential thrombus >50%, and length 30 days) (p = 0.57), distal type I endoleak (p = 0.40), type III endoleak (p 0.51), secondary interventions (p = 1.0), aneurysm sac expansion (p = 0.44), or 30 day mortality (p = 0.70). The good neck group had a significantly increased incidence of type II endoleak (p = 0.023). By multivariate analysis, the incidence of intraoperative adjunctive procedures was significantly increased in the presence of severe angulation (p = 0.041, OR 3.08, 95% CI 1.05-9.04). Conclusion. Patients with severely hostile proximal aortic neck anatomy may be treated with EVR, although severely angulated necks require additional intraoperative procedures. Early outcomes are encouraging and suggest that indications for EVR may be expanded to include patients with hostile neck anatomy

  8. Reverse extra-anatomic aortic arch debranching procedure allowing thoracic endovascular aortic repair of a chronic ascending aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovic Canaud, MD, PhD

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available A 79-year-old woman was admitted with a large chronic dissecting ascending aortic aneurysm starting 5 mm distal to the ostia of the left coronary artery and ending immediately proximal to the innominate artery. A reverse extra-anatomic aortic arch debranching procedure was performed. During the same operative time, through a transapical approach, a thoracic stent graft was deployed with the proximal landing zone just distal to the coronary ostia and the distal landing zone excluding the origin of the left common carotid artery. The postoperative course was uneventful. Computed tomography at 12 months documented patent extra-anatomic aortic arch debranching and no evidence of endoleak. Keywords: Ascending aorta, Thoracic aorta, Aortic dissection, Stent graft

  9. Celiac Trunk Embolization, as a Means of Elongating Short Distal Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Necks, Prior to Endovascular Aortic Repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belenky, Alexander; Haddad, Menashe; Idov, Igor; Knizhnik, Michael; Litvin, Sergey; Bachar, Gil N.; Atar, Eli

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report our experience in elongating short distal necks of descending thoracic aortic aneurysms (DTAAs) by coil embolization of the celiac trunk prior to endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). During 6 years seven patients (five men and two women; mean age, 74) who had DTAAs with short distal necks unsuitable for conventional EVAR, and well patent superior and inferior mesenteric arteries based on CT, were treated in one session with EVAR after the celiac trunk was coil embolized to elongate the neck. All patients were followed by CT every 3 months in the first year and every 6 months thereafter. Technical success was achieved in all patients, and no early or late ischemic complications were noted. No procedural complications occurred and good aneurysm sealing was obtained in all patients. Three endoleaks were identified after 3 months (one patient) and 6 months (two patients); all were treated successfully with insertion of an additional stent-graft. In patients with DTAAs who are candidates for EVAR but have short aneurysm distal necks, celiac trunk embolization-only if the superior and inferior mesenteric arteries are patent-is a good and safe way to elongate the neck and enable EVAR.

  10. Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair complicated by spondylodiscitis and iliaco-enteral fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Koning, Heleen D; van Sterkenburg, Steven M M; Pierie, Maurice E N; Reijnen, Michel M P J

    2008-06-01

    Infections of abdominal aortic endografts are rare. There are no reports on the association with spondylodiscitis. We report a case of a 74-year-old man who underwent endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and subsequently femorofemoral bypass placement due to occlusion of the right limb of the endograft. Six months later, he presented with rectal bleeding, weight loss, back pain, and low abdominal pain. Computed tomography revealed extensive abscess formation with air in and around the endograft and psoas muscles, in continuity with destructive spondylodiscitis L3-4. There was a small bowel loop in close proximity to the occluded right leg of the endograft, which was filled with air bubbles. An axillofemoral bypass was created followed by a laparotomy. Intra-operatively, an iliaco-enteral fistula was found. The small bowel defect was sutured, the endograft completely removed, and the infrarenal aorta and both common iliac arteries were closed. Necrotic fragments of the former L3-4 disk were removed. The postoperative course was uneventful. Seven months postoperatively, the patient had recovered well. Iliaco-enteric fistula and spondylodiscitis are rare complications of aortic aneurysm repair. This is the first report of spondylodiscitis after EVAR.

  11. Brain aneurysm repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aneurysm repair; Dissecting aneurysm repair; Endovascular aneurysm repair - brain; Subarachnoid hemorrhage - aneurysm ... Your scalp, skull, and the coverings of the brain are opened. A metal clip is placed at ...

  12. Comparison of three contemporary risk scores for mortality following elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, S W; Hickey, G L; Carlson, E D; McCollum, C N

    2014-07-01

    A number of contemporary risk prediction models for mortality following elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair have been developed. Before a model is used either in clinical practice or to risk-adjust surgical outcome data it is important that its performance is assessed in external validation studies. The British Aneurysm Repair (BAR) score, Medicare, and Vascular Governance North West (VGNW) models were validated using an independent prospectively collected sample of multicentre clinical audit data. Consecutive, data on 1,124 patients undergoing elective AAA repair at 17 hospitals in the north-west of England and Wales between April 2011 and March 2013 were analysed. The outcome measure was in-hospital mortality. Model calibration (observed to expected ratio with chi-square test, calibration plots, calibration intercept and slope) and discrimination (area under receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC]) were assessed in the overall cohort and procedural subgroups. The mean age of the population was 74.4 years (SD 7.7); 193 (17.2%) patients were women and the majority of patients (759, 67.5%) underwent endovascular aneurysm repair. All three models demonstrated good calibration in the overall cohort and procedural subgroups. Overall discrimination was excellent for the BAR score (AUC 0.83, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.76-0.89), and acceptable for the Medicare and VGNW models, with AUCs of 0.78 (95% CI 0.70-0.86) and 0.75 (95% CI 0.65-0.84) respectively. Only the BAR score demonstrated good discrimination in procedural subgroups. All three models demonstrated good calibration and discrimination for the prediction of in-hospital mortality following elective AAA repair and are potentially useful. The BAR score has a number of advantages, which include being developed on the most contemporaneous data, excellent overall discrimination, and good performance in procedural subgroups. Regular model validations and recalibration will be essential. Copyright

  13. Contemporary strategies for repair of complex thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms: real-world experiences and multilayer stents as an alternative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Robert Kolvenbach

    Full Text Available Abstract Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAA present special challenges for repair due to their extent, their distinctive pathology, and the fact that they typically cross the ostia of one or more visceral branch vessels. Historically, the established treatment for TAAA was open surgical repair, with the first procedure reported in 1955. Endovascular repair of TAAA with fenestrated and/ or branched endografts, has been studied since the beginning of the current century as a means of mechanical aneurysm exclusion. More recently, flow modulator stents have been employed with the aim at reducing shear stress on aortic aneurysmal wall. In this review we present technical and main results of these techniques, based on literature review and personal experience.

  14. Simultaneous repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm and resection of unexpected, associated abdominal malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, Giulio; Calio', Francesco G; D'Urso, Antonio; Lorusso, Riccardo; Ceccanei, Gianluca; Vietri, Francesco

    2004-12-15

    The management of unexpected intra-abdominal malignancy, discovered at laparotomy for elective treatment of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), is controversial. It is still unclear whether both conditions should be treated simultaneously or a staged approach is to be preferred. To contribute in improving treatment guidelines, we retrospectively reviewed the records of patients undergoing laparotomy for elective AAA repair. From January 1994 to March 2003, 253 patients underwent elective, trans-peritoneal repair of an AAA. In four patients (1.6%), an associated, unexpected neoplasm was detected at abdominal exploration, consisting of one renal, one gastric, one ileal carcinoid, and one ascending colon tumor. All of them were treated at the same operation, after aortic repair and careful isolation of the prosthetic graft. The whole series' operative mortality was 3.6%. None of the patients simultaneously treated for AAA and tumor resection died in the postoperative period. No graft-related infections were observed. Simultaneous treatment of AAA and tumor did not prolong significantly the mean length of stay in the hospital, compared to standard treatment of AAA alone. Except for malignancies of organs requiring major surgical resections, simultaneous AAA repair and resection of an associated, unexpected abdominal neoplasm can be safely performed, in most of the patients, sparing the need for a second procedure. Endovascular grafting of the AAA can be a valuable tool in simplifying simultaneous treatment, or in staging the procedures with a very short delay.

  15. Endovascular treatment of type II endoleak following thoracic endovascular aortic repair for thoracic aortic aneurysm: Case report of squeeze technique to reach the aneurysmal sac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyun Jung; Kim, Chang Won; Lee, Tae Hong; Song, Seung Hwan; Lee, Chung Won; Chung, Sung Woon [Pusan National University Hospital, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Type II endoleaks are common after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). Various strategies are introduced to manage type II endoleaks, such as the use of coils, plugs, or liquid embolic agents (histoacryl, thrombin, onyx, etc.) through a transarterial approach or a direct puncture of the aneurysmal sac. We herein report a case of a type II endoleak caused by reverse blood flow through intercostal artery after TEVAR which was successfully treated with n-butyl cyanoacrylate (histoacryl)-lipiodol mixture by a squeeze technique to reach the aneurismal sac using a microcatheter.

  16. Provider volume and outcomes for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, carotid endarterectomy, and lower extremity revascularization procedures.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Killeen, Shane D

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Intuitively, vascular procedures performed by high-volume vascular subspecialists working at high-volume institutions should be associated with improved patient outcome. Although a large number of studies assess the relationship between volume and outcome, a single contemporary compilation of such studies is lacking. METHODS: A review of the English language literature was performed incorporating searches of the Medline, EMBASE, and Cochrane collaboration databases for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (elective and emergent), carotid endarterectomy, and arterial lower limb procedures for any volume outcome relationship. Studies were included if they involved a patient cohort from 1980 onwards, were community or population based, and assessed health outcomes (mortality and morbidity) as a dependent variable and volume as an independent variable. RESULTS: We identified 74 relevant studies, and 54 were included. All showed either an inverse relationship of variable magnitude between provider volume and mortality, or no volume-outcome effect. The reduction in the risk-adjusted mortality rate (RAMR) for high-volume providers was 3% to 11% for elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair, 2.5 to 5% for emergent AAA repair, 0.7% to 4.7% carotid endarterectomy, and 0.3% to 0.9% for lower limb arterial bypass procedures. Subspeciality training also conferred a considerable morbidity and mortality benefit for emergent AAA repair, carotid endarterectomy, and lower limb arterial procedures. CONCLUSION: High-volume providers have significantly better outcomes for vascular procedures both in the elective and emergent setting. Subspeciality training also has a considerable impact. These data provide further evidence for the specialization of vascular services, whereby vascular procedures should generally be preformed by high-volume, speciality trained providers.

  17. Outcome after open surgery repair in endovascular-suitable patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenzien, Felix; Matia, Ivan; Wiltberger, Georg; Hau, Hans-Michael; Freitas, Bruno; Moche, Michael; Schmelzle, Moritz; Jonas, Sven; Fellmer, Peter T

    2013-11-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has been suggested in several studies to be superior to open surgery repair (OSR) for the treatment of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (rAAAs), but this finding might be affected by selection bias based on aneurysm morphology and patient characteristics. We tested rAAA anatomy according to EVAR suitability in patients undergoing OSR to assess the impact on mortality. This retrospective analysis reports on 83 patients with rAAAs treated between November 2002 and July 2013. Pre-operative computed tomography (CT) scans were evaluated based on EVAR suitability and were determined by blinded independent reviewers. CT scans were lacking due to acquisition in an external institution with no availability (n = 9) or solely ultrasound evaluations (n = 8). In addition patient characteristics and outcomes were assessed. All patients who underwent OSR and who had available preoperative CT scans were included in the study (n = 66). In summary, 42 % of the patients (28/66; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 30.5 - 54.4) were considered eligible for EVAR according to pre-operative CT scans and 58 % of the patients (38/66; 95 % CI, 45.6 - 69.5) were categorized as unsuitable for endovascular repair. Patients suitable for EVAR had a significantly lower prevalence of in-hospital deaths (25 % [7/28]; 95 % CI, 9 - 41) in contrast to patients unsuitable for EVAR (53 % [20/38]; 95 % CI, 36.8 - 68.5; p = 0.02). EVAR-suitable patients had a highly significant mortality reduction undergoing OSR. Thus, the present study proposes that EVAR suitability is a positive predictor for survival after open repair of rAAA.

  18. Hybrid Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Preservation of Pelvic Perfusion with External to Internal Iliac Artery Bypass.

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    Mansukhani, Neel A; Havelka, George E; Helenowski, Irene B; Rodriguez, Heron E; Hoel, Andrew W; Eskandari, Mark K

    2017-07-01

    Diminished pelvic arterial flow as a result of intentional coverage/embolization of internal iliac arteries (IIA) during isolated endovascular common iliac artery aneurysm (CIAA) repair or endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVAR) may result in symptomatic pelvic ischemia. Although generally well tolerated, in severe cases, pelvic ischemia may manifest as recalcitrant buttock claudication, vasculogenic impotence, or perineal, vesicle, rectal, and/or spinal cord ischemia. Branched graft technology has recently become available; however, many patients are not candidates for endovascular repair with these devices. Therefore, techniques to preserve pelvic arterial flow are needed. We reviewed our outcomes of isolated endovascular CIAA repair or EVAR in conjunction with unilateral external-internal iliac artery bypass. Single-center, retrospective review of 10 consecutive patients who underwent hybrid endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) or CIAA repair with concomitant external-internal iliac artery bypass between 2006 and 2015. Demographics, index procedural details, postoperative symptoms, hospital length of stay (LOS), follow-up imaging, and bypass patency were recorded. The cohort of 10 patients was all men with a mean age of 71 years (range: 56-84). Hybrid repair consisted of contralateral IIA coil embolization followed by EVAR with external iliac artery-internal iliac artery (EIA-IIA) bypass. All EIA-IIA bypasses were performed via a standard lower quadrant retroperitoneal approach with a prosthetic bypass graft. Technical success was 100%, and there were no perioperative deaths. One patient developed transient paraplegia, 1 patient had buttock claudication on the side of his hypogastric embolization contralateral to his iliac bypass, and 1 developed postoperative impotence. 20% of patients sustained long-term complications (buttock claudication and postoperative impotence). Mean LOS was 2.8 days (range: 1-9 days). Postoperative imaging

  19. Atypical Presentation of a Type 2 Endoleak following Emergency Open Repair of a Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

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    K. Sharma

    Full Text Available : Background: An endoleak is a common complication following EVAR. Specifically, a Type 2 endoleak occurs because of retrograde flow from lumbar vessels outside the endograft within the aneurysm sac. Even though it is common following EVAR, it has not been identified as a complication following open ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA repair. Report: A 73-year-old male underwent open repair of a ruptured AAA. Five months later, computed tomography revealed filling from a lumbar vessel mimicking a Type 2 “endoleak.” The initial ultrasound showed a single pair of lumbar vessels with aneurysm sac expansion 8 weeks later. The “endoleak” and expanding sac were treated, and the 2-year surveillance demonstrated sac shrinkage. Discussion: Because endoleak is a complication after EVAR, this case provides a unique presentation of Type 2 “endoleak” physiology following open repair of a ruptured AAA. It is believed that it is necessary to expand the list of possible complications after open ruptured AAA repair to include “endoleaks.” Keywords: Endoleak: EVAR, Ruptured aneurysm, Open abdominal aortic aneurysm

  20. Ten-Year Experience with Surgical Repair of Mycotic Aortic Aneurysms

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    I-Ming Chen

    2005-06-01

    Conclusion: Mycotic aneurysm of the aorta is a life-threatening disease, especially when rupture occurs. The high mortality rate is due not only to the high rupture rate, but also to sepsis. When mycotic aortic aneurysm is diagnosed, early surgical intervention is mandatory.

  1. Embolization by micro navigation for treatment of persistent type 2 Endoleaks after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

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    Bruno Lorenção de Almeida

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background:Endovascular repair has become established as a safe and effective method for treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms. One major complication of this treatment is leakage, or endoleaks, of which type 2 leaks are the most common.Objective:To conduct a brief review of the literature and evaluate the safety and effectiveness of embolization by micronavigation for treatment of type 2 endoleaks.Method:A review of medical records from patients who underwent endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms identified 5 patients with persistent type 2 endoleaks. These patients were submitted to embolization by micronavigation.Results:In all cases, angiographic success was achieved and control CT scans showed absence of type 2 leaks and aneurysm sacs that had reduced in size after the procedure.Conclusion:Treatment of type 2 endoleaks using embolization by micronavigation is an effective and safe method and should be considered as a treatment option for this complication after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

  2. Contemporary economic and clinical evaluations of endovascular repair for intact descending thoracic aortic aneurysms.

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    Silingardi, Roberto; Gennai, Stefano; Coppi, Giovanni; Chester, Johanna; Marcheselli, Luigi; Brunetti, Massimo

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess clinical and contemporary costs associated with elective endovascular repair of intact descending thoracic aortic aneurysms (DTAA) into the mid-term follow-up. A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained clinical database including 29 consecutive patients from July 2005 to December 2009 treated with elective endovascular repair (TEVAR) or TEVAR and surgical infrarenal repair (hybrid) of intact DTAA was performed. Mean age was 74.5 years old (±7.1). Primary clinical endpoints include mortality and major morbidity. Additionally a comprehensive economic appraisal of individual in-hospital and follow-up costs was executed. Economic endpoints include in-hospital and follow-up costs and patient discharge status. Elective endovascular and open repairs' clinical and economical outcomes in contemporary literature were assessed for comparison according to PRISMA standards. Immediate mortality was 6.9% (1/24 TEVAR and 1/5 hybrid). Three respiratory complications were recorded (11%; 2 TEVAR, 1 hybrid). Renal and cardiac complication rates were 7.4% (1 TEVAR, 1 hybrid) and 3.7% (1 TEVAR) respectively. Routine discharge home was achieved for 85% of patients (95.7% TEVAR, 25% hybrid). Three endoleaks were treated throughout the follow-up (2 TEVAR, 1 hybrid; mean 30.4 mo, ±19.9) rendering an 11% (3/27) reintervention rate. Average immediate cost was €21,976.87 for elective endovascular repair and €33,783.21 for elective endovascular hybrid repair. Additional reintervention and routine follow-up costs augmented immediate costs by 12.4%. This study supports satisfying immediate clinical outcomes for TEVAR and TEVAR+surgical infrarenal procedures. Although limited by a small population size and difficulties in economic comparisons, this study presents the real world social and economic cost scenario for both elective TEVAR and TEVAR hybrid treatment of DTAA of both the in-hospital and at mid term follow-up periods.

  3. Sequential Hybrid Repair of Aorta and Bilateral Common Iliac Arteries Secondary to Chronic Aortic Dissection with Extensive Aneurysmal Degeneration in a Marfan Patient.

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    Hinojosa, Carlos A; Anaya-Ayala, Javier E; Laparra-Escareno, Hugo; Lizola, Rene; Torres-Machorro, Adriana

    2017-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is a connective tissue disorder associated with aortic dissection, aneurysmal degeneration and rupture. These cardiovascular complications represent the main cause of mortality, therefore repair is indicated. We present a 35-year-old woman who experienced acute onset of chest pain. Her imaging revealed a chronic DeBakey type I dissection with aortic root dilation and descending thoracic aneurysmal degeneration. She underwent a Bentall procedure and endovascular exclusion of the descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. She was closely followed and 2 years later a computed tomography angiography (CTA) revealed the aneurysmal degeneration of the thoracoabominal aorta and bilateral iliac arteries. The patient underwent a composite reconstruction using multi-visceral branched and bifurcated Dacron grafts. At 5 years from her last surgery, a CTA revealed no new dissection or further aneurysmal degenerations. Aortic disease in Marfan patients is a complex clinical problem that may lead to secondary or tertiary aortic reconstructions; close follow-up is mandatory.

  4. Duplex ultrasound and computed tomography angiography in the follow-up of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantador, Alex Aparecido; Siqueira, Daniel Emilio Dalledone; Jacobsen, Octavio Barcellos; Baracat, Jamal; Pereira, Ines Minniti Rodrigues; Menezes, Fabio Hüsemann; Guillaumon, Ana Terezinha

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare duplex ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) angiography in terms of their performance in detecting endoleaks, as well as in determining the diameter of the aneurysm sac, in the postoperative follow-up of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study involving 30 patients who had undergone endovascular repair of infrarenal aortoiliac aneurysms. Duplex ultrasound and CT angiography were performed simultaneously by independent radiologists. Measurements of the aneurysm sac diameter were assessed, and the presence or absence of endoleaks was determined. Results: The average diameter of the aneurysm sac, as determined by duplex ultrasound and CT angiography was 6.09 ± 1.95 and 6.27 ± 2.16 cm, respectively. Pearson's correlation coefficient showing a statistically significant correlation (R = 0.88; p < 0.01). Comparing the duplex ultrasound and CT angiography results regarding the detection of endoleaks, we found that the former had a negative predictive value of 92.59% and a specificity of 96.15%. Conclusion: Our results show that there is little variation between the two methods evaluated, and that the choice between the two would have no significant effect on clinical management. Duplex ultrasound could replace CT angiography in the postoperative follow-up of endovascular aneurysm repair of the infrarenal aorta, because it is a low-cost procedure without the potential clinical complications related to the use of iodinated contrast and exposure to radiation. (author)

  5. Duplex ultrasound and computed tomography angiography in the follow-up of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: a comparative study

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    Cantador, Alex Aparecido; Siqueira, Daniel Emilio Dalledone; Jacobsen, Octavio Barcellos; Baracat, Jamal; Pereira, Ines Minniti Rodrigues; Menezes, Fabio Hüsemann; Guillaumon, Ana Terezinha, E-mail: alex_cantador@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (FCM/UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas

    2016-07-15

    Objective: To compare duplex ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) angiography in terms of their performance in detecting endoleaks, as well as in determining the diameter of the aneurysm sac, in the postoperative follow-up of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study involving 30 patients who had undergone endovascular repair of infrarenal aortoiliac aneurysms. Duplex ultrasound and CT angiography were performed simultaneously by independent radiologists. Measurements of the aneurysm sac diameter were assessed, and the presence or absence of endoleaks was determined. Results: The average diameter of the aneurysm sac, as determined by duplex ultrasound and CT angiography was 6.09 ± 1.95 and 6.27 ± 2.16 cm, respectively. Pearson's correlation coefficient showing a statistically significant correlation (R = 0.88; p < 0.01). Comparing the duplex ultrasound and CT angiography results regarding the detection of endoleaks, we found that the former had a negative predictive value of 92.59% and a specificity of 96.15%. Conclusion: Our results show that there is little variation between the two methods evaluated, and that the choice between the two would have no significant effect on clinical management. Duplex ultrasound could replace CT angiography in the postoperative follow-up of endovascular aneurysm repair of the infrarenal aorta, because it is a low-cost procedure without the potential clinical complications related to the use of iodinated contrast and exposure to radiation. (author)

  6. Calculating when elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair improves survival for individual patients: development of the Aneurysm Repair Decision Aid and economic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Stuart W; Sperrin, Matthew; Carlson, Eric; Chinai, Natasha; Ntais, Dionysios; Hamilton, Matthew; Dunn, Graham; Buchan, Iain; Davies, Linda; McCollum, Charles N

    2015-04-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair aims to prevent premature death from AAA rupture. Elective repair is currently recommended when AAA diameter reaches 5.5 cm (men) and 5.0 cm (women). Applying population-based indications may not be appropriate for individual patient decisions, as the optimal indication is likely to differ between patients based on age and comorbidities. To develop an Aneurysm Repair Decision Aid (ARDA) to indicate when elective AAA repair optimises survival for individual patients and to assess the cost-effectiveness and associated uncertainty of elective repair at the aneurysm diameter recommended by the ARDA compared with current practice. The UK Vascular Governance North West and National Vascular Database provided individual patient data to develop predictive models for perioperative mortality and survival. Data from published literature were used to model AAA growth and risk of rupture. The cost-effectiveness analysis used data from published literature and from local and national databases. A combination of systematic review methods and clinical registries were used to provide data to populate models and inform the structure of the ARDA. Discrete event simulation (DES) was used to model the patient journey from diagnosis to death and synthesised data were used to estimate patient outcomes and costs for elective repair at alternative aneurysm diameters. Eight patient clinical scenarios (vignettes) were used as exemplars. The DES structure was validated by clinical and statistical experts. The economic evaluation estimated costs, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) from the NHS, social care provider and patient perspective over a lifetime horizon. Cost-effectiveness acceptability analyses and probabilistic sensitivity analyses explored uncertainty in the data and the value for money of ARDA-based decisions. The ARDA outcome measures include perioperative mortality risk, annual risk of

  7. Periprocedural and long-term outcomes of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in cardiology practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basoor, Abhijeet; Patel, Kiritkumar C; Halabi, Abdul R; Todorov, Mina; Senthilvadivel, Prashanth; Choksi, Nishit; Phan, Thanh; LaLonde, Thomas; Yamasaki, Hiroshi; DeGregorio, Michele

    2014-12-01

    Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) has recently been made a class I indication in the treatment of AAA. In comparison to the conventional open surgical treatment, endovascular AAA repair (EVAR) is associated with equivalent long-term morbidity and mortality rates. Vascular surgeons perform majority of EVAR. There are no reports for the long-term results of this intervention performed by interventional cardiologists. We present one of the first reports of periprocedural and long-term outcomes of EVAR performed by interventional cardiologists. Retrospective chart review on patients with attempted EVAR between September 2005 and January 2011 was performed. Included cases were all consecutive patients who had attempted EVAR by interventional cardiologists. During the study period EVAR was attempted in 170 patients, with 27% being women. The mean age was 74 years (range 52-93). The endovascular graft placement was successful in 96% (163/170) of patients. Procedure failures were more common in women (6 of 46 vs 1 of 124, P = 0.003). The 30-day mortality was 1.8 % (3 of 170). In patients with successful EVAR the mean follow-up was 30 months and mean length of hospital stay was 3.5 ± 3.2 days. Major periprocedural complications were noted in 9% patients (15 of 167). During follow-up, six patients (3.5%) required re-intervention and additional 16 patients died with no aneurysm related deaths. EVAR primarily performed by interventional cardiologists demonstrates high periprocedural and long-term success rates. A higher EVAR failure rate has been observed in women. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Duodenal Obstruction after Elective Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: A Case Report

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    Chun-Yao Lin

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal tract complications after abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA repair are well known. The reported frequency ranges from 6.6% to 21%. However, the incidence of duodenal obstruction following AAA has probably been underestimated. This report concerns a 78-year-old male who was admitted for elective repair of an infrarenal AAA. On the ninth postoperative day, the patient presented with large quantities of bile-stained vomitus despite passing flatus per rectum. Metoclopramide and ranitidine were given under the initial impression of paralytic ileus. However, the upper gastrointestinal obstruction persisted, and on day 12, computerized tomography (CT revealed marked distension of the gastric tube and duodenum, down to the level of the third portion, with abrupt change of caliber at the point of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA. SMA syndrome was diagnosed. After nasogastric tube aspiration, parenteral nutrition, and 11 days of conservative treatment, abdominal CT and upper gastrointestinal series showed no apparent duodenal obstruction. The patient was discharged on the 29th postoperative day; follow-up abdominal CT 4 months later was unremarkable.

  9. 3D printing of an aortic aneurysm to facilitate decision making and device selection for endovascular aneurysm repair in complex neck anatomy.

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    Tam, Matthew D B S; Laycock, Stephen D; Brown, James R I; Jakeways, Matthew

    2013-12-01

    To describe rapid prototyping or 3-dimensional (3D) printing of aneurysms with complex neck anatomy to facilitate endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). A 75-year-old man had a 6.6-cm infrarenal aortic aneurysm that appeared on computed tomographic angiography to have a sharp neck angulation of ~90°. However, although the computed tomography (CT) data were analyzed using centerline of flow, the true neck length and relations of the ostial origins were difficult to determine. No multidisciplinary consensus could be reached as to which stent-graft to use owing to these borderline features of the neck anatomy. Based on past experience with rapid prototyping technology, a decision was taken to print a model of the aneurysm to aid in visualization of the neck anatomy. The CT data were segmented, processed, and converted into a stereolithographic format representing the lumen as a 3D volume, from which a full-sized replica was printed within 24 hours. The model demonstrated that the neck was adequate for stent-graft repair using the Aorfix device. Rapid prototyping of aortic aneurysms is feasible and can aid decision making and device delivery. Further work is required to test the value of 3D replicas in planning procedures and their impact on procedure time, radiation dose, and procedure cost.

  10. Initial clinical experience with a sac-anchoring endoprosthesis for aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donayre, Carlos E; Zarins, Christopher K; Krievins, Dainis K; Holden, Andrew; Hill, Andrew; Calderas, Carlos; Velez, Jaime; White, Rodney A

    2011-03-01

    All current aortic endografts depend on proximal and distal fixation to prevent migration. However, migration and rupture can occur, particularly in patients with aortic necks that are short or angulated, or both. We present our initial clinical experience with a new sac-anchoring endoprosthesis designed to anchor and seal the device within the aneurysm sac. The initial worldwide experience using a new endoprosthesis for the treatment of aortic aneurysms (Nellix Endovascular, Palo Alto, Calif) was reviewed. The endoprosthesis consists of dual balloon-expandable endoframes surrounded by polymer-filled endobags designed to obliterate the aneurysm sac and maintain endograft position. Clinical results and follow-up contrast computed tomography (CT) scans at 30 days and 6 and 12 months were reviewed. The endograft was successfully deployed in 21 patients with infrarenal aortic aneurysms measuring 5.7 ± 0.7 cm (range, 4.3-7.4 cm). Two patients with common iliac aneurysms were treated with sac-anchoring extenders that maintained patency of the internal iliac artery. Infusion of 71 ± 37 mL of polymer (range, 19-158 mL) into the aortic endobags resulted in complete aneurysm exclusion in all patients. Mean implant time was 76 ± 35 minutes, with 33 ± 17 minutes of fluoroscopy time and 180 ± 81 mL of contrast; estimated blood loss was 174 ± 116 mL. One patient died during the postoperative period (30-day mortality, 4.8%), and one died at 10 months from non-device-related causes. During a mean follow-up of 8.7 ± 3.1 months and a median of 6.3 months, there were no late aneurysm- or device-related adverse events and no secondary procedures. CT imaging studies at 6 months and 1 year revealed no increase in aneurysm size, no device migration, and no new endoleaks. One patient had a limited proximal type I endoleak at 30 days that resolved at 60 days and remained sealed. One patient has an ongoing distal type I endoleak near the iliac bifurcation, with no change in aneurysm

  11. Mid-term outcomes of endovascular aortic aneurysm repair with carbon dioxide-guided angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yuriko; Morikage, Noriyasu; Matsuno, Yutaro; Nakamura, Tamami; Samura, Makoto; Ueda, Koshiro; Harada, Takasuke; Ikeda, Yoshitaka; Suehiro, Kotaro; Ito, Hiroshi; Sakata, Kensuke; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2018-05-14

    Although iodinated contrast (IC) agents are commonly used in endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), perioperative use in patients with renal dysfunction or IC allergies is avoided. Carbon dioxide (CO 2 )-guided angiography is a promising alternative. We aimed to evaluate short-term and mid-term outcomes of EVAR using CO 2 -guided angiography. Three hundred and eighty-one patients who underwent EVAR from January 2012 to September 2016 were retrospectively reviewed and divided into an IC-EVAR group (n=351) and CO 2 -EVAR group (n=30). Subjects in the CO 2 -EVAR group had severe renal dysfunction (n=27) and IC allergy (n=4). Intraoperative, postoperative, and follow-up variables were compared. Compared to the IC-EVAR group, preoperative serum creatinine level was significantly higher (2.0 vs. 0.92 mg/dL, P < .0001) and mean IC dose significantly lower (18 vs. 55 mL P < .0001) in the CO 2 -EVAR group. The fluoroscopy time, operative time, number of stent grafts placed, and technical success rates of the groups were similar; no type I and/or type III endoleaks were detected on completion angiography. There was no acute kidney injury and one case of intestinal necrosis in the CO 2 -EVAR group, potentially due to cholesterol embolism. Postoperative endoleak, enlargement of aneurysms, survival, freedom from secondary intervention, and renal function change up to 3 months postoperatively were similar between groups. CO 2 -EVAR is technically feasible and exhibits prominent renal protection. However, consideration of the aortic lumen status remains an important challenge. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Outcomes and Prognostic Factors of Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair in Patients with Hostile Neck Anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Hye Doo; Lee, Yun Young; Lee, Seung Jin; Yim, Nam Yeol; Kim, Jae Kyu; Choi, Soo Jin Na; Jung, Sang Young; Chang, Nam Kyu; Lim, Jae Hoon

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the outcomes and find the prognostic factors of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) in patients with hostile neck anatomy of the abdominal aorta. This study was performed on 100 patients with abdominal aneurysm who were treated with EVAR between March 2006 and December 2010. We divided the patients into two groups: good neck anatomy (GNA), and hostile neck anatomy (HNA) and then compared the primary success rate and the incidence rate of complications with EVAR between the two groups. Our aim was to determine the factors related to the complications of EVAR among HNA types. There were no significant differences of primary success rate and incidence rate of complications between the two groups. Among the types of HNA, the short neck angle [odd ratio (OR), 4.23; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.21-18.70; p = 0.023] and large neck angle (OR, 2.58; 95% CI, 0.15-11.85; p = 0.031) showed a low primary success rate. The short neck angle (OR, 2.32; 95% CI, 1.18-12.29; p = 0.002) and large neck angle (OR, 4.67; 95% CI, 0.14-19.07; p = 0.032) showed a high incidence rate of early type 1 complication. In the case of the large neck angle (OR, 3.78; 95% CI, 0.96-20.80; p = 0.047), the large neck thrombus (OR, 2.23; 95% CI, 0.24-7.12; p = 0.035) and large neck calcification (OR, 2.50; 95% CI, 0.08-18.37; p 0.043) showed a high incidence rate of complications within a year. The results suggest that patients with hostile neck anatomy can be treated with EVAR successfully, although there was a higher incidence of complications in patients with a short neck length, severe neck angulation, circumferential thrombosis, and calcified proximal neck.

  13. Trends in treatment of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: impact of endovascular repair and implications for future care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Brian D; Azefor, Nchang; Huang, Chun-Chih; Ricotta, John J

    2013-04-01

    Our aim was to determine national trends in treatment of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA), with specific emphasis on open surgical repair (OSR) and endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and its impact on mortality and complications. Data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) from 2005 to 2009 were queried to identify patients older than 59 years with RAAA. Three groups were studied: nonoperative (NO), EVAR, and OSR. Chi-square analysis was used to determine the relationship between treatment type and patient demographics, clinical characteristics, and hospital type. The impact of EVAR compared with OSR on mortality and overall complications was examined using logistic regression analysis. We identified 21,206 patients with RAAA from 2005 to 2009, of which 16,558 (78.1%) underwent operative repair and 21.8% received no operative treatment. In the operative group, 12,761 (77.1%) underwent OSR and 3,796 (22.9%) underwent EVAR. Endovascular aneurysm repair was more common in teaching hospitals (29.1% vs 15.2%, p < .0001) and in urban versus rural settings. Nonoperative approach was twice as common in rural versus urban hospitals. Reduced mortality was seen in patients transferred from another institutions (31.2% vs 39.4%, p = 0.014). Logistic regression analysis demonstrated a benefit of EVAR on both complication rate (OR = 0.492; CI, 0.380-0.636) and mortality (OR=0.535; CI, 0.395-0.724). Endovascular aneurysm repair use is increasing for RAAA and is more common in urban teaching hospitals while NO therapy is more common in rural hospitals. Endovascular aneurysm repair is associated with reduced mortality and complications across all age groups. Efforts to reduce mortality from RAAA should concentrate on reducing NO and OSR in patients who are suitable for EVAR. Copyright © 2013 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Repair of aortic arch aneurysm under cardiopulmonary bypass and deep hypothermia with low flow: A case report

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    Md. Rezwanul Hoque

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aortic arch surgery is the challenging and most difficult surgery among the cardiovascular operations. Cerebral and spinal complications are the most feared and common complications of aortic arch surgery. With best available techniques for cerebral and spinal protection, anesthetic management and good post-operative care; aortic arch surgery is considerably safer nowadays and satisfactory results can be achieved in most patients. Also, selecting the sites for arterial cannulation to maintain whole body circulation, during isolation of the aortic arch to operate on it, need proper anatomical description of the extent of the aneurysm. This is also achievable by the availability of the imaging techniques like Computed Tomog­raphy (CT with or without contrast, CT Angiography (CTA and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI. We are reporting a case of aneurysm of aortic arch in a young adult, who had undergone repair under cardiopulmonary bypass and deep hypothermia with low flow and had normal convalescence without any cerebral or spinal complications.

  15. Endovascular strategy or open repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: one-year outcomes from the IMPROVE randomized trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, Bruce; Cheshire, Nicholas J.; Greenhalgh, Roger M.; Grieve, Richard; Hassan, Tajek B.; Hinchliffe, Robert; Howell, Simon; Moore, Fionna; Nicholson, Anthony A.; Soong, Chee V.; Thompson, Matt M.; Thompson, Simon G.; Ulug, Pinar; Heatley, Francine; Anjum, Aisha; Kalinowska, Gosia; Sweeting, Michael J.; Thompson, Simon G.; Gomes, Manuel; Grieve, Richard; Powell, Janet T.; Ashleigh, Ray; Gomes, Manuel; Greenhalgh, Roger M.; Grieve, Richard; Hinchliffe, Robert; Sweeting, Michael; Thompson, Matt M.; Thompson, Simon G.; Ulug, Pinar; Roberts, Ian; Bell, Peter R. F.; Cheetham, Anne; Stephany, Jenny; Warlow, Charles; Lamont, Peter; Moss, Jonathan; Tijssen, Jan; Braithwaite, Bruce; Nicholson, Anthony A.; Thompson, Matthew; Ashleigh, Ray; Thompson, Luke; Cheshire, Nicholas J.; Boyle, Jonathan R.; Serracino-Inglott, Ferdinand; Thompson, Matt M.; Hinchliffe, Robert J.; Bell, Rachel; Wilson, Noel; Bown, Matt; Dennis, Martin; Davis, Meryl; Ashleigh, Ray; Howell, Simon; Wyatt, Michael G.; Valenti, Domenico; Bachoo, Paul; Walker, Paul; MacSweeney, Shane; Davies, Jonathan N.; Rittoo, Dynesh; Parvin, Simon D.; Yusuf, Waquar; Nice, Colin; Chetter, Ian; Howard, Adam; Chong, Patrick; Bhat, Raj; McLain, David; Gordon, Andrew; Lane, Ian; Hobbs, Simon; Pillay, Woolagasen; Rowlands, Timothy; El-Tahir, Amin; Asquith, John; Cavanagh, Steve; Dubois, Luc; Forbes, Thomas L.; Ashworth, Emily; Baker, Sara; Barakat, Hashem; Brady, Claire; Brown, Joanne; Bufton, Christine; Chance, Tina; Chrisopoulou, Angela; Cockell, Marie; Croucher, Andrea; Dabee, Leela; Dewhirst, Nikki; Evans, Jo; Gibson, Andy; Gorst, Siobhan; Gough, Moira; Graves, Lynne; Griffin, Michelle; Hatfield, Josie; Hogg, Florence; Howard, Susannah; Hughes, Cían; Metcalfe, David; Lapworth, Michelle; Massey, Ian; Novick, Teresa; Owen, Gareth; Parr, Noala; Pintar, David; Spencer, Sarah; Thomson, Claire; Thunder, Orla; Wallace, Tom; Ward, Sue; Wealleans, Vera; Wilson, Lesley; Woods, Janet; Zheng, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Aims To report the longer term outcomes following either a strategy of endovascular repair first or open repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm, which are necessary for both patient and clinical decision-making. Methods and results This pragmatic multicentre (29 UK and 1 Canada) trial randomized 613 patients with a clinical diagnosis of ruptured aneurysm; 316 to an endovascular first strategy (if aortic morphology is suitable, open repair if not) and 297 to open repair. The principal 1-year outcome was mortality; secondary outcomes were re-interventions, hospital discharge, health-related quality-of-life (QoL) (EQ-5D), costs, Quality-Adjusted-Life-Years (QALYs), and cost-effectiveness [incremental net benefit (INB)]. At 1 year, all-cause mortality was 41.1% for the endovascular strategy group and 45.1% for the open repair group, odds ratio 0.85 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.62, 1.17], P = 0.325, with similar re-intervention rates in each group. The endovascular strategy group and open repair groups had average total hospital stays of 17 and 26 days, respectively, P < 0.001. Patients surviving rupture had higher average EQ-5D utility scores in the endovascular strategy vs. open repair groups, mean differences 0.087 (95% CI 0.017, 0.158), 0.068 (95% CI −0.004, 0.140) at 3 and 12 months, respectively. There were indications that QALYs were higher and costs lower for the endovascular first strategy, combining to give an INB of £3877 (95% CI £253, £7408) or €4356 (95% CI €284, €8323). Conclusion An endovascular first strategy for management of ruptured aneurysms does not offer a survival benefit over 1 year but offers patients faster discharge with better QoL and is cost-effective. Clinical trial registration ISRCTN 48334791. PMID:25855369

  16. Transretroperitoneal CT-guided Embolization of Growing Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysm after Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: A Transretroperitoneal Approach with Intramuscular Lidocaine Injection Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Joon Young, E-mail: pjy1331@hanmail.net; Kim, Shin Jung, E-mail: witdd2@hanmail.net; Kim, Hyoung Ook, E-mail: chaos821209@hanmail.net [Chonnam National University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Tae, E-mail: mono-111@hanmail.net [Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Nam Yeol, E-mail: apleseed@hanmail.net; Kim, Jae Kyu, E-mail: kjkrad@jnu.ac.kr [Chonnam National University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Sang Young, E-mail: sycpvts@jnu.ac.kr; Choi, Soo Jin Na, E-mail: choisjn@jnu.ac.kr; Lee, Ho Kyun, E-mail: mhaha@hanmail.net [Chonnam National University Hospital, Department of Surgery (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of CT-guided embolization of internal iliac artery aneurysm (IIAA) after repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm by transretroperitoneal approach using the lidocaine injection technique to iliacus muscle, making window for safe needle path for three patients for whom CT-guided embolization of IIAA was performed by transretroperitoneal approach with intramuscular lidocaine injection technique. Transretroperitoneal access to the IIAA was successful in all three patients. In all three patients, the IIAA was first embolized using microcoils. The aneurysmal sac was then embolized with glue and coils without complication. With a mean follow-up of 7 months, the volume of the IIAAs remained stable without residual endoleaks. Transretroperitoneal CT-guided embolization of IIAA using intramuscular lidocaine injection technique is effective, safe, and results in good outcome.

  17. Blood flow dynamic improvement with aneurysm repair detected by a patient-specific model of multiple aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sughimoto, Koichi; Takahara, Yoshiharu; Mogi, Kenji; Yamazaki, Kenji; Tsubota, Ken'ichi; Liang, Fuyou; Liu, Hao

    2014-05-01

    Aortic aneurysms may cause the turbulence of blood flow and result in the energy loss of the blood flow, while grafting of the dilated aorta may ameliorate these hemodynamic disturbances, contributing to the alleviation of the energy efficiency of blood flow delivery. However, evaluating of the energy efficiency of blood flow in an aortic aneurysm has been technically difficult to estimate and not comprehensively understood yet. We devised a multiscale computational biomechanical model, introducing novel flow indices, to investigate a single male patient with multiple aortic aneurysms. Preoperative levels of wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index (OSI) were elevated but declined after staged grafting procedures: OSI decreased from 0.280 to 0.257 (first operation) and 0.221 (second operation). Graftings may strategically counter the loss of efficient blood delivery to improve hemodynamics of the aorta. The energy efficiency of blood flow also improved postoperatively. Novel indices of pulsatile pressure index (PPI) and pulsatile energy loss index (PELI) were evaluated to characterize and quantify energy loss of pulsatile blood flow. Mean PPI decreased from 0.445 to 0.423 (first operation) and 0.359 (second operation), respectively; while the preoperative PELI of 0.986 dropped to 0.820 and 0.831. Graftings contributed not only to ameliorate wall shear stress or oscillatory shear index but also to improve efficient blood flow. This patient-specific modeling will help in analyzing the mechanism of aortic aneurysm formation and may play an important role in quantifying the energy efficiency or loss in blood delivery.

  18. Treatment strategy for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidovic, L

    2014-07-01

    Rupture is the most serious and lethal complication of the abdominal aortic aneurysm. Despite all improvements during the past 50 years, ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms are still associated with very high mortality. Namely, including patients who die before reaching the hospital, the mortality rate due to abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture is 90%. On the other hand, during the last twenty years, the number of abdominal aortic aneurysms significantly increased. One of the reasons is the fact that in majority of countries the general population is older nowadays. Due to this, the number of degenerative AAA is increasing. This is also the case for patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture. Age must not be the reason of a treatment refusal. Optimal therapeutic option ought to be found. The following article is based on literature analysis including current guidelines but also on my Clinics significant experience. Furthermore, this article show cases options for vascular medicine in undeveloped countries that can not apply endovascular procedures at a sufficient level and to a sufficient extent. At this moment the following is evident. Thirty-day-mortality after repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms is significantly lower in high-volume hospitals. Due to different reasons all ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms are not suitable for EVAR. Open repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm should be performed by experienced open vascular surgeons. This could also be said for the treatment of endovascular complications that require open surgical conversion. There is no ideal procedure for the treatment of AAA. Each has its own advantages and disadvantages, its own limits and complications, as well as indications and contraindications. Future reductions in mortality of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms will depend on implementation of population-based screening; on strategies to prevent postoperative organ injury and also on new medical technology

  19. Brain aneurysm repair - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000123.htm Brain aneurysm repair - discharge To use the sharing features ... this page, please enable JavaScript. You had a brain aneurysm . An aneurysm is a weak area in ...

  20. Correlation between intrasac pressure measurements of a pressure sensor and an angiographic catheter during endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Galvagni Silveira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To establish a correlation between intrasac pressure measurements of a pressure sensor and an angiographic catheter placed in the same aneurysm sac before and after its exclusion by an endoprosthesis. METHODS: Patients who underwent endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair and received an EndoSureTM wireless pressure sensor implant between March 19 and December 11, 2004 were enrolled in the study. Simultaneous readings of systolic, diastolic, mean, and pulse pressure within the aneurysm sac were obtained from the catheter and the sensor, both before and after sac exclusion by the endoprosthesis (Readings 1 and 2, respectively. Intrasac pressure measurements were compared using Pearson's correlation and Student's t test. Statistical significance was set at p0.05, mean (p>0.05, and pulse (p0.05 by the sensor. CONCLUSION: The excellent agreement between intrasac pressure readings recorded by the catheter and the sensor justifies use of the latter for detection of post-exclusion abdominal aortic aneurysm pressurization.

  1. Treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm in nine countries 2005-2009: a vascunet report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mani, K; Lees, T; Beiles, B

    2011-01-01

    To study contemporary treatment and outcome of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair in nine countries.......To study contemporary treatment and outcome of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair in nine countries....

  2. Aortic root repair for thoracic aorta false aneurysm following Bentall procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Jones, Steve; Sivananthan, U M; McGoldrick, J P

    2008-08-01

    The Bentall procedure for aortic root replacement in Marfan's syndrome is safe and durable. We describe successful repair of periprosthetic valvular leak, 12 years following Bentall repair with composite graft. The aim of this report is to analyse and evaluate technical factors leading to this unusual occurrence.

  3. Regional Differences in Case Mix and Peri-operative Outcome After Elective Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair in the Vascunet Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, K; Venermo, M; Beiles, B; Menyhei, G; Altreuther, M; Loftus, I; Björck, M

    2015-06-01

    National differences exist in the outcome of elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. The role of case mix variation was assessed based on an international vascular registry collaboration. All elective AAA repairs with aneurysm size data in the Vascunet database in the period 2005-09 were included. AAA size and peri-operative outcome (crude and age adjusted mortality) were analysed overall and in risk cohorts, as well as per country. Glasgow Aneurysm Score (GAS) was calculated as risk score, and patients were stratified in three equal sized risk cohorts based on GAS. Predictors of peri-operative mortality were analysed with multiple regression. Missing data were handled with multiple imputation. Patients from Australia, Finland, Hungary, Norway, Sweden and the UK (n = 5,895) were analysed; mean age was 72.7 years and 54% had endovascular repair (EVAR). There were significant variations in GAS (lowest = Finland [75.7], highest = UK [79.4], p for comparison of all regions 82. Of those with a GAS >82, 8.4% of men and 20.8% of women had an AAA case selection for elective AAA repair, including variations in AAA size and patient risk profile. These differences partly explain the variations in peri-operative mortality. Further audit is warranted to assess the underlying reasons for the regional variation in case-mix. Copyright © 2015 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Laparotomy during endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms increases mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkar, Shaunak S; Turley, Ryan S; Benrashid, Ehsan; Cox, Mitchell W; Mureebe, Leila; Shortell, Cynthia K

    2017-02-01

    Subset analyses from small case series suggest patients requiring laparotomy during endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (REVAR) have worse survival than those undergoing REVAR without laparotomy. Most concomitant laparotomies are performed for abdominal compartment syndrome. This study used data from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program to determine whether the need for laparotomy during REVAR is associated with increased mortality. Data were obtained from the 2005 to 2013 National Surgical Quality Improvement Program participant user files based on Current Procedural Terminology (American Medical Association, Chicago, Ill) and International Classification of Diseases-9 Edition coding. Patient and procedure-related characteristics and 30-day postoperative outcomes were compared using Pearson χ 2 tests for categoric variables and Wilcoxon rank sum tests for continuous variables. A backward-stepwise multivariable logistic regression model was used to identify patient- and procedure-related factors associated with increased death after REVAR. We identified 1241 patients who underwent REVAR, and 91 (7.3%) required concomitant laparotomy. The 30-day mortality was 60% in the laparotomy group and 21% in the standard REVAR group (P < .001). The major complication rate was also higher in the laparotomy group (88% vs 63%; P < .001). Multivariable analysis showed laparotomy was strongly associated with 30-day mortality (odds ratio, 5.91; 95% confidence interval, 3.62-9.62; P < .001). Laparotomy during REVAR is a commonly used technique for the management of elevated intra-abdominal pressure and abdominal compartment syndrome development. The results of this study strongly confirm findings from smaller studies that the need for laparotomy during REVAR is associated with significantly worse 30-day survival. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. The Burden of Hard Atherosclerotic Plaques Does Not Promote Endoleak Development After Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair: A Risk Stratification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, Johannes; Glodny, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To objectify the influence of the atherosclerotic burden in the proximal landing zone on the development of endoleaks after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) or thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR) using objective aortic calcium scoring (ACS). Materials and Methods: This retrospective observation study included 267 patients who received an aortic endograft between 1997 and 2010 and for whom preoperative computed tomography (CT) was available to perform ACS using the CT-based V600 method. The mean follow-up period was 2 ± 2.3 years. Results: Type I endoleaks persisted in 45 patients (16.9%), type II in 34 (12.7%), type III in 8 (3%), and type IV or V in 3 patients, respectively (1.1% each). ACS in patients with type I endoleaks was not increased: 0.029 ± 0.061 ml compared with 0.075 ± 0.1349 ml in the rest of the patients, (p > 0.05; Whitney–Mann U-Test). There were significantly better results for the indication “traumatic aortic rupture” than for the other indications (p < 0.05). In multivariate logistic regression analyses, age was an independent risk factor for the development of type I endoleaks in the thoracic aorta (Wald 9.5; p = 0.002), whereas ACS score was an independent protective factor (Wald 6.9; p = 0.009). In the abdominal aorta, neither age nor ACS influenced the development of endoleaks. Conclusion: Contrary to previous assumptions, TEVAR and EVAR can be carried out without increasing the risk of an endoleak of any type, even if there is a high atherosclerotic “hard-plaque” burden of the aorta. The results are significantly better for traumatic aortic.

  6. Technical and clinical success of infrarenal endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: A 10-year single-center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steingruber, I.E.; Neuhauser, B.; Seiler, R.; Greiner, A.; Chemelli, A.; Kopf, H.; Walch, C.; Waldenberger, P.; Jaschke, W.; Czermak, B.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The aim of our retrospective study was to review our single-center experience with aortic abdominal aneurysm (AAA) repair retrospectively. Material and methods: From 1995 to 2005, 70 consecutive patients affected by AAA were treated by endovascular stent-graft repair. Mean follow-up was 23.9 months. Follow-up investigations were performed at 6 and 12 months and yearly thereafter. Five different stent-graft designs were compared to each other. Primary technical success (PTS), assisted primary technical success (APTS), primary clinical success (PCS) and secondary clinical success (SCS) were evaluated. Results: All over PTS was achieved in 94.3%, APTS in 97.1%, PCS in 61.4%, APCS in 64.3% and SCS in 70%. There were 3 type I endoleaks, 25 type II endoleaks, 4 type III endoleaks, 8 limb problems, 5 conversions to open surgery, 10 aneurysm sac expansions and 14 device migrations. Patients with newer generation devices showed better results than patients with first generation prosthesis. In addition results were better for grafts with suprarenal fixation (versus infrarenal fixation) and grafts with barbs and hooks (versus grafts without barbs and hooks). Patients with bad anatomic preconditions showed a higher complication rate. Conclusion: Contrary to first generation products, new stent-graft designs show acceptable technical and clinical results in endovascular AAA aneurysm repair. However, this therapy still should be reserved only for patients with significant comorbities and suitable anatomic conditions

  7. Technical and clinical success of infrarenal endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: A 10-year single-center experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steingruber, I.E. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)]. E-mail: iris.steingruber@uibk.ac.at; Neuhauser, B. [Department of Vascular Surgery, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Seiler, R. [Department of Vascular Surgery, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Greiner, A. [Department of Vascular Surgery, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Chemelli, A. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Kopf, H. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Walch, C. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Waldenberger, P. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Jaschke, W. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Czermak, B. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2006-09-15

    Objective: The aim of our retrospective study was to review our single-center experience with aortic abdominal aneurysm (AAA) repair retrospectively. Material and methods: From 1995 to 2005, 70 consecutive patients affected by AAA were treated by endovascular stent-graft repair. Mean follow-up was 23.9 months. Follow-up investigations were performed at 6 and 12 months and yearly thereafter. Five different stent-graft designs were compared to each other. Primary technical success (PTS), assisted primary technical success (APTS), primary clinical success (PCS) and secondary clinical success (SCS) were evaluated. Results: All over PTS was achieved in 94.3%, APTS in 97.1%, PCS in 61.4%, APCS in 64.3% and SCS in 70%. There were 3 type I endoleaks, 25 type II endoleaks, 4 type III endoleaks, 8 limb problems, 5 conversions to open surgery, 10 aneurysm sac expansions and 14 device migrations. Patients with newer generation devices showed better results than patients with first generation prosthesis. In addition results were better for grafts with suprarenal fixation (versus infrarenal fixation) and grafts with barbs and hooks (versus grafts without barbs and hooks). Patients with bad anatomic preconditions showed a higher complication rate. Conclusion: Contrary to first generation products, new stent-graft designs show acceptable technical and clinical results in endovascular AAA aneurysm repair. However, this therapy still should be reserved only for patients with significant comorbities and suitable anatomic conditions.

  8. Percutaneous Transabdominal Approach for the Treatment of Endoleaks after Endovascular Repair of Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sun Young; Lee, Do Yun; Lee, Kwang Hun [Severance Hospital, University of Yonsei, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Won, Jong Yun [Gangnam Severance Hospital, University of Yonsei, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Dong Hoon; Shim, Won Heum [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technical feasibility and clinical efficacy of percutaneous transabdominal treatment of endoleaks after endovascular aneurysm repair. Between 2000 and 2007, six patients with type I (n = 4) or II (n = 2) endoleaks were treated by the percutaneous transabdominal approach using embolization with N-butyl cyanoacrylate with or without coils. Five patients underwent a single session and one patient had two sessions of embolization. The median time between aneurysm repair and endoleak treatment was 25.5 months (range: 0-84 months). Follow-up CT images were evaluated for changes in the size and shape of the aneurysm sac and presence or resolution of endoleaks. The median follow-up after endoleak treatment was 16.4 months (range: 0-37 months). Technical success was achieved in all six patients. Clinical success was achieved in four patients with complete resolution of the endoleak confirmed by follow-up CT. Clinical failure was observed in two patients. One eventually underwent surgical conversion, and the other was lost to follow-up. There were no procedure-related complications. The percutaneous transabdominal approach for the treatment of type I or II endoleaks, after endovascular aneurysm repair, is an alternative method when conventional endovascular methods have failed.

  9. Dutch experience with the fenestrated Anaconda endograft for short-neck infrarenal and juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Martijn L; Tielliu, Ignace F J; Meerwaldt, Robbert; Pierie, Maurice; van Brussel, Jerome; Schurink, Geert Willem H; Lardenoye, Jan-Willem; Zeebregts, Clark J

    2014-08-01

    In the past decennium, the management of short-neck infrarenal and juxtarenal aortic aneurysms with fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair (FEVAR) has been shown to be successful, with good early and midterm results. Recently, a new fenestrated device, the fenestrated Anaconda (Vascutek, Renfrewshire, Scotland), was introduced. The aim of this study was to present the current Dutch experience with this device. A prospectively held database of patients treated with the fenestrated Anaconda endograft was analyzed. Decision to treat was based on current international guidelines. Indications for FEVAR included an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) with unsuitable neck anatomy for EVAR. Planning was performed on computed tomography angiography images using a three-dimensional workstation. Between May 2011 and September 2013, 25 patients were treated in eight institutions for juxtarenal (n = 23) and short-neck AAA (n = 2). Median AAA size was 61 mm (59-68.5 mm). All procedures except one were performed with bifurcated devices. A total of 56 fenestrations were incorporated, and 53 (94.6%) were successfully cannulated and stented. One patient died of bowel ischemia caused by occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery. On completion angiography, three type I endoleaks and seven type II endoleaks were observed. At 1 month of follow-up, all endoleaks had spontaneously resolved. Median follow-up was 11 months (range, 1-29 months). There were no aneurysm ruptures or aneurysm-related deaths and no reinterventions to date. Primary patency at 1 month of cannulated and stented target vessels was 96%. Initial and short-term results of FEVAR using the fenestrated Anaconda endograft are promising, with acceptable technical success and short-term complication rates. Growing experience and long-term results are needed to support these findings. Copyright © 2014 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Anatomical Features and Early Outcomes of Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm from a Korean Multicenter Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyunwook; Lee, Do Yun; Choi, Soo Jin Na; Park, Ki Hyuk; Min, Seung-Kee; Chang, Jeong-Hwan; Huh, Seung; Jeon, Yong Sun; Won, Jehwan; Byun, Seung Jae; Park, Sang Jun; Jang, Lee Chan; Kwon, Tae-Won

    2015-09-01

    To introduce a nation-based endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) registry in South Korea and to analyze the anatomical features and early clinical outcomes of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) in patients who underwent EVAR. The Korean EVAR registry (KER) was a template-based online registry developed and established in 2009. The KER recruited 389 patients who underwent EVAR from 13 medical centers in South Korea from January 2010 to June 2010. We retrospectively reviewed the anatomic features and 30-day clinical outcomes. Initial deployment without open conversion was achieved in all cases and procedure-related 30-day mortality rate was 1.9%. Anatomic features showed the following variables: proximal aortic neck angle 48.8±25.7° (mean±standard deviation), vertical neck length 35.0±17.2 mm, aneurysmal sac diameter 57.2±14.2 mm, common iliac artery (CIA) involvement in 218 (56.3%) patients, and median right CIA length 34.9 mm. Two hundred and nineteen (56.3%) patients showed neck calcification, 98 patients (25.2%) had neck thrombus, and the inferior mesenteric arteries of 91 patients (23.4%) were occluded. Anatomical features of AAA in patients from the KER were characterized as having angulated proximal neck, tortuous iliac artery, and a higher rate of CIA involvement. Long-term follow-up and ongoing studies are required.

  11. Aneurysm Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the aneurysm. The stent graft acts as a barrier between the blood and the diseased wall of ... Search THI Resources Office of Research Administration Library & Learning Resource Center Scientific Publications & Grants Visual Communications & Public ...

  12. Seventeen Years’ Experience of Late Open Surgical Conversion after Failed Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair with 13 Variant Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Ziheng; Xu, Liang; Qu, Lefeng; Raithel, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    PurposeTo investigate the causes and results of late open surgical conversion (LOSC) after failed abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) and to summarize our 17 years’ experience with 13 various endografts.MethodsRetrospective data from August 1994 to January 2011 were analyzed at our center. The various devices’ implant time, the types of devices, the rates and causes of LOSC, and the procedures and results of LOSC were analyzed and evaluated.ResultsA total of 1729 endovascular aneurysm repairs were performed in our single center (Nuremberg South Hospital) with 13 various devices within 17 years. The median follow-up period was 51 months (range 9–119 months). Among them, 77 patients with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms received LOSC. The LOSC rate was 4.5 % (77 of 1729). The LOSC rates were significantly different before and after January 2002 (p < 0.001). The reasons of LOSC were mainly large type I endoleaks (n = 51) that were hard to repair by endovascular techniques. For the LOSC procedure, 71 cases were elective and 6 were emergent. The perioperative mortality was 5.2 % (4 of 77): 1 was elective (due to septic shock) and 3 were urgent (due to hemorrhagic shock).ConclusionLarge type I endoleaks were the main reasons for LOSC. The improvement of devices and operators’ experience may decrease the LOSC rate. Urgent LOSC resulted in a high mortality rate, while selective LOSC was relatively safe with significantly lower mortality rate. Early intervention, full preparation, and timely LOSC are important for patients who require LOSC

  13. Seventeen Years’ Experience of Late Open Surgical Conversion after Failed Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair with 13 Variant Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Ziheng, E-mail: wuziheng303@hotmail.com [Zhejiang University, Department of Vascular Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine (China); Xu, Liang, E-mail: maxalive@163.com [Zhejiang University, Department of Neurosurgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine (China); Qu, Lefeng, E-mail: qulefeng@gmail.com [The Second Military Medical University, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Changzheng Hospital (China); Raithel, Dieter, E-mail: dieter.raithel@rzmail.uni-erlangen.de [Nuremberg Southern Hospital, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo investigate the causes and results of late open surgical conversion (LOSC) after failed abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) and to summarize our 17 years’ experience with 13 various endografts.MethodsRetrospective data from August 1994 to January 2011 were analyzed at our center. The various devices’ implant time, the types of devices, the rates and causes of LOSC, and the procedures and results of LOSC were analyzed and evaluated.ResultsA total of 1729 endovascular aneurysm repairs were performed in our single center (Nuremberg South Hospital) with 13 various devices within 17 years. The median follow-up period was 51 months (range 9–119 months). Among them, 77 patients with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms received LOSC. The LOSC rate was 4.5 % (77 of 1729). The LOSC rates were significantly different before and after January 2002 (p < 0.001). The reasons of LOSC were mainly large type I endoleaks (n = 51) that were hard to repair by endovascular techniques. For the LOSC procedure, 71 cases were elective and 6 were emergent. The perioperative mortality was 5.2 % (4 of 77): 1 was elective (due to septic shock) and 3 were urgent (due to hemorrhagic shock).ConclusionLarge type I endoleaks were the main reasons for LOSC. The improvement of devices and operators’ experience may decrease the LOSC rate. Urgent LOSC resulted in a high mortality rate, while selective LOSC was relatively safe with significantly lower mortality rate. Early intervention, full preparation, and timely LOSC are important for patients who require LOSC.

  14. Meta-analysis of individual-patient data from EVAR-1, DREAM, OVER and ACE trials comparing outcomes of endovascular or open repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm over 5 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Powell, J. T.; Sweeting, M. J.; Ulug, P.; Blankensteijn, J. D.; Lederle, F. A.; Becquemin, J.-P.; Greenhalgh, R. M.; Beard, J. D.; Buxton, M. J.; Brown, L. C.; Harris, P. L.; Rose, J. D. G.; Russell, I. T.; Sculpher, M. J.; Thompson, S. G.; Lilford, R. J.; Bell, P. R. F.; Whitaker, S. C.; Poole-Wilson, The Late P. A.; Ruckley, C. V.; Campbell, W. B.; Dean, M. R. E.; Ruttley, M. S. T.; Coles, E. C.; Halliday, A.; Gibbs, S. J.; Epstein, D.; Hannon, R. J.; Johnston, L.; Bradbury, A. W.; Henderson, M. J.; Parvin, S. D.; Shepherd, D. F. C.; Mitchell, A. W.; Edwards, P. R.; Abbott, G. T.; Higman, D. J.; Vohra, A.; Ashley, S.; Robottom, C.; Wyatt, M. G.; Byrne, D.; Edwards, R.; Leiberman, D. P.; McCarter, D. H.; Taylor, P. R.; Reidy, J. F.; Wilkinson, A. R.; Ettles, D. F.; Clason, A. E.; Leen, G. L. S.; Wilson, N. V.; Downes, M.; Walker, S. R.; Lavelle, J. M.; Gough, M. J.; McPherson, S.; Scott, D. J. A.; Kessell, D. O.; Naylor, R.; Sayers, R.; Fishwick, N. G.; Gould, D. A.; Walker, M. G.; Chalmers, N. C.; Garnham, A.; Collins, M. A.; Gaines, P. A.; Ashour, M. Y.; Uberoi, R.; Braithwaite, B.; Davies, J. N.; Travis, S.; Hamilton, G.; Platts, A.; Shandall, A.; Sullivan, B. A.; Sobeh, M.; Matson, M.; Fox, A. D.; Orme, R.; Yusef, W.; Doyle, T.; Horrocks, M.; Hardman, J.; Blair, P. H. B.; Ellis, P. K.; Morris, G.; Odurny, A.; Vohra, R.; Duddy, M.; Thompson, M.; Loosemore, T. M. L.; Belli, A. M.; Morgan, R.; Adiseshiah, M.; Brookes, J. A. S.; McCollum, C. N.; Ashleigh, R.; Aukett, M.; Baker, S.; Barbe, E.; Batson, N.; Bell, J.; Blundell, J.; Boardley, D.; Boyes, S.; Brown, O.; Bryce, J.; Carmichael, M.; Chance, T.; Coleman, J.; Cosgrove, C.; Curran, G.; Dennison, T.; Devine, C.; Dewhirst, N.; Errington, B.; Farrell, H.; Fisher, C.; Fulford, P.; Gough, M.; Graham, C.; Hooper, R.; Horne, G.; Horrocks, L.; Hughes, B.; Hutchings, T.; Ireland, M.; Judge, C.; Kelly, L.; Kemp, J.; Kite, A.; Kivela, M.; Lapworth, M.; Lee, C.; Linekar, L.; Mahmood, A.; March, L.; Martin, J.; Matharu, N.; McGuigen, K.; Morris-Vincent, P.; Murray, S.; Murtagh, A.; Owen, G.; Ramoutar, V.; Rippin, C.; Rowley, J.; Sinclair, J.; Spencer, S.; Taylor, V.; Tomlinson, C.; Ward, S.; Wealleans, V.; West, J.; White, K.; Williams, J.; Wilson, L.; Grobbee, D. E.; Bak, A. A. A.; Buth, J.; Pattynama, P. M.; Verhoeven, E. L. G.; van Voorthuisen, A. E.; Balm, R.; Cuypers, P. W. M.; Prinssen, M.; van Sambeek, M. R. H. M.; Baas, A. F.; Hunink, M. G.; van Engelshoven, J. M.; Jacobs, M. J. H. M.; de Mol, B. A. J. M.; van Bockel, J. H.; Reekers, J.; Tielbeek, X.; Wisselink, W.; Boekema, N.; Heuveling, L. M.; Sikking, I.; de Bruin, J. L.; Tielbeek, A. V.; Pattynama, P.; Prins, T.; van der Ham, A. C.; van der Velden, J. J. I. M.; van Sterkenburg, S. M. M.; ten Haken, G. B.; Bruijninckx, C. M. A.; van Overhagen, H.; Tutein Nolthenius, R. P.; Hendriksz, T. R.; Teijink, J. A. W.; Odink, H. F.; de Smet, A. A. E. A.; Vroegindeweij, D.; van Loenhout, R. M. M.; Rutten, M. J.; Hamming, J. F.; Lampmann, L. E. H.; Bender, M. H. M.; Pasmans, H.; Vahl, A. C.; de Vries, C.; Mackaay, A. J. C.; van Dortmont, L. M. C.; van der Vliet, A. J.; Schultze Kool, L. J.; Boomsma, J. H. B.; van Dop, H. R.; de Mol van Otterloo, J. C. A.; de Rooij, T. P. W.; Smits, T. M.; Yilmaz, E. N.; van den Berg, F. G.; Visser, M. J. T.; van der Linden, E.; Schurink, G. W. H.; de Haan, M.; Smeets, H. J.; Stabel, P.; van Elst, F.; Poniewierski, J.; Vermassen, F. E. G.; Freischlag, J. A.; Kohler, T. R.; Latts, E.; Matsumura, J.; Padberg, F. T.; Kyriakides, T. C.; Swanson, K. M.; Guarino, P.; Peduzzi, P.; Antonelli, M.; Cushing, C.; Davis, E.; Durant, L.; Joyner, S.; Kossack, The Late A.; LeGwin, Mary; McBride, V.; O'Connor, T.; Poulton, J.; Stratton, The Late S.; Zellner, S.; Snodgrass, A. J.; Thornton, J.; Haakenson, C. M.; Stroupe, K. T.; Jonk, Y.; Hallett, J. W.; Hertzer, N.; Towne, J.; Katz, D. A.; Karrison, T.; Matts, J. P.; Marottoli, R.; Kasl, S.; Mehta, R.; Feldman, R.; Farrell, W.; Allore, H.; Perry, E.; Niederman, J.; Randall, F.; Zeman, M.; Beckwith, The Late D.; O'Leary, T. J.; Huang, G. D.; Bader, M.; Ketteler, E. R.; Kingsley, D. D.; Marek, J. M.; Massen, R. J.; Matteson, B. D.; Pitcher, J. D.; Langsfeld, M.; Corson, J. D.; Goff, J. M.; Kasirajan, K.; Paap, C.; Robertson, D. C.; Salam, A.; Veeraswamy, R.; Milner, R.; Guidot, J.; Lal, B. K.; Busuttil, S. J.; Lilly, M. P.; Braganza, M.; Ellis, K.; Patterson, M. A.; Jordan, W. D.; Whitley, D.; Taylor, S.; Passman, M.; Kerns, D.; Inman, C.; Poirier, J.; Ebaugh, J.; Raffetto, J.; Chew, D.; Lathi, S.; Owens, C.; Hickson, K.; Dosluoglu, H. H.; Eschberger, K.; Kibbe, M. R.; Baraniewski, H. M.; Endo, M.; Busman, A.; Meadows, W.; Evans, M.; Giglia, J. S.; El Sayed, H.; Reed, A. B.; Ruf, M.; Ross, S.; Jean-Claude, J. M.; Pinault, G.; Kang, P.; White, N.; Eiseman, M.; Jones, The Late R.; Timaran, C. H.; Modrall, J. G.; Welborn, M. B.; Lopez, J.; Nguyen, T.; Chacko, J. K. Y.; Granke, K.; Vouyouka, A. G.; Olgren, E.; Chand, P.; Allende, B.; Ranella, M.; Yales, C.; Whitehill, T. A.; Krupski, The Late W. C.; Nehler, M. R.; Johnson, S. P.; Jones, D. N.; Strecker, P.; Bhola, M. A.; Shortell, C. K.; Gray, J. L.; Lawson, J. H.; McCann, R.; Sebastian, M. W.; Kistler Tetterton, J.; Blackwell, C.; Prinzo, P. A.; Lee, N.; Cerveira, J. J.; Zickler, R. W.; Hauck, K. A.; Berceli, S. A.; Lee, W. A.; Ozaki, C. K.; Nelson, P. R.; Irwin, A. S.; Baum, R.; Aulivola, B.; Rodriguez, H.; Littooy, F. N.; Greisler, H.; O'Sullivan, M. T.; Kougias, P.; Lin, P. H.; Bush, R. L.; Guinn, G.; Bechara, C.; Cagiannos, C.; Pisimisis, G.; Barshes, N.; Pillack, S.; Guillory, B.; Cikrit, D.; Lalka, S. G.; Lemmon, G.; Nachreiner, R.; Rusomaroff, M.; O'Brien, E.; Cullen, J. J.; Hoballah, J.; Sharp, W. J.; McCandless, J. L.; Beach, V.; Minion, D.; Schwarcz, T. H.; Kimbrough, J.; Ashe, L.; Rockich, A.; Warner-Carpenter, J.; Moursi, M.; Eidt, J. F.; Brock, S.; Bianchi, C.; Bishop, V.; Gordon, I. L.; Fujitani, R.; Kubaska, S. M.; Behdad, M.; Azadegan, R.; Ma Agas, C.; Zalecki, K.; Hoch, J. R.; Carr, S. C.; Acher, C.; Schwarze, M.; Tefera, G.; Mell, M.; Dunlap, B.; Rieder, J.; Stuart, J. M.; Weiman, D. S.; Abul-Khoudoud, O.; Garrett, H. E.; Walsh, S. M.; Wilson, K. L.; Seabrook, G. R.; Cambria, R. A.; Brown, K. R.; Lewis, B. D.; Framberg, S.; Kallio, C.; Barke, R. A.; Santilli, S. M.; d'Audiffret, A. C.; Oberle, N.; Proebstle, C.; Johnson, L. L.; Jacobowitz, G. R.; Cayne, N.; Rockman, C.; Adelman, M.; Gagne, P.; Nalbandian, M.; Caropolo, L. J.; Pipinos, I. I.; Johanning, J.; Lynch, T.; DeSpiegelaere, H.; Purviance, G.; Zhou, W.; Dalman, R.; Lee, J. T.; Safadi, B.; Coogan, S. M.; Wren, S. M.; Bahmani, D. D.; Maples, D.; Thunen, S.; Golden, M. A.; Mitchell, M. E.; Fairman, R.; Reinhardt, S.; Wilson, M. A.; Tzeng, E.; Muluk, S.; Peterson, N. M.; Foster, M.; Edwards, J.; Moneta, G. L.; Landry, G.; Taylor, L.; Yeager, R.; Cannady, E.; Treiman, G.; Hatton-Ward, S.; Salabsky, The Late B.; Kansal, N.; Owens, E.; Estes, M.; Forbes, B. A.; Sobotta, C.; Rapp, J. H.; Reilly, L. M.; Perez, S. L.; Yan, K.; Sarkar, R.; Dwyer, S. S.; Perez, S.; Chong, K.; Hatsukami, T. S.; Glickerman, D. G.; Sobel, M.; Burdick, T. S.; Pedersen, K.; Cleary, P.; Back, M.; Bandyk, D.; Johnson, B.; Shames, M.; Reinhard, R. L.; Thomas, S. C.; Hunter, G. C.; Leon, L. R.; Westerband, A.; Guerra, R. J.; Riveros, M.; Mills, J. L.; Hughes, J. D.; Escalante, A. M.; Psalms, S. B.; Day, N. N.; Macsata, R.; Sidawy, A.; Weiswasser, J.; Arora, S.; Jasper, B. J.; Dardik, A.; Gahtan, V.; Muhs, B. E.; Sumpio, B. E.; Gusberg, R. J.; Spector, M.; Pollak, J.; Aruny, J.; Kelly, E. L.; Wong, J.; Vasilas, P.; Joncas, C.; Gelabert, H. A.; DeVirgillio, C.; Rigberg, D. A.; Cole, L.; Marzelle, J.; Sapoval, M.; Favre, J.-P.; Watelet, J.; Lermusiaux, P.; Lepage, E.; Hemery, F.; Dolbeau, G.; Hawajry, N.; Cunin, P.; Harris, P.; Stockx, L.; Chatellier, G.; Mialhe, C.; Fiessinger, J.-N.; Pagny, L.; Kobeiter, H.; Boissier, C.; Lacroix, P.; Ledru, F.; Pinot, J.-J.; Deux, J.-F.; Tzvetkov, B.; Duvaldestin, P.; Jourdain, C.; DAVID, V.; Enouf, D.; Ady, N.; Krimi, A.; Boudjema, N.; Jousset, Y.; Enon, B.; Blin, V.; Picquet, J.; L'Hoste, P.; Thouveny, F.; Borie, H.; Kowarski, S.; Pernes, J.-M.; Auguste, M.; Desgranges, P.; Allaire, E.; Meaulle, P.-Y.; Chaix, D.; Juliae, P.; Fabiani, J. N.; Chevalier, P.; Combes, M.; Seguin, A.; Belhomme, D.; Baque, J.; Pellerin, O.; Favre, J. P.; Barral, X.; Veyret, C.; Peillon, C.; Plissonier, D.; Thomas, P.; Clavier, E.; Martinez, R.; Bleuet, F.; C, Dupreix; Verhoye, J. P.; Langanay, T.; Heautot, J. F.; Koussa, M.; Haulon, S.; Halna, P.; Destrieux, L.; Lions, C.; Wiloteaux, S.; Beregi, J. P.; Bergeron, P.; Patra, P.; Costargent, A.; Chaillou, P.; D'Alicourt, A.; Goueffic, Y.; Cheysson, E.; Parrot, A.; Garance, P.; Demon, A.; Tyazi, A.; Pillet, J.-C.; Lescalie, F.; Tilly, G.; Steinmetz, E.; Favier, C.; Brenot, R.; Krause, D.; Cercueil, J. P.; Vahdat, O.; Sauer, M.; Soula, P.; Querian, A.; Garcia, O.; Levade, M.; Colombier, D.; Cardon, J.-M.; Joyeux, A.; Borrelly, P.; Dogas, G.; Magnan, P.-É; Branchereau, A.; Bartoli, J.-M.; Hassen-Khodja, R.; Batt, M.; Planchard, P.-F.; Bouillanne, P.-J.; Haudebourg, P.; Bayne, J.; Gouny, P.; Badra, A.; Braesco, J.; Nonent, M.; Lucas, A.; Cardon, A.; Kerdiles, Y.; Rolland, Y.; Kassab, M.; Brillu, C.; Goubault, F.; Tailboux, L.; Darrieux, H.; Briand, O.; Maillard, J.-C.; Varty, K.; Cousins, C.

    2017-01-01

    The erosion of the early mortality advantage of elective endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) compared with open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm remains without a satisfactory explanation. An individual-patient data meta-analysis of four multicentre randomized trials of EVAR versus open repair

  15. Near-infrared spectroscopy assessed cerebral oxygenation during open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, H.; Nielsen, Henning Morris Bay; Secher, N H

    2016-01-01

    During open abdominal aortic aneurism (AAA) repair cerebral blood flow is challenged. Clamping of the aorta may lead to unintended hyperventilation as metabolism is reduced by perfusion of a smaller part of the body and reperfusion of the aorta releases vasodilatory substances including CO2. We i...

  16. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections: endovascular treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baril, Donald T; Cho, Jae S; Chaer, Rabih A; Makaroun, Michel S

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of thoracic aortic disease has changed radically with the advances made in endovascular therapy since the concept of thoracic endovascular aortic repair was first described 15 years ago. Currently, there is a diverse array of endografts that are commercially available to treat the thoracic aorta. Multiple studies, including industry-sponsored and single-institution reports, have demonstrated excellent outcomes of thoracic endovascular aortic repair for the treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms, with less reported perioperative morbidity and mortality in comparison with conventional open repair. Additionally, similar outcomes have been demonstrated for the treatment of type B dissections. However, the technology remains relatively novel, and larger studies with longer term outcomes are necessary to more fully evaluate the role of endovascular therapy for the treatment of thoracic aortic disease. This review examines the currently available thoracic endografts, preoperative planning for thoracic endovascular aortic repair, and outcomes of thoracic endovascular aortic repair for the treatment of both thoracic aortic aneurysms and type B aortic dissections. Mt Sinai J Med 77:256-269, 2010. (c) 2010 Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

  17. Fenestrated Stent Graft Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Hemodynamic Analysis of the Effect of Fenestrated Stents on the Renal Arteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Zhonghua; Chaichana, Thanapong [Curtin University of Technology, Perth (Australia)

    2010-02-15

    We wanted to investigate the hemodynamic effect of fenestrated stents on the renal arteries with using a fluid structure interaction method. Two representative patients who each had abdominal aortic aneurysm that was treated with fenestrated stent grafts were selected for the study. 3D realistic aorta models for the main artery branches and aneurysm were generated based on the multislice CT scans from two patients with different aortic geometries. The simulated fenestrated stents were designed and modelled based on the 3D intraluminal appearance, and these were placed inside the renal artery with an intra-aortic protrusion of 5.0-7.0 mm to reflect the actual patients' treatment. The stent wire thickness was simulated with a diameter of 0.4 mm and hemodynamic analysis was performed at different cardiac cycles. Our results showed that the effect of the fenestrated stent wires on the renal blood flow was minimal because the flow velocity was not significantly affected when compared to that calculated at pre-stent graft implantation, and this was despite the presence of recirculation patterns at the proximal part of the renal arteries. The wall pressure was found to be significantly decreased after fenestration, yet no significant change of the wall shear stress was noticed at post-fenestration, although the wall shear stress was shown to decrease slightly at the proximal aneurysm necks. Our analysis demonstrates that the hemodynamic effect of fenestrated renal stents on the renal arteries is insignificant. Further studies are needed to investigate the effect of different lengths of stent protrusion with variable stent thicknesses on the renal blood flow, and this is valuable for understanding the long-term outcomes of fenestrated repair.

  18. Fenestrated Stent Graft Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Hemodynamic Analysis of the Effect of Fenestrated Stents on the Renal Arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Zhonghua; Chaichana, Thanapong

    2010-01-01

    We wanted to investigate the hemodynamic effect of fenestrated stents on the renal arteries with using a fluid structure interaction method. Two representative patients who each had abdominal aortic aneurysm that was treated with fenestrated stent grafts were selected for the study. 3D realistic aorta models for the main artery branches and aneurysm were generated based on the multislice CT scans from two patients with different aortic geometries. The simulated fenestrated stents were designed and modelled based on the 3D intraluminal appearance, and these were placed inside the renal artery with an intra-aortic protrusion of 5.0-7.0 mm to reflect the actual patients' treatment. The stent wire thickness was simulated with a diameter of 0.4 mm and hemodynamic analysis was performed at different cardiac cycles. Our results showed that the effect of the fenestrated stent wires on the renal blood flow was minimal because the flow velocity was not significantly affected when compared to that calculated at pre-stent graft implantation, and this was despite the presence of recirculation patterns at the proximal part of the renal arteries. The wall pressure was found to be significantly decreased after fenestration, yet no significant change of the wall shear stress was noticed at post-fenestration, although the wall shear stress was shown to decrease slightly at the proximal aneurysm necks. Our analysis demonstrates that the hemodynamic effect of fenestrated renal stents on the renal arteries is insignificant. Further studies are needed to investigate the effect of different lengths of stent protrusion with variable stent thicknesses on the renal blood flow, and this is valuable for understanding the long-term outcomes of fenestrated repair

  19. Long-term decline in renal function is more significant after endovascular repair of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Adas, Ziad; Shepard, Alexander D; Nypaver, Timothy J; Weaver, Mitchell R; Maatman, Thomas; Yessayan, Lenar T; Balraj, Praveen; Kabbani, Loay S

    2018-03-20

    It is not clear whether endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) results in an increase in renal insufficiency during the long term compared with open repair (OR). We reviewed our experience with AAA repair to determine whether there was a significant difference in postoperative and long-term renal outcomes between OR and EVAR. A retrospective cohort study was conducted of all patients who underwent AAA repair between January 1993 and July 2013 at a tertiary referral hospital. Demographics, comorbidities, preoperative and postoperative laboratory values, morbidity, and mortality were collected. Patients with ruptured AAAs, preoperative hemodialysis, juxtarenal or suprarenal aneurysm origin, and no follow-up laboratory values were excluded. Preoperative, postoperative, 6-month, and yearly serum creatinine values were collected. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was calculated on the basis of the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation. Acute kidney injury (AKI) was classified using the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines. Change in GFR was defined as preoperative GFR minus the GFR at each follow-up interval. Comparison was made between EVAR and OR groups using multivariate logistics for categorical data and linear regression for continuous variables. During the study period, 763 infrarenal AAA repairs were performed at our institution; 675 repairs fit the inclusion criteria (317 ORs and 358 EVARs). Mean age was 73.9 years. Seventy-nine percent were male, 78% were hypertensive, 18% were diabetic, and 31% had preoperative renal dysfunction defined as GFR below 60 mL/min. Using a multivariate logistic model to control for all variables, OR was found to have a 1.6 times greater chance for development of immediate postoperative AKI compared with EVAR (P = .038). Hypertension and aneurysm size were independent risk factors for development of AKI (P = .012 and .022, respectively). Using a linear

  20. Tobacco smoking and aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sode, Birgitte F; Nordestgaard, Børge; Grønbæk, Morten

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We determined the predictive power of tobacco smoking on aortic aneurysm as opposed to other risk factors in the general population. METHODS: We recorded tobacco smoking and other risk factors at baseline, and assessed hospitalization and death from aortic aneurysm in 15,072 individuals...... aneurysm in males and females consuming above 20g tobacco daily was 3.5% and 1.3%, among those >60years with plasma cholesterol >5mmol/L and a systolic blood pressure >140mmHg. CONCLUSIONS: Tobacco smoking is the most important predictor of future aortic aneurysm outcomes in the general population...

  1. Sex differences in 30-day and 5-year outcomes after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms in the EUROSTAR study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grootenboer, Nathalie; Hunink, M G Myriam; Hendriks, Johanna M

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of sex on 30-day and long-term outcomes after elective endovascular aneurysm repair.......The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of sex on 30-day and long-term outcomes after elective endovascular aneurysm repair....

  2. Lower extremity weakness is associated with elevated blood and cerebrospinal fluid glucose levels following multibranched endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramoto, Jade S; Fernandez, Charlene; Gasper, Warren; Vartanian, Shant; Reilly, Linda; Chuter, Timothy

    2017-02-01

    Hyperglycemia is associated with worsened clinical outcomes after central nervous system injury. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between lower extremity weakness (LEW) and the glucose levels of blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in patients undergoing multibranched endovascular aneurysm repair (MBEVAR) of thoracoabdominal and pararenal aortic aneurysms. Blood and CSF samples were collected preoperatively, immediately after aneurysm repair, and on postoperative day 1 in 21 patients undergoing MBEVAR. Data on demographics, operative repair, complications, and outcomes were collected prospectively. There were 21 patients who underwent successful MBEVAR. Two patients had pre-existing paraplegia from prior open aortic surgery and were excluded from the current analysis. The mean age was 73 ± 8 years, and 15 of 19 (79%) were men. In the postoperative period, 7 of 19 (37%) patients developed LEW. This was temporary in 5 of 19 (26%) patients and permanent in 2 of 19 (11%) patients. The LEW group was older than the non-LEW group (77 ± 6 vs 70 ± 9 years, respectively; P = .10), had a lower preoperative glomerular filtration rate (58.6 ± 18.5 vs 71.4 ± 23.5 mL/min per 1.73 m 2 ; P = .24), and was more likely to be taking a statin (100% vs 67%, respectively; P = .13), but these did not reach statistical significance. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, coronary artery disease, lung disease, or peripheral artery disease between the LEW and non-LEW groups. There was also no difference in operative time, blood loss, contrast material volume, or fluoroscopy times between the two groups. Preoperative blood and CSF glucose levels were similar in those with and without LEW. During the postoperative period, glucose values in the blood and CSF were significantly higher in those patients who developed LEW compared with those who did not develop LEW. In all patients with LEW, the elevation

  3. Wall stress on ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms with bicuspid compared with tricuspid aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Yue; Wang, Zhongjie; Liu, Raymond; Haraldsson, Henrik; Hope, Michael D; Saloner, David A; Guccione, Julius M; Ge, Liang; Tseng, Elaine

    2018-03-08

    Guidelines for repair of bicuspid aortic valve-associated ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms have been changing, most recently to the same criteria as tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms. Rupture/dissection occurs when wall stress exceeds wall strength. Recent studies suggest similar strength of bicuspid aortic valve versus tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms; thus, comparative wall stress may better predict dissection in bicuspid aortic valve versus tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms. Our aim was to determine whether bicuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms had higher wall stresses than their tricuspid aortic valve counterparts. Patients with bicuspid aortic valve- and tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (bicuspid aortic valve = 17, tricuspid aortic valve = 19) greater than 4.5 cm underwent electrocardiogram-gated computed tomography angiography. Patient-specific 3-dimensional geometry was reconstructed and loaded to systemic pressure after accounting for prestress geometry. Finite element analyses were performed using the LS-DYNA solver (LSTC Inc, Livermore, Calif) with user-defined fiber-embedded material model to determine ascending thoracic aortic aneurysm wall stress. Bicuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms 99th-percentile longitudinal stresses were 280 kPa versus 242 kPa (P = .028) for tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms in systole. These stresses did not correlate to diameter for bicuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (r = -0.004) but had better correlation to tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms diameter (r = 0.677). Longitudinal stresses on sinotubular junction were significantly higher in bicuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms than in tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (405 vs 329 kPa, P = .023). Bicuspid

  4. Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair with the Talent Stent-Graft: Outcomes in Patients with Large Iliac Arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    England, Andrew; Butterfield, John S.; McCollum, Charles N.; Ashleigh, Raymond J.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to report outcomes following endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in patients with ectatic common iliac arteries (CIAs). Of 117 AAA patients treated by EVAR between 1998 and 2005, 87 (74%) had CIAs diameters 18 but <25 mm. All patients were treated with Talent stent-grafts, 114 bifurcated and 3 AUI devices. Departmental databases and patient records were reviewed to assess outcomes. Technical success, iliac-related outcome, and iliac-related reintervention (IRSI) were analyzed. Patients with EVAR extending into the external iliac artery were excluded. Median (range) follow-up for the study group was 24 (1-84) months. Initial technical success was 98% for CIAs <18 mm and 100% for CIAs ≥18 mm (p = 0.551). There were three distal type I endoleaks (two in the ectatic group) and six iliac limb occlusions (one in an ectatic patient); there were no statistically significant differences between groups (p = 0.4). There were nine IRSIs (three stent-graft extensions, six femorofemoral crossover grafts); three of these patients had one or both CIAs ≥18 mm (p = 0.232). One-year freedom from IRSI was 92% ± 3% and 84% ± 9% for the <18-mm and ≥18-mm CIA groups, respectively (p = 0.232). We conclude that the treatment of AAA by EVAR in patients with CIAs 18-24 mm appears to be safe and effective, however, it may be associated with more frequent reinterventions.

  5. Can Surgeons Assess CT Suitability for Endovascular Repair (EVAR) in Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm? Implications for a Ruptured EVAR Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rayt, Harjeet; Lambert, Kelly; Bown, Matthew; Fishwick, Guy; Morgan, Robert; McCarthy, Mark; London, Nick; Sayers, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether surgeons without formal radiological training are able to assess suitability of patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) for EVAR. The CT scans of 20 patients with AAA were reviewed under timed conditions by six vascular surgeons. Twenty minutes was allocated per scan. They were asked to determine if each aneurysm would be treatable by EVAR in the emergency setting and, if so, to measure for device selection. The results were then compared with those of a vascular radiologist. Six surgeons agreed on the suitability of endovascular repair in 45% of cases (95% CI, 23.1-68.5%; 9/20 scans; κ = 0.41 [p = 0.01]) and concurred with the radiologist in eight of these. Individually, agreement ranged from 13 to 16 of the 20 scans, 65-80% between surgeons. The kappa value for agreement between all the surgeons and the radiologist was 0.47 (p = 0.01, moderate agreement). For the individual surgeons, this ranged from 0.3 to 0.6 (p = 0.01). In conclusion, while overall agreement was moderate between the surgeons and the radiologist, it is clear that if surgeons are to assess patients for ruptured EVAR in the future, focused training of surgical trainees is required.

  6. Medium-Term Outcomes Following Endovascular Repair of Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms with an Unfavourable Proximal Neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, Prakash; Hughes, John; Patel, Ashish S.; Donati, Tommaso; Sallam, Morad; Patel, Sanjay D.; Bell, Rachel E.; Katsanos, Konstantinos; Modarai, Bijan; Zayed, Hany A.

    2015-01-01

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to evaluate medium-term outcomes following endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVAR) with unfavourable neck anatomy using stent grafts with a 36 mm or larger proximal diameter.Materials and MethodsA retrospective review of 27 patients who underwent elective EVAR between 2006 and 2008 using a stent graft with a 36 mm or larger proximal diameter was carried out. All patients had computed tomography angiography (CTA) for procedure planning, and detailed assessment of the aneurysm neck was performed using a three-dimensional CTA workstation. Patients were followed up with CTA at 3 and 12 months and annual duplex thereafter.ResultsThe median aneurysm diameter was 7 cm, and the median aneurysm neck diameter was 31 mm. Cook Zenith stent grafts were used in all patients, with a proximal diameter of 36 mm (n = 25) and 40 mm (n = 2). Primary and assisted primary technical success rates were 74 and 93 %, respectively. The follow-up period ranged from 62 to 84 months, with a median of 72 months. 15 patients died during follow-up. Two patients died from aortic rupture, and the remaining patients died from cardiac disease (n = 4), chest sepsis (n = 6), cancer (n = 2) and renal failure (n = 1). Complications included type I endoleak (n = 5), limb occlusion (n = 2), limb stenosis (n = 2), limb kinking (n = 1), dissection of an artery (n = 1), occlusion of a femorofemoral cross-over graft (n = 1) and poor attachment of a distal limb (n = 1).ConclusionsEVAR using stent grafts in the presence of an unfavourable neck has a high risk of complications. Medium-term survival in this group is low but mainly due to patient co-morbidities

  7. Medium-Term Outcomes Following Endovascular Repair of Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms with an Unfavourable Proximal Neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Prakash, E-mail: prakash.2.saha@kcl.ac.uk; Hughes, John, E-mail: johnhughes387@rocketmail.com; Patel, Ashish S., E-mail: ashish.s.patel@kcl.ac.uk; Donati, Tommaso, E-mail: tommaso.donati@gstt.nhs.uk; Sallam, Morad, E-mail: morad.sallam@gstt.nhs.uk; Patel, Sanjay D., E-mail: sanjay.patel@gstt.nhs.uk; Bell, Rachel E. [King’s Health Partners, Department of Vascular Surgery, Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom); Katsanos, Konstantinos, E-mail: katsanos@med.upatras.gr [King’s Health Partners, Department of Interventional Radiology, Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom); Modarai, Bijan, E-mail: bijan.modarai@kcl.ac.uk; Zayed, Hany A., E-mail: hany.zayed@gstt.nhs.uk [King’s Health Partners, Department of Vascular Surgery, Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to evaluate medium-term outcomes following endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVAR) with unfavourable neck anatomy using stent grafts with a 36 mm or larger proximal diameter.Materials and MethodsA retrospective review of 27 patients who underwent elective EVAR between 2006 and 2008 using a stent graft with a 36 mm or larger proximal diameter was carried out. All patients had computed tomography angiography (CTA) for procedure planning, and detailed assessment of the aneurysm neck was performed using a three-dimensional CTA workstation. Patients were followed up with CTA at 3 and 12 months and annual duplex thereafter.ResultsThe median aneurysm diameter was 7 cm, and the median aneurysm neck diameter was 31 mm. Cook Zenith stent grafts were used in all patients, with a proximal diameter of 36 mm (n = 25) and 40 mm (n = 2). Primary and assisted primary technical success rates were 74 and 93 %, respectively. The follow-up period ranged from 62 to 84 months, with a median of 72 months. 15 patients died during follow-up. Two patients died from aortic rupture, and the remaining patients died from cardiac disease (n = 4), chest sepsis (n = 6), cancer (n = 2) and renal failure (n = 1). Complications included type I endoleak (n = 5), limb occlusion (n = 2), limb stenosis (n = 2), limb kinking (n = 1), dissection of an artery (n = 1), occlusion of a femorofemoral cross-over graft (n = 1) and poor attachment of a distal limb (n = 1).ConclusionsEVAR using stent grafts in the presence of an unfavourable neck has a high risk of complications. Medium-term survival in this group is low but mainly due to patient co-morbidities.

  8. Strategy of endovascular versus open repair for patients with clinical diagnosis of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: the IMPROVE RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulug, Pinar; Hinchliffe, Robert J; Sweeting, Michael J; Gomes, Manuel; Thompson, Matthew T; Thompson, Simon G; Grieve, Richard J; Ashleigh, Raymond; Greenhalgh, Roger M; Powell, Janet T

    2018-05-01

    Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a common vascular emergency. The mortality from emergency endovascular repair may be much lower than the 40-50% reported for open surgery. To assess whether or not a strategy of endovascular repair compared with open repair reduces 30-day and mid-term mortality (including costs and cost-effectiveness) among patients with a suspected ruptured AAA. Randomised controlled trial, with computer-generated telephone randomisation of participants in a 1 : 1 ratio, using variable block size, stratified by centre and without blinding. Vascular centres in the UK ( n  = 29) and Canada ( n  = 1) between 2009 and 2013. A total of 613 eligible participants (480 men) with a ruptured aneurysm, clinically diagnosed at the trial centre. A total of 316 participants were randomised to the endovascular strategy group (immediate computerised tomography followed by endovascular repair if anatomically suitable or, if not suitable, open repair) and 297 were randomised to the open repair group (computerised tomography optional). The primary outcome measure was 30-day mortality, with 30-day reinterventions, costs and disposal as early secondary outcome measures. Later outcome measures included 1- and 3-year mortality, reinterventions, quality of life (QoL) and cost-effectiveness. The 30-day mortality was 35.4% in the endovascular strategy group and 37.4% in the open repair group [odds ratio (OR) 0.92, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.66 to 1.28; p  = 0.62, and, after adjustment for age, sex and Hardman index, OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.67 to 1.33]. The endovascular strategy appeared to be more effective in women than in men (interaction test p  = 0.02). More discharges in the endovascular strategy group (94%) than in the open repair group (77%) were directly to home ( p  open repair group, respectively (OR 0.73, 95% CI 0.53 to 1.00; p  = 0.053), with a stronger benefit for the endovascular strategy in the subgroup of 502 participants

  9. Complete ten-year follow-up after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: Survival and causes of death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wibmer, Andreas; Nolz, Richard; Teufelsbauer, Harald; Kretschmer, Georg; Prusa, Alexander M.; Funovics, Martin; Lammer, Johannes; Schoder, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the hazard and causes of death after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms during a complete ten year follow-up. Methods: This is a retrospective clinical study of 130 consecutive patients undergoing EVAR between 1995 and 1998. One-hundred twenty-one patients (93.1%) were treated with first-generation stentgrafts and nine patients (6.9%) received second-generation devices. All patients completed a follow-up of at least 10 years, unless death occurred before then. Time and causes of death were provided by the Austrian central register of deaths. Results: The median follow-up was 7.6 years, and the 130 patients had 968.5 person-years of follow-up. The ten-year mortality rate was 62.3%. Cardiovascular events were the most frequent causes of death, with a 3.9 incidence rate per 100 person-years. Cancer death and death due to other causes occurred in 2.1 and 1.8 cases per 100 person-years, respectively. Lethal late aneurysm rupture happened in 4.6% (n = 6), which corresponds to an annual incidence rate of 0.6 per 100 person-years. All of those patients had been treated with first-generation devices. Conclusions: Cardiovascular events were the most frequent cause of death after EVAR, followed by malignancy and other diseases. The risk of dying from secondary rupture was clearly lower than that of death due to other reasons during ten years after EVAR, even in patients with first-generation stentgrafts.

  10. Mid-term cost-effectiveness analysis of open and endovascular repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, K E; Shak, J; Ambler, G K; Tang, T Y; Hayes, P D; Boyle, J R

    2014-02-01

    Emergency endovascular repair (EVAR) for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) may have lower operative mortality rates than open surgical repair. Concerns remain that the early survival benefit after EVAR for rAAA may be offset by late reinterventions. The aim of this study was to compare reintervention rates and cost-effectiveness of EVAR and open repair for rAAA. A retrospective analysis was undertaken of patients with rAAA undergoing EVAR or open repair over 6 years. A health economic model developed for the cost-effectiveness of elective EVAR was used in the emergency setting. Sixty-two patients (mean age 77·9 years) underwent EVAR and 85 (mean age 75·9 years) had open repair of rAAA. Median follow-up was 42 and 39 months respectively. There was no significant difference in 30-day mortality rates after EVAR and open repair (18 and 26 per cent respectively; P = 0·243). Reintervention rates were also similar (32 and 31 per cent; P = 0·701). The mean cost per patient was €26,725 for EVAR and €30,297 for open repair, and the cost per life-year gained was €7906 and €9933 respectively (P = 0·561). Open repair had greater initial costs: longer procedural times (217 versus 178·5 min; P < 0·001) and intensive care stay (5·0 versus 1·0 days; P = 0·015). Conversely, EVAR had greater reintervention (€156,939 versus €35,335; P = 0·001) and surveillance (P < 0·001) costs. There was no significant difference in reintervention rates after EVAR or open repair for rAAA. EVAR was as cost-effective at mid-term follow-up. The increased procedural costs of open repair are not outweighed by greater surveillance and reintervention costs after EVAR. © 2014 BJS Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Reduction in allogeneic blood products with routine use of autotransfusion in open elective infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtemanche, Karim; Elkouri, Stephane; Dugas, Jean-Philippe; Beaudoin, Nathalie; Bruneau, Luc; Blair, Jean-François

    2013-11-01

    Concern about allogeneic blood product cost and complications has prompted interest in blood conservation techniques. Intraoperative autotransfusion (IAT) is currently not used routinely by vascular surgeons in open elective infrareanl abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. The objective of this study is to review our experience with IAT and its impact on blood transfusion. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of consecutive patients treated electively over a 4-year period and compared 2 strategy related to IAT, routine use IAT (rIAT) versus on-demand IAT (oIAT). Outcomes measured were number of units of allogeneic red blood cells and autologous red blood cells transfused intraoperatively and postoperatively, preoperative, postoperative, and discharge hemoglobin levels; postoperative infections; length of postoperative intensive care stay; and length of hospital stay. T-independent and Fisher exact test were used. A total of 212 patients were included, 38 (18%) in the rIAT and 174 (82%) in the oIAT. Groups were similar except for an inferior creatinine and a superior mean aneurysm diameter for the rIAT group. Patients in the rIAT group had a lower rate of transfusion (26% vs 54%, P = .002) and a lower mean number of blood unit transfused (0.8 vs 1.8, P = .048). These findings were still more significant for AAA larger than 60 mm (18% rIAT vs 62% oIAT, P = .0001). Postoperative hemoglobin was superior in the rIAT group (107 vs 101 g/L, P = .01). Mean postoperative intensive care length of stay was shorter for the rIAT group (1.1 vs 1.8 days, P = .01). No difference was noted for infection, mortality, or hospital length of stay. The rIAT reduced the exposure to allogeneic blood products by more than 50%, in particular for patients with AAA larger than 60 mm. These results support the use of rIAT for open elective infrarenal AAA repair.

  12. Abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes S.

    2010-01-01

    Although the number of elective operations for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is increasing, the sex- and age-standardised mortality rate of AAAs continues to rise, especially among men aged 65 years or more. The lethality of ruptured AAA continues to be 80-95%, compared with 5-7% by elective...... surgery of symptomfree AAA. In order to fulfil all WHO, European, and Danish criteria for screening, a randomised hospitalbased screening trial of 12,639 65-73 year old men in Viborg County (Denmark) was initiated in 1994. It seemed that US screening is a valid, suitable and acceptable method of screening...... patients without previous hospital discharge diagnoses due to cardiovascular disease than among similar men without AAA. The absolute risk difference after 5 years was 16%. So, they will benefit from general cardiovascular preventive action as smoking cessation, statins and low-dose aspirin, which could...

  13. Abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gefke, K; Schroeder, T V; Thisted, B

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify patients who need longer care in the ICU (more than 48 hours) following abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery and to evaluate the influence of perioperative complications on short- and long-term survival and quality of life. AAA surgery was performed in 553...... patients, 51 (9%) of whom died within the first 48 hours. Of the 502 patients who survived for more than 48 hours, 109 required ICU therapy for more than 48 hours, whereas 393 patients were in the ICU for less than 48 hours. The incidence of preoperative risk factors was similar for the two groups...... combined failed to permit identification of patients in whom the perioperative survival rate was 0%. Even 20% of patients with multiorgan failure survived for 6 months. Of those patients who needed ICU therapy for more than 48 hours, 41 (38%) were alive at the end of 1988. In response to a questionnaire...

  14. Alginate oligosaccharide indirectly affects toll-like receptor signaling via the inhibition of microRNA-29b in aneurysm patients after endovascular aortic repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Y

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Yong Yang,1–4,* Zhenhuan Ma,1–4,* Guokai Yang,1–4 Jia Wan,1–4 Guojian Li,1–4 Lingjuan Du,1–4 Ping Lu1–4 1Department of Vascular Surgery, The Second People’s Hospital of Yunnan Province, Kunming, China; 2Department of Vascular Surgery, The Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming, China; 3Department of Vascular Surgery, Vascular Surgery Centre in Yunnan Province, Kunming, China; 4Department of Vascular Surgery, Abdominal Surgery Centre in Yunnan Province, Kunming, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Endovascular aortic repair (EVAR is often followed by aneurysm recurrence. Alginate oligosaccharide (AOS has potential antitumor properties as a natural product while the related mechanisms remain unclear. Toll-like receptor (TLR signaling is associated with inflammatory activity of aneurysm and may be affected by miR-29b. Thus, inhibitory function of AOS on aneurysms was explored by measuring the important molecules in TLR4 signaling. After EVAR, a total of 248 aortic aneurysm patients were recruited and randomly assigned into two groups: AOS group (AG, oral administration 10-mg AOS daily and control group (CG, placebo daily. The size of residual aneurysms, aneurysm recurrence, and side effects were investigated. Aneurysm recurrence was determined by Kaplan–Meier analysis. After 2 years, eight and two patients died in the CG and AG, respectively. The sizes of residual aneurysms were significantly larger in the CG than in the AG (P<0.05. The incidence of aneurysm recurrence was also significantly higher in the CG than in the AG (P<0.05. AOS treatment reduced the levels of miR-29b, TLR4, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B, interleukin 1 (IL-1 beta, and interleukin 6 (IL-6. Overexpression and silence of miR-29b increased and reduced the level of TLR4, phospho-p65 NF-kappa B, phospho-p38 MAPK, IL-1 beta, and IL-6. Spearman’s rank correlation

  15. PCA-induced respiratory depression simulating stroke following endoluminal repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Javed

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim To report a case of severe respiratory depression with PCA fentanyl use simulating stroke in a patient who underwent routine elective endoluminal graft repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA Case presentation A 78-year-old obese lady underwent routine endoluminal graft repair for AAA that was progressively increasing in size. Following an uneventful operation postoperative analgesia was managed with a patient-controlled analgesia (PCA device with fentanyl. On the morning following operation the patient was found to be unusually drowsy and unresponsive to stimuli. Her GCS level was 11 with plantars upgoing bilaterally. A provisional diagnosis of stroke was made. Urgent transfer to a high-dependency unit (HDU was arranged and she was given ventilatory support with a BiPap device. CT was performed and found to be normal. Arterial blood gas (ABG analysis showed respiratory acidosis with PaCO2 81 mmHg, PaO2 140 mmHg, pH 7.17 and base excess -2 mmol/l. A total dose of 600 mcg of fentanyl was self-administered in the 16 hours following emergence from general anaesthesia. Naloxone was given with good effect. There was an increase in the creatinine level from 90 μmol/L preoperatively to 167 μmol/L on the first postoperative day. The patient remained on BiPap for two days that resulted in marked improvement in gas exchange. Recovery was complete.

  16. Beneficial effect of statins on total mortality in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathisen, Sven Ross; Abdelnoor, Michael

    2017-10-01

    In this single center, retrospective cohort study we wished to compare early and total mortality for all patients treated for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) with open surgery who were taking statins compared to those who were not. A cohort of 640 patients with AAA was treated with open surgery between 1999 and 2012. Patients were consecutively recruited from a source population of 390,000; 21.3% were female, and the median age was 73 years. The median follow-up was 3.93 years, with an interquartile range of 1.79-6.58 years. The total follow-up was 2855 patient-years. An explanatory strategy was used. The propensity score (PS) was implemented to control for selection bias and confounders. The crude effect of statin use showed a 78% reduction of the 30-day mortality. A stratified analysis using the Mantel-Haenszel method on quintiles of the PS gave an adjusted effect of the odds ratio equal to 0.43 (95% CI: 0.18-0.96), indicating a 57% reduction of the 30-day mortality for statin users. The adjusted rate ratio was 0.62 (95% CI: 0.45-0.83), indicating a reduction of long-term mortality of 38% for statin users compared to non-users for a median follow-up of 3.93 years. This retrospective cohort study showed a significant beneficial effect of statin use on early and long-term survival for patients treated with open surgery. To be conclusive, our results need to be replicated by a randomized clinical trial.

  17. Source of errors and accuracy of a two-dimensional/three-dimensional fusion road map for endovascular aneurysm repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffmann, Claude; Douane, Frédéric; Therasse, Eric; Lessard, Simon; Elkouri, Stephane; Gilbert, Patrick; Beaudoin, Nathalie; Pfister, Marcus; Blair, Jean François; Soulez, Gilles

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the accuracy and source of errors using a two-dimensional (2D)/three-dimensional (3D) fusion road map for endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysm. A rigid 2D/3D road map was tested in 16 patients undergoing EVAR. After 3D/3D manual registration of preoperative multidetector computed tomography (CT) and cone beam CT, abdominal aortic aneurysm outlines were overlaid on live fluoroscopy/digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Patient motion was evaluated using bone landmarks. The misregistration of renal and internal iliac arteries were estimated by 3 readers along head-feet and right-left coordinates (z-axis and x-axis, respectively) before and after bone and DSA corrections centered on the lowest renal artery. Iliac deformation was evaluated by comparing centerlines before and during intervention. A score of clinical added value was estimated as high (z-axis 5 mm). Interobserver reproducibility was calculated by the intraclass correlation coefficient. The lowest renal artery misregistration was estimated at x-axis = 10.6 mm ± 11.1 and z-axis = 7.4 mm ± 5.3 before correction and at x-axis = 3.5 mm ± 2.5 and z-axis = 4.6 mm ± 3.7 after bone correction (P = .08), and at 0 after DSA correction (P artery was estimated at x-axis = 2.4 mm ± 2.0 and z-axis = 2.2 mm ± 2.0. Score of clinical added value was low (n = 11), good (n= 0), and high (n= 5) before correction and low (n = 5), good (n = 4), and high (n = 7) after bone correction. Interobserver intraclass correlation coefficient for misregistration measurements was estimated at 0.99. Patient motion before stent graft delivery was estimated at x-axis = 8 mm ± 5.8 and z-axis = 3.0 mm ± 2.7. The internal iliac artery misregistration measurements were estimated at x-axis = 6.1 mm ± 3.5 and z-axis = 5.6 mm ± 4.0, and iliac centerline deformation was estimated at 38.3 mm ± 15.6. Rigid registration is feasible and fairly accurate. Only a partial reduction of vascular

  18. Epidemiology of abdominal aortic aneurysms in a Chinese population during introduction of endovascular repair, 1994 to 2013: A retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Greta; Chan, Yiu Che; Chong, Ka Chun; Lee, Kam Pui; Cheung, Grace Chung-Yan; Cheng, Stephen Wing-Keung

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine changes in abdominal aortic aneurysm repair and mortality during a period when endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) was introduced.Open repair surgery was the mainstay of treatment for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), but EVAR is increasingly utilized. Studies in the Western population have reported improved short-term or postoperative mortality and shorter length of hospital stay with EVAR. However, scant data are available in the Chinese population.We conducted a retrospective observational study using the database of the Hospital Authority, which provides public health care to most of the Hong Kong population. AAA patients admitted to public hospitals for intact repair or rupture from 1994 to 2013 were included in this study. We calculated the incidence of ruptured AAA, annual repair rates according to type of AAA and surgery, as well as death rates (operative and overall short-term). We calculated whether there were significant changes over time and compared short-term mortality between open surgery and EVAR.One thousand eight hundred eighty-five patients were admitted for intact repair and 1306 patients were admitted for AAA rupture, of whom 795 underwent rupture repair. Intact repair rates significantly increased in all age groups (7.3-37.8%, P short-term AAA-related deaths decreased by more than half (73% in 1994 to 24% in 2013, P Short-term mortality was significantly lower for EVAR than for open repair (17.2% vs 40.3%, P Short-term AAA-related deaths have declined likely due to decreased operative mortality and rupture deaths during the period of EVAR introduction and expansion.

  19. Infectious or Noninfectious? Ruptured, Thrombosed Inflammatory Aortic Aneurysm with Spondylolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanczyk, Ludomir; Elgalal, Marcin, E-mail: telgalal@yahoo.co.uk [Medical University of Lodz, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging (Poland); Papiewski, Andrzej [Medical University of Lodz, Department of Gastroenterological Surgery (Poland); Szubert, Wojciech [Medical University of Lodz, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging (Poland); Szopinski, Piotr [Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, Clinic of Vascular Surgery (Poland)

    2013-06-15

    Osteolysis of vertebrae due to inflammatory aortic aneurysm is rarely observed. However, it is estimated that up to 10 % of infectious aneurysms coexist with bone tissue destruction, most commonly the vertebrae. Inflammatory aneurysms with no identified infection factor, along with infiltration of adjacent muscle and in particular extensive destruction of bone tissue have rarely been described in the literature. A case of inflammatory aneurysm with posterior wall rupture and inflammatory infiltration of the iliopsoas muscle and spine, together with extensive vertebral body destruction, is presented. The aneurysm was successfully treated with endovascular aneurysm repair EVAR.

  20. Infectious or Noninfectious? Ruptured, Thrombosed Inflammatory Aortic Aneurysm with Spondylolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefańczyk, Ludomir; Elgalal, Marcin; Papiewski, Andrzej; Szubert, Wojciech; Szopiński, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Osteolysis of vertebrae due to inflammatory aortic aneurysm is rarely observed. However, it is estimated that up to 10 % of infectious aneurysms coexist with bone tissue destruction, most commonly the vertebrae. Inflammatory aneurysms with no identified infection factor, along with infiltration of adjacent muscle and in particular extensive destruction of bone tissue have rarely been described in the literature. A case of inflammatory aneurysm with posterior wall rupture and inflammatory infiltration of the iliopsoas muscle and spine, together with extensive vertebral body destruction, is presented. The aneurysm was successfully treated with endovascular aneurysm repair EVAR.

  1. The pharmacokinetics of cefazolin in patients undergoing elective & semi-elective abdominal aortic aneurysm open repair surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts Michael S

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical site infections are common, so effective antibiotic concentrations at the sites of infection are required. Surgery can lead to physiological changes influencing the pharmacokinetics of antibiotics. The aim of the study is to evaluate contemporary peri-operative prophylactic dosing of cefazolin by determining plasma and subcutaneous interstitial fluid concentrations in patients undergoing elective of semi-elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA open repair surgery. Methods/Design This is an observational pharmacokinetic study of patients undergoing AAA open repair surgery at the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital. All patients will be administered 2-g cefazolin by intravenous injection within 30-minutes of the procedure. Participants will have samples from blood and urine, collected at different intervals. Patients will also have a microdialysis catheter inserted into subcutaneous tissue to measure interstitial fluid penetration by cefazolin. Participants will be administered indocyanine green and sodium bromide as well as have cardiac output monitoring performed and tetrapolar bioimpedance to determine physiological changes occurring during surgery. Analysis of samples will be performed using validated liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry. Pharmacokinetic analysis will be performed using non-linear mixed effects modeling to determine individual and population pharmacokinetic parameters and the effect of peri-operative physiological changes on cefazolin disposition. Discussion The study will describe cefazolin levels in plasma and the interstitial fluid of tissues during AAA open repair surgery. The effect of physiological changes to the patient mediated by surgery will also be determined. The results of this study will guide clinicians and pharmacists to effectively dose cefazolin in order to maximize the concentration of antibiotics in the tissues which are the most common site of surgical site infections.

  2. Perioperative risk factors for hospital readmission after elective endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Samuel L; Kuo, Isabella J; Kabutey, Nii-Kabu; Gabra, Fady; Fujitani, Roy M

    2018-04-02

    Elective endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is generally well tolerated. However, the incidence of hospital readmission after EVAR and the risk factors and reasons for it are not well studied. This study sought to determine the incidence, to characterize the indications, and to identify perioperative patient-centered risk factors for hospital readmission within 30 days after elective EVAR. All patients who underwent EVAR electively in 2012 to 2013 were identified from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Targeted Vascular database (n = 3886). Preoperative demographics, operation-specific variables, and postoperative outcomes were compared between those who were readmitted within 30 days of the index operation and those who were not. Multivariate logistic regression was then used to determine independent predictors of hospital readmission. The unadjusted 30-day readmission rate after EVAR was 8.2%. Of all readmissions, 55% were for reasons related to the procedure. Median time to readmission was 12 days. Significant preoperative risk factors associated with readmission were female sex, preoperative steroid use, congestive heart failure, and dialysis dependence (P readmission, including myocardial infarction and deep venous thrombosis (P readmission were surgical site infection (odds ratio, 10.24; 95% confidence interval, 5.31-19.75; P readmissions remain a costly problem after vascular surgery and are associated with 30-day mortality after elective EVAR. Whereas female sex and certain irreversible medical comorbidities are nonmodifiable, focusing on medical optimization and identifying those perioperative variables that can affect the need for post-EVAR interventions will be an important step in decreasing hospital readmission. Copyright © 2018 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Editor's Choice - Late Open Surgical Conversion after Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansal, Vinay; Nagpal, Sudhir; Jetty, Prasad

    2018-02-01

    Late open surgical conversion following endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) may occur more frequently after performing EVAR in anatomy outside the instructions for use (IFU). This study reviews predictors and outcomes of late open surgical conversion for failed EVAR. This retrospective cohort study reviewed all EVARs performed at the Ottawa Hospital between January 1999 and May 2015. Open surgical conversions >1 month post EVAR were identified. Variables analysed included indication for conversion, pre-intervention AAA anatomy, endovascular device and configuration, operative technique, re-interventions, complications, and death. Of 1060 consecutive EVARs performed, 16 required late open surgical conversion. Endografts implanted were Medtronic Talent (n = 8, 50.0%), Medtronic Endurant (n = 3, 18.8%), Cook Zenith (n = 4, 25.0%), and Terumo Anaconda (n = 1, 6.2%). Eleven grafts were bifurcated (68.8%), five were aorto-uni-iliac (31.2%). The median time to open surgical conversion was 3.1 (IQR 1.0-5.2) years. There was no significant difference in pre-EVAR rupture status (1.4% elective, 2.1% ruptured, p = .54). Indications for conversion included: Type 1 endoleak with sac expansion (n = 4, 25.0%), Type 2 endoleak with expansion (n = 2, 12.5%), migration (n = 3, 18.8%), sac expansion without endoleak (n = 2, 12.5%), graft infection (n = 3, 18.8%), rupture (n = 2, 12.5%). Nine patients (56.2%) underwent stent graft explantation with in situ surgical graft reconstruction, seven had endograft preserving open surgical intervention. The 30 day mortality was 18.8% (n = 3, all of whom having had endograft preservation). Ten patients (62.5%) suffered major in hospital complications. One patient (6.5%) required post-conversion major surgical re-intervention. IFU adherence during initial EVAR was 43.8%, versus 79.0% (p Open surgical conversion following EVAR results in significant morbidity and mortality. IFU adherence of EVARs later requiring open surgical

  4. Low baseline and subsequent higher aortic abdominal aneurysm FDG uptake are associated with poor sac shrinkage post endovascular repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marie, Pierre-Yves [CHRU-Nancy, Universite de Lorraine, Nuclear Medecine and Nancyclotep Platform, Nancy (France); INSERM, University of Lorraine, UMR 1116, Nancy (France); CHRU-Nancy, Hopitaux de BRABOIS, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Vandoeuvre (France); Plissonnier, Didier; Rouer, Martin [CHU-Rouen, Department of Vascular Surgery, Rouen (France); Bravetti, Stephanie [CHRU-Nancy, Universite de Lorraine, Department of Radiology, Nancy (France); Coscas, Raphael [Hopital Ambroise Pare, APHP, Chirurgie Vasculaire, Boulogne-Billancourt (France); Haulon, Stephan [CHU-Lille, Department of Vascular Surgery, Lille (France); Mandry, Damien [CHRU-Nancy, Universite de Lorraine, Department of Radiology, Nancy (France); INSERM, University of Lorraine, UMR 947, Nancy (France); Alsac, Jean-Marc [grid.414093.b, APHP, HEGP, Department of Vascular Surgery, Paris (France); Malikov, Serguei; Settembre, Nicla [CHRU-Nancy, Universite de Lorraine, Vascular Surgery, Nancy (France); Goueffic, Yann [CHU-Nantes, Department of Vascular Surgery, Nantes (France); Morel, Olivier [CHU-Besancon, Department of Nuclear Medecine, Besancon (France); Roch, Veronique [CHRU-Nancy, Universite de Lorraine, Nuclear Medecine and Nancyclotep Platform, Nancy (France); Micard, Emilien [INSERM, University of Lorraine, UMR 947, Nancy (France); INSERM, CHRU-Nancy, Universite de Lorraine, CIC-1433, FCRIN INI-CRCT, Nancy (France); Lamiral, Zohra [INSERM, CHRU-Nancy, Universite de Lorraine, CIC-1433, FCRIN INI-CRCT, Nancy (France); Michel, Jean-Baptiste [INSERM, Bichat, UMR 698, Paris (France); Rossignol, Patrick [INSERM, University of Lorraine, UMR 1116, Nancy (France); INSERM, CHRU-Nancy, Universite de Lorraine, CIC-1433, FCRIN INI-CRCT, Nancy (France)

    2018-04-15

    The growth phases of medically treated abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are frequently associated with an {sup 18}F-fluorodesoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) pattern involving low baseline and subsequent higher FDG uptake. However, the FDG-PET patterns associated with the endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of larger AAA are presently unknown. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between serial AAA FDG uptake measurements, obtained before EVAR and 1 and 6 months post-intervention and subsequent sac shrinkage at 6 months, a well-recognized indicator of successful repair. Thirty-three AAA patients referred for EVAR (maximal diameter: 55.4 ± 6.0 mm, total volume: 205.7 ± 63.0 mL) underwent FDG-PET/computed tomography (CT) before EVAR and at 1 and 6 months thereafter, with the monitoring of AAA volume and of a maximal standardized FDG uptake [SUVmax] averaged between the axial slices encompassing the AAA. Sac shrinkage was highly variable and could be stratified into three terciles: a first tercile in which shrinkage was absent or very limited (0-29 mL) and a third tercile with pronounced shrinkage (56-165 mL). SUVmax values were relatively low at baseline in the 1st tercile (SUVmax: 1.69 ± 0.33), but markedly increased at 6 months (2.42 ± 0.69, p = 0.02 vs. baseline). These SUV max values were by contrast much higher at baseline in the 3rd tercile (SUVmax: 2.53 ± 0.83 p = 0.009 vs. 1st tercile) and stable at 6 months (2.49 ± 0.80), while intermediate results were documented in the 2nd tercile. Lastly, the amount of sac shrinkage, expressed in absolute values or in percentages of baseline AAA volumes, was positively correlated with baseline SUVmax (p = 0.001 for both). A low pre-EVAR FDG uptake and increased AAA FDG uptake at 6 months are associated with reduced sac shrinkage. This sequential FDG-PET pattern is similar to that already shown to accompany growth phases of medically treated AAA. (orig.)

  5. Low baseline and subsequent higher aortic abdominal aneurysm FDG uptake are associated with poor sac shrinkage post endovascular repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, Pierre-Yves; Plissonnier, Didier; Rouer, Martin; Bravetti, Stephanie; Coscas, Raphael; Haulon, Stephan; Mandry, Damien; Alsac, Jean-Marc; Malikov, Serguei; Settembre, Nicla; Goueffic, Yann; Morel, Olivier; Roch, Veronique; Micard, Emilien; Lamiral, Zohra; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Rossignol, Patrick

    2018-01-01

    The growth phases of medically treated abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are frequently associated with an 18 F-fluorodesoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) pattern involving low baseline and subsequent higher FDG uptake. However, the FDG-PET patterns associated with the endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of larger AAA are presently unknown. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between serial AAA FDG uptake measurements, obtained before EVAR and 1 and 6 months post-intervention and subsequent sac shrinkage at 6 months, a well-recognized indicator of successful repair. Thirty-three AAA patients referred for EVAR (maximal diameter: 55.4 ± 6.0 mm, total volume: 205.7 ± 63.0 mL) underwent FDG-PET/computed tomography (CT) before EVAR and at 1 and 6 months thereafter, with the monitoring of AAA volume and of a maximal standardized FDG uptake [SUVmax] averaged between the axial slices encompassing the AAA. Sac shrinkage was highly variable and could be stratified into three terciles: a first tercile in which shrinkage was absent or very limited (0-29 mL) and a third tercile with pronounced shrinkage (56-165 mL). SUVmax values were relatively low at baseline in the 1st tercile (SUVmax: 1.69 ± 0.33), but markedly increased at 6 months (2.42 ± 0.69, p = 0.02 vs. baseline). These SUV max values were by contrast much higher at baseline in the 3rd tercile (SUVmax: 2.53 ± 0.83 p = 0.009 vs. 1st tercile) and stable at 6 months (2.49 ± 0.80), while intermediate results were documented in the 2nd tercile. Lastly, the amount of sac shrinkage, expressed in absolute values or in percentages of baseline AAA volumes, was positively correlated with baseline SUVmax (p = 0.001 for both). A low pre-EVAR FDG uptake and increased AAA FDG uptake at 6 months are associated with reduced sac shrinkage. This sequential FDG-PET pattern is similar to that already shown to accompany growth phases of medically treated AAA. (orig.)

  6. MMP-2 Isoforms in Aortic Tissue and Serum of Patients with Ascending Aortic Aneurysms and Aortic Root Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tscheuschler, Anke; Meffert, Philipp; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Heilmann, Claudia; Kocher, Nadja; Uffelmann, Xenia; Discher, Philipp; Siepe, Matthias; Kari, Fabian A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The need for biological markers of aortic wall stress and risk of rupture or dissection of ascending aortic aneurysms is obvious. To date, wall stress cannot be related to a certain biological marker. We analyzed aortic tissue and serum for the presence of different MMP-2 isoforms to find a connection between serum and tissue MMP-2 and to evaluate the potential of different MMP-2 isoforms as markers of high wall stress. Methods Serum and aortic tissue from n = 24 patients and serum from n = 19 healthy controls was analyzed by ELISA and gelatin zymography. 24 patients had ascending aortic aneurysms, 10 of them also had aortic root aneurysms. Three patients had normally functioning valves, 12 had regurgitation alone, eight had regurgitation and stenosis and one had only stenosis. Patients had bicuspid and tricuspid aortic valves (9/15). Serum samples were taken preoperatively, and the aortic wall specimen collected during surgical aortic repair. Results Pro-MMP-2 was identified in all serum and tissue samples. Pro-MMP-2 was detected in all tissue and serum samples from patients with ascending aortic/aortic root aneurysms, irrespective of valve morphology or other clinical parameters and in serum from healthy controls. We also identified active MMP-2 in all tissue samples from patients with ascending aortic/aortic root aneurysms. None of the analyzed serum samples revealed signals relatable to active MMP-2. No correlation between aortic tissue total MMP-2 or tissue pro-MMP-2 or tissue active MMP-2 and serum MMP-2 was found and tissue MMP-2/pro-MMP-2/active MMP-2 did not correlate with aortic diameter. This evidence shows that pro-MMP-2 is the predominant MMP-2 species in serum of patients and healthy individuals and in aneurysmatic aortic tissue, irrespective of aortic valve configuration. Active MMP-2 species are either not released into systemic circulation or not detectable in serum. There is no reliable connection between aortic tissue—and serum MMP-2

  7. Surgical treatment of pararenal aortic aneurysms in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, G; D'Urso, A; Ceccanei, G; Caliò, F; Vietri, F

    2007-12-01

    Until fenestrated endografts will become the standard treatment of pararenal aortic aneurysms, open surgical repair will currently be employed for the repair of this condition. Suprarenal aortic control and larger surgical dissection represent additional technical requirements for the treatment of pararenal aneurysms compared to those of open infrarenal aortic aneurysms, which may be followed by an increased operative mortality and morbidity rate. As this may be especially true when dealing with pararenal aneurysms in an elderly patients' population, we decided to retrospectively review our results of open pararenal aortic aneurysm repair in elderly patients, in order to compare them with those reported in the literature. Twenty-one patients over 75 years of age were operated on for pararenal aortic aneurysms in a ten-year period. Exposure of the aorta was obtained by means of a retroperitoneal access, through a left flank incision on the eleventh rib. When dealing with interrenal aortic aneurysm the left renal artery was revascularized with a retrograde bypass arising from the aortic graft, proximally bevelled on the ostium of the right renal artery. Two patients died of acute intestinal ischemia, yielding a postoperative mortality of 9.5%. Nonfatal complications included 2 pleural effusions, a transitory rise in postoperative serum creatinine levels in 3 cases, and one retroperitoneal hematoma. Mean renal ischemia time was 23 min, whereas mean visceral ischemia time was 19 min. Mean inhospital stay was 11 days. Pararenal aortic aneurysms in the elderly can be surgically repaired with results that are similar to those obtained in younger patients.

  8. Hepatopancreaticobiliary Values after Thoracoabdominal Aneurysm Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Darrell; Coselli, Joseph S.; Johnson, Michael L.; LeMaire, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: After thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) repair, blood tests assessing hepatopancreaticobiliary (HPB) organs commonly have abnormal results. The clinical significance of such abnormalities is difficult to determine because the expected postoperative levels have not been characterized. Therefore, we sought to establish expected trends in HPB laboratory values after TAAA repair. Methods: This 5-year study comprised 155 patients undergoing elective Crawford extent II TAAA repair...

  9. Flow and wall shear stress characterization following endovascular aneurysm repair and endovascular aneurysm sealing in an infrarenal aneurysm model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersen, Johannes T.; Groot Jebbink, Erik; Versluis, Michel; Slump, Cornelis H.; Ku, David N.; de Vries, Jean-Paul P.M.; Reijnen, Michel M.P.J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) with a modular endograft has become the preferred treatment for abdominal aortic aneurysms. A novel concept is endovascular aneurysm sealing (EVAS), consisting of dual endoframes surrounded by polymer-filled endobags. This dual-lumen configuration is

  10. Impact of surgeon and hospital experience on outcomes of abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in New York State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, Andrew J; Connolly, Peter H; Schneider, Darren B; Sedrakyan, Art

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to assess the impact of the surgeon's and hospital's experience on the outcomes of open surgical repair (OSR) and endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of intact and ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) in New York State. New York Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System data were used to identify patients undergoing AAA repair from 2000 to 2011. Characteristics of the provider and hospital were determined by linkage to the New York Office of Professions and National Provider Identification databases. Distinct hierarchical logistic regression models for EVAR and OSR for intact and ruptured AAAs were created to adjust for the patient's comorbidities and to evaluate the impact of the surgeon's and hospital's experience on outcomes. The provider's years since medical school graduation as well as annual volume of the facility and provider are examined in tertiles. Adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals are presented. A total of 18,842 patients underwent AAA repair by a vascular surgeon. For intact AAAs (n = 17,118), 26.2% of patients underwent OSR and 73.8% underwent EVAR. For ruptured AAAs (n = 1724), 63.9% underwent OSR and 36.1% underwent EVAR. After intact AAA repair, OSR adjusted outcomes were significantly influenced by the surgeon's annual volume but not by the facility's volume or the surgeon's age. The lowest volume providers (1-4 OSRs) had higher in-hospital mortality rates than high-volume (>11 OSRs) surgeons (adjusted odds ratio, 1.87 [95% confidence interval, 1.1-3.17]). Low-volume providers also had higher odds of major complications (1.23 [1-1.51]). For patients with intact AAA undergoing EVAR, mortality was higher at low-volume facilities (2.6 [1.3-5.3] and 2.7 [1.5-4.8] for 27 OSRs for ruptured AAA) centers (1.56 [1.02-2.39]), whereas low-volume physicians (<4 OSRs for ruptured AAA) had higher odds of major complications (1.58 [1.04-2.41]). In the case of EVAR for rupture, there were no characteristics of

  11. Aortic Arch Aneurysms: Treatment with Extra anatomical Bypass and Endovascular Stent-Grafting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Noriyuki; Shimono, Takatsugu; Hirano, Tadanori; Mizumoto, Toru; Ishida, Masaki; Fujii, Hideki; Yada, Isao; Takeda, Kan

    2002-01-01

    Endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysms is emerging as an attractive alternative to surgical graft replacement. However,patients with aortic arch aneurysms are often excluded from the target of endovascular repair because of lack of suitable landing zones, especially at the proximal ones. In this paper we describe our method for treating patients with aortic arch aneurysms using a combination of extra anatomical bypass surgery and endovascular stent-grafting

  12. Predictors of outcome after elective endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair and external validation of a risk prediction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniowski, Brendan; Barnes, Mary; Jenkins, Jason; Boyne, Nicholas; Kruger, Allan; Walker, Philip J

    2011-09-01

    Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair (EVAR) has been associated with lower operative mortality and morbidity than open surgery but comparable long-term mortality and higher delayed complication and reintervention rates. Attention has therefore been directed to identifying preoperative and operative variables that influence outcomes after EVAR. Risk-prediction models, such as the EVAR Risk Assessment (ERA) model, have also been developed to help surgeons plan EVAR procedures. The aims of this study were (1) to describe outcomes of elective EVAR at the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital (RBWH), (2) to identify preoperative and operative variables predictive of outcomes after EVAR, and (3) to externally validate the ERA model. All elective EVAR procedures at the RBWH before July 1, 2009, were reviewed. Descriptive analyses were performed to determine the outcomes. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify preoperative and operative variables predictive of outcomes after EVAR. Binomial logistic regression analyses were used to externally validate the ERA model. Before July 1, 2009, 197 patients (172 men), who were a mean age of 72.8 years, underwent elective EVAR at the RBWH. Operative mortality was 1.0%. Survival was 81.1% at 3 years and 63.2% at 5 years. Multivariate analysis showed predictors of survival were age (P = .0126), American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score (P = .0180), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (P = .0348) at 3 years and age (P = .0103), ASA score (P = .0006), renal failure (P = .0048), and serum creatinine (P = .0022) at 5 years. Aortic branch vessel score was predictive of initial (30-day) type II endoleak (P = .0015). AAA tortuosity was predictive of midterm type I endoleak (P = .0251). Female sex was associated with lower rates of initial clinical success (P = .0406). The ERA model fitted RBWH data well for early death (C statistic = .906), 3-year survival (C statistic = .735), 5-year

  13. Endovascular Repair of Acute Symptomatic Pararenal Aortic Aneurysm With Three Chimney and One Periscope Graft for Complete Visceral Artery Revascularization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brechtel, Klaus; Ketelsen, Dominik; Endisch, Andrea; Heller, Stephan; Heuschmid, Martin; Stock, Ulrich A.; Kalender, Guenay

    2012-01-01

    PurposeTo describe a modified endovascular technique for complete revascularization of visceral and renal arteries in symptomatic pararenal aortic aneurysm (PRAA).TechniqueArterial access was surgically established in both common femoral arteries (CFAs) and the left subclavian artery (LSA). Revascularization of the left renal artery, the celiac trunk, and the superior mesenteric artery was performed through one single sheath via the LSA. Suitable covered stents were put in the aortic branches but not deployed. The right renal artery was accessed over the left CFA. Due to the longitudinal extension of the presented aneurysm two stent-grafts were introduced via the right CFA. After deploying the aortic stent-grafts, all covered stents in the side branches were deployed consecutively with a minimum overlap of 5 mm over the cranial and caudal stent-graft edges. Simultaneous ballooning was performed to fully expand all stent-grafts and warranty patency. Conclusion: This is the first report in the literature of chimney grafting in PRAA for complete revascularization of visceral and renal branches by using more than two covered stents introduced from one side through one single sheath. However this technique is modified, it should be used only in bailout situations when branched stent-grafts are not available and/or surgery is not suitable.

  14. Predictive Factors for Mortality and Morbidity of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manabu Shiraishi

    2012-04-01

    Conclusions: Emergency open repair can be safely performed in patients for infrarenal rAAA. In particular, we identified specific independent predictive factors of clinical examination and laboratory studies for mortality, major morbidity and renal insufficiency. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2012; 1(2.000: 94-101

  15. Aortic aneurysm sac pressure measurements after endovascular repair using an implantable remote sensor: initial experience and short-term follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoppe, Hanno; Kaufman, John A.; Segall, Jocelyn A.; Liem, Timothy K.; Landry, Gregory J.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this single-center study was to report our initial experience with an implantable remote pressure sensor for aneurysm sac pressure measurement in patients post-endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) including short-term follow-up. A pressure sensor (EndoSure, Atlanta, GA) was implanted in 12 patients treated with different commercially available aortic endografts for EVAR. Pressure was read pre- and post-EVAR in the operating room. One-month follow-up (30 days ± 6 days) was performed including sac pressure readings and IV contrast CT scans. Variables were compared using the paired Student's t test. An intraprocedure type-I endoleak and a type-III endoleak were successfully treated resulting in decreasing sac pressures. In all patients, post-EVAR systolic sac pressure decreased by an average of 33% (P ≤ 0.005) compared to pre-EVAR measurements. One-month follow-up demonstrated a 47% decrease in systolic sac pressure (P ≤ 0.05). On follow-up CT scans, the average maximum aneurysm diameter pre-EVAR was 6.3 ± 1.6 cm and post-EVAR 6.0 ± 1.7 cm (P≤0.05). The diameter of the aneurysm sac was larger only in one patient with a type-III endoleak. Remote sac pressure measurement may provide important information in addition to imaging and may help to reduce the number of follow-up CT scans. (orig.)

  16. Infected aortic aneurysm and inflammatory aortic aneurysm. In search of an optimal differential diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizaka, Nobukazu; Sohmiya, Koichi; Miyamura, Masatoshi; Umeda, Tatsuya; Tsuji, Motomu; Katsumata, Takahiro; Miyata, Tetsuro

    2012-01-01

    Infected aortic aneurysm and inflammatory aortic aneurysm each account for a minor fraction of the total incidence of aortic aneurysm and are associated with periaortic inflammation. Despite the similarity, infected aortic aneurysm generally shows a more rapid change in clinical condition, leading to a fatal outcome; in addition, delayed diagnosis and misuse of corticosteroid or immunosuppressing drugs may lead to uncontrolled growth of microorganisms. Therefore, it is mandatory that detection of aortic aneurysm is followed by accurate differential diagnosis. In general, infected aortic aneurysm appears usually as a saccular form aneurysm with nodularity, irregular configuration; however, the differential diagnosis may not be easy sometimes for the following reasons: symptoms, such as abdominal and/or back pain and fever, and blood test abnormalities, such as elevated C-reactive protein and enhanced erythrocyte sedimentation rate, are common in infected aortic aneurysm, but they are not found infrequently in inflammatory aortic aneurysm; some inflammatory aortic aneurysms are immunoglobulin (Ig) G4-related, but not all of them; the prevalence of IgG4 positivity in infected aortic aneurysm has not been well investigated; enhanced uptake of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) by 18F-FDG-positron emission tomography may not distinguish between inflammation mediated by autoimmunity and that mediated by microorganism infection. Here we discuss the characteristics of these two forms of aortic aneurysm and the points of which we have to be aware before reaching a final diagnosis. (author)

  17. Mid-term results of zone 0 thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair after ascending aorta wrapping and supra-aortic debranching in high-risk patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecoraro, Felice; Lachat, Mario; Hofmann, Michael; Cayne, Neal S; Chaykovska, Lyubov; Rancic, Zoran; Puippe, Gilbert; Pfammatter, Thomas; Mangialardi, Nicola; Veith, Frank J; Bettex, Dominique; Maisano, Francesco; Neff, Thomas A

    2017-06-01

    Surgical repair of aneurysmal disease involving the ascending aorta, aortic arch and eventually the descending aorta is generally associated with significant morbidity and mortality. A less invasive approach with the ascending wrapping technique (WT), supra-aortic vessel debranching (SADB) and thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR) in zone 0 was developed to reduce the associated risk in these patients. During a 10-year period, consecutive patients treated by the ascending WT, SADB and TEVAR in zone 0 were included. All patients were considered at high risk for conventional surgery. Measured outcomes included perioperative deaths and morbidity, maximal aortic transverse diameter (TD) and its postoperative evolution, endoleak, survival, freedom from cardiovascular reinterventions, SADB freedom from occlusion and aortic valve function during follow-up. Median follow-up was 37.4 [mean = 34; range, 0-65; standard deviation (SD) = 20] months. Twenty-six cases were included with a mean age of 71.88 ( r  = 56-87; SD = 8) years. A mean of 2.9 supra-aortic vessels (75) per patient was debranched from the ascending aorta. The mean time interval from WT/SADB and TEVAR was 29 ( r  = 0-204; SD = 48) days. TEVAR was associated with chimney and/or periscope grafts in 6 (23%) patients, and extra-anatomical supra-aortic bypasses were performed in 6 (23%) patients. Perioperative mortality was 7.7% (2/26). Neurological events were registered in 3 (11.5%) cases, and a reintervention was required in 3 (11.5%) cases. After the WT, the ascending diameter remained stable during the follow-up period in all cases. At mean follow-up, significant shrinkage of the arch/descending aorta diameter was observed. A type I/III endoleak occurred in 3 cases. At 5 years, the rates of survival, freedom from cardiovascular reinterventions and SADB freedom from occlusion were 71.7, 82.3 and 96%, respectively. The use of the ascending WT, SADB and TEVAR in selected patients

  18. Comparative clinical effectiveness and cost effectiveness of endovascular strategy v open repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: three year results of the IMPROVE randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-14

    Objective  To assess the three year clinical outcomes and cost effectiveness of a strategy of endovascular repair (if aortic morphology is suitable, open repair if not) versus open repair for patients with suspected ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. Design  Randomised controlled trial. Setting  30 vascular centres (29 in UK, one in Canada), 2009-16. Participants  613 eligible patients (480 men) with a clinical diagnosis of ruptured aneurysm, of whom 502 underwent emergency repair for rupture. Interventions  316 patients were randomised to an endovascular strategy (275 with confirmed rupture) and 297 to open repair (261 with confirmed rupture). Main outcome measures  Mortality, with reinterventions after aneurysm repair, quality of life, and hospital costs to three years as secondary measures. Results  The maximum follow-up for mortality was 7.1 years, with two patients in each group lost to follow-up by three years. After similar mortality by 90 days, in the mid-term (three months to three years) there were fewer deaths in the endovascular than the open repair group (hazard ratio 0.57, 95% confidence interval 0.36 to 0.90), leading to lower mortality at three years (48% v 56%), but by seven years mortality was about 60% in each group (hazard ratio 0.92, 0.75 to 1.13). Results for the 502 patients with repaired ruptures were more pronounced: three year mortality was lower in the endovascular strategy group (42% v 54%; odds ratio 0.62, 0.43 to 0.88), but after seven years there was no clear difference between the groups (hazard ratio 0.86, 0.68 to 1.08). Reintervention rates up to three years were not significantly different between the randomised groups (hazard ratio 1.02, 0.79 to 1.32); the initial rapid rate of reinterventions was followed by a much slower mid-term reintervention rate in both groups. The early higher average quality of life in the endovascular strategy versus open repair group, coupled with the lower mortality at three years, led to a

  19. Spinal arterial anatomy and risk factors for lower extremity weakness following endovascular thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair with branched stent-grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Catherine K; Chuter, Timothy A M; Reilly, Linda M; Ota, Maile K; Furtado, Andre; Bucci, Monica; Wintermark, Max; Hiramoto, Jade S

    2008-06-01

    To evaluate spinal arterial anatomy and identify risk factors for lower extremity weakness (LEW) following endovascular thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) repair. A retrospective review was conducted of 37 patients (27 men; mean age 74.8+/-7.1 years, range 58-86) undergoing endovascular TAAA repair with branched stent-grafts at a single academic institution from July 2005 to December 2007. Data were collected on preoperative comorbidities, duration of operation, blood loss, type of anesthesia, extent of aortic coverage, blood pressure, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure and drainage, and postoperative development of LEW. Pre- and postoperative contrast-enhanced computed tomographic angiograms (CTA) in a 26-patient subset were analyzed to evaluate the number of patent intercostal and lumbar arteries before and after repair. All patients were neurologically intact at the end of the operation. Seven (19%) patients developed LEW postoperatively: 6 perioperatively and 1 after discharge. LEW was associated with postoperative hypotension, internal iliac artery (IIA) occlusion, and fewer patent segmental arteries on preoperative CTA. Lowest mean systolic blood pressure was segmental arteries in patients with or without LEW. Endovascular TAAA repair inevitably occludes direct inflow to lumbar and intercostal arteries. The distal segments of these arteries to the spine, however, are seen to remain patent through collaterals. Measures to preserve collateral pathways and increase perfusion pressure may help prevent or treat LEW.

  20. Outcome and survival of patients aged 75 years and older compared to younger patients after ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: do the results justify the effort?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahidi, S; Schroeder, T Veith; Carstensen, M.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated early mortality (preoperative variables that may be predictive of 30-day mortality in elderly patients compared to younger patients after emergency open repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA). The survey is a retrospective analysis based...... patients compared to the younger group. Between the survivors of the two groups, there were no significant differences in the total length of stay (LOS) and the LOS in the intensive care unit. Advanced age (>or=75) and the combination of this advanced age and serum creatinine of >or=0.150 mmol/L were...... the only significant (p preoperative risk factors in our single-center study. However, we believe that treatment for RAAA can be justified in elderly patients. In our experience, surgical open repair has been life-saving in 33% of patients aged 75 years and older, at a relatively low price for each...

  1. Visceral hybrid reconstruction of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm after open repair of type a aortic dissection by the Bentall procedure with the elephant trunk technique: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjanović Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Reconstruction of chronic type B dissection and thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA remaining after the emergency reconstruction of the ascending thoracic aorta and aortic arch for acute type A dissection represents one of the major surgical challenges. Complications of chronic type B dissection are aneurysmal formation and rupture of an aortic aneurysm with a high mortality rate. We presented a case of visceral hybrid reconstruction of TAAA secondary to chronic dissection type B after the Bentall procedure with the elephant trunk technique due to acute type A aortic dissection in a high-risk patient. Case report. A 62 year-old woman was admitted to our institution for reconstruction of Crawford type I TAAA secondary to chronic dissection. The patient had had an acute type A aortic dissection 3 years before and undergone reconstruction by the Bentall procedure with the elephant trunk technique with valve replacement. On admission the patient had coronary artery disease (myocardial infarction, two times in the past 3 years, congestive heart disease with ejection fraction of 25% and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. On computed tomography (CT of the aorta TAAA was revealed with a maximum diameter of 93 mm in the descending thoracic aorta secondary to chronic dissection. All the visceral arteries originated from the true lumen with exception of the celiac artery (CA, and the end of chronic dissection was below the origin of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA. The patient was operated on using surgical visceral reconstruction of the SMA, CA and the right renal artery (RRA as the first procedure. Postoperative course was without complications. Endovascular TAAA reconstruction was performed as the second procedure one month later, when the elephant trunk was used as the proximal landing zone for the endograft, and distal landing zone was the level of origin of the RRA. Postoperatively, the patient had no neurological deficit and

  2. Total Endovascular Aortic Repair in a Patient with Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amako, Mau; Spear, Rafaëlle; Clough, Rachel E; Hertault, Adrien; Azzaoui, Richard; Martin-Gonzalez, Teresa; Sobocinski, Jonathan; Haulon, Stéphan

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study is to describe a total endovascular aortic repair with branched and fenestrated endografts in a young patient with Marfan syndrome and a chronic aortic dissection. Open surgery is the gold standard to treat aortic dissections in patients with aortic disease and Marfan syndrome. In 2000, a 38-year-old man with Marfan syndrome underwent open ascending aorta repair for an acute type A aortic dissection. One year later, a redo sternotomy was performed for aortic valve replacement. In 2013, the patient presented with endocarditis and pulmonary infection, which necessitated tracheostomy and temporary dialysis. In 2014, the first stage of the endovascular repair was performed using an inner branched endograft to exclude a 77-mm distal arch and descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. In 2015, a 63-mm thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm was excluded by implantation of a 4-fenestrated endograft. Follow-up after both endovascular repairs was uneventful. Total aortic endovascular repair was successfully performed to treat a patient with arch and thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysm associated with chronic aortic dissection and Marfan syndrome. The postoperative images confirmed patency of the endograft and its branches, and complete exclusion of the aortic false lumen. Endovascular repair is a treatment option in patients with connective tissue disease who are not candidates for open surgery. Long-term follow-up is required to confirm these favorable early outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Mycotic Aneurysm of the Aortic Arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hye Seo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A mycotic aneurysm of the thoracic aorta is rare. We report a case of mycotic aneurysm that developed in the aortic arch. An 86-year-old man was admitted with fever and general weakness. Blood culture yielded methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Chest X-ray showed an enlarged aortic arch, and computed tomography scan revealed an aneurysm in the aortic arch. The patient was treated only with antibiotics and not surgically. The size of the aneurysm increased rapidly, resulting in bronchial obstruction and superimposed pneumonia. The patient died of respiratory failure.

  4. [Albert Einstein and his abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes Castro, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The interesting case of Albert Einstein's abdominal aortic aneurysm is presented. He was operated on at age 69 and, finding that the large aneurysm could not be removed, the surgeon elected to wrap it with cellophane to prevent its growth. However, seven years later the aneurysm ruptured and caused the death of the famous scientist.

  5. Ruptured Aortic Aneurysm From Late Type II Endoleak Treated by Transarterial Embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunasekaran, Senthil; Funaki, Brian; Lorenz, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Endoleak is the most common complication after endovascular aneurysm repair. The most common type of endoleak, a type II endoleak, typically follows a benign course and is only treated when associated with increasing aneurysm size. In this case report, we describe a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm due to a late, type II endoleak occurring 10 years after endovascular aneurysm repair that was successfully treated by transarterial embolization.

  6. Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair (TEVAR) in Proximal (Type A) Aortic Dissection: Ready for a Broader Application?

    OpenAIRE

    Nienaber, Christoph A.; Sakalihasan, Natzi; Clough, Rachel E.; Aboukoura, Mohamed; Mancuso, Enrico; Yeh, James S.M.; Defraigne, Jean-Olivier; Cheshire, Nick; Rosendahl, Ulrich Peter; Quarto, Cesare; Pepper, John

    2016-01-01

    ObjectiveThoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has demonstrated encouraging results and is gaining increasing acceptance as a treatment option for aortic aneurysms and dissections. Yet, its role in managing proximal aortic pathologies is unknown - this is important because in proximal (Stanford type A) aortic dissections, 10-30% are not accepted for surgery, and 30-50% are technically amenable for TEVAR. We describe our case series of type A aortic dissections treated using TEVAR.Method...

  7. Improving Results of Elective Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair at a Low-Volume Hospital by Risk-Adjusted Selection of Treatment in the Endovascular Era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wibmer, Andreas; Meyer, Bernhard; Albrecht, Thomas; Buhr, Heinz-Johannes; Kruschewski, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have observed both higher mortality rates and lower utilization of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) at low-volume centers. This article presents the results of elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair at a low-volume center in the endovascular era and investigates whether postprocedural mortality can be improved by extension of EVAR application also in this setting. This is an 11.6-year retrospective cohort study of 132 patients undergoing elective surgical or endovascular AAA repair at a tertiary care academic hospital between 1997 and July 2008, i.e., a median volume of 12 cases per year. The study was divided into two periods of time according to the respective indications and contraindications for EVAR, which substantially changed in 2005. During period 1, only aneurysms with necks ≥20 mm long and not involving the iliac arteries were treated endoluminally. Beginning in 2005, indication for EVAR was expanded to aortoiliac aneurysms with a minimum neck length of 15 mm. Preoperative risk was assessed by the SVS/AAVS comorbidity score. During the first period (1997-2004) 18.4% (16/87) of all patients received EVAR. By extending anatomical confines and indications for EVAR in 2005, the utilization rate of EVAR increased to 40.0% (18/45) during the second period (2005-July 2008; p = 0.007). Prevalence of preoperative risk factors did not change during the two observation periods. In contrast to period 1, high-risk patients were preferentially treated endoluminally during the second period, resulting in a significantly higher median SVS/AAVS score in the EVAR group (p < 0.001). A significant decrease in median length of stay at the intensive/intermediate care unit (5 vs. 2 days; p = 0.006) and length of in-hospital stay (20 vs. 12.5 days; p < 0.001) was observed during period 2. Overall perioperative mortality was reduced from 6.9% during the first period to 2.2% during the second period (p = 0.256). EVAR mortality was 0%, mortality after

  8. Can Early Computed Tomography Angiography after Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair Predict the Need for Reintervention in Patients with Type II Endoleak?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudeck, O., E-mail: oliver.dudeck@med.ovgu.de [University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Germany); Schnapauff, D. [Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology (Germany); Herzog, L.; Löwenthal, D.; Bulla, K.; Bulla, B. [University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Germany); Halloul, Z.; Meyer, F. [University of Magdeburg, Department of General, Visceral and Vascular Surgery (Germany); Pech, M. [University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Germany); Gebauer, B. [Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology (Germany); Ricke, J. [University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to identify parameters on CT angiography (CTA) of type II endoleaks following endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), which can be used to predict the subsequent need for reinterventions.MethodsWe retrospectively identified 62 patients with type II endoleak who underwent early CTA in mean 3.7 ± 1.9 days after EVAR. On the basis of follow-up examinations (mean follow-up period 911 days; range, 373–1,987 days), patients were stratified into two groups: those who did (n = 18) and those who did not (n = 44) require reintervention. CTA characteristics, such as AAA, endoleak, as well as nidus dimensions, patency of the inferior mesenteric artery, number of aortic branch vessels, and the pattern of endoleak appearance, were recorded and correlated with the clinical outcome.ResultsUnivariate and receiver operating characteristic curve regression analyses revealed significant differences between the two groups for the endoleak volume (surveillance group: 1391.6 ± 1427.9 mm{sup 3}; reintervention group: 3227.7 ± 2693.8 mm{sup 3}; cutoff value of 2,386 mm{sup 3}; p = 0.002), the endoleak diameter (13.6 ± 4.3 mm compared with 25.9 ± 9.6 mm; cutoff value of 19 mm; p < 0.0001), the number of aortic branch vessels (2.9 ± 1.2 compared with 4.2 ± 1.4 vessels; p = 0.001), as well as a “complex type” endoleak pattern (13.6 %, n = 6 compared with 44.4 %, n = 8; p = 0.02).ConclusionsEarly CTA can predict the future need for reintervention in patients with type II endoleak. Therefore, treatment decision should be based not only on aneurysm enlargement alone but also on other imaging characteristics.

  9. Vitamins and abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Hisato; Umemoto, Takuya

    2017-02-01

    To summarize the association of vitamins (B6, B12, C, D, and E) and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), we reviewed clinical studies with a comprehensive literature research and meta-analytic estimates. To identify all clinical studies evaluating the association of vitamins B6/B12/C/D/E and AAA, databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched through April 2015, using Web-based search engines (PubMed and OVID). For each case-control study, data regarding vitamin levels in both the AAA and control groups were used to generate standardized mean differences (SMDs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Pooled analyses of the 4 case-control studies demonstrated significantly lower circulating vitamin B6 levels (SMD, -0.33; 95% CI, -0.55 to -0.11; P=0.003) but non-significantly lower vitamin B12 levels (SMD, -0.42; 95% CI, -1.09 to 0.25; P=0.22) in patients with AAA than subjects without AAA. Pooled analyses of the 2 case-control studies demonstrated significantly lower levels of circulating vitamins C (SMD, -0.71; 95% CI, -1.23 to -0.19; P=0.007) and E (SMD, -1.76; 95% CI, -2.93 to 0.60; P=0.003) in patients with AAA than subjects without AAA. Another pooled analysis of the 3 case-control studies demonstrated significantly lower circulating vitamin D (25-hydroxyvitamin D) levels (SMD, -0.25; 95% CI, -0.50 to -0.01; P=0.04) in patients with AAA than subjects without AAA. In a double-blind controlled trial, 4.0-year treatment with a high-dose folic acid and vitamin B6/B12 multivitamin in kidney transplant recipients did not reduce a rate of AAA repair despite significant reduction in homocysteine level. In another randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 5.8-year supplementation with α-tocopherol (vitamin E) had no preventive effect on large AAA among male smokers. In clinical setting, although low circulating vitamins B6/C/D/E (not B12) levels are associated with AAA presence, vitamins B6/B12/E

  10. Why routine intensive care unit admission after elective open infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm repair is no longer an evidence based practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, David

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Elective open infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) repair is major surgery performed on high-risk patients. Routine ICU admission postoperatively is the current accepted standard of care. Few of these patients actually require a level of care that cannot be provided just as effectively in a surgical high dependency unit (HDU). Our aim was to determine, \\'can high risk patients that will require ICU admission postoperatively be reliably identified preoperatively?\\'. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of all elective open infrarenal AAA repairs in our institution over a 3-year period was performed. The Estimation of Physiological Ability and Surgical Stress (E-PASS) model was used as our risk stratification tool for predicting post-operative morbidity. Renal function was also considered as a predictor of outcome, independent of the E-PASS. RESULTS: 80% (n = 16) were admitted to ICU. Only 30% (n = 6) of the total study population necessitated intensive care. There were 9 complications in 7 patients in our study. The E-PASS comprehensive risk score (CRS)\\/Surgical stress score (SSS) were found to be significantly associated with the presence of a complication (p = 0.009)\\/(p = 0.032) respectively. Serum creatinine (p = 0.013) was similarly significantly associated with the presence of a complication. CONCLUSIONS: The E-PASS model possessing increasing external validity is an effective risk stratification tool in safely deciding the appropriate level of post-operative care for elective infrarenal AAA repairs.

  11. Resultados da cirurgia do aneurisma da aorta abdominal em pacientes jovens Outcomes after surgical repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms in young patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telmo P. Bonamigo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: A presença de aneurisma da aorta abdominal (AAA é rara em pacientes jovens. OBJETIVO: Avaliar os resultados da cirurgia do AAA em pacientes com idade BACKGROUND: Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA are rare in young patients. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate outcomes after AAA repair in patients aged < 50 years. METHODS: Between June 1979 and January 2008, 946 patients underwent elective repair for an infrarenal AAA performed by the first author. Of these, 13 patients (1.4% were < 50 years old at surgery. Demographic characteristics and surgical data were analyzed, as well as early and late outcomes after surgical intervention. RESULTS: Mean age was 46±3.4 years (ranging from 43 to 50 years. Most patients were men (76.9%, hypertensive (76.9% and smokers (61.5%. Perioperative morbidity and mortality rates were low (15.4% and 0%, respectively; one patient had respiratory infection and another patient had unstable angina. Median follow-up was 85.5 months, and two patients died due to ischemic cardiopathy and cerebrovascular accident during the follow-up period. CONCLUSION: AAA repair in young patients is a safe procedure, with good long-term results. In our study, there were no perioperative deaths, and a good long-term survival was observed.

  12. Systolic Sac Pressure Index for the Prediction of Persistent Type II Endoleak for 12 Months After Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikoma, Akira, E-mail: yfb04322@nifty.com; Nakai, Motoki, E-mail: momonga@wakayama-med.ac.jp; Sato, Morio, E-mail: morisato@wakayama-med.ac.jp; Sato, Hirotatsu, E-mail: kuppa1220@yahoo.co.jp; Minamiguchi, Hiroki, E-mail: hiromina4@hotmail.com; Sonomura, Tetsuo, E-mail: sonomura@wakayama-med.ac.jp [Wakayama Medical University, Departments of Radiology (Japan); Nishimura, Yoshiharu, E-mail: nishim-y@wakayama-med.ac.jp; Okamura, Yoshitaka, E-mail: y-ok@wakayama-med.ac.jp [Wakayama Medical University, Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    PurposeTo assess the relationship between the systolic sac pressure index (SPI) and the presence of endoleaks 12 months after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR).Materials and MethodsWe performed a single-center prospective trial of consecutively treated patients. SPI (calculated as systolic sac pressure/systolic aortic pressure) was measured by catheterization immediately after EVAR. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography was scheduled 12 months after EVAR to detect possible endoleaks.ResultsData were available for 34 patients who underwent EVAR for an AAA. Persisting type II endoleak was found in 8 patients (endoleak-positive group) but not in the other 26 patients (endoleak-negative group). The mean ± standard deviation SPI was significantly greater in the endoleak-positive group than in the endoleak-negative group (0.692 ± 0.048 vs. 0.505 ± 0.081, respectively; P = .001). Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that an SPI of 0.638 was the optimum cutoff value for predicting a persistent endoleak at 12 months with high accuracy (0.971; 33/34), sensitivity (1.00), and specificity (0.962) values. The mean change in AAA diameter was −4.28 ± 5.03 mm and 2.22 ± 4.54 mm in patients with SPI of <0.638 or ≥0.638, respectively (P = .002).ConclusionPatients with an SPI of ≥0.638 immediately after EVAR were more likely to have a persistent type II endoleak at 12 months with an accuracy of 0.971, and showed increases in aneurysm sac diameter compared with patients with an SPI of <0.638.

  13. Dissecting aortic aneurysm in maintenance hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ounissi M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The dissecting aortic aneurysm (DAA is a rare pathology that may result in fatal outcome. We report follow up of three cases of DAA patients undergoing maintenance hemo-dialysis who were managed conservatively.

  14. Systematic review of recent evidence for the safety and efficacy of elective endovascular repair in the management of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, D; Michaels, J A; Jones, L; Ayiku, L

    2005-08-01

    Conventional management of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is by open repair and is associated with a mortality rate of 2-6 per cent. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is an alternative technique first introduced in 1991. A systematic review was undertaken of the evidence for the safety and efficacy of elective EVAR in the management of asymptomatic infrarenal AAA. Thirteen electronic bibliographical databases were searched, covering biomedical, health-related, science and social science literature. Outcomes were assessed with respect to efficacy (successful deployment, technical success, conversion rates and secondary intervention rates) and safety (30-day mortality rate, procedure morbidity rates and technical issues-endoleaks, graft thrombosis, stenosis and migration). Of 606 reports identified, 61 met the inclusion criteria (three randomized and 15 non-randomized controlled trials, and 43 uncontrolled studies). There were 29 059 participants in total; 19,804 underwent EVAR. Deployment was successful in 97.6 per cent of cases. Technical success (complete aneurysm exclusion) was 81.9 per cent at discharge and 88.8 per cent at 30 days. Secondary intervention to treat endoleak or maintain graft patency was required in 16.2 per cent of patients. Mean stay in the intensive care unit and mean hospital stay were significantly shorter following EVAR. The 30-day mortality rate for EVAR was 1.6 per cent (randomized controlled trials) and 2.0 per cent in nonrandomized trials and case series. Technical complications comprised stent migration (4.0 per cent), graft limb thrombosis (3.9 per cent), endoleak (type I, 6.8 per cent; type II, 10.3 per cent; type III, 4.2 per cent) and access artery injury (4.8 per cent). EVAR is technically effective and safe, with lower short-term morbidity and mortality rates than open surgery. However, there is a need for extended follow-up as the long-term success of EVAR in preventing aneurysm-related deaths is not yet known.

  15. Six years' experience with prostaglandin I2 infusion in elective open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm: a parallel group observational study in a tertiary referral vascular center.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Beirne, Chris

    2008-11-01

    The prostaglandin I(2) (PGI(2)) analogue iloprost, a potent vasodilator and inhibitor of platelet activation, has traditionally been utilized in pulmonary hypertension and off-label use for revascularization of chronic critical lower limb ischemia. This study was designed to assess the effect of 72 hr iloprost infusion on systemic ischemia post-open elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (EAAA) surgery. Between January 2000 and 2007, 104 patients undergoing open EAAA were identified: 36 had juxtarenal, 15 had suprarenal, and 53 had infrarenal aneurysms, with a mean maximal diameter of 6.9 cm. The male-to-female ratio was 2.5:1, with a mean age of 71.9 years. No statistically significant difference was seen between the study groups with regard to age, sex, risk factors, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade, or diameter of aneurysm repaired. All emergency, urgent, and endovascular procedures for aneurysms were excluded. Fifty-seven patients received iloprost infusion for 72 hr in the immediate postoperative period compared with 47 patients who did not. Patients were monitored for signs of pulmonary, renal, cardiac, systemic ischemia, and postoperative intensive care unit (ICU) morbidity. Statistically significantly increased ventilation rates (p=0.0048), pulmonary complication rates (p=0.0019), and myocardial ischemia (p=0.0446) were noted in those patients not receiving iloprost. These patients also had significantly higher renal indices including estimate glomerular filtration rate changes (p=0.041) and postoperative urea level rises (p=0.0286). Peripheral limb trashing was noted in five patients (11.6%) in the non-iloprost group compared with no patients who received iloprost. Increased rates of transfusion requirements and bowel complications were noted in those who did not receive iloprost, with their ICU stay greater than twice that of iloprost patients. All-cause morbidity affected 67% of patients not receiving iloprost compared to 40% who did

  16. Epidemiology and contemporary management of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullery, Brant W; Hallett, Richard L; Fleischmann, Dominik

    2018-05-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is most commonly defined as a maximal diameter of the abdominal aorta in excess of 3 cm in either anterior-posterior or transverse planes or, alternatively, as a focal dilation ≥ 1.5 times the diameter of the normal adjacent arterial segment. Risk factors for the development of AAA include age > 60, tobacco use, male gender, Caucasian race, and family history of AAA. Aneurysm growth and rupture risk appear to be associated with persistent tobacco use, female gender, and chronic pulmonary disease. The majority of AAAs are asymptomatic and detected incidentally on various imaging studies, including abdominal ultrasound, and computed tomographic angiography. Symptoms associated with AAA may include abdominal or back pain, thromboembolization, atheroembolization, aortic rupture, or development of an arteriovenous or aortoenteric fistula. The Screening Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Efficiently (SAAAVE) Act provides coverage for a one-time screening abdominal ultrasound at age 65 for men who have smoked at least 100 cigarettes and women who have family history of AAA disease. Medical management is recommended for asymptomatic patients with AAAs  5 mm/6 months), or presence of a fusiform aneurysm with maximum diameter of 5.5 cm or greater. Intervention for AAA includes conventional open surgical repair and endovascular aortic stent graft repair.

  17. Hemodynamic and Anatomic Predictors of Renovisceral Stent-Graft Occlusion Following Chimney Endovascular Repair of Juxtarenal Aortic Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricarico, Rosamaria; He, Yong; Laquian, Liza; Scali, Salvatore T; Tran-Son-Tay, Roger; Beck, Adam W; Berceli, Scott A

    2017-12-01

    To identify anatomic and hemodynamic changes associated with impending visceral chimney stent-graft occlusion after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) with the chimney technique (chEVAR). A retrospective evaluation was performed of computed tomography scans from 41 patients who underwent juxtarenal chEVAR from 2008 to 2012 to identify stent-grafts demonstrating conformational changes following initial placement. Six subjects (mean age 74 years; 3 men) were selected for detailed reconstruction and computational hemodynamic analysis; 4 had at least 1 occluded chimney stent-graft. This subset of repairs was systematically analyzed to define the anatomic and hemodynamic impact of these changes and identify signature patterns associated with impending renovisceral stent-graft occlusion. Spatial and temporal analyses of cross-sectional area, centerline angle, intraluminal pressure, and wall shear stress (WSS) were performed within the superior mesenteric and renal artery chimney grafts used for repair. Conformational changes in the chimney stent-grafts and associated perturbations, in both local WSS and pressure, were responsible for the 5 occlusions in the 13 stented branches. Anatomic and hemodynamic signatures leading to occlusion were identified within 1 month postoperatively, with a lumen area 25 Pa/mm (p=0.03), and systolic WSS >45 Pa (p=0.03) associated with future chimney stent-graft occlusion. Chimney stent-grafts at increased risk for occlusion demonstrated anatomic and hemodynamic signatures within 1 month of juxtarenal chEVAR. Analysis of these parameters in the early postoperative period may be useful for identifying and remediating these high-risk stent-grafts.

  18. Risk models for mortality following elective open and endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: a single institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choke, E; Lee, K; McCarthy, M; Nasim, A; Naylor, A R; Bown, M; Sayers, R

    2012-12-01

    To develop and validate an "in house" risk model for predicting perioperative mortality following elective AAA repair and to compare this with other models. Multivariate logistics regression analysis was used to identify risk factors for perioperative-day mortality from one tertiary institution's prospectively maintained database. Consecutive elective open (564) and endovascular (589) AAA repairs (2000-2010) were split randomly into development (810) and validation (343) data sets. The resultant model was compared to Glasgow Aneurysm Score (GAS), Modified Customised Probability Index (m-CPI), CPI, the Vascular Governance North West (VGNW) model and the Medicare model. Variables associated with perioperative mortality included: increasing age (P = 0.034), myocardial infarct within last 10 years (P = 0.0008), raised serum creatinine (P = 0.005) and open surgery (P = 0.0001). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for predicted probability of 30-day mortality in development and validation data sets were 0.79 and 0.82 respectively. AUCs for GAS, m-CPI and CPI were poor (0.63, 0.58 and 0.58 respectively), whilst VGNW and Medicare model were fair (0.73 and 0.79 respectively). In this study, an "in-house" developed and validated risk model has the most accurate discriminative value in predicting perioperative mortality after elective AAA repair. For purposes of comparative audit with case mix adjustments, national models such as the VGNW or Medicare models should be used. Copyright © 2012 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Arch translocation and the intra-arch elephant-trunk technique with collared graft for extended chronic dissecting aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikenaga Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Management of extensive, chronic, dissecting aortic aneurysms after prior repair of the ascending aorta presents a technical challenge for surgeons. A symptomatic 64-year-old patient was admitted for elective surgical repair of an aortic annular dilatation, causing severe aortic regurgitation, and a Crawford type II extended thoracoabdominal aneurysm, 4 years after he underwent primary repair of an acute aortic dissection. The aorta was diffusely dilated, and there were no sites beyond the distal aortic arch where anastomosis could be performed. We successfully performed total aortic replacement with a 2-stage strategy, using an arch translocation technique and an intra-arch elephant-trunk technique.

  20. New Technique for the Preservation of the Left Common Carotid Artery in Zone 2a Endovascular Repair of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juszkat, Robert; Kulesza, Jerzy; Zarzecka, Anna; Jemielity, Marek; Staniszewski, Ryszard; Majewski, Wacław

    2011-01-01

    To describe a technique for the preservation of the left common carotid artery (CCA) in zone 2 endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysm. This technique involves the placement of a guide wire into the left CCA via the right brachial artery before stent graft deployment to enable precise visualization and protection of the left CCA during the whole procedure. Of the 107 patients with thoracic endovascular aortic repair in our study, 32 (30%) had the left subclavian artery intentionally covered (landing zone 2). Eight (25%) of those 32 had landing zone 2a—the segment distally the origin of the left CCA, halfway between the origin of the left CCA and the left subclavian artery. In all patients, a guide wire was positioned into the left CCA via the right brachial artery before stent graft deployment. It is a retrospective study in design. In seven patients, stent grafts were positioned precisely. In the remaining patient, the positioning was imprecise; the origin of the left CCA was partially covered by the graft. A stent was implanted into the left CCA to restore the flow into the vessel. All procedures were performed successfully. The technique of placing a guide wire into the left CCA via the right brachial artery before stent graft deployment is a safe and effective method that enables the precise visualization of the left CCA during the whole procedure. Moreover, in case of inadvertent complete or partial coverage of the origin of the left CCA, it supplies safe and quick access to the artery for stent implantation.

  1. Severity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is associated with adverse outcomes in patients undergoing elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, David H; Goodney, Philip P; Kalish, Jeffrey; Schanzer, Andres; Indes, Jeffrey; Walsh, Daniel B; Cronenwett, Jack L; Nolan, Brian W

    2013-06-01

    Although chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been implicated as a risk factor for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture, its effect on surgical repair is less defined. Consequently, variation in practice persists regarding patient selection and surgical management. The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of COPD on patients undergoing AAA repair. We reviewed a prospective regional registry of 3455 patients undergoing elective open AAA repair (OAR) and endovascular AAA repair (EVAR) from 23 centers in the Vascular Study Group of New England from 2003 to 2011. COPD was categorized as none, medical (medically treated but not oxygen [O2]-dependent), and O2-dependent. End points included in-hospital death, pulmonary complications, major postoperative adverse events (MAEs), extubation in the operating room, and 5-year survival. Survival was determined using life-table analysis based on the Social Security Death Index. Predictors of in-hospital and long-term mortality were determined by multivariate logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards analysis. During the study interval, 2043 patients underwent EVAR and 1412 patients underwent OAR with a nearly equal prevalence of COPD (35% EVAR vs 36% OAR). O2-dependent COPD (4%) was associated with significantly increased in-hospital mortality, pulmonary complications, and MAE and was also associated with significantly decreased extubation in the operating room among patients undergoing both EVAR and OAR. Five-year survival was significantly diminished among all patients undergoing AAA repair with COPD (none, 78%; medical, 72%; O2-dependent, 42%; P < .001). By multivariate analysis, O2-dependent COPD was independently associated with in-hospital mortality (odds ratio 2.02, 95% confidence interval, 1.0-4.0; P = .04) and diminished 5-year survival (hazard ratio, 3.02; 95% confidence interval, 2.2-4.1; P < .001). Patients with O2-dependent COPD undergoing AAA repair suffer increased pulmonary

  2. Outcomes of endovascular aortic repair in the modern era

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budtz-Lilly, Jacob; Wanhainen, Anders; Mani, Kevin

    2018-01-01

    Monitoring outcomes following endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) is critical. Although evidence from randomized controlled trials has solidified the role of EVAR, the analysis of outcomes and "real-world" data has uncovered limitations, improved the selection of appropriate patients, and underscored...... the importance of instructions for use. Subsequent studies demonstrated the learning curve of EVAR and gradual improvement of outcomes over time. Outcomes analyses will continue to play an important role, particularly as technological growth of endovascular therapy has enabled treatment of more complex aneurysm...... pathologies and patients. The important analyses are herein reviewed, following the development of EVAR in the treatment of intact abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) to ruptured AAAs, and finally to complex aneurysms, including thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms and mycotic aneurysms. This includes an overview...

  3. Carbon dioxide (CO2) angiography as an option for endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Chiara; Sardanelli, Francesco; Perego, Matteo; Alì, Marco; Casilli, Francesco; Inglese, Luigi; Mauri, Giovanni

    2017-11-01

    To assess feasibility, efficacy and safety of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) digital subtraction angiography (DSA) to guide endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in a cohort of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). After Ethical Committee approval, the records of 13 patients (all male, mean age 74.6 ± 8.0 years) with CKD, who underwent EVAR to exclude an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) under CO 2 angiography guidance, were reviewed. The AAA to be excluded had a mean diameter of 52.0 ± 8.0 mm. CO 2 angiography was performed by automatic (n = 7) or hand (n = 6) injection. The endograft was correctly placed and the AAA was excluded in all cases, without any surgical conversions. Two patients (15.4%) had an endoleak: one type-Ia, detected by CO 2 -DSA and effectively treated with prosthesis dilatation; one type-III, detected by CO 2 -DSA, confirmed using 10 ml of ICM, and conservatively managed. In one patient, CO 2 angiograms were considered of too low quality for guiding the procedure and 200 ml of ICM were administered. Overall, 11 patients (84.6%) underwent a successful EVAR under the guidance of the sole CO 2 angiography. No patients suffered from major complications, including those typically CO 2 -related. Two patients suffered from abdominal pain during the procedure secondary to a transient splanchnic perfusion's reduction due to CO 2 , and one patient had a worsening of renal function probably caused by a cholesterol embolization during the procedure. In patients with CKD, EVAR under CO 2 angiography guidance is feasible, effective, and safe.

  4. Implementation of the Continuous AutoTransfusion System (C.A.T.S) in open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: an observational comparative cohort study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tawfick, Wael A

    2008-01-01

    The use of the Continuous AutoTransfusion System (C.A.T.S; Fresenius Hemotechnology, Bad Homburg v.d.H., Germany), which conserves allogenic blood, is reported in 187 patients having abdominal aortic aneurysm repair during a 9-year period. Patients were allocated to C.A.T.S if a Haemovigilance technician was available. A mean of 685 mL of retrieved blood was reinfused in 101 patients receiving C.A.T.S; 61% required 2 U or less. All control patients required 3 U or more of allogenic blood. Allogenic transfusion in C.A.T.S patients decreased significantly (P < .0001). Mean intensive care unit stay was significantly reduced in C.A.T.S patients (P = .042). Mean postoperative hospital stay was 18 days for C.A.T.S group and 25 days in control patients (P = .014). The respective 30-day mortality was 12% versus 19% (P = .199). The C.A.T.S markedly reduced the amount of blood transfused, was associated with reduced intensive care unit and postoperative hospital stay, and was cost-effective.

  5. Collected world and single center experience with endovascular treatment of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veith, F.J.; Lachat, M.; Mayer, D.; Malina, M.; Holst, J.; Mehta, M.; Verhoeven, E.L.; Larzon, T.; Gennai, S.; Coppi, G.; Lipsitz, E.C.; Gargiulo, N.J.; Vliet, J.A. van der; Blankensteijn, J.D.; Buth, J.; Lee, W.A.; Biasiol, G.; Deleo, G.; Kasirajan, K.; Moore, R.; Soong, C.V.; Cayne, N.S.; Farber, M.A.; Raithel, D.; Greenberg, R.K.; Sambeek, M.R. van; Brunkwall, J.S.; Rockman, C.B.; Hinchliffe, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Case and single center reports have documented the feasibility and suggested the effectiveness of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (RAAAs), but the role and value of such treatment remain controversial. OBJECTIVE: To clarify these we examined a

  6. Collected World and Single Center Experience With Endovascular Treatment of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veith, Frank J.; Lachat, Mario; Mayer, Dieter; Malina, Martin; Holst, Jan; Mehta, Manish; Verhoeven, Eric L. G.; Larzon, Thomas; Gennai, Stefano; Coppi, Gioacchino; Lipsitz, Evan C.; Gargiulo, Nicholas J.; van der Vliet, J. Adam; Blankensteijn, Jan; Buth, Jacob; Lee, W. Anthony; Biasi, Giorgio; Deleo, Gaetano; Kasirajan, Karthikeshwar; Moore, Randy; Soong, Chee V.; Cayne, Neal S.; Farber, Mark A.; Raithel, Dieter; Greenberg, Roy K.; van Sambeek, Marc R. H. M.; Brunkwall, Jan S.; Rockman, Caron B.; Hinchliffe, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Case and single center reports have documented the feasibility and suggested the effectiveness of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (RAAAs), but the role and value of such treatment remain controversial. Objective: To clarify these we examined a

  7. Two-dimensional versus three-dimensional CT angiography in analysis of anatomical suitability for stentgraft repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitoulias, Georgios A.; Aslanidou, Eleni A.; Papadimitriou, Dimitrios K.; Donas, Konstantinos P.; Schulte, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Background The morphological analysis prior to endovascular abdominal aneurysm repair (EVAR) plays an important role in long-term outcomes. Post-imaging analysis of computed tomographic angiography (CTA) by three-dimensional reconstruction with central lumen line detection (CLL 3D-CTA) enables measurements to be made in orthogonal slices. This might be more precise than equal post-imaging analysis in axial slices by two-dimensional computed tomographic angiography (2D-CTA). Purpose To evaluate the intra- and interobserver variability of CLL 3D-CTA and 2D-CTA post-imaging analysis methods and the agreement between them in pre-EVAR suitability analysis of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Material and Methods Anonymized CTA data-sets from 70 patients with AAA were analyzed retrospectively. Length measurements included proximal and distal aortic neck lengths and total distance from the lower renal artery to the higher iliac bifurcation. Width measurements included proximal and distal neck diameters, maximum AAA diameter and common iliac diameters just above the iliac bifurcations. The measurements were performed in random order by two vascular surgeons, twice per method with 1-month interval between readings. In the CLL 3D-CTA method we used semi-automated CLL detection by software and manual measurements on CTA slices perpendicular to CLL. The equal measurements in 2D-CTA were performed manually on axial CTA slices using a DICOM viewer workstation. The intra- and interobserver variability, as well as the agreement between the two methods were assessed by Bland-Altman test and bivariate correlation analysis. Results The intraobserver variability was significantly higher in 2D-CTA measurements for both readers. The interobserver variability was significant in 2D-CTA measurements of proximal neck dimensions while the agreement in CLL 3D-CTA analysis between the two readers was excellent in all studied parameters. The agreement between the two suitability

  8. Serum angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 is an independent risk factor for in-hospital mortality following open surgical repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Wanpin; Wang, Yan; Yao, Kai; Wang, Zheng; Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Open surgical repair (OSR) is a conventional surgical method used in the repair a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA); however, OSR results in high perioperative mortality rates. The level of serum angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) has been reported to be an independent risk factor for postoperative in-hospital mortality following major cardiopulmonary surgery. In the present study, the association of serum ACE2 levels with postoperative in-hospital mortality was investigated in patients undergoing OSR for ruptured AAA. The study enrolled 84 consecutive patients underwent OSR for ruptured AAA and were subsequently treated in the intensive care unit. Patients who succumbed postoperatively during hospitalization were defined as non-survivors. Serum ACE2 levels were measured in all patients prior to and following the surgery using ELISA kits. The results indicated that non-survivors showed significantly lower mean preoperative and postoperative serum ACE2 levels when compared with those in survivors. Multivariate logistic regression analysis also showed that, subsequent to adjusting for potential confounders, the serum ACE2 level on preoperative day 1 showed a significant negative association with the postoperative in-hospital mortality. This was confirmed by multivariate hazard ratio analysis, which showed that, subsequent to adjusting for the various potential confounders, the risk of postoperative in-hospital mortality remained significantly higher in the two lowest serum ACE2 level quartiles compared with that in the highest quartile on preoperative day 1. In conclusion, the present study provided the first evidence supporting that the serum ACE2 level is an independent risk factor for the in-hospital mortality following OSR for ruptured AAA. Furthermore, low serum ACE2 levels on preoperative day 1 were found to be associated with increased postoperative in-hospital mortality. Therefore, the serum ACE2 level on preoperative day 1 may be a potential

  9. Ruptured Aortic Aneurysm Presenting as a Stridor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Lin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Stridor is an abnormal, high-pitched, whining breathing sound caused by a blockage in the throat or larynx that is usually heard in children. We describe an unusual case of an 81-year-old man brought to our emergency department with sudden onset of dyspnea and shortness of breath. Stridor could be heard without a stethoscope. We found a huge mass over the left upper chest on chest radiography, suggesting an aortic aneurysm. We believed that these symptoms were caused by a huge thoracic aortic aneurysm with trachea/bronchi compression. Chest computed tomography confirmed the diagnosis.

  10. Early inflammatory response following elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: A comparison between endovascular procedure and conventional, open surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjanović Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Abdominal aorta aneurysm (AAA represents a pathological enlargment of infrarenal portion of aorta for over 50% of its lumen. The only treatment of AAA is a surgical reconstruction of the affected segment. Until the late XX century, surgical reconstruction implied explicit, open repair (OR of AAA, which was accompanied by a significant morbidity and mortality of the treated patients. Development of endovascular repair of (EVAR AAA, especially in the last decade, offered another possibility of surgical reconstruction of AAA. The preliminary results of world studies show that complications of such a procedure, as well as morbidity and mortality of patients, are significantly lower than with OR of AAA. The aim of this paper was to present results of comparative clinical prospective study of early inflammatory response after reconstruction of AAA between endovascular and open, conventional surgical technique. Methods. A comparative clinical prospective study included 39 patients, electively operated on for AAA within the period of December 2008 - February 2010, divided into two groups. The group I counted 21 (54% of the patients, 58-87 years old (mean 74.3 years, who had been submited to EVAR by the use of excluder stent graft. The group II consisted of 18 (46% of the patients, 49-82 (mean 66.8 years, operated on using OR technique. All of the treated patients in both groups had AAA larager than 50 mm. The study did not include patients who have been treated as urgent cases, due to the rupture or with simptomatic AAA. Clinical, biochemical and inflamatory parameters in early postoperative period were analyzed, in direct postoperative course (number of leucocytes, thrombocytes, serum circulating levels of cytokine - interleukine (IL-2, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10. Parameters were monitored on the zero, first, second, third and seventh postoperative days. The study was approved by the Ethics Commitee of the Military Medical Academy. Results

  11. Natural history of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perko, M J; Schroeder, T V; Olsen, P S

    1993-01-01

    During a 10-year period in which 735 patients presented with abdominal aortic aneurysms to our clinic, 63 were not offered operative treatment. The primary reason for choosing conservative treatment was concomitant diseases that increased the risk of operation. After 2 years of followup, half...

  12. Hepatopancreaticobiliary Values after Thoracoabdominal Aneurysm Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Darrell; Coselli, Joseph S.; Johnson, Michael L.; LeMaire, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: After thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) repair, blood tests assessing hepatopancreaticobiliary (HPB) organs commonly have abnormal results. The clinical significance of such abnormalities is difficult to determine because the expected postoperative levels have not been characterized. Therefore, we sought to establish expected trends in HPB laboratory values after TAAA repair. Methods: This 5-year study comprised 155 patients undergoing elective Crawford extent II TAAA repair. In accordance with a prospective study protocol, all repairs involved left-sided heart bypass, selective visceral perfusion, and cold renal perfusion. Blood levels of aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), total bilirubin, amylase, and lipase were measured before TAAA repair and for 7 days afterward. Ratios between postoperative and baseline levels were compared for each time point with 95% confidence intervals. Results: Temporal patterns for the laboratory values varied greatly. Amylase, lipase, and AST underwent significant early increases before decreasing to preoperative levels. LDH increased immediately and remained significantly elevated, whereas ALT increased more gradually. GGT remained near baseline through postoperative day 4, and then increased to more than twice baseline. Total bilirubin never differed significantly from baseline. After adjusted analysis, the ischemic time predicted the maximum AST, lipase, GGT, and LDH values. Conclusions: Although most HPB laboratory values increase significantly after elective TAAA repair, the temporal trends for different values vary substantially. The ischemic time predicts the maximum AST, lipase, GGT, and LDH levels. These trends should be considered when laboratory values are assessed after TAAA repair. PMID:26798731

  13. Results of aortic root reimplantation in patients with ascending aortic aneurysm and concomitant aortic insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. М. Чернявский

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The research was designed to evaluate the results of valve-sparing operations: aortic root reimplantation versus aortic valve reimplantation when repairing an ascending aortic aneurysm with concomitant aortic insufficiency.Methods. Within a blind prospective randomized study conducted over a period from 2011 to 2015, 64 patients underwent aortic valve-sparing surgery. The inclusion criteria were the presence of an aortic aneurysm of the ascending aorta exceeding 4.5 cm and concomitant aortic insufficiency. All patients were divided into two groups: FS-group, aortic root reimplantation (modified Florida Sleeve technique (n = 32 and D-group, aortic valve reimplantation (David procedure (n = 32. The average age of patients was 57±13 (23–73 years in the FS-group and 55±11 (15–72 years in the D-group (p = 0.54. Both groups had 78% of males (p>0.99. A Marfan syndrome was identified in 6% and 9% in the FS-group and D-group respectively (p>0.99. Mean diameter of the sinuses of Valsalva was 51±7 mm and 56±10 mm (p = 0.09, aortic insufficiency 2.6±0.7 and 2.8±0.8 (p = 0.15 in the FS-group and D-group respectively. In the FS-group and D-group LVEDD amounted to 5.5±0.7 mm and 5.9±1.0 mm (p = 0.09 respectively. All patients took echocardiography in the preoperative, postoperative and follow-up periods.Results. In the long-term period, the degree of aortic regurgitation was 1.2±0.1 in the FS-group and 1.3±0.6 in the D-group (p = 0.72. LVEDD was 123±23 mm in the FS-group and 139.6±80 mm in the D-group at follow-up (p = 0.77. There were no statistically significant differences in the analysis of complications. Overall 30-day in-hospital mortality was 7.8%. There were 2 (6.3% deaths in the FS-group and 3 (9.4% in the D-group (p = 0.5.Late mortality was 6.3% in the FS-group and 3.1% in the D-group (p>0.99. Cumulative survival at 4 years was 84.3% and 84.8% in the FS-group and the D-group respectively (p = 0.94. Cumulative freedom from

  14. Salvage of bilateral renal artery occlusion after endovascular aneurysm repair with open splenorenal bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Jessula, MDCM

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We report renal salvage maneuvers after accidental bilateral renal artery coverage during endovascular aneurysm repair of an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm. A 79-year-old man with an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm was treated with endovascular aneurysm repair. Completion angiography demonstrated coverage of the renal arteries. Several revascularization techniques were attempted, including endograft repositioning and endovascular stenting through the femoral and brachial approach. The patient eventually underwent open splenorenal bypass with a Y Gore-Tex graft (W. L. Gore & Associates, Flagstaff, Ariz. After 3 months, computed tomography showed no evidence of endoleak and patent renal arteries. Renal function was well maintained, and the patient did not require dialysis.

  15. Surgeon leadership in the coding, billing, and contractual negotiations for fenestrated endovascular aortic aneurysm repair increases medical center contribution margin and physician reimbursement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Francesco; Durgin, Jonathan; Daniel, Vijaya; Messina, Louis; Doucet, Danielle; Simons, Jessica; Jenkins, James; Schanzer, Andres

    2017-10-01

    Fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair (FEVAR) allows endovascular treatment of thoracoabdominal and juxtarenal aneurysms previously outside the indications of use for standard devices. However, because of considerable device costs and increased procedure time, FEVAR is thought to result in financial losses for medical centers and physicians. We hypothesized that surgeon leadership in the coding, billing, and contractual negotiations for FEVAR procedures will increase medical center contribution margin (CM) and physician reimbursement. At the UMass Memorial Center for Complex Aortic Disease, a vascular surgeon with experience in medical finances is supported to manage the billing and coding of FEVAR procedures for medical center and physician reimbursement. A comprehensive financial analysis was performed for all FEVAR procedures (2011-2015), independent of insurance status, patient presentation, or type of device used. Medical center CM (actual reimbursement minus direct costs) was determined for each index FEVAR procedure and for all related subsequent procedures, inpatient or outpatient, 3 months before and 1 year subsequent to the index FEVAR procedure. Medical center CM for outpatient clinic visits, radiology examinations, vascular laboratory studies, and cardiology and pulmonary evaluations related to FEVAR were also determined. Surgeon reimbursement for index FEVAR procedure, related adjunct procedures, and assistant surgeon reimbursement were also calculated. All financial analyses were performed and adjudicated by the UMass Department of Finance. The index hospitalization for 63 FEVAR procedures incurred $2,776,726 of direct costs and generated $3,027,887 in reimbursement, resulting in a positive CM of $251,160. Subsequent related hospital procedures (n = 26) generated a CM of $144,473. Outpatient clinic visits, radiologic examinations, and vascular laboratory studies generated an additional CM of $96,888. Direct cost analysis revealed that grafts

  16. Repair of Multiple Subclavian and Axillary Artery Aneurysms in a 58-Year-Old Man with Marfan Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Dolapoglu, Ahmet; de la Cruz, Kim I.; Preventza, Ourania; Coselli, Joseph S.

    2016-01-01

    Dilation of the ascending aorta and aortic dissections are often seen in Marfan syndrome; however, true aneurysms of the subclavian and axillary arteries rarely seem to develop in patients who have this disease. We present the case of a 58-year-old man with Marfan syndrome who had undergone a Bentall procedure and thoracoabdominal aortic repair for an aortic dissection and who later developed multiple aneurysmal dilations of his right subclavian and axillary arteries. The aneurysms were succe...

  17. Familial Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm : Clinical Features and Genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.M. van de Luijtgaarden (Koen)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Cardiovascular disease is the most important cause of death in the world and encompasses occlusive as well as aneurysmal disease. The most common aneurysm in humans is the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The question is why the aorta dilates in aneurysmal disease and

  18. Influence of diabetes mellitus on the endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leurs, L.J.; Laheij, R.J.F.; Buth, J.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the influence of diabetes mellitus on outcome after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. METHODS: Of 6017 patients enrolled in the EUROSTAR registry after undergoing endovascular AAA repair between May 1994 and December 2003, 731 (12%) had diabetes mellitus

  19. ADAMTS-1 in abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emina Vorkapic

    Full Text Available Extracellular matrix degradation is a hallmark of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA. Among proteases that are capable of degrading extracellular matrix are a disintegrin and metalloproteases with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS. Pathogenesis of these proteases in AAA has not been investigated until date.Human aneurysmal and control aortas were collected and analyzed with RT-PCR measuring the ADAMTS-1, 4,5,6,8,9,10,13,17 and ADAMTSL-1. Expression of a majority of the investigated ADAMTS members on mRNA level was decreased in aneurysm compared to control aorta. ADAMTS-1 was one of the members that was reduced most. Protein analysis using immunohistochemistry and western blot for localization and expression of ADAMTS-1 revealed that ADAMTS-1 was present predominantly in areas of SMCs and macrophages in aneurysmal aorta and higher expressed in AAA compared to control aortas. The role of ADAMTS-1 in AAA disease was further examined using ADAMTS-1 transgenic/apoE-/- mice with the experimental angiotensin II induced aneurysmal model. Transgenic mice overexpressing ADAMTS-1 showed to be similar to ADAMTS-1 wild type mice pertaining collagen, elastin content and aortic diameter.Several of the ADAMTS members, and especially ADAMTS-1, are down regulated at mRNA level in AAA, due to unknown mechanisms, at the same time ADAMTS-1 protein is induced. The cleavage of its substrates, don't seem to be crucial for the pathogenesis of AAA but rather more important in the development of thoracic aortic aneurysm and atherosclerosis as shown in previous studies.

  20. Hybrid endovascular treatment of an aortic root and thoracoabdominal aneurysm in a high-risk patient with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelpi, Guido; Mazzaccaro, Daniela; Romagnoni, Claudia; Contino, Monica; Antona, Carlo

    2013-05-01

    This report describes the hybrid endovascular treatment of an aortic root dilatation and a thoracoabdominal aneurysm in a high-risk patient with Marfan syndrome. A 50-year-old male, in hemodialysis for polycystic kidney and polycystic liver, was referred to our department for aortic root dilatation of 5 cm and a 6.3-cm thoracoabdominal aneurysm . He already underwent surgical repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm 10 years ago, complicated by pseudoaneurysm of the proximal anastomosis that had been treated in another center, with an endoprosthesis. The patient underwent aortic root replacement, aortic valve sparing operation, and rerouting of the superior mesenteric artery and celiac trunk to the ascending aorta. The thoracoabdominal aneurysm was excluded with an endoprosthesis few days after the surgical step. The 12-month computed tomography scan confirmed the complete exclusion of the thoracoabdominal aneurysm.

  1. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair and Sealing (EVARS): A Useful Adjunct in Treating Challenging Morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Gareth J., E-mail: garethjamesharrison@yahoo.co.uk; Antoniou, George A., E-mail: antoniou.ga@hotmail.com; Torella, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.torella@rlbuht.nhs.uk; McWilliams, Richard G., E-mail: richard.mcwilliams@rlbuht.nhs.uk; Fisher, Robert K., E-mail: robert.fisher@rlbuht.nhs.uk [Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool Vascular and Endovascular Service (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-15

    An 81-year-old male with previous open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair presented with asymptomatic large pseudoaneurysms at both ends of an open surgical tube graft. Endovascular aneurysm sealing (EVAS) in combination with the iliac limbs of a standard endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) successfully excluded both pseudoaneurysms from circulation. We describe the combination of elements of EVAS and EVAR and have termed this endovascular aneurysm repair and sealing (EVARS). EVARS has the advantage of harnessing the benefits of endobag sealing in aortic necks unsuitable for standard EVAR whilst providing the security of accurate stent placement within short common iliac arteries. In conclusion, EVAS may be combined with standard endovascular iliac limbs and is a possible treatment option for pseudoaneurysm following open aneurysm repair.

  2. Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Prediction of Mortality From Clinical Presentation and Glasgow Aneurysm Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingarten, Toby N; Thompson, Lauren T; Licatino, Lauren K; Bailey, Christopher H; Schroeder, Darrell R; Sprung, Juraj

    2016-04-01

    To examine association of presenting clinical acuity and Glasgow Aneurysm Score (GAS) with perioperative and 1-year mortality. Retrospective chart review. Major tertiary care facility. Patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) from 2003 through 2013. Emergency repair of rAAA. The authors reviewed outcomes after stable versus unstable presentation and by GAS. Unstable presentation included hypotension, cardiac arrest, loss of consciousness, and preoperative tracheal intubation. In total, 125 patients (40 stable) underwent repair. Perioperative mortality rates were 41% and 12% in unstable and stable patients, respectively (pClinical presentation and GAS identified patients with rAAA who were likely to have a poor surgical outcome. GAS≥96 was associated with poor long-term survival, but>20% of these patients survived 1 year. Thus, neither clinical presentation nor GAS provided reliable guidance for decisions regarding futility of surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Evolution of the Proximal Sealing Rings of the Anaconda Stent-Graft After Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenrades, Maaike A.; Klein, Almar; Leferink, Anne M.; Slump, Cornelis H.; Geelkerken, Robert H.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: To provide insight into the evolution of the saddle-shaped proximal sealing rings of the Anaconda stent-graft after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Methods: Eighteen abdominal aortic aneurysm patients were consecutively enrolled in a single-center, prospective, observational cohort

  4. Colorectal cancer associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm: results of EVAR followed by colectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, Giulio; Ceccanei, Gianluca; Pacilè, Maria A; Pizzardi, Giulia; Palumbo, Piergaspare; Vietri, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    The association of colorectal cancer and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is infrequent but poses special problems of priority of treatment under elective circumstances. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the outcome of 16 consecutive patients undergoing endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) followed by colectomy. Operative mortality was nil. Operative morbidity included two transient rise of serum creatinine level and one extraperitoneal anastomotic leakage which evolved favourably with conservative treatment. EVAR allowed a very short delay of treatment of colorectal cancer after aneurysm repair, minimizing operative complications.

  5. High risk endovascular aneurysm repair: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, Samanthi

    2017-10-01

    Mr AB is a 66-year old gentleman who presented for elective endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) following a routine screening scan identifying a 5.5cm abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). He had a past history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with FEV1/FVC ratio of 48% on pre-assessment. He was hypertensive with a history of ischaemic heart disease (IHD), which has remained asymptomatic following coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) eight years prior to this presentation. Copyright the Association for Perioperative Practice.

  6. Idiopathic subvalvular aortic aneurysm masquerading as acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Balaji; Ramanathan, Sundar; Subramaniam, Natarajan; Janardhanan, Rajesh

    2016-09-02

    Subvalvular aneurysms are the least common type of left ventricular (LV) aneurysms and can be fatal. Subaortic LV aneurysms are much rarer than submitral LV aneurysms and mostly reported in infancy. They can be congenital or acquired secondary to infections, cardiac surgery or trauma. Here, we report a unique presentation of a large, idiopathic subaortic aneurysm in an adult masquerading as an acute coronary syndrome. Diagnosis was made with the help of a CT aortography. Aneurysm was surgically resected with good results. This case highlights the clinical presentation and management of subaortic aneurysms, an important differential for congenital aortic malformations. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  7. Quality Improvement Guidelines for Imaging Detection and Treatment of Endoleaks following Endovascular Aneurysm Repair (EVAR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rand, T.; Uberoi, R.; Cil, B.; Munneke, G.; Tsetis, D.

    2013-01-01

    Major concerns after aortic aneurysm repair are caused by the presence of endoleaks, which are defined as persistent perigraft flow within the aortic aneurysm sac. Diagnosis of endoleaks can be performed with various imaging modalities, and indications for treatment are based on further subclassifications. Early detection and correct classification of endoleaks are crucial for planning patient management. The vast majority of endoleaks can be treated successfully by interventional means. Guidelines for Imaging Detection and Treatment of endoleaks are described in this article.

  8. Geometric Deformations of the Thoracic Aorta and Supra-Aortic Arch Branch Vessels Following Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullery, Brant W; Suh, Ga-Young; Hirotsu, Kelsey; Zhu, David; Lee, Jason T; Dake, Michael D; Fleischmann, Dominik; Cheng, Christopher P

    2018-04-01

    To utilize 3-D modeling techniques to better characterize geometric deformations of the supra-aortic arch branch vessels and descending thoracic aorta after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Eighteen patients underwent endovascular repair of either type B aortic dissection (n = 10) or thoracic aortic aneurysm (n = 8). Computed tomography angiography was obtained pre- and postprocedure, and 3-D geometric models of the aorta and supra-aortic branch vessels were constructed. Branch angle of the supra-aortic branch vessels and curvature metrics of the ascending aorta, aortic arch, and stented thoracic aortic lumen were calculated both at pre- and postintervention. The left common carotid artery branch angle was lower than the left subclavian artery angles preintervention ( P Supra-aortic branch vessel angulation remains relatively static when proximal landing zones are distal to the left common carotid artery.

  9. Endovascular repair of para-anastomotic aortoiliac aneurysms.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tsang, Julian S

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of endovascular stent grafts in the treatment of para-anastomotic aneurysms (PAAs) as an alternative to high-risk open surgical repair. We identified all patients with previous open aortic aneurysm repair who underwent infrarenal endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) at our institution from June 1998 to April 2007. Patient demographics, previous surgery, and operative complications were recorded. One hundred forty-eight patients underwent EVAR during the study period and 11 patients had previous aortic surgery. Of these 11 redo patients, the mean age was 62 years at initial surgery and 71 years at EVAR. All patients were male. Initial open repair was for rupture in five (45%) patients. The average time between initial and subsequent reintervention was 9 years. All patients were ASA Grade III or IV. Fifty-five percent of the PAAs involved the iliac arteries, 36% the abdominal aorta, and 9% were aortoiliac. Ten patients had endovascular stent-grafts inserted electively, and one patient presented with a contained leak. Aorto-uni-iliac stent-grafts were deployed in seven patients, and bifurcated stent-grafts in four patients. A 100% successful deployment rate was achieved. Perioperative mortality was not seen and one patient needed surgical reintervention to correct an endoleak. Endovascular repair of PAAs is safe and feasible. It is a suitable alternative and has probably now become the treatment of choice in the management of PAAs.

  10. Commentary on “Inhibition of interleukin-1beta decreases aneurysm formation and progression in a novel model of thoracic aortic aneurysms”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghua Bi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aortic aneurysm is a silent but life-threatening disease, whose pathogenesis remains poorly understood. Aneurysm models have been induced in small animals to study its pathogenesis, Johnston WF et al. successfully induced a novel model of thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA by periadventitial application of elastase in mice. We comment on this model according to our experiment. We hypothesize that endogenous MMPs, especially MMP2, play a vital role in complex repair process of aneurysmal wall, which should be a key target in the investigation and treatment of aortic aneurysms.

  11. Diagnosis of mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm using 67-gallium citrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumoff, R.L.; McCartney, W.; Jaques, P.; Johnson, G. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Mycotic aneurysms of the abdominal aorta are uncommon, but potentially lethal problems. Clinical subtleties may suggest their presence, but in the past, definitive diagnosis has been dependent on surgical exploration or autopsy findings. A case is presented in which 67-gallium citrate abdominal scanning localized the site of sepsis in an abdominal aortic aneurysm and allowed for prompt and successful surgical therapy. This noninvasive technique is recommended as a adjunct in the diagnosis of mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysms

  12. Hybrid aortic repair with antegrade supra-aortic and renovisceral debranching from ascending aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Castro-Madrazo, José Antonio; Rivas-Domínguez, Margarita; Fernández-Prendes, Carlota; Zanabili Al-Sibbai, Amer; Llaneza-Coto, José Manuel; Alonso-Pérez, Manuel

    2017-05-01

    Aortic dissection is a life threatening condition. Hybrid repair has been described for the treatment of complex aortic pathology such as thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAA) and type A and B dissections, although open and total endovascular repair are also possible. Open surgery is still associated with substantial perioperative morbi-mortality rates, thus less invasive techniques such as endovascular repair and hybrid procedures can achieve good results in centers with experience. We present the case of a patient with a chronic type B dissection and TAAA degeneration that was treated in a single stage hybrid procedure with antegrade supra-aortic and renovisceral debranching from the ascending aorta and TEVAR. At three-year follow up, the patient is free of intervention-related complications.

  13. The mechanical role of thrombus on the growth rate of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speelman, L.; Schurink, G.W.H.; Bosboom, E.M.H.; Buth, J.; Breeuwer, M.; Vosse, van de F.N.; Jacobs, M.J.H.M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: In the decision for surgical repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), the maximum diameter is the main factor. Several studies have concluded that the diameter may not be reliable as rupture risk criterion for the individual patient and wall stress was found to have a higher

  14. CT diagnosis of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sacknoff, R.; Novelline, R.A.; Wittenberg, J.; Waltman, A.C.; De Luca, S.A.; Rhea, J.T.; Lawrason, J.N.

    1986-01-01

    Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a life-threatening condition requiring immediate diagnosis and surgery. In a series of 23 consecutive patients scanned by CT for suspected ruptured AAA, CT proved 100% accurate. In seven patients with surgically or pathologically proved ruptured AAA, CT demonstrated a similar distribution of hemorrhage into the perirenal space and to a lesser degree into the anterior and posterior pararenal spaces. The 16 true-negative examinations included ten in patients with unruptured AAA and six in patients with other diseases. The authors conclude that patients in stable condition with suspected ruptured AAA should be examined by CT

  15. Dynamic CT in dissecting aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Nobuyuki; Matsuoka, Yosuke; Mizuo, Hideyo; Shirato, Hiroki; Irie, Goro

    1985-01-01

    especially about the branching of major vessels Eight cases of aortic dissection were analysed to evaluate detectability of the branching of major vessels from a ture or false lumen, by dynamic CT. Although recognition of the branching is easy when the direct continuity to a dissected lumen is demonstrated, but without visualization of direct continuity or with no information about dissected lumens, it is sometimes difficult or leads us to misdiagnosis. The diagnostic accuracy is 100% when direct continuity to a dissected lumen is demonstrated, or dynamic CT revealed branching pattern distinctly. Dynamic CT is useful for a diagnosis of dissecting aneurysm and branching pattern of major vessels. (author)

  16. Aortic Disease in the Young: Genetic Aneurysm Syndromes, Connective Tissue Disorders, and Familial Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Cury

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many genetic syndromes associated with the aortic aneurysmal disease which include Marfan syndrome (MFS, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS, Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS, familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD, bicuspid aortic valve disease (BAV, and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD. In the absence of familial history and other clinical findings, the proportion of thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms and dissections resulting from a genetic predisposition is still unknown. In this study, we propose the review of the current genetic knowledge in the aortic disease, observing, in the results that the causative genes and molecular pathways involved in the pathophysiology of aortic aneurysm disease remain undiscovered and continue to be an area of intensive research.

  17. Unplanned return to operating room after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (EVAR) is associated with increased risk of hospital readmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Faisal; Ferranti, Katelynn; Lehman, Erik B

    2018-04-01

    Objectives Hospital readmissions after surgical operations are considered serious events. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) consider surgical readmissions as preventable and hold hospitals responsible for them. Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (EVAR) has become the first line modality of treatment for suitable patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The purpose of this study is to retrospectively review the factors associated with hospital readmission after EVAR. Methods The 2013 EVAR targeted American College of Surgeons (ACS-NSQIP) database and generalized 2013 general and vascular surgery ACS-NSQIP participant use files were used for this study. Patient, diagnosis, and procedure characteristics of patients undergoing EVAR surgery were assessed. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine independent risk factors for hospital readmission within 30 days after surgery. Results A total of 2277 patients (81% males, 19% females) underwent EVAR operations in the year 2013. Indications for operations included: asymptomatic large diameter (79%), symptomatic (5.7%), rupture without hypotension (4.3%), and rupture with hypotension (2.8%). Among these patients, 178 (7.8%) were readmitted to the hospital within 30 days after surgery. About 53% of all readmissions were within two weeks after the discharge. Risk factors, associated with readmission included: body mass index (per 5-units, OR 1.23, CI 1.06-1.42, p readmission for patients with presence of all these seven factors was 99.9%. Conclusions Readmission after EVAR is a serious occurrence. Various factors predispose a patient at a high risk for readmission. Unplanned return to operating room after EVAR is associated with a 11-fold increase in hospital readmission.

  18. A novel microwave sensor to detect specific biomarkers in human cerebrospinal fluid and their relationship to cellular ischemia during thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, M; Bashir, M; Fraser, H; Strouther, N; Mason, A

    2015-04-01

    Thoraco-abdominal aneurysms (TAAA) represents a particularly lethal vascular disease that without surgical repair carries a dismal prognosis. However, there is an inherent risk from surgical repair of spinal cord ischaemia that can result in paraplegia. One method of reducing this risk is cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage. We believe that the CSF contains clinically significant biomarkers that can indicate impending spinal cord ischaemia. This work therefore presents a novel measurement method for proteins, namely albumin, as a precursor to further work in this area. The work uses an interdigitated electrode (IDE) sensor and shows that it is capable of detecting various concentrations of albumin (from 0 to 100 g/L) with a high degree of repeatability at 200 MHz (R(2) = 0.991) and 4 GHz (R(2) = 0.975).

  19. Comparison of arterial stiffness and microcirculatory changes following abdominal aortic aneurysm grafting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moloney, M A

    2012-02-01

    BACKGOUND: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery provides a unique opportunity to study the impact of arterial stiffness on central haemodynamics, reflected in augmentation index (AI). The aneurysmal aorta is significantly stiffer than undilated age-matched aorta. AIM: We investigated whether replacement of an aneurysmal aorta with a compliant graft would result in a decrease in AI, which would thus decrease myocardial workload parameters. METHODS: Patients undergoing elective open or endovascular AAA repair were assessed with applanation tonometry and laser fluximetry pre-operatively, immediately and long-term post-operatively. RESULTS: Replacement of a small segment of abnormal conduit vessel resulted in improvements in AI, demonstrating that arterial stiffness can be surgically manipulated. CONCLUSIONS: These results reflect a decreased myocardial workload post-aortic grafting. This decrease in AI is important from a risk factor management perspective, and arterial stiffness should become a further recognised and screened for risk factor in patients with known aneurysmal disease.

  20. Comparison of arterial stiffness and microcirculatory changes following abdominal aortic aneurysm grafting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moloney, M A

    2010-11-11

    BACKGOUND: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery provides a unique opportunity to study the impact of arterial stiffness on central haemodynamics, reflected in augmentation index (AI). The aneurysmal aorta is significantly stiffer than undilated age-matched aorta. AIM: We investigated whether replacement of an aneurysmal aorta with a compliant graft would result in a decrease in AI, which would thus decrease myocardial workload parameters. METHODS: Patients undergoing elective open or endovascular AAA repair were assessed with applanation tonometry and laser fluximetry pre-operatively, immediately and long-term post-operatively. RESULTS: Replacement of a small segment of abnormal conduit vessel resulted in improvements in AI, demonstrating that arterial stiffness can be surgically manipulated. CONCLUSIONS: These results reflect a decreased myocardial workload post-aortic grafting. This decrease in AI is important from a risk factor management perspective, and arterial stiffness should become a further recognised and screened for risk factor in patients with known aneurysmal disease.

  1. Follow-up on Small Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Using Three Dimensional Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghulam, Q. M.; Bredahl, K. K.; Lönn, L.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Rupture risk in abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) is assessed using AAA diameter; yet 10% of ruptures occur in a small aneurysm. This underlines the inadequacy of diameter as a standalone parameter. In this prospective follow-up study, ultrasound determined aneurysm diameter was compared...... with aneurysm volume determined by three dimensional ultrasound (3D-US) in a group of 179 AAAs. Design This was a prospective cohort study with repeated diameter and volume measurements by 3D-US. Material and methods In total, 179 patients with small infrarenal AAAs (diameter 30–55 mm) were enrolled......L) were recorded. In post-hoc analysis, it was found that more AAAs with a stable diameter and a growing volume than AAAs with a stable diameter and volume were undergoing aortic repair during follow-up, based on the maximum diameter. Conclusion In this cohort of small AAAs, 40% of patients with a stable...

  2. Delayed Presentation of a Giant Ascending Aortic Aneurysm following Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tugrul Göncü

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant ascending aortic aneurysm formation following aortic valve replacement is rare. A 28-year-old man who underwent aortic valve replacement with a prosthetic valve for aortic regurgitation secondary to congenital bicuspid aortic valve about 10 years ago was diagnosed with a giant ascending aortic aneurysm about 16 cm in diameter in follow-up. The aneurysm was resected leaving the functional old mechanical prosthesis in place and implanted a 34-mm Hemashield woven graft, associated with the left and right coronary artery button implantation. Histological findings of the aortic aneurysm wall showed cystic medial necrosis. The postoperative course was uneventful and postoperative examination demonstrated good surgical results.

  3. Spontaneous Retroperitoneal Hematoma Simulating Ruptured Infrarenal Aortic Aneurysm in a Patient with End-Stage Renal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, JYY; Chan, YC; Qing, KX; Cheng, SW

    2014-01-01

    We reported a case of spontaneous retroperitoneal hematoma (SRH) simulating a ruptured infrarenal aortic aneurysm. A 72-year-old man with a history of infrarenal aortic aneurysm and end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis presented with malaise and nonspecific central abdominal pain and left loin discomfort. An emergency computed tomography scan showed a large retroperitoneal hematoma and clinical suspicion of ruptured infrarenal aortic aneurysm. However, the hematoma was discontinuous with the aneurysm sac and raised the clinical suspicion on dual pathology. The SRH was treated conservatively with transfusion of blood products, and the aneurysm was treated with nonemergency endovascular repair electively. This case demonstrates the importance of recognizing different clinical and radiological characteristics and be aware of dual pathology. PMID:28031651

  4. Emergency Endovascular Treatment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Feasibility and Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagana, Domenico; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Mangini, Monica; Fontana, Federico; Caronno, Roberto; Castelli, Patrizio; Cuffari, Salvatore; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2006-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the feasibility and effectiveness of emergency endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Methods. During 36 months we treated, on an emergency basis, 30 AAAs with endovascular exclusion. In 21 hemodynamically stable patients preoperative CT angiography (CTA) was performed to confirm the diagnosis and to plan the treatment; 9 patients with hemorrhagic shock were evaluated with angiography performed in the operating room. Twenty-two Excluder (Gore) and 8 Zenith (Cook) stent-grafts (25 bifurcated and 5 aorto-uni-iliac) were used. The follow-up was performed by CTA at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Results. Technical success was achieved in 100% of cases with a 10% mortality rate. The total complication rate was 23% (5 increases in serum creatinine level and 2 wound infections). During the follow-up, performed in 27 patients (1-36 months, mean 15.2 months), 4 secondary endoleaks (15%) (3 type II, 2 spontaneously thrombosed and 1 under observation, and 1 type III treated by iliac extender insertion) and 1 iliac leg occlusion (treated with femoro-femoral bypass) occurred. We observed a shrinkage of the aneurysmal sac in 8 of 27 cases and stability in 19 of 27 cases; we did not observe any endotension. Conclusions. Endovascular repair is a good option for emergency treatment of AAAs. The team's experience allows correct planning of the procedure in emergency situations also, with technical results comparable with elective repair. In our experience the bifurcated stent-graft is the device of choice in patients with suitable anatomy because the procedure is less time-consuming than aorto-uni-iliac stent-grafting with surgical crossover, allowing faster aneurysm exclusion. However, further studies are required to demonstrate the long-term efficacy of endovascular repair compared with surgical treatment

  5. Acute Symptomatic Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Secondary to Endovascular Stent Graft Associated Type II Endoleak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Ka Leung Chan

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Endovascular abdominal aneurysm repair (EVAR is popular because of its low invasiveness and feasibility for high-risk patients. Endoleak is common after EVAR and is characterized by blood flow within the aneurysm sac but outside the stent graft. Type II or collateral endoleak commonly results from retrograde filling of the aneurysm from collateral visceral vessels, lumbar, inferior mesenteric, accessory renal or sacral arteries. Collateral leaks are generally thought to be benign and over half of the early leaks will seal spontaneously. Sporadically, collateral endoleak could lead to aneurysm sac pressurization and place the patient at ongoing risk of rupture. Herein, we report an uncommon case of early post-stent graft placement symptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm associated with type II endoleak.

  6. An anatomic risk model to screen post endovascular aneurysm repair patients for aneurysm sac enlargement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Png, Chien Yi M; Tadros, Rami O; Beckerman, William E; Han, Daniel K; Tardiff, Melissa L; Torres, Marielle R; Marin, Michael L; Faries, Peter L

    2017-09-01

    Follow-up computed tomography angiography (CTA) scans add considerable postimplantation costs to endovascular aneurysm repairs (EVARs) of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). By building a risk model, we hope to identify patients at low risk for aneurysm sac enlargement to minimize unnecessary CTAs. 895 consecutive patients who underwent EVAR for AAA were reviewed, of which 556 met inclusion criteria. A Probit model was created for aneurysm sac enlargement, with preoperative aneurysm morphology, patient demographics, and operative details as variables. Our final model included 287 patients and had a sensitivity of 100%, a specificity of 68.9%, and an accuracy of 70.4%. Ninety-nine (35%) of patients were assigned to the high-risk group, whereas 188 (65%) of patients were assigned to the low-risk group. Notably, regarding anatomic variables, our model reported that age, pulmonary comorbidities, aortic neck diameter, iliac artery length, and aneurysms were independent predictors of post-EVAR sac enlargement. With the exception of age, all statistically significant variables were qualitatively supported by prior literature. With regards to secondary outcomes, the high-risk group had significantly higher proportions of AAA-related deaths (5.1% versus 1.1%, P = 0.037) and Type 1 endoleaks (9.1% versus 3.2%, P = 0.033). Our model is a decent predictor of patients at low risk for post AAA EVAR aneurysm sac enlargement and associated complications. With additional validation and refinement, it could be applied to practices to cut down on the overall need for postimplantation CTA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Proteomic identification of differentially expressed proteins in aortic wall of patients with ruptured and nonruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urbonavicius, Sigitas; Lindholt, Jes S.; Vorum, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    To compare the basic proteomic composition of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) wall tissue in patients with nonruptured and ruptured aneurysms.......To compare the basic proteomic composition of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) wall tissue in patients with nonruptured and ruptured aneurysms....

  8. [Aortic elastic properties and its clinical significance in intracranial aneurysms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Zhao-xia; You, Xiang-dong; Weng, Wen-chao; Wang, Jian-an; Shi, Jian

    2011-09-01

    To investigate the aortic elastic properties and its clinical significance in intracranial aneurysms (IAs). One hundred and seven IAs patients (57 with hypertension) and 108 healthy subjects were recruited. The internal aortic diameters in systole and diastole were measured by the M-mode echocardiography, the aortic elasticity indexes were calculated and compared. The aortic distensibility (DIS) was lower and the aortic stiffness index (SI) was higher in IAs patients than those in controls (both P IAs patients with hypertension (IAs-HP) than those in IAs with no hypertension (P IAs patients and hypertension is closely related to the severity of aortic elasticity.

  9. Mast Cells in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Guo-Ping; Lindholt, Jes Sanddal

    2013-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are proinflammatory cells that play important roles in allergic responses, tumor growth, obesity, diabetes, atherosclerosis, and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Although the presence and function of MCs in atherosclerotic lesions have been thoroughly studied in human specimens......, in primary cultured vascular cells, and in atherosclerosis in animals, their role in AAA was recognized only recently. Via multiple activation pathways, MCs release a spectrum of mediators � including histamine, inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, proteoglycans, and proteases � to activate...... neighboring cells, degrade extracellular matrix proteins, process latent bioactive molecules, promote angiogenesis, recruit additional inflammatory cells, and stimulate vascular cell apoptosis. These activities associate closely with medial elastica breakdown, medial smooth-muscle cell loss and thinning...

  10. Abdominal aortic aneurysm neck remodeling after Anaconda stent graft implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukovic, Elisabeth; Czerny, Martin; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Wolkewitz, Martin; Berezowski, Mikolaj; Siepe, Matthias; Blanke, Philipp; Rylski, Bartosz

    2018-05-24

    The aim of this study was to define how the proximal landing zone changes geometrically after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) with the Anaconda (Vascutek, Inchinnan, United Kingdom) stent graft. Among 230 patients who underwent Anaconda stent graft implantation between 2005 and 2014, we included 126 with adequate computed tomography (CT) image quality and follow-up. CT analysis entailed the geometric changes in the main body, proximal rings, and proximal landing zone. The median CT follow-up was 2.0 years (345.8 patients-years). The proximal portion of the main body ring system flattened within the first year after EVAR, resulting in an up to 30° increase in the upper ring's angle in 40% patients and up to 40° increase in 24% patients. One year after EVAR, the upper ring angle increase slowed down. Aortic diameter measured at the level of the upper and lower ring expanded by 2 to 4 mm within 1 year, but remained unchanged afterward. The main body migrated continuously down toward the aortic bifurcation, attaining an average 6-mm increase in the distance between the superior mesenteric artery and main body within 4 years. Freedom from endoleak type IA was 95 ± 2% and 93 ± 3% after 1 and 4 years, respectively. The Anaconda main body ring system in its proximal portion flattens within the first year after EVAR, leading to an increase of 2 to 4 mm in the proximal landing zone's aortic diameter. The main body migrates slowly but continuously down toward the aortic bifurcation. Copyright © 2018 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. 2D MR angiography of the aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amanuma, Makoto; Hasegawa, Makoto; Watabe, Tsuneya; Heshiki, Atsuko

    1992-01-01

    2D time-of-flight MR angiography was performed in 6 cases of thoracic aortic aneurysm. Oblique saturation pulses were used to suppress the signals of the pulmonary artery and SVC, providing excellent selective MR aortograms. Three dimensional extension of the aneurysm and its relation with cervical branches were easily assessed. It could be possible to replace invasive aortography by this technique. (author)

  12. Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelberger, Stephan; Rosso, Raffaele; Sarti, Manuela; Del Grande, Filippo; Canevascini, Reto; van den Berg, Jos C; Prouse, Giorgio; Giovannacci, Luca

    2017-03-21

    This pilot study aimed to assess the feasibility, acceptance and costs of an ultrasound scan screening programme for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) in the elderly male population resident in Canton Ticino, Switzerland. The target population were male patients aged 65-80 years who attended the outpatient clinics of the Lugano Regional Hospital in 2013. The patients showing interest were contacted by phone to verify their eligibility and fix the appointment for the ultrasound scan of the abdominal aorta. Patients with recent examinations suitable for AAA detection were excluded. Aneurysm was defined as an abdominal aorta with sagittal and/or axial diameter  30 mm. Patients' characteristics and study results were presented as descriptive statistics. The chi-squared test was used to compare categorical variables with p rate was 68.3%. A previously unknown AAA was diagnosed in 31 patients (4.2%, 95% confidence interval 2.8-5.9%). Age and area of residence had a statistically significant impact on patient's acceptance rate (p <0.05). The mean cost per screened patient was CHF 88. AAA screening of male patients aged 65-80 years is feasible with limited financial and organisational effort. Adherence might be improved by a larger community-based programme and involvement of general practitioners.

  13. 18F-FDG PET-CT uptake is a feature of both normal diameter and aneurysmal aortic wall and is not related to aneurysm size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barwick, Tara D.; Lyons, O.T.A.; Waltham, M.; Mikhaeel, N.G.; O'Doherty, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Aortic metabolic activity is suggested to correlate with presence and progression of aneurysmal disease, but has been inadequately studied. This study investigates the 2-[ 18 F] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ( 18 F-FDG) uptake in a population of infra-renal abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), compared to a matched non-aneurysmal control group. The Positron Emission Tomography - Computed Tomography (PET/CT) database was searched for infra-renal AAA. Exclusion criteria were prior repair, vasculitis, and saccular/mycotic thoracic or thoraco-abdominal aneurysms. Matching of 159 non-aneurysmal ( max ) and target to background mediastinal blood pool ratio (TBR) were documented. Predictors of FDG uptake (age, sex, aortic diameter, hypertension, statin use, and diabetes) were assessed using univariate analysis. Follow-up questionnaires were sent to referring clinicians. Aneurysms (n = 151) and controls (n = 159) were matched (p > 0.05) for age, sex, diabetes, hypertension, smoking status, statin use, and indication for PET/CT. Median aneurysm diameter was 5.0 cm (range 3.2-10.4). On visual analysis there was no significant difference in the overall numbers with increased visual uptake 24 % (36/151) in the aneurysm group vs. 19 % (30/159) in the controls, p = ns. SUV max was slightly lower in the aneurysm group vs. controls (mean (2 SD) 1.75(0.79) vs. 1.84(0.58), p = 0.02). However there was no difference in TBR between the AAA group and controls (mean (2 SD) 1.03 (0.46) vs. 1.05(0.31), p = 0.36). During a median 18 (interquartile range 8-35) months' follow-up 20 were repaired and four were confirmed ruptured. The level of metabolic activity as assessed by 18 F-FDG PET/CT in infra-renal AAA does not correlate with aortic size and does not differ between aneurysms and matched controls. (orig.)

  14. Epidemiology of aortic disease - aneurysm, dissection, occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steckmeier, B.

    2001-01-01

    The physiological infrarenal aortic diameter varies between 12.4 mm in women an 27.6 mm in men. As defined, an aneurysmatic dilatation begins with 29 mm. According to that, 9% of all people above the age of 65 are affected by an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Compared with the female sex, the male sex predominates at a rate of about 5:1. The disease is predominant in men of the white race. In black men, black and white women the incidence of AAA is identical. 38 to 50 percent of the AAA patients (patients) suffer from hypertension, 33 to 60% from coronary, 28% from cerebrovascular and 25% from peripheral occlusive disease. The AAA expansion rate varies between 0.2 and 0.8 cm per year and is exponential from a diameter of 5 cm on. In autopsy studies, the rupture rates with AAA diameters of 7 cm were below 5%, 39% and 65%, respecitvely. 70% of the AAA patients do not die of a rupture, but of a cardiac disease. Serum markers, such as metalloproteinases and procollagen peptides are significantly increased in AAA patients. Thoraco-abdominal aneurysms (TAA) make up only 2 to 5% of all degenerative aneurysms. 20 to 30% of the TAA patients are also affected by an AAA. 80% of the TAA are degenerative, 15 to 20% are a consequence of the chronic dissection - including 5% of Marfan patients -, 2% occur in case of infections and 1 to 2% in case of aortitis. The TAA incidence in 100,000 person-years is 5.9% during a monitoring period of 30 years. In case of TAA, an operation is indicated with a maximum diameter of 5.5 to 6 cm and more and, in case of a Marfan's syndrome (incidence of 1:10,000), with a maximum diameter of 5.5 cm and more. With regard to aorto-iliac occlusive diseases, there are defined 3 types of distribution. Type I refers to the region of the bifurcation itself. Type II defines the diffuse aortoiliac spread of the disease. Type III designates multiple-level occlusions also beyond the inguinal ligament. Type I patients in most cases are female and more

  15. Early experience with transfemoral endovascular aneurysm management (TEAM) in the treatment of aortic aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balm, R.; Eikelboom, B. C.; May, J.; Bell, P. R.; Swedenborg, J.; Collin, J.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the early experience with transfemoral endovascular aortic aneurysm management using the Endovascular Grafting System. DESIGN: Multi-centre prospective evaluation of the implantation procedure and early results (median follow-up 153 days). SETTING: Department of Surgery,

  16. The effect of endoleak on intra-aneurysmal pressure after EVE for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Sheng; Jing Zaiping; Mei Zhijun; Lu Qingsheng; Zhao Jun; Zhang Suzhen; Zhao Xin; Cai Lili; Tang Jingdong; Xiong Jiang; Liao Mingfang

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the intra-aneurysmal pressure curve in the presence of endoleak after endovascular exclusion (EVE) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Methods: Infrarenal aortic aneurysms were created with bovine jugular vein segments or patches. Then they were underwent incomplete endovascular exclusion of the aneurysm and formation of endoleaks. The pressures of blood flow outside the graft into the sac were measured. Results: The intrasac pressure was higher than systemic pressure in the presence of endoleak. After sealing the endoleak, pressure decreased significantly, and the pressure cure showed approximately linear. Conclusion: The change of intra-aneurysmal pressure curve reflected the load on aneurysmal wall after EVE, and can also help to determine the endoleak existence

  17. Repair of an aneurysm of the ascending aorta and arch in an infant with Loeys-Dietz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Pratiksha; Shetty, Varun; Patel, Ebrahim; Shetty, Deviprasad

    2018-05-01

    Aortic aneurysms in childhood are rare disease entities and are usually seen in patients with genetic connective tissue disorders such as Marfans, Ehler-Danlos, and Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS). Patients affected with LDS present early in life and have a rapid disease progression. We report a case of repair of an ascending and aortic arch aneurysm in an infant with Loeys-Dietz syndrome. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Endovascular Treatment of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Aortocaval Fistula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzzardi, Giuseppe; Fossaceca, Rita; Divenuto, Ignazio; Musiani, Antonello; Brustia, Piero; Carriero, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    Aortocaval fistula (ACF) is a rare complication of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). We report the endovascular repair of an AAA rupture into the inferior vena cava. A 78-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for acute hypotension. She presented with a pulsatile abdominal mass and became rapidly anuric. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) showed an AAA rupture into the inferior vena cava. The features of the AAA made it suitable for endovascular repair. To prevent pulmonary embolism caused by the presence of sac thrombosis near the vena cava lumen, a temporary vena cava filter was deployed before the procedure. A bifurcated stent-graft was placed with the patient under local anaesthesia, and the AAA was successfully treated. A transient type II endoleak was detected on CT 3 days after endograft placement. At routine follow-up 6 and 12 months after the procedure, the patient was in good clinical condition, and the type II endoleak had sealed completely. Endovascular treatment offers an attractive therapeutic alternative to open repair in case of ACF; however, only small numbers of patients have been treated, and long-term follow-up interval is lacking.

  19. Validation of the Simbionix PROcedure Rehearsal Studio sizing module : A comparison of software for endovascular aneurysm repair sizing and planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velu, Juliëtte F.; Groot Jebbink, Erik; de Vries, Jean-Paul P.M.; Slump, Cornelis H.; Geelkerken, Robert H.

    2017-01-01

    An important determinant of successful endovascular aortic aneurysm repair is proper sizing of the dimensions of the aortic-iliac vessels. The goal of the present study was to determine the concurrent validity, a method for comparison of test scores, for EVAR sizing and planning of the recently

  20. Three-dimensional finite volume modelling of blood flow in simulated angular neck abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algabri, Y. A.; Rookkapan, S.; Chatpun, S.

    2017-09-01

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is considered a deadly cardiovascular disease that defined as a focal dilation of blood artery. The healthy aorta size is between 15 and 24 mm based on gender, bodyweight, and age. When the diameter increased to 30 mm or more, the rupture can occur if it is kept growing or untreated. Moreover, the proximal angular neck of aneurysm is categorized as a significant morphological feature with prime harmful effects on endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Flow pattern in pathological vessel can influence the vascular intervention. The aim of this study is to investigate the blood flow behaviours in angular neck abdominal aortic aneurysm with simulated geometry based on patient’s information using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The 3D angular neck AAA models have been designed by using SolidWorks Software. Consequently, CFD tools are used for simulating these 3D models of angular neck AAA in ANSYS FLUENT Software. Eventually, based on the results, we summarized that the CFD techniques have shown high performance in explaining and investigating the flow patterns for angular neck abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  1. Abdominal aortic aneurysm screening program in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawien, A; Formankiewicz, B; Derezinski, T; Migdalski, A; Brazis, P; Woda, L

    Screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is currently recommended by several vascular societies. In countries where it has been introduced the prevalence of AAAs differed greatly and was mainly related to cigarette smoking. The screening program also had an enormous impact on the decrease of AAA ruptures and reduced mortality rate. These facts have led to the introduction of the first screening program for AAAs in Poland. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of AAAs among men aged 60 years and older undergoing ultrasound examination of the abdominal aorta. A single ultrasonography of the abdomen was performed to assess the aorta from the renal arteries to the bifurcation and the diameter of the aorta was measured at its widest point. The cut-off value for determining an aortic aneurysm was set at a diameter of ≥ 30 mm. All ultrasonography measurements were performed by physicians in outpatient departments throughout the Kuyavian-Pomeranian Province. Additionally, each subject had to fill out a questionnaire with demographic data, smoking habits, existing comorbidities and familial occurrence of AAAs. The study was conducted from October 2009 to November 2011. The abdominal aorta ultrasound examinations were carried out in 1556 men aged 60 years and older. The prevalence of AAA in the study population was 6.0 % (94 out of 1556). The average age of the men was 69 years (SD 6 years, range 60-92 years). In the study population 55 % of the men smoked or had smoked and 3 % were aware of the presence of AAAs in family members. There were three risk factors significantly associated with the presence of AAAs: age (p < 0.05), smoking (72.3 % vs 53.9 %, p = 0.004) and family history of AAAs (9.6 % vs 2.7 %, p = 0.017). The prevalence of AAAs among men in Poland is higher than in other European countries and the USA. The screening program for AAAs is an easy and reliable method for detecting early stages of the disease and

  2. Evaluation of Aneurysm Neck Angle Change After Endovascular Aneurysm Repair Clinical Investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, Trong Binh; Moon, Mi Hyoung [Inha University Hospital, Endovascular Training Center (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Yong Sun, E-mail: radjeon@inha.ac.kr [Inha University Hospital, Inha University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Kee Chun [Inha University School of Medicine, Department of Vascular Surgery (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Soon Gu [Inha University Hospital, Inha University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Park, Keun-Myoung [Inha University School of Medicine, Department of Vascular Surgery (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the aneurysm neck angle changes and post-endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) complications.MethodsWe retrospectively analyzed 72 cases of elective EVAR for abdominal aortic aneurysm among 109 consecutive cases from December 2005 to April 2014. Patients were divided into angulated and non-angulated groups. The angulated group was defined as neck angulation ≥60°. Neck angle was evaluated pre- and post-EVAR during short- (within 1 month), mid- (3–6 months), and long-term (>1 year) follow-up. Aneurysm sac diameter change, aneurysm neck morphology other than angulation, endoleaks, and other post-procedural complications were also documented.ResultsA total of 34 patients were enrolled in the angulated group. There were no statistical differences in age, sex, follow-up duration, and aneurysm neck profile between the two groups (p > 0.05). Both groups showed statistically significant and consistent decreases in angulation during the follow-up period (p < 0.01). The angulated group revealed 22.45 % more straightening than the non-angulated group. Recoil of the Endurant device occurred in the angulated group. No statistically significant intergroup differences were observed in any endoleaks, complications, or re-intervention rates (p > 0.05). Pre-EVAR angle was the only predictor for post-procedural angle change (p < 0.001).ConclusionEVAR is applicable for patients with highly angulated aneurysm neck and provides consistent neck straightening over long-term follow-up. Recoil was evident in the angulated group using the Endurant device.

  3. Preoperative evaluation of the abdominal aortic aneurysm using spiral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chisuwa, Hisanao; Nishimaki, Keiji; Arai, Masayuki; Honda, Haruyasu; Urata, Koichi; Miyagawa, Yusuke; Makuuchi, Masatoshi; Shimizu, Mikio; Okamoto, Kohei.

    1995-01-01

    Six patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) were studied with three-dimensionally reconstructed CT angiography (3D-CTA) in order to evaluate its usefulness as a diagnostic tool for vascular surgery patients. Images of the intravenously contrasted abdominal aorta were obtained with spiral scan during a single breath hold. The images of the abdominal aorta and its major branches were three-dimensionally reconstructed with a shaded surface display mode. The three-dimensional image reconstruction was successful in all the six cases and performed without difficulties. Shaded surface display presented a deficit to depict the aortic wall with mural thrombus. However, multidirectional display of the abdominal aorta and its branches facilitated interpretation of the anatomical details of the lesions and planning of surgical repair. 3D-CTA is an alternative to conventional aortography for preoperative diagnosis of AAA. Moreover it was shown to be noninvasive, easy to proceed. It presented good angiographical resolution that can be used as a precise diagnostic tool in vascular surgery. (author)

  4. Chronic inflammation, immune response, and infection in abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Shi, G-P

    2006-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are associated with atherosclerosis, transmural degenerative processes, neovascularization, decrease in content of vascular smooth muscle cells, and a chronic infiltration, mainly located in the outer aortic wall. The chronic infiltration consists mainly of macrop......Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are associated with atherosclerosis, transmural degenerative processes, neovascularization, decrease in content of vascular smooth muscle cells, and a chronic infiltration, mainly located in the outer aortic wall. The chronic infiltration consists mainly...... matrix metalloproteases and cysteine proteases for aortic matrix remodeling. The lymphocyte activation may be mediated by microorganisms as well as autoantigens generated from vascular structural proteins, perhaps through molecular mimicry. As in autoimmune diseases, the risk of AAA is increased...

  5. Ascending aortic aneurysm and diaphragmatic hernia in a case of Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Jignesh; Hinduja, Manish; Baria, Kinnaresh; Pandya, Himani

    2017-06-01

    Marfan syndrome commonly affects the skeletal, ocular, and cardiovascular systems. Involvement of the gastrointestinal system is known but uncommon. Intervention depends upon the system involved and the severity of symptoms. Special awareness is required for the diagnosis and management of gastrointestinal involvement in these patients. We report a rare case of simultaneous surgical repair of an ascending aortic aneurysm and a type IV hiatal hernia in a 35-year-old man with Marfan syndrome.

  6. Massive aggrecan and versican accumulation in thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cikach, Frank S; Koch, Christopher D; Mead, Timothy J; Galatioto, Josephine; Willard, Belinda B; Emerton, Kelly B; Eagleton, Matthew J; Blackstone, Eugene H; Ramirez, Francesco; Roselli, Eric E; Apte, Suneel S

    2018-03-08

    Proteoglycan accumulation is a hallmark of medial degeneration in thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection (TAAD). Here, we defined the aortic proteoglycanome using mass spectrometry, and based on the findings, investigated the large aggregating proteoglycans aggrecan and versican in human ascending TAAD and a mouse model of severe Marfan syndrome. The aortic proteoglycanome comprises 20 proteoglycans including aggrecan and versican. Antibodies against these proteoglycans intensely stained medial degeneration lesions in TAAD, contrasting with modest intralamellar staining in controls. Aggrecan, but not versican, was increased in longitudinal analysis of Fbn1mgR/mgR aortas. TAAD and Fbn1mgR/mgR aortas had increased aggrecan and versican mRNAs, and reduced expression of a key proteoglycanase gene, ADAMTS5, was seen in TAAD. Fbn1mgR/mgR mice with ascending aortic dissection and/or rupture had dramatically increased aggrecan staining compared with mice without these complications. Thus, aggrecan and versican accumulation in ascending TAAD occurs via increased synthesis and/or reduced proteolytic turnover, and correlates with aortic dissection/rupture in Fbn1mgR/mgR mice. Tissue swelling imposed by aggrecan and versican is proposed to be profoundly deleterious to aortic wall mechanics and smooth muscle cell homeostasis, predisposing to type-A dissections. These proteoglycans provide potential biomarkers for refined risk stratification and timing of elective aortic aneurysm repair.

  7. Endovascular Exclusion of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in Patients with Concomitant Abdominal Malignancy: Early Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, You Ri; Chang, Nam Kyu [Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Hyo Hyun; Oh, Hyun Jun; Kim, Jae Kyu; Choi, Soo Jin Na; Chung, Sang Young [Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Yim, Nam Yeol [Armed Forces Yangju Hospital, Yangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    To assess the outcomes of endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) for the treatment of an abdominal aortic aneurysm in patients undergoing curative surgical treatment for concomitant abdominal malignancy. The study included 12 patients with abdominal neoplasia and an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), which was treated by surgery and stent EVAR. The neoplasm consisted of the gastric, colorectal, pancreas, prostate, and gall bladder. The follow up period was 3-21 months (mean 11.8 months). All medical records and imaging analyses were reviewed by CTA and/or color Doppler US, retrospectively. Successful endoluminal repair was accomplished in all twelve patients. The mean interval time between EVAR and surgery was 58.6 days. Small amounts of type 2 endoleaks were detected in two patients (17%). One patient developed adult respiratory distress syndrome after Whipple's operation 20 days after surgery, which led to hopeless discharge. No procedure-related mortality, morbidity, or graft-related infection was noted. Exclusion of AAA in patients with accompanying malignancy show with a relatively low procedure morbidity and mortality. Hence, endoluminal AAA repair in patients with synchronous neoplasia may allow greater flexibility in the management of an offending malignancy

  8. Endovascular Exclusion of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in Patients with Concomitant Abdominal Malignancy: Early Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, You Ri; Chang, Nam Kyu; Shin, Hyo Hyun; Oh, Hyun Jun; Kim, Jae Kyu; Choi, Soo Jin Na; Chung, Sang Young; Yim, Nam Yeol

    2010-01-01

    To assess the outcomes of endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) for the treatment of an abdominal aortic aneurysm in patients undergoing curative surgical treatment for concomitant abdominal malignancy. The study included 12 patients with abdominal neoplasia and an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), which was treated by surgery and stent EVAR. The neoplasm consisted of the gastric, colorectal, pancreas, prostate, and gall bladder. The follow up period was 3-21 months (mean 11.8 months). All medical records and imaging analyses were reviewed by CTA and/or color Doppler US, retrospectively. Successful endoluminal repair was accomplished in all twelve patients. The mean interval time between EVAR and surgery was 58.6 days. Small amounts of type 2 endoleaks were detected in two patients (17%). One patient developed adult respiratory distress syndrome after Whipple's operation 20 days after surgery, which led to hopeless discharge. No procedure-related mortality, morbidity, or graft-related infection was noted. Exclusion of AAA in patients with accompanying malignancy show with a relatively low procedure morbidity and mortality. Hence, endoluminal AAA repair in patients with synchronous neoplasia may allow greater flexibility in the management of an offending malignancy

  9. Common and uncommon CT findings in rupture and impending rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M.Z.; Ling, L.; Ettles, D.F.

    2013-01-01

    The rapid imaging evaluation and diagnosis of rupture and impending rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is imperative. This article describes the imaging findings of rupture, impending rupture, and other abdominal aortic abnormalities. It is important not to overlook AAA as the consequences can be life threatening. All patients who had open or endovascular repair of AAA rupture over 6 years (2008–2012) were identified from our departmental database. The computed tomography (CT) images of 99 patients were reviewed for relevant findings. The mean age of the patients was 65 years and 85% were male

  10. Tissue Responses to Stent Grafts with Endo-Exo-Skeleton for Saccular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in a Canine Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Il Young; Chung, Jin Wook; Kim, Hyo Cheol [Dept. of Radiology and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Clinical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Young Ho; So Young Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Beom [Dept. of Radiology, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Min, Seung Kee [Dept. of Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae Hyung [Dept. of Radiology, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    We evaluated the effect of close contact between the stent and the graft on the induction of endothelial covering on the stent graft placed over an aneurysm. Saccular abdominal aortic aneurysms were made with Dacron patch in eight dogs. The stent graft consisted of an inner stent, a expanded polytetrafluoroethylene graft, and an outer stent. After sacrificing the animals, the aortas with an embedded stent graft were excised. The aortas were inspected grossly and evaluated microscopically. The animals were sacrificed at two (n = 3), six (n = 3), and eight months (n = 2) after endovascular repair. In two dogs, the aortic lumen was occluded at two months after the placement. On gross inspection of specimens from the other six dogs with a patent aortic lumen, stent grafts placed over the normal aortic wall were covered by glossy white neointima, whereas, stent grafts placed over the aneurysmal aortic wall were covered by brownish neointima. On microscopic inspection, stent grafts placed over the normal aortic wall were covered by thin neointima (0.27 ± 0.05 mm, mean ± standard deviation) with an endothelial layer, and stent grafts placed over the aneurysmal aortic wall were covered by thick neointima (0.62 ± 0.17 mm) without any endothelial lining. Transgraft cell migration at the normal aortic wall was more active than that at the aneurysmal aortic wall. Close contact between the stent and the graft, which was achieved with stent grafts with endo-exo-skeleton, could not enhance endothelial covering on the stent graft placed over the aneurysms.

  11. Microarray analysis to identify the similarities and differences of pathogenesis between aortic occlusive disease and abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guofu; Bi, Lechang; Wang, Gaofeng; Huang, Feilai; Lu, Mingjing; Zhu, Kai

    2018-06-01

    Objectives Expression profile of GSE57691 was analyzed to identify the similarities and differences between aortic occlusive disease and abdominal aortic aneurysm. Methods The expression profile of GSE57691 was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database, including 20 small abdominal aortic aneurysm samples, 29 large abdominal aortic aneurysm samples, 9 aortic occlusive disease samples, and 10 control samples. Using the limma package in R, the differentially expressed genes were screened. Followed by enrichment analysis was performed for the differentially expressed genes using database for annotation, visualization, and integrated discovery online tool. Based on string online tool and Cytoscape software, protein-protein interaction network and module analyses were carried out. Moreover, integrated TF platform database and Cytoscape software were used for constructing transcriptional regulatory networks. Results As a result, 1757, 354, and 396 differentially expressed genes separately were identified in aortic occlusive disease, large abdominal aortic aneurysm, and small abdominal aortic aneurysm samples. UBB was significantly enriched in proteolysis related pathways with a high degree in three groups. SPARCL1 was another gene shared by these groups and regulated by NFIA, which had a high degree in transcriptional regulatory network. ACTB, a significant upregulated gene in abdominal aortic aneurysm samples, could be regulated by CLIC4, which was significantly enriched in cell motions. ACLY and NFIB were separately identified in aortic occlusive disease and small abdominal aortic aneurysm samples, and separately enriched in lipid metabolism and negative regulation of cell proliferation. Conclusions The downregulated UBB, NFIA, and SPARCL1 might play key roles in both aortic occlusive disease and abdominal aortic aneurysm, while the upregulated ACTB might only involve in abdominal aortic aneurysm. ACLY and NFIB were specifically involved in aortic occlusive

  12. Hybrid treatment of a true thyreocervical trunk aneurysm in a patient with Type B aortic dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos G Baikoussis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We would like to describe a case with a complex aortic disease treated in hybrid fashion. We present an interesting case of a 65-year-old man with a medical history of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and coronary artery disease percutaneously treated. An acute Type B aortic dissection occurred and treated with the implantation of a stent-graft which occluded the left subclavian artery due to its extension to the aortic arch. This event required a carotid-subclavian artery bypass due to ischemia of the left arm. An aneurysm in the innominate artery also detected, was treated with another stent-graft implantation 3 months later. At 5-year follow-up, an aneurysm of the thyreocervical trunk was found while the stent-graft of the aorta was well-tolerated without endoleak and the carotid-subclavian graft was patent. The aneurysm was asymptomatic but considering the risk of spontaneous rupture of an aneurysm of this size, elective surgery was indicated. Because the aneurysm was very close to the brachiocephalic bifurcation, open surgical repair would require a sternotomy. The right common carotid artery and right subclavian artery were exposed. The thyrocervical trunk, right internal mammary artery and right vertebral artery were occluded by ligations to isolate the aneurysm. An 8-mm Dacron graft was anastomosed end-to-end to the distal part of subclavian artery. We would like through this case, discuss the role of the hybrid cardiovascular surgery to minimize the postoperative complications in complex cardiovascular pathology. We also discuss the international bibliography about the thyreocervical trunk aneurysm and the treatment options.

  13. Proteins associated with the size and expansion rate of the abdominal aortic aneurysm wall as identified by proteomic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urbonavicius, Sigitas; Lindholt, Jes S.; Delbosc, Sandrine

    2010-01-01

    Identification of biomarkers for the natural history of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) holds the key to non-surgical intervention and improved selection for AAA repair. We aimed to associate the basic proteomic composition of AAA wall tissue with the expansion rate and size in patients with AAA....

  14. Aortic elongation in aortic aneurysm and dissection: the Tübingen Aortic Pathoanatomy (TAIPAN) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Tobias; Sandoval Boburg, Rodrigo; Lescan, Mario; Oikonomou, Alexandre; Schneider, Wilke; Vöhringer, Luise; Lausberg, Henning; Bamberg, Fabian; Blumenstock, Gunnar; Schlensak, Christian

    2018-01-24

    To study the lengths and diameters of aortic segments in healthy and diseased aortas and to assess the role of aortic elongation in Type A aortic dissection (TAD) prediction. Ectasia and aneurysm were defined by ascending aorta diameters of 45-54 mm and ≥55 mm, respectively. Computed tomography angiography studies of 256 healthy, 102 ectasia, 38 aneurysm, 17 pre-TAD and 166 TAD aortas were analysed using curved multiplanar reformats. The study groups were structurally equal. The diameter of the ascending aorta was 35 mm in the control group and was larger (P TAD (43 mm) and TAD (56 mm) groups. The length of the ascending aorta from the aortic annulus to the brachiocephalic trunk was 92 mm in the control group, 113 mm in the ectasia group, 120 mm in the aneurysm group and 111 mm and 118 mm in the pre-TAD and TAD groups (all P TAD group and 48% of the TAD group. The correlation between the diameter and the length of the ascending aorta was r = 0.752; therefore, both parameters must be examined separately. A score considering both parameters identified 23.5% of pre-TAD patients, significantly more than the diameter alone, and 31.4% of ectasia aortas were elongated. Patients with ectatic (45-54 mm diameter) and elongated (≥120 mm) ascending aortas represent a high-risk subpopulation for TAD. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  15. The β-d-Endoglucuronidase Heparanase Is a Danger Molecule That Drives Systemic Inflammation and Correlates with Clinical Course after Open and Endovascular Thoracoabdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Lessons Learnt from Mice and Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Martin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA is a highly lethal disorder requiring open or endovascular TAAA repair, both of which are rare, but extensive and complex surgical procedures associated with a significant systemic inflammatory response and high post-operative morbidity and mortality. Heparanase is a β-d-endoglucuronidase that remodels the endothelial glycocalyx by degrading heparan sulfate in many diseases/conditions associated with systemic inflammation including sepsis, trauma, and major surgery. We hypothesized that (a perioperative serum levels of heparanase and heparan sulfate are associated with the clinical course after open or endovascular TAAA repair and (b induce a systemic inflammatory response and renal injury/dysfunction in mice. Using a reverse-translational approach, we assessed (a the serum levels of heparanase, heparan sulfate, and the heparan sulfate proteoglycan syndecan-1 preoperatively as well as 6 and 72 h after intensive care unit (ICU admission in patients undergoing open or endovascular TAAA repair and (b laboratory and clinical parameters and 90-day survival, and (c the systemic inflammatory response and renal injury/dysfunction induced by heparanase and heparan sulfate in mice. When compared to preoperative values, the serum levels of heparanase, heparan sulfate, and syndecan-1 significantly transiently increased within 6 h of ICU admission and returned to normal within 72 h after ICU admission. The kinetics of any observed changes in heparanase, heparan sulfate, or syndecan-1 levels, however, did not differ between open and endovascular TAAA-repair. Postoperative heparanase levels positively correlated with noradrenalin dose at 12 h after ICU admission and showed a high predictive value of vasopressor requirements within the first 24 h. Postoperative heparan sulfate showed a strong positive correlation with interleukin-6 levels day 0, 1, and 2 post-ICU admission and a strong negative correlation with

  16. Comparative Study of Cerebral Protection during Surgery of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    OpenAIRE

    Sueda, Taijiro; Nomimura, Takayuki; Kagawa, Tetsuya; Morita, Satoru; Hayashi, Saiho; Orihashi, Kazumasa; Shikata, Hiroo; Ryuu, Gou; Hamanaka, Yoshiharu; Matsuura, Yuichiro; Kawaue, Yasushi; Kanehiro, Keiichi; Ishihara, Hiroshi

    1992-01-01

    During the past 5 years, 30 cases of thoracic aortic aneurysm were treated. Selective cerebral perfusion (SCP) and retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP) were conducted for cerebral protection during aortic cross clamping. SCP was carried out in 5 cases of dissecting aneurysm (all Stanford type A, including a case of AAE) and 3 cases of arch aneurysm. RCP was conducted in 5 cases of dissecting aneurysm (4 Stanford type A; 1 Stanford type B with retrograde dissection) and 2 cases of aortic arch a...

  17. Preoperative methylprednisolone enhances recovery after endovascular aortic repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de la Motte, Louise; Kehlet, Henrik; Vogt, Katja

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate effects of preoperative high-dose glucocorticoid on the inflammatory response and recovery after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). BACKGROUND: The postimplantation syndrome after EVAR may delay recovery due to the release of proinflammatory mediators....... Glucocorticoids may reduce postoperative inflammatory responses and enhance recovery, but with limited information on EVAR. METHODS: A single-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 153 patients undergoing elective EVAR between November 2009 and January 2013. Patients received 30 mg.......001) and fulfillment of discharge criteria was shorter [2 days (IQR = 2-4 days) vs 3 days (IQR = 3-4 days)] (P factor receptor were also reduced (P

  18. A 10-year institutional experience with open branched graft reconstruction of aortic aneurysms in connective tissue disorders versus degenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Caitlin W; Lue, Jennifer; Glebova, Natalia O; Ehlert, Bryan A; Black, James H

    2017-11-01

    Aortic reconstruction for complex thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAAs) can be challenging, especially in patients with connective tissue disorders (CTDs) in whom tissue fragility is a major concern. Branched graft reconstruction is a more complex operation compared with inclusion patch repair of the aorta but is frequently necessary in patients with CTDs or other pathologies because of anatomic reasons. We describe our institutional experience with open branched graft reconstruction of aortic aneurysms and compare outcomes for patients with CTDs vs degenerative pathologies. We retrospectively analyzed all patients undergoing open aortic reconstruction using branched grafts at our institution between July 2006 and December 2015. Postoperative outcomes, including perioperative morbidity and mortality, midterm graft patency, and the development of new aneurysms, were compared for patients with CTD vs degenerative disease. During the 10-year study period, 137 patients (CTD, 29; degenerative, 108) underwent aortic repair with branched graft reconstruction. CTD patients were significantly younger (39 ± 1.9 vs 68 ± 1.0 years; P disease, coronary artery disease; P degenerative disease. Perioperative mortality (CTD: 10% [n = 3] vs degenerative: 6% [n = 6]; P = .40) and any complication (62% vs 55%; P = .47) were similar between groups. At a median follow-up time of 14.5 months (interquartile range: 6.5, 43.9 months), CTD patients were more likely to develop both new aortic (21%) and nonaortic (14%) aneurysms compared with the degenerative group (7% and 4% for aortic and nonaortic aneurysms, respectively; P = .02). Loss of branch graft patency occurred in 0 of 99 grafts (0%) in CTD patients and in 13 of 167 grafts (7.8%) in degenerative disease patients (P = .005). Loss of branch graft patency occurred most commonly in left renal artery bypass grafts (77%) and was clinically asymptomatic (creatinine: 1.77 ± 0.13 mg/dL currently vs 1.41 ± 0

  19. The influence of neck thrombus on clinical outcome and aneurysm morphology after endovascular aneurysm repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.M.V. Bastos Gonçalves (Frederico); H.J.M. Verhagen (Hence); K. Chinsakchai (Khamin); J.W. van Keulen (Jasper); M.T. Voûte (Michiel); H.J.A. Zandvoort (Herman); F.L. Moll (Frans); J.A. van Herwaarden (Joost)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractObjective: This study investigated the influence of significant aneurysm neck thrombus in clinical and morphologic outcomes after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Methods: The patient population was derived from a prospective EVAR database from two university institutions in The

  20. Administration of platelets to ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm patients before open surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunen, T B; Johansson, P I; Jensen, L P

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients undergoing open surgery for a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA), survivors demonstrate a high platelet count, and proactive administration of platelets (and fresh frozen plasma) appears to influence mortality. OBJECTIVES: This trial investigated the effect of plate......BACKGROUND: In patients undergoing open surgery for a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA), survivors demonstrate a high platelet count, and proactive administration of platelets (and fresh frozen plasma) appears to influence mortality. OBJECTIVES: This trial investigated the effect...... vs 39; P = 0·15) were similar in the two groups of patients. No adverse reactions to platelet administration were observed. In addition, length of stay in the intensive care unit was unaffected by intervention. CONCLUSIONS: For patients planned for open repair of a rAAA, we observed no significant...... effect of early administration of platelets with regard to post-operative complications and stay in the ICU or in hospital and also no significant effect on mortality....

  1. How to manage a case of aymptomatic thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysm with occluded mesenteric arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhisekh Mohanty

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report a unique case of a 57-year-old male having a suprarenal thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysm which is extending till the origin of superior mesenteric artery (SMA. The origins of celiac artery and SMA were totally occluded and filled retrogradely through dense collateral vessels arising from the inferior mesenteric artery. Surprisingly, the patient was not having any symptoms related to mesenteric ischemia. We decided to use a conventional aortic aneurysm stent graft to repair it without revascularizing the occluded mesenteric arteries. After 1 month, CT aortogram was repeated which revealed a well-apposed stent graft with no endoleaks. He did not have any clinical signs and symptoms attributable to mesenteric ischemia.

  2. Right-sided aortic arch with Kommerell′s aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Orathi Patangi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case report of a 55-year-old lady who presented with progressive dysphagia and was diagnosed with a Kommerell′s aneurysm and a right-sided aortic arch. This case report outlines our management strategy and the challenges encountered during the perioperative period in a patient with this rare anomaly.

  3. Estimating overdiagnosis in Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Minna; Hansson, Anders; Brodersen, J.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical context: Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are often asymptomatic until they rupture, when the death rate is greater than 80%. If diagnosed before rupture, AAA can be treated with surgery, which has a mortality of 4-5% Diagnostic change: Sweden, the UK, and the US have initiated screenin...

  4. Effectiveness of treatment for octogenarians with acute abdominal aortic aneurysm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheer, Margot L. J.; Pol, Robert A.; Haveman, Jan Willem; Tielliu, Ignace F. J.; Verhoeven, Eric L. G.; Van den Dungen, Jan J. A. M.; Nijsten, Maarten W.; Zeebregts, Clark J.

    Objective: To investigate whether advanced age may be a reason to refrain from treatment in patients with an acute abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAAA). Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study that took place in a tertiary care university hospital with a 45-bed intensive care unit. Two hundred

  5. Mass or high-risk screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Henneberg, E W; Fasting, H

    1997-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is known to be associated with various diseases, especially hypertension, acute myocardial infarction (AMI), chronic obstructive airway disease (COAD), and intermittent claudication. These associations have led to a debate about whether screening of older men for AAA...

  6. Marfan's syndrome presenting with abdominal aortic aneurysm: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present the case of a 16-year old student with Marfan's syndrome and abdominal aortic aneurysm who presented with a diagnostic conundrum. He presented with a three months history of progressive painful left upper abdominal mass and back pain. It became severe in the last two weeks before presentation and was ...

  7. Antimicrobial treatment to impair expansion of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergqvist, David; Lindeman, Johannes H N; Lindholt, Jes S

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial treatment to attenuate expansion of abdominal aortic aneurysm has been suggested, especially with the focus on Chlamydophila. In this systematic literature review only four randomized trials were identified. In two small studies there is an indication of an effect of roxithromycin. ...

  8. A Variant in LDLR Is Associated With Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bradley, Declan T.; Hughes, Anne E.; Badger, Stephen A.; Jones, Gregory T.; Harrison, Seamus C.; Wright, Benjamin J.; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Baas, Annette F.; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Burnand, Kevin; Child, Anne H.; Clough, Rachel E.; Cockerill, Gillian; Hafez, Hany; Scott, D. Julian A.; Ariens, Robert A. S.; Johnson, Anne; Sohrabi, Soroush; Smith, Alberto; Thompson, Matthew M.; van Bockxmeer, Frank M.; Waltham, Matthew; Matthiasson, Stefan E.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Blankensteijn, Jan D.; Teijink, Joep A. W.; Wijmenga, Cisca; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Wild, John B.; Edkins, Sarah; Gwilliam, Rhian; Hunt, Sarah E.; Potter, Simon; Lindholt, Jes S.; Golledge, Jonathan; Norman, Paul E.; van Rij, Andre; Powell, Janet T.; Eriksson, Per; Stefansson, Kari; Thompson, John R.; Humphries, Steve E.; Sayers, Robert D.; Deloukas, Panos; Samani, Nilesh J.; Bown, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a common cardiovascular disease among older people and demonstrates significant heritability. In contrast to similar complex diseases, relatively few genetic associations with AAA have been confirmed. We reanalyzed our genome-wide study and carried

  9. A variant in LDLR is associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bradley, Declan T; Hughes, Anne E; Badger, Stephen A

    2013-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a common cardiovascular disease among older people and demonstrates significant heritability. In contrast to similar complex diseases, relatively few genetic associations with AAA have been confirmed. We reanalyzed our genome-wide study and carried through to re...

  10. Biomechanical Indices for Rupture Risk Estimation in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leemans, Eva L.; Willems, Tineke P.; van der Laan, Maarten J.; Slump, Cornelis H.; Zeebregts, Clark J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To review the use of biomechanical indices for the estimation of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture risk, emphasizing their potential use in a clinical setting. Methods: A search of the PubMed, Embase, Scopus, and Compendex databases was made up to June 2015 to identify articles

  11. Induction of autoimmune abdominal aortic aneurysm in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Sara Schødt; Ali, Mulham; Bergseth, Sara Hveding

    2017-01-01

    of this study was to develop a large animal model for abdominal aortic aneurysm induction through autoimmunity by performing sheep-to-pig xenotransplantation. Methods Six pigs underwent a xenotransplantation procedure where the infrarenal porcine aorta was replaced by a decellularized sheep aorta...

  12. Development of stroke-induced quadriplegia after endovascular repair of blunt aortic injury pseudoaneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoudi, Abdullah S; Merdad, Anas A; Makhdoom, Ahmed Q; Jamjoom, Reda A

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular repair of blunt aortic injury is now a first-line approach in management. This can warrant coverage of the left subclavian artery (LSA), which could lead to posterior strokes. In this case report, we present a severe complication of endovascular repair of a traumatic aortic aneurysm. A 53-year-old man presented with blunt aortic injury, endovascular repair was carried out where the left subclavian artery was covered. The intervention had a 100% technical success. Twelve hours later, he was discovered to have quadriplegia, a CT scan showed a large left cerebellar infarction extending to the medulla oblongata and proximal spinal cord. Strokes complicate 3% of thoracic endovascular aortic repairs, 80% of those strokes occur in patients who had their LSA`s covered. Most patients however, tolerate the coverage. Although our patient had a dominant right vertebral artery, and lacked risks for these strokes, he developed an extensive stroke that left him quadriplegic.

  13. Association between osteopontin and human abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golledge, Jonathan; Muller, Juanita; Shephard, Neil; Clancy, Paula; Smallwood, Linda; Moran, Corey; Dear, Anthony E; Palmer, Lyle J; Norman, Paul E

    2007-03-01

    In vitro and animal studies have implicated osteopontin (OPN) in the pathogenesis of aortic aneurysm. The relationship between serum concentration of OPN and variants of the OPN gene with human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) was investigated. OPN genotypes were examined in 4227 subjects in which aortic diameter and clinical risk factors were measured. Serum OPN was measured by ELISA in two cohorts of 665 subjects. The concentration of serum OPN was independently associated with the presence of AAA. Odds ratios (and 95% confidence intervals) for upper compared with lower OPN tertiles in predicting presence of AAA were 2.23 (1.29 to 3.85, P=0.004) for the population cohort and 4.08 (1.67 to 10.00, P=0.002) for the referral cohort after adjusting for other risk factors. In 198 patients with complete follow-up of aortic diameter at 3 years, initial serum OPN predicted AAA growth after adjustment for other risk factors (standardized coefficient 0.24, P=0.001). The concentration of OPN in the aortic wall was greater in patients with small AAAs (30 to 50 mm) than those with aortic occlusive disease alone. There was no association between five single nucleotide polymorphisms or haplotypes of the OPN gene and aortic diameter or AAA expansion. Serum and tissue concentrations of OPN are associated with human AAA. We found no relationship between variation of the OPN gene and AAA. OPN may be a useful biomarker for AAA presence and growth.

  14. Thoracic aortic aneurysm in a child due to cystic medial necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuribayashi, Sachio; Watabe, Tsuneya; Ohtaki, Makoto; Matsuyama, Shoya; Ogawa, Junichi

    1983-01-01

    The valuable role of computed tomography (CT) was stressed in the diagnosis of thoracic aortic aneurysm in an asymptomatic 12-year-old child. She initially presented mediastinal mass on plain chest film. A saccular thoracic aortic aneurysm was highly suspected from the CT findings, and it was confirmed on angiography. Pathological examination of the aneurysmal wall revealed cystic medial necrosis. (author)

  15. Elastin-derived peptides promote abdominal aortic aneurysm formation by modulating M1/M2 macrophage polarization1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Matthew A; Xiong, Wanfen; Carson, Jeffrey S; Suh, Melissa K; Karpisek, Andrew D.; Meisinger, Trevor M.; Casale, George P.; Baxter, B. Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a dynamic vascular disease characterized by inflammatory cell invasion and extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation. Damage to elastin in the ECM results in release of elastin-derived peptides (EDPs), which are chemotactic for inflammatory cells such as monocytes. Their effect on macrophage polarization is less well known. Pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages initially are recruited to sites of injury but, if their effects are prolonged, they can lead to chronic inflammation that prevents normal tissue repair. Conversely, anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages reduce inflammation and aid in wound healing. Thus, a proper M1/M2 ratio is vital for tissue homeostasis. AAA tissue reveals a high M1/M2 ratio where pro-inflammatory cells and their associated markers dominate. In the present study, in vitro treatment of bone marrow-derived macrophages with EDPs induced M1 macrophage polarization. By using C57Bl/6 mice, antibody-mediated neutralization of EDPs reduced aortic dilation, matrix metalloproteinase activity, and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression at early and late time points after aneurysm induction. Furthermore, direct manipulation of the M1/M2 balance altered aortic dilation. Injection of M2 polarized macrophages reduced aortic dilation after aneurysm induction. EDPs promoted a pro-inflammatory environment in aortic tissue by inducing M1 polarization and neutralization of EDPs attenuated aortic dilation. The M1/M2 imbalance is vital to aneurysm formation. PMID:27183603

  16. Update on the prevention of death from ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacomelli, Jo; Summers, Lisa; Stevenson, Anne; Lees, Tim; Earnshaw, Jonothan J

    2017-09-01

    Objectives To monitor the early effect of a national population screening programme for abdominal aortic aneurysm in 65-year-old men. Setting The study used national statistics for death rates from abdominal aortic aneurysm (Office of National Statistics) and hospital admission data in England (Hospital Episode Statistics). Methods Information concerning deaths from abdominal aortic aneurysm (ruptured and non-ruptured) (1999-2014) and hospital admissions for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (2000-2015) was examined. Results The absolute number of deaths from abdominal aortic aneurysm in men and women aged 65 and over has decreased by around 30% from 2001 to 2014, but as the population has increased, the relative reduction was 45.6% and 40.0%, respectively. Some 65% of all abdominal aortic aneurysm deaths are in men aged over 65; women aged 65 and over account for around 31%. Deaths from ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm in men aged 60-74 (the screened group) appear to be declining at the same rate as in men aged 75 and over. The relative decline in admissions to hospital with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm may be greater in men and women aged 60-74 (which contains the screened group of men), than those older, giving the first possible evidence that abdominal aortic aneurysm screening is having an effect. Conclusion The death rate from abdominal aortic aneurysm is declining rapidly in England. There is the first evidence that screening may be contributing to this reduction.

  17. 18F-FDG PET-CT uptake is a feature of both normal diameter and aneurysmal aortic wall and is not related to aneurysm size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barwick, Tara D. [Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Charing Cross Hospital, Department of Radiology/Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Hammersmith Hospital, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Lyons, O.T.A.; Waltham, M. [King' s College London, BHF Centre of Research Excellence and NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at King' s Health Partners, Academic Department of Surgery, London (United Kingdom); Mikhaeel, N.G. [Guy' s and St Thomas' Foundation NHS Trust, Department of Oncology, London (United Kingdom); O' Doherty, M.J. [King' s Health Partners, Clinical PET Centre, St Thomas' Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    Aortic metabolic activity is suggested to correlate with presence and progression of aneurysmal disease, but has been inadequately studied. This study investigates the 2-[{sup 18}F] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) uptake in a population of infra-renal abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), compared to a matched non-aneurysmal control group. The Positron Emission Tomography - Computed Tomography (PET/CT) database was searched for infra-renal AAA. Exclusion criteria were prior repair, vasculitis, and saccular/mycotic thoracic or thoraco-abdominal aneurysms. Matching of 159 non-aneurysmal (<3 cm diameter) controls from the same population was assessed. Infra-renal aortic wall FDG uptake was assessed using visual analysis; maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) and target to background mediastinal blood pool ratio (TBR) were documented. Predictors of FDG uptake (age, sex, aortic diameter, hypertension, statin use, and diabetes) were assessed using univariate analysis. Follow-up questionnaires were sent to referring clinicians. Aneurysms (n = 151) and controls (n = 159) were matched (p > 0.05) for age, sex, diabetes, hypertension, smoking status, statin use, and indication for PET/CT. Median aneurysm diameter was 5.0 cm (range 3.2-10.4). On visual analysis there was no significant difference in the overall numbers with increased visual uptake 24 % (36/151) in the aneurysm group vs. 19 % (30/159) in the controls, p = ns. SUV{sub max} was slightly lower in the aneurysm group vs. controls (mean (2 SD) 1.75(0.79) vs. 1.84(0.58), p = 0.02). However there was no difference in TBR between the AAA group and controls (mean (2 SD) 1.03 (0.46) vs. 1.05(0.31), p = 0.36). During a median 18 (interquartile range 8-35) months' follow-up 20 were repaired and four were confirmed ruptured. The level of metabolic activity as assessed by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in infra-renal AAA does not correlate with aortic size and does not differ between aneurysms and matched controls

  18. Extra-Thoracic Supra-aortic Bypass Surgery Is Safe in Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair and Arterial Occlusive Disease Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombert, Alexander; van Issum, Lea; Barbati, Mohammad E; Grommes, Jochen; Keszei, Andras; Kotelis, Drosos; Jalaie, Houman; Greiner, Andreas; Jacobs, Michael J; Kalder, Johannes

    2018-04-20

    The safety and feasibility of supra-aortic debranching as part of endovascular aortic surgery or as a treatment option for arterial occlusive disease (AOD) remains controversial. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical outcome of this surgery. This single centre, retrospective study included 107 patients (mean age 69.2 years, 38.4% women) who underwent supra-aortic bypass surgery (carotid-subclavian bypass, carotid-carotid bypass, and carotid-carotid-subclavian bypass) because of thoracic or thoraco-abdominal endovascular aortic repair (57%; 61/107) or as AOD treatment (42.9%; 46/107) between January 2006 and January 2015. Mortality, morbidity with a focus on neurological complications, and patency rate were assessed. Twenty-six of 107 (14.2%) of the debranching patients were treated under emergency conditions because of acute type B dissection or symptomatic aneurysm. Follow up, conducted by imaging interpretation and telephone interviews, continued till March 2017 (mean 42.1, 0-125, months). The in hospital mortality rate was 10.2% (11/107), all of these cases from the debranching group and related to emergency procedures (p supra-aortic bypass surgery involves low complication rates and high mid-term bypass patency rates. It is a safe and feasible treatment option in the form of debranching in combination with endovascular aortic aneurysm repair and in AOD. Copyright © 2018 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Hepatic artery aneurysm repair: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaunoo SS

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hepatic artery aneurysms remain a clinically significant entity. Their incidence continues to rise slowly and mortality from spontaneous rupture is high. Repair is recommended in those aneurysms greater than 2 cm in diameter. It is not surprising that vascular comorbidities, such as ischaemic heart disease, are common in surgical patients, particularly those with arterial aneurysms such as these. The decision of when to operate on patients who require urgent surgery despite having recently suffered an acute coronary syndrome remains somewhat of a grey and controversial area. We discuss the role of delayed surgery and postoperative followup of this vascular problem. Case presentation A 58-year-old man was admitted with a 5.5 cm hepatic artery aneurysm. The aneurysm was asymptomatic and was an incidental finding as a result of an abdominal computed tomography scan to investigate an episode of haemoptysis (Figure 1. Three weeks prior to admission, the patient had suffered a large inferior myocardial infarction and was treated by thrombolysis and primary coronary angioplasty. Angiographic assessment revealed a large aneurysm of the common hepatic artery involving the origins of the hepatic, gastroduodenal, left and right gastric arteries and the splenic artery (Figures 2 and 3. Endovascular treatment was not considered feasible and immediate surgery was too high-risk in the early post-infarction period. Therefore, surgery was delayed for 3 months when aneurysm repair with reconstruction of the hepatic artery was successfully performed. Graft patency was confirmed with the aid of an abdominal arterial duplex. Plasma levels of conventional liver function enzymes and of alpha-glutathione-S-transferase were within normal limits. This was used to assess the extent of any hepatocellular damage perioperatively. The patient made a good recovery and was well at his routine outpatient check-ups. Conclusion There is no significant

  20. MULTIDETECTOR COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY FOR IDENTIFICATION OF INSTABILITY OF AORTIC ANEURYSM WALL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Vishnyakova Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aortic aneurysm is characterized by high incidence, polymorphic clinical features and sudden onset of severe complications.Aim: To develop a standard multidetector computed tomography (MDCT protocol for aortic aneurysm examination and image analysis for detection the signs of aortic wall instability.Materials and methods: The data of 279 patients with aortic aneurysm who underwent MDCT examination during 2009–2014 was analyzed to identify aortic wall instability signs.Results: Complicated course of aortic aneurysm was observed in 100 cases (36%. The most common sign of aortic wall instability was aortic dissection. According to our results, a new definition of aortic aneurysm complications was elaborated. It included signs of aortic wall instability with incomplete and/or complete disruption of aortic wall layers. A scheme of the most common patterns of aortic wall abnormalities was proposed, allowing a radiologist to reach high accuracy in characterizing this pathology.Conclusion: A dedicated MDCT protocol for aortic aneurysm detection and image analysis can increase quality of radiologic assessment of aneurysm wall allowing to approach to the level of histological accuracy.

  1. Postoperative CT findings of aortic aneurysm and dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, Su Ok; Lee, Ghi Jai; Kim, Mi Young; Moon, Hi Eun; Shim, Jae Chan; Lee, Hong Sup; Kim, Ho Kyun; Han, Chang Yul

    1995-01-01

    To assess the postoperative CT findings of aortic aneurysms or dissections treared by resection-and graft replacement or continuous-suture graft-inclusion technique. We reviewed postoperative follow-up CT findings of 14 patients, 19 cases. There were 8 patients (10 cases) of aortic aneurysm and 6 patients (9 cases) of aortic dissection which involved the thoracic aorta in 9 patients (13 cases) and abdominal aorta in 5 patients (6 cases). The interval of follow-up after operation was from 9 days to 2 year 9 months. On CT scans, we analyzed the appearance of graft materials, differences of CT findings between two surgical techniques, and normal or abnormal postoperative CT findings. Most of grafts appeared as hyperdense ring on precontrast scan, and all of them were not separated from aortic lumen on postcontrast scan. On CT findings of patients who were operated by continuous-suture graft-inclusion technique, perigraft thrombus was concentrically located with sharp demarcation by native aortic wall and its density was homogeneous, but in cases of those operated by resection-and graft replacement, perigraft hematoma was eccentrically located with indistinct margin and its density was heterogeneous and native aortic wall could not be delineated. In patients without complication, perigraft thrombus or hematoma (15 cases), perigraft calcification (11 cases), residual intimal flap (6 cases), graft deformity (4 cases), perigraft air (2 cases) and reconstructed vessels (1 cases) were noted. And in one patient with complication, perigraft flow was noted with more increased perigraft hematoma. Precise knowledge of the differences of CT findings between two surgical techniques and normal postoperative CT findings is crucial to evaluated the postoperative CT findings in aortic aneurysm and dissection

  2. Preliminary ten year results from a randomised single centre mass screening trial for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Juul, Søren; Fasting, H

    2006-01-01

    At present, several regions and countries are considering screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). However, The Chichester Aneurysms Screening Trial has reported poor long term benefit of screening for AAA. We therefore supplement previously published data with a preliminary analysis...

  3. Endovascular Treatment of Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Short and Angulated Neck in High-Risk Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stylianos Koutsias

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA is an established alternative to open repair. However lifelong surveillance is still required to monitor endograft function and signal the need for secondary interventions (Hobo and Buth 2006. Aortic morphology, especially related to the proximal neck, often complicates the procedure or increases the risk for late device-related complications (Hobo et al. 2007 and Chisci et al. 2009. The definition of a short and angulated neck is based on length (60° (Hobo et al. 2007 and Chisci et al. 2009. A challenging neck also offers difficulties during open repairs (OR, necessitating extensive dissection with juxta- or suprarenal aortic cross-clamping. Patients with extensive aneurysmal disease typically have more comorbidities and may not tolerate extensive surgical trauma (Sarac et al. 2002. It is, therefore, unclear whether aneurysms with a challenging proximal neck should be offered EVAR or OR (Cox et al. 2006, Choke et al. 2006, Robbins et al. 2005, Sternbergh III et al. 2002, Dillavou et al. 2003, and Greenberg et al. 2003. In our case the insertion of a thoracic endograft followed by the placement of a bifurcated aortic endograft for the treatment of a very short and severely angulated neck proved to be feasible offering acceptable duration of aneurysm exclusion. This adds up to our armamentarium in the treatment of high-risk patients, and it should be considered in emergency cases when the fenestrated and branched endografts are not available.

  4. Repair of Multiple Subclavian and Axillary Artery Aneurysms in a 58-Year-Old Man with Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolapoglu, Ahmet; de la Cruz, Kim I; Preventza, Ourania; Coselli, Joseph S

    2016-10-01

    Dilation of the ascending aorta and aortic dissections are often seen in Marfan syndrome; however, true aneurysms of the subclavian and axillary arteries rarely seem to develop in patients who have this disease. We present the case of a 58-year-old man with Marfan syndrome who had undergone a Bentall procedure and thoracoabdominal aortic repair for an aortic dissection and who later developed multiple aneurysmal dilations of his right subclavian and axillary arteries. The aneurysms were successfully repaired by means of a surgical bypass technique in which a Dacron graft was placed between the carotid and brachial arteries. We also discuss our strategy for determining the optimal surgical approach in these patients.

  5. Endovascular Therapy of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Mid- and Long-Term Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubin, Klaus; Sodeck, Gottfried H.; Teufelsbauer, H.; Nowatschka, Bernd; Kretschmer, Georg; Lammer, Johannes; Schoder, Maria

    2008-01-01

    As an alternative to open aneurysm repair, emergency endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) has emerged as a promising technique for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) within the last decade. The aim of this retrospective study is to present early and late outcomes of patients treated with EVAR for rAAA. Twenty-two patients (5 women, 17 men; mean age, 74 years) underwent EVAR for rAAA between November 2000 and April 2006. Diagnostic multislice computed tomography angiography was performed prior to stent-graft repair to evaluate anatomical characteristics and for follow-up examinations. Periprocedural patient characteristics and technical settings were evaluated. Mortality rates, hospital stay, and early and late complications, within a mean follow-up time of 744 ± 480 days, were also assessed. Eight of 22 patients were hemodynamically unstable at admission. Stent-graft insertion was successful in all patients. The total early complication rate was 54%, resulting in a 30-day mortality rate of 23%. The median intensive care unit stay was 2 days (range, 2-48 days), and the median hospital stay was 16 days (range, 9-210 days). During the follow-up period, three patients suffered from stent-graft-related complications. The overall mortality rate in our study group was 36%. EVAR is an acceptable, minimally invasive treatment option in patients with acute rAAA, independent of the patient's general condition. Short- and long-term outcomes are definitely comparable to those with open surgical repair procedures

  6. Primary congenital abdominal aortic aneurysm: a case report with perinatal serial follow-up imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Im; Lee, Whal; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Sang Joon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Seoul (Korea); Seo, Jeong-Wook [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea)

    2008-11-15

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms in neonates and infants are rare and are usually associated with infection, vasculitis, connective tissue disorder, or iatrogenic trauma such as umbilical catheterization. An idiopathic congenital abdominal aortic aneurysm is the least common category and there are few descriptions of the imaging features. We present the antenatal and postnatal imaging findings of an idiopathic congenital abdominal aortic aneurysm including the findings on US, MRI and CT. (orig.)

  7. Vascular Rupture Caused by a Molding Balloon during Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hee Young; Do, Young Soo; Park, Hong Suk; Park, Kwang Bo; Kim, Young Wook; Kim, Dong Ik

    2011-01-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has been accepted as an alternative to traditional open surgery in selected patients. Despite the minimally invasiveness of this treatment, several complications may occur during or after EVAR. Complications include endoleak, aortic dissection, distal embolism, or iatrogenic injury to the access artery. However, there are few reports on the vascular rupture caused by a molding balloon during EVAR. We report two cases of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms complicated by procedure-related aortic or iliac artery rupture by the molding balloon during EVAR. In our cases, we observed suddenly abrupt increase of the diameter of the endograft during balloon inflation, because we inflated the balloon rapidly. In conclusion, careful attention must be paid during inflation of the molding balloon to prevent vascular rupture.

  8. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement and aortic valve repair in a patient with acromegaly and aortic root dilatation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Van Praet

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aortic regurgitation and dilatation of the aortic root and ascending aorta are severe complications of acromegaly. The current trend for management of an aortic root aneurysm is valve-sparing root replacement as well as restoring the diameter of the aortic sinotubular junction (STJ and annulus. Our case report supports the recommendation that in patients with acromegaly, severe aortic root involvement may indicate the need for surgery.

  9. Monozygotic twins with Marfan's syndrome and ascending aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redruello, Héctor Jorge; Cianciulli, Tomas Francisco; Rostello, Eduardo Fernandez; Recalde, Barbara; Lax, Jorge Alberto; Picone, Victorio Próspero; Belforte, Sandro Mario; Prezioso, Horacio Alberto

    2007-08-01

    Marfan's syndrome is a hereditary connective tissue disease, in which cardiovascular abnormalities (especially aortic root dilatation) are the most important cause of morbidity and mortality. In this report, we describe two 24-year-old twins, with a history of surgery for lens subluxation and severe cardiovascular manifestations secondary to Marfan's syndrome. One of the twins suffered a type A aortic dissection, which required replacement of the ascending aorta, and the other twin had an aneurysmal dilatation of the ascending aorta (46mm) and was prescribed medical treatment with atenolol and periodic controls to detect the presence of a critical diameter (50mm) that would indicate the need for prophylactic surgery.

  10. Statin use and rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wemmelund, H; Høgh, A; Hundborg, H H

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) is associated with high mortality. Research suggests that statins may reduce abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) growth and improve rAAA outcomes. However, the clinical impact of statins remains uncertain in relation to both the risk and prognosis...... of rAAA. METHODS: This nationwide, population-based, combined case-control and follow-up study included all patients (aged at least 50 years) with a first-time hospital admission for rAAA and 1:1 matched AAA controls without rupture in Denmark from 1996 to 2008. Individual-level data on preadmission...... drug use, co-morbidities, socioeconomic markers, healthcare contacts and death were obtained from Danish nationwide registries. RESULTS: The study included 3584 cases and 3584 matched controls. Current statin use was registered for 418 patients with rAAA (11.7 per cent) and 539 AAA controls (15.0 per...

  11. Hospital costs and benefits of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms. Results from a randomised population screening trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Juul, Søren; Fasting, H

    2002-01-01

    to analyse the hospital costs and benefits of screening older males for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). MATERIALS and......to analyse the hospital costs and benefits of screening older males for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). MATERIALS and...

  12. Rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm into sigmoid colon: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Murat; Yanar, Hakan; Taviloglu, Korhan; Ertekin, Cemalettin; Ayalp, Kemal; Yanar, Fatih; Guloglu, Recep; Kurtoglu, Mehmet

    2006-01-01

    Primary aorto-colic fistula is rarely reported in the literature. Although infrequently encountered, it is an important complication since it is usually fatal unless detected. Primary aorto-colic fistula is a spontaneous rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm into the lumen of the adjacent colon loop. Here we report a case of primary aorto-colic fistula in a 54-year old male. The fistulated sigmoid colon was repaired by end-to-end anastomosis. Despite inotropic support, the patient died of sepsis and multiorgan failure on the first postoperative day. PMID:17167850

  13. Endovascular Treatment of Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms with the EndoFit Stent-Graft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saratzis, N.; Saratzis, Athanasios; Melas, N.; Ginis, G.; Lioupis, A.; Lykopoulos, D.; Lazaridis, J.; Kiskinis, Dimitrios

    2007-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the mid-term feasibility, efficacy, and durability of descending thoracic aortic aneurysm (DTAA) exclusion using the EndoFit device (LeMaitre Vascular). Methods. Twenty-three (23) men (mean age 66 years) with a DTAA were admitted to our department for endovascular repair (21 were ASA III+ and 2 refused open repair) from January 2003 to July 2005. Results. Complete aneurysm exclusion was feasible in all subjects (100% technical success). The median follow-up was 18 months (range 8-40 months). A single stent-graft was used in 6 cases. The deployment of a second stent-graft was required in the remaining 17 patients. All endografts were attached proximally, beyond the left subclavian artery, leaving the aortic arch branches intact. No procedure-related deaths have occurred. A distal type I endoleak was detected in 2 cases on the 1 month follow-up CT scan, and was repaired with reintervention and deployment of an extension graft. A nonfatal acute myocardial infarction occurred in 1 patient in the sixth postoperative month. Graft migration, graft infection, paraplegia, cerebral or distal embolization, renal impairment or any other major complications were not observed. Conclusion. The treatment of DTAAs using the EndoFit stent-graft is technically feasible. Mid-term results in this series are promising

  14. Plasma levels of plasmin-antiplasmin-complexes are predictive for small abdominal aortic aneurysms expanding to operation-recommendable sizes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Jørgensen, B; Fasting, H

    2001-01-01

    Three proteolytic systems seem involved in the aneurysmal degradation of the aortic wall. Plasmin is a common activator of the systems and could thus be predictive for the progression of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs).......Three proteolytic systems seem involved in the aneurysmal degradation of the aortic wall. Plasmin is a common activator of the systems and could thus be predictive for the progression of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs)....

  15. Flow and wall shear stress characterization after endovascular aneurysm repair and endovascular aneurysm sealing in an infrarenal aneurysm model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersen, Johannes T; Groot Jebbink, Erik; Versluis, Michel; Slump, Cornelis H; Ku, David N; de Vries, Jean-Paul P M; Reijnen, Michel M P J

    2017-12-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) with a modular endograft has become the preferred treatment for abdominal aortic aneurysms. A novel concept is endovascular aneurysm sealing (EVAS), consisting of dual endoframes surrounded by polymer-filled endobags. This dual-lumen configuration is different from a bifurcation with a tapered trajectory of the flow lumen into the two limbs and may induce unfavorable flow conditions. These include low and oscillatory wall shear stress (WSS), linked to atherosclerosis, and high shear rates that may result in thrombosis. An in vitro study was performed to assess the impact of EVAR and EVAS on flow patterns and WSS. Four abdominal aortic aneurysm phantoms were constructed, including three stented models, to study the influence of the flow divider on flow (Endurant [Medtronic, Minneapolis, Minn], AFX [Endologix, Irvine, Calif], and Nellix [Endologix]). Experimental models were tested under physiologic resting conditions, and flow was visualized with laser particle imaging velocimetry, quantified by shear rate, WSS, and oscillatory shear index (OSI) in the suprarenal aorta, renal artery (RA), and common iliac artery. WSS and OSI were comparable for all models in the suprarenal aorta. The RA flow profile in the EVAR models was comparable to the control, but a region of lower WSS was observed on the caudal wall compared with the control. The EVAS model showed a stronger jet flow with a higher shear rate in some regions compared with the other models. Small regions of low WSS and high OSI were found near the distal end of all stents in the common iliac artery compared with the control. Maximum shear rates in each region of interest were well below the pathologic threshold for acute thrombosis. The different stent designs do not influence suprarenal flow. Lower WSS is observed in the caudal wall of the RA after EVAR and a higher shear rate after EVAS. All stented models have a small region of low WSS and high OSI near the distal outflow

  16. Natural history of abdominal aortic aneurysm with and without coexisting chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Heickendorff, Lene; Antonsen, Sebastian

    1998-01-01

    To study the relation between abdominal aortic aneurysms and chronical obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), in particular the suggested common elastin degradation caused by elastase and smoking.......To study the relation between abdominal aortic aneurysms and chronical obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), in particular the suggested common elastin degradation caused by elastase and smoking....

  17. Rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm in a young man with Marfan Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Maria Weinkouff; Huynh, Khiem Dinh; Baandrup, Ulrik Thorngren

    2018-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms are very rare in Marfan syndrome. We present a case with a young non-smoking and normotensive male with Marfan syndrome, who developed an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm that presented with rupture to the retroperitoneal cavity causing life-threatening bleeding shock...

  18. Identification of peroxiredoxin-1 as a novel biomarker of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez-Pinna, Roxana; Ramos-Mozo, Priscila; Madrigal-Matute, Julio

    2011-01-01

    In the search of novel biomarkers of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) progression, proteins released by intraluminal thrombus (ILT) were analyzed by a differential proteomic approach.......In the search of novel biomarkers of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) progression, proteins released by intraluminal thrombus (ILT) were analyzed by a differential proteomic approach....

  19. Infective Endocarditis of the Aortic Valve with Anterior Mitral Valve Leaflet Aneurysm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomsic, Anton; Li, Wilson W. L.; van Paridon, Marieke; Bindraban, Navin R.; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Mitral valve leaflet aneurysm is a rare and potentially devastating complication of aortic valve endocarditis. We report the case of a 48-year-old man who had endocarditis of the native aortic valve and a concomitant aneurysm of the anterior mitral valve leaflet. Severe mitral regurgitation occurred

  20. Risk stratification of aortic aneurysms : Predictors of natural and clinical course

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlösser, F.J.V.

    2008-01-01

    Rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a dramatic and often fatal process with an overall risk of mortality that ranges from 79 to 94%. The risk of AAA rupture increases strongly with increasing diameter of the AAA. Approximately 14,000 persons die each year due to aortic aneurysm rupture

  1. The validity of ultrasonographic scanning as screening method for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Vammen, Sten; Juul, Søren

    1999-01-01

    the sensitivity and specificity of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) with ultrasonographic scanning (US) is unknown. The aim of the study was to validate US as screening test for AAAs.......the sensitivity and specificity of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) with ultrasonographic scanning (US) is unknown. The aim of the study was to validate US as screening test for AAAs....

  2. Wall stress analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysms using 3D ultrasound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, A. M.; Nguyen, V.L.; Speelman, L.; Schurink, G.W.H.; van de Vosse, F.N.; Lopata, R.G.P.

    2014-01-01

    Wall stress analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysms is a novel tool that has proven high potential to improve risk stratification of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Wall stress analysis is based on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging, however, 3D ultrasound (US) has not been

  3. Critical role of mast cell chymase in mouse abdominal aortic aneurysm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, J; Zhang, J; Lindholt, Jes S.

    2009-01-01

    Mast cell chymase may participate in the pathogenesis of human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), yet a direct contribution of this serine protease to AAA formation remains unknown.......Mast cell chymase may participate in the pathogenesis of human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), yet a direct contribution of this serine protease to AAA formation remains unknown....

  4. A case of megadolichobasilar anomaly complicated with abdominal aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Sumio; Yamaguchi, Takenori; Ogata, Jun; Ito, Mamoru; Kikuchi, Haruhiko

    1985-01-01

    A 41 year-old hypertensive male was admitted because of progressing left hemiparesis and dysarthria. CT demonstrated hyperdense mass with partial contast enhancement, extending from the level of lower pons to that of suprasellar cistern. Reconstructed imaging of CT showed a huge mass lesion, in which a wide curvilinear hyperdensity was demonstrated by contrast enhancement. Cerebral angiography revealed markedly elongated and dilated basilar and carotid arteries. From these findings, the prepontine hyperdense mass lesion was diagnosed as megadolichobasilar anomaly with marked wall thickening. Findings of abdominal aortic angiography and abdominal CT suggested the presence of marked atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysm with mural thrombi. Six months after initial admission, neurological symptoms gradually deteriorated and CT showed dilatation of the 3rd and lateral ventricles, suggesting the development of hydrocephalus due to compression of the aqueduct by the megadolichobasilar anomaly. Magnetic resonance imaging at this time demonstrated more details of the lesion and the deformity of the brain stem, which was not detected by conventional CT. Complications of vascular anomalies other than intracranial vasculature, such as aortic aneurysm, have also been repoted. After the introduction of CT, demonstration of a long, wide, curvilinear structure with abnormal density in the prepontine region has been reported to be diagnostic for the megadolichobasilar anomaly. This patient has had hypertension for 10 years, which probably due to chronic nephritis. He had no definite findings for angitis, but had abdominal aortic aneurysm with mural thrombi. From these findings, atherosclerosis of large vessels may have played one of the roles in the pathogenesis of this anomaly in the present case. (J.P.N.)

  5. Familial Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm with Dissection Presenting as Flash Pulmonary Edema in a 26-Year-Old Man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabry Omar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We are reporting a case of familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection in a 26-year-old man with no significant past medical history and a family history of dissecting aortic aneurysm in his mother at the age of 40. The patient presented with cough, shortness of breath, and chest pain. Chest X-ray showed bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. CT scan of the chest showed a dissection of the ascending aorta. The patient underwent aortic dissection repair and three months later he returned to our hospital with new complaints of back pain. CT angiography showed a new aortic dissection extending from the left carotid artery through the bifurcation and into the iliac arteries. The patient underwent replacement of the aortic root, ascending aorta, total aortic arch, and aortic valve. The patient recovered well postoperatively. Genetic studies of the patient and his children revealed no mutations in ACTA2, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, TGFB2, MYH11, MYLK, SMAD3, or FBN1. This case report focuses on a patient with familial TAAD and discusses the associated genetic loci and available screening methods. It is important to recognize potential cases of familial TAAD and understand the available screening methods since early diagnosis allows appropriate management of risk factors and treatment when necessary.

  6. Aortic aneurysm disease vs. aortic occlusive disease - differences in outcome and intensive care resource utilisation after elective surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Jannie; Gilsaa, Torben; Rønholm, Ebbe

    2013-01-01

    clamping is more pronounced in patients with aortic aneurysm disease, which may affect outcome. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this observational cohort study was to evaluate outcome after open elective abdominal aortic surgery, hypothesising a higher 30-day mortality, a higher incidence of postoperative organ...... dysfunction and a longer length of stay in patients with aortic aneurysm compared with aortic occlusive disease. DESIGN: Cohort observational study based on prospective registrations from national databases. SETTING: Eight Danish hospitals, including four university and four non-university centres, from 1...... or inotropes, ICU stay more than 24 h, hospital length of stay and mortality. RESULTS: Compared with aortic occlusive disease, more patients with aortic aneurysm disease had ICU stays more than 24 h (62 vs. 45%, P ...

  7. Impact of Discordant Views in the Management of Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Peter; Sailer, Anna-Margaretha; Baiocchi, Michael; Goldstone, Andrew B; Schaffer, Justin M; Trojan, Jeff; Fleischmann, Dominik; Mitchell, R Scott; Miller, D Craig; Dake, Michael D; Woo, Y Joseph; Lee, Jason T; Fischbein, Michael P

    2017-01-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair has a lower perceived risk than open surgical repair and has become an increasingly popular alternative. Whether general consensus exists regarding candidacy for either operation among open and endovascular specialists is unknown. A retrospective review of isolated descending thoracic aortic aneurysm at our institution between January 2005 and October 2015 was performed, excluding trauma and dissection. Two cardiac surgeons, 2 cardiovascular surgeons, 1 vascular surgeon, and 1 interventional radiologist gave their preference for open vs endovascular repair. Interobserver agreement was assessed with the kappa coefficient. k-means clustering agnostically grouped various patterns of agreement. The mean rating was predicted using least absolute shrinkage and selection operator regression. Negative binomial regression predicted the discrepancy between our panel of raters and the historical operation. Generalized estimating equation modeling was then used to evaluate the association between the extent of discrepancy and the adverse perioperative outcome. There were 77 patients with preoperative imaging studies. Pairwise interobserver agreement was only fair (median weighted kappa 0.270 [interquartile range 0.211-0.404]). Increasing age and proximal neck length predicted an increasing preference for thoracic endovascular aortic repair in our panel; larger proximal neck diameter predicted a general preference for open surgical repair. Increasing proximal neck diameter predicted a larger discrepancy between our panel and the historical operation. Greater discrepancy was associated with adverse outcome. Substantial disagreement existed among our panel, and an exploratory analysis of the effect of increasing discrepancy demonstrated an association with adverse perioperative outcome. An investigation of the effect of a thoracic aortic team with open and endovascular specialists is warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  8. Thoracic aortic aneurysm: A rare cause of elevated hemidiaphragm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Arshad Ejazi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Phrenic nerve palsy causing hemidiaphragm paralysis is a very uncommon feature of thoracic aortic aneurysm. In one case, a 30 year male complained of chronic dull aching chest pain, and hoarseness of voice; posteroanterior view chest radiograph revealed large spherical radiopacity on the left upper lung zone with smooth lobulated margin with elevated left hemidiaphragm. On Colour Doppler sonography, lesion was anechoic on gray scale sonography but on Doppler analysis revealed intense internal vascularity within it with characteristic "Ying Yang" sign. The finding favor the vascular origin of the lesion and a diagnosis of an arterial aneurysm was made Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT of the thorax revealed a large well defined spherical lesion of 8 × 10 cm size with smooth well defined margin arising from the aortic arch and attenuation of impending rupture or dissection were lesion on immediate post contrast and delayed scan was similar to that of aorta. Left hemidiaphragm elevation was explained by the gross mass effect of the aneurysm causing right phrenic nerve palsy.

  9. Multiple Re-entry Closures After TEVAR for Ruptured Chronic Post-dissection Thoraco-abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kinoshita

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR has become a promising treatment for complicated acute type B dissection, its role in treating chronic post-dissection thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysm (TAA is still limited owing to persistent retrograde flow into the false lumen (FL through abdominal or iliac re-entry tears. Report: A case of chronic post-dissection TAA treatment, in which a dilated descending FL ruptured into the left thorax, is described. The primary entry tear was closed by emergency TEVAR and multiple abdominal re-entries were closed by EVAR. In addition, major re-entries at the detached right renal artery and iliac bifurcation were closed using covered stents. To close re-entries as far as possible, EVAR was carried out using the chimney technique, and additional aortic extenders were placed above the coeliac artery. A few re-entries remained, but complete FL thrombosis of the rupture site was achieved. Follow-up computed tomography showed significant shrinkage of the FL. Discussion: In treating post-dissection TAA, entry closure by TEVAR is sometimes insufficient, owing to persistent retrograde flow into the FL from abdominal or iliac re-entries. Adjunctive techniques are needed to close these distal re-entries to obtain complete FL exclusion, especially in rupture cases. Recently, encouraging results of complete coverage of the thoraco-abdominal aorta with fenestrated or branched endografts have been reported; however, the widespread employment of such techniques appears to be limited owing to technical difficulties. The present method with multiple re-entry closures using off the shelf and immediately available devices is an alternative for the endovascular treatment of post-dissection TAA, especially in the emergency setting. Keywords: Aortic dissection, Ruptured aortic aneurysm, Post-dissection thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm, Endovascular aortic repair, Reentry closure, Endovascular procedures

  10. Resolved Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Following Stent Graft Treatment: A Report of Five Cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimon, Uri; Garniek, Alexander; Golan, Gil; Bensaid, Paul; Galili, Yair; Schneiderman, Jacob; Morag, Benyamina

    2004-01-01

    Complete aneurysm resolution is the hallmark of successful endoluminal stent-graft treatment. We describe 5 patients in whom an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) disappeared completely at mid-term follow-up after endovascular stent-graft placement. We reviewed 45 patients (43 men and 2 women) who underwent AAA repair using an endovascular technique, from April 1997 to December 2001. Mean AAA diameter was 58.3 mm. On 48-month follow-up, 12 aneurysms had not changed in size, 4 had grown, 16 had shrunk, and 5 had resolved completely. We describe these 5 patients in detail. The 5 patients were all men, mean age 68 years; their mean aneurysmal sac diameter was 54 mm. The only common finding in all of them was patency of lumbar and inferior mesenteric arteries at pre-procedure evaluation as well as at follow-up. Mean time to complete resolution was 18 months. No major complications were encountered. AAA may resolve completely after endovascular stent-graft implantation. Patent side branches may perhaps contribute to AAA disappearance by antegrade flow. A larger patient population should be reviewed, however, before any statistical conclusion can be drawn

  11. Intensive Care Management of Thoracic Aortic Surgical Patients, Including Thoracic and Infradiaphragmatic Endovascular Repair (EVAR/TEVAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Sheela Pai

    2015-12-01

    The patient with thoracic aortic disease can present for open or endovascular repair. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has emerged as a minimally invasive option for a multitude of aortic pathology, including dissections, aneurysms, traumatic injuries, and ulcers. Postoperative management of these patients depends on the extent of procedure, whether it was open or endovascular, and, finally, on the preoperative comorbidities present. While procedural success has catapulted TEVAR to popularity, midterm results have been mixed. Additionally, periprocedural complications such as paraplegia and renal failure remain a significant morbidity in these patients. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Endovascular treatment of false-aneurysm ten years after dacron patch aortoplasty for coarctation of the aortic isthmus. Report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, Giulio; Pacilè, Maria Antonietta; Palumbo, Piergaspare; Salvatori, Filippo Maria; Vietri, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    False aneurysm degeneration is a known complication of patch aortoplasty for coarctation of the aortic isthmus. Open surgical treatment consists of prosthetic graft repair of the involved aorta, often requires circulatory arrest to achieve a safe proximal aortic control and perform proximal anastomosis, and finally is associated with substantial perioperative morbidity. Endografting of the diseased aorta is a valuable alternative to open repair, when feasible, with good short and long term results. We now report one more case of false aneurysm ten years after Dacron patch aortoplasty for isthmic coarctation in a 26-year-old woman, successfully treated by endovascular repair via the left common iliac artery, and a complete exclusion of the aneurysm at two year follow-up.

  13. Influence of endoleaks on aneurysm volume and hemodynamics after endovascular aneurysm repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitton, M.B.; Welter, B.; Schmenger, P.; Thelen, M.; Dueber, C.; Neufang, A.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the aneurysm volume and the intra-aneurysmatic pressure and maximal pressure pulse (dp/dtmax) in completely excluded aneurysms and cases with endoleaks. Materials and Methods: In 36 mongrel dogs, experimental autologous aneurysms were treated with stent-grafts. All aortic side branches were ligated in 18 cases (group I) but were preserved in group II (n=18). Aneurysm volumes were calculated from CT scans before and after intervention, and from follow-up CT scans at 1 week, 6 weeks and 6 months. Finally, for hemodynamic measurements, manometer-tipped catheters were introduced into the excluded aneurysm sac (group I and II), selectively in endoleaks (group II), and intraluminally for aortic reference measurement. Systemic hypertension was induced by volume load and pharmacologic stress. Pressure curves and dp/dt were simultaneously recorded and the ratios of aneurysm pressure to systemic reference pressure calculated. Results: At follow-up, type-II, endoleaks were excluded in all cases of group I by selective angiography. In contrast, endoleaks were evident in all cases of group II. Volumetric analysis of the aneurysms showed a benefit for group I with an improved aneurysm shrinkage: ΔVolume +0.08%, -1.62% and -9.76% at 1 week, 6 weeks and 6 months follow-up (median, group I), compared to +1.43%, +0.67%, and -4.04% (group II), p [de

  14. Aortic aneurysm in a 74-year-old man with coronary disease and obstructive lung disease: is double jeopardy enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, M D; Eckman, M H; Pauker, S G

    1989-01-01

    A previous decision analysis examined a patient with severe CAD, diminished ventricular function, and an abdominal aortic aneurysm and also concluded that CABG followed by aneurysm repair was optimal. This patient, who had well-preserved cardiac function but severely compromised pulmonary status, stood to gain less from CABG than would a patient with more severe coronary disease, thus accounting for the "close-call" between the CABG-AAA and AAA only strategies. Nevertheless, the analysis did emphasize the benefit of aneurysm repair, whether done alone or after CABG. The analysis also highlighted the significant risk of aneurysm rupture the patient is exposed to while recovering from CABG surgery. The operative mortality risks of the two procedures are similar; thus, the patient's total operative risk is approximately doubled if he undergoes both procedures rather than aneurysm repair alone. The key question raised by the analysis is whether this double jeopardy is more than compensated by the degree to which prior CABG reduces both short-term cardiac risk at subsequent aneurysm repair and long-term cardiac mortality. For this patient, who had good cardiac function, the gains appeared sufficient to offset the interval risk of aneurysm rupture and the additional risk associated with a surgical procedures. THE REAL WORLD The patient indeed underwent and tolerated CABG, although he had a stormy prolonged postoperative course due to pulmonary failure. After discharge from the hospital, he declined readmission for repair of the aneurysm. We did not model that possibility, clearly an inadequacy in our tree. Some six months later, the patient was still alive and was, reluctantly, readmitted for aneurysmorrhaphy. At that time, however, his pulmonary function had deteriorated and both the anesthesiologist and the pulmonary consultant stated unequivocally that further surgery was now impossible. In retrospect, the expected utility of CABG without aneurysm repair (thus

  15. Renal failure after operation for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, P S; Schroeder, T; Perko, M

    1990-01-01

    Among 656 patients undergoing surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm, 81 patients (12%) developed postoperative renal failure. Before operation hypotension and shock occurred in 88% of the patients with ruptured aneurysm, whereas none of the patients operated electively were hypotensive. Dialysis...... was performed in 32 patients, while the remaining 49 patients were managed without dialysis. Within 30 days after the operation 47 patients (58%) had died. There was no difference in mortality between patients in dialysis and patients managed without dialysis. Thirteen patients died during follow-up. In six...... cases the death was caused by renal failure only or in combination with failure of other organs. Analysis of the cumulative survival shows that, if the patients survive the postoperative period, their life expectancy is comparable to that of patients without renal complications....

  16. Extending Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Detection to Older Age Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makrygiannis, Georgios; Labalue, Philippe; Erpicum, Marie

    2016-01-01

    . Current screening policies (e.g., men aged 65-74 years), however, do not account for aging and increased life expectancy of Western populations. This study investigated AAA detection by extending the target population to older age groups (75-85 years). METHODS: AAA screening was conducted in the County......-74 age group but rose to 7.3% in the age-extended group (75-85 years). Further in addition to age, height, current smoking, history of coronary artery disease, hypercholesterolemia, peripheral artery disease of the lower limbs, and varicose veins were significantly associated with the presence of AAA......BACKGROUND: There is evident benefit in terms of reduced aneurysm-related mortality from screening programs of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in men aged 65 years and more. Recent studies in the United Kingdom and Sweden have shown a decline of the prevalence of AAA in the general population...

  17. The pathogenesis shared between abdominal aortic aneurysms and intracranial aneurysms: a microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen; Li, Hao; Zhao, Zheng; Wang, Haoyuan; Zhang, Dong; Zhang, Yan; Lan, Qing; Wang, Jiangfei; Cao, Yong; Zhao, Jizong

    2018-04-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) and intracranial saccular aneurysms (IAs) are the most common types of aneurysms. This study was to investigate the common pathogenesis shared between these two kinds of aneurysms. We collected 12 IAs samples and 12 control arteries from the Beijing Tiantan Hospital and performed microarray analysis. In addition, we utilized the microarray datasets of IAs and AAAs from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), in combination with our microarray results, to generate messenger RNA expression profiles for both AAAs and IAs in our study. Functional exploration and protein-protein interaction (PPI) analysis were performed. A total of 727 common genes were differentially expressed (404 was upregulated; 323 was downregulated) for both AAAs and IAs. The GO and pathway analyses showed that the common dysregulated genes were mainly enriched in vascular smooth muscle contraction, muscle contraction, immune response, defense response, cell activation, IL-6 signaling and chemokine signaling pathways, etc. The further protein-protein analysis identified 35 hub nodes, including TNF, IL6, MAPK13, and CCL5. These hub node genes were enriched in inflammatory response, positive regulation of IL-6 production, chemokine signaling pathway, and T/B cell receptor signaling pathway. Our study will gain new insight into the molecular mechanisms for the pathogenesis of both types of aneurysms and provide new therapeutic targets for the patients harboring AAAs and IAs.

  18. Case report and review of the literature total endovascular repair of acute ascending aortic rupture: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallum, John C; Limmer, Karl K; Perricone, Anthony; Bandyk, Dennis; Kansal, Nikhil

    2013-07-01

    Thoracic aortic endografting has been successfully implemented to treat aneurysmal disease of the distal aortic arch and descending thoracic aorta. Although there are reports of ascending aortic endovascular interventions, the total endovascular repair of a ruptured ascending aorta secondary to a Type A dissection has not been described. We report the case of a 77-year-old patient who presented with a ruptured ascending aortic aneurysm secondary to degeneration of a Stanford type A aortic dissection. His surgical history was significant for orthotropic heart transplant 19 years prior. The dissection, aneurysm, and rupture occurred in the native aorta distal to the ascending aortic suture line. At presentation, he was hemodynamically unstable with a right hemothorax. We placed 3 Medtronic Talent Thoracic Stent Graft devices (Medtronic Inc, Minneapolis, MN) across the suture line in the ascending aorta, excluding the rupture. The patient survived and has been followed to 25 months.

  19. Total Percutaneous Aortic Repair: Midterm Outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bent, Clare L.; Fotiadis, Nikolas; Renfrew, Ian; Walsh, Michael; Brohi, Karim; Kyriakides, Constantinos; Matson, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the immediate and midterm outcomes of percutaneous endovascular repair of thoracic and abdominal aortic pathology. Between December 2003 and June 2005, 21 patients (mean age: 60.4 ± 17.1 years; 15 males, 6 females) underwent endovascular stent-graft insertion for thoracic (n = 13) or abdominal aortic (n = 8) pathology. Preprocedural computed tomographic angiography (CTA) was performed to assess the suitability of aorto-iliac and common femoral artery (CFA) anatomy, including the degree of CFA calcification, for total percutaneous aortic stent-graft repair. Percutaneous access was used for the introduction of 18- to 26-Fr delivery devices. A 'preclose' closure technique using two Perclose suture devices (Perclose A-T; Abbott Vascular) was used in all cases. Data were prospectively collected. Each CFA puncture site was assessed via clinical examination and CTA at 1, 6, and 12 months, followed by annual review thereafter. Minimum follow-up was 36 months. Outcome measures evaluated were rates of technical success, conversion to open surgical repair, complications, and late incidence of arterial stenosis at the site of Perclose suture deployment. A total of 58 Perclose devices were used to close 29 femoral arteriotomies. Outer diameters of stent-graft delivery devices used were 18 Fr (n = 5), 20 Fr (n = 3), 22 Fr (n = 4), 24 Fr (n = 15), and 26 Fr (n = 2). Percutaneous closure was successful in 96.6% (28/29) of arteriotomies. Conversion to surgical repair was required at one access site (3.4%). Mean follow-up was 50 ± 8 months. No late complications were observed. By CT criteria, no patient developed a >50% reduction in CFA caliber at the site of Perclose deployment during the study period. In conclusion, percutaneous aortic stent-graft insertion can be safely performed, with a low risk of both immediate and midterm access-related complications.

  20. Elective reconstruction of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm type IV by transabdominal approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjanović Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA type IV represents an aortic dilatation from the level of the diaphragmatic hiatus to the iliac arteries branches, including visceral branches of the aorta. In the traditional procedure of TAAA type IV repair, the body is opened using thoractomy and laparotomy in order to provide adequate exposure of the descending thoracic and abdominal aorta for safe aortic reconstruction. Case report. We reported a 71-yearold man with elective reconstruction of the TAAA type IV performed by transabdominal approach. Computed tomography scans angiography revealed a TAAA type IV with diameter of 62 mm in the region of celiac trunk and superior mesenteric artery branching, and the largest diameter of 75 mm in the infrarenal aortic level. The patient comorbidity included a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and hypertension, therefore he was treated for a prolonged period. In preparation for the planned aortic reconstruction asymptomatic carotid disease (occlusion of the left internal carotid artery and subtotal stenosis of the right internal carotid artery was diagnosed. Within the same intervention percutaneous transluminal angioplasty with stent placement in right internal carotid artery was made. In general, under endotracheal anesthesia and epidural analgesia, with transabdominal approach performed aortic reconstruction with tubular dakron graft 24 mm were, and reimplantation of visceral aortic branches into the graft performed. Postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged on the postoperative day 17. Control computed tomography scan angiography performed three months after the operation showed vascular state of the patient to be in order. Conclusion. Complete transabdominal approach to TAAA type IV represents an appropriate substitute for thoracoabdominal approach, without compromising safety of the patient. This approach is less traumatic, especially in patients with impaired

  1. Morphological risk factors of stroke during thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotelis, Drosos; Bischoff, Moritz S; Jobst, Bertram; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Hinz, Ulf; Geisbüsch, Philipp; Böckler, Dittmar

    2012-12-01

    This study aims to identify independent factors correlating to an increased risk of perioperative stroke during thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). A prospective maintained TEVAR database, medical records, and imaging studies of 300 patients (205 men; median age of all, 66 years, range 21-89), who underwent TEVAR between March 1997 and February 2011, were reviewed. Preoperative CT data sets were reviewed by two experienced radiologists with focus on the atheroma burden in the aortic arch (grade I, normal, to grade V, ulcerated or pedunculated atheroma). Aortic arch geometry (arch types I-III) was documented. Further parameters included in the univariate analysis were age, gender, urgency of repair, duration of procedure, adenosine-induced cardiac arrest or rapid pacing, proximal landing zone, left subclavian artery (LSA) coverage, and number of stent grafts. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the independent correlations of potential risk factors. Atherosclerotic aneurysm was the most common pathology (44%). One hundred and fifty-four of our patients (51%) were treated under urgent or emergent conditions. Seventeen percent of all patients had significant arch atheroma (grade IV or V), and 43% had a steep type III aortic arch. The perioperative stroke was 4% (12 patients; median age, 73 years, range 31-78). Two strokes were lethal (0.7%). All strokes were classified as embolic based on imaging characteristics. In eight patients, strokes were located in the left cerebral hemisphere (seven of them in the anterior and one in the posterior circulation). Four stroke patients (one in the left posterior circulation) underwent LSA coverage without revascularization. Three stroke patients had severe arch atheroma grade V. Five patients suffering stroke were recognized to have a type III aortic arch. Strokes were equally distributed between zones 0-2 vs. 3-4 (n = 6 each, 5 vs. 3.3%). The highest incidence was found in zone 1 (11

  2. Plasma cytokine levels and risks of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liao, Mengyang; Liu, Cong-Lin; Lv, Bing-Jie

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is characterized by inflammatory cell accumulation in AAA lesions that produce inflammatory cytokines and advance its pathogenesis. Peripheral cytokines may predict the degree or risk of AAA. METHODS AND RESULTS: ELISA determined plasma interleukin-6 (IL6......), IL10, IL17A, IFN-γ, and C-reactive protein (CRP) from 476 AAA patients and 200 controls. AAA patients had lower IL6, IFN-γ, IL10, IL17A, and higher CRP than controls. IL10 correlated positively with IFN-γ, IL17A, or IL6, but not CRP in control or AAA populations. IL10 associated negatively...... with systolic blood pressure, whereas CRP associated positively with diastolic blood pressure and body mass index. CRP was an independent AAA risk factor and correlated positively with aortic diameters before and after adjustments for other risk factors. IFN-γ, IL17A, and CRP correlated positively with cross...

  3. Assessing the potential risk of rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, S.; Verma, V.; Verma, S.; Polzer, S.; Jha, S.

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) involve complex interplays between inflammatory and biomechanical factors that can be elucidated with anatomical and functional imaging. Although AAA size has been well-established in the literature to correlate with risk of rupture (and subsequent need for vascular intervention), there are other less-well-known characteristics about AAAs that also contribute to higher risk of rupture. This review focuses on biomechanical, radiological, and epidemiological characteristics of AAAs that are associated with higher rupture risk. For clinicians, knowing and considering a wide variety of risk factors in addition to AAA size is important to initiate early and proper intervention for AAA repair. Although there is no official quantitative risk score of AAA rupture risk that takes other non-size-related variables into account, if clinicians are aware of these other parameters, it is hoped that intervention can be appropriately performed for higher-risk AAAs that have not met the size-threshold for elective repair

  4. Locally Different Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Protein Levels in Ascending Aortic Aneurysms of Bicuspid and Tricuspid Aortic Valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah A. Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. Dysregulated expression of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS is observed in aortic aneurysms associated with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV. We determined eNOS protein levels in various areas in ascending aortic aneurysms. Methods and Results. Aneurysmal specimens were collected from 19 patients, 14 with BAV and 5 with tricuspid aortic valve (TAV. ENOS protein levels were measured in the outer curve (convexity, the opposite side (concavity, the distal and above the sinotubular junction (proximal aneurysm. Cultured aortic cells were treated with NO synthesis inhibitor L-NAME and the amounts of 35 apoptosis-related proteins were determined. In patients with BAV, eNOS levels were significantly lower in the proximal aorta than in the concavity and distal aorta. ENOS protein levels were also lower in the convexity than in the concavity. While the convexity and distal aorta showed similar eNOS protein levels in BAV and TAV patients, levels were higher in TAV proximal aorta. Inhibition of NO synthesis in aneurysmal aortic cells by L-NAME led to a cytosolic increase in the levels of mitochondrial serine protease HTRA2/Omi. Conclusion. ENOS protein levels were varied at different areas of the aneurysmal aorta. The dysregulation of nitric oxide can lead to an increase in proapoptotic HTRA2/Omi.

  5. Bentall procedure in ascending aortic aneurysm: hospital mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galicia-Tornell, Matilde Myriam; Marín-Solís, Bertha; Fuentes-Orozco, Clotilde; Martínez-Martínez, Manuel; Villalpando-Mendoza, Esteban; Ramírez-Orozco, Fermín

    2010-01-01

    Ascending aortic aneurysm disease (AAAD) shows a low frequency, heterogeneous behavior, high risk of rupture, dissection and mortality, making elective surgery necessary. Several procedures have been developed, and the Bentall technique is considered as the reference standard. The objective was to describe the hospital mortality of AAAD surgically treated using the Bentall procedure. We carried out a descriptive study. Included were 23 patients with AAAD who were operated on between March 1, 2005 and September 30, 2008 at our hospital. Data were obtained from clinical files, and descriptive statistics were selected for analysis. The study population was comprised of 23 patients with an average age of 46 years; 83% were males. Etiology was nonspecific degeneration of the middle layer with valve implication in 43%, bivalve aorta in 22%, Marfan syndrome, Turner's syndrome and poststenotic aneurysms each represented 9%, and Takayasu disease and ankylosing spondylitis 4% each. Associated heart disease was reported in six (26%) patients as follows: aortic coarctation (2), ischemic cardiopathy (1), atrial septal defect (1), severe mitral insufficiency (1) and subaortic membrane (1). Procedures carried out were Bentall surgery in 20 (87%) patients and aortoplasty with valve prosthesis in three (13%) patients. Complications reported were abnormal bleeding with mediastinal exploration (17%), nosocomial pneumonia (13%), arrhythmia (13%), and septic shock (9%). Mortality was reported in three (13%) patients due to septic shock and ventricular fibrillation. Surgical mortality with the Bentall procedure is similar to published results by other specialized centers. Events related to the basic aortic pathology, surgical technique, aortic valve prosthesis and left ventricular dysfunction encourage longterm studies with follow-up.

  6. Survival affects decision making for fenestrated and branched endovascular aortic repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Jocelyn M; Rajeswaran, Jeevanantham; Parodi, F Ezequiel; Kuramochi, Yuki; Brier, Corey; Blackstone, Eugene; Eagleton, Matthew J

    2018-03-01

    Repair options for complex abdominal and thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAAs) are evolving with increased experience and availability of less invasive endovascular techniques. Identifying risk factors for mortality after fenestrated and branched endovascular aortic repair (F/B-EVAR) could improve patient selection and facilitate decision making regarding who may benefit from prophylactic F/B-EVAR. We evaluated 1091 patients in a prospective investigational device exemption trial who underwent F/B-EVAR from August 2001 to June 2015 for complex aortic aneurysms (CAAs). Multivariable analysis of risk factors for death was performed using a nonproportional hazards model and a nonparametric analysis using random survival forest technology. Operative mortality after F/B-EVAR was low (3.7%), with high CAA-related survival at 30 day and 5 years (96.8% and 94.0%, respectively). All-cause 5-year survival, however, was 46.2% and older age, heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, renal disease, anemia, and coagulation disorders were risk factors. Risk was highest for those undergoing type I/II TAAA repairs and those with larger aneurysms. Patients with multiple comorbidities and those undergoing type I or II TAAA repair are at greatest risk of mortality; however, in this high-risk population, F/B-EVAR offers greater survival compared with that reported for the natural history of untreated aneurysms. Operative and early mortality is lower than the best-reported open repair outcomes, even in this high-risk population, suggesting a potential benefit in extending the use of F/B-EVAR to low-to-average risk CAA patients. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Endo-luminal grafting for treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Weiguo; Wang Yuqi; Chen Fuzhen; Ye Jianrong; Wang Jianhua; Yan Zhiping; Cheng Jiemin

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the preliminary clinical results of endovascular procedures for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) in a prospective study. Methods: Six patients (average age 70 years, range 56 to 78) with infrarenal AAA were enrolled in Shanghai Zhongshan hospital from February 1998 to February 1999. Computed tomography and angiography were done in every patient for measurement of the length, diameter, and angulation of the proximal and distal AAA necks, aneurysm sac, and common and external iliac arteries. The average diameter of the aneurysm was 6.3 cm (range 4.6 cm to 8.0 cm). The mean proximal neck diameter was 2.0 cm (range 1.8 cm to 2.2 cm) and proximal neck length was 3.0 cm (range 2.5 cm to 3.5 cm). All patients were treated with the endo-luminal grafting for exclusion of AAA. Results: Two tubular and 4 bifurcated endo-grafts were used. All endo-graft procedures were completed successfully. One patient died of renal failure 72 hours after the procedure because of the prolonged operative time and excessive contrast medium. Aortography after the procedure showed the AAA were excluded by endo-graft and no endo-leak in the proximal or distal connections was detected. The patients could take meal and were ambulatory on the first and second postoperative day, respectively. Clinical success (aneurysm exclusion with no death or endo-leak) at 30 days was 83.3%. In the 24 months follow-up in 5 cases, no migration, endo-leak, and increasing aneurysm size were detected with spiral CT or color Duplex ultrasound. Conclusion: Based on initial results and a short term mean follow-up period of 24 months, the endovascular treatment of AAA with stent-graft system is feasible and safe. Further study will be required to observe the long term result in the exclusion of AAA

  8. Strain measurement of abdominal aortic aneurysm with real-time 3D ultrasound speckle tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihari, P; Shelke, A; Nwe, T H; Mularczyk, M; Nelson, K; Schmandra, T; Knez, P; Schmitz-Rixen, T

    2013-04-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture is caused by mechanical vascular tissue failure. Although mechanical properties within the aneurysm vary, currently available ultrasound methods assess only one cross-sectional segment of the aorta. This study aims to establish real-time 3-dimensional (3D) speckle tracking ultrasound to explore local displacement and strain parameters of the whole abdominal aortic aneurysm. Validation was performed on a silicone aneurysm model, perfused in a pulsatile artificial circulatory system. Wall motion of the silicone model was measured simultaneously with a commercial real-time 3D speckle tracking ultrasound system and either with laser-scan micrometry or with video photogrammetry. After validation, 3D ultrasound data were collected from abdominal aortic aneurysms of five patients and displacement and strain parameters were analysed. Displacement parameters measured in vitro by 3D ultrasound and laser scan micrometer or video analysis were significantly correlated at pulse pressures between 40 and 80 mmHg. Strong local differences in displacement and strain were identified within the aortic aneurysms of patients. Local wall strain of the whole abdominal aortic aneurysm can be analysed in vivo with real-time 3D ultrasound speckle tracking imaging, offering the prospect of individual non-invasive rupture risk analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysms. Copyright © 2013 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Transluminal endovascular stent-graft for the treatment of aortic aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Do Yun; Chang, Byung Chul; Shim, Won Heum; Cho, Seung Yun; Chung, Nam Sik; Kwon, Hyuk Moon; Lee, Young Joon; Lee, Jong Tae [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-09-15

    The standard treatment for aortic aneurysms is surgical replacement with a prosthetic graft. Currently there is great interest in endoluminal intervention for treatment of aortic aneurysm. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of endoluminally placed Stent-graft for the treatment of aortic aneurysms. Transluminal endovascular Stent-graft placements were attempted in 9 patients with infra-renal aortic aneurysms(n 6), thoracic aortic aneurysm(n = 1), and aortic dissection(n = 2). The endovascular Stent-grafts were custom-designed for each patient and were constructed of self-expandable modified Gianturco Stents covered with polytetrafluroethylene. The Stent-grafts were introduced through a 16-18 French sheath and expanded to 17-30 mm in diameter. The endovascular therapy was performed using a common femoral artery cutdown with local anesthesia. The endovascular Stent-graft deployment was achieved in 7 of 9 patients. Two cases failed deployment of the Stent-graft due to iliac artery stenosis and tortousity. There were complete thrombosis of the thoracic and infra-renal aortic aneurysm surround the Stent-graft in 3 patients, and persistent leak with partial thrombosis in 2. Two patients with aortic dissection were successfully treated by obliteration of entry tears. There were no major complication associated with Stent-graft placement. These preliminary results show that transluminal endovascular Stent-grafts offer great promise and good results. Further investigation is needed to establish its long-term safety and efficacy.

  10. Transluminal endovascular stent-graft for the treatment of aortic aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Do Yun; Chang, Byung Chul; Shim, Won Heum; Cho, Seung Yun; Chung, Nam Sik; Kwon, Hyuk Moon; Lee, Young Joon; Lee, Jong Tae

    1995-01-01

    The standard treatment for aortic aneurysms is surgical replacement with a prosthetic graft. Currently there is great interest in endoluminal intervention for treatment of aortic aneurysm. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of endoluminally placed Stent-graft for the treatment of aortic aneurysms. Transluminal endovascular Stent-graft placements were attempted in 9 patients with infra-renal aortic aneurysms(n 6), thoracic aortic aneurysm(n = 1), and aortic dissection(n = 2). The endovascular Stent-grafts were custom-designed for each patient and were constructed of self-expandable modified Gianturco Stents covered with polytetrafluroethylene. The Stent-grafts were introduced through a 16-18 French sheath and expanded to 17-30 mm in diameter. The endovascular therapy was performed using a common femoral artery cutdown with local anesthesia. The endovascular Stent-graft deployment was achieved in 7 of 9 patients. Two cases failed deployment of the Stent-graft due to iliac artery stenosis and tortousity. There were complete thrombosis of the thoracic and infra-renal aortic aneurysm surround the Stent-graft in 3 patients, and persistent leak with partial thrombosis in 2. Two patients with aortic dissection were successfully treated by obliteration of entry tears. There were no major complication associated with Stent-graft placement. These preliminary results show that transluminal endovascular Stent-grafts offer great promise and good results. Further investigation is needed to establish its long-term safety and efficacy

  11. Endovascular repair of early rupture of Dacron aortic graft--two case reports.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sultan, Sherif

    2005-01-01

    Complications after open aortic surgery pose a challenge both to the vascular surgeon and the patient because of aging population, widespread use of cardiac revascularization, and improved survival after aortic surgery. The perioperative mortality rate for redo elective aortic surgery ranges from 5% to 29% and increases to 70-100% in emergency situation. Endovascular treatment of the postaortic open surgery (PAOS) patient has fewer complications and a lower mortality rate in comparison with redo open surgical repair. Two cases of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) were managed with the conventional open surgical repair. Subsequently, spiral contrast computer tomography scans showed reperfusion of the AAA sac remnant mimicking a type III endoleak. These graft-related complications presented as vascular emergencies, and in both cases endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) procedure was performed successfully by aortouniiliac (AUI) stent graft and femorofemoral crossover bypass. These 2 patients add further merit to the cases reported in the English literature. This highlights the crucial importance of endovascular grafts in the management of such complex vascular problems.

  12. Endovascular Repair of Thoracoabdominal and Arch Aneurysms in Patients with Connective Tissue Disease Using Branched and Fenestrated Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, Rachel E; Martin-Gonzalez, Teresa; Van Calster, Katrien; Hertault, Adrien; Spear, Rafaëlle; Azzaoui, Richard; Sobocinski, Jonathan; Haulon, Stéphan

    2017-10-01

    Prophylactic open surgery is the standard practice in patients with connective tissue and thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) and aortic arch disease. Branched and fenestrated devices offer a less invasive alternative but there are concerns regarding the durability of the repair and the effect of the stent graft on the fragile aortic wall. The aim of this study is to evaluate mid-term outcomes of fenestrated and/or branched endografting in patients with connective tissue disease. All patients with connective tissue disease who underwent TAAA or arch aneurysm repair using a fenestrated and/or branched endograft in a single, high-volume center between 2004 and 2015 were included. Ruptured aneurysms and acute aortic dissections were excluded from this study, but not chronic aortic dissections. In total, 427 (403 pararenal and TAAAs, and 24 arch aneurysms) endovascular interventions were performed during the study period. Of these, 17 patients (4%) (16 TAAAs, 1 arch) had connective tissue disease. All patients were classified as unfit for open repair. The mean age was 51 ± 8 years. Thirteen patients with TAAA were treated with a fenestrated, 1 with a branched, and 2 with a combined fenestrated/branch device. A double inner branch device was used to treat the arch aneurysm. The technical success rate was 100% with no incidence of early mortality, spinal cord ischemia, stroke, or further dissection. Postoperative deterioration in renal function was seen in 3 patients (18.8%) and no hemodialysis was required. The mean follow-up was 3.4 years (0.3-7.4). Aneurysm sac shrinkage was seen in 35% of patients (6/17) and the sac diameter remained stable in 65% of patients (11/17). No sac or sealing zone enlargement was observed in any of the patients and there were no conversions to open repair. Reintervention was required in 1 patient at 2 years for bilateral renal artery occlusion (successful fibrinolysis). One type II endoleak (lumbar) is under surveillance and 1 type

  13. Influence of atmospheric pressure on infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Nicolas; Frank, Michael; Avenin, Laure; Hemery, Francois; Becquemin, Jean Pierre

    2014-04-01

    Meteorologic conditions have a significant impact on the occurrence of cardiovascular events. Previous studies have shown that abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture (AAAR) may be associated with atmospheric pressure, with conflicting results. Therefore, we aimed to further investigate the nature of the correlation between atmospheric pressure variations and AAAR. Hospital admissions related to AAAR between 2005-2009 were assessed in 19 districts of metropolitan France and correlated with geographically and date-matched mean atmospheric pressures. In parallel and from 2005-2009, all fatal AAARs as reported by death certificates were assessed nationwide and correlated to local atmospheric pressures at the time of aortic rupture. Four hundred ninety-four hospital admissions related to AAAR and 6,358 deaths nationwide by AAAR were identified between 2005-2009. Both in-hospital ruptures and aneurysm-related mortality had seasonal variations, with peak/trough incidences in January and June, respectively. Atmospheric pressure peaks occurred during winter. Univariate analysis revealed a significant association (P atmospheric pressure values and AAAR. After multivariate analysis, mean maximum 1-month prerupture atmospheric pressure had a persistent correlation with both in-hospital relative risk (1.05 [95% confidence interval: 1.03-1.06]; P atmospheric pressure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Association of aortic and main left coronary aneurysms with severe aortic insufficiency in Takayasu’s arteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Ferraz de Freitas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Takayasu’s arteritis is a granulomatous vasculitis of unknown etiology that affects mainly the aorta and its branches. As a result of intimal fibroproliferation, segmental stenosis, occlusion, dilatation, and aneurysmal formation of the involved vessels may develop. It is an uncommon disease and usually affects young Asian female patients during the second and third decades of life. Coronary arteries are exceptionally affected and coronary aneurysm formation is a very rare finding. We describe a case of a previously healthy 26-year-old Caucasian female whose Takayasu’s arteritis presented as a previously undescribed association of aortic and main left coronary aneurysms with severe aortic insufficiency.

  15. Association of aortic and main left coronary aneurysms with severe aortic insufficiency in Takayasu’s arteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafranski, Marcelo Derbli; Ferraz de Freitas, Marcelo; Valladão de Carvalho, Marcelo

    2011-01-01

    Takayasu’s arteritis is a granulomatous vasculitis of unknown etiology that affects mainly the aorta and its branches. As a result of intimal fibroproliferation, segmental stenosis, occlusion, dilatation, and aneurysmal formation of the involved vessels may develop. It is an uncommon disease and usually affects young Asian female patients during the second and third decades of life. Coronary arteries are exceptionally affected and coronary aneurysm formation is a very rare finding. We describe a case of a previously healthy 26-year-old Caucasian female whose Takayasu’s arteritis presented as a previously undescribed association of aortic and main left coronary aneurysms with severe aortic insufficiency. PMID:24765288

  16. Abdominal aortic aneurysm development in men following a "normal" aortic ultrasound scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, H; Druce, P S; Ashton, H A

    2008-11-01

    To determine predictors related to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development following a "normal" aortic ultrasound scan. Over a 23-year period, 22 961 men participated in an AAA screening programme. Maximum aortic diameter of less than 30 mm was deemed "normal". 4308 of these "normal" individuals were later re-scanned at intervals for research purposes. AAA prevalence was 4.4% at initial scanning. In those with a normal scan, 46 patients subsequently presented with AAAs incidentally detected and 120 (2.8%) had AAAs identified as part of the ongoing surveillance. The median initial aortic size of these 166 men was 25 mm (range 15-29 mm). Over the follow-up period, there have been 24 (14%) AAA-related deaths, 24 patients underwent successful AAA surgery and 36 died of unrelated causes. In those with an initial aortic diameter of <25 mm who later developed an AAA, the odds ratio for AAA-related mortality was 2 (95% CI 1-4.1, p=0.03, x(2)). AAAs can develop following an initial "normal" scan and men with an aortic diameters of 25-29 mm appear to be at greater risk. Surveillance for this sub-group may further reduce the incidence of undiagnosed AAA and AAA-related mortality.

  17. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement in patients with Marfan syndrome enrolled in the National Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Howard K; Preiss, Liliana R; Maslen, Cheryl L; Kroner, Barbara; Devereux, Richard B; Roman, Mary J; Holmes, Kathryn W; Tolunay, H Eser; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; Asch, Federico M; Milewski, Rita K; Bavaria, Joseph; LeMaire, Scott A

    2014-05-01

    The long-term outcomes of aortic valve-sparing (AVS) root replacement in Marfan syndrome (MFS) patients remain uncertain. The study aim was to determine the utilization and outcomes of AVS root replacement in MFS patients enrolled in the Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions (GenTAC). At the time of this analysis, 788 patients with MFS were enrolled in the GenTAC Registry, of whom 288 had undergone aortic root replacement. Patients who had undergone AVS procedures were compared to those who had undergone aortic valve replacement (AVR). AVS root replacement was performed in 43.5% of MFS patients, and the frequency of AVS was increased over the past five years. AVS patients were younger at the time of surgery (31.0 versus 36.3 years, p = 0.006) and more likely to have had elective rather than emergency surgery compared to AVR patients, in whom aortic valve dysfunction and aortic dissection was the more likely primary indication for surgery. After a mean follow up of 6.2 +/- 3.6 years, none of the 87 AVS patients had required reoperation; in contrast, after a mean follow up of 10.5 +/- 7.6 years, 11.5% of AVR patients required aortic root reoperation. Aortic valve function has been durable, with 95.8% of AVS patients having aortic insufficiency that was graded as mild or less. AVS root replacement is performed commonly among the MFS population, and the durability of the aortic repair and aortic valve function have been excellent to date. These results justify a continued use of the procedure in an elective setting. The GenTAC Registry will be a useful resource to assess the long-term durability of AVS root replacement in the future.

  18. Valve Sparing Aortic Root Replacement in Patients with Marfan Syndrome Enrolled in the National Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Howard K.; Preiss, Liliana R.; Maslen, Cheryl L.; Kroner, Barbara; Devereux, Richard B.; Roman, Mary J.; Holmes, Kathryn W.; Tolunay, H. Eser; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; Asch, Federico M.; Milewski, Rita K.; Bavaria, Joseph; LeMaire, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The long-term outcomes of aortic valve sparing (AVS) root replacement in Marfan syndrome (MFS) patients remain uncertain. We sought to determine the utilization and outcomes of AVS root replacement in MFS patients enrolled in the Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions (GenTAC). Methods At the time of this analysis, 788 patients with MFS were enrolled in the GenTAC Registry, of whom 288 have undergone aortic root replacement. Patients who have undergone AVS procedures were compared to those who have undergone aortic valve replacing (AVR) procedures. Results AVS root replacement was performed in 43.5% of MFS patients and the frequency of AVS increased over the past 5 years. AVS patients were younger at the time of surgery (31.0 vs. 36.3 years, p=0.006) and more likely to have had elective rather than emergency surgery compared to AVR patients. AVR patients were more likely to have had aortic valve dysfunction and aortic dissection as a primary indication for surgery. After mean follow-up of 6.2 (SD=3.6) years, none of the 87 AVS patients have required reoperation; in contrast, after mean follow up of 10.5 (SD=7.6) years, 11.5% of AVR patients have required aortic root reoperation. Aortic valve function has been durable with 95.8% of AVS patients with aortic insufficiency graded as mild or less. Conclusions AVS root replacement is performed commonly in the MFS population. The durability of the aortic repair and aortic valve function have been excellent to date. These results justify the continued use of the procedure in the elective setting. The GenTAC Registry will be a useful resource to assess the long-term durability of AVS root replacement in the future. PMID:25296451

  19. Appearance of femoropopliteal segment aneurysms in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksić Milanko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. To promote better treatment outcome, as well as economic benefit it is very important to find out patients with simultaneous occurrence of both aortic and arterial aneurysms. The aim of this prospective study was to determine the frequency and factors affecting femoropopliteal (F-P segment aneurysms appearance in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA. Methods. This study included 70 patients who had underwent elective or urgent surgery of AAA from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2007. After ultrasonographic examination of F-P segment, all the patients were divided into two groups - those with adjunctive F-P segment aneurysm (n = 20 and the group of 50 patients with no adjunctive F-P segment aneurysm. In both groups demographic characteristics (gender, age, risk factors (diabetes mellitus, elevated serum levels of cholesterol and triglycerides, arterial hypertension, smoking, obesity and cardiovascular comorbidity (cerebrovascular desease, ischemic heart desease were investigated. Results. Twenty (28.57% patients who had been operated on because of AAA, had adjunctive aneurysmal desease of F-P segment. Diabetes was no statistically significantly more present among the patients who, beside AAA, had adjunctive aneurismal desease of F-P segment (χ2 = 0.04; DF = 1; p > 0.05. Also, in both groups there was no statistically significant difference in gender structure (χ2 = 2. 05; DF = 2; p > 0.05, age (χ2 = 5. 46; DF = 1; p > 0.05, total cholesterol level (χ2 = 0.89; DF = 1; p > 0.05 and triglyceride (χ2 = 0.89; DF = 1; p > 0.05 levels, the presence of arterial hypertension (χ2 = 1.38; DF = 2; p > 0.05, smoking (χ2 = 1.74; DF = 1; p > 0.05, obesity (χ2 = 1.76; DF = 1; p > 0.05 and presence of cerebrovascular desease (χ2 = 2.34; DF = 1; p > 0.05. Conversly, ischemic heart desease was statistically significantly more present among the patients who, beside AAA, had adjunctive aneurismal desease of F-P segment (χ2 = 5

  20. Late graft explants in endovascular aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, Eric J; Steenberge, Sean P; Lyden, Sean P; Eagleton, Matthew J; Srivastava, Sunita D; Sarac, Timur P; Kelso, Rebecca L; Clair, Daniel G

    2014-04-01

    With more than a decade of use of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), we expect to see a rise in the number of failing endografts. We review a single-center experience with EVAR explants to identify patterns of presentation and understand operative outcomes that may alter clinical management. A retrospective analysis of EVARs requiring late explants, >1 month after implant, was performed. Patient demographics, type of graft, duration of implant, reason for removal, operative technique, length of stay, complications, and in-hospital and late mortality were reviewed. During 1999 to 2012, 100 patients (91% men) required EVAR explant, of which 61 were placed at another institution. The average age was 75 years (range, 50-93 years). The median length of time since implantation was 41 months (range, 1-144 months). Explanted grafts included 25 AneuRx (Medtronic, Minneapolis, Minn), 25 Excluder (W. L. Gore & Associates, Flagstaff, Ariz), 17 Zenith (Cook Medical, Bloomington, Ind), 15 Talent (Medtronic), 10 Ancure (Guidant, Indianapolis, Ind), 4 Powerlink (Endologix, Irvine, Calif), 1 Endurant (Medtronic), 1 Quantum LP (Cordis, Miami Lakes, Fla), 1 Aorta Uni Iliac Rupture Graft (Cook Medical, Bloomington, Ind), and 1 homemade tube graft. Overall 30-day mortality was 17%, with an elective case mortality of 9.9%, nonelective case mortality of 37%, and 56% mortality for ruptures. Endoleak was the most common indication for explant, with one or more endoleaks present in 82% (type I, 40%; II, 30%; III, 22%; endotension, 6%; multiple, 16%). Other reasons for explant included infection (13%), acute thrombosis (4%), and claudication (1%). In the first 12 months, 23 patients required explants, with type I endoleak (48%) and infection (35%) the most frequent indication. Conversely, 22 patients required explants after 5 years, with type I (36%) and type III (32%) endoleak responsible for most indications. The rate of EVAR late explants has increased during the past decade at our

  1. Aneurysm pulsatility after endovascular exclusion: an experimental study using human aortic aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Amin Orra

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To measure the pulsatility of human aneurysms before and after complete exclusion with an endograft. METHOD: Five aortic aneurysms obtained during necropsy were submitted to pulsatile perfusion before and after implantation of a bifurcated endograft. The specimens were contained in a closed chamber filled with saline solution. A vertical tube attached to the chamber was used to measure volume dislocation in each systole. Mural thrombus was kept intact, and the space around the device was filled with human blood. After each experiment, the aneurysm was opened to check for the correct positioning and attachment of the device. RESULTS: The level of the saline column oscillated during pulsation in each case, with respective amplitudes of 17, 16, 13, 7, and 25 cm before the endograft insertion. After the insertion, the amplitudes dropped to 13, 12, 9, 3.5, and 23 cm, respectively. The differences were not significant. During the post-experimental examination, all devices were found to be in position and well attached to the neck and iliacs. No endoleak was detected during perfusion or by visual inspection. CONCLUSION: Pulsation of an endograft is transmitted to the aneurysm wall even in the absence of endoleak, and should not be interpreted as procedural failure.

  2. The influence of atmospheric pressure on aortic aneurysm rupture--is the diameter of the aneurysm important?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanek, Tomasz; Juśko, Maciej; Niewiem, Alfred; Kuczmik, Wacław; Ziaja, Damian; Ziaja, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    The rate of aortic aneurysm rupture correlates with the aneurysm's diameter, and a higher rate of rupture is observed in patients with larger aneurysms. According to the literature, contradictory results concerning the relationship between atmospheric pressure and aneurysm size have been reported. In this paper, we assessed the influence of changes in atmospheric pressure on abdominal aneurysm ruptures in relationship to the aneurysm's size. The records of 223 patients with ruptured abdominal aneurysms were evaluated. All of the patients had been admitted to the department in the period 1997-2007 from the Silesia region. The atmospheric pressures on the day of the rupture and on the days both before the rupture and between the rupture events were compared. The size of the aneurysm was also considered in the analysis. There were no statistically significant differences in pressure between the days of rupture and the remainder of the days within an analysed period. The highest frequency of the admission of patients with a ruptured aortic aneurysm was observed during periods of winter and spring, when the highest mean values of atmospheric pressure were observed; however, this observation was not statistically confirmed. A statistically non-significant trend towards the higher rupture of large aneurysms (> 7 cm) was observed in the cases where the pressure increased between the day before the rupture and the day of the rupture. This trend was particularly pronounced in patients suffering from hypertension (p = 0.1). The results of this study do not support the hypothesis that there is a direct link between atmospheric pressure values and abdominal aortic aneurysm ruptures.

  3. Comparison of hybrid endovascular and open surgical repair for proximal aortic arch diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Woong Chol; Ko, Young-Guk; Shin, Eak Kyun; Park, Chul-Hyun; Choi, Donghoon; Youn, Young Nam; Lee, Do Yun

    2016-01-15

    To compare the outcomes of hybrid endovascular and open surgical repair for proximal aortic arch diseases. A total of 55 consecutive patients with aortic arch aneurysm or aortic dissection involving any of zone 0 to 1 (39 male, age 63.4 ± 14.3 years) underwent a hybrid endovascular repair (n=35) or open surgical repair (n=20) from 2006 to 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. Perioperative and late outcomes were compared. Baseline characteristics were similar between the two groups, except age and EuroSCORE II, which were higher in the hybrid group. Perioperative mortality or stroke was not significantly different between the two groups, however, tended to be lower in the hybrid repair group than in the open repair group (11.4% vs. 30.0%, p=0.144). Incidences of other morbidities did not differ. During follow-up, over-all survival was similar between the hybrid and the open repair was similar (87.3% vs. 79.7% at 1 year and 83.8% vs. 72.4% at 3 years; p=0.319). However, reintervention-free survival was significantly lower for hybrid repair compared with open repair (83.8% vs. 100% at 1 year and 65.7% vs. 100% at 3 years; p=0.022). Hybrid repair of proximal aortic disease showed comparable perioperative and late outcomes compared with open surgical repair despite a higher reintervention rate during follow-up. Therefore, hybrid repair may be considered as an acceptable treatment alternative to surgery especially in patients at high surgical risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Male gender and smoking are related to single, but not to multiple, human aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Paulo S; Leite, Thiago N P; Mangione, Fernanda M

    2015-01-01

    There is scanty information concerning multiple aortic aneurysms. Thus, we verified if clinical or pathological characteristics are different in patients with multiple (two or more) aortic aneurysms in comparison with those with only one. We selected at the necropsy files of the Heart Institute, São Paulo University School of Medicine, the last 100 cases with aortic aneurysms, comparing between the two groups: sex, age, presence of systemic arterial hypertension, diabetes, dyslipedemia, history of smoking habit, cause of the aneurysm, cause of death, and if the diagnosis was reached during life. Age was analysed by Mann-Whitney test, and the other variables by chi-square or Fisher's exact test. Multiple aneurysms corresponded to 14% of cases. The proportion of women among patients with multiple aneurysms was higher than among those with single aneurysm (64.3% versus 20.9%, P<.01), even if only cases with atherosclerosis were taken into consideration (women among multiple-6/10, 60.0%; among single-14/70, 20.0%; P=.01). Smoking was less reported in cases with multiple (4/14, 28.6%) than with single aneurysm (53/86, 61.6%; P=.04); considering cases with atherosclerosis, such difference decreases (40.0% of multiple versus 68.6% of single, P=.09). although atherosclerosis is present in most cases of both single and multiple aortic aneurysms, male gender and smoking, considered highly influential in such lesions, are less frequent in patients with multiple than in patients with single aneurysms. Thus mechanisms underlying multiple aortic aneurysms are probably different from those related to single, more common aneurysms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Tissue factor levels and the fibrinolytic system in thin and thick intraluminal thrombus and underlying walls of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siennicka, Aldona; Zuchowski, Marta; Kaczmarczyk, Mariusz; Cnotliwy, Miłosław; Clark, Jeremy Simon; Jastrzębska, Maria

    2018-03-20

    The hemostatic system cooperates with proteolytic degradation in processes allowing abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) formation. In previous studies, it has been suggested that aneurysm rupture depends on intraluminal thrombus (ILT) thickness, which varies across each individual aneurysm. We hypothesized that hemostatic components differentially accumulate in AAA tissue in relation to ILT thickness. Thick (A1) and thin (B1) segments of ILTs and aneurysm wall sections A (adjacent to A1) and B (adjacent to B1) from one aneurysm sac were taken from 35 patients undergoing elective repair. Factor levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of protein extract. Tissue factor (TF) activities were significantly higher in thinner segments of AAA (B1 vs A1, P = .003; B vs A, P thick thrombus-covered wall segments (A) than in B, A1, and B1 (P = .015, P thick ILT (P = .021) and thick ILT (A1; P thick ILT (A1). However, no correlations were found at B sites, except for a correlation between plasmin and TF activities (r = 0.55; P = .004). These results suggest that higher TF activities are present in thinner AAA regions. These parameters and local fibrinolysis may be part of the processes leading to destruction of the aneurysm wall. Copyright © 2018 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) follow-up imaging: the assessment and treatment of common postoperative complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilyas, S.; Shaida, N.; Thakor, A.S.; Winterbottom, A.; Cousins, C.

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a well-established procedure, which has long-term mortality rates similar to that of open repair. It has the additional benefit of being less invasive, making it the favoured method of treating abdominal aortic aneurysms in elderly and high-risk patients with multiple co-morbidities. The main disadvantage of EVAR is the higher rate of re-intervention, due to device-related complications, including endoleaks, limb occlusion, stent migration, kinking, and infection. As a result lifelong surveillance is required. In order to avoid missing these complications, intricate knowledge of stent graft design, good-quality diagnostic ultrasound skills, multiplanar reformatting of CT images, and reproducible investigations are important. Most of these complications can be treated via an endovascular approach using cuff extensions, uncovered stents, coils, and liquid embolic agents. Open surgery is reserved for complex complications, where an endovascular approach is not feasible. - Highlights: • Comprehensive pictorial review of EVAR related complications. • Importance of life-long EVAR surveillance, to prevent aortic rupture or lower limb ischaemia. • Identification and management of endoleaks, rupture, migration, kink/infolding, occlusion and infection

  7. Analysis of blood flow patterns in aortic aneurysm by cine magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Hiroshi

    1993-01-01

    Cine MRI (0.5 T) using rephased gradient echo technique was performed to study the patterns of blood flow in the aortic aneurysm of 16 patients with aortic aneurysm, and the data were compared with those of 5 healthy volunteers. In the transaxial section, the blood flow in normal aorta appeared as homogeneous high intensity during systole. On the other hand, the blood flow in the aneurysm appeared as inhomogeneous flow enhancement with flow void. In the sagittal scan, the homogeneous flow enhancement in a normal aorta was also observed during systole and its apex of flow enhancement was 'taper'. The blood flow patterns in the aneurysm were classified as 'irregular', 'zonal', 'eddy', and 'obscure' depending on the contrast of flow enhancement and flow void. Their apexes were 'taper' or 'round'. The blood flow patterns in the aneurysm were related to the size of aneurysm. In patients with a large size 'aneurysm, their flow patterns were 'eddy' or 'obscure' and the flow enhancement was 'round'. On the other hand, in patients with a small size aneurysm, their flow patterns were 'irregular' or 'zonal', and their flow enhancement was 'taper'. Though the exact mechanism of abnormal flow patterns in an aortic aneurysm remains to be determined, cine MRI gives helpful informations in assessing blood flow dynamics in the aneurysm. (author)

  8. Late type III endoleak after thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair and previous infrarenal stent graft implantation - a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leszczyński, Jerzy; Macioch, Waldemar; Chudziński, Witold; Gałązka, Zbigniew

    2017-09-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) effectively improved the results of thoracic aortic aneurysm treatment. TEVAR is a less invasive procedure that can be performed under local anesthesia with shorter hospital stay. The perioperative morbidity and mortality rates are lower for endovascular than open repair, but the rate of secondary interventions is higher for TEVAR. We report a case of an elderly man with synchronous abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysms. A type III dangerous endoleak was recognized 3 years after TEVAR. It was successfully repaired during an endovascular procedure. There were no new endoleaks after 12 months of follow-up. TEVAR may be the only option of treatment for risky and elderly patients. However, postoperative monitoring is necessary to exclude different types of endoleaks. Most of them undergo effective endovascular repair.

  9. A proposal for standardizing computed tomography reports on abdominal aortic aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torlai, Fabiola Goda; Meirelles, Gustavo S. Portes; Miranda Junior, Fausto; Fonseca, Jose Honorio A.P. da; Ajzen, Sergio; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2006-01-01

    Objective: to propose a model to standardize computed tomography reports on abdominal aortic aneurysms. Materials and methods: interviews were carried out with members of the Vascular Surgery Division of our institution, in the period between April and October 2004, aiming at developing a standardized model of computed tomography reports on abdominal aortic aneurysms. Based on this model, a questionnaire was elaborated and sent to other nine surgeons, all of them experienced in the field of abdominal aortic surgery. The questionnaires response rate was 55.5% (5/9). Results: the most frequently mentioned parameters of interest for evaluation of abdominal aortic aneurysms were: maximum diameter of proximal aortic neck, proximal aortic neck length to lower renal arteries, shape of proximal aortic neck, maximum diameter of the aneurysm and diameter of the common iliac arteries. These data allowed the development of a proposal for a model to standardize computed tomography reports. Conclusion: a model for standardized tomographic analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysms has met vascular surgeons' needs for following-up patients and planning their treatment. (author)

  10. Daily diurnal variation in admissions for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Killeen, Shane

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Many vascular events, such as myocardial infarction and cerebrovascular accident, demonstrate a circadian pattern of presentation. Blood pressure is intimately related to these pathologies and is the one physiological variable consistently associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture. It also demonstrates a diurnal variation. The purpose of this study was to determine if rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA) exhibits a diurnal variation. METHODS: A retrospective cohort-based study was performed to determine the timing of presentation of RAAA to the vascular unit of Cork University Hospital over a 15-year period. Time of admission, symptom onset, and co-morbidities such as hypertension were noted. Fournier\\'s analysis and chi-squared analysis were performed. To ameliorate possible confounding factors, patients admitted with perforated peptic ulcers were examined in the same manner. RESULTS: A total of 148 cases of RAAA were identified, with a male preponderance (71.7% [124] male versus 29.3% [44] female patients) and a mean age of 74.4 +\\/- 7.2 years at presentation. 70.9% (105) were known to have hypertension, 52.2% (77) were current smokers, and 46.8% (69) were being treated for chronic obstructive airway disease (COAD). Time of symptom onset was recorded in 88.5% (131) of patients. There was a marked early morning peak in RAAA admissions, with the highest number of RAAA being admitted between 08.00 and 09.59. A second, smaller peak was observed at 14.00-15.59. These findings were suggestive of diurnal variation. [chi(2) =16.75, p < 0.003]. Some 40% (59) of patients were admitted between 00.00 and 06.00, an incidence significantly higher than for other time periods (06.00-12.00, 12.00-18.00, and 18.00-24.00) [chi(2) = 18.72; df = 3; p < 0.0003]. A significantly higher number of patients admitted between 00.00 and 06.00 were known hypertensives (chi(2) = 7.94; p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study suggest a distinct

  11. Clinical and genetic aspects of Marfan syndrome and familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilhorst-Hofstee, Yvonne

    2013-01-01

    This thesis concerns the clinical and genetic aspects of familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections, in particular in Marfan syndrome. It includes the Dutch multidisciplinary guidelines for diagnosis and management of Marfan syndrome. These guidelines contain practical directions for

  12. Reproducibility of ECG-gated Ultrasound Diameter Assessment of Small Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredahl, K; Eldrup, N; Meyer, C

    2013-01-01

    No standardised ultrasound procedure to obtain reliable growth estimates for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is currently available. We investigated the feasibility and reproducibility of a novel approach controlling for a combination of vessel wall delineation and cardiac cycle variation....

  13. Fatal late multiple emboli after endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Sandermann, Jes; Bruun-Petersen, J

    1998-01-01

    The short term experience of endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) seems promising but long term randomised data are lacking. Consequently, cases treated by endovascular procedures need to be closely followed for potential risks and benefits....

  14. Upper gastrointestinal obstruction secondary to aortoduodenal syndrome owing to a noninflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cahill, Kevin

    2012-01-31

    Aortoduodenal syndrome is a rare complication of an abdominal aortic aneurysm wherein the aneurysm sac obstructs the patient\\'s duodenum. It presents with the symptoms of an upper gastrointestinal tract obstruction and requires surgical intervention to relieve it. Previously, gastric bypass surgery was advocated, but now aortic replacement is the mainstay of treatment. We report a case of a 67-year-old woman whose aortoduodenal syndrome was successfully managed and review the literature on this topic.

  15. Acute Contained Ruptured Aortic Aneurysm Presenting as Left Vocal Fold Immobility

    OpenAIRE

    Gnagi, Sharon H.; Howard, Brittany E.; Hoxworth, Joseph M.; Lott, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To recognize intrathoracic abnormalities, including expansion or rupture of aortic aneurysms, as a source of acute onset vocal fold immobility. Methods. A case report and review of the literature. Results. An 85-year-old female with prior history of an aortic aneurysm presented to a tertiary care facility with sudden onset hoarseness. On laryngoscopy, the left vocal fold was immobile in the paramedian position. A CT scan obtained that day revealed a new, large hematoma surrounding ...

  16. The same sequence variant on 9p21 associates with myocardial infarction, abdominal aortic aneurysm and intracranial aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helgadottir, Anna; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Magnusson, Kristinn P

    2008-01-01

    . Here we report that rs10757278-G is associated with, in addition to CAD, abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA; odds ratio (OR) = 1.31, P = 1.2 x 10(-12)) and intracranial aneurysm (OR = 1.29, P = 2.5 x 10(-6)), but not with T2D. This variant is the first to be described that affects the risk of AAA...

  17. Bio-chemo-mechanics of thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenseil, Jessica E

    2018-03-01

    Most thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) occur in the ascending aorta. This review focuses on the unique bio-chemo-mechanical environment that makes the ascending aorta susceptible to TAA. The environment includes solid mechanics, fluid mechanics, cell phenotype, and extracellular matrix composition. Advances in solid mechanics include quantification of biaxial deformation and complex failure behavior of the TAA wall. Advances in fluid mechanics include imaging and modeling of hemodynamics that may lead to TAA formation. For cell phenotype, studies demonstrate changes in cell contractility that may serve to sense mechanical changes and transduce chemical signals. Studies on matrix defects highlight the multi-factorial nature of the disease. We conclude that future work should integrate the effects of bio-chemo-mechanical factors for improved TAA treatment.

  18. HAS-1 genetic polymorphism in sporadic abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Balbarini

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The hyaluronan synthase 1 (HAS-1 gene encodes a plasma membrane protein that synthesizes hyaluronan (HA, an extracellular matrix molecule. Accumulating evidence emphasizes the relevance of HA metabolism in an increasing number of processes of clinical interest, including abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA. The existence of aberrant splicing variants of the HAS-1 gene could partly explain the altered extracellular matrix architecture and influence various biological functions, resulting in progressive arterial wall failure in the development of AAA. In the present study, we assessed the hypothesis that HAS-1 genetic 833A/G polymorphism could be associated with the risk of AAA by performing a case-control association study, involving AAA patients and healthy matched donors.

  19. Atmospheric pressure variations and abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Killeen, S D

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA) presents with increased frequency in the winter and spring months. Seasonal changes in atmospheric pressure mirrors this pattern. AIM: To establish if there was a seasonal variation in the occurrence of RAAA and to determine if there was any association with atmospheric pressure changes. METHODS: A retrospective cohort-based study was performed. Daily atmospheric pressure readings for the region were obtained. RESULTS: There was a statistically significant monthly variation in RAAA presentation with 107 cases (52.5%) occurring from November to March. The monthly number of RAAA and the mean atmospheric pressure in the previous month were inversely related (r = -0.752, r (2) = 0.566, P = 0.03), and there was significantly greater daily atmospheric pressure variability on days when patients with RAAA were admitted. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest a relationship between atmospheric pressure and RAAA.

  20. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 gene variants and abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, L; Warrington, N; Allcock, R; van Bockxmeer, F; Palmer, L J; Iacopetta, B; Golledge, J; Norman, P E

    2009-08-01

    To investigate associations between two polymorphisms of the matrix metalloproteinase-2 gene (MMP2) and the incidence and progression of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Cases and controls were recruited from a trial of screening for AAAs. The association between two variants of MMP2 (-1360C>T, and +649C>T) in men with AAA (n=678) and in controls (n=659) was examined using multivariate analyses. The association with AAA expansion (n=638) was also assessed. In multivariate analyses with adjustments for multiple testing, no association between either SNP and AAA presence or expansion was detected. MMP2 -1360C>T and +649C>T variants are not risk factors for AAA.

  1. Animal Models Used to Explore Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysgaard Poulsen, J; Stubbe, J; Lindholt, J S

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Experimental animal models have been used to investigate the formation, development, and progression of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) for decades. New models are constantly being developed to imitate the mechanisms of human AAAs and to identify treatments that are less risky than...... those used today. However, to the authors' knowledge, there is no model identical to the human AAA. The objective of this systematic review was to assess the different types of animal models used to investigate the development, progression, and treatment of AAA and to highlight their advantages...... and limitations. METHODS: A search protocol was used to perform a systematic literature search of PubMed and Embase. A total of 2,830 records were identified. After selection of the relevant articles, 564 papers on animal AAA models were included. RESULTS: The most common models in rodents, including elastase...

  2. Importance of initial stress for abdominal aortic aneurysm wall motion: Dynamic MRI validated finite element analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merkx, M.A.G.; Veer, van 't M.; Speelman, L.; Breeuwer, M.; Buth, J.; Vosse, van de F.N.

    2009-01-01

    Currently the transverse diameter is the primary decision criterion to assess rupture risk in patients with an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). To obtain a measure for more patient-specific risk assessment, aneurysm wall stress, calculated using finite element analysis (FEA), has been evaluated in

  3. Relationships between activators and inhibitors of plasminogen, and the progression of small abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Jørgensen, B; Shi, G-P

    2003-01-01

    plasmin is a common activator of the known proteolytic systems involved in the aneurysmal degradation, and is reported to be associated with the expansion of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). The aim of this study was to study the activating pathways of plasminogen as predictors of the progression...

  4. Aortic valve-sparing operations in aortic root aneurysms: remodeling or reimplantation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahnavardi, Mohammad; Yan, Tristan D; Bannon, Paul G; Wilson, Michael K

    2011-08-01

    A best evidence topic was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether the reimplantation (David) technique or the remodeling (Yacoub) technique provides the optimum event free survival in patients with an aortic root aneurysm suitable for an aortic valve-sparing operation. In total, 392 papers were found using the reported search criteria, of which 14 papers provided the best evidence to answer the clinical question. A total of 1338 patients (Yacoub technique in 606 and David technique in 732) from 13 centres were included. In most series, cardiopulmonary bypass time and aortic cross-clamp time were longer for the David technique compared to the Yacoub technique. Early mortality was comparable between the two techniques (0-6.9% for the Yacoub technique and 0-6% for the David technique). There is a tendency for a higher freedom from significant long-term aortic insufficiency in the David group than the Yacoub group, which does not necessarily result in a higher reoperation rate in the Yacoub group. In the largest series reported, freedom from a moderate-to-severe aortic insufficiency at 12 years was 82.6 ± 6.2% in the Yacoub and 91.0 ± 3.8% in the David group (P=0.035). Freedom from reoperation at the same time point was 90.4 ± 4.7% in the Yacoub group and 97.4 ± 2.2% in the David group (P=0.09). In another series, freedom from reoperation at a follow-up time of about four years was 89 ± 4% in the Yacoub group and 98 ± 2% in the David group. Although some authors merely preferred the Yacoub technique for a bicuspid aortic valve, the accumulated evidence in the current review indicates comparable results for both techniques in a bicuspid aortic valve. Current evidence is in favour of the David rather than the Yacoub technique in pathologies such as Marfan syndrome, acute type A aortic dissection, and excessive annular dilatation that may impair aortic root integrity. Careful selection of patients for each technique and

  5. Epidemiology of abdominal aortic aneurysms in the Asian community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spark, J I; Baker, J L; Vowden, P; Wilkinson, D

    2001-03-01

    Studies relating to the ethnic origin of patients with an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) are few and are mainly concerned with the differences between black and white Americans. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the incidence of AAA among the Asian population of Bradford is different from that in the Caucasian population. A retrospective study of patients with an AAA was carried out between 1990 and 1997 using data collected by the Patient Administrative Service, personal databases of the vascular consultants and theatre records. Information about the ethnic composition of the population of Bradford was obtained from the 1991 national census. Demographic data, including ethnic origin and clinical details, were obtained from patient notes. Two hundred and thirty-three patients with an AAA were identified during the study interval. The Asian population comprised 14.0 per cent of the total population of Bradford. Twenty-eight AAAs would be expected per year. All of the aneurysms identified occurred in the Caucasian population and none in the Asian community. These early results suggest that AAA is rare among the Asian population.

  6. Various complications of abdominal aortic aneurysm : CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Byun, Jae Young; Kim, Bum Soo; Kim, Euy Neyung; Yoon, Yeo Dong; Kim, Ki Tae; Lee, Jae Mun; Shinn, Kyung Sub [The Catholic Univ. of Korea, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-03-01

    To evaluate on abdominal CT the type and incidence of various complications of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Twenty six suspected cases of AAA were confirmed by operation(n=21) and by CT(n=5). The etiology, size, shape and incidence of various complications of AAA were then retrospectively evaluated. In addition, post-operative complications were also evaluated in five cases. The etiology of the aneurysm was atherosclerotic in 18 cases and mycotic in three;it showed the presence of Behcet disease in three cases, of tuberculosis in one, and of Marfan syndrome in one. Among the 18 fusiform AAA, the mean maximum diameter of ruptured AAA(7.5{+-}3cm, n=3) was significantly larger than that of unruptured AAA(4.9{+-}1.6cm, n=15) (p<0.05). The saccular type was much more likely to rupture than the fusiform type(p<0.00001). Out of the eight saccular AAA, seven ruptured ; their mean maximum diameter was 3.9{+-}1.3cm This was significantly smaller than that of ruptured fusiform aneurysm(p<0.05). The most common complication was rupture, and occurred ten of 26 cases(38%). Others included hydronephrosis in three cases, bowel infarction in one, and perianeurysmal retroperitoneal fibrosis in one case. Various post-oper-ative complications developed in five patients; these comprised periprosthetic pseudoaneurysm with hematoma (two cases), bowel ischemia (one), focal renal infarction (one), and secondary aorticoduodenal fistula (one). The most common complication of AAA was rupture, the rate of which was much higher in the saccular type with smaller size than the fusiform type. Other various and uncommon complications were observed. CT was helpful in detecting complications arising from AAA and in planning its treatment.

  7. Various complications of abdominal aortic aneurysm : CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Byun, Jae Young; Kim, Bum Soo; Kim, Euy Neyung; Yoon, Yeo Dong; Kim, Ki Tae; Lee, Jae Mun; Shinn, Kyung Sub

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate on abdominal CT the type and incidence of various complications of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Twenty six suspected cases of AAA were confirmed by operation(n=21) and by CT(n=5). The etiology, size, shape and incidence of various complications of AAA were then retrospectively evaluated. In addition, post-operative complications were also evaluated in five cases. The etiology of the aneurysm was atherosclerotic in 18 cases and mycotic in three;it showed the presence of Behcet disease in three cases, of tuberculosis in one, and of Marfan syndrome in one. Among the 18 fusiform AAA, the mean maximum diameter of ruptured AAA(7.5±3cm, n=3) was significantly larger than that of unruptured AAA(4.9±1.6cm, n=15) (p<0.05). The saccular type was much more likely to rupture than the fusiform type(p<0.00001). Out of the eight saccular AAA, seven ruptured ; their mean maximum diameter was 3.9±1.3cm This was significantly smaller than that of ruptured fusiform aneurysm(p<0.05). The most common complication was rupture, and occurred ten of 26 cases(38%). Others included hydronephrosis in three cases, bowel infarction in one, and perianeurysmal retroperitoneal fibrosis in one case. Various post-oper-ative complications developed in five patients; these comprised periprosthetic pseudoaneurysm with hematoma (two cases), bowel ischemia (one), focal renal infarction (one), and secondary aorticoduodenal fistula (one). The most common complication of AAA was rupture, the rate of which was much higher in the saccular type with smaller size than the fusiform type. Other various and uncommon complications were observed. CT was helpful in detecting complications arising from AAA and in planning its treatment

  8. Valve-sparing root replacement in children with aortic root aneurysm: mid-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Rüdiger; Badiu, Catalin C; Vogt, Manfred; Voss, Bernhard; Hörer, Jürgen; Prodan, Zsolt; Schreiber, Christian; Mazzitelli, Domenico

    2013-05-01

    We aimed at evaluating the results of aortic valve-sparing root replacement (AVSRR) in children with aortic root aneurysm (ARA) due to genetic disorders in terms of mortality, reoperation and recurrent aortic valve regurgitation (AVR). Thirteen patients (mean age 9.7 ± 6.5 years, 10 months-18 years) underwent AVSRR for ARA between 2002 and 2011. Six of the 13 patients had Marfan syndrome, 3 Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS), 2 bicuspid aortic valve syndrome and 2 an unspecified connective tissue disorder. AVR was graded as none/trace, mild and severe in 5, 7 and 1 patient, respectively. The mean pre-operative root diameter was 45 ± 10 mm (mean Z-score 10.3 ± 2.0). Remodelling of the aortic root was performed in 4 patients, reimplantation of the aortic valve in 9 and a concomitant cusp repair in 4. The diameter of the prostheses used for root replacement varied from 22 to 30 mm (mean Z-score = 2.3 ± 3). The follow-up was 100% complete with a mean follow-up time of 3.7 years. There was no operative mortality. One patient with LDS died 2.5 years after the operation due to spontaneous rupture of the descending aorta. Root re-replacement with mechanical conduit was necessary in 1 patient for severe recurrent AVR 8 days after remodelling of the aortic root. At final follow-up, AVR was graded as none/trace and mild in all patients. Eleven patients presented in New York Heart Association functional Class I and 1 in Class II. In paediatric patients with ARA, valve-sparing root replacement can be performed with low operative risk and excellent mid-term valve durability. Hence, prosthetic valve-related morbidity may be avoided. Due to the large diameters of the aortic root and the ascending aorta, the size of the implanted root prostheses will not limit later growth of the native aorta.

  9. Reporting individual surgeon outcomes does not lead to risk aversion in abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saratzis, A; Thatcher, A; Bath, M F; Sidloff, D A; Bown, M J; Shakespeare, J; Sayers, R D; Imray, C

    2017-02-01

    INTRODUCTION Reporting surgeons' outcomes has recently been introduced in the UK. This has the potential to result in surgeons becoming risk averse. The aim of this study was to investigate whether reporting outcomes for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery impacts on the number and risk profile (level of fitness) of patients offered elective treatment. METHODS Publically available National Vascular Registry data were used to compare the number of AAAs treated in those centres across the UK that reported outcomes for the periods 2008-2012, 2009-2013 and 2010-2014. Furthermore, the number and characteristics of patients referred for consideration of elective AAA repair at a single tertiary unit were analysed yearly between 2010 and 2014. Clinic, casualty and theatre event codes were searched to obtain all AAAs treated. The results of cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) were assessed. RESULTS For the 85 centres that reported outcomes in all three five-year periods, the median number of AAAs treated per unit increased between the periods 2008-2012 and 2010-2014 from 192 to 214 per year (p=0.006). In the single centre cohort study, the proportion of patients offered elective AAA repair increased from 74% in 2009-2010 to 81% in 2013-2014, with a maximum of 84% in 2012-2013. The age, aneurysm size and CPET results (anaerobic threshold levels) for those eventually offered elective treatment did not differ significantly between 2010 and 2014. CONCLUSIONS The results do not support the assumption that reporting individual surgeon outcomes is associated with a risk averse strategy regarding patient selection in aneurysm surgery at present.

  10. Polymorphisms of the MMP-9 gene and abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Linda; Allcock, Richard; van Bockxmeer, Frank; Warrington, Nicole; Palmer, Lyle J; Iacopetta, Barry; Golledge, Jonathan; Norman, Paul E

    2008-01-01

    Background Increased matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity has been implicated in the formation of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). The aim of the present study was to explore the association between potentially functional variants of the MMP-9 gene and AAA. Method The −1562C>T and −1811A>T variants of the MMP-9 gene were genotyped in 678 men with AAAs (>30mm in diameter) and 659 controls (aortic diameter 19−22mm) recruited from a population-based trial of screening for AAAs. The levels of MMP-9 were measured in a random subset of 300 cases and 84 controls. The association between genetic variants (including haplotypes) and AAA was assessed using multivariate logistic regression. Results There was no association between the MMP-9 −1562C>T (OR 0.70 95%CI 0.27, 1.82) or −1811A>T (OR 0.71, 95%CI 0.28, 1.85) genotypes, or the most common haplotype (OR 0.81 95%CI 0.62, 1.05), and AAA. The serum MMP-9 concentration (ng/mL) was higher in cases than controls and in minor allele carriers in cases and controls although the differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion The results suggest that a genetic tendency to have higher levels of circulating MMP-9 is not associated with AAAs. PMID:18763261

  11. Pilot study of dynamic cine CT angiography for the evaluation of abdominal aortic aneurysms : Implications for endograft treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teutelink, A; Rutten, A; Muhs, BE; Olree, M; van Herwaarden, JA; de Vos, AM; Prokop, M; Moll, FL; Verhagen, HJM

    Purpose: To utilize 40-slice electrocardiographically (ECG)-gated cine computed tomographic angiography (CTA) to characterize normal aortic motion during the cardiac cycle at relevant anatomical landmarks in preoperative abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patients. Methods: In 10 consecutive

  12. Office-based ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blois, Beau

    2012-03-01

    To assess the efficacy of an office-based, family physician–administered ultrasound examination to screen for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). A prospective observational study. Consecutive patients were approached by nonphysician staff. Rural family physician offices in Grand Forks and Revelstoke, BC. The Canadian Society for Vascular Surgery screening recommendations for AAA were used to help select patients who were at risk of AAA. All men 65 years of age or older were included. Women 65 years of age or older were included if they were current smokers or had diabetes, hypertension, a history of coronary artery disease, or a family history of AAA. A focused “quick screen”, which measured the maximal diameter of the abdominal aorta using point-of-care ultrasound technology, was performed in the office by a resident physician trained in emergency ultrasonography. Each patient was then booked for a criterion standard scan (i.e., a conventional abdominal ultrasound scan performed by a technician and interpreted by a radiologist). The maximal abdominal aortic diameter measured by ultrasound in the office was compared with that measured by the criterion standard method. The time to screen each patient was recorded. Forty-five patients were included in data analysis; 62% of participants were men. The mean age was 73 years. The mean pairwise difference between the office-based ultrasound scan and the criterion standard scan was not statistically significant. The mean absolute difference between the 2 scans was 0.20 cm (95% CI 0.15 to 0.25 cm). Correlation between the scans was 0.81. The office-based ultrasound scan had both a sensitivity and a specificity of 100%. The mean time to screen each patient was 212 seconds (95% CI 194 to 230 seconds). Abdominal aortic aneurysm screening can be safely performed in the office by family physicians who are trained to use point-of- care ultrasound technology. The screening test can be completed within the time constraints of a

  13. Cardiovascular Disease in Ageing: An Overview on Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm as an Emerging Inflammatory Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calogera Pisano

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Medial degeneration associated with thoracic aortic aneurysm and acute aortic dissection was originally described by Erdheim as a noninflammatory lesion related to the loss of smooth muscle cells and elastic fibre fragmentation in the media. Recent evidences propose the strong role of a chronic immune/inflammatory process in aneurysm evocation and progression. The coexistence of inflammatory cells with markers of apoptotic vascular cell death in the media of ascending aorta with aneurysms and type A dissections raises the possibility that activated T cells and macrophages may contribute to the elimination of smooth muscle cells and degradation of the matrix. On the other hand, several inflammatory pathways (including TGF-β, TLR-4 interferon-γ, chemokines, and interferon-γ seem to be involved in the medial degeneration related to aged and dilated aorta. This is an overview on thoracic aortic aneurysm as an emerging inflammatory disease.

  14. Cost-effectiveness analysis of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms based on five year results from a randomised hospital based mass screening trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Juul, Søren; Fasting, H

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the cost effectiveness of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA).......The aim of this study was to estimate the cost effectiveness of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA)....

  15. A multicentre observational study of the outcomes of screening detected sub-aneurysmal aortic dilatation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wild, J B; Stather, P W; Biancari, F

    2013-01-01

    of patients with screening detected sub aneurysmal aortic dilatation. DESIGN AND METHODS: Individual patient data was obtained from 8 screening programmes that had performed long term follow up of patients with sub aneurysmal aortic dilatation. Outcome measures recorded were the progression to true aneurysmal...... dilatation (aortic diameter 30 mm or greater), progression to size threshold for surgical intervention (55 mm) and aneurysm rupture. RESULTS: Aortic measurements for 1696 men and women (median age 66 years at initial scan) with sub-aneurysmal aortae were obtained, median period of follow up was 4.0 years...... (range 0.1-19.0 years). Following Kaplan Meier and life table analysis 67.7% of patients with 5 complete years of surveillance reached an aortic diameter of 30 mm or greater however 0.9% had an aortic diameter of 54 mm. A total of 26.2% of patients with 10 complete years of follow up had an AAA...

  16. Endovascular repair of traumatic thoracic aortic tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, M Ashraf; Kirk, Jeffrey S; Cuff, Robert F; Banegas, Shonda L; Ambrosi, Gavin M; Liao, Timothy H; Chambers, Christopher M; Wong, Peter Y; Heiser, John C

    2012-03-01

    Patients with thoracic aorta injuries (TAI) present a unique challenge. The purpose of this study was to review the outcomes of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in patients with TAI. A retrospective chart review of all patients admitted for TEVAR for trauma was performed. In a 5-year period, 19 patients (6 women and 13 men; average age, 42 y) were admitted to our trauma center with TAI. Mechanism of injury was a motor vehicle crash in 12 patients, motorcycle crash in 2 patients, automobile-pedestrian accident in 2 patients, 1 fall, 1 crush injury, and 1 stab wound to the back. A thoracic endograft was used in 6 patients and proximal aortic cuffs were used in 13 patients (68%). One patient (5%) died. There were no strokes, myocardial infarctions, paraplegia, or renal failure. TEVAR for TAI appears to be a safe option for patients with multiple injuries. TEVAR in young patients is still controversial because long-term endograft behavior is unknown. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ruptured aortic aneurysm in a coyote (Canis latrans) from South Carolina.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Debra, Lee; Schrecengost, Joshua; Kilgo, John; Ray, Scott; Miller, Karl V.

    2007-07-01

    Abstract – A radio-collared adult female coyote (Canis latrans) from South Carolina was found dead with no apparent signs of trauma or struggle. Necropsy revealed a ruptured aortic aneurysm within the thoracic cavity as well as severe heartworm infection, with paracites present in the caudal vena cava. Histologically, inflammatory cell infiltrates were frequent in the aneurysm and consisted of eosinophils, neutrophils, lymphocytes, plasma cells, and macrophages. Bacteria, fungi, and paracites were not found in the aneurysm. Death was due to exsanguinations. This represents a first report of an aneurysm in a coyote.

  18. Aortic stentgrafts and en dovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-07-19

    Jul 19, 2007 ... intensive care unit (ICU) stay, less perioperative morbidity, earlier ambulation and shorter ... new technology, to being currently the widely accepted alternative treatment option for AAA ... overall cost and similar overall mortality rates compared with OR. .... EVAR is performed with local, regional. (epidural) or ...

  19. Value of volume measurements in evaluating abdominal aortic aneurysms growth rate and need for surgical treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kontopodis, Nikolaos, E-mail: kontopodisn@yahoo.gr [Department of Vascular Surgery, University of Crete Medical School, Heraklion (Greece); Metaxa, Eleni, E-mail: emmetaxa@gmail.com [Institute of Applied and Computational Mathematics, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Papaharilaou, Yannis, E-mail: yannisp@iacm.forth.gr [Institute of Applied and Computational Mathematics, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Georgakarakos, Efstratios, E-mail: efstratiosgeorg@gmail.com [Vascular Surgery Department, “Demokritus” University of Thrace Medical School, Alexandroupolis (Greece); Tsetis, Dimitris, E-mail: tsetis@med.uoc.gr [Interventional Radiology Unit, Department of Radiology, University of Crete Medical School, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Ioannou, Christos V., E-mail: ioannou@med.uoc.gr [Department of Vascular Surgery, University of Crete Medical School, Heraklion (Greece)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To examine whether indices other than the traditionally used abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) maximum diameter, such as AAA volume, intraluminal thrombus (ILT) thickness and ILT volume, may be superior to evaluate aneurismal enlargement. Materials and methods: Thirty-four small AAAs (initially presenting a maximum diameter <5.5 cm which is the threshold for surgical repair) with an initial and a follow-up CT were examined. Median increase and percentile annual change of these variables was calculated. Correlation between growth rates as determined by the new indices under evaluation and those of maximum diameter were assessed. AAAs were divided according to outcome (surveillance vs. elective repair after follow-up which is based on the maximum diameter criterion) and according to growth rate (high vs. low) based on four indices. Contingency between groups of high/low growth rate regarding each of the four indices on one hand and those regarding need for surgical repair on the other was assessed. Results: A strong correlation between growth rates of maximum diameter and those of AAA and ILT volumes could be established. Evaluation of contingency between groups of outcome and those of growth rate revealed significant associations only for AAA and ILT volumes. Subsequently AAAs with a rapid volumetric increase over time had a likelihood ratio of 10 to be operated compared to those with a slower enlargement. Regarding increase of maximum diameter, likelihood ratio between AAAs with rapid and those with slow expansion was only 3. Conclusion: Growth rate of aneurysms regarding 3Dimensional indices of AAA and ILT volumes is significantly associated with the need for surgical intervention while the same does not hold for growth rates determined by 2Dimensional indices of maximum diameter and ILT thickness.

  20. Value of volume measurements in evaluating abdominal aortic aneurysms growth rate and need for surgical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kontopodis, Nikolaos; Metaxa, Eleni; Papaharilaou, Yannis; Georgakarakos, Efstratios; Tsetis, Dimitris; Ioannou, Christos V.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To examine whether indices other than the traditionally used abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) maximum diameter, such as AAA volume, intraluminal thrombus (ILT) thickness and ILT volume, may be superior to evaluate aneurismal enlargement. Materials and methods: Thirty-four small AAAs (initially presenting a maximum diameter <5.5 cm which is the threshold for surgical repair) with an initial and a follow-up CT were examined. Median increase and percentile annual change of these variables was calculated. Correlation between growth rates as determined by the new indices under evaluation and those of maximum diameter were assessed. AAAs were divided according to outcome (surveillance vs. elective repair after follow-up which is based on the maximum diameter criterion) and according to growth rate (high vs. low) based on four indices. Contingency between groups of high/low growth rate regarding each of the four indices on one hand and those regarding need for surgical repair on the other was assessed. Results: A strong correlation between growth rates of maximum diameter and those of AAA and ILT volumes could be established. Evaluation of contingency between groups of outcome and those of growth rate revealed significant associations only for AAA and ILT volumes. Subsequently AAAs with a rapid volumetric increase over time had a likelihood ratio of 10 to be operated compared to those with a slower enlargement. Regarding increase of maximum diameter, likelihood ratio between AAAs with rapid and those with slow expansion was only 3. Conclusion: Growth rate of aneurysms regarding 3Dimensional indices of AAA and ILT volumes is significantly associated with the need for surgical intervention while the same does not hold for growth rates determined by 2Dimensional indices of maximum diameter and ILT thickness

  1. [An implantable micro-device using wireless power transmission for measuring aortic aneurysm sac pressure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xudong; Ge, Bin; Wang, Wenxing

    2013-08-01

    In order to detect endoleaks after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), we developed an implantable micro-device based on wireless power transmission to measure aortic aneurysm sac pressure. The implantable micro-device is composed of a miniature wireless pressure sensor, an energy transmitting coil, a data recorder and a data processing platform. Power transmission without interconnecting wires is performed by a transmitting coil and a receiving coil. The coupling efficiency of wireless power transmission depends on the coupling coefficient between the transmitting coil and the receiving coil. With theoretical analysis and experimental study, we optimized the geometry of the receiving coil to increase the coupling coefficient. In order to keep efficiency balance and satisfy the maximizing conditions, we designed a closed loop power transmission circuit, including a receiving voltage feedback module based on wireless communication. The closed loop improved the stability and reliability of transmission energy. The prototype of the micro-device has been developed and the experiment has been performed. The experiments showed that the micro-device was feasible and valid. For normal operation, the distance between the transmitting coil and the receiving coil is smaller than 8cm. Besides, the distance between the micro-device and the data recorder is within 50cm.

  2. Screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm reduces overall mortality in men. A meta-analysis of the mid- and long-term effects of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Norman, P

    2008-01-01

    Four randomised controlled trials of screening older men for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) have been completed. A meta-analysis was performed to examine the pooled effects of screening on both mid- and long-term AAA-related and total mortality, and operations for AAA....

  3. Elevation of Matrix Metalloproteinases in Different Areas of Ascending Aortic Aneurysms in Patients with Bicuspid and Tricuspid Aortic Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah A. Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Our aim is to investigate the elevation of matrix proteins in tissues obtained from distal, above the sinotubular junction (proximal, concave, and convex sites of aneurysms in the ascending aorta using a simultaneous multiplex protein detection system. Tissues were collected from 41 patients with ascending aortic aneurysms. A total of 31 patients had a bicuspid aortic valve (BAV, whereas 10 had a tricuspid aortic valve (TAV. Concave and convex aortic site samples were collected from all patients, whereas proximal and distal convexity samples were obtained from 19 patients with BAV and 7 patients with TAV. Simultaneous detection of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and their inhibitors (TIMPs was performed at each of the four aortic sites. MMP-2 levels were higher in the concave aortic sites than in the convex aortic sites. In contrast, MMP-8 levels were higher in the convex sites than in the concave sites, as were MMP-9 levels. In both BAV and TAV patients, TIMP-3 levels were higher in the concave sites than in the convex sites. However, TIMP-2 and TIMP-4 levels were significantly elevated in the sinotubular proximal aorta of BAV patients. Simultaneous detection of MMPs and TIMPs revealed different levels at different aortic sites in the same patient.

  4. A tetrad of bicuspid aortic valve association: A single-stage repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Ramachandra; Patnaik, A. N.; Mishra, Ramesh C.; Kumari, N. Rama; Gulati, A. S.

    2012-01-01

    We report a 27 years old male who presented with a combination of both congenital and acquired cardiac defects. This syndrome complex includes congenital bicuspid aortic valve, Seller's grade II aortic regurgitation, juxta- subclavian coarctation, stenosis of ostium of left subclavian artery and ruptured sinus of Valsalva aneurysm without any evidence of infective endocarditis. This type of constellation is extremely rare. Neither coarctation of aorta with left subclavian artery stenosis nor the rupture of sinus Valsalva had a favorable pathology for percutaneus intervention. Taking account into morbidity associated with repeated surgery and anesthesia patient underwent a single stage surgical repair of both the defects by two surgical incisions. The approaches include median sternotomy for rupture of sinus of Valsalva and lateral thoracotomy for coarctation with left subclavian artery stenosis. The surgery was uneventful. After three months follow up echocardiography showed mild residual gradient across the repaired coarctation segment, mild aortic regurgitation and no residual left to right shunt. This patient is under follow up. This is an extremely rare case of single stage successful repair of coarctation and rupture of sinus of Valsalva associated with congenital bicuspid aortic valve. PMID:22629035

  5. Perfusion computed tomography imaging of abdominal aortic aneurysms may be of value for patient specific rupture risk estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontopodis, Nikolaos; Galanakis, Nikolaos; Tsetis, Dimitrios; Ioannou, Christos V

    2017-04-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) continues to pose a significant cause of unexpected mortality in the developed countries with its incidence constantly rising. The indication of elective surgical repair is currently based on the maximum diameter and growth rate criteria which represent an oversimplification of the Law of Laplace stating that the stress exerted in a cylinder or sphere is proportional to its radius. These criteria fail to capture the complex pathophysiology of the aneurismal disease thus often leading to therapeutic inaccuracies (treating large AAAs with a very low actual rupture risk while observing smaller ones with a much greater risk). Aneurysmal disease is mainly a degenerative process leading to loss of structural integrity of the diseased aortic wall which cannot withhold the stresses due to systemic pressurization. Moreover aortic wall degeneration has been shown to be a localized phenomenon and rupture depends on the pointwise comparison of strength and stress rather than a global aortic wall weakening. Ex-vivo mechanical studies have related vessel wall hypoxia to loss of structural endurance and reduced wall strength. Therefore a module to capture in vivo variation of aortic wall blood supply and oxygenation would be of value for the evaluation of AAA rupture risk. Perfusion computed tomography (PCT) imaging represents a novel technique which has been already used to estimate tissue vascularity in several clinical conditions but not aneurismal disease. We hypothesize that PCT could be used as an adjunct tool during AAA diagnostics in order to evaluate aortic wall oxygenation in vivo, therefore providing a possible means to identify weak spots making the lesion amenable to rupture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Endovascular Repair of Aortic Dissection in Marfan Syndrome: Current Status and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosario Parisi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decades, improvement of medical and surgical therapy has increased life expectancy in Marfan patients. Consequently, the number of such patients requiring secondary interventions on the descending thoracic aorta due to new or residual dissections, and distal aneurysm formation has substantially enlarged. Surgical and endovascular procedures represent two valuable options of treatment, both associated with advantages and drawbacks. The aim of the present manuscript was to review endovascular outcomes in Marfan syndrome and to assess the potential role of Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair (TEVAR in this subset of patients.

  7. Aortocaval fistula (ACF) in patients operated for ruptured aortic aneurysm (rAAA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warning, Karina; Houlind, Kim Christian; Ravn, Hans

    Aortocaval fistula (ACF) in patients operated for Ruptured Acute Aorta Aneurysm (rAAA): A surgical challenge. Introduction Aortocaval fistula is a rare complication of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). It been reported to be present in less than 1% of all AAAs. ACF arise in patients with large...... aneurysms and is typically discovered peroperatively in patients with rAAA. Open surgical treatment is associated with high mortality and morbidity. ACF is a result of spontaneously rupture of large atherosclerotic aneurysms into the inferior vena cava in 80%, 15% arise after trauma and 5% are iatrogenic....... Patients During the last 9 month, we have operated three cases with rAAA and ACF. All patients had an open, acute operation. All ACFs detected during operation. Common for all operations was that the patients had large aneurysms (>10 cm) and extensive bleeding (3-4 l) immediately when the aneurysm...

  8. Cost-effectiveness of endovascular repair, open repair, and conservative management of splenic artery aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogendoorn, Wouter; Lavida, Anthi; Hunink, M. G Myriam; Moll, Frans L.; Geroulakos, George; Muhs, Bart E.; Sumpio, Bauer E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Open repair (OPEN) and conservative management (CONS) have been the treatments of choice for splenic artery aneurysms (SAAs) for many years. Endovascular repair (EV) has been increasingly used with good short-term results. In this study, we evaluated the cost-effectiveness of OPEN, EV, and

  9. The cardiac cycle is a major contributor to variability in size measurements of abdominal aortic aneurysms by ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøndal, Nikolaj Fibiger; Bramsen, Morten; Thomsen, Marie Dahl

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the impact of the cardiac cycle on ultrasound measurements of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) diameters.......The objective of the study was to evaluate the impact of the cardiac cycle on ultrasound measurements of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) diameters....

  10. Long-term benefit and cost-effectiveness analysis of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms from a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, J S; Sørensen, J; Søgaard, Rikke

    2010-01-01

    The aim was to estimate long-term mortality benefits and cost-effectiveness of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in men aged 64-73 years.......The aim was to estimate long-term mortality benefits and cost-effectiveness of screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in men aged 64-73 years....

  11. Combined open proximal and stent-graft distal repair for distal arch aneurysms: an alternative to total debranching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zierer, Andreas; Sanchez, Luis A; Moon, Marc R

    2009-07-01

    We present herein a novel, combined, simultaneous open proximal and stent-graft distal repair for complex distal aortic arch aneurysms involving the descending aorta. In the first surgical step, the transverse arch is opened during selective antegrade cerebral perfusion, and a Dacron graft (DuPont, Wilmington, DE) is positioned down the descending aorta in an elephant trunk-like fashion with its proximal free margin sutured circumferentially to the aorta just distal to the left subclavian or left common carotid artery. With the graft serving as the new proximal landing zone, subsequent endovascular repair is performed antegrade during rewarming through the ascending aorta.

  12. Ultrasound surveillance of endovascular aneurysm repair: a safe modality versus computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, John T; Boros, Michael J; Combs, Kristin

    2007-11-01

    Routine ultrasound surveillance is adequate and safe for monitoring endovascular aneurysm repairs (EVARs). A retrospective chart review including 160 endograft patients was performed from August 2000 to September 2005. All ultrasound examinations (n = 359) were performed by a board-certified vascular surgery group's accredited laboratory. Registered vascular technologists utilized the same equipment consisting of Siemens Antares high-definition ultrasonography with tissue harmonics and color flow Doppler. An identical protocol was followed by each technologist: scan body and both limbs of the endograft and distal iliac vessels, measure anterior-posterior aneurysm sac size, and detect intrasac pulsatility and color flow. Statistical analysis utilized Pearson's correlation coefficient and the paired t-test. Forty-one endoleaks were discovered out of the 359 exams (11.4%). There were type I (7, 17%), type II (26, 63%), and combined type I with type II (8, 20%) endoleaks. Correlation with computed tomography (CT) was obtained in 35 of these cases. CT discovered three endoleaks that were not seen with ultrasound. However, these particular ultrasound exams were inadequate due to additional factors (bowel gas, body habitus, hernia), which prompted CT investigation and, hence, endoleak discovery. Of the 41 endoleaks found on ultrasound, only 14 were seen on CT. Specifically, 26 type II endoleaks were seen with ultrasound versus only nine during CT. Additional factors addressed included comparison between ultrasound and CT of residual aneurysm sac measurements and conditions limiting ultrasound examination. Although criticized in the past, color flow ultrasonography is a safe and effective modality for surveillance of aortic endografts. Utilizing ultrasound to analyze abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) sac dimensions and endoleak detection is statistically sound for screening AAA status post-EVAR.

  13. Screening of COPD patients for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flessenkaemper IH

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ingo H Flessenkaemper,1 Robert Loddenkemper,2 Stephanie Roll,3 Kathrin Enke-Melzer,1 Henrik Wurps,2 Torsten T Bauer21Department for Vascular Medicine, 2Department of Pneumology, Helios Klinikum Emil von Behring, Berlin, Germany; 3Institute for Social Medicine, Epidemiology and Health Economics, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, GermanyPurpose: Screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA in “men aged over 65 years who have ever smoked” is a recommended policy. To reduce the number of screenings, it may be of value to define subgroups with a higher prevalence of AAA. Since chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and AAA are associated with several common risk factors, this study investigates the prevalence of AAA in COPD patients.Patients and methods: Patients with COPD were identified via the hospital information system. Inclusion criteria were: COPD stage I–IV, ability to give full consent, and age >18 years; exclusion criteria were: patient too obese for an ultrasound check, previously diagnosed AAA, prior surgery for AAA, or ethical grounds such as concomitant advanced malignant or end-stage disease. The primary endpoint of the study was an aortic diameter measured by ultrasound of ≥30 mm. Defined secondary endpoints were evaluated on the basis of medical records and interviews.Results: Of the 1,180 identified COPD patients, 589 were included in this prospective study. In 22 patients (3.70%, the aortic diameter was ≥30 mm, representing an AAA prevalence of 6.72% among males aged >65 years. The risk of AAA increased with the following comorbidities/risk factors: male sex (odds ratio [OR] 2.98, coronary heart disease (OR 2.81, peripheral arterial occlusive disease (OR 2.47, hyperlipoproteinemia (OR 2.77, AAA in the family history (OR 3.95, and COPD stage I/II versus IV (OR 1.81.Conclusion: The overall AAA prevalence of 3.7% in our group of COPD patients is similar to that of the general population aged >65

  14. Thoracic aortic aneurysm in a buck associated with caseous lymphadenitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.R. Pinheiro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the clinical, bacteriological and pathological findings of a thoracic aortic aneurysm in a four-year-old Anglo-Nubian goat buck, related to a framework of visceral caseous lymphadenitis. General clinical examination showed heart rate of 75 beats per minute, respiratory rate of 20 movements per minute and ruminal movements of four movements per minute. Superficial lymph nodes were normal upon palpation. Rectal temperature was slightly high (40.5°C. Blood test showed an intense leukocytosis (54,000/µL, characterized by strong neutrophil shift to the left. At necropsy, a large blood clot was detected in the thoracic cavity. The thickening of the myocardium and dilatation of the aorta in the thoracic portion, presenting a saculiform format was also observed. A large number of abscesses were disseminated in the media and intima layers of aorta. The aorta lumen obstruction by arterial plaques consisting of inflammatory infiltrate, predominantly neutrophilic was also detected. Abscesses were found spread in turbinate, rumen, reticulum, kidneys, liver, spleen, testicles and aorta wall. The microbiological exam of exudate confirmed Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis as the causal agent.

  15. Medical image of the week: massive abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larson M

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. An 88 year-old presented to the emergency department with left flank and lower back pain as well as lower abdominal fullness. The fullness had started 2 days prior, but the left flank pain acutely started in the early morning before presenting. He had a history of unmedicated hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and mild vertigo. His review of systems was positive for chills and difficulty urinating but no hematuria. He was a non-smoker, and had undergone orthopedic surgeries but had otherwise avoided emergent hospitalizations. On exam, vitals were unremarkable; there was no flank nor costovertebral angle tenderness; however, a midline pulsatile mass was present. An initial non-contrast CT abdomen/pelvis revealed a massive abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA, Figure 1. Follow-up CT angiogram of the AAA can be seen in Figure 2. Upon further questioning, he had undergone a research study some 30 years earlier involving ultrasound to screen for AAA and was told he ...

  16. Recognition and treatment of outflow tract stenosis during and after endovascular exclusion for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Qingsheng; Jing Zaiping; Zhao Zhiqing; Bao Junmin; Zhao Jun; Feng Xiang; Feng Rui; Huang Sheng

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the cognition and treatment of outflow tract stenosis in and after endovascular exclusion for abdominal aortic aneurysm. Methods: From Mar 1997 to Oct 2002, in 136 patients undergoing abdominal aortic aneurysm endovascular exclusion, 8 patients had outflow tract stenosis during the operation, and 3 patients had outflow tract stenosis after operation. The stenosis of 5 patients occurred at the crotch of the graft-stent. PTA was done in 7 patients and stents were placed in stenotic segment in 2 patients. 2 patients were treated with crossover operation. Results: Following up 1 month to 2 years, all patients have no lower limbs ischemia. Conclusions: The diagnosis of outflow tract stenosis during and after abdominal endovascular exclusion for aortic aneurysm must be in time. The treatment should be according to the different causes of stenosis

  17. Perioperative nursing for patients receiving endovascular therapy for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Yanfen; Pan Wei; Zhang Hongpeng; Guo Wei; Liu Xiaoping; Wei Ren

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the nursing strategy and practical measures for patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm during the perioperative period of endovascular intervention. Methods: Endovascular therapy was carried out in 34 patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm,who were encountered in our department during the period of July 1997 to September 2008. The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed and the nursing points were summarized. Results: The average hospitalization days of the 34 patients were (14 ± 5) days, the mortality rate within 30 days was 23.5% (8/34). No nursing-related complications occurred. Conclusion: A comprehensive understanding of the mechanism, development and clinical evolution of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm is very important for nursing care. For nursing staff, well mastering the relevant nursing technique, carefully guarding against any nursing errors and lessening patient's suffering as far as possible, all these are the task of primary importance. (authors)

  18. Infected aortic aneurysm presenting as prevertebral abscess in magnetic resonance imaging: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Jung Re; Ko, Seong Joo; Heo, Sang Taek; Kim, Jin Seok; Kim, Seung Hyoung

    2013-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of mass-like lesions around the aorta includes saccular pseudoaneurysms and abscesses. A 69-year-old female was admitted with multiple abscesses and fluid collections in several muscles and joints. Methicillin susceptible Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from her blood and pus. Even though she was treated with repeated operations and appropriate antibiotics, her conditions worsened with persistent fever and newly developed abscesses at other sites. Serial enhanced computed tomography (CT) revealed a newly developed saccular abdominal aortic aneurysm in the retroaortic space at the celiac axis level. However, the infected aortic aneurysm mimicked a prevertebral abscess on enhanced spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) due to its heterogeneous signal intensity caused by intraaneurysmal turbulent blood flow. We report to alert the pitfall in the diagnosis of saccular aortic aneurysm using spinal MRI and the importance of serial enhanced CT study in highly suspicious patients.

  19. Preoperative evaluation of the artery of adamkiewicz by MR angiography and CT angiography in patients with a thoracic aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niinuma, Hiroyuki; Ohira, Atsushi; Makita, Shinji; Moriai, Yoshiteru; Hiramori, Katsuhiko; Yoshioka, Kunihiro; Nakajima, Takayuki; Kawazoe, Kohei

    2002-01-01

    Paraplegia is known as an extremely serious and important complication of surgical repair in patients with a thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysm. It is important to evaluate the artery of Adamkiewicz (AdA) before surgical repair to prevent paraplegia. But the AdA is difficult to visualize by the invasive and hazardous, conventional selective angiography. The aim of this study was to visualize AdA by MR angiography (MRA) and CT angiography (CTA). Twenty-one consecutive patients with a thoracic aortic aneurysm underwent both gadolinium-enhanced, three-dimensional MRA and CTA using multislice helical CT. The AdA was successfully visualized in 15 of the 21 patients (71.4%) by MRA, and in 17 of those 21 patients (80.9%) by CTA. Its continuity was depicted in 12 of 15 patients (80%) by MRA, and in 9 of 17 patients (47%) by CTA. AdA was visualized at 85.7% by MRA or CTA, respectively. This study shows that CTA is a much more sensitive method to detect AdA than MRA. On the other hand, MRA is better to evaluate the continuity of AdA from the descending aorta to the anterior spinal artery, than CTA. Therefore, MRA and CTA are both useful for a preoperative evaluation of AdA and its detailed vascular anatomy from the aorta to the anterior spinal artery. (author)

  20. Survival following ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm before and during the IMPROVE Trial: a single-centre series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambler, G K; Twine, C P; Shak, J; Rollins, K E; Varty, K; Coughlin, P A; Hayes, P D; Boyle, J R

    2014-04-01

    The first large-scale randomised trial (Immediate Management of the Patient with Rupture: Open Versus Endovascular repair [IMPROVE]) for endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rEVAR) has recently finished recruiting patients. The aim of this study was to examine the impact on survival after rEVAR when the IMPROVE protocol was initiated in a high volume abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) centre previously performing rEVAR. One hundred and sixty-nine patients requiring emergency infrarenal AAA repair from January 2006 to April 2013 were included. Eighty-four patients were treated before (38 rEVAR, 46 open) and 85 (31 rEVAR, 54 open) were treated during the trial period. A retrospective analysis was performed. Before the trial, there was a significant survival benefit for rEVAR over open repair (90-day mortality 13% vs. 30%, p = .04, difference remained significant up to 2 years postoperatively). This survival benefit was lost after starting randomisation (90-day mortality 35% vs. 33%, p = .93). There was an increase in overall 30-day mortality from 15% to 31% (p = .02), while there was no change for open repair (p = .438). There was a significant decrease in general anaesthetic use (p = .002) for patients treated during the trial. Randomised patients had shorter hospital and intensive treatment unit stays (p = .006 and p = .03 respectively). The change in survival seen during the IMROVE trial highlights the need for randomised rather than cohort data to eliminate selection bias. These results from a single centre reinforce those recently reported in IMPROVE. Copyright © 2014 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Investigation on the Regional Loss Factor and Its Anisotropy for Aortic Aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nastaran Shahmansouri

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available An aortic aneurysm is a lethal arterial disease that mainly occurs in the thoracic and abdominal regions of the aorta. Thoracic aortic aneurysms are prevalent in the root/ascending parts of the aorta and can lead to aortic rupture resulting in the sudden death of patients. Understanding the biomechanical and histopathological changes associated with ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (ATAAs, this study investigates the mechanical properties of the aorta during strip-biaxial tensile cycles. The loss factor—defined as the ratio of dissipated energy to the energy absorbed during a tensile cycle—the incremental modulus, and their anisotropy indexes were compared with the media fiber compositions for aneurysmal (n = 26 and control (n = 4 human ascending aortas. The aneurysmal aortas were categorized into the aortas with bicuspid aortic valves (BAV and tricuspid aortic valves (TAV. The strip-biaxial loss factor correlates well with the diameter of the aortas with BAV and TAV (for the axial direction, respectively, R2 = 0.71, p = 0.0022 and R2 = 0.54, p = 0.0096. The loss factor increases significantly with patients’ age in the BAV group (for the axial direction: R2 = 0.45, p = 0.0164. The loss factor is isotropic for all TAV quadrants, whereas it is on average only isotropic in the anterior and outer curvature regions of the BAV group. The results suggest that loss factor may be a useful surrogate measure to describe the histopathology of aneurysmal tissue and to demonstrate the differences between ATAAs with the BAV and TAV.

  2. Surgical repair of a celiac artery aneurysm using a sutureless proximal anastomosis device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuro Uchida, MD, PhD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Some celiac artery aneurysms are not suitable for endovascular therapy. We describe the case of a 63-year-old man with a celiac trunk aneurysm extending to the hepatosplenic bifurcation. The aneurysm was resected and oversewn at the origin from the abdominal aorta. A saphenous vein bypass from the supraceliac aorta to the celiac artery bifurcation was performed using a sutureless anastomotic device (PAS-Port system; Cardica, Redwood City, Calif to create the proximal anastomosis, eliminating the need for aortic clamping. This system is thought to make direct proximal aortic anastomosis safe and easy in patients requiring surgical reconstruction of celiac artery aneurysms.

  3. Mild aerobic exercise blocks elastin fiber fragmentation and aortic dilatation in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome associated aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Christine; Nielsen, Cory; Alex, Ramona; Cooper, Kimbal; Farney, Michael; Gaufin, Douglas; Cui, Jason Z; van Breemen, Cornelis; Broderick, Tom L; Vallejo-Elias, Johana; Esfandiarei, Mitra

    2017-07-01

    Regular low-impact physical activity is generally allowed in patients with Marfan syndrome, a connective tissue disorder caused by heterozygous mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene. However, being above average in height encourages young adults with this syndrome to engage in high-intensity contact sports, which unfortunately increases the risk for aortic aneurysm and rupture, the leading cause of death in Marfan syndrome. In this study, we investigated the effects of voluntary (cage-wheel) or forced (treadmill) aerobic exercise at different intensities on aortic function and structure in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome. Four-week-old Marfan and wild-type mice were subjected to voluntary and forced exercise regimens or sedentary lifestyle for 5 mo. Thoracic aortic tissue was isolated and subjected to structural and functional studies. Our data showed that exercise improved aortic wall structure and function in Marfan mice and that the beneficial effect was biphasic, with an optimum at low intensity exercise (55-65% V̇o 2max ) and tapering off at a higher intensity of exercise (85% V̇o 2max ). The mechanism underlying the reduced elastin fragmentation in Marfan mice involved reduction of the expression of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 within the aortic wall. These findings present the first evidence of potential beneficial effects of mild exercise on the structural integrity of the aortic wall in Marfan syndrome associated aneurysm. Our finding that moderate, but not strenuous, exercise protects aortic structure and function in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome could have important implications for the medical care of young Marfan patients. NEW & NOTEWORTHY The present study provides conclusive scientific evidence that daily exercise can improve aortic health in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome associated aortic aneurysm, and it establishes the threshold for the exercise intensity beyond which exercise may not be as protective. These findings establish a platform

  4. Outcomes of Endovascular Aneurysm Repair using the Ovation Stent Graft System in Adverse Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, Nicholas S; Moore, Aiden; Seriki, Dare; Ghosh, Jonathan

    2018-04-01

    The aim was the evaluation of mid-term efficacy and safety outcome measures for the Ovation (Endologix, Santa Rosa, CA, USA) stent graft system in the management of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms (iAAA) with adverse anatomy. A retrospective observational study of all patients undergoing elective iAAA repair was carried out from 2012 to 2017 using Ovation Prime or iX stent grafts with a minimum of 3 months follow-up at a single UK vascular centre. Post-operative surveillance involved computed tomography scans at 3 months and 1 year, with duplex ultrasound yearly thereafter. Outcome measures were established with retrospective analysis of pre- and post-operative imaging, and included peri-operative mortality, major adverse events, limb complications, aneurysm diameter change, and endoleak rates. All patients were within Ovation instructions for use (IFU), and assessment was made to determine whether aneurysms had anatomical features considered adverse for other commonly used stent graft platforms. Ovation stent grafts were implanted in 52 patients (79% male, mean age 75.7 years) with a mean aneurysm diameter of 62.5 mm (range 55-107 mm). There was 100% technical deployment success. The 30 day mortality was 0% and there was no aneurysm related mortality during follow-up (median 24 months, range 3-48 months). There were no type I or III endoleaks, but 19% developed type II endoleaks with one patient requiring re-intervention. No iliac limb occlusions were identified but one case required relining for limb kinking. All 52 cases were within the IFU for Ovation but only 12% met the IFU criteria for the Cook and Medtronic devices. The mid-term experience with Ovation demonstrates safe, durable treatment of iAAAs, including those with unfavourable anatomy, frequently off IFU for other commonly used devices. Copyright © 2017 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. "Elephant trunk" and endovascular stentgrafting : a hybrid approach to the treatment of extensive thoracic aortic aneurysm

    OpenAIRE

    Holubec, Tomás; Raupach, Jan; Dominik, Jan; Vojácek, Jan

    2013-01-01

    A hybrid approach to elephant trunk technique for treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms combines a conventional surgical and endovascular therapy. Compared to surgery alone, there is a presumption that mortality and morbidity is reduced. We present a case report of a 42-year-old man with a giant aneurysm of the entire thoracic aorta, significant aortic and tricuspid regurgitation and ventricular septum defect. The patient underwent multiple consecutive operations and interventions having, am...

  6. Correção endovascular de aneurisma de aorta abdominal e artéria ilíaca comum esquerda em paciente com hemofilia C grave Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm and left common iliac artery in a patient with severe hemophilia C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Quilici Belczak

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A deficiência do fator XI, também conhecida como hemofilia C, é uma doença hematológica hereditária rara, que se manifesta clinicamente com hemorragia persistente após cirurgias, traumas, menorragias e extrações dentárias. Neste artigo, relatou-se a correção endovascular de um paciente com aneurisma de aorta e de artéria ilíaca comum esquerda em um paciente portador de deficiência major do fator XI (atividade do fator XI inferior a 20%. O procedimento foi realizado com sucesso, com o manuseio do distúrbio da coagulação por meio da infusão de plasma fresco no pré-operatório imediato e no pós-operatório, e controle laboratorial da coagulação do paciente.Factor XI deficiency, also known as hemophilia C, is a rare hereditary blood disease that manifests with persistent bleeding after surgery, trauma, menorrhagia, and dental extractions. This article reports an endovascular repair of a patient diagnosed with an aortic and left common iliac aneurysm, with severe factor XI deficiency (factor XI activity below 20%. The procedure was successfully performed with management of the coagulation disorder by preoperative and postoperative infusion of plasma and laboratory control of the coagulation.

  7. Characterizing saccular aortic arch aneurysms from the geometry-flow dynamics relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsume, Kayoko; Shiiya, Norihiko; Takehara, Yasuo; Sugiyama, Masataka; Satoh, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Katsushi; Washiyama, Naoki

    2017-06-01

    Low wall shear stress (WSS) has been reported to be associated with accelerated atherosclerosis, aneurysm growth, or rupture. We evaluated the geometry of aortic arch aneurysms and their relationship with WSS by using the 4-dimensional flow magnetic resonance imaging to better characterize the saccular aneurysms. We analyzed the geometry in 100 patients using multiplanar reconstruction of computed tomography. We evaluated WSS and vortex flow using 4-dimensional flow magnetic resonance imaging in 16 of them, which were compared with 8 age-matched control subjects and eight healthy young volunteers. Eighty-two patients had a saccular aneurysm, and 18 had a fusiform aneurysm. External diameter/aneurysm length ratio and sac depth/neck width ratio of the fusiform aneurysms were constant at 0.76 ± 0.18 and 0.23 ± 0.09, whereas those of saccular aneurysms, especially those involving the outer curvature, were higher and more variable. Vortex flow was always present in the aneurysms, resulting in low WSS. When the sac depth/neck width ratio was less than 0.8, peak WSS correlated inversely with luminal diameter even in the saccular aneurysms. When this ratio exceeded 0.8, which was the case only with the saccular aneurysms, such correlation no longer existed and WSS was invariably low. Fusiform aneurysms elongate as they dilate, and WSS is lower as the diameter is larger. Saccular aneurysms dilate without proportionate elongation, and they, especially those occupying the inner curvature, have higher and variable sac depth/neck width ratio. When this ratio exceeds 0.8, WSS is low regardless of diameter, which may explain their malignant clinical behavior. Copyright © 2016 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Patient and Aneurysm Characteristics Predicting Prolonged Length of Stay After Elective Open AAA Repair in the Endovascular Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas-Berumen, Sergio; Rojas-Miguez, Florencia A; Farber, Alik; Komshian, Sevan; Kalish, Jeffrey A; Rybin, Denis; Doros, Gheorghe; Siracuse, Jeffrey J

    2018-01-01

    Open aortic aneurysm repair (AAA) repair can be resource intensive and associated with a prolonged length of stay (LOS). We sought to examine patient and aneurysm predictors of prolonged LOS to better identify those at risk in the preoperative setting. Patient data were obtained from the targeted AAA American College of Surgery National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database from 2012 to 2014 of patients undergoing open AAA repair. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine predictors of prolonged postoperative LOS defined as greater than 10 days (75th percentile). There were 1172 open AAA repairs identified. The majority (54%) of patients were older than 70 years and male (74%). Surgical approach was transperitoneal (70.9%) and retroperitoneal (29.1%). Aneurysms were 51.4% infrarenal, 33% juxtarenal, 5.7% pararenal, 7.4% suprarenal, and 2.5% type IV thoracoabdominal. Mean and median LOS were 9.1 ± 7.4 and 7 (0-72) days, respectively. Independently associated with extended LOS factors were visceral revascularization (odds ratio [OR]: 5.32, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.77-10.22, P AAA repair. Prospective identification of high-risk patients may allow physicians and hospitals to engage in multidisciplinary collaborations preoperatively to try to improve LOS in this resource-intensive population.

  9. Rupture of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Young Man with Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Maria Weinkouff; Huynh, Khiem Dinh; Baandrup, Ulrik Thorngren; Nielsen, Dorte Guldbrand; Andersen, Niels Holmark

    2018-04-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are very rare in Marfan syndrome. We present a case with a young nonsmoking and normotensive male with Marfan syndrome, who developed an infrarenal AAA that presented with rupture to the retroperitoneal cavity causing life-threatening bleeding shock. The patient had acute aortic surgery and survived. Five months before this incident, the patient had uneventful elective aortic root replacement (ad modum David) due to an enlarged aortic root. At that time, his abdominal aorta was assessed with a routine ultrasound scan that showed a normal-sized abdominal aorta. This documents that the aneurysm had evolved very rapidly despite young age and absence of risk factors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Increased galectin-3 levels are associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm progression and inhibition of galectin-3 decrease elastase-induced AAA development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez-García, Carlos-Ernesto; Tarin, Carlos; Roldan-Montero, Raquel

    2017-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) evolution is unpredictable. Moreover, no specific treatment exists for AAA, except surgery to prevent aortic rupture. Galectin-3 has been previously associated with CVD, but its potential role in AAA have not been addressed. Galectin-3 levels were increased in plasma...... of AAA patients (n=225) compared to controls (n=100). Moreover, galectin-3 concentrations were associated with need for surgical repair, independently of potential confounding factors. Galectin-3 mRNA and protein expression were increased in human AAA samples compared to healthy aortas. Experimental AAA...... in mice was induced by aortic elastase perfusion. Mice were treated i.v. with the galectin-3 inhibitor modified citrus pectin (MCP, 10mg/kg, every other day) or saline. Similar to humans, galectin-3 serum and aortic mRNA levels were also increased in elastase-induced AAA mice compared to control mice...

  11. Suspected leaking abdominal aortic aneurysm: use of sonography in the emergency room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, W P; Hastrup, W; Kohler, T R; Nyberg, D A; Wang, K Y; Vincent, L M; Mack, L A

    1988-07-01

    To determine the value of sonography in the emergent evaluation of suspected leaking abdominal aortic aneurysms, the authors examined 60 patients in the emergency department using sonography and a protocol involving advance radio notification from the ambulance; arrival of sonographic personnel and equipment in the triage room before patient arrival; and, during other triage activities, rapid sonographic evaluation of the aorta for aneurysm and of the paraaortic region for extraluminal blood. Sonographic findings were correlated with surgical results and clinical outcome. When performed under these circumstances, sonography was accurate in demonstrating presence or absence of aneurysm (98%), but its sensitivity for extraluminal blood was poor (4%). A combination of sonographic confirmation of aneurysm, abdominal pain, and unstable hemodynamic condition resulted in the correct decision to perform emergent surgery in 21 of 22 patients (95%). An abbreviated sonographic examination done in the emergency room can provide accurate, useful information about the presence of aneurysm; this procedure does not significantly delay triage of these patients.

  12. The risk of endoleak following stent covering of the internal iliac artery during endovascular aneurysm repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajesparan, K.; Partridge, W.; Refson, J.; Abidia, A.; Aldin, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the risk of endoleak during endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) involving the distal common iliac artery (CIA) when the internal iliac artery (IIA) is covered without prior coil embolization. Materials and methods: Retrospective analysis of 145 (125 men, 20 women) consecutive EVAR cases. Clinical notes and radiological images were reviewed, and data collected on patient demographics, aneurysm morphology, covering of the IIA with or without embolization, presence of endoleaks, and patient symptoms relating to IIA ischaemia. Results: A total of 29 IIAs (10%) were covered in a total of 25 patients. Seven IIAs (24%) were embolized before stent covering (Embolization group), and 22 IIAs (76%) were covered only without embolization (Cover group). There was no statistically significant difference in the mean size of the abdominal aortic aneurysm diameter or CIA diameter between each group. No endoleaks from IIA retrograde filling were found in either group. Conclusion: The results of the present study do not support the traditional view that coverage of the IIA without prior embolization carries a high risk of endoleak, with no endoleaks seen in all 22 cases. Large-scale trials are required. However, the advent of branched-stenting techniques and the emergence of their success in long-term follow-up may preclude the former. - Highlights: • No EVAR endoleaks due to retrograde filling of the internal iliac artery (IIA). • No increased risk of endoleak with stent coverage of the IIA without embolisation. • Current evidence does not support traditional views

  13. Categorization of aortic aneurysm thrombus morphology by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motte, Louise de la, E-mail: louise.de.la.motte@rh.regionh.dk [Department of Vascular Surgery, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Pedersen, Mads Møller, E-mail: phd@medit.dk [Department of Radiology, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Thomsen, Carsten, E-mail: carsten.thomsen@rh.regionh.dk [Department of Radiology, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Vogt, Katja, E-mail: Vogt@dadlnet.dk [Department of Vascular Surgery, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Schroeder, Torben V., E-mail: Torben.Veith.schroeder@rh.regionh.dk [Department of Vascular Surgery, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Lonn, Lars, E-mail: lonn.lars@gmail.com [Department of Vascular Surgery and Department of Radiology, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2013-10-01

    Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been proposed for qualitative categorization of intraluminal thrombus morphology. We aimed to correlate the qualitative MRI categorization previously described to quantitative measurements of signal intensity and to compare morphological characteristics of intraluminal thrombus specimens to the appearance on magnetic resonance imaging. Methods: Thirty-four patients undergoing open surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm had a preoperative MRI obtained with a 1.5 T magnet. Qualitative categorization was performed (blinded and in consensus) and correlated to intraluminal thrombus to muscle signal-intensity ratios. Morphology of intraluminal thrombus specimens collected during surgery were compared to the magnetic resonance imaging categories and specimen weight was correlated to thrombus volume measured on preoperative computer tomography angiography. Results: Blinded MRI categorization resulted in agreement in 22 out of 34 intraluminal thrombi (Kappa value 0.3, p = 0.006). Medians (p = 0.004) and distribution (p = 0.002) of signal-intensity ratios varied significantly across the three MRI categories obtained by consensus. Heterogeneous and homogenous specimen appearance corresponded to similar appearances on MRI in 78% and 55% respectively, resulting in an overall Kappa = 0.4 (p = 0.04). Intraluminal thrombus volume and weight correlated well (r{sub s} 0.831, p < 0.001) with a mean difference of 60 g (95% CI 38–80 g), without proportional bias. Conclusion: Qualitative evaluation of intraluminal thrombus morphology based on MRI can be quantified by measuring signal-intensity ratios. Concurrently a fair agreement to blinded qualitative evaluation of thrombus specimens can be obtained. However, the evaluation is impaired by loss of a large proportion of thrombus during sampling.

  14. Categorization of aortic aneurysm thrombus morphology by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motte, Louise de la; Pedersen, Mads Møller; Thomsen, Carsten; Vogt, Katja; Schroeder, Torben V.; Lonn, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been proposed for qualitative categorization of intraluminal thrombus morphology. We aimed to correlate the qualitative MRI categorization previously described to quantitative measurements of signal intensity and to compare morphological characteristics of intraluminal thrombus specimens to the appearance on magnetic resonance imaging. Methods: Thirty-four patients undergoing open surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm had a preoperative MRI obtained with a 1.5 T magnet. Qualitative categorization was performed (blinded and in consensus) and correlated to intraluminal thrombus to muscle signal-intensity ratios. Morphology of intraluminal thrombus specimens collected during surgery were compared to the magnetic resonance imaging categories and specimen weight was correlated to thrombus volume measured on preoperative computer tomography angiography. Results: Blinded MRI categorization resulted in agreement in 22 out of 34 intraluminal thrombi (Kappa value 0.3, p = 0.006). Medians (p = 0.004) and distribution (p = 0.002) of signal-intensity ratios varied significantly across the three MRI categories obtained by consensus. Heterogeneous and homogenous specimen appearance corresponded to similar appearances on MRI in 78% and 55% respectively, resulting in an overall Kappa = 0.4 (p = 0.04). Intraluminal thrombus volume and weight correlated well (r s 0.831, p < 0.001) with a mean difference of 60 g (95% CI 38–80 g), without proportional bias. Conclusion: Qualitative evaluation of intraluminal thrombus morphology based on MRI can be quantified by measuring signal-intensity ratios. Concurrently a fair agreement to blinded qualitative evaluation of thrombus specimens can be obtained. However, the evaluation is impaired by loss of a large proportion of thrombus during sampling

  15. Patients’ perceptions of conservative treatment for a small abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomee SM

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Stephanie M Tomee,1 Winifred A Gebhardt,2 Jean-Paul PM de Vries,3 Victoria C Hamelinck,1 Jaap F Hamming,1 Jan HN Lindeman1 1Department of Surgery, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, 2Health, Medical and Neuropsychology Unit, Institute of Psychology, Leiden University, Leiden, 3Department of Vascular Surgery, St Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein, Leiden, the Netherlands Background: An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is a progressive, generally symptomless disease that could ultimately result in a fatal rupture. Current guidelines advise conservative follow-up, and preventive surgical repair once the risk of rupture outweighs the cost of repair (55 mm in men. In developed countries, the majority of patients are diagnosed with AAAs less than 55 mm, and so enter a period of conservative surveillance. An important question is how patients perceive and cope with risk of rupture, AAA diagnosis and treatment, and presented AAA information. The goal of this study was to gain insight into patients’ perceptions of conservative treatment for a small AAA to increase patient satisfaction.Methods: We conducted semistructured in-depth interviews and used questionnaires measuring health-related quality of life (RAND 36-Item Health Survey 1.0, illness-perceptions (Illness Perception Questionnaire – Revised, and anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Interviews were audio recorded and transcript contents were analyzed based on grounded theory. Mean scores of the questionnaires were compared to (population reference groups.Results: This study included ten male patients under surveillance for a small AAA from two hospitals in the Netherlands. Patients expressed no fear for AAA rupture, and also reported low levels of anxiety and depression in both the interviews and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The presence of an AAA did not affect their social life or emotional well-being. The reported poorer physical health on RAND 36

  16. An Animal Model of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Created with Peritoneal Patch: Technique and Initial Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maynar, Manuel; Qian Zhong; Hernandez, Javier; Sun Fei; Miguel, Carmen de; Crisostomo, Veronica; Uson, Jesus; Pineda, Luis-Fernando; Espinoza, Carmen G.; Castaneda, Wilfrido R.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an abdominal aortic aneurysm model that more closely resembles themorphology of human aneurysms with potential for further growth of the sac. An infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) model was created with a double-layered peritoneal patch in 27 domestic swine. The patch,measuring in average from 6 to 12 cm in length and from 2 to 3 cm in width, was sutured to the edge of an aortotomy. Pre- and postsurgical digital subtraction aortograms (DSA) were obtained to document the appearance and dimensions of the aneurysm. All animals were followed with DSA for up to 5 months. Laparoscopic examination enhanced by the use of laparoscopic ultrasound was also carried out in 2 animals to assess the aneurysm at 30 and 60 days following surgery. Histological examination was performed on 4 animals. All the animals that underwent the surgical creation of the AAA survived the surgical procedure.Postsurgical DSA demonstrated the presence of the AAA in all animals,defined as more than 50% increase in diameter. The aneurysmal mean diameter increased from the baseline of 10.27 ± 1.24 to 16.69± 2.29 mm immediately after surgery, to 27.6 ± 6.59 mm at 14 days, 32.45 ± 8.76 mm at 30 days (p <0.01), and subsequently decreased to 25.98 ± 3.75 mm at 60 days. A total of 15 animals died of aneurysmal rupture that occurred more frequently in the long aneurysms (≥6 cm in length) than the short aneurysms (<6 cm in length) during the first 2 weeks after surgery(p < 0.05). No rupture occurred beyond 16 days after surgery. Four animals survived and underwent 60-day angiographic follow-up. Laparoscopic follow-up showed strong pulses, a reddish external appearance and undetectable suture lines on the aneurysmal wall. On pathology, the patches were well incorporated into the aortic wall, the luminal wall appeared almost completely endothelialized, and cellular and matrix proliferation were noted in the aneurysmal wall. A reproducible technique for the

  17. [Surgical treatment of the aortic root aneurysm related to Marfan syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Si-hong; Sun, Yan-qing; Meng, Xu; Zhang, Hong; Hou, Xiao-tong; Wang, Jian-gang; Gao, Feng

    2005-08-24

    To review the experience of surgical treatment of aortic root aneurysm of Marfan syndrome. We The clinical data of 84 Marfan syndrome patients, 61 males and 23 females, aged 35 +/- 12 (5 - 62), 41 cases presenting with aortic dissection (Debakey type I in 32 cases and type II in 9), 52 cases with moderate to severe aortic regurgitation, and 9 cases with moderate to severe mitral regurgitation, 43 cases with cardiac function of class I - II, 30 with class III and 11 with class IV according the New York Heart Association (NYHA) standard, who underwent surgical treatment for aortic root aneurysm with a mean diameter of 68 mm +/- 14 mm, were analyzed. Bentall procedure was performed in 68 cases, Wheat procedure in 6, Cabrol procedure in 5, and aortic valve replacement and aortoplasty in 5. Concomitant procedures included mitral value replacement and mitral valvuoplasty in 3 cases respectively. Urgent surgery was conducted in 28 cases, and elective operation in 56 cases. There were 3 in-hospital deaths (3.57%). 76 cases were followed up for a mean duration of 55 +/- 31 months. Three patients underwent reoperation. The cardiac function returned to class I - II except for 2 cases that remained at the class III. Bentall procedure should be the first choice of the surgery for aortic root aneurysm of Marfan syndrome with a low mortality and a good late outcome.

  18. Percutaneous endovascular stent-graft treatment of aortic aneurysms and dissections: new techniques and initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Do Yun; Choi, Dong Hoon; Kang, Sung Gwon; Lee, Kwang Hoon; Won, Jong Yun [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Sung Gwon [Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Won, Je Whan [Aju University College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Ho Young [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, safety and effectiveness of a newly designed percutaneously implanted separate stent-graft (SSG) for the treatment of aortic aneurysms and dissections. Using a percutaneous technique, SSG placement (in the descending thoracic aorta in 26 cases and infrarenal abdominal aorta in 24) was attempted in 50 patients with aortic aneurysms (n=27) or dissection (n=23). All SSGs were individually constructed using self-expandable nitinol stents and a Dacron graft, and were introduced through a 12 F sheath and expanded to a diameter of 20-34 mm. In all cases, vascular access was through the femoral artery. The clinical status of each patient was monitored, and postoperative CT was performed within one week of the procedure and at 3-6 month intervals afterwards. Endovascular stent-graft deployment was technically successful in 49 of 50 patients (98%). The one failure was due to torsion of the unsupported graft during deployment. Successful exclusion of aneurysms and the primary entry tears of dissections was achieved in all but three patients with aortic dissection. All patients in whom technical success was achieved showed complete thrombosis of the thoracic false lumen or aneurysmal sac, and the overall technique success rate was 92%. In addition, sixteen patients demonstrated complete resolution of the dissected thoracic false lumen (n=9) or aneurysmal sac (n=7). Immediate post-operative complications occurred at the femoral puncture site in one patient with an arteriovenous fistula, and in two, a new saccular aneurysm developed at the distal margin of the stent. No patients died, and there was no instance of paraplegia, stroke, side-branch occlusion or infection during the subsequent mean follow-up period of 9.4 (range, 2 to 26) months. In patients with aortic aneurysm and dissection, treatment with a separate percutaneously inserted stent-graft is technically feasible, safe, and effective.

  19. Predictive factors for cerebrovascular accidents after thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariscalco, Giovanni; Piffaretti, Gabriele; Tozzi, Matteo; Bacuzzi, Alessandro; Carrafiello, Giampaolo; Sala, Andrea; Castelli, Patrizio

    2009-12-01

    Cerebrovascular accidents are devastating and worrisome complications after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. The aim of this study was to determine cerebrovascular accident predictors after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Between January 2001 and June 2008, 76 patients treated with thoracic endovascular aortic repair were prospectively enrolled. The study cohort included 61 men; mean age was 65.4 +/- 16.8 years. All patients underwent a specific neurologic assessment on an hourly basis postoperatively to detect neurologic deficits. Cerebrovascular accidents were diagnosed on the basis of physical examination, tomography scan or magnetic resonance imaging, or autopsy. Cerebrovascular accidents occurred in 8 (10.5%) patients, including 4 transient ischemic attack and 4 major strokes. Four cases were observed within the first 24-hours. Multivariable analysis revealed that anatomic incompleteness of the Willis circle (odds ratio [OR] 17.19, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.10 to 140.66), as well as the presence of coronary artery disease (OR 6.86, 95 CI% 1.18 to 40.05), were independently associated with postoperative cerebrovascular accident development. Overall hospital mortality was 9.2%, with no significant difference for patients hit by cerebrovascular accidents (25.0% vs 7.3%, p = 0.102). Preexisting coronary artery disease, reflecting a severe diseased aorta and anomalies of Willis circle are independent cerebrovascular accident predictors after thoracic endovascular aortic repair procedures. A careful evaluation of the arch vessels and cerebral vascularization should be mandatory for patients suitable for thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

  20. Background differences in baseline and stimulated MMP levels influence abdominal aortic aneurysm susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Matthew A.; Ruhlman, Melissa K.; Zhao, Shijia; Meisinger, Trevor; Gu, Linxia; Swier, Vicki J.; Agrawal, Devendra K.; Greiner, Timothy C.; Carson, Jeffrey S.; Baxter, B. Timothy; Xiong, Wanfen

    2015-01-01

    Objective Evidence has demonstrated profound influence of genetic background on cardiovascular phenotypes. Murine models in Marfan syndrome (MFS) have shown that genetic background-related variations affect thoracic aortic aneurysm formation, rupture, and lifespan of mice. MFS mice with C57Bl/6 genetic background are less susceptible to aneurysm formation compared to the 129/SvEv genetic background. In this study, we hypothesize that susceptibility to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) will be increased in 129/SvEv mice versus C57Bl/6 mice. We tested this hypothesis by assessing differences in aneurysm size, tissue properties, immune response, and MMP expression. Methods Mice of C57Bl/6 or 129/SvEv background underwent AAA induction by periaortic application of CaCl2. Baseline aortic diameters, tissue properties and MMP levels were measured. After aneurysm induction, diameters, MMP expression, and immune response (macrophage infiltration and bone marrow transplantation) were measured. Results Aneurysms were larger in 129/SvEv mice than C57Bl/6 mice (83.0% ± 13.6 increase compared to 57.8% ± 6.4). The aorta was stiffer in the 129/SvEv mice compared to C57Bl/6 mice (952.5 kPa ± 93.6 versus 621.4 kPa ± 84.2). Baseline MMP-2 and post-aneurysm MMP-2 and -9 levels were higher in 129/SvEv aortas compared to C57Bl/6 aortas. Elastic lamella disruption/fragmentation and macrophage infiltration were increased in 129/SvEv mice. Myelogenous cell reversal by bone marrow transplantation did not affect aneurysm size. Conclusions These data demonstrate that 129/SvEv mice are more susceptible to AAA compared to C57Bl/6 mice. Intrinsic properties of the aorta between the two strains of mice, including baseline expression of MMP-2, influence susceptibility to AAA. PMID:26546710

  1. Selective Aortic Arch and Root Replacement in Repair of Acute Type A Aortic Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischman, Fernando; Elsayed, Ramsey S; Cohen, Robbin G; Tatum, James M; Kumar, S Ram; Kazerouni, Kayvan; Mack, Wendy J; Barr, Mark L; Cunningham, Mark J; Hackmann, Amy E; Baker, Craig J; Starnes, Vaughn A; Bowdish, Michael E

    2018-02-01

    Controversy exists regarding the optimal extent of repair for type A aortic dissection. Our approach is to replace the ascending aorta, and only replace the aortic root or arch when intimal tears are present in those areas. We examined intermediate outcomes with this approach to acute type A aortic dissection repair. Between March 2005 and October 2016, 195 patients underwent repair of acute type A aortic dissection. Repair was categorized by site of proximal and distal anastomosis and extent of repair. Mean follow-up was 31.0 ± 30.9 months. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to assess survival. Multiple variable Cox proportional hazards modeling was utilized to identify factors associated with overall mortality. Overall survival was 85.1%, 83.9%, 79.1%, and 74.4% at 6, 12, 36, and 60 months, respectively. Eight patients required reintervention. The cumulative incidence of aortic reintervention at 1 year with death as a competing outcome was 3.95%. Multiple variable regression analysis identified factors such as age, preoperative renal failure, concomitant thoracic endograft, postoperative myocardial infarction and sepsis, and need for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as predictive of overall mortality. Neither proximal or distal extent of repair, nor need for reintervention affected overall survival (proximal: hazard ratio 1.63, 95% confidence interval: 0.75 to 3.51, p = 0.22; distal: hazard ratio 1.12, 95% confidence interval: 0.43 to 2.97, p = 0.81; reintervention: hazard ratio 0.03, 95% confidence interval: 0.002 to 0.490, p < 0.01). A selective approach to root and arch repair in acute type A aortic dissection is safe. If aortic reintervention is needed, survival does not appear to be affected. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: Is Imaging Surveillance Robust, and Does It Influence Long-term Mortality?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waduud, Mohammed Abdul, E-mail: m.a.waduud@doctors.org.uk [Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Department of Surgery (United Kingdom); Choong, Wen Ling, E-mail: wenlingchoong@nhs.net [Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, NHS Grampian, Department of Surgery (United Kingdom); Ritchie, Moira, E-mail: moirasim9@gmail.com; Williams, Claire, E-mail: c.williams.3@research.gla.ac.uk [University of Glasgow, Institute of Health and Wellbeing Glasgow (United Kingdom); Yadavali, Reddi, E-mail: reddi.yadavali@nhs.net [Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, NHS Grampian, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Lim, Shueh, E-mail: s.lim.06@aberdeen.ac.uk [Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, NHS Lothian, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Buchanan, Fraser, E-mail: f.buchanan.11@aberdeen.ac.uk [University of Aberdeen, The School of Medicine and Dentistry (United Kingdom); Bhat, Raj, E-mail: raj.bhat@nhs.net [Ninewells Hospital, NHS Tayside, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Ramanathan, Krishnappan, E-mail: k.ramanathan@dundee.ac.uk [University of Dundee, School of Medicine (United Kingdom); Ingram, Susan, E-mail: susan.ingram@luht.scot.nhs.uk; Cormack, Laura, E-mail: lgcormack@googlemail.com [Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, NHS Lothian, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Moss, Jonathan G., E-mail: jon.moss@ggc.scot.nhs.uk [Gartnavel General Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-15

    PurposeEndovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is the dominant treatment strategy for abdominal aortic aneurysms. However, as a result of uncertainty regarding long-term durability, an ongoing imaging surveillance program is required. The aim of the study was to assess EVAR surveillance in Scotland and its effect on all-cause and aneurysm-related mortality.MethodsA retrospective analysis of all EVAR procedures carried out in the four main Scottish vascular units. The primary outcome measure was the implementation of post-EVAR imaging surveillance across Scotland. Patients were identified locally and then categorized as having complete, incomplete, or no surveillance. Secondary outcome measures were all-cause mortality and aneurysm-related mortality. Cause of death was obtained from death certificates.ResultsData were available for 569 patients from the years 2001 to 2012. All centers had data for a minimum of 5 contiguous years. Surveillance ranged from 1.66 to 4.55 years (median 3.03 years). Overall, 53 % had complete imaging surveillance, 43 % incomplete, and 4 % none. For the whole cohort, all-cause 5-year mortality was 33.5 % (95 % confidence interval 28.0–38.6) and aneurysm-related mortality was 4.5 % (.8–7.3). All-cause mortality in patients with complete, incomplete, and no imaging was 49.9 % (39.2–58.6), 19.1 % (12.6–25.2), and 47.2 % (17.7–66.2), respectively. Aneurysm-related mortality was 3.7 % (1.8–7.4), 4.4 % (2.2–8.9), and 9.5 % (2.5–33.0), respectively. All-cause mortality was significantly higher in patients with complete compared to incomplete imaging surveillance (p < 0.001). No significant differences were observed in aneurysm-related mortality (p = 0.2).ConclusionOnly half of EVAR patients underwent complete long-term imaging surveillance. However, incomplete imaging could not be linked to any increase in mortality. Further work is required to establish the role and deliverability of EVAR imaging surveillance.

  3. Preadmission use of renin-angiotensin blockers and rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wemmelund, Holger; Høgh, Annette; Hundborg, Heidi H.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms (rAAA) is associated with high mortality. Use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-inhibitors) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) has been suggested to reduce the risk of rAAA. This nationwide, combined case-control and follow-up st...

  4. CD1d deficiency inhibits the development of abdominal aortic aneurysms in LDL receptor deficient mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Puijvelde, Gijs H. M.; Foks, Amanda C.; van Bochove, Rosemarie E.; Bot, Ilze; Habets, Kim L. L.; de Jager, Saskia C.; ter Borg, Mariëtte N. D.; van Osch, Puck; Boon, Louis; Vos, Mariska; de Waard, Vivian; Kuiper, Johan

    2018-01-01

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a dilatation of the abdominal aorta leading to serious complications and mostly to death. AAA development is associated with an accumulation of inflammatory cells in the aorta including NKT cells. An important factor in promoting the recruitment of these

  5. Plasma levels of cathepsins L, K, and V and risks of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lv, Bing-Jie; Lindholt, Jes S; Wang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Cathepsin L (CatL), cathepsin K (CatK), and cathepsin V (CatV) are potent elastases implicated in human arterial wall remodeling. Whether plasma levels of these cathepsins are altered in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) remains unknown....

  6. Vascular dysfunctions in the isolated aorta of double-transgenic hypertensive mice developing aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waeckel, L.; Badier-Commander, C.; Damery, T.

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin-II and oxidative stress are involved in the genesis of aortic aneurysms, a phenomenon exacerbated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) deletion or uncoupling. The purpose of this work was to study the endothelial function in wild-type C57BL/6 (BL) and transgenic mice expressing...

  7. [Bacteremia associated with mycotic aneurysm of the transversal aortic arch and myocarditis caused by Salmonella enteritidis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Martínez, L; Mesa, E; Rodríguez, J E; Sánchez, M P; Ugarte, J; Algora Weber, A; Dámaso, D; Daza, R M; Mendaza, P

    1989-02-01

    A 60-year-old male with diabetes mellitus had Salmonella enteritidis bacteremia associated with mycotic aneurysm of the transverse aortic arc and myocarditis. Antibiotic therapy with ampicillin and chloramphenicol was ineffective despite the fact that the microorganism was sensitive in vitro to those antimicrobials, and the patient had a progressive clinical deterioration which culminated in death.

  8. Low-dose aspirin and rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wemmelund, Holger; Jørgensen, Trine M M; Høgh, Annette

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The use of low-dose aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid [ASA]) has been suggested to attenuate growth of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), yet solid clinical evidence of this hypothesis is still missing. This study aimed to investigate whether preadmission ASA use influenced the risk...

  9. Three-dimensional Ultrasound in the Management of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lowe, C B; Ghulam, Q; Bredahl, K

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound is an evolving modality that may have numerous applications in the management of abdominal aortic aneurysms. Many vascular specialists will not be familiar with the different ways in which 3D vascular ultrasound data can be acquired nor how potential applications...

  10. Abdominal aortic aneurysm in a premature neonate with disseminated candidiasis: Ultrasound and angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoss, A.E.; Ponhold, W.; Pollak, A.; Schlemmer, M.; Weninger, M.

    1985-01-01

    When using ultrasound for detection of kidney enlargement, we found an acute abdominal aortic aneurysm secondary to aortitis arising from umbilical artery catheterisation in a premature neonate with systemic candidiasis. Aortography was performed to provide vascular details such as involvement of celiac, renal, iliac and femoral arteries. (orig.)

  11. Abdominal aortic aneurysm in a premature neonate with disseminated candidiasis: Ultrasound and angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoss, A.E.; Ponhold, W.; Pollak, A.; Schlemmer, M.; Weninger, M.

    1985-09-01

    When using ultrasound for detection of kidney enlargement, we found an acute abdominal aortic aneurysm secondary to aortitis arising from umbilical artery catheterisation in a premature neonate with systemic candidiasis. Aortography was performed to provide vascular details such as involvement of celiac, renal, iliac and femoral arteries.

  12. Randomized double-blind controlled trial of roxithromycin for prevention of abdominal aortic aneurysm expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vammen, Sten; Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Ostergaard, L

    2001-01-01

    Macrolide treatment has been reported to lower the risk of recurrent ischaemic heart disease. The influence of macrolides on the expansion rate of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) remains unknown. The aim was to investigate the effect of roxithromycin on the expansion rate of small AAAs....

  13. Induction of continuous expanding infrarenal aortic aneurysms in a large porcine animal model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kloster, Brian Ozeraitis; Lund, Lars; Lindholt, Jes S.

    2015-01-01

    BackgroundA large animal model with a continuous expanding infrarenal aortic aneurysm gives access to a more realistic AAA model with anatomy and physiology similar to humans, and thus allows for new experimental research in the natural history and treatment options of the disease. Methods10 pigs...

  14. Hybrid Repair of Complex Thoracic Aortic Arch Pathology: Long-Term Outcomes of Extra-anatomic Bypass Grafting of the Supra-aortic Trunk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotfi, S.; Clough, R. E.; Ali, T.; Salter, R.; Young, C. P.; Bell, R.; Modarai, B.; Taylor, P.

    2013-01-01

    Hybrid repair constitutes supra-aortic debranching before thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). It offers improved short-term outcome compared with open surgery; however, longer-term studies are required to assess patient outcomes and patency of the extra-anatomic bypass grafts. A prospectively maintained database of 380 elective and urgent patients who had undergone TEVAR (1997–2011) was analyzed retrospectively. Fifty-one patients (34 males; 17 females) underwent hybrid repair. Median age was 71 (range, 18–90) years with mean follow-up of 15 (range, 0–61) months. Perioperative complications included death: 10 % (5/51), stroke: 12 % (6/51), paraplegia: 6 % (3/51), endoleak: 16 % (8/51), rupture: 4 % (2/51), upper-limb ischemia: 2 % (1/51), bypass graft occlusion: 4 % (2/51), and cardiopulmonary complications in 14 % (7/51). Three patients (6 %) required emergency intervention for retrograde dissection: (2 aortic root repairs; 2 innominate stents). Early reintervention was performed for type 1 endoleak in two patients (2 proximal cuff extensions). One patient underwent innominate stenting and revision of their bypass for symptomatic restenosis. At 48 months, survival was 73 %. Endoleak was detected in three (6 %) patients (type 1 = 2; type 2 = 1) requiring debranching with proximal stent graft (n = 2) and proximal extension cuff (n = 1). One patient had a fatal rupture of a mycotic aneurysm and two arch aneurysms expanded. No bypass graft occluded after the perioperative period. Hybrid operations to treat aortic arch disease can be performed with results comparable to open surgery. The longer-term outcomes demonstrate low rates of reintervention and high rates of graft patency.

  15. Hybrid Repair of Complex Thoracic Aortic Arch Pathology: Long-Term Outcomes of Extra-anatomic Bypass Grafting of the Supra-aortic Trunk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotfi, S., E-mail: shamim.lotfi@kcl.ac.uk; Clough, R. E.; Ali, T. [Guy' s and St. Thomas' NHS Trust, Vascular Surgery (United Kingdom); Salter, R. [Guy' s and St. Thomas' NHS Trust, Interventional Radiology (United Kingdom); Young, C. P. [Guy' s and St. Thomas' NHS Trust, Cardiac Surgery (United Kingdom); Bell, R.; Modarai, B.; Taylor, P., E-mail: peter.taylor@gstt.nhs.uk [Guy' s and St. Thomas' NHS Trust, Vascular Surgery (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-15

    Hybrid repair constitutes supra-aortic debranching before thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). It offers improved short-term outcome compared with open surgery; however, longer-term studies are required to assess patient outcomes and patency of the extra-anatomic bypass grafts. A prospectively maintained database of 380 elective and urgent patients who had undergone TEVAR (1997-2011) was analyzed retrospectively. Fifty-one patients (34 males; 17 females) underwent hybrid repair. Median age was 71 (range, 18-90) years with mean follow-up of 15 (range, 0-61) months. Perioperative complications included death: 10 % (5/51), stroke: 12 % (6/51), paraplegia: 6 % (3/51), endoleak: 16 % (8/51), rupture: 4 % (2/51), upper-limb ischemia: 2 % (1/51), bypass graft occlusion: 4 % (2/51), and cardiopulmonary complications in 14 % (7/51). Three patients (6 %) required emergency intervention for retrograde dissection: (2 aortic root repairs; 2 innominate stents). Early reintervention was performed for type 1 endoleak in two patients (2 proximal cuff extensions). One patient underwent innominate stenting and revision of their bypass for symptomatic restenosis. At 48 months, survival was 73 %. Endoleak was detected in three (6 %) patients (type 1 = 2; type 2 = 1) requiring debranching with proximal stent graft (n = 2) and proximal extension cuff (n = 1). One patient had a fatal rupture of a mycotic aneurysm and two arch aneurysms expanded. No bypass graft occluded after the perioperative period. Hybrid operations to treat aortic arch disease can be performed with results comparable to open surgery. The longer-term outcomes demonstrate low rates of reintervention and high rates of graft patency.

  16. Endovascular Treatment of a Symptomatic Thoracoabdominal Aortic Aneurysm by Chimney and Periscope Techniques for Total Visceral and Renal Artery Revascularization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cariati, Maurizio, E-mail: cariati.maurizio@sancarlo.mi.it [San Carlo Borromeo Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Sciences (Italy); Mingazzini, Pietro; Dallatana, Raffaello [San Carlo Borromeo Hospital, Department of Vascular Surgery (Italy); Rossi, Umberto G. [San Carlo Borromeo Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Sciences (Italy); Settembrini, Alberto [San Carlo Borromeo Hospital, Università degli Studi di Milano (Italy); Santuari, Davide [San Carlo Borromeo Hospital, Department of Vascular Surgery (Italy)

    2013-05-02

    Conventional endovascular therapy of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm with involving visceral and renal arteries is limited by the absence of a landing zone for the aortic endograft. Solutions have been proposed to overcome the problem of no landing zone; however, most of them are not feasible in urgent and high-risk patients. We describe a case that was successfully treated by total endovascular technique with a two-by-two chimney-and-periscope approach in a patient with acute symptomatic type IV thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm with supra-anastomotic aneurysm formation involving the renal and visceral arteries and a pseduaneurismatic sac localized in the left ileopsoas muscle.

  17. Glycated Hemoglobin Is Associated With the Growth Rate of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Katrine Lawaetz; Dahl, Marie; Rasmussen, Lars Melholt

    2017-01-01

    and HbA1c in the total study population (P=0.002). Both crude and adjusted analyses identified slower growth for the group with the highest HbA1c tertile compared with the lowest HbA1c tertile. After 3 years, the mean difference was 1.8 mm (confidence interval, 0.98–2.64). Similar significant differences......OBJECTIVE—: An inverse association between abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) and diabetes mellitus exists; however, the cause remains unknown. This study aimed to evaluate whether the degree of glycemia is associated with aneurysm growth. APPROACH AND RESULTS—: The study was based on VIVA trial...... (Viborg Vascular), the randomized clinically controlled screening trial for abdominal aortic aneurysm in men aged 65 to 74 years in the Central Denmark Region. The screening included measurement of the abdominal aorta by ultrasound, analysis of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and follow-up for ≤5 years...

  18. Valve-sparing operation for aortic root aneurysm in patients with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R; Ma, W G; Tian, L X; Sun, L Z; Chang, Q

    2010-03-01

    We report our experience with aortic valve-sparing procedures in patients with Marfan syndrome and aortic root aneurysm. Between August 2003 and July 2007, we performed aortic valve-sparing procedures in 20 patients with aortic root aneurysm resulting from Marfan syndrome. Mean age was 28 +/- 10 years (range, 10 to 57 years), and there were 9 females and 11 males. A reimplantation technique was used in 9 cases, a remodeling technique in 8 and a patch technique in 3 cases. Additional procedures included total aorta replacement in 1 patient, and aortic arch replacement plus stented elephant trunk in 2 patients. The mean follow-up time was 46 +/- 16 months (range, 17 to 64 months). No in-hospital or late death occurred. Reexploration for bleeding was required in one case on postoperative day 1. No valve-related complications occurred during the follow-up period. At the end of follow-up, trivial or no aortic regurgitation was demonstrated in 14 patients, mild in 4 patients, moderate in 1 and severe in 1. Two patients with moderate and severe aortic regurgitation required reoperation. The early and mid-term results of the valve-sparing operations were favorable, and the durability of the preserved valve should encourage use of this technique in patients with Marfan syndrome.

  19. Open and endovascular aneurysm repair in the Society for Vascular Surgery Vascular Quality Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Emily L; Beck, Adam W

    2017-12-01

    The Society for Vascular Surgery Vascular Quality Initiative is a patient safety organization and a collection of procedure-based registries that can be utilized for quality improvement initiatives and clinical outcomes research. The Vascular Quality Initiative consists of voluntary participation by centers to collect data prospectively on all consecutive cases within specific registries which physicians and centers elect to participate. The data capture extends from preoperative demographics and risk factors (including indications for operation), through the perioperative period, to outcomes data at up to 1-year of follow-up. Additionally, longer-term follow-up can be achieved by matching with Medicare claims data, providing long-term longitudinal follow-up for a majority of patients within the Vascular Quality Initiative registries. We present the unique characteristics of the Vascular Quality Initiative registries and highlight important insights gained specific to open and endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Bovine aortic arch and idiopathic pulmonary artery aneurysm associated with bronchial compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Süleyman Sezai Yıldız

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The left common carotid artery originating from the brachiocephalic trunk is termed the bovine aortic arch. Although it is the third most-common normal variant found in 9% humans, the origin of this term remains unclear. Until now, It has not been reported in the literature bovine aortic arch togetherness with pulmonary aneurysm and bronchial compression. Herein, we present a case with bovine aorta arch and pulmonary artery aneurysm associated with bronchial compression, which is incidentally detected by X-ray film. A 56-year-old Caucasian female admitted to the cardiology clinic with complaint of chest pain. Physical examination was unremarkable. Blood biochemistry values and cardiac markers were in normal range. Chest radiography revealed a widened mediastinum and prominent pulmonary conus with no active pulmonary disease. A subsequent transthoracic echocardiography revealed left ventricular hypertrophy, left atrial enlargement (diameter: 41 mm, mild mitral and tricuspid valve insufficiency, dilatation of main pulmonary artery (parasternal short-axis view diameter: 33 mm, normal pulmonary artery pressure and normal left ventricular systolic function. Computed tomography revealed bovine aortic arch associated with pulmonary artery aneurysm (diameter: 53 mm. And left main bronch of trachea was critically squeezed by aortic arch. Aortic and pulmonary vascular anomalies should be considered in patients with chest pain. And, identification with imaging modalities is important for prevention of chronic and irreversible complications.

  1. Determining the influence of calcification on the failure properties of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Siobhan A; Mulvihill, John J; Barrett, Hilary E; Kavanagh, Eamon G; Walsh, Michael T; McGloughlin, Tim M; Doyle, Barry J

    2015-02-01

    Varying degrees of calcification are present in most abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). However, their impact on AAA failure properties and AAA rupture risk is unclear. The aim of this work is evaluate and compare the failure properties of partially calcified and predominantly fibrous AAA tissue and investigate the potential reasons for failure. Uniaxial mechanical testing was performed on AAA samples harvested from 31 patients undergoing open surgical repair. Individual tensile samples were divided into two groups: fibrous (n=31) and partially calcified (n=38). The presence of calcification was confirmed by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). A total of 69 mechanical tests were performed and the failure stretch (λf), failure stress (σf) and failure tension (Tf) were recorded for each test. Following mechanical testing, the failure sites of a subset of both tissue types were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) to investigate the potential reasons for failure. It has been shown that the failure properties of partially calcified tissue are significantly reduced compared to fibrous tissue and SEM and EDS results suggest that the junction between a calcification deposit and the fibrous matrix is highly susceptible to failure. This study implicates the presence of calcification as a key player in AAA rupture risk and provides further motivation for the development of non-invasive methods of measuring calcification. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Case of neuroleptic malignant syndrome following open heart surgery for thoracic aortic aneurysm with parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Maiko; Sakamoto, Mik; Shindo, Yuki; Ando, Yumi; Tateda, Takeshi

    2013-12-01

    An 80-year-old woman with Parkinson's disease was scheduled for open heart surgery to repair thoracic aortic aneurysm. Parkinson's symptoms were normally treated using oral levodopa (200 mg), selegiline-hydrochloride (5 mg), bromocriptine-mesilate (2 mg), and amantadine-hydrochloride (200 mg) daily. On the day before surgery, levodopa 50mg was infused intravenously. Another 25 mg of levodopa was infused immediately after surgery. Twenty hours later, the patient developed tremors, heyperventilation, but no obvious muscle rigidity. Two days after surgery, the patient exhibited high fever, hydropoiesis, elevated creatine kinase, and a rise in blood leukocytes. She was diagnosed with neuroleptic malignant syndrome. She was intubated, and received dantrolene sodium. Symptoms of neuroleptic malignant syndrome disappeared on the fourth postoperative day. The stress of open heart surgery, specifically extracorporeal circulation and concomitant dilution of levodopa, triggered neuroleptic malignant syndrome in this patient. Parkinson's patients require higher doses of levodopa prior to surgery to compensate and prevent neuroleptic malignant syndrome after surgery.

  3. Surgery of abdominal aortic aneurysm associated with coronary artery disease. Simultaneous or two staged operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Narisawa, Takashi; Mori, Takanobu; Masuda, Mikio; Kishi, Daijirou; Suzuki, Takashi; Takaba, Toshihiro

    2003-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) was evaluated by noninvasive examination in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patients. A simultaneous operation or a 2-staged operation was performed depending on the seriousness of the condition when both diseases were combined. A total of 36 patients underwent elective repair of AAA between 1996 and 2001. Coronary angiography (CAG) was performed only in patients with suspected CAD by dipyridamole myocardial scintigraphy. Significant CAD was found in 8 patients. Simultaneous operation was performed in 4 patients, and off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB) was performed in all cases of simultaneous operation. In 4 patients receiving 2-staged operations, 1 standard coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), 1 OPCAB and 2 percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasties (PTCA) were performed prior to AAA surgery. Twenty-eight patients underwent only AAA operation. Though there were no incidents of perioperative myocardial infarction or cardiac related deaths in this group, 2 patients died due to other causes (hemorrhage and duodenal perforation). In the 8 patients associated with CAD, 1 patient died of myonephrotic metabolic syndrome (MNMS) after simultaneous operation. The other 7 patients revived their social function soon of the discharge. Dipyridamole cardiac scintigraphy was considered to be an effective examination for evaluation of CAD in AAA patients. There was no need to perform CAG in all AAA patients. The policy of choosing simultaneous operation or 2-staged operation according to the seriousness of the 2 diseases seemed to be appropriate. (author)

  4. Personal resources and satisfaction with life in Marfan syndrome patients with aortic pathology and in abdominal aortic aneurysm patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanišić, Michał-Goran; Rzepa, Teresa; Gawrońska, Alicja; Kubaszewski, Przemysław; Putowski, Maciej; Stefaniak, Sebastian; Perek, Bartłomiej

    2018-03-01

    Whether or not the source of aortic pathology is Marfan syndrome (MFS) or other processes leading to development of abdominal aorta aneurysms (AAA), the awareness of pathology may lead to an emotional upset and low assessment of satisfaction with life. To assess, in regard to MFS patients with aortic pathology and to abdominal aortic aneurysm patients: 1) whether or not self-efficacy (SE) and health locus of control (HLoC) affect the patients' satisfaction with life; 2) whether the two groups of patients differ in terms of mental dispositions. The study population consisted of 16 MFS patients with aortic pathology and 16 AAA patients, 9 men and 7 women in each group. The mean age of the MFS patients was 28.5 ±8.214, and of the AAA patients 64.25 ±7.019. The following scales were applied: Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale, Satisfaction With Life Scale, Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale. Abdominal aorta aneurysms patients compared to MFS patients gave a higher rating for SE ( MD = 33.94 and MD = 29.56), internal health locus of control ( MD = 25.00 and MD = 21.13), external personal HL o C ( MD = 24.50 and MD = 19.25), external impersonal HLoC ( MD = 23.06 and MD = 18.25), and satisfaction with life ( M = 22.06 and M = 20.13). Internal and external HL o C were significantly lower in MFS patients compared to AAA patients. In patients with aortic diseases, special attention must be paid to the state of personal resources (PR). Interactions made by medical professionals should focus on enhancing PR supporting the patients' self-knowledge on their SE. This will help to improve their satisfaction with life and form a positive attitude to the illness.

  5. Factors Affecting Optimal Aortic Remodeling After Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair of Type B (IIIb) Aortic Dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, I-Ming; Chen, Po-Lin; Huang, Chun-Yang; Weng, Shih-Hsien; Chen, Wei-Yuan; Shih, Chun-Che

    2017-01-01

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to determine factors associated with entire aortic remodeling after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in patients with type B dissection.Materials and MethodsThe patients with type B (IIIb) dissections who underwent TEVAR from 2006 to 2013 with minimum of 2 years of follow-up computed tomography data were retrospectively reviewed. Based on the status of false lumen remodeling of entire aorta, patients were divided into three groups: complete regression, total thrombosis, and inadequate regression with patent abdominal false lumen.ResultsA total of 90 patients (72 males, 18 females; mean age 56.6 ± 16.4 years) were included and divided into the complete regression (n = 22), total thrombosis (n = 18), and inadequate regression (n = 50) groups. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that dissection extension to iliac arteries, increased preoperative number of dissection tear over abdominal aorta, and decreased preoperative abdominal aorta bifurcation true lumen ratio, as compared between the inadequate and complete regression groups, were associated with a persistent false lumen (odds ratio = 33.33, 2.304, and 0.021; all, p ≤ 0.012). Comparison of 6, 12, and 24 months postoperative data revealed no significant differences at any level, suggesting that the true lumen area ratio might not change after 6 months postoperatively.ConclusionsIncreased preoperative numbers of dissection tear around the abdominal visceral branches, dissection extension to the iliac arteries, and decreased preoperative true lumen area ratio of abdominal aorta are predictive of entire aortic remodeling after TEVAR in patients with type B dissection.Level of EvidenceIII.

  6. Factors Affecting Optimal Aortic Remodeling After Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair of Type B (IIIb) Aortic Dissection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, I-Ming [National Yang Ming University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, School of Medicine (China); Chen, Po-Lin; Huang, Chun-Yang [National Yang Ming University, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine (China); Weng, Shih-Hsien; Chen, Wei-Yuan; Shih, Chun-Che, E-mail: ccshih@vghtpe.gov.tw [National Yang Ming University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, School of Medicine (China)

    2017-05-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to determine factors associated with entire aortic remodeling after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in patients with type B dissection.Materials and MethodsThe patients with type B (IIIb) dissections who underwent TEVAR from 2006 to 2013 with minimum of 2 years of follow-up computed tomography data were retrospectively reviewed. Based on the status of false lumen remodeling of entire aorta, patients were divided into three groups: complete regression, total thrombosis, and inadequate regression with patent abdominal false lumen.ResultsA total of 90 patients (72 males, 18 females; mean age 56.6 ± 16.4 years) were included and divided into the complete regression (n = 22), total thrombosis (n = 18), and inadequate regression (n = 50) groups. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that dissection extension to iliac arteries, increased preoperative number of dissection tear over abdominal aorta, and decreased preoperative abdominal aorta bifurcation true lumen ratio, as compared between the inadequate and complete regression groups, were associated with a persistent false lumen (odds ratio = 33.33, 2.304, and 0.021; all, p ≤ 0.012). Comparison of 6, 12, and 24 months postoperative data revealed no significant differences at any level, suggesting that the true lumen area ratio might not change after 6 months postoperatively.ConclusionsIncreased preoperative numbers of dissection tear around the abdominal visceral branches, dissection extension to the iliac arteries, and decreased preoperative true lumen area ratio of abdominal aorta are predictive of entire aortic remodeling after TEVAR in patients with type B dissection.Level of EvidenceIII.

  7. Application of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in treating dwarfism with Stanford B aortic dissection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jian; Cai, Wenwu; Shu, Chang; Li, Ming; Xiong, Qinggen; Li, Quanming; Li, Xin

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: To apply thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) to treat dwarfism complicated with Stanford B aortic dissection. Patient concerns: In this report, we presented a 63-year-old male patient of dwarfism complicated with Stanford B aortic dissection successfully treated with TEVAR. Diagnoses: He was diagnosed with dwarfism complicated with Stanford B aortic dissection. Interventions: After conservative treatment, the male patient underwent TEVAR at 1 week after hospitalization. After operation, he presented with numbness and weakness of his bilateral lower extremities, and these symptoms were significantly mitigated after effective treatment. At 1- and 3-week after TEVAR, the aorta status was maintained stable and restored. Outcomes: The patient obtained favorable clinical prognosis and was smoothly discharged. During subsequent follow-up, he remained physically stable. Lessons: TEVAR is probably an option for treating dwarfism complicated with Stanford B aortic dissection, which remains to be validated by subsequent studies with larger sample size. PMID:29703033

  8. Developing a new endograft for the treatment of juxtarenal aortic aneurysms: definition and experimentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Q. Belczak

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To analyze angiotomographic parameters of juxtarenal aneurysms to assess the applicability of an endograft model to patients and to create in vitro and in vivo models to assess the new endograft. METHODS: A total of 49 patients with juxtarenal aneurysms were submitted to angiotomographic evaluation, and parameters such as the aortic diameter, the length of the neck, and the angulations of the celiac trunk, superior mesenteric artery and renal arteries; the distances between them; and anatomic variations were analyzed. Based on these parameters, an endograft model was developed and tested in a newly created in vitro model of juxtarenal aneurysm. An experimental model of juxtarenal aneurysm was then established in six pigs weighing 50-60 kg to assess the new endograft model. RESULTS: The angiotomographic parameters of juxtarenal aneurysm measured in this study were similar to those reported in the literature and allowed the development of an endograft based on the hourglass concept, which was applicable to 85.8% of the patients. The in vitro model of juxtarenal aneurysm evidenced good radiopacity and functionality and permitted adjustments in the new device and technical improvements in the procedures for treating these aneurysms. In addition, the porcine model of juxtarenal aneurysm was successfully created in all six animals using a bovine pericardial patch, and use of the new endograft in three pilot procedures evidenced its feasibility. CONCLUSIONS: The Hourglass endograft was rendered applicable to treatment of the majority of patients with juxtarenal aneurysms simply by changing its diameter. Moreover, the new in vitro and in vivo models were shown to be effective for assessing both the presented endograft and experiments assessing the endovascular treatment of juxtarenal aneurysms.

  9. Atmospheric Pressure and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Rupture : Results from a Time Series Analysis and Case-Crossover Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penning De Vries, Bas B.L.; Kolkert, Joé L.P.; Meerwaldt, Robbert; Groenwold, Rolf H.H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Associations between atmospheric pressure and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture risk have been reported, but empirical evidence is inconclusive and largely derived from studies that did not account for possible nonlinearity, seasonality, and confounding by temperature. Methods:

  10. Risk stratification by pre-operative cardiopulmonary exercise testing improves outcomes following elective abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodyear, Stephen J; Yow, Heng; Saedon, Mahmud; Shakespeare, Joanna; Hill, Christopher E; Watson, Duncan; Marshall, Colette; Mahmood, Asif; Higman, Daniel; Imray, Christopher He

    2013-05-19

    In 2009, the NHS evidence adoption center and National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) published a review of the use of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). They recommended the development of a risk-assessment tool to help identify AAA patients with greater or lesser risk of operative mortality and to contribute to mortality prediction.A low anaerobic threshold (AT), which is a reliable, objective measure of pre-operative cardiorespiratory fitness, as determined by pre-operative cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) is associated with poor surgical outcomes for major abdominal surgery. We aimed to assess the impact of a CPET-based risk-stratification strategy upon perioperative mortality, length of stay and non-operative costs for elective (open and endovascular) infra-renal AAA patients. A retrospective cohort study was undertaken. Pre-operative CPET-based selection for elective surgical intervention was introduced in 2007. An anonymized cohort of 230 consecutive infra-renal AAA patients (2007 to 2011) was studied. A historical control group of 128 consecutive infra-renal AAA patients (2003 to 2007) was identified for comparison.Comparative analysis of demographic and outcome data for CPET-pass (AT ≥ 11 ml/kg/min), CPET-fail (AT 11 ml/kg/min was associated with reduced perioperative mortality (open cases only), LOS, survival and inpatient costs (open and endovascular repair) for elective infra-renal AAA surgery.

  11. Does Lower Limb Exercise Worsen Renal Artery Hemodynamics in Patients with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm?

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Anqiang; Tian, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Nan; Xu, Zaipin; Deng, Xiaoyan; Liu, Ming; Liu, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Renal artery stenosis (RAS) and renal complications emerge in some patients after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) to treat abdominal aorta aneurysm (AAA). The mechanisms for the causes of these problems are not clear. We hypothesized that for EVAR patients, lower limb exercise could negatively influence the physiology of the renal artery and the renal function, by decreasing the blood flow velocity and changing the hemodynamics in the renal arteries. To evaluate this hypothesis, pre- and ...

  12. Endovascular repair of mycotic aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta: diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas-two case reports with 1-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjanovic, Ivan; Sarac, Momir; Tomic, Aleksandar; Bezmarevic, Mihailo

    2013-10-01

    A mycotic aneurysm of the thoracic aorta is a rare diagnosis with high mortality. We present two cases of endovascular reconstruction of mycotic descending thoracic aorta. Specific or nonspecific bacterial or other infectious agent in serial samples of blood, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and pleural puncture was not detected in the first case, but we found in sputum sample Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the second patient. We empirically began by administering broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics in the first case, with preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis and antituberculotic drugs therapy in the second case, and continued with the same medication for 4 months after endovascular repair. Control computed tomographic scans 6 months after reconstruction showed no endoleak in both patients. Repair of mycotic descending thoracic aortic aneurysms by endoluminal stent graft is reasonable alternative to open surgical intervention. A broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy has a high significance in the treatment of patients with mycotic aneurysm. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Endovascular repair of aortic disease: a venture capital perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Lucas W; Stavropoulos, S William; Resnick, Joshua B; Solomon, Jeffrey

    2009-03-01

    Endovascular devices for the treatment of abdominal and thoracic aortic disease are poised to become the next $1 billion medical device market. A shift from open repair to endovascular repair, advances in technology, screening initiatives, and new indications are driving this growth. Although billion-dollar medical device markets are rare, this field is fraught with risk and uncertainty for startups and their venture capital investors. Technological hurdles, daunting clinical and regulatory timelines, market adoption issues, and entrenched competitors pose significant barriers to successful new venture creation. In fact, the number of aortic endografts that have failed to reach commercialization or have been pulled from the market exceeds the number of Food and Drug Administration-approved endografts in the United States. This article will shed some light on the venture capital mind-set and decision-making paradigm in the context of aortic disease.

  14. Impact of surgical era on outcomes of patients undergoing elective atherosclerotic ascending aortic aneurysm operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, Tatiana M; Koinig, Herbert; Czerny, Martin; Hutschala, Doris; Wolner, Ernst; Ehrlich, Marek; Grabenwoger, Martin

    2004-08-01

    implementation of various refinements in surgical and anaesthetic techniques, the current risk of mortality for ascending aortic aneurysm repair has not changed in the last 7 years. However, shortened ICU and hospital stays as well as diminished usage of blood derivates are mainly the result of a more aggressive and improved peri- and post-operative management due to economic considerations.

  15. Early and midterm outcomes of open stent-graft treatment for distal aortic arch aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Kazunori; Mochizuki, Takaaki; Tsubota, Hideki; Funamoto, Masaki

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate early and late outcomes for open stent-graft treatment, which was introduced as a less-invasive technique for thoracic aortic aneurysm of the distal arch, and to clarify the validity of and indications for this treatment. We retrospectively investigated 38 patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm of the distal arch who underwent open stent-graft placement at our hospital between June 2000 and September 2006. Five patients died in hospital (hospital mortality 13.2%). Age at the time of surgery and onset of postoperative paraplegia were identified as risk factors. Four patients (10.5%) had postoperative paraplegia, but no significant risk factors were seen. The size of the aneurysm was clearly reduced in 18 of the 25 patients (75.8%), in whom computed tomography was performed after discharge, and late outcomes were good. Mural thrombus thickness on the stent landing zone of <4 mm was a predictor for aneurysm shrinkage. Seven patients died during the late period, and the 5-year survival rate among hospital survivors was 80.1%. Early outcomes for open stent-graft are not necessarily good, and late survival is also not excellent. Open stent-graft thus cannot be regarded as an ideal technique for all patients with distal aortic arch aneurysm. However, after aneurysm shrinkage was confirmed during the early period, late outcomes were good. Absence of thick mural thrombus on the stent landing zone may represent a good indication for open stent-graft surgery. (author)

  16. Case report: ruptured aortic aneurysm into oesophagus - treatment by covered stent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, N.; Tan, I.; Costa, R.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: A case report of a 70 year old man acutely presenting with a large descending thoracic aortic aneurysm, ruptured into the adjacent oesophagus. He was treated with an Aneurex covered stent (Medtronics). This patient has a long history of ischaemic heart disease, hypertension and previously treated abdominal aortic aneurysm. After diagnosis by CT, the bleeding was emergency temponaded by insertion of a Sengstaken-Blackmore tube into the oesophagus and inflated to arterial pressure. After stabilisation in ICU, it was decided that open surgery would probably prove fatal, and insertion of a covered thoracic aortic stent was performed in theatre with a femoral artery cut-down. Post-operatively the bleeding from the aortic aneurysm ceased. However, the patient has ongoing problems with large, open oesophageal ulcer with chronic ooze requiring intermittent transfusions, chronic infection with MRSA, requiring long term antibiotics, feeding via feeding gastrostomy tubes. The patient is stable 12 months after presentation. Treatment of this otherwise fatal problem by covered stent has permitted survival benefit. However, there are significant, unresolved issues of oesophageal ulcer and ongoing MRSA infection. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  17. Acute contained ruptured aortic aneurysm presenting as left vocal fold immobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnagi, Sharon H; Howard, Brittany E; Hoxworth, Joseph M; Lott, David G

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To recognize intrathoracic abnormalities, including expansion or rupture of aortic aneurysms, as a source of acute onset vocal fold immobility. Methods. A case report and review of the literature. Results. An 85-year-old female with prior history of an aortic aneurysm presented to a tertiary care facility with sudden onset hoarseness. On laryngoscopy, the left vocal fold was immobile in the paramedian position. A CT scan obtained that day revealed a new, large hematoma surrounding the upper descending aortic stent graft consistent with an acute contained ruptured aortic aneurysm. She was referred to the emergency department for evaluation and treatment by vascular surgery. She was counseled regarding surgical options and ultimately decided not to pursue further treatment. Her vocal fold immobility was subsequently treated via office-based injection medialization two weeks after presentation and again 5 months after the initial injection which dramatically improved her voice. Follow-up CT scan at 8 months demonstrated a reduction of the hematoma. The left vocal cord remains immobile to date. Conclusion. Ortner's syndrome, or cardiovocal syndrome, is hoarseness secondary to left recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy caused by cardiovascular pathology. It is a rare condition and, while typically presenting gradually, may also present with acute symptomatology.

  18. Acute Contained Ruptured Aortic Aneurysm Presenting as Left Vocal Fold Immobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon H. Gnagi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To recognize intrathoracic abnormalities, including expansion or rupture of aortic aneurysms, as a source of acute onset vocal fold immobility. Methods. A case report and review of the literature. Results. An 85-year-old female with prior history of an aortic aneurysm presented to a tertiary care facility with sudden onset hoarseness. On laryngoscopy, the left vocal fold was immobile in the paramedian position. A CT scan obtained that day revealed a new, large hematoma surrounding the upper descending aortic stent graft consistent with an acute contained ruptured aortic aneurysm. She was referred to the emergency department for evaluation and treatment by vascular surgery. She was counseled regarding surgical options and ultimately decided not to pursue further treatment. Her vocal fold immobility was subsequently treated via office-based injection medialization two weeks after presentation and again 5 months after the initial injection which dramatically improved her voice. Follow-up CT scan at 8 months demonstrated a reduction of the hematoma. The left vocal cord remains immobile to date. Conclusion. Ortner’s syndrome, or cardiovocal syndrome, is hoarseness secondary to left recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy caused by cardiovascular pathology. It is a rare condition and, while typically presenting gradually, may also present with acute symptomatology.

  19. In vivo characterization of a new abdominal aortic aneurysm mouse model with conventional and molecular magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klink, Ahmed; Heynens, Joeri; Herranz, Beatriz; Lobatto, Mark E.; Arias, Teresa; Sanders, Honorius M. H. F.; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Merkx, Maarten; Nicolay, Klaas; Fuster, Valentin; Tedgui, Alain; Mallat, Ziad; Mulder, Willem J. M.; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study was to use noninvasive conventional and molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect and characterize abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) in vivo. Collagen is an essential constituent of aneurysms. Noninvasive MRI of collagen may represent an opportunity to help detect

  20. Chimney-Graft as a Bail-Out Procedure for Endovascular Treatment of an Inflammatory Juxtarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Fratesi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory and juxtarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (j-iAAA represents a technical challenge for open repair (OR due to the peculiar anatomy, extensive perianeurysmal fibrosis, and dense adhesion to the surrounding tissues. A 68-year-old man with an 11 cm asymptomatic j-iAAA was successfully treated with elective EVAR and chimney-graft (ch-EVAR without postprocedural complications. Target vessel patency and normal renal function are present at 24-month follow-up. The treatment of j-iAAA can be technically challenging. ch-EVAR is a feasible and safe bail-out method for elective j-iAAA with challenging anatomy.

  1. Tube Stent-Grafts for Infrarenal Aortic Aneurysm: A Matched-Paired Analysis Based on EUROSTAR Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruppert, Volker; Leurs, Lina J.; Hobo, Roel; Buth, Jacob; Rieger, Johannes; Umscheid, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Objective. Tube stent-grafts for treatment of infrarenal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are a nearly forgotten concept. For focal aortic pathologies tube stent-grafts may be a treatment option. We have performed a retrospective matched-paired analysis of the EUROSTAR registry regarding the outcome of tube vs. bifurcated stent-grafts for AAA. Tapered aortomonoiliac stent-grafts were not the objective of this study. Materials and methods. From July 1997 to June 2006, 7581 patients who underwent an endovascular AAA repair were entered in the EUROSTAR registry by 164 centers. One hundred fifty-three patients were treated with tube stent-grafts. For each of these 153 patients we selected one patient from a bifurcated stent-graft group (BGG-original, 7428 patients) matched according to gender, ASA, age, AAA diameter, and type of anesthesia. Differences in preoperative details between the two study groups were analyzed using chi-square test for discrete variables and Wilcoxon rank-sum test for continuous variables. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed on early complications. Midterm outcomes (>30 days) were analyzed by Kaplan-Meier and multivariate Cox proportional hazard model. Results. The duration of the procedure was shorter in the tube stent-graft group (TGG; 102.3 ± 52.2) than in BGG (128.3 ± 55.0; p 0.0002). Type II endoleak was less frequent in TGG (4.0%; mean follow-up, 23.12 ± 23.9 months) than in BGG (14.3%; mean follow-up, 20.77 ± 20.0 months; p = 0.0394). Type I endoleaks and migration were distributed equally, with