WorldWideScience

Sample records for antiviral drugs advisory

  1. Antiviral Drugs: Seasonal Flu

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-09-29

    In this podcast, Dr. Joe Bresee explains the nature of antiviral drugs and how they are used for seasonal flu.  Created: 9/29/2010 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 9/29/2010.

  2. Emerging antiviral drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clercq, Erik

    2008-09-01

    Foremost among the newly described antiviral agents that may be developed into drugs are, for the treatment of human papilloma virus (HPV) infections, cPrPMEDAP; for the treatment of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections, BAY 57-1293; for the treatment of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infections, FV-100 (prodrug of Cf 1743); for the treatment of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections, maribavir; for the treatment of poxvirus infections, ST-246; for the treatment of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) (which in the meantime has already been approved in the EU); for the treatment of various DNA virus infections, the hexadecyloxypropyl (HDP) and octadecyloxyethyl (ODE) prodrugs of cidofovir; for the treatment of orthomyxovirus infections (i.e., influenza), peramivir; for the treatment of hepacivirus infections (i.e., hepatitis C), the protease inhibitors telaprevir and boceprevir, the nucleoside RNA replicase inhibitors (NRRIs) PSI-6130 and R1479, and various non-nucleoside RNA replicase inhibitors (NNRRIs); for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections, integrase inhibitors (INIs) such as elvitegravir, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) such as apricitabine, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) such as rilpivirine and dapivirine; and for the treatment of both HCV and HIV infections, cyclosporin A derivatives such as the non-immunosuppressive Debio-025. PMID:18764719

  3. Antiviral Drug Research Proposal Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Injaian

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of antiviral drugs provides an excellent example of how basic and clinical research must be used together in order to achieve the final goal of treating disease. A Research Oriented Learning Activity was designed to help students to better understand how basic and clinical research can be combined toward a common goal. Through this project students gained a better understanding of the process of scientific research and increased their information literacy in the field of virology. The students worked as teams to research the many aspects involved in the antiviral drug design process, with each student becoming an "expert" in one aspect of the project. The Antiviral Drug Research Proposal (ADRP culminated with students presenting their proposals to their peers and local virologists in a poster session. Assessment data showed increased student awareness and knowledge of the research process and the steps involved in the development of antiviral drugs as a result of this activity.

  4. Influenza Round Table: Antiviral Drugs

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-11-04

    In this podcast, Dr. Joe Bresee explains the nature of antiviral drugs and how they are used.  Created: 11/4/2009 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 11/4/2009.

  5. Can antiviral drugs contain pandemic influenza transmission?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels G Becker

    Full Text Available Antiviral drugs dispensed during the 2009 influenza pandemic generally failed to contain transmission. This poses the question of whether preparedness for a future pandemic should include plans to use antiviral drugs to mitigate transmission.Simulations using a standard transmission model that allows for infected arrivals and delayed vaccination show that attempts to contain transmission require relatively few antiviral doses. In contrast, persistent use of antiviral drugs when the reproduction number remains above 1 use very many doses and are unlikely to reduce the eventual attack rate appreciably unless the stockpile is very large. A second model, in which the community has a household structure, shows that the effectiveness of a strategy of dispensing antiviral drugs to infected households decreases rapidly with time delays in dispensing the antivirals. Using characteristics of past pandemics it is estimated that at least 80% of primary household cases must present upon show of symptoms to have a chance of containing transmission by dispensing antiviral drugs to households. To determine data needs, household outbreaks were simulated with 50% receiving antiviral drugs early and 50% receiving antiviral drugs late. A test to compare the size of household outbreaks indicates that at least 100-200 household outbreaks need to be monitored to find evidence that antiviral drugs can mitigate transmission of the newly emerged virus.Use of antiviral drugs in an early attempt to contain transmission should be part of preparedness plans for a future influenza pandemic. Data on the incidence of the first 350 cases and the eventual attack rates of the first 200 hundred household outbreaks should be used to estimate the initial reproduction number R and the effectiveness of antiviral drugs to mitigate transmission. Use of antiviral drugs to mitigate general transmission should cease if these estimates indicate that containment of transmission is unlikely.

  6. What You Should Know about Flu Antiviral Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Newsletters What You Should Know About Flu Antiviral Drugs Language: ... that can be used to treat flu illness. What are antiviral drugs? Antiviral drugs are prescription medicines ( ...

  7. Clinical relevance of HCV antiviral drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, C; Zeuzem, S

    2012-10-01

    The approval of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) against the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 protease revolutionized antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis C. They mark the beginning of an era with drugs designed to inhibit specific viral proteins involved in the virus life cycle rather than the nonspecific antiviral activity of interferon. Upcoming generations of antivirals are expected that lead to viral eradication in most patients who undergo treatment with hope held for years that HCV can be cured without interferon. Antiviral drug resistance plays a key role in DAA-treatment failure. Knowledge on molecular escape mechanisms of resistant variants, their time to wild-type reversal and potential persistence is of upmost importance to design treatment strategies for patients with previous DAA-treatment failure. PMID:23006585

  8. Antiviral Drug Resistance of Human Cytomegalovirus

    OpenAIRE

    Lurain, Nell S.; Chou, Sunwen

    2010-01-01

    Summary: The study of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) antiviral drug resistance has enhanced knowledge of the virological targets and the mechanisms of antiviral activity. The currently approved drugs, ganciclovir (GCV), foscarnet (FOS), and cidofovir (CDV), target the viral DNA polymerase. GCV anabolism also requires phosphorylation by the virus-encoded UL97 kinase. GCV resistance mutations have been identified in both genes, while FOS and CDV mutations occur only in the DNA polymerase gene. Co...

  9. Vaccines and Antiviral Drugs in Pandemic Preparedness

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold S. Monto

    2006-01-01

    While measures such as closing schools and social distancing may slow the effects of pandemic influenza, only vaccines and antiviral drugs are clearly efficacious in preventing infection or treating illness. Unless the pandemic strain closely resembles one already recognized, vaccine will not be available early. However, studies can be conducted beforehand to address questions concerning vaccine dose, frequency of inoculation, and need for adjuvants. In contrast, antiviral drugs, particularly...

  10. Antiviral Drug Resistance: Mechanisms and Clinical Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Strasfeld, Lynne; Chou, Sunwen

    2010-01-01

    Antiviral drug resistance is an increasing concern in immunocompromised patient populations, where ongoing viral replication and prolonged drug exposure lead to the selection of resistant strains. Rapid diagnosis of resistance can be made by associating characteristic viral mutations with resistance to various drugs as determined by phenotypic assays. Management of drug resistance includes optimization of host factors and drug delivery, selection of alternative therapies based on knowledge of...

  11. Bell's Palsy: Treatment with Steroids and Antiviral Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PATIENTS and their FAMILIES BELL’S PALSY: TREATMENT WITH STEROIDS AND ANTIVIRAL DRUGS This information sheet is provided to help you understand the role of steroids and antiviral drugs for treating Bell’s palsy. Neurologists ...

  12. Antiviral drug discovery: broad-spectrum drugs from nature.

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, J P; Sasse, F; Brönstrup, M; Diez, J; Meyerhans, A

    2015-01-01

    Covering: up to April 2014. The development of drugs with broad-spectrum antiviral activities is a long pursued goal in drug discovery. It has been shown that blocking co-opted host-factors abrogates the replication of many viruses, yet the development of such host-targeting drugs has been met with scepticism mainly due to toxicity issues and poor translation to in vivo models. With the advent of new and more powerful screening assays and prediction tools, the idea of a drug that can efficien...

  13. 75 FR 10490 - Joint Meeting of the Arthritis Drugs Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug...: Arthritis Drugs Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee....

  14. The treatment of influenza with antiviral drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Stiver, Grant

    2003-01-01

    Influenza vaccination with current inactivated vaccines homologous to the prevalent wild-type virus can reduce influenza illness in 75%–80% of healthy adults. Vaccine is recommended for all individuals with chronic underlying diseases and for those aged 65 years or older. Although influenza vaccination is still advocated for patients with blunted immunity, protection rates are not as high, running at 40% for frail institutionalized elderly people. The influenza antiviral agents amantadine or ...

  15. Aminoadamantanes versus other antiviral drugs for chronic hepatitis C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamers, Mieke H; Broekman, Mark; Drenth, Joost Ph;

    2014-01-01

    aminoadamantanes for patients with chronic hepatitis C would show strong benefits, it is probably better to focus on the assessments of other direct acting antiviral drugs. We found no evidence assessing other aminoadamantanes in randomised clinical trials in order to recommend or refute their use....... months after the end of treatment) in approximately 40% to 80% of treated patients, depending on viral genotype. Recently, a new class of drugs have emerged for hepatitis C infection, the direct acting antivirals, which in combination with standard therapy or alone can lead to sustained virological...... response in 80% or more of treated patients. Aminoadamantanes, mostly amantadine, are antiviral drugs used for the treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis C. We have previously systematically reviewed amantadine versus placebo or no intervention and found no significant effects of the amantadine on...

  16. Flu Resistance to Antiviral Drug in North Carolina

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-12-19

    Dr. Katrina Sleeman, Associate Service Fellow at CDC, discusses resistance to an antiviral flu drug in North Carolina.  Created: 12/19/2011 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 12/19/2011.

  17. INVESTMENT IN ANTIVIRAL DRUGS : A REAL OPTIONS APPROACH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attema, Arthur E.; Lugner, Anna K.; Feenstra, Talitha L.

    2010-01-01

    Real options analysis is a promising approach to model investment under uncertainty. We employ this approach to value stockpiling of antiviral drugs as a precautionary measure against a possible influenza pandemic. Modifications of the real options approach to include risk attitude and deviations fr

  18. H1N1 Flu and Antiviral Drugs

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-05-02

    This podcast discusses the use of antiviral drugs for treating and preventing the H1N1 flu virus.  Created: 5/2/2009 by Coordinating Center for Infectious Diseases, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Influenza Division (CCID/NCIRD/ID).   Date Released: 5/2/2009.

  19. Approved Antiviral Drugs over the Past 50 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clercq, Erik; Li, Guangdi

    2016-07-01

    Since the first antiviral drug, idoxuridine, was approved in 1963, 90 antiviral drugs categorized into 13 functional groups have been formally approved for the treatment of the following 9 human infectious diseases: (i) HIV infections (protease inhibitors, integrase inhibitors, entry inhibitors, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and acyclic nucleoside phosphonate analogues), (ii) hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections (lamivudine, interferons, nucleoside analogues, and acyclic nucleoside phosphonate analogues), (iii) hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections (ribavirin, interferons, NS3/4A protease inhibitors, NS5A inhibitors, and NS5B polymerase inhibitors), (iv) herpesvirus infections (5-substituted 2'-deoxyuridine analogues, entry inhibitors, nucleoside analogues, pyrophosphate analogues, and acyclic guanosine analogues), (v) influenza virus infections (ribavirin, matrix 2 protein inhibitors, RNA polymerase inhibitors, and neuraminidase inhibitors), (vi) human cytomegalovirus infections (acyclic guanosine analogues, acyclic nucleoside phosphonate analogues, pyrophosphate analogues, and oligonucleotides), (vii) varicella-zoster virus infections (acyclic guanosine analogues, nucleoside analogues, 5-substituted 2'-deoxyuridine analogues, and antibodies), (viii) respiratory syncytial virus infections (ribavirin and antibodies), and (ix) external anogenital warts caused by human papillomavirus infections (imiquimod, sinecatechins, and podofilox). Here, we present for the first time a comprehensive overview of antiviral drugs approved over the past 50 years, shedding light on the development of effective antiviral treatments against current and emerging infectious diseases worldwide. PMID:27281742

  20. Searching for antiviral drugs for human papillomaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, M R; Shewchuk, L M; Hassell, A M; Phelps, W C

    2000-12-01

    The human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are ubiquitous human pathogens that cause a wide variety of benign and pre-malignant epithelial tumours. Of the almost 100 different types of HPV that have been characterized to date, approximately two dozen specifically infect genital and oral mucosa. Mucosal HPVs are most frequently sexually transmitted and, with an incidence roughly twice that of herpes simplex virus infection, are considered one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases throughout the world. A subset of genital HPVs, termed 'high-risk' HPVs, is highly associated with the development of genital cancers including cervical carcinoma. The absence of a simple monolayer cell culture system for analysis and propagation of the virus has substantially retarded progress in the development of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for HPV infection. In spite of these difficulties, great progress has been made in the elucidation of the molecular controls of virus gene expression, replication and pathogenesis. With this knowledge and some important new tools, there is great potential for the development of improved diagnostic and prognostic tests, prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines, and traditional antiviral medicines. PMID:11142617

  1. Anti-Viral Drugs for Human Adenoviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chor Wing Sing

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available There are many stages in the development of a new drug for viral infection and such processes are even further complicated for adenovirus by the fact that there are at least 51 serotypes, forming six distinct groups (A–F, with different degree of infectivity. This review attempts to address the importance of developing pharmaceuticals for adenovirus and also review recent development in drug discovery for adenovirus, including newer strategies such as microRNA approaches. Different drug screening strategies will also be discussed.

  2. 75 FR 81283 - Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Cancellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Cancellation AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The meeting of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory... of December 6, 2010 (75 FR 75680). On February 9, 2011, the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee...

  3. A case for developing antiviral drugs against polio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Marc S; Neyts, Johan; Modlin, John F

    2008-09-01

    Polio eradication is within sight. In bringing the world close to this ultimate goal, the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) has relied exclusively on the live, attenuated oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). However, as eradication nears, continued OPV use becomes less tenable due to the incidence of vaccine associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP) in vaccine recipients and disease caused by circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs) in contacts. Once wild poliovirus transmission has been interrupted globally, OPV use will stop. This will leave the inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) as the only weapon to defend a polio-free world. Outbreaks caused by cVDPVs are expected post-OPV cessation, and accidental or deliberate releases of virus could also occur. There are serious doubts regarding the ability of IPV alone to control outbreaks. Here, we argue that antiviral drugs against poliovirus be added to the arsenal. Anti-poliovirus drugs could be used to treat the infected and protect the exposed, acting rapidly on their own to contain an outbreak and used as a complement to IPV. While there are no polio antiviral drugs today, the technological feasibility of developing such drugs and their probability of clinical success have been established by over three decades of drug development targeting the related rhinoviruses and non-polio enteroviruses (NPEVs). Because of this history, there are known compounds with anti-poliovirus activity in vitro that represent excellent starting points for polio drug development. Stakeholders must come to understand the potential public health benefits of polio drugs, the feasibility of their development, and the relatively modest costs involved. Given the timelines for eradication and those for drug development, the time for action is now. PMID:18513807

  4. Epidemiological Characteristics of Novel Influenza A (H1N1) in Antiviral Drug Users in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Kyunghi Choi; Sung-il Cho; Masahiro Hashizume; Ho Kim

    2012-01-01

    Soon after the first novel influenza A (H1N1) death was documented in Korea on August 15, 2009, prompt treatment with antiviral drugs was recommended when an infection was suspected. Free antiviral drugs were distributed to patients who met the case definition in the treatment guidelines, and patients prescribed the antiviral drugs were included in the Antiviral Drug Surveillance System (ADSS). A total of 2,825,821 patients were reported to the ADSS from September 1 to December 31, 2009. Odds...

  5. The use of antiviral drugs for influenza: Guidance for practitioners, 2012/2013; Paediatric summary

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Upton D.

    2013-01-01

    This practice point summarizes the use of antiviral drugs to manage influenza illness in children and youth for the 2012/2013 season. It excerpts a recently published, full-length update of Canadian recommendations for clinicians on the use of antiviral drugs for the prevention and treatment of influenza, with a focus on paediatric antiviral therapy. Detailed information on the selective use of chemoprophylaxis can be found in the source document, which also highlights the importance of secon...

  6. Clinical pharmacokinetic drug interactions associated with artemisinin derivatives and HIV-antivirals

    OpenAIRE

    Kiang, Tony K.L.; Kyle J Wilby; Ensom, Mary H H

    2014-01-01

    Management of HIV and malaria co-infection is challenging due to potential drug-drug interactions between antimalarial and HIV-antiviral drugs. Little is known of the clinical significance of these drug interactions, and this review provides a comprehensive summary and critical evaluation of the literature. Specifically, drug interactions between WHO-recommended artemisinin combination therapies (ACT) and HIV-antivirals are discussed. An extensive literature search produced eight articles det...

  7. Curious discoveries in antiviral drug development: the role of serendipity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clercq, Erik

    2015-07-01

    Antiviral drug development has often followed a curious meandrous route, guided by serendipity rather than rationality. This will be illustrated by ten examples. The polyanionic compounds (i) polyethylene alanine (PEA) and (ii) suramin were designed as an antiviral agent (PEA) or known as an antitrypanosomal agent (suramin), before they emerged as, respectively, a depilatory agent, or reverse transcriptase inhibitor. The 2',3'-dideoxynucleosides (ddNs analogues) (iii) have been (and are still) used in the "Sanger" DNA sequencing technique, although they are now commercialized as nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) in the treatment of HIV infections. (E)-5-(2-Bromovinyl)-2'-deoxyuridine (iv) was discovered as a selective anti-herpes simplex virus compound and is now primarily used for the treatment of varicella-zoster virus infections. The prototype of the acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (ANPs), (S)-9-(3-hydroxy-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)adenine [(S)-HPMPA], (v) was never commercialized, although it gave rise to several marketed products (cidofovir, adefovir, and tenofovir). 1-[2-(Hydroxyethoxy)methyl]-6-(phenylthio)thymine (vi) and TIBO (tetrahydroimidazo[4,5,1-jk][1,4-benzodiazepin-2(1H)]-one and -thione) (vii) paved the way to a number of compounds (i.e., nevirapine, delavirdine, etravirine, and rilpivirine), which are now collectively called non-NRTIs. The bicyclam AMD3100 (viii) was originally described as an anti-HIV agent before it became later marketed as a stem cell mobilizer. The S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase inhibitors (ix), while active against a broad range of (-)RNA viruses and poxviruses may be particularly effective against Ebola virus, and for (x) the O-ANP derivatives, the potential application range encompasses virtually all DNA viruses. PMID:25726922

  8. SOME ASPECTS OF THE MARKETING STUDIES FOR THE PHARMACEUTICAL MARKET OF ANTIVIRAL DRUGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Salnikova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiviral drugs are widely used in medicinal practice. They suppress the originator and stimulate the protection of an organism. The drugs are used for the treatment of flu and ARVI, herpetic infections, virus hepatitis, HIV-infection. Contemporary pharmaceutical market is represented by a wide range of antiviral drugs. Marketing studies are conducted to develop strategies, used for the enhancement of pharmacy organization activity efficiency. Conduction of the marketing researches of pharmaceutical market is the purpose of this study. We have used State Registry of Drugs, State Record of Drugs, List of vital drugs, questionnaires of pharmaceutical workers during our work. Historical, sociological, mathematical methods, and a method of expert evaluation were used in the paper. As the result of the study we have made the following conclusions. We have studied and generalized the literature data about classification and application of antiviral drugs, marketing, competition. The assortment of antiviral drugs on the pharmaceutical market of the Russian Federation was also studied. We have conducted an analysis for the obtainment of the information about antiviral drugs by pharmaceutical workers. We have determined the competitiveness of antiviral drugs, and on the basis of the research conducted we have submitted an offer for pharmaceutical organizations to form the range of antiviral drugs.

  9. 78 FR 57166 - Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-17

    ... the treatment of chronic hepatitis C genotype 1 infection, in combination with peginterferon alfa and... disease (including cirrhosis) who are treatment- na ve or who have failed previous interferon...

  10. 75 FR 67093 - Joint Meeting of the Anesthetic and Life Support Drugs Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ... Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY... and the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committees: To... public advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). At least one portion of the...

  11. 75 FR 70932 - Joint Meeting of the Anesthetic and Life Support Drugs Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-19

    ... Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Cancellation AGENCY: Food... Support Drugs Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee scheduled for... FR 67093). This meeting has been cancelled because the Agency believes the information received...

  12. 76 FR 59142 - Joint Meeting of the Advisory Committee for Reproductive Health Drugs and the Drug Safety and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Joint Meeting of the Advisory Committee for Reproductive... of Committees: Advisory Committee for Reproductive Health Drugs and the Drug Safety and Risk... estradiol transdermal system), marketed by Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc., for the prevention of...

  13. 76 FR 45578 - Request for Nominations for Members on a Public Advisory Committee; Medical Imaging Drugs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-29

    ... Committee; Medical Imaging Drugs Advisory Committee AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... on the Medical Imaging Drugs Advisory Committee in the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. FDA... requesting nominations for voting members on the Medical Imaging Drugs Advisory Committee (the...

  14. 75 FR 59730 - Joint Meeting of the Anesthetic and Life Support Drugs Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-28

    ... Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY... Risk Management Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committees: To provide advice and... public advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to...

  15. 75 FR 32189 - Joint Meeting of the Endocrinologic and Metabolic Drugs Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-07

    ... Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY... Risk Management Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committees: To provide advice and... public advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to...

  16. 75 FR 12767 - Joint Meeting of the Anesthetic and Life Support Drugs Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-17

    ... Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY... Risk Management Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committees: To provide advice and... public advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to...

  17. 76 FR 40735 - Joint Meeting of the Advisory Committee for Reproductive Health Drugs and the Drug Safety and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    ... Health Drugs and the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food... of Committees: Advisory Committee for Reproductive Health Drugs and the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committees: To provide advice and recommendations...

  18. 78 FR 20327 - Joint Meeting of the Advisory Committee for Reproductive Health Drugs and the Drug Safety and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-04

    ... Health Drugs and the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Amendment of Notice AGENCY: Food... Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee. This meeting was announced in the Federal Register... the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee would be held on April 18, 2013. On page...

  19. 78 FR 2677 - Joint Meeting of the Advisory Committee for Reproductive Health Drugs and the Drug Safety and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-14

    ... Health Drugs and the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food... of Committees: Advisory Committee for Reproductive Health Drugs and the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committees: To provide advice and recommendations...

  20. Development of Potent Antiviral Drugs Inspired by Viral Hexameric DNA-Packaging Motors with Revolving Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Fengmei; Zhao, Zhengyi; Chelikani, Venkata; Yoder, Kristine; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Guo, Peixuan

    2016-09-15

    The intracellular parasitic nature of viruses and the emergence of antiviral drug resistance necessitate the development of new potent antiviral drugs. Recently, a method for developing potent inhibitory drugs by targeting biological machines with high stoichiometry and a sequential-action mechanism was described. Inspired by this finding, we reviewed the development of antiviral drugs targeting viral DNA-packaging motors. Inhibiting multisubunit targets with sequential actions resembles breaking one bulb in a series of Christmas lights, which turns off the entire string. Indeed, studies on viral DNA packaging might lead to the development of new antiviral drugs. Recent elucidation of the mechanism of the viral double-stranded DNA (dsDNA)-packaging motor with sequential one-way revolving motion will promote the development of potent antiviral drugs with high specificity and efficiency. Traditionally, biomotors have been classified into two categories: linear and rotation motors. Recently discovered was a third type of biomotor, including the viral DNA-packaging motor, beside the bacterial DNA translocases, that uses a revolving mechanism without rotation. By analogy, rotation resembles the Earth's rotation on its own axis, while revolving resembles the Earth's revolving around the Sun (see animations at http://rnanano.osu.edu/movie.html). Herein, we review the structures of viral dsDNA-packaging motors, the stoichiometries of motor components, and the motion mechanisms of the motors. All viral dsDNA-packaging motors, including those of dsDNA/dsRNA bacteriophages, adenoviruses, poxviruses, herpesviruses, mimiviruses, megaviruses, pandoraviruses, and pithoviruses, contain a high-stoichiometry machine composed of multiple components that work cooperatively and sequentially. Thus, it is an ideal target for potent drug development based on the power function of the stoichiometries of target complexes that work sequentially. PMID:27356896

  1. Antiviral resistance during pandemic influenza: implications for stockpiling and drug use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowman Christopher S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The anticipated extent of antiviral use during an influenza pandemic can have adverse consequences for the development of drug resistance and rationing of limited stockpiles. The strategic use of drugs is therefore a major public health concern in planning for effective pandemic responses. Methods We employed a mathematical model that includes both sensitive and resistant strains of a virus with pandemic potential, and applies antiviral drugs for treatment of clinical infections. Using estimated parameters in the published literature, the model was simulated for various sizes of stockpiles to evaluate the outcome of different antiviral strategies. Results We demonstrated that the emergence of highly transmissible resistant strains has no significant impact on the use of available stockpiles if treatment is maintained at low levels or the reproduction number of the sensitive strain is sufficiently high. However, moderate to high treatment levels can result in a more rapid depletion of stockpiles, leading to run-out, by promoting wide-spread drug resistance. We applied an antiviral strategy that delays the onset of aggressive treatment for a certain amount of time after the onset of the outbreak. Our results show that if high treatment levels are enforced too early during the outbreak, a second wave of infections can potentially occur with a substantially larger magnitude. However, a timely implementation of wide-scale treatment can prevent resistance spread in the population, and minimize the final size of the pandemic. Conclusion Our results reveal that conservative treatment levels during the early stages of the outbreak, followed by a timely increase in the scale of drug-use, will offer an effective strategy to manage drug resistance in the population and avoid run-out. For a 1918-like strain, the findings suggest that pandemic plans should consider stockpiling antiviral drugs to cover at least 20% of the population.

  2. 77 FR 75176 - Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice..., 2012, Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee meeting due to unanticipated weather conditions caused by Hurricane Sandy. Name of Committee: Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory...

  3. 75 FR 23782 - Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice... forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee....

  4. Human cytomegalovirus antiviral drug resistance in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: current state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Ana Bela; Ribeiro, Joana; Boutolleau, David; Sousa, Hugo

    2016-05-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. The significant clinical impact of HCMV infection and progression to HCMV disease among allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients has been reduced by prophylactic, preemptive, and curative treatments using ganciclovir, valganciclovir, foscarnet, and cidofovir. Resistance to (val)ganciclovir results from mutations localized in HCMV UL97 gene (encoding the pUL97 phosphotransferase), UL54 gene (encoding the pUL54 DNA polymerase), or both genes, whereas foscarnet and cidofovir resistance results from mutations localized within UL54 gene only. This review is focused on HCMV antiviral drug resistance, including the functions of target genes of antivirals, the mechanisms of antiviral resistance, the different mutations in pUL97 and pUL54 that have been identified in either clinical isolates or laboratory strains, and their impact on HCMV susceptibility to antiviral drugs. It emphasizes the importance of proving that observed genetic changes confer resistance so they can be distinguished from polymorphisms. Because of the emergence of HCMV resistance to currently available drugs, novel drugs are urgently needed for the therapeutic management of HCMV-resistant infections in hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26990717

  5. A simple, rapid, and sensitive system for the evaluation of anti-viral drugs in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We established a novel, simple and rapid in vivo system for evaluation of anti-HIV-1 drugs with rats. ► The system may be applicable for other antiviral drugs, and/or useful for initial screening in vivo. ► In this system, TRI-1144 displayed the most potent anti-HIV-1 activity in vivo. -- Abstract: The lack of small animal models for the evaluation of anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) agents hampers drug development. Here, we describe the establishment of a simple and rapid evaluation system in a rat model without animal infection facilities. After intraperitoneal administration of test drugs to rats, antiviral activity in the sera was examined by the MAGI assay. Recently developed inhibitors for HIV-1 entry, two CXCR4 antagonists, TF14016 and FC131, and four fusion inhibitors, T-20, T-20EK, SC29EK, and TRI-1144, were evaluated using HIV-1IIIB and HIV-1BaL as representative CXCR4- and CCR5-tropic HIV-1 strains, respectively. CXCR4 antagonists were shown to only possess anti-HIV-1IIIB activity, whereas fusion inhibitors showed both anti-HIV-1IIIB and anti-HIV-1BaL activities in rat sera. These results indicate that test drugs were successfully processed into the rat sera and could be detected by the MAGI assay. In this system, TRI-1144 showed the most potent and sustained antiviral activity. Sera from animals not administered drugs showed substantial anti-HIV-1 activity, indicating that relatively high dose or activity of the test drugs might be needed. In conclusion, the novel rat system established here, “phenotypic drug evaluation”, may be applicable for the evaluation of various antiviral drugs in vivo.

  6. Caulerpin as a potential antiviral drug against herpes simplex virus type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathália Regina Porto Vieira Macedo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available About 80% of the human adult population is infected with HSV-1. Although there are many anti-HSV-1 drugs available (acyclovir, ganciclovir, valaciclovir, foscarnet, their continuous use promotes the selection of resistant strains, mainly in ACV patients. In addition to resistance, the drugs also have toxicity, particularly when administration is prolonged. The study of new molecules isolated from green algae with potential antiviral activity represents a good opportunity for the development of antiviral drugs. Caulerpin, the major product from the marine algae Caulerpa Lamouroux (Caulerpales, is known for its biological activities such as antioxidant, antifungal, acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (AChE and antibacterial activity. In this work, we show that caulerpin could be an alternative to acyclovir as an anti-HSV-1 drug that inhibits the alpha and beta phases of the replication cycle.

  7. Molecular characterization and antiviral activity test of common drugs against echovirus 18 isolated in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Park KwiSung; Yeo SangGu; Baek KyoungAh; Cheon DooSung; Choi YoungJin; Park JoonSoo; Lee SooJin

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Genetic diversity and antiviral activity for five common antiviral drugs of echovirus (ECV) 5 isolated in Korea have been described. The present study extended these tests to a Korean ECV 18 isolate. An outbreak of aseptic meningitis caused by the ECV 18 isolate was reported in Korea in 2005, marking the first time this virus had been identified in the country since enterovirus surveillance began in 1993. Using a sample isolated from stool specimen of a 5-year-old male patient with a...

  8. 78 FR 64957 - Joint Meeting of the Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-30

    ... Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice of Joint Meeting AGENCY: Food... public. Name of Committees: Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committees: To provide advice and recommendations...

  9. 76 FR 19374 - Joint Meeting of the Cardiovascular and Renal Drugs Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-07

    ... Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and.... Name of Committees: Cardiovascular and Renal Drugs Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committees: To provide advice and recommendations...

  10. Current Landscape of Antiviral Drug Discovery [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wade Blair

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Continued discovery and development of new antiviral medications are paramount for global human health, particularly as new pathogens emerge and old ones evolve to evade current therapeutic agents. Great success has been achieved in developing effective therapies to suppress human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and hepatitis B virus (HBV; however, the therapies are not curative and therefore current efforts in HIV and HBV drug discovery are directed toward longer-acting therapies and/or developing new mechanisms of action that could potentially lead to cure, or eradication, of the virus. Recently, exciting early clinical data have been reported for novel antivirals targeting respiratory syncytial virus (RSV and influenza (flu. Preclinical data suggest that these new approaches may be effective in treating high-risk patients afflicted with serious RSV or flu infections. In this review, we highlight new directions in antiviral approaches for HIV, HBV, and acute respiratory virus infections.

  11. Molecular characterization and antiviral activity test of common drugs against echovirus 18 isolated in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park KwiSung

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Genetic diversity and antiviral activity for five common antiviral drugs of echovirus (ECV 5 isolated in Korea have been described. The present study extended these tests to a Korean ECV 18 isolate. An outbreak of aseptic meningitis caused by the ECV 18 isolate was reported in Korea in 2005, marking the first time this virus had been identified in the country since enterovirus surveillance began in 1993. Using a sample isolated from stool specimen of a 5-year-old male patient with aseptic meningitis, the complete genome sequence was obtained and was compared it with the Metcalf prototype strain. Unlike the ECV5 isolate, the 3' untranslated region had the highest identity value (94.2% at the nucleotide level, while, at the amino acid level, the P2 region displayed the highest identity value (96.9%. These two strains shared all cleavage sites, with the exception of the 2B/2C site, which was RQ/NN in the Metcalf strain but RQ/NS in the Korean ECV 18 isolate. In Vero cells infected with the Korean ECV 18 isolate, no cytotoxicity was observed in the presence of azidothymidine, acyclovir, amantadine, lamivudine, or ribavirin, when the drugs were administered at a CC50 value >100 μg/mL. Of the five drugs, only amantadine (IC50: 4.97 ± 0.77 μg/mL, TI: 20.12 and ribavirin (IC50: 7.63 ± 0.87 μg/mL, TI: 13.11 had any antiviral activity against the Korean ECV 18 isolate in the five antiviral drugs. These antiviral activity effects were similar with results of the Korean ECV5 isolate.

  12. A review of antiviral drugs and other compounds with activity against feline herpesvirus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomasy, Sara M; Maggs, David J

    2016-07-01

    Feline herpesvirus type 1 (FHV-1) is a common and important cause of ocular surface disease, dermatitis, respiratory disease, and potentially intraocular disease in cats. Many antiviral drugs developed for the treatment of humans infected with herpesviruses have been used to treat cats infected with FHV-1. Translational use of drugs in this manner ideally requires methodical investigation of their in vitro efficacy against FHV-1 followed by pharmacokinetic and safety trials in normal cats. Subsequently, placebo-controlled efficacy studies in experimentally inoculated animals should be performed followed, finally, by carefully designed and monitored clinical trials in client-owned animals. This review is intended to provide a concise overview of the available literature regarding the efficacy of antiviral drugs and other compounds with proven or putative activity against FHV-1, as well as a discussion of their safety in cats. PMID:27091747

  13. 78 FR 30929 - Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee. General... and Risk Management Advisory Committee (DSaRM). On July 10, 2013, the Agency plans to discuss the...

  14. Parallel shRNA and CRISPR-Cas9 screens enable antiviral drug target identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deans, Richard M; Morgens, David W; Ökesli, Ayşe; Pillay, Sirika; Horlbeck, Max A; Kampmann, Martin; Gilbert, Luke A; Li, Amy; Mateo, Roberto; Smith, Mark; Glenn, Jeffrey S; Carette, Jan E; Khosla, Chaitan; Bassik, Michael C

    2016-05-01

    Broad-spectrum antiviral drugs targeting host processes could potentially treat a wide range of viruses while reducing the likelihood of emergent resistance. Despite great promise as therapeutics, such drugs remain largely elusive. Here we used parallel genome-wide high-coverage short hairpin RNA (shRNA) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 screens to identify the cellular target and mechanism of action of GSK983, a potent broad-spectrum antiviral with unexplained cytotoxicity. We found that GSK983 blocked cell proliferation and dengue virus replication by inhibiting the pyrimidine biosynthesis enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH). Guided by mechanistic insights from both genomic screens, we found that exogenous deoxycytidine markedly reduced GSK983 cytotoxicity but not antiviral activity, providing an attractive new approach to improve the therapeutic window of DHODH inhibitors against RNA viruses. Our results highlight the distinct advantages and limitations of each screening method for identifying drug targets, and demonstrate the utility of parallel knockdown and knockout screens for comprehensive probing of drug activity. PMID:27018887

  15. 76 FR 37131 - Joint Meeting of the Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    ... Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and... and Risk Management Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committees: To provide advice and... advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). At least one portion of the meeting will...

  16. Dynamics of an HBV Model with Drug Resistance Under Intermittent Antiviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ben-Gong; Tanaka, Gouhei; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Honda, Masao; Kaneko, Shuichi; Chen, Luonan

    2015-06-01

    This paper studies the dynamics of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) model and the therapy regimens of HBV disease. First, we propose a new mathematical model of HBV with drug resistance, and then analyze its qualitative and dynamical properties. Combining the clinical data and theoretical analysis, we demonstrate that our model is biologically plausible and also computationally viable. Second, we demonstrate that the intermittent antiviral therapy regimen is one of the possible strategies to treat this kind of complex disease. There are two main advantages of this regimen, i.e. it not only may delay the development of drug resistance, but also may reduce the duration of on-treatment time compared with the long-term continuous medication. Moreover, such an intermittent antiviral therapy can reduce the adverse side effects. Our theoretical model and computational results provide qualitative insight into the progression of HBV, and also a possible new therapy for HBV disease.

  17. The chemical bases of the various AIDS epidemics: recreational drugs, anti-viral chemotherapy and malnutrition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Peter Duesberg; Claus Koehnlein; David Rasnick

    2003-06-01

    In 1981 a new epidemic of about two-dozen heterogeneous diseases began to strike non-randomly growing numbers of male homosexuals and mostly male intravenous drug users in the US and Europe. Assuming immunodeficiency as the common denominator the US Centers for Disease Control (CDC) termed the epidemic, AIDS, for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. From 1981–1984 leading researchers including those from the CDC proposed that recreational drug use was the cause of AIDS, because of exact correlations and of drug-specific diseases. However, in 1984 US government researchers proposed that a virus, now termed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), is the cause of the non-random epidemics of the US and Europe but also of a new, sexually random epidemic in Africa. The virus-AIDS hypothesis was instantly accepted, but it is burdened with numerous paradoxes, none of which could be resolved by 2003: Why is there no HIV in most AIDS patients, only antibodies against it? Why would HIV take 10 years from infection to AIDS? Why is AIDS not self-limiting via antiviral immunity? Why is there no vaccine against AIDS? Why is AIDS in the US and Europe not random like other viral epidemics? Why did AIDS not rise and then decline exponentially owing to antiviral immunity like all other viral epidemics? Why is AIDS not contagious? Why would only HIV carriers get AIDS who use either recreational or anti-HIV drugs or are subject to malnutrition? Why is the mortality of HIV-antibody-positives treated with anti-HIV drugs 7–9%, but that of all (mostly untreated) HIV-positives globally is only 1.4%? Here we propose that AIDS is a collection of chemical epidemics, caused by recreational drugs, anti-HIV drugs, and malnutrition. According to this hypothesis AIDS is not contagious, not immunogenic, not treatable by vaccines or antiviral drugs, and HIV is just a passenger virus. The hypothesis explains why AIDS epidemics strike non-randomly if caused by drugs and randomly if caused by

  18. The Use of Antiviral Drugs for Influenza: Recommended Guidelines for Practitioners

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Upton D.; Fred Y Aoki; H Grant Stiver; for the Canadian Paediatric Society and the Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Disease Canada

    2006-01-01

    The present document outlines current guidelines and supporting literature relating to the use of antiviral drugs for chemoprophylaxis and influenza illness therapy in paediatric and adult settings. The focus is on the management of influenza in interpandemic periods. Where appropriate, the areas in need of additional research are identified. It will be necessary to update aspects of these guidelines as new information emerges. The recommendations that follow represent the results of a joint ...

  19. The anti-obesity drug orlistat reveals anti-viral activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammer, Elisabeth; Nietzsche, Sandor; Rien, Christian; Kühnl, Alexander; Mader, Theresa; Heller, Regine; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Henke, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    The administration of drugs to inhibit metabolic pathways not only reduces the risk of obesity-induced diseases in humans but may also hamper the replication of different viral pathogens. In order to investigate the value of the US Food and Drug Administration-approved anti-obesity drug orlistat in view of its anti-viral activity against different human-pathogenic viruses, several anti-viral studies, electron microscopy analyses as well as fatty acid uptake experiments were performed. The results indicate that administrations of non-cytotoxic concentrations of orlistat reduced the replication of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) in different cell types significantly. Moreover, orlistat revealed cell protective effects and modified the formation of multi-layered structures in CVB3-infected cells, which are necessary for viral replication. Lowering fatty acid uptake from the extracellular environment by phloretin administrations had only marginal impact on CVB3 replication. Finally, orlistat reduced also the replication of varicella-zoster virus moderately but had no significant influence on the replication of influenza A viruses. The data support further experiments into the value of orlistat as an inhibitor of the fatty acid synthase to develop new anti-viral compounds, which are based on the modulation of cellular metabolic pathways. PMID:25680890

  20. Influenza vaccines and influenza antiviral drugs in Africa: are they available and do guidelines for their use exist?

    OpenAIRE

    Duque, Jazmin; McMorrow, Meredith L.; Adam L Cohen

    2014-01-01

    Background Influenza viruses cause significant morbidity and mortality in Africa, particularly among high-risk groups, but influenza vaccines and antiviral drugs may not be commonly available and used. The main aim of this study was to determine the availability and use of influenza vaccines and antiviral drugs as well as to describe existing related guidelines and policies in Africa. Methods A self-administered survey was distributed among key influenza experts in 40 African countries. Resul...

  1. Guidance on The Use of Antiviral Drugs for Influenza in Acute Care Facilities in Canada, 2014-2015

    OpenAIRE

    H Grant Stiver; Evans, Gerald A; Fred Y Aoki; Allen, Upton D.; Michel Laverdière

    2015-01-01

    This article represents the second update to the AMMI Canada Guidelines document on the use of antiviral drugs for influenza. The article aims to inform health care professionals of the increased risk for influenza in long-term care facilities due to a documented mismatch between the components chosen for this season’s vaccine and currently circulating influenza strains. Adjusted recommendations for the use of antiviral drugs for influenza in the acute care setting for this season are provide...

  2. Studies of Retroviral Reverse Transcriptase and Flaviviral Protease Enzymes as Antiviral Drug Targets : Applications in Antiviral Drug Discovery & Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Junaid, Muhammad

    2012-01-01

    Viruses are a major threat to humans due to their unique adaptability, evolvability and  capability to control their hosts as parasites and genetic elements. HIV/AIDS is the third largest cause of death by infectious diseases in the world, and drug resistance due to the viral mutations is still the leading cause of treatment failure. The flaviviruses, such as Dengue virus (DEN) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), represent other major cause of morbidity and mortality, and the areas where t...

  3. Letermovir and inhibitors of the terminase complex: a promising new class of investigational antiviral drugs against human cytomegalovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melendez DP

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Dante P Melendez,1,2 Raymund R Razonable1,2 1Division of Infectious Diseases, 2William J von Liebig Center for Transplantation and Clinical Regeneration, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Abstract: Infection with cytomegalovirus is prevalent in immunosuppressed patients. In solid organ transplant and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, cytomegalovirus infection is associated with high morbidity and preventable mortality. Prevention and treatment of cytomegalovirus with currently approved antiviral drugs is often associated with side effects that sometimes preclude their use. Moreover, cytomegalovirus has developed mutations that confer resistance to standard antiviral drugs. During the last decade, there have been calls to develop novel antiviral drugs that could provide better options for prevention and treatment of cytomegalovirus. Letermovir (AIC246 is a highly specific antiviral drug that is currently undergoing clinical development for the management of cytomegalovirus infection. It acts by inhibiting the viral terminase complex. Letermovir is highly potent in vitro and in vivo against cytomegalovirus. Because of a distinct mechanism of action, it does not exhibit cross-resistance with other antiviral drugs. It is predicted to be active against strains that are resistant to ganciclovir, foscarnet, and cidofovir. To date, early-phase clinical trials suggest a very low incidence of adverse effects. Herein, we present a comprehensive review on letermovir, from its postulated novel mechanism of action to the results of most recent clinical studies. Keywords: cytomegalovirus, letermovir, AIC246, terminase, antivirals, transplantation 

  4. 75 FR 17417 - Joint Meeting of the Arthritis Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-06

    ... Management Advisory Committee. This meeting was announced in the Federal Register of March 8, 2010 (75 FR... Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Amendment of Notice AGENCY: Food and Drug... meeting of the Arthritis Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory...

  5. 75 FR 32188 - Joint Meeting of the Anesthetic and Life Support Drugs Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-07

    ... Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY... Risk Management Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committees: To provide advice and... possible modifications before coming to the meeting. Agenda: The committees will discuss Risk...

  6. 76 FR 59143 - Joint Meeting of the Advisory Committee for Reproductive Health Drugs and the Drug Safety and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Joint Meeting of the Advisory Committee for Reproductive... of Committees: Advisory Committee for Reproductive Health Drugs and the Drug Safety and Risk... break loose and move within the circulatory system) associated with use of these products may be...

  7. The Use of Antiviral Drugs for Influenza: Guidance for Practitioners 2012/2013

    OpenAIRE

    Fred Y Aoki; Allen, Upton D.; H Grant Stiver; Evans, Gerald A

    2012-01-01

    The present article addresses the use of antiviral drugs in the management of seasonal influenza illness for the 2012/2013 season. It updates the previous document published in 2011 (1). Noteworthy guidance updates since 2011 include the following: Seasonal influenza in 2012/2013 is predicted to be caused by two human influenza A and one influenza B strain, all of which are anticipated to remain generally susceptible to oseltamivir.The predicted strains are A/California/7/2009 (H1N1) pdm09...

  8. The Use of Antiviral Drugs for Influenza: Recommended Guidelines for Practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upton D Allen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The present document outlines current guidelines and supporting literature relating to the use of antiviral drugs for chemoprophylaxis and influenza illness therapy in paediatric and adult settings. The focus is on the management of influenza in interpandemic periods. Where appropriate, the areas in need of additional research are identified. It will be necessary to update aspects of these guidelines as new information emerges. The recommendations that follow represent the results of a joint effort supported by the Canadian Paediatric Society and the Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Disease Canada.

  9. Reaction of cis- and trans-Dichlorotetra(Dimethylsulfoxide)Ruthenium(II) With the Antiviral Drug Acyclovir

    OpenAIRE

    Koutsodimou, Aglaia; Natile, Giovanni

    2000-01-01

    NMR was used to investigate the reaction of cis- and trans-[RuCl2(DMSO)4] with the antiviral drug acyclovir, a guanine derivative containing the acyclic (2-hydroxo) ethoxymethyl pendant linked to N(9). Studies were performed in aqueous solutions at ambient temperature and at 37 °C, and at various molar ratios. Both isomers yielded two compounds, a monoadduct and a bisadduct, the relative yields being dependent upon the metal to ligand concentration ratios. The products derived from the two Ru...

  10. 78 FR 17413 - Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    ... meeting announced in the Federal ] Register of December 14, 2012 (77 FR 74486), originally scheduled for... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of..., Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee meeting due to unanticipated weather conditions. Name...

  11. 77 FR 69635 - Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of... to the public. Name of Committee: Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee. General Function of...

  12. 76 FR 29766 - Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of... to the public. Name of Committee: Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee. General Function of...

  13. 75 FR 5334 - Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of... to the public. Name of Committee: Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee. General Function of...

  14. 77 FR 74486 - Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of... to the public. Name of Committee: Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee. General Function of...

  15. 75 FR 9420 - Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of... to the public. Name of Committee: Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee. General Function of...

  16. 75 FR 5333 - Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of... to the public. Name of Committee: Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee. General Function of...

  17. 75 FR 8377 - Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee; Amendment of Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ... Administration (FDA) is announcing an amendment to the notice of a meeting of the Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee. This meeting was announced in the Federal Register of February 2, 2010 (75 FR 5334... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee; Amendment...

  18. 78 FR 63224 - Endocrinologic and Metabolic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Endocrinologic and Metabolic Drugs Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Endocrinologic and Metabolic Drugs Advisory Committee... Type IVA (Morquio A syndrome). Morquio A syndrome is a rare congenital disorder caused by the...

  19. 77 FR 65000 - Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee. General... Committee (DSaRM). The Agency plans to present information on the risk management of teratogens, some...

  20. 77 FR 34051 - Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee. General... 29 and 30, 2012, the committee will discuss the public health benefits and risks, including...

  1. 77 FR 69636 - Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-20

    ... sponsored by Pharmaxis, for the proposed indication of management of cystic fibrosis in patients aged 6... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of... to the public. Name of Committee: Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee. General Function of...

  2. 75 FR 82031 - Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-29

    ... patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, including chronic bronchitis and/or emphysema. FDA... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of... to the public. Name of Committee: Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee. General Function of...

  3. 78 FR 46976 - Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ... with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, including chronic bronchitis and emphysema. FDA intends to... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of... to the public. Name of Committee: Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee. General Function of...

  4. 77 FR 4566 - Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    ... chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, including chronic bronchitis and emphysema. FDA intends to make... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of... to the public. Name of Committee: Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee. General Function of...

  5. Using ICR and SCID mice as animal models for smallpox to assess antiviral drug efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titova, Ksenya A; Sergeev, Alexander A; Zamedyanskaya, Alena S; Galahova, Darya O; Kabanov, Alexey S; Morozova, Anastasia A; Bulychev, Leonid E; Sergeev, Artemiy A; Glotova, Tanyana I; Shishkina, Larisa N; Taranov, Oleg S; Omigov, Vladimir V; Zavjalov, Evgenii L; Agafonov, Alexander P; Sergeev, Alexander N

    2015-09-01

    The possibility of using immunocompetent ICR mice and immunodeficient SCID mice as model animals for smallpox to assess antiviral drug efficacy was investigated. Clinical signs of the disease did not appear following intranasal (i.n.) challenge of mice with strain Ind-3a of variola virus (VARV), even when using the highest possible dose of the virus (5.2 log10 p.f.u.). The 50 % infective doses (ID50) of VARV, estimated by the virus presence or absence in the lungs 3 and 4 days post-infection, were 2.7 ± 0.4 log10 p.f.u. for ICR mice and 3.5 ± 0.7 log10 p.f.u. for SCID mice. After i.n. challenge of ICR and SCID mice with VARV 30 and 50 ID50, respectively, steady reproduction of the virus occurred only in the respiratory tract (lungs and nose). Pathological inflammatory destructive changes were revealed in the respiratory tract and the primary target cells for VARV (macrophages and epithelial cells) in mice, similar to those in humans and cynomolgus macaques. The use of mice to assess antiviral efficacies of NIOCH-14 and ST-246 demonstrated the compliance of results with those described in scientific literature, which opens up the prospect of their use as an animal model for smallpox to develop anti-smallpox drugs intended for humans. PMID:26067292

  6. A method for evaluating antiviral drug susceptibility of Epstein-Barr virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte A Romain

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Charlotte A Romain1, Henry H Balfour Jr1,2, Heather E Vezina1,3, Carol J Holman11Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, 2Department of Pediatrics, 3Department of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USAAbstract: We developed an in vitro Epstein-Barr virus (EBV drug susceptibility assay using P3HR1 cells or lymphoblastoid cells from subjects with infectious mononucleosis, which were grown in the presence of various concentrations of acyclovir (ACV, ganciclovir (GCV or R-9-[4-hydroxy-2-(hydroxymethylbutyl]guanine (H2G and 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA. On day 7, total cellular DNA was extracted and EBV DNA was detected using an in-house quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR method. All three drugs had in vitro activity against EBV in both the laboratory standard producer cell line P3HR1 and in subject-derived lymphoblastoid cell lines. The median 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s in P3HR1 cells were: ACV, 3.4 μM; GCV, 2.6 μM; and H2G, 2.7 μM and in 3 subject-derived cells were: ACV, 2.5 μM; GCV, 1.7 μM; and H2G, 1.9 μM. Our assay can be used to screen candidate anti-EBV drugs. Because we can measure the IC50 of patients’ strains of EBV, this assay may also be useful for monitoring viral resistance especially in immunocompomised hosts receiving antiviral drugs for prevention or treatment of EBV diseases.Keywords: Epstein-Barr virus, ganciclovir, acyclovir, valomaciclovir, H2G, antivirals

  7. A novel corneal explant model system to evaluate antiviral drugs against feline herpesvirus type 1 (FHV-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Matthew R; Fort, Michael W; Ledbetter, Eric C; Van de Walle, Gerlinde R

    2016-06-01

    Feline herpesvirus type-1 (FHV-1) is the most common viral cause of ocular surface disease in cats. Many antiviral drugs are used to treat FHV-1, but require frequent topical application and most lack well-controlled in vivo studies to justify their clinical use. Therefore, better validation of current and novel treatment options are urgently needed. Here, we report on the development of a feline whole corneal explant model that supports FHV-1 replication and thus can be used as a novel model system to evaluate the efficacy of antiviral drugs. The anti-herpes nucleoside analogues cidofovir and acyclovir, which are used clinically to treat ocular herpesvirus infection in cats and have previously been evaluated in traditional two-dimensional feline cell cultures in vitro, were evaluated in this explant model. Both drugs suppressed FHV-1 replication when given every 12 h, with cidofovir showing greater efficacy. In addition, the potential efficacy of the retroviral integrase inhibitor raltegravir against FHV-1 was evaluated in cell culture as well as in the explant model. Raltegravir was not toxic to feline cells or corneas, and most significantly, inhibited FHV-1 replication at 500 µM in both systems. Importantly, this drug was effective when given only once every 24 h. Taken together, our data indicate that the feline whole corneal explant model is a useful tool for the evaluation of antiviral drugs and, furthermore, that raltegravir appears a promising novel antiviral drug to treat ocular herpesvirus infection in cats. PMID:26959283

  8. Prescription of antiviral drugs during the 2009 influenza pandemic: an observational study using electronic medical files of general practitioners in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Hooiveld, M; Groep, T. van de; Verheij, Th.J.M.; Sande, M A; Verheij, R.A.; Tacken, M.A.; van Essen, G. A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: After the clinical impact of the A(H1N1) pdm09 virus was considered to be mild, treatment with antiviral drugs was recommended only to patients who were at risk for severe disease or who had a complicated course of influenza. We investigated to what extent antiviral prescriptions in primary care practices were in accordance with the recommendations, what proportion of patients diagnosed with influenza had been prescribed antiviral drugs, and to what extent prescriptions related to...

  9. The Use of Antiviral Drugs for Influenza: Guidance for Practitioners 2012/2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred Y Aoki

    2012-01-01

    Seasonal influenza in 2012/2013 is predicted to be caused by two human influenza A and one influenza B strain, all of which are anticipated to remain generally susceptible to oseltamivir.The predicted strains are A/California/7/2009 (H1N1 pdm09-like, A/Victoria/361/2011 (H3N2-like and B/Wisconsin/1/2010-like (Yamagata lineage. All are included in the seasonal influenza vaccine and are susceptible to oseltamivir.Swine-variant H3N2v, which has rarely caused infection in humans exposed to infected swine within the past year in the United States, is susceptible to oseltamivir. It is not included in the current seasonal influenza vaccine.It is still considered that initiation of antiviral therapy more than 36 h to 48 h after onset of symptoms is beneficial in patients hospitalized with complicated influenza and severe illness.Oseltamivir continues to be recommended for the treatment of influenza in pregnant women.The use of antiviral drugs among measures to control outbreaks of influenza in closed facilities such as correctional institutions is now included in the present document.

  10. 75 FR 2875 - Endocrinologic and Metabolic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-19

    ... another compound in structure) of growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH). The proposed indication (use... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Endocrinologic and Metabolic Drugs Advisory Committee... in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with lipodystrophy (a condition in...

  11. 75 FR 36427 - Joint Meeting of the Arthritis Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-25

    ... Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug...: Arthritis Advisory Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee. ] General Function... and efficacy findings for sodium oxybate in the fibromyalgia population and the proposed...

  12. Design and evaluation of novel interferon lambda analogs with enhanced antiviral activity and improved drug attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Debin; Zhao, Mingzhi; Dong, Liwei; Zhao, Lu; Zou, Mingwei; Sun, Hetong; Zhang, Mengying; Liu, Hongyu; Zou, Zhihua

    2016-01-01

    Type III interferons (IFNs) (also called IFN-λ: IFN-λ1, IFN-λ2, IFN-λ3, and IFN-λ4) are critical players in the defense against viral infection of mucosal epithelial cells, where the activity of type I IFNs is weak, and unlike type I IFNs that are associated with severe and diverse side effects, type III IFNs cause minimal side effects due to the highly restricted expression of their receptors, and thus appear to be promising agents for the treatment and prevention of respiratory and gastrointestinal viral infection. However, the antiviral potency of natural type III IFNs is weak compared to type I and, although IFN-λ3 possesses the highest bioactivity among the type III IFNs, IFN-λ1, instead of IFN-λ3, is being developed as a therapeutic drug due to the difficulty to express IFN-λ3 in the prokaryotic expression system. Here, to develop optimal IFN-λ molecules with improved drug attributes, we designed a series of IFN-λ analogs by replacing critical amino acids of IFN-λ1 with the IFN-λ3 counterparts, and vice versa. Four of the designed analogs were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli with high yield and were easily purified from inclusion bodies. Interestingly, all four analogs showed potent activity in inducing the expression of the antiviral genes MxA and OAS and two of them, analog-6 and -7, displayed an unexpected high potency that is higher than that of type I IFN (IFN-α2a) in activating the IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE)-luciferase reporter. Importantly, both analog-6 and -7 effectively inhibited replication of hepatitis C virus in Huh-7.5.1 cells, with an IC50 that is comparable to that of IFN-α2a; and consistent with the roles of IFN-λ in mucosal epithelia, both analogs potently inhibited replication of H3N2 influenza A virus in A549 cells. Together, these studies identified two IFN-λ analogs as candidates to be developed as novel antiviral biologics. PMID:26792983

  13. Design and evaluation of novel interferon lambda analogs with enhanced antiviral activity and improved drug attributes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu D

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Debin Yu,1 Mingzhi Zhao,2 Liwei Dong,1 Lu Zhao,1 Mingwei Zou,3 Hetong Sun,4 Mengying Zhang,4 Hongyu Liu,4 Zhihua Zou1 1National Engineering Laboratory for AIDS Vaccine, Key Laboratory for Molecular Enzymology and Engineering of the Ministry of Education, School of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun, 2State Key Laboratory of Proteomics, National Engineering Research Center for Protein Drugs, Beijing Proteome Research Center, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences, University of Houston, Houston, TX, USA; 4Prosit Sole Biotechnology, Co., Ltd., Beijing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Type III interferons (IFNs (also called IFN-λ: IFN-λ1, IFN-λ2, IFN-λ3, and IFN-λ4 are critical players in the defense against viral infection of mucosal epithelial cells, where the activity of type I IFNs is weak, and unlike type I IFNs that are associated with severe and diverse side effects, type III IFNs cause minimal side effects due to the highly restricted expression of their receptors, and thus appear to be promising agents for the treatment and prevention of respiratory and gastrointestinal viral infection. However, the antiviral potency of natural type III IFNs is weak compared to type I and, although IFN-λ3 possesses the highest bioactivity among the type III IFNs, IFN-λ1, instead of IFN-λ3, is being developed as a therapeutic drug due to the difficulty to express IFN-λ3 in the prokaryotic expression system. Here, to develop optimal IFN-λ molecules with improved drug attributes, we designed a series of IFN-λ analogs by replacing critical amino acids of IFN-λ1 with the IFN-λ3 counterparts, and vice versa. Four of the designed analogs were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli with high yield and were easily purified from inclusion bodies. Interestingly, all four analogs showed potent activity in inducing the

  14. Diagnostic imaging of herpes simplex virus encephalitis using a radiolabeled antiviral drug: autoradiographic assessment in an animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To develop a new approach to the diagnosis of herpes simplex encephalitis, we used a radiolabeled antiviral drug, 2'-fluoro-5-methyl-1-beta-D-arabinosyluracil labeled with carbon 14 ([14C]FMAU), as a probe for selectively imaging brain infection in a rat model by quantitative autoradiography. A high correlation was found between focal infection, as defined by immunoperoxidase viral antigen staining, and increased regional [14C]FMAU uptake in brain sections. Two potential sources of false-positive imaging were defined: high concentrations of drug in the choroid plexus because of its higher permeability compared with brain, and drug sequestration by proliferating uninfected cell populations. Our results support the soundness of the proposed strategy of using a labeled antiviral drug that is selectively phosphorylated by herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase in conjunction with scanning methods for human diagnosis, and also define some of the factors that must be taken into account when planning clinical application

  15. High throughput screening for small molecule enhancers of the interferon signaling pathway to drive next-generation antiviral drug discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhara A Patel

    Full Text Available Most of current strategies for antiviral therapeutics target the virus specifically and directly, but an alternative approach to drug discovery might be to enhance the immune response to a broad range of viruses. Based on clinical observation in humans and successful genetic strategies in experimental models, we reasoned that an improved interferon (IFN signaling system might better protect against viral infection. Here we aimed to identify small molecular weight compounds that might mimic this beneficial effect and improve antiviral defense. Accordingly, we developed a cell-based high-throughput screening (HTS assay to identify small molecules that enhance the IFN signaling pathway components. The assay is based on a phenotypic screen for increased IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE activity in a fully automated and robust format (Z'>0.7. Application of this assay system to a library of 2240 compounds (including 2160 already approved or approvable drugs led to the identification of 64 compounds with significant ISRE activity. From these, we chose the anthracycline antibiotic, idarubicin, for further validation and mechanism based on activity in the sub-µM range. We found that idarubicin action to increase ISRE activity was manifest by other members of this drug class and was independent of cytotoxic or topoisomerase inhibitory effects as well as endogenous IFN signaling or production. We also observed that this compound conferred a consequent increase in IFN-stimulated gene (ISG expression and a significant antiviral effect using a similar dose-range in a cell-culture system inoculated with encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV. The antiviral effect was also found at compound concentrations below the ones observed for cytotoxicity. Taken together, our results provide proof of concept for using activators of components of the IFN signaling pathway to improve IFN efficacy and antiviral immune defense as well as a validated HTS approach to identify

  16. High frequency of antiviral drug resistance and non-b subtypes in HIV-1 patients failing antiviral therapy in Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouri, Vivian; Alemán, Yoan; Pérez, Lissette; Pérez, Jorge; Fonseca, Carlos; Correa, Consuelo; Aragonés, Carlos; Campos, Jorge; Álvarez, Delmis; Schrooten, Yoeri; Vinken, Lore; Limia, Celia; Soto, Yudira; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Van Laethem, Kristel

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Emergence of HIV-1 drug resistance may limit the sustained benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in settings with limited laboratory monitoring and drug options. The objective is to implement the surveillance of drug resistance and subtypes in HIV-1 patients failing ART in Cuba. Methods This study compiled clinical and genotypic drug resistance data 588 ART-experienced HIV-1 patients attending a clinical center in Havana in 2009–2013. Drug resistance testing was performed as part of routine clinical care. Drug resistance mutations and levels were determined using Rega version 8.0.2. Results Eighty-three percent received solely ART containing at least three drugs. Patients from 2009 to 2010 were longer treated (median: 4.9 vs 2.7 years) and exposed to more ART regimens (median: 4 vs 2 regimens) compared to patients from 2011–2013. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI), non-nucleoside RTI (NNRTI) and PI mutations were present in 83.5, 77.4 and 52.0%. Full-class resistance (FCR) to NRTI, NNRTI, PI and multidrug resistance (MDR) were detected in 25.0, 33.7, 11.4 and 6.3%. FCR to NRTI, NNRTI, PI and MDR were present in 12.8, 28.7, 0 and 0% after first-line failure (164 patients) and in 23.1, 34.6, 3.8 and 3.1% after second-line failure (130 patients). Subtype B (32.5%), BG recombinants (19.6%) and CRF19_cpx (16.2%) were the most prevalent genetic forms. Subtype distribution did not change significantly between 2009–2010 and 2011–2013, except for BG recombinants that increased from 12.2 to 21.3% (p=0.002). Conclusions Our study found a high prevalence of drug resistance and supports the need for appropriate laboratory monitoring in clinical practice and access to drug options in case of virological failure. PMID:25397499

  17. High frequency of antiviral drug resistance and non-b subtypes in HIV-1 patients failing antiviral therapy in Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Kouri

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emergence of HIV-1 drug resistance may limit the sustained benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART in settings with limited laboratory monitoring and drug options. The objective is to implement the surveillance of drug resistance and subtypes in HIV-1 patients failing ART in Cuba. Methods: This study compiled clinical and genotypic drug resistance data 588 ART-experienced HIV-1 patients attending a clinical center in Havana in 2009–2013. Drug resistance testing was performed as part of routine clinical care. Drug resistance mutations and levels were determined using Rega version 8.0.2. Results: Eighty-three percent received solely ART containing at least three drugs. Patients from 2009 to 2010 were longer treated (median: 4.9 vs 2.7 years and exposed to more ART regimens (median: 4 vs 2 regimens compared to patients from 2011–2013. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI, non-nucleoside RTI (NNRTI and PI mutations were present in 83.5, 77.4 and 52.0%. Full-class resistance (FCR to NRTI, NNRTI, PI and multidrug resistance (MDR were detected in 25.0, 33.7, 11.4 and 6.3%. FCR to NRTI, NNRTI, PI and MDR were present in 12.8, 28.7, 0 and 0% after first-line failure (164 patients and in 23.1, 34.6, 3.8 and 3.1% after second-line failure (130 patients. Subtype B (32.5%, BG recombinants (19.6% and CRF19_cpx (16.2% were the most prevalent genetic forms. Subtype distribution did not change significantly between 2009–2010 and 2011–2013, except for BG recombinants that increased from 12.2 to 21.3% (p=0.002. Conclusions: Our study found a high prevalence of drug resistance and supports the need for appropriate laboratory monitoring in clinical practice and access to drug options in case of virological failure.

  18. Potential for Drug-Drug Interactions between Antiretrovirals and HCV Direct Acting Antivirals in a Large Cohort of HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Poizot-Martin, Isabelle; Naqvi, Alissa; Obry-Roguet, Véronique; Valantin, Marc-Antoine; Cuzin, Lise; Billaud, Eric; Cheret, Antoine; Rey, David; Jacomet, Christine; Duvivier, Claudine; Pugliese, Pascal; Pradat, Pierre; Cotte, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Development of direct acting antivirals (DAA) offers new benefits for patients with chronic hepatitis C. The combination of these drugs with antiretroviral treatment (cART) is a real challenge in HIV/HCV coinfected patients. The aim of this study was to describe potential drug-drug interactions between DAAs and antiretroviral drugs in a cohort of HIV/HCV coinfected patients. Methods Cross-sectional study of all HIV/HCV coinfected patients attending at least one visit in 2012 in the...

  19. Guidance for Practitioners on the Use of Antiviral Drugs to Control Influenza Outbreaks in Long-Term Care Facilities in Canada, 2014-2015 Season

    OpenAIRE

    Fred Y Aoki; Allen, Upton D.; H Grant Stiver; Michel Laverdière; Danuta Skowronski; Evans, Gerald A

    2015-01-01

    The AMMI Canada Guidelines document ‘The use of antiviral drugs for influenza: A foundation document for practitioners’, published in the Autumn 2013 issue of the Journal, outlines the recommendations for the use of antiviral drugs to treat influenza. This article, which represents the first of two updates to these guidelines published in the current issue of the Journal, aims to inform health care professionals of the increased risk for influenza in long-term care facilities due to a documen...

  20. 77 FR 61609 - Endocrinologic and Metabolic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Endocrinologic and Metabolic Drugs Advisory Committee... efficacy of new drug applications (NDAs) 203313, insulin degludec/insulin aspart [rDNA origin] injection and 203314, insulin degludec injection, manufactured by Novo Nordisk Inc. The proposed indication...

  1. 75 FR 75681 - Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs... and circulation) of the central nervous system. The BBB is an area consisting of specialized...

  2. 78 FR 13348 - Science Board to the Food and Drug Administration Advisory Committee; Amendment of Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Science Board to the Food and Drug Administration Advisory... Administration (FDA) is announcing an amendment to the notice of meeting of the Science Board to the Food and Drug Administration. This meeting was announced in the Federal Register of January 30, 2013 (78 FR...

  3. A human genome-wide loss-of-function screen identifies effective chikungunya antiviral drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlas, Alexander; Berre, Stefano; Couderc, Thérèse; Varjak, Margus; Braun, Peter; Meyer, Michael; Gangneux, Nicolas; Karo-Astover, Liis; Weege, Friderike; Raftery, Martin; Schönrich, Günther; Klemm, Uwe; Wurzlbauer, Anne; Bracher, Franz; Merits, Andres; Meyer, Thomas F; Lecuit, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a globally spreading alphavirus against which there is no commercially available vaccine or therapy. Here we use a genome-wide siRNA screen to identify 156 proviral and 41 antiviral host factors affecting CHIKV replication. We analyse the cellular pathways in which human proviral genes are involved and identify druggable targets. Twenty-one small-molecule inhibitors, some of which are FDA approved, targeting six proviral factors or pathways, have high antiviral activity in vitro, with low toxicity. Three identified inhibitors have prophylactic antiviral effects in mouse models of chikungunya infection. Two of them, the calmodulin inhibitor pimozide and the fatty acid synthesis inhibitor TOFA, have a therapeutic effect in vivo when combined. These results demonstrate the value of loss-of-function screening and pathway analysis for the rational identification of small molecules with therapeutic potential and pave the way for the development of new, host-directed, antiviral agents. PMID:27177310

  4. Structures of Two Coronavirus Main Proteases: Implications for Substrate Binding and Antiviral Drug Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Xiaoyu; Yu, Hongwei; Yang, Haitao; Xue, Fei; Wu, Zhixin; Shen, Wei; Li, Jun; Zhou, Zhe; Ding, Yi; Zhao, Qi; Zhang, Xuejun C.; Liao, Ming; Bartlam, Mark; Rao, Zihe (SCAU); (Tsinghua); (Chinese Aca. Sci.)

    2008-07-21

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) can infect humans and multiple species of animals, causing a wide spectrum of diseases. The coronavirus main protease (M{sup pro}), which plays a pivotal role in viral gene expression and replication through the proteolytic processing of replicase polyproteins, is an attractive target for anti-CoV drug design. In this study, the crystal structures of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) MP{sup pro} and a severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV (SARS-CoV) M{sup pro} mutant (H41A), in complex with an N-terminal autocleavage substrate, were individually determined to elucidate the structural flexibility and substrate binding of M{sup pro}. A monomeric form of IBV M{sup pro} was identified for the first time in CoV M{sup pro} structures. A comparison of these two structures to other available M{sup pro} structures provides new insights for the design of substrate-based inhibitors targeting CoV M{sup pro}s. Furthermore, a Michael acceptor inhibitor (named N3) was cocrystallized with IBV M{sup pro} and was found to demonstrate in vitro inactivation of IBV M{sup pro} and potent antiviral activity against IBV in chicken embryos. This provides a feasible animal model for designing wide-spectrum inhibitors against CoV-associated diseases. The structure-based optimization of N3 has yielded two more efficacious lead compounds, N27 and H16, with potent inhibition against SARS-CoV M{sup pro}.

  5. 76 FR 63929 - Joint Meeting of the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee and the Dermatologic and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-14

    ... public. Name of Committees: Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee and Dermatologic and... Management Advisory Committee (DSaRM). On December 1, 2011, the DSaRM and the Dermatologic and Ophthalmic... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Joint Meeting of the Drug Safety and Risk...

  6. 75 FR 56548 - Joint Meeting of the Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory Committee and the Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Joint Meeting of the Peripheral and Central Nervous System... the public. Name of Committees: Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory Committee and...

  7. Ophthalmic antiviral chemotherapy : An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athmanathan Sreedharan

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiviral drug development has been slow due to many factors. One such factor is the difficulty to block the viral replication in the cell without adversely affecting the host cell metabolic activity. Most of the antiviral compounds are analogs of purines and pyramidines. Currently available antiviral drugs mainly inhibit viral nucleic acid synthesis, hence act only on actively replicating viruses. This article presents an overview of some of the commonly used antiviral agents in clinical ophthalmology.

  8. 76 FR 59405 - Anti-Infective Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-26

    ... discuss clinical trial design issues in the development of antibacterials for the treatment of hospital... entitled ``Guidance for Industry: Hospital-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia and Ventilator-Associated Bacterial... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Anti-Infective Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of...

  9. 78 FR 63481 - Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Peripheral and Central Nervous System...

  10. 76 FR 3912 - Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Peripheral and Central Nervous System...

  11. 77 FR 20037 - Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Peripheral and Central Nervous System...

  12. 75 FR 12768 - Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Peripheral and Central Nervous System...

  13. 78 FR 63478 - Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Peripheral and Central Nervous System...

  14. 75 FR 36428 - Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Peripheral and Central Nervous System...

  15. 76 FR 44595 - Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Peripheral and Central Nervous System...

  16. 75 FR 17417 - Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Peripheral and Central Nervous System...

  17. Mixture toxicity of the antiviral drug Tamiflu (oseltamivir ethylester) and its active metabolite oseltamivir acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escher, Beate I., E-mail: b.escher@uq.edu.au [University of Queensland, National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology (Entox), 39 Kessels Rd, Brisbane, Qld 4108 (Australia); Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Bramaz, Nadine; Lienert, Judit; Neuwoehner, Judith [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Straub, Juerg Oliver [F.Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, Corporate Safety, Health and Environmental Protection, 4070 Basel (Switzerland)

    2010-02-18

    Tamiflu (oseltamivir ethylester) is an antiviral agent for the treatment of influenza A and B. The pro-drug Tamiflu is converted in the human body to the pharmacologically active metabolite, oseltamivir acid, with a yield of 75%. Oseltamivir acid is indirectly photodegradable and slowly biodegradable in sewage works and sediment/water systems. A previous environmental risk assessment has concluded that there is no bioaccumulation potential of either of the compounds. However, little was known about the ecotoxicity of the metabolite. Ester hydrolysis typically reduces the hydrophobicity and thus the toxicity of a compound. In this case, a zwitterionic, but overall neutral species is formed from the charged parent compound. If the speciation and predicted partitioning into biological membranes is considered, the metabolite may have a relevant contribution to the overall toxicity. These theoretical considerations triggered a study to investigate the toxicity of oseltamivir acid (OA), alone and in binary mixtures with its parent compound oseltamivir ethylester (OE). OE and OA were found to be baseline toxicants in the bioluminescence inhibition test with Vibrio fischeri. Their mixture effect lay between predictions for concentration addition and independent action for the mixture ratio excreted in urine and nine additional mixture ratios of OE and OA. In contrast, OE was an order of magnitude more toxic than OA towards algae, with a more pronounced effect when the direct inhibition of photosystem II was used as toxicity endpoint opposed to the 24 h growth rate endpoint. The binary mixtures in this assay yielded experimental mixture effects that agreed with predictions for independent action. This is consistent with the finding that OE exhibits slightly enhanced toxicity, while OA acts as baseline toxicant. Therefore, with respect to mixture classification, the two compounds can be considered as acting according to different modes of toxic action, although there are

  18. Mixture toxicity of the antiviral drug Tamiflu (oseltamivir ethylester) and its active metabolite oseltamivir acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamiflu (oseltamivir ethylester) is an antiviral agent for the treatment of influenza A and B. The pro-drug Tamiflu is converted in the human body to the pharmacologically active metabolite, oseltamivir acid, with a yield of 75%. Oseltamivir acid is indirectly photodegradable and slowly biodegradable in sewage works and sediment/water systems. A previous environmental risk assessment has concluded that there is no bioaccumulation potential of either of the compounds. However, little was known about the ecotoxicity of the metabolite. Ester hydrolysis typically reduces the hydrophobicity and thus the toxicity of a compound. In this case, a zwitterionic, but overall neutral species is formed from the charged parent compound. If the speciation and predicted partitioning into biological membranes is considered, the metabolite may have a relevant contribution to the overall toxicity. These theoretical considerations triggered a study to investigate the toxicity of oseltamivir acid (OA), alone and in binary mixtures with its parent compound oseltamivir ethylester (OE). OE and OA were found to be baseline toxicants in the bioluminescence inhibition test with Vibrio fischeri. Their mixture effect lay between predictions for concentration addition and independent action for the mixture ratio excreted in urine and nine additional mixture ratios of OE and OA. In contrast, OE was an order of magnitude more toxic than OA towards algae, with a more pronounced effect when the direct inhibition of photosystem II was used as toxicity endpoint opposed to the 24 h growth rate endpoint. The binary mixtures in this assay yielded experimental mixture effects that agreed with predictions for independent action. This is consistent with the finding that OE exhibits slightly enhanced toxicity, while OA acts as baseline toxicant. Therefore, with respect to mixture classification, the two compounds can be considered as acting according to different modes of toxic action, although there are

  19. Identification of transformation products of antiviral drugs formed during biological wastewater treatment and their occurrence in the urban water cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funke, Jan; Prasse, Carsten; Ternes, Thomas A

    2016-07-01

    The fate of five antiviral drugs (abacavir, emtricitabine, ganciclovir, lamivudine and zidovudine) was investigated in biological wastewater treatment. Investigations of degradation kinetics were accompanied by the elucidation of formed transformation products (TPs) using activated sludge lab experiments and subsequent LC-HRMS analysis. Degradation rate constants ranged between 0.46 L d(-1) gSS(-1) (zidovudine) and 55.8 L d(-1) gSS(-1) (abacavir). Despite these differences of the degradation kinetics, the same main biotransformation reaction was observed for all five compounds: oxidation of the terminal hydroxyl-moiety to the corresponding carboxylic acid (formation of carboxy-TPs). In addition, the oxidation of thioether moieties to sulfoxides was observed for emtricitabine and lamivudine. Antiviral drugs were detected in influents of municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) with concentrations up to 980 ng L(-1) (emtricitabine), while in WWTP effluents mainly the TPs were found with concentration levels up to 1320 ng L(-1) (carboxy-abacavir). Except of zidovudine none of the original antiviral drugs were detected in German rivers and streams, whereas the concentrations of the TPs ranged from 16 ng L(-1) for carboxy-lamivudine up to 750 ng L(-1) for carboxy-acyclovir. These concentrations indicate an appreciable portion from WWTP effluents present in rivers and streams, as well as the high environmental persistence of the carboxy-TPs. As a result three of the carboxylic TPs were detected in finished drinking water. PMID:27082694

  20. Marine natural seaweed products as potential antiviral drugs against Bovine viral diarrhea virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Viana Pinto

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV is an etiologic agent that causes important economic losses in the world. It is endemic in cattle herds in most parts of the world. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the in vitro cytotoxic effect and antiviral properties of several marine natural products obtained from seaweeds: the indole alkaloid caulerpin (CAV, 1 and three diterpenes: 6-hydroxydichotoma-3,14-diene-1,17-dial (DA, 2, 10,18-diacetoxy-8-hydroxy-2,6-dolabelladiene (DB1, 3 and 8,10,18-trihydroxy-2,6-dolabelladiene (DB3, 4. The screening to evaluate the cytotoxicity of compounds did not show toxic effects to MDBK cells. The antiviral activity of the compounds was measured by the inhibition of the cytopathic effect on infected cells by plaque assay (PA and EC50 values were calculated for CAV (EC=2,0± 5.8, DA (EC 2,8± 7.7, DB1 (EC 2,0±9.7, and DB3 (EC 2,3±7.4. Acyclovir (EC50 322± 5.9 was used in all experiments as the control standard. Although the results of the antiviral activity suggest that all compounds are promising as antiviral agents against BVDV, the Selectivity Index suggests that DB1 is the safest of the compounds tested.

  1. The Need for Development of New HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase and Integrase Inhibitors in the Aftermath of Antiviral Drug Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Wainberg

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART involves combinations of drugs to achieve maximal virological response and reduce the potential for the emergence of antiviral resistance. There are two broad classes of reverse transcriptase inhibitors, the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs. Since the first classes of such compounds were developed, viral resistance against them has necessitated the continuous development of novel compounds within each class. This paper considers the NRTIs and NNRTIs currently in both preclinical and clinical development or approved for second line therapy and describes the patterns of resistance associated with their use, as well as the underlying mechanisms that have been described. Due to reasons of both affordability and availability, some reverse transcriptase inhibitors with low genetic barrier are more commonly used in resource-limited settings. Their use results to the emergence of specific patterns of antiviral resistance and so may require specific actions to preserve therapeutic options for patients in such settings. More recently, the advent of integrase strand transfer inhibitors represents another major step forward toward control of HIV infection, but these compounds are also susceptible to problems of HIV drug resistance.

  2. Influenza Resistance to Antiviral Drugs: Virus characterization, mechanism and clinical impact

    OpenAIRE

    Vries, Erhard

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Each year, approximately 5-10% of the world population is infected with the influenza viruses resulting in significant morbidity and an estimated 250.000 to 500.000 deaths every year. Among individuals at increased risk of developing severe influenza disease are those with a compromised immune system. For them being able to effectively suppress viral replication antiviral therapy can be crucial. However, in immunocompromised patients the currently available antivi...

  3. Pharmacological Characterization of the Spectrum of Antiviral Activity and Genetic Barrier to Drug Resistance of M2-S31N Channel Blockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chunlong; Zhang, Jiantao; Wang, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Adamantanes (amantadine and rimantadine) are one of the two classes of Food and Drug Administration-approved antiviral drugs used for the prevention and treatment of influenza A virus infections. They inhibit viral replication by blocking the wild-type (WT) M2 proton channel, thus preventing viral uncoating. However, their use was discontinued due to widespread drug resistance. Among a handful of drug-resistant mutants, M2-S31N is the predominant mutation and persists in more than 95% of currently circulating influenza A strains. We recently designed two classes of M2-S31N inhibitors, S31N-specific inhibitors and S31N/WT dual inhibitors, which are represented by N-[(5-cyclopropyl-1,2-oxazol-3-yl)methyl]adamantan-1-amine (WJ379) and N-[(5-bromothiophen-2-yl)methyl]adamantan-1-amine (BC035), respectively. However, their antiviral activities against currently circulating influenza A viruses and their genetic barrier to drug resistance are unknown. In this report, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of these two classes of M2-S31N inhibitors (WJ379 and BC035) by profiling their antiviral efficacy against multidrug-resistant influenza A viruses, in vitro drug resistance barrier, and synergistic effect with oseltamivir. We found that M2-S31N inhibitors were active against several influenza A viruses that are resistant to one or both classes of Food and Drug Administration-approved anti-influenza drugs. In addition, M2-S31N inhibitors display a higher in vitro genetic barrier to drug resistance than amantadine. The antiviral effect of WJ379 was also synergistic with oseltamivir carboxylate. Overall, these results reaffirm that M2-S31N inhibitors are promising antiviral drug candidates that warrant further development. PMID:27385729

  4. Antiviral drug profile of human influenza A & B viruses circulating in India: 2004-2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V A Potdar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Recent influenza antiviral resistance studies in South East Asia, Europe and the United States reveal adamantane and neuraminidase inhibitor (NAIs resistance. This study was undertaken to evaluate antiviral resistance in influenza viruses isolated from various parts of India, during 2004 to 2011. Methods: Influenza viruses were analyzed genetically for known resistance markers by M2 and NA gene sequencing. Influenza A/H1N1 (n=206, A/H3N2 (n=371 viruses for amantadine resistance and A/H1N1 (n=206, A/H3N2 (n=272 and type B (n=326 for oseltamivir resistance were sequenced. Pandemic (H1N1 (n= 493 isolates were tested for H274Y mutation by real time reverse transcription (rRT-PCR. Randomly selected resistant and sensitive influenza A/H1N1 and A/H3N2 viruses were confirmed by phenotypic assay. Results: Serine to asparagine (S3IN mutation was detected in six isolates of 2007-2008.One dual-resistant A/H1N1 was detected for the first time in India with leucine to phenylalanine (L26F mutation in M2 gene and H274Y mutation in NA gene. A/H3N2 viruses showed an increase in resistance to amantadine from 22.5 per cent in 2005 to 100 per cent in 2008 onwards with S3IN mutation. Fifty of the 61 (82% A/H1N1 viruses tested in 2008-2009 were oseltamivir resistant with H274Y mutation, while all A/H3N2, pandemic A/H1N1 and type B isolates remained sensitive. Genetic results were also confirmed by phenotypic analysis of randomly selected 50 resistant A/H1N1 and 40 sensitive A/H3N2 isolates. Interpretation & conclusions: Emergence of influenza viruses resistant to amantadine and oseltamivir in spite of negligible usage of antivirals emphasizes the need for continuous monitoring of antiviral resistance.

  5. 77 FR 55845 - Anti-Infective Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ... the public. Name of Committee: Anti-Infective Drugs Advisory Committee. General Function of the..., raxibacumab injection, a humanized monoclonal antibody against protective antigen of Bacillis anthracis, by... the contact person and submit a brief statement of the general nature of the evidence or...

  6. Dengue Virus Reporter Replicon is a Valuable Tool for Antiviral Drug Discovery and Analysis of Virus Replication Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Fumihiro; Hishiki, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    Dengue, the most prevalent arthropod-borne viral disease, is caused by the dengue virus (DENV), a member of the Flaviviridae family, and is a considerable public health threat in over 100 countries, with 2.5 billion people living in high-risk areas. However, no specific antiviral drug or licensed vaccine currently targets DENV infection. The replicon system has all the factors needed for viral replication in cells. Since the development of replicon systems, transient and stable reporter replicons, as well as reporter viruses, have been used in the study of various virological aspects of DENV and in the identification of DENV inhibitors. In this review, we summarize the DENV reporter replicon system and its applications in high-throughput screening (HTS) for identification of anti-DENV inhibitors. We also describe the use of this system in elucidation of the mechanisms of virus replication and viral dynamics in vivo and in vitro. PMID:27164125

  7. Dengue Virus Reporter Replicon is a Valuable Tool for Antiviral Drug Discovery and Analysis of Virus Replication Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Fumihiro; Hishiki, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    Dengue, the most prevalent arthropod-borne viral disease, is caused by the dengue virus (DENV), a member of the Flaviviridae family, and is a considerable public health threat in over 100 countries, with 2.5 billion people living in high-risk areas. However, no specific antiviral drug or licensed vaccine currently targets DENV infection. The replicon system has all the factors needed for viral replication in cells. Since the development of replicon systems, transient and stable reporter replicons, as well as reporter viruses, have been used in the study of various virological aspects of DENV and in the identification of DENV inhibitors. In this review, we summarize the DENV reporter replicon system and its applications in high-throughput screening (HTS) for identification of anti-DENV inhibitors. We also describe the use of this system in elucidation of the mechanisms of virus replication and viral dynamics in vivo and in vitro. PMID:27164125

  8. Public health management of antiviral drugs during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic: a survey of local health departments in California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunter Jennifer C

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The large-scale deployment of antiviral drugs from the Strategic National Stockpile during the 2009 H1N1 influenza response provides a unique opportunity to study local public health implementation of the medical countermeasure dispensing capability in a prolonged event of national significance. This study aims to describe the range of methods used by local health departments (LHDs in California to manage antiviral activities and to gain a better understanding of the related challenges experienced by health departments and their community partners. Methods This research employed a mixed-methods approach. First, a multi-disciplinary focus group of pandemic influenza planners from key stakeholder groups in California was convened in order to generate ideas and identify critical themes related to the local implementation of antiviral activities during the H1N1 influenza response. These qualitative data informed the development of a web-based survey, which was distributed to all 61 LHDs in California for the purpose of assessing the experiences of a representative sample of local health agencies in a large region. Results Forty-four LHDs participated in this study, representing 72% of the local public health agencies in California. While most communities dispensed a modest number of publicly purchased antivirals, LHDs nevertheless drew on their previous work and engaged in a number of antiviral activities, including: acquiring, allocating, distributing, dispensing, tracking, developing guidance, and communicating to the public and clinical community. LHDs also identified specific antiviral challenges presented by the H1N1 pandemic, including: reconciling multiple sources and versions of antiviral guidance, determining appropriate uses and recipients of publicly purchased antivirals, and staffing shortages. Conclusions The 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic presented an unusual opportunity to learn about the role of local public health

  9. Synthesis of an antiviral drug precursor from chitin using a saprophyte as a whole-cell catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steiger Matthias G

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent incidents, such as the SARS and influenza epidemics, have highlighted the need for readily available antiviral drugs. One important precursor currently used for the production of Relenza, an antiviral product from GlaxoSmithKline, is N-acetylneuraminic acid (NeuNAc. This substance has a considerably high market price despite efforts to develop cost-reducing (biotechnological production processes. Hypocrea jecorina (Trichoderma reesei is a saprophyte noted for its abundant secretion of hydrolytic enzymes and its potential to degrade chitin to its monomer N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc. Chitin is considered the second most abundant biomass available on earth and therefore an attractive raw material. Results In this study, we introduced two enzymes from bacterial origin into Hypocrea, which convert GlcNAc into NeuNAc via N-acetylmannosamine. This enabled the fungus to produce NeuNAc from the cheap starting material chitin in liquid culture. Furthermore, we expressed the two recombinant enzymes as GST-fusion proteins and developed an enzyme assay for monitoring their enzymatic functionality. Finally, we demonstrated that Hypocrea does not metabolize NeuNAc and that no NeuNAc-uptake by the fungus occurs, which are important prerequisites for a potential production strategy. Conclusions This study is a proof of concept for the possibility to engineer in a filamentous fungus a bacterial enzyme cascade, which is fully functional. Furthermore, it provides the basis for the development of a process for NeuNAc production as well as a general prospective design for production processes that use saprophytes as whole-cell catalysts.

  10. Antiviral Polymer Therapeutics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Anton Allen Abbotsford

    2014-01-01

    The field of drug delivery is in essence an exercise in engineered pharmacokinetics. Methods of doing so have been developed through the introduction of a vehicle carrying the drug, either by encapsulation or covalent attachment. The emergence of polymer therapeutics in anticancer therapy has...... the examples of polymer therapeutics being applied as an antiviral treatment are few and far in-between. This work aims to explore antiviral therapeutics, specifically in context of hepatitis virus C (HCV) and HIV. The current treatment of hepatitis C consists of a combination of drugs, of which ribavirin...

  11. Crystal Structures, Thermal Analysis, and Dissolution Behavior of New Solid Forms of the Antiviral Drug Arbidol with Dicarboxylic Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex N. Manin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Salts of the antiviral drug arbidol (umifenovir (Arb with maleate (Mlc and fumarate (Fum anions have been obtained, and their crystal structures have been described. The crystal structure of arbidol maleate has been redetermined by single crystal X-ray diffraction at 180K. A new arbidol cocrystal in zwitterion form with succinic acid (Suc has also been found and characterized. The arbidol zwitterion was not previously seen in any of the drug crystal forms, and the [Arb + Suc] cocrystal seems to be the first found instance. Analysis of the conformational preferences of the arbidol molecule in the crystal structures has shown that it adopts two types of conformations, namely “open” and “closed” ones. Thermal stability of the arbidol salts and cocrystal have been analyzed by means of differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric, and mass-spectrometry analysis. The dissolution study of the arbidol salts and cocrystal performed in aqueous buffer solutions with pH 1.2 and 6.8 has shown that both the salts and the cocrystal dissolve incongruently to form an arbidol hydrochloride monohydrate at pH 1.2 and an arbidol base at pH 6.8, respectively. The cocrystal reaches the highest solubility level in both pH 1.2 and pH 6.8 solutions.

  12. HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase and Antiviral Drug Resistance (Part 1 of 2)

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Kalyan; Arnold, Eddy

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) contributes to the development of resistance to all anti-AIDS drugs by introducing mutations into the viral genome. At the molecular level, mutations in RT result in resistance to RT inhibitors. Eight nucleoside/nucleotide analogs (NRTIs) and five non-nucleoside inhibitors (NNRTIs) are approved HIV-1 drugs. Structures of RT have been determined in complexes with substrates and/or inhibitors, and the structures have revealed different conforma...

  13. Virus-encoded chemokine receptors--putative novel antiviral drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2005-01-01

    Large DNA viruses, in particular herpes- and poxviruses, have evolved proteins that serve as mimics or decoys for endogenous proteins in the host. The chemokines and their receptors serve key functions in both innate and adaptive immunity through control of leukocyte trafficking, and have as such a...... receptors. The chemokine receptors belong to the superfamily of G-protein coupled 7TM receptors that per se are excellent drug targets. At present, non-peptide antagonists have been developed against many chemokine receptors. The potentials of the virus-encoded chemokine receptors as drug targets--ie. as...

  14. Quantifying antiviral activity optimizes drug combinations against hepatitis C virus infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koizumi, Yoshiki [School of Medicine, College of Medical, Pharmaceutical and Health Sciences, Kanazawa University, Ishikawa, Japan; Nakajim, Syo [Department of Virology II, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan; Department of Applied Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Sciences, Chiba, J; Ohash, Hirofumi [Department of Virology II, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan: Department of Applied Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Sciences, Chiba, J; Tanaka, Yasuhito [Department of Virology and Liver Unit, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medicinal Sciences, Nagoya, Japan; Wakita, Takaji [Department of Virology II, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan; Perelson, Alan S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Iwami, Shingo [Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan: PRESTO, JST, Saitama, Japan: CREST, JST, Saitama, Japan; Watashi, Koichi [Department of Virology II, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan: Department of Applied Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Sciences, Chiba, J

    2016-03-21

    Cell culture study combing a mathematical model and computer simulation quantifies the anti-hepatitis C virus drug efficacy at any concentrations and any combinations in preclinical settings, and can obtain rich basic evidences for selecting optimal treatments prior to costly clinical trials.

  15. Biophysical studies on the interaction of platinum(II) complex containing antiviral drug ribavirin with human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Hadidi, Saba; Kalar, Zeinab Mirzaei

    2016-07-01

    This study describes HSA binding properties of a platinum(II) complex with an antiviral drug ligand; ribavirin. Spectroscopic analysis of the emission quenching at different temperatures and UV-vis spectra revealed that the quenching mechanism of HSA by Pt(II) complex is static quenching mechanism. The binding constants and the number of binding sites were determined by fluorescence quenching method. Pt(II) complex binding is characterized by one high affinity binding site. Through the site marker competitive experiment, site I was assigned to possess high affinity binding site for Pt(II) complex. The calculated thermodynamic parameters (ΔG, ΔH and ΔS) confirmed that the binding reaction is spontaneous, and hydrophobic forces played a major role in the reaction. Fluorescence quenching studies showed that the binding affinity of Pt(II) complex with HSA in the buffer solution at different pH values is: Kb (pH3.0)>Kb (pH9.0)>Kb (pH7.4). The CD spectrum shows the binding of Pt(II) complex leads to a change in the α-helical structure of HSA. CD spectroscopy studies further indicated the influence of pH on the complexation process and the alteration in the protein conformation upon binding. PMID:27183492

  16. OxyContin: Prescription Drug Abuse. CSAT Advisory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Center for Substance Abuse Treatment.

    Recently, the media have issued numerous reports about the apparent increase in OxyContin abuse and addiction. OxyContin has been heralded as a miracle drug that allows patients with chronic pain to resume a normal life. It has also been called pharmaceutical heroin and is thought to have been responsible for a number of deaths and robberies in…

  17. 75 FR 30045 - Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ... information on this meeting. A notice in the Federal Register about last minute modifications that impact a... addition to the discussion of these two indications, the committee will also consider the impact of the... cancer known as HER2-negative breast cancer, in combination with the chemotherapy drug docetaxel; and...

  18. 75 FR 65362 - Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-22

    ... drug applications (sNDAs) 021-319/S-024, trade name AVODART (dutasteride) Soft Gelatin Capsules... name PROSCAR (finasteride) Tablets, manufactured by Merck & Co., Inc. The proposed indication (use) for AVODART (dutasteride) is for reduction in the risk of prostate cancer in men at increased risk...

  19. 76 FR 65736 - Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-24

    ... proposed indication (use) for this product is for the treatment of patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (kidney cancer). During the afternoon session, the committee will discuss new drug application... renal failure in adult patients on dialysis. FDA intends to make background material available to...

  20. The antiviral drug valacyclovir successfully suppresses salivary gland hypertrophy virus (SGHV in laboratory colonies of Glossina pallidipes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adly M M Abd-Alla

    Full Text Available Many species of tsetse flies are infected with a virus that causes salivary gland hypertrophy (SGH symptoms associated with a reduced fecundity and fertility. A high prevalence of SGH has been correlated with the collapse of two laboratory colonies of Glossina pallidipes and colony maintenance problems in a mass rearing facility in Ethiopia. Mass-production of G. pallidipes is crucial for programs of tsetse control including the sterile insect technique (SIT, and therefore requires a management strategy for this virus. Based on the homology of DNA polymerase between salivary gland hypertrophy virus and herpes viruses at the amino acid level, two antiviral drugs, valacyclovir and acyclovir, classically used against herpes viruses were selected and tested for their toxicity on tsetse flies and their impact on virus replication. While long term per os administration of acyclovir resulted in a significant reduction of productivity of the colonies, no negative effect was observed in colonies fed with valacyclovir-treated blood. Furthermore, treatment of a tsetse colony with valacyclovir for 83 weeks resulted in a significant reduction of viral loads and consequently suppression of SGH symptoms. The combination of initial selection of SGHV-negative flies by non-destructive PCR, a clean feeding system, and valacyclovir treatment resulted in a colony that was free of SGH syndromes in 33 weeks. This is the first report of the use of a drug to control a viral infection in an insect and of the demonstration that valacyclovir can be used to suppress SGH in colonies of G. pallidipes.

  1. Biochemical Effects Of Ribavirin (Antiviral And Ddb (Hepato Protective Drugs In Albino Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soliman S. Ibrahim, Amr Shalaby and Mahmoud Rabeh

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation has been designed to through spot light on the efficiency of these two drugs in treatment of hepatitis patients. Cortisol, antigliadin (1gG , total protein (TP albumin (ALB , Iron (Fe , alanine aminotransferase (ALT , aspartic aminotransferase (AST and alkaline phosphatase (ALP were determined in serum of normal mature male and female albino rats that injected intraperitoneally day after day with 1mg/kg body weight of each drug separately for 3 months. The cortisol level and ALP showed significant increase in each of ribavirin or DDB treated animals, while the IgG concentration in ribavirin treated animals increased significantly, but it is did not vary greatly from that of the control in DDB treated animals. On the other hand both ribavirin and DDB treated male and female rats showed significant decrease in the ALT in serum while serum AST elicited non significant decrease in each of ribavirin and DDB treated male and female. With respect to serum TP and ALB levels the result showed significant decrease in ribavirin and non significant decrease in DDB treated male and female rats. Furthermore, the serum Fe level in ribavirin treated male and female rats increased significantly but it is did not vary greatly from that of the control in DDB treated animal.

  2. Simultaneous determination of 14 antiviral drugs and relevant metabolites in chicken muscle by UPLC-MS/MS after QuEChERS preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Pengqian; Xu, Nana; Chai, Tingting; Jia, Qi; Yin, Zhiqiang; Yang, Shuming; Qian, Yongzhong; Qiu, Jing

    2016-06-15

    A fast method for the simultaneous determination of 14 antiviral drugs and relevant metabolites in chicken muscle by ultra-high liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) was developed. The analytes included anti-influenza drugs (amantadine, rimantadine, oseltamivir, oseltamivir carboxylate, memantine, arbidol, and moroxydine), anti-herpes drugs (acyclovir, ganciclovir, famciclovir, penciclovir, ribavirin and its main metabolite TCONH2), and an immunomodulator (imiquimod). The samples were pretreated using a modified QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe) method. The determination of the target compounds was conducted in less than 11.0min, and specificity was ensured by the use of multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) acquisition mode. Good linearities (R(2)>0.9928) were obtained in the range of 0.1-100μg/L, and the recovery rates were 56.2-113.4% with RSDs of 1.7-10.3% for intra-day precision and 2.4-8.8% for inter-day precision. The LODs and LOQs of all analytes were in the ranges of 0.02-1.0 and 0.05-2.5μg/kg, respectively. An analysis of real samples suggested that this method is simple, sensitive, reliable and practical for the detection of antiviral drugs in animal tissue. PMID:27174693

  3. Synthesis and Antiviral Evaluation of 6-(Trifluoromethylbenzyl) and 6-(Fluorobenzyl) Analogues of HIV Drugs Emivirine and GCA-186

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Brollosy, Nasser R.; Sørensen, Esben R.; Pedersen, Erik Bjerreg.;

    2008-01-01

    antiviral activity against HIV-1 wild type and mutants resistant to non-nucleoside RT inhibitors. The biological test results showed that the most of theses compounds showed good activity against wild type HIV-1. Among them, compound 1-(ethoxymethyl)-6-(3-fluorobenzyl)-5-isopropyluracil (9i) showed the...

  4. Antiviral Prophylaxis and Isolation for the Control of Pandemic Influenza

    OpenAIRE

    Qingxia Zhang; Dingcheng Wang

    2014-01-01

    Before effective vaccines become available, antiviral drugs are considered as the major control strategies for a pandemic influenza. However, perhaps such control strategies can be severely hindered by the low-efficacy of antiviral drugs. For this reason, using antiviral drugs and an isolation strategy is included in our study. A compartmental model that allows for imported exposed individuals and asymptomatic cases is used to evaluate the effectiveness of control strategies via antiviral pro...

  5. Diversity of Pharmacological Properties in Chinese and European Medicinal Plants: Cytotoxicity, Antiviral and Antitrypanosomal Screening of 82 Herbal Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Efferth; Marin, Jose J. G.; Stefan Kahl; Dorothea Kaufmann; Ashour, Mohamed L; Blazquez, Alba G; Romero, Marta R.; Michael Wink; Florian Herrmann

    2011-01-01

    In an extensive screening, the antiviral, antitrypanosomal and anticancer properties of extracts from 82 plants used in traditional Chinese medicine and European phytomedicine were determined. Several promising plants that were highly effective against hepatitis B virus (HBV), bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV)—a flavivirus used here as a surrogate in vitro model of hepatitis C virus, trypanosomes (Trypanosoma brucei brucei) and several cancer cell lines were identified. Six aqueous extracts...

  6. Use of Antiviral Drugs to Reduce Household Transmission of Pandemic (H1N1) 2009, United Kingdom1

    OpenAIRE

    Pebody, Richard G.; Harris, Ross; Kafatos, George; Chamberland, Mary; Campbell, Colin; Jonathan S Nguyen-Van-Tam; McLean, Estelle; Andrews, Nick; Peter J White; Wynne-Evans, Edward; Green, Jon; Ellis, Joanna; Wreghitt, Tim; Bracebridge, Sam; Ihekweazu, Chikwe

    2011-01-01

    The United Kingdom implemented a containment strategy for pandemic (H1N1) 2009 through administering antiviral agents (AVs) to patients and their close contacts. This observational household cohort study describes the effect of AVs on household transmission. We followed 285 confirmed primary cases in 259 households with 761 contacts. At 2 weeks, the confirmed secondary attack rate (SAR) was 8.1% (62/761) and significantly higher in persons 50 years of age (18.9% vs. 1.2%, p

  7. Efficacy of combined antiviral therapy with pegylated interferon α-2a and ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C infection in intravenous drug users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ružić Maja

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hepatitis C Virus infection represents not just a medical, but also a socio-economic problem. It is estimated that among 170 million infected, 60% belongs to the category of intravenous drug users (IDUs. Objective. The aim of this paper was to compare the response to the combined therapy of pegylated interferon alfa 2a and ribavirin, in the group of patients with HCV infection who were intravenous drug users (IDUs and in patients who were identified in the other way of transmission of HCV. Also to identify the influence of the therapy on diseases of addiction, during the course of HCV infection and on the effects of the combined therapy of pegylated interferon alfa 2a and ribavirin. Methods. We conducted a retrospective-prospective study, on 60 patients, treated with combined antiviral therapy-pegylated interferon alfa 2a and ribavirin. 30 patients were from the group of IDUs, and 30 patients from other epidemiological groups. Results. There were significant differences between the age of the patients (30.2±7.1 vs. 39.3±11.2 years; p=0.002, but no significant difference in the duration of the HCV infection between the two groups of patients (8.9±7.4 vs. 13.1±7.0 years; p>0.05. A large number of the patients in the group of IDUs had a problem with the abstinence of the drug abuse. In this group, there was the influence of alcohol (30% and other substances with potential hepatotoxicity: marihuana (23.3% and psycho-active drugs (73.6%. Staging of the liver fibrosis was not influenced by those two parameters and was similar in both groups (p>0.05. The genotype 3a was dominant in intravenous drug users (50.0% and genotype 1b in the control group of the patients (76.6%. In both groups, SVR was achieved at a higher percentage (86% vs. 70.00%; p>0.05, but among the intravenous drug users the relapses of HCV infection were at a lower percentage (3.3% vs. 20.0%; p=0.044. Side effects were noticed in solitary cases in both of the examined

  8. The role of the Australian Adverse Drug Reactions Advisory Committee (ADRAC) in monitoring drug safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australian adverse drug reaction reporting system is acknowledged as one of the best in the world. Despite its small population of less than 20 million people, Australia's current ADR reporting rate of over 12000 reports per year places it in the top few nations in terms of reports per capita. The ADRAC program has been in operation for over 30 years. Australia was a founding member of the WHO International Drug Monitoring Programme which commenced in 1968 and currently there are about 153000 reports in the ADRAC database. Reports from health professionals have uncovered a number of significant safety problems over the years. Of particular importance are flucloxacillin-induced hepatitis, amoxycillin/clavulanate-induced hepatitis, and the association of cystitis with tiaprofenic acid. The number and quality of the reports has allowed an understanding of the characteristics of the reactions and, using ADRAC reporters as a major source of cases, case-control studies have been completed which have identified risk factors. ADRAC's review of Australian reports has highlighted many important associations that have been disseminated through the Australian Adverse Drug Reactions Bulletin

  9. Diversity of Pharmacological Properties in Chinese and European Medicinal Plants: Cytotoxicity, Antiviral and Antitrypanosomal Screening of 82 Herbal Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Efferth

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In an extensive screening, the antiviral, antitrypanosomal and anticancer properties of extracts from 82 plants used in traditional Chinese medicine and European phytomedicine were determined. Several promising plants that were highly effective against hepatitis B virus (HBV, bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV—a flavivirus used here as a surrogate in vitro model of hepatitis C virus, trypanosomes (Trypanosoma brucei brucei and several cancer cell lines were identified. Six aqueous extracts from Celosia cristata, Ophioglossum vulgatum, Houttuynia cordata, Selaginella tamariscina, Alpinia galanga and Alpinia oxyphylla showed significant antiviral effects against BVDV without toxic effects on host embryonic bovine trachea (EBTr cells, while Evodia lepta, Hedyotis diffusa and Glycyrrhiza spp. demonstrated promising activities against the HBV without toxic effects on host human hepatoblastoma cells transfected with HBV-DNA (HepG2 2.2.15 cells. Seven organic extracts from Alpinia oxyphylla, Coptis chinensis, Kadsura longipedunculata, Arctium lappa, Panax ginseng, Panax notoginseng and Saposhnikovia divaricata inhibited T. b. brucei. Moreover, among fifteen water extracts that combined high antiproliferative activity (IC50 0.5–20 µg/mL and low acute in vitro toxicity (0–10% reduction in cell viability at IC50, Coptis chinensis presented the best beneficial characteristics. In conclusion, traditional herbal medicine from Europe and China still has a potential for new therapeutic targets and therapeutic applications.

  10. The TREAT-NMD advisory committee for therapeutics (TACT): an innovative de-risking model to foster orphan drug development

    OpenAIRE

    Heslop, Emma; Csimma, Cristina; Straub, Volker; McCall, John; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Wagner, Kathryn R.; Caizergues, Didier; Korinthenberg, Rudolf; Flanigan, Kevin M.; Kaufmann, Petra; McNeil, Elizabeth; Mendell, Jerry; Hesterlee, Sharon; Wells, Dominic J.; BUSHBY, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Despite multiple publications on potential therapies for neuromuscular diseases (NMD) in cell and animal models only a handful reach clinical trials. The ability to prioritise drug development according to objective criteria is particularly critical in rare diseases with large unmet needs and a limited numbers of patients who can be enrolled into clinical trials. TREAT-NMD Advisory Committee for Therapeutics (TACT) was established to provide independent and objective guidance on the preclinic...

  11. A Quantitative Measurement of Antiviral Activity of Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Drugs against Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection: Dose-Response Curve Slope Strongly Influences Class-Specific Inhibitory Potential

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Kai; Zink, M. Christine; Clements, Janice E; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in macaques is so far the best animal model for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) studies, but suppressing viral replication in infected animals remains challenging. Using a novel single-round infectivity assay, we quantitated the antiviral activities of antiretroviral drugs against SIV. Our results emphasize the importance of the dose-response curve slope in determining the inhibitory potential of antiretroviral drugs and provide useful...

  12. Viability of a Drug-Resistant Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Protease Variant: Structural Insights for Better Antiviral Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Prabu-Jeyabalan, Moses; Ellen A. Nalivaika; King, Nancy M.; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2003-01-01

    Under the selective pressure of protease inhibitor therapy, patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) often develop drug-resistant HIV strains. One of the first drug-resistant mutations to arise in the protease, particularly in patients receiving indinavir or ritonavir treatment, is V82A, which compromises the binding of these and other inhibitors but allows the virus to remain viable. To probe this drug resistance, we solved the crystal structures of three natural substrates ...

  13. Towards antivirals against chikungunya virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelnabi, Rana; Neyts, Johan; Delang, Leen

    2015-09-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has re-emerged in recent decades, causing major outbreaks of chikungunya fever in many parts of Africa and Asia, and since the end of 2013 also in Central and South America. Infections are usually associated with a low mortality rate, but can proceed into a painful chronic stage, during which patients may suffer from polyarthralgia and joint stiffness for weeks and even several years. There are no vaccines or antiviral drugs available for the prevention or treatment of CHIKV infections. Current therapy therefore consists solely of the administration of analgesics, antipyretics and anti-inflammatory agents to relieve symptoms. We here review molecules that have been reported to inhibit CHIKV replication, either as direct-acting antivirals, host-targeting drugs or those that act via a yet unknown mechanism. This article forms part of a symposium in Antiviral Research on "Chikungunya discovers the New World." PMID:26119058

  14. Development of robust in vitro RNA-dependent RNA polymerase assay as a possible platform for antiviral drug testing against dengue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amraiz, Deeba; Zaidi, Najam-Us-Sahar Sadaf; Fatima, Munazza

    2016-10-01

    NS5 is the largest and most conserved protein among the four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes. It has been the target of interest for antiviral drug development due to its major role in replication. NS5 consists of two domains, the N-terminal methyltransferase domain and C-terminal catalytic RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domain. It is an unstable protein and is prone to inactivation upon prolonged incubation at room temperature, thus affecting the inhibitor screening assays. In the current study, we expressed and purified DENV RdRp alone in Esherichia coli (E. coli) cells. The N-terminally His-tagged construct of DENV RdRp was transformed into E. coli expression strain BL-21 (DE3) pLysS cells. Protein expression was induced with isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) at a final concentration of 0.4mM. The induced cultures were then grown for 20h at 18°C and cells were harvested by centrifugation at 6000xg for 15min at 4°C. The recombinant protein was purified using HisTrap affinity column (Ni-NTA) and then the sample was subjected to size exclusion chromatography, which successfully removed the degradation product obtained during the previous purification step. The in vitro polymerase activity of RdRp was successfully demonstrated using homopolymeric polycytidylic acid (poly(rC)) RNA template. This study describes the high level production of enzymatically active DENV RdRp protein which can be used to develop assays for testing large number of compounds in a high-throughput manner. RdRp has the de novo initiation activity and the in vitro polymerase assays for the protein provide a platform for highly robust and efficient antiviral compound screening systems. PMID:27542741

  15. Use of antiviral drugs to reduce household transmission of pandemic (H1N1) 2009, United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pebody, Richard G; Harris, Ross; Kafatos, George; Chamberland, Mary; Campbell, Colin; Nguyen-Van-Tam, Jonathan S; McLean, Estelle; Andrews, Nick; White, Peter J; Wynne-Evans, Edward; Green, Jon; Ellis, Joanna; Wreghitt, Tim; Bracebridge, Sam; Ihekweazu, Chikwe; Oliver, Isabel; Smith, Gillian; Hawkins, Colin; Salmon, Roland; Smyth, Bryan; McMenamin, Jim; Zambon, Maria; Phin, Nick; Watson, John M

    2011-06-01

    The United Kingdom implemented a containment strategy for pandemic (H1N1) 2009 through administering antiviral agents (AVs) to patients and their close contacts. This observational household cohort study describes the effect of AVs on household transmission. We followed 285 confirmed primary cases in 259 households with 761 contacts. At 2 weeks, the confirmed secondary attack rate (SAR) was 8.1% (62/761) and significantly higher in persons 50 years of age (18.9% vs. 1.2%, p<0.001). Early (<48 hours) treatment of primary case-patients reduced SAR (4.5% vs. 10.6%, p = 0.003). The SAR in child contacts was 33.3% (10/30) when the primary contact was a woman and 2.9% (1/34) when the primary contact was a man (p = 0.010). Of 53 confirmed secondary case-patients, 45 had not received AV prophylaxis. The effectiveness of AV prophylaxis in preventing infection was 92%. PMID:21749759

  16. Using mutagenesis to explore conserved residues in the RNA-binding groove of influenza A virus nucleoprotein for antiviral drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chia-Lin; Hung, Hui-Chen; Lo, Shou-Chen; Chiang, Ching-Hui; Chen, I-Jung; Hsu, John T-A; Hou, Ming-Hon

    2016-01-01

    Nucleoprotein (NP) is the most abundant type of RNA-binding viral protein in influenza A virus-infected cells and is necessary for viral RNA transcription and replication. Recent studies demonstrated that influenza NP is a valid target for antiviral drug development. The surface of the groove, covered with numerous conserved residues between the head and body domains of influenza A NP, plays a crucial role in RNA binding. To explore the mechanism by which NP binds RNA, we performed a series of site-directed mutagenesis in the RNA-binding groove, followed by surface plasmon resonance (SPR), to characterize the interactions between RNA and NP. Furthermore, a role of Y148 in NP stability and NP-RNA binding was evaluated. The aromatic residue of Y148 was found to stack with a nucleotide base. By interrupting the stacking interaction between Y148 and an RNA base, we identified an influenza virus NP inhibitor, (E, E)-1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl) -1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione; this inhibitor reduced the NP's RNA-binding affinity and hindered viral replication. Our findings will be useful for the development of new drugs that disrupt the interaction between RNA and viral NP in the influenza virus. PMID:26916998

  17. P1-Substituted Symmetry-Based Human Immunodeficiency Virus Protease Inhibitors with Potent Antiviral Activity against Drug-Resistant Viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeGoey, David A.; Grampovnik, David J.; Chen, Hui-Ju; Flosi, William J.; Klein, Larry L.; Dekhtyar, Tatyana; Stoll, Vincent; Mamo, Mulugeta; Molla, Akhteruzzaman; Kempf, Dale J. (Abbott)

    2013-03-07

    Because there is currently no cure for HIV infection, patients must remain on long-term drug therapy, leading to concerns over potential drug side effects and the emergence of drug resistance. For this reason, new and safe antiretroviral agents with improved potency against drug-resistant strains of HIV are needed. A series of HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) with potent activity against both wild-type (WT) virus and drug-resistant strains of HIV was designed and synthesized. The incorporation of substituents with hydrogen bond donor and acceptor groups at the P1 position of our symmetry-based inhibitor series resulted in significant potency improvements against the resistant mutants. By this approach, several compounds, such as 13, 24, and 29, were identified that demonstrated similar or improved potencies compared to 1 against highly mutated strains of HIV derived from patients who previously failed HIV PI therapy. Overall, compound 13 demonstrated the best balance of potency against drug resistant strains of HIV and oral bioavailability in pharmacokinetic studies. X-ray analysis of an HIV PI with an improved resistance profile bound to WT HIV protease is also reported.

  18. 78 FR 63222 - Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    ... class of products will be discussed. FDA intends to make background material available to the public no... providing access to electrical outlets. FDA welcomes the attendance of the public at its advisory...

  19. Evaluation of Antiviral Compounds Against Avian Influenza

    OpenAIRE

    Call, Evan W.

    1991-01-01

    Tests in vitro for antiviral activity against avian influenza viruses, A/Turkey/Sanpete/85 (H6N8) and A/Turkey/Sanpete/86 (H10N9), isolated in Sanpete County, Utah, utilized known antiviral agents, amantadine•HCl (adamantanamine hydrochloride) and ribavirin (1-β-D ribofuranosyl-1,2,4-triazole-3-carboxamide). The testing involved evaluation of seven drug concentrations. Maximum tolerated dose, minimum inhibitory concentration and therapeutic indexes were determined for each drug used. Both dru...

  20. TARGETING OF ANTIVIRAL DRUGS TO LYMPHOCYTES-T4 - ANTI-HIV ACTIVITY OF NEOGLYCOPROTEIN AZTMP CONJUGATES INVITRO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MOLEMA, G; JANSEN, RW; PAUWELS, R; DECLERCQ, E; MEIJER, DKF

    1990-01-01

    The delivery of the anti-HIV agent 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT), in its 5'-monophosphate form, (in)to human T-lymphocyte MT-4 cells in vitro through covalent coupling to neoglycoproteins was investigated. In vivo application of this drug targeting concept may lead to increased efficacy and/or di

  1. Potent Antiviral HIV-1 Protease Inhibitor GRL-02031 Adapts to the Structures of Drug Resistant Mutants with Its P1;#8242;-Pyrrolidinone Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yu-Chung E.; Yu, XiaXia; Zhang, Ying; Tie, Yunfeng; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Yashchuk, Sofiya; Ghosh, Arun K.; Harrison, Robert W.; Weber, Irene T. (GSU); (Purdue); (GSI); (CDC)

    2012-11-14

    GRL-02031 (1) is an HIV-1 protease (PR) inhibitor containing a novel P1' (R)-aminomethyl-2-pyrrolidinone group. Crystal structures at resolutions of 1.25-1.55 {angstrom} were analyzed for complexes of 1 with the PR containing major drug resistant mutations, PR{sub I47V}, PR{sub L76V}, PR{sub V82A}, and PR{sub N88D}. Mutations of I47V and V82A alter residues in the inhibitor-binding site, while L76V and N88D are distal mutations having no direct contact with the inhibitor. Substitution of a smaller amino acid in PR{sub I47V} and PR{sub L76V} and the altered charge of PR{sub N88D} are associated with significant local structural changes compared to the wild-type PR{sub WT}, while substitution of alanine in PR{sub V82A} increases the size of the S1' subsite. The P1' pyrrolidinone group of 1 accommodates to these local changes by assuming two different conformations. Overall, the conformation and interactions of 1 with PR mutants resemble those of PR{sub WT} with similar inhibition constants in good agreement with the antiviral potency on multidrug resistant HIV-1.

  2. Evaluation of the role of the antioxidant silymarin in modulating the in vivo genotoxicity of the antiviral drug ribavirin in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noshy, Magda M; Hussien, Nahed A; El-Ghor, Akmal A

    2013-04-15

    Ribavirin (1-β-d-ribofuranosyl-1,2,4-triazole-3-carboxamide) is a widely used broad-spectrum antiviral drug. Recently, several reports revealed genotoxic effects of ribavirin in vivo and in vitro, which were correlated with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study aimed to evaluate the genotoxicity of ribavirin and to investigate the role of the natural antioxidant silymarin to modulate this genotoxicity. Male albino mice (age, 8-10 weeks) were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with ribavirin at three dose levels (20, 75 and 130 mg/kg bw) either in a single injection (acute treatment) or in multiple injections on five consecutive days (sub-acute treatment). Other comparable groups were treated with silymarin (70 mg/kg bw) 1h before the injection with ribavirin. Mice were sacrificed at different sampling times (24, 48 and 72 h) after the last ribavirin treatment. Micronucleus (MN) and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) assays were used to assess genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of ribavirin and to evaluate the protective effect of the pre-treatment with silymarin. Our results reveal genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of ribavirin in the MN assay. Pre-treatment with silymarin reduced the toxicity of ribavirin. In the SSCP assay, ribavirin treatment did not induce any mutations in the two selected sites in the D-loop of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). PMID:23402882

  3. Chiral analysis of anti-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome drug, 9-(R)-[2-(phosphonomethoxy)propyl]adenine (tenofovir), and related antiviral acyclic nucleoside phosphonates by CE using beta-CD as chiral selector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šolínová, Veronika; Kašička, Václav; Sázelová, Petra; Holý, Antonín

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 12 (2009), s. 2245-2254. ISSN 0173-0835 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/06/1044; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/08/1428; GA AV ČR 1QS400550501; GA MŠk 1M0508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : antiviral drugs * capillary electrophoresis * enantioseparation Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.077, year: 2009

  4. Small molecules with antiviral activity against the Ebola virus

    OpenAIRE

    Nadia Litterman; Christopher Lipinski; Sean Ekins

    2015-01-01

    The recent outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa has highlighted the clear shortage of broad-spectrum antiviral drugs for emerging viruses. There are numerous FDA approved drugs and other small molecules described in the literature that could be further evaluated for their potential as antiviral compounds. These molecules are in addition to the few new antivirals that have been tested in Ebola patients but were not originally developed against the Ebola virus, and may play an important r...

  5. 78 FR 20328 - Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-04

    ... disability, visitor parking, and transportation may be accessed at: http://www.fda.gov/AdvisoryCommittees... committee information line to learn about possible modifications before coming to the meeting. Agenda: On... insomnia characterized by difficulties with sleep onset and/or maintenance. FDA intends to make...

  6. Conformational Analysis, Molecular Structure and Solid State Simulation of the Antiviral Drug Acyclovir (Zovirax) Using Density Functional Theory Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Ros, Margarita Clara; Palafox, Mauricio Alcolea

    2014-01-01

    The five tautomers of the drug acyclovir (ACV) were determined and optimised at the MP2 and B3LYP quantum chemical levels of theory. The stability of the tautomers was correlated with different parameters. On the most stable tautomer N1 was carried out a comprehensive conformational analysis, and the whole conformational parameters (R, β, Φ, φ1, φ2, φ3, φ4, φ5) were studied as well as the NBO Natural atomic charges. The calculations were carried out with full relaxation of all geometrical parameters. The search located at least 78 stable structures within 8.5 kcal/mol electronic energy range of the global minimum, and classified in two groups according to the positive or negative value of the torsional angle φ1. In the nitrogen atoms and in the O2' and O5' oxygen atoms of the most stable conformer appear a higher reactivity than in the natural nucleoside deoxyguanosine. The solid state was simulated through a dimer and tetramer forms and the structural parameters were compared with the X-ray crystal data available. Several general conclusions were emphasized. PMID:24915059

  7. Conformational Analysis, Molecular Structure and Solid State Simulation of the Antiviral Drug Acyclovir (Zovirax Using Density Functional Theory Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Clara Alvarez-Ros

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The five tautomers of the drug acyclovir (ACV were determined and optimised at the MP2 and B3LYP quantum chemical levels of theory. The stability of the tautomers was correlated with different parameters. On the most stable tautomer N1 was carried out a comprehensive conformational analysis, and the whole conformational parameters (R, β, Φ, φ1, φ2, φ3, φ4, φ5 were studied as well as the NBO Natural atomic charges. The calculations were carried out with full relaxation of all geometrical parameters. The search located at least 78 stable structures within 8.5 kcal/mol electronic energy range of the global minimum, and classified in two groups according to the positive or negative value of the torsional angle j1. In the nitrogen atoms and in the O2' and O5' oxygen atoms of the most stable conformer appear a higher reactivity than in the natural nucleoside deoxyguanosine. The solid state was simulated through a dimer and tetramer forms and the structural parameters were compared with the X-ray crystal data available. Several general conclusions were emphasized.

  8. Preparation of molecularly imprinted solid-phase microextraction fiber for the selective removal and extraction of the antiviral drug abacavir in environmental and biological matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzopoulou, Zoi; Papageorgiou, Myrsini; Kyzas, George Z; Bikiaris, Dimitrios N; Lambropoulou, Dimitra A

    2016-03-24

    In the present study, a molecularly imprinted solid-phase microextraction fiber (MIP-SPMEf) was synthesized and applied for the selective removal and extraction of the antiviral drug, abacavir (ABA). Morphology and structure characterization of fibers were performed by scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectra, respectively. The effects on the adsorption behavior of the process parameters were studied and the equilibrium data were fitted by the Langmuir, Freundlich and Langmuir-Freundlich models. The maximum adsorption capability (Qmax) was determined by Langmuir- Freundlich model and was 149 mg/g for MIP-SPMEf. In the next step, SPME methodology followed by liquid desorption and liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry (LC/MS) has been developed and evaluated for the determination of the target compound in environmental and biological matrices (surface waters, wastewaters and urine). Parameters that could influence SPME efficiency were investigated. Then, optimization of stirring speed, extraction time and salt content was carried out by using a central composite design (CCD) and response surface methodology (RSM). A quadratic model between dependent and independent variables was built. Under the optimum conditions (extraction time 40 min, stirring rate 650 rpm and salt content 0.3% NaCl w/v) the validated method presented a high sensitivity and selectivity with LODs and LOQs in the range of 10.1-13.6 and 33.3-43.9 ng/L, respectively. The developed method was successfully applied to the analysis of ABA in real samples. The percentage extraction efficiency ranged from 88 to 99% revealing good accuracy and absence of matrix effects. PMID:26944990

  9. Mathematical Modeling of Hepatitis C Prevalence Reduction with Antiviral Treatment Scale-Up in Persons Who Inject Drugs in Metropolitan Chicago.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desarae Echevarria

    Full Text Available New direct-acting antivirals (DAAs provide an opportunity to combat hepatitis C virus (HCV infection in persons who inject drugs (PWID. Here we use a mathematical model to predict the impact of a DAA-treatment scale-up on HCV prevalence among PWID and the estimated cost in metropolitan Chicago.To estimate the HCV antibody and HCV-RNA (chronic infection prevalence among the metropolitan Chicago PWID population, we used empirical data from three large epidemiological studies. Cost of DAAs is assumed $50,000 per person.Approximately 32,000 PWID reside in metropolitan Chicago with an estimated HCV-RNA prevalence of 47% or 15,040 cases. Approximately 22,000 PWID (69% of the total PWID population attend harm reduction (HR programs, such as syringe exchange programs, and have an estimated HCV-RNA prevalence of 30%. There are about 11,000 young PWID (<30 years old with an estimated HCV-RNA prevalence of 10% (PWID in these two subpopulations overlap. The model suggests that the following treatment scale-up is needed to reduce the baseline HCV-RNA prevalence by one-half over 10 years of treatment [cost per year, min-max in millions]: 35 per 1,000 [$50-$77] in the overall PWID population, 19 per 1,000 [$20-$26] for persons in HR programs, and 5 per 1,000 [$3-$4] for young PWID.Treatment scale-up could dramatically reduce the prevalence of chronic HCV infection among PWID in Chicago, who are the main reservoir for on-going HCV transmission. Focusing treatment on PWID attending HR programs and/or young PWID could have a significant impact on HCV prevalence in these subpopulations at an attainable cost.

  10. Antiviral activity of silymarin against chikungunya virus

    OpenAIRE

    Rafidah Lani; Pouya Hassandarvish; Chun Wei Chiam; Ehsan Moghaddam; Justin Jang Hann Chu; Kai Rausalu; Andres Merits; Stephen Higgs; Dana Vanlandingham; Sazaly Abu Bakar; Keivan Zandi

    2015-01-01

    The mosquito-borne chikungunya virus (CHIKV) causes chikungunya fever, with clinical presentations such as severe back and small joint pain, and debilitating arthritis associated with crippling pains that persist for weeks and even years. Although there are several studies to evaluate the efficacy of drugs against CHIKV, the treatment for chikungunya fever is mainly symptom-based and no effective licensed vaccine or antiviral are available. Here, we investigated the antiviral activity of thre...

  11. Antiviral Strategies for Pandemic and Seasonal Influenza

    OpenAIRE

    Fang Fang; Maria Hedlund; Larson, Jeffrey L.

    2010-01-01

    While vaccines are the primary public health response to seasonal and pandemic flu, short of a universal vaccine there are inherent limitations to this approach. Antiviral drugs provide valuable alternative options for treatment and prophylaxis of influenza. Here, we will review drugs and drug candidates against influenza with an emphasis on the recent progress of a host-targeting entry-blocker drug candidate, DAS181, a sialidase fusion protein.

  12. Determining Mechanism of Action of Antivirals for Respiratory Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Irma; Dobrovolny, Hana

    2015-03-01

    Viral infections in the respiratory tract are common in humans and can cause serious illness and death. Drug treatment is the principal line of protection against many of these illnesses and many compounds are tested as antivirals. Often the efficacy of these antivirals are determined before a mechanism of action is understood. We use mathematical models to represent the evolution of these diseases and establish which experiments can help determine the mechanism of action of antivirals.

  13. Screening for Antiviral Activities of Isolated Compounds from Essential Oils

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Schnitzler; Jürgen Reichling; Akram Astani

    2011-01-01

    Essential oil of star anise as well as phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes, for example, trans-anethole, eugenol, β-eudesmol, farnesol, β-caryophyllene and β-caryophyllene oxide, which are present in many essential oils, were examined for their antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in vitro. Antiviral activity was analyzed by plaque reduction assays and mode of antiviral action was determined by addition of the drugs to uninfected cells, to the virus prior to infectio...

  14. 75 FR 9416 - Advisory Committee Information Hotline

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-02

    ... 3014512532 Cardiovascular and Renal Drugs Advisory Committee 3014512533 Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs... Pathology Devices Panel 3014512515 Immunology Devices Panel 3014512516 Medical Devices Dispute...

  15. 77 FR 59624 - Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Postponement of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    ..., 2012. This meeting was announced in the Federal Register of August 16, 2012 (77 FR 49446). The postponement is due to scheduling issues. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Cindy Hong, Center for Drug... Postponement of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and...

  16. 76 FR 61713 - Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of..., are in late stage development for an adult oncology indication, or in late stage development...

  17. 75 FR 66773 - Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of... were either recently approved by FDA or, are in late stage development for an adult oncology...

  18. 76 FR 58520 - Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee...

  19. 78 FR 63224 - Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of... late stage development for various adult oncology indications. The subcommittee will consider...

  20. 77 FR 57095 - Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of... plans for four products that are in development for an adult oncology indication. The subcommittee...

  1. In Vitro Antiviral Activity of Favipiravir (T-705) against Drug-Resistant Influenza and 2009 A(H1N1) Viruses▿

    OpenAIRE

    Sleeman, Katrina; Mishin, Vasiliy P.; Deyde, Varough M.; Furuta, Yousuke; Klimov, Alexander I; Larisa V Gubareva

    2010-01-01

    Favipiravir (T-705) has previously been shown to have a potent antiviral effect against influenza virus and some other RNA viruses in both cell culture and in animal models. Currently, favipiravir is undergoing clinical evaluation for the treatment of influenza A and B virus infections. In this study, favipiravir was evaluated in vitro for its ability to inhibit the replication of a representative panel of seasonal influenza viruses, the 2009 A(H1N1) strains, and animal viruses with pandemic ...

  2. Antiviral activity of silymarin against chikungunya virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lani, Rafidah; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Chiam, Chun Wei; Moghaddam, Ehsan; Chu, Justin Jang Hann; Rausalu, Kai; Merits, Andres; Higgs, Stephen; Vanlandingham, Dana; Abu Bakar, Sazaly; Zandi, Keivan

    2015-01-01

    The mosquito-borne chikungunya virus (CHIKV) causes chikungunya fever, with clinical presentations such as severe back and small joint pain, and debilitating arthritis associated with crippling pains that persist for weeks and even years. Although there are several studies to evaluate the efficacy of drugs against CHIKV, the treatment for chikungunya fever is mainly symptom-based and no effective licensed vaccine or antiviral are available. Here, we investigated the antiviral activity of three types of flavonoids against CHIKV in vitro replication. Three compounds: silymarin, quercetin and kaempferol were evaluated for their in vitro antiviral activities against CHIKV using a CHIKV replicon cell line and clinical isolate of CHIKV of Central/East African genotype. A cytopathic effect inhibition assay was used to determine their activities on CHIKV viral replication and quantitative reverse transcription PCR was used to calculate virus yield. Antiviral activity of effective compound was further investigated by evaluation of CHIKV protein expression using western blotting for CHIKV nsP1, nsP3, and E2E1 proteins. Briefly, silymarin exhibited significant antiviral activity against CHIKV, reducing both CHIKV replication efficiency and down-regulating production of viral proteins involved in replication. This study may have important consequence for broaden the chance of getting the effective antiviral for CHIKV infection. PMID:26078201

  3. Antiviral therapy of decompensated hepatitis B virus-related cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Guang-cheng; YU Tao; HUANG Kai-hong; CHEN Qi-kui

    2012-01-01

    Objective To review the development,mechanism,necessity and limitation of antiviral therapy in decompensated hepatitis B virus-related cirrhosis.Data sources Most information was pulled from a literature search (Pubmed 2000 to 2011) using the keywords of antiviral and decompensated hepatitis B virus-related cirrhosis.Relevant book chapters were also reviewed.Study selection Well-controlled,prospective landmark studies and review articles on antiviral therapy in decompesated hepatitis B virus-related cirrhosis were selected.Results Specific antiviral agents not only control viral replication,which permits liver transplantation,but also improve liver function so significantly that patients could be removed from the transplant waiting list.However,the emergence of drug-resistant mutants can result in treatment failure.Combination therapy is a save-strategy in drug-resistant.Conclusions Although the treatment of end-stage liver disease is still a challenge worldwide,antiviral therapy has altered the natural history of hepatitis B patients with decompensated cirrhosis.The approval of the new generation of antivirals is opening new perspectives for finding the optimal antiviral treatment for patients with decompensated cirrhosis and preventing antiviral resistance.A combination of antivirals may be one of the future strategies for fulfilling these goals.

  4. Quantitative Analysis of a Parasitic Antiviral Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hwijin; Yin, John

    2004-01-01

    We extended a computer simulation of viral intracellular growth to study a parasitic antiviral strategy that diverts the viral replicase toward parasite growth. This strategy inhibited virus growth over a wide range of conditions, while minimizing host cell perturbations. Such parasitic strategies may inhibit the development of drug-resistant virus strains.

  5. Antiviral activity of luteolin against Japanese encephalitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wenchun; Qian, Suhong; Qian, Ping; Li, Xiangmin

    2016-07-15

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a member of family Flaviviridae, is a neurotropic flavivirus that causes Japanese encephalitis (JE). JEV is one of the most important causative agents of viral encephalitis in humans, and this disease leads to high fatality rates. Although effective vaccines are available, no effective antiviral therapy for JE has been developed. Hence, identifying effective antiviral agents against JEV infection is important. In this study, we found that luteolin was an antiviral bioflavonoid with potent antiviral activity against JEV replication in A549 cells with IC50=4.56μg/mL. Luteolin also showed extracellular virucidal activity on JEV. With a time-of-drug addition assay revealing that JEV replication was inhibited by luteolin after the entry stage. Overall, our results suggested that luteolin can be used to develop an antiviral drug against JEV. PMID:27126774

  6. 78 FR 17414 - Risk Communications Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    ...: Luis G. Bravo, Designated Federal Officer, Risk Communication Staff, Office of Planning, Food and Drug... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Risk Communications Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting... the public. Name of Committee: Risk Communications Advisory Committee. General Function of...

  7. Antiviral effects of Glycyrrhiza species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, Cristina; Eisenhut, Michael; Krausse, Rea; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Pellati, Donatella; Armanini, Decio; Bielenberg, Jens

    2008-02-01

    Historical sources for the use of Glycyrrhiza species include ancient manuscripts from China, India and Greece. They all mention its use for symptoms of viral respiratory tract infections and hepatitis. Randomized controlled trials confirmed that the Glycyrrhiza glabra derived compound glycyrrhizin and its derivatives reduced hepatocellular damage in chronic hepatitis B and C. In hepatitis C virus-induced cirrhosis the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma was reduced. Animal studies demonstrated a reduction of mortality and viral activity in herpes simplex virus encephalitis and influenza A virus pneumonia. In vitro studies revealed antiviral activity against HIV-1, SARS related coronavirus, respiratory syncytial virus, arboviruses, vaccinia virus and vesicular stomatitis virus. Mechanisms for antiviral activity of Glycyrrhiza spp. include reduced transport to the membrane and sialylation of hepatitis B virus surface antigen, reduction of membrane fluidity leading to inhibition of fusion of the viral membrane of HIV-1 with the cell, induction of interferon gamma in T-cells, inhibition of phosphorylating enzymes in vesicular stomatitis virus infection and reduction of viral latency. Future research needs to explore the potency of compounds derived from licorice in prevention and treatment of influenza A virus pneumonia and as an adjuvant treatment in patients infected with HIV resistant to antiretroviral drugs. PMID:17886224

  8. Antiviral targets of human noroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Bv Venkataram; Shanker, Sreejesh; Muhaxhiri, Zana; Deng, Lisheng; Choi, Jae-Mun; Estes, Mary K; Song, Yongcheng; Palzkill, Timothy; Atmar, Robert L

    2016-06-01

    Human noroviruses are major causative agents of sporadic and epidemic gastroenteritis both in children and adults. Currently there are no licensed therapeutic intervention measures either in terms of vaccines or drugs available for these highly contagious human pathogens. Genetic and antigenic diversity of these viruses, rapid emergence of new strains, and their ability to infect a broad population by using polymorphic histo-blood group antigens for cell attachment, pose significant challenges for the development of effective antiviral agents. Despite these impediments, there is progress in the design and development of therapeutic agents. These include capsid-based candidate vaccines, and potential antivirals either in the form of glycomimetics or designer antibodies that block HBGA binding, as well as those that target essential non-structural proteins such as the viral protease and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. In addition to these classical approaches, recent studies suggest the possibility of interferons and targeting host cell factors as viable approaches to counter norovirus infection. This review provides a brief overview of this progress. PMID:27318434

  9. Antiviral lead compounds from marine sponges

    KAUST Repository

    Sagar, Sunil

    2010-10-11

    Marine sponges are currently one of the richest sources of pharmacologically active compounds found in the marine environment. These bioactive molecules are often secondary metabolites, whose main function is to enable and/or modulate cellular communication and defense. They are usually produced by functional enzyme clusters in sponges and/or their associated symbiotic microorganisms. Natural product lead compounds from sponges have often been found to be promising pharmaceutical agents. Several of them have successfully been approved as antiviral agents for clinical use or have been advanced to the late stages of clinical trials. Most of these drugs are used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV). The most important antiviral lead of marine origin reported thus far is nucleoside Ara-A (vidarabine) isolated from sponge Tethya crypta. It inhibits viral DNA polymerase and DNA synthesis of herpes, vaccinica and varicella zoster viruses. However due to the discovery of new types of viruses and emergence of drug resistant strains, it is necessary to develop new antiviral lead compounds continuously. Several sponge derived antiviral lead compounds which are hopedto be developed as future drugs are discussed in this review. Supply problems are usually the major bottleneck to the development of these compounds as drugs during clinical trials. However advances in the field of metagenomics and high throughput microbial cultivation has raised the possibility that these techniques could lead to the cost-effective large scale production of such compounds. Perspectives on biotechnological methods with respect to marine drug development are also discussed. 2010 by the authors; licensee MDPI.

  10. Antiviral Lead Compounds from Marine Sponges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth P. Minneman

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Marine sponges are currently one of the richest sources of pharmacologically active compounds found in the marine environment. These bioactive molecules are often secondary metabolites, whose main function is to enable and/or modulate cellular communication and defense. They are usually produced by functional enzyme clusters in sponges and/or their associated symbiotic microorganisms. Natural product lead compounds from sponges have often been found to be promising pharmaceutical agents. Several of them have successfully been approved as antiviral agents for clinical use or have been advanced to the late stages of clinical trials. Most of these drugs are used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and herpes simplex virus (HSV. The most important antiviral lead of marine origin reported thus far is nucleoside Ara-A (vidarabine isolated from sponge Tethya crypta. It inhibits viral DNA polymerase and DNA synthesis of herpes, vaccinica and varicella zoster viruses. However due to the discovery of new types of viruses and emergence of drug resistant strains, it is necessary to develop new antiviral lead compounds continuously. Several sponge derived antiviral lead compounds which are hopedto be developed as future drugs are discussed in this review. Supply problems are usually the major bottleneck to the development of these compounds as drugs during clinical trials. However advances in the field of metagenomics and high throughput microbial cultivation has raised the possibility that these techniques could lead to the cost-effective large scale production of such compounds. Perspectives on biotechnological methods with respect to marine drug development are also discussed.

  11. Ethical guidelines in pandemic influenza: recommendations of the Ethics Subcommittee of the Advisory Committee of the Director, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinlaw, Kathy; Barrett, Drue H; Levine, Robert J

    2009-12-01

    Because of the importance of including ethical considerations in planning efforts for pandemic influenza, in February 2005 the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention requested that the Ethics Subcommittee of the Advisory Committee to the Director develop guidance that would serve as a foundation for decision making in preparing for and responding to pandemic influenza. Specifically, the ethics subcommittee was asked to make recommendations regarding ethical considerations relevant to decision making about vaccine and antiviral drug distribution prioritization and development of interventions that would limit individual freedom and create social distancing. The ethics subcommittee identified a number of general ethical considerations including identification of clear goals for pandemic planning, responsibility to maximize preparedness, transparency and public engagement, sound science, commitment to the global community, balancing individual liberty and community interests, diversity in ethical decision making, and commitment to justice. These general ethical considerations are applied to the issues of vaccine and antiviral drug distribution and use of community mitigation interventions. PMID:19675459

  12. Effects of solubilizing surfactants and loading of antiviral, antimicrobial, and antifungal drugs on their release rates from ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallury, Padmavathy; Randall, Marcus K; Thaw, Khin L; Preisser, John S.; Kalachandra, Sid

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study investigates the effects of surfactants and drug loading on the drug release rate from ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) copolymer. The release rate of nystatin from EVA was studied with addition of non-ionic surfactants Tween 60 and Cremophor RH 40. In addition, the effect of increasing drug load on the release rates of nystatin, chlorhexidine diacetate and acyclovir is also presented. Method Polymer casting solutions were prepared by stirring EVA copolymer and nystatin (2.5 wt %) in dichloromethane. Nystatin and surfactants were added in ratios of (1:1), (1:2) and (1:3). Drug loading was studied with 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, and 10.0% wt. proportions of nystatin, chlorhexidine diacetate and acyclovir incorporated into a separate polymer. Three drug loaded polymer square films (3cm × 3cm × 0.08 cm) were cut from dry films to follow the kinetics of drug release at 37°C. 10 ml of either distilled water or PBS was used as the extracting medium that was replaced daily. PBS was used for nystatin release with addition of surfactants and water was used for the study on drug loading and surfactant release. The rate of drug release was measured by UV-spectrophotometer. The amount of surfactant released was determined by HPLC. Results The release of nystatin was low in PBS and its release rate increased with the addition of surfactants. Also, increasing surfactant concentrations resulted in increased drug release rates. The release rates of chlorhexidine diacetate (p<0.0001), acyclovir (p<0.0003) and nystatin (p<0.0017) linearly increased with increasing drug loads. The amount of surfactants released was above the CMC. Significance This study demonstrates that the three therapeutic agents show a sustained rate of drug release from EVA copolymer over extended periods of time. Nystatin release in PBS is low owing to its poor solubility. Its release rate is enhanced by addition of surfactants and increasing the drug load as well. PMID:17049593

  13. Application of coamplification at lower denaturation temperature-PCR sequencing for early detection of antiviral drug resistance mutations of hepatitis B virus

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Danny Ka-Ho; Tsoi, Ottilia; Huang, Fung-Yu; Seto, Wai-Kay; Fung, James; Lai, Ching-Lung; YUEN, MAN-FUNG

    2014-01-01

    Nucleoside/nucleotide analogue for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is hampered by the emergence of drug resistance mutations. Conventional PCR sequencing cannot detect minor variants of

  14. 78 FR 70954 - Risk Communications Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-27

    ... the free Webcast. Visit the Risk Communication Advisory Committee Web site at http://www.fda.gov/AdvisoryCommittees/CommitteesMeetingMaterials/RiskCommunicationAdvisoryCommittee/default.htm . The link... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Risk Communications Advisory Committee; Notice of...

  15. L-Valine Ester of Cyclopropavir - a New Antiviral Prodrug

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Zhimeng; Drach, John C.; Prichard, Mark N.; Yanachkova, Milka; Yanachkov, Ivan; Bowlin, Terry L.; Zemlicka, Jiri

    2009-01-01

    The L-Valine ester of antiviral agent cyclopropavir, valcyclopropavir (6), was synthesized and evaluated for antiviral properties. Prodrug (6) inhibited replication of HCMV virus (Towne and AD169 strain) in HFF cells to approximately the same extent as the parent drug cyclopropavir (5). Stability of 6 toward hydrolysis at pH 7.0 roughly corresponds to that of valganciclovir (2). Pharmacokinetic studies in mice established that the oral bioavailability of valcyclopropavir (6) was 95%.

  16. ANTIVIRAL POTENTIAL OF MEDICINAL PLANTS: AN OVERVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Ruwali Pushpa; Rai Nishant; Kumar Navin; Gautam Pankaj

    2013-01-01

    The term ‘Antiviral agents’ has been defined in very broad terms as substances other than a virus or virus containing vaccine or specific antibody which can produce either a protective or therapeutic effect to the clear detectable advantage of the virus infected host. The herbal medicine has a long traditional use and the major advantage over other medicines is their wide therapeutic window with rare side effects. There are some disadvantages of synthetic drugs like narrow therapeutic window...

  17. Antiviral immunity in marine molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Timothy J; Raftos, David; Speck, Peter; Montagnani, Caroline

    2015-09-01

    Marine molluscs, like all living organisms, are constantly exposed to viruses and have evolved efficient antiviral defences. We review here recent developments in molluscan antiviral immunity against viruses belonging to the order Herpesvirales. Emerging results suggest an interferon-like response and autophagy are involved in the antiviral defence of bivalves to viral infection. Multi-functional plasma proteins from gastropods and bivalves have been identified to have broad-spectrum antiviral activity against mammalian viruses. The antiviral defences present in molluscs can be enhanced by genetic selection, as shown by the presence of oyster strains specifically resistant to ostreid herpesvirus type 1. Whether varying amounts or different isoforms of these antiviral plasma proteins contributes to genetic resistance is worthy of further research. Other evolutionarily conserved antiviral mechanisms, such as RNA interference and apoptosis, still need further characterization. PMID:26297577

  18. 78 FR 64505 - Request for Nominations for Voting Members on a Public Advisory Committee; Tobacco Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    ... for nomination to the committee as later vacancies occur. ADDRESSES: All nominations for membership... Advisory Committee; Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration... voting members to serve on the Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee, Office of Science,...

  19. 78 FR 37821 - Joint Meeting of the Risk Communication Advisory Committee and Tobacco Products Scientific...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Joint Meeting of the Risk Communication Advisory Committee...: Risk Communication Advisory Committee and Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee....

  20. Role of combination antiviral therapy in pandemic influenza and stockpiling implications

    OpenAIRE

    Tsiodras, Sotirios; Mooney, John D; Hatzakis, Angelos

    2007-01-01

    It is impossible to predict which drugs will be effective against a new pandemic strain of influenza. Sotirios Tsiodras and colleagues argue that failure to stockpile both major classes of antiviral drugs could prove costly

  1. Drug: D02267 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D02267 Drug Foscarnet sodium hydrate (JAN); Trisodium phosphonoformate hexahydrate;...Chemotherapeutics 625 Antivirals 6250 Antivirals D02267 Foscarnet sodium hydrate (JAN) Anatomical Therapeuti...SE J05A DIRECT ACTING ANTIVIRALS J05AD Phosphonic acid derivatives J05AD01 Foscarnet D02267 Foscar...net sodium hydrate (JAN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Anti-cytomegalovirus (CMV) Agents Foscar...net D02267 Foscarnet sodium hydrate (JAN) Antiherpetic Agents Foscarnet D02267 Foscarn

  2. The Antiviral Activity of Approved and Novel Drugs against HIV-1 Mutations Evaluated under the Consideration of Dose-Response Curve Slope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Chang

    Full Text Available This study was designed to identify common HIV-1 mutation complexes affecting the slope of inhibition curve, and to propose a new parameter incorporating both the IC50 and the slope to evaluate phenotypic resistance.Utilizing site-directed mutagenesis, we constructed 22 HIV-1 common mutation complexes. IC50 and slope of 10 representative approved drugs and a novel agent against these mutations were measured to determine the resistance phenotypes. The values of new parameter incorporating both the IC50 and the slope of the inhibition curve were calculated, and the correlations between parameters were assessed.Depending on the class of drug, there were intrinsic differences in how the resistance mutations affected the drug parameters. All of the mutations resulted in large increases in the IC50s of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. The effects of the mutations on the slope were the most apparent when examining their effects on the inhibition of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors. For example, some mutations, such as V82A, had no effect on IC50, but reduced the slope. We proposed a new concept, termed IIPatoxic, on the basis of IC50, slope and the maximum limiting concentrations of the drug. The IIPatoxic values of 10 approved drugs and 1 novel agent were calculated, and were closely related to the IIPmax values (r > 0.95, p < 0.001.This study confirms that resistance mutations cannot be accurately assessed by IC50 alone, because it tends to underestimate the degree of resistance. The slope parameter is of very importance in the measurement of drug resistance and the effect can be applied to more complex patterns of resistance. This is the most apparent when testing the effects of the mutations on protease inhibitors activity. We also propose a new index, IIPatoxic, which incorporates both the IC50 and the slope. This new index could complement current IIP indices, thereby enabling predict the

  3. Evaluation of the in vitro skin permeation of antiviral drugs from penciclovir 1% cream and acyclovir 5% cream used to treat herpes simplex virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bader Marlene

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herpes simplex virus infection (HSV is a common and ubiquitous infection of the skin which causes mucocutaneous lesions called cold sores (herpes labialis or fever blisters. It is estimated that approximately 80% of the population worldwide are carriers of the Herpes simplex virus, approximately 40% suffer from recurrent recurrent infections. This study evaluates the in vitro skin permeation and penetration of penciclovir and acyclovir from commercialized creams for the treatment of herpes labialis (cold sores, using non viable excised human abdominal skin samples, which were exposed to 5 mg/cm2 of acyclovir 5% cream or penciclovir 1% cream. Methods After 24 h of cream application, excess cream was washed off and layers of stratum corneum were removed by successive tape stripping. Amounts of active ingredients having penetrated through the skin were measured, as well as the amounts in the washed-off cream, in skin strips and creams remaining in the skin. Molecular modelling was used to evaluate physico-chemical differences between the drugs. Western blot analysis enabled to determine whether the marker of basal cells keratin 5 could be detected in the various tape strips. Results Application of penciclovir 1% cream yielded higher concentration of drug in the deeper layers of the epidermis as well as a higher drug flux through the skin. Molecular modelling showed two higher hydrophobic moieties for acyclovir. Presence of the basal cell marker keratin 5 was underscored in the deeper tape strips from the skin, giving evidence that both drugs can reach their target cells. Conclusion Penciclovir 1% cream has the tendency to facilitate the diffusion of the drug through the stratum corneum into the deeper epidermis layers, in which it could reach the target basal cells at effective therapeutical concentration. The small difference in the surface properties between both molecules might also contribute to favour the passage of

  4. Antiviral resistance and the control of pandemic influenza.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Lipsitch

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The response to the next influenza pandemic will likely include extensive use of antiviral drugs (mainly oseltamivir, combined with other transmission-reducing measures. Animal and in vitro studies suggest that some strains of influenza may become resistant to oseltamivir while maintaining infectiousness (fitness. Use of antiviral agents on the scale anticipated for the control of pandemic influenza will create an unprecedented selective pressure for the emergence and spread of these strains. Nonetheless, antiviral resistance has received little attention when evaluating these plans. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We designed and analyzed a deterministic compartmental model of the transmission of oseltamivir-sensitive and -resistant influenza infections during a pandemic. The model predicts that even if antiviral treatment or prophylaxis leads to the emergence of a transmissible resistant strain in as few as 1 in 50,000 treated persons and 1 in 500,000 prophylaxed persons, widespread use of antivirals may strongly promote the spread of resistant strains at the population level, leading to a prevalence of tens of percent by the end of a pandemic. On the other hand, even in circumstances in which a resistant strain spreads widely, the use of antivirals may significantly delay and/or reduce the total size of the pandemic. If resistant strains carry some fitness cost, then, despite widespread emergence of resistance, antivirals could slow pandemic spread by months or more, and buy time for vaccine development; this delay would be prolonged by nondrug control measures (e.g., social distancing that reduce transmission, or use of a stockpiled suboptimal vaccine. Surprisingly, the model suggests that such nondrug control measures would increase the proportion of the epidemic caused by resistant strains. CONCLUSIONS: The benefits of antiviral drug use to control an influenza pandemic may be reduced, although not completely offset, by drug resistance

  5. Evolution and Spread of Influenza Virus and Progress on Antiviral Drugs and Vaccines%流感病毒的演变传播及抗病毒药物和疫苗的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈执中

    2009-01-01

    The influenza virus is an infectious virus in mankind. After the storm of influenza across the world in 1918, that is nightmare incessantly now. In this article, the evolution and spread of itinerary map of influenza virus are reviewed. Additionally, the progress on unique 'cap-snatching' mechanism, antiviral drugs and vaccines are also introduced. The applications of neuraminidase inhibitors and the developments of new influenza vaccines will open up broad prospects for the prevention and therapy of influenza.%流感病毒是引起人类流感的传染性病毒.1918年流感风暴席卷全球,至今仍为挥之不去的梦魇.本文综述了流感病毒的演变,在世界的传播路线和流感病毒"劫持"人体细胞的新机制,以及抗流感病毒新药和新型流感疫苗的研究进展.神经氨酸苷酶抑制剂的应用和新型流感疫苗的研制成功将为预防和治疗流感开拓广阔的前景.

  6. Perspective of Use of Antiviral Peptides against Influenza Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalickova, Sylvie; Heger, Zbynek; Krejcova, Ludmila; Pekarik, Vladimir; Bastl, Karel; Janda, Jozef; Kostolansky, Frantisek; Vareckova, Eva; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-10-01

    The threat of a worldwide influenza pandemic has greatly increased over the past decade with the emergence of highly virulent avian influenza strains. The increased frequency of drug-resistant influenza strains against currently available antiviral drugs requires urgent development of new strategies for antiviral therapy, too. The research in the field of therapeutic peptides began to develop extensively in the second half of the 20(th) century. Since then, the mechanisms of action for several peptides and their antiviral prospect received large attention due to the global threat posed by viruses. Here, we discussed the therapeutic properties of peptides used in influenza treatment. Peptides with antiviral activity against influenza can be divided into three main groups. First, entry blocker peptides such as a Flupep that interact with influenza hemagglutinin, block its binding to host cells and prevent viral fusion. Second, several peptides display virucidal activity, disrupting viral envelopes, e.g., Melittin. Finally, a third set of peptides interacts with the viral polymerase complex and act as viral replication inhibitors such as PB1 derived peptides. Here, we present a review of the current literature describing the antiviral activity, mechanism and future therapeutic potential of these influenza antiviral peptides. PMID:26492266

  7. Perspective of Use of Antiviral Peptides against Influenza Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Skalickova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The threat of a worldwide influenza pandemic has greatly increased over the past decade with the emergence of highly virulent avian influenza strains. The increased frequency of drug-resistant influenza strains against currently available antiviral drugs requires urgent development of new strategies for antiviral therapy, too. The research in the field of therapeutic peptides began to develop extensively in the second half of the 20th century. Since then, the mechanisms of action for several peptides and their antiviral prospect received large attention due to the global threat posed by viruses. Here, we discussed the therapeutic properties of peptides used in influenza treatment. Peptides with antiviral activity against influenza can be divided into three main groups. First, entry blocker peptides such as a Flupep that interact with influenza hemagglutinin, block its binding to host cells and prevent viral fusion. Second, several peptides display virucidal activity, disrupting viral envelopes, e.g., Melittin. Finally, a third set of peptides interacts with the viral polymerase complex and act as viral replication inhibitors such as PB1 derived peptides. Here, we present a review of the current literature describing the antiviral activity, mechanism and future therapeutic potential of these influenza antiviral peptides.

  8. [Antiviral properties of basidiomycetes metabolites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avtonomova, A V; Krasnopolskaya, L M

    2014-01-01

    The data on the antiviral action of the Ganoderma lucidum, Lentinus edodes, Grifola frondosa, Agaricus brasiliensis and other basidiomycetes metabolites are summurized. The metabolites of these species of basidiomycetes exhibit a direct antiviral effect on herpes simplex virus types I and II, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, influenza virus, Epstein-Barr virus, and others. Moreover, metabolites of basidiomycetes increased antiviral immunity. PMID:25975107

  9. Antiviral agents against equid alphaherpesviruses: Current status and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vissani, María A; Thiry, Etienne; Dal Pozzo, Fabiana; Barrandeguy, María

    2016-01-01

    Equid herpesvirus infections cause respiratory, neurological and reproductive syndromes. Despite preventive and control measures and the availability of vaccines and immunostimulants, herpesvirus infections still constitute a major threat to equine health and for the equine industry worldwide. Antiviral drugs, particularly nucleoside analogues and foscarnet, are successfully used for the treatment of human alphaherpesvirus infections. In equine medicine, the use of antiviral medications in alphaherpesvirus infections would decrease the excretion of virus and diminish the risk of contagion and the convalescent time in affected horses, and would also improve the clinical outcome of equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy. The combined use of antiviral compounds, along with vaccines, immune modulators, and effective preventive and control measures, might be beneficial in diminishing the negative impact of alphaherpesvirus infections in horses. The purpose of this review is to analyse the available information regarding the use of antiviral agents against alphaherpesviruses, with particular emphasis on equine alphaherpesvirus infections. PMID:26654843

  10. 75 FR 57279 - Risk Communication Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Risk Communication Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting... the public. Name of Committee: Risk Communication Advisory Committee. General Function of the... programs, such as FDA's Strategic Plan for Risk Communication, FDA's Transparency Initiative, and...

  11. 76 FR 58519 - Risk Communication Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Risk Communication Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting... the public. Name of Committee: Risk Communication Advisory Committee. General Function of the... November 18, 2011, the committee will discuss implications, for strategic communication, of...

  12. 77 FR 70450 - Risk Communication Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Risk Communication Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting... the public. Name of Committee: Risk Communication Advisory Committee. General Function of the... Campus must enter through Building 1. Contact Person: Lee L. Zwanziger, Risk Communication Staff,...

  13. 77 FR 31025 - Risk Communication Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Risk Communication Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting... the public. Name of Committee: Risk Communication Advisory Committee. General Function of the... enter through Building 1. Contact Person: Lee L. Zwanziger, Risk Communication Staff, Office of...

  14. 77 FR 62242 - Risk Communication Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Risk Communication Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting... the public. Name of Committee: Risk Communication Advisory Committee. General Function of the... enter through Building 1. Contact Person: Lee L. Zwanziger, Risk Communication Staff, Office of...

  15. 75 FR 52605 - Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting... the public. Name of Committee: Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee. General Function of the...-1100. Contact Person: Aleta Sindelar, Center for Veterinary Medicine (HFV-3), Food and...

  16. Is Minocycline an Antiviral Agent? A Review of Current Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarakanti, Sandhya; Bishburg, Eliahu

    2016-01-01

    Minocycline is a second-generation semi-synthetic derivative of tetracycline and has well-known anti-bacterial effects. The drug possesses anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-apoptotic and immunomodulatory effects. The drug is widely used in bacterial infections and non-infectious conditions such as acne, dermatitis, periodontitis and neurodegenerative conditions. Minocycline was shown to have antiviral activity in vitro and also against different viruses in some animal models. Some studies have been done on human patients infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus. We have review the available data regarding minocycline activity as an antiviral agent. PMID:26177421

  17. Neuropsychiatric Effects of HIV Antiviral Medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treisman, Glenn J; Soudry, Olivia

    2016-10-01

    The development of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has dramatically increased the lifespan of HIV patients but treatment is complicated by numerous adverse effects and toxicities. ART complications include neuropsychiatric, metabolic, gastrointestinal, cardiac, and numerous other toxicities, and clinicians often have to choose one toxicity over another to offer the best medication regimen for a patient. Some antiviral drugs cause significant neuropsychiatric complications, including depression, cognitive impairment, and sleep disturbance. Even in careful studies, it may be difficult to determine which effects are related to the virus, the immune system, or the treatment. Of the six currently marketed classes of antiviral drugs, the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors have been most commonly associated with neuropsychiatric complications. Within these classes, certain drugs are more likely to cause difficulty than others. We review the contention regarding the central nervous system (CNS) complications of efavirenz, as well as debate about the role of CNS penetration in drug effectiveness and toxicity. A thorough working knowledge of the neuropsychiatric consequences of ART allows clinicians to tailor treatment more successfully to individual patients as well as to identify ART more quickly as the source of a problem or symptom. PMID:27534750

  18. Drug: D10469 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 9 D10469.gif Treatment of hepatitis C [DS:H00413] Therapeutic category: 6250 Macrocyclic antivirus Direct-ac...tics 625 Antivirals 6250 Antivirals D10469 Simeprevir sodium (JAN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Anti-hepatitis

  19. Age-prioritized use of antivirals during an influenza pandemic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajelli Marco

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The WHO suggested that governments stockpile, as part of preparations for the next influenza pandemic, sufficient influenza antiviral drugs to treat approximately 25% of their populations. Our aim is two-fold: first, since in many countries the antiviral stockpile is well below this level, we search for suboptimal strategies based on treatment provided only to an age-dependent fraction of cases. Second, since in some countries the stockpile exceeds the suggested minimum level, we search for optimal strategies for post-exposure prophylactic treatment of close contacts of cases. Methods We used a stochastic, spatially structured individual-based model, considering explicit transmission in households, schools and workplaces, to simulate the spatiotemporal spread of an influenza pandemic in Italy and to evaluate the efficacy of interventions based on age-prioritized use of antivirals. Results Our results show that the antiviral stockpile required for treatment of cases ranges from 10% to 35% of the population for R0 in 1.4 – 3. No suboptimal strategies, based on treatment provided to an age-dependent fraction of cases, were found able to remarkably reduce both clinical attack rate and antiviral drugs needs, though they can contribute to largely reduce the excess mortality. Treatment of all cases coupled with prophylaxis provided to younger individuals is the only intervention resulting in a significant reduction of the clinical attack rate and requiring a relatively small stockpile of antivirals. Conclusion Our results strongly suggest that governments stockpile sufficient influenza antiviral drugs to treat approximately 25% of their populations, under the assumption that R0 is not much larger than 2. In countries where the number of antiviral stockpiled exceeds the suggested minimum level, providing prophylaxis to younger individuals is an option that could be taken into account in preparedness plans. In countries where the

  20. Emerging trends, confront and scenario in healthcare and antiviral development for infectious diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishra N

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Health defines the state of being free from illness, infection or injury and healthcare performs the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of such anomalies. Infectious diseases are well known since ancient time to human civilization and put heavy toll on social health as well as healthcare system. Among different infections agents viruses are the most notorious ones. Even in 21st century word, virus creates a panic in well educated society and among healthcare professionals. This causes unnecessary havoc, limited help to the patients and malfunctioning of healthcare system. The scuffle between the viruses and the humans is unremitting process and both are continuously changing their combating strategies to succeed. Our increasing knowledge about viruses, mechanism of their infections and the rapid involvement of novel antiviral strategies and techniques has enabled us to develop various antivirals. Development of antiviral is very costly, complex, risky, tedious, time consuming and multistage process. Inspite of recent development in technology, identification of novel antivirals and stern regulation in quality control measures; till date there is no fool proof treatment (vaccines and drugs available against viruses and due to viral resistance and/or drug toxicity, the rate of antiviral drugs coming to the market for human application is very low probably. Therefore, this review is mainly based on global view of antiviral discovery including classification of antiviral, its developmental stages, current advancements in upcoming technologies and limitations of the antiviral drug development in last five decades as well as future challenges and briefly on emerging problems in healthcare.

  1. Screening for Antiviral Activities of Isolated Compounds from Essential Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Astani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential oil of star anise as well as phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes, for example, trans-anethole, eugenol, β-eudesmol, farnesol, β-caryophyllene and β-caryophyllene oxide, which are present in many essential oils, were examined for their antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 in vitro. Antiviral activity was analyzed by plaque reduction assays and mode of antiviral action was determined by addition of the drugs to uninfected cells, to the virus prior to infection or to herpesvirus-infected cells. Star anise oil reduced viral infectivity by >99%, phenylpropanoids inhibited HSV infectivity by about 60–80% and sesquiterpenes suppressed herpes virus infection by 40–98%. Both, star anise essential oil and all isolated compounds exhibited anti-HSV-1 activity by direct inactivation of free virus particles in viral suspension assays. All tested drugs interacted in a dose-dependent manner with herpesvirus particles, thereby inactivating viral infectivity. Star anise oil, rich in trans-anethole, revealed a high selectivity index of 160 against HSV, whereas among the isolated compounds only β-caryophyllene displayed a high selectivity index of 140. The presence of β-caryophyllene in many essential oils might contribute strongly to their antiviral ability. These results indicate that phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes present in essential oils contribute to their antiviral activity against HSV.

  2. Glucosidase inhibitors as antiviral agents for hepatitis B and C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durantel, David; Alotte, Christine; Zoulim, Fabien

    2007-02-01

    HBV and HCV infections are a major public health concern. New antiviral drugs are urgently needed with improved efficacy. Compounds that specifically target viral enzymes are the most attractive in terms of drug development and are therefore the most studied. However, antiviral strategies based entirely on this class of compounds encounter problems caused by the emergence of viral escape mutants, as already widely described for HIV. One way to prevent or delay viral resistance is to combine antiviral agents that target different steps of the virus life cycle. Future therapy may also combine such virus-specific antivirals with compounds targeting host proteins or functions. In this respect, viral morphogenesis and infectivity represent interesting, and still unexploited, novel molecular targets. Endoplasmic reticulum glucosidase inhibitors have demonstrated anti-HBV and anti-HCV properties by inhibiting viral morphogenesis and infectivity. One such compound, celgosivir, is currently being evaluated in clinical trials against HCV infection, and encouraging phase IIa data have been disclosed. This review will discuss HBV and HCV morphogenesis, with a particular focus on the role of N-glycosylation for viral protein folding and assembly, and will present the antiviral properties of glucosidase inhibitors. PMID:17328228

  3. Screening for antiviral activities of isolated compounds from essential oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astani, Akram; Reichling, Jürgen; Schnitzler, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Essential oil of star anise as well as phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes, for example, trans-anethole, eugenol, β-eudesmol, farnesol, β-caryophyllene and β-caryophyllene oxide, which are present in many essential oils, were examined for their antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in vitro. Antiviral activity was analyzed by plaque reduction assays and mode of antiviral action was determined by addition of the drugs to uninfected cells, to the virus prior to infection or to herpesvirus-infected cells. Star anise oil reduced viral infectivity by >99%, phenylpropanoids inhibited HSV infectivity by about 60-80% and sesquiterpenes suppressed herpes virus infection by 40-98%. Both, star anise essential oil and all isolated compounds exhibited anti-HSV-1 activity by direct inactivation of free virus particles in viral suspension assays. All tested drugs interacted in a dose-dependent manner with herpesvirus particles, thereby inactivating viral infectivity. Star anise oil, rich in trans-anethole, revealed a high selectivity index of 160 against HSV, whereas among the isolated compounds only β-caryophyllene displayed a high selectivity index of 140. The presence of β-caryophyllene in many essential oils might contribute strongly to their antiviral ability. These results indicate that phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes present in essential oils contribute to their antiviral activity against HSV. PMID:20008902

  4. 78 FR 69991 - Advisory Committee; Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee; Termination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    ... established on April 24, 1984 (49 FR 20809; May 17, 1984). The purpose of the Committee was to review and... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 14 Advisory Committee; Veterinary Medicine... Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the termination of the Veterinary Medicine...

  5. Antiviral medication in sexually transmitted diseases. Part I: HSV, HPV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynarczyk-Bonikowska, Beata; Majewska, Anna; Malejczyk, Magdalena; Mlynarczyk, Grazyna; Majewski, Slawomir

    2013-11-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STD) are one of the most prevalent infectious diseases in the world and important cause of morbidity and mortality. Especially STDs of viral etiology are difficult to cure. In many cases the antiviral therapy can relieve the symptoms but not eliminate the virus. During the past decades, considerable progress has been made in the development of antiviral drugs. One of the oldest antiviral medications is acyclovir (ACV). It is approved to treat initial and recurrent genital herpes and as a suppressive therapy in severe recurrent genital infections as well. Drug resistance to ACV and related drugs is seen among immunocompromised hosts, including human immunodeficiency virus HIV-infected patients. Resistant infections can be managed by second-line drugs - foscarnet or cidofovir- but they are more toxic than ACV. In case of HPV there is not known specific target for the medication and that is why the substances used in human papilloma virus HPV infection therapy are either antimitotics or immunomodulators. The Part I review focuses on mechanisms of actions and mechanisms of resistance to antiviral agents used in a treatment of the genital herpes and genital HPV infection. In Part II we will show the therapeutic options in other sexually transmitted infections: hepatitis B, C and HIV. PMID:24032509

  6. 6-azacytidine--compound with wide spectrum of antiviral activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeeva, I; Dyachenko, N; Nosach, L; Zhovnovataya, V; Rybalko, S; Lozitskaya, R; Fedchuk, A; Lozitsky, V; Gridina, T; Shalamay, A; Palchikovskaja, L; Povnitsa, O

    2001-01-01

    6-azacytidine demonstrates activity against adenoviruses types 1, 2, 5. It inhibit synthesis of viral DNA and proteins. 6-AC shows antiherpetic and antiinfluenza action during experimental infection in mice. 6-AC is prospective for drug development as an antiviral substance with a wide spectrum of activity. PMID:11562975

  7. Antiviral therapy: a perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahidi Bonjar AH

    2016-02-01

    s recovery to a large extent depends on their general health status. EVAC would be for single use and appropriately disposed of after each detoxification procedure. When sufficient research has yielded positive results in animal models, EVAC could be used as a supportive treatment in humans along with conventional antiviral therapies. EVAC would not be suitable for all viral infections, but could be expected to decrease the casualties resulting from blood-borne viral infections. The EVAC approach would be efficient in terms of time, effort, and expenditure in the research and treatment of blood-borne viral infections. Keywords: blood, virus, infection, antiviral, sepsis, HIV, Ebola

  8. Are Cancer Drugs Less Likely to be Recommended for Listing by the Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee in Australia?

    OpenAIRE

    Lesley Chim; Kelly, Patrick J; Glenn Salkeld; Stockler, Martin R.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The hurdle of cost effectiveness for the selection and reimbursement of drugs in Australia limits access to new medicines based on an assessment of cost relative to clinical benefit. Those drugs that are expensive and provide modest benefits will be less likely to receive a government price subsidy. There is concern that the cost-effectiveness hurdle will limit access to new cancer treatments because of their high costs and modest benefits. Objective: To test the hypothesis that C...

  9. Development of antiviral agents toward enterovirus 71 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourianfar, Hamid Reza; Grollo, Lara

    2015-02-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection remains a public health problem at a global level, particularly in the Asia-Pacific region. The infection normally manifests as hand-foot-mouth disease; however, it is capable of developing into potentially fatal neurological complications. There is currently no approved vaccine or antiviral substance available for the prevention or treatment of EV71 infection. This paper, thus, reviews efforts to develop or discover synthetic as well as naturally occurring compounds directed against EV71 infection. The recent achievements in cellular receptors of EV71 are also highlighted, and their contribution to the development of antiviral drugs against EV71 is discussed in this article. PMID:24560700

  10. Novel four-drug salvage treatment regimens after failure of a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease inhibitor-containing regimen: antiviral activity and correlation of baseline phenotypic drug susceptibility with virologic outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeks, S G; Hellmann, N S; Grant, R M; Parkin, N T; Petropoulos, C J; Becker, M; Symonds, W; Chesney, M; Volberding, P A

    1999-06-01

    Twenty human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients experiencing virologic failure of an indinavir- or ritonavir-containing treatment regimen were evaluated in a prospective, open-label study. Subjects received nelfinavir, saquinavir, abacavir, and either another nucleoside analog (n=10) or nevirapine (n=10). Patients treated with the nevirapine-containing regimen experienced significantly greater virologic suppression at week 24 than those not treated with nevirapine (P=.04). Baseline phenotypic drug susceptibility was strongly correlated with outcome in both treatment arms. Subjects with baseline virus phenotypically sensitive to 2 or 3 drugs in the salvage regimen experienced significantly greater virus load suppression than those with baseline virus sensitive to 0 or 1 drug (median week-24 change=-2.24 log and -0.35 log, respectively; P=.01). In conclusion, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors may represent a potent drug in salvage therapy regimens after failure of an indinavir or ritonavir regimen. Phenotypic resistance testing may provide a useful tool for selecting more effective salvage regimens. PMID:10228057

  11. 75 FR 5335 - Risk Communication Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Risk Communication Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting... the public. Name of Committee: Risk Communication Advisory Committee. General Function of the... and call the appropriate advisory committee hot line/phone line to learn about possible...

  12. 76 FR 16427 - Risk Communication Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Risk Communication Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting... the public. Name of Committee: Risk Communication Advisory Committee. General Function of the... appropriate advisory committee hot line/phone line to learn about possible modifications before coming to...

  13. Exploiting Genetic Interference for Antiviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkegaard, Karla A.; Weinberger, Leor S.

    2016-01-01

    Rapidly evolving viruses are a major threat to human health. Such viruses are often highly pathogenic (e.g., influenza virus, HIV, Ebola virus) and routinely circumvent therapeutic intervention through mutational escape. Error-prone genome replication generates heterogeneous viral populations that rapidly adapt to new selection pressures, leading to resistance that emerges with treatment. However, population heterogeneity bears a cost: when multiple viral variants replicate within a cell, they can potentially interfere with each other, lowering viral fitness. This genetic interference can be exploited for antiviral strategies, either by taking advantage of a virus’s inherent genetic diversity or through generating de novo interference by engineering a competing genome. Here, we discuss two such antiviral strategies, dominant drug targeting and therapeutic interfering particles. Both strategies harness the power of genetic interference to surmount two particularly vexing obstacles—the evolution of drug resistance and targeting therapy to high-risk populations—both of which impede treatment in resource-poor settings. PMID:27149616

  14. Exploiting Genetic Interference for Antiviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Elizabeth J; Kirkegaard, Karla A; Weinberger, Leor S

    2016-05-01

    Rapidly evolving viruses are a major threat to human health. Such viruses are often highly pathogenic (e.g., influenza virus, HIV, Ebola virus) and routinely circumvent therapeutic intervention through mutational escape. Error-prone genome replication generates heterogeneous viral populations that rapidly adapt to new selection pressures, leading to resistance that emerges with treatment. However, population heterogeneity bears a cost: when multiple viral variants replicate within a cell, they can potentially interfere with each other, lowering viral fitness. This genetic interference can be exploited for antiviral strategies, either by taking advantage of a virus's inherent genetic diversity or through generating de novo interference by engineering a competing genome. Here, we discuss two such antiviral strategies, dominant drug targeting and therapeutic interfering particles. Both strategies harness the power of genetic interference to surmount two particularly vexing obstacles-the evolution of drug resistance and targeting therapy to high-risk populations-both of which impede treatment in resource-poor settings. PMID:27149616

  15. Exploiting Genetic Interference for Antiviral Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth J Tanner

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rapidly evolving viruses are a major threat to human health. Such viruses are often highly pathogenic (e.g., influenza virus, HIV, Ebola virus and routinely circumvent therapeutic intervention through mutational escape. Error-prone genome replication generates heterogeneous viral populations that rapidly adapt to new selection pressures, leading to resistance that emerges with treatment. However, population heterogeneity bears a cost: when multiple viral variants replicate within a cell, they can potentially interfere with each other, lowering viral fitness. This genetic interference can be exploited for antiviral strategies, either by taking advantage of a virus's inherent genetic diversity or through generating de novo interference by engineering a competing genome. Here, we discuss two such antiviral strategies, dominant drug targeting and therapeutic interfering particles. Both strategies harness the power of genetic interference to surmount two particularly vexing obstacles-the evolution of drug resistance and targeting therapy to high-risk populations-both of which impede treatment in resource-poor settings.

  16. [Antiviral activity of aqueous extracts of the birch fungus Inonotus obliquus on the human immunodeficiency virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibnev, V A; Garaev, T M; Finogenova, M P; Kalnina, L B; Nosik, D N

    2015-01-01

    Fractions of aqueous and water-alcohol extracts of the birch fungus Inonotus obliquus have antiviral effect against the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Antiviral properties of low toxic extracts were manifested in the concentration of 5.0 μg/ml upon simultaneous application with the virus in the lymphoblastoid cells culture MT-4. The extract of the birch fungus can be used for development of new antiviral drugs, inhibitors of HIV-replication when used both in the form of individual drugs and as a part of complex therapy. PMID:26182655

  17. Liposomal Systems as Nanocarriers for the Antiviral Agent Ivermectin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croci, Romina; Bottaro, Elisabetta; Chan, Kitti Wing Ki; Watanabe, Satoru; Pezzullo, Margherita; Mastrangelo, Eloise; Nastruzzi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    RNA virus infections can lead to the onset of severe diseases such as fever with haemorrhage, multiorgan failure, and mortality. The emergence and reemergence of RNA viruses continue to pose a significant public health threat worldwide with particular attention to the increasing incidence of flaviviruses, among others Dengue, West Nile Virus, and Yellow Fever viruses. Development of new and potent antivirals is thus urgently needed. Ivermectin, an already known antihelminthic drug, has shown potent effects in vitro on Flavivirus helicase, with EC50 values in the subnanomolar range for Yellow Fever and submicromolar EC50 for Dengue Fever, Japanese encephalitis, and tick-borne encephalitis viruses. However ivermectin is hampered in its application by pharmacokinetic problems (little solubility and high cytotoxicity). To overcome such problems we engineered different compositions of liposomes as ivermectin carriers characterizing and testing them on several cell lines for cytotoxicity. The engineered liposomes were less cytotoxic than ivermectin alone and they showed a significant increase of the antiviral activity in all the Dengue stains tested (1, 2, and S221). In the current study ivermectin is confirmed to be an effective potential antiviral and liposomes, as drug carriers, are shown to modulate the drug activity. All together the results represent a promising starting point for future improvement of ivermectin as antiviral and its delivery. PMID:27242902

  18. Small molecules with antiviral activity against the Ebola virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litterman, Nadia; Lipinski, Christopher; Ekins, Sean

    2015-01-01

    The recent outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa has highlighted the clear shortage of broad-spectrum antiviral drugs for emerging viruses. There are numerous FDA approved drugs and other small molecules described in the literature that could be further evaluated for their potential as antiviral compounds. These molecules are in addition to the few new antivirals that have been tested in Ebola patients but were not originally developed against the Ebola virus, and may play an important role as we await an effective vaccine. The balance between using FDA approved drugs versus novel antivirals with minimal safety and no efficacy data in humans should be considered. We have evaluated 55 molecules from the perspective of an experienced medicinal chemist as well as using simple molecular properties and have highlighted 16 compounds that have desirable qualities as well as those that may be less desirable. In addition we propose that a collaborative database for sharing such published and novel information on small molecules is needed for the research community studying the Ebola virus. PMID:25713700

  19. Liposomal Systems as Nanocarriers for the Antiviral Agent Ivermectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croci, Romina; Bottaro, Elisabetta; Chan, Kitti Wing Ki; Watanabe, Satoru; Pezzullo, Margherita; Mastrangelo, Eloise; Nastruzzi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    RNA virus infections can lead to the onset of severe diseases such as fever with haemorrhage, multiorgan failure, and mortality. The emergence and reemergence of RNA viruses continue to pose a significant public health threat worldwide with particular attention to the increasing incidence of flaviviruses, among others Dengue, West Nile Virus, and Yellow Fever viruses. Development of new and potent antivirals is thus urgently needed. Ivermectin, an already known antihelminthic drug, has shown potent effects in vitro on Flavivirus helicase, with EC50 values in the subnanomolar range for Yellow Fever and submicromolar EC50 for Dengue Fever, Japanese encephalitis, and tick-borne encephalitis viruses. However ivermectin is hampered in its application by pharmacokinetic problems (little solubility and high cytotoxicity). To overcome such problems we engineered different compositions of liposomes as ivermectin carriers characterizing and testing them on several cell lines for cytotoxicity. The engineered liposomes were less cytotoxic than ivermectin alone and they showed a significant increase of the antiviral activity in all the Dengue stains tested (1, 2, and S221). In the current study ivermectin is confirmed to be an effective potential antiviral and liposomes, as drug carriers, are shown to modulate the drug activity. All together the results represent a promising starting point for future improvement of ivermectin as antiviral and its delivery. PMID:27242902

  20. Liposomal Systems as Nanocarriers for the Antiviral Agent Ivermectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romina Croci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA virus infections can lead to the onset of severe diseases such as fever with haemorrhage, multiorgan failure, and mortality. The emergence and reemergence of RNA viruses continue to pose a significant public health threat worldwide with particular attention to the increasing incidence of flaviviruses, among others Dengue, West Nile Virus, and Yellow Fever viruses. Development of new and potent antivirals is thus urgently needed. Ivermectin, an already known antihelminthic drug, has shown potent effects in vitro on Flavivirus helicase, with EC50 values in the subnanomolar range for Yellow Fever and submicromolar EC50 for Dengue Fever, Japanese encephalitis, and tick-borne encephalitis viruses. However ivermectin is hampered in its application by pharmacokinetic problems (little solubility and high cytotoxicity. To overcome such problems we engineered different compositions of liposomes as ivermectin carriers characterizing and testing them on several cell lines for cytotoxicity. The engineered liposomes were less cytotoxic than ivermectin alone and they showed a significant increase of the antiviral activity in all the Dengue stains tested (1, 2, and S221. In the current study ivermectin is confirmed to be an effective potential antiviral and liposomes, as drug carriers, are shown to modulate the drug activity. All together the results represent a promising starting point for future improvement of ivermectin as antiviral and its delivery.

  1. 76 FR 80952 - Request for Nominations for Voting Members on a Public Advisory Committee; Food Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-27

    ... be considered for nomination to the committee if nominees are still needed. ADDRESSES: All... INFORMATION: FDA is requesting nomination for voting members on the Food Advisory Committee. I. General... Advisory Committee; Food Advisory Committee AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION:...

  2. Antiviral activity of monoterpenes beta-pinene and limonene against herpes simplex virus in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Astani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils are complex mixtures containing compounds of several different functional- group classes. Depending on the structure, we can distinguish monoterpenes, phenylpropanes, and other components. Here in this study two monoterpene compounds of essential oils, i.e. β-pinene and limonene were examined for their antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 in vitro.All antiviral assays were performed using RC-37 cells. Cytotoxicity was determined in a neutral red assay, antiviral assays were performed with HSV-1 strain KOS. The mode of antiviral action was evaluated at different periods during the viral replication cycle. Acyclovir was used as positive antiviral control.Beta-pinenene and limonenen reduced viral infectivity by 100 %. The mode of antiviral action has been determined, only moderate antiviral effects were revealed by monoterpenes when these drugs were added to host cells prior infection or after entry of HSV into cells. However, both monoterpenes exhibited high anti-HSV-1 activity by direct interaction with free virus particles. Both tested drugs interacted with HSV-1 in a dose-dependent manner thereby inactivating viral infection.These results suggest that monoterpenes in essential oils exhibit antiherpetic activity in the early phase of viral multiplication and might be used as potential antiviral agents.

  3. Drug: D07441 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D07441 Drug Amantadine (INN) C10H17N 151.1361 151.2487 D07441.gif Antiviral, Antiparkinson...synapse Transporter: SLC22A2 [HSA:6582] map07044 Antiviral agents map07057 Antiparkinson...inson Agents Antiparkinson Agents, Other Amantadine D07441 Amantadine (INN) Antivir...ntane derivatives N04BB01 Amantadine D07441 Amantadine (INN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Antipark

  4. Antiviral Chemistry & Chemotherapy's current antiviral agents FactFile 2008 (2nd edition): RNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clercq, Erik; Field, Hugh J

    2008-01-01

    Among the RNA viruses, other than the retroviruses (that is, HIV), which are dealt with separately in the current FactFile, the most important targets for the development of antiviral agents at the moment are the orthomyxoviruses (that is, influenza), the hepaciviruses (that is, hepatitis C virus [HCV]) and, to a lesser extent, the picornaviruses. Although the uncoating inhibitors amantadine and rimantadine were the first known inhibitors of influenza A, the neuraminidase inhibitors oseltamivir, zanamivir and peramivir have now become the prime antiviral drugs for the treatment of influenza A and B virus infections. For HCV infections, standard treatment consists of the combination of pegylated interferon-alpha with ribavirin, but several other antivirals targeted at specific viral functions such as the HCV protease and/ or polymerase may be expected to soon take an important share of this important market. Still untapped is the potential of a variety of uncoating inhibitors, as well as protease and/or polymerase inhibitors against the wide spectrum of picornaviruses. While ribavirin has been available for 35 years as a broad-spectrum anti-RNA virus agent, relatively new and unexplored is favipiravir (T-705) accredited with activity against influenza as well as flaviviruses, bunyaviruses and arenaviruses. PMID:18727441

  5. 5α-reductase inhibitors, antiviral and anti-tumor activities of some steroidal cyanopyridinone derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mohizea, Abdullah M; Al-Omar, Mohamed A; Abdalla, Mohamed M; Amr, Abdel-Galil E

    2012-01-01

    We herein report the 5α-reductase inhibitors, antiviral and anti-tumor activities of some synthesized heterocyclic cyanopyridone and cyanothiopyridone derivatives fused with steroidal structure. Initially the acute toxicity of the compounds was assayed via the determination of their LD(50). All the compounds, except 3b, were interestingly less toxic than the reference drug (Prednisolone(®)). Seventeen heterocyclic derivatives containing a cyanopyridone or cyanothiopyridone rings fused to a steroidal moiety were synthesized and screened for their 5α-reductase inhibitors, antiviral and anti-tumor activities comparable to that of Anastrozole, Bicalutamide, Efavirenz, Capravirine, Ribavirin, Oseltamivir and Amantadine as the reference drugs. Some of the compounds exhibited better 5α-reductase inhibitors, antiviral and anti-tumor activities than the reference drugs. The detailed 5α-reductase inhibitors, antiviral and anti-tumor activities of the synthesized compounds were reported. PMID:22057085

  6. Antiviral therapy: a perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahidi Bonjar, Amir Hashem

    2016-01-01

    research has yielded positive results in animal models, EVAC could be used as a supportive treatment in humans along with conventional antiviral therapies. EVAC would not be suitable for all viral infections, but could be expected to decrease the casualties resulting from blood-borne viral infections. The EVAC approach would be efficient in terms of time, effort, and expenditure in the research and treatment of blood-borne viral infections. PMID:26893542

  7. Viral Ancestors of Antiviral Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis P. Villarreal

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the ‘Big Bang’ theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features.

  8. Viral ancestors of antiviral systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Luis P

    2011-10-01

    All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the 'Big Bang' theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features. PMID:22069523

  9. Antiviral Effect Assay of Aqueous Extract of Echium Amoenum-L against HSV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malihe Farahani

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medicinal plants have been used for different diseases in past. There is an increasing need for substances with antiviral activity since the treatment of viral infections with the available antiviral drugs often leads to the problem of viral resistance. Therefore in the present study Echium amoenum L plant with ethnomedical background was screened for antiviral activity against HSV-1 in different times. Materials and Methods: Flower part of Echium amoenum L plant collected from Iran was extracted with different methods to obtain crude aqueous extract. This extract was screened for its cytotoxicity against Hep II cell line by CPE assay. Antiviral properties of the plant extract were determined by cytopathic effect inhibition assay.Results: Echium amoenum L extract exhibited significant antiviral activity at non toxic concentrations to the cell line used. Findings indicated that plant extract has the most antiviral activity when it used an hour after virus inoculation.Conclusion: Echium amoenum L plant had not toxic effect at highest concentrations to the cell lines used and showed the most antiviral activity when it used an hour after virus inoculation. Further research is needed to elucidate the active constituents of this plant which may be useful in the development of new and effective antiviral agents.

  10. Drug: D03256 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D03256 Drug Valganciclovir hydrochloride (JAN/USAN); Valcyte (TN) C14H22N6O5. HCl 3...90.1418 390.8226 D03256.gif Antiviral [DS:H00368] Therapeutic category: 6250 ATC code: J05AB14 prodrug, active substance: Ganciclov...ms and parasites 62 Chemotherapeutics 625 Antivirals 6250 Antivirals D03256 Valganciclovir hydrochloride (JA...nd nucleotides excl. reverse transcriptase inhibitors J05AB14 Valganciclovir D03256 Valganciclovir hydrochlo...ride (JAN/USAN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Anti-cytomegalovirus (CMV) Agents Valganciclovir D03256 Valganciclov

  11. Drug: D00333 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D00333 Drug Ganciclovir (JAN/USP/INN); Cytovene (TN); Vitrasert (TN) C9H13N5O4 255....ic organisms and parasites 62 Chemotherapeutics 625 Antivirals 6250 Antivirals D00333 Ganciclovir (JAN/USP/I...ucleotides excl. reverse transcriptase inhibitors J05AB06 Ganciclovir D00333 Ganciclovir (JAN/USP/INN) S SEN...SORY ORGANS S01 OPHTHALMOLOGICALS S01A ANTIINFECTIVES S01AD Antivirals S01AD09 Ganciclovir D00333 Ganciclovi...r (JAN/USP/INN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Anti-cytomegalovirus (CMV) Agents Ganciclo

  12. Antiviral effect of lithium chloride on infection of cells by canine parvovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Pei; Fu, Xinliang; Yan, Zhongshan; Fang, Bo; Huang, San; Fu, Cheng; Hong, Malin; Li, Shoujun

    2015-11-01

    Canine parvovirus type 2 causes significant viral disease in dogs, with high morbidity, high infectivity, and high mortality. Lithium chloride is a potential antiviral drug for viruses. We determined the antiviral effect of Lithium Chloride on canine parvovirus type 2 in feline kidney cells. The viral DNA and proteins of canine parvovirus were suppressed in a dose-dependent manner by lithium chloride. Further investigation verified that viral entry into cells was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by lithium chloride. These results indicated that lithium chloride could be a potential antiviral drug for curing dogs with canine parvovirus infection. The specific steps of canine parvovirus entry into cells that are affected by lithium chloride and its antiviral effect in vivo should be explored in future studies. PMID:26315688

  13. 76 FR 44017 - Risk Communication Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Risk Communication Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting... the public. Name of Committee: Risk Communication Advisory Committee. General Function of the... Person: Lee L. Zwanziger, Office of Policy, Planning and Budget, Food and Drug Administration, 10903...

  14. 75 FR 4576 - Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting... the public. Name of Committee: Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee. General Function of the... Medicine (HFV-3), Food and Drug Administration, 7519 Standish Pl., Rockville, MD 20855, 240-276-9004,...

  15. 78 FR 12068 - Device Good Manufacturing Practice Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Device Good Manufacturing Practice Advisory Committee... meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Device Good Manufacturing Practice Advisory... effects of extreme weather and natural disasters on medical device manufacturing chain processes...

  16. 75 FR 65640 - Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and... Tumor Vaccines and Biotechnology Branch, Office of Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies, Center...

  17. 77 FR 73472 - Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice...

  18. 76 FR 78931 - Advisory Committees; Tentative Schedule of Meetings for 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-20

    ... Advisory Committee..... May 16-17. Arthritis Advisory Committee March 12. Cardiovascular and Renal Drugs.... Hematology and Pathology Devices Panel. June 28. Immunology Devices Panel Date(s), if needed, to...

  19. Antiviral therapies against Ebola and other emerging viral diseases using existing medicines that block virus entry

    OpenAIRE

    Long, Jason; Wright, Edward; Molesti, Eleonora; Temperton, Nigel J.; Barclay, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Emerging viral diseases pose a threat to the global population as intervention strategies are mainly limited to basic containment due to the lack of efficacious and approved vaccines and antiviral drugs. The former was the only available intervention when the current unprecedented Ebolavirus (EBOV) outbreak in West Africa began. Prior to this, the development of EBOV vaccines and anti-viral therapies required time and resources that were not available. Therefore, focus has turned to re-purpos...

  20. Liposomal Systems as Nanocarriers for the Antiviral Agent Ivermectin

    OpenAIRE

    Romina Croci; Elisabetta Bottaro; Kitti Wing Ki Chan; Satoru Watanabe; Margherita Pezzullo; Eloise Mastrangelo; Claudio Nastruzzi

    2016-01-01

    RNA virus infections can lead to the onset of severe diseases such as fever with haemorrhage, multiorgan failure, and mortality. The emergence and reemergence of RNA viruses continue to pose a significant public health threat worldwide with particular attention to the increasing incidence of flaviviruses, among others Dengue, West Nile Virus, and Yellow Fever viruses. Development of new and potent antivirals is thus urgently needed. Ivermectin, an already known antihelminthic drug, has shown ...

  1. Drug: D00317 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D00317 Drug Famciclovir (JAN/USAN/INN); Famvir (TN) C14H19N5O4 321.1437 321.3318 D0...0317.gif Antiviral [DS:H00365] Therapeutic category: 6250 ATC code: J05AB09 S01AD07 Prodrug, active substance: Penciclov...otherapeutics 625 Antivirals 6250 Antivirals D00317 Famciclovir (JAN/USAN/INN) Anatomical Therapeutic Chemic...ptase inhibitors J05AB09 Famciclovir D00317 Famciclovir (JAN/USAN/INN) S SENSORY ORGANS S01 OPHTHALMOLOGICAL...S S01A ANTIINFECTIVES S01AD Antivirals S01AD07 Famciclovir D00317 Famciclovir (JAN/USAN/INN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Antiherpetic Agents Famciclovir D00317 Famciclovir (JAN/USAN/INN) Antiinfectives [BR:br08307] Antivirals Anti-HSV agent DNA polym

  2. In vitro antiviral effect of germacrone on feline calicivirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hongxia; Liu, Yongxiang; Zu, Shaopo; Sun, Xue; Liu, Chunguo; Liu, Dafei; Zhang, Xiaozhan; Tian, Jin; Qu, Liandong

    2016-06-01

    Feline calicivirus (FCV) often causes respiratory tract and oral disease in cats and is a highly contagious virus. Widespread vaccination does not prevent the spread of FCV. Furthermore, the low fidelity of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of FCV leads to the emergence of new variants, some of which show increased virulence. Currently, few effective anti-FCV drugs are available. Here, we found that germacrone, one of the main constituents of volatile oil from rhizoma curcuma, was able to effectively reduce the growth of FCV strain F9 in vitro. This compound exhibited a strong anti-FCV effect mainly in the early phase of the viral life cycle. The antiviral effect depended on the concentration of the drug. In addition, germacrone treatment had a significant inhibitory effect against two other reference strains, 2280 and Bolin, and resulted in a significant reduction in the replication of strains WZ-1 and HRB-SS, which were recently isolated in China. This is the first report of antiviral effects of germacrone against a calicivirus, and extensive in vivo research is needed to evaluate this drug as an antiviral therapeutic agent for FCV. PMID:26997613

  3. Advisory Committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Educational Management, Eugene, OR.

    This chapter of "The Best of the Best of ERIC," Volume 2, contains 14 summaries of documents and journal articles on citizen advisory committees, all of which are indexed in either "Resources in Education" or "Current Index to Journals in Education." The materials included deal with various aspects of this topic, such as the role of the school…

  4. Drug: D10518 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D10518 Drug Valaciclovir hydrochloride hydrate (JAN); Valaciclovir (TN) C13H20N6O4.... HCl. xH2O D10518.gif Antiviral [DS:H00365] Therapeutic category: 6250 ATC code: J05AB11 prodrug, active substance: Aciclov...ganisms and parasites 62 Chemotherapeutics 625 Antivirals 6250 Antivirals D10518 Valaciclovir hydrochloride ...ides and nucleotides excl. reverse transcriptase inhibitors J05AB11 Valaciclovir D10518 Valaciclovir hydroch

  5. Antiviral treatment for the control of pandemic influenza: some logistical constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Arinaminpathy, N.; McLean, A. R.

    2007-01-01

    Disease control programmes for an influenza pandemic will rely initially on the deployment of antiviral drugs such as Tamiflu, until a vaccine becomes available. However, such control programmes may be severely hampered by logistical constraints such as a finite stockpile of drugs and a limit on the distribution rate. We study the effects of such constraints using a compartmental modelling approach.

  6. Escape Mutations in NS4B Render Dengue Virus Insensitive to the Antiviral Activity of the Paracetamol Metabolite AM404.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Cleef, Koen W R; Overheul, Gijs J; Thomassen, Michael C; Marjakangas, Jenni M; van Rij, Ronald P

    2016-04-01

    Despite the enormous disease burden associated with dengue virus infections, a licensed antiviral drug is lacking. Here, we show that the paracetamol (acetaminophen) metabolite AM404 inhibits dengue virus replication. Moreover, we find that mutations in NS4B that were previously found to confer resistance to the antiviral compounds NITD-618 and SDM25N also render dengue virus insensitive to AM404. Our work provides further support for NS4B as a direct or indirect target for antiviral drug development. PMID:26856827

  7. Antifungal and antiviral products of marine organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Wong, Jack Ho; Pan, Wen Liang; Chan, Yau Sang; Yin, Cui Ming; Dan, Xiu Li; Wang, He Xiang; Fang, Evandro Fei; Lam, Sze Kwan; Ngai, Patrick Hung Kui; Xia, Li Xin; Liu, Fang; Ye, Xiu Yun; Zhang, Guo Qing; Liu, Qing Hong; Sha, Ou; Lin, Peng; Ki, Chan; Bekhit, Adnan A; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din; Wan, David Chi Cheong; Ye, Xiu Juan; Xia, Jiang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2014-04-01

    Marine organisms including bacteria, fungi, algae, sponges, echinoderms, mollusks, and cephalochordates produce a variety of products with antifungal activity including bacterial chitinases, lipopeptides, and lactones; fungal (-)-sclerotiorin and peptaibols, purpurides B and C, berkedrimane B and purpuride; algal gambieric acids A and B, phlorotannins; 3,5-dibromo-2-(3,5-dibromo-2-methoxyphenoxy)phenol, spongistatin 1, eurysterols A and B, nortetillapyrone, bromotyrosine alkaloids, bis-indole alkaloid, ageloxime B and (-)-ageloxime D, haliscosamine, hamigeran G, hippolachnin A from sponges; echinoderm triterpene glycosides and alkene sulfates; molluscan kahalalide F and a 1485-Da peptide with a sequence SRSELIVHQR; and cepalochordate chitotriosidase and a 5026.9-Da antifungal peptide. The antiviral compounds from marine organisms include bacterial polysaccharide and furan-2-yl acetate; fungal macrolide, purpurester A, purpurquinone B, isoindolone derivatives, alterporriol Q, tetrahydroaltersolanol C and asperterrestide A, algal diterpenes, xylogalactofucan, alginic acid, glycolipid sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol, sulfated polysaccharide p-KG03, meroditerpenoids, methyl ester derivative of vatomaric acid, lectins, polysaccharides, tannins, cnidarian zoanthoxanthin alkaloids, norditerpenoid and capilloquinol; crustacean antilipopolysaccharide factors, molluscan hemocyanin; echinoderm triterpenoid glycosides; tunicate didemnin B, tamandarins A and B and; tilapia hepcidin 1-5 (TH 1-5), seabream SauMx1, SauMx2, and SauMx3, and orange-spotted grouper β-defensin. Although the mechanisms of antifungal and antiviral activities of only some of the aforementioned compounds have been elucidated, the possibility to use those known to have distinctly different mechanisms, good bioavailability, and minimal toxicity in combination therapy remains to be investigated. It is also worthwhile to test the marine antimicrobials for possible synergism with existing drugs. The prospects of

  8. ANTIVIRAL POTENTIAL OF MEDICINAL PLANTS: AN OVERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruwali Pushpa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The term ‘Antiviral agents’ has been defined in very broad terms as substances other than a virus or virus containing vaccine or specific antibody which can produce either a protective or therapeutic effect to the clear detectable advantage of the virus infected host. The herbal medicine has a long traditional use and the major advantage over other medicines is their wide therapeutic window with rare side effects. There are some disadvantages of synthetic drugs like narrow therapeutic window and more importantly the various adverse side effects which occur quite frequently. Due to these disadvantages and other limitations, there is an increasing trend in the field of research for discovering new and noble drugs based on various herbal formulations. This review attempts to address the importance of developing therapeutic herbal formulations from various medicinal plants using the knowledge based on traditional system of medicines, the Ayurveda. Although natural products have been used by civilization since ancient times, only in recent decades has there been growing research into alternative therapies and the therapeutics use of natural products, especially those derived from plants. Plants synthesize and preserve a variety of biochemical products, many of which are extractable and used for various scientific investigations. Therefore, medicinal plants proved to be a major resort for the treatment of diseases and sicknesses by traditional healers in many societies.

  9. Meeting report: 26th International Conference on Antiviral Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vere Hodge, R Anthony

    2013-10-01

    The 26th International Conference on Antiviral Research (ICAR) was held in San Francisco, California from May 11 to 15, 2013. This article summarizes the principal invited lectures at the meeting. The opening symposium on the legacy of the late Antonín Holý included presentations on his pioneering work with nucleotide analogs, which led to the development of several antiviral drugs including tenofovir. This drug has transformed the treatment of HIV infection and has recently become the first-line therapy for chronic hepatitis B. The Gertrude Elion Award lecturer described the anti-HIV activities of the CCR5 inhibitor cenicriviroc and the reverse transcriptase inhibitor festinavir®, and also reviewed the evaluation of biodegradable nanoparticles with adjuvant activity. The William Prusoff Award winner reported on the creation of NAOMI, a computer model with 21 enzymes to predict the activity of nucleoside analogs against hepatitis C virus (HCV). Other invited lecturers discussed the development of countermeasures against severe dengue and the potential of RNA virus capping and repair enzymes as drug targets. Topics in the clinical symposium included the current status of the anti-HCV compounds sovaprevir, ACH-3102, miravirsen and ALS-2200; the evaluation of single-tablet regimens for HIV infection; and the investigation of cytomegalovirus resistance to CMX001. Two chemistry minisymposia examined strategies and tactics in drug design and the use of in drug discovery. PMID:23973733

  10. Genetic Consequences of Antiviral Therapy on HIV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Arenas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A variety of enzyme inhibitors have been developed in combating HIV-1, however the fast evolutionary rate of this virus commonly leads to the emergence of resistance mutations that finally allows the mutant virus to survive. This review explores the main genetic consequences of HIV-1 molecular evolution during antiviral therapies, including the viral genetic diversity and molecular adaptation. The role of recombination in the generation of drug resistance is also analyzed. Besides the investigation and discussion of published works, an evolutionary analysis of protease-coding genes collected from patients before and after treatment with different protease inhibitors was included to validate previous studies. Finally, the review discusses the importance of considering genetic consequences of antiviral therapies in models of HIV-1 evolution that could improve current genotypic resistance testing and treatments design.

  11. Drug: D03690 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D03690 Drug Desciclovir (USAN/INN) C8H11N5O2 209.0913 209.2052 D03690.gif Antiviral...08307] Antivirals Anti-HSV agent DNA polymerase inhibitor Purine analogue Desciclovir D03690 Desciclovir (US

  12. Drug: D04008 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2O 295.1281 295.2945 D04008.gif Antiviral used in the treatment of hepatitis B infections [DS:H00412] Therap...ntecavir D04008 Entecavir hydrate (JAN); Entecavir (USAN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Anti-hepatitis

  13. Drug: D01937 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D01937 Drug Zanamivir hydrate (JAN); Relenza (TN) C12H20N4O7. xH2O D01937.gif Antiviral; Inhibit ... or [influenza virus neuraminidase] [DS:H00398] Therapeutic catego ... ry: 6250 ATC code: J05AH01 influenza virus A, B neuraminidase inhibitor map07044 Antivir ...

  14. Drug: D08306 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D08306 Drug Oseltamivir (INN); Agucort (TN) C16H28N2O4 312.2049 312.4045 D08306.gif Antiviral; E ... nzyme inhibitor, neuraminidase, influenza ... virus [DS:H00398] Same as: C08092 ATC code: J05AH0 ... 2 influenza virus A, B neuraminidase inhibitor map07044 Antivir ...

  15. Drug: D08775 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D08775 Mixture, Drug Abacavir sulfate - lamivudine mixt; Epzicom (TN) Abacavir sulf...emotherapeutics 625 Antivirals 6250 Antivirals D08775 Abacavir sulfate - lamivudi...ns, combinations J05AR02 Lamivudine and abacavir D08775 Abacavir sulfate - lamivu... Transcriptase Inhibitors (NRTI)v Abacavir and Lamivudine D08775 Abacavir sulfate - lamivudine mixt PubChem: 96025458 ...

  16. Drug: D02764 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available OTHERAPEUTICS FOR DERMATOLOGICAL USE D06B CHEMOTHERAPEUTICS FOR TOPICAL USE D06BB Antivirals D06BB03 Aciclov...NTIINFECTIVES S01AD Antivirals S01AD03 Aciclovir D02764 Acyclovir sodium (USAN) USP drug classification [BR:...Antiinfectives [BR:br08307] Antivirals Anti-HSV agent DNA polymerase inhibitor Purine analogue Aciclovir [AT...se inhibitors J05AB01 Aciclovir D02764 Acyclovir sodium (USAN) S SENSORY ORGANS S01 OPHTHALMOLOGICALS S01A A...ECT ACTING ANTIVIRALS J05AB Nucleosides and nucleotides excl. reverse transcripta

  17. Сost-effectiveness of the second wave of protease inhibitors in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C (genotype 1 in patients not previously treated with antiviral drugs, and for relapsed disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Rudakova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The protease inhibitors (PI actively using for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C (CHC.The aim of this analysis was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of narlaprevir and simeprevir in the CHC (genotype 1 therapy in treatment-naïve patients and relapses.Material and methods. Analysis of the cost-effectiveness of simeprevir and narlaprevir was conducted from the perspective of the health care system and base on QUEST-1, QUEST-2, ASPIRE and PIONEER clinical trials. The relative risk of achieving SVR 24 compared to the peg-INF + RBV therapy was used in the model. Treatment discontinuation in patients receiving narlaprevir assumed in the absence of a SVR after 12 weeks and in patients receiving simeprevir in the SVR absence after 4 weeks. The cost of narlaprevir was calculate based on estimated registration price in case of EDL (essential pharmaceutical list approved by MOH inclusion, including VAT (10% and 10% as trade margin. Costs of other antiviral products were in line with the results of 2015 average auctions prices.Results. In the base case costs on antiviral products with narlaprevir as first-line therapy are lower compared with simeprevir by 12,2% (950,6 and 1083,0 thousand RUR, respectively, and the cost per patient with SVR 24 by 7,8%. In patients group after relapse costs on antiviral products with narlaprevir as first-line therapy will decrease compared with simeprevir by 4,3% (971,3 and 1014,7 thousand RUR, respectively, and the cost per patient with SVR 24 by 25,0%. The sensitivity analysis demonstrated a high reliability of obtained results. Thus, assuming equal clinical effectiveness of narlaprevir and simeprevir, costs of treatment naive patients will be 10.6% lower for narlaprevir group compared to simeprevir group (953,0 and 1066,0 thousand rur, respectively, and by 12,9% for the treatment of relapses (957,9 and 1100,0 thousand RUR, respectively.Conclusions. With comparable clinical efficacy and

  18. Population-wide emergence of antiviral resistance during pandemic influenza.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed M Moghadas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The emergence of neuraminidase inhibitor resistance has raised concerns about the prudent use of antiviral drugs in response to the next influenza pandemic. While resistant strains may initially emerge with compromised viral fitness, mutations that largely compensate for this impaired fitness can arise. Understanding the extent to which these mutations affect the spread of disease in the population can have important implications for developing pandemic plans. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By employing a deterministic mathematical model, we investigate possible scenarios for the emergence of population-wide resistance in the presence of antiviral drugs. The results show that if the treatment level (the fraction of clinical infections which receives treatment is maintained constant during the course of the outbreak, there is an optimal level that minimizes the final size of the pandemic. However, aggressive treatment above the optimal level can substantially promote the spread of highly transmissible resistant mutants and increase the total number of infections. We demonstrate that resistant outbreaks can occur more readily when the spread of disease is further delayed by applying other curtailing measures, even if treatment levels are kept modest. However, by changing treatment levels over the course of the pandemic, it is possible to reduce the final size of the pandemic below the minimum achieved at the optimal constant level. This reduction can occur with low treatment levels during the early stages of the pandemic, followed by a sharp increase in drug-use before the virus becomes widely spread. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings suggest that an adaptive antiviral strategy with conservative initial treatment levels, followed by a timely increase in the scale of drug-use, can minimize the final size of a pandemic while preventing large outbreaks of resistant infections.

  19. 76 FR 12973 - Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Amendment of Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory... Medical Devices Advisory Committee. This meeting was announced in the Federal Register of February 7, 2011... meeting of the Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee would be held on...

  20. 75 FR 58414 - Dental Products Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Amendment of Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Dental Products Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory... Medical Devices Advisory Committee. This meeting was announced in the Federal Register of June 11, 2010... announced that a meeting of the Dental Products Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee would...

  1. 76 FR 54777 - Request for Nominations for Voting Members on a Public Advisory Committee; Tobacco Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-02

    ... November 1, 2011 will be considered for nomination to the committee if nominees are still needed. ADDRESSES... also specify the advisory committee for which the nominee recommended. Nomination must also acknowledge... Advisory Committee; Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee AGENCY: Food and Drug...

  2. 77 FR 10755 - Request for Nominations for Voting Members on a Public Advisory Committee; Risk Communication...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-23

    .... Nominations received after April 23, 2012 will be considered for nomination to the committee as later... Advisory Committee; Risk Communication Advisory Committee AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... the Risk Communication Advisory Committee, Office of Planning, Office of Policy and Planning,...

  3. 77 FR 61007 - Request for Nominations for Voting Members on a Public Advisory Committee; Tobacco Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ... nomination to the committee as later vacancies occur. ADDRESSES: All nominations for membership should be... nomination for voting members on the Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee. Elsewhere in this issue... Advisory Committee; Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee AGENCY: Food and Drug...

  4. A new antiviral screening method that simultaneously detects viral replication, cell viability, and cell toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matza-Porges, Sigal; Eisen, Kobi; Ibrahim, Hadeel; Haberman, Adva; Fridlender, Bertold; Joseph, Gili

    2014-11-01

    Viruses cause a variety of illnesses in humans, yet only a few antiviral drugs have been developed; thus, new antiviral drugs are urgently needed. Plants could be a good source of antiviral drugs, they do not have mobility and can only defend themselves by producing compounds against pathogens such as viruses in their own fix environment. These compounds may have the potential to inhibit animal and human viruses as well. In this study, a fast and reliable method for screening plant extracts for specific antiviral activity against Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) was developed. This method distinguishes between host cell death due to infectivity and multiplicity of the virus versus toxicity of the plant extract. Extracts from 80 plant and plant organs were screened using this approach. Six plant extracts showed potential to exert specific HSV-1 growth inhibition activity. In two cases, different organs from the same plant showed similar active results. With this method it is possible to screen a large number of extracts in a rapid and accurate way to detect antiviral substances against HSV-I and other viruses. PMID:25152527

  5. Antiviral Activities of Several Oral Traditional Chinese Medicines against Influenza Viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Lin-Lin Ma; Miao Ge; Hui-Qiang Wang; Jin-Qiu Yin; Jian-Dong Jiang; Yu-Huan Li

    2015-01-01

    Influenza is still a serious threat to human health with significant morbidity and mortality. The emergence of drug-resistant influenza viruses poses a great challenge to existing antiviral drugs. Traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) may be an alternative to overcome the challenge. Here, 10 oral proprietary Chinese medicines were selected to evaluate their anti-influenza activities. These drugs exhibit potent inhibitory effects against influenza A H1N1, influenza A H3N2, and influenza B virus...

  6. Update On Emerging Antivirals For The Management Of Herpes Simplex Virus Infections: A Patenting Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Vadlapudi, Aswani D.; Vadlapatla, Ramya K.; Ashim K. Mitra

    2013-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections can be treated efficiently by the application of antiviral drugs. The herpes family of viruses is responsible for causing a wide variety of diseases in humans. The standard therapy for the management of such infections includes acyclovir (ACV) and penciclovir (PCV) with their respective prodrugs valaciclovir and famciclovir. Though effective, long term prophylaxis with the current drugs leads to development of drug-resistant viral isolates, particularly i...

  7. 21 CFR 14.84 - Nominations and selection of nonvoting members of standing technical advisory committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nominations and selection of nonvoting members of standing technical advisory committees. 14.84 Section 14.84 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Advisory Committees § 14.84 Nominations and selection of nonvoting members of standing technical...

  8. The RNA Template Channel of the RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase as a Target for Development of Antiviral Therapy of Multiple Genera within a Virus Family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, Lonneke; Vives-Adrián, Laia; Selisko, Barbara; Ferrer-Orta, Cristina; Liu, Xinran; Lanke, Kjerstin; Ulferts, Rachel; De Palma, Armando M; Tanchis, Federica; Goris, Nesya; Lefebvre, David; De Clercq, Kris; Leyssen, Pieter; Lacroix, Céline; Pürstinger, Gerhard; Coutard, Bruno; Canard, Bruno; Boehr, David D; Arnold, Jamie J; Cameron, Craig E; Verdaguer, Nuria; Neyts, Johan; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M

    2015-01-01

    The genus Enterovirus of the family Picornaviridae contains many important human pathogens (e.g., poliovirus, coxsackievirus, rhinovirus, and enterovirus 71) for which no antiviral drugs are available. The viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase is an attractive target for antiviral therapy. Nucleoside-b

  9. 75 FR 20608 - Risk Communication Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Risk Communication Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting... the public. Name of Committee: Risk Communication Advisory Committee. General Function of the... current research in a range of fields relevant to improving risk communication at FDA, and...

  10. 75 FR 65641 - Risk Communication Advisory Committee; Amendment of Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Risk Communication Advisory Committee; Amendment of Notice... announcing an amendment to the notice of meeting of the Risk Communication Advisory Committee. This meeting was announced in the Federal Register of September 20, 2010 (75 FR 57279). The amendment is being...

  11. 78 FR 42087 - Risk Communications Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-15

    ... the White Oak Campus must enter through Building 1. Contact Person: Luis G. Bravo, Risk Communication... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Risk Communications Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting... the public. Name of Committee: Risk Communications Advisory Committee. General Function of...

  12. Drug: D06478 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D06478 Drug Darunavir ethanolate (JAN); Prezista (TN) C27H37N3O7S. C2H6O 593.2771 5...BR:br08301] 6 Agents against pathologic organisms and parasites 62 Chemotherapeutics 625 Antivirals 6250 Antivirals D06478 Daruna...ING ANTIVIRALS J05AE Protease inhibitors J05AE10 Darunavir D06478 Darunavir ethanolate (JAN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Anti-HIV Agents, Protease Inhibitors Darunavir D06478 Darunavir ethanolate ...08307] Antivirals Anti-HIV agent Protease inhibitor (PIs) Nonpeptidic Daruna...vir [ATC:J05AE10] D06478 Darunavir ethanolate (JAN) CAS: 635728-49-3 PubChem: 47208134

  13. Using the Ferret as an Animal Model for Investigating Influenza Antiviral Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ding Y; Hurt, Aeron C

    2016-01-01

    The concern of the emergence of a pandemic influenza virus has sparked an increased effort toward the development and testing of novel influenza antivirals. Central to this is the animal model of influenza infection, which has played an important role in understanding treatment effectiveness and the effect of antivirals on host immune responses. Among the different animal models of influenza, ferrets can be considered the most suitable for antiviral studies as they display most of the human-like symptoms following influenza infections, they can be infected with human influenza virus without prior viral adaptation and have the ability to transmit influenza virus efficiently between one another. However, an accurate assessment of the effectiveness of an antiviral treatment in ferrets is dependent on three major experimental considerations encompassing firstly, the volume and titer of virus, and the route of viral inoculation. Secondly, the route and dose of drug administration, and lastly, the different methods used to assess clinical symptoms, viral shedding kinetics and host immune responses in the ferrets. A good understanding of these areas is necessary to achieve data that can accurately inform the human use of influenza antivirals. In this review, we discuss the current progress and the challenges faced in these three major areas when using the ferret model to measure influenza antiviral effectiveness. PMID:26870031

  14. Using the ferret as an animal model for investigating influenza antiviral effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Yuan Oh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The concern of the emergence of a pandemic influenza virus has sparked an increased effort towards the development and testing of novel influenza antivirals. Central to this is the animal model of influenza infection, which has played an important role in understanding treatment effectiveness and the effect of antivirals on host immune responses. Among the different animal models of influenza, ferrets can be considered the most suitable for antiviral studies as they display most of the human-like symptoms following influenza infections, they can be infected with human influenza virus without prior viral adaptation and have the ability to transmit influenza virus efficiently between one another. However, an accurate assessment of the effectiveness of an antiviral treatment in ferrets is dependent on three major experimental considerations encompassing firstly, the volume and titre of virus, and the route of viral inoculation. Secondly, the route and dose of drug administration, and lastly, the different methods used to assess clinical symptoms, viral shedding kinetics and host immune responses in the ferrets. A good understanding of these areas is necessary to achieve data that can accurately inform the human use of influenza antivirals. In this review, we discuss the current progress and the challenges faced in these three major areas when using the ferret model to measure influenza antiviral effectiveness.

  15. Antiviral active peptide from oyster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Mingyong; Cui, Wenxuan; Zhao, Yuanhui; Liu, Zunying; Dong, Shiyuan; Guo, Yao

    2008-08-01

    An active peptide against herpes virus was isolated from the enzymic hydrolysate of oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) and purified with the definite direction hydrolysis technique in the order of alcalase and bromelin. The hydrolysate was fractioned into four ranges of molecular weight (>10 kDa, 10 5 kDa, 5 1 kDa and <1 kDa) using ultrafiltration membranes and dialysis. The fraction of 10 5 kDa was purified using consecutive chromatographic methods including DEAE Sephadex A-25 column, Sephadex G-25 column, and high performance liquid chromatogram (HPLC) by activity-guided isolation. The antiviral effect of the obtained peptide on herpetic virus was investigated in Vero cells by observing cytopathic effect (CPE). The result shows that the peptide has high inhibitory activity on herpetic virus.

  16. Antiviral active peptide from oyster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    An active peptide against herpes virus was isolated from the enzymic hydrolysate of oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and purified with the definite direction hydrolysis technique in the order of alcalase and bromelin. The hydrolysate was fractioned into four ranges of molecular weight (>10 kDa, 10-5 kDa, 5-1 kDa and <1 kDa) using ultrafiltration membranes and dialysis. The fraction of 10?5 kDa was purified using consecutive chromatographic methods including DEAE Sephadex A-25 column, Sephadex G-25 column, and high performance liquid chromatogram (HPLC) by activity-guided isolation. The antiviral effect of the obtained peptide on herpetic virus was investigated in Vero cells by observing cytopathic effect (CPE). The result shows that the peptide has high inhibitory activity on herpetic virus.

  17. Drug: D02748 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available (generical recombination) (JAN); Peginterferon alfa-2b (INN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Anti-hepatitis...(JAN); Peginterferon alfa-2b (INN) Anti-hepatitis C (HCV) Agents Peginterferon Al

  18. Drug: D02297 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available n [BR:br08301] 6 Agents against pathologic organisms and parasites 62 Chemotherapeutics 625 Antivirals 6250 Ant...D02297 Mixture, Drug Emtricitabine - tenofovir disoproxil fumarate mixt; Truvada (T...N) Emtricitabine [DR:D01199], Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate [DR:D01982] Antiviral [DS:H00406] Therapeutic cate...ivirals D02297 Emtricitabine - tenofovir disoproxil fumarate mixt Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classificat...ofovir disoproxil and emtricitabine D02297 Emtricitabine - tenofovir disoproxil fumarate mixt USP drug classificat

  19. Drug: D07896 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nhibitors J05AF10 Entecavir D07896 Entecavir (INN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Anti-hepatitis...atitis B infection [DS:H00412] ATC code: J05AF10 Nucleoside reverse transcriptase i...D07896 Drug Entecavir (INN) C12H15N5O3 277.1175 277.2792 D07896.gif Antiviral agent used in treatment of hep

  20. Drug: D10081 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ease inhibitor [CPD:C18290 C18291] ko05160 Hepatitis C USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Anti-hepatitis...D10081 Drug Simeprevir (JAN/USAN); Olysio (TN) C38H47N5O7S2 749.2917 749.9391 D10081.gif Treatment of hepati...tis C [DS:H00413] Macrocyclic antivirus Direct-acting antiviral (DAA) NS3/NS4A prot

  1. Drug: D08483 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D08483 Drug Rimantadine (INN) C12H21N 179.1674 179.3018 D08483.gif Antiviral [DS:H00398] Same as ... : C07236 ATC code: J05AC02 Adamantane derivative influenza ... A M2 proton channel blocker [VG:NC_004907_1 NC_002 ... P drug classification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Anti-influenza ... Agents Rimantadine D08483 Rimantadine (INN) Antiin ...

  2. Drug: D02737 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D02737 Drug Palivizumab (genetical recombination) (JAN); Palivizumab (INN); Synagis... parasites 62 Chemotherapeutics 625 Antivirals 6250 Antivirals D02737 Palivizumab (genetica...pecific immunoglobulins J06BB16 Palivizumab D02737 Palivizumab (genetical recombi...tein monoclonal antibody Palivizumab [ATC:J06BB16] D02737 Palivizumab (genetical recombination) (JAN); Palivizumab (INN) CAS: 188039-54-5 PubChem: 47205815 DrugBank: DB00110 ...

  3. Drug: D05407 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D05407 Drug Penciclovir (USAN/INN); Denavir (TN) C10H15N5O3 253.1175 253.2578 D0540...TICS FOR TOPICAL USE D06BB Antivirals D06BB06 Penciclovir D05407 Penciclovir (USAN/INN) J ANTIINFECTIVES FOR...s excl. reverse transcriptase inhibitors J05AB13 Penciclovir D05407 Penciclovir (...USAN/INN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Antiherpetic Agents Penciclovir D05407 Penciclovir... (USAN/INN) Antiinfectives [BR:br08307] Antivirals Anti-HSV agent DNA polymerase inhibitor Purine analogue Penciclov

  4. Drug: D02124 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D02124 Drug Penciclovir sodium (USAN); Denavir (TN) C10H14N5O3. Na 275.0994 275.239...LOGICAL USE D06B CHEMOTHERAPEUTICS FOR TOPICAL USE D06BB Antivirals D06BB06 Penciclovir D02124 Penciclovir s... J05AB Nucleosides and nucleotides excl. reverse transcriptase inhibitors J05AB13 Penciclov...ir D02124 Penciclovir sodium (USAN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Antiherpetic Agents Penciclov...ir D02124 Penciclovir sodium (USAN) Antiinfectives [BR:br08307] Antivirals Anti-HSV agent DNA

  5. Drug: D04301 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D04301 Drug Ganciclovir sodium (USAN); Cytovene IV (TN) C9H12N5O4. Na 277.0787 277....DIRECT ACTING ANTIVIRALS J05AB Nucleosides and nucleotides excl. reverse transcriptase inhibitors J05AB06 Ganciclovir D04301 Ganciclo...lovir D04301 Ganciclovir sodium (USAN) USP drug classifi...cation [BR:br08302] Antivirals Anti-cytomegalovirus (CMV) Agents Ganciclovir D04301 Ganciclovir sodium (USAN...) Antiinfectives [BR:br08307] Antivirals Anti-CMV agent DNA polymerase inhibitor Purine analogue Ganciclovir

  6. Drug: D02495 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D02495 Drug Valganciclovir (INN) C14H22N6O5 354.1652 354.3617 D02495.gif Antiviral ...[DS:H00368] ATC code: J05AB14 prodrug, active substance: Ganciclovir [DR:D00333] DNA polymerase inhibitor [E...NTIVIRALS J05AB Nucleosides and nucleotides excl. reverse transcriptase inhibitors J05AB14 Valganciclovir D02495 Valganciclov...ir (INN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Anti-cytomegalovirus (CMV) Agents Valganciclov...ir D02495 Valganciclovir (INN) Antiinfectives [BR:br08307] Antivirals

  7. Drug: D00579 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D00579 Drug Foscarnet sodium (USAN/INN); Foscavir (TN) CO5P. 3Na 191.9176 191.9508 ...d derivatives J05AD01 Foscarnet D00579 Foscarnet sodium (USAN/INN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Anti...virals Anti-cytomegalovirus (CMV) Agents Foscarnet D00579 Foscarnet sodium (USAN/INN) Antiherpetic Agents Foscarnet D00579 Foscar... Anti-CMV agent DNA polymerase inhibitor Phosphonic acid derivatives Foscarnet [ATC:J05AD01] D00579 Foscarne...05 ANTIVIRALS FOR SYSTEMIC USE J05A DIRECT ACTING ANTIVIRALS J05AD Phosphonic aci

  8. Cytotoxic, Virucidal, and Antiviral Activity of South American Plant and Algae Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Faral-Tello

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 infection has a prevalence of 70% in the human population. Treatment is based on acyclovir, valacyclovir, and foscarnet, three drugs that share the same mechanism of action and of which resistant strains have been isolated from patients. In this aspect, innovative drug therapies are required. Natural products offer unlimited opportunities for the discovery of antiviral compounds. In this study, 28 extracts corresponding to 24 plant species and 4 alga species were assayed in vitro to detect antiviral activity against HSV-1. Six of the methanolic extracts inactivated viral particles by direct interaction and 14 presented antiviral activity when incubated with cells already infected. Most interesting antiviral activity values obtained are those of Limonium brasiliense, Psidium guajava, and Phyllanthus niruri, which inhibit HSV-1 replication in vitro with 50% effective concentration (EC50 values of 185, 118, and 60 μg/mL, respectively. For these extracts toxicity values were calculated and therefore selectivity indexes (SI obtained. Further characterization of the bioactive components of antiviral plants will pave the way for the discovery of new compounds against HSV-1.

  9. Transdermal Delivery and Cutaneous Targeting of Antivirals using a Penetration Enhancer and Lysolipid Prodrugs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Diblíková, D.; Kopečná, M.; Školová, B.; Krečmerová, Marcela; Roh, J.; Hrabálek, A.; Vávrová, K.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 4 (2014), s. 1071-1081. ISSN 0724-8741 Grant ostatní: GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/11/0365 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : acyclic nucleoside phosphonate antivirals * lysolipid prodrug * penetration enhancer * skin absorption * transdermal drug delivery Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 3.420, year: 2014

  10. 21 CFR 861.38 - Standards advisory committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Development and Publication § 861.38 Standards advisory committees. (a) The Food and Drug Administration will... the proposed regulation which requires the exercise of scientific judgment if: (1) The Food and...

  11. Antiviral activities of whey proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Tzi Bun; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Wong, Jack Ho; Wang, Yan; Ip, Denis Tsz Ming; Wan, David Chi Cheong; Xia, Jiang

    2015-09-01

    Milk contains an array of proteins with useful bioactivities. Many milk proteins encompassing native or chemically modified casein, lactoferrin, alpha-lactalbumin, and beta-lactoglobulin demonstrated antiviral activities. Casein and alpha-lactalbumin gained anti-HIV activity after modification with 3-hydroxyphthalic anhydride. Many milk proteins inhibited HIV reverse transcriptase. Bovine glycolactin, angiogenin-1, lactogenin, casein, alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, bovine lactoferrampin, and human lactoferrampin inhibited HIV-1 protease and integrase. Several mammalian lactoferrins prevented hepatitis C infection. Lactoferrin, methylated alpha-lactalbumin and methylated beta-lactoglobulin inhibited human cytomegalovirus. Chemically modified alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin and lysozyme, lactoferrin and lactoferricin, methylated alpha-lactalbumin, methylated and ethylated beta-lactoglobulins inhibited HSV. Chemically modified bovine beta-lactoglobulin had antihuman papillomavirus activity. Beta-lactoglobulin, lactoferrin, esterified beta-lactoglobulin, and esterified lactoferrindisplayed anti-avian influenza A (H5N1) activity. Lactoferrin inhibited respiratory syncytial virus, hepatitis B virus, adenovirus, poliovirus, hantavirus, sindbis virus, semliki forest virus, echovirus, and enterovirus. Milk mucin, apolactoferrin, Fe(3+)-lactoferrin, beta-lactoglobulin, human lactadherin, bovine IgG, and bovine kappa-casein demonstrated antihuman rotavirus activity. PMID:26198883

  12. Identification of a series of compounds with potent antiviral activity for the treatment of enterovirus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Angus M; Mitchell, Dale R; Palmer, Nicholas J; Van de Poël, Hervé; Conrath, Katja; Andrews, Martin; Leyssen, Pieter; Neyts, Johan

    2013-07-11

    Rhinovirus (genus enterovirus) infections are responsible for many of the severe exacerbations of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Other members of the genus can cause life-threatening acute neurological infections. There is currently no antiviral drug approved for the treatment of such infections. We have identified a series of potent, broad-spectrum antiviral compounds that inhibit the replication of the human rhinovirus, Coxsackie virus, poliovirus, and enterovirus-71. The mechanism of action of the compounds has been established as inhibition of a lipid kinase, PI4KIIIβ. Inhibition of hepatitis C replication in a replicon assay correlated with enterovirus inhibition. PMID:24900715

  13. Antiviral activity of viro care gz-08 against newcastle disease virus in poultry and its in-vitro cytotoxicity assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newcastle disease (ND), one of the most important disease of poultry throughout the World is caused by Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV). It is causing huge economic losses in poultry industry of Pakistan. Regardless of vaccination, other prevention and control measures are necessary to prevent ND outbreaks. Natural resources have been exploited to obtain antiviral compounds in several latest studies. In this study, the antiviral activity of Viro Care GZ-081 was checked up in-vitro, in-ovo and in-vivo. The cytotoxicity assay of the product was performed using Vero cell line. All the trials revealed that the stock solution and 1:2 dilution of GZ-08 had some antiviral activity as well as were cytotoxic. As the concentration decreased, cytotoxicity as well as antiviral activities were lost. Based on these findings, it was concluded that GZ-08 sanitizer or spray can be used as antiviral agent to clean or disinfect some non-living surfaces against different viruses in general and NDV in particular. However, in-vivo use of GZ-08 in poultry against NDV is recommended only as pre-treatment with ND vaccines as it significantly reduced morbidity and mortality as compared to the use of vaccines alone. However, further work is recommended in future on GZ-08 for its use as post-treatment of ND as well as on other antiviral compounds of natural origin to develop a novel antiviral drug against NDV in poultry. (author)

  14. Antiviral effect of ranpirnase against Ebola virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Thomas; Draper, Ken; Brasel, Trevor; Freiberg, Alexander; Squiquera, Luis; Sidransky, David; Sulley, Jamie; Taxman, Debra J

    2016-08-01

    The recent epidemic of Ebola has intensified the need for the development of novel antiviral therapeutics that prolong and improve survival against deadly viral diseases. We sought to determine whether ranpirnase, an endoribonuclease from Rana pipiens with a demonstrated human safety profile in phase III oncology trials, can reduce titers of Ebola virus (EBOV) in infected cells, protect mice against mouse-adapted EBOV challenge, and reduce virus levels in infected mice. Our results demonstrate that 0.50 μg/ml ranpirnase is potently effective at reducing EBOV Zaire Kikwit infection in cultured Vero E6 cells (Selectivity Index 47.8-70.2). In a prophylactic study, a single intravenous dose of 0.1 mg/kg ranpirnase protected 70% of mice from progressive infection. Additionally, in a post-exposure prophylactic study, 100% of female mice survived infection after intraperitoneal administration of 0.1 mg/kg ranpirnase for ten days beginning 1 h post challenge. Most of the male counterparts were sacrificed due to weight loss by Study Day 8 or 9; however, the Clinical Activity/Behavior scores of these mice remained low and no significant microscopic pathologies could be detected in the kidneys, livers or spleens. Furthermore, live virus could not be detected in the sera of ranpirnase-treated mice by Study Day 8 or in the kidneys, livers or spleens by Study Day 12, and viral RNA levels declined exponentially by Study Day 12. Because ranpirnase is exceptionally stable and has a long track record of safe intravenous administration to humans, this drug provides a promising new candidate for clinical consideration in the treatment of Ebola virus disease alone or in combination with other therapeutics. PMID:27350309

  15. Repurposing Kinase Inhibitors as Antiviral Agents to Control Influenza A Virus Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perwitasari, Olivia; Yan, Xiuzhen; O'Donnell, Jason; Johnson, Scott; Tripp, Ralph A

    2015-12-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) infection causes seasonal epidemics of contagious respiratory illness that causes substantial morbidity and some mortality. Regular vaccination is the principal strategy for controlling influenza virus, although vaccine efficacy is variable. IAV antiviral drugs are available; however, substantial drug resistance has developed to two of the four currently FDA-approved antiviral drugs. Thus, new therapeutic approaches are being sought to reduce the burden of influenza-related disease. A high-throughput screen using a human kinase inhibitor library was performed targeting an emerging IAV strain (H7N9) in A549 cells. The inhibitor library contained 273 structurally diverse, active cell permeable kinase inhibitors with known bioactivity and safety profiles, many of which are at advanced stages of clinical development. The current study shows that treatment of human A549 cells with kinase inhibitors dinaciclib, flavopiridol, or PIK-75 exhibits potent antiviral activity against H7N9 IAV as well as other IAV strains. Thus, targeting host kinases can provide a broad-spectrum therapeutic approach against IAV. These findings provide a path forward for repurposing existing kinase inhibitors safely as potential antivirals, particularly those that can be tested in vivo and ultimately for clinical use. PMID:26192013

  16. 75 FR 36660 - Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ... Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION:...

  17. 76 FR 71983 - Gastroenterology and Urology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Gastroenterology and Urology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION:...

  18. 76 FR 6626 - Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee; Notice of... to the public. Name of Committee: Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee. General Function of... Cohen, Office of Science, Center for Tobacco Products, Food and Drug Administration, 9200 Corporate...

  19. 75 FR 9422 - Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee; Notice of... to the public. Name of Committee: Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee. General Function of....) Contact Person: Cristi Stark, Office of Science, Center for Tobacco Products, Food and Drug...

  20. 75 FR 15342 - Advisory Committees; Technical Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-29

    ... committees to reflect an internal change with respect to the staff that handles the nomination and selection... Oversight and Management Staff to determine continued interest. Upon selection of the nominees to be placed...: Dornette D. Spell LeSane, Advisory Committee Oversight and Management Staff, Food and Drug...

  1. Antiviral Activity of Hederasaponin B from Hedera helix against Enterovirus 71 Subgenotypes C3 and C4a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jaehyoung; Yeo, Sang-Gu; Hong, Eun-Hye; Lee, Bo-Ra; Kim, Jin-Won; Kim, Jeonghoon; Jeong, Hyeongun; Kwon, Yongsoo; Kim, Hyunpyo; Lee, Sangwon; Park, Jae-Hak; Ko, Hyun-Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the predominant cause of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). The antiviral activity of hederasaponin B from Hedera helix against EV71 subgenotypes C3 and C4a was evaluated in vero cells. In the current study, the antiviral activity of hederasaponin B against EV71 C3 and C4a was determined by cytopathic effect (CPE) reduction method and western blot assay. Our results demonstrated that hederasaponin B and 30% ethanol extract of Hedera helix containing hederasaponin B showed significant antiviral activity against EV71 subgenotypes C3 and C4a by reducing the formation of a visible CPE. Hederasaponin B also inhibited the viral VP2 protein expression, suggesting the inhibition of viral capsid protein synthesis.These results suggest that hederasaponin B and Hedera helix extract containing hederasaponin B can be novel drug candidates with broad-spectrum antiviral activity against various subgenotypes of EV71. PMID:24596620

  2. NaVirCept - Nucleic Acid-Based Anti-Viral Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaccines are generally considered to be the most effective countermeasures to bacterial and viral diseases, however, licensed vaccines against many disease agents are either not available or their efficacies have not been demonstrated. Vaccines are generally agent specific in terms of treatment spectrum and are subject to defeat through natural mutation or through directed efforts. With respect to viral therapeutics, one of the major limitations associated with antiviral drugs is acquired drug resistance caused by antigenic shift or drift. A number of next-generation prophylactic and/or therapeutic measures are on the horizon. Of these, nucleic acid-based drugs are showing great antiviral potential. These drugs elicit long-lasting, broad spectrum protective immune responses, especially to respiratory viral pathogens. The Nucleic Acid-Based Antiviral (NaVirCept) project provides the opportunity to demonstrate the effectiveness of novel medical countermeasures against military-significant endemic and other viral threat agents. This project expands existing DRDC drug delivery capability development, in the form of proprietary liposome intellectual property, by coupling it with leading-edge nucleic acid-based technology to deliver effective medical countermeasures that will protect deployed personnel and the warfighter against a spectrum of viral disease agents. The technology pathway will offer a means to combat emerging viral diseases or modified threat agents such as the bird flu or reconstructed Spanish flu without going down the laborious, time-consuming and expensive paths to develop countermeasures for each new and/or emerging viral disease organism.(author)

  3. Update on emerging antivirals for the management of herpes simplex virus infections: a patenting perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadlapudi, Aswani D; Vadlapatla, Ramya K; Mitra, Ashim K

    2013-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections can be treated efficiently by the application of antiviral drugs. The herpes family of viruses is responsible for causing a wide variety of diseases in humans. The standard therapy for the management of such infections includes acyclovir (ACV) and penciclovir (PCV) with their respective prodrugs valaciclovir and famciclovir. Though effective, long term prophylaxis with the current drugs leads to development of drug-resistant viral isolates, particularly in immunocompromised patients. Moreover, some drugs are associated with dose-limiting toxicities which limit their further utility. Therefore, there is a need to develop new antiherpetic compounds with different mechanisms of action which will be safe and effective against emerging drug resistant viral isolates. Significant advances have been made towards the design and development of novel antiviral therapeutics during the last decade. As evident by their excellent antiviral activities, pharmaceutical companies are moving forward with several new compounds into various phases of clinical trials. This review provides an overview of structure and life cycle of HSV, progress in the development of new therapies, update on the advances in emerging therapeutics under clinical development and related recent patents for the treatment of Herpes simplex virus infections. PMID:23331181

  4. The Psoriatic Disease Payer Advisory Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greb, Jacqueline E; Merola, Joseph; Garg, Amit; Latella, John; Howard, Leah; Acharya, Nayan; Gottlieb, Alice B

    2016-05-01

    A collaborative exchange of ideas occurred at The Psoriatic Disease Payer Advisory Panel sponsored by International Dermatology Outcomes Measures (IDEOM) and The National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF) in January, 2016. Patient, provider, payer, pharmaceutical industry, IDEOM board member, and NPF leader representatives shared perspectives to address the unmet needs in the treatment of psoriatic patients. The payers who play a crucial role in controlling treatment access and improving patient outcomes played a pivotal role in the discussion. Progress made during the Payer Advisory Panel will ultimately advance psoriatic initiatives and help to address the persistent challenges of all vested stakeholders. J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(5):641-644. PMID:27168273

  5. A fresh look at an antiviral helicase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Leonid Gitlin; Marco Colonna

    2007-01-01

    @@ In order to survive,all organlsms must guard against viral infections.Recognition of viruses is accomplished via multiple sensors.Many mammalian proteins can recognize viral products,such as double-stranded RNA(dsRNA),yet feW of them are known to induce interferon,the central antiviral messenger.Since interferon is indispensable for Successful antiviral defense [1],the interferon-inducing sensors have been of particular interest.However,a clear understanding of such sensors has been elusive,and the first well-established sensor family,the toll-like receptors (TLRs),was described relatively recently[2].Antiviral TLRS are positioned in the endosomes,where they report the appearance of viral genetic material(DNA,single-and double-stranded RNA).

  6. Report of the first Asia-Pacific Forum on antiviral treatment of influenza, Asia-Pacific Alliance for the Control of Influenza, Bangkok, 14 June 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Lance C; Smith, David W; Chan, Paul K S

    2013-11-01

    On 14 June 2012, the Asia-Pacific Alliance for the Control of Influenza (APACI) convened the first Antiviral Forum jointly with the Influenza Foundation of Thailand and the Thailand Department of Disease Control. The goals of the meeting were to improve pandemic planning in the region from lessons learned during the 2009 pandemic, particularly with regard to the safety and efficacy of antiviral use; gain a better understanding of the therapeutic use of antivirals in seasonal influenza; review and analyse the official influenza control policies of Asia-Pacific countries and evidence gaps to support policy development; and to establish collaborative relationships to promote best practices in the use of antivirals for the treatment of influenza. The urgent need for education highlighting the importance of influenza and the benefits of antiviral drug use in the Asia-Pacific region was identified. PMID:23756551

  7. Drug: D00222 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D00222 Drug Aciclovir (JP16/INN); Acyclovir (USP); Sitavig (TN); Zovirax (TN) C8H11...Ophthalmic agents 1319 Others D00222 Aciclovir (JP16/INN); Acyclovir (USP) 6 Agents against pathologic organ...isms and parasites 62 Chemotherapeutics 625 Antivirals 6250 Antivirals D00222 Aciclov...SE D06BB Antivirals D06BB03 Aciclovir D00222 Aciclovir (JP16/INN); Acyclovir (USP...eosides and nucleotides excl. reverse transcriptase inhibitors J05AB01 Aciclovir D00222 Aciclovir (JP16/INN)

  8. Comparative study on the antiviral activity of selected monoterpenes derived from essential oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astani, Akram; Reichling, Jürgen; Schnitzler, Paul

    2010-05-01

    Essential oils are complex natural mixtures, their main constituents, e.g. terpenes and phenylpropanoids, being responsible for their biological properties. Essential oils from eucalyptus, tea tree and thyme and their major monoterpene compounds alpha-terpinene, gamma-terpinene, alpha-pinene, p-cymene, terpinen-4-ol, alpha-terpineol, thymol, citral and 1,8-cineole were examined for their antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in vitro. These essential oils were able to reduce viral infectivity by >96%, the monoterpenes inhibited HSV by about >80%. The mode of antiviral action has been determined, only moderate antiviral effects were revealed by essential oils and monoterpenes when these drugs were added to host cells prior to infection or after entry of HSV into cells. However, both essential oils and monoterpenes exhibited high anti-HSV-1 activity by direct inactivation of free virus particles. All tested drugs interacted in a dose-dependent manner with herpesvirus particles thereby inactivating viral infection. Among the analysed compounds, monoterpene hydrocarbons were slightly superior to monoterpene alcohols in their antiviral activity, alpha-pinene and alpha-terpineol revealed the highest selectivity index. However, mixtures of different monoterpenes present in natural tea tree essential oil revealed a ten-fold higher selectivity index and a lower toxicity than its isolated single monoterpenes. PMID:19653195

  9. Antiviral activity of constituents of Tamus communis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, R; Conti, C; De Simone, F; Orsi, N; Pizza, C; Stein, M L

    1991-10-01

    The antiviral activity of the phenanthrene derivatives 1-6, of the spyrostane triglycosides dioscin (7) and gracillin (8), of the furostanol tetraglycosides methylprotodioscin (9), its (25S) epimer methylprotoneodioscin (10), and methylprotogracillin 11, have been tested towards two RNA viruses: vesicular stomatitis virus and human rhinovirus type 1B. All these products were extracted from the rizomes of Tamus communis L; compound 11 was isolated also from Asparagus cochinchinesis, together with pseudoprotodioscin (12), a 20 (22)-unsaturated furostanoside, which was also investigated for antiviral activity. The results were of some interest mainly for the phenanthrene derivatives. PMID:1667189

  10. Drug: D00398 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D00398 Drug Valaciclovir hydrochloride (JAN); Valacyclovir hydrochloride (USAN); Va...tegory: 6250 ATC code: J05AB11 prodrug, active substance: Aciclovir [DR:D00222] DNA polymerase inhibitor Tra...erapeutics 625 Antivirals 6250 Antivirals D00398 Valaciclovir hydrochloride (JAN); Valacyclovir hydrochlorid...and nucleotides excl. reverse transcriptase inhibitors J05AB11 Valaciclovir D00398 Valaciclovir hydrochlorid...ntivirals Antiherpetic Agents Valacyclovir D00398 Valaciclovir hydrochloride (JAN); Valacyclovir hydrochlori

  11. Meeting report: 4th ISIRV antiviral group conference: Novel antiviral therapies for influenza and other respiratory viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKimm-Breschkin, Jennifer L; Fry, Alicia M

    2016-05-01

    The International Society for Influenza and other Respiratory Virus Diseases (isirv) held its 4th Antiviral Group Conference at the University of Texas on 2-4 June, 2015. With emerging resistance to the drugs currently licensed for treatment and prophylaxis of influenza viruses, primarily the neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir phosphate (Tamiflu) and the M2 inhibitors amantadine and rimantadine, and the lack of effective interventions against other respiratory viruses, the 3-day programme focused on the discovery and development of inhibitors of several virus targets and key host cell factors involved in virus replication or mediating the inflammatory response. Virus targets included the influenza haemagglutinin, neuraminidase and M2 proteins, and both the respiratory syncytial virus and influenza polymerases and nucleoproteins. Therapies for rhinoviruses and MERS and SARS coronaviruses were also discussed. With the emerging development of monoclonal antibodies as therapeutics, the potential implications of antibody-dependent enhancement of disease were also addressed. Topics covered all aspects from structural and molecular biology to preclinical and clinical studies. The importance of suitable clinical trial endpoints and regulatory issues were also discussed from the perspectives of both industry and government. This meeting summary provides an overview, not only for the conference participants, but also for those interested in the current status of antivirals for respiratory viruses. PMID:26872862

  12. Broad spectrum antiviral activity of favipiravir (T-705: protection from highly lethal inhalational Rift Valley Fever.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy L Caroline

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Development of antiviral drugs that have broad-spectrum activity against a number of viral infections would be of significant benefit. Due to the evolution of resistance to currently licensed antiviral drugs, development of novel anti-influenza drugs is in progress, including Favipiravir (T-705, which is currently in human clinical trials. T-705 displays broad-spectrum in vitro activity against a number of viruses, including Rift Valley Fever virus (RVFV. RVF is an important neglected tropical disease that causes human, agricultural, and economic losses in endemic regions. RVF has the capacity to emerge in new locations and also presents a potential bioterrorism threat. In the current study, the in vivo efficacy of T-705 was evaluated in Wistar-Furth rats infected with the virulent ZH501 strain of RVFV by the aerosol route. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Wistar-Furth rats are highly susceptible to a rapidly lethal disease after parenteral or inhalational exposure to the pathogenic ZH501 strain of RVFV. In the current study, two experiments were performed: a dose-determination study and a delayed-treatment study. In both experiments, all untreated control rats succumbed to disease. Out of 72 total rats infected with RVFV and treated with T-705, only 6 succumbed to disease. The remaining 66 rats (92% survived lethal infection with no significant weight loss or fever. The 6 treated rats that succumbed survived significantly longer before succumbing to encephalitic disease. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Currently, there are no licensed antiviral drugs for treating RVF. Here, T-705 showed remarkable efficacy in a highly lethal rat model of Rift Valley Fever, even when given up to 48 hours post-infection. This is the first study to show protection of rats infected with the pathogenic ZH501 strain of RVFV. Our data suggest that T-705 has potential to be a broad-spectrum antiviral drug.

  13. Viral genome imaging of hepatitis C virus to probe heterogeneous viral infection and responses to antiviral therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanan, Vyas; Trehan, Kartik; Ong, Mei-Lyn; Luna, Joseph M; Hoffmann, Hans-Heinrich; Espiritu, Christine; Sheahan, Timothy P; Chandrasekar, Hamsika; Schwartz, Robert E; Christine, Kathleen S; Rice, Charles M; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Bhatia, Sangeeta N

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive single-stranded RNA virus of enormous global health importance, with direct-acting antiviral therapies replacing an immunostimulatory interferon-based regimen. The dynamics of HCV positive and negative-strand viral RNAs (vRNAs) under antiviral perturbations have not been studied at the single-cell level, leaving a gap in our understanding of antiviral kinetics and host-virus interactions. Here, we demonstrate quantitative imaging of HCV genomes in multiple infection models, and multiplexing of positive and negative strand vRNAs and host antiviral RNAs. We capture the varying kinetics with which antiviral drugs with different mechanisms of action clear HCV infection, finding the NS5A inhibitor daclatasvir to induce a rapid decline in negative-strand viral RNAs. We also find that the induction of host antiviral genes upon interferon treatment is positively correlated with viral load in single cells. This study adds smFISH to the toolbox available for analyzing the treatment of RNA virus infections. PMID:27128351

  14. Drug: D08664 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D08664 Drug Valaciclovir (INN); Valacyclovir; Valtrex (TN) C13H20N6O4 324.1546 324....3357 D08664.gif Antiviral [DS:H00365] ATC code: J05AB11 prodrug, active substance: Aciclovir [DR:D00222] DNA...xcl. reverse transcriptase inhibitors J05AB11 Valaciclovir D08664 Valaciclovir (INN) USP drug classification... [BR:br08302] Antivirals Antiherpetic Agents Valacyclovir D08664 Valaciclovir (IN...ir [ATC:J05AB11] D08664 Valaciclovir (INN) CAS: 124832-26-4 PubChem: 96025347 DrugBank: DB00577 LigandBox: D

  15. IFN-gamma: Novel antiviral cytokines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ank, Nina; West, Hans; Paludan, Søren Riis

    2006-01-01

    adaptive immune responses. Recently, a novel class of cytokines was discovered and named IFN-lambda (alternatively type III IFN or interleukin-28/29 [IL- 28/29]), based on IFN-like antiviral activity and induction of typical IFN-inducible genes. Here, we review the literature on IFN-lambda and discuss the...

  16. The IKK Kinases: Operators of Antiviral Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alissa M. Pham

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability of a cell to combat an intracellular pathogen requires a mechanism to recognize the threat and elicit a transcriptional response against it. In the context of virus infection, the cell must take measures to inhibit viral replication, meanwhile, convey warning signals to neighboring cells of the imminent threat. This immune response is predominantly mediated by the production of cytokines, notably, interferon beta (IFNβ. IFNβ signaling results in the transcriptional induction of over one hundred antiviral gene products whose timely expression renders infected cells more capable of inhibiting virus replication, while providing the uninfected cells with the reinforcements to generate a less permissive cellular environment. Induction of IFNβ and many aspects of the antiviral response pivot on the function of the IKK and IKK-related kinases. Despite sharing high levels of homology and some degree of functional redundancy, the classic IKK kinases: IKKα and IKKβ, and the IKK-related kinases: TBK1 and IKKε, perform distinct roles in regulating the host antiviral defense. These kinases serve as molecular operators in their cooperative ability to integrate incoming cellular cues and act on a range of essential antiviral transcription factors to reshape the cellular transcriptome during infection.

  17. Anti-viral Responses in Insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although the study of anti-viral responses in insects has lagged behind studies of responses to other types of pathogens, progress has begun to rapidly accelerate over the past few years. Insects are subject to infection by many different kinds of DNA and RNA viruses. These include viruses that ar...

  18. Antiviral Prophylaxis and H1N1

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-07-14

    Dr. Richard Pebody, a consultant epidemiologist at the Health Protection Agency in London, UK, discusses the use of antiviral post-exposure prophylaxis and pandemic H1N1.  Created: 7/14/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 7/18/2011.

  19. Antiviral treatment in patients with cytomegalovirus positive ulcerative colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kadir; Ozturk

    2014-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus(CMV) is a common virus in patients with ulcerative colitis receiving immunosuppressive drugs. Many studies suggested that CMV infection is an exacerbating factor in patients with ulcerative colitis. The role of CMV in exacerbations of ulcerative colitis has been discussed. One of studies starting this discussion is an article entitled "CMV positive ulcerative colitis: A single center experience and literature review" by Kopylov et al. However, we think that there are some points that should be emphasized about the study. Especially, the small number of patients in the study has led to meaningless results. Large controlled prospective trials are needed to clarify the benefit of antiviral therapy for active ulcerative colitis patients.

  20. Drug: D00901 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D00901 Drug Rimantadine hydrochloride (USAN); Flumadine (TN) C12H21N. HCl 215.1441 215.7628 D009 ... TC code: J05AC02 Adamantane derivative Indication: Influenza ... A influenza ... A M2 proton channel blocker [VG:NC_004 ... P drug classification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Anti-influenza ... Agents Rimantadine D00901 Rimantadine hydrochlorid ...

  1. Drug: D06806 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D06806 Drug Measles virus vaccine live (USP) Immunizing agent [active] Component of... M-M-Vax (TN) map07044 Antiviral agents USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Immunological Agents Vaccines Measles... virus vaccine live D06806 Measles virus vaccine live (USP) PubChem: 47208457 ...

  2. 76 FR 42714 - Science Board Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Science Board Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY... public. Name of Committee: Science Board to the Food and Drug Administration (Science Board). General Function of the Committee: The Science Board provides advice primarily to the Commissioner of Food...

  3. 75 FR 37452 - Science Board Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Science Board Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY... public. Name of Committee: Science Board to the Food and Drug Administration (Science Board). General Function of the Committee: The Science Board provides advice primarily to the Commissioner of Food...

  4. 75 FR 65497 - Science Board Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Science Board Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY... to the public. Name of Committee: Science Board to the Food and Drug Administration (Science Board). General Function of the Committee: The Science Board provides advice primarily to the Commissioner of...

  5. Determination of Appropriate Dosing of Influenza Drugs in Pediatric Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Acosta, EP; Kimberlin, DW

    2010-01-01

    Dose-finding studies of influenza antiviral drugs are challenging because it is difficult to enroll subjects in pediatric interventional studies and also because of the lack of concentration (or toxicity)–response relationships, the short duration of antiviral therapy, and the continually developing metabolic profiles of infants and young children. The evaluation of influenza antiviral agents in premature infants adds even more complexity. Recent advances in exposure-targeted study designs an...

  6. Citizens Advisory Committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemnock, Suzanne K.

    1968-01-01

    This document contains the results of a national survey designed to determine the composition and location of permanent citizens advisory committees operating within the nation's school districts. The 52 district-wide, continuing citizens advisory bodies identified by 290 responding school systems are listed alphabetically by State. The following…

  7. The promise and progress of RNA-interference-based antiviral therapy for respiratory syncytial virus.

    OpenAIRE

    V. V. Vysochinskayа; E. V. Esaulenko; Bogdanov, A A; D. N. Ghorab; N. A. Кnyazev; Dubina, M. V.

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of morbidity in infants, young children, and the elderly worldwide. Presently, there are no explicit recommendations for RSV treatment apart from supportive care. Recent progress in studies of the mechanism of RNA interference suggests the formation of a new class of antiviral drugs in the treatment of RSV infection and related respiratory diseases.

  8. The promise and progress of RNA-interference-based antiviral therapy for respiratory syncytial virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Vysochinskayа

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is a major cause of morbidity in infants, young children, and the elderly worldwide. Presently, there are no explicit recommendations for RSV treatment apart from supportive care. Recent progress in studies of the mechanism of RNA interference suggests the formation of a new class of antiviral drugs in the treatment of RSV infection and related respiratory diseases.

  9. Design, synthesis, and antiviral properties of 2-aryl-lH-benzimidazole-4-carboxamide derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianjin LUO; Zhonglü ZHANG; Yutian YANG; Fei XUE; Naiyun XIU; Yuanbin SHE

    2009-01-01

    A series of new benzimidazole derivatives were designed and synthesized. Their chemical structures were testified by 1H NMR, infrared spectroscopy (IR), mass spectrography (MS), and elemental analysis. Their potent antiviral properties indicated the prospect of new drugs. Compound 13, 16, 18, 19, 21, 22, and 23 were identified as novel antivirus with much better selective activity and inhibitory activity than the comparable ribavirin against Coxsackie virus B3 in VERO cells.

  10. Treatment of norovirus infections: Moving antivirals from the bench to the bedside

    OpenAIRE

    Kaufman, Stuart S.; Green, Kim Y.; Korba, Brent E.

    2014-01-01

    Noroviruses (NV) are the most common cause of acute gastrointestinal illness in the United States and worldwide. The development of specific antiviral countermeasures has lagged behind that of other viral pathogens, primarily because norovirus disease has been perceived as brief and self-limiting and robust assays suitable for drug discovery have been lacking. The increasing recognition that NV illness can be life-threatening, especially in immunocompromised patients who often require prolong...

  11. Virus susceptibility and clinical effectiveness of anti-influenza drugs during the 2010–2011 influenza season in Russia

    OpenAIRE

    I.A. Leneva; E.I. Burtseva; S.B. Yatsyshina; I.T. Fedyakina; E.S. Kirillova; E.P. Selkova; Osipova, E.; V. V. Maleev

    2016-01-01

    Background: Antiviral drugs are critical adjuncts to influenza vaccination. This study determined the in vitro susceptibilities of influenza A and B viruses isolated in the 2010–2011 season in Russia to the neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir and the hemagglutinin fusion inhibitor umifenovir and clinical efficacy of this antiviral drugs in this season. Methods: The antiviral potency of these drugs against A(H1N1)pdm09 virus in mice was assessed. Importantly, the clinical effectiveness of o...

  12. Genetic diversity of the hepatitis C virus: Impact and issues in the antiviral therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H Le Guillou-Guillemette; S Vallet; C Gaudy-Graffin; C Payan; A Pivert; A Goudeau; F Lunel-Fabiani

    2007-01-01

    The hepatitis C Virus (HCV) presents a high degree of genetic variability which is explained by the combination of a lack of proof reading by the RNA dependant RNA polymerase and a high level of viral replication. The resuiting genetic polymorphism defines a classification in clades, genotypes, subtypes, isolates and quasispecies.This diversity is known to reflect the range of responses to Interferon therapy. The genotype is one of the predictive parameters currently used to define the antiviral treatment strategy and the chance of therapeutic success. Studies have also reported the potential impact of the viral genetic polymorphism in the outcome of antiviral therapy in patients infected by the same HCV genotype. Both structural and non structural genomic regions of HCV have been suggested to be involved in the Interferon pathway and the resistance to antiviral therapy. In this review, we first detail the viral basis of HCV diversity.Then, the HCV genetic regions that may be implicated in resistance to therapy are described, with a focus on the structural region encoded by the E2 gene and the non-structural genes NS3, NS5A and NS5B. Both mechanisms of the Interferon resistance and of the new antiviral drugs are described in this review.

  13. A High Throughput Assay for Screening Host Restriction Factors and Antivirals Targeting Influenza A Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingyan; Li, Wenjun; Li, Shitao

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is a human respiratory pathogen that causes seasonal epidemics and occasional global pandemics with devastating levels of morbidity and mortality. Currently approved treatments against influenza are losing effectiveness, as new viral strains are often refractory to conventional treatments. Thus, there is an urgent need to find new therapeutic targets with which to develop novel antiviral drugs. The common strategy to discover new drug targets and antivirals is high throughput screening. However, most current screenings for IAV rely on the engineered virus carrying a reporter, which prevents the application to newly emerging wild type flu viruses, such as 2009 pandemic H1N1 flu. Here we developed a simple and sensitive screening assay for wild type IAV by quantitatively analyzing viral protein levels using a Dot Blot Assay in combination with the LI-COR Imaging System (DBALIS). We first validated DBALIS in overexpression and RNAi assays, which are suitable methods for screening host factors regulating viral infection. More importantly, we also validated and initiated drug screening using DBALIS. A pilot compound screening identified a small molecule that inhibited IAV infection. Taken together, our method represents a reliable and convenient high throughput assay for screening novel host factors and antiviral compounds. PMID:27375580

  14. A High Throughput Assay for Screening Host Restriction Factors and Antivirals Targeting Influenza A Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingyan; Li, Wenjun; Li, Shitao

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is a human respiratory pathogen that causes seasonal epidemics and occasional global pandemics with devastating levels of morbidity and mortality. Currently approved treatments against influenza are losing effectiveness, as new viral strains are often refractory to conventional treatments. Thus, there is an urgent need to find new therapeutic targets with which to develop novel antiviral drugs. The common strategy to discover new drug targets and antivirals is high throughput screening. However, most current screenings for IAV rely on the engineered virus carrying a reporter, which prevents the application to newly emerging wild type flu viruses, such as 2009 pandemic H1N1 flu. Here we developed a simple and sensitive screening assay for wild type IAV by quantitatively analyzing viral protein levels using a Dot Blot Assay in combination with the LI-COR Imaging System (DBALIS). We first validated DBALIS in overexpression and RNAi assays, which are suitable methods for screening host factors regulating viral infection. More importantly, we also validated and initiated drug screening using DBALIS. A pilot compound screening identified a small molecule that inhibited IAV infection. Taken together, our method represents a reliable and convenient high throughput assay for screening novel host factors and antiviral compounds. PMID:27375580

  15. Indian marine bivalves: Potential source of antiviral drugs

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chatterji, A.; Ansari, Z.A.; Ingole, B.S.; Bichurina, M.A.; Sovetova, M.; Boikov, Y.A.

    ( Crassostrea gryphoides ) and clam (Meretrix casta , M. meretrix , Paphia malabarica , Villorita cypr i noides ) . Recent investigations conducted jointly by Russian and Indian scientists showed that Indian green mussels ( P. viridis... prophyla c tic effect has been observed in mice when a dose of mussel extract was given 5 h before inoculation of v i rus 3 and the mice showed 100% survival. Marine bivalves are filter - feeding animals, and while feeding they accumulate...

  16. Pandemic influenza: overview of vaccines and antiviral drugs.

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Manon M. J.

    2005-01-01

    Pandemic influenza has become a high priority item for all public health authorities. An influenza pandemic is believed to be imminent, and scientists agree that it will be a matter of when, where, and what will be the causative agent. Recently, most attention has been directed to human cases of avian influenza caused by a H5N1 avian influenza virus. An effective vaccine will be needed to substantially reduce the impact of an influenza pandemic. Current influenza vaccine manufacturing technol...

  17. Acyclic nucleoside phosphonates: A key class of antiviral drugs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    De Clercq, E.; Holý, Antonín

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 13 (2005), 928-940. ISSN 1474-1776 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : tenofovir * adefovir * cidofovir Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 18.775, year: 2005

  18. Clinical Implications of Antiviral Resistance in Influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy C. M. Li

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Influenza is a major cause of severe respiratory infections leading to excessive hospitalizations and deaths globally; annual epidemics, pandemics, and sporadic/endemic avian virus infections occur as a result of rapid, continuous evolution of influenza viruses. Emergence of antiviral resistance is of great clinical and public health concern. Currently available antiviral treatments include four neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir, zanamivir, peramivir, laninamivir, M2-inibitors (amantadine, rimantadine, and a polymerase inhibitor (favipiravir. In this review, we focus on resistance issues related to the use of neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs. Data on primary resistance, as well as secondary resistance related to NAI exposure will be presented. Their clinical implications, detection, and novel therapeutic options undergoing clinical trials are discussed.

  19. An antiviral furanoquinone from Paulownia tomentosa Steud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, K H; Huh, H; Kim, B K; Lee, C K

    1999-11-01

    A methanol extract of the stem bark of Paulownia tomentosa showed antiviral activity against poliovirus types 1 and 3. Sequential liquid-liquid extraction with n-hexane, chloroform and water, and a silicagel column chromatography resulted in the purification of a compound. The compound was identified as methyl-5-hydroxy-dinaphthol[1,2-2',3']furan-7,12-dione-6-carbox yla te on the basis of spectroscopic data. The component caused a significant reduction of viral cytopathic effect when it was subjected to a standard antiviral assay by using HeLa cells. The EC(50) of the compound against poliovirus type 1 strain Brunhilde, and type 3 strain Leon were 0.3 microg/mL and 0.6 microg/mL, respectively. PMID:10548761

  20. RNAi: antiviral therapy against dengue virus

    OpenAIRE

    Idrees, Sobia; Ashfaq, Usman A

    2013-01-01

    Dengue virus infection has become a global threat affecting around 100 countries in the world. Currently, there is no licensed antiviral agent available against dengue. Thus, there is a strong need to develop therapeutic strategies that can tackle this life threatening disease. RNA interference is an important and effective gene silencing process which degrades targeted RNA by a sequence specific process. Several studies have been conducted during the last decade to evaluate the efficiency of...

  1. Strategies to develop antivirals against enterovirus 71

    OpenAIRE

    Kuo, Rei-Lin; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2013-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is an important human pathogen which may cause severe neurological complications and death in children. The virus caused several outbreaks in the Asia-Pacific region during the past two decades and has been considered a significant public health problem in the post-poliovirus eradication era. Unlike poliovirus, there is no effective vaccine or approved antivirals against EV71. To explore anti-EV71 agents therefore is of vital importance. Several strategies have been empl...

  2. Antiviral and Immunostimulant Activities of Andrographis paniculata

    OpenAIRE

    Churiyah; Olivia Bunga Pongtuluran; Elrade Rofaani; Tarwadi,

    2015-01-01

    Andrographis paniculata (Burm. f.) Nees is a medicinal plant which was reported to have anti HIV, anti pathogenic bacteria and immunoregulatory activities. The research purpose was to investigate the activity of Andrographis paniculata ethanol extract as antiviral and immunostimulant. A. paniculata leaves oven-dried, then grinded and macerated with ethanol 90%, and the extract then analyzed using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) to determine the content of active compounds androg...

  3. 76 FR 75874 - Technology Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    ... COMMISSION Technology Advisory Committee AGENCY: Commodity Futures Trading Commission (``CFTC''). ACTION: Notice of Meeting of Technology Advisory Committee. SUMMARY: The Technology Advisory Committee will hold..., attention: Office of the Secretary. Please use the title ``Technology Advisory Committee'' in any...

  4. 76 FR 8715 - Technology Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... COMMISSION Technology Advisory Committee AGENCY: Commodity Futures Trading Commission (``CFTC''). ACTION: Notice of meeting of Technology Advisory Committee. SUMMARY: The Technology Advisory Committee will hold...: Office of the Secretary. Please use the title ``Technology Advisory Committee'' in any written...

  5. 78 FR 77689 - Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-24

    ... Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide... Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... published a proposed rule (44 FR 50520) for classification of iontophoresis devices for specialized...

  6. 77 FR 12064 - Radiological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Radiological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory... Devices Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and recommendations to... April 9, 2009 (74 FR 16214), for breast transilluminators, one of the remaining preamendments class...

  7. 78 FR 20328 - Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee: Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-04

    ... Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee scheduled for April 5, 2013. The meeting was announced in the Federal Register of November 29, 2012 (77 FR 71195). The meeting... Devices Advisory Committee: Notice of Postponement of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration,...

  8. 78 FR 77688 - Ophthalmic Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Ophthalmic Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Ophthalmic Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and recommendations...

  9. 76 FR 6625 - Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory... Devices Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and recommendations to... Embolization Device (PED), sponsored by Chestnut Medical. The PED is indicated for the endovascular...

  10. 78 FR 13350 - Ophthalmic Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Ophthalmic Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Ophthalmic Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and recommendations...

  11. 75 FR 44273 - Radiological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Radiological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Radiological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and recommendations...

  12. 76 FR 48871 - Immunology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Immunology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Immunology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and recommendations...

  13. 77 FR 71195 - Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-29

    ... Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide... Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... July 6, 2012 (77 FR 39953), FDA issued a proposed rule which, if made final, would make...

  14. 75 FR 72832 - Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and recommendations...

  15. 77 FR 73034 - Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and recommendations...

  16. 77 FR 7589 - Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and ] recommendations...

  17. 75 FR 35495 - Ophthalmic Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Ophthalmic Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Ophthalmic Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and recommendations...

  18. 76 FR 55398 - Immunology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee: Notice of Postponement of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Immunology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory... of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee scheduled for October 14, 2011. The meeting was announced in the Federal Register of August 9, 2011 (76 FR 48871). The meeting is postponed so that FDA...

  19. 78 FR 66942 - Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    ... Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide... Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... device is intended to climb stairs. On June 12, 2013 (78 FR 35173), FDA issued a proposed order which,...

  20. 78 FR 27971 - Dental Products Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Dental Products Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Dental Products Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and recommendations...

  1. 77 FR 42503 - Ophthalmic Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Ophthalmic Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Ophthalmic Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and recommendations...

  2. 77 FR 61768 - Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and recommendations...

  3. 77 FR 50701 - Radiological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Radiological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Radiological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and recommendations...

  4. 77 FR 14769 - Meeting of the Uniform Formulary Beneficiary Advisory Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-13

    ... Department of Defense (DoD) announces the following Federal Advisory Committee meeting of the Uniform... Formulary Beneficiary Advisory Panel, 4130 Stanley Road, Suite 208, Building 1000, San Antonio, TX 78234...: Dipeptidyl Peptidase--4(DPP-4) Inhibitors. d. Designated Newly Approved Drugs in Already-Reviewed Classes....

  5. 78 FR 48438 - Pediatric Ethics Subcommittee of the Pediatric Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Ethics Subcommittee of the Pediatric Advisory... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Subcommittee: Pediatric Ethics Subcommittee... recommendations to the Pediatric Advisory Committee on pediatric ethical issues. Date and Time: The meeting...

  6. 78 FR 44133 - Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    ... and gene therapy products. CBER is planning to publish guidance on this topic during calendar year... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory...

  7. 75 FR 66381 - Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-28

    ... Lentiviral Vector Based Gene Therapy Products. FDA intends to make background material available to the... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory...

  8. 76 FR 81513 - Cellular, Tissue, and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue, and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee..., Tissue, and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and... Gene Therapies, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, FDA. FDA intends to make...

  9. 77 FR 65693 - Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Amendment of Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-30

    ... Administration (FDA) is announcing an amendment to the notice of a meeting of the Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee. This meeting was announced in the Federal Register of October 17, 2012 (77 FR... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory...

  10. 76 FR 64951 - Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory...

  11. 76 FR 22405 - Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-21

    ... gene therapy products for the treatment of retinal disorders. Topics to be considered include the... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory...

  12. 76 FR 49774 - Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory...

  13. 77 FR 63840 - Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee..., Tissue and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and... in open session to hear updates of research programs in the Gene Transfer and Immunogenicity...

  14. 76 FR 3639 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... selection of strains to be included in the influenza virus vaccine for the 2011-2012 influenza season....

  15. 75 FR 2876 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... selection of strains to be included in the influenza virus vaccine for the 2010 - 2011 influenza season....

  16. 78 FR 5465 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee... strains to be included in the influenza virus vaccine for the 2013- 2014 influenza season. FDA intends...

  17. 76 FR 2398 - Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee; Notice of... the meeting will be closed to the public. Name of Committee: Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory.... Location: Center for Tobacco Products, 9200 Corporate Blvd., Rockville, MD 20850. The phone number is...

  18. 76 FR 10609 - Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee; Amendment of Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-25

    ...) is announcing an amendment to the notice of a meeting of the Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee. This meeting was announced in the Federal Register of January 26, 2011 (76 FR 4705). The... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee; Amendment...

  19. 76 FR 4705 - Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee; Notice of... the meeting will be closed to the public. Name of Committee: Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory.... Location: Center for Tobacco Products, 9200 Corporate Blvd., Rockville, MD, 20850. The telephone number...

  20. 77 FR 7589 - Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee; Notice of... the meeting will be closed to the public. Name of Committee: Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory.... to 5 p.m., and on March 2, 2012, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Location: Center for Tobacco Products,...

  1. TDP1 repairs nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage induced by chain-terminating anticancer and antiviral nucleoside analogs

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Shar-yin N.; Murai, Junko; Dalla Rosa, Ilaria; Dexheimer, Thomas S.; Naumova, Alena; Gmeiner, William H.; Pommier, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Chain-terminating nucleoside analogs (CTNAs) that cause stalling or premature termination of DNA replication forks are widely used as anticancer and antiviral drugs. However, it is not well understood how cells repair the DNA damage induced by these drugs. Here, we reveal the importance of tyrosyl–DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1) in the repair of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage induced by CTNAs. On investigating the effects of four CTNAs—acyclovir (ACV), cytarabine (Ara-C), zidovudine (AZT...

  2. In Vitro Antiviral Effect of "Nanosilver" on Influenza Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Mehrbod

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Influenza is a viral infectious disease with frequent seasonal epidemics causing world-wide economical and social effects. Due to antigenic shifts and drifts of influenza virus, long-lasting vaccine has not been developed so far. The current annual vaccines and effective antiviral drugs are not available sufficiently. Therefore in order to prevent spread of infectious agents including viruses, antiseptics are considered by world health authorities. Small particles of silver have a long history as general antiseptic and disinfectant. Silver does not induce resistance in microorganisms and this ability in Nano-size is stronger. Materials and methods: The aim of this study was to determine antiviral effects of Nanosilver against influenza virus. TCID50 (50% Tissue Culture Infectious Dose of the virus as well as CC50 (50% Cytotoxic Concentration of Nanosilver was obtained by MTT (3- [4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide, Sigma method. This compound was non-toxic to MDCK (Madin-Darbey Canin Kidney cells at concentration up to 1 µg/ml.  Effective minimal cytotoxic concentration and 100 TCID50 of the virus were added to the confluent cells.  Inhibitory effects of Nanosilver on the virus and its cytotoxicity were assessed at different temperatures using Hemagglutination (HA assay, RT-PCR (Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction, and DIF (Direct Immunofluorescent. RT-PCR and free band densitometry software were used to compare the volume of the PCR product bands on the gel. Results and Discussion:  In this study it was found that Nanosilver has destructive effect on the virus membrane glycoprotein knobs as well as the cells.

  3. Drug: D02734 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D02734 Drug Abacavir succinate (USAN) C14H18N6O. C4H6O4 404.1808 404.4204 D02734.gi...ry the HLA-B*5701 allele are at high risk for experiencing a hypersensitivity reaction to Abacavir RNA-direc...scriptase inhibitors J05AF06 Abacavir D02734 Abacavir succinate (USAN) USP drug c...lassification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Anti-HIV Agents, Nucleoside and Nucleotide Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NRTI)v Abacavir... D02734 Abacavir succinate (USAN) Antiinfectives [BR:br08307] Antivirals Anti-HIV agen

  4. Drug: D07057 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D07057 Drug Abacavir (INN) C14H18N6O 286.1542 286.3323 D07057.gif Antiviral [DS:H00...the HLA-B*5701 allele are at high risk for experiencing a hypersensitivity reaction to Abacavir RNA-directed...iptase inhibitors J05AF06 Abacavir D07057 Abacavir (INN) USP drug classification ...[BR:br08302] Antivirals Anti-HIV Agents, Nucleoside and Nucleotide Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NRTI)v Abacavir D07057 Abacavir...nhibitor (RTI) Nucleoside and nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) Abacavir

  5. Drug: D03656 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D03656 Drug Darunavir (USAN/INN) C27H37N3O7S 547.2352 547.6636 D03656.gif Treatment...tease inhibitors J05AE10 Darunavir D03656 Darunavir (USAN/INN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Antivira...ls Anti-HIV Agents, Protease Inhibitors Darunavir D03656 Darunavir (USAN/INN) Ant...iinfectives [BR:br08307] Antivirals Anti-HIV agent Protease inhibitor (PIs) Nonpeptidic Darunavir [ATC:J05AE10] D03656 Daruna

  6. Assessment of Antiviral Properties of Peramivir against H7N9 Avian Influenza Virus in an Experimental Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqui, Amber; Huang, Linxi; Wu, Suwu; Cai, Yingmu; Su, Min; Lin, Pengzhou; Chen, Weihong; Fang, Xibin; Zhang, Li; Liu, Yisu; Zeng, Tiansheng; Paquette, Stephane G; Khan, Adnan; Kelvin, Alyson A; Kelvin, David J

    2015-12-01

    The H7N9 influenza virus causes a severe form of disease in humans. Neuraminidase inhibitors, including oral oseltamivir and injectable peramivir, are the first choices of antiviral treatment for such cases; however, the clinical efficacy of these drugs is questionable. Animal experimental models are essential for understanding the viral replication kinetics under the selective pressure of antiviral agents. This study demonstrates the antiviral activity of peramivir in a mouse model of H7N9 avian influenza virus infection. The data show that repeated administration of peramivir at 30 mg/kg of body weight successfully eradicated the virus from the respiratory tract and extrapulmonary tissues during the acute response, prevented clinical signs of the disease, including neuropathy, and eventually protected mice against lethal H7N9 influenza virus infection. Early treatment with peramivir was found to be associated with better disease outcomes. PMID:26369969

  7. Algae Bloom Advisories 2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Only a fraction of all water bodies in Oregon are monitored due to limited physical and monetary resources. A water body with no advisory is not an indication that...

  8. The Plagiarism Advisory Service

    OpenAIRE

    Duggan, Fiona

    2003-01-01

    The issue of plagiarism in education has existed for many years, however, advances in technology resulting in easy access to a multitude of information sources has reduced the effort required to incorporate the work of others into an essay or report. A Plagiarism Advisory Service has been established to provide advice and guidance on all aspects of plagiarism prevention and detection. This article presents the background to the Advisory Service and the associated electronic Plagiarism Detecti...

  9. Modulation of alpha-interferon's antiviral and clinical effects by aspirin, acetaminophen, and prednisone in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, C W; Petty, B G; Woods, A; Kuwahara, S K; Witter, F R; Soo, W; Griffin, D E; Lietman, P S

    1995-10-01

    The magnitude and duration of the antiviral and clinical effect of alpha-interferon was measured in healthy volunteers. A single 3 million unit intramuscular dose of interferon was given either alone (controls) or after 72 h of concomitant medications. These medications included either aspirin (650 mg every 4 h), acetaminophen (650 mg every 4 h), or prednisone (40 mg per day). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were assayed for resistance to vesicular stomatitis virus infection and induction of 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase activity as evidence of interferon's antiviral effect. Co-administration of acetaminophen increased both antiviral parameters by more than 70% (P acetaminophen, aspirin, and prednisone reduced the clinical symptoms by 47% compared to controls (P = 0.03) after interferon dosing, although individual drug comparisons failed to reach statistical significance. Independent of treatment group, the changes in antiviral markers after interferon dosing correlated closely with each other (r = 0.72, P 0.05). Acetaminophen enhances the antiviral effects of a single intramuscular dose of alpha-interferon, considering the parameters measured in these healthy volunteers. PMID:8585766

  10. Potent in vitro antiviral activity of Cistus incanus extract against HIV and Filoviruses targets viral envelope proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebensburg, Stephanie; Helfer, Markus; Schneider, Martha; Koppensteiner, Herwig; Eberle, Josef; Schindler, Michael; Gürtler, Lutz; Brack-Werner, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Novel therapeutic options are urgently needed to improve global treatment of virus infections. Herbal products with confirmed clinical safety features are attractive starting material for the identification of new antiviral activities. Here we demonstrate that Cistus incanus (Ci) herbal products inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections in vitro. Ci extract inhibited clinical HIV-1 and HIV-2 isolates, and, importantly, a virus isolate with multiple drug resistances, confirming broad anti-HIV activity. Antiviral activity was highly selective for virus particles, preventing primary attachment of the virus to the cell surface and viral envelope proteins from binding to heparin. Bioassay-guided fractionation indicated that Ci extract contains numerous antiviral compounds and therefore has favorably low propensity to induce virus resistance. Indeed, no resistant viruses emerged during 24 weeks of continuous propagation of the virus in the presence of Ci extracts. Finally, Ci extracts also inhibited infection by virus particles pseudotyped with Ebola and Marburg virus envelope proteins, indicating that antiviral activity of Ci extract extends to emerging viral pathogens. These results demonstrate that Ci extracts show potent and broad in vitro antiviral activity against viruses that cause life-threatening diseases in humans and are promising sources of agents that target virus particles. PMID:26833261

  11. Anti-viral RNA silencing: do we look like plants ?

    OpenAIRE

    Lecellier Charles-Henri; Saumet Anne

    2006-01-01

    Abstract The anti-viral function of RNA silencing was first discovered in plants as a natural manifestation of the artificial 'co-suppression', which refers to the extinction of endogenous gene induced by homologous transgene. Because silencing components are conserved among most, if not all, eukaryotes, the question rapidly arose as to determine whether this process fulfils anti-viral functions in animals, such as insects and mammals. It appears that, whereas the anti-viral process seems to ...

  12. Antiviral therapy for hepatitis C: Has anything changed for pregnant/lactating women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spera, Anna Maria; Eldin, Tarek Kamal; Tosone, Grazia; Orlando, Raffaele

    2016-04-28

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) affects about 3% of the world's population, with the highest prevalence in individuals under 40. The prevalence in pregnant women varies with geographical distribution (highest in developing countries). Prevalence also increases in sub-populations of women at high risk for blood-transmitted infections. HCV infection in pregnancy represents a non-negligible problem. However, most of the past antiviral regimens cannot be routinely offered to pregnant or breastfeeding women because of their side effects. We briefly reviewed the issue of treatment of HCV infection in pregnant/breastfeeding women focusing on the effects of the new direct-acting antivirals on fertility, pregnancy and lactation in animal studies and on the potential risk for humans based on the pharmacokinetic properties of each drug. Currently, all new therapy regimens are contraindicated in this setting because of lack of sufficient safety information and adequate measures of contraception are still routinely recommended for female patients of childbearing potential. PMID:27134703

  13. Antiviral effect of lithium chloride on infection of cells by porcine parvovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ye; Yan, Huichao; Zheng, Hao; Shi, Yuzhen; Sun, Lingsuang; Wang, Chong; Sun, Jingchen

    2015-04-01

    Porcine parvovirus (PPV) causes reproductive failure in pigs, which leads to economic losses to the industry. As reported previously, LiCl efficiently impairs the replication of a variety of viruses, including the coronavirus infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), and pseudorabies herpesvirus. We demonstrate for the first time that inhibition of PPV replication in swine testis (ST) cells by LiCl is dose-dependent, and that the antiviral effect of LiCl occurred in the early phase of PPV replication. These results indicate that LiCl might be an effective anti-PPV drug to control PPV disease. Further studies are required to explore the mechanism of the antiviral effect of LiCl on PPV infection in vivo. PMID:25663217

  14. 77 FR 25183 - Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices... the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and... Commissioner for Special Medical Programs. BILLING CODE 4160-01-P...

  15. 76 FR 38668 - Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    ... Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice... Science and Clinical Pharmacology. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and... April 13, 2010, Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology...

  16. 78 FR 104 - Advisory Committees; Tentative Schedule of Meetings for 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-02

    ... dates to be determined. Cardiovascular and Renal Drugs Advisory April 17 and other date(s) to Committee.... Devices Panel. Hematology and Pathology Devices Panel. Date(s), if needed, to be determined....

  17. 75 FR 80059 - Advisory Committees; Tentative Schedule of Meetings for 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-21

    ... Committee..... April 27-29. Arthritis Advisory Committee March 15-16, May 3. Cardiovascular and Renal Drugs... Personal Use July 29. Devices Panel. Hematology and Pathology Devices Panel. March 24-25, June...

  18. 75 FR 30002 - Federal Advisory Committee; Threat Reduction Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ... Office of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; Threat Reduction Advisory Committee AGENCY... the charter for the Threat Reduction Advisory Committee (hereafter referred to as the Committee). FOR... Acquisition, Technology and Logistics and the Director of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency on the...

  19. 75 FR 60430 - Federal Advisory Committee; Threat Reduction Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    ... of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; Threat Reduction Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of... announces a meeting of the Threat Reduction Advisory Committee (hereafter referred to as ``the Committee..., October 21, 2010, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Heritage...

  20. Antiviral Activity of Euphorbia helioscopia Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ramezani

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the antiviral effects of Euphorbia helioscopia extracts were investigated using plaque reduction assay. Plant extracts were prepared using Soxhlet apparatus or by maceration in methanol. After applying several enriching stages of phage CP51, phage titration was performed to determine the phage concentration in phage lysate for specifying the dilution factor of the phage to be used as negative control for the next working stages. Then IC50 of trifluridine, as a positive control, for phage CP51 was determined. The MIC of the extracts for Bacillus cereus was determined as 1.25 and 0.5 mg mL-1 for Soxhlet and maceration extracts, respectively. To determine whether the extracts have the ability to inhibit the adsorption of virus to host cell, it was pre-incubated with phage CP51 for 30 min at 25°C. The growth and reproduction of phage was inhibited by more than 50% at concentration of 1 and 0.25 mg mL-1, respectively. In order to test the effects of extract on transcription process, Bacillus cereus, phage CP51 and extract were incubated together. The growth and reproduction of phage was inhibited by more than 50% at concentration of 0.75 and 0.125 mg mL-1 or Soxhlet and macerated extracts, respectively. These results indicated that both extracts of E. helioscopia have considerable antiviral activity.

  1. Antiviral and Immunostimulant Activities of Andrographis paniculata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Churiyah

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Andrographis paniculata (Burm. f. Nees is a medicinal plant which was reported to have anti HIV, anti pathogenic bacteria and immunoregulatory activities. The research purpose was to investigate the activity of Andrographis paniculata ethanol extract as antiviral and immunostimulant. A. paniculata leaves oven-dried, then grinded and macerated with ethanol 90%, and the extract then analyzed using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC to determine the content of active compounds andrographolide. The antiviral activity of the extract was determined by observing its ability on inhibiting virus load in A549 cells transfected with Simian Retro Virus (SRV by Real Time – Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR analysis. The immunostimulant activity of extract was determined by its ability to induce lymphocytes cell proliferation using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Our result indicated that the A. paniculata ethanol extract inhibited the SRV virus titer similar to the positive control Lamivudine, and it was not toxic to the A459 cell line. Furthermore, low concentration (1 μg/mL of A. paniculata extract could stimulated lymphocyte cell proliferation about 38% compared to the control lymphocyte cell without any treatment.

  2. 77 FR 38065 - The President's Management Advisory Board (PMAB); Notification of Upcoming Public Advisory Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-26

    ... management, IT vendor performance management, Senior Executive Service (SES) leadership development and SES... ADMINISTRATION The President's Management Advisory Board (PMAB); Notification of Upcoming Public Advisory Meeting.... SUMMARY: The President's Management Advisory Board (PMAB), a Federal Advisory Committee established...

  3. 76 FR 53901 - The President's Management Advisory Board (PMAB); Notification of Upcoming Public Advisory Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-30

    ... management, SES leadership development, and SES performance appraisal systems. The meeting minutes will be... ADMINISTRATION The President's Management Advisory Board (PMAB); Notification of Upcoming Public Advisory Meeting.... SUMMARY: The President's Management Advisory Board (PMAB), a Federal Advisory Committee established...

  4. An innate antiviral pathway acting before interferons at epithelial surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Marie B; Reinert, Line S; Thomsen, Martin K;

    2015-01-01

    we identify an innate antiviral pathway that works at epithelial surfaces before the IFNs. The pathway is activated independently of known innate sensors of viral infections through a mechanism dependent on viral O-linked glycans, which induce CXCR3 chemokines and stimulate antiviral activity in a...

  5. An initial assessment of correlations between host- and virus-related factors affecting analogues antiviral therapy in HBV chronically infected patients

    OpenAIRE

    Stalke, Piotr; Rybicka, Magda; Wróblewska, Anna; Dreczewski, Marcin; Stracewska, Ewa; Smiatacz, Tomasz; Bielawski, Krzysztof Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Background Success in treating hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection with nucleoside analogues drugs is limited by the emergence of drug-resistant viral strains upon prolonged therapy. In addition to mutation patterns in the viral polymerase gene, host factors are assumed to contribute to failure of treatment in chronic HBV infections. The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation between efficacy of antiviral therapy and the prevalence of HBV pretreatment drug-resistant variants. We also ...

  6. 75 FR 14176 - National Institute on Drug Abuse; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute on Drug Abuse; Notice of Meeting... hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse. The meeting will be open to the... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse....

  7. 76 FR 81952 - National Institute on Drug Abuse; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute on Drug Abuse; Notice of Meeting... hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse. The meeting will be open to the... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse....

  8. 76 FR 2697 - National Institute on Drug Abuse; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute on Drug Abuse; Notice of Meeting... ] hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse. The meeting will be open to the... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse....

  9. 77 FR 52752 - National Institute on Drug Abuse; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute on Drug Abuse; Notice of Meeting... hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse. The meeting will be open to the... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse....

  10. 77 FR 22581 - National Institute on Drug Abuse; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute on Drug Abuse; Notice of Meeting... hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse. The meeting will be open to the... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse....

  11. 75 FR 42100 - National Institute on Drug Abuse; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute on Drug Abuse; Notice of Meeting... hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse. The meeting will be open to the... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse....

  12. EVA copolymer matrix for intra-oral delivery of antimicrobial and antiviral agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadevi, A; Padmavathy, T; Stigall, G; Paquette, D; Kalachandra, S

    2008-02-01

    Biocompatible ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) was utilized to study the release of an antiviral drug (acyclovir (ACY)) and an antimicrobial drug (doxycycline hyclate (DOH)). Release of both drugs from EVA was measured individually and in combination. The effect of drug combination of DOH and ACY is presented. Additionally, the release rate of DOH after coating of the matrix with a different copolymer, in drug-loading with increasing loads of DOH, and with increases in temperature are also presented. The drugs incorporated in EVA films were prepared from the dry sheet obtained by solvent evaporation of polymer casting solutions with drugs. Drug release from the films was examined for about 12 days in distilled water at 37 degrees C. Changes in optical density were followed spectrophotometrically. The combination of ACY and DOH resulted in an increased release of ACY by about three times (P < 0.001) while DOH showed a decrease in rate of about two times compared to the individual release rates (P = 0.008). Increases in drug levels of DOH resulted in increases in drug release rates (P = 0.001). The release rate of DOH increased with temperature (P = .001; 27, 32, 37 and 42 degrees C were studied) and the energy of activation (DeltaE ( not equal) = 56.69 kJ/mol) was calculated using the Arrhenius equation for the diffusion of DOH molecules. Thus, the release rates of drugs were influenced by many factors: drug combination, coating the device, drug-loading, and temperature variation. Therefore it is proposed that controlling these variables should make it possible to obtain therapeutic levels of drugs released from drug loaded polymer, which may be beneficial in treating oral infections. PMID:17619973

  13. Drug: D03001 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D03001 Drug Atevirdine mesylate (USAN) C21H25N5O2. CH4SO3 475.1889 475.5612 D03001.gif Antiviral nonnucleosi...de reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) RNA-directed DNA polymerase inhibitor [K

  14. Drug: D09012 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 7 679.8493 D09012.gif Treatment of hepatitis [DS:H00413] Therapeutic category: 6250 ATC code: J05AE11 hepatitis...vir D09012 Telaprevir (JAN/USAN/INN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Anti-hepatitis C (HCV)

  15. Drug: D04553 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sponse modifier [DS:H00004 H00021 H00034 H00038 H00045] USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Anti-hepatitis... B (HBV) Agents Interferon Alfa-n3 D04553 Interferon alfa-n3 (USAN) Anti-hepatitis C (HCV) Agents

  16. Drug: D00423 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available bavirin (JAN/USP/INN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Anti-hepatitis B (HBV) Agents Ribaviri...n D00423 Ribavirin (JAN/USP/INN) Anti-hepatitis C (HCV) Agents Ribavirin D00423 Ribavirin (JAN/USP/INN) Anti

  17. Drug: D02747 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available te: 31; 121; 131; 134) Peptide Treatment of hepatitis C Therapeutic category: 6399 ATC code: L03AB11 R: Inte...ation) (JAN); Peginterferon alfa-2a (USAN/INN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Anti-hepatitis...rferon alfa-2a (USAN/INN) Anti-hepatitis C (HCV) Agents Peginterferon Alfa-2a D02

  18. Drug: D06676 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D06676 Drug Raltegravir (USAN/INN); MK-0518 C20H21FN6O5 444.1557 444.4163 D06676.gif Antivirals ... [DS:H00406] ATC code: J05AX08 HIV -1 integrase inhibitor Enzyme: UGT1A1 [HSA:54658] m ... ap07053 Anti-HIV ... agents Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) class ...

  19. Drug: D08605 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D08605 Drug Tipranavir (INN); Aptivus (TN) C31H33F3N2O5S 602.2062 602.6643 D08605.gif Antiviral; ... HIV ... protease inhibitor; Nonpeptidic [DS:H00406] ATC co ... de: J05AE09 HIV ... protease inhibitor [CPD:C19849] Enzyme: CYP3A [HSA ...

  20. Drug: D03837 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D03837 Drug Fosamprenavir sodium (USAN) C25H34N3O9PS. 2Na 629.1549 629.5705 D03837.gif Antiviral ... [HIV ... protease inhibitor] [DS:H00406] ATC code: J05AE07 ... prodrug, active substance: Amprenavir [DR:D00894] HIV ... protease inhibitor [CPD:C19849] Enzyme: CYP3A4 [HS ...

  1. Drug: D00902 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D00902 Drug Zanamivir (USAN/INN); Relenza (TN) C12H20N4O7 332.1332 332.3098 D00902.gif Antiviral ... ; Inhibitor [influenza ... virus neuraminidase] [DS:H00398] Same as: C08095 A ... TC code: J05AH01 Indication: Influenza ... A and B influenza virus A, B neuraminidase inhibito ...

  2. Drug: D03829 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D03829 Drug Peramivir hydrate (JAN); Peramivir (USAN/INN) C15H28N4O4. 3H2O 382.2427 382.4531 D03 ... 829.gif Treatment and prevention of influenza ... A and B viruses [neuraminidase inhibitor] [DS:H003 ... 98] Therapeutic category: 6250 influenza virus A, B neuraminidase inhibitor map07044 Antivir ...

  3. Drug: D07989 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D07989 Drug Fomivirsen (INN) C204H243N63O114P20S20 6657.4321 6662.2412 Antisense antiviral used in the thera...py of cytomegalovirus retinitis [DS:H00368] ATC code: S01AD08 Antisense oligonucleo

  4. 76 FR 46304 - Pediatric Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-02

    ... Transcatheter Pulmonary Valve and Ensemble Delivery System. FDA intends to make background material available to... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY:...

  5. Targeting dengue virus NS4B protein for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xuping; Zou, Jing; Wang, Qing-Yin; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2015-06-01

    The flavivirus nonstructural 4B protein (NS4B) has recently emerged as a valid antiviral target for drug discovery. Here we review (i) the current understanding of the structure and function of DENV NS4B, (ii) the approaches that have been taken to identify NS4B inhibitors, and (iii) the known inhibitors of flavivirus NS4B protein. This article forms part of a symposium in Antiviral Research on flavivirus drug discovery. PMID:25796970

  6. Hepatitis C virus cell-cell transmission and resistance to direct-acting antiviral agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Xiao

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is transmitted between hepatocytes via classical cell entry but also uses direct cell-cell transfer to infect neighboring hepatocytes. Viral cell-cell transmission has been shown to play an important role in viral persistence allowing evasion from neutralizing antibodies. In contrast, the role of HCV cell-cell transmission for antiviral resistance is unknown. Aiming to address this question we investigated the phenotype of HCV strains exhibiting resistance to direct-acting antivirals (DAAs in state-of-the-art model systems for cell-cell transmission and spread. Using HCV genotype 2 as a model virus, we show that cell-cell transmission is the main route of viral spread of DAA-resistant HCV. Cell-cell transmission of DAA-resistant viruses results in viral persistence and thus hampers viral eradication. We also show that blocking cell-cell transmission using host-targeting entry inhibitors (HTEIs was highly effective in inhibiting viral dissemination of resistant genotype 2 viruses. Combining HTEIs with DAAs prevented antiviral resistance and led to rapid elimination of the virus in cell culture model. In conclusion, our work provides evidence that cell-cell transmission plays an important role in dissemination and maintenance of resistant variants in cell culture models. Blocking virus cell-cell transmission prevents emergence of drug resistance in persistent viral infection including resistance to HCV DAAs.

  7. Antiviral Ability of Kalanchoe gracilis Leaf Extract against Enterovirus 71 and Coxsackievirus A16

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Ying Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pandemic infection or reemergence of Enterovirus 71 (EV71 and coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16 occurs in tropical and subtropical regions, being associated with hand-foot-and-mouth disease, herpangina, aseptic meningitis, brain stem encephalitis, pulmonary edema, and paralysis. However, effective therapeutic drugs against EV71 and CVA16 are rare. Kalanchoe gracilis (L. DC is used for the treatment of injuries, pain, and inflammation. This study investigated antiviral effects of K. gracilis leaf extract on EV71 and CVA16 replications. HPLC analysis with a C-18 reverse phase column showed fingerprint profiles of K. gracilis leaf extract had 15 chromatographic peaks. UV/vis absorption spectra revealed peaks 5, 12, and 15 as ferulic acid, quercetin, and kaempferol, respectively. K. gracilis leaf extract showed little cytotoxicity, but exhibited concentration-dependent antiviral activities including cytopathic effect, plaque, and virus yield reductions. K. gracilis leaf extract was shown to be more potent in antiviral activity than ferulic acid, quercetin, and kaempferol, significantly inhibiting in vitro replication of EV71 (IC50=35.88 μg/mL and CVA16 (IC50=42.91 μg/mL. Moreover, K. gracilis leaf extract is a safe antienteroviral agent with the inactivation of viral 2A protease and reduction of IL-6 and RANTES expressions.

  8. Antiviral activity of 3,4'-dihydroxyflavone on influenza a virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mohammed Kawser; Choi, Hye Yeon; Hwang, Jae-Seon; Dayem, Ahmed Abdal; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Young Bong; Poo, Haryoung; Cho, Ssang-Goo

    2014-06-01

    Influenza virus infection causes thousands of deaths and millions of hospitalizations worldwide every year and the emergence of resistance to anti-influenza drugs has prompted scientists to seek new natural antiviral materials. In this study, we screened 13 different flavonoids from various flavonoid groups to identify the most potent antiviral flavonoid against human influenza A/PR/8/34 (H1N1). The 3-hydroxyl group flavonoids, including 3,2᾿dihydroxyflavone (3,2᾿DHF) and 3,4᾿dihydroxyflavone (3,4᾿DHF), showed potent anti-influenza activity. They inhibited viral neuraminidase activity and viral adsorption onto cells. To confirm the anti-influenza activity of these flavonoids, we used an in vivo mouse model. In mice infected with human influenza, oral administration of 3,4᾿DHF significantly decreased virus titers and pathological changes in the lung and reduced body weight loss and death. Our data suggest that 3-hydroxyl group flavonoids, particularly 3,4᾿DHF, have potent antiviral activity against human influenza A/PR/8/34 (H1N1) in vitro and in vivo. Further clinical studies are needed to investigate the therapeutic and prophylactic potential of the 3-hydroxyl group flavonoids in treating influenza pandemics. PMID:24871979

  9. Antiviral activity of a Bacillus sp: P34 peptide against pathogenic viruses of domestic animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Scopel e Silva

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available P34 is an antimicrobial peptide produced by a Bacillus sp. strain isolated from the intestinal contents of a fish in the Brazilian Amazon basin with reported antibacterial activity. The aim of this work was to evaluate the peptide P34 for its in vitro antiviral properties against canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2, canine coronavirus (CCoV, canine distemper virus (CDV, canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2, equine arteritis virus (EAV, equine influenza virus (EIV, feline calicivirus (FCV and feline herpesvirus type 1 (FHV-1. The results showed that the peptide P34 exhibited antiviral activity against EAV and FHV-1. The peptide P34 inhibited the replication of EAV by 99.9% and FHV-1 by 94.4%. Virucidal activity was detected only against EAV. When P34 and EAV were incubated for 6 h at 37 °C the viral titer reduced from 10(4.5 TCID50 to 10(2.75 TCID50, showing a percent of inhibition of 98.6%. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that P34 inhibited EAV and FHV-1 replication in infected cell cultures and it showed virucidal activity against EAV. Since there is documented resistance to the current drugs used against herpesviruses and there is no treatment for equine viral arteritis, it is advisable to search for new antiviral compounds to overcome these infections.

  10. The antiviral activity of arctigenin in traditional Chinese medicine on porcine circovirus type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Li, Wentao; Jin, Erguang; He, Qigai; Yan, Weidong; Yang, Hanchun; Gong, Shiyu; Guo, Yi; Fu, Shulin; Chen, Xiabing; Ye, Shengqiang; Qian, Yunguo

    2016-06-01

    Arctigenin (ACT) is a phenylpropanoid dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan extracted from the traditional herb Arctium lappa L. (Compositae) with anti-viral and anti-inflammatory effects. Here, we investigated the antiviral activity of ACT found in traditional Chinese medicine on porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) in vitro and in vivo. Results showed that dosing of 15.6-62.5μg/mL ACT could significantly inhibit the PCV2 proliferation in PK-15 cells (P<0.01). Dosing of 62.5μg/mL ACT 0, 4 or 8h after challenge inoculation significantly inhibited the proliferation of 1MOI and 10MOI in PK-15 cells (P<0.01), and the inhibitory effect of ACT dosing 4h or 8h post-inoculation was greater than 0h after dosing (P<0.01). In vivo test with mice challenge against PCV2 infection demonstrated that intraperitoneal injection of 200μg/kg ACT significantly inhibited PCV2 proliferation in the lungs, spleens and inguinal lymph nodes, with an effect similar to ribavirin, demonstrating the effectiveness of ACT as an antiviral agent against PCV2 in vitro and in vivo. This compound, therefore, may have the potential to serve as a drug for protection of pigs against the infection of PCV2. PMID:27234554

  11. Novel concept on antiviral strategies to dengue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Yu-Chih; Perng, Guey Chuen

    2016-06-01

    Recent evidence has revealed that asymptomatic and/or persistent dengue virus (DENV) infections play a role in the cycling pattern of dengue outbreaks. These findings add a new dimension to the continually evolving search for effective prevention strategies in dengue. Disappointing outcomes of clinical trials in anti-dengue modalities have become commonplace. These failures may result from confounding variables and/or unresolved scientific issues that surround dengue, including the replication cycle of DENV in a natural setting, the target cells and reservoir for viral replication in vivo, and the effect of asymptomatic/persistent carriers in the dissemination of dengue. This article sets forth to address these issues using the most updated information available in the literature and to propose a novel antiviral strategy for the prevention and control of dengue. PMID:27284691

  12. RNAi:antiviral therapy against dengue virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sobia Idrees; Usman A Ashfaq

    2013-01-01

    Dengue virus infection has become a global threat affecting around 100 countries in the world. Currently, there is no licensed antiviral agent available against dengue. Thus, there is a strong need to develop therapeutic strategies that can tackle this life threatening disease. RNA interference is an important and effective gene silencing process which degrades targeted RNA by a sequence specific process. Several studies have been conducted during the last decade to evaluate the efficiency of siRNA in inhibiting dengue virus replication. This review summarizes siRNAs as a therapeutic approach against dengue virus serotypes and concludes that siRNAs against virus and host genes can be next generation treatment of dengue virus infection.

  13. Atividade antiviral de Musa acuminata Colla, Musaceae Antiviral activity of Musa acuminata Colla, Musaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Otaviano Martins

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho avalia a atividade antiviral de extratos e frações de Musa acuminata Colla, Musaceae, coletada em duas regiões do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (Petrópolis e Santo Antônio de Pádua. As inflorescências de M. acuminata apresentaram excelente atividade para os dois vírus avaliados: herpesvírus simples humano tipo 1 e herpesvírus simples humano tipo 2, ambos resistentes ao Aciclovir. Os resultados indicam que os extratos de M. acuminata testados podem constituir alvo potencial para uso em terapias antivirais.This study evaluates the antiviral activity of extracts and fractions of Musa acuminata Colla collected in two regions of Rio de Janeiro State (Petrópolis and Santo Antônio de Pádua. The inflorescences of M. acuminata showed excellent activity for the two virus evaluated: simple human herpesvirus type 1 and simple human herpesvirus type 2, both resistant to Acyclovir. The results indicate that the tested extracts of M. acuminata can be potential target for use in antiviral therapy.

  14. Influenza neuraminidase inhibitors: antiviral action and mechanisms of resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKimm‐Breschkin, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: McKimm‐Breschkin (2012) Influenza neuraminidase inhibitors: Antiviral action and mechanisms of resistance. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 7(Suppl. 1), 25–36. There are two major classes of antivirals available for the treatment and prevention of influenza, the M2 inhibitors and the neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs). The M2 inhibitors are cheap, but they are only effective against influenza A viruses, and resistance arises rapidly. The current influenza A H3N2 and pandemic A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses are already resistant to the M2 inhibitors as are many H5N1 viruses. There are four NAIs licensed in some parts of the world, zanamivir, oseltamivir, peramivir, and a long‐acting NAI, laninamivir. This review focuses on resistance to the NAIs. Because of differences in their chemistry and subtle differences in NA structures, resistance can be both NAI‐ and subtype specific. This results in different drug resistance profiles, for example, the H274Y mutation confers resistance to oseltamivir and peramivir, but not to zanamivir, and only in N1 NAs. Mutations at E119, D198, I222, R292, and N294 can also reduce NAI sensitivity. In the winter of 2007–2008, an oseltamivir‐resistant seasonal influenza A(H1N1) strain with an H274Y mutation emerged in the northern hemisphere and spread rapidly around the world. In contrast to earlier evidence of such resistant viruses being unfit, this mutant virus remained fully transmissible and pathogenic and became the major seasonal A(H1N1) virus globally within a year. This resistant A(H1N1) virus was displaced by the sensitive A(H1N1)pdm09 virus. Approximately 0·5–1·0% of community A(H1N1)pdm09 isolates are currently resistant to oseltamivir. It is now apparent that variation in non‐active site amino acids can affect the fitness of the enzyme and compensate for mutations that confer high‐level oseltamivir resistance resulting in minimal impact on enzyme function. PMID:23279894

  15. Drug: D00891 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D00891 Drug Abacavir sulfate (JAN/USAN); Ziagen (TN) (C14H18N6O)2. H2SO4 670.2758 6...ersensitivity reaction to Abacavir RNA-directed DNA polymerase inhibitor Genomic ...ls 6250 Antivirals D00891 Abacavir sulfate (JAN/USAN) Anatomical Therapeutic Chem...A DIRECT ACTING ANTIVIRALS J05AF Nucleoside and nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors J05AF06 Abacavir D00891 Abacavir...ls Anti-HIV Agents, Nucleoside and Nucleotide Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NRTI)v Abacavir D00891 Abacavir

  16. Drug: D00777 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 28 187.7096 D00777.gif Antiviral, Antiparkinsonian [DS:H00057 H00398] Same as: C07939 Therapeutic category: ...ansporter: SLC22A2 [HSA:6582] map07044 Antiviral agents map07057 Antiparkinsonian agents map07235 N-Metyl-D-...rvous system and sensory organs 11 Agents affecting central nervous system 116 Antiparkinson...ation [BR:br08302] Antiparkinson Agents Antiparkinson Agents, Other Amantadine D0...04BB Adamantane derivatives N04BB01 Amantadine D00777 Amantadine hydrochloride (JP16/USP) USP drug classific

  17. Antiviral Activity of Chloroquine against Human Coronavirus OC43 Infection in Newborn Mice▿

    OpenAIRE

    Keyaerts, Els; Li, Sandra; Vijgen, Leen; Rysman, Evelien; Verbeeck, Jannick; Van Ranst, Marc; Maes, Piet

    2009-01-01

    Until recently, human coronaviruses (HCoVs), such as HCoV strain OC43 (HCoV-OC43), were mainly known to cause 15 to 30% of mild upper respiratory tract infections. In recent years, the identification of new HCoVs, including severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus, revealed that HCoVs can be highly pathogenic and can cause more severe upper and lower respiratory tract infections, including bronchiolitis and pneumonia. To date, no specific antiviral drugs to prevent or treat HCoV infectio...

  18. Molecular Sleds and More: Novel Antiviral Agents via Single-Molecule Biology (441st Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangel, Wally (Ph.D., Biology Department)

    2008-10-15

    Vaccines are effective against viruses such as polio and measles, but vaccines against other important viruses, such as HIV and flu viruses, may be impossible to obtain. These viruses change their genetic makeup each time they replicate so that the immune system cannot recognize all their variations. Hence it is important to develop new antiviral agents that inhibit virus replication. During this lecture, Dr. Mangel will discuss his group's work with a model system, the human adenovirus, which causes, among other ailments, pink eye, blindness and obesity. Mangel's team has developed a promising drug candidate that works by inihibiting adenovirus proteinase, an enzyme necessary for viral replication.

  19. Characterization of Antiviral Activity of Benzamide Derivative AH0109 against HIV-1 Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Liyu; Ao, Zhujun; Jayappa, Kallesh Danappa; Kobinger, Gary; Liu, ShuiPing; Wu, Guojun; Wainberg, Mark A.; Yao, Xiaojian

    2013-01-01

    In the absence of an effective vaccine against HIV-1 infection, anti-HIV-1 strategies play a major role in disease control. However, the rapid emergence of drug resistance against all currently used anti-HIV-1 molecules necessitates the development of new antiviral molecules and/or strategies against HIV-1 infection. In this study, we have identified a benzamide derivative named AH0109 that exhibits potent anti-HIV-1 activity at an 50% effective concentration of 0.7 μM in HIV-1-susceptible CD...

  20. Citizen Advisory Committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Leann R.

    This guide, describing community involvement through citizen advisory committees, is a summary of the literature on such committees. Its main concern is district committees created by school boards. Citations in the bibliography contain all points of view on committees and present many alternatives on most of the topics covered in the guide.…

  1. Drug: D02499 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D02499 Drug Enfuvirtide (USAN/INN); Fuzeon (TN) C204H301N51O64 4489.1866 4491.876 Ac-Tyr Thr Ser ... on] [DS:H00406] ATC code: J05AX07 fusion inhibitor HIV ... glycoprotein 41 (gp41) map07053 Anti-HIV ... agents An ... P drug classification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Anti-HIV ... Agents, Other Enfuvirtide D02499 Enfuvirtide (USAN ...

  2. Drug: D10066 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D10066 Drug Dolutegravir (USAN) C20H19F2N3O5 419.1293 419.3788 D10066.gif Treatment of HIV ... infec ... tion [DS:H00406] ATC code: J05AX12 HIV -1 integrase inhibitor map07053 Anti-HIV ... agents Ana ... P drug classification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Anti-HIV ... Agents, Integrase Inhibitors (INSTI) Dolutegravir ...

  3. Drug: D00900 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D00900 Drug Oseltamivir phosphate (JAN/USAN); Tamiflu (TN) C16H28N2O4. H3PO4 410.1818 410.3997 D ... 08093 Therapeutic category: 6250 ATC code: J05AH02 influenza virus A, B neuraminidase inhibitor Transporter: SLC ... P drug classification [BR:br08302] Antivirals Anti-influenza ... Agents Oseltamivir D00900 Oseltamivir phosphate (J ...

  4. HIV-1 Antiretroviral Drug Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Arts, Eric J.; Hazuda, Daria J.

    2012-01-01

    The most significant advance in the medical management of HIV-1 infection has been the treatment of patients with antiviral drugs, which can suppress HIV-1 replication to undetectable levels. The discovery of HIV-1 as the causative agent of AIDS together with an ever-increasing understanding of the virus replication cycle have been instrumental in this effort by providing researchers with the knowledge and tools required to prosecute drug discovery efforts focused on targeted inhibition with ...

  5. 77 FR 36250 - Recreation Resource Advisory Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-18

    ... Forest Service Recreation Resource Advisory Committees AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Call for nominations for the Pacific Northwest Recreation Resource Advisory Committee. SUMMARY: The Secretary of Agriculture has established the Pacific Northwest Recreation Resource Advisory Committee (Recreation...

  6. 78 FR 50040 - Technology Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... COMMISSION Technology Advisory Committee AGENCY: Commodity Futures Trading Commission. ACTION: Notice of Meeting of Technology Advisory Committee. SUMMARY: The Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) announces that on September 12, 2013, the CFTC's Technology Advisory Committee (TAC) will hold a...

  7. 76 FR 776 - Technology Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-06

    ... COMMISSION Technology Advisory Committee AGENCY: Commodity Futures Trading Commission (``CFTC''). ACTION: Notice of meeting of Technology Advisory Committee. SUMMARY: The Technology Advisory Committee will hold...., Washington, DC 20581, attention: Office of the Secretary. Please use the title ``Technology...

  8. 75 FR 58367 - Technology Advisory Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    ... COMMISSION Technology Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Commodity Futures Trading Commission (``CFTC''). ACTION: Notice of meeting of Technology Advisory Committee. SUMMARY: The Technology Advisory Committee...., Washington, DC 20581, attention: Office of the Secretary. Please use the title ``Technology...

  9. Evaluation antiviral effect of leaf extract of Rosmarinus officinalis against Herpes simplex virus type 1 in cell cultur

    OpenAIRE

    G Yousefi Kordestani; M Parsania

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Herpes simplex virus type I belongs to herpesviridae. Several studies are ongoing for achieve a drug with good effectiveness and lower side effects, because the incidence of infections caused by this virus is increasing and there is some HSV resistance in the world. In this study, anti-viral effects of rosemary extract against of HSV was evaluated in cell culture. Material and methods: At first the rosemary extract toxicity on Hela cells with trypan blue and MTT methods has been ...

  10. Identification of a novel multiple kinase inhibitor with potent antiviral activity against influenza virus by reducing viral polymerase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Yutaka; Kakisaka, Michinori; Chutiwitoonchai, Nopporn [Viral Infectious Diseases Unit, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Tajima, Shigeru [Department of Virology I, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, 1-23-1 Toyama, Shinjuku, Tokyo 162-8640 (Japan); Hikono, Hirokazu; Saito, Takehiko [Influenza and Prion Disease Research Center, National Institute of Animal Health, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization (NARO), 3-1-5 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0856 (Japan); Aida, Yoko, E-mail: aida@riken.jp [Viral Infectious Diseases Unit, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Screening of 50,000 compounds and subsequent lead optimization identified WV970. • WV970 has antiviral effects against influenza A, B and highly pathogenic viral strains. • WV970 inhibits viral genome replication and transcription. • A target database search suggests that WV970 may bind to a number of kinases. • KINOMEscan screening revealed that WV970 has inhibitory effects on 15 kinases. - Abstract: Neuraminidase inhibitors are the only currently available influenza treatment, although resistant viruses to these drugs have already been reported. Thus, new antiviral drugs with novel mechanisms of action are urgently required. In this study, we identified a novel antiviral compound, WV970, through cell-based screening of a 50,000 compound library and subsequent lead optimization. This compound exhibited potent antiviral activity with nanomolar IC{sub 50} values against both influenza A and B viruses but not non-influenza RNA viruses. Time-of-addition and indirect immunofluorescence assays indicated that WV970 acted at an early stage of the influenza life cycle, but likely after nuclear entry of viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP). Further analyses of viral RNA expression and viral polymerase activity indicated that WV970 inhibited vRNP-mediated viral genome replication and transcription. Finally, structure-based virtual screening and comprehensive human kinome screening were used to demonstrate that WV970 acts as a multiple kinase inhibitor, many of which are associated with influenza virus replication. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that WV970 is a promising anti-influenza drug candidate and that several kinases associated with viral replication are promising drug targets.

  11. Genetically Engineered Protein Modules: Development and Applications in Anti-Viral Agent Screening and Cancer Marker Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Biswas, Payal

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT OF THE DISSERTATION Genetically Engineered Protein Modules: Development and Applications in Anti-Viral Agent Screening and Cancer Marker Detection byPayal BiswasDoctor of Philosophy Cell Molecular and Developmental Biology Graduate ProgramUniversity of California, Riverside, August 2010Dr. Wilfred Chen, ChairpersonOne of the most critical aspects in drug discovery is the bioactivity screening assay, by which compounds that most effectively inhibit the target are identified. During t...

  12. Identification of a novel multiple kinase inhibitor with potent antiviral activity against influenza virus by reducing viral polymerase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Screening of 50,000 compounds and subsequent lead optimization identified WV970. • WV970 has antiviral effects against influenza A, B and highly pathogenic viral strains. • WV970 inhibits viral genome replication and transcription. • A target database search suggests that WV970 may bind to a number of kinases. • KINOMEscan screening revealed that WV970 has inhibitory effects on 15 kinases. - Abstract: Neuraminidase inhibitors are the only currently available influenza treatment, although resistant viruses to these drugs have already been reported. Thus, new antiviral drugs with novel mechanisms of action are urgently required. In this study, we identified a novel antiviral compound, WV970, through cell-based screening of a 50,000 compound library and subsequent lead optimization. This compound exhibited potent antiviral activity with nanomolar IC50 values against both influenza A and B viruses but not non-influenza RNA viruses. Time-of-addition and indirect immunofluorescence assays indicated that WV970 acted at an early stage of the influenza life cycle, but likely after nuclear entry of viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP). Further analyses of viral RNA expression and viral polymerase activity indicated that WV970 inhibited vRNP-mediated viral genome replication and transcription. Finally, structure-based virtual screening and comprehensive human kinome screening were used to demonstrate that WV970 acts as a multiple kinase inhibitor, many of which are associated with influenza virus replication. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that WV970 is a promising anti-influenza drug candidate and that several kinases associated with viral replication are promising drug targets

  13. Potent in vitro antiviral activity of Cistus incanus extract against HIV and Filoviruses targets viral envelope proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Stephanie Rebensburg; Markus Helfer; Martha Schneider; Herwig Koppensteiner; Josef Eberle; Michael Schindler; Lutz Gürtler; Ruth Brack-Werner

    2016-01-01

    Novel therapeutic options are urgently needed to improve global treatment of virus infections. Herbal products with confirmed clinical safety features are attractive starting material for the identification of new antiviral activities. Here we demonstrate that Cistus incanus (Ci) herbal products inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections in vitro. Ci extract inhibited clinical HIV-1 and HIV-2 isolates, and, importantly, a virus isolate with multiple drug resistances, confirming bro...

  14. Antiviral effect of HPMPC (Cidofovir (R)), entrapped in cationic liposomes: In vitro study on MDBK cell and BHV-1 virus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Korvasová, Z.; Drašar, L.; Mašek, J.; Turánek Knotigová, P.; Kulich, P.; Matiašovic, J.; Kovařčík, K.; Bartheldyová, E.; Koudelka, Š.; Škrabalová, M.; Miller, A. D.; Holý, Antonín; Ledvina, Miroslav; Turánek, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 160, č. 2 (2012), s. 330-338. ISSN 0168-3659 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/10/1951; GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN200520703; GA AV ČR KAN200100801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : cationic lipids * BHV-1 virus * Cidofovir * HPMC * antiviral drugs Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 7.633, year: 2012

  15. Antiviral therapy with nucleotide/nucleoside analogues in chronic hepatitis B: A meta-analysis of prospective randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedre, Renesh H; Raj, Utkarsh; Misra, Sri Prakash; Varadwaj, Pritish Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Nucleotide/nucleoside analogues (antiviral therapy) are used in the therapy of HBeAg positive and HBeAg negative chronic hepatitis B. We analyzed ten selected randomized controlled with 2557 patients to estimate the effect of antiviral drugs in chronic hepatitis B with compared to placebo. Virological response, biochemical response, histological response, seroconversion of HBeAg, and loss of HBeAg were estimated as primary efficacy measures. The included studies were subjected for heterogeneity and publication bias. The heterogeneity was assessed with χ2 and I(2) statistics. Publication bias was assessed by funnel plot. Greater rates of improvement obtained in antiviral group for virological response [43.96 % vs. 3.15 %, RR = 0.57, 95 % CI = 0.54-0.61, p-value pharyngitis [22.22 % vs. 18.23 %, OR = 1.12, 95 % CI = 0.86-1.45, p-value = 0.40]. Excluding adverse events, all primary efficacy measures shown statistical significant result for chronic hepatitis treatment (p-value <0.05). Antiviral therapy provided significant benefit for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B with no measurable adverse effects. PMID:27083430

  16. Multiplex Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry Assay for Simultaneous Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Ribavirin, Boceprevir, and Telaprevir

    OpenAIRE

    Aouri, Manel; Moradpour, Darius; Cavassini, Matthias; Mercier, Thomas; Buclin, Thierry; Csajka, Chantal; Telenti, Amalio; Rauch, Andri; Decosterd, Laurent A.

    2013-01-01

    New directly acting antivirals (DAAs) that inhibit hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication are increasingly used for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C. A marked pharmacokinetic variability and a high potential for drug-drug interactions between DAAs and numerous drug classes have been identified. In addition, ribavirin (RBV), commonly associated with hemolytic anemia, often requires dose adjustment, advocating for therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) in patients under combined antiviral therapy. ...

  17. Dendrimers in drug research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boas, Ulrik; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    2004-01-01

    and in vivo cytotoxicity, as well as biopermeability, biostability and immunogenicity. The review deals with numerous applications of dendrimers as tools for efficient multivalent presentation of biological ligands in biospecific recognition, inhibition and targeting. Dendrimers may be used as drugs...... for antibacterial and antiviral treatment and have found use as antitumor agents. The review highlights the use of dendrimers as drug or gene delivery devices in e.g. anticancer therapy, and the design of different host-guest binding motifs directed towards medical applications is described. Other specific examples...

  18. The SARS-coronavirus papain-like protease: structure, function and inhibition by designed antiviral compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Báez-Santos, Yahira M; St John, Sarah E; Mesecar, Andrew D

    2015-03-01

    Over 10 years have passed since the deadly human coronavirus that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV) emerged from the Guangdong Province of China. Despite the fact that the SARS-CoV pandemic infected over 8500 individuals, claimed over 800 lives and cost billions of dollars in economic loss worldwide, there still are no clinically approved antiviral drugs, vaccines or monoclonal antibody therapies to treat SARS-CoV infections. The recent emergence of the deadly human coronavirus that causes Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS-CoV) is a sobering reminder that new and deadly coronaviruses can emerge at any time with the potential to become pandemics. Therefore, the continued development of therapeutic and prophylactic countermeasures to potentially deadly coronaviruses is warranted. The coronaviral proteases, papain-like protease (PLpro) and 3C-like protease (3CLpro), are attractive antiviral drug targets because they are essential for coronaviral replication. Although the primary function of PLpro and 3CLpro are to process the viral polyprotein in a coordinated manner, PLpro has the additional function of stripping ubiquitin and ISG15 from host-cell proteins to aid coronaviruses in their evasion of the host innate immune responses. Therefore, targeting PLpro with antiviral drugs may have an advantage in not only inhibiting viral replication but also inhibiting the dysregulation of signaling cascades in infected cells that may lead to cell death in surrounding, uninfected cells. This review provides an up-to-date discussion on the SARS-CoV papain-like protease including a brief overview of the SARS-CoV genome and replication followed by a more in-depth discussion on the structure and catalytic mechanism of SARS-CoV PLpro, the multiple cellular functions of SARS-CoV PLpro, the inhibition of SARS-CoV PLpro by small molecule inhibitors, and the prospect of inhibiting papain-like protease from other coronaviruses. This paper forms part of a series of

  19. Dengue Virus Entry as Target for Antiviral Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijke M. F. Alen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV infections are expanding worldwide and, because of the lack of a vaccine, the search for antiviral products is imperative. Four serotypes of DENV are described and they all cause a similar disease outcome. It would be interesting to develop an antiviral product that can interact with all four serotypes, prevent host cell infection and subsequent immune activation. DENV entry is thus an interesting target for antiviral therapy. DENV enters the host cell through receptor-mediated endocytosis. Several cellular receptors have been proposed, and DC-SIGN, present on dendritic cells, is considered as the most important DENV receptor until now. Because DENV entry is a target for antiviral therapy, various classes of compounds have been investigated to inhibit this process. In this paper, an overview is given of all the putative DENV receptors, and the most promising DENV entry inhibitors are discussed.

  20. Regulation of antiviral innate immunity by deubiquitinase CYLD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minying Zhang; Andrew J Lee; Xuefeng Wu; Shao-Cong Sun

    2011-01-01

    An antiviral innate immune response involves induction of type Ⅰ interferons (IFNs) and their subsequent autocrine and paracrine actions,but the underlying regulatory mechanisms are incompletely understood.Here we report that CYLD,a deubiquitinase that specifically digests lysine 63-1inked ubiquitin chains,is required for antiviral host defense.Loss of CYLD renders mice considerably more susceptible to infection by vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV).Consistently,CYLD-deficient dendritic cells are more sensitive to VSV infection.This functional defect was not due to lack of type I IFN production but rather because of attenuated IFN receptor signaling.In the absence of CYLD,IFN-β is ineffective in the induction of antiviral genes and protection of cells from viral infection.These findings establish CYLD as a novel regulator of antiviral innate immunity and suggest a role for CYLD in regulating IFN receptor signaling.

  1. STUDY OF ANTIVIRAL ACTIVITY OF SOME HYDRAZONE PINOSTROBIN DERIVATIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. K. Mukusheva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available New derivatives on the basis of hydrazone pinostrobin molecule were synthesized. Significant antiviral activity of received samples of new hydrazone pinstrobin derivatives was identified.

  2. Development of Small-Molecule Antivirals for Ebola

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janeba, Zlatko

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 6 (2015), s. 1175-1194. ISSN 0198-6325 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : antiviral * filovirus * Ebola virus * Marburg virus * hemorrhagic fever Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 8.431, year: 2014

  3. Budesonide and formoterol reduce early innate anti-viral immune responses in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet M Davies

    Full Text Available Asthma is a chronic inflammatory airways disease in which respiratory viral infections frequently trigger exacerbations. Current treatment of asthma with combinations of inhaled corticosteroids and long acting beta2 agonists improves asthma control and reduces exacerbations but what impact this might have on innate anti-viral immunity is unclear. We investigated the in vitro effects of asthma drugs on innate anti-viral immunity. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from healthy and asthmatic donors were cultured for 24 hours with the Toll-like receptor 7 agonist, imiquimod, or rhinovirus 16 (RV16 in the presence of budesonide and/or formoterol. Production of proinflammatory cytokines and expression of anti-viral intracellular signalling molecules were measured by ELISA and RT-PCR respectively. In PBMC from healthy donors, budesonide alone inhibited IP-10 and IL-6 production induced by imiquimod in a concentration-dependent manner and the degree of inhibition was amplified when budesonide and formoterol were used in combination. Formoterol alone had little effect on these parameters, except at high concentrations (10⁻⁶ M when IL-6 production increased. In RV16 stimulated PBMC, the combination of budesonide and formoterol inhibited IFNα and IP-10 production in asthmatic as well as healthy donors. Combination of budesonide and formoterol also inhibited RV16-stimulated expression of the type I IFN induced genes myxovirus protein A and 2', 5' oligoadenylate synthetise. Notably, RV16 stimulated lower levels of type Myxovirus A and oligoadenylate synthase in PBMC of asthmatics than control donors. These in vitro studies demonstrate that combinations of drugs commonly used in asthma therapy inhibit both early pro-inflammatory cytokines and key aspects of the type I IFN pathway. These findings suggest that budesonide and formoterol curtail excessive inflammation induced by rhinovirus infections in patients with asthma, but whether this inhibits

  4. Diagnosis and antiviral intervention strategies for mitigating an influenza epidemic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Moss

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many countries have amassed antiviral stockpiles for pandemic preparedness. Despite extensive trial data and modelling studies, it remains unclear how to make optimal use of antiviral stockpiles within the constraints of healthcare infrastructure. Modelling studies informed recommendations for liberal antiviral distribution in the pandemic phase, primarily to prevent infection, but failed to account for logistical constraints clearly evident during the 2009 H1N1 outbreaks. Here we identify optimal delivery strategies for antiviral interventions accounting for logistical constraints, and so determine how to improve a strategy's impact. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We extend an existing SEIR model to incorporate finite diagnostic and antiviral distribution capacities. We evaluate the impact of using different diagnostic strategies to decide to whom antivirals are delivered. We then determine what additional capacity is required to achieve optimal impact. We identify the importance of sensitive and specific case ascertainment in the early phase of a pandemic response, when the proportion of false-positive presentations may be high. Once a substantial percentage of ILI presentations are caused by the pandemic strain, identification of cases for treatment on syndromic grounds alone results in a greater potential impact than a laboratory-dependent strategy. Our findings reinforce the need for a decentralised system capable of providing timely prophylaxis. CONCLUSIONS: We address specific real-world issues that must be considered in order to improve pandemic preparedness policy in a practical and methodologically sound way. Provision of antivirals on the scale proposed for an effective response is infeasible using traditional public health outbreak management and contact tracing approaches. The results indicate to change the transmission dynamics of an influenza epidemic with an antiviral intervention, a decentralised system is required for

  5. Small creatures use small RNAs to direct antiviral defenses

    OpenAIRE

    Sabin, Leah R.; Cherry, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Antiviral RNA silencing has been recognized as an important defense mechanism in arthropods against RNA viruses. However, the role of this pathway in DNA virus infection remains largely unexplored. A report in this issue of the European Journal of Immunology [Eur J Immunol 2012. XXXX] provides new insight into the role of RNA silencing in antiviral defense against DNA viruses. Huang and Zhang found that the dsDNA virus White Spot Syndrome virus, an agriculturally important pathogen of shrimp,...

  6. Antiviral properties of two trimeric recombinant gp41 proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisole Sébastien

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As it is the very first step of the HIV replication cycle, HIV entry represents an attractive target for the development of new antiviral drugs. In this context, fusion inhibitors are the third class of anti-HIV drugs to be used for treatment, in combination with nucleoside analogues and antiproteases. But the precise mechanism of HIV fusion mechanism is still unclear. Gp41 ectodomain-derived synthetic peptides represent ideal tools for clarifying this mechanism, in order to design more potent anti-HIV drugs. Results Two soluble trimeric recombinant gp41 proteins, termed Rgp41B and Rgp41A were designed. Both comprise the N- and C-terminal heptad repeat regions of the ectodomain of HIV-1 gp41, connected by a 7-residue hydrophilic linker, in order to mimic the trimeric fusogenic state of the transmembrane glycoprotein. Both recombinant proteins were found to inhibit HIV-1 entry into target cells in a dose-dependent manner. Rgp41A, the most potent inhibitor, was able to inhibit both X4 and R5 isolates into HeLa cells and primary T lymphocytes. X4 viruses were found to be more susceptible than R5 isolates to inhibition by Rgp41A. In order to elucidate how the trimeric recombinant gp41 protein can interfere with HIV-1 entry into target cells, we further investigated its mode of action. Rgp41A was able to bind gp120 but did not induce gp120-gp41 dissociation. Furthermore, this inhibitor could also interfere with a late step of the fusion process, following the mixing of lipids. Conclusion Taken together, our results suggest that Rgp41A can bind to gp120 and also interfere with a late event of the fusion process. Interestingly, Rgp41A can block membrane fusion without preventing lipid mixing. Although further work will be required to fully understand its mode of action, our results already suggest that Rgp41A can interfere with multiple steps of the HIV entry process.

  7. RNA interference: Antiviral weapon and beyond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quan-Chu Wang; Qing-He Nie; Zhi-Hua Feng

    2003-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a remarkable type of gene regulation based on sequence-specific targeting and degradation of RNA. The term encompasses related pathways found in a broad range of eukaryotic organisms, including fungi, plants, and animals. RNA interference is part of a sophisticated network of interconnected pathways for cellular defense, RNA surveillance, and development and it may become a powerful tool to manipulate gene expression experimentally. RNAi technology is currently being evaluated not only as an extremely powerful instrument for functional genomic analyses, but also as a potentially useful method to develop specific dsRNA based gene-silencing therapeutics.Several laboratories have been interested in using RNAi to control viral infection and many reports in Nature and in Cell show that short interfering (si) RNAs can inhibit infection by HIV-1, polio and hepatitis C viruses in a sequence-specific manner. RNA-based strategies for gene inhibition in mammalian cells have recently been described, which offer the promise of antiviral therapy.

  8. Antiviral Warrior-APOBEC3G

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Xiao-xia; MA Yi-cai

    2005-01-01

    This paper is to further understand how APOBEC3G can defend the retroviruses and to find new approaches to AIDs (acquired immure deficiency syndrome).The viral infectivity factor (Vif) induces rapid degradation of APOBEC3G by ubiquitination, which is a proteosome-dependent pathway. Precisely speaking, only in the virus-producing cell Vif expression is necessary; in its absence, infection of a subsequent target cell terminates at a postentry step through the action of the human APOBEC3G antiviral mechanism. Vif protein has two domains: one binds to APOBEC3G and the other regulates the degradation of APOBEC3G by a conserved sequence, SLQ (Y/F) LA motif. Recently, the research on Vif has also revealed APOBEC3G is a novel component of innate immune system. In fact, APOBEC3G not only acts in DNA editing to block the replication of retroviruses such as HIV-1, but also is able to defend a wide spectrum of distantly related retroviruses and interferes with HBV through a different mechanism from HIV.

  9. [Study of the antiviral action of gentamicin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novokhatskiĭ, A S; Gerasimova, S S

    1975-05-01

    Experimental data on the effect of various concentrations of gentamycin on reproduction of VEE and Sindbis viruses in tissue culture are presented. It was found that gentamycin had no cytotoxic effect on the primary tripsinized chick embryon fibroblasts (CEF) when used in doses of 10, 20 or 30 mg/ml and only when used in a dose of 50 mg/ml it induced 50 percent destruction of the cell layer. Multiplication of the VEE and Sindbis viruses in the culture of CEF was inhibited in the presence of gentamycin by 1.5--3.5 lg PFU/ml. Two stages in the virus inhibiting effect of gentamycin were determined on the model of VEE, i. e. the stage of inhibition in the absence of visible damages of the cells and the stage associated with their destruction. The doses of gentamycin higher than 3 mg/ml inhibited in parallel the virus specific synthesis and synthesis of the cell proteins and nucleic acids. At the same time, when gentamycin was used in a dose of 10 mg/ml, no impairement of the cell viability was observed and the cell capacity to produce high titers of the model virus was reduced after incubation without the antibiotic for 24 hours. The antiviral activity of gentamycin were therefore determined by revers inhibition of the cell metabolic activity. PMID:1225192

  10. Antiviral therapies against Ebola and other emerging viral diseases using existing medicines that block virus entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jason; Wright, Edward; Molesti, Eleonora; Temperton, Nigel; Barclay, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Emerging viral diseases pose a threat to the global population as intervention strategies are mainly limited to basic containment due to the lack of efficacious and approved vaccines and antiviral drugs. The former was the only available intervention when the current unprecedented Ebolavirus (EBOV) outbreak in West Africa began. Prior to this, the development of EBOV vaccines and anti-viral therapies required time and resources that were not available. Therefore, focus has turned to re-purposing of existing, licenced medicines that may limit the morbidity and mortality rates of EBOV and could be used immediately. Here we test three such medicines and measure their ability to inhibit pseudotype viruses (PVs) of two EBOV species, Marburg virus (MARV) and avian influenza H5 (FLU-H5). We confirm the ability of chloroquine (CQ) to inhibit viral entry in a pH specific manner. The commonly used proton pump inhibitors, Omeprazole and Esomeprazole were also able to inhibit entry of all PVs tested but at higher drug concentrations than may be achieved in vivo. We propose CQ as a priority candidate to consider for treatment of EBOV. PMID:26069727

  11. Atmospheric release advisory capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ARAC system (Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability) is described. The system is a collection of people, computers, computer models, topographic data and meteorological input data that together permits a calculation of, in a quasi-predictive sense, where effluent from an accident will migrate through the atmosphere, where it will be deposited on the ground, and what instantaneous and integrated dose an exposed individual would receive

  12. Antiviral activity of glycyrrhizin against hepatitis C virus in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Matsumoto

    Full Text Available Glycyrrhizin (GL has been used in Japan to treat patients with chronic viral hepatitis, as an anti-inflammatory drug to reduce serum alanine aminotransferase levels. GL is also known to exhibit various biological activities, including anti-viral effects, but the anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV effect of GL remains to be clarified. In this study, we demonstrated that GL treatment of HCV-infected Huh7 cells caused a reduction of infectious HCV production using cell culture-produced HCV (HCVcc. To determine the target step in the HCV lifecycle of GL, we used HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpp, replicon, and HCVcc systems. Significant suppressions of viral entry and replication steps were not observed. Interestingly, extracellular infectivity was decreased, and intracellular infectivity was increased. By immunofluorescence and electron microscopic analysis of GL treated cells, HCV core antigens and electron-dense particles had accumulated on endoplasmic reticulum attached to lipid droplet (LD, respectively, which is thought to act as platforms for HCV assembly. Furthermore, the amount of HCV core antigen in LD fraction increased. Taken together, these results suggest that GL inhibits release of infectious HCV particles. GL is known to have an inhibitory effect on phospholipase A2 (PLA2. We found that group 1B PLA2 (PLA2G1B inhibitor also decreased HCV release, suggesting that suppression of virus release by GL treatment may be due to its inhibitory effect on PLA2G1B. Finally, we demonstrated that combination treatment with GL augmented IFN-induced reduction of virus in the HCVcc system. GL is identified as a novel anti-HCV agent that targets infectious virus particle release.

  13. LIVER SPECIFIC DRUG TARGETING STRATEGIES: A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Ramesh S. Gorad*, Satish K. Mandlik and Kishore N. Gujar

    2013-01-01

    Drug delivery to liver is one of the most challenging research areas in pharmaceutical sciences. The some physiological barrier such as opsonization, mechanical entrapment by pulmonary vascular bed, uptake by RES represents an insurmountable obstacle for a large number of proteins and drugs, including antibiotics, antineoplastic agents and antiviral agents to target liver disorders. Therefore, various strategies have been proposed to improve the delivery of different drugs to liver and hepato...

  14. Small molecules with antiviral activity against the Ebola virus [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/523

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Litterman

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The recent outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa has highlighted the clear shortage of broad-spectrum antiviral drugs for emerging viruses. There are numerous FDA approved drugs and other small molecules described in the literature that could be further evaluated for their potential as antiviral compounds. These molecules are in addition to the few new antivirals that have been tested in Ebola patients but were not originally developed against the Ebola virus, and may play an important role as we await an effective vaccine. The balance between using FDA approved drugs versus novel antivirals with minimal safety and no efficacy data in humans should be considered. We have evaluated 55 molecules from the perspective of an experienced medicinal chemist as well as using simple molecular properties and have highlighted 16 compounds that have desirable qualities as well as those that may be less desirable. In addition we propose that a collaborative database for sharing such published and novel information on small molecules is needed for the research community studying the Ebola virus.

  15. 76 FR 60848 - National Mammography Quality Assurance Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration National Mammography Quality Assurance Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public...

  16. 78 FR 13347 - Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Toxicology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Toxicology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces...

  17. 78 FR 77443 - Electricity Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    ... Electricity Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Department of... Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC). The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770.../oe/services/electricity-advisory-committee-eac . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Matthew...

  18. 76 FR 34088 - Homeland Security Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-10

    ... SECURITY Homeland Security Advisory Council AGENCY: The Office of Policy, DHS. ACTION: Notice of Open Teleconference Federal Advisory Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The Homeland Security Advisory Council (HSAC) will... message. Fax: (202) 282-9207. Mail: Homeland Security Advisory Council, Department of Homeland...

  19. 76 FR 55079 - Homeland Security Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-06

    ... SECURITY Homeland Security Advisory Council AGENCY: The Office of Policy, DHS. ACTION: Notice of Open Teleconference Federal Advisory Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The Homeland Security Advisory Council (HSAC) will... subject line of the message. Fax: (202) 282-9207. Mail: Homeland Security Advisory Council, Department...

  20. 77 FR 26774 - Homeland Security Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-07

    ... SECURITY Homeland Security Advisory Council AGENCY: The Office of Policy, DHS. ACTION: Notice of partially closed federal advisory committee meeting. SUMMARY: The Homeland Security Advisory Council (HSAC) will... number in the subject line of the message. Fax: (202) 282-9207. Mail: Homeland Security Advisory...